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Sample records for detects alterations induced

  1. Tumor-induced lymph node alterations detected by MRI lymphography using gadolinium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, S. C.; Kurland, B. F.; Liu, C.-L.; Ho, R. J. Y.; Ruddell, A.

    2015-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced MRI lymphography shows potential to identify alterations in lymph drainage through lymph nodes (LNs) in cancer and other diseases. MRI studies have typically used low molecular weight gadolinium contrast agents, however larger gadolinium-loaded nanoparticles possess characteristics that could improve the specificity and sensitivity of lymphography. The performance of three gadolinium contrast agents with different sizes and properties was compared by 3T MRI after subcutaneous injection. Mice bearing B16-F10 melanoma footpad tumors were imaged to assess tumor-induced alterations in lymph drainage through tumor-draining popliteal and inguinal LNs versus contralateral uninvolved drainage. Gadolinium lipid nanoparticles were able to identify tumor-induced alterations in contrast agent drainage into the popliteal LN, while lower molecular weight or albumin-binding gadolinium agents were less effective. All of the contrast agents distributed in foci around the cortex and medulla of tumor-draining popliteal LNs, while they were restricted to the cortex of non-draining LNs. Surprisingly, second-tier tumor-draining inguinal LNs exhibited reduced uptake, indicating that tumors can also divert LN drainage. These characteristics of tumor-induced lymph drainage could be useful for diagnosis of LN pathology in cancer and other diseases. The preferential uptake of nanoparticle contrasts into tumor-draining LNs could also allow selective targeting of therapies to tumor-draining LNs. PMID:26497382

  2. Altered fingerprints: analysis and detection.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soweon; Feng, Jianjiang; Jain, Anil K

    2012-03-01

    The widespread deployment of Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) in law enforcement and border control applications has heightened the need for ensuring that these systems are not compromised. While several issues related to fingerprint system security have been investigated, including the use of fake fingerprints for masquerading identity, the problem of fingerprint alteration or obfuscation has received very little attention. Fingerprint obfuscation refers to the deliberate alteration of the fingerprint pattern by an individual for the purpose of masking his identity. Several cases of fingerprint obfuscation have been reported in the press. Fingerprint image quality assessment software (e.g., NFIQ) cannot always detect altered fingerprints since the implicit image quality due to alteration may not change significantly. The main contributions of this paper are: 1) compiling case studies of incidents where individuals were found to have altered their fingerprints for circumventing AFIS, 2) investigating the impact of fingerprint alteration on the accuracy of a commercial fingerprint matcher, 3) classifying the alterations into three major categories and suggesting possible countermeasures, 4) developing a technique to automatically detect altered fingerprints based on analyzing orientation field and minutiae distribution, and 5) evaluating the proposed technique and the NFIQ algorithm on a large database of altered fingerprints provided by a law enforcement agency. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed approach in detecting altered fingerprints and highlight the need to further pursue this problem. PMID:21808092

  3. Early TBI-Induced Cytokine Alterations are Similarly Detected by Two Distinct Methods of Multiplex Assay

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sanjib; Katki, Khurshed; Arisi, Gabriel M.; Foresti, Maira L.; Shapiro, Lee A.

    2011-01-01

    Annually, more than a million persons experience traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the US and a substantial proportion of this population develop debilitating neurological disorders, such as, paralysis, cognitive deficits, and epilepsy. Despite the long-standing knowledge of the risks associated with TBI, no effective biomarkers or interventions exist. Recent evidence suggests a role for inflammatory modulators in TBI-induced neurological impairments. Current technological advances allow for the simultaneous analysis of the precise spatial and temporal expression patterns of numerous proteins in single samples which ultimately can lead to the development of novel treatments. Thus, the present study examined 23 different cytokines, including chemokines, in the ipsi and contralateral cerebral cortex of rats at 24 h after a fluid percussion injury (FPI). Furthermore, the estimation of cytokines were performed in a newly developed multiplex assay instrument, MAGPIX (Luminex Corp), and compared with an established instrument, Bio-Plex (Bio-Rad), in order to validate the newly developed instrument. The results show numerous inflammatory changes in the ipsi and contralateral side after FPI that were consistently reported by both technologies. PMID:21954376

  4. Infrared Microspectroscopy Detects Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification (PMCA)-induced Conformational Alterations in Hamster Scrapie Progeny Seeds*

    PubMed Central

    Daus, Martin L.; Wagenführ, Katja; Thomzig, Achim; Boerner, Susann; Hermann, Peter; Hermelink, Antje; Beekes, Michael; Lasch, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The self-replicative conformation of misfolded prion proteins (PrP) is considered a major determinant for the seeding activity, infectiousness, and strain characteristics of prions in different host species. Prion-associated seeding activity, which converts cellular prion protein (PrPC) into Proteinase K-resistant, infectious PrP particles (PrPTSE), can be monitored in vitro by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA). Thus, PMCA has been established as a valuable analytical tool in prion research. Currently, however, it is under discussion whether prion strain characteristics are preserved during PMCA when parent seeds are amplified in PrPC substrate from the identical host species. Here, we report on the comparative structural analysis of parent and progeny (PMCA-derived) PrP seeds by an improved approach of sensitive infrared microspectroscopy. Infrared microspectroscopy revealed that PMCA of native hamster 263K scrapie seeds in hamster PrPC substrate caused conformational alterations in progeny seeds that were accompanied by an altered resistance to Proteinase K, higher sedimentation velocities in gradient ultracentrifugations, and a longer incubation time in animal bioassays. When these progeny seeds were propagated in hamsters, misfolded PrP from brain extracts of these animals showed mixed spectroscopic and biochemical properties from both parental and progeny seeds. Thus, strain modifications of 263K prions induced by PMCA seem to have been partially reversed when PMCA products were reinoculated into the original host species. PMID:24163371

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI detects acute radiotherapy-induced alterations in mandibular microvasculature: prospective assessment of imaging biomarkers of normal tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandulache, Vlad C.; Hobbs, Brian P.; Mohamed, Abdallah S.R.; Frank, Steven J.; Song, Juhee; Ding, Yao; Ger, Rachel; Court, Laurence E.; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Hazle, John D.; Wang, Jihong; Awan, Musaddiq J.; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Colen, Rivka R.; Elshafeey, Nabil; Elbanan, Mohamed; Hutcheson, Katherine A.; Lewin, Jan S.; Chambers, Mark S.; Hofstede, Theresa M.; Weber, Randal S.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity is an important consideration in the continued development of more effective external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) regimens for head and neck tumors. The ability to detect EBRT-induced changes in mandibular bone vascularity represents a crucial step in decreasing potential toxicity. To date, no imaging modality has been shown to detect changes in bone vascularity in real time during treatment. Based on our institutional experience with multi-parametric MRI, we hypothesized that DCE-MRI can provide in-treatment information regarding EBRT-induced changes in mandibular vascularity. Thirty-two patients undergoing EBRT treatment for head and neck cancer were prospectively imaged prior to, mid-course, and following treatment. DCE-MRI scans were co-registered to dosimetric maps to correlate EBRT dose and change in mandibular bone vascularity as measured by Ktrans and Ve. DCE-MRI was able to detect dose-dependent changes in both Ktrans and Ve in a subset of patients. One patient who developed ORN during the study period demonstrated decreases in Ktrans and Ve following treatment completion. We demonstrate, in a prospective imaging trial, that DCE-MRI can detect dose-dependent alterations in mandibular bone vascularity during chemoradiotherapy, providing biomarkers that are physiological correlates of acute of acute mandibular vascular injury and recovery temporal kinetics. PMID:27499209

  6. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI detects acute radiotherapy-induced alterations in mandibular microvasculature: prospective assessment of imaging biomarkers of normal tissue injury.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity is an important consideration in the continued development of more effective external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) regimens for head and neck tumors. The ability to detect EBRT-induced changes in mandibular bone vascularity represents a crucial step in decreasing potential toxicity. To date, no imaging modality has been shown to detect changes in bone vascularity in real time during treatment. Based on our institutional experience with multi-parametric MRI, we hypothesized that DCE-MRI can provide in-treatment information regarding EBRT-induced changes in mandibular vascularity. Thirty-two patients undergoing EBRT treatment for head and neck cancer were prospectively imaged prior to, mid-course, and following treatment. DCE-MRI scans were co-registered to dosimetric maps to correlate EBRT dose and change in mandibular bone vascularity as measured by Ktrans and Ve. DCE-MRI was able to detect dose-dependent changes in both Ktrans and Ve in a subset of patients. One patient who developed ORN during the study period demonstrated decreases in Ktrans and Ve following treatment completion. We demonstrate, in a prospective imaging trial, that DCE-MRI can detect dose-dependent alterations in mandibular bone vascularity during chemoradiotherapy, providing biomarkers that are physiological correlates of acute of acute mandibular vascular injury and recovery temporal kinetics. PMID:27499209

  7. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy detects alterations induced by organotin(IV) carboxylates in MCF-7 cells at sub-cytotoxic/-genotoxic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Muhammad S; Mirza, Bushra; Hussain, Mukhtiar; Hanif, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; Walsh, Michael J; Martin, Francis L

    2008-01-01

    The environmental impact of metal complexes such as organotin(IV) compounds is of increasing concern. Genotoxic effects of organotin(IV) compounds (0.01 μg/ml, 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml) were measured using the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay to measure DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay to determine micronucleus formation. Biochemical-cell signatures were also ascertained using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. In the comet assay, organotin(IV) carboxylates induced significantly-elevated levels of DNA SSBs. Elevated micronucleus-forming activities were also observed. Following interrogation using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, infrared spectra in the biomolecular range (900 cm-1 – 1800 cm-1) derived from organotin-treated MCF-7 cells exhibited clear alterations in their biochemical-cell fingerprint compared to control-cell populations following exposures as low as 0.0001 μg/ml. Mono-, di- or tri-organotin(IV) carboxylates (0.1 μg/ml, 1.0 μg/ml or 10.0 μg/ml) were markedly cytotoxic as determined by the clonogenic assay following treatment of MCF-7 cells with ≥ 1.0 μg/ml. Our results demonstrate that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy can be applied to detect molecular alterations induced by organotin(IV) compounds at sub-cytotoxic and sub-genotoxic concentrations. This biophysical approach points to a novel means of assessing risk associated with environmental contaminants. PACS codes: 87.15.-v, 87.17.-d, 87.18.-h PMID:19351425

  8. Metabolic alterations accompanying oncogene-induced senescence

    PubMed Central

    Aird, Katherine M; Zhang, Rugang

    2014-01-01

    Senescence is defined as a stable cell growth arrest. Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) occurs in normal primary human cells after activation of an oncogene in the absence of other cooperating oncogenic stimuli. OIS is therefore considered a bona fide tumor suppression mechanism in vivo. Indeed, overcoming OIS-associated stable cell growth arrest can lead to tumorigenesis. Although cells that have undergone OIS do not replicate their DNA, they remain metabolically active. A number of recent studies report significant changes in cellular metabolism during OIS, including alterations in nucleotide, glucose, and mitochondrial metabolism and autophagy. These alterations may be necessary for stable senescence-associated cell growth arrest, and overcoming these shifts in metabolism may lead to tumorigenesis. This review highlights what is currently known about alterations in cellular metabolism during OIS and the implication of OIS-associated metabolic changes in cellular transformation and the development of cancer therapeutic strategies. PMID:27308349

  9. In vivo detection of exercised-induced ultrastructural changes in genetically-altered murine skeletal muscle using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen

    2006-02-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers are a known source of form birefringence in biological tissue. The birefringence present in skeletal muscle is associated with the ultrastructure of individual sarcomeres, specifically the arrangement of A-bands corresponding to the thick myosin filaments. Certain structural proteins that prevent damage and maintain the structural and functional health of the muscle fiber preserve the organization of the Abands in skeletal muscle. Therefore, the level of birefringence detected can estimate the health of the muscle as well as the damage incurred during exercise. Murine skeletal muscle from both genetically-altered (mdx) and normal (wild-type) specimens were imaged in vivo with a fiber-based PSOCT imaging system to quantitatively determine the level of birefringence present in the tissue before and after exercise. The mdx muscle lacks dystrophin, a structural protein that is mutated in Duchenne muscular dystrophy in humans. Muscle from these mdx mice exhibited a marked decrease in birefringence after exercise, whereas the wild-type muscle was highly birefringent before and after exercise. The quantitative results from this tissue optics study suggest for the first time that there is a distinct relationship between the degree of birefringence detected using PS-OCT and the sarcomeric ultrastructure present within skeletal muscle.

  10. Hypergravity-induced altered behavior in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Wan, Judy; Marcu, Oana; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2012-07-01

    Microgravity and mechanical stress are important factors of the spaceflight environment, and affect astronaut health and behavior. Structural, functional, and behavioral mechanisms of all cells and organisms are adapted to Earth's gravitational force, 1G, while altered gravity can pose challenges to their adaptability to this new environment. On ground, hypergravity paradigms have been used to predict and complement studies on microgravity. Even small changes that take place at a molecular and genetic level during altered gravity may result in changes in phenotypic behavior. Drosophila provides a robust and simple, yet very reliable model system to understand the complexity of hypergravity-induced altered behavior, due to availability of a plethora of genetic tools. Locomotor behavior is a sensitive parameter that reflects the array of molecular adaptive mechanisms recruited during exposure to altered gravity. Thus, understanding the genetic basis of this behavior in a hypergravity environment could potentially extend our understanding of mechanisms of adaptation in microgravity. In our laboratory we are trying to dissect out the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypergravity-induced oxidative stress, and its potential consequences on behavioral alterations by using Drosophila as a model system. In the present study, we employed pan-neuronal and mushroom body specific knock-down adult flies by using Gal4/UAS system to express inverted repeat transgenes (RNAi) to monitor and quantify the hypergravity-induced behavior in Drosophila. We established that acute hypergravity (3G for 60 min) causes a significant and robust decrease in the locomotor behavior in adult Drosophila, and that this change is dependent on genes related to Parkinson's disease, such as DJ-1α , DJ-1β , and parkin. In addition, we also showed that anatomically the control of this behavior is significantly processed in the mushroom body region of the fly brain. This work links a molecular

  11. Southern analysis of genomic alterations in gamma-ray-induced aprt- hamster cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Drobetsky, E.A.; deJong, P.J.; Glickman, B.W.

    1986-06-01

    The role of genomic alterations in mutagenesis induced by ionizing radiation has been the subject of considerable speculation. By Southern blotting analysis we show here that 9 of 55 (approximately 1/6) gamma-ray-induced mutants at the adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (aprt) locus of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells have a detectable genomic rearrangement. These fall into two classes: intragenic deletions and chromosomal rearrangements. In contrast, no major genomic alterations were detected among 67 spontaneous mutants, although two restriction site loss events were observed. Three gamma-ray-induced mutants were found to be intragenic deletions; all may have identical break-points. The remaining six gamma-ray-induced mutants demonstrating a genomic alteration appear to be the result of chromosomal rearrangements, possibly translocation or inversion events. None of the remaining gamma-ray-induced mutants showed any observable alteration in blotting pattern indicating a substantial role for point mutation in gamma-ray-induced mutagenesis at the aprt locus.

  12. ORIENTATION REQUIREMENT TO DETECT MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCTED ALTERATION OF GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORIENTATION REQUIREMENT TO DETECT MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCED ALTERATION OF GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS.
    OBJECTIVE: We have shown that functional gap junction communication as measured by Lucifer yellow dye transfer (DT) in Clone-9 rat liver epithelial cells, c...

  13. Ultrastructural hepatocytic alterations induced by silver nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Almansour, Mansour; Sajti, Laszlo; Melhim, Walid; Jarrar, Bashir M

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (SNPs) are widely used in nanomedicine and consuming products with potential risk to human health. While considerable work was carried out on the molecular, biochemical, and physiological alterations induced by these particles, little is known of the ultrastructural pathological alterations that might be induced by nanosilver materials. The aim of the present work is to investigate the hepatocyte ultrastructural alterations that might be induced by SNP exposure. Male rats were subjected to a daily single dose (2 mg/kg) of SNPs (15-35 nm diameter) for 21 days. Liver biopsies from all rats under study were processed for transmission electron microscopy examination. The following hepatic ultrastructural alterations were demonstrated: mitochondria swelling and crystolysis, endoplasmic reticulum disruption, cytoplasmic vacuolization, lipid droplets accumulation, glycogen depletion, karyopyknosis, apoptosis, sinusoidal dilatation, Kupffer cells activation, and myelin figures formation. The current findings may indicate that SNPs can induce hepatocyte organelles alteration, leading to cellular damage that may affect the function of the liver. These findings might indicate that SNPs potentially trigger heptocyte ultrastructural alterations that may affect the function of the liver with potential risk on human health in relation to numerous applications of these particles. More work is needed to elucidate probable ultrastructural alterations in the vital organs that might result from nanosilver toxicity. PMID:26934218

  14. Laser-induced alteration of contaminated papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, P.; Ligterink, F. J.; Pedersoli, J. L., Jr.; Scholten, H.; Schipper, D.; Havermans, J. B. G. A.; Aziz, H. A.; Quillet, V.; Kraan, M.; van Beek, B.; Corr, S.; Hua-Ströfer, H.-Y.; Stokmans, J.; Dalen, P. van; Kautek, W.

    Cleaning of paper objects represents one of the most complex cases of laser ablation, since low volumes of dispersed material phases are evaporated while a sensitive and fragile fibrous organic matrix has to be preserved. Conventional chemical and mechanical cleaning methods suffer from the common phenomenon that the foreign matter is diluted into the substrate rather than removed. The application of a laser beam allows highly localized and optically specific interaction. However, the occurrence of extreme temperatures and light intensities may cause irreversible alteration of the paper matrix. Further, incomplete removal and/or chemical conversion of contaminations may result in insufficient cleaning or affect the ageing behaviour. Laser treatments were performed by Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers at three wavelengths (355 nm, 532 nm, and 1064 nm). Papers contaminated with inks and adhesive-tape remnants served as model samples. Multispectral imaging and colorimetric results served to quantify and systematize the results.

  15. Alterations in the rat electrocardiogram induced by stationary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffey, C.T.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    A field strength dependent increase in the amplitude of the T-wave signal in the rat electrocardiogram (ECG) was observed during exposure to homogeneous, stationary magnetic fields. For 24 adult Sprague-Dswley and Buffalo rats of both sexes, the T-wave amplitude was found to increase by an average of 408% in a 2.0 Tesla (1 Tesla = 10/sup 4/ Gauss) field. No significant magnetically induced changes were observed in other components of the ECG record, including the P wave and the QRS complex. The minimum field level at which augmentation of the T wave could be detected was 0.3 Tesla. The magnetically induced increase in T-wave amplitude occurred instantaneously, and was immediately reversible after exposure to fields as high as 2.0 Tesla. No abnormalities in any component of the ECG record, including the T wave, were noted during a period of 3 weeks following cessation of a continuous 5-h exposure of rats to a 1.5-Tesla field. The heart rate and breathing rate of adult rats were not altered during, or subsequent to, application of fields up to 2.0 Tesla. The effect of animal orientation within the field was tested using juvenile rats 3-14 days old. The maximum increase in T-wave amplitude was observed when subjects were placed with the long axis of the body perpendicular to the lines of magnetic induction. (JMT)

  16. Epigenetic Alterations Induced by Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Coretti, Lorena; Pero, Raffaela; Lembo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the principal bacterial products known to elicit inflammation. Cells of myeloid lineage such as monocytes and macrophages, but also epithelial cells give rise to an inflammatory response upon LPS stimulation. This phenomenon implies reprogramming of cell specific gene expression that can occur through different mechanisms including epigenetic modifications. Given their intrinsic nature, epigenetic modifications may be involved both in the acute response to LPS and in the establishment of a preconditioned genomic state (epigenomic memory) that may potentially influence the host response to further contacts with microorganisms. Information has accumulated during the last years aimed at elucidating the epigenetic mechanisms which underlie the cellular LPS response. These findings, summarized in this chapter, will hopefully be a good basis for a definition of the complete cascade of LPS-induced epigenetic events and their biological significance in different cell types. PMID:26659265

  17. Alterations in the rat electrocardiogram induced by stationary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffey, C.T.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    A field strength dependent increase in the amplitude of the T-wave signal in the rat electrocardiogram (ECG) was observed during exposure to homogeneous, stationary magnetic fields. For 24 adult Sprague-Dawley and Buffalo rats of both sexes, the T-wave amplitude was found to increase by an average of 408% in a 2.0 Tesla (1 Tesla - 10(4) Gauss) field. No significant magnetically induced changes were observed in other components of the ECG record, including the P wave and the QRS complex. The minimum field level at which augmentation of the T wave could be detected was 0.3 Tesla. The magnetically induced increase in T-wave amplitude occurred instantaneously, and was immediately reversible after exposure to fields as high as 2.0 Tesla. No abnormalities in any component of the ECG record, including the T wave, were noted during a period of 3 weeks following cessation of a continuous 5-h exposure of rats to a 1.5-Tesla field. The heart rate and breathing rate of adult rats were not altered during, or subsequent to, application of fields up to 2.0 Tesla. The effect of animal orientation within the field was tested using juvenile rats 3-14 days old. The maximum increase in T-wave amplitude was observed when subjects were placed with the long axis of the body perpendicular to the lines of magnetic induction. These experimental observations, as well as theoretical considerations, suggest that augmentation of the signal amplitude in the T-wave segment of the ECG may result from a superimposed electrical potential generated by aortic blood flow in the presence of a stationary magnetic field.

  18. Permeability alteration induced by drying of brines in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.

    2012-11-01

    Permeability of reservoir rocks can be strongly altered by salt precipitation induced by drying. Indeed, gas injection in deep saline aquifers leads first to the brine displacement. The liquid saturation decreases near the injection point and reaches a residual water saturation. But at longer time, the water mass transfer to the gas phase by evaporation can become significant and the dissolved salt can precipitate in the porous structure. The solid salts fill the pores and the permeability decreases. Permeability alteration by salting out is a risk of injectivity decline in the context of CO2 geological storage in saline aquifers where high level of gas injection has to be maintained over decades. However, this problem has been poorly investigated. It implies physical processes that are strongly coupled: drying, water and gas flows in the porous structure and precipitation. This work is an experimental investigation aiming at measuring on natural rock samples the permeability alteration induced by convective drying where dry gas is injected through the sample. We show that alteration of permeability is strong and total blockage of the flow is even possible. We also show that the change in porosity due to the solid salt is heterogeneous along the rock samples. A local permeability-porosity relationship has been estimated from the measurements and we could deduce the permeability alteration function of time by modeling the drying dynamic. We show that it starts very early because capillary backflows are extremely efficient in this process to accumulate solid salt near the injection surfaces.

  19. Radiation-induced functional connectivity alterations in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiongmin; Wu, Donglin; Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Hu, Dewen; Qiu, Shijun

    2016-07-01

    The study aims to investigate the radiation-induced brain functional alterations in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients who received radiotherapy (RT) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and statistic scale.The fMRI data of 35 NPC patients with RT and 24 demographically matched untreated NPC patients were acquired. Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was also measured to evaluate their global cognition performance. Multivariate pattern analysis was performed to find the significantly altered functional connections between these 2 groups, while the linear correlation level was detected between the altered functional connections and the MoCA scores.Forty-five notably altered functional connections were found, which were mainly located between 3 brain networks, the cerebellum, sensorimotor, and cingulo-opercular. With strictly false discovery rate correction, 5 altered functional connections were shown to have significant linear correlations with the MoCA scores, that is, the connections between the vermis and hippocampus, cerebellum lobule VI and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus and dorsal frontal cortex, cuneus and middle occipital lobe, and insula and cuneus. Besides, the connectivity between the vermis and hippocampus was also significantly correlated with the attention score, 1 of the 7 subscores of the MoCA.The present study provides new insights into the radiation-induced functional connectivity impairments in NPC patients. The results showed that the RT may induce the cognitive impairments, especially the attention alterations. The 45 altered functional connections, especially the 5 altered functional connections that were significantly correlated to the MoCA scores, may serve as the potential biomarkers of the RT-induced brain functional impairments and provide valuable targets for further functional recovery treatment. PMID:27442663

  20. Diphenyl diselenide prevents hepatic alterations induced by paraquat in rats.

    PubMed

    Costa, Michael D; de Freitas, Mayara L; Dalmolin, Laíza; Oliveira, Lia P; Fleck, Michelli A; Pagliarini, Paula; Acker, Carmine; Roman, Silvane S; Brandão, Ricardo

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the beneficial effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)₂ on paraquat (PQ) induced alterations in rats liver. Adult male Wistar rats received (PhSe)₂ at 10 mg kg(-1), by oral administration (p.o.), during five consecutive days. Twenty-four hours after the last (PhSe)₂ dose, rats received PQ at 15 mg kg(-1), in a single intraperitoneally injection (i.p.). Seventy-two hours after PQ exposure, animals were sacrificed by decapitation for blood and liver samples obtainment. Histological alterations induced by PQ exposure, such as inflammatory cells infiltration and edema, were prevented by (PhSe)₂ administration. Moreover, (PhSe)₂ prevented hepatic lipid peroxidation (LPO) induced by PQ and was effective in reducing the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in liver, which was enhanced by PQ exposure. (PhSe)₂ also was effective in protecting against the reduction in ascorbic acid and non-protein thiols (NPSH) levels induced by PQ. The inhibition of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, in rats exposed to PQ, was normalized by (PhSe)₂ pre-treatment, whereas the inhibition of catalase (CAT) activity was not prevented by (PhSe)₂. The serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) inhibition, induced by PQ administration, was also prevented by (PhSe)₂ pre-treatment. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities were not modified by PQ and/or (PhSe)₂ administration. Therefore, (PhSe)₂ pre-treatment was effective in protecting against the hepatic alterations induced by PQ in rats. This protective effect can involve the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of (PhSe)₂. PMID:23958967

  1. Histologic and temperature alterations induced by skin refrigerants.

    PubMed

    Dzubow, L M

    1985-05-01

    The histologic alterations induced by spray refrigerants independent of and in combination with dermabrasion were studied with the use of the domestic pig as a model. Tissue injury was found to be a function of spray duration and freeze intensity. Both preabrasion freezing and postabrasion refreezing could produce damage additive to that of mechanical planing. Skin surface and intradermal temperature variations during refrigeration were recorded. The possible implications of these findings as they pertain to clinical dermabrasion are discussed. PMID:4008684

  2. Congenital heart malformations induced by hemodynamic altering surgical interventions

    PubMed Central

    Midgett, Madeline; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic heart formation results from a dynamic interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Blood flow during early embryonic stages plays a critical role in heart development, as interactions between flow and cardiac tissues generate biomechanical forces that modulate cardiac growth and remodeling. Normal hemodynamic conditions are essential for proper cardiac development, while altered blood flow induced by surgical manipulations in animal models result in heart defects similar to those seen in humans with congenital heart disease. This review compares the altered hemodynamics, changes in tissue properties, and cardiac defects reported after common surgical interventions that alter hemodynamics in the early chick embryo, and shows that interventions produce a wide spectrum of cardiac defects. Vitelline vein ligation and left atrial ligation decrease blood pressure and flow; and outflow tract banding increases blood pressure and flow velocities. These three surgical interventions result in many of the same cardiac defects, which indicate that the altered hemodynamics interfere with common looping, septation and valve formation processes that occur after intervention and that shape the four-chambered heart. While many similar defects develop after the interventions, the varying degrees of hemodynamic load alteration among the three interventions also result in varying incidence and severity of cardiac defects, indicating that the hemodynamic modulation of cardiac developmental processes is strongly dependent on hemodynamic load. PMID:25136319

  3. Hypoxia-induced alterations of G2 checkpoint regulators.

    PubMed

    Hasvold, Grete; Lund-Andersen, Christin; Lando, Malin; Patzke, Sebastian; Hauge, Sissel; Suo, ZhenHe; Lyng, Heidi; Syljuåsen, Randi G

    2016-05-01

    Hypoxia promotes an aggressive tumor phenotype with increased genomic instability, partially due to downregulation of DNA repair pathways. However, genome stability is also surveilled by cell cycle checkpoints. An important issue is therefore whether hypoxia also can influence the DNA damage-induced cell cycle checkpoints. Here, we show that hypoxia (24 h 0.2% O2) alters the expression of several G2 checkpoint regulators, as examined by microarray gene expression analysis and immunoblotting of U2OS cells. While some of the changes reflected hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell cycle progression, the levels of several G2 checkpoint regulators, in particular Cyclin B, were reduced in G2 phase cells after hypoxic exposure, as shown by flow cytometric barcoding analysis of individual cells. These effects were accompanied by decreased phosphorylation of a Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) target in G2 phase cells after hypoxia, suggesting decreased CDK activity. Furthermore, cells pre-exposed to hypoxia showed increased G2 checkpoint arrest upon treatment with ionizing radiation. Similar results were found following other hypoxic conditions (∼0.03% O2 20 h and 0.2% O2 72 h). These results demonstrate that the DNA damage-induced G2 checkpoint can be altered as a consequence of hypoxia, and we propose that such alterations may influence the genome stability of hypoxic tumors. PMID:26791779

  4. Altered Gravity Induces Oxidative Stress in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Hosamani, Ravikumar

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity environments can induce increased oxidative stress in biological systems. Microarray data from our previous spaceflight experiment (FIT experiment on STS-121) indicated significant changes in the expression of oxidative stress genes in adult fruit flies after spaceflight. Currently, our lab is focused on elucidating the role of hypergravity-induced oxidative stress and its impact on the nervous system in Drosophila melanogaster. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches were combined to study this effect on the ground. Adult flies (2-3 days old) exposed to acute hypergravity (3g, for 1 hour and 2 hours) showed significantly elevated levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in fly brains compared to control samples. This data was supported by significant changes in mRNA expression of specific oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes. As anticipated, a stress-resistant mutant line, Indy302, was less vulnerable to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress compared to wild-type flies. Survival curves were generated to study the combined effect of hypergravity and pro-oxidant treatment. Interestingly, many of the oxidative stress changes that were measured in flies showed sex specific differences. Collectively, our data demonstrate that altered gravity significantly induces oxidative stress in Drosophila, and that one of the organs where this effect is evident is the brain.

  5. Change detection in remote sensing images using modified polynomial regression and spatial multivariate alteration detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dianat, Rouhollah; Kasaei, Shohreh

    2009-11-01

    A new and efficient method for incorporating the spatiality into difference-based change detection (CD) algorithms is introduced in this paper. It uses the spatial derivatives of image pixels to extract spatial relations among them. Based on this methodology, the performances of two famous difference-based CD methods, conventional polynomial regression (CPR) and multivariate alteration detection (MAD), are improved and called modified polynomial regression (MPR) and spatial multivariate alteration detection (SMAD), respectively. Various quantitative and qualitative evaluations have shown the superiority of MPR over CPR and SMAD over MAD. Also, the superiority of SMAD over all mentioned CD algorithms is shown. Moreover, it has been proved that both proposed methods enjoy the affine invariance property.

  6. Epigenetic alteration to activate Bmp2-Smad signaling in Raf-induced senescence

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Mai; Mano, Yasunobu; Anai, Motonobu; Yamamoto, Shogo; Fukuyo, Masaki; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate epigenomic and gene expression alterations during cellular senescence induced by oncogenic Raf. METHODS: Cellular senescence was induced into mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) by infecting retrovirus to express oncogenic Raf (RafV600E). RNA was collected from RafV600E cells as well as MEFs without infection and MEFs with mock infection, and a genome-wide gene expression analysis was performed using microarray. The epigenomic status for active H3K4me3 and repressive H3K27me3 histone marks was analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing for RafV600E cells on day 7 and for MEFs without infection. These data for Raf-induced senescence were compared with data for Ras-induced senescence that were obtained in our previous study. Gene knockdown and overexpression were done by retrovirus infection. RESULTS: Although the expression of some genes including secreted factors was specifically altered in either Ras- or Raf-induced senescence, many genes showed similar alteration pattern in Raf- and Ras-induced senescence. A total of 841 commonly upregulated 841 genes and 573 commonly downregulated genes showed a significant enrichment of genes related to signal and secreted proteins, suggesting the importance of alterations in secreted factors. Bmp2, a secreted protein to activate Bmp2-Smad signaling, was highly upregulated with gain of H3K4me3 and loss of H3K27me3 during Raf-induced senescence, as previously detected in Ras-induced senescence, and the knockdown of Bmp2 by shRNA lead to escape from Raf-induced senescence. Bmp2-Smad inhibitor Smad6 was strongly repressed with H3K4me3 loss in Raf-induced senescence, as detected in Ras-induced senescence, and senescence was also bypassed by Smad6 induction in Raf-activated cells. Different from Ras-induced senescence, however, gain of H3K27me3 did not occur in the Smad6 promoter region during Raf-induced senescence. When comparing genome-wide alteration between Ras- and Raf-induced senescence, genes

  7. Environmental toxicants--induced epigenetic alterations and their reversers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minju; Bae, Minji; Na, Hyunkyung; Yang, Mihi

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics has been emphasized in the postgenome era to clarify obscure health risks of environmental toxicants including endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). In addition, mixed exposure in real life can modify health consequences of the toxicants. Particularly, some nutritional and dietary materials modify individual susceptibility through changes in the epigenome. Therefore, we focused on some environmental toxicants that induce epigenetic alterations, and introduced chemopreventive materials to reverse the toxicants-induced epigenetic alterations. Methodologically, we used global and specific DNA methylation as epigenetic end points and searched epigenetic modulators in food. We reviewed various epigenetic end points induced by environmental toxicants including alcohol, asbestos, nanomaterials, benzene, EDCs, metals, and ionizing radiation. The epigenetic end points can be summarized into global hypomethylation and specific hypermethylation at diverse tumor suppress genes. Exposure timing, dose, sex, or organ specificity should be considered to use the epigenetic end points as biomarkers for exposure to the epimutagenic toxicants. Particularly, neonatal exposure to the epimutagens can influence their future adult health because of characteristics of the epimutagens, which disrupt epigenetic regulation in imprinting, organogenesis, development, etc. Considering interaction between epimutagenic toxicants and their reversers in food, we suggest that multiple exposures to them can alleviate or mask epigenetic toxicity in real life. Our present review provides useful information to find new end points of environmental toxicants and to prevention from environment-related diseases. PMID:23167630

  8. Alteration of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation Properties Induced by Particle Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Polen, M.; Beydoun, H.; Lawlis, E.; Ahern, A.; Jahn, L.; Hill, T. C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol particles that can serve as ice nuclei frequently experience rapid and extensive chemical aging during atmospheric transport. This is known to significantly alter some ice nucleation modes of the few types of ice nucleation particle systems where aging effects have been simulated, such as for mineral dust. Yet much of our understanding of atmospheric particle freezing properties is derived from measurements of fresh or unaged particles. We know almost nothing regarding how atmospheric aging might alter the freezing properties of biomass burning aerosol or biological particle nucleants. We have investigated the effects of simulated aging using a chamber reactor on the heterogeneous ice nucleation properties of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) and ice-active bacteria particles. Some types of aging were found to enhance the freezing ability of BBA, exhibited as a shift in a portion of the droplet freezing curve to warmer temperatures by a few °C. Ice-active bacteria were found to consistently loose their most ice-active nucleants after repeated aging cycles. The bacterial systems always retained significantly efficient ice active sites that still allowed them to induce freezing at mild/warm temperatures, despite this decrease in freezing ability. A comprehensive series of online single-particle mass spectrometry and offline spectromicroscopic analysis of individual particles was used to determine how the aging altered the aerosol's composition, and gain mechanistic insights into how this in turn altered the freezing properties. Our new ice nucleation framework that uses a continuous distribution of ice active site ability (contact angle) was used to interpret the droplet freezing spectra and understand how aging alters the internal and external variability, and rigidity, of the ice active sites.

  9. Light-induced voltage alteration for integrated circuit analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Jr., Edward I.; Soden, Jerry M.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method are described for analyzing an integrated circuit (IC), The invention uses a focused light beam that is scanned over a surface of the IC to generate a light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) signal for analysis of the IC, The LIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any defects in the IC; and it may be further used to image and control the logic states of the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for the development of ICs, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs.

  10. Light-induced voltage alteration for integrated circuit analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.

    1995-07-04

    An apparatus and method are described for analyzing an integrated circuit (IC). The invention uses a focused light beam that is scanned over a surface of the IC to generate a light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) signal for analysis of the IC. The LIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any defects in the IC; and it may be further used to image and control the logic states of the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for the development of ICs, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs. 18 figs.

  11. Aging induced endoplasmic reticulum stress alters sleep and sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Marishka K; Chan, May T; Zimmerman, John E; Pack, Allan I; Jackson, Nicholas E; Naidoo, Nirinjini

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in the quality, quantity, and architecture of baseline and recovery sleep have been shown to occur during aging. Sleep deprivation induces endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress and upregulates a protective signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response. The effectiveness of the adaptive unfolded protein response is diminished by age. Previously, we showed that endogenous chaperone levels altered recovery sleep in Drosophila melanogaster. We now report that acute administration of the chemical chaperone sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) reduces ER stress and ameliorates age-associated sleep changes in Drosophila. PBA consolidates both baseline and recovery sleep in aging flies. The behavioral modifications of PBA are linked to its suppression of ER stress. PBA decreased splicing of X-box binding protein 1 and upregulation of phosphorylated elongation initiation factor 2 α, in flies that were subjected to sleep deprivation. We also demonstrate that directly activating ER stress in young flies fragments baseline sleep and alters recovery sleep. Alleviating prolonged or sustained ER stress during aging contributes to sleep consolidation and improves recovery sleep or sleep debt discharge. PMID:24444805

  12. Diethanolamine alters neurogenesis and induces apoptosis in fetal mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Craciunescu, Corneliu N.; Wu, Renan; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2006-01-01

    Diethanolamine (DEA) is present in many consumer products such as shampoo. Dermal administration of DEA diminishes hepatic stores of the essential nutrient choline, and we previously reported that dietary choline deficiency during pregnancy reduces neurogenesis and increases apoptosis in the hippocampus of fetal rats and mice. Therefore, DEA could also alter brain development. Timed-pregnant C57BL/6 mice were dosed dermally from gestation day 7 through 17 with DEA at 0, 20, 80, 160, 320, and 640 mg/kg body/day. At doses of DEA > 80 mg/kg body/day, we observed decreased litter size. In fetuses (embryonic day 17) collected from dams treated dermally with 80 mg/kg body/day DEA, we observed decreased neural progenitor cell mitosis at the ventricular surface of the ventricular zone of the hippocampus [to 56±14% (SE) histone 3 (H3) phosphorylation as compared to controls; P < 0.01]. We also observed increased apoptosis in fetal hippocampus (to 170±10% of control measured using TUNEL and to 178±7% of control measured using activated caspase 3; P < 0.01). Thus, maternal exposure to DEA reduces the number of neural progenitor cells in hippocampus by two mechanisms, and this could permanently alter memory function in offspring of mothers exposed to this common ingredient of shampoos and soaps.—Craciunescu, C. N., Wu, R., Zeisel, S. H. Diethanolamine alters neurogenesis and induces apoptosis in fetal mouse hippocampus. PMID:16873886

  13. Investigation of cadmium-induced alterations in renal glomerular function

    SciTech Connect

    Long, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    This research was designed to test the hypothesis that certain aspects of cadmium-induced renal dysfunction are the result of glomerular, rather than classic tubular, injury. To determine whether cadmium-induced proteinuria was due to altered glomerular function, cadmium was administered chronically at a concentration of 185 ppm in the drinking water. This protocol resulted in the production of proteinuria which when analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay was indistinguishable from that occurring in control rats. Glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, and filtration fraction were all significantly depressed after 20-30 weeks of exposure. In order to further investigate these alterations in glomerular function, an acute exposure model was developed. It was found that a single i.p. injection of cadmium in mercaptoethanol resulted in the onset of acute renal failure. The clinical picture was characterized by a reduction in glomerular filtrate rate of 50-90% within 24 hours, with partial to total recovery occurring by day 7 post-exposure. Histological evidence indicated that to a large extent the reduction in GFR was due to tubular blockade and/or backleak of filtrate across damaged tubules.

  14. Treadmill exercise induces hippocampal astroglial alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Caren; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Nardin, Patrícia; Biasibetti, Regina; Costa, Ana Paula; Vizueti, Adriana Fernanda; Batassini, Cristiane; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Bobermin, Larissa; Sesterheim, Patrícia; Quincozes-Santos, André; de Souza, Jaqueline; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Physical exercise effects on brain health and cognitive performance have been described. Synaptic remodeling in hippocampus induced by physical exercise has been described in animal models, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Changes in astrocytes, the glial cells involved in synaptic remodeling, need more characterization. We investigated the effect of moderate treadmill exercise (20 min/day) for 4 weeks on some parameters of astrocytic activity in rat hippocampal slices, namely, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamate uptake and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities, glutathione content, and S100B protein content and secretion, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and glucose uptake activity in this tissue. Results show that moderate treadmill exercise was able to induce a decrease in GFAP content (evaluated by ELISA and immunohistochemistry) and an increase in GS activity. These changes could be mediated by corticosterone, whose levels were elevated in serum. BDNF, another putative mediator, was not altered in hippocampal tissue. Moreover, treadmill exercise caused a decrease in NO content. Our data indicate specific changes in astrocyte markers induced by physical exercise, the importance of studying astrocytes for understanding brain plasticity, as well as reinforce the relevance of physical exercise as a neuroprotective strategy. PMID:23401802

  15. Treadmill Exercise Induces Hippocampal Astroglial Alterations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Caren; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Nardin, Patrícia; Biasibetti, Regina; Costa, Ana Paula; Vizueti, Adriana Fernanda; Batassini, Cristiane; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Bobermin, Larissa; Sesterheim, Patrícia; Quincozes-Santos, André; de Souza, Jaqueline; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Physical exercise effects on brain health and cognitive performance have been described. Synaptic remodeling in hippocampus induced by physical exercise has been described in animal models, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Changes in astrocytes, the glial cells involved in synaptic remodeling, need more characterization. We investigated the effect of moderate treadmill exercise (20 min/day) for 4 weeks on some parameters of astrocytic activity in rat hippocampal slices, namely, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamate uptake and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities, glutathione content, and S100B protein content and secretion, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and glucose uptake activity in this tissue. Results show that moderate treadmill exercise was able to induce a decrease in GFAP content (evaluated by ELISA and immunohistochemistry) and an increase in GS activity. These changes could be mediated by corticosterone, whose levels were elevated in serum. BDNF, another putative mediator, was not altered in hippocampal tissue. Moreover, treadmill exercise caused a decrease in NO content. Our data indicate specific changes in astrocyte markers induced by physical exercise, the importance of studying astrocytes for understanding brain plasticity, as well as reinforce the relevance of physical exercise as a neuroprotective strategy. PMID:23401802

  16. Detection of microvasculature alterations by synchrotron radiation in murine with delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beilei; Zhang, Bo; Huo, Hua; Wang, Tao; Wang, Qianqian; Wu, Yuanlin; Xiao, Liang; Ren, Yuqi; Zhang, Liming

    2014-04-01

    Using the tentacle extract (TE) from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata, we have previously established a delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome (DJES) model, which is meaningful for clinical interventions against jellyfish stings. However, the mechanism of DJES still remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to explore its potential mechanism by detecting TE-induced microvasculature alterations in vivo and ex vivo. Using a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, we, for the first time, directly observed the blood vessel alterations induced by jellyfish venom in vivo and ex vivo. Firstly, microvasculature imaging of whole-body mouse in vivo indicated that the small blood vessel branches in the liver and kidney in the TE-treated group, seemed much thinner than those in the control group. Secondly, 3D imaging of kidney ex vivo showed that the kidneys in the TE-treated group had incomplete vascular trees where distal vessel branches were partly missing and disorderly disturbed. Finally, histopathological analysis found that obvious morphological changes, especially hemorrhagic effects, were also present in the TE-treated kidney. Thus, TE-induced microvasculature changes might be one of the important mechanisms of multiple organ dysfunctions in DJES. In addition, the methods we employed here will probably facilitate further studies on developing effective intervention strategies against DJES. PMID:24508769

  17. Hydrogen peroxide induces lysosomal protease alterations in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel C; Mason, Ceceile W; Goodman, Carl B; Holder, Maurice S; Kirksey, Otis W; Womble, Tracy A; Severs, Walter B; Palm, Donald E

    2007-09-01

    Alterations in lysosomal proteases have been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. The current study demonstrates a concentration-dependent decrease in PC12 cell viability and transient changes in cystatin C (CYSC), cathepsin B (CATB), cathepsin D (CATD) and caspase-3 following exposure to H2O2. Furthermore, activation of CATD occurred following exposure to H2O2 and cysteine protease suppression, while inhibition of CATD with pepstatin A significantly improved cell viability. Additionally, significant PARP cleavage, suggestive of caspase-3-like activity, was observed following H2O2 exposure, while inhibition of caspase-3 significantly increased cell viability compared to H2O2 administration alone. Collectively, our data suggest that H2O2 induced cell death is regulated at least in part by caspase-3 and CATD. Furthermore, cysteine protease suppression increases CATD expression and activity. These studies provide insight for alternate pathways and potential therapeutic targets of cell death associated with oxidative stress and lysosomal protease alterations. PMID:17440810

  18. Thermally-induced voltage alteration for integrated circuit analysis

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Jr., Edward I.

    2000-01-01

    A thermally-induced voltage alteration (TIVA) apparatus and method are disclosed for analyzing an integrated circuit (IC) either from a device side of the IC or through the IC substrate to locate any open-circuit or short-circuit defects therein. The TIVA apparatus uses constant-current biasing of the IC while scanning a focused laser beam over electrical conductors (i.e. a patterned metallization) in the IC to produce localized heating of the conductors. This localized heating produces a thermoelectric potential due to the Seebeck effect in any conductors with open-circuit defects and a resistance change in any conductors with short-circuit defects, both of which alter the power demand by the IC and thereby change the voltage of a source or power supply providing the constant-current biasing. By measuring the change in the supply voltage and the position of the focused and scanned laser beam over time, any open-circuit or short-circuit defects in the IC can be located and imaged. The TIVA apparatus can be formed in part from a scanning optical microscope, and has applications for qualification testing or failure analysis of ICs.

  19. Epigenetic Alterations Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter in Mouse Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Miousse, Isabelle R.; Chalbot, Marie-Cécile G.; Aykin-Burns, Nükhet; Wang, Xiaoying; Basnakian, Alexei; Kavouras, Ilias G.; Koturbash, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory mortality and morbidity has been associated with exposure to particulate matter (PM). Experimental evidence suggests involvement of cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the development of PM-associated pathological states; however, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. In the current study, we analyzed short-term epigenetic response to PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) exposure in mouse ascitic RAW264.7 macrophages (BALB/C Abelson murine leukemia virus-induced tumor). Ambient PM10 was collected using a high volume sampler in Little Rock, AR. Analysis revealed that PM10 was composed mainly of Al and Fe, and the water soluble organic fraction was dominated by aliphatic and carbohydrate fragments and minor quantities of aromatic components. Exposure to PM10 compromised the cellular epigenome at concentrations 10–200 μg/ml. Specifically, epigenetic alterations were evident as changes in the methylation and expression of repetitive element-associated DNA and associated DNA methylation machinery. These results suggest that epigenetic alterations, in concert with cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammation, might contribute to the pathogenesis of PM-associated respiratory diseases. PMID:24535919

  20. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zeevi, David; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Thaiss, Christoph A; Maza, Ori; Israeli, David; Zmora, Niv; Gilad, Shlomit; Weinberger, Adina; Kuperman, Yael; Harmelin, Alon; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Shapiro, Hagit; Halpern, Zamir; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2014-10-01

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide, regularly consumed by lean and obese individuals alike. NAS consumption is considered safe and beneficial owing to their low caloric content, yet supporting scientific data remain sparse and controversial. Here we demonstrate that consumption of commonly used NAS formulations drives the development of glucose intolerance through induction of compositional and functional alterations to the intestinal microbiota. These NAS-mediated deleterious metabolic effects are abrogated by antibiotic treatment, and are fully transferrable to germ-free mice upon faecal transplantation of microbiota configurations from NAS-consuming mice, or of microbiota anaerobically incubated in the presence of NAS. We identify NAS-altered microbial metabolic pathways that are linked to host susceptibility to metabolic disease, and demonstrate similar NAS-induced dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in healthy human subjects. Collectively, our results link NAS consumption, dysbiosis and metabolic abnormalities, thereby calling for a reassessment of massive NAS usage. PMID:25231862

  1. Thermally-induced voltage alteration for analysis of microelectromechanical devices

    DOEpatents

    Walraven, Jeremy A.; Cole, Jr., Edward I.

    2002-01-01

    A thermally-induced voltage alteration (TIVA) apparatus and method are disclosed for analyzing a microelectromechanical (MEM) device with or without on-board integrated circuitry. One embodiment of the TIVA apparatus uses constant-current biasing of the MEM device while scanning a focused laser beam over electrically-active members therein to produce localized heating which alters the power demand of the MEM device and thereby changes the voltage of the constant-current source. This changing voltage of the constant-current source can be measured and used in combination with the position of the focused and scanned laser beam to generate an image of any short-circuit defects in the MEM device (e.g. due to stiction or fabrication defects). In another embodiment of the TIVA apparatus, an image can be generated directly from a thermoelectric potential produced by localized laser heating at the location of any short-circuit defects in the MEM device, without any need for supplying power to the MEM device. The TIVA apparatus can be formed, in part, from a scanning optical microscope, and has applications for qualification testing or failure analysis of MEM devices.

  2. Altered brain energetics induces mitochondrial fission arrest in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Trushin, Sergey; Christensen, Trace A; Bachmeier, Benjamin V; Gateno, Benjamin; Schroeder, Andreas; Yao, Jia; Itoh, Kie; Sesaki, Hiromi; Poon, Wayne W; Gylys, Karen H; Patterson, Emily R; Parisi, Joseph E; Diaz Brinton, Roberta; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Trushina, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Altered brain metabolism is associated with progression of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Mitochondria respond to bioenergetic changes by continuous fission and fusion. To account for three dimensional architecture of the brain tissue and organelles, we applied 3-dimensional electron microscopy (3D EM) reconstruction to visualize mitochondrial structure in the brain tissue from patients and mouse models of AD. We identified a previously unknown mitochondrial fission arrest phenotype that results in elongated interconnected organelles, "mitochondria-on-a-string" (MOAS). Our data suggest that MOAS formation may occur at the final stages of fission process and was not associated with altered translocation of activated dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria but with reduced GTPase activity. Since MOAS formation was also observed in the brain tissue of wild-type mice in response to hypoxia or during chronological aging, fission arrest may represent fundamental compensatory adaptation to bioenergetic stress providing protection against mitophagy that may preserve residual mitochondrial function. The discovery of novel mitochondrial phenotype that occurs in the brain tissue in response to energetic stress accurately detected only using 3D EM reconstruction argues for a major role of mitochondrial dynamics in regulating neuronal survival. PMID:26729583

  3. Alcohol induced alterations to the human fecal VOC metabolome.

    PubMed

    Couch, Robin D; Dailey, Allyson; Zaidi, Fatima; Navarro, Karl; Forsyth, Christopher B; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip A; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that excessive alcohol consumption impacts the intestinal microbiota composition, causing disruption of homeostasis (dysbiosis). However, this observed change is not indicative of the dysbiotic intestinal microbiota function that could result in the production of injurious and toxic products. Thus, knowledge of the effects of alcohol on the intestinal microbiota function and their metabolites is warranted, in order to better understand the role of the intestinal microbiota in alcohol associated organ failure. Here, we report the results of a differential metabolomic analysis comparing volatile organic compounds (VOC) detected in the stool of alcoholics and non-alcoholic healthy controls. We performed the analysis with fecal samples collected after passage as well as with samples collected directly from the sigmoid lumen. Regardless of the approach to fecal collection, we found a stool VOC metabolomic signature in alcoholics that is different from healthy controls. The most notable metabolite alterations in the alcoholic samples include: (1) an elevation in the oxidative stress biomarker tetradecane; (2) a decrease in five fatty alcohols with anti-oxidant property; (3) a decrease in the short chain fatty acids propionate and isobutyrate, important in maintaining intestinal epithelial cell health and barrier integrity; (4) a decrease in alcohol consumption natural suppressant caryophyllene; (5) a decrease in natural product and hepatic steatosis attenuator camphene; and (6) decreased dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, microbial products of decomposition. Our results showed that intestinal microbiota function is altered in alcoholics which might promote alcohol associated pathologies. PMID:25751150

  4. Alcohol Induced Alterations to the Human Fecal VOC Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Robin D.; Dailey, Allyson; Zaidi, Fatima; Navarro, Karl; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip A.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that excessive alcohol consumption impacts the intestinal microbiota composition, causing disruption of homeostasis (dysbiosis). However, this observed change is not indicative of the dysbiotic intestinal microbiota function that could result in the production of injurious and toxic products. Thus, knowledge of the effects of alcohol on the intestinal microbiota function and their metabolites is warranted, in order to better understand the role of the intestinal microbiota in alcohol associated organ failure. Here, we report the results of a differential metabolomic analysis comparing volatile organic compounds (VOC) detected in the stool of alcoholics and non-alcoholic healthy controls. We performed the analysis with fecal samples collected after passage as well as with samples collected directly from the sigmoid lumen. Regardless of the approach to fecal collection, we found a stool VOC metabolomic signature in alcoholics that is different from healthy controls. The most notable metabolite alterations in the alcoholic samples include: (1) an elevation in the oxidative stress biomarker tetradecane; (2) a decrease in five fatty alcohols with anti-oxidant property; (3) a decrease in the short chain fatty acids propionate and isobutyrate, important in maintaining intestinal epithelial cell health and barrier integrity; (4) a decrease in alcohol consumption natural suppressant caryophyllene; (5) a decrease in natural product and hepatic steatosis attenuator camphene; and (6) decreased dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide, microbial products of decomposition. Our results showed that intestinal microbiota function is altered in alcoholics which might promote alcohol associated pathologies. PMID:25751150

  5. Galantamine reverses scopolamine-induced behavioral alterations in Dugesia tigrina.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Latha; Amatya, Christina; DeSaer, Cassie J; Dalhoff, Zachary; Eggerichs, Michael R

    2014-09-01

    In planaria (Dugesia tigrina), scopolamine, a nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist, induced distinct behaviors of attenuated motility and C-like hyperactivity. Planarian locomotor velocity (pLMV) displayed a dose-dependent negative correlation with scopolamine concentrations from 0.001 to 1.0 mM, and a further increase in scopolamine concentration to 2.25 mM did not further decrease pLMV. Planarian hyperactivity counts was dose-dependently increased following pretreatment with scopolamine concentrations from 0.001 to 0.5 mM and then decreased for scopolamine concentrations ≥ 1 mM. Planarian learning and memory investigated using classical Pavlovian conditioning experiments demonstrated that scopolamine (1 mM) negatively influenced associative learning indicated by a significant decrease in % positive behaviors from 86 % (control) to 14 % (1 mM scopolamine) and similarly altered memory retention, which is indicated by a decrease in % positive behaviors from 69 % (control) to 27 % (1 mM scopolamine). Galantamine demonstrated a complex behavior in planarian motility experiments since co-application of low concentrations of galantamine (0.001 and 0.01 mM) protected planaria against 1 mM scopolamine-induced motility impairments; however, pLMV was significantly decreased when planaria were tested in the presence of 0.1 mM galantamine alone. Effects of co-treatment of scopolamine and galantamine on memory retention in planaria via classical Pavlovian conditioning experiments showed that galantamine (0.01 mM) partially reversed scopolamine (1 mM)-induced memory deficits in planaria as the % positive behaviors increased from 27 to 63 %. The results demonstrate, for the first time in planaria, scopolamine's effects in causing learning and memory impairments and galantamine's ability in reversing scopolamine-induced memory impairments. PMID:24402079

  6. Gastrointestinal motor alterations induced by precipitated benzodiazepine withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Martinez, J; Fargeas, M J; Bueno, L

    1992-03-01

    The effects of benzodiazepine withdrawal on intestinal motor activity and propulsion were investigated in two groups of diazepam-dependent rats (15 mg/kg/day for 8 days). Withdrawal was precipitated by injection of two benzodiazepine antagonists (Ro 15.1788 and PK 11.95) acting on central and peripheral-type receptors, respectively. Intestinal motor activity was assessed by implanting electrodes for long-term electromyographic recordings. Gastrointestinal transit was evaluated after gavage by a marker (51CrO4Na2) and radioactivity counting. Both RO 15.1788 (15 mg/kg) and PK 11.195 (5 mg/kg) triggered an abstinence syndrome with behavioral and autonomic signs. At the intestinal level, Ro 15.1788 induced a phase of strong irregular spiking activity (173 +/- 63 min) which remained located in the duodenum. In contrast, PK 11.195 induced a period of propagated myoelectric complexes characterized by phases II and III of high amplitude. The cecal frequency was doubled during the 1st hr after withdrawal induced by the two antagonists. Both Ro 15.1788 and PK 11.195 at this dosage had no effect per se on intestinal motility in vehicle-treated rats. In the second group of rats, gastric emptying was enhanced by 49.4 and 45.6% by Ro 15.1788 and PK 11.195, respectively. In contrast, PK 11.195 was able to accelerate the intestinal transit more than did Ro 15.1788 (geometric center, 5.9 +/- 0.43 and 5.3 +/- 0.49, respectively, vs. 4.1 +/- 0.31 in control rats). Our study shows that precipitated benzodiazepine withdrawal in diazepam-dependent rats induces alterations of the intestinal myoelectrical activity leading to an increase of the gastrointestinal transit. Central and peripheral-type receptors are involved in these effects. PMID:1312156

  7. Fracture-aperture alteration induced by calcite precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation significantly alters the transport properties of fractured rock. Chemical solubility gradients that favor precipitation induce mineral growth, which decreases the local aperture and alters preferential flow paths. Understanding the resulting development of spatial heterogeneities is necessary to predict the evolution of transport properties in the subsurface. We present experimental results that quantify the relationship between mineral precipitation and aperture alteration in a transparent analog fracture, 7.62cm x 7.62cm, with a uniform aperture of ~200 μm. Prior to flow experiments, a pump circulated a super-saturated calcite solution over the bottom glass, coating the glass surface with calcite. This method of seeding resulted in clusters of calcite crystals with large reactive surface area and provided micro-scale variability in the aperture field. A continuous flow syringe pump injected a reactive fluid into the fracture at 0.5 ml/min. The fluid was a mixture of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3, 0.02M) and calcium chloride (CaCl2 0.0004M) with a saturation index, Ω, of 8.51 with respect to calcite. A strobed LED panel backlit the fracture and a high-resolution CCD camera monitored changes in transmitted light intensity. Light transmission techniques provided a quantitative measurement of fracture aperture over the flow field. Results from these preliminary experiments showed growth near the inlet of the fracture, with decreasing precipitation rates in the flow direction. Over a period of two weeks, the fracture aperture decreased by 17% within the first 4mm of the inlet. Newly precipitated calcite bridged individual crystal clusters and smoothed the reacting surface. This observation is an interesting contradiction to the expectation of surface roughening induced by mineral growth. Additionally, the aperture decreased uniformly across the width of the fracture due to the initial aperture distribution. Future experiments of precipitation

  8. Early biochemical alterations induced by 2-acetylaminofluorene in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Elliott, W L; Sawick, D P; Creek, K E; Deutscher, S L; Quinn, J F; Yeo, E; Webb, W R; Morré, D M; Harrington, D D; Heinstein, P F

    1984-01-01

    Livers from rats fed the carcinogen 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) were analyzed at weekly or semiweekly intervals to correlate appearance of enzymatic markers in total liver homogenates with histochemical events accompanying formation of hyperplastic liver nodules. gamma-Glutamyltranspeptidase (gamma-GT)-positive foci appeared by day 11 and visible nodules were present by days 28-35. Specific activity of homogenate gamma-GT increased in parallel to formation of hyperplastic foci and nodules, declined and then rose again to 20-fold that of controls by day 77. Specific activity of ornithine decarboxylase increased in advance of that of gamma-GT, to a level of 8-fold above control during the period of formation of hyperplastic foci. An early response was a 2-fold rise in the specific activity of nucleoside diphosphate phosphatase during the first week of carcinogen administration. The specific activity of 5'-nucleotidase, known to increase during liver regeneration, declined as the animals aged and was not increased by the dietary AAF. The enzymatic alterations induced by AAF could not be mimicked by cell proliferation, diet stress or the hepatotoxicity induced by feeding 1.87% 4-acetamidophenol. PMID:6148271

  9. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-06-27

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C {r_arrow} A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C {r_arrow} T, two C {r_arrow} A, one C {r_arrow} G, and one A {r_arrow} T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Isovolumetric elasticity alteration in the human heart detected by in vivo time-harmonic elastography.

    PubMed

    Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Hättasch, Robert; Knebel, Fabian; Klaua, Robert; Schultz, Michael; Jenderka, Klaus-Vitold; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2013-12-01

    Time harmonic elastography (THE) has recently been introduced for measurement of the periodic alteration in myocardial shear modulus based on externally induced low-frequency acoustic vibrations produced by a loudspeaker. In this study, we propose further developments of cardiac THE toward a clinical modality including integration of the vibration source into the patient bed and automated parameter extraction from harmonic shear wave amplitudes, wall motion profiles and synchronized electrocardiographic records. This method has enabled us to evaluate the delay between wall motion and wave amplitude alteration for the measurement of isovolumetric times of elasticity alteration during contraction (τ(C)) and relaxation (τ(R)) in a group of 32 healthy volunteers. On average, the wave amplitudes changed between systole and diastole by a factor of 1.7 ± 0.3, with a τ(C) of 137 ± 61 ms and a τ(R) of 68 ± 73 ms, which agrees with results obtained with the more time-consuming and expensive cardiac magnetic resonance elastography. Furthermore, because of the high sampling rate, elasto-morphometric parameters such as transition times and the area of wave amplitude-cardiac motion cycles can be processed in an automated way for the future clinical detection of myocardial relaxation abnormalities. PMID:24035628

  11. Alteration of sperm protein profile induced by cigarette smoking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohui; Xu, Wangjie; Miao, Maohua; Zhu, Zijue; Dai, Jingbo; Chen, Zhong; Fang, Peng; Wu, Junqing; Nie, Dongsheng; Wang, Lianyun; Wang, Zhaoxia; Qiao, Zhongdong; Shi, Huijuan

    2015-07-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with lower semen quality, but how cigarette smoking changes the semen quality remains unclear. The aim of this study was to screen the differentially expressed proteins in the sperm of mice with daily exposure to cigarette smoke. The 2D gel electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) analyses results showed that the mouse sperm protein profile was altered by cigarette smoking. And 22 of the most abundant proteins that correspond to differentially expressed spots in 2DE gels of the sperm samples were identified. These proteins were classified into different groups based on their functions, such as energy metabolism, reproduction, and structural molecules. Furthermore, the 2DE and MS results of five proteins (Aldoa, ATP5a1, Gpx4, Cs, and Spatc1) were validated by western blot analysis and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results showed that except Spatc1 the other four proteins showed statistically significant different protein levels between the smoking group and the control group (P < 0.05). The expressions of three genes (Aldoa, Gpx4, and Spatc1) were significantly different (P < 0.05) at transcription level between the smoking group and the control group. In addition, five proteins (Aldoa, ATP5a1, Spatc1, Cs, and Gpx4) in human sperm samples from 30 male smokers and 30 non-smokers were detected by western blot analysis. Two proteins (Aldoa and Cs) that are associated with energy production were found to be significantly altered, suggesting that these proteins may be potential diagnostic markers for evaluation of smoking risk in sperm. Further study of these proteins may provide insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying infertility in smoking persons. PMID:26063603

  12. Methylation Alterations at Imprinted Genes Detected Among Long Term Shiftworkers

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Daniel I.; Hansen, Johnni; Fu, Alan; Stevens, Richard G.; Tjonneland, Anne; Vogel, Ulla B.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to light at night through shiftwork has been linked to alterations in DNA methylation and increased risk of cancer development. Using an Illumina Infinium Methylation Assay, we analyzed methylation levels of 397 CpG sites in the promoter regions of 56 normally imprinted genes to investigate whether shiftwork is associated with alteration of methylation patterns. Methylation was significantly higher at 20 CpG sites and significantly lower at 30 CpG sites (P < 0.05) in 10 female long-term shiftworkers as compared to 10 female age- and folate intake-matched day workers. The strongest evidence for altered methylation patterns in shiftworkers was observed for DLX5, IGF2AS, and TP73 based on the magnitude of methylation change and consistency in the direction of change across multiple CpG sites, and consistent results were observed using quantitative DNA methylation analysis. We conclude that long-term shiftwork may alter methylation patterns at imprinted genes, which may be an important mechanism by which shiftwork has carcinogenic potential and warrants further investigation. PMID:23193016

  13. Alteration of fibroblast phenotype by asbestos-induced autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Pfau, Jean C; Li, Sheng'ai; Holland, Sara; Sentissi, Jami J

    2011-06-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a relentlessly progressive disease for which the etiology can be idiopathic or associated with environmental or occupational exposures. There is not a clear explanation for the chronic and progressive nature of the disease, leaving treatment and prevention options limited. However, there is increasing evidence of an autoimmune component, since fibrotic diseases are often accompanied by production of autoantibodies. Because exposure to silicates such as silica and asbestos can lead to both autoantibodies and pulmonary/pleural fibrosis, these exposures provide an excellent tool for examining the relationship between these outcomes. This study explored the possibility that autoantibodies induced by asbestos exposure in mice would affect fibroblast phenotype. L929 fibroblasts and primary lung fibroblasts were treated with serum IgG from asbestos- or saline-treated mice, and tested for binding using cell-based ELISA, and for phenotypic changes using immunofluorescence, laser scanning cytometry and Sirius Red collagen assay. Autoantibodies in the serum of C57Bl/6 mice exposed to asbestos (but not sera from untreated mice) bound to mouse fibroblasts. The autoantibodies induced differentiation to a myofibroblast phenotype, as demonstrated by increased expression of smooth muscle α-actin (SMA), which was lost when the serum was cleared of IgG. Cells treated with purified IgG of exposed mice produced excess collagen. Using ELISA, we tested serum antibody binding to DNA topoisomerase (Topo) I, vimentin, TGFβ-R, and PDGF-Rα. Antibodies to DNA Topo I and to PDGF-Rα were detected, both of which have been shown by others to be able to affect fibroblast phenotype. The anti-fibroblast antibodies (AFA) also induced STAT-1 activation, implicating the PDGF-R pathway as part of the response to AFA binding. These data support the hypothesis that asbestos induces AFA that modify fibroblast phenotype, and suggest a mechanism whereby autoantibodies may mediate

  14. Drought induces alterations in the stomatal development program in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Malcolm M

    2012-01-01

    Much is known about the physiological control of stomatal aperture as a means by which plants adjust to water availability. By contrast, the role played by the modulation of stomatal development to limit water loss has received much less attention. The control of stomatal development in response to water deprivation in the genus Populus is explored here. Drought induced declines in stomatal conductance as well as an alteration in stomatal development in two genotypes of Populus balsamifera. Leaves that developed under water-deficit conditions had lower stomatal indices than leaves that developed under well-watered conditions. Transcript abundance of genes that could hypothetically underpin drought-responsive changes in stomatal development was examined, in two genotypes, across six time points, under two conditions, well-watered and with water deficit. Populus homologues of STOMAGEN, ERECTA (ER), STOMATA DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION 1 (SDD1), and FAMA had variable transcript abundance patterns congruent with their role in the modulation of stomatal development in response to drought. Conversely, there was no significant variation in transcript abundance between genotypes or treatments for the Populus homologues of YODA (YDA) and TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM). The findings highlight the role that could be played by stomatal development during leaf expansion as a longer term means by which to limit water loss from leaves. Moreover, the results point to the key roles played by the regulation of the homologues of STOMAGEN, ER, SDD1, and FAMA in the control of this response in poplar. PMID:22760471

  15. Morphofunctional renal alterations in rats induced by intrauterine hyperglycemic environment

    PubMed Central

    França-Silva, Nathane; Oliveira, Natácia Dreyce Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The renal development of rats begins in intrauterine life, finishing by 15 days after birth. Diabetes and other diseases during pregnancy can cause systemic changes in the offspring. We evaluated the structural and functional renal alterations of the offspring from diabetic mothers. Material and methods Pregnant rats were separated and 1, 7, 30 and 90 days-old (DO) pups were divided into groups according to the treatment that the mothers received: G1: control, G2: untreated diabetic and G3: insulin-treated diabetic. The kidneys from offspring at 1, 7 and 30 DO were removed for immunohistochemical and histological studies. Furthermore, blood and urine samples were collected from animals at 30 DO to determine the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by creatinine clearance, and the animals at 90 DO were subjected to blood pressure measurement by plethysmography. Results Our results show an increase of PCNA+ glomerular cells at 7 DO and a reduction in 30 DO animals as well as increased α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) tubulointerstitial expression at 1 and 7 DO in animals from G2, when compared with controls. The adult offspring from G2 showed reduced GFR and increased blood pressure. Conclusions Maternal diabetes may have induced programming of renal damage in offspring of hyperglycemic mothers, which may have contributed to the impairment of renal function. PMID:27186167

  16. Platelets Potentiate Brain Endothelial Alterations Induced by Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Wassmer, Samuel C.; Combes, Valéry; Candal, Francisco J.; Juhan-Vague, Irène; Grau, Georges E.

    2006-01-01

    Brain lesions of cerebral malaria (CM) are characterized by a sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized red blood cells (PRBC) and platelets within brain microvessels, as well as by blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. In the present study, we evaluated the possibility that PRBC and platelets induce functional alterations in brain endothelium. In a human brain endothelial cell line, named HBEC-5i, exhibiting most of the features demanded for a pathophysiological study of BBB, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or lymphotoxin α (LT-α) reduced transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER), enhanced the permeability to 70-kDa dextran, and increased the release of microparticles, a recently described indicator of disease severity in CM patients. In vitro cocultures showed that platelets or PRBC can have a direct cytotoxic effect on activated, but not on resting, HBEC-5i cells. Platelet binding was required, as platelet supernatant had no effect. Furthermore, platelets potentiated the cytotoxicity of PRBC for TNF- or LT-α-activated HBEC-5i cells when they were added prior to these cells on the endothelial monolayers. This effect was not observed when platelets were added after PRBC. Both permeability and TEER were strongly affected, and the apoptosis rate of HBEC-5i cells was dramatically increased. These findings provide insights into the mechanisms by which platelets can be deleterious to the brain endothelium during CM. PMID:16369021

  17. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mitochondria of the Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Tripathi, Preeti; Krager, Kimberly J.; Sharma, Sunil K.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Corry, Peter M.; Nowak, Grazyna; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy for the treatment of thoracic cancers may be associated with radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), especially in long-term cancer survivors. Mechanisms by which radiation causes heart disease are largely unknown. To identify potential long-term contributions of mitochondria in the development of radiation-induced heart disease, we examined the time course of effects of irradiation on cardiac mitochondria. In this study, Sprague-Dawley male rats received image-guided local X irradiation of the heart with a single dose ranging from 3–21 Gy. Two weeks after irradiation, left ventricular mitochondria were isolated to assess the dose-dependency of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening in a mitochondrial swelling assay. At time points from 6 h to 9 months after a cardiac dose of 21 Gy, the following analyses were performed: left ventricular Bax and Bcl-2 protein levels; apoptosis; mitochondrial inner membrane potential and mPTP opening; mitochondrial mass and expression of mitophagy mediators Parkin and PTEN induced putative kinase-1 (PINK-1); mitochondrial respiration and protein levels of succinate dehydrogenase A (SDHA); and the 70 kDa subunit of complex II. Local heart irradiation caused a prolonged increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and induced apoptosis between 6 h and 2 weeks. The mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced until 2 weeks, and the calcium-induced mPTP opening was increased from 6 h up to 9 months. An increased mitochondrial mass together with unaltered levels of Parkin suggested that mitophagy did not occur. Lastly, we detected a significant decrease in succinate-driven state 2 respiration in isolated mitochondria from 2 weeks up to 9 months after irradiation, coinciding with reduced mitochondrial levels of succinate dehydrogenase A. Our results suggest that local heart irradiation induces long-term changes in cardiac mitochondrial membrane functions, levels of SDH and state 2 respiration. At any time after

  18. 46 CFR 109.425 - Repairs and alterations: Fire detecting and extinguishing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Repairs and alterations: Fire detecting and extinguishing equipment. 109.425 Section 109.425 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Reports, Notifications, and Records Reports and Notifications § 109.425 Repairs and alterations:...

  19. Gene expression patterns underlying parasite-induced alterations in host behaviour and life history.

    PubMed

    Feldmeyer, Barbara; Mazur, Johanna; Beros, Sara; Lerp, Hannes; Binder, Harald; Foitzik, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Many parasites manipulate their hosts' phenotype. In particular, parasites with complex life cycles take control of their intermediate hosts' behaviour and life history to increase transmission to their definitive host. The proximate mechanisms underlying these parasite-induced alterations are poorly understood. The cestode Anomotaenia brevis affects the behaviour, life history and morphology of parasitized Temnothorax nylanderi ants and indirectly of their unparasitized nestmates. To gain insights on how parasites alter host phenotypes, we contrast brain gene expression patterns of T. nylanderi workers parasitized with the cestode, their unparasitized nestmates and unparasitized workers from unparasitized colonies. Over 400 differentially expressed genes between the three groups were identified, with most uniquely expressed genes detected in parasitized workers. Among these are genes that can be linked to the increased lifespan of parasitized workers. Furthermore, many muscle (functionality) genes are downregulated in these workers, potentially causing the observed muscular deformations and their inactive behaviour. Alterations in lifespan and activity could be adaptive for the parasite by increasing the likelihood that infected workers residing in acorns are eaten by their definitive host, a woodpecker. Our transcriptome analysis reveals numerous gene expression changes in parasitized workers and their uninfected nestmates and indicates possible routes of parasite manipulation. Although causality still needs to be established, parasite-induced alterations in lifespan and host behaviour appear to be partly explained by morphological muscle atrophy instead of central nervous system interference, which is often the core of behavioural regulation. Results of this study will shed light upon the molecular basis of antagonistic species interactions. PMID:26615010

  20. Tissue culture-induced genetic and epigenetic alterations in rice pure-lines, F1 hybrids and polyploids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic and epigenetic alterations can be invoked by plant tissue culture, which may result in heritable changes in phenotypes, a phenomenon collectively termed somaclonal variation. Although extensive studies have been conducted on the molecular nature and spectrum of tissue culture-induced genomic alterations, the issue of whether and to what extent distinct plant genotypes, e.g., pure-lines, hybrids and polyploids, may respond differentially to the tissue culture condition remains poorly understood. Results We investigated tissue culture-induced genetic and epigenetic alterations in a set of rice genotypes including two pure-lines (different subspecies), a pair of reciprocal F1 hybrids parented by the two pure-lines, and a pair of reciprocal tetraploids resulted from the hybrids. Using two molecular markers, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP), both genetic and DNA methylation alterations were detected in calli and regenerants from all six genotypes, but genetic alteration is more prominent than epigenetic alteration. While significant genotypic difference was observed in frequencies of both types of alterations, only genetic alteration showed distinctive features among the three types of genomes, with one hybrid (N/9) being exceptionally labile. Surprisingly, difference in genetic alteration frequencies between the pair of reciprocal F1 hybrids is much greater than that between the two pure-line subspecies. Difference also exists in the pair of reciprocal tetraploids, but is to a less extent than that between the hybrids. The steady-state transcript abundance of genes involved in DNA repair and DNA methylation was significantly altered in both calli and regenerants, and some of which were correlated with the genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. Conclusions Our results, based on molecular marker analysis of ca. 1,000 genomic loci, document that genetic alteration is the major cause of

  1. Detection of Ligand- and Solvent-Induced Shape Alterations of Cell-Growth-Regulatory Human Lectin Galectin-1 in Solution by Small Angle Neutron and X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    He, Lizhong; André, Sabine; Siebert, Hans-Christian; Helmholz, Heike; Niemeyer, Bernd; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2003-01-01

    The bioactivity of galectin-1 in cell growth regulation and adhesion prompted us to answer the questions whether ligand presence and a shift to an aprotic solvent typical for bioaffinity chromatography might alter the shape of the homodimeric human lectin in solution. We used small angle neutron and synchrotron x-ray scattering studies for this purpose. Upon ligand accommodation, the radius of gyration of human galectin-1 decreased from 19.1 ± 0.1 Å in the absence of ligand to 18.2 ± 0.1 Å. In the aprotic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide, which did not impair binding capacity, galectin-1 formed dimers of a dimer, yielding tetramers with a cylindrical shape. Intriguingly, no dissociation into subunits occurred. In parallel, NMR monitoring was performed. The spectral resolution was in accord with these data. In contrast to the properties of the human protein, a nonhomologous agglutinin from mistletoe sharing galactose specificity was subject to a reduction in the radius of gyration from ∼62 Å in water to 48.7 Å in dimethyl sulfoxide. Evidently, the solvent caused opposite responses in the two tested galactoside-binding lectins with different folding patterns. We have hereby proven that ligand presence and an aprotic solvent significantly affect the shape of galectin-1 in solution. PMID:12829506

  2. DETECTION OF MUTAGENIC/CARCINOGENIC ALTERATION IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of using fish as bioassay organisms to detect mutagenic/carcinogenic substances in the aquatic environment was tested. The data in fish were compared to those in higher vertebrates including humans. Microsomal fractions from livers of channel catfish, fathead minn...

  3. Light-Induced Alterations in Basil Ganglia Kynurenic Acid Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.; Orr, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolic synthesis, release and breakdown of several known CNS neurotransmitters have been shown to follow a circadian pattern entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle. The levels of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmitters such as glutamate, have been shown to vary with environmental lighting conditions. Kynurenic Acid (KA), an endogenous tryptophan metabolite and glutamate receptor antagonist, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects against EAA-induced excitotoxic cell damage. Changes in KA's activity within the mammalian basal ganglia has been proposed as being contributory to neurotoxicity in Huntington's Disease. It is not known whether CNS KA levels follow a circadian pattern or exhibit light-induced fluctuations. However, because the symptoms of certain degenerative motor disorders seem to fluctuate with daily 24 hour rhythm, we initiated studies to determine if basal ganglia KA were influenced by the daily light/dark cycle and could influence motor function. Therefore in this study, HPLC-EC was utilized to determine if basal ganglia KA levels in tissue extracts from adult male Long-Evans rats (200-250g) entrained to 24 and 48 hours constant light and dark conditions, respectively. Samples were taken one hour before the onset of the subjective day and one hour prior to the onset of the subjective night in order to detect possible phase differences in KA levels and to allow for accumulation of factors expressed in association with the light or dark phase. Data analysis revealed that KA levels in the basal ganglia vary with environmental lighting conditions; being elevated generally during the dark. Circadian phase differences in KA levels were also evident during the subjective night and subjective day, respectively. Results from these studies are discussed with respect to potential cyclic changes in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic damage during the daily 24 hour cycle and its possible relevance to future therapeutic approaches in

  4. Diet-induced and mono-genetic obesity alter volatile organic compound signature in mice.

    PubMed

    Kistler, Martin; Muntean, Andreea; Szymczak, Wilfried; Rink, Nadine; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hoeschen, Christoph; Klingenspor, Martin; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Rozman, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity is still rising in many countries, resulting in an increased risk of associated metabolic diseases. In this study we aimed to describe the volatile organic compound (VOC) patterns symptomatic for obesity. We analyzed high fat diet (HFD) induced obese and mono-genetic obese mice (global knock-in mutation in melanocortin-4 receptor MC4R-ki). The source strengths of 208 VOCs were analyzed in ad libitum fed mice and after overnight food restriction. Volatiles relevant for a random forest-based separation of obese mice were detected (26 in MC4R-ki, 22 in HFD mice). Eight volatiles were found to be important in both obesity models. Interestingly, by creating a partial correlation network of the volatile metabolites, the chemical and metabolic origins of several volatiles were identified. HFD-induced obese mice showed an elevation in the ketone body acetone and acrolein, a marker of lipid peroxidation, and several unidentified volatiles. In MC4R-ki mice, several yet-unidentified VOCs were found to be altered. Remarkably, the pheromone (methylthio)methanethiol was found to be reduced, linking metabolic dysfunction and reproduction. The signature of volatile metabolites can be instrumental in identifying and monitoring metabolic disease states, as shown in the screening of the two obese mouse models in this study. Our findings show the potential of breath gas analysis to non-invasively assess metabolic alterations for personalized diagnosis. PMID:26860833

  5. Detection of subtle neurological alterations by the Catwalk XT gait analysis system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A new version of the CatWalk XT system was evaluated as a tool for detecting very subtle alteration in gait based on higher speed sample rate; the system could also demonstrate minor changes in neurological function. In this study, we evaluated the neurological outcome of sciatic nerve injury intervened by local injection of hyaluronic acid. Using the CatWalk XT system, we looked for differences between treated and untreated groups and differences within the same group as a function of time so as to assess the power of the Catwalk XT system for detecting subtle neurological change. Methods Peripheral nerve injury was induced in 36 Sprague–Dawley rats by crushing the left sciatic nerve using a vessel clamp. The animals were randomized into one of two groups: Group I: crush injury as the control; Group II: crush injury and local application with hyaluronic acid. These animals were subjected to neurobehavior assessment, histomorphology evaluation, and electrophysiology study periodically. These data were retrieved for statistical analysis. Results The density of neurofilament and S-100 over the distal end of crushed nerve showed significant differences either in inter-group comparison at various time points or intra-group comparison from 7 to 28 days. Neuronal structure architecture, axon counts, intensity of myelination, electrophysiology, and collagen deposition demonstrate significant differences between the two groups. There was significant difference of SFI and angle of ankle in inter- group analysis from 7 to 28 days, but there were no significant differences in SFI and angle of ankle at time points of 7 and 14 days. In the Cat Walk XT analysis, the intensity, print area, stance duration, and swing duration all showed detectable differences at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days, whereas there were no significant difference at 7 and 14 days with CatWalk 7 testing. In addition, there were no significant differences of step sequence or regularity index

  6. Integrated circuit failure analysis by low-energy charge-induced voltage alteration

    DOEpatents

    Cole, E.I. Jr.

    1996-06-04

    A scanning electron microscope apparatus and method are described for detecting and imaging open-circuit defects in an integrated circuit (IC). The invention uses a low-energy high-current focused electron beam that is scanned over a device surface of the IC to generate a charge-induced voltage alteration (CIVA) signal at the location of any open-circuit defects. The low-energy CIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any open-circuit defects. A low electron beam energy is used to prevent electrical breakdown in any passivation layers in the IC and to minimize radiation damage to the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs. 5 figs.

  7. Integrated circuit failure analysis by low-energy charge-induced voltage alteration

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Jr., Edward I.

    1996-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope apparatus and method are described for detecting and imaging open-circuit defects in an integrated circuit (IC). The invention uses a low-energy high-current focused electron beam that is scanned over a device surface of the IC to generate a charge-induced voltage alteration (CIVA) signal at the location of any open-circuit defects. The low-energy CIVA signal may be used to generate an image of the IC showing the location of any open-circuit defects. A low electron beam energy is used to prevent electrical breakdown in any passivation layers in the IC and to minimize radiation damage to the IC. The invention has uses for IC failure analysis, for production-line inspection of ICs, and for qualification of ICs.

  8. Paroxysmal Perceptual Alteration: Drug-Induced Phenomenon or Schizophrenic Psychopathology?

    PubMed

    Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Kongasseri, Sreejayan; Acharya, Mahima

    2016-01-01

    Brief and repetitive episodes of perceptual changes, termed paroxysmal perceptual alteration (PPA), have been described in association with antipsychotic treatment. We report a case of paranoid schizophrenia who had such perceptual changes akin to PPA for 15 years, which was not related to antipsychotic treatment. There was a rapid resolution of PPA after treatment with low-dose clonazepam. PMID:26954463

  9. Increased Klk9 Urinary Excretion Is Associated to Hypertension-Induced Cardiovascular Damage and Renal Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Blázquez-Medela, Ana M.; García-Sánchez, Omar; Quirós, Yaremi; Blanco-Gozalo, Victor; Prieto-García, Laura; Sancho-Martínez, Sandra M.; Romero, Miguel; Duarte, Juan M.; López-Hernández, Francisco J.; López-Novoa, José M.; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Early detection of hypertensive end-organ damage and secondary diseases are key determinants of cardiovascular prognosis in patients suffering from arterial hypertension. Presently, there are no biomarkers for the detection of hypertensive target organ damage, most outstandingly including blood vessels, the heart, and the kidneys. We aimed to validate the usefulness of the urinary excretion of the serine protease kallikrein-related peptidase 9 (KLK9) as a biomarker of hypertension-induced target organ damage. Urinary, plasma, and renal tissue levels of KLK9 were measured by the Western blot in different rat models of hypertension, including angiotensin-II infusion, DOCA-salt, L-NAME administration, and spontaneous hypertension. Urinary levels were associated to cardiovascular and renal injury, assessed by histopathology. The origin of urinary KLK9 was investigated through in situ renal perfusion experiments. The urinary excretion of KLK9 is increased in different experimental models of hypertension in rats. The ACE inhibitor trandolapril significantly reduced arterial pressure and the urinary level of KLK9. Hypertension did not increase kidney, heart, liver, lung, or plasma KLK9 levels. Hypertension-induced increased urinary excretion of KLK9 results from specific alterations in its tubular reabsorption, even in the absence of overt nephropathy. KLK9 urinary excretion strongly correlates with cardiac hypertrophy and aortic wall thickening. KLK9 appears in the urine in the presence of hypertension as a result of subtle renal handling alterations. Urinary KLK9 might be potentially used as an indicator of hypertensive cardiac and vascular damage. PMID:26469898

  10. Prenatal hyperandrogenism induces alterations that affect liver lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Abruzzese, Giselle Adriana; Heber, Maria Florencia; Ferreira, Silvana Rocio; Velez, Leandro Martin; Reynoso, Roxana; Pignataro, Omar Pedro; Motta, Alicia Beatriz

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal hyperandrogenism is hypothesized as one of the main factors contributing to the development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). PCOS patients have high risk of developing fatty liver and steatosis. This study aimed to evaluate the role of prenatal hyperandrogenism in liver lipid metabolism and fatty liver development. Pregnant rats were hyperandrogenized with testosterone. At pubertal age, the prenatally hyperandrogenized (PH) female offspring displayed both ovulatory (PHov) and anovulatory (PHanov) phenotypes that mimic human PCOS features. We evaluated hepatic transferases, liver lipid content, the balance between lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation pathway, oxidant/antioxidant balance and proinflammatory status. We also evaluated the general metabolic status through growth rate curve, basal glucose and insulin levels, glucose tolerance test, HOMA-IR index and serum lipid profile. Although neither PH group showed signs of liver lipid content, the lipogenesis and fatty oxidation pathways were altered. The PH groups also showed impaired oxidant/antioxidant balance, a decrease in the proinflammatory pathway (measured by prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels), decreased glucose tolerance, imbalance of circulating lipids and increased risk of metabolic syndrome. We conclude that prenatal hyperandrogenism generates both PHov and PHanov phenotypes with signs of liver alterations, imbalance in lipid metabolism and increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome. The anovulatory phenotype showed more alterations in liver lipogenesis and a more impaired balance of insulin and glucose metabolism, being more susceptible to the development of steatosis. PMID:27179108

  11. Chromosomal and Nuclear Alterations in Root Tip Cells of Allium Cepa L. Induced by Alprazolam

    PubMed Central

    Nefic, Hilada; Musanovic, Jasmin; Metovic, Azra; Kurteshi, Kemajl

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Alprazolam is a triazolobenzodiazepine used in panic disorders and other anxiety states. Target organ of Alprazolam is CNS, causing depression of respiration and consciousness. Aim: This study aimed to estimate the genotoxic potential of Alprazolam using Allium cepa test. Methods: Allium cepa is one of the most suitable plants for detecting different types of xenobiotics. The test enables the assessment of different genetic endpoints making possible damage to the DNA of humans to be predicted. Results: Alprazolam induced chromosomal (anaphase bridges, breaks, lagging and stickiness, abnormal spiralisation, multipolarity and polyploidy) and cytological aberrations, especially nuclear alterations (nuclear buds, fragmented nucleus and apoptotic bodies, cells without nucleus, binucleated and micronucleated cells), morphological alterations in shape and size of cells, spindle disturbance and polar deviation in root tip meristem cells of Allium cepa at all tested concentrations. Alprazolam also caused significant inhibition of mitotic index in these cells. Conclusion: These changes in cells are indicators of genotoxic potential of Alprazolam suggesting a need for further in vitro studies on animal and human lymphocytes as well as in vivo studies. PMID:25568504

  12. Impedance Alterations in Healthy and Diseased Mice During Electrically Induced Muscle Contraction.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Benjamin; Li, Jia; Geisbush, Tom; Bardia, Ramon Bragos; Rutkove, Seward B

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in the health of muscles can be evaluated through the use of electrical impedance myography (EIM). To date, however, nearly all work in this field has relied upon the measurement of muscle at rest. To provide an insight into the contractile mechanisms of healthy and disease muscle, we evaluated the alterations in the spectroscopic impedance behavior of muscle during the active process of muscle contraction. The gastrocnemii from a total of 13 mice were studied (five wild type, four muscular dystrophy animals, and four amyotrophic lateral sclerosis animals). Muscle contraction was induced via monophasic current pulse stimulation of the sciatic nerve. Simultaneously, multisine EIM (1 kHz to 1 MHz) and force measurements of the muscle were performed. Stimulation was applied at three different rates to produce mild, moderate, and strong contractions. We identified changes in both single and multifrequency data, as assessed by the Cole impedance model parameters. The processes of contraction and relaxation were clearly identified in the impedance spectra and quantified via derivative plots. Reductions in the center frequency fc were observed during the contraction consistent with the increasing muscle fiber diameter. Different EIM stimulation rate-dependencies were also detected across the three groups of animals. PMID:24800834

  13. Localization of pellicle-induced open contacts using Charge-Induced Voltage Alteration

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.

    1993-08-01

    The recently developed Charge-Induced Voltage Alteration (CIVA) technique for localizing open metal conductors was used successfully to identify transistors with electrically open metal-1 contacts to silicon. The transistors were in the I/O port circuitry of a failing microcontroller and were completely covered by a metal-2 power bus. The root cause of the open contacts was a subtle scratch in the pellicle over the contact reticle. The scratch prevented full exposure of the photoresist, resulting in incomplete removal of the interlevel oxide in several contact windows. In addition to this powerful new application of CIVA, a number of failure analysis techniques utilizing both the electrical and physical properties of the failing microcontrollers were employed to identify and confirm the open contacts. These techniques are reviewed and recommendations are given for improved pellicle/reticle inspection.

  14. Radiation-induced alterations of fracture healing biomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Pelker, R.R.; Friedlaender, G.E.; Panjabi, M.M.; Kapp, D.; Doganis, A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of irradiation on the normal temporal progression of the physical properties of healing fractures were studied in a rat model. Fractures were surgically produced in the femur, stabilized with an intramedullary pin, and irradiated. One group of rats was exposed to 2,500 rads in divided doses over 2 weeks, beginning 3 days after fracture, and compared to a control group with fractures which were not irradiated. Animals were sacrificed at periodic intervals and the bones were tested to failure in torsion. The torque, stiffness, and energy increased and the angle decreased for the nonirradiated specimens in the expected fashion. This progression was deleteriously altered in the irradiated femurs.

  15. Alterations and Abnormal Mitosis of Wheat Chromosomes Induced by Wheat-Rye Monosomic Addition Lines

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shulan; Yang, Manyu; Fei, Yunyan; Tan, Feiquan; Ren, Zhenglong; Yan, Benju; Zhang, Huaiyu; Tang, Zongxiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat-rye addition lines are an old topic. However, the alterations and abnormal mitotic behaviours of wheat chromosomes caused by wheat-rye monosomic addition lines are seldom reported. Methodology/Principal Findings Octoploid triticale was derived from common wheat T. aestivum L. ‘Mianyang11’×rye S. cereale L. ‘Kustro’ and some progeny were obtained by the controlled backcrossing of triticale with ‘Mianyang11’ followed by self-fertilization. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) using rye genomic DNA and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using repetitive sequences pAs1 and pSc119.2 as probes were used to analyze the mitotic chromosomes of these progeny. Strong pSc119.2 FISH signals could be observed at the telomeric regions of 3DS arms in ‘Mianyang11’. However, the pSc119.2 FISH signals were disappeared from the selfed progeny of 4R monosomic addition line and the changed 3D chromosomes could be transmitted to next generation stably. In one of the selfed progeny of 7R monosomic addition line, one 2D chromosome was broken and three 4A chromosomes were observed. In the selfed progeny of 6R monosomic addition line, structural variation and abnormal mitotic behaviour of 3D chromosome were detected. Additionally, 1A and 4B chromosomes were eliminated from some of the progeny of 6R monosomic addition line. Conclusions/Significance These results indicated that single rye chromosome added to wheat might cause alterations and abnormal mitotic behaviours of wheat chromosomes and it is possible that the stress caused by single alien chromosome might be one of the factors that induced karyotype alteration of wheat. PMID:23936213

  16. Protein-Induced Membrane Curvature Alters Local Membrane Tension

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Mandadap, Kranthi K.; Oster, George

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of proteins onto membranes can alter the local membrane curvature. This phenomenon has been observed in biological processes such as endocytosis, tubulation, and vesiculation. However, it is not clear how the local surface properties of the membrane, such as membrane tension, change in response to protein adsorption. In this article, we show that the partial differential equations arising from classical elastic model of lipid membranes, which account for simultaneous changes in shape and membrane tension due to protein adsorption in a local region, cannot be solved for nonaxisymmetric geometries using straightforward numerical techniques; instead, a viscous-elastic formulation is necessary to fully describe the system. Therefore, we develop a viscous-elastic model for inhomogeneous membranes of the Helfrich type. Using the newly available viscous-elastic model, we find that the lipids flow to accommodate changes in membrane curvature during protein adsorption. We show that, at the end of protein adsorption process, the system sustains a residual local tension to balance the difference between the actual mean curvature and the imposed spontaneous curvature. We also show that this change in membrane tension can have a functional impact such as altered response to pulling forces in the presence of proteins. PMID:25099814

  17. Radiation-induced motility alterations in medulloblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rieken, Stefan; Rieber, Juliane; Brons, Stephan; Habermehl, Daniel; Rief, Harald; Orschiedt, Lena; Lindel, Katja; Weber, Klaus J; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2015-05-01

    Photon irradiation has been repeatedly suspected of increasing tumor cell motility and promoting locoregional recurrence of disease. This study was set up to analyse possible mechanisms underlying the potentially radiation-altered motility in medulloblastoma cells. Medulloblastoma cell lines D425 and Med8A were analyzed in migration and adhesion experiments with and without photon and carbon ion irradiation. Expression of integrins was determined by quantitative FACS analysis. Matrix metalloproteinase concentrations within cell culture supernatants were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test. Both photon and carbon ion irradiation significantly reduced chemotactic medulloblastoma cell transmigration through 8-μm pore size membranes, while simultaneously increasing adherence to fibronectin- and collagen I- and IV-coated surfaces. Correspondingly, both photon and carbon ion irradiation downregulate soluble MMP9 concentrations, while upregulating cell surface expression of proadhesive extracellular matrix protein-binding integrin α5. The observed phenotype of radiation-altered motility is more pronounced following carbon ion than photon irradiation. Both photon and (even more so) carbon ion irradiation are effective in inhibiting medulloblastoma cell migration through downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and upregulation of proadhesive cell surface integrin α5, which lead to increased cell adherence to extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:25736470

  18. Study on hematological alterations induced by amphistomosis in buffaloes

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vandip. D.; Patel, P. V.; Hasnani, Jigar J.; Pandya, Suchit S.; Pandey, Sunanda; Pansuriya, Dhaval V.; Choudhary, Vijayata

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The study was undertaken to compare the alterations in the hematological parameters in buffaloes suffering from Amphistomosis with normal buffaloes and to correlate it with the subclinical infection that is hard to diagnose. Materials and Methods: Blood samples from 50 amphistomes infected as well as 50 non-infected buffaloes from slaughter houses were taken into vacutainer tubes containing ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid for estimation of various hematological parameters by Automatic Analyzer Hema-2062 manufactured by Analytical Technologies Ltd. Result: There was a significant reduction in the mean hemoglobin, total leukocyte count, total erythrocyte count and packed cell volume and significant increase in the neutrophils count and eosinophil count of infected buffaloes as compared to the non-infected buffaloes respectively. Conclusion: Amphistomosis is characterized by severe neutrophilia, eosinophilia, and anemia. Anemia of high intensity along with hepatic damage can lead to the death of the animal in severe cases. Alterations in the Hematological parameters can be used as an indicator to diagnose and check the severity of amphistomosis especially in young ones and in subclinical infection. PMID:27047107

  19. Low molecular weight heparin restores antithrombin III activity from hyperglycemia induced alterations.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Marchi, E; Palazzni, E; Quatraro, A; Giugliano, D

    1990-01-01

    Alteration of antithrombin III (ATIII) activity, glycemia level dependent, exists in diabetes mellitus. In this study the ability of a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (Fluxum, Alfa-Wassermann S.p.A., Bologna, Italy), as well as unfractioned héparin, to preserve ATIII activity from glucose-induced alterations, both in vitro and in vivo, is reported. The subcutaneous and intravenous LMWH and heparin administration increases basal depressed ATIII activity in diabetic patients. Heparin shows an equivalent effect on both anti-IIa and anti-Xa activity of ATIII, while LMWH is more effective in preserving the anti-Xa activity. Similarity, heparin preserves ATIII activity from hyperglycemia-induced alterations, during hyperglycemic clamp, and LMWH infusion is able to preserve a significant amount of anti-Xa activity from glucose-induced alterations. Since diabetic patients show a high incidence of thrombotic accidents, LMWH appears to be a promising innovation for the prevention of diabetic thrombophylia. PMID:2196192

  20. Chronic Intake of Japanese Sake Mediates Radiation-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Sake is a traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage that is gaining popularity worldwide. Although sake is reported to have beneficial health effects, it is not known whether chronic sake consumption modulates health risks due to radiation exposure or other factors. Here, the effects of chronic administration of sake on radiation-induced metabolic alterations in the livers of mice were evaluated. Sake (junmai-shu) was administered daily to female mice (C3H/He) for one month, and the mice were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy/day) for the last four days of the sake administration period. For comparative analysis, a group of mice were administered 15% (v/v) ethanol in water instead of sake. Metabolites in the liver were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry one day following the last exposure to radiation. The metabolite profiles of mice chronically administered sake in combination with radiation showed marked changes in purine, pyrimidine, and glutathione (GSH) metabolism, which were only partially altered by radiation or sake administration alone. Notably, the changes in GSH metabolism were not observed in mice treated with radiation following chronic administration of 15% ethanol in water. Changes in several metabolites, including methionine and valine, were induced by radiation alone, but were not detected in the livers of mice who received chronic administration of sake. In addition, the chronic administration of sake increased the level of serum triglycerides, although radiation exposure suppressed this increase. Taken together, the present findings suggest that chronic sake consumption promotes GSH metabolism and anti-oxidative activities in the liver, and thereby may contribute to minimizing the adverse effects associated with radiation. PMID:26752639

  1. Thiamine Deficiency Induced Neurochemical, Neuroanatomical, and Neuropsychological Alterations: A Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Höller, Yvonne; Storti, Monica; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional deficiency can cause, mainly in chronic alcoholic subjects, the Wernicke encephalopathy and its chronic neurological sequela, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS). Long-term chronic ethanol abuse results in hippocampal and cortical cell loss. Thiamine deficiency also alters principally hippocampal- and frontal cortical-dependent neurochemistry; moreover in WKS patients, important pathological damage to the diencephalon can occur. In fact, the amnesic syndrome typical for WKS is mainly due to the damage in the diencephalic-hippocampal circuitry, including thalamic nuclei and mammillary bodies. The loss of cholinergic cells in the basal forebrain region results in decreased cholinergic input to the hippocampus and the cortex and reduced choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities and function, as well as in acetylcholine receptor downregulation within these brain regions. In this narrative review, we will focus on the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neuropsychological studies shedding light on the effects of thiamine deficiency in experimental models and in humans. PMID:24235882

  2. Thiamine deficiency induced neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neuropsychological alterations: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Storti, Monica; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen; Brigo, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional deficiency can cause, mainly in chronic alcoholic subjects, the Wernicke encephalopathy and its chronic neurological sequela, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS). Long-term chronic ethanol abuse results in hippocampal and cortical cell loss. Thiamine deficiency also alters principally hippocampal- and frontal cortical-dependent neurochemistry; moreover in WKS patients, important pathological damage to the diencephalon can occur. In fact, the amnesic syndrome typical for WKS is mainly due to the damage in the diencephalic-hippocampal circuitry, including thalamic nuclei and mammillary bodies. The loss of cholinergic cells in the basal forebrain region results in decreased cholinergic input to the hippocampus and the cortex and reduced choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities and function, as well as in acetylcholine receptor downregulation within these brain regions. In this narrative review, we will focus on the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neuropsychological studies shedding light on the effects of thiamine deficiency in experimental models and in humans. PMID:24235882

  3. Metronidazole-induced alterations in murine spermatozoa morphology.

    PubMed

    Mudry, Marta D; Palermo, Ana M; Merani, María S; Carballo, Marta A

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the effect of metronidazole (MTZ) on the stages of the seminiferous epithelial cycle and spermatozoa morphology when the drug is administered in human therapeutic doses to 60-day-old CFW male mice. The frequency of the stages was established by counting spermatocytes in pachytene and spermatids. Abnormalities in the flagellum or the head, lack of maturity and multiple malformations, were considered in the morphological analysis. Murine control strain was compared with MTZ treated group (v.ip 130 mg/kg/bw) both kept in standard captivity conditions. Cellular composition or number of stages in the seminiferous tubules were not altered in MTZ exposed animals, though the number of cells in stages I, V and XII was increased. The sperm cell morphology was severely affected by the treatment with potentially serious consequences on the normal fertilization process. Thus, the MTZ has to be considered as a conceivable thread regarding male fertility. PMID:17184970

  4. Alcohol-induced alterations in dopamine modulation of prefrontal activity.

    PubMed

    Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Chandler, L Judson

    2015-12-01

    Long-term alcohol use leads to persistent cognitive deficits that may be associated with maladaptive changes in the neurocircuitry that mediates executive functions. Impairments caused by these changes can persist well into abstinence and have a negative impact on quality of life and job performance, and can increase the probability of relapse. Many of the changes that affect cognitive function appear to involve dysregulation of the mesocortical dopamine system. This includes changes in dopamine release and alterations in dopamine receptor expression and function in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). This review summarizes the cellular effects of acute and chronic ethanol exposure on dopamine release and dopamine receptor function in the PFC with the goal of providing greater understanding of the effects of alcohol-use disorders on the dopamine system and how this relates to deficits in the executive function of the PFC. PMID:26558348

  5. Alterations in Regulatory T Cells Induced by Specific Oligosaccharides Improve Vaccine Responsiveness in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schijf, Marcel A.; Kerperien, JoAnn; Bastiaans, Jacqueline; Szklany, Kirsten; Meerding, Jenny; Hofman, Gerard; Boon, Louis; van Wijk, Femke; Garssen, Johan; van’t Land, Belinda

    2013-01-01

    Prophylactic vaccinations are generally performed to protect naïve individuals with or without suppressed immune responsiveness. In a mouse model for Influenza vaccinations the specific alterations of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs) in the immune modulation induced by orally supplied oligosaccharides containing scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS was assessed. This dietary intervention increased vaccine specific DTH responses. In addition, a significant increased percentage of T-bet+ (Th1) activated CD69+CD4+ T cells (p<0.001) and reduced percentage of Gata-3+ (Th2) activated CD69+CD4+T cells (p<0.001) was detected in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS compared to control mice. Although no difference in the number or percentage of Tregs (CD4+Foxp3+) could be determined after scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS intervention, the percentage of CXCR3 + /T-bet+ (Th1-Tregs) was significantly reduced (p<0.05) in mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS as compared to mice receiving placebo diets. Moreover, although no absolute difference in suppressive capacity could be detected, an alteration in cytokine profile suggests a regulatory T cell shift towards a reducing Th1 suppression profile, supporting an improved vaccination response. In conclusion These data are indicative for improved vaccine responsiveness due to reduced Th1 suppressive capacity in the Treg population of mice fed the oligosaccharide specific diet, showing compartmentalization within the Treg population. The modulation of Tregs to control immune responses provides an additional arm of intervention using alternative strategies possibly leading to the development of improved vaccines. PMID:24073243

  6. Vanadium Exposure-Induced Neurobehavioral Alterations among Chinese Workers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Zhou, Dinglun; Zhang, Qin; Feng, Chengyong; Zheng, Wei; He, Keping; Lan, Yajia

    2014-01-01

    Vanadium-containing products are manufactured and widely used in the modern industry. Yet the neurobehavioral toxicity due to occupational exposure to vanadium remained elusive. This cross-sectional study was designed to examine the neurotoxic effects of occupational vanadium exposure. A total of 463 vanadium-exposed workers (exposed group) and 251 non-exposed workers (control group) were recruited from a Steel and Iron Group in Sichuan, China. A WHO-recommended neurobehavioral core test battery (NCTB) and event-related auditory evoked potentials test (P300) were used to assess the neurobehavioral functions of all study subjects. A general linear model was used to compare outcome scores between the two groups while controlling for possible confounders. The exposed group showed a statistically significant neurobehavioral alteration more than the control group in the NCTB tests. The exposed workers also exhibited an increased anger-hostility, depression-dejection and fatigue-inertia on the profile of mood states (p<0.05). Performances in the Simple Reaction Time, Digit Span, Benton Visual Retention and Pursuit Aiming were also poorer among exposed workers as compared to unexposed control workers(p<0.05). Some of these poor performances in tests were also significantly related to workers’ exposure duration. P300 latencies were longer in the exposed group than in the control (p<0.05). Longer mean reaction times and more counting errors were also found in the exposed workers (p<0.05). Given the findings of our study and the limitations of neurobehavioral workplace testing, we found evidence of altered neurobehavioral outcomes by occupational exposure to vanadium. PMID:23500660

  7. ABILITY OF THE MALE RAT PUBERTAL ASSAY TO DETECT ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS THAT ALTER THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABILITY OF THE MALE RAT PUBERTAL ASSAY TO DETECT ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS THAT ALTER THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS

    Stoker, Tammy E.1; Laws, Susan C.1; Ferrell, Janet M.1; Cooper, Ralph L.1.

    Endocrinology Branch, RTD, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, 27711.

    The...

  8. 46 CFR 109.425 - Repairs and alterations: Fire detecting and extinguishing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Reports, Notifications, and Records Reports and... to fire detecting and extinguishing equipment, the master or person in charge must report the nature... person in charge must report the nature of the repairs or alterations to the OCMI. Records...

  9. Val66Met Polymorphism of BDNF Alters Prodomain Structure to Induce Neuronal Growth Cone Retraction

    PubMed Central

    Anastasia, Agustin; Deinhardt, Katrin; Chao, Moses V.; Will, Nathan E.; Irmady, Krithi; Lee, Francis S.; Hempstead, Barbara L.; Bracken, Clay

    2013-01-01

    A common single-nucleotide polymorphism in the human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene results in a Val66Met substitution in the BDNF prodomain region. This single-nucleotide polymorphism is associated with alterations in memory and with enhanced risk to develop depression and anxiety disorders in humans. Here we show that the isolated BDNF prodomain is detected in the hippocampus and that it can be secreted from neurons in an activity-dependent manner. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and circular dichroism we find that the prodomain is intrinsically disordered, and the Val66Met substitution induces structural changes. Surprisingly, application of Met66 (but not Val66) BDNF prodomain induces acute growth cone retraction and a decrease in Rac activity in hippocampal neurons. Expression of p75NTR and differential engagement of the Met66 prodomain to the SorCS2 receptor are required for this effect. These results identify the Met66 prodomain as a new active ligand which modulates neuronal morphology. PMID:24048383

  10. Mechanically induced alterations in cultured skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.; Hatfaludy, S.; Karlisch, P.; Shansky, J.

    1991-01-01

    Model systems are available for mechanically stimulating cultured skeletal muscle cells by passive tensile forces which simulate those found in vivo. When applied to embryonic muscle cells in vitro these forces induce tissue organogenesis, metabolic adaptations, and muscle cell growth. The mechanical stimulation of muscle cell growth correlates with stretch-induced increases in the efflux of prostaglandins PGE2 and PGF2(alpha) in a time and frequency dependent manner. These prostaglandins act as mechanical 'second messengers' regulating skeletal muscle protein turnover rates. Since they also effect bone remodelling in response to tissue loading and unloading, secreted prostaglandins may serve as paracrine growth factors, coordinating the growth rates of muscle and bone in response to external mechanical forces. Cell culture model systems will supplement other models in understanding mechanical transduction processes at the molecular level.

  11. Light-Induced Alterations in Striatal Neurochemical Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Much of our present knowledge regarding circadian rhythms and biological activity during space flight has been derived from those missions orbiting the Earth. During space missions, astronauts can become exposed to bright/dark cycles that vary considerably from those that entrain the mammalian biological timing system to the 24-hour cycle found on Earth. As a spacecraft orbits the Earth, the duration of the light/dark period experienced becomes a function of the time it takes to circumnavigate the planet which in turn depends upon the altitude of the craft. Orbiting the Earth at an altitude of 200-800 km provides a light/dark cycle lasting between 80 and 140 minutes, whereas a voyage to the moon or even another planet would provide a light condition of constant light. Currently, little is known regarding the effects of altered light/dark cycles on neurochemical levels within the central nervous system (CNS). Many biochemical, physiological and behavioral phenomena are under circadian control, governed primarily by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. As such, these phenomena are subject to influence by the environmental light/dark cycle. Circadian variations in locomotor and behavioral activities have been correlated to both the environmental light/dark cycle and to dopamine (DA) levels within the CNS. It has been postulated by Martin-Iverson et al. that DA's role in the control of motor activity is subject to modulation by circadian rhythms (CR), environmental lighting and excitatory amino acids (EAAs). In addition, DA and EAA receptor regulated pathways are involved in both the photic entrainment of CR and the control of motor activity. The cellular mechanisms by which DA and EAA-receptor ligands execute these functions, is still unclear. In order to help elucidate these mechanisms, we set out to determine the effects of altered environmental light/dark cycles on CNS neurotransmitter levels. In this study, we focused on the striatum, a region of the brain

  12. Epstein-Barr Virus Induced Epigenetic Alterations Following Transient Infection

    PubMed Central

    Queen, Krista J.; Shi, Mingxia; Zhang, Fangfang; Cvek, Urska; Scott, Rona S.

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a known tumor virus associated with an increasing array of malignancies; however, the association of the virus with certain malignancies is often erratic. To determine EBV’s contributions to tumorigenesis in a setting of incomplete association, a transient model of infection was established where a clonal CCL185 carcinoma cell line infected with recombinant EBV was allowed to lose viral genomes by withdrawal of selection pressure. Global gene expression comparing EBV-negative, transiently infected clones to uninfected controls identified expression changes in over 1000 genes. Among downregulated genes, several genes known to be DNA methylated in cancer were identified including E-cadherin and PYCARD. A cadherin switch, increased motility and enhanced cellular invasiveness present in EBV-positive cells were retained following viral loss indicating an epigenetic effect. Repression of PYCARD expression was due to increased promoter CpG methylation, whereas loss of E-cadherin expression after transient EBV infection did not correlate with increased DNA methylation of the E-cadherin promoter. Rather, repression of E-cadherin was consistent with formation of a repressive chromatin state. Decreased histone 3 or 4 acetylation at the promoter and 5’ end of the E-cadherin gene was observed in an EBV-negative, transiently infected clone relative to the uninfected controls. These results suggest that EBV can stably alter gene expression in a heritable fashion in formerly infected cells, while its own contribution to the oncogenic process is masked. PMID:23047626

  13. Aging induced cortical drive alterations during sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Ciric, Jelena; Lazic, Katarina; Petrovic, Jelena; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2015-03-01

    We followed the impact of healthy aging on cortical drive during sleep in rats by using the corticomuscular coherence (CMC). We employed the chronic electrodes implantation for sleep recording in adult, male Wistar rats, and followed the aging impact during sleep from 3 to 5.5 months age. We have analyzed the sleep/wake states architecture, and the sleep/wake state related EEG microstructure and CMCs. We evidenced the topographically distinct impact of aging on sleep/wake states architecture within the sensorimotor (SMCx) vs. motor cortex (MCx) from 4.5 to 5.5 months age. Healthy aging consistently altered only the SMCx sleep/wake states architecture, and increased the delta and beta CMCs through both cortical drives during Wake, but only through the MCx drive during REM. According to the delta and beta CMCs values, aging impact through the SMCx drive was opposite, but it was convergent through the MCx drive during Wake vs. REM, and there was a dual and inverse mode for the motor control during REM. PMID:25773067

  14. Alterations in glucose kinetics induced by pentobarbital anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Bagby, G.J.; Hargrove, D.M.; Hyde, P.M.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1987-12-01

    Because pentobarbital is often used in investigations related to carbohydrate metabolism, the in vivo effect of this drug on glucose homeostasis was studied. Glucose kinetics assessed by the constant intravenous infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose, were determined in three groups of catheterized fasted rats: conscious, anesthetized and body temperature maintained, and anesthetized but body temperature not maintained. After induction of anesthesia, marked hypothermia developed in rats not provided with external heat. Anesthetized rats that developed hypothermia showed a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (25%) and heart rate (40%). Likewise, the plasma lactate concentration and the rates of glucose appearance, recycling, and metabolic clearance were reduced by 30-50% in the hypothermic anesthetized rats. Changes in whole-body carbohydrate metabolism were prevented when body temperature was maintained. Because plasma pentobarbital levels were similar between the euthermic and hypothermic rats during the first 2 h of the experiment, the rapid reduction in glucose metabolism in this latter group appears related to the decrease in body temperature. The continuous infusion of epinephrine produced alterations in glucose kinetics that were not different between conscious animals and anesthetized rats with body temperature maintained. Thus pentobarbital-anesthetized rats became hypothermic when kept at room temperature and exhibited marked decreases in glucose metabolism. Such changes were absent when body temperature was maintained during anesthesia.

  15. Ceramide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function.

    PubMed

    Riddle, Evan L; Rau, Kristi S; Topham, Matthew K; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of ceramide on dopamine and serotonin (5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptamine) transporters. Exposure of rat striatal synaptosomes to C2-ceramide caused a reversible, concentration-dependent decrease in plasmalemmal dopamine uptake. In contrast, ceramide exposure increased striatal 5-HT synaptosomal uptake. This increase did not appear to be due to an increased uptake by the 5-HT transporter. Rather, the increase appeared to result from an increase in 5-HT transport through the dopamine transporter, an assertion evidenced by findings that this increase: (1) does not occur in hippocampal synaptosomes (i.e., a preparation largely devoid of dopamine transporters), (2) occurs in striatal synaptosomes prepared from para-chloroamphetamine-treated rats (i.e., a preparation lacking 5-HT transporters), (3) is attenuated by pretreatment with methylphenidate (i.e., a relatively selective dopamine reuptake inhibitor) and (4) is inhibited by exposure to exogenous dopamine (i.e., which presumably competes for uptake with 5-HT). Taken together, these results reveal that ceramide is a novel modulator of monoamine transporter function, and may alter the affinity of dopamine transporters for its primary substrate. PMID:12498904

  16. Parvovirus Induced Alterations in Nuclear Architecture and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Niskanen, Einari A.; Jylhävä, Juulia; Paloheimo, Outi; Dross, Nicolas; Smolander, Hanna; Langowski, Jörg; Timonen, Jussi; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija

    2009-01-01

    The nucleus of interphase eukaryotic cell is a highly compartmentalized structure containing the three-dimensional network of chromatin and numerous proteinaceous subcompartments. DNA viruses induce profound changes in the intranuclear structures of their host cells. We are applying a combination of confocal imaging including photobleaching microscopy and computational methods to analyze the modifications of nuclear architecture and dynamics in parvovirus infected cells. Upon canine parvovirus infection, expansion of the viral replication compartment is accompanied by chromatin marginalization to the vicinity of the nuclear membrane. Dextran microinjection and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) studies revealed the homogeneity of this compartment. Markedly, in spite of increase in viral DNA content of the nucleus, a significant increase in the protein mobility was observed in infected compared to non-infected cells. Moreover, analyzis of the dynamics of photoactivable capsid protein demonstrated rapid intranuclear dynamics of viral capsids. Finally, quantitative FRAP and cellular modelling were used to determine the duration of viral genome replication. Altogether, our findings indicate that parvoviruses modify the nuclear structure and dynamics extensively. Intranuclear crowding of viral components leads to enlargement of the interchromosomal domain and to chromatin marginalization via depletion attraction. In conclusion, parvoviruses provide a useful model system for understanding the mechanisms of virus-induced intranuclear modifications. PMID:19536327

  17. Altered Acer Rubrum Fecundity Induced By Chemical Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, J. L.; Peters, A.

    2014-12-01

    Red maple (Acer rubrum L.) is becoming the most dominating tree in North American eastern deciduous forests. Concurrently, human activities have altered the chemical climate of terrestrial ecosystems via acidic deposition, which increases the available of nitrogen (N), while decreasing phosphorus (P) availability. Once a minor forest component prior to European settlement, the abundance of red maple may be a symptom of the modern age. The current paradigm explaining red maple's rise to prominence concerns fire suppression that excludes competitors. However, this still does not explain why red maple is unique compared to other functionally similar trees. The objective of this study was to investigate the interactive influence of acid rain mitigation on the fecundity of red maple. Objectives were achieved by measuring flowering, seed production, germination, and growth from red maple on plots that have been experimentally manipulated to increase soil pH, P, or both in three unglaciated eastern deciduous hardwood forests. At least 50% of the red maple population is seed bearing in our control soils, however the median percent of seed-bearing trees declined to zero when mitigating soils from acidic deposition. This can be explained by the curious fact that red maple is polygamodioecious, or has labile sex-expression, in which an individual tree can change its sex-expression in response to the environment. Furthermore, seed-bearing trees in the mitigated plots grew less, produced less seeds, and germinated at lower rates than their counterparts in control soils. Our results provide evidence that chemical climate change could be the primary contributing factor accelerating the dominance of red maple in eastern North American forests. Our observations can provide a boarder conceptual framework for understanding how nutrient limitations can be applied beyond plant productivity towards explaining distribution changes in vegetation.

  18. Methoxychlor induces atresia by altering Bcl2 factors and inducing caspase activity in mouse ovarian antral follicles in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S.; Karman, Bethany N.; Wang, Wei; Gupta, Rupesh K.; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2012-01-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide widely used in many countries against various species of insects that attack crops and domestic animals. MXC reduces fertility by increasing atresia (death) of antral follicles in vivo. MXC also induces atresia of antral follicles after 96 h in vitro. The current work tested the hypothesis that MXC induces morphological atresia at early time points (24 and 48 h) by altering pro-apoptotic (Bax, Bok, Casp3, and caspase activity) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2 and Bcl-xL) factors in the follicles. The results indicate that at 24 h, MXC increased Bcl-xL and Bax mRNA levels and increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl2. At 48–96 h, MXC induced morphological atresia. At 24–96 h, MXC increased caspase activities. These data suggest that MXC may induce atresia by altering Bcl2 factors and inducing caspase activities in antral follicles. PMID:23000595

  19. Loss of Bace1 in Mice Does Not Alter the Severity of Caerulein Induced Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Heindl, Mario; Tuennemann, Jan; Sommerer, Ines; Mössner, Joachim; Hoffmeister, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Context Beta-site alpha-amyloid protein cleaving enzyme1 (BACE1) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Additional to its moderate expression in the brain, high levels of BACE1 mRNA were found in the pancreas. Murine Bace1 has been immunohistochemicaly detected at the apical pole of acinar cells within the exocrine pancreas of mice and Bace1 activity was observed in pancreatic juice. In vitro experiments revealed enteropeptidase as a putative substrate for Bace1 suggesting a role in acute pancreatitis. Objective The aim of this study was to address a protective mechanism of Bace1 in acute experimental pancreatitis in mice. Methods Acute experimental pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of caerulein in homozygote Bace1-/- mice and wild type mice. Serum and tissue analyses were carried out after 4 h, 8 h and 24 h. Measurement of plasma amylase and lipase was performed to confirm pancreatitis induction. In order to assess the severity of pancreatitis H&E stained pancreatic sections were examined regarding edema, inflammation and apoptosis. Immunohistochemical detection of myeloperoxidase (MPO) positive cells was carried out to further quantify the extent of inflammation. Expression of Bace2 within the pancreas was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR. Results We demonstrate that total loss of Bace1 in mice leads to no alterations in the course of acute experimental caerulein-pancreatitis. Bace1-/- mice develop a moderate pancreatitis that is comparable in histomorphological and serological features with those seen in wild type mice. Discussion We discuss the results in the context of the applied caerulein induced edematous pancreatitis model and possible compensatory mechanisms via Bace2 that might be responsible for the observed results. PMID:25961820

  20. Plasma-induced Escape and Alterations of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Tucker, O. J.; Ewrin, J.; Cassidy, T. A.; Leblanc, F.

    2009-12-01

    The atmospheres of planets and planetary satellites are typically imbedded in space plasmas. Depending on the interaction with the induced or intrinsic fields energetic ions can have access to the thermosphere and the corona affecting their composition and thermal structure and causing loss to space. These processes are often lumped together as ‘atmospheric sputtering’ (Johnson 1994). In this talk I will review the results of simulations of the plasma bombardment at a number of solar system bodies and use those data to describe the effect on the upper atmosphere and on escape. Of considerable recent interest is the modeling of escape from Titan. Prior to Cassini’s tour of the Saturnian system, plasma-induced escape was suggested to be the dominant loss process, but recent models of enhanced thermal escape, often referred to as ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape, have been suggested to lead to much larger Titan atmospheric loss rates (Strobel 2008; Cui et al. 2008). Such a process has been suggested to be active at some point in time on a number of solar system bodies. I will present hybrid fluid/ kinetic models of the upper atmosphere of certain bodies in order to test both the plasma-induced and thermal escape processes. Preliminary results suggest that the loss rates estimated using the ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape process can be orders of magnitude too large. The implications for Mars, Titan and Pluto will be discussed. Background for this talk is contained in the following papers (Johnson 2004; 2009; Chaufray et al. 2007; Johnson et al. 2008; 2009; Tucker and Johnson 2009). References: Chaufray, J.Y., R. Modolo, F. Leblanc, G. Chanteur, R.E. Johnson, and J.G. Luhmann, Mars Solar Wind interaction: formation of the Martian corona and atmosphric loss to space, JGR 112, E09009, doi:10.1029/2007JE002915 (2007) Cui, J., Yelle, R. V., Volk, K. Distribution and escape of molecular hydrogen in Titan's thermosphere and exosphere. J. Geophys. Res. 113, doi:10

  1. MCD diet-induced steatohepatitis is associated with alterations in asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and its transporters.

    PubMed

    Di Pasqua, Laura G; Berardo, Clarissa; Rizzo, Vittoria; Richelmi, Plinio; Croce, Anna Cleta; Vairetti, Mariapia; Ferrigno, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Using an experimental model of NASH induced by a methionine-choline-deficient (MCD) diet, we investigated whether changes occur in serum and tissue levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA). Male Wistar rats underwent NASH induced by 8-week feeding with an MCD diet. Serum and hepatic biopsies at 2, 4 and 8 weeks were taken, and serum enzymes, ADMA and nitrate/nitrite (NOx), were evaluated. Hepatic biopsies were used for mRNA and protein expression analysis of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase-1 (DDAH-1) and protein methyltransferases (PRMT-1), enzymes involved in ADMA metabolism and synthesis, respectively, and ADMA transporters (CAT-1, CAT-2A and CAT-2B). Lipid peroxides (TBARS), glutathione, ATP/ADP and DDAH activity were quantified. An increase in serum AST and ALT was detected in MCD animals. A time-dependent decrease in serum and tissue ADMA and increase in mRNA expression of DDAH-1 and PRMT-1 as well as higher rates of mRNA expression of CAT-1 and lower rates of CAT-2A and CAT-2B were found after 8-week MCD diet. An increase in serum NOx and no changes in protein expression in DDAH-1 and CAT-1 and higher content in CAT-2 and PRMT-1 were found at 8 weeks. Hepatic DDAH activity decreased with a concomitant increase in oxidative stress, as demonstrated by high TBARS levels and low glutathione content. In conclusion, a decrease in serum and tissue ADMA levels in the MCD rats was found associated with a reduction in DDAH activity due to the marked oxidative stress observed. Changes in ADMA levels and its transporters are innovative factors in the onset and progression of hepatic alterations correlated with MCD diet-induced NASH. PMID:27357826

  2. Thermal nociceptive threshold testing detects altered sensory processing in broiler chickens with spontaneous lameness.

    PubMed

    Hothersall, Becky; Caplen, Gina; Parker, Richard M A; Nicol, Christine J; Waterman-Pearson, Avril E; Weeks, Claire A; Murrell, Joanna C

    2014-01-01

    Lameness is common in commercially reared broiler chickens but relationships between lameness and pain (and thus bird welfare) have proved complex, partly because lameness is often partially confounded with factors such as bodyweight, sex and pathology. Thermal nociceptive threshold (TNT) testing explores the neural processing of noxious stimuli, and so can contribute to our understanding of pain. Using an acute model of experimentally induced articular pain, we recently demonstrated that TNT was reduced in lame broiler chickens, and was subsequently attenuated by administration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs). This study extended these findings to a large sample of commercial broilers. It examined factors affecting thermal threshold (Part 1) and the effect of an NSAID drug (meloxicam, 5 mg/kg) and of an opioid (butorphanol; 4 mg/kg) (Part 2). Spontaneously lame and matched non-lame birds (n=167) from commercial farms were exposed to ramped thermal stimulations via a probe attached to the lateral aspect of the tarsometatarsus. Baseline skin temperature and temperature at which a behavioural avoidance response occurred (threshold) were recorded. In Part 1 bird characteristics influencing threshold were modelled; In Part 2 the effect of subcutaneous administration of meloxicam or butorphanol was investigated. Unexpectedly, after accounting for other influences, lameness increased threshold significantly (Part 1). In Part 2, meloxicam affected threshold differentially: it increased further in lame birds and decreased in non-lame birds. No effect of butorphanol was detected. Baseline skin temperature was also consistently a significant predictor of threshold. Overall, lameness significantly influenced threshold after other bird characteristics were taken into account. This, and a differential effect of meloxicam on lame birds, suggests that nociceptive processing may be altered in lame birds, though mechanisms for this require further investigation

  3. Psychosine-induced alterations in peroxisomes of Twitcher Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Miguel Agustin; Haq, Ehtishamul; Uto, Takuhiro; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar Kaur

    2008-01-01

    Krabbe’s disease is a neuroinflammatory disorder in which galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) accumulates in nervous tissue. To gain insight into whether the psychosine-induced effects in nervous tissue extend to peripheral organs, we investigated the expression of cytokines and their effects on peroxisomal structure/function in twitcher mouse liver (animal model of Krabbe disease). Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated TNF-α and IL-6 expression, which was confirmed by mRNAs quantitation. Despite the presence of TNF-α, lipidomic analysis did not indicate a significant decrease in sphingomyelin or an increase in ceramide fractions. Ultrastructural analysis of catalase-dependent staining of liver sections showed reduced reactivity without significant changes in peroxisomal contents. This observation was confirmed by assaying catalase activity and quantitation of its mRNA, both of which were found significantly decreased in twitcher mouse liver. Western blot analysis demonstrated a generalized reduction of peroxisomal matrix and membrane proteins. These observations indicate that twitcher mouse pathobiology extends to the liver, where the induction of TNF-α and IL-6 compromise peroxisomal structure and function. PMID:18602885

  4. HIV-Induced Epigenetic Alterations in Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hameed, Enass A; Ji, Hong; Shata, Mohamed Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a member of the Retroviridae family, is a positive-sense, enveloped RNA virus. HIV, the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has two major types, HIV-1 and HIV-2 In HIV-infected cells the single stranded viral RNA genome is reverse transcribed and the double-stranded viral DNA integrates into the cellular DNA, forming a provirus. The proviral HIV genome is controlled by the host epigenetic regulatory machinery. Cellular epigenetic regulators control HIV latency and reactivation by affecting the chromatin state in the vicinity of the viral promoter located to the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence. In turn, distinct HIV proteins affect the epigenotype and gene expression pattern of the host cells. HIV-1 infection of CD4(+) T cells in vitro upregulated DNMT activity and induced hypermethylation of distinct cellular promoters. In contrast, in the colon mucosa and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected patients demethylation of the FOXP3 promoter was observed, possibly due to the downregulation of DNA methyltransferase 1. For a curative therapy of HIV infected individuals and AIDS patients, a combination of antiretroviral drugs with epigenetic modifying compounds have been suggested for the reactivation of latent HIV-1 genomes. These epigenetic drugs include histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI), histone methyltransferase inhibitors (HMTI), histone demethylase inhibitors, and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTI). PMID:26659262

  5. Alterations in enamel remineralization in vitro induced by blue light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, I. T.; Zezell, D. M.; Mendes, F. M.; Wetter, N. U.

    2010-06-01

    Blue light, especially from LED devices, is a very frequently used tool in dental procedures. However, the investigations of its effects on dental enamel are focused primarily on enamel demineralization and fluoride retention. Despite the fact that this spectral region can inhibit enamel demineralization, the effects of the irradiation on demineralized enamel are not known. For this reason, we evaluated the effects of blue LED on remineralization of dental enamel. Artificial lesions were formed in bovine dental enamel blocks by immersing the samples in undersaturated acetate buffer. The lesions were irradiated with blue LED (455 nm, 1.38 W/cm2, 13.75 J/cm2, and 10 s) and remineralization was induced by pH-cycling process. Cross-sectional hardness was used to asses mineral changes after remineralization. Non-irradiated enamel lesions presented higher mineral content than irradiated ones. Furthermore, the mineral content of irradiated group was not significantly different from the lesion samples that were not submitted to the remineralization process. Results obtained in the present study show that the blue light is not innocuous for the dental enamel and inhibition of its remineralization can occur.

  6. Chronic cola drinking induces metabolic and cardiac alterations in rats

    PubMed Central

    Milei, José; Losada, Matilde Otero; Llambí, Hernán Gómez; Grana, Daniel R; Suárez, Daniel; Azzato, Francisco; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of chronic drinking of cola beverages on metabolic and echocardiographic parameters in rats. METHODS: Forty-eight male Wistar rats were divided in 3 groups and allowed to drink regular cola (C), diet cola (L), or tap water (W) ad libitum during 6 mo. After this period, 50% of the animals in each group were euthanized. The remaining rats drank tap water ad libitum for an additional 6 mo and were then sacrificed. Rat weight, food, and beverage consumption were measured regularly. Biochemical, echocardiographic and systolic blood pressure data were obtained at baseline, and at 6 mo (treatment) and 12 mo (washout). A complete histopathology study was performed after sacrifice. RESULTS: After 6 mo, C rats had increased body weight (+7%, P < 0.01), increased liquid consumption (+69%, P < 0.001), and decreased food intake (-31%, P < 0.001). C rats showed mild hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia. Normoglycemia (+69%, P < 0.01) and sustained hypertriglyceridemia (+69%, P < 0.01) were observed in C after washout. Both cola beverages induced an increase in left ventricular diastolic diameter (C: +9%, L: +7%, P < 0.05 vs W) and volumes (diastolic C: +26%, L: +22%, P < 0.01 vs W; systolic C: +24%, L: +24%, P < 0.05 vs W) and reduction of relative posterior wall thickness (C: -8%, L: -10%, P < 0.05 vs W). Cardiac output tended to increase (C: +25%, P < 0.05 vs W; L: +17%, not significant vs W). Heart rate was not affected. Pathology findings were scarce, related to aging rather than treatment. CONCLUSION: This experimental model may prove useful to investigate the consequences of high consumption of soft drinks. PMID:21526048

  7. Methamphetamine alters occludin expression via NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative insult and intact caveolae

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minseon; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Methamphetamine (METH) is a drug of abuse with neurotoxic and vascular effects that may be mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, potential sources of METH-induced generation of ROS are not fully understood. This study is focused on the role of NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX) in METH-induced dysfunction of brain endothelial cells. Treatment with METH induced a time-dependent increase in phosphorylation of NOX subunit p47, followed by its binding with gp91 and p22, and the formation of an active NOX complex. An increase in NOX activity was associated with elevated production of ROS, alterations of occludin levels and increased transendothelial migration of monocytes. Inhibition of NOX by NSC 23766 attenuated METH-induced ROS generation, changes in occludin protein levels and monocyte migration. Because an active NOX complex is localized to caveolae, we next evaluated the role of caveolae in METH-mediated toxicity to brain endothelial cells. Treatment with METH induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and caveolin-1 protein. Inhibition of ERK1/2 activity or caveolin-1 silencing protected against METH-induced alterations of occludin levels. These findings indicate an important role of NOX and functional caveolae in METH-induced oxidative stress in brain endothelial cells that contribute to the subsequent alterations of occludin levels and transendothelial migration of inflammatory cells. PMID:21435178

  8. Laser-Induced Incandescence: Detection Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental LII (laser-induced incandescence) measurements were performed in a laminar gasjet flame to test the sensitivity of different LII signal collection strategies to particle size. To prevent introducing a particle size dependent bias in the LII signal, signal integration beginning with the excitation laser pulse is necessary . Signal integration times extending to 25 or 100 nsec after the laser pulse do not produce significant differences in radial profiles of the LII signal due to particle size effects with longer signal integration times revealing a decreased sensitivity to smaller primary particles. Long wavelength detection reduces the sensitivity of the LII signal to primary particle size. Excitation of LII using 1064 nm light is recommended to avoid creating photochemical interferences thus allowing LII signal collection to occur during the excitation pulse without spectral interferences.

  9. Mitomycin C induced alterations in antioxidant enzyme levels in a model insect species, Spodoptera eridania.

    PubMed

    Batcabe, J P; MacGill, R S; Zaman, K; Ahmad, S; Pardini, R S

    1994-05-01

    1. An insect species, the southern armyworm Spodoptera eridania, was used as an in vivo model to examine mitomycin C's (MMC) pro-oxidant effect reflected in alterations of antioxidant enzymes. 2. Following a 2-day exposure to 0.01 and 0.05% w/w dietary concentrations, MMC only induced superoxide dismutase activity. All other enzyme activities were not affected, indicating oxidative stress was mild. 3. Following a 5-day exposure to 0.05% w/w dietary MMC, the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione-S-transferase and its peroxidase activity and DT-diaphorase were induced. GR activity was not altered. The high constitutive catalase activity was also not affected. These responses of S. eridania's antioxidant enzymes are analogous to those of mammalian systems in alleviating MMC-induced oxidative stress. 4. S. eridania emerges as an appropriate non-mammalian model for initial and cost-effective screening of drug-induced oxidative stress. PMID:7926607

  10. Local and systemic biochemical alterations induced by Bothrops atrox snake venom in mice.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Carlos At; Kayano, Anderson M; Setúbal, Sulamita S; Pontes, Adriana S; Furtado, Juliana L; Kwasniewski, Fábio H; Zaqueo, Kayena D; Soares, Andreimar M; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Zuliani, Juliana P

    2012-01-01

    The local and systemic alterations induced by Bothrops atrox snake venom (BaV) injection in mice were studied. BaV induced superoxide production by migrated neutrophils, mast cell degranulation and phagocytosis by macrophages. Moreover, BaV caused hemorrhage in dorsum of mice after 2hr post- injection. Three hours post-injection in gastrocnemius muscle, we also observed myonecrosis, which was assessed by the determination of serum and tissue CK besides the release of urea, but not creatinine and uric acid, indicating kidney alterations. BaV also induced the release of LDH and transaminases (ALT and AST) indicating tissue and liver abnormalities. In conclusion, the data indicate that BaV induces events of local and systemic importance. PMID:23487552

  11. Local and systemic biochemical alterations induced by Bothrops atrox snake venom in mice

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Carlos AT; Kayano, Anderson M; Setúbal, Sulamita S; Pontes, Adriana S; Furtado, Juliana L; Kwasniewski, Fábio H; Zaqueo, Kayena D; Soares, Andreimar M; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Zuliani, Juliana P

    2012-01-01

    The local and systemic alterations induced by Bothrops atrox snake venom (BaV) injection in mice were studied. BaV induced superoxide production by migrated neutrophils, mast cell degranulation and phagocytosis by macrophages. Moreover, BaV caused hemorrhage in dorsum of mice after 2hr post- injection. Three hours post-injection in gastrocnemius muscle, we also observed myonecrosis, which was assessed by the determination of serum and tissue CK besides the release of urea, but not creatinine and uric acid, indicating kidney alterations. BaV also induced the release of LDH and transaminases (ALT and AST) indicating tissue and liver abnormalities. In conclusion, the data indicate that BaV induces events of local and systemic importance. PMID:23487552

  12. [A study of epidermal alterations induced by PCDF on experimental carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Hirose, R; Hori, M; Toyoshima, H; Shukuwa, T; Udono, M; Yoshida, H

    1991-05-01

    An effect of 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (PCDF) as a promoter on a course of experimental skin carcinogenesis in mice by chemicals 20-methylcholanthrene (MC) has been proved by our previous studies. Details of ultrastructural epidermal alterations induced by MC and PCDF were observed and an attempt to differentiate benign tumor from malignant one in which a combined application of MC and PCDF on mice skin resulted was done electron microscopically. Four significant findings as follows were detected. First of all even the epidermal cells without tumor had some atypicality. Secondly both of benign tumor and normal-appeared skin without tumor had giant and round-shaped keratohyalin granules (KHGs) which show a tendency of less keratinization. Thirdly cytoplasmic projections of epidermal cells increased in number and sparse tonofilaments scattered in the cytoplasm of benign tumor. This is also an appearance of mucous metaplasia of keratinocytes as well as the form of KHGs mentioned above. Finally benign tumor had thick horny cells including numerous lipid droplets, and that is a sign of acceleration of epidermal turn over. Since epidermal cells have little chance to be exposed to carcinogens when they quickly keratinize, they rarely form a cancer. When epidermal cells have such tendency as less keratinization or more keratinization, they are supposed to be less sensitive to any stimuli of carcinogens, and consequently they incline to be benign tumor instead of malignant one. PMID:1916594

  13. Enteropathogenic E. coli-induced barrier function alteration is not a consequence of host cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, V. K.; Weflen, Andrew; Koutsouris, Athanasia; Roxas, Jennifer L.; Hecht, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a diarrheagenic pathogen that perturbs intestinal epithelial function. Many of the alterations in the host cells are mediated by effector molecules that are secreted directly into epithelial cells by the EPEC type III secretion system. The secreted effector molecule EspF plays a key role in redistributing tight junction proteins and altering epithelial barrier function. EspF has also been shown to localize to mitochondria and trigger membrane depolarization and eventual host cell death. The relationship, if any, between EspF-induced host cell death and epithelial barrier disruption is presently not known. Site-directed mutation of leucine 16 (L16E) of EspF impairs both mitochondrial localization and consequent host cell death. Although the mutation lies within a region critical for type III secretion, EspF(L16E) is secreted efficiently from EPEC. Despite its inability to promote cell death, EspF(L16E) was not impaired for tight junction alteration or barrier disruption. Consistent with this, the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPH, despite reducing EPEC-induced host cell death, had no effect on infection-mediated barrier function alteration. Thus EPEC alters the epithelial barrier independent of its ability to induce host cell death. PMID:18356531

  14. Ethanol-Induced Alterations in Fatty Acid-Related Lipids in Serum and Tissues in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhenwen; Yu, Menggang; Crabb, David; Xu, Yan; Liangpunsakul, Suthat

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic alcohol consumption is a major factor for several human diseases and alcoholism is associated with a host of societal problems. One of the major alcohol- induced metabolic changes is the increased NADH levels, which reduces glucose synthesis and increases fatty acid (FA) synthesis. Probably more important is the induction of FA synthesizing enzymes under the control of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBP), plus increased malonyl-CoA which blocks FA entry to the mitochondria for oxidation. The changes in FA-related lipids, particularly lysophospholipids (LPLs) and ceramides (Cers), in different tissues in ethanol-fed have not been reported. Methods We systematically determined the levels of FA-related lipids, including FAs, phosphatidylcholines (PCs), phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs), lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), sphingomyelins (SMs), and ceramides (Cers) in the serum and different tissues by high-performance-liquid-chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). The study was performed in C57BL/6J mice fed with Lieber DeCarli diet; in which ethanol was added to account for 27.5% of total calories. The serum and tissues were collected at the time of sacrifice in these mice and the results were compared to pair-fed controls. Results The important observation was that ethanol induced tissue-specific changes, which were related to different FA chains. Several 22:6 FA, 18:0 FA, 18:0 to 18:3 FA-containing lipids were significantly increased in the serum, liver, and skeletal muscle, respectively. In the kidney, all 22:6 FA-containing lipids detected were increased. In addition, alterations of other lipids in tissues, except adipose tissue, were also observed. Conclusions We found tissue-specific alterations in the levels of FA-related lipids after ethanol administration. The implications of these findings

  15. ALTERED RA SIGNALING IN THE GENESIS OF ETHANOL-INDUCED LIMB DEFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Altered RA Signaling in the Genesis of Ethanol-Induced Limb Defects

    Johnson CS(1), Sulik KK(1,2) Hunter, ES III(3)
    (1) Dept of Cell and Developmental Biology, UNC-Chapel Hill (2) Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies, UNC-CH (3) NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC

    Administr...

  16. Neuroglial alterations in rats submitted to the okadaic acid-induced model of dementia.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Paula; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Biasibetti, Regina; Batassini, Cristiane; Lopes, Mark William; Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Bernardi, Caren; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2012-01-15

    Several types of animal models have been developed to investigate Alzheimer's disease (AD). Okadaic acid (OA), a potent inhibitor of phosphatases 1 and 2A, induces characteristics that resemble AD-like pathology. Memory impairment induced by intra-hippocampal injection of OA has been reported, accompanied by remarkable neuropathological changes including hippocampal neurodegeneration, a paired helical filament-like phosphorylation of tau protein, and formation of β-amyloid containing plaque-like structures. Rats were submitted to bilateral intrahippocampal okadaic acid-injection (100 ng) and, 12 days after the surgery, behavioral and biochemical tests were performed. Using this model, we evaluated spatial cognitive deficit and neuroglial alterations, particularly astroglial protein markers such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100B, metabolism of glutamate, oxidative parameters and alterations in MAPKs. Our results indicate significant hippocampal changes, including increased GFAP, protein oxidation, and phosphorylation of p38(MAPK); and decreases in glutathione content, transporter EAAT2/GLT-1, and glutamine synthetase activity as well as a decrease in cerebrospinal fluid S100B. No alterations were observed in glutamate uptake activity and S100B content. In conclusion, the OA-induced model of dementia caused spatial cognitive deficit and oxidative stress in this model and, for the first time to our knowledge, specific astroglial alterations. Findings contribute to understanding diseases accompanied by cognitive deficits and the neural damage induced by AO administration. PMID:21982813

  17. Outcome of Children with Hyperventilation-Induced High-Amplitude Rhythmic Slow Activity with Altered Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Alexander; Ng, Joanne; Rittey, Christopher D. C.; Kandler, Rosalind H.; Mordekar, Santosh R.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperventilation-induced high-amplitude rhythmic slow activity with altered awareness (HIHARS) is increasingly being identified in children and is thought to be an age-related non-epileptic electrographic phenomenon. We retrospectively investigated the clinical outcome in 15 children (six males, nine females) with HIHARS (mean age 7y, SD 1y 11mo;…

  18. Hyperspectral hybrid method classification for detecting altered mucosa of the human larynx

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the field of earth observation, hyperspectral detector systems allow precise target detections of surface components from remote sensing platforms. This enables specific land covers to be identified without the need to physically travel to the areas examined. In the medical field, efforts are underway to develop optical technologies that detect altering tissue surfaces without the necessity to perform an excisional biopsy. With the establishment of expedient classification procedures, hyperspectral imaging may provide a non-invasive diagnostic method that allows determination of pathological tissue with high reliability. In this study, we examined the performance of a hyperspectral hybrid method classification for the automatic detection of altered mucosa of the human larynx. Materials and methods Hyperspectral Imaging was performed in vivo and 30 bands from 390 to 680 nm for 5 cases of laryngeal disorders (2x hemorrhagic polyp, 3x leukoplakia) were obtained. Image stacks were processed with unsupervised clustering (linear spectral unmixing), spectral signatures were extracted from unlabeled cluster maps and subsequently applied as end-members for supervised classification (spectral angle mapper) of further medical cases with identical diagnosis. Results Linear spectral unmixing clearly highlighted altered mucosa as single spectral clusters in all cases. Matching classes were identified, and extracted spectral signatures could readily be applied for supervised classifications. Automatic target detection performed well, as the considered classes showed notable correspondence with pathological tissue locations. Conclusions Using hyperspectral classification procedures derived from remote sensing applications for diagnostic purposes can create concrete benefits for the medical field. The approach shows that it would be rewarding to collect spectral signatures from histologically different lesions of laryngeal disorders in order to build up a spectral

  19. Altered magnesium transport in slices of kidney cortex from chemically-induced diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, B.

    1981-10-01

    The uptake of magnesium-28 was measured in slices of kidney cortex from rats with alloxan-diabetes and from rats with streptozotocin-diabetes of increasing durations. In both forms of chemically-induced diabetes, magnesium-28 uptake by kidney cortex slices was significantly increased over uptake measured in kidney cortex slices from control rats. Immediate institution of daily insulin therapy to the diabetic rats prevented the diabetes-induced elevated uptake of magnesium without controlling blood glucose levels. Late institution of daily insulin therapy was ineffective in restoring the magnesium uptake to control values. These alterations in magnesium uptake occurred prior to any evidence of nephropathy (via the classic indices of proteinuria and increased BUN levels). The implications of these findings, together with our earlier demonstrations of altered calcium transport by kidney cortex slices from chemically-induced diabetic rats, are discussed in terms of disordered divalent cation transport being at least part of the basic pathogenesis underlying diabetic nephropathy.

  20. Dependence of Nociceptive Detection Thresholds on Physiological Parameters and Capsaicin-Induced Neuroplasticity: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan; Meijer, Hil G. E.; Doll, Robert J.; Buitenweg, Jan R.; van Gils, Stephan A.

    2016-01-01

    Physiological properties of peripheral and central nociceptive subsystems can be altered over time due to medical interventions. The effective change for the whole nociceptive system can be reflected in changes of psychophysical characteristics, e.g., detection thresholds. However, it is challenging to separate contributions of distinct altered mechanisms with measurements of thresholds only. Here, we aim to understand how these alterations affect Aδ-fiber-mediated nociceptive detection of electrocutaneous stimuli. First, with a neurophysiology-based model, we study the effects of single-model parameters on detection thresholds. Second, we derive an expression of model parameters determining the functional relationship between detection thresholds and the interpulse interval for double-pulse stimuli. Third, in a case study with topical capsaicin treatment, we translate neuroplasticity into plausible changes of model parameters. Model simulations qualitatively agree with changes in experimental detection thresholds. The simulations with individual forms of neuroplasticity confirm that nerve degeneration is the dominant mechanism for capsaicin-induced increases in detection thresholds. In addition, our study suggests that capsaicin-induced central plasticity may last at least 1 month. PMID:27252644

  1. Dependence of Nociceptive Detection Thresholds on Physiological Parameters and Capsaicin-Induced Neuroplasticity: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Meijer, Hil G E; Doll, Robert J; Buitenweg, Jan R; van Gils, Stephan A

    2016-01-01

    Physiological properties of peripheral and central nociceptive subsystems can be altered over time due to medical interventions. The effective change for the whole nociceptive system can be reflected in changes of psychophysical characteristics, e.g., detection thresholds. However, it is challenging to separate contributions of distinct altered mechanisms with measurements of thresholds only. Here, we aim to understand how these alterations affect Aδ-fiber-mediated nociceptive detection of electrocutaneous stimuli. First, with a neurophysiology-based model, we study the effects of single-model parameters on detection thresholds. Second, we derive an expression of model parameters determining the functional relationship between detection thresholds and the interpulse interval for double-pulse stimuli. Third, in a case study with topical capsaicin treatment, we translate neuroplasticity into plausible changes of model parameters. Model simulations qualitatively agree with changes in experimental detection thresholds. The simulations with individual forms of neuroplasticity confirm that nerve degeneration is the dominant mechanism for capsaicin-induced increases in detection thresholds. In addition, our study suggests that capsaicin-induced central plasticity may last at least 1 month. PMID:27252644

  2. Intra-strain polymorphisms are detected but no genomic alteration is found in cloned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Koshichi . E-mail: koshichi@kazusa.or.jp; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogura, Atsuo; Oishi, Michio

    2006-09-15

    In-gel competitive reassociation (IGCR) is a method for differential subtraction of polymorphic (RFLP) DNA fragments between two DNA samples of interest without probes or specific sequence information. Here, we applied the IGCR procedure to two cloned mice derived from an F1 hybrid of the C57BL/6Cr and DBA/2 strains, in order to investigate the possibility of genomic alteration in the cloned mouse genomes. Each of the five of the genomic alterations we detected between the two cloned mice corresponded to the 'intra-strain' polymorphisms in the C57BL/6Cr and DBA/2 mouse strains. Our result suggests that no severe aberration of genome sequences occurs due to somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  3. Altered autophagic flux enhances inflammatory responses during inflammation-induced preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Varkha; Jaiswal, Mukesh K.; Mallers, Timothy; Katara, Gajendra K.; Gilman-Sachs, Alice; Beaman, Kenneth D.; Hirsch, Emmet

    2015-01-01

    Cellular organelles and proteins are degraded and recycled through autophagy, a process during which vesicles known as autophagosomes fuse with lysosomes. Altered autophagy occurs in various diseases, but its role in preterm labor (PTL) is unknown. We investigated the role of autophagic flux in two mouse models of PTL compared to controls: 1) inflammation-induced PTL (IPTL), induced by toll-like receptor agonists; and 2) non-inflammation (hormonally)-induced PTL (NIPTL). We demonstrate that the autophagy related genes Atg4c and Atg7 (involved in the lipidation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) B-I to the autophagosome-associated form, LC3B-II) decrease significantly in uterus and placenta during IPTL but not NIPTL. Autophagic flux is altered in IPTL, as shown by the accumulation of LC3B paralogues and diminishment of lysosome associated membrane protein (LAMP)-1, LAMP-2 and the a2 isoform of V-ATPase (a2V, an enzyme involved in lysosome acidification). These alterations in autophagy are associated with increased activation of NF-κB and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in both uterus and placenta. Similar changes are seen in macrophages exposed to TLR ligands and are enhanced with blockade of a2V. These novel findings represent the first evidence of an association between altered autophagic flux and hyper-inflammation and labor in IPTL. PMID:25797357

  4. Fast and sensitive detection of indels induced by precise gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhang; Steentoft, Catharina; Hauge, Camilla; Hansen, Lars; Thomsen, Allan Lind; Niola, Francesco; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Frödin, Morten; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H; Bennett, Eric P

    2015-05-19

    The nuclease-based gene editing tools are rapidly transforming capabilities for altering the genome of cells and organisms with great precision and in high throughput studies. A major limitation in application of precise gene editing lies in lack of sensitive and fast methods to detect and characterize the induced DNA changes. Precise gene editing induces double-stranded DNA breaks that are repaired by error-prone non-homologous end joining leading to introduction of insertions and deletions (indels) at the target site. These indels are often small and difficult and laborious to detect by traditional methods. Here we present a method for fast, sensitive and simple indel detection that accurately defines indel sizes down to ±1 bp. The method coined IDAA for Indel Detection by Amplicon Analysis is based on tri-primer amplicon labelling and DNA capillary electrophoresis detection, and IDAA is amenable for high throughput analysis. PMID:25753669

  5. Comparison of methods to detect copy number alterations in cancer using simulated and real genotyping data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The detection of genomic copy number alterations (CNA) in cancer based on SNP arrays requires methods that take into account tumour specific factors such as normal cell contamination and tumour heterogeneity. A number of tools have been recently developed but their performance needs yet to be thoroughly assessed. To this aim, a comprehensive model that integrates the factors of normal cell contamination and intra-tumour heterogeneity and that can be translated to synthetic data on which to perform benchmarks is indispensable. Results We propose such model and implement it in an R package called CnaGen to synthetically generate a wide range of alterations under different normal cell contamination levels. Six recently published methods for CNA and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) detection on tumour samples were assessed on this synthetic data and on a dilution series of a breast cancer cell-line: ASCAT, GAP, GenoCNA, GPHMM, MixHMM and OncoSNP. We report the recall rates in terms of normal cell contamination levels and alteration characteristics: length, copy number and LOH state, as well as the false discovery rate distribution for each copy number under different normal cell contamination levels. Assessed methods are in general better at detecting alterations with low copy number and under a little normal cell contamination levels. All methods except GPHMM, which failed to recognize the alteration pattern in the cell-line samples, provided similar results for the synthetic and cell-line sample sets. MixHMM and GenoCNA are the poorliest performing methods, while GAP generally performed better. This supports the viability of approaches other than the common hidden Markov model (HMM)-based. Conclusions We devised and implemented a comprehensive model to generate data that simulate tumoural samples genotyped using SNP arrays. The validity of the model is supported by the similarity of the results obtained with synthetic and real data. Based on these results and

  6. Satellite detection of vegetative damage and alteration caused by pollutants emitted by a zinc smelter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); Fritz, E. L.; Pennypacker, S. P.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Field observations and data collected by low flying aircraft were used to verify the accuracy of maps produced from the satellite data. Although areas of vegetation as small as six acres can accurately be detected, a white pine stand that was severely damaged by sulfur dioxide could not be differentiated from a healthy white pine stand because spectral differences were not large enough. When winter data were used to eliminate interference from herbaceous and deciduous vegetation, the damage was still undetectable. The analysis was able to produce a character map that accurately delineated areas of vegetative alteration due to high zinc levels accumulating in the soil. The map depicted a distinct gradient of less damage and alteration as the distance from the smelter increased. Although the satellite data will probably not be useful for detecting small acreages of damaged vegetation, it is concluded that the data may be very useful as an inventory tool to detect and delineate large vegetative areas possessing differing spectral signatures.

  7. ‘Druggable’ alterations detected by Ion Torrent in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    FANG, WEIJIA; RADOVICH, MILAN; ZHENG, YULONG; FU, CAI-YUN; ZHAO, PENG; MAO, CHENGYU; ZHENG, YI; ZHENG, SHUSEN

    2014-01-01

    The frequency and poor prognosis of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) emphasizes the requirement for improved biomarkers for use in the treatment and prognosis of mCRC. In the present study, somatic variants in exonic regions of key cancer genes were identified in mCRC patients. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues obtained by biopsy of the metastases of mCRC patients were collected, and the DNA was extracted and sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. For the targeted amplification of known cancer genes, the Ion AmpliSeq™ Cancer Panel, which is designed to detect 739 Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) mutations in 604 loci from 46 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes using as little as 10 ng of input DNA, was used. The sequencing results were then analyzed using the Ampliseq™ Variant Caller plug-in within the Ion Torrent Suite software. In addition, Ingenuity Pathway software was used to perform a pathway analysis. The Cox regression analysis was also conducted to investigate the potential correlation between alteration numbers and clinical factors, including response rate, disease-free survival and overall survival. Among 10 specimens, 65 genetic alterations were identified in 24 genes following the exclusion of germline mutations using the SNP database, whereby 41% of the alterations were also present in the COSMIC database. No clinical factors were found to significantly correlate with the alteration numbers in the patients by statistical analysis. However, pathway analysis identified ‘colorectal cancer metastasis signaling’ as the most commonly mutated canonical pathway. This analysis further revealed mutated genes in the Wnt, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/SMAD signaling pathways. Notably, 11 genes, including the expected APC, BRAF, KRAS, PIK3CA and TP53 genes, were mutated in at least two samples. Notably, 90% (9/10) of mCRC patients harbored at least

  8. Stressor-induced proteome alterations in zebrafish: a meta-analysis of response patterns.

    PubMed

    Groh, Ksenia J; Suter, Marc J-F

    2015-02-01

    Proteomics approaches are being increasingly applied in ecotoxicology on the premise that the identification of specific protein expression changes in response to a particular chemical would allow elucidation of the underlying molecular pathways leading to an adverse effect. This in turn is expected to promote the development of focused testing strategies for specific groups of toxicants. Although both gel-based and gel-free global characterization techniques provide limited proteome coverage, the conclusions regarding the cellular processes affected are still being drawn based on the few changes detected. To investigate how specific the detected responses are, we analyzed a set of studies that characterized proteome alterations induced by various physiological, chemical and biological stressors in zebrafish, a popular model organism. Our analysis highlights several proteins and protein groups, including heat shock and oxidative stress defense proteins, energy metabolism enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, to be most frequently identified as responding to diverse stressors. In contrast, other potentially more specifically responding protein groups are detected much less frequently. Thus, zebrafish proteome responses to stress reported by different studies appear to depend mostly on the level of stress rather than on the specific stressor itself. This suggests that the most broadly used current proteomics technologies do not provide sufficient proteome coverage to allow in-depth investigation of specific mechanisms of toxicant action. We suggest that the results of any differential proteomics experiment performed with zebrafish should be interpreted keeping in mind the list of the most frequent responders that we have identified. Similar reservations should apply to any other species where proteome responses are analyzed by global proteomics methods. Careful consideration of the reliability and significance of observed changes is necessary in order not to over

  9. Alteration of liver glycopatterns during cirrhosis and tumor progression induced by HBV.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yannan; Zhong, Yaogang; Ma, Tianran; Wu, Fei; Wu, Haoxiang; Yu, Hanjie; Huang, Chen; Li, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is closely correlated with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-induced liver cirrhosis. Structural changes in the glycans of serum and tissue proteins are reliable indicators of liver damage. However, little is known about the alteration of liver glycopatterns during cirrhosis and tumor progression induced by HBV infection. This study compared the differential expression of liver glycopatterns in 7 sets of normal pericarcinomatous tissues (PCTs), cirrhotic, and tumor tissues from patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC induced by HBV using lectin microarrays. Fluorescence-based lectin histochemistry and lectin blotting were further utilized to validate and assess the expression and distribution of certain glycans in 9 sets of corresponding liver tissue sections. Eight lectins (e.g., Jacalin and AAL) revealed significant difference in cirrhotic tissues versus PCTs. Eleven lectins (e.g., EEL and SJA) showed significant alteration during cirrhotic and tumor progression. The expression of Galα1-3(Fucα1-2)Gal (EEL) and fucosyltransferase 1 was mainly increasing in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes during PCTs-cirrhotic-tumor tissues progression, while the expression of T antigen (ACA and PNA) was decreased sharply in cytoplasm of tumor hepatocytes. Understanding the precision alteration of liver glycopatterns related to the development of hepatitis, cirrhosis, and tumor induced by HBV infection may help elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of chronic liver diseases and develop new antineoplastic therapeutic strategies. PMID:26833199

  10. Renal Oxidative Stress Induced by Long-Term Hyperuricemia Alters Mitochondrial Function and Maintains Systemic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cristóbal-García, Magdalena; García-Arroyo, Fernando E.; Arellano-Buendía, Abraham S.; Madero, Magdalena; Rodríguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Zazueta, Cecilia; Johnson, Richard J.; Sánchez Lozada, Laura-Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    We addressed if oxidative stress in the renal cortex plays a role in the induction of hypertension and mitochondrial alterations in hyperuricemia. A second objective was to evaluate whether the long-term treatment with the antioxidant Tempol prevents renal oxidative stress, mitochondrial alterations, and systemic hypertension in this model. Long-term (11-12 weeks) and short-term (3 weeks) effects of oxonic acid induced hyperuricemia were studied in rats (OA, 750 mg/kg BW), OA+Allopurinol (AP, 150 mg/L drinking water), OA+Tempol (T, 15 mg/kg BW), or vehicle. Systolic blood pressure, renal blood flow, and vascular resistance were measured. Tubular damage (urine N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase) and oxidative stress markers (lipid and protein oxidation) along with ATP levels were determined in kidney tissue. Oxygen consumption, aconitase activity, and uric acid were evaluated in isolated mitochondria from renal cortex. Short-term hyperuricemia resulted in hypertension without demonstrable renal oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. Long-term hyperuricemia induced hypertension, renal vasoconstriction, tubular damage, renal cortex oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction and decreased ATP levels. Treatments with Tempol and allopurinol prevented these alterations. Renal oxidative stress induced by hyperuricemia promoted mitochondrial functional disturbances and decreased ATP content, which represent an additional pathogenic mechanism induced by chronic hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia-related hypertension occurs before these changes are evident. PMID:25918583

  11. High-Throughput Detection of Actionable Genomic Alterations in Clinical Tumor Samples by Targeted, Massively Parallel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wagle, Nikhil; Berger, Michael F.; Davis, Matthew J.; Blumenstiel, Brendan; DeFelice, Matthew; Pochanard, Panisa; Ducar, Matthew; Van Hummelen, Paul; MacConaill, Laura E.; Hahn, William C.; Meyerson, Matthew; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Garraway, Levi A.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of “actionable” somatic genomic alterations present in each tumor (e.g., point mutations, small insertions/deletions, and copy number alterations that direct therapeutic options) should facilitate individualized approaches to cancer treatment. However, clinical implementation of systematic genomic profiling has rarely been achieved beyond limited numbers of oncogene point mutations. To address this challenge, we utilized a targeted, massively parallel sequencing approach to detect tumor genomic alterations in formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor samples. Nearly 400-fold mean sequence coverage was achieved, and single nucleotide sequence variants, small insertions/deletions, and chromosomal copy number alterations were detected simultaneously with high accuracy compared to other methods in clinical use. Putatively actionable genomic alterations, including those that predict sensitivity or resistance to established and experimental therapies, were detected in each tumor sample tested. Thus, targeted deep sequencing of clinical tumor material may enable mutation-driven clinical trials and, ultimately, ”personalized” cancer treatment. PMID:22585170

  12. Prenatal caffeine ingestion induces transgenerational neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in second generation rats

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Hanwen; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Lian; Shen, Lang; Kou, Hao; He, Zheng; Ping, Jie; Xu, Dan; Ma, Lu; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that prenatal caffeine ingestion induces an increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome with alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic phenotypes in adult first generation (F1) of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rats, and the underlying mechanism is originated from a hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in utero. This study aims to investigate the transgenerational effects of this programming alteration in adult second generation (F2). Pregnant Wistar rats were administered with caffeine (120 mg/kg·d) from gestational day 11 until delivery. Four groups in F2 were set according to the cross-mating between control and caffeine-induced IUGR rats. F2 were subjected to a fortnight ice water swimming stimulus on postnatal month 4, and blood samples were collected before and after stress. Results showed that the majority of the activities of HPA axis and phenotypes of glucose and lipid metabolism were altered in F2. Particularly, comparing with the control group, caffeine groups had an enhanced corticosterone levels after chronic stress. Compared with before stress, the serum glucose levels were increased in some groups whereas the triglyceride levels were decreased. Furthermore, total cholesterol gain rates were enhanced but the high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol gain rates were decreased in most caffeine groups after stress. These transgenerational effects were characterized partially with gender and parental differences. Taken together, these results indicate that the reproductive and developmental toxicities and the neuroendocrine metabolic programming mechanism by prenatal caffeine ingestion have transgenerational effects in rats, which may help to explain the susceptibility to metabolic syndrome and associated diseases in F2. - Highlights: • Caffeine-induced neuroendocrine metabolic programming of HPA has hereditary effect. • Caffeine-induced

  13. Phenobarbital Induces Alterations in the Proteome of Hepatocytes and Mesenchymal Cells of Rat Livers

    PubMed Central

    Klepeisz, Philip; Sagmeister, Sandra; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Pichlbauer, Melanie; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Gerner, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs) have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs). A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs) in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB) which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme. PMID:24204595

  14. Microcystin-LR and Cylindrospermopsin Induced Alterations in Chromatin Organization of Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Máthé, Csaba; M-Hamvas, Márta; Vasas, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria produce metabolites with diverse bioactivities, structures and pharmacological properties. The effects of microcystins (MCYs), a family of peptide type protein-phosphatase inhibitors and cylindrospermopsin (CYN), an alkaloid type of protein synthesis blocker will be discussed in this review. We are focusing mainly on cyanotoxin-induced changes of chromatin organization and their possible cellular mechanisms. The particularities of plant cells explain the importance of such studies. Preprophase bands (PPBs) are premitotic cytoskeletal structures important in the determination of plant cell division plane. Phragmoplasts are cytoskeletal structures involved in plant cytokinesis. Both cyanotoxins induce the formation of multipolar spindles and disrupted phragmoplasts, leading to abnormal sister chromatid segregation during mitosis. Thus, MCY and CYN are probably inducing alterations of chromosome number. MCY induces programmed cell death: chromatin condensation, nucleus fragmentation, necrosis, alterations of nuclease and protease enzyme activities and patterns. The above effects may be related to elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or disfunctioning of microtubule associated proteins. Specific effects: MCY-LR induces histone H3 hyperphosphorylation leading to incomplete chromatid segregation and the formation of micronuclei. CYN induces the formation of split or double PPB directly related to protein synthesis inhibition. Cyanotoxins are powerful tools in the study of plant cell organization. PMID:24084787

  15. [Cadmium-induced cytotoxicity and intracellular Ca2+ alteration in hepatocytes and protection by selenium].

    PubMed

    Wang, Sha Sha; Chen, Long; Xia, Shu Kai; Jiang, Shan Xiang

    2006-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd)-induced cytotoxicity and intracellular Ca2+ alteration ([Ca2+]i) in hepatocytes and intervention with selenium (Se) were studied to discuss mechanism of Cd-induced hepatocyte injury and protective effect by Se. Freshly primary culture hepatocytes isolated from neonatal mice were randomly divided into a normal control group, four treatment groups with cadmium chloride (CdCl2,5,25,100,250 micromol/L, respectively), two treatment groups with sodium selenite (Na2SeO3,10,20 micromol/L, respectively), and eight treatment groups with CdCl2 (5,25,100, 250 micromol/L,respectively) of administered Na2SeO3 (10,20 micromol/L, respectively). Hepatocyte viability and its malondialdehyde (MDA) content as well as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in cultured medium were assayed, and the intracellular free Ca2+ level ([Ca2+]i) in hepatocytes was detected with laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) at 12 h after treatment. The results showed that hepatocyte viability significantly decreased in Cd-exposed groups with dosages, and had no significant differences in Se-treated groups compared with that of control group. Administration of Se increased or obviously raised the viability in Cd-exposed hepatocytes. We observed a dose-dependent increase of LDH activity and significantly higher values in cultured medium of 100 and 250 micromol/L CdC12 groups compared with that in control group,while Se-treated groups had no significant change. LDH activity of administered Se in 25,100,250 micromol/L CdCl2 groups decreased or significant decreased, respectively. Different dosages of Cd induced significant elevation of MDA concentration in hepatocytes, but administration of Se to hepatocytes is incapable of eliciting the same consequences as Cd. 10 and 20 micromol/L Na2SeO3 inhibited or significantly reduced MDA production in hepatocytes induced by 25,100 and 250 micromol/L CdCl2, respectively. [Ca2+]i fluorescence intensity was significantly higher in Cd-exposed hepatocytes

  16. Metabolic alterations induced in cultured skeletal muscle by stretch-relaxation activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfaludy, Sophia; Shansky, Janet; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1989-01-01

    Muscle cells differentiated in vitro are repetitively stretched and relaxed in order to determine the presence of short- and long-term alterations occurring in glucose uptake and lactate efflux that are similar to the metabolic alterations occurring in stimulated organ-cultured muscle and in vivo skeletal muscle during the active state. It is observed that whereas mechanical stimulation increases these metabolic parameters within 4-6 h of starting activity, unstimulated basal rates in control cultures also increase during this period of time, and by 8 h, their rates have reached or exceeded the rates in continuously stimulated cells. Measurements of these parameters in media of different compositions show that activity-induced long-term alterations in the parameters occur independently of growth factors in serium and embryo extracts.

  17. Partial purification and characterization of an escherichia coli toxic factor that induces morphological cell alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, A; Falbo, V; Roda, L G; Ruggeri, F M; Zona, C

    1983-01-01

    A factor produced by several strains of Escherichia coli isolated from enteritis-affected children has been shown to produce both a necrotizing effect on rabbit skin and striking morphological alterations on CHO, Vero, and HeLa cells. The same strains were found to have hemolytic activity on sheep erythrocytes. The toxic, cell-altering factor was demonstrated to be different from both heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxins and from Vero toxin. The main effect induced by the isolated factor on cultured cells was the formation of large multinucleated cells. The partial purification achieved suggests that the same factor (most likely a protein with a molecular weight of 70,000 to 80,000) is responsible for toxic and cell-altering activities, whereas a different molecular species is responsible for hemolytic activity. Images PMID:6341235

  18. DNA demethylation caused by 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine induces mitotic alterations and aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Lentini, Laura; Cilluffo, Danilo; Di Leonardo, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy, the unbalanced number of chromosomes in a cell, is considered a prevalent form of genetic instability and is largely acknowledged as a condition implicated in tumorigenesis. Epigenetic alterations like DNA hypomethylation have been correlated with cancer initiation/progression. Furthermore, a growing body of evidence suggests the involvement of epigenome-wide disruption as a cause of global DNA hypomethylation in aneuploidy generation. Here, we report that the DNA hypomethylating drug 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC), affects the correct ploidy of nearly diploid HCT-116 human cells by altering the methylation pattern of the chromosomes. Specifically, we show that a DAC-induced reduction of 5-Methyl Cytosine at the pericentromeric region of chromosomes correlates with aneuploidy and mitotic defects. Our results suggest that DNA hypomethylation leads to aneuploidy by altering the DNA methylation landscape at the centromere that is necessary to ensure proper chromosomes segregation by recruiting the proteins necessary to build up a functional kinetochore. PMID:26771138

  19. Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Altered SRY Genomic Binding During Gonadal Sex Determination

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Michael K.; Bhandari, Ramji K.; Haque, M. Muksitul; Nilsson, Eric E.

    2016-01-01

    A critical transcription factor required for mammalian male sex determination is SRY (sex determining region on the Y chromosome). The expression of SRY in precursor Sertoli cells is one of the initial events in testis development. The current study was designed to determine the impact of environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance on SRY binding during gonadal sex determination in the male. The agricultural fungicide vinclozolin and vehicle control (DMSO) exposed gestating females (F0 generation) during gonadal sex determination promoted the transgenerational inheritance of differential DNA methylation in sperm of the F3 generation (great grand-offspring). The fetal gonads in F3 generation males were used to identify potential alterations in SRY binding sites in the developing Sertoli cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with an SRY antibody followed by genome-wide promoter tiling array (ChIP-Chip) was used to identify alterations in SRY binding. A total of 81 adjacent oligonucleotide sites and 173 single oligo SRY binding sites were identified to be altered transgenerationally in the Sertoli cell vinclozolin lineage F3 generation males. Observations demonstrate the majority of the previously identified normal SRY binding sites were not altered and the altered SRY binding sites were novel and new additional sites. The chromosomal locations, gene associations and potentially modified cellular pathways were investigated. In summary, environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of germline epimutations appears to alter the cellular differentiation and development of the precursor Sertoli cell SRY binding during gonadal sex determination that influence the developmental origins of adult onset testis disease. PMID:27175298

  20. Gender differences in alcohol-induced oxidative stress and altered membrane properties in erythrocytes of rats.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kindinti Rameshwar; Reddy, Vaddi Damodara; Padmavathi, Pannuru; Kavitha, Godugu; Saradamma, Bulle; Varadacharyulu, N C

    2013-02-01

    Alcohol-induced oxidative stress leads to imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the antioxidant defense system, resulting in oxidative damage to membrane components such as lipids and proteins, ultimately altering membrane properties. In this study, we assessed oxidative stress status and alterations in erythrocyte membrane properties in alcohol-administered rats with respect to gender difference. Alcohol (20% v/v) administered rats of both genders showed significant changes in plasma lipid profile with elevated nitrite/nitrate levels. Furthermore, alcohol-administration significantly decreased erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes and enhanced erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation, cholesterol/phospholipid (C/P) ratio and Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity in both males and females. Besides, anisotropic studies revealed that alcohol-administration significantly decreased erythrocyte membrane fluidity. In conclusion, alcohol-administration significantly increased oxidative stress by decreasing antioxidant status, and subsequent generation of ROS altered membrane properties by altering fluidity and Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity. Female rats were more vulnerable to alcohol-induced biochemical and biophysical changes in plasma and erythrocyte including oxidative stress than male rats. PMID:23617072

  1. Anthropogenic habitat alteration induces rapid morphological divergence in a native stream fish

    PubMed Central

    Franssen, Nathan R

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic habitat alteration creates novel environments that can alter selection pressures. Construction of reservoirs worldwide has disturbed riverine ecosystems by altering biotic and abiotic environments of impounded streams. Changes to fish communities in impoundments are well documented, but effects of those changes on native species persisting in reservoirs, which are presumably subjected to novel selective pressures, are largely unexplored. I assessed body shape variation of a native stream fish in reservoir habitats and streams from seven reservoir basins in the Central Plains of the USA. Body shape significantly and consistently diverged in reservoirs compared with stream habitats within reservoir basins; individuals from reservoir populations were deeper-bodied and had smaller heads compared with stream populations. Individuals from reservoir habitats also exhibited lower overall shape variation compared with stream individuals. I assessed the contribution of genotypic divergence and predator-induced phenotypic plasticity on body shape variation by rearing offspring from a reservoir and a stream population with or without a piscivorous fish. Significant population-level differences in body shape persisted in offspring, and both populations demonstrated similar predator-induced phenotypic plasticity. My results suggest that, although components of body shape are plastic, anthropogenic habitat modification may drive trait divergence in native fish populations in reservoir-altered habitats. PMID:25568023

  2. Alteration patterns of trabecular bone microarchitectural characteristics induced by osteoarthritis over time

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joo Hyung; Chun, Keyoung Jin; Kim, Han Sung; Kim, Sang Ho; Han, Paul; Jun, Yongtae; Lim, Dohyung

    2012-01-01

    Information regarding the alteration of trabecular bone microarchitecture, which is one of the important criteria to estimate bone condition, induced by osteoarthritis (OA) is sparse. The current study therefore aimed to identify and quantify patterns of alterations in trabecular bone microarchitectural characteristics at tibial epiphysis induced by OA using in vivo microcomputed tomography. Fourteen 8-week-old female Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into control (n = 7) and OA (n = 7) groups. Rats in the OA group were administered monoiodoacetate into the knee-joint cavity. The tibial joints were scanned by in vivo microcomputed tomography at 0, 4, and 8 weeks after administration. Two-way analysis of variance with Tukey’s honestly significant difference post hoc test was carried out for statistical analyses. The results showed that patterns of alterations in the trabecular bone microarchitectural characteristics in the OA group were not different from those in the control group from 0 to 4 weeks (P > 0.05), but differed from 4 to 8 weeks (P < 0.05). In particular, both trabecular bone thickness and trabecular bone separation distributions over time (4–8 weeks) differed significantly (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that the patterns of bone microarchitecture changes brought about by OA should be periodically considered in the diagnosis and management of arthritic symptoms over time. Improved understanding of the alteration pattern on trabecular bone microarchitecture may assist in developing more targeted treatment interventions for OA. PMID:22956865

  3. In vitro radiation induced alterations in heavy metals and metallothionein content in Plantago ovata Forsk.

    PubMed

    Saha, Priyanka; Mishra, Debadutta; Chakraborty, Anindita; Sudarshan, Mathummal; Raychaudhuri, Sarmistha Sen

    2008-09-01

    Proton Induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) have been used to study the effects of gamma irradiation on heavy metal accumulation in callus tissue of Plantago ovata-an important cash crop of India. PIXE analysis revealed radiation-induced alteration in trace element profile during developmental stages of the callus of P. ovata. Subsequent experiments showed antagonism between Fe and Cu and also Cu and Zn and synergistic effect between Fe and Zn. FACS analysis showed significant induction of the metallothionein (MT) protein following gamma-irradiation, and maximum induction was noted at the 50-Gy absorbed dose. This indicated a progressive increment of MTs as a measure for protection against gamma-rays, to combat alteration in the homeostasis of heavy metals like Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn. PMID:18493724

  4. Cytokine factors present in dengue patient sera induces alterations of junctional proteins in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Appanna, Ramapraba; Wang, Seok Mui; Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela A; Lum, Lucy Chai See; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2012-11-01

    Plasma leakage in severe dengue has been postulated to be associated with skewed cytokine immune responses. In this study, the association of cytokines with vascular permeability in dengue patients was investigated. Human serum samples collected from 48 persons (13 with dengue fever, 29 with dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 6 healthy) were subjected to cytokines analysis by using Luminex Multiplex Technology. Selected serum samples from patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever sera and recombinant human cytokines were then tested for roles on inducing vascular permeability by treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Confocal immunofluorescence staining indicated morphologic alteration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with serum samples from patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever compared with serum samples from healthy persons. The findings suggest that cytokines produced during dengue hemorrhagic infections could induce alterations in the vascular endothelium, which may play a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of dengue. PMID:22987650

  5. Retinoic acid metabolism proteins are altered in trichoblastomas induced by mouse papillomavirus 1.

    PubMed

    Everts, Helen B; Suo, Liye; Ghim, Shinge; Bennett Jenson, A; Sundberg, John P

    2015-12-01

    Skin cancer burden is significant as treatment costs have skyrocketed to $8.1 million annually and some forms metastasize, such as cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) and melanoma. cSCC is caused by altered growth factor signaling induced by chemical carcinogens, ultraviolet light (UV) exposure, and infections with papillomaviruses (PVs). One of the few options for preventing cSCC in high-risk patients is oral retinoids. While much is understood about retinoid treatments and metabolism in mouse models of chemically and UV exposure induced cSCC, little is known about the role of retinoids in PV-induced cSCC. To better understand how retinoid metabolism is altered in cSCC, we examined the expression of this pathway in the newly discovered mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV1), which produces trichoblastomas in dorsal skin but not cSCC. We found significant increases in a rate-limiting enzyme involved in retinoic acid synthesis and retinoic acid binding proteins, suggestive of increased RA synthesis, in MmuPV1-induced tumors in B6.Cg-Foxn1(nu)/J mice. Similar increases in these proteins were seen after acute UVB exposure in Crl:SKH1-Hr(hr) mice and in regressing pre-cancerous lesions in a chemically-induced mouse model, suggesting a common mechanism in limiting the progression of papillomas to full blown cSCC. PMID:26416148

  6. Modification of mercury-induced biochemical alterations by Triticum Aestivum Linn in rats.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, B V S; Sudhakar, M; Nireesha, G

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation has been undertaken to evaluate role of Wheat grass extract in modifying mercury-induced biochemical alterations in albino rats. Mercuric chloride 5 mg/kg body weight i.p. was given on 11, 13 & 15th day of the experiment. Wheat grass extract (400 mg/kg) and Quercetin (10 mg/kg) were administered 10 days before mercuric chloride administration and continued up to 30 days after mercuric chloride administration. The animals were sacrificed on 1, 15 and 30 days, the activity of serum alkaline and acid phosphatase and the iron, calcium, BUN, creatinine, SGPT, SGOT, total bilirubin, total protein levels were measured. Tissue lipid peroxidation content, glutathione (GSH) level, anti-oxidant enzymes- CAT and GR were measured. Hematological indices were also estimated. Mercury intoxication causes significant increase (P < 0.001) in calcium level, acid phosphatase, BUN, creatinine, SGOT, SGPT, total bilirubin, lipid peroxidation content and significant decrease in iron level, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, and CAT, GR and glutathione level. Wheat grass extract pre- and post-treatment ameliorated mercury-induced alterations in terms of biochemical and hematological parameters. Concomitant treatment of Wheatgrass extract with Mercury showed prominent recovery and normal architecture with mild residual degeneration in the tissues. Thus from present investigation, it can be concluded that Wheat grass extract pre- and post-treatment with HgCl2 significantly modulate or modify mercury-induced biochemical alteration in albino rats. PMID:26215012

  7. Altered heart rate dynamics associated with antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Ann, Jun-Hyung; Lee, Jinyoung; Kim, Mee-Hee; Han, Ah-Young

    2013-01-01

    Background Antipsychotic-induced subjective inner restlessness is one of the common and distressing adverse effects associated with antipsychotics; however, its underlying neurobiological basis is not well understood. We examined the relationship between antipsychotic-induced subjective inner restlessness and autonomic neurocardiac function. Methods Twenty-two schizophrenia patients with antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness, 28 schizophrenia patients without antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness, and 28 matched healthy control subjects were evaluated. Assessments of the linear and nonlinear complexity measures of heart rate dynamics were performed. Multivariate analysis of variance and correlation analysis were conducted. Results The mean interbeat (RR) interval value was significantly higher in control subjects than in patients with and without antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness (P < 0.05). The low frequency/high frequency ratio was significantly higher in patients with antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness than in control subjects and in patients without antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness (P < 0.05), while the approximate entropy value was significantly lower in patients with antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness than in control subjects and in patients without antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness (P < 0.05). Correlation analyses controlling for psychotic symptom severity showed that the degree of antipsychotic-induced restlessness had a significant negative correlation with the value of approximate entropy (P < 0.05). Conclusion The results indicate that antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness is associated with altered heart rate dynamics parameters, particularly the nonlinear complexity measure, suggesting that it might adversely affect autonomic neurocardiac integrity. Further prospective research is necessary to elucidate the precise interrelationships and causality. PMID:23986638

  8. RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stephanie; Paris, Francois; Corre, Isabelle

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial

  9. Prenatal stress-induced alterations in major physiological systems correlate with gut microbiota composition in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Golubeva, Anna V; Crampton, Sean; Desbonnet, Lieve; Edge, Deirdre; O'Sullivan, Orla; Lomasney, Kevin W; Zhdanov, Alexander V; Crispie, Fiona; Moloney, Rachel D; Borre, Yuliya E; Cotter, Paul D; Hyland, Niall P; O'Halloran, Ken D; Dinan, Timothy G; O'Keeffe, Gerard W; Cryan, John F

    2015-10-01

    Early-life adverse experiences, including prenatal stress (PNS), are associated with a higher prevalence of neurodevelopmental, cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in affected offspring. Here, in a rat model of chronic PNS, we investigate the impact of late gestational stress on physiological outcomes in adulthood. Sprague-Dawley pregnant dams were subjected to repeated restraint stress from embryonic day 14 to day 20, and their male offspring were assessed at 4 months of age. PNS induced an exaggeration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress, as well as an elevation of blood pressure and impairment of cognitive function. Altered respiratory control was also observed, as demonstrated by increased variability in basal respiratory frequency and abnormal frequency responses to both hypoxic and hypercapnic challenges. PNS also affected gastrointestinal neurodevelopment and function, as measured by a decrease in the innervation density of distal colon and an increase in the colonic secretory response to catecholaminergic stimulation. Finally, PNS induced long lasting alterations in the intestinal microbiota composition. 16S rRNA gene 454 pyrosequencing revealed a strong trend towards decreased numbers of bacteria in the Lactobacillus genus, accompanied by elevated abundance of the Oscillibacter, Anaerotruncus and Peptococcus genera in PNS animals. Strikingly, relative abundance of distinct bacteria genera significantly correlated with certain respiratory parameters and the responsiveness of the HPA axis to stress. Together, these findings provide novel evidence that PNS induces long-term maladaptive alterations in the gastrointestinal and respiratory systems, accompanied by hyper-responsiveness to stress and alterations in the gut microbiota. PMID:26135201

  10. In Situ Biospectroscopic Investigation of Rapid Ischemic and Postmortem Induced Biochemical Alterations in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in imaging technologies have pushed novel spectroscopic modalities such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the sulfur K-edge to the forefront of direct in situ investigation of brain biochemistry. However, few studies have examined the extent to which sample preparation artifacts confound results. Previous investigations using traditional analyses, such as tissue dissection, homogenization, and biochemical assay, conducted extensive research to identify biochemical alterations that occur ex vivo during sample preparation. In particular, altered metabolism and oxidative stress may be caused by animal death. These processes were a concern for studies using biochemical assays, and protocols were developed to minimize their occurrence. In this investigation, a similar approach was taken to identify the biochemical alterations that are detectable by two in situ spectroscopic methods (FTIR, XAS) that occur as a consequence of ischemic conditions created during humane animal killing. FTIR and XAS are well suited to study markers of altered metabolism such as lactate and creatine (FTIR) and markers of oxidative stress such as aggregated proteins (FTIR) and altered thiol redox (XAS). The results are in accordance with previous investigations using biochemical assays and demonstrate that the time between animal death and tissue dissection results in ischemic conditions that alter brain metabolism and initiate oxidative stress. Therefore, future in situ biospectroscopic investigations utilizing FTIR and XAS must take into consideration that brain tissue dissected from a healthy animal does not truly reflect the in vivo condition, but rather reflects a state of mild ischemia. If studies require the levels of metabolites (lactate, creatine) and markers of oxidative stress (thiol redox) to be preserved as close as possible to the in vivo condition, then rapid freezing of brain tissue via decapitation into

  11. Dramatyping: a generic algorithm for detecting reasonable temporal correlations between drug administration and lab value alterations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, one of the criteria for the standardized assessment of case causality in adverse drug reactions is the temporal relationship between the intake of a drug and the occurrence of a reaction or a laboratory test abnormality. This article presents and describes an algorithm for the detection of a reasonable temporal correlation between the administration of a drug and the alteration of a laboratory value course. The algorithm is designed to process normalized lab values and is therefore universally applicable. It has a sensitivity of 0.932 for the detection of lab value courses that show changes in temporal correlation with the administration of a drug and it has a specificity of 0.967 for the detection of lab value courses that show no changes. Therefore, the algorithm is appropriate to screen the data of electronic health records and to support human experts in revealing adverse drug reactions. A reference implementation in Python programming language is available. PMID:27042396

  12. Dramatyping: a generic algorithm for detecting reasonable temporal correlations between drug administration and lab value alterations.

    PubMed

    Newe, Axel

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, one of the criteria for the standardized assessment of case causality in adverse drug reactions is the temporal relationship between the intake of a drug and the occurrence of a reaction or a laboratory test abnormality. This article presents and describes an algorithm for the detection of a reasonable temporal correlation between the administration of a drug and the alteration of a laboratory value course. The algorithm is designed to process normalized lab values and is therefore universally applicable. It has a sensitivity of 0.932 for the detection of lab value courses that show changes in temporal correlation with the administration of a drug and it has a specificity of 0.967 for the detection of lab value courses that show no changes. Therefore, the algorithm is appropriate to screen the data of electronic health records and to support human experts in revealing adverse drug reactions. A reference implementation in Python programming language is available. PMID:27042396

  13. 13C-phenylalanine breath test detects altered phenylalanine kinetics in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Teraishi, T; Ozeki, Y; Hori, H; Sasayama, D; Chiba, S; Yamamoto, N; Tanaka, H; Iijima, Y; Matsuo, J; Kawamoto, Y; Kinoshita, Y; Hattori, K; Ota, M; Kajiwara, M; Terada, S; Higuchi, T; Kunugi, H

    2012-01-01

    Phenylalanine is an essential amino acid required for the synthesis of catecholamines including dopamine. Altered levels of phenylalanine and its metabolites in blood and cerebrospinal fluid have been reported in schizophrenia patients. This study attempted to examine for the first time whether phenylalanine kinetics is altered in schizophrenia using L-[1-(13)C]phenylalanine breath test ((13)C-PBT). The subjects were 20 chronically medicated schizophrenia patients (DSM-IV) and the same number of age- and sex-matched controls. (13)C-phenylalanine (99 atom% (13)C; 100 mg) was administered orally and the breath (13)CO(2) /(12)CO(2) ratio was monitored for 120 min. The possible effect of antipsychotic medication (risperidone (RPD) or haloperidol (HPD) treatment for 21 days) on (13)C-PBT was examined in rats. Body weight (BW), age and diagnostic status were significant predictors of the area under the curve of the time course of Δ(13)CO(2) (‰) and the cumulative recovery rate (CRR) at 120 min. A repeated measures analysis of covariance controlled for age and BW revealed that the patterns of CRR change over time differed between the patients and controls and that Δ(13)CO(2) was lower in the patients than in the controls at all sampling time points during the 120 min test, with an overall significant difference between the two groups. Chronic administration of RPD or HPD had no significant effect on (13)C-PBT indices in rats. Our results suggest that (13)C-PBT is a novel laboratory test that can detect altered phenylalanine kinetics in chronic schizophrenia patients. Animal experiments suggest that the observed changes are unlikely to be attributable to antipsychotic medication. PMID:22832963

  14. Epilepsy-induced electrocardiographic alterations following cardiac ischemia and reperfusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, J.G.P.; Vasques, E.R.; Arida, R.M.; Cavalheiro, E.A.; Cabral, F.R.; Torres, L.B.; Menezes-Rodrigues, F.S.; Jurkiewicz, A.; Caricati-Neto, A.; Godoy, C.M.G.; Gomes da Silva, S.

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated electrocardiographic alterations in rats with epilepsy submitted to an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model induced by cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. Rats were randomly divided into two groups: control (n=12) and epilepsy (n=14). It was found that rats with epilepsy presented a significant reduction in atrioventricular block incidence following the ischemia and reperfusion procedure. In addition, significant alterations were observed in electrocardiogram intervals during the stabilization, ischemia, and reperfusion periods of rats with epilepsy compared to control rats. It was noted that rats with epilepsy presented a significant increase in the QRS interval during the stabilization period in relation to control rats (P<0.01). During the ischemia period, there was an increase in the QRS interval (P<0.05) and a reduction in the P wave and QT intervals (P<0.05 for both) in rats with epilepsy compared to control rats. During the reperfusion period, a significant reduction in the QT interval (P<0.01) was verified in the epilepsy group in relation to the control group. Our results indicate that rats submitted to an epilepsy model induced by pilocarpine presented electrical conductivity alterations of cardiac tissue, mainly during an AMI episode. PMID:25590352

  15. Rifaximin Alters Intestinal Bacteria and Prevents Stress-Induced Gut Inflammation and Visceral Hyperalgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dabo; Gao, Jun; Gillilland, Merritt; Wu, Xiaoyin; Song, Il; Kao, John Y.; Owyang, Chung

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Rifaximin is used to treat patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders, but little is known about its therapeutic mechanism. We propose that rifaximin modulates the ileal bacterial community, reduces subclinical inflammation of the intestinal mucosa, and improves gut barrier function to reduce visceral hypersensitivity. Methods We induced visceral hyperalgesia in rats, via chronic water avoidance or repeat restraint stressors, and investigated whether rifaximin altered the gut microbiota, prevented intestinal inflammation, and improved gut barrier function. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and 454 pyrosequencing were used to analyze bacterial 16S rRNA in ileal contents from the rats. Reverse transcription, immunoblot, and histologic analyses were used to evaluate levels of cytokines, the tight junction protein occludin, and mucosal inflammation, respectively. Intestinal permeability and rectal sensitivity were measured. Results Water avoidance and repeat restraint stress each led to visceral hyperalgesia, accompanied by mucosal inflammation and impaired mucosal barrier function. Oral rifaximin altered the composition of bacterial communities in the ileum (Lactobacillus species became the most abundant) and prevented mucosal inflammation, impairment to intestinal barrier function, and visceral hyperalgesia in response to chronic stress. Neomycin also changed the composition of the ileal bacterial community (Proteobacteria became the most abundant species). Neomycin did not prevent intestinal inflammation or induction of visceral hyperalgesia induced by water avoidance stress. Conclusions Rifaximin alters the bacterial population in the ileum of rats, leading to a relative abundance of Lactobacillus. These changes prevent intestinal abnormalities and visceral hyperalgesia in response to chronic psychological stress. PMID:24161699

  16. Alterations in left ventricular diastolic function in conscious dogs with pacing-induced heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komamura, K.; Shannon, R. P.; Pasipoularides, A.; Ihara, T.; Lader, A. S.; Patrick, T. A.; Bishop, S. P.; Vatner, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated in conscious dogs (a) the effects of heart failure induced by chronic rapid ventricular pacing on the sequence of development of left ventricular (LV) diastolic versus systolic dysfunction and (b) whether the changes were load dependent or secondary to alterations in structure. LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction were evident within 24 h after initiation of pacing and occurred in parallel over 3 wk. LV systolic function was reduced at 3 wk, i.e., peak LV dP/dt fell by -1,327 +/- 105 mmHg/s and ejection fraction by -22 +/- 2%. LV diastolic dysfunction also progressed over 3 wk of pacing, i.e., tau increased by +14.0 +/- 2.8 ms and the myocardial stiffness constant by +6.5 +/- 1.4, whereas LV chamber stiffness did not change. These alterations were associated with increases in LV end-systolic (+28.6 +/- 5.7 g/cm2) and LV end-diastolic stresses (+40.4 +/- 5.3 g/cm2). When stresses and heart rate were matched at the same levels in the control and failure states, the increases in tau and myocardial stiffness were no longer observed, whereas LV systolic function remained depressed. There were no increases in connective tissue content in heart failure. Thus, pacing-induced heart failure in conscious dogs is characterized by major alterations in diastolic function which are reversible with normalization of increased loading condition.

  17. Molecular basis for T cell response induced by altered peptide ligand of type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeoung-Eun; Cullins, David; Zalduondo, Lillian; Barnett, Stacey L; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Kleinau, Sandra; Stuart, John M; Kang, Andrew H; Myers, Linda K

    2012-06-01

    Mounting evidence from animal models has demonstrated that alterations in peptide-MHC interactions with the T cell receptor (TCR) can lead to dramatically different T cell outcomes. We have developed an altered peptide ligand of type II collagen, referred to as A9, which differentially regulates TCR signaling in murine T cells leading to suppression of arthritis in the experimental model of collagen-induced arthritis. This study delineates the T cell signaling pathway used by T cells stimulated by the A9·I-A(q) complex. We have found that T cells activated by A9 bypass the requirement for Zap-70 and CD3-ζ and signal via FcRγ and Syk. Using collagen-specific T cell hybridomas engineered to overexpress either Syk, Zap-70, TCR-FcRγ, or CD3-ζ, we demonstrate that A9·I-A(q) preferentially activates FcRγ/Syk but not CD3-ζ/Zap-70. Moreover, a genetic absence of Syk or FcRγ significantly reduces the altered peptide ligand induction of the nuclear factor GATA3. By dissecting the molecular mechanism of A9-induced T cell signaling we have defined a new alternate pathway that is dependent upon FcRγ and Syk to secrete immunoregulatory cytokines. Given the interest in using Syk inhibitors to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis, understanding this pathway may be critical for the proper application of this therapy. PMID:22511761

  18. Regional alterations of type I collagen in rat tibia induced by skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, Masashi; Arnaud, Sara B.; Tanzawa, Hideki; Kitamura, Eiji; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of mineral density in weight-bearing bones that leads to inferior bone mechanical strength. This appears to be caused by a failure of bone formation; however, its mechanisms still are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize collagen, the predominant matrix protein in bone, in various regions of tibia of rats that were subjected to skeletal unloading by 4 weeks tail suspension. Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (4 months old) were divided into tail suspension and ambulatory controls (eight rats each). After the tail suspension, tibias from each animal were collected and divided into five regions and collagen was analyzed. The collagen cross-linking and the extent of lysine (Lys) hydroxylation in unloaded bones were significantly altered in proximal epiphysis, diaphysis, and, in particular, proximal metaphysis but not in distal regions. The pool of immature/nonmineralized collagen measured by its extractability with a chaotropic solvent was significantly increased in proximal metaphysis. These results suggest that skeletal unloading induced an accumulation of post-translationally altered nonmineralized collagen and that these changes are bone region specific. These alterations might be caused by impaired osteoblastic function/differentiation resulting in a mineralization defect.

  19. Alterations in left ventricular diastolic function in conscious dogs with pacing-induced heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Komamura, K; Shannon, R P; Pasipoularides, A; Ihara, T; Lader, A S; Patrick, T A; Bishop, S P; Vatner, S F

    1992-01-01

    We investigated in conscious dogs (a) the effects of heart failure induced by chronic rapid ventricular pacing on the sequence of development of left ventricular (LV) diastolic versus systolic dysfunction and (b) whether the changes were load dependent or secondary to alterations in structure. LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction were evident within 24 h after initiation of pacing and occurred in parallel over 3 wk. LV systolic function was reduced at 3 wk, i.e., peak LV dP/dt fell by -1,327 +/- 105 mmHg/s and ejection fraction by -22 +/- 2%. LV diastolic dysfunction also progressed over 3 wk of pacing, i.e., tau increased by +14.0 +/- 2.8 ms and the myocardial stiffness constant by +6.5 +/- 1.4, whereas LV chamber stiffness did not change. These alterations were associated with increases in LV end-systolic (+28.6 +/- 5.7 g/cm2) and LV end-diastolic stresses (+40.4 +/- 5.3 g/cm2). When stresses and heart rate were matched at the same levels in the control and failure states, the increases in tau and myocardial stiffness were no longer observed, whereas LV systolic function remained depressed. There were no increases in connective tissue content in heart failure. Thus, pacing-induced heart failure in conscious dogs is characterized by major alterations in diastolic function which are reversible with normalization of increased loading condition. Images PMID:1601992

  20. Genetic and epigenetic alterations induced by different levels of rye genome integration in wheat recipient.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X L; Zhou, J P; Zang, L L; Tang, A T; Liu, D Q; Deng, K J; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-01

    The narrow genetic variation present in common wheat (Triticum aestivum) varieties has greatly restricted the improvement of crop yield in modern breeding systems. Alien addition lines have proven to be an effective means to broaden the genetic diversity of common wheat. Wheat-rye addition lines, which are the direct bridge materials for wheat improvement, have been wildly used to produce new wheat cultivars carrying alien rye germplasm. In this study, we investigated the genetic and epigenetic alterations in two sets of wheat-rye disomic addition lines (1R-7R) and the corresponding triticales. We used expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat, amplified fragment length polymorphism, and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analyses to analyze the effects of the introduction of alien chromosomes (either the entire genome or sub-genome) to wheat genetic background. We found obvious and diversiform variations in the genomic primary structure, as well as alterations in the extent and pattern of the genomic DNA methylation of the recipient. Meanwhile, these results also showed that introduction of different rye chromosomes could induce different genetic and epigenetic alterations in its recipient, and the genetic background of the parents is an important factor for genomic and epigenetic variation induced by alien chromosome addition. PMID:27323191

  1. Role of neutrophilic inflammation in ozone-induced epithelial alterations in the nasal airways of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hye Youn

    Ozone is a principal oxidant air pollutant in photochemical smog. Epithelial cells lining the centriacinar region of lung and the proximal aspects of nasal passage are primary target sites for ozone-induced injury in laboratory animals. Acute exposure of rats to high ambient concentrations of ozone (e.g., 0.5 ppm) results in neutrophilic inflammation, epithelial hyperplasia and mucous cell metaplasia (MCM) in the nasal transitional epithelium (NTE) lining the proximal nasal airways. The principal purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of pre-metaplastic cellular responses, especially neutrophilic inflammation, in the pathogenesis of ozone-induced MCM in rat NTE. For this purpose, three specific hypotheses-based whole-animal inhalation studies were conducted. Male F344/N rats were exposed in whole-body inhalation chambers to 0 (filtered air) or 0.5 ppm ozone for 1-3 days (8 h/day). Histochemical, immunochemical, molecular and morphometric techniques were used to investigate the ozone-induced cellular and molecular events in the NTE. Two in vitro studies were also conducted to examine the effects of ozone-inducible cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha; TNF- a, and interleukin-6; IL-6) on mucin gene (rMuc-5AC) expression. Ozone induced a rapid increase of rMuc-5AC mRNA in nasal tissues within hours after the start of exposure. It preceded the appearance of MCM, and persisted with MCM. Ozone-induced neutrophilic inflammation accompanied the mucin gene upregulation, but was resolved when MCM first appeared in the NTE. Antibody-mediated depletion of circulating neutrophils attenuated ozone-induced MCM, although it did not affect the ozone-induced epithelial hyperplasia and mucin mRNA upregulation. In another study, it was found that preexisting neutrophilic rhinitis induced by endotoxin augmented the ozone-induced MCM. However, pre-existing rhinitis did not alter the severity of ozone-induced epithelial hyperplasia and mucin gene upregulation

  2. Gold nanostar based biosensor detects epigenetic alterations on promoter of real cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh H; Ma, Xingyi; Sim, Sang Jun

    2015-04-15

    Epigenetic changes, particularly in cancer suppressor genes, are novel biomarkers for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. However, epigenetic studies should not only provide an estimation of the amount of 5-methylcytosine, but also examine the presence of epigenetic proteins to reveal the complete epigenetic alterations for downstream molecular process. The challenge of natural epigenetics is to unveil key factors of epigenetics in one assay, containing low concentrations. This would be valuable for the monitoring of early-stage cancer. On the basic of the nanoplasmonic biosensor, here we report a sensitive sensor to study epigenetics of DNA promoter. The results show detection limit for dual epigenetic biomarkers methyl-CpG group and methyl-CpG binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) are one 5-methylcytosine molecule and 125fM MBD2. Moreover, DNA structure bending, steric competition under interaction of epigenetic proteins and transcription factors; and epigenetics-mediated suppression of transcription are observed during epigenetic alterations. This study provides a platform for full story of epigenetics, as compared with that of methylcytosine-based techniques only. PMID:25500525

  3. Gamma radiation alters cell cycle and induces apoptosis in p53 mutant E6.1 Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmadianpour, Mohammad Reza; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of gamma radiation with 1.5, 3.0 and 7.5 Gy doses on apoptosis induction, cell cycle alteration and increment of amount of p-ATM (phosphorylated ATM) and p-E2F1 (phosphorylated E2F1) proteins in Jurkat T-lymphoblastoid E6.1 cells. Exposure of human p53 mutant Jurkat cells to gamma radiation resulted in apoptosis, which was detected by luminometric and flow cytometric analysis. Also, phosphorylated ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and E2F1 (elongation factor) proteins were detected by western blot analysis. Based on luminescence detection data the lethal dose of 7.5 Gy induced cell death 12 h after exposure (p<0.05) while sub-lethal doses of 1.5 and 3.0 Gy induced apoptosis 18 h after exposure (p<0.05). Flow cytometric analysis revealed a G2 arrest 24h after exposure to 3.0 and 7.5 Gy. This arrest was accompanied by cell death with an increasing rate of occurrence up to 72 h after exposure. Western blot analysis showed that 1 h after cell irradiation by 1.5, 3.0 and 7.5 Gy, the amount of p-ATM increased to its maximum rate and remained constant up to 6 h, and then it decreased. Moreover, the amount of phosphorylated E2F1 (Ser-31) increased 2 h after exposure to the same doses and remained constant up to 12 h after irradiation. Survival and cell division of treated Jurkat cells showed a decrease compared to the control group. We believe that ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage activates a p53-independent apoptosis pathway via back-up systems in which the phosphorylation of ATM and E2F1 proteins was involved. Thus, gamma radiation can induce apoptosis and cell cycle alteration in Jurkat cells via a P53-independent pathway. PMID:23079488

  4. Detection of time-varying harmonic amplitude alterations due to spectral interpolations between musical instrument tones.

    PubMed

    Horner, Andrew B; Beauchamp, James W; So, Richard H Y

    2009-01-01

    Gradated spectral interpolations between musical instrument tone pairs were used to investigate discrimination as a function of time-averaged spectral difference. All possible nonidentical pairs taken from a collection of eight musical instrument sounds consisting of bassoon, clarinet, flute, horn, oboe, saxophone, trumpet, and violin were tested. For each pair, several tones were generated with different balances between the primary and secondary instruments, where the balance was fixed across the duration of each tone. Among primary instruments it was found that changes to horn and bassoon [corrected] were most easily discriminable, while changes to saxophone and trumpet timbres were least discriminable. Among secondary instruments, the clarinet had the strongest effect on discrimination, whereas the bassoon had the least effect. For primary instruments, strong negative correlations were found between discrimination and their spectral incoherences, suggesting that the presence of dynamic spectral variations tends to increase the difficulty of detecting time-varying alterations such as spectral interpolation. PMID:19173434

  5. Protective effect of Labisia pumila on stress-induced behavioral, biochemical, and immunological alterations.

    PubMed

    Kour, Kiranjeet; Sharma, Neelam; Chandan, Bal Krishan; Koul, Surrinder; Sangwan, Payare Lal; Bani, Sarang

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the antistress potential of LABISIA PUMILA aqueous extract (LPPM/A003) using a battery of tests widely employed in different stressful situations. Pretreatment of experimental animals with LPPM/A003 caused an increase in the swimming endurance and hypoxia time and also showed the recovery of physical stress-induced depletion of neuromuscular coordination and scopolamine induced memory deficit. LPPM/A003 at graded doses reversed the chronic restraint stress (RST), induced depletion of CD4 (+) and CD8 (+) T lymphocytes, NK cell population, and corresponding cytokines expression besides downregulating the stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone, a major stress hormone. In addition, LPPM/A003 reversed the chronic stress-induced increase in adrenal gland weight, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and hepatic lipid peroxidation (LP) levels and augmented the RST induced decrease in hepatic glutathione (GSH), thymus and spleen weight. Thus, we conclude that LPPM/A003 has the ability to reverse the alterations produced by various stressful stimuli and therefore restores homeostasis. PMID:20217640

  6. Propiconazole induces alterations in the hepatic metabolome of mice: relevance to propiconazole-induced hepatocarcinogenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide and has been the subject of recent mechanistic investigations on its carcinogenic mechanism of action. The goals of this study were: 1. To identify metabolomic changes induced in the liver by increasing doses of propiconazole i...

  7. Propiconazole induces alterations in the hepatic metabolome of mice: relevance to propiconazole-induced hepatocarcinogenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide and has been the subject of recent investigations into its carcinogenic mechanism of action. The goals of this study were: 1. To identify metabolomic changes induced in the liver by increasing doses of propiconazole in mice; 2...

  8. Cytosine Methylation Alteration in Natural Populations of Leymus chinensis Induced by Multiple Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yingjie; Yang, Xuejiao; Wang, Huaying; Shi, Fengxue; Liu, Ying; Liu, Jushan; Li, Linfeng; Wang, Deli; Liu, Bao

    2013-01-01

    Background Human activity has a profound effect on the global environment and caused frequent occurrence of climatic fluctuations. To survive, plants need to adapt to the changing environmental conditions through altering their morphological and physiological traits. One known mechanism for phenotypic innovation to be achieved is environment-induced rapid yet inheritable epigenetic changes. Therefore, the use of molecular techniques to address the epigenetic mechanisms underpinning stress adaptation in plants is an important and challenging topic in biological research. In this study, we investigated the impact of warming, nitrogen (N) addition, and warming+nitrogen (N) addition stresses on the cytosine methylation status of Leymus chinensis Tzvel. at the population level by using the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) and retrotransposon based sequence-specific amplification polymorphism (SSAP) techniques. Methodology/Principal Findings Our results showed that, although the percentages of cytosine methylation changes in SSAP are significantly higher than those in MSAP, all the treatment groups showed similar alteration patterns of hypermethylation and hypomethylation. It meant that the abiotic stresses have induced the alterations in cytosine methylation patterns, and the levels of cytosine methylation changes around the transposable element are higher than the other genomic regions. In addition, the identification and analysis of differentially methylated loci (DML) indicated that the abiotic stresses have also caused targeted methylation changes at specific loci and these DML might have contributed to the capability of plants in adaptation to the abiotic stresses. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrated that abiotic stresses related to global warming and nitrogen deposition readily evoke alterations of cytosine methylation, and which may provide a molecular basis for rapid adaptation by

  9. Detection of Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climatic Change

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.

    1998-05-26

    The objective of this report is to assemble and analyze instrumental climate data and to develop and apply climate models as a basis for (1) detecting greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, and (2) validation of General Circulation Models.

  10. Inducible Arginase 1 Deficiency in Mice Leads to Hyperargininemia and Altered Amino Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    St. Amand, Tim; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D.

    2013-01-01

    Arginase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a loss of the liver arginase isoform, arginase 1 (ARG1), which is the final step in the urea cycle for detoxifying ammonia. ARG1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia, characterized by progressive neurological impairment, persistent growth retardation and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Using the Cre/loxP-directed conditional gene knockout system, we generated an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model by crossing “floxed” Arg1 mice with CreERT2 mice. The resulting mice (Arg-Cre) die about two weeks after tamoxifen administration regardless of the starting age of inducing the knockout. These treated mice were nearly devoid of Arg1 mRNA, protein and liver arginase activity, and exhibited symptoms of hyperammonemia. Plasma amino acid analysis revealed pronounced hyperargininemia and significant alterations in amino acid and guanidino compound metabolism, including increased citrulline and guanidinoacetic acid. Despite no alteration in ornithine levels, concentrations of other amino acids such as proline and the branched-chain amino acids were reduced. In summary, we have generated and characterized an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model exhibiting several pathologic manifestations of hyperargininemia. This model should prove useful for exploring potential treatment options of ARG1 deficiency. PMID:24224027

  11. Inducible arginase 1 deficiency in mice leads to hyperargininemia and altered amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sin, Yuan Yan; Ballantyne, Laurel L; Mukherjee, Kamalika; St Amand, Tim; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2013-01-01

    Arginase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a loss of the liver arginase isoform, arginase 1 (ARG1), which is the final step in the urea cycle for detoxifying ammonia. ARG1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia, characterized by progressive neurological impairment, persistent growth retardation and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Using the Cre/loxP-directed conditional gene knockout system, we generated an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model by crossing "floxed" Arg1 mice with CreER(T2) mice. The resulting mice (Arg-Cre) die about two weeks after tamoxifen administration regardless of the starting age of inducing the knockout. These treated mice were nearly devoid of Arg1 mRNA, protein and liver arginase activity, and exhibited symptoms of hyperammonemia. Plasma amino acid analysis revealed pronounced hyperargininemia and significant alterations in amino acid and guanidino compound metabolism, including increased citrulline and guanidinoacetic acid. Despite no alteration in ornithine levels, concentrations of other amino acids such as proline and the branched-chain amino acids were reduced. In summary, we have generated and characterized an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model exhibiting several pathologic manifestations of hyperargininemia. This model should prove useful for exploring potential treatment options of ARG1 deficiency. PMID:24224027

  12. Experimental pathophysiology of systemic alterations induced by Bothrops asper snake venom.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, José María; Escalante, Teresa; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2009-12-01

    Moderate and severe envenomations by the snake Bothrops asper provoke systemic alterations, such as systemic bleeding, coagulopathy, hypovolemia, hemodynamic instability and shock, and acute renal failure. Systemic hemorrhage is a typical finding of these envenomations, and is primarily caused by the action of P-III snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs). This venom also contains a thrombin-like serine proteinase and a prothrombin-activating P-III SVMP, both of which cause defibrin(ogen)ation. Thrombocytopenia, predominantly induced by a C-type lectin-like protein, and platelet hypoaggregation, caused by the two defibrin(ogen)ating enzymes, also contribute to hemostatic disturbances, which potentiate the systemic bleeding induced by hemorrhagic SVMPs. Cardiovascular disturbances leading to shock are due to the combined effects of hemorrhagic toxins, other venom components that increase vascular permeability, the action of hypotensive agents in the venom and of endogenous mediators, and the potential cardiotoxic effect of some toxins. Renal alterations are likely to be caused by direct cytotoxicity of venom components in the kidney, and by renal ischemia resultant from hypovolemia and hypoperfusion. Lethality induced by B. asper venom is the consequence of several combined effects among which the action of P-III SVMPs is especially relevant. PMID:19303034

  13. Apigenin ameliorates gamma radiation-induced cytogenetic alterations in cultured human blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Begum, Naziya; Prasad, N Rajendra; Kanimozhi, G; Hasan, Annie Q

    2012-08-30

    The aim of the present study was to assess the protective effect of apigenin, a dietary flavone, against cytogenetic alterations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) induced by Cobalt-60 radiation (3Gy). Results of MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2-thiaozolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide] assay revealed that 37.2μM of apigenin was found to be non-toxic in HPBL. At this dose (37.2μM) of apigenin, the LD(50) radiation dose of HPBL increased from 2.9Gy to 3.4Gy, which resulted in a DMF of 1.17. Apigenin (37.2μM) treatment 1h before irradiation significantly (p<0.05) reduced DNA damage in irradiated HPBL as measured by comet assay (% tail DNA, tail length, tail moment, and olive tail moment). Moreover, apigenin treatment significantly decreased the frequencies of dicentric (DC), acentric fragments (AF), and acentric rings (AR) in irradiated HPBL. Apigenin pretreatment also reduced the radiation-induced CBMN (cytokinesis blocked micronuclei) anomalies such as micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and nuclear buds (NBUD) in HPBL. These results also showed that there was a significant correlation between NPB and DC frequencies and MNi and AF+AR. Treatment with apigenin alone had no significant effect on DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations in HPBL. Thus, the current studies indicate that apigenin protects HPBL from radiation-induced cytogenetic alterations. PMID:22516036

  14. Neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate induces morphological alterations in suprachiasmatic nucleus of adult rat.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Castañeda, Julio César; Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Chávez-Saldaña, Margarita; Rojas, Patricia; Gutiérrez-Pérez, Oscar; Rojas, Carolina; Arteaga-Silva, Marcela

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate (MSG) induces circadian disorders in several physiological and behavioural processes regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of neonatal exposure to MSG on locomotor activity, and on morphology, cellular density and expression of proteins, as evaluated by optical density (OD), of vasopressin (VP)-, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive cells in the SCN. Male Wistar rats were used: the MSG group was subcutaneously treated from 3 to 10 days of age with 3.5 mg/g/day. Locomotor activity was evaluated at 90 days of age using 'open-field' test, and the brains were processed for immunohistochemical studies. MSG exposure induced a significant decrease in locomotor activity. VP- and VIP-immunoreactive neuronal densities showed a significant decrease, while the somatic OD showed an increase. Major axes and somatic area were significantly increased in VIP neurons. The cellular and optical densities of GFAP-immunoreactive sections of SCN were significantly increased. These results demonstrated that newborn exposure to MSG induced morphological alterations in SCN cells, an alteration that could be the basis for behavioural disorders observed in the animals. PMID:26799547

  15. A large-scale perspective on stress-induced alterations in resting-state networks.

    PubMed

    Maron-Katz, Adi; Vaisvaser, Sharon; Lin, Tamar; Hendler, Talma; Shamir, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Stress is known to induce large-scale neural modulations. However, its neural effect once the stressor is removed and how it relates to subjective experience are not fully understood. Here we used a statistically sound data-driven approach to investigate alterations in large-scale resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) induced by acute social stress. We compared rsfMRI profiles of 57 healthy male subjects before and after stress induction. Using a parcellation-based univariate statistical analysis, we identified a large-scale rsFC change, involving 490 parcel-pairs. Aiming to characterize this change, we employed statistical enrichment analysis, identifying anatomic structures that were significantly interconnected by these pairs. This analysis revealed strengthening of thalamo-cortical connectivity and weakening of cross-hemispheral parieto-temporal connectivity. These alterations were further found to be associated with change in subjective stress reports. Integrating report-based information on stress sustainment 20 minutes post induction, revealed a single significant rsFC change between the right amygdala and the precuneus, which inversely correlated with the level of subjective recovery. Our study demonstrates the value of enrichment analysis for exploring large-scale network reorganization patterns, and provides new insight on stress-induced neural modulations and their relation to subjective experience. PMID:26898227

  16. Maternal Diet-Induced Obesity Alters Mitochondrial Activity and Redox Status in Mouse Oocytes and Zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Igosheva, Natalia; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Poston, Lucilla; Eckert, Judith J.; Fleming, Tom P.; Duchen, Michael R.; McConnell, Josie

    2010-01-01

    The negative impact of obesity on reproductive success is well documented but the stages at which development of the conceptus is compromised and the mechanisms responsible for the developmental failure still remain unclear. Recent findings suggest that mitochondria may be a contributing factor. However to date no studies have directly addressed the consequences of maternal obesity on mitochondria in early embryogenesis. Using an established murine model of maternal diet induced obesity and a live cell dynamic fluorescence imaging techniques coupled with molecular biology we have investigated the underlying mechanisms of obesity-induced reduced fertility. Our study is the first to show that maternal obesity prior to conception is associated with altered mitochondria in mouse oocytes and zygotes. Specifically, maternal diet-induced obesity in mice led to an increase in mitochondrial potential, mitochondrial DNA content and biogenesis. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was raised while glutathione was depleted and the redox state became more oxidised, suggestive of oxidative stress. These altered mitochondrial properties were associated with significant developmental impairment as shown by the increased number of obese mothers who failed to support blastocyst formation compared to lean dams. We propose that compromised oocyte and early embryo mitochondrial metabolism, resulting from excessive nutrient exposure prior to and during conception, may underlie poor reproductive outcomes frequently reported in obese women. PMID:20404917

  17. A large-scale perspective on stress-induced alterations in resting-state networks

    PubMed Central

    Maron-Katz, Adi; Vaisvaser, Sharon; Lin, Tamar; Hendler, Talma; Shamir, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Stress is known to induce large-scale neural modulations. However, its neural effect once the stressor is removed and how it relates to subjective experience are not fully understood. Here we used a statistically sound data-driven approach to investigate alterations in large-scale resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) induced by acute social stress. We compared rsfMRI profiles of 57 healthy male subjects before and after stress induction. Using a parcellation-based univariate statistical analysis, we identified a large-scale rsFC change, involving 490 parcel-pairs. Aiming to characterize this change, we employed statistical enrichment analysis, identifying anatomic structures that were significantly interconnected by these pairs. This analysis revealed strengthening of thalamo-cortical connectivity and weakening of cross-hemispheral parieto-temporal connectivity. These alterations were further found to be associated with change in subjective stress reports. Integrating report-based information on stress sustainment 20 minutes post induction, revealed a single significant rsFC change between the right amygdala and the precuneus, which inversely correlated with the level of subjective recovery. Our study demonstrates the value of enrichment analysis for exploring large-scale network reorganization patterns, and provides new insight on stress-induced neural modulations and their relation to subjective experience. PMID:26898227

  18. Transient and persistent pain induced connectivity alterations in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Becerra, Lino; Lebel, Alyssa; Berde, Charles; Grant, P Ellen; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of pain-induced changes in functional connectivity was performed in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patients. High field functional magnetic resonance imaging was done in the symptomatic painful state and at follow up in the asymptomatic pain free/recovered state. Two types of connectivity alterations were defined: (1) Transient increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb vs. unaffected limb in the CRPS state, but with normalized connectivity patterns in the recovered state; and (2) Persistent increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb as compared to the unaffected limb that persisted also in the recovered state (recovered affected limb versus recovered unaffected limb). The data support the notion that even after symptomatic recovery, alterations in brain systems persist, particularly in amygdala and basal ganglia systems. Connectivity analysis may provide a measure of temporal normalization of different circuits/regions when evaluating therapeutic interventions for this condition. The results add emphasis to the importance of early recognition and management in improving outcome of pediatric CRPS. PMID:23526938

  19. Transient and Persistent Pain Induced Connectivity Alterations in Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Becerra, Lino; Lebel, Alyssa; Berde, Charles; Grant, P. Ellen; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of pain-induced changes in functional connectivity was performed in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patients. High field functional magnetic resonance imaging was done in the symptomatic painful state and at follow up in the asymptomatic pain free/recovered state. Two types of connectivity alterations were defined: (1) Transient increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb vs. unaffected limb in the CRPS state, but with normalized connectivity patterns in the recovered state; and (2) Persistent increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb as compared to the unaffected limb that persisted also in the recovered state (recovered affected limb versus recovered unaffected limb). The data support the notion that even after symptomatic recovery, alterations in brain systems persist, particularly in amygdala and basal ganglia systems. Connectivity analysis may provide a measure of temporal normalization of different circuits/regions when evaluating therapeutic interventions for this condition. The results add emphasis to the importance of early recognition and management in improving outcome of pediatric CRPS. PMID:23526938

  20. Carcinogenic alterations in murine liver, lung, and uterine tumors induced by in utero exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Lumniczky, K; Antal, S; Unger, E; Wunderlich, L; Hidvégi, E J; Sáfrány, G

    1998-02-01

    The atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the nuclear accident at Chernobyl raised the question of prenatal sensitivity to ionizing radiation-induced cancer. In this study, mice were exposed to single doses of gamma-radiation (0.2-2.0 Gy) at different embryonic stages. The tumor incidence increased with dose from 15% in control mice to 35% in mice irradiated with 2.0 Gy on 18 d of prenatal life. Various oncogenic events were investigated in lymphoid, liver, lung, and uterine tumors. We observed threefold to fivefold increases in myc expression in 25% of the lymphomas, and the expression of Ha-ras and p53 genes decreased in 40% and 60% of the lung tumors by twofold to fivefold. Point mutations were tissue specific: Ha-ras codon 61 mutations were found in about 40% of the liver adenocarcinomas, Ki-ras codon 12 mutations in about 17% of lung tumors, and p53 mutations in about 15% of the lymphomas. Amplification and rearrangement of the p53, myc, and Ha-, Ki- and N-ras genes were not detected. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 4 at the multiple tumor suppressor 1 and 2 genes was observed in all types of malignancies. Allelic losses on chromosome 11 at the p53 locus were found in lymphoid, liver, and lung tumors, but they were absent from uterine tumors. Multiple oncogenic changes were often detected. The frequency of carcinogenic alterations was similar in spontaneous and radiation-induced lymphoid, liver, and uterine tumors. In radiation-induced lung adenocarcinomas, however, the incidences of many oncogenic changes were different from those found in their spontaneous counterparts. This suggests that different oncogenic pathways are activated during spontaneous and in utero gamma-radiation-induced murine lung carcinogenesis. PMID:9496910

  1. OMP gene deletion results in an alteration in odorant-induced mucosal activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Youngentob, S L; Kent, P F; Margolis, F L

    2003-12-01

    Previous behavioral work, using a complex five-odorant identification task, demonstrated that olfactory marker protein (OMP) is critically involved in odor processing to the extent that its loss results in an alteration in odorant quality perception. Exactly how the lack of OMP exerts its influence on the perception of odorant quality is unknown. However, there is considerable neurophysiological evidence that different odorants produce different spatiotemporal patterns of neural activity at the level of the mucosa and that these patterns predict the psychophysically determined perceptual relationship among odorants. In this respect, OMP gene deletion is known to result in a constellation of physiologic defects (i.e., marked reduction in the electroolfactogram (EOG) and altered response and recovery kinetics) that would be expected to alter the odorant-induced spatiotemporal activity patterns that are characteristic of different odorants. This, in turn, would be expected to alter the spatiotemporal patterning of information that results from the mucosal projection onto the bulb, thereby changing odorant quality perception. To test the hypothesis that odorant-induced mucosal activity patterns are altered in mice lacking the gene for OMP, we optically recorded the fluorescent changes in response to odorant stimulation from both the septum and turbinates of both OMP-null and control mice using a voltage-sensitive dye (di-4-ANEPPS Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and a Dalsa 120 x 120, 12-bit CCD camera. To maintain continuity with the previous behavioral work, the odorants 2-propanol, citral, carvone, ethylacetoacetate, and propyl acetate were again used. Each odorant was randomly presented to each mucosal surface in a Latin-Square design. The results of this study demonstrated that, for both mouse strains, there do indeed exist different spatiotemporal activity patterns for different odorants. More importantly, however, these patterns significantly differed between OMP

  2. Antibiotics induce redox-related physiological alterations as part of their lethality.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Daniel J; Belenky, Peter A; Yang, Jason H; MacDonald, I Cody; Martell, Jeffrey D; Takahashi, Noriko; Chan, Clement T Y; Lobritz, Michael A; Braff, Dana; Schwarz, Eric G; Ye, Jonathan D; Pati, Mekhala; Vercruysse, Maarten; Ralifo, Paul S; Allison, Kyle R; Khalil, Ahmad S; Ting, Alice Y; Walker, Graham C; Collins, James J

    2014-05-20

    Deeper understanding of antibiotic-induced physiological responses is critical to identifying means for enhancing our current antibiotic arsenal. Bactericidal antibiotics with diverse targets have been hypothesized to kill bacteria, in part by inducing production of damaging reactive species. This notion has been supported by many groups but has been challenged recently. Here we robustly test the hypothesis using biochemical, enzymatic, and biophysical assays along with genetic and phenotypic experiments. We first used a novel intracellular H2O2 sensor, together with a chemically diverse panel of fluorescent dyes sensitive to an array of reactive species to demonstrate that antibiotics broadly induce redox stress. Subsequent gene-expression analyses reveal that complex antibiotic-induced oxidative stress responses are distinct from canonical responses generated by supraphysiological levels of H2O2. We next developed a method to quantify cellular respiration dynamically and found that bactericidal antibiotics elevate oxygen consumption, indicating significant alterations to bacterial redox physiology. We further show that overexpression of catalase or DNA mismatch repair enzyme, MutS, and antioxidant pretreatment limit antibiotic lethality, indicating that reactive oxygen species causatively contribute to antibiotic killing. Critically, the killing efficacy of antibiotics was diminished under strict anaerobic conditions but could be enhanced by exposure to molecular oxygen or by the addition of alternative electron acceptors, indicating that environmental factors play a role in killing cells physiologically primed for death. This work provides direct evidence that, downstream of their target-specific interactions, bactericidal antibiotics induce complex redox alterations that contribute to cellular damage and death, thus supporting an evolving, expanded model of antibiotic lethality. PMID:24803433

  3. Antibiotics induce redox-related physiological alterations as part of their lethality

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Daniel J.; Belenky, Peter A.; Yang, Jason H.; MacDonald, I. Cody; Martell, Jeffrey D.; Takahashi, Noriko; Chan, Clement T. Y.; Lobritz, Michael A.; Braff, Dana; Schwarz, Eric G.; Ye, Jonathan D.; Pati, Mekhala; Vercruysse, Maarten; Ralifo, Paul S.; Allison, Kyle R.; Khalil, Ahmad S.; Ting, Alice Y.; Walker, Graham C.; Collins, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Deeper understanding of antibiotic-induced physiological responses is critical to identifying means for enhancing our current antibiotic arsenal. Bactericidal antibiotics with diverse targets have been hypothesized to kill bacteria, in part by inducing production of damaging reactive species. This notion has been supported by many groups but has been challenged recently. Here we robustly test the hypothesis using biochemical, enzymatic, and biophysical assays along with genetic and phenotypic experiments. We first used a novel intracellular H2O2 sensor, together with a chemically diverse panel of fluorescent dyes sensitive to an array of reactive species to demonstrate that antibiotics broadly induce redox stress. Subsequent gene-expression analyses reveal that complex antibiotic-induced oxidative stress responses are distinct from canonical responses generated by supraphysiological levels of H2O2. We next developed a method to quantify cellular respiration dynamically and found that bactericidal antibiotics elevate oxygen consumption, indicating significant alterations to bacterial redox physiology. We further show that overexpression of catalase or DNA mismatch repair enzyme, MutS, and antioxidant pretreatment limit antibiotic lethality, indicating that reactive oxygen species causatively contribute to antibiotic killing. Critically, the killing efficacy of antibiotics was diminished under strict anaerobic conditions but could be enhanced by exposure to molecular oxygen or by the addition of alternative electron acceptors, indicating that environmental factors play a role in killing cells physiologically primed for death. This work provides direct evidence that, downstream of their target-specific interactions, bactericidal antibiotics induce complex redox alterations that contribute to cellular damage and death, thus supporting an evolving, expanded model of antibiotic lethality. PMID:24803433

  4. Carotid Body Ablation Abrogates Hypertension and Autonomic Alterations Induced by Intermittent Hypoxia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Rodrigo; Andrade, David C; Lucero, Claudia; Arias, Paulina; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2016-08-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the main feature of obstructive sleep apnea, enhances carotid body (CB) chemosensory responses to hypoxia and produces autonomic dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmias, and hypertension. We tested whether autonomic alterations, arrhythmogenesis, and the progression of hypertension induced by CIH depend on the enhanced CB chemosensory drive, by ablation of the CB chemoreceptors. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to control (Sham) conditions for 7 days and then to CIH (5% O2, 12/h 8 h/d) for a total of 28 days. At 21 days of CIH exposure, rats underwent bilateral CB ablation and then exposed to CIH for 7 additional days. Arterial blood pressure and ventilatory chemoreflex response to hypoxia were measured in conscious rats. In addition, cardiac autonomic imbalance, cardiac baroreflex gain, and arrhythmia score were assessed during the length of the experiments. In separate experimental series, we measured extracellular matrix remodeling content in cardiac atrial tissue and systemic oxidative stress. CIH induced hypertension, enhanced ventilatory response to hypoxia, induced autonomic imbalance toward sympathetic preponderance, reduced baroreflex gain, and increased arrhythmias and atrial fibrosis. CB ablation normalized blood pressure, reduced ventilatory response to hypoxia, and restored cardiac autonomic and baroreflex function. In addition, CB ablation reduced the number of arrhythmias, but not extracellular matrix remodeling or systemic oxidative stress, suggesting that reductions in arrhythmia incidence during CIH were related to normalization of cardiac autonomic balance. Present results show that autonomic alterations induced by CIH are critically dependent on the CB and support a main role for the CB in the CIH-induced hypertension. PMID:27381902

  5. Multiscale alterations in bone matrix quality increased fragility in steroid induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Karunaratne, A; Xi, L; Bentley, L; Sykes, D; Boyde, A; Esapa, C T; Terrill, N J; Brown, S D M; Cox, R D; Thakker, R V; Gupta, H S

    2016-03-01

    A serious adverse clinical effect of glucocorticoid steroid treatment is secondary osteoporosis, enhancing fracture risk in bone. This rapid increase in bone fracture risk is largely independent of bone loss (quantity), and must therefore arise from degradation of the quality of the bone matrix at the micro- and nanoscale. However, we lack an understanding of both the specific alterations in bone quality n steroid-induced osteoporosis as well as the mechanistic effects of these changes. Here we demonstrate alterations in the nanostructural parameters of the mineralized fibrillar collagen matrix, which affect bone quality, and develop a model linking these to increased fracture risk in glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis. Using a mouse model with an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced corticotrophin releasing hormone promoter mutation (Crh(-120/+)) that developed hypercorticosteronaemia and osteoporosis, we utilized in situ mechanical testing with small angle X-ray diffraction, synchrotron micro-computed tomography and quantitative backscattered electron imaging to link altered nano- and microscale deformation mechanisms in the bone matrix to abnormal macroscopic mechanics. We measure the deformation of the mineralized collagen fibrils, and the nano-mechanical parameters including effective fibril modulus and fibril to tissue strain ratio. A significant reduction (51%) of fibril modulus was found in Crh(-120/+) mice. We also find a much larger fibril strain/tissue strain ratio in Crh(-120/+) mice (~1.5) compared to the wild-type mice (~0.5), indicative of a lowered mechanical competence at the nanoscale. Synchrotron microCT show a disruption of intracortical architecture, possibly linked to osteocytic osteolysis. These findings provide a clear quantitative demonstration of how bone quality changes increase macroscopic fragility in secondary osteoporosis. PMID:26657825

  6. Multiscale alterations in bone matrix quality increased fragility in steroid induced osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Karunaratne, A.; Xi, L.; Bentley, L.; Sykes, D.; Boyde, A.; Esapa, C.T.; Terrill, N.J.; Brown, S.D.M.; Cox, R.D.; Thakker, R.V.; Gupta, H.S.

    2016-01-01

    A serious adverse clinical effect of glucocorticoid steroid treatment is secondary osteoporosis, enhancing fracture risk in bone. This rapid increase in bone fracture risk is largely independent of bone loss (quantity), and must therefore arise from degradation of the quality of the bone matrix at the micro- and nanoscale. However, we lack an understanding of both the specific alterations in bone quality n steroid-induced osteoporosis as well as the mechanistic effects of these changes. Here we demonstrate alterations in the nanostructural parameters of the mineralized fibrillar collagen matrix, which affect bone quality, and develop a model linking these to increased fracture risk in glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis. Using a mouse model with an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced corticotrophin releasing hormone promoter mutation (Crh− 120/+) that developed hypercorticosteronaemia and osteoporosis, we utilized in situ mechanical testing with small angle X-ray diffraction, synchrotron micro-computed tomography and quantitative backscattered electron imaging to link altered nano- and microscale deformation mechanisms in the bone matrix to abnormal macroscopic mechanics. We measure the deformation of the mineralized collagen fibrils, and the nano-mechanical parameters including effective fibril modulus and fibril to tissue strain ratio. A significant reduction (51%) of fibril modulus was found in Crh− 120/+ mice. We also find a much larger fibril strain/tissue strain ratio in Crh− 120/+ mice (~ 1.5) compared to the wild-type mice (~ 0.5), indicative of a lowered mechanical competence at the nanoscale. Synchrotron microCT show a disruption of intracortical architecture, possibly linked to osteocytic osteolysis. These findings provide a clear quantitative demonstration of how bone quality changes increase macroscopic fragility in secondary osteoporosis. PMID:26657825

  7. Light-Induced Indeterminacy Alters Shade-Avoiding Tomato Leaf Morphology1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chitwood, Daniel H.; Kumar, Ravi; Ranjan, Aashish; Pelletier, Julie M.; Townsley, Brad T.; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Martinez, Ciera C.; Zumstein, Kristina; Harada, John J.; Maloof, Julin N.; Sinha, Neelima R.

    2015-01-01

    Plants sense the foliar shade of competitors and alter their developmental programs through the shade-avoidance response. Internode and petiole elongation, and changes in overall leaf area and leaf mass per area, are the stereotypical architectural responses to foliar shade in the shoot. However, changes in leaf shape and complexity in response to shade remain incompletely, and qualitatively, described. Using a meta-analysis of more than 18,000 previously published leaflet outlines, we demonstrate that shade avoidance alters leaf shape in domesticated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and wild relatives. The effects of shade avoidance on leaf shape are subtle with respect to individual traits but are combinatorially strong. We then seek to describe the developmental origins of shade-induced changes in leaf shape by swapping plants between light treatments. Leaf size is light responsive late into development, but patterning events, such as stomatal index, are irrevocably specified earlier. Observing that shade induces increases in shoot apical meristem size, we then describe gene expression changes in early leaf primordia and the meristem using laser microdissection. We find that in leaf primordia, shade avoidance is not mediated through canonical pathways described in mature organs but rather through the expression of KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX and other indeterminacy genes, altering known developmental pathways responsible for patterning leaf shape. We also demonstrate that shade-induced changes in leaf primordium gene expression largely do not overlap with those found in successively initiated leaf primordia, providing evidence against classic hypotheses that shaded leaf morphology results from the prolonged production of juvenile leaf types. PMID:26381315

  8. Cytarabine induced cerebellar neuronal damage in juvenile rat: correlating neurobehavioral performance with cellular and genetic alterations.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ronak S; Rachamalla, Mahesh; Chary, Namoju R; Shera, Firdos Y; Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2012-03-11

    Cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a pyrimidine analogue induces cerebellar dysfunction and behavioral abnormalities. Although many in vitro experiments have been conducted in the past demonstrating the lethal potential of Ara-C to cerebellar neurons, there is a paucity of literature available regarding the effects of Ara-C on the cellular and genetic material of cerebellum and its subsequent influence on the neurobehavioral performance in vivo. Rats were treated with Ara-C at the dose levels 50, 100 and 200mg/kg/day for 5 and 14 days by intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. Endpoints of the evaluation included food and water intake, body and organ weight, behavioral parameters, histopathology, oxidative stress, DNA damage, apoptosis, expression of p53, caspase-3 and calbindin D-28K (calbindin) as well as histone acetylation and methylation. Ara-C treatment for 14 days significantly decreased the food and water intake, body weight gain and brain weight in rat as compared to the control. Alterations in various behavioral parameters were observed, indicating the impaired cerebellar function. Further, cellular abnormalities in the cerebellum such as Purkinje cell misalignment and granule cell cytotoxicity were observed. Positive correlation was observed between Ara-C induced disturbance in the motor performance and the Purkinje cell loss in rat cerebellum. Moreover, Ara-C treatment significantly increased the oxidative stress, DNA damage, TUNEL positive cells, p53 and caspase-3 positive cells in the rat cerebellum. Unlike short-term treatment, long-term Ara-C treatment significantly reduced calbindin expression in the cerebellum. Apart from this, 14 days Ara-C treatment led to significant alterations in the histone acetylation and methylation in the cerebellum, while in 5 days treatment no such alterations were observed. Present results indicated that Ara-C, by inducing oxidative stress mediated DNA damage, executes neuronal apoptosis which is accompanied by an increase in the p53

  9. Subtoxic Alterations in Hepatocyte-Derived Exosomes: An Early Step in Drug-Induced Liver Injury?

    PubMed

    Holman, Natalie S; Mosedale, Merrie; Wolf, Kristina K; LeCluyse, Edward L; Watkins, Paul B

    2016-06-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a significant clinical and economic problem in the United States, yet the mechanisms that underlie DILI remain poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests that signaling molecules released by stressed hepatocytes can trigger immune responses that may be common across DILI mechanisms. Extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes, principally hepatocyte-derived exosomes (HDEs), may constitute one such signal. To examine HDE alterations as a function of drug-induced stress, this work utilized prototypical hepatotoxicant acetaminophen (APAP) in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, SD rat hepatocytes, and primary human hepatocytes. HDE were isolated using ExoQuick precipitation reagent and analyzed by quantification of the liver-specific RNAs albumin and microRNA-122 (miR-122). In vivo, significant elevations in circulating exosomal albumin mRNA were observed at subtoxic APAP exposures. Significant increases in exosomal albumin mRNA were also observed in primary rat hepatocytes at subtoxic APAP concentrations. In primary human hepatocytes, APAP elicited increases in both exosomal albumin mRNA and exosomal miR-122 without overt cytotoxicity. However, the number of HDE produced in vitro in response to APAP did not increase with exosomal RNA quantity. We conclude that significant drug-induced alterations in the liver-specific RNA content of HDE occur at subtoxic APAP exposures in vivo and in vitro, and that these changes appear to reflect selective packaging rather than changes in exosome number. The current findings demonstrate that translationally relevant HDE alterations occur in the absence of overt hepatocellular toxicity, and support the hypothesis that HDE released by stressed hepatocytes may mediate early immune responses in DILI. PMID:26962055

  10. Light-Induced Indeterminacy Alters Shade-Avoiding Tomato Leaf Morphology.

    PubMed

    Chitwood, Daniel H; Kumar, Ravi; Ranjan, Aashish; Pelletier, Julie M; Townsley, Brad T; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Martinez, Ciera C; Zumstein, Kristina; Harada, John J; Maloof, Julin N; Sinha, Neelima R

    2015-11-01

    Plants sense the foliar shade of competitors and alter their developmental programs through the shade-avoidance response. Internode and petiole elongation, and changes in overall leaf area and leaf mass per area, are the stereotypical architectural responses to foliar shade in the shoot. However, changes in leaf shape and complexity in response to shade remain incompletely, and qualitatively, described. Using a meta-analysis of more than 18,000 previously published leaflet outlines, we demonstrate that shade avoidance alters leaf shape in domesticated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and wild relatives. The effects of shade avoidance on leaf shape are subtle with respect to individual traits but are combinatorially strong. We then seek to describe the developmental origins of shade-induced changes in leaf shape by swapping plants between light treatments. Leaf size is light responsive late into development, but patterning events, such as stomatal index, are irrevocably specified earlier. Observing that shade induces increases in shoot apical meristem size, we then describe gene expression changes in early leaf primordia and the meristem using laser microdissection. We find that in leaf primordia, shade avoidance is not mediated through canonical pathways described in mature organs but rather through the expression of KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEOBOX and other indeterminacy genes, altering known developmental pathways responsible for patterning leaf shape. We also demonstrate that shade-induced changes in leaf primordium gene expression largely do not overlap with those found in successively initiated leaf primordia, providing evidence against classic hypotheses that shaded leaf morphology results from the prolonged production of juvenile leaf types. PMID:26381315

  11. Surfactant-induced Marangoni eddies alter the coffee-rings of evaporating colloidal drops.

    PubMed

    Still, Tim; Yunker, Peter J; Yodh, Arjun G

    2012-03-20

    The influence of the small ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the evaporation of drying colloidal droplets is quantitatively investigated. The addition of SDS leads to a significantly more uniform deposition of colloidal particles after evaporation (i.e., the so-called "coffee-ring effect" is dramatically altered). We understand this phenomenon in the context of circulating radial Marangoni flows induced by the variation of SDS concentration along the air-water interface. Video microscopy permits the direct visualization of the colloidal particles involved in these flows, revealing a surprisingly stable "Marangoni eddy" that prevents particle deposition at the drop perimeter. PMID:22369657

  12. Detection of Phenotypic Alterations Using High-Content Analysis of Whole-Slide Images.

    PubMed

    Shirinifard, Abbas; Thiagarajan, Suresh; Vogel, Peter; Sablauer, András

    2016-05-01

    Tumors exhibit spatial heterogeneity, as manifested in immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining patterns. Current IHC quantification methods lose information by reducing this heterogeneity in each whole-slide image (WSI) or in selective fields of view to a single staining index. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of an IHC quantification method that uses this heterogeneity to reliably compare IHC staining patterns. We virtually partitioned WSIs by a grid of square tiles, and computed the staining index distributions to quantify heterogeneities. We used samples from these distributions as inputs to non-parametric statistical comparisons. We applied our grid method to fixed tumor samples from 26 tumors obtained from a double-blind preclinical study of a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft model of pediatric neuroblastoma in CD1 nude mice. We compared the results of our grid method to the results based on whole-slide indices, the current practice. We show that our grid method reliably detects phenotypic alterations that other tests based on whole-slide indices fail to detect. Based on robustness and increased sensitivity of statistical inference, we conclude that our method of whole-slide grid quantification is superior to existing whole-slide quantification techniques. PMID:27026297

  13. "Deafness" effects in detecting alterations to auditory feedback during sequence production.

    PubMed

    Pfordresher, Peter Q

    2014-01-01

    Past research has shown that when discrete responses are associated with a perceptual goal, performers may have difficulty detecting stimuli that are commensurate with that goal. Three experiments are reported here that test whether such effects extend to sequence production. In Experiment 1, participants performed 8-note melodies repeatedly, and on each trial a single tone could be altered with respect to its pitch and/or synchrony with actions. Results suggested a selective deficit of detection when feedback pitch was unchanged and the event was slightly delayed. Experiment 2 showed that this "deafness" to feedback is limited to rhythmic motor tasks that require sequencing, in that similar effects did not emerge when participants produced pitch sequences by tapping a single key repeatedly. A third experiment demonstrated similar results to Experiment 1 when the mapping of keys to pitches on the keyboard was reversed. Taken together, results suggest a selective deafness to response-congruent delayed feedback, consistent with the idea that performers suppress previously planned events during production. PMID:23344903

  14. Metabolomic alterations in human cancer cells by vitamin C-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Uetaki, Megumi; Tabata, Sho; Nakasuka, Fumie; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous administration of high-dose vitamin C has recently attracted attention as a cancer therapy. High-dose vitamin C induces pro-oxidant effects and selectively kills cancer cells. However, the anticancer mechanisms of vitamin C are not fully understood. Here, we analyzed metabolic changes induced by vitamin C in MCF7 human breast adenocarcinoma and HT29 human colon cancer cells using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). The metabolomic profiles of both cell lines were dramatically altered after exposure to cytotoxic concentrations of vitamin C. Levels of upstream metabolites in the glycolysis pathway and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were increased in both cell lines following treatment with vitamin C, while adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels and adenylate energy charges were decreased concentration-dependently. Treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and reduced glutathione (GSH) significantly inhibited vitamin C-induced cytotoxicity in MCF7 cells. NAC also suppressed vitamin C-dependent metabolic changes, and NAD treatment prevented vitamin C-induced cell death. Collectively, our data suggests that vitamin C inhibited energy metabolism through NAD depletion, thereby inducing cancer cell death. PMID:26350063

  15. Ethanol-Induced Alterations in Purkinje Neuron Dendrites in Adult and Aging Rats: a Review.

    PubMed

    Dlugos, Cynthia A

    2015-08-01

    Uncomplicated alcoholics suffer from discrete motor dysfunctions that become more pronounced with age. These deficits involve the structure and function of Purkinje neurons (PN), the sole output neurons from the cerebellar cortex. This review focuses on alterations to the PN dendritic arbor in the adult and aging Fischer 344 rat following lengthy alcohol consumption. It describes seminal studies using the Golgi-Cox method which proposed a model for ethanol-induced dendritic regression. Subsequent ultrastructural studies of PN dendrites showed dilation of the extensive smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) which preceded and accompanied dendritic regression. The component of the SER that was most affected by ethanol was the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase pump (SERCA) responsible for resequestration of calcium into the SER. Ethanol-induced decreases in SERCA pump levels, similar to the finding of SER dilation, preceded and occurred concomitantly with dendritic regression. Discrete ethanol-induced deficits in balance also accompanied these decreases. Ethanol-induced ER stress within the SER of PN dendrites was proposed as an underlying cause of dendritic regression. It was recently shown that increased activation of caspase 12, inherent to the ER, occurred in PN of acute slices in ethanol-fed rats and was most pronounced following 40 weeks of ethanol treatment. These findings shed new light into alcohol-induced disruption in PN dendrites providing a new model for the discrete but critical changes in motor function in aging, adult alcoholics. PMID:25648753

  16. Metabolomic alterations in human cancer cells by vitamin C-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Uetaki, Megumi; Tabata, Sho; Nakasuka, Fumie; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous administration of high-dose vitamin C has recently attracted attention as a cancer therapy. High-dose vitamin C induces pro-oxidant effects and selectively kills cancer cells. However, the anticancer mechanisms of vitamin C are not fully understood. Here, we analyzed metabolic changes induced by vitamin C in MCF7 human breast adenocarcinoma and HT29 human colon cancer cells using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). The metabolomic profiles of both cell lines were dramatically altered after exposure to cytotoxic concentrations of vitamin C. Levels of upstream metabolites in the glycolysis pathway and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were increased in both cell lines following treatment with vitamin C, while adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels and adenylate energy charges were decreased concentration-dependently. Treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and reduced glutathione (GSH) significantly inhibited vitamin C-induced cytotoxicity in MCF7 cells. NAC also suppressed vitamin C-dependent metabolic changes, and NAD treatment prevented vitamin C-induced cell death. Collectively, our data suggests that vitamin C inhibited energy metabolism through NAD depletion, thereby inducing cancer cell death. PMID:26350063

  17. [Effects of trimetazidine on altered functions of rat kidney induced by cyclosporine].

    PubMed

    Simon, N; Morin, C; Bruguerolle, B; Tillement, J P

    2001-01-01

    A mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested to explain chronic renal toxicity observed in ciclosporine A therapy. Our study has investigated whether trimetazidine allows inhibition of mitochondrial alteration induced by ciclosporine A. Oxidative phosphorylation was measured by polarography, calcium fluxes by a specific calcium electrode and the mitochondrial swelling by determination of the optical density at 520 nm, using a spectrophotometer. The ciclosporine A effect on the respiratory control was fully inhibited by trimetazidine (EC50 5.10 x 10(-7) M; Emax 11 per cent). Trimetazidine also inhibited the ciclosporine effects on calcium fluxes, i.e. calcium accumulation into the matrix and delay of efflux. Trimetazidine allows a decrease of mitochondrial dysfunction induced by ciclosporine A. PMID:11806297

  18. Cigarette smoke induces alterations in the drug-binding properties of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Clerici, Marco; Colombo, Graziano; Secundo, Francesco; Gagliano, Nicoletta; Colombo, Roberto; Portinaro, Nicola; Giustarini, Daniela; Milzani, Aldo; Rossi, Ranieri; Dalle-Donne, Isabella

    2014-04-01

    Albumin is the most abundant plasma protein and serves as a transport and depot protein for numerous endogenous and exogenous compounds. Earlier we had shown that cigarette smoke induces carbonylation of human serum albumin (HSA) and alters its redox state. Here, the effect of whole-phase cigarette smoke on HSA ligand-binding properties was evaluated by equilibrium dialysis and size-exclusion HPLC or tryptophan fluorescence. The binding of salicylic acid and naproxen to cigarette smoke-oxidized HSA resulted to be impaired, unlike that of curcumin and genistein, chosen as representative ligands. Binding of the hydrophobic fluorescent probe 4,4'-bis(1-anilino-8-naphtalenesulfonic acid) (bis-ANS), intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, and susceptibility to enzymatic proteolysis revealed slight changes in albumin conformation. These findings suggest that cigarette smoke-induced modifications of HSA may affect the binding, transport and bioavailability of specific ligands in smokers. PMID:24388826

  19. Altering a gene involved in nuclear distribution increases the repeat-induced point mutation process in the fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed Central

    Bouhouche, Khaled; Zickler, Denise; Debuchy, Robert; Arnaise, Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is a homology-dependent gene-silencing mechanism that introduces C:G-to-T:A transitions in duplicated DNA segments. Cis-duplicated sequences can also be affected by another mechanism called premeiotic recombination (PR). Both are active over the sexual cycle of some filamentous fungi, e.g., Neurospora crassa and Podospora anserina. During the sexual cycle, several developmental steps require precise nuclear movement and positioning, but connections between RIP, PR, and nuclear distributions have not yet been established. Previous work has led to the isolation of ami1, the P. anserina ortholog of the Aspergillus nidulans apsA gene, which is required for nuclear positioning. We show here that ami1 is involved in nuclear distribution during the sexual cycle and that alteration of ami1 delays the fruiting-body development. We also demonstrate that ami1 alteration affects loss of transgene functions during the sexual cycle. Genetically linked multiple copies of transgenes are affected by RIP and PR much more frequently in an ami1 mutant cross than in a wild-type cross. Our results suggest that the developmental slowdown of the ami1 mutant during the period of RIP and PR increases time exposure to the duplication detection system and thus increases the frequency of RIP and PR. PMID:15166143

  20. Root Exudate-Induced Alterations in Bacillus cereus Cell Wall Contribute to Root Colonization and Plant Growth Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Swarnalee; Rani, T. Swaroopa; Podile, Appa Rao

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of an interaction between plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and plants may depend on the chemical composition of root exudates (REs). We report the colonization of tobacco, and not groundnut, roots by a non-rhizospheric Bacillus cereus (MTCC 430). There was a differential alteration in the cell wall components of B. cereus in response to the REs from tobacco and groundnut. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy revealed a split in amide I region of B. cereus cells exposed to tobacco-root exudates (TRE), compared to those exposed to groundnut-root exudates (GRE). In addition, changes in exopolysaccharides and lipid-packing were observed in B. cereus grown in TRE-amended minimal media that were not detectable in GRE-amended media. Cell-wall proteome analyses revealed upregulation of oxidative stress-related alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, and DNA-protecting protein chain (Dlp-2), in response to GRE and TRE, respectively. Metabolism-related enzymes like 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase and 2-methylcitrate dehydratase and a 60 kDa chaperonin were up-regulated in response to TRE and GRE. In response to B. cereus, the plant roots altered their exudate-chemodiversity with respect to carbohydrates, organic acids, alkanes, and polyols. TRE-induced changes in surface components of B. cereus may contribute to successful root colonization and subsequent plant growth promotion. PMID:24205213

  1. CO2-induced ocean acidification increases anxiety in Rockfish via alteration of GABAA receptor functioning

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Trevor James; Holcombe, Adam; Tresguerres, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The average surface pH of the ocean is dropping at a rapid rate due to the dissolution of anthropogenic CO2, raising concerns for marine life. Additionally, some coastal areas periodically experience upwelling of CO2-enriched water with reduced pH. Previous research has demonstrated ocean acidification (OA)-induced changes in behavioural and sensory systems including olfaction, which is due to altered function of neural gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. Here, we used a camera-based tracking software system to examine whether OA-dependent changes in GABAA receptors affect anxiety in juvenile Californian rockfish (Sebastes diploproa). Anxiety was estimated using behavioural tests that measure light/dark preference (scototaxis) and proximity to an object. After one week in OA conditions projected for the next century in the California shore (1125 ± 100 µatm, pH 7.75), anxiety was significantly increased relative to controls (483 ± 40 µatm CO2, pH 8.1). The GABAA-receptor agonist muscimol, but not the antagonist gabazine, caused a significant increase in anxiety consistent with altered Cl− flux in OA-exposed fish. OA-exposed fish remained more anxious even after 7 days back in control seawater; however, they resumed their normal behaviour by day 12. These results show that OA could severely alter rockfish behaviour; however, this effect is reversible. PMID:24285203

  2. Air pollution induced alterations in assimilate partitioning in Anagallis arvensis L

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, F.A.; Iqbal, M.; Ahmad, Z.; Saquib, M.; Ghouse, A.K.M. )

    1989-04-01

    The Thermal Power Plant Complex of Kasimpur (Aligarh, UP, India) emits enormous amounts of oxides of sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon as well as particulate matters on consuming 3192 MT of coal/day. These effluents induce significant alterations in carbon allocation in Anagallis arvensis populations. Monthly samples of 10 plants each were collected on random basis at seedling to mature stage from 0.5, 2, 6, 12 and 20 km leeward from the power plant. In oven dried samples, assimilate partitioning was noted to be more severely altered by the air pollutants in the seedling stage. In 2 and 3 months old populations, photosynthate allocation to root and shoot was not altered noticeably. Considerable changes in carbon allocation were noted in 4 mo old mature stage. The carbon allocation to fruit was 3 fold and to seed was about 4 fold greater in the population thriving 20 km away from the source than in those growing in the vicinity of the source. Assimilate partitioning was linearly related to the distance from power plant and the productivity of the populations.

  3. Glomerular alterations in uranyl acetate-induced acute renal failure in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, S.; Nagase, M.; Honda, N.; Hishida, A.

    1984-12-01

    The study was performed to elucidate the progression and regression of superficial and inner glomerular alterations in uranyl acetate-induced renal failure in rabbits. Fifteen hours after the drug injection, creatinine clearance (CCr) decreased to 55% of controls with slightly elevated plasma creatinine concentration (initiation stage). After 5 days, urine flow and CCr decreased to approximately zero, with severe azotemia (maintenance stage). Scanning electron microscopic observations in these stages revealed a flattening and spreading of podocyte cell bodies associated with loss of epithelial foot processes, and reduction in the density of endothelial fenestrae. These changes were more advanced in the maintenance stage. Glomerular and fenestral diameters did not significantly change in the initiation stage but increased in the maintenance stage. There was no significant difference in these morphologic alterations, however, between the superficial and inner glomeruli. Glomerular alterations reverted to normal within 14 days, with good recovery of glomerular function. The findings show no significant difference in the progression or regression of the glomerular changes between the superficial and deep cortex. These morphologic changes may play a role in the reduction of CCr observed in this model.

  4. Alterations in lenticular proteins during ageing and selenite-induced cataractogenesis in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Sakthivel, Muniyan; Elanchezhian, Rajan; Thomas, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To determine putative alterations in the major lenticular proteins in Wistar rats of different ages and to compare these alterations with those occurring in rats with selenite-induced cataract. Methods Lenticular transparency was determined by morphological examination using slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Alterations in lenticular protein were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE (SDS–PAGE) and confirmed immunologically by western blot. Results Morphological examination did not reveal observable opacities in the lenses of the rats of different age groups; however, dense nuclear opacities were noted in lenses of rats in the selenite-cataract group. Western blot assays revealed age-related changes in soluble and urea-soluble lenticular proteins. Decreased αA- and βB1-crystallins in the soluble fraction and aggregation of αA-crystallin, in addition to the degraded fragment of βB1-crystallin, in the urea-soluble fraction appeared to occur in relation to increasing age of the rats from which the lenses were taken; similarly, cytoskeletal proteins appeared to decline with increasing age. The lenses from rats in the selenite-cataract group exhibited similar changes, except that there was also high molecular weight aggregation of αA-crystallin. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that there is loss, as well as aggregation, of αA-crystallin in the aging rat lens, although there is no accompanying loss of lenticular transparency. PMID:20300567

  5. Alterations in the hippocampal endocannabinoid system in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Massa, Federico; Mancini, Giacomo; Schmidt, Helmut; Steindel, Frauke; Mackie, Ken; Angioni, Carlo; Oliet, Stéphane H.R.; Geisslinger, Gerd; Lutz, Beat

    2010-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system plays central roles in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. Its alteration in activity contributes to the development and maintenance of obesity. Stimulation of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) increases feeding, enhances reward aspects of eating and promotes lipogenesis, while its blockade decreases appetite, sustains weight loss, increases insulin sensitivity, and alleviates dysregulation of lipid metabolism. The hypothesis has been put forward that the eCB system is over-active in obesity. Hippocampal circuits are not directly involved in the neuronal control of food intake and appetite, but they play important roles in hedonic aspects of eating. We investigated the possibility whether or not diet-induced obesity (DIO) alters the functioning of the hippocampal eCB system. We found that levels of the two eCBs, 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) and anandamide, were increased in the hippocampus from DIO mice, with a concomitant increase of the 2-AG synthesizing enzyme diacylglycerol lipase-α and increased CB1 receptor immunoreactivity in CA1 and CA3 regions, while CB1 receptor agonist-induced GTPγS binding was unchanged. eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity was changed in the CA1 region, as depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI) and long-term depression of inhibitory synapses (I-LTD) were enhanced. Functionality of CB1 receptors in GABAergic neurons was furthermore revealed, as mice specifically lacking CB1 receptors on this neuronal population were partly resistant to DIO. Our results showed that DIO-induced changes in the eCB system does not affect only tissues directly involved in the metabolic regulation, but also brain regions mediating hedonic aspects of eating and influencing cognitive processes. PMID:20445053

  6. Ethanol induced impairment of glucose metabolism involves alterations of GABAergic signaling in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuanglian; Luo, Yan; Feng, Allen; Li, Tao; Yang, Xupeng; Nofech-Mozes, Roy; Yu, Meng; Wang, Changhui; Li, Ziwei; Yi, Fan; Liu, Chuanyong; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2014-12-01

    Alcohol overindulgence is a risk factor of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the mechanisms by which alcohol overindulgence damages glucose metabolism remain unclear. Pancreatic islet β-cells are endowed with type-A γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAAR) mediated autocrine signaling mechanism, which regulates insulin secretion and fine-tunes glucose metabolism. In neurons GABAAR is one of the major targets for alcohol. This study investigated whether ethanol alters glucose metabolism by affecting GABAAR signaling in pancreatic β-cells. Blood glucose level of test mice was measured using a blood glucose meter. Insulin secretion by the pancreatic β-cell line INS-1 cells was examined using a specific insulin ELISA kit. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to evaluate GABA-elicited current in INS-1 cells. Western blot and immunostaining were used to measure the expression of GABAAR subunits in mouse pancreatic tissues or in INS-1 cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of ethanol (3.0g/kg body weight) to mice altered glucose metabolism, which was associated with decreased expression of GABAAR α1- and δ- subunits on the surface of pancreatic β-cells. Acute treatment of cultured INS-1cells with ethanol (60mM) decreased the GABA-induced current and reduced insulin secretion. In contrast, treating INS-1 cells with GABA (100μM) largely prevented the ethanol-induced reduction of insulin release. Importantly, pre-treating mice with GABA (i.p., 1.5mg/kg body weight) partially reversed ethanol-induced impairment of glucose homeostasis in mice. Our data suggest a novel role of pancreatic GABA signaling in protecting pancreatic islet β-cells from ethanol-induced dysfunction. PMID:25456265

  7. Plasma-induced sputtering and chemical alteration of solar system surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Cassidy, T. A.; Leblanc, F.

    The surfaces of a number of solar system bodies are directly exposed to relative intense plasmas as well as UV photon bombardment. This irradiation can produce a very tenuous atmosphere and can chemically alter the surface (Johnson 1990; 2002; Madey et al. 2002). Such processes have been shown to be critical in understanding the ambient gas and plasma as well as the reflectance properties of the icy Galilean satellites (e.g., Johnson et al. 2004), and similarly affect other icy bodies in the outer solar system. Plasma and UV sputtering have produced, for instance, detectable molecular oxygen atmospheres at Europa (e.g., Shematovich et al. 2005) and Ganymede and the molecular oxygen above Saturn's main rings (Johnson et al. 2006). This bombardment also sputters (Jurac et al. 2001) and charges (Jurac et al. 1995) the icy grains in Saturn's tenuous rings. Plasma and UV irradiation have been shown to produce the alkali atmospheres observed at the Moon and Mercury (e.g., Leblanc and Johnson 2002; Leblanc et al. 2003) as well as at Europa (e.g., Leblanc et al. 2005; Cassidy and Johnson 2005). In this paper I will review the data on the effect of plasmas on laboratory surfaces and then will describe its application to regoliths (Cassidy and Johnson 2005) on a number of solar system bodies. References: Cassidy, T.A. and R.E. Johnson, Monte Carlo madel of sputtering and other ejection processes within a regolith", Icarus 176, 499-507 (2005). Johnson, R.E., Energetic Charged-Particle Interactions with Atmospheres and Surfaces, Springer (1990). Johnson, R.E., Surface Boundary Layer Atmospheres, in Atmospheres in the Solar System: Comparative Aeronomy. Geophys. Mono. 130, 203-219 (2002). Johnson, R.E., R.W. Carlson, J.F. Cooper, C. Paranicas, M.H. Moore, and M.C. Wong, "Radiation Effects on the Surface of the Galilean Satellites", In Jupiter-The Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere, Ed. F. Bagenal, T. Dowling, and W.B. McKinnon, Cambridge University, Cambridge. Chapter 20, pp

  8. Altered Sporulation and Respiratory Patterns in Mutants of Bacillus subtilis Induced by Acridine Orange

    PubMed Central

    Bott, K. F.; Davidoff-Abelson, R.

    1966-01-01

    Bott, K. F. (The University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.), and R. Davidoff-Abelson. Altered sporulation and respiratory patterns in mutants of Bacillus subtilis induced by acridine orange. J. Bacteriol. 92:229–240. 1966.—The addition of acridine orange to vegetative cultures of Bacillus subtilis induces the formation of sporulation mutants at a frequency of 20% or greater. These mutants are grouped into seven categories which reflect their different morphological properties. They are altered in their vegetative metabolism, as indicated by abnormal growth on synthetic media. Sporulation of these mutants is impaired at several levels, all of which are stable upon repeated subculturing. The initial stages of sporulation which require no increased metabolic activity (proteolytic enzyme activity and antibiotic production) are functional in all strains, but glucose dehydrogenase activity, an enzyme associated with early synthetic functions in spore synthesis, is significantly reduced. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase is slightly depressed. It is suggested that acridine orange interacts with a cellular constituent controlling respiration and consequently prevents an increased metabolic activity that may be associated with normal spore synthesis. Images PMID:4957434

  9. Molecular alterations in tumorigenic human bronchial and breast epithelial cells induced by high let radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, T. K.; Zhao, Y. L.; Roy, D.; Piao, C. Q.; Calaf, G.; Hall, E. J.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequence of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer. In the present study, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) and breast (MCF-10F) cells were irradiated with graded doses of either 150 keV/μm alpha particles or 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. Cell fusion studies indicated that radiation-induced tumorigenic phenotype in BEP2D cells could be completely suppressed by fusion with non-tumorigenic BEP2D cells. The differential expressions of known genes between tumorigenic bronchial and breast cells induced by alpha particles and their respective control cultures were compared using cDNA expression array. Among the 11 genes identified to be differentially expressed in BEP2D cells, three ( DCC, DNA-PK and p21 CIPI) were shown to be consistently down-regulated by 2 to 4 fold in all the 5 tumor cell lines examined. In contrast, their expressions in the fusion cell lines were comparable to control BEP2D cells. Similarly, expression levels of a series of genes were found to be altered in a step-wise manner among tumorigenic MCF-10F cells. The results are highly suggestive that functional alterations of these genes may be causally related to the carcinogenic process.

  10. Ultraviolet B-induced alterations of the skin barrier and epidermal calcium gradient.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shao Jun; Chu, Ai Wu; Lu, Zhen Feng; Pan, Min Hong; Che, Dun Fa; Zhou, Xiao Jun

    2007-12-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation induces a variety of cutaneous changes, including epidermal permeability barrier disruption. In the present study, we assessed the effects of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation in epidermal barrier function and calcium distribution in murine epidermis. Adult hairless mice were exposed to a single dose of UVB (0.15 J/cm(2)). Barrier function was evaluated by transepidermal water loss (TEWL), lanthanum perfusion. The morphological alterations were examined by histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy using ruthenium tetroxide (RuO(4)) postfixation. For evaluation of the effect on epidermal calcium distribution, the ion-capture cytochemistry was employed. UVB irradiation caused a significant increase in TEWL, which peaked at day 4. In parallel, the increased number of sunburn cells and the changes in epidermal hyperplasia and proliferation were observed. Electron microscopic observation demonstrated that the water-soluble lanthanum tracer was present in the extracellular stratum corneum domains, and the increased intercellular permeability was correlated with defective organization of the extracellular lipid lamellar bilayers of the stratum corneum. Moreover, UVB irradiation also caused an appearance of calcium precipitates in the stratum corneum and transitional cell layers as well as the increased cytosolic calcium in the lower epidermis, reflecting the alterations of the epidermal calcium gradient. These results suggest that the changes of the epidermal calcium distribution pattern may correlate with the perturbation of the epidermal barrier induced by UVB irradiation. PMID:18031457

  11. Alterations induced by chronic lead exposure on the cells of circadian pacemaker of developing rats

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Castañeda, Julio César; Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Rojas, Patricia; Chávez-Saldaña, Margarita; Pérez, Oscar Gutiérrez; Montes, Sergio; Ríos, Camilo

    2011-01-01

    Lead (Pb) exposure alters the temporal organization of several physiological and behavioural processes in which the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus plays a fundamental role. In this study, we evaluated the effects of chronic early Pb exposure (CePbe) on the morphology, cellular density and relative optical density (OD) in the cells of the SCN of male rats. Female Wistar rats were exposed during gestation and lactation to a Pb solution containing 320 ppm of Pb acetate through drinking water. After weaning, the pups were maintained with the same drinking water until sacrificed at 90 days of age. Pb levels in the blood, hypothalamus, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were significantly increased in the experimental group. Chronic early Pb exposure induced a significant increase in the minor and major axes and somatic area of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)- and vasopressin (VP)-immunoreactive neurons. The density of VIP-, VP- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive cells showed a significant decrease in the experimental group. OD analysis showed a significant increase in VIP neurons of the experimental group. The results showed that CePbe induced alterations in the cells of the SCN, as evidenced by modifications in soma morphology, cellular density and OD in circadian pacemaker cells. These findings provide a morphological and cellular basis for deficits in circadian rhythms documented in Pb-exposed animals. PMID:21324006

  12. Silver nanoparticle-induced hemoglobin decrease involves alteration of histone 3 methylation status.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi; Zhang, Jie; Hu, Qinglin; Xu, Ming; Chen, Yue; Hu, Guoqing; Zhao, Meirong; Liu, Sijin

    2015-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles (nanosilver, AgNPs) have been shown to induce toxicity in vitro and in vivo; however, the molecular bases underlying the detrimental effects have not been thoroughly understood. Although there are numerous studies on its genotoxicity, only a few studies have investigated the epigenetic changes, even less on the changes of histone modifications by AgNPs. In the current study, we probed the AgNP-induced alterations to histone methylation that could be responsible for globin reduction in erythroid cells. AgNP treatment caused a significant reduction of global methylation level for histone 3 (H3) in erythroid MEL cells at sublethal concentrations, devoid of oxidative stress. The ChIP-PCR analyses demonstrated that methylation of H3 at lysine (Lys) 4 (H3K4) and Lys 79 (H3K79) on the β-globin locus was greatly reduced. The reduction in methylation could be attributed to decreased histone methyltransferase DOT-1L and MLL levels as well as the direct binding between AgNPs to H3/H4 that provide steric hindrance to prevent methylation as predicted by the all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. This direct interaction was further proved by AgNP-mediated pull-down assay and immunoprecipitation assay. These changes, together with decreased RNA polymerase II activity and chromatin binding at this locus, resulted in decreased hemoglobin production. By contrast, Ag ion-treated cells showed no alterations in histone methylation level. Taken together, these results showed a novel finding in which AgNPs could alter the methylation status of histone. Our study therefore opens a new avenue to study the biological effects of AgNPs at sublethal concentrations from the perspective of epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:26295435

  13. Alterations in the Porcine Colon Microbiota Induced by the Gastrointestinal Nematode Trichuris suis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong; Navarro, Karl; Couch, Robin D.; Hill, Dolores; Urban, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Helminth parasites ensure their survival by regulating host immunity through mechanisms that dampen inflammation. These properties have recently been exploited therapeutically to treat human diseases. The biocomplexity of the intestinal lumen suggests that interactions between the parasite and the intestinal microbiota would also influence inflammation. In this study, we characterized the microbiota in the porcine proximal colon in response to Trichuris suis (whipworm) infection using 16S rRNA gene-based and whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing. A 21-day T. suis infection in four pigs induced a significant change in the composition of the proximal colon microbiota compared to that of three parasite-naive pigs. Among the 15 phyla identified, the abundances of Proteobacteria and Deferribacteres were changed in infected pigs. The abundances of approximately 13% of genera were significantly altered by infection. Changes in relative abundances of Succinivibrio and Mucispirillum, for example, may relate to alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and niche disruptions in mucosal interfaces induced by parasitic infection, respectively. Of note, infection by T. suis led to a significant shift in the metabolic potential of the proximal colon microbiota, where 26% of all metabolic pathways identified were affected. Besides carbohydrate metabolism, lysine biosynthesis was repressed as well. A metabolomic analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the luminal contents showed a relative absence in infected pigs of cofactors for carbohydrate and lysine biosynthesis, as well as an accumulation of oleic acid, suggesting altered fatty acid absorption contributing to local inflammation. Our findings should facilitate development of strategies for parasitic control in pigs and humans. PMID:22493085

  14. Glomerular lesions induced in the rabbit by physicochemically altered homologous IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Cavalot, F.; Miyata, M.; Vladutiu, A.; Terranova, V.; Dubiski, S.; Burlingame, R.; Tan, E.; Brentjens, J.; Milgrom, F.; Andres, G.

    1992-01-01

    Immunization of rabbits with physicochemically altered homologous or even autologous IgG induces formation of antibodies combining with IgG of rabbit and of foreign species. Cardiac but not renal lesions were reported in such animals. This study examined the nephritogenic potential of the immune response to cationized or heat-aggregated homologous IgG of b9 or b4 allotype in rabbits of the b4 allotype. Rabbits injected with either b9 or b4 cationized IgG produced antibodies reactive with rabbit and human IgG and with histones; they also developed abnormal glomerular deposits of IgG b4 and C3 corresponding to alterations of the glomerular basement membranes (GBM). Rabbits injected with either b9 or b4 aggregated IgG developed antibodies reactive with rabbit and human IgG and abnormal glomerular deposits of IgG b4 and C3 in the GBM and in the mesangium with subendothelial and mesangial electron-dense deposits. Some rabbits in both groups had proliferative and exudative glomerulonephritis and proteinuria. The results showed that immunization of rabbits with physicochemically altered homologous IgG induces an immune response to rabbit and human IgG and to histones as well as glomerular deposits of autologous IgG and C3 and other glomerular lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 30 PMID:1546743

  15. Altered Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha expression levels correlate with coronary vessel anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Wikenheiser, Jamie; Wolfram, Julie A.; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Yang, Ke; Karunamuni, Ganga; Wilson, David L.; Semenza, Gregg L.; Agani, Faton; Fisher, Steven A.; Ward, Nicole; Watanabe, Michiko

    2009-01-01

    The outflow tract myocardium and other regions corresponding to the location of the major coronary vessels of the developing chicken heart, display a high level of hypoxia as assessed by the hypoxia indicator EF5. The EF5 positive tissues were also specifically positive for nuclear-localized hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), the oxygen-sensitive component of the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) heterodimer. This led to our hypothesis that there is a “template” of hypoxic tissue that determines the stereotyped pattern of the major coronary vessels. In this study we disturbed this template by altering ambient oxygen levels (hypoxia 15%; hyperoxia 75-40%) during the early phases of avian coronary vessel development, in order to alter tissue hypoxia, HIF-1α protein expression and its downstream target genes without high mortality. We also altered HIF-1α gene expression in the embryonic outflow tract cardiomyocytes by injecting an adenovirus containing a constitutively active form of HIF-1α (AdCA5). We assayed for coronary anomalies using anti-alpha-smooth muscle actin immunohistology. When incubated under abnormal oxygen levels or injected with a low titer of the AdCA5, coronary arteries displayed deviations from their normal proximal connections to the aorta. These deviations were similar to known clinical anomalies of coronary arteries. These findings indicated that developing coronary vessels may be subject to a level of regulation that is dependent on differential oxygen levels within cardiac tissues and subsequent HIF-1 regulation of gene expression. PMID:19777592

  16. Environmental Particulate Matter Induces Murine Intestinal Inflammatory Responses and Alters the Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Kish, Lisa; Hotte, Naomi; Kaplan, Gilaad G.; Vincent, Renaud; Tso, Robert; Gänzle, Michael; Rioux, Kevin P.; Thiesen, Aducio; Barkema, Herman W.; Wine, Eytan; Madsen, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Particulate matter (PM) is a key pollutant in ambient air that has been associated with negative health conditions in urban environments. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of orally administered PM on the gut microbiome and immune function under normal and inflammatory conditions. Methods Wild-type 129/SvEv mice were gavaged with Ottawa urban PM10 (EHC-93) for 7–14 days and mucosal gene expression analyzed using Ingenuity Pathways software. Intestinal permeability was measured by lactulose/mannitol excretion in urine. At sacrifice, segments of small and large intestine were cultured and cytokine secretion measured. Splenocytes were isolated and incubated with PM10 for measurement of proliferation. Long-term effects of exposure (35 days) on intestinal cytokine expression were measured in wild-type and IL-10 deficient (IL-10−/−) mice. Microbial composition of stool samples was assessed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. Short chain fatty acids were measured in caecum. Results Short-term treatment of wild-type mice with PM10 altered immune gene expression, enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in the small intestine, increased gut permeability, and induced hyporesponsiveness in splenocytes. Long-term treatment of wild-type and IL-10−/− mice increased pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the colon and altered short chain fatty acid concentrations and microbial composition. IL-10−/− mice had increased disease as evidenced by enhanced histological damage. Conclusions Ingestion of airborne particulate matter alters the gut microbiome and induces acute and chronic inflammatory responses in the intestine. PMID:23638009

  17. Parasite-induced alteration of odour responses in an amphipod-acanthocephalan system.

    PubMed

    Stone, Charles F; Moore, Janice

    2014-11-01

    Odour-related behaviours in aquatic invertebrates are important and effective anti-predator behaviours. Parasites often alter invertebrate host behaviours to increase transmission to hosts. This study investigated the responses of the amphipod Hyalella azteca when presented with two predator chemical cues: (i) alarm pheromones produced by conspecifics and (ii) kairomones produced by a predatory Green Sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus). We compared the responses of amphipods uninfected and infected with the acanthocepalan parasite Leptorhynchiodes thecatus. Uninfected amphipods reduced activity and increased refuge use after detecting both the alarm pheromones and predator kairomones. Infected amphipods spent significantly more time being active and less time on the refuge than uninfected amphipods, and behaved as if they had not detected the chemical stimulus. Therefore, L. thecatus infections disrupt the amphipods' anti-predator behaviours and likely make their hosts more susceptible to predation. PMID:25200352

  18. Epigenetic alterations induced by genotoxic occupational and environmental human chemical carcinogens: A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Grace; Pogribny, Igor P; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic alterations play an important role in chemically-induced carcinogenesis. Although the epigenome and genome may be equally important in carcinogenicity, the genotoxicity of chemical agents and exposure-related transcriptomic responses have been more thoroughly studied and characterized. To better understand the evidence for epigenetic alterations of human carcinogens, and the potential association with genotoxic endpoints, we conducted a systematic review of published studies of genotoxic carcinogens that reported epigenetic endpoints. Specifically, we searched for publications reporting epigenetic effects for the 28 agents and occupations included in Monograph Volume 100F of the International Agency for the Research on Cancer (IARC) that were classified as "carcinogenic to humans" (Group 1) with strong evidence of genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. We identified a total of 158 studies that evaluated epigenetic alterations for 12 of these 28 carcinogenic agents and occupations (1,3-butadiene, 4-aminobiphenyl, aflatoxins, benzene, benzidine, benzo[a]pyrene, coke production, formaldehyde, occupational exposure as a painter, sulfur mustard, and vinyl chloride). Aberrant DNA methylation was most commonly studied, followed by altered expression of non-coding RNAs and histone changes (totaling 85, 59 and 25 studies, respectively). For 3 carcinogens (aflatoxins, benzene and benzo[a]pyrene), 10 or more studies reported epigenetic effects. However, epigenetic studies were sparse for the remaining 9 carcinogens; for 4 agents, only 1 or 2 published reports were identified. While further research is needed to better identify carcinogenesis-associated epigenetic perturbations for many potential carcinogens, published reports on specific epigenetic endpoints can be systematically identified and increasingly incorporated in cancer hazard assessments. PMID:27234561

  19. Caloric Restriction Normalizes Obesity-Induced Alterations on Regulators of Skeletal Muscle Growth Signaling.

    PubMed

    Dungan, Cory M; Li, Ji; Williamson, David L

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the impact of caloric restriction on high fat diet-induced alterations on regulators of skeletal muscle growth. We hypothesized that caloric restriction would reverse the negative effects of high fat diet-induced obesity on REDD1 and mTOR-related signaling. Following an initial 8 week period of HF diet-induced obesity, caloric restriction (CR ~30 %) was employed while mice continued to consume either a low (LF) or high fat (HF) diet for 8 weeks. Western analysis of skeletal muscle showed that CR reduced (p < 0.05) the obesity-related effects on the lipogenic protein, SREBP1. Likewise, CR reduced (p < 0.05) the obesity-related effects on the hyperactivation of mTORC1 and ERK1/2 signaling to levels comparable to the LF mice. CR also reduced (p < 0.05) obesity-induced expression of negative regulators of growth, REDD1 and cleaved caspase 3. These findings have implications for on the reversibility of dysregulated growth signaling in obese skeletal muscle, using short-term caloric restriction. PMID:27289530

  20. Beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage and alteration in the expression patterns of DNA repair-related genes.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry M; Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Hassan, Memy H; Bakheet, Saleh A

    2013-09-01

    Beryllium metal has physical properties that make its use essential for very specific applications, such as medical diagnostics, nuclear/fusion reactors and aerospace applications. Because of the widespread human exposure to beryllium metals and the discrepancy of the genotoxic results in the reported literature, detail assessments of the genetic damage of beryllium are warranted. Mice exposed to beryllium chloride at an oral dose of 23mg/kg for seven consecutive days exhibited a significant increase in the level of DNA-strand breaking and micronuclei formation as detected by a bone marrow standard comet assay and micronucleus test. Whereas slight beryllium chloride-induced oxidative DNA damage was detected following formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase digestion, digestion with endonuclease III resulted in considerable increases in oxidative DNA damage after the 11.5 and 23mg/kg/day treatment as detected by enzyme-modified comet assays. Increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was also directly correlated with increased bone marrow micronuclei formation and DNA strand breaks, which further confirm the involvement of oxidative stress in the induction of bone marrow genetic damage after exposure to beryllium chloride. Gene expression analysis on the bone marrow cells from beryllium chloride-exposed mice showed significant alterations in genes associated with DNA damage repair. Therefore, beryllium chloride may cause genetic damage to bone marrow cells due to the oxidative stress and the induced unrepaired DNA damage is probably due to the down-regulation in the expression of DNA repair genes, which may lead to genotoxicity and eventually cause carcinogenicity. PMID:23793613

  1. Morpho-anatomical and growth alterations induced by arsenic in Cajanus cajan (L.) DC (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Pita-Barbosa, Alice; Gonçalves, Elton Carvalho; Azevedo, Aristéa Alves

    2015-08-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic element to most organisms. Studies investigating anatomic alterations due to As exposure in plants are scarce but of utmost importance to the establishment of environmental biomonitoring techniques. So, this study aimed to investigate the effects of As on the development and initial root growth in Cajanus cajan (Fabaceae), characterize and quantify the possible damages, evaluate genotoxic effects, and identify structural markers to be used in environmental bioindication. Plants were exposed hydroponically to 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mg As L(-1), as sodium arsenate. Growth parameters were measured, and in the end of the exposure, root samples were analyzed for qualitative and quantitative anatomical alterations. Arsenic genotoxicity was evaluated through analysis of the mitotic index in the root apex. Compared to the control, As-treated seedlings showed an altered architecture, with significantly decreased root length (due to the lower mitotic index in the apical meristem and reduced elongation of parenchyma cells) with darkened color, and abnormal development of the root cap. A significant increase in vascular cylinder/root diameter ratio was also detected, due to the reduction of the cellular spaces in the cortex. The secondary xylem vessel elements were reduced in diameter and had sinuous walls. The severest damage was visible in the ramification zone, where uncommon division planes of phellogen and cambium cells and disintegration of the parenchyma cells adjacent to lateral roots were observed. The high sensibility of C. cajan to As was confirmed, since it caused severe damages in root growth and anatomy. The main structural markers for As toxicity were the altered root architecture, with the reduction of the elongation zone and increase of ramification zone length, and the root primordia retained within the cortex. Our results show a new approach about As toxicity and indicate that C. cajan is a promising species to be used for

  2. Circulating plasma factors induce tubular and glomerular alterations in septic burns patients

    PubMed Central

    Mariano, Filippo; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Stella, Maurizio; Romanazzi, Giuseppe Mauriello; Assenzio, Barbara; Cairo, Monica; Biancone, Luigi; Triolo, Giorgio; Ranieri, V Marco; Camussi, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe burn is a systemic illness often complicated by sepsis. Kidney is one of the organs invariably affected, and proteinuria is a constant clinical finding. We studied the relationships between proteinuria and patient outcome, severity of renal dysfunction and systemic inflammatory state in burns patients who developed sepsis-associated acute renal failure (ARF). We then tested the hypothesis that plasma in these patients induces apoptosis and functional alterations that could account for proteinuria and severity of renal dysfunction in tubular cells and podocytes. Methods We studied the correlation between proteinuria and indexes of systemic inflammation or renal function prospectively in 19 severe burns patients with septic shock and ARF, and we evaluated the effect of plasma on apoptosis, polarity and functional alterations in cultured human tubular cells and podocytes. As controls, we collected plasma from 10 burns patients with septic shock but without ARF, 10 burns patients with septic shock and ARF, 10 non-burns patients with septic shock without ARF, 10 chronic uremic patients and 10 healthy volunteers. Results Septic burns patients with ARF presented a severe proteinuria that correlated to outcome, glomerular (creatinine/urea clearance) and tubular (fractional excretion of sodium and potassium) functional impairment and systemic inflammation (white blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts). Plasma from these patients induced a pro-apoptotic effect in tubular cells and podocytes that correlated with the extent of proteinuria. Plasma-induced apoptosis was significantly higher in septic severe burns patients with ARF with respect to those without ARF or with septic shock without burns. Moreover, plasma from septic burns patients induced an alteration of polarity in tubular cells, as well as reduced expression of the tight junction protein ZO-1 and of the endocytic receptor megalin. In podocytes, plasma from septic burns patients increased

  3. Aβ-Induced Synaptic Alterations Require the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Nedd4-1

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Elizabeth M.; Scudder, Samantha L.; Goo, Marisa S.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease in which patients experience progressive cognitive decline. A wealth of evidence suggests that this cognitive impairment results from synaptic dysfunction in affected brain regions caused by cleavage of amyloid precursor protein into the pathogenic peptide amyloid-β (Aβ). Specifically, it has been shown that Aβ decreases surface AMPARs, dendritic spine density, and synaptic strength, and also alters synaptic plasticity. The precise molecular mechanisms by which this occurs remain unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for ubiquitination in Aβ-induced synaptic dysfunction in cultured rat neurons. We find that Aβ promotes the ubiquitination of AMPARs, as well as the redistribution and recruitment of Nedd4-1, a HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase we previously demonstrated to target AMPARs for ubiquitination and degradation. Strikingly, we show that Nedd4-1 is required for Aβ-induced reductions in surface AMPARs, synaptic strength, and dendritic spine density. Our findings, therefore, indicate an important role for Nedd4-1 and ubiquitin in the synaptic alterations induced by Aβ. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Synaptic changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) include surface AMPAR loss, which can weaken synapses. In a cell culture model of AD, we found that AMPAR loss correlates with increased AMPAR ubiquitination. In addition, the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-1, known to ubiquitinate AMPARs, is recruited to synapses in response to Aβ. Strikingly, reducing Nedd4-1 levels in this model prevented surface AMPAR loss and synaptic weakening. These findings suggest that, in AD, Nedd4-1 may ubiquitinate AMPARs to promote their internalization and weaken synaptic strength, similar to what occurs in Nedd4-1's established role in homeostatic synaptic scaling. This is the first demonstration of Aβ-mediated control of a ubiquitin ligase to regulate surface AMPAR expression. PMID:26843640

  4. Water deprivation-partial rehydration induces sensitization of sodium appetite and alteration of hypothalamic transcripts.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Derderian, Daniela T B; Vendramini, Regina C; Menani, José V; Chiavegatto, Silvana; De Luca, Laurival A

    2016-01-01

    iSodium intake occurs either as a spontaneous or induced behavior, which is enhanced, i.e., sensitized, by repeated episodes of water deprivation followed by subsequent partial rehydration (WD-PR). In the present work, we examined whether repeated WD-PR alters hypothalamic transcripts related to the brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and apelin system in male normotensive Holtzman rats (HTZ). We also examined whether the sodium intake of a strain with genetically inherited high expression of the brain RAS, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), responds differently than HTZ to repeated WD-PR. We found that repeated WD-PR, besides enhancing spontaneous and induced 0.3 M NaCl intake, increased the hypothalamic expression of angiotensinogen, aminopeptidase N, and apelin receptor transcripts (43%, 60%, and 159%, respectively) in HTZ at the end of the third WD-PR. Repeated WD-PR did not change the daily spontaneous 0.3 M NaCl intake and barely changed the need-induced 0.3 M NaCl intake of SHR. The same treatment consistently enhanced spontaneous daily 0.3 M NaCl intake in the normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. The results show that repeated WD-PR produces alterations in hypothalamic transcripts and also sensitizes sodium appetite in HTZ. They suggest an association between the components of hypothalamic RAS and the apelin system, with neural and behavioral plasticity produced by repeated episodes of WD-PR in a normotensive strain. The results also indicate that the inherited hyperactive brain RAS is not a guarantee for sensitization of sodium intake in the male adult SHR exposed to repeated WD-PR. PMID:26538239

  5. Altered surfactant homeostasis and alveolar epithelial cell stress in amiodarone-induced lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Poornima; Henneke, Ingrid; Ruppert, Clemens; Knudsen, Lars; Venkatesan, Shalini; Liebisch, Gerhard; Chambers, Rachel C; Ochs, Matthias; Schmitz, Gerd; Vancheri, Carlo; Seeger, Werner; Korfei, Martina; Guenther, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Amiodarone (AD) is a highly efficient antiarrhythmic drug with potentially serious side effects. Severe pulmonary toxicity is reported in patients receiving AD even at low doses and may cause interstitial pneumonia as well as lung fibrosis. Apoptosis of alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECII) has been suggested to play an important role in this disease. In the current study, we aimed to establish a murine model of AD-induced lung fibrosis and analyze surfactant homeostasis, lysosomal, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in this model. AD/vehicle was instilled intratracheally into C57BL/6 mice, which were sacrificed on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. Extent of lung fibrosis development was assessed by trichrome staining and hydroxyproline measurement. Cytotoxicity was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Phospholipids (PLs) were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Surfactant proteins (SP) and markers for apoptosis, lysosomal, and ER stress were studied by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. AECII morphology was evaluated by electron microscopy. Extensive lung fibrosis and AECII hyperplasia were observed in AD-treated mice already at day 7. Surfactant PL and SP accumulated in AECII over time. In parallel, induction of apoptosis, lysosomal, and ER stress was encountered in AECII of mice lungs and in MLE12 cells treated with AD. In vitro, siRNA-mediated knockdown of cathepsin D did not alter the AD-induced apoptotic response. Our data suggest that mice exposed to intratracheal AD develop severe pulmonary fibrosis, exhibit extensive surfactant alterations and cellular stress, but AD-induced AECII apoptosis is not mediated primarily via cathepsin D. PMID:25163675

  6. Minimal changes in hypothalamic temperature accompany microwave-induced alteration of thermoregulatory behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, E.R.; Adams, B.W.; Akel, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    This study probed the mechanisms underlying microwave-induced alterations of thermoregulatory behavior. Adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus), trained to regulate the temperature of their immediate environment (Ta) behaviorally, were chronically implanted with Teflon reentrant tubes in the medical preoptic/anterior hypothalamic area (PO/AH), the brainstem region considered to control normal thermoregulatory processes. A Vitek temperature probe inserted into the tube measured PO/AH temperature continuously while changes in thermoregulatory behavior were induced by either brief (10-min) or prolonged (2.5-h) unilateral exposures to planewave 2,450-MHz continuous wave (CW) microwaves (E polarization). Power densities explored ranged from 4 to 20 mW/cm2 (rate of energy absorption (SAR) . 0.05 (W/kg)/cm2)). Rectal temperature and four representative skin temperatures were also monitored, as was the Ta selected by the animal. When the power density was high enough to induce a monkey to select a cooler Ta (8 mW/cm2 and above), PO/AH temperature rose approximately 0.3 degrees C but seldom more. Lower power densities usually produced smaller increases in PO/AH temperature and no reliable change in thermoregulatory behavior. Rectal temperature remained constant while PO/AH temperature rose only 0.2-0.3 degrees C during 2.5-h exposures at 20 mW/cm2 because the Ta selected was 2-3 degrees C cooler than normally preferred. Sometimes PO/AH temperature increments greater than 0.3 degrees C were recorded, but they always accompanied inadequate thermoregulatory behavior. Thus, a PO/AH temperature rise of 0.2-0.3 degrees C, accompanying microwave exposure, appears to be necessary and sufficient to alter thermoregulatory behavior, which ensures in turn that no greater temperature excursions occur in this hypothalamic thermoregulatory center.

  7. Radiation-Induced Epigenetic Alterations after Low and High LET Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-02-01

    Epigenetics, including DNA methylation and microRNA (miRNA) expression, could be the missing link in understanding the delayed, non-targeted effects of radiation including radiationinduced genomic instability (RIGI). This study tests the hypothesis that irradiation induces epigenetic aberrations, which could eventually lead to RIGI, and that the epigenetic aberrations induced by low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation are different than those induced by high LET irradiations. GM10115 cells were irradiated with low LET x-rays and high LET iron (Fe) ions and evaluated for DNA damage, cell survival and chromosomal instability. The cells were also evaluated for specific locus methylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB), tumor suppressor in lung cancer 1 (TSLC1) and cadherin 1 (CDH1) gene promoter regions, long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1) and Alu repeat element methylation, CpG and non-CpG global methylation and miRNA expression levels. Irradiated cells showed increased micronucleus induction and cell killing immediately following exposure, but were chromosomally stable at delayed times post-irradiation. At this same delayed time, alterations in repeat element and global DNA methylation and miRNA expression were observed. Analyses of DNA methylation predominantly showed hypomethylation, however hypermethylation was also observed. MiRNA shown to be altered in expression level after x-ray irradiation are involved in chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation. Different and higher incidence of epigenetic changes were observed after exposure to low LET x-rays than high LET Fe ions even though Fe ions elicited more chromosomal damage and cell killing. This study also shows that the irradiated cells acquire epigenetic changes even though they are chromosomally stable suggesting that epigenetic aberrations may arise in the cell without initiating RIGI.

  8. HeLa cell response proteome alterations induced by mammalian reovirus T3D infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cells are exposed to multiple stressors that induce significant alterations in signaling pathways and in the cellular state. As obligate parasites, all viruses require host cell material and machinery for replication. Virus infection is a major stressor leading to numerous induced modifications. Previous gene array studies have measured infected cellular transcriptomes. More recently, mass spectrometry-based quantitative and comparative assays have been used to complement such studies by examining virus-induced alterations in the cellular proteome. Methods We used SILAC (stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture), a non-biased quantitative proteomic labeling technique, combined with 2-D HPLC/mass spectrometry and reciprocal labeling to identify and measure relative quantitative differences in HeLa cell proteins in purified cytosolic and nuclear fractions after reovirus serotype 3 Dearing infection. Protein regulation was determined by z-score analysis of each protein’s label distribution. Results A total of 2856 cellular proteins were identified in cytosolic fractions by 2 or more peptides at >99% confidence and 884 proteins were identified in nuclear fractions. Gene ontology analyses indicated up-regulated host proteins were associated with defense responses, immune responses, macromolecular binding, regulation of immune effector processes, and responses to virus, whereas down-regulated proteins were involved in cell death, macromolecular catabolic processes, and tissue development. Conclusions These analyses identified numerous host proteins significantly affected by reovirus T3D infection. These proteins map to numerous inflammatory and innate immune pathways, and provide the starting point for more detailed kinetic studies and delineation of virus-modulated host signaling pathways. PMID:23799967

  9. Hypercapnia-induced cerebral and ocular vasodilation is not altered by glibenclamide in humans.

    PubMed

    Bayerle-Eder, M; Wolzt, M; Polska, E; Langenberger, H; Pleiner, J; Teherani, D; Rainer, G; Polak, K; Eichler, H G; Schmetterer, L

    2000-06-01

    Carbon dioxide is an important regulator of vascular tone. Glibenclamide, an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive potassium channel (K(ATP)) activation, significantly blunts vasodilation in response to hypercapnic acidosis in animals. We investigated whether glibenclamide also alters the cerebral and ocular vasodilator response to hypercapnia in humans. Ten healthy male subjects were studied in a controlled, randomized, double-blind two-way crossover study under normoxic and hypercapnic conditions. Glibenclamide (5 mg po) or insulin (0.3 mU. kg(-1). min(-1) iv) were administered with glucose to achieve comparable plasma insulin levels. In control experiments, five healthy volunteers received glibenclamide (5 mg) or nicorandil (40 mg) or glibenclamide and nicorandil in a randomized, three-way crossover study. Mean blood flow velocity and resistive index in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and in the ophthalmic artery (OA) were measured with Doppler sonography. Pulsatile choroidal blood flow was assessed with laser interferometric measurement of fundus pulsation. Forearm blood flow was measured with venous occlusion plethysmography. Hypercapnia increased ocular fundus pulsation amplitude by +18.2-22.3% (P < 0. 001) and mean flow velocity in the MCA by +27.4-33.3% (P < 0.001), but not in the OA (2.1-6.5%, P = 0.2). Forearm blood flow increased by 78.2% vs. baseline (P = 0.041) after nicorandil administration. Glibenclamide did not alter hypercapnia-induced changes in cerebral or ocular hemodynamics and did not affect systemic hemodynamics or forearm blood flow but significantly increased glucose utilization and blunted the nicorandil-induced vasodilation in the forearm. This suggests that hypercapnia-induced changes in the vascular beds under study are not mediated by activation of K(ATP) channels in humans. PMID:10848537

  10. Detection of alterations in testicular and epididymal function in laboratory animals

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, R.P.

    1986-12-01

    The potential impact of an agent altering male reproductive function is greater for humans than for animals. Consequently, it is essential that sensitive criteria be used to look for effects on a multiplicity of target sites when an agent is evaluated using an animal model. No animal model has reproductive characteristics similar to those of humans, but this does not negate the validity of using animal models. Classic methodologies for reproductive toxicology are limited by the approaches used for subjective evaluation of testicular histology and use of natural mating for fertility tests. After dosing for an interval at least equal to six times the duration of one cycle of the seminiferous epithelium, sperm from ejaculated semen or the cauda epididymidis can be evaluated for normalacy of morphology or function and should be used for artificial insemination of females to critically evaluate fertility. Normal males of animals models ejaculate a great excess of sperm. Artificial insemination of a critical number of sperm, selected to result in slightly less than maximal fertility for control animals, will maximize the probability of detecting a decrease in fertility if the same critical number of sperm is inseminated for treated animals as for control animals. Testicular function should be evaluated by objective, rather than subjective, criteria. Among the more sensitive criteria of testicular function are the minor diameter of essentially round seminiferous tubules, the ratio of leptotene spermatocytes to Sertoli cells, the corrected numbers of germ cells per seminiferous tubule cross section, and the number of homogenization-resistant spermatids per testis.

  11. Cold-Induced Browning Dynamically Alters the Expression Profiles of Inflammatory Adipokines with Tissue Specificity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao; Jia, Ru; Zhang, Qiangling; Sun, Bo; Yan, Jianqun

    2016-01-01

    Cold exposure or β₃-adrenoceptor agonist treatment induces the adipose tissues remodeling, relevant for beige adipogenesis within white adipose tissue (WAT). It remains unclear whether this process influences inflammatory adipokines expression in adipose tissues. We determine the temporal profile of cold or β₃-adrenoceptor agonist (CL316,243)-induced changes in the expression of inflammatory adipokines in adipose tissues in mice or primary mice adipocytes. Male C57BL/6J mice at eight weeks old were exposed to 4 °C for 1-5 days. Interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT), inguinal subcutaneous WAT (sWAT) and epididymal WAT (eWAT) were harvested for gene and protein expression analysis. In addition, cultured primary mice brown adipocyte (BA) and white adipocyte (WA) treated with or without CL316,243 were harvested for gene expression analysis. The inflammatory adipokines expressed significantly higher in WAT than BAT at baseline. They were rapidly changed in iBAT, while down-regulated in sWAT and up-regulated in eWAT during the cold acclimation. Upon CL316,243 treatment, detected inflammatory adipokines except Leptin were transiently increased in both BA and WA. Our in vivo and in vitro data demonstrate that the browning process alters the inflammatory adipokines expression in adipose tissues, which is acutely responded to in iBAT, dynamically decreased in sWAT whilst increased in eWAT for compensation. PMID:27223282

  12. Truncated DNMT3B isoform DNMT3B7 suppresses growth, induces differentiation, and alters DNA methylation in human neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ostler, Kelly R.; Yang, Qiwei; Looney, Timothy J.; Zhang, Li; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Tian, Yufeng; Kocherginsky, Masha; Raimondi, Stacey L.; DeMaio, Jessica G.; Salwen, Helen R.; Gu, Song; Chlenski, Alexandre; Naranjo, Arlene; Gill, Amy; Peddinti, Radhika; Lahn, Bruce T.; Cohn, Susan L.; Godley, Lucy A.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic changes in pediatric neuroblastoma may contribute to the aggressive pathophysiology of this disease, but little is known about the basis for such changes. In this study, we examined a role for the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3B, in particular, the truncated isoform DNMT3B7 which is generated frequently in cancer. To investigate if aberrant DNMT3B transcripts alter DNA methylation, gene expression, and phenotypic character in neuroblastoma, we measured DNMT3B expression in primary tumors. Higher levels of DNMT3B7 were detected in differentiated ganglioneuroblastomas compared to undifferentiated neuroblastomas, suggesting that expression of DNMT3B7 may induce a less aggressive clinical phenotype. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of enforced DNMT3B7 expression in neuroblastoma cells, finding a significant inhibition of cell proliferation in vitro and angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo. DNMT3B7-positive cells had higher levels of total genomic methylation and a dramatic decrease in expression of the FOS and JUN family members that comprise AP1 transcription factors. Consistent with an established antagonistic relationship between AP1 expression and retinoic acid receptor activity, increased differentiation was seen in the DNMT3B7-expressing neuroblastoma cells following treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) compared to controls. Our results indicate that DNMT3B7 modifies the epigenome in neuroblastoma cells to induce changes in gene expression, inhibit tumor growth, and increase sensitivity to ATRA. PMID:22815530

  13. Cold-Induced Browning Dynamically Alters the Expression Profiles of Inflammatory Adipokines with Tissue Specificity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao; Jia, Ru; Zhang, Qiangling; Sun, Bo; Yan, Jianqun

    2016-01-01

    Cold exposure or β3-adrenoceptor agonist treatment induces the adipose tissues remodeling, relevant for beige adipogenesis within white adipose tissue (WAT). It remains unclear whether this process influences inflammatory adipokines expression in adipose tissues. We determine the temporal profile of cold or β3-adrenoceptor agonist (CL316,243)-induced changes in the expression of inflammatory adipokines in adipose tissues in mice or primary mice adipocytes. Male C57BL/6J mice at eight weeks old were exposed to 4 °C for 1–5 days. Interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT), inguinal subcutaneous WAT (sWAT) and epididymal WAT (eWAT) were harvested for gene and protein expression analysis. In addition, cultured primary mice brown adipocyte (BA) and white adipocyte (WA) treated with or without CL316,243 were harvested for gene expression analysis. The inflammatory adipokines expressed significantly higher in WAT than BAT at baseline. They were rapidly changed in iBAT, while down-regulated in sWAT and up-regulated in eWAT during the cold acclimation. Upon CL316,243 treatment, detected inflammatory adipokines except Leptin were transiently increased in both BA and WA. Our in vivo and in vitro data demonstrate that the browning process alters the inflammatory adipokines expression in adipose tissues, which is acutely responded to in iBAT, dynamically decreased in sWAT whilst increased in eWAT for compensation. PMID:27223282

  14. Carbon tetrachloride-mediated lipid peroxidation induces early mitochondrial alterations in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Knockaert, Laetitia; Berson, Alain; Ribault, Catherine; Prost, Pierre-Emmanuel; Fautrel, Alain; Pajaud, Julie; Lepage, Sylvie; Lucas-Clerc, Catherine; Bégué, Jean-Marc; Fromenty, Bernard; Robin, Marie-Anne

    2012-03-01

    Although carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced acute and chronic hepatotoxicity have been extensively studied, little is known about the very early in vivo effects of this organic solvent on oxidative stress and mitochondrial function. In this study, mice were treated with CCl(4) (1.5 ml/kg ie 2.38 g/kg) and parameters related to liver damage, lipid peroxidation, stress/defense and mitochondria were studied 3 h later. Some CCl(4)-intoxicated mice were also pretreated with the cytochrome P450 2E1 inhibitor diethyldithiocarbamate or the antioxidants Trolox C and dehydroepiandrosterone. CCl(4) induced a moderate elevation of aminotransferases, swelling of centrilobular hepatocytes, lipid peroxidation, reduction of cytochrome P4502E1 mRNA levels and a massive increase in mRNA expression of heme oxygenase-1 and heat shock protein 70. Moreover, CCl(4) intoxication induced a severe decrease of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity, mitochondrial DNA depletion and damage as well as ultrastructural alterations. Whereas DDTC totally or partially prevented all these hepatic toxic events, both antioxidants protected only against liver lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial damage. Taken together, our results suggest that lipid peroxidation is primarily implicated in CCl(4)-induced early mitochondrial injury. However, lipid peroxidation-independent mechanisms seem to be involved in CCl(4)-induced early hepatocyte swelling and changes in expression of stress/defense-related genes. Antioxidant therapy may not be an efficient strategy to block early liver damage after CCl(4) intoxication. PMID:22157718

  15. Alterations in Perivascular Sympathetic and Nitrergic Innervation Function Induced by Late Pregnancy in Rat Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Caracuel, Laura; Callejo, María; Balfagón, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated whether pregnancy was associated with changed function in components of perivascular mesenteric innervation and the mechanism/s involved. Experimental Approach We used superior mesenteric arteries from female Sprague-Dawley rats divided into two groups: control rats (in oestrous phase) and pregnant rats (20 days of pregnancy). Modifications in the vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were analysed in the presence/absence of phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) or L-NAME (nitric oxide synthase-NOS- non-specific inhibitor). Vasomotor responses to noradrenaline (NA), and to NO donor DEA-NO were studied, NA and NO release measured and neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression/activation analysed. Key Results EFS induced a lower frequency-dependent contraction in pregnant than in control rats. Phentolamine decreased EFS-induced vasoconstriction in segments from both experimental groups, but to a greater extent in control rats. EFS-induced vasoconstriction was increased by L-NAME in arteries from both experimental groups. This increase was greater in segments from pregnant rats. Pregnancy decreased NA release while increasing NO release. nNOS expression was not modified but nNOS activation was increased by pregnancy. Pregnancy decreased NA-induced vasoconstriction response and did not modify DEA-NO-induced vasodilation response. Conclusions and Implications Neural control of mesenteric vasomotor tone was altered by pregnancy. Diminished sympathetic and enhanced nitrergic components both contributed to the decreased vasoconstriction response to EFS during pregnancy. All these changes indicate the selective participation of sympathetic and nitrergic innervations in vascular adaptations produced during pregnancy. PMID:25951331

  16. Detection of hydrothermal alteration at Virginia City, Nevada using Airborne Imaging Spectrometry (AIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutsinpiller, A.; Taranik, J. V.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data were collected over Virginia City, Nevada; an area of gold and silver mineralization with extensive surface exposures of altered volcanic rocks. The data were corrected for atmospheric effects by a flat-field method, and compared to library spectra of various alteration minerals using a spectral analysis program SPAM. Areas of strong clay alteration were identified on the AIS images that were mapped as kaolinitic, illitic, and sericitic alterations zones. Kaolinitic alteration is distinguishable in the 2.1 to 2.4 and 1.2 to 1.5 micrometer wavelength regions. Montmorillonite, illite, and sericite have absorption features similar to each other at 2.2 micrometer wavelength. Montnorillonite and illite also may be present in varying proportions within one Ground Instantaneous Field of View (GIFOV). In general AIS data is useful in identifying alteration zones that are associated with or lie above precious metal mineralization at Virginia City.

  17. Cocaine-induced alterations in dopamine receptor signaling: implications for reinforcement and reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Anderson, S M; Pierce, R C

    2005-06-01

    The transition from casual drug use to addiction, and the intense drug craving that accompanies it, has been postulated to result from neuroadaptations within the limbic system caused by repeated drug exposure. This review will examine the implications of cocaine-induced alterations in mesolimbic dopamine receptor signaling within the context of several widely used animal models of addiction. Extensive evidence indicates that dopaminergic mechanisms critically mediate behavioral sensitization to cocaine, cocaine-induced conditioned place preference, cocaine self-administration, and the drug prime-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. The propagation of the long-term neuronal changes associated with recurring cocaine use appears to occur at the level of postreceptor signal transduction. Repeated cocaine treatment causes an up-regulation of the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-signaling pathway within the nucleus accumbens, resulting in a dys-regulation of balanced D1/D2 dopamine-like receptor signaling. The intracellular events arising from enhanced D1-like postsynaptic signaling mediate both facilitatory and compensatory responses to the further reinforcing effects of cocaine. PMID:15922019

  18. Aluminum Toxicity-Induced Alterations of Leaf Proteome in Two Citrus Species Differing in Aluminum Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan; Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Guo, Peng; Lu, Yi-Bin; Chen, Li-Song

    2016-01-01

    Seedlings of aluminum-tolerant 'Xuegan' (Citrus sinensis) and Al-intolerant 'sour pummelo' (Citrus grandis) were fertigated for 18 weeks with nutrient solution containing 0 and 1.2 mM AlCl₃·6H₂O. Al toxicity-induced inhibition of photosynthesis and the decrease of total soluble protein only occurred in C. grandis leaves, demonstrating that C. sinensis had higher Al tolerance than C. grandis. Using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ), we obtained more Al toxicity-responsive proteins from C. sinensis than from C. grandis leaves, which might be responsible for the higher Al tolerance of C. sinensis. The following aspects might contribute to the Al tolerance of C. sinensis: (a) better maintenance of photosynthesis and energy balance via inducing photosynthesis and energy-related proteins; (b) less increased requirement for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and other toxic compounds, such as aldehydes, and great improvement of the total ability of detoxification; and (c) upregulation of low-phosphorus-responsive proteins. Al toxicity-responsive proteins related to RNA regulation, protein metabolism, cellular transport and signal transduction might also play key roles in the higher Al tolerance of C. sinensis. We present the global picture of Al toxicity-induced alterations of protein profiles in citrus leaves, and identify some new Al toxicity-responsive proteins related to various biological processes. Our results provide some novel clues about plant Al tolerance. PMID:27455238

  19. Resveratrol induces mitochondrial alterations, autophagy and a cryptobiosis-like state in scuticociliates.

    PubMed

    Morais, Pedro; Lamas, Jesús; Sanmartín, Manuel L; Orallo, Francisco; Leiro, José

    2009-11-01

    The phytoalexin resveratrol (RESV), a defensive substance produced by plants in response to infection by pathogenic microorganisms, displays a wide range of biological effects in mammalian cells. In the present study, we analysed the in vitro effect of RESV on the amphizoic ciliate Philasterides dicentrarchi and demonstrated for the first time that this polyphenol causes cellular and metabolic abnormalities that generate an autophagic process and a state similar to cryptobiosis in the ciliate. At concentrations between 50 and 100 microM, RESV had a cytocidal effect when the ciliate was grown in medium with low levels of nutrients, and a cytostatic effect when the parasite was grown in culture media rich in nutrients. At these concentrations, RESV induced alterations in mitochondria, generated autophagy, provoked a reduction in the cell volume, and also drastically reduced the ciliate endocytic activity in small ciliates, generating a state compatible with cryptobiosis. The results demonstrate that RESV is a potent inducer of autophagy in the scuticociliate P. dicentrarchi. The ciliate may therefore be a good experimental organism for identifying autophagy-inducing drugs with therapeutic potential in diseases in which autophagy plays a protective role. PMID:19640787

  20. Stress-induced alterations of left-right electrodermal activity coupling indexed by pointwise transinformation.

    PubMed

    Světlák, M; Bob, P; Roman, R; Ježek, S; Damborská, A; Chládek, J; Shaw, D J; Kukleta, M

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that experimental stress induces a specific change of left-right electrodermal activity (EDA) coupling pattern, as indexed by pointwise transinformation (PTI). Further, we hypothesized that this change is associated with scores on psychometric measures of the chronic stress-related psychopathology. Ninety-nine university students underwent bilateral measurement of EDA during rest and stress-inducing Stroop test and completed a battery of self-report measures of chronic stress-related psychopathology. A significant decrease in the mean PTI value was the prevalent response to the stress conditions. No association between chronic stress and PTI was found. Raw scores of psychometric measures of stress-related psychopathology had no effect on either the resting levels of PTI or the amount of stress-induced PTI change. In summary, acute stress alters the level of coupling pattern of cortico-autonomic influences on the left and right sympathetic pathways to the palmar sweat glands. Different results obtained using the PTI, EDA laterality coefficient, and skin conductance level also show that the PTI algorithm represents a new analytical approach to EDA asymmetry description. PMID:24359433

  1. Altered gastric emptying and prevention of radiation-induced vomiting in dogs. [Cobalt 60 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Jacobus, J.P.; Grissom, M.P.; Eng, R.R.; Conklin, J.J.

    1984-03-01

    The relation between radiation-induced vomiting and gastric emptying is unclear and the treatment of this condition is not established. We explored, therefore, (a) the effect of cobalt 60 irradiation on gastric emptying of solids and liquids and (b) the possibility of preventing radiation-induced vomiting with the dopamine antagonist, domperidone. Twenty dogs were studied on two separate days, blindly and in random order, after i.v. injection of either a placebo or 0.06 mg/kg domperidone. On a third day, they received 8 Gy (800 rads) whole body irradiation with cobalt 60 gamma-rays after either placebo (n . 10) or domperidone (n . 10). Before each study, each dog was fed chicken liver tagged in vivo with 99mTc-sulfur colloid (solid marker), and water containing 111In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (liquid marker). Dogs were placed in a Pavlov stand for the subsequent 3 h and radionuclide imaging was performed at 10-min intervals. Irradiation produced vomiting in 9 of 10 dogs given placebo but only in 1 of 10 dogs pretreated with domperidone (p less than 0.01). Gastric emptying of liquids and solids was significantly suppressed by irradiation (p less than 0.01) after both placebo and domperidone. These results demonstrate that radiation-induced vomiting is accompanied by suppression of gastric emptying. Furthermore, domperidone prevents vomiting produced by ionizing radiation but does not alter the accompanying delay of gastric emptying.

  2. Aluminum Toxicity-Induced Alterations of Leaf Proteome in Two Citrus Species Differing in Aluminum Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huan; Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Guo, Peng; Lu, Yi-Bin; Chen, Li-Song

    2016-01-01

    Seedlings of aluminum-tolerant ‘Xuegan’ (Citrus sinensis) and Al-intolerant ‘sour pummelo’ (Citrus grandis) were fertigated for 18 weeks with nutrient solution containing 0 and 1.2 mM AlCl3·6H2O. Al toxicity-induced inhibition of photosynthesis and the decrease of total soluble protein only occurred in C. grandis leaves, demonstrating that C. sinensis had higher Al tolerance than C. grandis. Using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ), we obtained more Al toxicity-responsive proteins from C. sinensis than from C. grandis leaves, which might be responsible for the higher Al tolerance of C. sinensis. The following aspects might contribute to the Al tolerance of C. sinensis: (a) better maintenance of photosynthesis and energy balance via inducing photosynthesis and energy-related proteins; (b) less increased requirement for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and other toxic compounds, such as aldehydes, and great improvement of the total ability of detoxification; and (c) upregulation of low-phosphorus-responsive proteins. Al toxicity-responsive proteins related to RNA regulation, protein metabolism, cellular transport and signal transduction might also play key roles in the higher Al tolerance of C. sinensis. We present the global picture of Al toxicity-induced alterations of protein profiles in citrus leaves, and identify some new Al toxicity-responsive proteins related to various biological processes. Our results provide some novel clues about plant Al tolerance. PMID:27455238

  3. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R. . E-mail: nerurkar@pbrc.hawaii.edu

    2006-02-20

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML.

  4. Early detection of chemotherapy-refractory patients by monitoring textural alterations in diffuse optical spectroscopic images

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Vorauer, Eric; Chin, Lee; Tran, William T.; Wright, Frances C.; Gandhi, Sonal; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Changes in textural characteristics of diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) functional images, accompanied by alterations in their mean values, are demonstrated here for the first time as early surrogates of ultimate treatment response in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). NAC, as a standard component of treatment for LABC patient, induces measurable heterogeneous changes in tumor metabolism which were evaluated using DOS-based metabolic maps. This study characterizes such inhomogeneous nature of response development, by determining alterations in textural properties of DOS images apparent at early stages of therapy, followed later by gross changes in mean values of these functional metabolic maps. Methods: Twelve LABC patients undergoing NAC were scanned before and at four times after treatment initiation, and tomographic DOS images were reconstructed at each time. Ultimate responses of patients were determined clinically and pathologically, based on a reduction in tumor size and assessment of residual tumor cellularity. The mean-value parameters and textural features were extracted from volumetric DOS images for several functional and metabolic parameters prior to the treatment initiation. Changes in these DOS-based biomarkers were also monitored over the course of treatment. The measured biomarkers were applied to differentiate patient responses noninvasively and compared to clinical and pathologic responses. Results: Responding and nonresponding patients demonstrated different changes in DOS-based textural and mean-value parameters during chemotherapy. Whereas none of the biomarkers measured prior the start of therapy demonstrated a significant difference between the two patient populations, statistically significant differences were observed at week one after treatment initiation using the relative change in contrast/homogeneity of seven functional maps (0.001 < p < 0.049), and mean value of water

  5. Chronic liquid nutrition intake induces obesity and considerable but reversible metabolic alterations in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mikuska, Livia; Vrabcova, Michaela; Tillinger, Andrej; Balaz, Miroslav; Ukropec, Jozef; Mravec, Boris

    2016-06-01

    We have previously described the development of substantial, but reversible obesity in Wistar rats fed with palatable liquid nutrition (Fresubin). In this study, we investigated changes in serum hormone levels, glycemia, fat mass, adipocyte size, and gene expression of adipokines and inflammatory markers in adipose tissue of Wistar rats fed by Fresubin (i) for 5 months, (ii) up to 90 days of age, or (iii) after 90 days of age to characterize metabolic alterations and their reversibility in rats fed with Fresubin. An intra-peritoneal glucose tolerance test was also performed to determine levels of serum leptin, adiponectin, insulin, and C-peptide in 2- and 4-month-old animals. In addition, mesenteric and epididymal adipose tissue weight, adipocyte diameter, and gene expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines and other markers were determined at the end of the study. Chronic Fresubin intake significantly increased adipocyte diameter, reduced glucose tolerance, and increased serum leptin, adiponectin, insulin, and C-peptide levels. Moreover, gene expression of leptin, adiponectin, CD68, and nuclear factor kappa B was significantly increased in mesenteric adipose tissue of Fresubin fed rats. Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels increased in mesenteric adipose tissue only in the group fed Fresubin during the entire experiment. In epididymal adipose tissue, fatty acid binding protein 4 mRNA levels were significantly increased in rats fed by Fresubin during adulthood. In conclusion, chronic Fresubin intake induced complex metabolic alterations in Wistar rats characteristic of metabolic syndrome. However, transition of rats from Fresubin to standard diet reversed these alterations. PMID:26939586

  6. Detection of cystic structures using pulsed ultrasonically induced resonant cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Kovach, John S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus and method for early detection of cystic structures indicative of ovarian and breast cancers uses ultrasonic wave energy at a unique resonance frequency for inducing cavitation in cystic fluid characteristic of cystic structures in the ovaries associated with ovarian cancer, and in cystic structures in the breast associated with breast cancer. Induced cavitation bubbles in the cystic fluid implode, creating implosion waves which are detected by ultrasonic receiving transducers attached to the abdomen of the patient. Triangulation of the ultrasonic receiving transducers enables the received signals to be processed and analyzed to identify the location and structure of the cyst.

  7. Features of vestibuloocular reflex modulations induced by altered gravitational forces in tadpoles ( Xenopus laevis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, C.; Horn, E.

    2001-01-01

    In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, we studied the static vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) in relation to modifications of the gravitational environment to find basic mechanisms of how altered gravitational forces (AGF) affect this reflex. Animals were exposed to microgravity during space flight or hypergravity (3g) for 4 to 12 days. Basic observations were that (1) the development of the rVOR is significantly affected by altered gravitational conditions, (2) the duration of 1g-readaptation depends on the strength of the test stimulus, (3) μg induces malformations of the body which are related to the rVOR depression. Future studies are based on the hypotheses (1) that the vestibular nuclei play a key roll in the adaptation to AGF conditions, (2) that the stimulus transducing systems in the sense organ are affected by AGF conditions, and (3) that fertilized eggs will be converted to normal adults guided by physiological and morphological set points representing the genetic programs. Developmental retardation or acceleration, or otherwise occurring deviations from standard development during embryonic and postembryonic life will activate genes that direct the developmental processes towards normality.

  8. The role of psychoneuroendocrine factors on spaceflight-induced immunological alterations.

    PubMed

    Meehan, R; Whitson, P; Sams, C

    1993-09-01

    This paper summarizes previous in-flight infections and novel conditions of spaceflight that may suppress immune function. Granulocytosis, monocytosis, and lymphopenia are routinely observed following short duration orbital flights. Subtle changes within the monocyte and T cell populations can also be noted by flow cytometric analysis. The similarity between the immunological changes observed after spaceflight and other diverse environmental stressors suggest that most of these alterations may be neuroendocrine-mediated. Available data support the hypothesis that spaceflight and other environmental stressors modulate normal immune regulation via stress hormones, other than exclusively glucocorticoids. It will be essential to simultaneously collect in-flight endocrine, immunologic, and infectious illness data to determine the clinical significance of these results. Additional research that delineates the neuroendocrine mechanisms of stress-induced changes in normal immune regulation will allow clinicians in the future to initiate prophylactic immunomodulator therapy to restore immune competence altered by the stress of long-duration spaceflight and therefore reduce morbidity from infectious illness, autoimmune disease, or malignancy. PMID:8371053

  9. The role of psychoneuroendocrine factors on spaceflight-induced immunological alterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, R.; Whitson, P.; Sams, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes previous in-flight infections and novel conditions of spaceflight that may suppress immune function. Granulocytosis, monocytosis, and lymphopenia are routinely observed following short duration orbital flights. Subtle changes within the monocyte and T cell populations can also be noted by flow cytometric analysis. The similarity between the immunological changes observed after spaceflight and other diverse environmental stressors suggest that most of these alterations may be neuroendocrine-mediated. Available data support the hypothesis that spaceflight and other environmental stressors modulate normal immune regulation via stress hormones, other than exclusively glucocorticoids. It will be essential to simultaneously collect in-flight endocrine, immunologic, and infectious illness data to determine the clinical significance of these results. Additional research that delineates the neuroendocrine mechanisms of stress-induced changes in normal immune regulation will allow clinicians in the future to initiate prophylactic immunomodulator therapy to restore immune competence altered by the stress of long-duration spaceflight and therefore reduce morbidity from infectious illness, autoimmune disease, or malignancy.

  10. p97 Disease Mutations Modulate Nucleotide-Induced Conformation to Alter Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bulfer, Stacie L; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Arkin, Michelle R

    2016-08-19

    The AAA+ ATPase p97/VCP adopts at least three conformations that depend on the binding of ADP and ATP and alter the orientation of the N-terminal protein-protein interaction (PPI) domain into "up" and "down" conformations. Point mutations that cause multisystem proteinopathy 1 (MSP1) are found at the interface of the N domain and D1-ATPase domain and potentially alter the conformational preferences of p97. Additionally, binding of "adaptor" proteins to the N-domain regulates p97's catalytic activity. We propose that p97/adaptor PPIs are coupled to p97 conformational states. We evaluated the binding of nucleotides and the adaptor proteins p37 and p47 to wild-type p97 and MSP1 mutants. Notably, p47 and p37 bind 8-fold more weakly to the ADP-bound conformation of wild-type p97 compared to the ATP-bound conformation. However, MSP1 mutants lose this nucleotide-induced conformational coupling because they destabilize the ADP-bound, "down" conformation of the N-domain. Loss in conformation coupling to PPIs could contribute to the mechanism of MSP1. PMID:27267671

  11. Effects of Chemotherapy-Induced Alterations in Cell Mechanical Properties on Cancer Metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prathivadhi, Sruti; Ekpenyong, Andrew; Nichols, Michael; Taylor, Carolyn; Ning, Jianhao

    Biological cells can modulate their mechanical properties to suit their functions and in response to changes in their environment. Thus, mechanical phenotyping of cells has been employed for tracking stem cell differentiation, bacterial infection, cell death, etc. Malignant transformation of cells also involves changes in mechanical properties. However, the extent to which mechanical properties of cancer cells contribute to metastasis is not well understood. Yet, more than 90% of all cancer deaths are directly related to metastasis. Transit of cells through the microcirculation is one of the key features of metastasis. We hypothesize that cancer treatment regimens do inadvertently alter cell mechanical properties in ways that might promote cancer metastasis. We use a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic (MMM) platform which mimics the capillary constrictions of the pulmonary and peripheral microcirculation to determine if in-vivo-like mechanical stimuli can evoke different responses from cells subjected to various cancer drugs. In particular, we show that cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as daunorubicin, become more deformable at short timescales (0.1 s) and transit faster through the device. Our results are first steps in evaluating the pro- or anti-metastatic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs based on their induced alterations in cell mechanical properties.

  12. Oxidative Stress and Histological Alterations of Chicken Brain Induced by Oral Administration of Chromium(III).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jia; Fan, Wentao; Zhao, Xiaona; Liu, Yanhan; Cheng, Ziqiang; Liu, Yongxia; Liu, Jianzhu

    2016-09-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the oxidative stress in chickens exposed to different concentrations of chromium trichloride (CrCl3) in drinking water. Seventy-two Hylan Brown male chickens were randomly divided into four groups: three experimental groups and one control group. The experimental groups were exposed to three different doses (50 % LD50, 25 % LD50, and 12.5 % LD50) of CrCl3 mg/kg body weight for 42 days, while the control group was given the equivalent water. The activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) and non-enzymatic index (glutathione, total antioxidant capacity, malondialdehyde, and hydrogen peroxide) were measured after obtaining the brain samples. Results suggested that 50 % LD50 chromium(III) significantly increased (P < 0.05) the contents of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide. The antioxidant enzyme activities, total glutathione concentration, and total antioxidant capacity decreased significantly (P < 0.05) compared with those of the controls and were consistent with the increase in dosage and time. Additionally, extensive histological alterations were observed in the chicken brain, such as the vacuolization and nuclear condensation of the neurons. These results indicated that exposure to high-dose CrCl3 for a certain time could induce the occurrence of oxidative stress and histological alterations. PMID:26873037

  13. Stress-induced alterations in interferon production and class II histocompatibility antigen expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Cunnick, J. E.; Armfield, A. V.; Wood, P. G.; Rabin, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    Mild electric foot-shock has been shown to be a stressor that can alter immune responses. Male Lewis rats were exposed to one session of 16 5.0-s 1.6-mA foot-shocks. Production of interferon-gamma by splenocytes in response to concanavalin-A was decreased in spleens from the shocked rats compared to control spleens. Spleen cells from rats treated with nadolol, a peripherally acting beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, and then shocked, showed dose-dependent attenuation of the suppression of interferon-gamma production. This suggests that catecholamines mediate shock-induced suppression of interferon-gamma production. The percentage of splenic mononuclear cells expressing class II histocompatibility (Ia) antigens on their surfaces from spleens of shocked rats was determined by flow cytometry. Significantly decreased class II positive mononuclear cells were present in the spleens of shocked rats in comparison to the spleens of control rats. This may reflect an alteration of cell trafficking or decreased production of class II antigens.

  14. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhong, Wei; Li, Houkai; Li, Qiong; Qiu, Yunping; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Huiyuan; Zhao, Xueqing; Zhang, Shucha; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zeisel, Steven H.; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the bile acid metabolism is limited by the fact that previous analyses have primarily focused on a selected few circulating bile acids; the bile acid profiles of the liver and gastrointestinal tract pools are rarely investigated. Here, we determined how chronic ethanol consumption altered the bile acids in multiple body compartments (liver, gastrointestinal tract, and serum) of rats. Rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with 38% of calories as ethanol (the amount equivalent of 4–5 drinks in humans). While conjugated bile acids predominated in the liver (98.3%), duodenum (97.8%), and ileum (89.7%), unconjugated bile acids comprised the largest proportion of measured bile acids in serum (81.2%), the cecum (97.7%), and the rectum (97.5%). In particular, taurine-conjugated bile acids were significantly decreased in the liver and gastrointestinal tract of ethanol-treated rats, while unconjugated and glycine-conjugated species increased. Ethanol consumption caused increased expression of genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis, efflux transport, and reduced expression of genes regulating bile acid influx transport in the liver. These results provide an improved understanding of the systemic modulations of bile acid metabolism in mammals through the gut-liver axis.—Xie, G., Zhong, W., Li, H., Li, Q., Qiu, Y., Zheng, X., Chen, H., Zhao, X., Zhang, S., Zhou, Z., Zeisel, S. H., Jia, W. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption. PMID:23709616

  15. Trifluralin-induced disorganization of microtubular cytoskeleton alters the development of roots in Hordeum vulgare L.

    PubMed

    Sheval, E V; Kazhura, Yu I; Poleshuk, Nina A; Lazareva, Elena M; Smirnova, Elena A; Maximova, Natalia P; Polyakov, V Y

    2008-12-01

    The extensive use of herbicides in agriculture becomes an important factor in environmental pollution, especially in case of slowly degradable compounds. Some agents act on plants during a long period of time, even if a very low concentration of the herbicide remains in the soil. Here, we investigated the toxicological effect of a low concentration of dinitroaniline herbicide, trifluralin, on growing seedlings of Hordeum vulgare L. Trifluralin in concentration of 1 microg/ml inhibited root growth. The mitotic activity of meristematic cells was suppressed due to the retardation of metaphase progression--alteration that can be caused by cytoskeleton disorder. Using antibodies to alpha-tubulin, we investigated the distribution of microtubules in root meristem cells. During all stages of mitosis, the highly regular system of microtubular cytoskeleton observed in control cells was slightly disorganized. An examination of root structure using light and electron microscopy demonstrated that the cell walls did not form normally during cell division that led to the appearance of large multinucleated cells. Also, the premature (pathological) cell differentiation was induced by trifluralin. A part of differentiating cells showed intracellular structural changes that are consistent with programmed cell death. It seems that the development of alterations in trifluralin-treated roots was due to the microtubular cytoskeleton disorganization. PMID:19133502

  16. Sodium tungstate induced neurological alterations in rat brain regions and their response to antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Sherry; Pant, Satish C; Kushwaha, Pramod; Bhargava, Rakesh; Flora, Swaran J S

    2015-08-01

    Tungsten, recognized recently as an environmental contaminant, is being used in arms and ammunitions as substitute to depleted uranium. We studied the effects of sodium tungstate on oxidative stress, few selected neurological variables like acetylcholinesterase, biogenic amines in rat brain regions (cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum) and their prevention following co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), naringenin and quercetin. Animals were sub-chronically exposed to sodium tungstate (100 ppm in drinking water) and orally co-supplemented with different antioxidants (0.30 mM) for three months. Sodium tungstate significantly decreased the activity of acetylcholinesterase, dopamine, nor-epinephrine and 5-hydroxytryptamine levels while it increased monoamine oxidase activity in different brain regions. Tungstate exposure produced a significant increase in biochemical variables indicative of oxidative stress while, neurological alterations were more pronounced in the cerebral cortex compared to other regions. Co-administration of NAC and flavonoids with sodium tungstate significantly restored glutathione, prevented changes in the brain biogenic amines, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and TBARS levels in the different brain regions. The protection was more prominent in the animals co-administered with NAC. We can thus conclude that sodium tungstate induced brain oxidative stress and the alterations in some neurological variables can effectively be reduced by co-supplementation of NAC. PMID:25983264

  17. Long-term alterations in neural and endocrine processes induced by motherhood in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care". The reproductive experience of pregnancy, lactation and motherhood can significantly remodel the female's biological state, affecting endocrine, neuroendocrine, neural, and immunological processes. The brain, pituitary gland, liver, thymus, and mammary tissue are among the structures that are modified by reproductive experience. The present review that focuses on rodent research, but also includes pertinent studies in sheep and other species, identifies specific changes in these processes brought about by the biological states of pregnancy, parturition, and lactation and how the components of reproductive experience contribute to the remodeling of the maternal brain and organ systems. Findings indicate that prior parity alters key circulating hormone levels and neural receptor gene expression. Moreover, reproductive experience results in modifications in neural processes and glial support. The possible role of pregnancy-induced neurogenesis is considered in the context of neuroplasticity and behavior, and the effects of reproductive experience on maternal memory, i.e. the retention of maternal behavior, together with anxiety and learning are presented. Together, these sets of findings support the concept that the neural and biological state of the adult female is significantly and dramatically altered on a long-term basis by the experiences of parity and motherhood. Remodeling of the maternal brain and other biological systems is posited to help facilitate adaptations to environmental/ecological challenges as the female raises young and ages. PMID:26388065

  18. The Gut Microbiome Is Altered in a Letrozole-Induced Mouse Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Scott T.; Skarra, Danalea V.; Rivera, Alissa J.; Thackray, Varykina G.

    2016-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have reproductive and metabolic abnormalities that result in an increased risk of infertility, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The large intestine contains a complex community of microorganisms (the gut microbiome) that is dysregulated in humans with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a letrozole-induced PCOS mouse model, we demonstrated significant diet-independent changes in the gut microbial community, suggesting that gut microbiome dysbiosis may also occur in PCOS women. Letrozole treatment was associated with a time-dependent shift in the gut microbiome and a substantial reduction in overall species and phylogenetic richness. Letrozole treatment also correlated with significant changes in the abundance of specific Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes previously implicated in other mouse models of metabolic disease in a time-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the hyperandrogenemia observed in PCOS may significantly alter the gut microbiome independently of diet. PMID:26731268

  19. Altered circadian rhythm of the clock genes in fibrotic livers induced by carbon tetrachloride.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Kakan, Xiamusiya; Zhang, Jianfa

    2010-04-16

    Disruption in circadian rhythms either by mutation in mice or by shiftwork in people, is associated with an increased risk for the development of multiple organ diseases. In turn, organ disease may influence the function of clock genes and peripheral circadian systems. Here we showed that hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride in mice leads to alterations in the circadian rhythms of hepatic clock genes. Especially, we found an impaired daily Cry2 rhythm in the fibrotic livers, with markedly decreased levels during the day time while compared with control livers. Associatively, the expressions of two important clock-regulated genes peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase lost circadian rhythm with significantly decreased levels during the light-dark (12/12h) cycle in fibrotic livers. PMID:20233594

  20. The Gut Microbiome Is Altered in a Letrozole-Induced Mouse Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Scott T; Skarra, Danalea V; Rivera, Alissa J; Thackray, Varykina G

    2016-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have reproductive and metabolic abnormalities that result in an increased risk of infertility, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The large intestine contains a complex community of microorganisms (the gut microbiome) that is dysregulated in humans with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a letrozole-induced PCOS mouse model, we demonstrated significant diet-independent changes in the gut microbial community, suggesting that gut microbiome dysbiosis may also occur in PCOS women. Letrozole treatment was associated with a time-dependent shift in the gut microbiome and a substantial reduction in overall species and phylogenetic richness. Letrozole treatment also correlated with significant changes in the abundance of specific Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes previously implicated in other mouse models of metabolic disease in a time-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the hyperandrogenemia observed in PCOS may significantly alter the gut microbiome independently of diet. PMID:26731268

  1. Antagonist of prostaglandin E2 receptor 4 induces metabolic alterations in liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Zhang, Limin; An, Yanpeng; Zhang, Lulu; Song, Yipeng; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2015-03-01

    Prostaglandin E2 receptor 4 (EP4) is one of the receptors for prostaglandin E2 and plays important roles in various biological functions. EP4 antagonists have been used as anti-inflammatory drugs. To investigate the effects of an EP4 antagonist (L-161982) on the endogenous metabolism in a holistic manner, we employed a mouse model, and obtained metabolic and transcriptomic profiles of multiple biological matrixes, including serum, liver, and urine of mice with and without EP4 antagonist (L-161982) exposure. We found that this EP4 antagonist caused significant changes in fatty acid metabolism, choline metabolism, and nucleotide metabolism. EP4 antagonist exposure also induced oxidative stress to mice. Our research is the first of its kind to report information on the alteration of metabolism associated with an EP4 antagonist. This information could further our understanding of current and new biological functions of EP4. PMID:25669961

  2. VEGF induces sensory and motor peripheral plasticity, alters bladder function, and promotes visceral sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This work tests the hypothesis that bladder instillation with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) modulates sensory and motor nerve plasticity, and, consequently, bladder function and visceral sensitivity. In addition to C57BL/6J, ChAT-cre mice were used for visualization of bladder cholinergic nerves. The direct effect of VEGF on the density of sensory nerves expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) and cholinergic nerves (ChAT) was studied one week after one or two intravesical instillations of the growth factor. To study the effects of VEGF on bladder function, mice were intravesically instilled with VEGF and urodynamic evaluation was assessed. VEGF-induced alteration in bladder dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons was performed on retrogradly labeled urinary bladder afferents by patch-clamp recording of voltage gated Na+ currents. Determination of VEGF-induced changes in sensitivity to abdominal mechanostimulation was performed by application of von Frey filaments. Results In addition to an overwhelming increase in TRPV1 immunoreactivity, VEGF instillation resulted in an increase in ChAT-directed expression of a fluorescent protein in several layers of the urinary bladder. Intravesical VEGF caused a profound change in the function of the urinary bladder: acute VEGF (1 week post VEGF treatment) reduced micturition pressure and longer treatment (2 weeks post-VEGF instillation) caused a substantial reduction in inter-micturition interval. In addition, intravesical VEGF resulted in an up-regulation of voltage gated Na+ channels (VGSC) in bladder DRG neurons and enhanced abdominal sensitivity to mechanical stimulation. Conclusions For the first time, evidence is presented indicating that VEGF instillation into the mouse bladder promotes a significant increase in peripheral nerve density together with alterations in bladder function and visceral sensitivity. The VEGF pathway is being proposed as a key modulator of

  3. DNA survival and physical and histological properties of heat-induced alterations in burnt bones.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, K; Taniguchi, K; Ogawa, Y

    2014-05-01

    During forensic casework, it is vital to be able to obtain valuable information from burnt bone fragments to ascertain the identity of the victim. Here, we report the findings of an experimental study on burnt bovine compact bone segments. Compact bones were cut to size and heated in an electric furnace at a temperature range of 100–1,100 °C with 100 °C increments. Heat-induced alterations to the bone color,weight, volume, and density were monitored using gross morphology and micro-focus X-ray computed tomography.We found that the increase in temperature caused the color of the compact bones to change in order of yellow, brown, gray,and white. In contrast to the weight reduction that occurred immediately after burning, we measured no significant reduction in volume even at 600 °C; however, volume reduced drastically once the temperature reached 700 °C. Light microscopic histological observations of burnt bone revealed heat induced alterations such as cracking and separation of the osteons at higher temperatures. In addition to these findings,we sought to examine the survival of DNA in the burnt bones using polymerase chain reaction of mitochondrial DNA. No amplification was found in the specimens burnt at 250 °C or higher, indicating the likely difficulty in testing the DNA of burnt bones from forensic casework. The results of this study will enable an estimation of the burning temperatures of burnt bones found in forensic cases and will provide an important framework with which to interpret data obtained during anthropological testing and DNA typing. PMID:24658641

  4. Ozone-Induced Alterations in the Accumulation of Newly Synthesized Proteins in Leaves of Maize.

    PubMed Central

    Pino, M. E.; Mudd, J. B.; Bailey-Serres, J.

    1995-01-01

    We examined the response of leaves of 3-week-old maize (Zea mays L.) to short-term (5 h) fumigation with O3-enriched air (0, 0.12, 0.24, or 0.36 [mu]L/L). Older leaves and leaf tissue developed more severe visible damage at higher external O3 concentrations. To investigate the immediate effect of O3 exposure on the accumulation of newly synthesized leaf proteins, leaves were labeled with [35S]methionine after 2 h and fumigated for an additional 3 h. O3-induced alterations of leaf proteins were observed in a concentration-dependent manner. There was a significant decrease in [35S]methionine incorporation into protein at the highest O3 concentration. Developmental differences in accumulation of de novo-synthesized leaf proteins were observed when the leaf tip, middle, and basal sections were labeled under 0 [mu]L/L O3, and additional changes were apparent upon exposure to increasing O3 concentrations. Changes in leaf protein synthesis were observed in the absence of visible leaf injury. Subcellular fractionation revealed O3-induced alterations in soluble and membrane-associated proteins. A number of thylakoid membrane-associated proteins showed specific increases in response to O3 fumigation. In contrast, the synthesis of a 32-kD polypeptide associated with thylakoid membranes was reduced in response to O3 fumigation in parallel with reduced incorporation of [35S]methionine into protein. Immunoprecipitation identified this polypeptide as the D1 protein of photosystem II. A reduction in the accumulation of newly synthesized D1 could have consequences for the efficiency of photosynthesis and other cellular processes. PMID:12228510

  5. Altered baroreflex and autonomic modulation in monosodium glutamate-induced hyperadipose rats.

    PubMed

    Karlen-Amarante, Marlusa; da Cunha, Natália Veronez; de Andrade, Ozahyr; de Souza, Hugo Celso Dutra; Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso

    2012-10-01

    We aimed to examine the cardiovascular function by tonic and baroreflex alterations in obese rats induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG). Neonatal male Wistar rats were injected with MSG (4 mg/g body weight) or equimolar saline (control, C). At 90 days, all rats were anesthetized for catheterization of the femoral artery for mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) recordings in the conscious state. After baseline, we performed IV treatment with hexamethonium (25 mg/kg), or atropine (1 mg/kg) or propranolol (3 mg/kg). We also performed the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) and baroreflex sensitivity. Baseline comparison showed that obese rats are hypertensive compared with control (C=110±2 mmHg; MSG=: 123±3 mmHg, P<0.05). After ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium the differences in MAP between control and obese rats disappeared. Beta adrenergic blockade with propranolol induced a greater decrease in heart rate compared with control. The analysis of HRV showed that obese rats have increased modulation by both components of the autonomic nervous system compared with control rats. The baroreflex gain showed increased sensitivity for the parasympathetic component in the obese rats (C=-2.41±0.25; MSG=-3.34±0.23 bpm/mmHg) compared with control. Our data suggest that both components of autonomic cardiac tonus and the parasympathetic component of the baroreflex sensitivity are increased in the MSG obese rat. It is possible that the parasympathetic alterations observed in these MSG obese rats may have originated from central areas of cardiovascular control. PMID:22554831

  6. Pretreatment with memantine prevents Alzheimer-like alterations induced by intrahippocampal okadaic acid administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Eduardo Rigon; Kalinine, Eduardo; Haas, Clarissa Branco; Torrez, Vitor Rocco; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Muller, Alexandre Pastoris; Portela, Luis Valmor

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral okadaic acid (OA) administration induces Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like phenotype in rats. Alterations in glutamate levels associated with hyperactivation of cyclin dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) signaling pathway downstream Tau phosphorylation may participate in the genesis of this pathological phenotype. Here, we examined the efficacy of memantine (MN) pretreatment on reducing OA-induced AD-like phenotypes in rats. Wistar rats were given daily intraperitoneal injections of MN for 3 days and then given an intrahippocampal infusion of OA. Animals were divided into four groups: control (CO), MN, OA and MN/OA. Spontaneous locomotion and spatial memory performance were assessed by open field and Morris water maze respectively. Additionally, we measured glutamate levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the immunocontent of Cdk5, p35, p25 and phosphorylated Tau (pTauSer199/202) in the hippocampus. Spontaneous locomotion did not differ between groups. The OA group showed a significant decrease in spatial memory performance compared to all groups. The OA infusion also increased CSF glutamate levels and the immunocontents of Cdk5, p25 and pTauSer199/202 in the hippocampus. Conversely, pretreatment with MN prevented OA-induced spatial memory deficits and the increment of CSF glutamate level; which paralleled with normal immunocontents of Cdk5, p25 and pTau- Ser199/202 proteins. There were positive correlations between spatial memory performance and the neurochemical parameters. In summary, pretreatment with MN prevents spatial memory deficits induced by intrahippocampal OA administration in rats. The prevention of increase CSF glutamate levels, along with the reduced hippocampal phosphorylation of TauSer199/202 by Cdk5/p25 signaling pathway, are the mechanisms proposed to participate in the prophylactic effects of MN in this AD-like model. PMID:22515493

  7. Diabetic retinopathy alters light-induced clock gene expression and dopamine levels in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Lahouaoui, Hasna; Coutanson, Christine; Cooper, Howard M.; Bennis, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most common consequences of diabetes that affects millions of working-age adults worldwide and leads to progressive degeneration of the retina, visual loss, and blindness. Diabetes is associated with circadian disruption of the central and peripheral circadian clocks, but the mechanisms responsible for such alterations are unknown. Using a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced model of diabetes, we investigated whether diabetes alters 1) the circadian regulation of clock genes in the retina and in the central clocks, 2) the light response of clock genes in the retina, and/or 3) light-driven retinal dopamine (DA), a major output marker of the retinal clock. Methods To quantify circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled genes, retinas and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) from the same animals were collected every 4 h in circadian conditions, 12 weeks post-diabetes. Induction of Per1, Per2, and c-fos mRNAs was quantified in the retina after the administration of a pulse of monochromatic light (480 nm, 1.17×1014 photons/cm2/s, 15 min) at circadian time 16. Gene expression was assessed with real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT–PCR). Pooled retinas from the control and STZ-diabetic mice were collected 2 h after light ON and light OFF (Zeitgeber time (ZT)2 and ZT14), and DA and its metabolite were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results We found variable effects of diabetes on the expression of clock genes in the retina and only slight differences in phase and/or amplitude in the SCN. c-fos and Per1 induction by a 480 nm light pulse was abolished in diabetic animals at 12 weeks post-induction of diabetes in comparison with the control mice, suggesting a deficit in light-induced neuronal activation of the retinal clock. Finally, we quantified a 56% reduction in the total number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunopositive cells, associated with a decrease in DA levels during the subjective day (ZT2

  8. Alteration of the Redox State with Reactive Oxygen Species for 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2013-01-01

    Oral mucositis is often induced in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy treatment. It has been reported that oral mucositis can reduce quality of life, as well as increasing the incidence of mortality. The participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis is well known, but no report has actually demonstrated the presence of ROS. Thus, the purpose of this study was thus to demonstrate the involvement of ROS and the alteration of the redox state in oral mucositis using an in vivo L-band electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. An oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with 10% acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch was used. Lipid peroxidation was measured as the level of malondialdehyde determined by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. The rate constants of the signal decay of nitroxyl compounds using in vivo L-band ESR were calculated from the signal decay curves. Firstly, we established the oral mucositis animal model induced by treatment of 5-fluorouracil with acetic acid in hamster cheek pouch. An increased level of lipid peroxidation in oral mucositis was found by measuring malondialdehyde using isolated hamster cheek pouch ulcer. In addition, as a result of in vivo L-band ESR measurements using our model animals, the decay rate constants of carbamoyl-PROXYL, which is a reagent for detecting the redox balance in tissue, were decreased. These results suggest that a redox imbalance might occur by excessive generation of ROS at an early stage of oral mucositis and the consumption of large quantities of antioxidants including glutathione in the locality of oral mucositis. These findings support the presence of ROS involved in the pathogenesis of oral mucositis with anti-cancer therapy, and is useful for the development of novel therapies drugs for oral mucositis. PMID:24376587

  9. Prenatal stress induces alterations in cerebellar nitric oxide that are correlated with deficits in spatial memory in rat's offspring.

    PubMed

    Maur, Damián G; Romero, Carolina B; Burdet, Berenice; Palumbo, María L; Zorrilla-Zubilete, María A

    2012-12-01

    Prenatal stress (PS) has been linked to abnormal cognitive, behavioral and psychosocial outcomes in both animals and humans. Since PS has been shown to induce a cerebellar cytoarchitectural disarrangement and cerebellar abnormalities that have been linked to an impairment of behavioral functions, the aim of the present work was to investigate whether the exposure to PS in a period in which the cerebellum is still immature can induce behavioral deficits in the adult and whether this alterations are correlated with changes in nitric oxide (NO) and cellular oxidative mechanisms in offspring's cerebellum. Our results show impairments in spatial memory and territory discrimination in PS adult rats. PS offspring also displayed alterations in cerebellar nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression and activity. Moreover, a correlation between spatial memory deficits and the increase in NOS activity was found. The results found here may point to a role of cerebellar NO in the behavioral alterations induced by stress during early development stages. PMID:23022609

  10. Ursodeoxycholic acid alleviates cholestasis-induced histophysiological alterations in the male reproductive system of bile duct-ligated rats.

    PubMed

    Saad, Ramadan A; Mahmoud, Yomna I

    2014-12-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid is the most widely used drug for treating cholestatic liver diseases. However, its effect on the male reproductive system alterations associated with cholestasis has never been studied. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the effect of ursodeoxycholic acid on cholestasis-induced alterations in the male reproductive system. Cholestasis was induced by bile duct ligation. Bile duct-ligated rats had higher cholestasis biomarkers and lower levels of testosterone, LH and FSH than did the Sham rats. They also had lower reproductive organs weights, and lower sperm motility, density and normal morphology than those of Sham rats. Histologically, these animals suffered from testicular tubular atrophy, interstitial edema, thickening of basement membranes, vacuolation, and depletion of germ cells. After ursodeoxycholic acid administration, cholestasis-induced structural and functional alterations were significantly ameliorated. In conclusion, ursodeoxycholic acid can ameliorate the reproductive complications of chronic cholestasis in male patients, which represents an additional benefit to this drug. PMID:25461907

  11. Effect of quercetin against lindane induced alterations in the serum and hepatic tissue lipids in wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Lalitha, Gurusamy; Shirony, Nicholson Puthanveedu; Baskaran, Rathinasamy

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of quercetin (flavonoid) against lindane induced alterations in lipid profile of wistar rats. Methods Rats were administered orally with lindane (100 mg/kg body weight) and quercetin (10 mg/kg body weight) for 30 days. After the end of treatment period lipid profile was estimated in serum and tissue. Results Elevated levels of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein (LDL), very Low Density Lipoprotein (VLDL) and tissue triglycerides, cholesterol with concomitant decrease in serum HDL and tissue phospholipids were decreased in lindane treated rats were found to be significantly decreased in the quercetin and lindane co-treated rats. Conclusions Our study suggests that quercetin has hypolipidemic effect and offers protection against lindane induced toxicity in liver by restoring the altered levels of lipids. The quercetin cotreatment along with lindane for 30 days reversed these biochemical alterations in lipids induced by lindane. PMID:23569870

  12. Camel milk beneficial effects on treating gentamicin induced alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K; Abbasmanthiri, R; Al-Elewi, Abdulrahman M; Al-Omani, Saud; Al-Asmary, Saeed; Al-Asmari, Sarah A

    2014-01-01

    The potential effect of camel milk (CM) against gentamicin (GM) induced biochemical changes in the rat serum was evaluated. Four groups of six albino rats were used for control, CM fed, injected with GM(i.p.), and then fed and injected with GM. The results showed that the administration of GM significantly altered the levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in rat serum. CM restored these parameters to almost their normal range in group IV. Additionally, the present study showed that injection of rats with gentamicin caused an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity while the antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione s-transferase (GST) activity decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05). Administration of CM significantly (P ≤ 0.05) inhibited the formation of MDA and activity of MPO and upregulated the antioxidant enzymes (SOD and GST) activity. The overall findings of this study demonstrated that pretreatment with CM gave protection against GM induced hepatic damage possibly by inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammation, and hence camel milk can be identified as a new therapeutic agent. PMID:25544839

  13. Rapid, Concurrent Alterations in Pre- and Postsynaptic Structure Induced by Soluble Natural Amyloid-β Protein

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Barbara; Shaked, Gideon M; Tabarean, Iustin V; Braga, Julia; Koo, Edward H; Halpain, Shelley

    2008-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease increasing evidence attributes synaptic and cognitive deficits to soluble oligomers of amyloid β protein (Aβ), even prior to the accumulation of amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuronal cell death. Here we show that within 1–2 hours picomolar concentrations of cell-derived, soluble Aβ induce specific alterations in pre- and postsynaptic morphology and connectivity in cultured hippocampal neurons. Clusters of presynaptic vesicle markers decreased in size and number at glutamatergic but not GABAergic terminals. Dendritic spines also decreased in number and became dysmorphic, as spine heads collapsed and/or extended long protrusions. Simultaneous time-lapse imaging of axon-dendrite pairs revealed that shrinking spines sometimes became disconnected from their presynaptic varicosity. Concomitantly, miniature synaptic potentials decreased in amplitude and frequency. Spine changes were prevented by blockers of nAChRs and NMDARs. Washout of Aβ within the first day reversed these spine changes. Further, spine changes reversed spontaneously by two days, because neurons acutely developed resistance to continuous Aβ exposure. Thus, rapid Aβ-induced synapse destabilization may underlie transient behavioral impairments in animal models, and early cognitive deficits in Alzheimer’s patients. PMID:17368908

  14. Glucocorticoid-induced alterations in mitochondrial membrane properties and respiration in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Karin; Rainer, Johannes; Bindreither, Daniel; Ritter, Ireen; Gnaiger, Erich; Kofler, Reinhard; Oefner, Peter J; Renner, Kathrin

    2011-06-01

    Mitochondria are signal-integrating organelles involved in cell death induction. Mitochondrial alterations and reduction in energy metabolism have been previously reported in the context of glucocorticoid (GC)-triggered apoptosis, although the mechanism is not yet clarified. We analyzed mitochondrial function in a GC-sensitive precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) model as well as in GC-sensitive and GC-resistant T-ALL model systems. Respiratory activity was preserved in intact GC-sensitive cells up to 24h under treatment with 100 nM dexamethasone before depression of mitochondrial respiration occurred. Severe repression of mitochondrial respiratory function was observed after permeabilization of the cell membrane and provision of exogenous substrates. Several mitochondrial metabolite and protein transporters and two subunits of the ATP synthase were downregulated in the T-ALL and in the precursor B-ALL model at the gene expression level under dexamethasone treatment. These data could partly be confirmed in ALL lymphoblasts from patients, dependent on the molecular abnormality in the ALL cells. GC-resistant cell lines did not show any of these defects after dexamethasone treatment. In conclusion, in GC-sensitive ALL cells, dexamethasone induces changes in membrane properties that together with the reduced expression of mitochondrial transporters of substrates and proteins may lead to repressed mitochondrial respiratory activity and lower ATP levels that contribute to GC-induced apoptosis. PMID:21237131

  15. Metabolic and histopathological alterations in the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis induced by chronic exposure to acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Larguinho, Miguel; Cordeiro, Ana; Diniz, Mário S; Costa, Pedro M; Baptista, Pedro V

    2014-11-01

    Although the neurotoxic and genotoxic potential of acrylamide has been established in freshwater fish, the full breadth of the toxicological consequences induced by this xenobiotic has not yet been disclosed, particularly in aquatic invertebrates. To assess the effects of acrylamide on a bivalve model, the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), two different setups were accomplished: 1) acute exposure to several concentrations of waterborne acrylamide to determine lethality thresholds of the substance and 2) chronic exposure to more reduced acrylamide concentrations to survey phases I and II metabolic endpoints and to perform a whole-body screening for histopathological alterations. Acute toxicity was low (LC50≈400mg/L). However, mussels were responsive to prolonged exposure to chronic concentrations of waterborne acrylamide (1-10mg/L), yielding a significant increase in lipid peroxidation plus EROD and GST activities. Still, total anti-oxidant capacity was not exceeded. In addition, no neurotoxic effects could be determined through acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. The findings suggest aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr)-dependent responses in mussels exposed to acrylamide, although reduced comparatively to vertebrates. No significant histological damage was found in digestive gland or gills but female gonads endured severe necrosis and oocyte atresia. Altogether, the results indicate that acrylamide may induce gonadotoxicity in mussels, although the subject should benefit from further research. Altogether, the findings suggest that the risk of acrylamide to aquatic animals, especially molluscs, may be underestimated. PMID:25262075

  16. Kojibiose ameliorates arachidic acid-induced metabolic alterations in hyperglycaemic rats.

    PubMed

    Moisés Laparra, José; Díez-Municio, Marina; Javier Moreno, F; Herrero, Miguel

    2015-11-14

    Herein we hypothesise the positive effects of kojibiose (KJ), a prebiotic disaccharide, selected for reducing hepatic expression of inflammatory markers in vivo that could modulate the severity of saturated arachidic acid (ARa)-induced liver dysfunction in hyperglycaemic rats. Animals were fed daily (20 d) with ARa (0·3 mg) together or not with KJ (22 mg approximately 0·5 %, w/w diet). Glucose, total TAG and cholesterol contents and the phospholipid profile were determined in serum samples. Liver sections were collected for the expression (mRNA) of enzymes and innate biomarkers, and intrahepatic macrophage and T-cell populations were analysed by flow cytometry. ARa administration increased the proportion of liver to body weight that was associated with an increased (by 11 %) intrahepatic macrophage population. These effects were ameliorated when feeding with KJ, which also normalised the plasmatic levels of TAG and N-acyl-phosphatidylethenolamine in response to tissue damage. These results indicate that daily supplementation of KJ significantly improves the severity of ARa-induced hepatic alterations. PMID:26344377

  17. Emersion Induces Nitrogen Release and Alteration of Nitrogen Metabolism in the Intertidal Genus Porphyra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jang K.; Kraemer, George P.; Yarish, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We investigated emersion-induced nitrogen (N) release from Porphyra umbilicalis Kütz. Thallus N concentration decreased during 4 h of emersion. Tissue N and soluble protein contents of P. umbilicalis were positively correlated and decreased during emersion. Growth of P. umbilicalis did not simply dilute the pre-emersion tissue N concentration. Rather, N was lost from tissues during emersion. We hypothesize that emersion-induced N release occurs when proteins are catabolized. While the δ15N value of tissues exposed to emersion was higher than that of continuously submerged tissues, further discrimination of stable N isotopes did not occur during the 4 h emersion. We conclude that N release from Porphyra during emersion did not result from bacterial denitrification, but possibly as a consequence of photorespiration. The release of N by P. umbilicalis into the environment during emersion suggests a novel role of intertidal seaweeds in the global N cycle. Emersion also altered the physiological function (nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase activity, growth rate) of P. umbilicalis and the co-occurring upper intertidal species P. linearis Grev., though in a seasonally influenced manner. Individuals of the year round perennial species P. umbilicalis were more tolerant of emersion than ephemeral, cold temperate P. linearis in early winter. However, the mid-winter populations of both P. linearis and P. umbilicalis, had similar temporal physiological patterns during emersion. PMID:23922872

  18. High fat diet induced alterations of atrial electrical activities in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Hartnett, Sigurd; Sample, Alex; Schnack, Sabrina; Li, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a well-known risk factor for various cardiovascular diseases. Recent clinical data showed that overweight and obese patients have higher incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with individuals with normal body weights, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the effects of a high fat diet on atrial activities in mice. ICR male mice were fed a regular diet (RD) or a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks. Mice fed HFD showed significantly greater body weight gains and visceral fat accumulation compared with RD mice. Under anesthetic condition, baseline arterial blood pressure and heart rate were not significantly different between RD and HFD groups. Although no spontaneous or atrial stimulation-induced atrial fibrillation was observed, this study revealed several alterations in the activities and protein levels in the atria in HFD mice. Surface electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed significantly shortened PR interval in HFD mice. In the atrial stimulation experiments, the sinoatrial (SA) node recovery time was significantly prolonged whereas the atrial effective refractory period was significantly reduced in HFD mice as compared with RD mice. Western blot showed protein levels of two major potassium channels, Kv1.5 and Kv4.2/3, were significantly increased in atria of HFD mice. These data indicate that HFD induces atrial electrophysiological remodeling in mice, which may be a potential mechanism underlying the increased risk for atrial arrhythmias in obesity and metabolic disorders. PMID:27073731

  19. Altered systemic bioavailability and organ distribution of azathioprine in methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Karbelkar, Sadaf A.; Majumdar, Anuradha S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Intestinal mucositis is a significant problem haunting clinicians for decades. One of the major reasons for its occurrence is high-dose chemotherapy. The study is aimed at investigating effect of intestinal mucositis on pharmacokinetics, organ distribution, and bioavailability of azathioprine (AZA) (6-mercaptopurine). Materials and Methods: Intestinal mucositis was induced with methotrexate (MTX) (2.5 mg/kg). The oral absorption of AZA and 6-mercaptopurine (metabolite) levels were determined in control and MTX-treated rats: ex vivo (noneverted sac technique) and in vivo (pharmacokinetics and organ-distribution) using high-performance liquid chromatography. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to evaluate peptide transporter expression on luminal membrane of small intestine. Results: Intestinal permeation of AZA into systemic circulation of rats was lower after MTX administration, widely found in intestinal segments of mucositis-induced rats leading to decline in systemic bioavailability of AZA. Immunohistochemistry findings indicated diminution of peptide transporter expression representing hampered absorption of drugs absorbed via this transporter. Conclusion: Study outcome has thrown light on altered fate of AZA when administered to individuals with mucositis which suggests modified drug therapy. These findings can further be investigated in different drug classes which might be administered concomitantly in mucositis and study outcome can be further confirmed in mucositis patients in clinical practice also. PMID:27298491

  20. Kinetics of exercise-induced neural activation; interpretive dilemma of altered cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Taiki; Horiuchi, Masahiro; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Sato, Kohei; Tanaka, Naoki; Bailey, Damian M; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2012-02-01

    Neural activation decreases cerebral deoxyhaemoglobin (HHb(C)) and increases oxyhaemoglobin concentration (O(2)Hb(C)). In contrast, patients who present with restricted cerebral blood flow, such as those suffering from cerebral ischaemia or Alzheimer's disease, and during the course of ageing the converse occurs, in that HHb(C) increases and O(2)Hb(C) decreases during neural activation. In the present study, we examined the interpretive implications of altered exercise-induced cerebral blood flow for cortical oxygenation in healthy subjects. Both O(2)Hb(C) and HHb(C) (prefrontal cortex) were determined in 11 healthy men using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V(mean)) was determined via transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. Measurements were performed during contralateral hand-grip exercise during suprasystolic bilateral thigh-cuff occlusion (Cuff+) and within 2 s of cuff release (Cuff-) for the acute manipulation of cerebral perfusion. During Cuff+, both MCA V(mean) and O(2)Hb(C) increased during exercise, whereas HHb(C) decreased. In contrast, the opposite occurred during the Cuff- manipulation. These findings highlight the inverse relationship between cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygenation as determined by NIRS, which has interpretive implications for the kinetics underlying exercise-induced neural activation. PMID:22041980

  1. Effect of Hibiscus rosa sinensis on reserpine-induced neurobehavioral and biochemical alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Nade, V S; Dwivedi, Subhash; Kawale, L A; Upasani, C D; Yadav, A V

    2009-07-01

    Effect of methanolic extract of Hibiscus rosa sinensis (100-300 mg/kg) was studied on reserpine-induced orofacial dyskinesia and neurochemical alterations. The rats were treated with intraperitoneal reserpine (1 mg/kg, ip) for 3 days every other day. On day 5, vacuous chewing movements and tongue protrusions were counted for 5 min. Reserpine treated rats significantly developed vacuous chewing movements and tongue protrusions however, coadministration of Hibiscus rosa sinensis roots extract (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg, per orally) attenuated the effects. Biochemical analysis of brain revealed that the reserpine treatment significantly increased lipid peroxidation and decreased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GSH), an index of oxidative stress process. Coadministration of extract significantly reduced the lipid peroxidation and reversed the decrease in brain SOD, CAT and GSH levels. The results of the present study suggested that Hibiscus rosa sinensis had a protective role against reserpine-induced orofacial dyskinesia and oxidative stress. PMID:19761039

  2. Combination of exercise training and erythropoietin prevents cancer-induced muscle alterations

    PubMed Central

    Pin, Fabrizio; Busquets, Silvia; Toledo, Miriam; Camperi, Andrea; Lopez-Soriano, Francisco J.; Costelli, Paola; Argilés, Josep M.; Penna, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a syndrome characterized by loss of skeletal muscle mass, inflammation, anorexia and anemia, contributing to patient fatigue and reduced quality of life. In addition to nutritional approaches, exercise training (EX) has been proposed as a suitable tool to manage cachexia. In the present work the effect of mild exercise training, coupled to erythropoietin (EPO) administration to prevent anemia, has been tested in tumor-bearing mice. In the C26 hosts, acute exercise does not prevent and even worsens muscle wasting. Such pattern is prevented by EPO co-administration or by the adoption of a chronic exercise protocol. EX and EPO co-treatment spares oxidative myofibers from atrophy and counteracts the oxidative to glycolytic shift, inducing PGC-1α. LLC hosts are responsive to exercise and their treatment with the EX-EPO combination prevents the loss of muscle strength and the onset of mitochondrial ultrastructural alterations, while increases muscle oxidative capacity and intracellular ATP content, likely depending on PGC-1α induction and mitophagy promotion. Consistently, muscle-specific PGC-1α overexpression prevents LLC-induced muscle atrophy and Atrogin-1 hyperexpression. Overall, the present data suggest that low intensisty exercise can be an effective tool to be included in combined therapeutic approaches against cancer cachexia, provided that anemia is coincidently treated in order to enhance the beneficial action of exercise. PMID:26636649

  3. Spatial disturbances in altered mucosal and luminal gut viromes of diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Soo; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2016-05-01

    Gut microbial biogeography is a key feature of host-microbe relationships. In gut viral ecology, biogeography and responses to dietary intervention remain poorly understood. Here, we conducted a metagenomic study to determine the composition of the mucosal and luminal viromes of the gut and to evaluate the impact of a Western diet on gut viral ecology. We found that mucosal and luminal viral assemblages comprised predominantly temperate phages. The mucosal virome significantly differed from the luminal virome in low-fat diet-fed lean mice, where spatial variation correlated with bacterial microbiota from the mucosa and lumen. The mucosal and luminal viromes of high-fat, high-sucrose 'Western' diet-fed obese mice were significantly enriched with temperate phages of the Caudovirales order. Interestingly, this community alteration occurred to a greater extent in the mucosa than lumen, leading to loss of spatial differences; however, these changes recovered after switching to a low-fat diet. Temperate phages enriched in the Western diet-induced obese mice were associated with the Bacilli, Negativicutes and Bacteroidia classes and temperate phages from the Bacteroidia class particularly encoded stress and niche-specific functions advantageous to bacterial host adaptation. This study illustrates a biogeographic view of the gut virome and phage-bacterial host connections under the diet-induced microbial dysbiosis. PMID:26690305

  4. Rutaecarpine Reverses the Altered Connexin Expression Pattern Induced by Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein in Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Fu, Yan-Qi; Peng, Wei-Jie; Yu, Yan-Rong; Wu, Yu-Si; Yan, Hang; Huang, Qi-Ren; He, Ming; Luo, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to the vascular endothelium is crucial in atherosclerosis development. Connexins (Cxs) which form hemichannels or gap junctions, modulate monocyte-endothelium interaction. We previously found that rutaecarpine, an active ingredient of the Chinese herbal medicine Evodia, reversed the altered Cx expression induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and consequently decreases the adhesive properties of endothelial cells to monocytes. This study further investigated the effect of rutaecarpine on Cx expression in monocytes exposed to ox-LDL. In cultured human monocytic cell line THP-1, ox-LDL rapidly reduced the level of atheroprotective Cx37 but enhanced that of atherogenic Cx43, thereby inhibiting adenosine triphosphate release through hemichannels. Pretreatment with rutaecarpine recovered the expression of Cx37 but inhibited the upregulation of Cx43 induced by ox-LDL, thereby improving adenosine triphosphate-dependent hemichannel activity and preventing monocyte adhesion. These effects of rutaecarpine were attenuated by capsazepine, an antagonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1. The antiadhesive effects of rutaecarpine were also attenuated by hemichannel blocker 18α-GA. This study provides additional evidence that rutaecarpine can modulate Cx expression through transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 activation in monocytes, which contributes to the antiadhesive properties of rutaecarpine. PMID:26859198

  5. Piwi-pathway alteration induces LINE-1 transposon derepression and infertility development in cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Hadziselimovic, Faruk; Hadziselimovic, Nils O; Demougin, Philippe; Krey, Gunthild; Oakeley, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogonia contain processing bodies that harbor P-element-induced wimpy testis (Piwi) proteins. Piwi proteins are associated specifically with Piwi-interacting RNAs to silence transposable DNA elements. Loss-of-function mutations in the Piwi pathway lead to derepression of transposable elements, resulting in defective spermatogenesis. Furthermore, deletion of gametocyte-specific factor 1 (GTSF1), a factor involved in Piwi-mediated transcriptional repression, causes male-specific sterility and derepression of LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. No previous studies have examined GTSF1, L1 and PIWIL4 expression in cryptorchidism. We examined transposon-silencing genes and L1 transposon expression in testicular biopsies with Affymetrix microarrays and immunohistology. Seven members of the Tudor gene family, 3 members of the DEAD-box RNA helicase family, and the GTSF1 gene were found to show significantly lower RNA signals in the high-infertility-risk group. In the immunohistochemical analysis, patients from the low-infertility-risk group showed coherently stronger staining for GTSF1 and PIWIL4 proteins and weaker staining for L1 transposon when compared to the high-infertility-risk samples. These new findings provide first evidence consistent with the idea that infertility in cryptorchidism is a consequence of alterations in the Piwi pathway and transposon derepression induced by the impaired function of mini-puberty. PMID:25791297

  6. Diet-Induced Obesity Impairs Endothelium-Derived Hyperpolarization via Altered Potassium Channel Signaling Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, Rebecca E.; Grayson, T. Hilton; Morris, Margaret J.; Howitt, Lauren; Chadha, Preet S.; Sandow, Shaun L.

    2011-01-01

    Background The vascular endothelium plays a critical role in the control of blood flow. Altered endothelium-mediated vasodilator and vasoconstrictor mechanisms underlie key aspects of cardiovascular disease, including those in obesity. Whilst the mechanism of nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation has been extensively studied in obesity, little is known about the impact of obesity on vasodilation to the endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH) mechanism; which predominates in smaller resistance vessels and is characterized in this study. Methodology/Principal Findings Membrane potential, vessel diameter and luminal pressure were recorded in 4th order mesenteric arteries with pressure-induced myogenic tone, in control and diet-induced obese rats. Obesity, reflecting that of human dietary etiology, was induced with a cafeteria-style diet (∼30 kJ, fat) over 16–20 weeks. Age and sexed matched controls received standard chow (∼12 kJ, fat). Channel protein distribution, expression and vessel morphology were determined using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and ultrastructural techniques. In control and obese rat vessels, acetylcholine-mediated EDH was abolished by small and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (SKCa/IKCa) inhibition; with such activity being impaired in obesity. SKCa-IKCa activation with cyclohexyl-[2-(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl)-6-methyl-pyrimidin-4-yl]-amine (CyPPA) and 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone (1-EBIO), respectively, hyperpolarized and relaxed vessels from control and obese rats. IKCa-mediated EDH contribution was increased in obesity, and associated with altered IKCa distribution and elevated expression. In contrast, the SKCa-dependent-EDH component was reduced in obesity. Inward-rectifying potassium channel (Kir) and Na+/K+-ATPase inhibition by barium/ouabain, respectively, attenuated and abolished EDH in arteries from control and obese rats, respectively; reflecting differential Kir expression and

  7. Proteome alteration induced by hTERT transfection of human fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazzucchelli, Gabriel D; Gabelica, Valérie; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Fléron, Maximilien; Ashimwe, Wilson; Rosu, Frédéric; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire; Riou, Jean-François; De Pauw, Edwin

    2008-01-01

    Background Telomerase confers cellular immortality by elongating telomeres, thereby circumventing the Hayflick limit. Extended-life-span cells have been generated by transfection with the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene. hTERT transfected cell lines may be of outstanding interest to monitor the effect of drugs targeting the telomerase activity. The incidence of hTERT gene transfection at the proteome level is a prerequisite to that purpose. The effect of the transfection has been studied on the proteome of human fibroblast (WI38). Cytosolic and nuclear fractions of WI38 cells, empty vector transfected WI38 (WI38-HPV) and hTERT WI38 cells were submitted to a 2D-DIGE (Two-Dimensional Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis) analysis. Only spots that had a similar abundance in WI38 and WI38-HPV, but were differentially expressed in WI38 hTERT were selected for MS identification. This method directly points to the proteins linked with the hTERT expression. Number of false positive differentially expressed proteins has been excluded by using control WI38-HPV cells. The proteome alteration induced by hTERT WI38 transfection should be taken into account in subsequent use of the cell line for anti-telomerase drugs evaluation. Results 2D-DIGE experiment shows that 57 spots out of 2246 are significantly differentially expressed in the cytosolic fraction due to hTERT transfection, and 38 were confidently identified. In the nuclear fraction, 44 spots out of 2172 were selected in the differential proteome analysis, and 14 were identified. The results show that, in addition to elongating telomeres, hTERT gene transfection has other physiological roles, among which an enhanced ER capacity and a potent cell protection against apoptosis. Conclusion We show that the methodology reduces the complexity of the proteome analysis and highlights proteins implicated in other processes than telomere elongation. hTERT induced proteome changes suggest that telomerase

  8. MicroRNA Expression Signature Is Altered in the Cardiac Remodeling Induced by High Fat Diets.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Elaine Castilho; França, Gustavo Starvaggi; Lino, Caroline Antunes; Koyama, Fernanda Christtanini; Moreira, Luana do Nascimento; Alexandre, Juliana Gomes; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Galante, Pedro Alexandre Favoretto; Diniz, Gabriela Placoná

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have revealed the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the control of cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial function. In addition, several reports have demonstrated that high fat (HF) diet induces cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling. In the current study, we investigated the effect of diets containing different percentages of fat on the cardiac miRNA expression signature. To address this question, male C57Bl/6 mice were fed with a low fat (LF) diet or two HF diets, containing 45 kcal% fat (HF45%) and 60 kcal% fat (HF60%) for 10 and 20 weeks. HF60% diet promoted an increase on body weight, fasting glycemia, insulin, leptin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and induced glucose intolerance. HF feeding promoted cardiac remodeling, as evidenced by increased cardiomyocyte transverse diameter and interstitial fibrosis. RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that HF feeding induced distinct miRNA expression patterns in the heart. HF45% diet for 10 and 20 weeks changed the abundance of 64 and 26 miRNAs in the heart, respectively. On the other hand, HF60% diet for 10 and 20 weeks altered the abundance of 27 and 88 miRNAs in the heart, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that insulin signaling pathway was overrepresented in response to HF diet. An inverse correlation was observed between cardiac levels of GLUT4 and miRNA-29c. Similarly, we found an inverse correlation between expression of GSK3β and the expression of miRNA-21a-3p, miRNA-29c-3p, miRNA-144-3p, and miRNA-195a-3p. In addition, miRNA-1 overexpression prevented cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Taken together, our results revealed differentially expressed miRNA signatures in the heart in response to different HF diets. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1771-1783, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26638879

  9. Megalin-Mediated Tubuloglomerular Alterations in High-Fat Diet-Induced Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Shoji; Hosojima, Michihiro; Kaneko, Reika; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Daisuke; Sasagawa, Taiji; Kabasawa, Hideyuki; Kaseda, Ryohei; Yasukawa, Ryota; Ishikawa, Tomomi; Suzuki, Akiyo; Sato, Hiroyoshi; Kageyama, Shun; Tanaka, Takahiro; Kitamura, Nobutaka; Narita, Ichiei; Komatsu, Masaaki; Nishiyama, Akira; Saito, Akihiko

    2016-07-01

    Obesity, an important risk factor for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular disease, is often complicated by CKD, which further increases cardiovascular risk and causes ESRD. To elucidate the mechanism underlying this relationship, we investigated the role of the endocytic receptor megalin in proximal tubule epithelial cells (PTECs). We studied a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity/MetS model using kidney-specific mosaic megalin knockout (KO) mice. Compared with control littermates fed a normal-fat diet, control littermates fed an HFD for 12 weeks showed autolysosomal dysfunction with autophagy impairment and increased expression of hypertrophy, lipid peroxidation, and senescence markers in PTECs of the S2 segment, peritubular capillary rarefaction with localized interstitial fibrosis, and glomerular hypertrophy with mesangial expansion. These were ameliorated in HFD-fed megalin KO mice, even though these mice had the same levels of obesity, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia as HFD-fed control mice. Intravital renal imaging of HFD-fed wild-type mice also demonstrated the accumulation of autofluorescent lipofuscin-like substances in PTECs of the S2 segment, accompanied by focal narrowing of tubular lumens and peritubular capillaries. In cultured PTECs, fatty acid-rich albumin induced the increased expression of genes encoding PDGF-B and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 via megalin, with large (auto)lysosome formation, compared with fatty acid-depleted albumin. Collectively, the megalin-mediated endocytic handling of glomerular-filtered (lipo)toxic substances appears to be involved primarily in hypertrophic and senescent PTEC injury with autophagy impairment, causing peritubular capillary damage and retrograde glomerular alterations in HFD-induced kidney disease. Megalin could be a therapeutic target for obesity/MetS-related CKD, independently of weight, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia modification. PMID:26534923

  10. Fructooligosaccharide raftilose reduces the mycophenolate mofetil-induced complications: Hematological and biochemical alterations

    PubMed Central

    Cheraghi, Hadi; Khaki, Zohreh; Malekinejad, Hassan; Sasani, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a selective inhibitor of Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase. Gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances in immature ones are reported for MMF-induced compilations, which in the case of occurrence dose reduction is required. Thus, in the present study, the fructooligosaccharide raftilose® (RFT) was co-administrated with MMF to estimate the protective effect of RFT against MMF-induced GI complications. Thirty six immature male Wistar rats were divided into six groups including: Control (normal saline), RFT-treated (100 mg kg-1), MMF-treated (20 mg kg-1), MMF + LRFT (50 mg kg-1), MMF + MRFT (100 mg kg-1) and MMF + HRFT (200 mg kg-1) groups. The hematocrit (Hct), lymphocyte/total WBC, feces water content and pH were analyzed. Moreover, the hepatic functional tests, kidney-related biomarkers, lipid and protein profiles, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) contents were assessed. Co-administration of RFT stabilized the MMF-reduced body weight. The MMF significantly diminished Hct and lymph/total WBC (p < 0.05). Only MRFT enhanced the lymphocyte/total WBC. Increased water content, no changes in feces pH, increased serum ALT and AST, no alteration in urea and mild enhancement in creatinine were demonstrated in MMF-received animals. However, RFT at low dose ameliorated the feces parameters and reduced ALT. No significant changes were demonstrated for serum lipid and protein profiles in MMF- and RFT + MMF-treated groups. The RFT enhanced the serum TAC, reduced MDA and NO contents. In conclusion, our data suggested that RFT could be considered as an effective agent to subsidize the MMF-induced clinical, hematological and biochemical disorders. PMID:26973768

  11. Alteration of hepatic structure and oxidative stress induced by intravenous nanoceria

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Michael T.; Lu, Xiaoqin; Duan, Xiaoxian; Hardas, Sarita S.; Sultana, Rukhsana; Wu, Peng; Unrine, Jason M.; Graham, Uschi; Butterfield, D. Allan; Grulke, Eric A.; Yokel, Robert A.

    2012-04-15

    Beyond the traditional use of ceria as an abrasive, the scope of nanoceria applications now extends into fuel cell manufacturing, diesel fuel additives, and for therapeutic intervention as a putative antioxidant. However, the biological effects of nanoceria exposure have yet to be fully defined, which gave us the impetus to examine its systemic biodistribution and biological responses. An extensively characterized nanoceria (5 nm) dispersion was vascularly infused into rats, which were terminated 1 h, 20 h or 30 days later. Light and electron microscopic tissue characterization was conducted and hepatic oxidative stress parameters determined. We observed acute ceria nanoparticle sequestration by Kupffer cells with subsequent bioretention in parenchymal cells as well. The internalized ceria nanoparticles appeared as spherical agglomerates of varying dimension without specific organelle penetration. In hepatocytes, the agglomerated nanoceria frequently localized to the plasma membrane facing bile canaliculi. Hepatic stellate cells also sequestered nanoceria. Within the sinusoids, sustained nanoceria bioretention was associated with granuloma formations comprised of Kupffer cells and intermingling CD3{sup +} T cells. A statistically significant elevation of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) level was seen at 1 and 20 h, but subsided by 30 days after ceria administration. Further, elevated apoptosis was observed on day 30. These findings, together with increased hepatic protein carbonyl levels on day 30, indicate ceria-induced hepatic injury and oxidative stress, respectively. Such observations suggest a single vascular infusion of nanoceria can lead to persistent hepatic retention of particles with possible implications for occupational and therapeutic exposures. -- Highlights: ► Time course study on nanoceria induced hepatic alterations in rats. ► Serum AST elevation indicated acute hepatotoxicity. ► Ceria is retained for up to 30 days in Kupffer cells

  12. Positron emission tomography studies of potential mechanisms underlying phencyclidine-induced alterations in striatal dopamine.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Wynne K; Logan, Jean; Dewey, Stephen L

    2003-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET), in combination with (11)C-raclopride, was used to examine the effects of phencyclidine (PCP) on dopamine (DA) in the primate striatum. In addition, we explored the hypotheses that GABAergic pathways as well as molecular targets beyond the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex (ie dopamine transporter proteins, DAT) contribute to PCP's effects. In the first series of experiments, (11)C-raclopride was administered at baseline and 30 min following intravenous PCP administration. In the second series of studies, gamma-vinyl GABA (GVG) was used to assess whether enhanced GABAergic tone altered NMDA antagonist-induced changes in DA. Animals received an initial PET scan followed by pretreatment with GVG (300 mg/kg), then PCP 30 min prior to a second scan. Finally, we explored the possible contributions of DAT blockade to PCP-induced increases in DA. By examining (11)C-cocaine binding a paradigm in which PCP was coadministered with the radiotracer, we assessed the direct competition between these two compounds for the DAT. At 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg, PCP decreased (11)C-raclopride binding by 2.1, 14.9+/-2.2 and 8.18+/-1.1%, respectively. These effects were completely attenuated by GVG (3.38+/-3.1% decrease in (11)C-raclopride binding). Finally, PCP (0.5 mg/kg) decreased (11)C-cocaine binding by 25.5+/-4.3%, while at 1.0 mg/kg this decrease was 13.5%, consistent with a competitive interaction at the DAT. These results suggest that PCP may be exerting some direct effects through the DAT and that GABA partially modulates NMDA-antagonist-induced increases in striatal DA. PMID:12888780

  13. DETECTING STREAM INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY ALTERATION DUE TO MID TO LOW LEVELS OF WATERSHED LANDSCAPE MODIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an investigation into the effects of watershed landscape alteration on stream ecosystems, quantitative invertebrate samples were collected from riffles in 26 second and third order south shore Lake Superior streams. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination ...

  14. Static magnetic field of 6 mT induces apoptosis and alters cell cycle in p53 mutant Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmadianpour, Mohammad Reza; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of 6 milliTesla (mT) static magnetic field (SMF) on apoptosis induction and cell cycle alteration in T-lymphoblastoid Jurkat E6.1 cells. Exposure of human p53 mutant Jurkat cells to 6 mT SMF resulted in apoptosis, which was detected by luminometric and flow cytometric analysis also, phosphorylated ATM and E2F1 proteins were detected by western blot analysis. Based on luminescence detection data, apoptosis initiated 36 h after exposure to 6 mT SMF. Apoptosis also reached its maximum rate 48 h after treatment. Flow cytometric analysis revealed a temporary G2 arrest after exposure to 6 mT SMF. Indeed, cellular population of S and G2 phases was increased. Based on reports of other investigations on the effect of magnetic fields on Ca2+flux changes in cell membranes and the effect of MFs on free radical formation, it can be suggested that the magnetic fields may induce the apoptosis and alter the cell population in different cell cycle phases of Jurkat cells via changing the Ca2+fluxes through cell membranes and playing a role in free radical formation. Western blot analysis showed that the amount of phosphorylated ATM and E2F1 proteins were increased in treated cells. The results of luminometric and flow cytometric detection did not show a significant difference in the apoptosis rate between 6 h-treated and 24 h-treated cells by 6 mT SMF. Thus, 6 mT SMF can induce apoptosis and alter cell cycle in Jurkat cells via a p53-independent pathway. PMID:23320430

  15. Detection of mitomycin C-induced genetic damage in fish cells by use of RAPD.

    PubMed

    Becerril, C; Ferrero, M; Sanz, F; Castaño, A

    1999-09-01

    Concern about genetic alterations in fish populations arising from anthropogenic activities has led to the adaptation and/or development of new tests and techniques that shed light on these alterations. The high number and the reduced size of chromosomes and the long cell cycle associated with most fish species preclude the use of most accepted genotoxicity assays. The purpose of this work was to study the capability of the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA technique to show genotoxic effects induced by chemicals in fish cells. To do that we studied the effect of 0.5 microg/ml mitomycin C (MMC) on an established rainbow trout cell line (RTG-2). To increase the sensitivity of detecting altered copies of DNA and to avoid the presence of false positives and a lack of reproducibility, the amounts of DNA template and primer present in amplification reactions were studied and optimized after comparison between the control and exposed fingerprints for 4, 6 and 8 h. Results show that 5 ng of DNA template and 4 pM chosen primer were optimum to show differences between control and exposed cells and to obtain reproducible results. The results obtained, after optimum conditions were established, show that this system could be useful for the assessment of DNA alterations in in vitro genotoxicity studies. PMID:10473647

  16. Process-induced extracellular matrix alterations affect the mechanisms of soft tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Sandor, Maryellen; Lombardi, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrices derived from animal tissues for human tissue repairs are processed by various methods of physical, chemical, or enzymatic decellularization, viral inactivation, and terminal sterilization. The mechanisms of action in tissue repair vary among bioscaffolds and are suggested to be associated with process-induced extracellular matrix modifications. We compared three non-cross-linked, commercially available extracellular matrix scaffolds (Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix), and correlated extracellular matrix alterations to in vivo biological responses upon implantation in non-human primates. Structural evaluation showed significant differences in retaining native tissue extracellular matrix histology and ultrastructural features among bioscaffolds. Tissue processing may cause both the condensation of collagen fibers and fragmentation or separation of collagen bundles. Calorimetric analysis showed significant differences in the stability of bioscaffolds. The intrinsic denaturation temperature was measured to be 51°C, 38°C, and 44°C for Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix, respectively, demonstrating more extracellular matrix modifications in the Veritas and XenMatrix scaffolds. Consequently, the susceptibility to collagenase degradation was increased in Veritas and XenMatrix when compared to their respective source tissues. Using a non-human primate model, three bioscaffolds were found to elicit different biological responses, have distinct mechanisms of action, and yield various outcomes of tissue repair. Strattice permitted cell repopulation and was remodeled over 6 months. Veritas was unstable at body temperature, resulting in rapid absorption with moderate inflammation. XenMatrix caused severe inflammation and sustained immune reactions. This study demonstrates that extracellular matrix alterations significantly affect biological responses in soft tissue repair and regeneration. The data offer useful insights into the rational design of

  17. Sulfite exposure-induced hepatocyte death is not associated with alterations in p53 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jianying; Lei, Peiyu; Zhang, Jidong; Zhao, Chunyan; Liang, Ruifeng

    2013-10-01

    Although sulfite (SO3(2-)) is commonly used as an antimicrobial agent and preservative in foods, medicines and wine, it has also been listed as an important risk factor for the initiation and progression of liver diseases due to oxidative damage. In general, apoptosis that is induced by oxidative stress is triggered by increases in p53 and alterations in Mdm2 and Bcl-2. However, the level of involvement of the p53 signaling pathway, which has been shown to be upregulated in some animal studies, in hepatocyte death remains unclear. To examine the response of the p53 signaling pathway to stimulation with different concentrations of sulfite, a time course study of p53, Mdm2, and Bcl-2 expression was conducted in an immortalized hepatic cell line, HL-7702. When the HL-7702 cells were cultured in the presence of Na2SO3, the cell viability was significantly decreased after 24h compared to that of the control group (0mmol/L) (p<0.05). Meanwhile, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in the supernatants of HL-7702 cells were significantly increased following Na2SO3 administration. Interestingly, the expression of p53 and p-p53 (Ser15) remained unchanged. In addition, no obvious alterations in Mdm2 and Bcl-2 expression were observed in HL-7702 cells that had been stimulated with various concentrations of sulfite. To further investigate the detailed mechanism underlying sulfite toxicity, caspase-3, PCNA and RIP1 expression in HL-7702 cells was studied. The expression levels of caspase-3 and PCNA were unchanged, but RIP1 expression was increased significantly after 24h of exposure. In light of this evidence, we propose that sulfite is cytotoxic to hepatocytes, but this cytotoxicity is not achieved by direct interruption of the p53 signaling pathway. In addition, we propose that an alternative necrotic process underlies hepatocellular death following sulfite exposure. PMID:23973939

  18. Stress-induced alterations in large-scale functional networks of the rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Henckens, Marloes J A G; van der Marel, Kajo; van der Toorn, Annette; Pillai, Anup G; Fernández, Guillén; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Joëls, Marian

    2015-01-15

    Stress-related psychopathology is associated with altered functioning of large-scale brain networks. Animal research into chronic stress, one of the most prominent environmental risk factors for development of psychopathology, has revealed molecular and cellular mechanisms potentially contributing to human mental disease. However, so far, these studies have not addressed the system-level changes in extended brain networks, thought to critically contribute to mental disorders. We here tested the effects of chronic stress exposure (10 days immobilization) on the structural integrity and functional connectivity patterns in the brain, using high-resolution structural MRI, diffusion kurtosis imaging, and resting-state functional MRI, while confirming the expected changes in neuronal dendritic morphology using Golgi-staining. Stress effectiveness was confirmed by a significantly lower body weight and increased adrenal weight. In line with previous research, stressed animals displayed neuronal dendritic hypertrophy in the amygdala and hypotrophy in the hippocampal and medial prefrontal cortex. Using independent component analysis of resting-state fMRI data, we identified ten functional connectivity networks in the rodent brain. Chronic stress appeared to increase connectivity within the somatosensory, visual, and default mode networks. Moreover, chronic stress exposure was associated with an increased volume and diffusivity of the lateral ventricles, whereas no other volumetric changes were observed. This study shows that chronic stress exposure in rodents induces alterations in functional network connectivity strength which partly resemble those observed in stress-related psychopathology. Moreover, these functional consequences of stress seem to be more prominent than the effects on gross volumetric change, indicating their significance for future research. PMID:25462693

  19. Toxicity of drinking water disinfection byproducts: cell cycle alterations induced by the monohaloacetonitriles.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Yukako; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    Haloacetonitriles (HANs) are a chemical class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that form from reactions between disinfectants and nitrogen-containing precursors, the latter more prevalent in water sources impacted by algae bloom and municipal wastewater effluent discharge. HANs, previously demonstrated to be genotoxic, were investigated for their effects on the mammalian cell cycle. Treating Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells with monoHANs followed by the release from the chemical treatment resulted in the accumulation of abnormally high DNA content in cells over time (hyperploid). The potency for the cell cycle alteration followed the order: iodoacetonitrile (IAN) > bromoacetonitrile (BAN) ≫ chloroacetonitrile (CAN). Exposure to 6 μM IAN, 12 μM BAN and 900 μM CAN after 26 h post-treatment incubation resulted in DNA repair; however, subsequent cell cycle alteration effects were observed. Cell proliferation of HAN-treated cells was suppressed for as long as 43 to 52 h. Enlarged cell size was observed after 52 h post-treatment incubation without the induction of cytotoxicity. The HAN-mediated cell cycle alteration was mitosis- and proliferation-dependent, which suggests that HAN treatment induced mitosis override, and that HAN-treated cells proceeded into S phase and directly into the next cell cycle. Cells with multiples genomes would result in aneuploidy (state of abnormal chromosome number and DNA content) at the next mitosis since extra centrosomes could compromise the assembly of bipolar spindles. There is accumulating evidence of a transient tetraploid state proceeding to aneuploidy in cancer progression. Biological self-defense systems to ensure genomic stability and to eliminate tetraploid cells exist in eukaryotic cells. A key tumor suppressor gene, p53, is oftentimes mutated in various types of human cancer. It is possible that HAN disruption of the normal cell cycle and the generation of aberrant cells with an abnormal number of

  20. Combined changes in Wnt signaling response and contact inhibition induce altered proliferation in radiation-treated intestinal crypts.

    PubMed

    Dunn, S-J; Osborne, J M; Appleton, P L; Näthke, I

    2016-06-01

    Curative intervention is possible if colorectal cancer is identified early, underscoring the need to detect the earliest stages of malignant transformation. A candidate biomarker is the expanded proliferative zone observed in crypts before adenoma formation, also found in irradiated crypts. However, the underlying driving mechanism for this is not known. Wnt signaling is a key regulator of proliferation, and elevated Wnt signaling is implicated in cancer. Nonetheless, how cells differentiate Wnt signals of varying strengths is not understood. We use computational modeling to compare alternative hypotheses about how Wnt signaling and contact inhibition affect proliferation. Direct comparison of simulations with published experimental data revealed that the model that best reproduces proliferation patterns in normal crypts stipulates that proliferative fate and cell cycle duration are set by the Wnt stimulus experienced at birth. The model also showed that the broadened proliferation zone induced by tumorigenic radiation can be attributed to cells responding to lower Wnt concentrations and dividing at smaller volumes. Application of the model to data from irradiated crypts after an extended recovery period permitted deductions about the extent of the initial insult. Application of computational modeling to experimental data revealed how mechanisms that control cell dynamics are altered at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. PMID:27053661

  1. Combined changes in Wnt signaling response and contact inhibition induce altered proliferation in radiation-treated intestinal crypts

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, S.-J.; Osborne, J. M.; Appleton, P. L.; Näthke, I.

    2016-01-01

    Curative intervention is possible if colorectal cancer is identified early, underscoring the need to detect the earliest stages of malignant transformation. A candidate biomarker is the expanded proliferative zone observed in crypts before adenoma formation, also found in irradiated crypts. However, the underlying driving mechanism for this is not known. Wnt signaling is a key regulator of proliferation, and elevated Wnt signaling is implicated in cancer. Nonetheless, how cells differentiate Wnt signals of varying strengths is not understood. We use computational modeling to compare alternative hypotheses about how Wnt signaling and contact inhibition affect proliferation. Direct comparison of simulations with published experimental data revealed that the model that best reproduces proliferation patterns in normal crypts stipulates that proliferative fate and cell cycle duration are set by the Wnt stimulus experienced at birth. The model also showed that the broadened proliferation zone induced by tumorigenic radiation can be attributed to cells responding to lower Wnt concentrations and dividing at smaller volumes. Application of the model to data from irradiated crypts after an extended recovery period permitted deductions about the extent of the initial insult. Application of computational modeling to experimental data revealed how mechanisms that control cell dynamics are altered at the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. PMID:27053661

  2. Mapping Transient Hyperventilation Induced Alterations with Estimates of the Multi-Scale Dynamics of BOLD Signal

    PubMed Central

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Remes, Jukka; Starck, Tuomo; Nikkinen, Juha; Haapea, Marianne; Silven, Olli; Tervonen, Osmo

    2009-01-01

    Temporal blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast signals in functional MRI during rest may be characterized by power spectral distribution (PSD) trends of the form 1/fα. Trends with 1/f characteristics comprise fractal properties with repeating oscillation patterns in multiple time scales. Estimates of the fractal properties enable the quantification of phenomena that may otherwise be difficult to measure, such as transient, non-linear changes. In this study it was hypothesized that the fractal metrics of 1/f BOLD signal trends can map changes related to dynamic, multi-scale alterations in cerebral blood flow (CBF) after a transient hyperventilation challenge. Twenty-three normal adults were imaged in a resting-state before and after hyperventilation. Different variables (1/f trend constant α, fractal dimension Df, and, Hurst exponent H) characterizing the trends were measured from BOLD signals. The results show that fractal metrics of the BOLD signal follow the fractional Gaussian noise model, even during the dynamic CBF change that follows hyperventilation. The most dominant effect on the fractal metrics was detected in grey matter, in line with previous hyperventilation vaso-reactivity studies. The α was able to differentiate also blood vessels from grey matter changes. Df was most sensitive to grey matter. H correlated with default mode network areas before hyperventilation but this pattern vanished after hyperventilation due to a global increase in H. In the future, resting-state fMRI combined with fractal metrics of the BOLD signal may be used for analyzing multi-scale alterations of cerebral blood flow. PMID:19636388

  3. Effects of ozone and endotoxin coexposure on rat airway epithelium: potentiation of toxicant-induced alterations.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J G; Hotchkiss, J A; Harkema, J R

    2001-08-01

    of these results indicates that epithelial and inflammatory responses to coexposure of these two pollutants are greater than those elicited by either agent alone. Interestingly, each toxicant enhances the epithelial alterations induced by the other. Furthermore, the synergistic effects elicited by coexposure to ozone and endotoxin are mediated partly by neutrophils. These studies provided some new insights into how inhaled co-pollutants interact to initiate and promote alterations of airway epithelium. Further studies with these and other air pollutants will help define their true risk to human health. PMID:11544169

  4. Effects of ozone and endotoxin coexposure on rat airway epithelium: potentiation of toxicant-induced alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J G; Hotchkiss, J A; Harkema, J R

    2001-01-01

    of these results indicates that epithelial and inflammatory responses to coexposure of these two pollutants are greater than those elicited by either agent alone. Interestingly, each toxicant enhances the epithelial alterations induced by the other. Furthermore, the synergistic effects elicited by coexposure to ozone and endotoxin are mediated partly by neutrophils. These studies provided some new insights into how inhaled co-pollutants interact to initiate and promote alterations of airway epithelium. Further studies with these and other air pollutants will help define their true risk to human health. PMID:11544169

  5. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  6. Diet-Induced Alterations in Total and Metabolically Active Microbes within the Rumen of Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Lettat, Abderzak; Benchaar, Chaouki

    2013-01-01

    DNA-based techniques are widely used to study microbial populations; however, this approach is not specific to active microbes, because DNA may originate from inactive and/or dead cells. Using cDNA and DNA, respectively, we aimed to discriminate the active microbes from the total microbial community within the rumen of dairy cows fed diets with increasing proportions of corn silage (CS). Nine multiparous lactating Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas were used in a replicated 3×3 Latin square (32-d period; 21-d adaptation) design to investigate diet-induced shifts in microbial populations by targeting the rDNA gene. Cows were fed a total mixed ration with the forage portion being either barley silage (0% CS), a 50∶50 mixture of barley silage and corn silage (50% CS), or corn silage (100% CS). No differences were found for total microbes analyzed by quantitative PCR, but changes were observed within the active ones. Feeding more CS to dairy cows was accompanied by an increase in Prevotella rRNA transcripts (P = 0.10) and a decrease in the protozoal rRNA transcripts (P<0.05). Although they were distributed differently among diets, 78% of the amplicons detected in DNA- and cDNA-based fingerprints were common to total and active bacterial communities. These may represent a bacterial core of abundant and active cells that drive the fermentation processes. In contrast, 10% of amplicons were specific to total bacteria and may represent inactive or dead cells, whereas 12% were only found within the active bacterial community and may constitute slow-growing bacteria with high metabolic activity. It appears that cDNA-based analysis is more discriminative to identify diet-induced shifts within the microbial community. This approach allows the detection of diet-induced changes in the microbial populations as well as particular bacterial amplicons that remained undetected using DNA-based methods. PMID:23593365

  7. Detection of alteration associated with a porphyry copper deposit in southern Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. J.; Siegal, B. S.

    1977-01-01

    Computer processing of Landsat MSS data was performed using contrast stretching and band-to-band ratioing. A false color ratio composite picture showed color anomalies which coincided with known areas of alteration on and about Red Mountain. A helicopter survey of the study area was undertaken using a portable field reflectance spectrometer. One hundred fifty-six spectra were obtained in the 0.4 to 2.5 micrometer wavelength region. The spectra were digitized, and contour maps for 24 wavelength intervals were produced; no spectral anomalies were evident for the known altered areas. A contour map produced from the 1.6 and 2.2 micrometer ratio generally delineated the alteration areas. The 1.3, 1.6, and 2.2 micrometer wavelength data were canonically transformed using a transformation empirically derived from discriminant function analysis of altered and unaltered materials for the Goldfield, Nevada region, and a contour map was produced for the first canonical variable. The known areas of alteration were clearly defined on the contour map.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of hypoxia-inducible factor-induced pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell alterations in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Veith, Christine; Schermuly, Ralph T; Brandes, Ralf P; Weissmann, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Oxygen (O2) is essential for the viability and function of most metazoan organisms and thus is closely monitored at both the organismal and the cellular levels. However, alveoli often encounter decreased O2 levels (hypoxia), leading to activation of physiological or pathophysiological responses in the pulmonary arteries. Such changes are achieved by activation of transcription factors. The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are the most prominent hypoxia-regulated transcription factors in this regard. HIFs bind to hypoxia-response elements (HREs) in the promoter region of target genes, whose expression and translation allows the organism, amongst other factors, to cope with decreased environmental O2 partial pressure (pO2). However, prolonged HIF activation can contribute to major structural alterations, especially in the lung, resulting in the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH). PH is characterized by a rise in pulmonary arterial pressure associated with pulmonary arterial remodelling, concomitant with a reduced intravascular lumen area. Patients with PH develop right heart hypertrophy and eventually die from right heart failure. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms of HIF regulation in PH is critical for the identification of novel therapeutic strategies. This review addresses the relationship of hypoxia and the HIF system with pulmonary arterial dysfunction in PH. We particularly focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the HIF-driven pathophysiological processes. PMID:26228924

  9. Role of macrophages in the altered epithelial function during a type 2 immune response induced by enteric nematode infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two major functions of the intestinal epithelium are to act as a physical barrier and to regulate the movement of nutrients, ions and fluid. Nematode infection induces alterations in smooth and epithelial cell function, including increased fluid in the intestinal lumen, which are attributed to a ST...

  10. 131I induced hematological alterations in rat blood: protection by zinc.

    PubMed

    Dani, Vijayta; Malhotra, Anshoo; Dhawan, D

    2007-01-01

    The present study was planned to determine the potential of zinc in attenuating the toxicity induced by 131I in rat blood. Female wistar rats were segregated into four main groups. Animals in Group I served as normal controls; Group II animals were administered a dose of 3.7 Mbq of 131I (carrier free) intraperitoneally, Group III was supplemented with Zinc in the form of ZnSo4.7H2O (227 mg/l drinking water), and Group IV was given a combined treatment of Zinc as well as 131I, in a similar way as was given to Groups IV and II animals, respectively. The effects of different treatments were studied on various parameters in rat blood including hemoglobin (Hb) levels, % hematocrit, zinc protoporphyrins (ZPP), activities of enzymes which included aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (delta-ALAD) and Na+ K+ ATPase and uptake of 65Zn in blood. The study revealed an increase in the levels of hemoglobin, % hematocrit, activities of delta-ALAD, Na+ K+ ATPase and uptake of 65Zn, 7 days after the 131I treatment. On the contrary, the levels of ZPP were found to be significantly decreased after 131I treatment. However, zinc treatment to 131I-treated animals significantly attenuated the various biochemical and hematological indices. Moreover, zinc treatment to the 131I-treated animals could significantly decrease the uptake of 65Zn, which was increased after 131I treatment. Based upon these data, the present study suggests that zinc has the potential to attenuate 131I induced toxicity by restoring the altered hematological indices and biochemical changes. PMID:17916974

  11. Cd2+-Induced Alteration of the Global Proteome of Human Skin Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a toxic heavy metal and a well-known human carcinogen. The toxic effects of Cd2+ on biological systems are diverse and thought to be exerted through a complex array of mechanisms. Despite the large number of studies aimed to elucidate the toxic mechanisms of action of Cd2+, few have been targeted toward investigating the ability of Cd2+ to disrupt multiple cellular pathways simultaneously and the overall cellular responses toward Cd2+ exposure. In this study, we employed a quantitative proteomic method, relying on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and LC–MS/MS, to assess the Cd2+-induced simultaneous alterations of multiple cellular pathways in cultured human skin fibroblast cells. By using this approach, we were able to quantify 2931 proteins, and 400 of them displayed significantly changed expression following Cd2+ exposure. Our results unveiled that Cd2+ treatment led to the marked upregulation of several antioxidant enzymes (e.g., metallothionein-1G, superoxide dismutase, pyridoxal kinase, etc.), enzymes associated with glutathione biosynthesis and homeostasis (e.g., glutathione S-transferases, glutathione synthetase, glutathione peroxidase, etc.), and proteins involved in cellular energy metabolism (e.g., glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and the citric acid cycle). Additionally, we found that Cd2+ treatment resulted in the elevated expression of two isoforms of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH I and II), enzymes known to play a key role in regulating nitric oxide biosynthesis. Consistent with these findings, we observed elevated formation of nitric oxide in human skin (GM00637) and lung (IMR-90) fibroblast cells following Cd2+ exposure. The upregulation of DDAH I and II suggests a role of nitric oxide synthesis in Cd2+-induced toxicity in human cells. PMID:24527689

  12. Aspirin-mediated acetylation induces structural alteration and aggregation of bovine pancreatic insulin.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Reza; Taheri, Behnaz; Alavi, Parnian; Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Asadi, Zahra; Ghahramani, Maryam; Niazi, Ali; Alavianmehr, Mohammad Mehdi; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The simple aggregation of insulin under various chemical and physical stresses is still an important challenge for both pharmaceutical production and clinical formulation. In the storage form, this protein is subjected to various chemical modifications which alter its physicochemical and aggregation properties. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) which is the most widely used medicine worldwide has been indicated to acetylate a large number of proteins both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, as insulin treated with aspirin at 37°C, a significant level of acetylation was observed by flourescamine and o-phthalaldehyde assay. Also, different spectroscopic techniques, gel electrophoresis, and microscopic assessment were applied to compare the structural variation and aggregation/fibrillation propensity among acetylated and non-acetylated insulin samples. The results of spectroscopic assessments elucidate that acetylation induces insulin unfolding which is accompanied with the exposure of protein hydrophobic patches, a transition from alpha-helix to beta-sheet and increased propensity of the protein for aggregation. The kinetic studies propose that acetylation increases aggregation rate of insulin under both thermal and chemical stresses. Also, gel electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering experiments suggest that acetylation induces insulin oligomerization. Additionally, the results of Thioflavin T fluorescence study, Congo red absorption assessment, and microscopic analysis suggest that acetylation with aspirin enhances the process of insulin fibrillation. Overall, the increased susceptibility of acetylated insulin for aggregation may reflect the fact that this type of modification has significant structural destabilizing effect which finally makes the protein more vulnerable for pathogenic aggregation/fibrillation. PMID:25994118

  13. Altered rectal sensory response induced by balloon distention in patients with functional abdominal pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) has chronic unexplained abdominal pain and is similar to the psychiatric diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder. A patient with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) also has chronic unexplained abdominal pain, and rectal hypersensitivity is observed in a majority of the patients. However, no reports have evaluated the visceral sensory function of FAPS precisely. We aimed to test the hypothesis that FAPS would show altered visceral sensation compared to healthy controls or IBS. The present study determined the rectal perceptual threshold, intensity of sensation using visual analogue scale (VAS), and rectal compliance in response to rectal balloon distention by a barostat in FAPS, IBS, and healthy controls. Methods First, the ramp distention of 40 ml/min was induced and the thresholds of discomfort, pain, and maximum tolerance (mmHg) were measured. Next, three phasic distentions (60-sec duration separated by 30-sec intervals) of 10, 15 and 20 mmHg were randomly loaded. The subjects were asked to mark the VAS in reference to subjective intensity of sensation immediately after each distention. A pressure-volume relationship was determined by plotting corresponding pressures and volumes during ramp distention, and the compliance was calculated over the linear part of the curve by calculating from the slope of the curve using simple regression. Results Rectal thresholds were significantly reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. The VAS ratings of intensity induced by phasic distention (around the discomfort threshold of the controls) were increased in IBS but significantly decreased in FAPS. Rectal compliance was reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. Conclusion An inconsistency of visceral sensitivity between lower and higher pressure distention might be a key feature for understanding the pathogenesis of FAPS. PMID:19925683

  14. Repeated stress-induced stimulation of catecholamine response is not followed by altered immune cell redistribution.

    PubMed

    Imrich, Richard; Tibenska, Elena; Koska, Juraj; Ksinantova, Lucia; Kvetnansky, Richard; Bergendiova-Sedlackova, Katarina; Blazicek, Pavol; Vigas, Milan

    2004-06-01

    Stress response is considered an important factor in the modulation of immune function. Neuroendocrine hormones, including catecholamines, affect the process of immune cell redistribution, important for cell-mediated immunity. This longitudinal investigation was aimed at evaluating the effect of repeated stress-induced elevation of catecholamines on immune cell redistribution and expression of adhesive molecules. We assessed the responses of epinephrine (EPI), norepinephrine (NE), cortisol, changes in lymphocytes subpopulations, and percentages of CD11a+, CD11b+, and CD62L+ lymphocytes to a 20-min treadmill exercise of an intensity equal to 80% of the individual's Vo(2)max. The exercise was performed before and after 6 weeks of endurance training consisting of a 1-h run 4 times a week (ET) and after 5 days of bed rest (HDBR) in 10 healthy males. We did not observe any significant changes in the basal levels of EPI, NE, and cortisol in the plasma, nor in the immune parameters after ET and HDBR. The exercise test led to a significant (P <.001) elevation of EPI and NE levels after both ET and HDBR, a significant elevation (P <.01) of cortisol after HDBR, an increase in the absolute numbers of leukocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, CD19+ lymphocytes, percentage of CD11a+ and CD11b+ lymphocytes, and to a decrease of CD62L1 before, after ET, and after HDBR. We found comparable changes in all measured immune parameters after ET and HDBR. In conclusion, repeated stress-induced elevation of EPI and NE was not associated with an alteration in immune cell redistribution found in response to the single bout of exercise. PMID:15240377

  15. Cocaine-Induced Synaptic Alterations in Thalamus to Nucleus Accumbens Projection.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Peter A; Wang, Yicun; Yan, Yijin; Wang, Yao; Ishikawa, Masago; Cui, Ranji; Huang, Yanhua H; Sesack, Susan R; Schlüter, Oliver M; Dong, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to cocaine induces addiction-associated behaviors partially through remodeling neurocircuits in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). The paraventricular nucleus of thalamus (PVT), which projects to the NAc monosynaptically, is activated by cocaine exposure and has been implicated in several cocaine-induced emotional and motivational states. Here we show that disrupting synaptic transmission of select PVT neurons with tetanus toxin activated via retrograde trans-synaptic transport of cre from NAc efferents decreased cocaine self-administration in rats. This projection underwent complex adaptations after self-administration of cocaine (0.75 mg/kg/infusion; 2 h/d × 5 d, 1d overnight training). Specifically, 1d after cocaine self-administration, we observed increased levels of AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-silent glutamatergic synapses in this projection, accompanied by a decreased ratio of AMPAR-to-NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated EPSCs. Furthermore, the decay kinetics of NMDAR EPSCs was significantly prolonged, suggesting insertion of new GluN2B-containing NMDARs to PVT-to-NAc synapses. After 45-d withdrawal, silent synapses within this projection returned to the basal levels, accompanied by a return of the AMPAR/NMDAR ratio and NMDAR decay kinetics to the basal levels. In amygdala and infralimbic prefrontal cortical projections to the NAc, a portion of cocaine-generated silent synapses becomes unsilenced by recruiting calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) after drug withdrawal. However, the sensitivity of PVT-to-NAc synapses to CP-AMPAR-selective antagonists was not changed after withdrawal, suggesting that CP-AMPAR trafficking is not involved in the evolution of cocaine-generated silent synapses within this projection. Meanwhile, the release probability of PVT-to-NAc synapses was increased after short- and long-term cocaine withdrawal. These results reveal complex and profound alterations at PVT-to-NAc synapses after cocaine exposure and withdrawal. PMID:27074816

  16. Laser-induced thermal-acoustic velocimetry with heterodyne detection

    SciTech Connect

    Schlamp, Stefan; Cummings, Eric B.; Sobota, Thomas H.

    2000-02-15

    Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) was used with heterodyne detection to measure simultaneously and in a single laser pulse the sound speed and flow velocity of NO{sub 2} -seeded air in a low-speed wind tunnel up to Mach number M=0.1 . The uncertainties of the velocity and the sound speed measurements were {approx}0.2 m/s and 0.5%, respectively. Measurements were obtained through a nonlinear least-squares fit to a general, analytic closed-form solution for heterodyne-detected LITA signals from thermal gratings. Agreement between theory and experiment is exceptionally good. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  17. Amiodarone-induced hepatic phospholipidosis: a morphological alteration independent of pseudoalcoholic liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Guigui, B.; Perrot, S.; Berry, J.P.; Fleury-Feith, J.; Martin, N.; Metreau, J.M.; Dhumeaux, D.; Zafrani, E.S.

    1988-09-01

    In order to study the relationship between amiodarone-induced hepatic phospholipidosis and liver disease, liver biopsies obtained from 13 patients treated with amiodarone for 4 months to 15 years were investigated by light and electron microscopy. Light microscopy showed pseudoalcoholic liver lesions that were probably related to amiodarone in four cases, various alterations (i.e. cirrhosis, three cases; steatosis and fibrosis, two cases; chronic venous congestion, one case; acute hepatitis, one case) that could be explained by another cause than amiodarone in seven cases and normal liver in two cases. In all cases, electron microscopy showed intralysosomal myelin figures suggestive of phospholipidosis. These myelin figures were associated with intralysosomal electron-dense deposits. In the four cases in which analysis by electron microprobe was performed, it demonstrated large amounts of iodine in the electron-dense deposit-containing lysosomes, indicating the accumulation of amiodarone. These results show that hepatic phospholipidosis is constantly observed in amiodarone-treated patients, whether or not pseudoalcoholic liver lesions are present. This phospholipidosis, which could be only a morphological marker of intrahepatic accumulation of the drug, should not therefore be considered grounds for attributing liver disease to the drug.

  18. Myocardial Perfusion and Function Are Distinctly Altered by Sevoflurane Anesthesia in Diet-Induced Prediabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    van den Brom, Charissa E; Boly, Chantal A; Bulte, Carolien S E; van den Akker, Rob F P; Kwekkeboom, Rick F J; Loer, Stephan A; Boer, Christa; Bouwman, R Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Preservation of myocardial perfusion during surgery is particularly important in patients with increased risk for perioperative complications, such as diabetes. Volatile anesthetics, like sevoflurane, have cardiodepressive effects and may aggravate cardiovascular complications. We investigated the effect of sevoflurane on myocardial perfusion and function in prediabetic rats. Rats were fed a western diet (WD; n = 18) or control diet (CD; n = 18) for 8 weeks and underwent (contrast) echocardiography to determine perfusion and function during baseline and sevoflurane exposure. Myocardial perfusion was estimated based on the product of microvascular filling velocity and blood volume. WD-feeding resulted in a prediabetic phenotype characterized by obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, and hyperglycemia. At baseline, WD-feeding impaired myocardial perfusion and systolic function compared to CD-feeding. Exposure of healthy rats to sevoflurane increased the microvascular filling velocity without altering myocardial perfusion but impaired systolic function. In prediabetic rats, sevoflurane did also not affect myocardial perfusion; however, it further impaired systolic function. Diet-induced prediabetes is associated with impaired myocardial perfusion and function in rats. While sevoflurane further impaired systolic function, it did not affect myocardial perfusion in prediabetic rats. Our findings suggest that sevoflurane anesthesia leads to uncoupling of myocardial perfusion and function, irrespective of the metabolic state. PMID:26824042

  19. Alteration of the Intestinal Environment by Lubiprostone Is Associated with Amelioration of Adenine-Induced CKD.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Eikan; Fukuda, Shinji; Shima, Hisato; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Akiyama, Yasutoshi; Takeuchi, Yoichi; Fukuda, Noriko N; Suzuki, Takehiro; Suzuki, Chitose; Yuri, Akinori; Kikuchi, Koichi; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Ito, Sadayoshi; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Abe, Takaaki

    2015-08-01

    The accumulation of uremic toxins is involved in the progression of CKD. Various uremic toxins are derived from gut microbiota, and an imbalance of gut microbiota or dysbiosis is related to renal failure. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the relationship between the gut microbiota and renal failure are still obscure. Using an adenine-induced renal failure mouse model, we evaluated the effects of the ClC-2 chloride channel activator lubiprostone (commonly used for the treatment of constipation) on CKD. Oral administration of lubiprostone (500 µg/kg per day) changed the fecal and intestinal properties in mice with renal failure. Additionally, lubiprostone treatment reduced the elevated BUN and protected against tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, and inflammation. Gut microbiome analysis of 16S rRNA genes in the renal failure mice showed that lubiprostone treatment altered their microbial composition, especially the recovery of the levels of the Lactobacillaceae family and Prevotella genus, which were significantly reduced in the renal failure mice. Furthermore, capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry-based metabolome analysis showed that lubiprostone treatment decreased the plasma level of uremic toxins, such as indoxyl sulfate and hippurate, which are derived from gut microbiota, and a more recently discovered uremic toxin, trans-aconitate. These results suggest that lubiprostone ameliorates the progression of CKD and the accumulation of uremic toxins by improving the gut microbiota and intestinal environment. PMID:25525179

  20. Altered responsiveness of BNST and amygdala neurons in trauma-induced anxiety.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sierra, O E; Goswami, S; Turesson, H K; Pare, D

    2016-01-01

    A highly conserved network of brain structures regulates the expression of fear and anxiety in mammals. Many of these structures display abnormal activity levels in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, some of them, like the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and amygdala, are comprised of several small sub-regions or nuclei that cannot be resolved with human neuroimaging techniques. Therefore, we used a well-characterized rat model of PTSD to compare neuronal properties in resilient vs PTSD-like rats using patch recordings obtained from different BNST and amygdala regions in vitro. In this model, a persistent state of extreme anxiety is induced in a subset of susceptible rats following predatory threat. Previous animal studies have revealed that the central amygdala (CeA) and BNST are differentially involved in the genesis of fear and anxiety-like states, respectively. Consistent with these earlier findings, we found that between resilient and PTSD-like rats were marked differences in the synaptic responsiveness of neurons in different sectors of BNST and CeA, but whose polarity was region specific. In light of prior data about the role of these regions, our results suggest that control of fear/anxiety expression is altered in PTSD-like rats such that the influence of CeA is minimized whereas that of BNST is enhanced. A model of the amygdalo-BNST interactions supporting the PTSD-like state is proposed. PMID:27434491

  1. Neurobiological Alterations Induced by Exercise and Their Impact on Depressive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Helmich, Ingo; Latini, Alexandra; Sigwalt, Andre; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Machado, Sergio; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Budde, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Background: The impact of physical activity on brain metabolic functions has been investigated in different studies and there is growing evidence that exercise can be used as a preventive and rehabilitative intervention in the treatment of depressive disorders. However, the exact neuronal mechanisms underlying the latter phenomenon have not been clearly elucidated. The present article summarises key results derived from studies that focussed on the neurobiological impact of exercise on brain metabolic functions associated with depressive disorders. Since major depressive disorder (MDD) is a life threatening disease it is of great significance to find reliable strategies to prevent or to cure this illness. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review (1) the physiological relationship between physical activity and depressive disorders and (2) the potential neurobiological alterations induced by exercise that might lead to the relief of mental disorders like depression. Methods: We searched electronic databases for literature concerning the relationship between exercise and depression from 1963 until 2009. Results: The data suggests an association between physical inactivity and higher levels of depressive symptoms. Properly designed studies could show that exercise training can be as effective as antidepressive medications. Conclusion: The exact mechanisms how exercise affects the brain are not fully understood and the literature lacks of well designed studies concerning the effects of exercise training on depressive disorders. But the observed antidepressant actions of exercise are strong enough that it already can be used as an alternative to current medications in the treatment of depressive disorders. PMID:21283646

  2. Susceptibility to seizure-induced sudden death in DBA/2 mice is altered by adenosine.

    PubMed

    Faingold, Carl L; Randall, Marc; Kommajosyula, Srinivasa P

    2016-08-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is rare but is an important public health burden due to the number of patient years lost. Respiratory dysfunction following generalized convulsive seizure is a common sequence of events in witnessed SUDEP cases. The DBA/2 mouse model of SUDEP exhibits generalized convulsive audiogenic seizures (AGSz), which result in seizure-induced respiratory arrest (S-IRA) in ∼75% of these animals, while the remaining DBA/2 mice exhibit AGSz without S-IRA. SUDEP induction may involve actions of adenosine, which is released during generalized seizures in animals and patients and is known to depress respiration. This study examined the effects of systemic administration of agents that alter the actions of adenosine on the incidence of S-IRA in DBA/2 mice. DBA/2 mice that consistently exhibited AGSz without S-IRA showed a significantly increased incidence of S-IRA following treatment with 5-iodotubercidin, which blocks adenosine metabolism. Treatment of DBA/2 mice that consistently exhibited AGSz followed by S-IRA with a non-selective adenosine antagonist, caffeine, or an A2A adenosine receptor subtype-selective antagonist (SCH 442416) significantly reduced S-IRA incidence. By contrast, an A1 adenosine receptor antagonist (DPCPX) was not effective in reducing S-IRA incidence. These findings suggest that preventative approaches for SUDEP should consider agents that reduce the actions of adenosine. PMID:27259068

  3. Environmental enrichment reduces behavioural alterations induced by chronic stress in Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Laurence, A; Houdelier, C; Calandreau, L; Arnould, C; Favreau-Peigné, A; Leterrier, C; Boissy, A; Lumineau, S

    2015-02-01

    Animals perceiving repeated aversive events can become chronically stressed. Chronic activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis can have deleterious consequences on physiological parameters (e.g. BW, blood chemistry) and behaviour (e.g. emotional reactivity, stereotypies, cognition). Environmental enrichment (EE) can be a mean to reduce animal stress and to improve welfare. The aim of this study was first, to assess the effects of EE in battery cages on the behaviour of young Japanese quail and second, to evaluate the impact of EE on quail exposed to chronic stress. The experiment involved quail housed in EE cages and submitted or not to a chronic stress procedure (CSP) (EE cages, control quail: n=16, CSP quail: n=14) and quail housed in standard cages and exposed or not to the CSP (standard non-EE cages, control quail: n=12, CSP quail: n=16). Our procedure consisted of repeated aversive events (e.g. ventilators, delaying access to food, physical restraint, noise) presented two to five times per 24 h, randomly, for 15 days. During CSP, EE improved quail's welfare as their stereotypic pacing decreased and they rested more. CSP decreased exploration in all quail. After the end of CSP, quail presented increased emotional reactivity in emergence test. However, the effect of EE varied with test. Finally, chronic stress effects on comfort behaviours in the emergence test were alleviated by EE. These results indicate that EE can alleviate some aspects of behavioural alterations induced by CSP. PMID:25354525

  4. Myocardial Perfusion and Function Are Distinctly Altered by Sevoflurane Anesthesia in Diet-Induced Prediabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    van den Brom, Charissa E.; Boly, Chantal A.; Bulte, Carolien S. E.; van den Akker, Rob F. P.; Kwekkeboom, Rick F. J.; Loer, Stephan A.; Boer, Christa; Bouwman, R. Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Preservation of myocardial perfusion during surgery is particularly important in patients with increased risk for perioperative complications, such as diabetes. Volatile anesthetics, like sevoflurane, have cardiodepressive effects and may aggravate cardiovascular complications. We investigated the effect of sevoflurane on myocardial perfusion and function in prediabetic rats. Rats were fed a western diet (WD; n = 18) or control diet (CD; n = 18) for 8 weeks and underwent (contrast) echocardiography to determine perfusion and function during baseline and sevoflurane exposure. Myocardial perfusion was estimated based on the product of microvascular filling velocity and blood volume. WD-feeding resulted in a prediabetic phenotype characterized by obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, glucose intolerance, and hyperglycemia. At baseline, WD-feeding impaired myocardial perfusion and systolic function compared to CD-feeding. Exposure of healthy rats to sevoflurane increased the microvascular filling velocity without altering myocardial perfusion but impaired systolic function. In prediabetic rats, sevoflurane did also not affect myocardial perfusion; however, it further impaired systolic function. Diet-induced prediabetes is associated with impaired myocardial perfusion and function in rats. While sevoflurane further impaired systolic function, it did not affect myocardial perfusion in prediabetic rats. Our findings suggest that sevoflurane anesthesia leads to uncoupling of myocardial perfusion and function, irrespective of the metabolic state. PMID:26824042

  5. Alcohol-induced alterations in serum immunoglobulin e (IgE) levels in human subjects.

    PubMed

    González-Quintela, Arturo; Vidal, Carmen; Gude, Francisco

    2002-05-01

    The association of alcohol intake with total serum IgE concentrations in humans is discussed in the present review. The possible relationship of regular alcohol intake with both the risk of allergic sensitization and serum allergen-specific IgE values is also reviewed. Several studies consistently show that total serum IgE concentrations are increased in alcoholics when compared with healthy controls. Total serum IgE levels decrease after ethanol abstinence in alcoholics. Total serum IgE is increased in moderate alcohol consumers with respect to abstainers. Alcohol consumption in mothers may be associated with increased cord blood IgE levels in their offspring. IgE elevation in alcohol consumers is independent of potential confounders such as age, sex, liver disease, cigarette smoking or atopic status. Experimental studies in animals further support that ethanol administration is followed by an increase in serum IgE concentrations. In atopic patients, regular alcohol consumption is associated with increased serum specific IgE levels against some aeroallergens. Preliminary reports suggest that alcohol intake is associated to variable risk of sensitization to some aeroallergens. The possible mechanisms of alcohol-induced alterations in IgE levels and IgE-mediated diseases are discussed. PMID:11991851

  6. Cyclosporine-induced immune suppression alters establishment of HTLV-1 infection in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Rashade A. H.; Ware, Evan; Premanandan, Christopher; Zimmerman, Bevin; Yu, Lianbo; Phipps, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection causes adult T-cell leukemia and several lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory diseases. Persistent HTLV-1 infection is determined by a balance between host immune responses and virus spread. Immunomodulatory therapy involving HTLV-1–infected patients occurs in a variety of clinical settings. Knowledge of how these treatments influence host-virus relationships is not understood. In this study, we examined the effects of cyclosporine A (CsA)–induced immune suppression during early infection of HTLV-1. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were split into 4 groups. Three groups were treated with either 10 or 20 mg/kg CsA or saline before infection. The fourth group was treated with 20 mg/kg CsA 1 week after infection. Immune suppression, plasma CsA concentration, ex vivo lymphocyte HTLV-1 p19 production, anti–HTLV-1 serologic responses, and proviral load levels were measured during infection. Our data indicated that CsA treatment before HTLV-1 infection enhanced early viral expression compared with untreated HTLV-1–infected rabbits, and altered long-term viral expression parameters. However, CsA treatment 1 week after infection diminished HTLV-1 expression throughout the 10-week study course. Collectively, these data indicate immunologic control is a key determinant of early HTLV-1 spread and have important implications for therapeutic intervention during HTLV-1–associated diseases. PMID:19965683

  7. Ligand-induced alterations in the phosphorylation state of ethylene receptors in tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Kamiyoshihara, Yusuke; Tieman, Denise M; Huber, Donald J; Klee, Harry J

    2012-09-01

    Perception of the plant hormone ethylene is essential to initiate and advance ripening of climacteric fruits. Since ethylene receptors negatively regulate signaling, the suppression is canceled upon ethylene binding, permitting responses including fruit ripening. Although receptors have autophosphorylation activity, the mechanism whereby signal transduction occurs has not been fully determined. Here we demonstrate that LeETR4, a critical receptor for tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening, is multiply phosphorylated in vivo and the phosphorylation level is dependent on ripening stage and ethylene action. Treatment of preclimacteric fruits with ethylene resulted in accumulation of LeETR4 with reduced phosphorylation whereas treatments of ripening fruits with ethylene antagonists, 1-methylcyclopropene and 2,5-norbornadiene, induced accumulation of the phosphorylated isotypes. A similar phosphorylation pattern was also observed for Never ripe, another ripening-related receptor. Alteration in the phosphorylation state of receptors is likely to be an initial response upon ethylene binding since treatments with ethylene and 1-methylcyclopropene rapidly influenced the LeETR4 phosphorylation state rather than protein abundance. The LeETR4 phosphorylation state closely paralleled ripening progress, suggesting that the phosphorylation state of receptors is implicated in ethylene signal output in tomato fruits. We provide insights into the nature of receptor on and off states. PMID:22797658

  8. High physical activity in young children suggests positive effects by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, E; Ludvigsson, J; Huus, K; Faresjö, M

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity in children is associated with several positive health outcomes such as decreased cardiovascular risk factors, improved lung function, enhanced motor skill development, healthier body composition, and also improved defense against inflammatory diseases. We examined how high physical activity vs a sedentary lifestyle in young children influences the immune response with focus on autoimmunity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, collected from 55 5-year-old children with either high physical activity (n = 14), average physical activity (n = 27), or low physical activity (n = 14), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort, were stimulated with antigens (tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin) and autoantigens (GAD65 , insulin, HSP60, and IA-2). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), C-peptide and proinsulin were analyzed. Children with high physical activity showed decreased immune activity toward the autoantigens GAD65 (IL-5, P < 0.05), HSP60 and IA-2 (IL-10, P < 0.05) and also low spontaneous pro-inflammatory immune activity (IL-6, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CCL2 (P < 0.05)) compared with children with an average or low physical activity. High physical activity in young children seems to have positive effects on the immune system by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity. PMID:25892449

  9. The role of autophagy in epileptogenesis and in epilepsy-induced neuronal alterations.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Filippo Sean; Biagioni, Francesca; Lenzi, Paola; Frati, Alessandro; Fornai, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that autophagy alterations are present in a variety of neurological disorders. These range from neurodegenerative diseases to acute neurological insults. Thus, despite a role of autophagy was investigated in a variety of neurological diseases, only recently these studies included epilepsy. This was fostered by the evidence that rapamycin, a powerful autophagy inducer, strongly modulates a variety of seizure models and epilepsies. These findings were originally interpreted as the results of the inhibition exerted by rapamycin on the molecular complex named "mammalian Target of Rapamycin" (mTOR). Recently, an increasing number of papers demonstrated that mTOR inhibition produces a strong activation of the autophagy machinery. In this way, it is now increasingly recognized that what was once defined as mTORpathy in epileptogenesis may be partially explained by abnormalities in the autophagy machinery. The present review features a brief introductory statement about the autophagy machinery and discusses the involvement of autophagy in seizures and epilepsies. An emphasis is posed on evidence addressing both pros and cons making it sometime puzzling and sometime evident, the role of autophagy in the epileptic brain. PMID:25217966

  10. Epileptic seizures induce structural and functional alterations on brain tissue membranes.

    PubMed

    Turker, Sevgi; Severcan, Mete; Ilbay, Gul; Severcan, Feride

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by disruption of balance between cerebral excitation and inhibition, leading to recurrent and unprovoked convulsions. Studies are still underway to understand mechanisms lying epileptic seizures with the aim of improving treatment strategies. In this context, the research on brain tissue membranes gains importance for generation of epileptic activities. In order to provide additional information for this field, we have investigated the effects of pentylenetetrazol-induced and audiogenetically susceptible epileptic seizures on structure, content and function of rat brain membrane components using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The findings have shown that both two types of epileptic seizures stimulate the variations in the molecular organization of membrane lipids, which have potential to influence the structures in connection with functions of membrane proteins. Moreover, less fluid lipid structure and a decline in content of lipids obtained from the ratio of CH3 asym/lipid, CH2 asym/lipid, CO/lipid, and olefinicCH/lipid and the areas of the PO2 symmetric and asymmetric modes were observed. Moreover, based on IR data the changes in the conformation of proteins were predicted by neural network (NN) analysis, and displayed as an increase in random coil despite a decrease in beta sheet. Depending on spectral parameters, we have successfully differentiated treated samples from the control by principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis. In summary, FT-IR spectroscopy may offer promising attempt to identify compositional, structural and functional alterations in brain tissue membranes resulting from epileptic activities. PMID:25194682

  11. Heat-stress-induced metabolic changes and altered male reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuanlong; Wang, Xiaoyan; Lei, Zhihai; Ping, Jihui; Liu, Jiajian; Ma, Zhiyu; Zhang, Zheng; Jia, Cuicui; Jin, Mengmeng; Li, Xiang; Li, Xiaoliang; Chen, Shaoqiu; Lv, Yingfang; Gao, Yingdong; Jia, Wei; Su, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Heat stress can cause systemic physiological and biochemical alterations in living organisms. In reproductive systems, heat stress induces germ cell loss and poor quality semen. However, until now, little has been known about such a complex regulation process, particularly in the perspective of metabolism. In this study, serum, hypothalamus, and epididymis samples derived from male SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats being exposed to high environmental temperature (40 °C) 2 h per day for 7 consecutive days were analyzed using metabonomics strategies based on GC/TOFMS. Differentially expressed metabolites reveal that the energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitters, and monoamine neurotransmitters pathways are associated with heat stress, in accordance with changes of the three upstream neuroendocrine system pathways in the SNS (sympathetic adrenergic system), hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis (HPA), and hypothalamic pituitary testis axis (HPT) axis. Many of these metabolites, especially in the epididymis, were found to be up-regulated, presumably due to a self-preserving action to resist the environmental hot irritation to maintain normal functioning of the male reproductive system. PMID:25607524

  12. Dietary linoleic acid-induced alterations in pro- and anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Amit; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon F; Yang, Jun; Blanchard, Helene; Zamora, Daisy; Loewke, James D; Rapoport, Stanley I; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Davis, John M; Hammock, Bruce D; Taha, Ameer Y

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic idiopathic pain syndromes are major causes of personal suffering, disability, and societal expense. Dietary n-6 linoleic acid has increased markedly in modern industrialized populations over the past century. These high amounts of linoleic acid could hypothetically predispose to physical pain by increasing the production of pro-nociceptive linoleic acid-derived lipid autacoids and by interfering with the production of anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids derived from n-3 fatty acids. Here, we used a rat model to determine the effect of increasing dietary linoleic acid as a controlled variable for 15 weeks on nociceptive lipid autacoids and their precursor n-6 and n-3 fatty acids in tissues associated with idiopathic pain syndromes. Results Increasing dietary linoleic acid markedly increased the abundance of linoleic acid and its pro-nociceptive derivatives and reduced the abundance of n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and their anti-nociceptive monoepoxide derivatives. Diet-induced changes occurred in a tissue-specific manner, with marked alterations of nociceptive lipid autacoids in both peripheral and central tissues, and the most pronounced changes in their fatty acid precursors in peripheral tissues. Conclusions The present findings provide biochemical support for the hypothesis that the high linoleic acid content of modern industrialized diets may create a biochemical susceptibility to develop chronic pain. Dietary linoleic acid lowering should be further investigated as part of an integrative strategy for the prevention and management of idiopathic pain syndromes. PMID:27030719

  13. Role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in lipopolysaccharide-induced pathologic alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Remick, D. G.; Strieter, R. M.; Eskandari, M. K.; Nguyen, D. T.; Genord, M. A.; Raiford, C. L.; Kunkel, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) has been implicated strongly as a principal mediator in the pathogenesis of septic shock. The authors investigated the in vivo production of TNF in CBA/J and CD-1 mice that had been primed by an intraperitoneal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant followed 2 weeks later by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). TNF bioactivity peaked in both the ascites and plasma one hour after challenge, and TNF mRNA expression in the ascites cells peaked 30 minutes after LPS. After the induction of bioactivity, an interstitial pulmonary neutrophilic infiltrate occurred that was quantitated both morphometrically and by a myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay. Peripheral blood neutrophilia and lymphopenia developed after the LPS injection (PMNs: control, 46 +/- 2%; LPS, 65 +/- 3%; Lymphs control, 53 +/- 2%; LPS, 37 +/- 3%). Treatment with dexamethasone (Dex) completely inhibited the pulmonary neutrophilic infiltrate as measured by the (MPO) assay. Because Dex will inhibit the production of several cytokines, anti-TNF antiserum was given to mice at the same time as the LPS challenge to assess specifically the role of TNF in inducing these changes. This antiserum partially blocked the pulmonary neutrophil infiltrate, and completely blocked the peripheral blood changes at one hour after LPS. These data demonstrate that TNF plays an important role in the early pathophysiologic alterations that occur after systemic exposure to LPS. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 11 PMID:2297050

  14. Involvement of Nitric Oxide, Neurotrophins and HPA Axis in Neurobehavioural Alterations Induced by Prenatal Stress.

    PubMed

    Maur, Damian G; Pascuan, Cecilia G; Genaro, Ana M; Zorrilla-Zubilete, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest that negative emotions during pregnancy generate adverse effects on the cognitive, behavioural and emotional development of the descendants. The psychoneuroendocrine pathways involve the transplacentary passage of maternal glucocorticoids in order to influence directly on fetal growth and brain development.Nitric oxide is a gaseous neurotransmitter that plays an important role in the control of neural activity by diffusing into neurons and participates in learning and memory processes. It has been demonstrated that nitric oxide is involved in the regulation of corticosterone secretion. Thus, it has been found that the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is an endogenous inhibitor of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the hippocampus and that nNOS in the hippocampus may participate in the modulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity via GR.Neurotrophins are a family of secreted growth factors consisting of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin 3 (NT3) and NT4. Although initially described in the nervous system, they regulate processes such as cell survival, proliferation and differentiation in several other compartments. It has been demonstrated that the NO-citrulline cycle acts together with BDNF in maintaining the progress of neural differentiation.In the present chapter, we explore the interrelation between nitric oxide, glucocorticoids and neurotrophins in brain areas that are key structures in learning and memory processes. The participation of this interrelation in the behavioural and cognitive alterations induced in the offspring by maternal stress is also addressed. PMID:25287536

  15. Decoding motor responses from the EEG during altered states of consciousness induced by propofol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokland, Yvonne; Farquhar, Jason; Lerou, Jos; Mourisse, Jo; Scheffer, Gert Jan; van Geffen, Geert-Jan; Spyrou, Loukianos; Bruhn, Jörgen

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Patients undergoing general anesthesia may awaken and become aware of the surgical procedure. Due to neuromuscular blocking agents, patients could be conscious yet unable to move. Using brain-computer interface (BCI) technology, it may be possible to detect movement attempts from the EEG. However, it is unknown how an anesthetic influences the brain response to motor tasks. Approach. We tested the offline classification performance of a movement-based BCI in 12 healthy subjects at two effect-site concentrations of propofol. For each subject a second classifier was trained on the subject’s data obtained before sedation, then tested on the data obtained during sedation (‘transfer classification’). Main results. At concentration 0.5 μg ml-1, despite an overall propofol EEG effect, the mean single trial classification accuracy was 85% (95% CI 81%-89%), and 83% (79%-88%) for the transfer classification. At 1.0 μg ml-1, the accuracies were 81% (76%-86%), and 72% (66%-79%), respectively. At the highest propofol concentration for four subjects, unlike the remaining subjects, the movement-related brain response had been largely diminished, and the transfer classification accuracy was not significantly above chance. These subjects showed a slower and more erratic task response, indicating an altered state of consciousness distinct from that of the other subjects. Significance. The results show the potential of using a BCI to detect intra-operative awareness and justify further development of this paradigm. At the same time, the relationship between motor responses and consciousness and its clinical relevance for intraoperative awareness requires further investigation.

  16. Testosterone and farnesoid X receptor agonist INT-747 counteract high fat diet-induced bladder alterations in a rabbit model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Annamaria; Comeglio, Paolo; Filippi, Sandra; Sarchielli, Erica; Cellai, Ilaria; Vignozzi, Linda; Yehiely-Cohen, Ravit; Maneschi, Elena; Gacci, Mauro; Carini, Marco; Adorini, Luciano; Vannelli, Gabriella B; Maggi, Mario

    2012-10-01

    In the male, metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated to an increased risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). A recently established rabbit model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced MetS showed hypogonadism and the presence of prostate gland alterations, including inflammation, hypoxia and fibrosis. The present study investigated whether HFD-induced MetS might also alter bladder structure and function. Testosterone and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist INT-747, were evaluated for possible effects on HFD bladder. MetS rabbits develop bladder alterations, including fibrosis (reduced muscle/fiber ratio), hypoxia [2-fold increase as compared to regular diet (RD) group], low-grade inflammation (increased leukocyte infiltration and inflammatory markers) and RhoA/ROCK hyperactivity. Bladder strips from HFD rabbits, pre-contracted with carbachol, showed an overactive response to the selective ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. All these HFD-induced bladder alterations were partially blunted by testosterone and almost completely reverted by INT-747. Both treatments prevented some MetS features (glucose intolerance and visceral fat increase), thus suggesting that their effects on bladder could be ascribed to an improvement of the metabolic and/or hypogonadal state. However, a pathogenetic role for hypogonadism has been ruled out as GnRH analog-induced hypogonadal rabbits, fed a regular diet, did not show any detectable bladder alterations. In addition, INT-747 did not revert the MetS-induced hypogonadal state. FXR mRNA was highly expressed in rabbit bladder and positively associated with visceral fat increase. A direct effect of INT-747 on bladder smooth muscle was further suggested by inhibition of RhoA/ROCK-mediated activity by in vitro experiments on isolated cells. In conclusion, HFD-related MetS features are associated to bladder derangements, which are ameliorated by testosterone or INT-747 administration. INT-747 showed the most marked

  17. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle; Lu, Fred G.; Lerch, Jason P.; Wong, C. Shun; Nieman, Brian J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  18. Lead-induced alterations in rat kidneys and testes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Massanyi, Peter; Lukac, Norbert; Makarevich, Alexander V; Chrenek, Peter; Forgacs, Zsolt; Zakrzewski, Marian; Stawarz, Robert; Toman, Robert; Lazor, Peter; Flesarova, Slavka

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of lead administration on the kidney and testicular structure of adult rats. Rats received lead (PbNO(3)) in single intraperitoneal dose 50 mg/kg (group A), 25 mg/kg (group B) and 12.5 mg (group C) per kilogram of body weight and were killed 48 h following lead administration. After the preparation of histological samples the results were compared with control. After the lead administration dilated Bowman's capsules and blood vessels in interstitium of kidney with evident hemorrhagic alterations were noted. Quantitative analysis determined increased relative volume of interstitium and tubules. Also, the diameter of renal corpuscules, diameter of glomeruli and diameter of Bowman's capsule were significantly increased, especially in group A, with the highest lead concentration. In testes, dilatation of blood capillaries in interstitium, undulation of basal membrane and occurrence of empty spaces in seminiferous epithelium were detected. An apoptosis assay confirmed increased incidence of apoptosis in the spermatogenetic cells after the lead administration. Also further morphometric analysis showed significant differences in evaluated parameters between control and treated groups. The number of cell nuclei was decreased in lead-treated groups, which is concerned with the occurrence of empty spaces as well as with the higher apoptosis incidence in germinal epithelium. This study reports a negative effect of lead on the structure and function of kidney and testes. PMID:17454374

  19. Evaluation of Potential Clinical Surrogate Markers of a Trauma Induced Alteration of Clotting Factor Activities

    PubMed Central

    Payas, Arzu; Schoeneberg, Carsten; Wegner, Alexander; Kauther, Max Daniel; Lendemans, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to identify routinely available clinical surrogate markers for potential clotting factor alterations following multiple trauma. Methods. In 68 patients admitted directly from the scene of the accident, all soluble clotting factors were analyzed and clinical data was collected prospectively. Ten healthy subjects served as control group. Results. Patients showed reduced activities of clotting factors II, V, VII, and X and calcium levels (all P < 0.0001 to 0.01). Levels of hemoglobin and base deficit correlated moderately to highly with the activities of a number of clotting factors. Nonsurvivors and patients who needed preclinical intubation or hemostatic therapy showed significantly reduced factor activities at admission. In contrast, factor VIII activity was markedly elevated after injury in general (P < 0.0001), but reduced in nonsurvivors (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Multiple trauma causes an early reduction of the activities of nearly all soluble clotting factors in general. Initial hemoglobin and, with certain qualifications, base deficit levels demonstrated a potential value in detecting those underlying clotting factor deficiencies. Nevertheless, their role as triggers of a hemostatic therapy as well as the observed response of factor VIII to multiple trauma and also its potential prognostic value needs further evaluation. PMID:27433474

  20. Female Mice are Resistant to Fabp1 Gene Ablation-Induced Alterations in Brain Endocannabinoid Levels.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory G; Chung, Sarah; Landrock, Danilo; Landrock, Kerstin K; Dangott, Lawrence J; Peng, Xiaoxue; Kaczocha, Martin; Murphy, Eric J; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2016-09-01

    Although liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1, L-FABP) is not detectable in the brain, Fabp1 gene ablation (LKO) markedly increases endocannabinoids (EC) in brains of male mice. Since the brain EC system of females differs significantly from that of males, it was important to determine if LKO differently impacted the brain EC system. LKO did not alter brain levels of arachidonic acid (ARA)-containing EC, i.e. arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), but decreased non-ARA-containing N-acylethanolamides (OEA, PEA) and 2-oleoylglycerol (2-OG) that potentiate the actions of AEA and 2-AG. These changes in brain potentiating EC levels were not associated with: (1) a net decrease in levels of brain membrane proteins associated with fatty acid uptake and EC synthesis; (2) a net increase in brain protein levels of cytosolic EC chaperones and enzymes in EC degradation; or (3) increased brain protein levels of EC receptors (CB1, TRVP1). Instead, the reduced or opposite responsiveness of female brain EC levels to loss of FABP1 (LKO) correlated with intrinsically lower FABP1 level in livers of WT females than males. These data show that female mouse brain endocannabinoid levels were unchanged (AEA, 2-AG) or decreased (OEA, PEA, 2-OG) by complete loss of FABP1 (LKO). PMID:27450559

  1. Intramammary lipopolysaccharide infusion alters gene expression but does not induce lysis of the bovine corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Lüttgenau, J; Wellnitz, O; Kradolfer, D; Kalaitzakis, E; Ulbrich, S E; Bruckmaier, R M; Bollwein, H

    2016-05-01

    treatment. In conclusion, intramammary LPS challenge induces systemic inflammatory reactions which alter the luteal mRNA abundance of TLR2 and TNFA but does not induce lysis of the CL. PMID:26923046

  2. Aging masks detection of radiation-induced brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Olson, John; D’Agostino, Ralph; Linville, Constance; Nicolle, Michelle M.; Robbins, Michael E.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2011-01-01

    Fractionated partial or whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) is a widely used, effective treatment for primary and metastatic brain tumors, but it also produces radiation-induced brain injury, including cognitive impairment. Radiation-induced neural changes are particularly problematic for elderly brain tumor survivors who also experience age-dependent cognitive impairment. Accordingly, we investigated, i] radiation-induced cognitive impairment, and ii] potential biomarkers of radiation-induced brain injury in a rat model of aging. Fischer 344 × Brown Norway rats received fractionated whole-brain irradiation (fWBI rats, 40 Gy, 8 fractions over 4 wk) or sham-irradiation (Sham-IR rats) at 12 months of age; all analyses were performed at 26–30 months of age. Spatial learning and memory were measured using the Morris water maze (MWM), hippocampal metabolites were measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS), and hippocampal glutamate receptor subunits were evaluated using Western blots. Young rats (7–10 month-old) were included to control for age effects. The results revealed that both Sham-IR and fWBI rats exhibited age-dependent impairments in MWM performance; fWBI induced additional impairments in the reversal MWM. 1H MRS revealed age-dependent decreases in neuronal markers, increases in glial markers, but no detectable fWBI-dependent changes. Western blot analysis revealed age-dependent, but not fWBI-dependent, glutamate subunit declines. Although previous studies demonstrated fWBI-induced changes in cognition, glutamate subunits, and brain metabolites in younger rats, age-dependent changes in these parameters appear to mask their detection in old rats, a phenomenon also likely to occur in elderly fWBI patients >70 years of age. PMID:21338580

  3. Virus-induced atherosclerosis. Herpesvirus infection alters aortic cholesterol metabolism and accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Hajjar, D. P.; Fabricant, C. G.; Minick, C. R.; Fabricant, J.

    1986-01-01

    Infection of normocholesterolemic, specific-pathogen-free chickens with Marek's disease herpesvirus (MDV) has been shown histologically to lead to chronic atherosclerosis like that in humans. The development of herpesvirus-induced atherosclerosis in vivo and the presence of specific Marek's antigen within aortic cells suggested that MDV infection may modify lipid metabolism and lead to significant lipid accumulation. Experiments reported herein were designed to determine the types and quantity of lipid present in aortas from MDV-infected and uninfected chickens between 2 and 8 months of age following infection and assess one possible mechanism of lipid accumulation by evaluating the effect of MDV infection on aortic cholesterol and cholesteryl ester (CE) metabolism. Chromatographic-fluorometric analyses indicated that at 4 and 8 months of age after MDV inoculation, MDV-infected animals had a significant (P less than 0.05) two-fold to threefold increase in total aortic lipid accumulation characterized by significant increases in cholesterol, CE, triacylglycerol, and phospholipid as compared with aortas from uninfected animals. At 8 months of age, similar increases in aortic lipid accumulation were observed in MDV-infected animals as compared with those animals vaccinated with turkey herpesvirus and later challenged with MDV. CE synthetic activity was increased significantly by 50% at 4 months of age in the MDV-infected group as compared with the uninfected group, which could explain the initial increase in CE accumulation. By 8 months of age, the authors also observed a twofold increase in CE synthetic activity and a 30% and 80% reduction in lysosomal and cytoplasmic CE hydrolytic activities, respectively, in aortas of MDV-infected chickens as compared to controls. Moreover, infection with MDV blocked the activation of cytoplasmic CE hydrolytic activity by dibutyryl cyclic AMP or exogenous cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Taken together, these results suggest

  4. Single acute stress-induced progesterone and ovariectomy alter cardiomyocyte contractile function in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Kalász, Judit; Tóth, Enikő Pásztor; Bódi, Beáta; Fagyas, Miklós; Tóth, Attila; Pal, Bhattoa Harjit; Vári, Sándor G.; Balog, Marta; Blažetić, Senka; Heffer, Marija; Papp, Zoltán; Borbély, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess how ovarian-derived sex hormones (in particular progesterone) modify the effects of single acute stress on the mechanical and biochemical properties of left ventricular cardiomyocytes in the rat. Methods Non-ovariectomized (control, n = 8) and ovariectomized (OVX, n = 8) female rats were kept under normal conditions or were exposed to stress (control-S, n = 8 and OVX-S, n = 8). Serum progesterone levels were measured using a chemiluminescent immunoassay. Left ventricular myocardial samples were used for isometric force measurements and protein analysis. Ca2+-dependent active force (Factive), Ca2+-independent passive force (Fpassive), and Ca2+-sensitivity of force production were determined in single, mechanically isolated, permeabilized cardiomyocytes. Stress- and ovariectomy-induced alterations in myofilament proteins (myosin-binding protein C [MyBP-C], troponin I [TnI], and titin) were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis using protein and phosphoprotein stainings. Results Serum progesterone levels were significantly increased in stressed rats (control-S, 35.6 ± 4.8 ng/mL and OVX-S, 21.9 ± 4.0 ng/mL) compared to control (10 ± 2.9 ng/mL) and OVX (2.8 ± 0.5 ng/mL) groups. Factive was higher in the OVX groups (OVX, 25.9 ± 3.4 kN/m2 and OVX-S, 26.3 ± 3.0 kN/m2) than in control groups (control, 16.4 ± 1.2 kN/m2 and control-S, 14.4 ± 0.9 kN/m2). Regarding the potential molecular mechanisms, Factive correlated with MyBP-C phosphorylation, while myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity inversely correlated with serum progesterone levels when the mean values were plotted for all animal groups. Fpassive was unaffected by any treatment. Conclusion Stress increases ovary-independent synthesis and release of progesterone, which may regulate Ca2+-sensitivity of force production in left ventricular cardiomyocytes. Stress and female hormones differently alter Ca2+-dependent cardiomyocyte contractile

  5. RADIATION-INDUCED DECOMPOSITION OF U(VI) ALTERATION PHASES OF UO2

    SciTech Connect

    S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

    2005-09-08

    U{sup 6+}-phases are common alteration products of spent nuclear fuel under oxidizing conditions, and they may potentially incorporate actinides, such as long-lived {sup 239}Pu and {sup 237}Np, delaying their transport to the biosphere. In order to evaluate the ballistic effects of {alpha}-decay events on the stability of the U{sup 6+}-phases, we report, for the first time, the results of ion beam irradiations (1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+}) for six different structures of U{sup 6+}-phases: uranophane, kasolite, boltwoodite, saleeite, carnotite, and liebigite. The target uranyl-minerals were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and identification confirmed by SAED (selected area electron diffraction) in TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The TEM observation revealed no initial contamination of uraninite in these U{sup 6+} phases. All of the samples were irradiated with in situ TEM observation using 1.0 MeV Kr{sup 2+} in the IVEM (intermediate-voltage electron microscope) at the IVEM-Tandem Facility of Argonne National Laboratory. The ion flux was 6.3 x 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}/sec. The specimen temperatures during irradiation were 298 and 673 K, respectively. The Kr{sup 2+}-irradiation decomposed the U{sup 6+}-phases to nanocrystals of UO{sub 2} at doses as low as 0.006 dpa. The cumulative doses for the pure U{sup 6+}-phases, e.g., uranophane, at 0.1 and 1 million years (m.y.) are calculated to be 0.009 and 0.09 dpa using SRIM2003. However, with the incorporation of 1 wt.% {sup 239}Pu, the calculated doses reach 0.27 and {approx}1.00 dpa in ten thousand and one hundred thousand years, respectively. Under oxidizing conditions, multiple cycles of radiation-induced decomposition to UO{sub 2} followed by alteration to U{sup 6+}-phases should be further investigated to determine the fate of trace elements that may have been incorporated in the U{sup 6+}-phases.

  6. Unique gene alterations are induced in FACS-purified Fos-positive neurons activated during cue-induced relapse to heroin seeking

    PubMed Central

    Fanous, Sanya; Guez-Barber, Danielle H; Goldart, Evan M; Schrama, Regina; Theberge, Florence RM; Shaham, Yavin; Hope, Bruce T

    2012-01-01

    Cue-induced heroin seeking after prolonged withdrawal is associated with neuronal activation and altered gene expression in prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, these previous studies assessed gene expression in all neurons regardless of their activity state during heroin seeking. Using Fos as a marker of neural activity, we describe distinct molecular alterations induced in activated versus non-activated neurons during cue-induced heroin seeking after prolonged withdrawal. We trained rats to self-administer heroin for 10 days (6-h/day) and assessed cue-induced heroin seeking in extinction tests after 14 or 30 days. We used fluorescent-activated cell-sorting (FACS) to purify Fos-positive and Fos-negative neurons from PFC 90 min after extinction testing. Flow cytometry showed that Fos-immunoreactivity was increased in less than 10% of sparsely distributed PFC neurons. mRNA levels of the immediate early genes fosB, arc, egr1, and egr2, as well as npy and map2k6, were increased in Fos-positive, but not Fos-negative, neurons. In support of these findings, double-label immunohistochemistry indicated substantial co-expression of NPY- and Arc-immunoreactivity in Fos-positive neurons. Our data indicate that cue-induced relapse to heroin seeking after prolonged withdrawal induces unique molecular alterations within activated PFC neurons that are distinct from those observed in the surrounding majority of non-activated neurons. PMID:23113797

  7. Chemical Detection Based on Adsorption-Induced and Photo-Induced Stresses in MEMS Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G.

    1999-04-05

    Recently there has been an increasing demand to perform real-time in-situ chemical detection of hazardous materials, contraband chemicals, and explosive chemicals. Currently, real-time chemical detection requires rather large analytical instrumentation that are expensive and complicated to use. The advent of inexpensive mass produced MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems) devices opened-up new possibilities for chemical detection. For example, microcantilevers were found to respond to chemical stimuli by undergoing changes in their bending and resonance frequency even when a small number of molecules adsorb on their surface. In our present studies, we extended this concept by studying changes in both the adsorption-induced stress and photo-induced stress as target chemicals adsorb on the surface of microcantilevers. For example, microcantilevers that have adsorbed molecules will undergo photo-induced bending that depends on the number of absorbed molecules on the surface. However, microcantilevers that have undergone photo-induced bending will adsorb molecules on their surfaces in a distinctly different way. Depending on the photon wavelength and microcantilever material, the microcantilever can be made to bend by expanding or contracting the irradiated surface. This is important in cases where the photo-induced stresses can be used to counter any adsorption-induced stresses and increase the dynamic range. Coating the surface of the microstructure with a different material can provide chemical specificity for the target chemicals. However, by selecting appropriate photon wavelengths we can change the chemical selectivity due to the introduction of new surface states in the MEMS device. We will present and discuss our results on the use of adsorption-induced and photo-induced bending of microcantilevers for chemical detection.

  8. Detection of Chromosomal Structural Alterations in Single Cells by SNP Arrays: A Systematic Survey of Amplification Bias and Optimized Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Kazuya; Bundo, Miki; Ueda, Junko; Nakano, Yoko; Ukai, Wataru; Hashimoto, Eri; Saito, Toshikazu; Kato, Tadafumi

    2007-01-01

    Background In single-cell human genome analysis using whole-genome amplified product, a strong amplification bias involving allele dropout and preferential amplification hampers the quality of results. Using an oligonucleotide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, we systematically examined the nature of this amplification bias, including frequency, degree, and preference for genomic location, and we assessed the effects of this amplification bias on subsequent genotype and chromosomal copy number analyses. Methodology/Principal Findings We found a large variability in amplification bias among the amplified products obtained by multiple displacement amplification (MDA), and this bias had a severe effect on the genotype and chromosomal copy number analyses. We established optimal experimental conditions for pre-screening for high-quality amplified products, processing array data, and analyzing chromosomal structural alterations. Using this optimized protocol, we successfully detected previously unidentified chromosomal structural alterations in single cells from a lymphoblastoid cell line. These alterations were subsequently confirmed by karyotype analysis. In addition, we successfully obtained reproducible chromosomal copy number profiles of single cells from the cell line with a complex karyotype, indicating the applicability and potential of our optimized workflow. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that the quality of amplification products should be critically assessed before using them for genomic analyses. The method of MDA-based whole-genome amplification followed by SNP array analysis described here will be useful for exploring chromosomal alterations in single cells. PMID:18074030

  9. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hybl, John D.; Tysk, Shane M.; Berry, Shaun R.; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors.However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  10. Naproxen, a Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug, Can Affect Daily Hypobaric Hypoxia-Induced Alterations of Monoamine Levels in Different Areas of the Brain in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Ananda Raj; Dutta, Goutam; Ghosh, Tusharkanti

    2016-06-01

    Goswami, Ananda Raj, Goutam Dutta, and Tusharkanti Ghosh. Naproxen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug can affect daily hypobaric hypoxia-induced alterations of monoamine levels in different areas of the brain in male rats. High Alt Med Biol. 17:133-140, 2016.-The oxidative stress (OS)-induced prostaglandin (PG) release, in hypobaric hypoxic (HHc) condition, may be linked with the changes of brain monoamines. The present study intends to explore the changes of monoamines in hypothalamus (H), cerebral cortex (CC), and cerebellum (CB) along with the motor activity in rats after exposing them to simulated hypobaric condition and the role of PGs on the daily hypobaric hypoxia (DHH)-induced alteration of brain monoamines by administering, an inhibitor of PG synthesis, naproxen. The rats were exposed to a decompression chamber at 18,000 ft for 8 hours per day for 6 days after administration of vehicle or naproxen (18 mg/kg body wt.). The monoamine levels (epinephrine, E; norepinephrine, NE; dopamine, DA; and 5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in CC, CB, and H were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection, and the locomotor behavior was measured by open field test. The NE and DA levels were decreased in CC, CB, and H of the rat brain in HHc condition. The E and 5-HT levels were decreased in CC, but in H and CB, they remained unaltered in HHc condition. These DHH-induced changes of monoamines in brain areas were prevented after administration of naproxen in HHc condition. The locomotor behavior remained unaltered in HHc condition and after administration of naproxen in HHc condition. The DHH-induced changes of monoamines in the brain in HHc condition are probably linked with PGs that may be induced by OS. PMID:26894935

  11. From genes to populations: how fisheries-induced evolution alters stock productivity.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Erin S; Eikeset, Anne Maria; Stenseth, Nils C

    2015-10-01

    By removing individuals with certain heritable characteristics such as large body size, harvesting may induce rapid evolutionary change in fish life history. There is controversy, however, as to the prevalence of fisheries-induced evolution (FIE) and to what extent it should be considered as part of sustainable resource management. Recent research has shown that FIE can be difficult to detect and its economic effects might not always be significant. Here, we show how population growth rate (r), a critical factor affecting sustainability and recovery, is affected by FIE through the analysis of a simulation model that demonstrates the link between individual-level genetic processes and stock dynamics. We examine how different levels of evolvability, fishing intensity, and density-dependence interact to influence r in three commercially harvested species: Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), and yellow perch (Perca flavescens). We demonstrate that at low harvest levels, evolution has minimal effect on r for all three species. However, at the harvest rates experienced by many fish stocks, evolution increases r and reduces the risk of collapse for cod and whitefish. During the initial stages of a harvest moratorium, a switch occurs, and r becomes reduced as a consequence of evolution. These results explain how evolution increases stock resilience, but also impedes recovery after periods of intense harvesting. PMID:26591452

  12. Microwave radiation (2450 MHz) alters the endotoxin-induced hypothermic response of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowicz, R.J.; Compton, K.L.; Riddle, M.M.; Rogers, R.R.; Brugnolotti, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The parenteral administration of bacterial endotoxin to rats causes a hypothermia that is maximal after approximately 90 minutes. When endotoxin-injected rats were held in a controlled environment at 22 degree C and 50% relative humidity and exposed for 90 minutes to microwaves (2450 MHz, CW) at 1 mW/cm2, significant increases were observed in body temperature compared with endotoxin-treated, sham-irradiated rats. The magnitude of the response was related to power density (10 mW/cm2 greater than 5 mW/cm2 greater than 1 mW/cm2). Saline-injected rats exposed for 90 minutes at 5 mW/cm2 (specific absorption rate approximately 1.0 mW/g) showed no significant increase in body temperature compared with saline-injected, sham-irradiated rats. The hypothermia induced by endotoxin in rats was also found to be affected by ambient temperature alone. Increases in ambient temperature above 22 degree C in the absence of microwaves caused a concomitant increase in body temperature. This study reveals that subtle microwave heating is detectable in endotoxin-treated rats that have impaired thermoregulatory capability. These results indicate that the interpretation of microwave-induced biological effects observed in animals at comparable rates and levels of energy absorption should include a consideration of the thermogenic potential of microwave.

  13. Evaluation of standardized Bacopa monniera extract in sodium fluoride-induced behavioural, biochemical, and histopathological alterations in mice.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Bhaskar; Kumar, Ekambaram Prem; Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Effect of standardized Bacopa monniera (BM; family: Scrophulariaceae) extract (100 and 300 mg/kg) against sodium fluoride (NaF; 100 and 200 ppm)-induced behavioural, biochemical, and neuropathological alterations in mice was evaluated. Akinesia, rotarod (motor coordination), forced swim test (depression), open field test (anxiety), transfer latency (memory), cholinesterase (ChE), and oxidative stress (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and lipid peroxidation) were determined in mice treated with NaF for 30 days alone and in combination with BM. NaF induced motor incoordination, depression, and memory impairment, and these were prevented by coadministration of BM in mice. However, NaF did not alter the weight gain, feed/water consumption, and anxiety profile. Suppression of ChE levels and increased oxidative stress were observed in mice treated with NaF. Coadministration of BM significantly improved the memory, ChE levels, and antioxidant enzymes but failed to alter the fluoride levels in NaF-treated mice. Histopathological studies revealed that BM protected the neuropathological alterations induced by NaF. PMID:23222693

  14. Evaluation of the systemic innate immune response and metabolic alterations of nonlactating cows with diet-induced subacute ruminal acidosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lecompte, J C; Kroeker, A D; Ceballos-Márquez, A; Li, S; Plaizier, J C; Gomez, D E

    2014-12-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) increases lipopolysaccharide endotoxin in the rumen, which might translocate into the systemic circulation, triggering a cascade of clinical and immunological alterations. The objective of this study was to characterize the clinical immune and metabolic responses to ruminal-derived lipopolysaccharide in nonlactating cows induced with SARA using 2 challenges, a grain-based SARA challenge (GBSC) or an alfalfa-pellet SARA challenge (APSC). Six dry, nonlactating Holstein cows were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square arrangement of treatments with 4-wk experimental cycles. All cows received the control diet containing 70% forage and 30% mixed concentrates (dry matter basis) for 3 wk. In wk 4, cows received a control diet, GBSC (38% wheat-barley pellets, 32% other mixed concentrate, and 30% forages), or APSC (45% mixed concentrate, 32% alfalfa pellets, and 23% other forages). Total plasma proteins and immunology-related proteins, acute phase proteins, blood cells, serum chemistry, mRNA gene expression of peripheral blood cell surface markers, and selected proinflammatory cytokines were evaluated. Ruminal pH was lower in both groups with induced SARA compared with a control group. Ruminal endotoxins were higher in GBSC; however, plasma endotoxin was not detected in any study group. No significant differences in feed intake, rectal temperature, white blood cell counts, or differentials were found between control and SARA challenge groups; changes in glucose, urea, Ca, and Mg were observed in SARA groups. Total plasma proteins were lower in both SARA groups, and acute phase proteins were higher in GBSC. The expression of CD14, MD2, and TLR4 mRNA in peripheral blood leukocytes was not affected by SARA induction. The induction of SARA as a result of GBSC or APSC challenge was successful; however, LPS was not detected in plasma. Changes in clinical, metabolic, and inflammatory responses were not observed in the SARA-challenged cows, suggesting that

  15. Alterations of lung microbiota in a mouse model of LPS-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyong; Meliton, Angelo; Afonyushkin, Taras; Ulanov, Alexander; Semenyuk, Ekaterina; Latif, Omar; Tesic, Vera; Birukova, Anna A.; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome are common responses to a variety of infectious and noninfectious insults. We used a mouse model of ALI induced by intratracheal administration of sterile bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to investigate the changes in innate lung microbiota and study microbial community reaction to lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction induced by endotoxin insult. One group of C57BL/6J mice received LPS via intratracheal injection (n = 6), and another received sterile water (n = 7). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed at 72 h after treatment. Bacterial DNA was extracted and used for qPCR and 16S rRNA gene-tag (V3–V4) sequencing (Illumina). The bacterial load in BAL from ALI mice was increased fivefold (P = 0.03). The community complexity remained unchanged (Simpson index, P = 0.7); the Shannon diversity index indicated the increase of community evenness in response to ALI (P = 0.07). Principal coordinate analysis and analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) test (P = 0.005) revealed a significant difference between microbiota of control and ALI groups. Bacteria from families Xanthomonadaceae and Brucellaceae increased their abundance in the ALI group as determined by Metastats test (P < 0.02). In concordance with the 16s-tag data, Stenotrohomonas maltophilia (Xanthomonadaceae) and Ochrobactrum anthropi (Brucellaceae) were isolated from lungs of mice from both groups. Metabolic profiling of BAL detected the presence of bacterial substrates suitable for both isolates. Additionally, microbiota from LPS-treated mice intensified IL-6-induced lung inflammation in naive mice. We conclude that the morbid transformation of ALI microbiota was attributed to the set of inborn opportunistic pathogens thriving in the environment of inflamed lung, rather than the external infectious agents. PMID:25957290

  16. Magnetic Field Is the Dominant Factor to Induce the Response of Streptomyces avermitilis in Altered Gravity Simulated by Diamagnetic Levitation

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Peng; Zhou, Xianlong; Ashforth, Elizabeth; Zhuo, Ying; Chen, Difei; Ren, Biao; Liu, Zhiheng; Zhang, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    Background Diamagnetic levitation is a technique that uses a strong, spatially varying magnetic field to simulate an altered gravity environment, as in space. In this study, using Streptomyces avermitilis as the test organism, we investigate whether changes in magnetic field and altered gravity induce changes in morphology and secondary metabolism. We find that a strong magnetic field (12T) inhibit the morphological development of S. avermitilis in solid culture, and increase the production of secondary metabolites. Methodology/Principal Findings S. avermitilis on solid medium was levitated at 0 g*, 1 g* and 2 g* in an altered gravity environment simulated by diamagnetic levitation and under a strong magnetic field, denoted by the asterix. The morphology was obtained by electromicroscopy. The production of the secondary metabolite, avermectin, was determined by OD245 nm. The results showed that diamagnetic levitation could induce a physiological response in S. avermitilis. The difference between 1 g* and the control group grown without the strong magnetic field (1 g), showed that the magnetic field was a more dominant factor influencing changes in morphology and secondary metabolite production, than altered gravity. Conclusion/Significance We have discovered that magnetic field, rather than altered gravity, is the dominant factor in altered gravity simulated by diamagnetic levitation, therefore care should to be taken in the interpretation of results when using diamagnetic levitation as a technique to simulate altered gravity. Hence, these results are significant, and timely to researchers considering the use of diamagnetic levitation to explore effects of weightlessness on living organisms and on physical phenomena. PMID:22039402

  17. Controlling element-induced alterations in UDPglucose:flavonoid glucosyltransferase, the enzyme specified by the bronze locus in maize

    PubMed Central

    Dooner, Hugo K.; Nelson, Oliver E.

    1977-01-01

    The bz locus in maize, which directs synthesis of the enzyme UDPglucose:flavonoid glucosyltransferase (UFGT) in the endosperm, is one of many loci at which controlling element-induced phenotypic changes are known. To characterize the nature of such modifications, several bz mutants derived by transposition of the controlling element Ds to the Bz gene were analyzed. Three mutants were found to lack UFGT at all stages of endosperm development. Two others appeared to make an altered UFGT, and in one of these the enzyme showed an altered developmental profile. PMID:16592474

  18. Detection of uranium using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chinni, Rosemarie C; Cremers, David A; Radziemski, Leon J; Bostian, Melissa; Navarro-Northrup, Claudia

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this work is a detailed study of uranium detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for application to activities associated with environmental surveillance and detecting weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The study was used to assist development of LIBS instruments for standoff detection of bulk radiological and nuclear materials and these materials distributed as contaminants on surfaces. Uranium spectra were analyzed under a variety of different conditions at room pressure, reduced pressures, and in an argon atmosphere. All spectra displayed a high apparent background due to the high density of uranium lines. Time decay curves of selected uranium lines were monitored and compared to other elements in an attempt to maximize detection capabilities for each species in the complicated uranium spectrum. A survey of the LIBS uranium spectra was conducted and relative emission line strengths were determined over the range of 260 to 800 nm. These spectra provide a guide for selection of the strongest LIBS analytical lines for uranium detection in different spectral regions. A detection limit for uranium in soil of 0.26% w/w was obtained at close range and 0.5% w/w was achieved at a distance of 30 m. Surface detection limits were substrate dependent and ranged from 13 to 150 microg/cm2. Double-pulse experiments (both collinear and orthogonal arrangements) were shown to enhance the uranium signal in some cases. Based on the results of this work, a short critique is given of the applicability of LIBS for the detection of uranium residues on surfaces for environmental monitoring and WMD surveillance. PMID:19891832

  19. Cell cycle alterations induced by urban PM2.5 in bronchial epithelial cells: characterization of the process and possible mechanisms involved

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study explores and characterizes cell cycle alterations induced by urban PM2.5 in the human epithelial cell line BEAS-2B, and elucidates possible mechanisms involved. Methods The cells were exposed to a low dose (7.5 μg/cm2) of Milan winter PM2.5 for different time points, and the cell cycle progression was analyzed by fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Activation of proteins involved in cell cycle control was investigated by Western blotting and DNA damage by 32P-postlabelling, immunostaining and comet assay. The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was quantified by flow cytometry. The role of PM organic fraction versus washed PM on the cell cycle alterations was also examined. Finally, the molecular pathways activated were further examined using specific inhibitors. Results Winter PM2.5 induced marked cell cycle alteration already after 3 h of exposure, represented by an increased number of cells (transient arrest) in G2. This effect was associated with an increased phosphorylation of Chk2, while no changes in p53 phosphorylation were observed at this time point. The increase in G2 was followed by a transient arrest in the metaphase/anaphase transition point (10 h), which was associated with the presence of severe mitotic spindle aberrations. The metaphase/anaphase delay was apparently followed by mitotic slippage at 24 h, resulting in an increased number of tetraploid G1 cells and cells with micronuclei (MN), and by apoptosis at 40 h. Winter PM2.5 increased the level of ROS at 2 h and DNA damage (8-oxodG, single- and double stand breaks) was detected after 3 h of exposure. The PM organic fraction caused a similar G2/M arrest and augmented ROS formation, while washed PM had no such effects. DNA adducts were detected after 24 h. Both PM-induced DNA damage and G2 arrest were inhibited by the addition of antioxidants and α-naphthoflavone, suggesting the involvement of ROS and reactive electrophilic metabolites formed via a P

  20. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with high detection sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. K.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2009-02-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with spatial confinement and LIBS combined with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) have been investigated to improve the detection sensitivity and selectivity of LIBS. An obvious enhancement in the emission intensity of Al atomic lines was observed when a cylindrical wall was placed to spatially confine the plasma plumes. The maximum enhancement factor for the emission intensity of Al atomic lines was measured to be around 10. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, the plasma temperatures are estimated to be in the range from 4000 to 5800 K. It shows that the plasma temperature increased by around 1000 K when the cylindrical confinement was applied. Fast imaging of the laser-induced Al plasmas shows that the plasmas were compressed into a smaller volume with a pipe presented. LIBS-LIF has been investigated to overcome the matrix effects in LIBS for the detection of trace uranium in solids. A wavelength-tunable laser with an optical parametric oscillator was used to resonantly excite the uranium atoms and ions within the plasma plumes generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Both atomic and ionic lines can be selected to detect their fluorescence lines. A uranium concentration of 462 ppm in a glass sample can be detected using this technique at an excitation wavelength of 385.96 nm for resonant excitation of U II and a fluorescence line wavelength of 409.01 nm from U II. The mechanism of spatial confinement effects and the influence of relevant operational parameters of LIBS-LIF are discussed.

  1. REM sleep deprivation reverses neurochemical and other depressive-like alterations induced by olfactory bulbectomy.

    PubMed

    Maturana, Maira J; Pudell, Cláudia; Targa, Adriano D S; Rodrigues, Laís S; Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Fortes, Mariana H; Dos Santos, Patrícia; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Zanata, Sílvio M; Ferraz, Anete C; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2015-02-01

    There is compelling evidence that sleep deprivation (SD) is an effective strategy in promoting antidepressant effects in humans, whereas few studies were performed in relevant animal models of depression. Acute administration of antidepressants in humans and rats generates a quite similar effect, i.e., suppression of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Then, we decided to investigate the neurochemical alterations generated by a protocol of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REMSD) in the notably known animal model of depression induced by the bilateral olfactory bulbectomy (OBX). REMSD triggered antidepressant mechanisms such as the increment of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), which were strongly correlated to the swimming time (r = 0.83; P < 0.0001) and hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) content (r = 0.66; P = 0.004). Moreover, there was a strong correlation between swimming time and hippocampal 5-HT levels (r = 0.70; P = 0.003), strengthen the notion of an antidepressant effect associated to REMSD in the OBX rats. In addition, REMSD robustly attenuated the hippocampal 5-HT deficiency produced by the OBX procedure. Regarding the rebound (REB) period, we observed the occurrence of a sustained antidepressant effect, indicated mainly by the swimming and climbing times which could be explained by the maintenance of the increased nigral BDNF expression. Hence, hippocampal 5-HT levels remained enhanced in the OBX group after this period. We suggested that the neurochemical complexity inflicted by the OBX model, counteracted by REMSD, is directly correlated to the nigral BDNF expression and hippocampal 5-HT levels. The present findings provide new information regarding the antidepressant mechanisms triggered by REMSD. PMID:24826915

  2. Shear Stress-Induced Alteration of Epithelial Organization in Human Renal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Belloy, Marcy; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Casemayou, Audrey; Ducasse, Laure; Grès, Sandra; Bellière, Julie; Caubet, Cécile; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P.; Buffin-Meyer, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    Tubular epithelial cells in the kidney are continuously exposed to urinary fluid shear stress (FSS) generated by urine movement and recent in vitro studies suggest that changes of FSS could contribute to kidney injury. However it is unclear whether FSS alters the epithelial characteristics of the renal tubule. Here, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo the influence of FSS on epithelial characteristics of renal proximal tubular cells taking the organization of junctional complexes and the presence of the primary cilium as markers of epithelial phenotype. Human tubular cells (HK-2) were subjected to FSS (0.5 Pa) for 48h. Control cells were maintained under static conditions. Markers of tight junctions (Claudin-2, ZO-1), Par polarity complex (Pard6), adherens junctions (E-Cadherin, β-Catenin) and the primary cilium (α-acetylated Tubulin) were analysed by quantitative PCR, Western blot or immunocytochemistry. In response to FSS, Claudin-2 disappeared and ZO-1 displayed punctuated and discontinuous staining in the plasma membrane. Expression of Pard6 was also decreased. Moreover, E-Cadherin abundance was decreased, while its major repressors Snail1 and Snail2 were overexpressed, and β-Catenin staining was disrupted along the cell periphery. Finally, FSS subjected-cells exhibited disappeared primary cilium. Results were confirmed in vivo in a uninephrectomy (8 months) mouse model where increased FSS induced by adaptive hyperfiltration in remnant kidney was accompanied by both decreased epithelial gene expression including ZO-1, E-cadherin and β-Catenin and disappearance of tubular cilia. In conclusion, these results show that proximal tubular cells lose an important number of their epithelial characteristics after long term exposure to FSS both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, the changes in urinary FSS associated with nephropathies should be considered as potential insults for tubular cells leading to disorganization of the tubular epithelium. PMID:26146837

  3. High glucose-induced proteome alterations in hepatocytes and its possible relevance to diabetic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Chen, You-Hsuan; Chan, Hong-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Hyperglycemia can cause several abnormalities in liver cells, including diabetic liver disease. Previous research has shown that high blood glucose levels can damage liver cells through glycoxidation. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of high blood glucose on the development of diabetic liver disease have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we cultured a liver cell line (Chang liver cell) in mannitol-balanced 5.5 mM, 25 mM and 100 mM d-glucose media and evaluated protein expression and redox regulation. We identified 141 proteins that showed significant changes in protein expression and 29 proteins that showed significant changes in thiol reactivity, in response to high glucose concentration. Several proteins involved in transcription-control, signal transduction, redox regulation and cytoskeleton regulation showed significant changes in expression, whereas proteins involved in protein folding and gene regulation displayed changes in thiol reactivity. Further analyses of clinical plasma specimens confirmed that the proteins AKAP8L, galectin-3, PGK 1, syntenin-1, Abin 2, aldose reductase, CD63, GRP-78, GST-pi, RXR-gamma, TPI and vimentin showed type 2 diabetic liver disease-dependent alterations. In summary, in this study we used a comprehensive hepatocyte-based proteomic approach to identify changes in protein expression and to identify redox-associated diabetic liver disease markers induced by high glucose concentration. Some of the identified proteins were validated with clinical samples and are presented as potential targets for the prognosis and diagnosis of diabetic liver disease. PMID:24011924

  4. The effects of acute oral antioxidants on diving-induced alterations in human cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    Obad, Ante; Palada, Ivan; Valic, Zoran; Ivančev, Vladimir; Baković, Darija; Wisløff, Ulrik; Brubakk, Alf O; Dujić, Željko

    2007-01-01

    Diving-induced acute alterations in cardiovascular function such as arterial endothelial dysfunction, increased pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and reduced heart function have been recently reported. We tested the effects of acute antioxidants on arterial endothelial function, PAP and heart function before and after a field dive. Vitamins C (2 g) and E (400 IU) were given to subjects 2 h before a second dive (protocol 1) and in a placebo-controlled crossover study design (protocol 2). Seven experienced divers performed open sea dives to 30 msw with standard decompression in a non-randomized protocol, and six of them participated in a randomized trial. Before and after the dives ventricular volumes and function and pulmonary and brachial artery function were assessed by ultrasound. The control dive resulted in a significant reduction in flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and heart function with increased mean PAP. Twenty-four hours after the control dive FMD was still reduced 37% below baseline (8.1 versus 5.1%, P = 0.005), while right ventricle ejection fraction (RV-EF), left ventricle EF and endocardial fractional shortening were reduced much less (∼2–3%). At the same time RV end-systolic volume was increased by 9% and mean PAP by 5%. Acute antioxidants significantly attenuated only the reduction in FMD post-dive (P < 0.001), while changes in pulmonary artery and heart function were unaffected by antioxidant ingestion. These findings were confirmed by repeating the experiments in a randomized study design. FMD returned to baseline values 72 h after the dive with pre-dive placebo, whereas for most cardiovascular parameters this occurred earlier (24–48 h). Right ventricular dysfunction and increased PAP lasted longer. Acute antioxidants attenuated arterial endothelial dysfunction after diving, while reduction in heart and pulmonary artery function were unchanged. Cardiovascular changes after diving are not fully reversed up to 3 days after a dive, suggesting

  5. Androgen Deficiency Exacerbates High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Jardi, Ferran; Antonio, Leen; Lemaire, Katleen; Goyvaerts, Lotte; Deldicque, Louise; Carmeliet, Geert; Decallonne, Brigitte; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Androgen deficiency is associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus in men, but the mechanisms behind these associations remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of androgen deficiency and high-fat diet (HFD) on body composition and glucose homeostasis in C57BL/6J male mice. Two models of androgen deficiency were used: orchidectomy (ORX) and androgen receptor knockout mice. Both models displayed higher adiposity and serum leptin levels upon HFD, whereas no differences were seen on a regular diet. Fat accumulation in HFD ORX animals was accompanied by increased sedentary behavior and occurred in spite of reduced food intake. HFD ORX mice showed white adipocyte hypertrophy, correlated with decreased mitochondrial content but not function as well as increased lipogenesis and decreased lipolysis suggested by the up-regulation of fatty acid synthase and the down-regulation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Both ORX and androgen receptor knockout exacerbated HFD-induced glucose intolerance by impairing insulin action in liver and skeletal muscle, as evidenced by the increased triglyceride and decreased glycogen content in these tissues. In addition, serum IL-1β levels were elevated, and pancreatic insulin secretion was impaired after ORX. Testosterone but not dihydrotestosterone supplementation restored the castration effects on body composition and glucose homeostasis. We conclude that sex steroid deficiency in combination with HFD exacerbates adiposity, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure in 2 preclinical male mouse models. Our findings stress the importance of a healthy diet in a clinical context of androgen deficiency and may have implications for the prevention of metabolic alterations in hypogonadal men. PMID:26562264

  6. Pharmacological alterations that could underlie radiation-induced changes in associative memory and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Caceres, L G; Cid, M P; Uran, S L; Zorrilla Zubilete, M A; Salvatierra, N A; Guelman, L R

    2013-10-01

    It is widely known that ionizing radiation is a physical agent broadly used to kill tumor cells during human cancer therapy. Unfortunately, adjacent normal tissues can concurrently undergo undesirable cell injury. Previous data of our laboratory demonstrated that exposure of developing rats to ionizing radiations induced a variety of behavioral differences respect to controls, including changes in associative memory and in anxiety state. However, there is a lack of data concerning modifications in different related pharmacological intermediaries. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether the behavioral differences observed in young animals irradiated at birth might be underlain by early changes in PKCß1 levels which, in turn, could lead to changes in hippocampal GABAergic neurotransmission. Male Wistar rats were irradiated with 5Gy of X rays between 24 and 48 h after birth. Different pharmacological markers related to the affected behavioral tasks were assessed in control and irradiated hippocampus at 15 and 30 days, namely GABAA receptor, GAD65-67, ROS and PKCß1. Results showed that all measured parameters were increased in the hippocampus of 30-days-old irradiated animals. In contrast, in the hippocampus of 15-days-old irradiated animals only the levels of PKCß1 were decreased. These data suggest that PKCß1 might constitute a primary target for neonatal radiation damage on the hippocampus. Therefore, it could be hypothesized that an initial decrease in the levels of this protein can trigger a subsequent compensatory increase that, in turn, could be responsible for the plethora of biochemical changes that might underlie the previously observed behavioral alterations. PMID:23958578

  7. PFOS Induces Behavioral Alterations, Including Spontaneous Hyperactivity That Is Corrected by Dexamfetamine in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Spulber, Stefan; Kilian, Pascal; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Norhamidah; Onishchenko, Natalia; Ulhaq, Mazhar; Norrgren, Leif; Negri, Sara; Di Tuccio, Marcello; Ceccatelli, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a widely spread environmental contaminant. It accumulates in the brain and has potential neurotoxic effects. The exposure to PFOS has been associated with higher impulsivity and increased ADHD prevalence. We investigated the effects of developmental exposure to PFOS in zebrafish larvae, focusing on the modulation of activity by the dopaminergic system. We exposed zebrafish embryos to 0.1 or 1 mg/L PFOS (0.186 or 1.858 µM, respectively) and assessed swimming activity at 6 dpf. We analyzed the structure of spontaneous activity, the hyperactivity and the habituation during a brief dark period (visual motor response), and the vibrational startle response. The findings in zebrafish larvae were compared with historical data from 3 months old male mice exposed to 0.3 or 3 mg/kg/day PFOS throughout gestation. Finally, we investigated the effects of dexamfetamine on the alterations in spontaneous activity and startle response in zebrafish larvae. We found that zebrafish larvae exposed to 0.1 mg/L PFOS habituate faster than controls during a dark pulse, while the larvae exposed to 1 mg/L PFOS display a disorganized pattern of spontaneous activity and persistent hyperactivity. Similarly, mice exposed to 0.3 mg/kg/day PFOS habituated faster than controls to a new environment, while mice exposed to 3 mg/kg/day PFOS displayed more intense and disorganized spontaneous activity. Dexamfetamine partly corrected the hyperactive phenotype in zebrafish larvae. In conclusion, developmental exposure to PFOS in zebrafish induces spontaneous hyperactivity mediated by a dopaminergic deficit, which can be partially reversed by dexamfetamine in zebrafish larvae. PMID:24740186

  8. Ozone-induced alterations in arachidonic acid metabolism in cultured lung cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most sensitive cells to ozone (O/sub 3/) damage is the pulmonary endothelial cell which may mediate the response of the lung to injury by productions of the autacoid prostacyclin (PGl/sub 2/), a metabolite of arachidonic acid. Exposure of endothelial cell cultures to ozone produced a concentration dependent decreases in the synthesis of PGl/sub 2/. Release of /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid from endothelial cells was increased after two hours of 0.3 and 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ exposure while incubation of cells with 20 ..mu..M and arachidonate (4 min) after exposure resulted in a decreased PGl/sub 2/ synthesis. Cells exposed to 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ did not have a decreased PGl/sub 2/ production when incubated with 5 ..mu..M PGH/sub 2/ immediately after exposure. These results are consistent with an O/sub 3/-induced inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity. O/sub 3/ exposure (1.0 ppm) produced a rapid decrease in endothelial PGl/sub 2/ synthesis. The data suggest that cyclooxygenase was not inactivated by increased autooxidation due to metabolism of increased free arachidonate. PGl/sub 2/ synthesis returned to control amounts within 12 hours after ozone exposure similar to the recovery time of irreversibly inhibited cyclooxygenase suggesting that recovery was due to de novo synthesis of enzyme. Lipid peroxides and/or hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) may have caused the inhibition of cyclooxygenase. Incubation of cells with catalase (5 U/ml) protected against the O/sub 3/-induced depression in PGl/sub 2/ synthesis. Exogenously added H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ (greater than or equal to 75 ..mu..M) caused a stimulation of basal PGl/sub 2/ production but depressed arachidonate-stimulated synthesis. O/sub 3/ exposure (2 hr, 1.0 ppm) produced altered metabolism of arachidonate in other important lung cell types, e.g., a decreased PGl/sub 2/ synthesis in smooth muscle cultures. Exposure of lung macrophages to O/sub 3/ caused an increase in almost all arachidonate metabolites produced.

  9. Microbial exposure alters HIV-1-induced mucosal CD4+ T cell death pathways Ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Early HIV-1 infection causes massive CD4+ T cell death in the gut and translocation of bacteria into the circulation. However, the programmed cell death (PCD) pathways used by HIV-1 to kill CD4+ T cells in the gut, and the impact of microbial exposure on T cell loss, remain unclear. Understanding mucosal HIV-1 triggered PCD could be advanced by an ex vivo system involving lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs). We therefore modeled the interactions of gut LPMCs, CCR5-tropic HIV-1 and a commensal gut bacterial species, Escherichia coli. In this Lamina Propria Aggregate Culture (LPAC) model, LPMCs were infected with HIV-1BaL by spinoculation and cultured in the presence or absence of heat killed E.coli. CD4+ T cell numbers derived from flow cytometry and viable cell counts were reported relative to mock infection. Viable cells were identified by viability dye exclusion (AqVi), and intracellular HIV-1 Gag p24 protein was used to identify infected cells. Annexin V and AqVi were used to identify apoptotic versus necrotic cells. Caspase-1 and Caspase-3 activities were blocked using specific inhibitors YVAD and DEVD, respectively. Results CD4+ T cell depletion following HIV-1 infection was reproducibly observed by 6 days post infection (dpi). Depletion at 6 dpi strongly correlated with infection frequency at 4 dpi, was significantly blocked by Efavirenz treatment, and was primarily driven by p24-negative cells that were predominantly necrotic. HIV-1 infection significantly induced CD4+ T-cell intrinsic Caspase-1 activity, whereas Caspase-1 inhibition, but not Caspase-3 inhibition, significantly blocked CD4+ T cell depletion. Exposure to E.coli enhanced HIV-1 infection and CD4+ T depletion, and significantly increased the number of apoptotic p24+ cells. Notably, CD4+ T cell depletion in the presence of E.coli was partially blocked by Caspase-3, but not by Caspase-1 inhibition. Conclusions In the LPAC model, HIV-1 induced Caspase-1 mediated pyroptosis in

  10. Radio-induced alteration in cordierite - Implications for petrology, gemmology and materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krickl, R.; Nasdala, L.; Grambole, D.; Kaindl, R.

    2009-04-01

    Cordierite is a common metamorphic and magmatic mineral, which is used as petrologic tool for reconstructing the history of its host rock. Further applications include cordierite gemstones and the use of synthetic analogs in ceramics. Cordierite is stable over a wide temperature and pressure range and relatively resistant to chemical alteration; however, its properties can be significantly changed upon the impact of external irradiation. In the course of a comprehensive study, natural radiohaloes in cordierite (a widespread feature caused by the impact of alpha-particles originating from radioactive inclusions) as well as artificial analogs produced by implantation of 8.8 MeV He2+ ions were investigated using modern micro-techniques. Additional irradiation experiments were performed using O6+ ions, electrons and gamma-rays. Ion irradiation causes yellow colouration that is strongly pleochroic, and fades at higher doses. The possibility of radiation-treatment for enhancing the quality of gem-cordierite is discussed. While samples remain crystalline up to doses of 1016 He2+/cm2, the same material is fully amorphised when irradiated with the same dose of 30 MeV O6+ ions. These different observations may help to estimate the performance assessment of cordierite-ceramics in radiated environments. A very important result concerning the petrological use of cordierite is the radio-induced transformation of channel constituents: Inside the irradiated areas the vibrational bands of CO2 decrease in intensity, whereas two new bands appear at 2135 cm-1 (both IR- and Raman-active; cf. Nasdala et al., 2006) and 1550 cm-1 (only Raman-activ). They are assigned to stretching vibrations of carbon monoxide and molecular oxygen, respectively, thus indicating a radio-chemical transformation 2CO2 → 2CO + O2 in alpha-irradiated cordierite. This study yields the first spectroscopic evidence for the irradiation-induced formation of molecular oxygen in cordierite. Polarised vibrational

  11. Overexpression of antioxidant enzymes in diaphragm muscle does not alter contraction-induced fatigue or recovery.

    PubMed

    McClung, Joseph M; Deruisseau, Keith C; Whidden, Melissa A; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan; Song, Wook; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Powers, Scott K

    2010-01-01

    Low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production are necessary to optimize muscle force production in unfatigued muscle. In contrast, sustained high levels of ROS production have been linked to impaired muscle force production and contraction-induced skeletal muscle fatigue. Using genetically engineered mice, we tested the hypothesis that the independent transgenic overexpression of catalase (CAT), copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD; SOD1) or manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD; SOD2) antioxidant enzymes would negatively affect force production in unfatigued diaphragm muscle but would delay the development of muscle fatigue and enhance force recovery after fatiguing contractions. Diaphragm muscle from wild-type littermates (WT) and from CAT, SOD1 and SOD2 overexpressing mice were subjected to an in vitro contractile protocol to investigate the force-frequency characteristics, the fatigue properties and the time course of recovery from fatigue. The CAT, SOD1 and SOD2 overexpressors produced less specific force (in N cm(-2)) at stimulation frequencies of 20-300 Hz and produced lower maximal tetanic force than WT littermates. The relative development of muscle fatigue and recovery from fatigue were not influenced by transgenic overexpression of any antioxidant enzyme. Morphologically, the mean cross-sectional area (in microm(2)) of diaphragm myofibres expressing myosin heavy chain type IIA was decreased in both CAT and SOD2 transgenic animals, and the percentage of non-contractile tissue increased in diaphragms from all transgenic mice. In conclusion, our results do not support the hypothesis that overexpression of independent antioxidant enzymes protects diaphragm muscle from contraction-induced fatigue or improves recovery from fatigue. Moreover, our data are consistent with the concept that a basal level of ROS is important to optimize muscle force production, since transgenic overexpression of major cellular antioxidants is associated with

  12. Alteration mineralogy and geochemistry as an exploration tool for detecting basement heat sources in sedimentary basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, Tonguc; Gasparon, Massimo; van Zyl, Jacobus; Wyborn, Doone

    2010-05-01

    The Cooper Basin located in South Australia and Queensland hosts some of the hottest granites in the world at economic drilling depths (240°C at 3.5 km). Investigating the mechanism of heat-producing element enrichment in the Cooper Basin granite is crucial for understanding hot-dry rock geothermal systems and developing exploration strategies. Trace element (by ICP-MS) and stable isotope geochemistry of whole rock granite samples and hydrothermal phyllosilicate alteration minerals separated from the granite and overlying sandstones and mudstones of the Cooper Basin were examined in detail. Granite core samples from relatively shallow depths in Moomba 1 and Big Lake 1 are strongly altered with pervasive sericite (illite) and quartz precipitation, probably associated with intense micro-fracturing and veining. The intensity of hydrothermal alteration is less in deeper samples from Mcleod 1, Jolokia and Habanero 1. Highly altered granites from former holes are substantially enriched in lithophile elements, particularly in Cs, Rb, Be, Th, U and rare earth elements (REE) relative to the upper continental crust (UCC). U and Th contents with concentrations of up to 30 and 144 ppm, respectively, are 10 and 13 times higher than those of the UCC. Comparison of the trace element composition of the same samples dissolved by open beaker acid digestion and high-pressure acid bomb digestion (to dissolve zircon) shows that zircon is not the main repository of U and Th in the Cooper Basin granite. Instead, we propose that the enrichment of heat-producing elements was promoted by a regional hydrothermal event leading to the precipitation of U and Th- bearing minerals such as illite, K-feldspar and thorite. Crystallinity index (illite crystallinity) of the sericite indicates hydrothermal temperatures ranging from 250°C (in Moomba 1 and Big Lake 1) to 350°C (in McLeod 1 and Jolokia 1). In the overlying sedimentary rocks, crystallinity of authigenic illites translates to lower

  13. Arsenic-induced alteration in intracellular calcium homeostasis induces head kidney macrophage apoptosis involving the activation of calpain-2 and ERK in Clarias batrachus

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Chaitali; Goswami, Ramansu; Datta, Soma; Rajagopal, R.; Mazumder, Shibnath

    2011-10-01

    We had earlier shown that exposure to arsenic (0.50 {mu}M) caused caspase-3 mediated head kidney macrophage (HKM) apoptosis involving the p38-JNK pathway in Clarias batrachus. Here we examined the roles of calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) and extra-cellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), the other member of MAPK-pathway on arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. Arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis involved increased expression of ERK and calpain-2. Nifedipine, verapamil and EGTA pre-treatment inhibited the activation of calpain-2, ERK and reduced arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis as evidenced from reduced caspase-3 activity, Annexin V-FITC-propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342 staining. Pre-incubation with ERK inhibitor U 0126 inhibited the activation of calpain-2 and interfered with arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. Additionally, pre-incubation with calpain-2 inhibitor also interfered with the activation of ERK and inhibited arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin and diphenyleneiodonium chloride also inhibited ERK activation indicating activation of ERK in arsenic-exposed HKM also depends on signals from NADPH oxidase pathway. Our study demonstrates the critical role of Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis on arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. We suggest that arsenic-induced alteration in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels initiates pro-apoptotic ERK and calpain-2; the two pathways influence each other positively and induce caspase-3 mediated HKM apoptosis. Besides, our study also indicates the role of ROS in the activation of ERK pathway in arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis in C. batrachus. - Highlights: > Altered Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis leads to arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. > Calpain-2 plays a critical role in the process. > ERK is pro-apoptotic in arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis. > Arsenic-induced HKM apoptosis involves cross talk between calpain-2 and ERK.

  14. Effects of lithium on oxidative stress and behavioral alterations induced by lisdexamfetamine dimesylate: relevance as an animal model of mania.

    PubMed

    Macêdo, Danielle S; de Lucena, David F; Queiroz, Ana Isabelle G; Cordeiro, Rafaela C; Araújo, Maíra M; Sousa, Francisca Cléa; Vasconcelos, Silvânia M; Hyphantis, Thomas N; Quevedo, João; McIntyre, Roger S; Carvalho, André F

    2013-06-01

    Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) is a prodrug that requires conversion to d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) for bioactivity. Treatment with d-AMPH induces hyperlocomotion and is regarded as a putative animal model of bipolar mania. Therefore, we sought to determine the behavioral and oxidative stress alterations induced by sub-chronic LDX administration as well as their reversal and prevention by lithium in rats. A significant increment in locomotor behavior was induced by LDX (10 and 30 mg/kg). To determine Li effects against LDX-induced alterations, in the reversal protocol rats received LDX (10 or 30 mg/kg) or saline for 14 days. Between days 8 and 14 animals received Li (47.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline. In the prevention paradigm, rats were pretreated with Li or saline prior to LDX administration. Glutathione (GSH) levels and lipid peroxidation was determined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HC) and striatum (ST) of rats. Lithium prevented LDX-induced hyperlocomotion at the doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg, but only reversed LDX-induced hyperlocomotion at dose of 10mg/kg. In addition, both doses of LDX decreased GSH content (in ST and PFC), while Li was able to reverse and prevent these alterations mainly in the PFC. LDX (10 and 30 mg/kg) increased lipid peroxidation which was reversed and prevented by Li. In conclusion, LDX-induced hyperlocomotion along with associated increments in oxidative stress show promise as an alternative animal model of mania. PMID:23333378

  15. Diabetes-Induced Decrease in Renal Oxygen Tension: Effects of an Altered Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Fredrik; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Fasching, Angelica; Hansell, Peter; Liss, Per

    During conditions with experimental diabetes mellitus, it is evident that several alterations in renal oxygen metabolism occur, including increased mitochondrial respiration and increased lactate accumulation in the renal tissue. Consequently, these alterations will contribute to decrease the interstitial pO2, preferentially in the renal medulla of animals with sustained long-term hyperglycemia.

  16. Ocean warming alters cellular metabolism and induces mortality in fish early life stages: A proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Madeira, D; Araújo, J E; Vitorino, R; Capelo, J L; Vinagre, C; Diniz, M S

    2016-07-01

    Climate change has pervasive effects on marine ecosystems, altering biodiversity patterns, abundance and distribution of species, biological interactions, phenology, and organisms' physiology, performance and fitness. Fish early life stages have narrow thermal windows and are thus more vulnerable to further changes in water temperature. The aim of this study was to address the sensitivity and underlying molecular changes of larvae of a key fisheries species, the sea bream Sparus aurata, towards ocean warming. Larvae were exposed to three temperatures: 18°C (control), 24°C (warm) and 30°C (heat wave) for seven days. At the end of the assay, i) survival curves were plotted for each temperature treatment and ii) entire larvae were collected for proteomic analysis via 2D gel electrophoresis, image analysis and mass spectrometry. Survival decreased with increasing temperature, with no larvae surviving at 30°C. Therefore, proteomic analysis was only carried out for 18°C and 24°C. Larvae up-regulated protein folding and degradation, cytoskeletal re-organization, transcriptional regulation and the growth hormone while mostly down-regulating cargo transporting and porphyrin metabolism upon exposure to heat stress. No changes were detected in proteins related to energetic metabolism suggesting that larval fish may not have the energetic plasticity needed to sustain cellular protection in the long-term. These results indicate that despite proteome modulation, S. aurata larvae do not seem able to fully acclimate to higher temperatures as shown by the low survival rates. Consequently, elevated temperatures seem to have bottleneck effects during fish early life stages, and future ocean warming can potentially compromise recruitment's success of key fisheries species. PMID:27062348

  17. Early maternal separation affects ethanol-induced conditioning in a nor-BNI insensitive manner, but does not alter ethanol-induced locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Fabio, Ma Carolina; Spear, Norman E

    2012-01-01

    Early environmental stress significantly affects the development of offspring. This stress has been modeled in rats through the maternal separation (MS) paradigm, which alters the functioning of the HPA axis and can enhance ethanol intake at adulthood. Infant rats are sensitive to ethanol's reinforcing effects, which modulate ethanol seeking and intake. Little is known about the impact of MS on sensitivity to ethanol's appetitive and aversive effects during infancy. The present study assessed ethanol-induced conditioned place preference established through second-order conditioning (SOC), spontaneous or ethanol-induced locomotor activity and ethanol intake in preweanling rats that experienced normal animal facility rearing (AFR) or daily episodes of maternal separation (MS) during postnatal days 1-13 (PDs 1-13). Low-ethanol dose (0.5 g/kg) induced appetitive conditioned place preference (via SOC) in control rats given conventional rearing but not in rats given maternal separation in early infancy, whereas 2.0 g/kg ethanol induced aversive conditioned place preference in the former but not the latter. The administration of a kappa antagonist at PD 1 or immediately before testing did not alter ethanol-induced reinforcement. High (i.e., 2.5 and 2.0 g/kg) but not low (i.e., 0.5 g/kg) ethanol dose induced reliable motor stimulation, which was independent of early maternal separation. Ethanol intake and blood alcohol levels during conditioning were unaffected by rearing conditions. Pups given early maternal separation had lower body weights than controls and showed an altered pattern of exploration when placed in an open field. These results indicate that, when assessed in infant rats, earlier maternal separation alters the balance between the appetitive and aversive motivational effects of ethanol but has no effect on the motor activating effects of the drug. PMID:22108648

  18. Evidence that disease-induced population decline changes genetic structure and alters dispersal patterns in the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Lachish, S; Miller, K J; Storfer, A; Goldizen, A W; Jones, M E

    2011-01-01

    Infectious disease has been shown to be a major cause of population declines in wild animals. However, there remains little empirical evidence on the genetic consequences of disease-mediated population declines, or how such perturbations might affect demographic processes such as dispersal. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) has resulted in the rapid decline of the Tasmanian devil, Sarcophilus harrisii, and threatens to cause extinction. Using 10 microsatellite DNA markers, we compared genetic diversity and structure before and after DFTD outbreaks in three Tasmanian devil populations to assess the genetic consequences of disease-induced population decline. We also used both genetic and demographic data to investigate dispersal patterns in Tasmanian devils along the east coast of Tasmania. We observed a significant increase in inbreeding (F(IS) pre/post-disease -0.030/0.012, P<0.05; relatedness pre/post-disease 0.011/0.038, P=0.06) in devil populations after just 2-3 generations of disease arrival, but no detectable change in genetic diversity. Furthermore, although there was no subdivision apparent among pre-disease populations (θ=0.005, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.003 to 0.017), we found significant genetic differentiation among populations post-disease (θ=0.020, 0.010-0.027), apparently driven by a combination of selection and altered dispersal patterns of females in disease-affected populations. We also show that dispersal is male-biased in devils and that dispersal distances follow a typical leptokurtic distribution. Our results show that disease can result in genetic and demographic changes in host populations over few generations and short time scales. Ongoing management of Tasmanian devils must now attempt to maintain genetic variability in this species through actions designed to reverse the detrimental effects of inbreeding and subdivision in disease-affected populations. PMID:20216571

  19. Global warming alters sound transmission: differential impact on the prey detection ability of echolocating bats

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jinhong; Koselj, Klemen; Zsebők, Sándor; Siemers, Björn M.; Goerlitz, Holger R.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change impacts the biogeography and phenology of plants and animals, yet the underlying mechanisms are little known. Here, we present a functional link between rising temperature and the prey detection ability of echolocating bats. The maximum distance for echo-based prey detection is physically determined by sound attenuation. Attenuation is more pronounced for high-frequency sound, such as echolocation, and is a nonlinear function of both call frequency and ambient temperature. Hence, the prey detection ability, and thus possibly the foraging efficiency, of echolocating bats and susceptible to rising temperatures through climate change. Using present-day climate data and projected temperature rises, we modelled this effect for the entire range of bat call frequencies and climate zones around the globe. We show that depending on call frequency, the prey detection volume of bats will either decrease or increase: species calling above a crossover frequency will lose and species emitting lower frequencies will gain prey detection volume, with crossover frequency and magnitude depending on the local climatic conditions. Within local species assemblages, this may cause a change in community composition. Global warming can thus directly affect the prey detection ability of individual bats and indirectly their interspecific interactions with competitors and prey. PMID:24335559

  20. Global warming alters sound transmission: differential impact on the prey detection ability of echolocating bats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinhong; Koselj, Klemen; Zsebok, Sándor; Siemers, Björn M; Goerlitz, Holger R

    2014-02-01

    Climate change impacts the biogeography and phenology of plants and animals, yet the underlying mechanisms are little known. Here, we present a functional link between rising temperature and the prey detection ability of echolocating bats. The maximum distance for echo-based prey detection is physically determined by sound attenuation. Attenuation is more pronounced for high-frequency sound, such as echolocation, and is a nonlinear function of both call frequency and ambient temperature. Hence, the prey detection ability, and thus possibly the foraging efficiency, of echolocating bats and susceptible to rising temperatures through climate change. Using present-day climate data and projected temperature rises, we modelled this effect for the entire range of bat call frequencies and climate zones around the globe. We show that depending on call frequency, the prey detection volume of bats will either decrease or increase: species calling above a crossover frequency will lose and species emitting lower frequencies will gain prey detection volume, with crossover frequency and magnitude depending on the local climatic conditions. Within local species assemblages, this may cause a change in community composition. Global warming can thus directly affect the prey detection ability of individual bats and indirectly their interspecific interactions with competitors and prey. PMID:24335559

  1. Real-time, label-free isothermal solid-phase amplification/detection (ISAD) device for rapid detection of genetic alteration in cancers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong; Perera, Agampodi Promoda; Kim, Kyung Woo; Park, Mi Kyoung

    2013-06-01

    Here, we first present an isothermal solid-phase amplification/detection (ISAD) technique for the detection of single-point mutations that can be performed without labelling in real-time by utilizing both silicon microring-based solid-phase amplification and isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The ISAD technique was performed on a silicon microring device with a plastic chamber containing 10 μL of the reaction mixture, and characterized with an assay for the detection of the HRAS (Harvey RAS) gene single-point mutation. For the solid-phase amplification, the primer of the gene was directly attached to the surface of the device via an amine modification reaction. The amplified DNA was detected, without a label, by measuring the optical wavelength shift of the silicon microring resonator during the reaction. We demonstrated that the sensitivity of the ISAD technique was 100-times higher than that of RPA and conventional PCR methods. Moreover, this technique can be used to distinguish a single-point mutation of the HRAS gene via target amplification. This novel DNA amplification/detection technique will be useful for the detection of sequence alterations such as mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms as DNA biomarkers in human diseases. PMID:23609609

  2. Mechanisms of flow and ACh-induced dilation in rat soleus arterioles are altered by hindlimb unweighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrage, William G.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that endothelium-dependent dilation (flow-induced dilation and ACh-induced dilation) in rat soleus muscle arterioles is impaired by hindlimb unweighting (HLU). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (approximately 300 g) were exposed to HLU or weight-bearing control (Con) conditions for 14 days. Soleus first-order (1A) and second-order (2A) arterioles were isolated, cannulated, and exposed to step increases in luminal flow at constant pressure. Flow-induced dilation was not impaired by HLU in 1A or 2A arterioles. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (Indo; 50 microM) did not alter flow-induced dilation in 1As or 2As. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA; 300 microM) reduced flow-induced dilation by 65-70% in Con and HLU 1As. In contrast, L-NNA abolished flow-induced dilation in 2As from Con rats but had no effect in HLU 2As. Combined treatment with L-NNA + Indo reduced tone in 1As and 2As from Con rats, but flow-induced dilation in the presence of L-NNA + Indo was not different from responses without inhibitors in either Con or HLU 1As or 2As. HLU also did not impair ACh-induced dilation (10(-9)-10(-4) M) in soleus 2As. L-NNA reduced ACh-induced dilation by approximately 40% in Con 2As but abolished dilation in HLU 2As. Indo did not alter ACh-induced dilation in Con or HLU 2As, whereas combined treatment with L-NNA + Indo abolished ACh-induced dilation in 2As from both groups. We conclude that flow-induced dilation (1As and 2As) was preserved after 2 wk HLU, but HLU decreased the contribution of NOS in mediating flow-induced dilation and increased the contribution of a NOS- and cyclooxygenase-independent mechanism (possibly endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor). In soleus 2As, ACh-induced dilation was preserved after 2-wk HLU but the contribution of NOS in mediating ACh-induced dilation was increased.

  3. Context-Induced Reinstatement of Methamphetamine Seeking Is Associated with Unique Molecular Alterations in Fos-Expressing Dorsolateral Striatum Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, F. Javier; Liu, Qing-Rong; Li, Xuan; Cruz, Fabio C.; Leão, Rodrigo M.; Warren, Brandon L.; Kambhampati, Sarita; Babin, Klil R.; McPherson, Kylie B.; Cimbro, Raffaello; Bossert, Jennifer M.; Shaham, Yavin

    2015-01-01

    Context-induced reinstatement of drug seeking is a well established animal model for assessing the neural mechanisms underlying context-induced drug relapse, a major factor in human drug addiction. Neural activity in striatum has previously been shown to contribute to context-induced reinstatement of heroin, cocaine, and alcohol seeking, but not yet for methamphetamine seeking. In this study, we found that context-induced reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking increased expression of the neural activity marker Fos in dorsal but not ventral striatum. Reversible inactivation of neural activity in dorsolateral but not dorsomedial striatum using the GABA agonists muscimol and baclofen decreased context-induced reinstatement. Based on our previous findings that Fos-expressing neurons play a critical role in conditioned drug effects, we assessed whether context-induced reinstatement was associated with molecular alterations selectively induced within context-activated Fos-expressing neurons. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate reinstatement-activated Fos-positive neurons from Fos-negative neurons in dorsal striatum and used quantitative PCR to assess gene expression within these two populations of neurons. Context-induced reinstatement was associated with increased expression of the immediate early genes Fos and FosB and the NMDA receptor subunit gene Grin2a in only Fos-positive neurons. RNAscope in situ hybridization confirmed that Grin2a, as well as Grin2b, expression were increased in only Fos-positive neurons from dorsolateral, but not dorsomedial, striatum. Our results demonstrate an important role of dorsolateral striatum in context-induced reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking and that this reinstatement is associated with unique gene alterations in Fos-expressing neurons. PMID:25855177

  4. Congenital Hypothyroidism with Neurological and Respiratory Alterations: A Case Detected Using a Variable Diagnostic Threshold for TSH

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Jesús; Castro-Feijoo, Lidia; Colón, Cristóbal; Cabanas, Paloma; Heredia, Claudia; Castaño, Luis Antonio; Gómez-Lado, Carmen; Couce, M.Luz; Pombo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) with neurological and respiratory alterations due to a heterozygotic c.374-1G > A mutation of TITF1/NKX2-1. The hypothyroidism was detected using a neonatal screening protocol in which the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) threshold is re-set each day on the basis of within-day variability and between-day variation. In this case, the threshold on the day of the initial analysis was 8.2 mIU/L, and the measured TSH level in heel-prick blood was 8.3 mIU/L. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22155464

  5. Congenital hypothyroidism with neurological and respiratory alterations: a case detected using a variable diagnostic threshold for TSH.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Jesús; Alonso-Fernández, Jóse Ramón; Castro-Feijoo, Lidia; Colón, Cristóbal; Cabanas, Paloma; Heredia, Claudia; Castaño, Luis Antonio; Gómez-Lado, Carmen; Couce, M Luz; Pombo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) with neurological and respiratory alterations due to a heterozygotic c.374-1G > A mutation of TITF1/NKX2-1. The hypothyroidism was detected using a neonatal screening protocol in which the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) threshold is re-set each day on the basis of within-day variability and between-day variation. In this case, the threshold on the day of the initial analysis was 8.2 mIU/L, and the measured TSH level in heel-prick blood was 8.3 mIU/L. PMID:22155464

  6. Assessment of altered binding specificity of bacteriophage for ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongjin; Jo, Ara; Ding, Tian; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Ahn, Juhee

    2016-08-01

    This study describes a new effort toward understanding the interaction mechanisms between antibiotic-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium and phages. The antibiotic susceptibility, β-lactamase activity, bacterial motility, gene expression, and lytic activity were evaluated in ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella Typhimurium (ASST(CIP)) and ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-resistant S. Typhimurium (ARST(CIP)), which were compared to the wild-type strains (ASST(WT) and ARST(WT)). The MIC values of ampicillin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline were significantly increased to > 512, 16, 16, and 256 μg/ml, respectively, in the ARST(CIP). The lowest and highest extracellular lactamase activities were observed in ASST(WT) (6.85 μmol/min/ml) and ARST(CIP) (48.83 μmol/min/ml), respectively. The acrA, lpfE, and hilA genes were significantly upregulated by more than tenfold in both ASST(CIP) and ARST(CIP). The induction of multiple antibiotic resistance resulted from the increased efflux pump activity (AcrAB-TolC). The highest phage adsorption rates were more than 95 % for ASST(WT), ASST(CIP), and ARST(WT), while the lowest adsorption rate was 52 % for ARST(CIP) at 15 min of infection. The least lytic activity of phage was 20 % against the ARST(CIP), followed by ASST(CIP) (30 %). The adsorption rate of phage against ARST(CIP) was 52 % at 15 min of infection, which resulted in the decrease in lytic activity (12 %). Understanding the interaction of phage and bacteria is essential for the practical application of phage to control and detect antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The results provide useful information for understanding the binding specificity of phages for multiple antibiotic-resistant pathogens. PMID:27000396

  7. Altered expression of hypoxia-Inducible factor-1α participates in the epileptogenesis in animal models.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Jiang, Guohui; Chen, Yalan; Chen, Ling; Li, Zengyou; Wang, Zhihua; Wang, Xuefeng

    2014-09-01

    Although epilepsy is a common neurological disorder, its mechanism(s) are still not completely understood. Hypoxia can lead to neuronal cell death and angiogenesis, and the same mechanisms were also found in epilepsy. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is an important transcription protein that regulates gene expression in the brain and other tissues in response to decreases in oxygen availability. However, little is known regarding the expression of HIF-1α in the epileptic brain and whether HIF-1α interventions affect the epileptic process. The aims of this study are to investigate the expression profile of HIF-1α in rat models and to explore the role of HIF-1α in epilepsy. We performed Western blots and immunofluorescence in a lithium-pilocarpine rat epilepsy model. To determine the role of HIF-1α in epilepsy, we used the HIF-1α agonist DMOG and inhibitor KC7F2 to detect changes in the animal behavior in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) and lithium-pilocarpine epilepsy models. The expression of HIF-1α was significantly increased after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. DMOG significantly prolonged the latent period in the PTZ kindling model and decreased the rate of spontaneous recurrent seizures during the chronic stage in the lithium-pilocarpine model. Conversely, the inhibitor KC7F2 produced an opposite behavioral change. Interestingly, both KC7F2 and DMOG had no effect on the acute stage of pilocarpine model and PTZ convulsive model. Our study suggests that upregulated HIF-1α may be involved in the process of epileptogenesis but not in the acute stage of epilepsy. The modulation of HIF-1α may offer a novel therapeutic target in epilepsy. PMID:24889205

  8. Detection of TTV in peripheral blood cells from patients with altered ALT and AST levels.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Jaqueline Carvalho; Nasser, Thiago Franco; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Aoki, Mateus Nóbrega; Carneiro, Juliana Laino do Val; Barbosa, Décio Sabbatini; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2008-04-01

    This work analyzes the prevalence of TTV DNA in peripheral blood cells from patients with hepatic alterations and healthy blood donors and measures levels of sodium, potassium, urea, creatinine, phosphatase alkaline, total and direct bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in certain randomly selected patients. DNA samples from 111 individuals were evaluated. They were divided into two groups, "A" (study) and "B" (control), including 54 patients with liver enzyme alterations (ALT/AST) presenting non-B-non-C hepatitis and 57 blood donors, respectively. TTV DNA was determined by nested PCR. Certain products of the second-round PCR were sequenced. Serum biochemical assay was performed and disclosed TTV in 31.48% (17/54) of patients in group A and 5.26% (3/57) in the control group B. TTV prevalence was significantly higher in patients with liver disease than in healthy donors. In group A, sodium, potassium, urea, creatinine, phosphatase alkaline, total and direct bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were analyzed in certain randomly selected patients and no significant difference in biochemical levels (p>0.05) was found when TTV infected and noninfected individuals were compared. Knowledge related to TTV has rapidly increased, but many fundamental aspects remain unclear. This led us to question the role of TTV and doubt remains as to whether or not it is just a commensal virus. Further studies are necessary to confirm and extend these findings. PMID:18623984

  9. What's in your buffer? Solute altered millisecond motions detected by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Wong, Madeline; Khirich, Gennady; Loria, J Patrick

    2013-09-17

    To date, little work has been conducted on the relationship between solute and buffer molecules and conformational exchange motion in enzymes. This study uses solution NMR to examine the effects of phosphate, sulfate, and acetate in comparison to MES- and HEPES-buffered references on the chemical shift perturbation and millisecond, chemical, or conformational exchange motions in the enzyme ribonuclease A (RNase A), triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) and HisF. The results indicate that addition of these solutes has a small effect on (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts for RNase A and TIM but a significant effect for HisF. For RNase A and TIM, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiments, however, show significant solute-dependent changes in conformational exchange motions. Some residues show loss of millisecond motions relative to the reference sample upon addition of solute, whereas others experience an enhancement. Comparison of exchange parameters obtained from fits of dispersion data indicates changes in either or both equilibrium populations and chemical shifts between conformations. Furthermore, the exchange kinetics are altered in many cases. The results demonstrate that common solute molecules can alter observed enzyme millisecond motions and play a more active role than what is routinely believed. PMID:23991940

  10. Renal alterations in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats: a natural model of lentivirus-induced renal disease changes.

    PubMed

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  11. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  12. Exposure to low-dose (56)Fe-ion radiation induces long-term epigenetic alterations in mouse bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Miousse, Isabelle R; Shao, Lijian; Chang, Jianhui; Feng, Wei; Wang, Yingying; Allen, Antiño R; Turner, Jennifer; Stewart, Blair; Raber, Jacob; Zhou, Daohong; Koturbash, Igor

    2014-07-01

    There is an increasing need to better understand the long-term health effects of high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation due to exposure during space missions, as well as its increasing use in clinical treatments. Previous studies have indicated that exposure to (56)Fe heavy ions increases the incidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in mice but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Epigenetic alterations play a role in radiation-induced genomic instability and the initiation and progression of AML. In this study, we assessed the effects of low-dose (56)Fe-ion irradiation on epigenetic alterations in bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) and hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells (HPSCs). Exposure to (56)Fe ions (600 MeV, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 Gy) resulted in significant epigenetic alterations involving methylation of DNA, the DNA methylation machinery and expression of repetitive elements. Four weeks after irradiation, these changes were primarily confined to HPSCs and were exhibited as dose-dependent hypermethylation of LINE1 and SINE B1 repetitive elements [4.2-fold increase in LINE1 (P < 0.001) and 7.6-fold increase in SINE B1 (P < 0.01) after exposure to 0.4 Gy; n = 5]. Epigenetic alterations were persistent and detectable for at least 22 weeks after exposure, when significant loss of global DNA hypomethylation (1.9-fold, P < 0.05), decreased expression of Dnmt1 (1.9-fold, P < 0.01), and increased expression of LINE1 and SINE B1 repetitive elements (2.8-fold, P < 0.001 for LINE1 and 1.9-fold, P < 0.05 for SINE B1; n = 5) were observed after exposure to 0.4 Gy. In contrast, exposure to (56)Fe ions did not result in accumulation of increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage, exhibited as DNA strand breaks. Furthermore, no significant alterations in cellular senescence and apoptosis were detected in HPSCs after exposure to (56)Fe-ion radiation. These findings suggest that epigenetic reprogramming is possibly involved in

  13. Exposure to Low-Dose 56Fe-Ion Radiation Induces Long-Term Epigenetic Alterations in Mouse Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Progenitor and Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jianhui; Feng, Wei; Wang, Yingying; Allen, Antiño R.; Turner, Jennifer; Stewart, Blair; Raber, Jacob; Zhou, Daohong

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing need to better understand the long-term health effects of high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation due to exposure during space missions, as well as its increasing use in clinical treatments. Previous studies have indicated that exposure to 56Fe heavy ions increases the incidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in mice but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Epigenetic alterations play a role in radiation-induced genomic instability and the initiation and progression of AML. In this study, we assessed the effects of low-dose 56Fe-ion irradiation on epigenetic alterations in bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) and hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells (HPSCs). Exposure to 56Fe ions (600 MeV, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 Gy) resulted in significant epigenetic alterations involving methylation of DNA, the DNA methylation machinery and expression of repetitive elements. Four weeks after irradiation, these changes were primarily confined to HPSCs and were exhibited as dose-dependent hypermethylation of LINE1 and SINE B1 repetitive elements [4.2-fold increase in LINE1 (P < 0.001) and 7.6-fold increase in SINE B1 (P < 0.01) after exposure to 0.4 Gy; n = 5]. Epigenetic alterations were persistent and detectable for at least 22 weeks after exposure, when significant loss of global DNA hypomethylation (1.9-fold, P < 0.05), decreased expression of Dnmt1 (1.9-fold, P < 0.01), and increased expression of LINE1 and SINE B1 repetitive elements (2.8-fold, P < 0.001 for LINE1 and 1.9-fold, P < 0.05 for SINE B1; n = 5) were observed after exposure to 0.4 Gy. In contrast, exposure to 56Fe ions did not result in accumulation of increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage, exhibited as DNA strand breaks. Furthermore, no significant alterations in cellular senescence and apoptosis were detected in HPSCs after exposure to 56Fe-ion radiation. These findings suggest that epigenetic reprogramming is possibly involved in the

  14. Distillery effluent induced alterations in the haematological profile of fingerlings of Colisa fasciatus.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Anuradha; Shukla, J P

    2013-09-01

    Present study deals with the impact of Gorakhpur distillery effluent at various concentration levels (5, 10 and 20%) on the blood profile of fingerling of, Colisa fosciotus after 30 days of exposure. Observations revealed that 5% of effluent concentration produced no significant alterations in various haematological parameters except for clotting time and immature erythrocytes. However, 10% of effluent concentration brought significant alterations in hematocrit as well as clotting time and 20% of effluent concentration produced highly significant (P<0.001) alteration in most of the haematological parameters except for hemoglobin percentage. PMID:24558806

  15. Detecting blast-induced infrasound in wind noise.

    PubMed

    Howard, Wheeler B; Dillion, Kevin L; Shields, F Douglas

    2010-03-01

    Current efforts seek to monitor and investigate such naturally occurring events as volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, bolides entering the atmosphere, earthquakes, and tsunamis by the infrasound they generate. Often, detection of the infrasound signal is limited by the masking effect of wind noise. This paper describes the use of a distributed array to detect infrasound signals from four atmospheric detonations at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, USA in 2006. Three of the blasts occurred during times of low wind noise and were easily observed with array processing techniques. One blast was obscured by high wind conditions. The results of signal processing are presented that allowed localization of the blast-induced signals in the presence of wind noise in the array response. PMID:20329823

  16. CEST-MRI detects metabolite levels altered by breast cancer cell aggressiveness and chemotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kannie W Y; Jiang, Lu; Cheng, Menglin; Wijnen, Jannie P; Liu, Guanshu; Huang, Peng; van Zijl, Peter C M; McMahon, Michael T; Glunde, Kristine

    2016-06-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is an MRI contrast mechanism that detects the exchange of protons from distinct hydroxyl, amine, and amide groups to tissue water through the transfer of signal loss, with repeated exchange enhancing their effective signal. We applied CEST to detect systematically 15 common cellular metabolites in a panel of differentially aggressive human breast cancer cell lines. The highest CEST contrast was generated by creatine, myo-inositol, glutamate, and glycerophosphocholine, whose cellular concentrations decreased with increasing breast cancer aggressiveness. These decreased metabolite concentrations resulted in turn in a decreased CEST profile with increasing breast cancer aggressiveness in water-soluble extracts of breast cell lines. Treatment of both breast cancer cell lines with the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin resulted in increased metabolic CEST profiles, which correlated with significant increases in creatine, phosphocreatine, and glycerophosphocholine. CEST can detect breast cancer aggressiveness and response to chemotherapy in water-soluble extracts of breast cell lines. The presented results help shed light on possible contributions from CEST-active metabolites to the CEST contrast produced by breast cancers. The metabolic CEST profile may improve detection sensitivity over conventional MRS, and may have the potential to assess breast cancer aggressiveness and response to chemotherapy non-invasively using MRI if specialized metabolic CEST profile detection can be realized in vivo. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27100284

  17. Anthropogenically induced adaptation to invade (AIAI): contemporary adaptation to human-altered habitats within the native range can promote invasions

    PubMed Central

    Hufbauer, Ruth A; Facon, Benoît; Ravigné, Virginie; Turgeon, Julie; Foucaud, Julien; Lee, Carol E; Rey, Olivier; Estoup, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive evolution is currently accepted as playing a significant role in biological invasions. Adaptations relevant to invasions are typically thought to occur either recently within the introduced range, as an evolutionary response to novel selection regimes, or within the native range, because of long-term adaptation to the local environment. We propose that recent adaptation within the native range, in particular adaptations to human-altered habitat, could also contribute to the evolution of invasive populations. Populations adapted to human-altered habitats in the native range are likely to increase in abundance within areas frequented by humans and associated with human transport mechanisms, thus enhancing the likelihood of transport to a novel range. Given that habitats are altered by humans in similar ways worldwide, as evidenced by global environmental homogenization, propagules from populations adapted to human-altered habitats in the native range should perform well within similarly human-altered habitats in the novel range. We label this scenario ‘Anthropogenically Induced Adaptation to Invade’. We illustrate how it differs from other evolutionary processes that may occur during invasions, and how it can help explain accelerating rates of invasions. PMID:25568032

  18. Anthropogenically induced adaptation to invade (AIAI): contemporary adaptation to human-altered habitats within the native range can promote invasions.

    PubMed

    Hufbauer, Ruth A; Facon, Benoît; Ravigné, Virginie; Turgeon, Julie; Foucaud, Julien; Lee, Carol E; Rey, Olivier; Estoup, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive evolution is currently accepted as playing a significant role in biological invasions. Adaptations relevant to invasions are typically thought to occur either recently within the introduced range, as an evolutionary response to novel selection regimes, or within the native range, because of long-term adaptation to the local environment. We propose that recent adaptation within the native range, in particular adaptations to human-altered habitat, could also contribute to the evolution of invasive populations. Populations adapted to human-altered habitats in the native range are likely to increase in abundance within areas frequented by humans and associated with human transport mechanisms, thus enhancing the likelihood of transport to a novel range. Given that habitats are altered by humans in similar ways worldwide, as evidenced by global environmental homogenization, propagules from populations adapted to human-altered habitats in the native range should perform well within similarly human-altered habitats in the novel range. We label this scenario 'Anthropogenically Induced Adaptation to Invade'. We illustrate how it differs from other evolutionary processes that may occur during invasions, and how it can help explain accelerating rates of invasions. PMID:25568032

  19. Alterations in the glutathione metabolism could be implicated in the ischemia-induced small intestinal cell damage in horses

    PubMed Central

    Marañón, Gonzalo; Manley, William; Cayado, Patricia; García, Cruz; de la Muela, Mercedes Sánchez; Vara, Elena

    2009-01-01

    Background Colic could be accompanied by changes in the morphology and physiology of organs and tissues, such as the intestine. This process might be, at least in part, due to the accumulation of oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), secondary to intestinal ischemia. Glutathione (GSH), being the major intracellular thiol, provides protection against oxidative injury. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ischemia-induced intestinal injury could be related with alterations in GSH metabolism. Results Ischemia induced a significant increase in lipid hydroperoxides, nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, and a reduction in reduced glutathione, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, as well as in methionine-adenosyl-transferase and methyl-transferase activities. Conclusion Our results suggest that ischemia induces harmful effects on equine small intestine, probably due to an increase in oxidative damage and proinflammatory molecules. This effect could be mediated, at least in part, by impairment in glutathione metabolism. PMID:19296836

  20. Microcystin-LR induces abnormal root development by altering microtubule organization in tissue-cultured common reed (Phragmites australis) plantlets.

    PubMed

    Máthé, Csaba; Beyer, Dániel; Erdodi, Ferenc; Serfozo, Zoltán; Székvölgyi, Lóránt; Vasas, Gábor; M-Hamvas, Márta; Jámbrik, Katalin; Gonda, Sándor; Kiss, Andrea; Szigeti, Zsuzsa M; Surányi, Gyula

    2009-05-01

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is a heptapeptide cyanotoxin, known to be a potent inhibitor of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases in eukaryotes. Our aim was to investigate the effect of MC-LR on the organization of microtubules and mitotic chromatin in relation to its possible effects on cell and whole organ morphology in roots of common reed (Phragmites australis). P. australis is a widespread freshwater and brackish water aquatic macrophyte, frequently exposed to phytotoxins in eutrophic waters. Reed plantlets regenerated from embryogenic calli were treated with 0.001-40 microg ml(-1) (0.001-40.2 microM) MC-LR for 2-20 days. At 0.5 microg ml(-1) MC-LR and at higher cyanotoxin concentrations, the inhibition of protein phosphatase activity by MC-LR induced alterations in reed root growth and morphology, including abnormal lateral root development and the radial swelling of cells in the elongation zone of primary and lateral roots. Both short-term (2-5 days) and long-term (10-20 days) of cyanotoxin treatment induced microtubule disruption in meristems and in the elongation and differentiation zones. Microtubule disruption was accompanied by root cell shape alteration. At concentrations of 0.5-5 microg ml(-1), MC-LR increased mitotic index at long-term exposure and induced the increase of the percentage of meristematic cells in prophase as well as telophase and cytokinesis of late mitosis. High cyanotoxin concentrations (10-40 microg ml(-1)) inhibited mitosis at as short as 2 days of exposure. The alteration of microtubule organization was observed in mitotic cells at all exposure periods studied, at cyanotoxin concentrations of 0.5-40 microg ml(-1). MC-LR induced spindle anomalies at the metaphase-anaphase transition, the formation of asymmetric anaphase spindles and abnormal sister chromatid separation. This paper reports for the first time that MC-LR induces cytoskeletal changes that lead to alterations of root architecture and development in common reed and generally, in

  1. Tunicamycin-Induced Alterations in the Vasorelaxant Response in Organ-Cultured Superior Mesenteric Arteries of Rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takayuki; Ando, Makoto; Watanabe, Shun; Iguchi, Maika; Nagata, Mako; Kobayashi, Shota; Taguchi, Kumiko; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In cellular events, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has an important role in the development of various diseases including cardiovascular diseases. Tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation, is known to be an inducer of ER stress. However, the extent to which tunicamycin affects the vasorelaxant function is not completely understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of tunicamycin on relaxations induced by various vasorelaxant agents, including acetylcholine (ACh; endothelium-dependent vasodilator), sodium nitroprusside (SNP; endothelium-independent vasodilator), isoprenaline (ISO; beta-adrenoceptor agonist), forskolin (FSK; adenylyl cyclase activator), and cromakalim [ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel activator] in organ-cultured superior mesenteric arteries of rats, which are treated with either a vehicle [dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)] or tunicamycin (20 µg/mL for 22-24 h). Protein levels of the ER stress marker binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) were determined by Western blotting. Tunicamycin increased the expression of BiP in organ-cultured arteries. Tunicamycin impaired ACh-induced relaxation, but did not alter SNP-induced relaxation. Tunicamycin also impaired vasorelaxation induced by ISO, FSK, and cromakalim; moreover, it reduced basal nitric oxide (NO) formation. In conclusion, short-term treatment with tunicamycin not only caused endothelial dysfunction but also impaired cAMP- and KATP-mediated responses in the superior mesenteric arteries of rats. These alterations in tunicamycin-treated arteries may be due to reduced basal NO formation. This work provides new insight into ER stress in vascular dysfunction. PMID:27582328

  2. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity alters blood pressure response to angiotensin II administration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Aghdas; Saberi, Shadan; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cisplatin (CP) is an effective chemotherapeutic drug used in the clinic, which is accompanied with nephrotoxicity. CP may also disturb hemodynamics of the circulation system. We have tested the role of CP in mean arterial pressure (MAP) response to graded angiotensin (Ang) II infusion in rats. Materials and Methods: Male and female rats were treated with CP (2.5 mg/kg/day) for a period of 1-week and compared with the vehicle-treated animals. The blood pressure response to Ang II (100–1000 ng/kg/min) was determined under the anesthesia condition. Endothelial permeability of aorta was measured according to the Evans blue uptake. The kidney tissue was also subjected to histological investigation. Results: Significant increase in serum levels of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine and pathological findings in CP-treated rats verified CP-induced nephrotoxicity. Significant difference in percentage of change in MAP response to Ang II between male and female rats was detected in vehicle-treated groups (P < 0.05) while in CP-treated animals this response difference was not observed. The groups were not significantly different with regard to the endothelial permeability of aorta while the serum level of nitrite in male rats increased significantly following administration of CP (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It seems the different response in percentage of change of MAP to graded Ang II infusion between male and female indicates the effect of CP on renin Ang system parameters. PMID:27110550

  3. The fungicide imazalil induces developmental abnormalities and alters locomotor activity during early developmental stages in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Zhu, Zhihong; Wang, Yueyi; Yang, Enlu; Feng, Xiayan; Fu, Zhengwei

    2016-06-01

    The fungicide imazalil (IMZ) is used extensively to protect vegetable fields, fruit plantations and post-harvest crops from rot. Likely due to its wide-spread use, IMZ is frequently detected in vegetable, fruit, soil and even surface water samples. Even though several previous studies have reported on the neurotoxicity of IMZ, its effects on the neurobehavior of zebrafish have received little attention to date. In this study, we show that the heartbeat and hatchability of zebrafish were significantly influenced by IMZ concentrations of 300 μg L(-1) or higher. Moreover, in zebrafish larvae, locomotor behaviors such as average swimming speed and swimming distance were significantly decreased after exposure to 300 μg L(-1) IMZ for 96 h, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) expression and activity were consistently inhibited in IMZ-treated fish. Our results further suggest that IMZ could act as a neuroendocrine disruptor by decreasing the expression of neurotoxicity-related genes such as Glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap), Myelin basic protein (Mbp) and Sonic hedgehog a (Shha) during early developmental stages of zebrafish. In conclusion, we show that exposure to IMZ has the potential to induce developmental toxicity and locomotor behavior abnormalities during zebrafish development. PMID:27035382

  4. Neuroprotection induced by post-conditioning following ischemia/reperfusion in mice is associated with altered microRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Miao, Wei; Bao, Tian-Hao; Han, Jian-Hong; Yin, Mei; Zhang, Jie; Yan, Yong; Zhu, Yu-Hong

    2016-09-01

    Ischemic preconditioning and ischemic postconditioning (IPostC) represent promising strategies to reduce ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and attenuate the lethal ischemic damage following stroke. However, the mechanism underlying this attenuation remains to be elucidated. It was hypothesized that alterations in microRNA (miRNA) expression in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice following I/R is associated with the functional improvement induced by IPostC. Behavioral changes were assessed in a mouse model of I/R in the absence or presence of IPostC, followed by microarray analyses to investigate the expressional alterations of miRNAs in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. The results of the present study revealed that IPostC abrogated the neurological impairment and hippocampus‑associated cognitive deficits induced by I/R, and upregulated or downregulated the expression levels of numerous miRNAs. Furthermore, the upregulation of miR‑19a, and the downregulation of miR‑1, let‑7f and miR‑124 expression levels following IPostC was confirmed utilizing reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study demonstrated that alterations in miRNA expression in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice following I/R was associated with the neuroprotection induced by IPostC. PMID:27485299

  5. Aluminium induced structural, metabolic alterations and protective effects of desferrioxamine in the brain tissue of mice: An FTIR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, S.; Sivasubramanian, J.; Raja, B.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we intended to made a new approach to evaluate aluminium induced metabolic changes in mice brain tissue using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results demonstrate that FTIR can successfully indicate the molecular changes that occur in all groups. The overall findings demonstrate the alterations on the major biochemical constituents, such as lipids, proteins and nucleic acids of the brain tissues of mice. The significant decrease in the area value of amide A peak and Olefinicdbnd CH stretching band suggests an alteration in the protein profile and lipid levels due to aluminium exposure, respectively. The significant shift in the amide I and amide II protein peaks may indicate the progression of aluminium induced Alzheimer's disease. Further the administration of DFO significantly improved the level of protein and brought back the amide I and II peaks nearer to the control value. Histopathological results also revealed impairment of Aluminium induced alterations in brain tissue. The results of the FTIR study were found to be in agreement with biochemical studies.

  6. Altered expression of KCC2 in GABAergic interneuron contributes prenatal stress-induced epileptic spasms in infant rat.

    PubMed

    Baek, Hyunjung; Yi, Min-Hee; Pandit, Sudip; Park, Jin Bong; Kwon, Hyeok Hee; Zhang, Enji; Kim, Sena; Shin, Nara; Kim, Eunjee; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Yonghyun; Kim, Dong Woon; Kang, Joon Won

    2016-07-01

    Long-term stress during pregnancy causes neurologic deficits to offspring with altered gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system in the brain. However, it is not clear how prenatal stress affects the maturing GABAergic interneurons and the resulting abnormalities in infantile seizures. Here, we showed that prenatal stress alters the maturation of GABA inhibitory system using a seizure model induced by prenatal stress. Prenatal stress with betamethasone or acute immobilization stress (AIS) on gestational day 15 increased the seizure susceptibility to N-methyl-d-aspartate-triggered spasms on postnatal day 15. The expression of GABA was lower in the prenatally stressed group, which compromise the decrease of glutamate decarboxylase 67-immunopositive cells. Prenatal stress markedly decreased the expression of K(+)/Cl(-) co-transporter (KCC2) in the cortex. GABA induced membrane depolarization demonstrated prenatal stress models had significant higher membrane depolarization compared to control. GABA increased KCC2 expression in cultured cortex-containing slices. Taken together, our results showed that prenatal stress with betamethasone or AIS altered the maturation of GABAergic progenitors and resulted in the lack of GABA input, which in turn, decreased KCC2 expression and lowered seizure threshold. We conclude that delayed GABA excitatory/inhibitory shift would render the cortical neuronal circuit more susceptible to excitatory input in prenatal stress induced seizure. PMID:27180051

  7. Investigation of Chitosan for Prevention of Diabetic Progression Through Gut Microbiota Alteration in Sugar Rich Diet Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Bhumika; Rajput, Parth; Jena, Prasant Kumar; Seshadri, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Sugar rich diet induces inflammation and insulin resistance mainly through gut microbiota alteration. Gut microflora dysbiosis increases plasma lipopolysaccharide and reduces short chain fatty acids to impair the insulin signaling cascades by different molecular pathways to progress into diabetes. Chitosan based formulations have major significance in insulin delivery system due to their ability to protect the insulin from enzymatic degradation and its efficient inter-epithelial transport. This study was designed to investigate the effect of chitosan administration on gut microflora mediated signaling pathways to prevent the diet induced diabetes. Male wistar rats were divided into non-diabetic group with a normal diet (CD), diabetic group with high sucrose diet (HSD) and treatment group with HSD and chitosan (60 mg/kg). After 8 weeks of the study, significant alterations in two major gut dominant microbial phyla i.e Firmicutes and Bacteroides and four dominant microbial species i.e. Lactobacilli, Bifidobacteria, Escherichia and Clostridia were observed in HSD group compared to CD. This microbial dysbiosis in dominant phyla was significantly prevented in chitosan administrated HSD group. Chitosan administration had also reduced the HSD induced activation of Toll like receptors and Nod like receptors signaling pathways compared to HSD control group to reduce the inflammation. These suggest that chitosan can prevent the progression of Type 2 Diabetes through gut microbiota alteration, reducing endotoxin and microbes mediated inflammation. PMID:26511978

  8. Neuroprotection induced by post-conditioning following ischemia/reperfusion in mice is associated with altered microRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Wei; Bao, Tian-Hao; Han, Jian-Hong; Yin, Mei; Zhang, Jie; Yan, Yong; Zhu, Yu-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning and ischemic postconditioning (IPostC) represent promising strategies to reduce ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and attenuate the lethal ischemic damage following stroke. However, the mechanism underlying this attenuation remains to be elucidated. It was hypothesized that alterations in microRNA (miRNA) expression in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice following I/R is associated with the functional improvement induced by IPostC. Behavioral changes were assessed in a mouse model of I/R in the absence or presence of IPostC, followed by microarray analyses to investigate the expressional alterations of miRNAs in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. The results of the present study revealed that IPostC abrogated the neurological impairment and hippocampus-associated cognitive deficits induced by I/R, and upregulated or downregulated the expression levels of numerous miRNAs. Furthermore, the upregulation of miR-19a, and the downregulation of miR-1, let-7f and miR-124 expression levels following IPostC was confirmed utilizing reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study demonstrated that alterations in miRNA expression in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice following I/R was associated with the neuroprotection induced by IPostC. PMID:27485299

  9. Neuropsychological evaluation for detecting alterations in the central nervous system after chemical exposure.

    PubMed

    Bolla, K I

    1996-08-01

    Individuals with multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) report decreased attention/concentration, memory loss, disorientation, confusion, fatigue, depression, irritability, decreased libido, sleep disturbances, headaches, and weakness. These neurobehavioral symptoms represent possible alterations in the central nervous system (CNS). The evaluation of neurobehavioral functioning using neuropsychological techniques provides an indirect method for determining the integrity of the CNS. However, caution must be used in interpreting neuropsychological test results, since this technique is extremely sensitive but is not specific. Clinically significant aberrant test performance may be noted after chemical exposure as well as with other diseases of the CNS. In addition, neuropsychiatric conditions such as anxiety and depression are often manifested as cognitive difficulties that are similar in pattern to the cognitive dysfunction caused by toxic chemicals. Herein, limitations and cautions in the interpretations of neuropsychological test results are discussed. PMID:8921555

  10. Estrogen-induced breast cancer: Alterations in breast morphology and oxidative stress as a function of estrogen exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Mense, Sarah M.; Remotti, Fabrizio; Bhan, Ashima; Singh, Bhupendra; El-Tamer, Mahmoud; Hei, Tom K.; Bhat, Hari K.

    2008-10-01

    mammary tissue from age-matched animals. Similarly, alterations in glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities were detected in both mammary and tumor tissue from E{sub 2}-treated rats. Taken together, our data reveal that proliferative changes in the breast tissue of ACI rats are associated with increases in 8-isoPGF{sub 2{alpha}} formation as well as changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes. These oxidative changes appear to be a function of E{sub 2} exposure and occur prior to tumor development.

  11. Exploratory Simulation Studies of Caprock Alteration Induced byStorage of CO2 in Depleted Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Gherardi, Fabrizio; Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-11-23

    This report presents numerical simulations of isothermalreactive flows which might be induced in the caprock of an Italiandepleted gas reservoir by the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.Our objective is to verify that CO2 geological disposal activitiesalready planned for the study area are safe and do not induce anyundesired environmental impact.Gas-water-rock interactions have beenmodelled under two different intial conditions, i.e., assuming that i)caprock is perfectly sealed, or ii) partially fractured. Field conditionsare better approximated in terms of the "sealed caprock model". Thefractured caprock model has been implemented because it permits toexplore the geochemical beahvior of the system under particularly severeconditions which are not currently encountered in the field, and then todelineate a sort of hypothetical maximum risk scenario.Major evidencessupporting the assumption of a sealed caprock stem from the fact that nogas leakages have been detected during the exploitation phase, subsequentreservoir repressurization due to the ingression of a lateral aquifer,and during several cycles of gas storage in the latest life of reservoirmanagement.An extensive program of multidisciplinary laboratory tests onrock properties, geochemical and microseismic monitoring, and reservoirsimulation studies is underway to better characterize the reservoir andcap-rock behavior before the performance of a planned CO2 sequestrationpilot test.In our models, fluid flow and mineral alteration are inducedin the caprock by penetration of high CO2 concentrations from theunderlying reservoir, i.e., it was assumed that large amounts of CO2 havebeen already injected at depth. The main focus is on the potential effectof these geochemical transformations on the sealing efficiency of caprockformations. Batch and multi-dimensional 1D and 2D modeling has been usedto investigate multicomponent geochemical processes. Our simulationsaccount for fracture-matrix interactions, gas

  12. Sensitive detection of chromatin-altering polymorphisms reveals autoimmune disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, Ricardo Cruz-Herrera; Poschmann, Jeremie; Rouam, Sigrid Laure; Png, Eileen; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Prabhakar, Shyam

    2015-05-01

    Most disease associations detected by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) lie outside coding genes, but very few have been mapped to causal regulatory variants. Here, we present a method for detecting regulatory quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that does not require genotyping or whole-genome sequencing. The method combines deep, long-read chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) with a statistical test that simultaneously scores peak height correlation and allelic imbalance: the genotype-independent signal correlation and imbalance (G-SCI) test. We performed histone acetylation ChIP-seq on 57 human lymphoblastoid cell lines and used the resulting reads to call 500,066 single-nucleotide polymorphisms de novo within regulatory elements. The G-SCI test annotated 8,764 of these as histone acetylation QTLs (haQTLs)—an order of magnitude larger than the set of candidates detected by expression QTL analysis. Lymphoblastoid haQTLs were highly predictive of autoimmune disease mechanisms. Thus, our method facilitates large-scale regulatory variant detection in any moderately sized cohort for which functional profiling data can be generated, thereby simplifying identification of causal variants within GWAS loci. PMID:25799442

  13. Kainate-induced epileptogenesis alters circular hole board learning strategy but not the performance of C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Hubens, Chantal J; Kaptein, Pascale S; ter Horst, Judith P; Voskuyl, Rob A; Schenk, Geert J

    2014-12-01

    Patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) frequently show cognitive deficits. However, the relation between mTLE and cognitive impairment is poorly understood. To gain more insight into epilepsy-associated alterations in cognitive performance, we studied the spatial learning of C57BL/6J mice five weeks after kainate-induced status epilepticus (SE). Typically, structural hippocampal rearrangements take place within five weeks after SE. Mice were monitored by exposing them to four tasks with a focus on spatial memory and anxiety: the circular hole board, modified hole board, novel object-placement task, and elevated plus maze. On the circular hole board, animals showed a higher preference for hippocampus-independent strategies after SE. In contrast, no change in strategy was seen on the modified hole board, but animals with SE were able to finish the task more often. Animals did not have an increased preference for a relocated object in the novel object-placement task but showed an increased locomotion after SE. No indications for altered anxiety were found when tested on the elevated plus maze following SE. These data suggest that the circular hole board is a well-suited paradigm to detect subtle SE-induced hippocampal deficits. PMID:25461204

  14. Early Detection of Drug-Induced Renal Hemodynamic Dysfunction Using Sonographic Technology in Rats.

    PubMed

    Fisch, Sudeshna; Liao, Ronglih; Hsiao, Li-Li; Lu, Tzongshi

    2016-01-01

    The kidney normally functions to maintain hemodynamic homeostasis and is a major site of damage caused by drug toxicity. Drug-induced nephrotoxicity is estimated to contribute to 19- 25% of all clinical cases of acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients. AKI detection has historically relied on metrics such as serum creatinine (sCr) or blood urea nitrogen (BUN) which are demonstrably inadequate in full assessment of nephrotoxicity in the early phase of renal dysfunction. Currently, there is no robust diagnostic method to accurately detect hemodynamic alteration in the early phase of AKI while such alterations might actually precede the rise in serum biomarker levels. Such early detection can help clinicians make an accurate diagnosis and help in in decision making for therapeutic strategy. Rats were treated with Cisplatin to induce AKI. Nephrotoxicity was assessed for six days using high-frequency sonography, sCr measurement and upon histopathology of kidney. Hemodynamic evaluation using 2D and Color-Doppler images were used to serially study nephrotoxicity in rats, using the sonography. Our data showed successful drug-induced kidney injury in adult rats by histological examination. Color-Doppler based sonographic assessment of AKI indicated that resistive-index (RI) and pulsatile-index (PI) were increased in the treatment group; and peak-systolic velocity (mm/s), end-diastolic velocity (mm/s) and velocity-time integral (VTI, mm) were decreased in renal arteries in the same group. Importantly, these hemodynamic changes evaluated by sonography preceded the rise of sCr levels. Sonography-based indices such as RI or PI can thus be useful predictive markers of declining renal function in rodents. From our sonography-based observations in the kidneys of rats that underwent AKI, we showed that these noninvasive hemodynamic measurements may consider as an accurate, sensitive and robust method in detecting early stage kidney dysfunction. This study also

  15. Early Detection of Drug-Induced Renal Hemodynamic Dysfunction Using Sonographic Technology in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fisch, Sudeshna; Liao, Ronglih; Hsiao, Li-Li; Lu, Tzongshi

    2016-01-01

    The kidney normally functions to maintain hemodynamic homeostasis and is a major site of damage caused by drug toxicity. Drug-induced nephrotoxicity is estimated to contribute to 19- 25% of all clinical cases of acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients. AKI detection has historically relied on metrics such as serum creatinine (sCr) or blood urea nitrogen (BUN) which are demonstrably inadequate in full assessment of nephrotoxicity in the early phase of renal dysfunction. Currently, there is no robust diagnostic method to accurately detect hemodynamic alteration in the early phase of AKI while such alterations might actually precede the rise in serum biomarker levels. Such early detection can help clinicians make an accurate diagnosis and help in in decision making for therapeutic strategy. Rats were treated with Cisplatin to induce AKI. Nephrotoxicity was assessed for six days using high-frequency sonography, sCr measurement and upon histopathology of kidney. Hemodynamic evaluation using 2D and Color-Doppler images were used to serially study nephrotoxicity in rats, using the sonography. Our data showed successful drug-induced kidney injury in adult rats by histological examination. Color-Doppler based sonographic assessment of AKI indicated that resistive-index (RI) and pulsatile-index (PI) were increased in the treatment group; and peak-systolic velocity (mm/s), end-diastolic velocity (mm/s) and velocity-time integral (VTI, mm) were decreased in renal arteries in the same group. Importantly, these hemodynamic changes evaluated by sonography preceded the rise of sCr levels. Sonography-based indices such as RI or PI can thus be useful predictive markers of declining renal function in rodents. From our sonography-based observations in the kidneys of rats that underwent AKI, we showed that these noninvasive hemodynamic measurements may consider as an accurate, sensitive and robust method in detecting early stage kidney dysfunction. This study also

  16. Spectrally resolved laser-induced fluorescence for bioaerosols standoff detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Stadnyk, Laurie; Rowsell, Susan; Simard, Jean-Robert; Ho, Jim; Déry, Bernard; McFee, John

    2007-09-01

    An efficient standoff biological warfare detection capability could become an important asset for both defence and security communities based on the increasing biological threat and the limits of the presently existing protection systems. Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor prototype based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). This LIDAR system named SINBAHD monitors the spectrally resolved LIF originating from inelastic interactions with bioaerosols present in atmospheric cells customizable in size and in range. SINBAHD has demonstrated the capability of near real-time detection and classification of bioaerosolized threats at multi-kilometre ranges. In spring 2005, DRDC has initiated the BioSense demonstration project, which combines the SINBAHD technology with a geo-referenced Near InfraRed (NIR) LIDAR cloud mapper. SINBAHD is now being used to acquire more signatures to add in the spectral library and also to optimize and test the new BioSense algorithm strategy. In September 2006, SINBAHD has participated in a two-week trial held at DRDC-Suffield where different open-air wet releases of live and killed bioagent simulants, growth media and obscurants were performed. An autoclave killing procedure was performed on two biological materials (Bacillus subtilis var globigii or BG, and Bacillus thuringiensis or Bt) before being aerosolized, disseminated and spectrally characterized with SINBAHD. The obtained results showed no significant impact of this killing process on their normalised spectral signature in comparison with their live counterparts. Correlation between the detection signals from SINBAHD, an array of slit samplers and a FLuorescent Aerosol Particle Sensor (C-FLAPS) was obtained and SINBAHD's sensitivity could then be estimated. At the 2006 trial, a detection limit of a few tens of Agent Containing Particles per Liter of Air (ACPLA) was obtained

  17. Systems biology analysis of the proteomic alterations induced by MPP+, a Parkinson's disease-related mitochondrial toxin

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Chiara; Bondi, Heather; Urbani, Andrea; Fasano, Mauro; Alberio, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease whose etiology has not been completely characterized. Many cellular processes have been proposed to play a role in the neuronal damage and loss: defects in the proteosomal activity, altered protein processing, increased reactive oxygen species burden. Among them, the involvement of a decreased activity and an altered disposal of mitochondria is becoming more and more evident. The mitochondrial toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), an inhibitor of complex I, has been widely used to reproduce biochemical alterations linked to PD in vitro and its precursor, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine hydrochloride (MPTP), to induce a Parkinson-like syndrome in vivo. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of the literature of all the proteomic investigations of neuronal alterations due to MPP+ treatment and compared it with our results obtained with a mitochondrial proteomic analysis of SH-SY5Y cells treated with MPP+. By using open-source bioinformatics tools, we identified the biochemical pathways and the molecular functions mostly affected by MPP+, i.e., ATP production, the mitochondrial unfolded stress response, apoptosis, autophagy, and, most importantly, the synapse funcionality. Eventually, we generated protein networks, based on physical or functional interactions, to highlight the relationships among the molecular actors involved. In particular, we identified the mitochondrial protein HSP60 as the central hub in the protein-protein interaction network. As a whole, this analysis clarified the cellular responses to MPP+, the specific mitochondrial proteome alterations induced and how this toxic model can recapitulate some pathogenetic events of PD. PMID:25698928

  18. TRIADIMEFON, A TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDE, INDUCES STEREOTYPED BEHAVIOR AND ALTERS MONOAMINE METABOLISM IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, a triazole fungicide, has been observed to increase locomotion and induce stereotyped behavior in rodents. he present experiments characterized the stereotyped behavior induced by triadimefon using a computer-supported observational method, and tested the hypothesis ...

  19. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Su

    2001-05-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sub 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  20. Detecting altered connectivity patterns in HIV associated neurocognitive impairment using mutual connectivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Anas Zainul; D'Souza, Adora M.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    The use of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has provided interesting insights into our understanding of the brain. In clinical setups these scans have been used to detect and study changes in the brain network properties in various neurological disorders. A large percentage of subjects infected with HIV present cognitive deficits, which are known as HIV associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). In this study we propose to use our novel technique named Mutual Connectivity Analysis (MCA) to detect differences in brain networks in subjects with and without HIV infection. Resting state functional MRI scans acquired from 10 subjects (5 HIV+ and 5 HIV-) were subject to standard preprocessing routines. Subsequently, the average time-series for each brain region of the Automated Anatomic Labeling (AAL) atlas are extracted and used with the MCA framework to obtain a graph characterizing the interactions between them. The network graphs obtained for different subjects are then compared using Network-Based Statistics (NBS), which is an approach to detect differences between graphs edges while controlling for the family-wise error rate when mass univariate testing is performed. Applying this approach on the graphs obtained yields a single network encompassing 42 nodes and 65 edges, which is significantly different between the two subject groups. Specifically connections to the regions in and around the basal ganglia are significantly decreased. Also some nodes corresponding to the posterior cingulate cortex are affected. These results are inline with our current understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of HIV associated neurocognitive disease (HAND) and other HIV based fMRI connectivity studies. Hence, we illustrate the applicability of our novel approach with network-based statistics in a clinical case-control study to detect differences connectivity patterns.

  1. A heterozygous IDH1R132H/WT mutation induces genome-wide alterations in DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Christopher G.; Barwick, Benjamin G.; Jin, Genglin; Rago, Carlo; Kapoor-Vazirani, Priya; Powell, Doris R.; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Bigner, Darell D.; Vertino, Paula M.; Yan, Hai

    2012-01-01

    Monoallelic point mutations of the NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases IDH1 and IDH2 occur frequently in gliomas, acute myeloid leukemias, and chondromas, and display robust association with specific DNA hypermethylation signatures. Here we show that heterozygous expression of the IDH1R132H allele is sufficient to induce the genome-wide alterations in DNA methylation characteristic of these tumors. Using a gene-targeting approach, we knocked-in a single copy of the most frequently observed IDH1 mutation, R132H, into a human cancer cell line and profiled changes in DNA methylation at over 27,000 CpG dinucleotides relative to wild-type parental cells. We find that IDH1R132H/WT mutation induces widespread alterations in DNA methylation, including hypermethylation of 2010 and hypomethylation of 842 CpG loci. We demonstrate that many of these alterations are consistent with those observed in IDH1-mutant and G-CIMP+ primary gliomas and can segregate IDH wild-type and mutated tumors as well as those exhibiting the G-CIMP phenotype in unsupervised analysis of two primary glioma cohorts. Further, we show that the direction of IDH1R132H/WT-mediated DNA methylation change is largely dependent upon preexisting DNA methylation levels, resulting in depletion of moderately methylated loci. Additionally, whereas the levels of multiple histone H3 and H4 methylation modifications were globally increased, consistent with broad inhibition of histone demethylation, hypermethylation at H3K9 in particular accompanied locus-specific DNA hypermethylation at several genes down-regulated in IDH1R132H/WT knock-in cells. These data provide insight on epigenetic alterations induced by IDH1 mutations and support a causal role for IDH1R132H/WT mutants in driving epigenetic instability in human cancer cells. PMID:22899282

  2. Epigenetic Alterations in Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis: Interaction of Bioactive Dietary Components on Epigenetic Targets†

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Santosh K.; Singh, Tripti; Prasad, Ram; Sun, Qian; Vaid, Mudit

    2011-01-01

    The importance of epigenetic alterations in the development of various diseases including the cancers has been realized. As epigenetic changes are reversible heritable changes, these can be utilized as an effective strategy for the prevention of cancers. DNA methylation is the most characterized epigenetic mechanism that can be inherited without changing the DNA sequence. Although limited, but available data suggest that silencing of tumor suppressor genes in ultraviolet (UV) radiation-exposed epidermis leads to photocarcinogenesis and is associated with a network of epigenetic modifications including alterations in DNA methylation, DNA methyltransferases and histone acetylations. Various bioactive dietary components have been shown to protect skin from UV radiation-induced skin tumors in animal models. The role of bioactive dietary components, such as, (−)-epicatechins from green tea and proanthocyanidins from grape seeds, has been assessed in chemoprevention of UV-induced skin carcinogenesis and underlying epigenetic mechanism in vitro and in vivo animal models. These bioactive components have the ability to block UV-induced DNA hypermethylation and histone modifications in the skin required for the silencing of tumor suppressor genes (e.g., Cip1/p21, p16INK4a). These information are of importance for understanding the role of epigenetic modulation in UV-induced skin tumor and the chemopreventive mechanism of bioactive dietary components. PMID:22017262

  3. Chronic hypoxia-induced alteration of presynaptic protein profiles and neurobehavioral dysfunction are averted by supplemental oxygen in Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Fei, G-H; Feng, Z-P

    2008-04-22

    Chronic hypoxia causes neural dysfunction. Oxygen (O(2)) supplements have been commonly used to increase the O(2) supply, yet the therapeutic benefit of this treatment remains controversial due to a lack of cellular and molecular evidence. In this study, we examined the effects of short-burst O(2) supplementation on neural behavior and presynaptic protein expression profiles in a simple chronic hypoxia model of snail Lymnaea stagnalis. We reported that hypoxia delayed the animal response to light stimuli, suppressed locomotory activity, induced expression of stress-response proteins, hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), repressed syntaxin-1 (a membrane-bound presynaptic protein) and elevated vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 (VAMP-1) (a vesicle-bound presynaptic protein) level. O(2) supplements relieved suppression of neural behaviors, and corrected hypoxia-induced protein alterations in a dose-dependent manner. The effectiveness of supplemental O(2) was further evaluated by determining time courses for recovery of neural behaviors and expression of stress response proteins and presynaptic proteins after relief from hypoxia conditions. Our findings suggest that O(2) supplement improves hypoxia-induced adverse alterations of presynaptic protein expression and neurobehaviors, however, the optimal level of O(2) required for improvement is protein specific and system specific. PMID:18343591

  4. Mercury heavy-metal-induced physiochemical changes and genotoxic alterations in water hyacinths [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.)].

    PubMed

    Malar, Srinivasan; Sahi, Shivendra Vikram; Favas, Paulo J C; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2015-03-01

    Mercury heavy metal pollution has become an important environmental problem worldwide. Accumulation of mercury ions by plants may disrupt many cellular functions and block normal growth and development. To assess mercury heavy metal toxicity, we performed an experiment focusing on the responses of Eichhornia crassipes to mercury-induced oxidative stress. E. crassipes seedlings were exposed to varying concentrations of mercury to investigate the level of mercury ions accumulation, changes in growth patterns, antioxidant defense mechanisms, and DNA damage under hydroponics system. Results showed that plant growth rate was significantly inhibited (52 %) at 50 mg/L treatment. Accumulation of mercury ion level were 1.99 mg/g dry weight, 1.74 mg/g dry weight, and 1.39 mg/g dry weight in root, leaf, and petiole tissues, respectively. There was a decreasing trend for chlorophyll a, b, and carotenoids with increasing the concentration of mercury ions. Both the ascorbate peroxidase and malondialdehyde contents showed increased trend in leaves and roots up to 30 mg/L mercury treatment and slightly decreased at the higher concentrations. There was a positive correlation between heavy metal dose and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase antioxidative enzyme activities which could be used as biomarkers to monitor pollution in E. crassipes. Due to heavy metal stress, some of the normal DNA bands were disappeared and additional bands were amplified compared to the control in the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profile. Random amplified polymorphic DNA results indicated that genomic template stability was significantly affected by mercury heavy metal treatment. We concluded that DNA changes determined by random amplified polymorphic DNA assay evolved a useful molecular marker for detection of genotoxic effects of mercury heavy metal contamination in plant species. PMID:25323404

  5. 5-fluoro-orotic acid induces chromosome alterations in genetically manipulated strains of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wellington, Melanie; Kabir, M Anaul; Rustchenko, Elena

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the occurrence of chromosome alterations in a Candida albicans prototrophic strain 3153A treated with 5-fluoro-orotic acid (5-FOA). In this study we investigated the mutagenic properties of 5-FOA with two derivatives of C. albicans strain CAF4-2 (ura3/ura3), each containing an ectopic copy of URA3 gene (ura3/ ura3 URA3) on a different chromosome. As expected, after the ura3/ura3 URA3 constructs were applied to 5-FOA containing solid medium, the "pop-outs" that lost URA3 appeared. However most of the "pop-outs" acquired various chromosome alterations. Thus constructs exposed to 5-FOA should be examined for chromosome alterations or the use of 5-FOA should be avoided. PMID:17040068

  6. Discordance in recovery between altered locomotion and muscle atrophy induced by simulated microgravity in rats.

    PubMed

    Tajino, Junichi; Ito, Akira; Nagai, Momoko; Zhang, Xiangkai; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Iijima, Hirotaka; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to a microgravity environment leads to adverse effects in motion and musculoskeletal properties. However, few studies have investigated the recovery of altered locomotion and muscle atrophy simultaneously. The authors investigated altered locomotion in rats submitted to simulated microgravity by hindlimb unloading for 2 weeks. Motion deficits were characterized by hyperextension of the knees and ankle joints and forward-shifted limb motion. Furthermore, these locomotor deficits did not revert to their original form after a 2-week recovery period, although muscle atrophy in the hindlimbs had recovered, implying discordance in recovery between altered locomotion and muscle atrophy, and that other factors such as neural drives might control behavioral adaptations to microgravity. PMID:25789843

  7. Aptamer-Assisted Detection of the Altered Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahirwar, Rajesh; Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen Karuthedath; Sett, Arghya; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod; Bora, Utpal; Borthakur, Bibhuti Bhusan; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Nahar, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    An increase in the expression of estrogen receptors (ER) and the expanded population of ER-positive cells are two common phenotypes of breast cancer. Detection of the aberrantly expressed ERα in breast cancer is carried out using ERα-antibodies and radiolabelled ligands to make decisions about cancer treatment and targeted therapy. Capitalizing on the beneficial advantages of aptamer over the conventional antibody or radiolabelled ligand, we have identified a DNA aptamer that selectively binds and facilitates the detection of ERα in human breast cancer tissue sections. The aptamer is identified using the high throughput sequencing assisted SELEX screening. Biophysical characterization confirms the binding and formation of a thermodynamically stable complex between the identified DNA aptamer (ERaptD4) and ERα (Ka = 1.55±0.298×108 M-1; ΔH = 4.32×104±801.1 cal/mol; ΔS = -108 cal/mol/deg). Interestingly, the specificity measurements suggest that the ERaptD4 internalizes into ERα-positive breast cancer cells in a target-selective manner and localizes specifically in the nuclear region. To harness these characteristics of ERaptD4 for detection of ERα expression in breast cancer samples, we performed the aptamer-assisted histochemical analysis of ERα in tissue samples from breast cancer patients. The results were validated by performing the immunohistochemistry on same samples with an ERα-antibody. We found that the two methods agree strongly in assay output (kappa value = 0.930, p-value <0.05 for strong ERα positive and the ERα negative samples; kappa value = 0.823, p-value <0.05 for the weak/moderate ER+ve samples, n = 20). Further, the aptamer stain the ERα-positive cells in breast tissues without cross-reacting to ERα-deficient fibroblasts, adipocytes, or the inflammatory cells. Our results demonstrate a significant consistency in the aptamer-assisted detection of ERα in strong ERα positive, moderate ERα positive and ERα negative breast cancer

  8. [Neuroimaging technique: a diagnostic tool to detect altered states of consciousness].

    PubMed

    Thonnard, Marie; Boly, Mélanie; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Chatelle, Camille; Gosseries, Olivia; Laureys, Steven; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey

    2011-01-01

    Vegetative and minimally conscious states diagnosis remained a major clinical challenge. New paradigms such as measurement of the global cerebral metabolism, the structural and functional integrity of fronto-parietal network, or the spontaneous activity in resting state have been shown to be helpful to disentangle vegetative from minimally conscious patients. Active neuroimagery paradigms also allow detecting voluntary and conscious activity in non-communicative patients. The implementation of these methods in clinical routine could permit to reduce the current high rate of misdiagnosis (40%). PMID:21299966

  9. Impact-Induced Chondrule Deformation and Aqueous Alteration of CM2 Murchison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, R. D.; Zolensky, M.; Ketcham, R. A.; Behr, W. M.; Martinez, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    Deformed chondrules in CM2 Murchison have been found to define a prominent foliation [1,2] and lineation [3] in 3D using X-ray computed tomography (XCT). It has been hypothesized that chondrules in foliated chondrites deform by "squeezing" into surrounding pore space [4,5], a process that also likely removes primary porosity [6]. However, shock stage classification based on olivine extinction in Murchison is consistently low (S1-S2) [4-5,7] implying that significant intracrystalline plastic deformation of olivine has not occurred. One objective of our study is therefore to determine the microstructural mechanisms and phases that are accommodating the impact stress and resulting in relative displacements within the chondrules. Another question regarding impact deformation in Murchison is whether it facilitated aqueous alteration as has been proposed for the CMs which generally show a positive correlation between degree of alteration and petrofabric strength [7,2]. As pointed out by [2], CM Murchison represents a unique counterpoint to this correlation: it has a strong petrofabric but a relatively low degree of aqueous alteration. However, Murchison may not represent an inconsistency to the proposed causal relationship between impact and alteration, if it can be established that the incipient aqueous alteration post-dated chondrule deformation. Methods: Two thin sections from Murchison sample USNM 5487 were cut approximately perpendicular to the foliation and parallel to lineation determined by XCT [1,3] and one section was additionally polished for EBSD. Using a combination of optical petrography, SEM, EDS, and EBSD several chondrules were characterized in detail to: determine phases, find microstructures indicative of strain, document the geometric relationships between grain-scale microstructures and the foliation and lineation direction, and look for textural relationships of alteration minerals (tochilinite and Mg-Fe serpentine) that indicate timing of their

  10. Hematoporphyrin derivative induced photodamage to brain tumor cells: Alterations in subcellular membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasan, Rajesh; Joshi, Preeti G.; Joshi, Nanda B.

    1997-01-01

    Photoinduced structural and functional changes were studied in the subcellular membranes isolated from HpD treated cells. Changes in the limiting anisotropy of lipid specific probes 1,6,Diphenyl-1,3,5,hexatriene (DPH) and 1-(4-Trimethyl ammonium 1,6 diphenyl)-1,3,5,hexatriene toulene sulphonate (TMA-DPH) incorporated into the membrane were used to assess the structural alterations while changes in the activity of the marker enzymes were used to assess the functional alterations. Our results suggest that damage to the endoplasmic reticulum may play an important role in the photosensitization of brain tumor cells.

  11. Benefits of agomelatine in behavioral, neurochemical and blood brain barrier alterations in prenatal valproic acid induced autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, B M; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-12-01

    Valproic acid administration during gestational period causes behavior and biochemical deficits similar to those observed in humans with autism spectrum disorder. Although worldwide prevalence of autism spectrum disorder has been increased continuously, therapeutic agents to ameliorate the social impairment are very limited. The present study has been structured to investigate the therapeutic potential of melatonin receptor agonist, agomelatine in prenatal valproic acid (Pre-VPA) induced autism spectrum disorder in animals. Pre-VPA has produced reduction in social interaction (three chamber social behavior apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complex I, II, IV). Furthermore, Pre-VPA has increased locomotor activity (actophotometer), anxiety, brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, and catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium levels and blood brain barrier leakage in animals. Treatment with agomelatine has significantly attenuated Pre-VPA induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, agomelatine also attenuated Pre-VPA induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative stress, nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium levels and blood brain barrier leakage. It is concluded that, Pre-VPA has induced autism spectrum disorder, which was attenuated by agomelatine. Agomelatine has shown ameliorative effect on behavioral, neurochemical and blood brain barrier alteration in Pre-VPA exposed animals. Thus melatonin receptor agonists may provide beneficial therapeutic strategy for managing autism spectrum disorder. PMID:26498253

  12. Detection of early diastolic alterations by tissue Doppler imaging in untreated childhood-onset essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Agu, Ngozi C; McNiece Redwine, Karen; Bell, Cynthia; Garcia, Kathleen Marie; Martin, David S; Poffenbarger, Tim S; Bricker, John T; Portman, Ronald J; Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the presence of preclinical diastolic dysfunction in hypertensive children relative to normotensive children by Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI). We prospectively enrolled children with untreated essential hypertension in absence of any other disease and a matched healthy control group with normal blood pressure (BP); both groups confirmed by clinic BP and a 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Echocardiographic diastolic parameters were determined using spectral transmitral inflow Doppler, flow propagation velocity, TDI, and systolic parameters were determined via midwall shortening fraction and ejection fraction. A total of 80 multiethnic children were prospectively enrolled for the study: 46 hypertensive (median age, 13 years; 72% males) and 34 control (median age, 14 years; 65% males). The only echocardiography parameters that had a statistically significant change compared with the control children, were regional mitral Ea, Aa, and the E/Ea ratio by TDI. In comparison with controls, hypertensive children had lower Ea and Aa velocities of anterior and posterior walls and higher lateral wall E/Ea ratio. The decrease in posterior wall Ea and Aa remained significant after adjustment for gender, age, body mass index, ethnicity, and left ventricular hypertrophy on multivariate analysis. The lateral and septal wall E/Ea ratios correlated significantly with fasting serum insulin levels on similar multivariate analysis. Decreased regional TDI velocities were seen with preserved left ventricular systolic function even when other measures of diastolic dysfunction remained unchanged in untreated hypertensive children. Hypertension and serum insulin levels had strong associations with preclinical diastolic alterations in children. PMID:24685005

  13. Diabetes-induced myelin abnormalities are associated with an altered lipid pattern: protective effects of LXR activation[S

    PubMed Central

    Cermenati, Gaia; Abbiati, Federico; Cermenati, Solei; Brioschi, Elisabetta; Volonterio, Alessandro; Cavaletti, Guido; Saez, Enrique; De Fabiani, Emma; Crestani, Maurizio; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Melcangi, Roberto C.; Caruso, Donatella; Mitro, Nico

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is characterized by myelin abnormalities; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying such deficits remain obscure. To uncover the effects of diabetes on myelin alterations, we have analyzed myelin composition. In a streptozotocin-treated rat model of diabetic neuropathy, analysis of sciatic nerve myelin lipids revealed that diabetes alters myelin's phospholipid, FA, and cholesterol content in a pattern that can modify membrane fluidity. Reduced expression of relevant genes in the FA biosynthetic pathway and decreased levels of the transcriptionally active form of the lipogenic factor sterol-regulatory element binding factor-1c (SREBF-1c) were found in diabetic sciatic nerve. Expression of myelin's major protein, myelin protein zero (P0), was also suppressed by diabetes. In addition, we confirmed that diabetes induces sciatic nerve myelin abnormalities, primarily infoldings that have previously been associated with altered membrane fluidity. In a diabetic setting, synthetic activator of the nuclear receptor liver X receptor (LXR) increased SREBF-1c function and restored myelin lipid species and P0 expression levels to normal. These LXR-modulated improvements were associated with restored myelin structure in sciatic nerve and enhanced performance in functional tests such as thermal nociceptive threshold and nerve conduction velocity. These findings demonstrate an important role for the LXR-SREBF-1c axis in protection from diabetes-induced myelin abnormalities. PMID:22158827

  14. Climate-induced changes in bottom-up and top-down processes independently alter a marine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Malte; Schneider, Florian D; Crowe, Tasman P; Brose, Ulrich; O'Gorman, Eoin J

    2012-11-01

    Climate change has complex structural impacts on coastal ecosystems. Global warming is linked to a widespread decline in body size, whereas increased flood frequency can amplify nutrient enrichment through enhanced run-off. Altered population body-size structure represents a disruption in top-down control, whereas eutrophication embodies a change in bottom-up forcing. These processes are typically studied in isolation and little is known about their potential interactive effects. Here, we present the results of an in situ experiment examining the combined effects of top-down and bottom-up forces on the structure of a coastal marine community. Reduced average body mass of the top predator (the shore crab, Carcinus maenas) and nutrient enrichment combined additively to alter mean community body mass. Nutrient enrichment increased species richness and overall density of organisms. Reduced top-predator body mass increased community biomass. Additionally, we found evidence for an allometrically induced trophic cascade. Here, the reduction in top-predator body mass enabled greater biomass of intermediate fish predators within the mesocosms. This, in turn, suppressed key micrograzers, which led to an overall increase in microalgal biomass. This response highlights the possibility for climate-induced trophic cascades, driven by altered size structure of populations, rather than species extinction. PMID:23007084

  15. Climate-induced changes in bottom-up and top-down processes independently alter a marine ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Jochum, Malte; Schneider, Florian D.; Crowe, Tasman P.; Brose, Ulrich; O'Gorman, Eoin J.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change has complex structural impacts on coastal ecosystems. Global warming is linked to a widespread decline in body size, whereas increased flood frequency can amplify nutrient enrichment through enhanced run-off. Altered population body-size structure represents a disruption in top-down control, whereas eutrophication embodies a change in bottom-up forcing. These processes are typically studied in isolation and little is known about their potential interactive effects. Here, we present the results of an in situ experiment examining the combined effects of top-down and bottom-up forces on the structure of a coastal marine community. Reduced average body mass of the top predator (the shore crab, Carcinus maenas) and nutrient enrichment combined additively to alter mean community body mass. Nutrient enrichment increased species richness and overall density of organisms. Reduced top-predator body mass increased community biomass. Additionally, we found evidence for an allometrically induced trophic cascade. Here, the reduction in top-predator body mass enabled greater biomass of intermediate fish predators within the mesocosms. This, in turn, suppressed key micrograzers, which led to an overall increase in microalgal biomass. This response highlights the possibility for climate-induced trophic cascades, driven by altered size structure of populations, rather than species extinction. PMID:23007084

  16. Detection of ultrastructural changes in genetically altered and exercised skeletal muscle using PS-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquesi, James J.; Schlachter, Simon C.; Boppart, Marni D.; Chaney, Eric; Kaufman, Stephen J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2006-02-01

    Birefringence of skeletal muscle has been associated with the ultrastructure of individual sarcomeres, specifically the arrangement of A-bands corresponding to the thick myosin filaments. Murine skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) was imaged with a fiber-based PS-OCT imaging system to determine the level of birefringence present in the tissue under various conditions. In addition to muscle controls from wild-type mice, muscle from abnormal mice included: genetically-modified (mdx) mice which model human muscular dystrophy, transgenic mice exhibiting an overexpression of integrin (α7β1), and transgenic integrin (α7β1)knockout mice. Comparisons were also made between rested and exercised muscles to determine the effects of exercise on muscle birefringence for each of these normal and abnormal conditions. The PS-OCT images revealed that the presence of birefringence was similar in the rested muscle with dystrophy-like features (i.e., lacking the structural protein dystrophin - mdx) and in the integrin (α7β1)knockout muscle when compared to the normal (wild-type) control. However, exercising these abnormal muscle tissues drastically reduced the presence of birefringence detected by the PS-OCT system. The muscle exhibiting an overexpression of integrin (α7β1) remained heavily birefringent before and after exercise, similar to the normal (wild-type) muscle. These results suggest that there is a distinct relationship between the degree of birefringence detected using PS-OCT and the sarcomeric ultrastructure present within skeletal muscle.

  17. Effectiveness of Sunscreen at Preventing Solar UV-Induced Alterations of Human Stratum Corneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, O.; Dauskardt, R.; Biniek, K.; Novoa, F.

    2012-12-01

    The outermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum, protects the body from harmful environmental conditions by serving as a selective barrier. Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is one of the most common conditions the body encounters and is responsible for many negative skin responses, including compromised barrier function. UV exposure has dramatic effects on stratum corneum cell cohesion and mechanical integrity that are related to its effects on the stratum corneum's intercellular lipids. Hypothesis Sunscreen contains chemicals that absorb UV radiation to prevent the radiation from penetrating the skin. Thus, it is expected that the application of sunscreen on human stratum corneum will reduce UV-induced alterations of human stratum corneum. Procedures/Equipment Human tissue was processed in order to isolate the stratum corneum, the top layer of the epidermis. Double cantilever beam (DCB) testing was used to study the effect of UV radiation on human stratum corneum. Two different types of DCB samples were created: control DCB samples with the application of carrier and UV light to the stratum corneum and DCB samples with the application of sunscreen and UV light to the stratum corneum. For the control sample, one side of the stratum corneum was glued to a polycarbonate beam and carrier was applied. Then, the sample was placed 10 cm away from the UV lamp inside of the environmental chamber and were exposed to UV dosages of about 800 J/cm2. Once this step was complete, a second polycarbonate beam was glued to the other side of the stratum corneum. The steps were similar for the DCB sample that had sunscreen applied and that was exposed to UV light. After gluing one side of the stratum corneum to a polycarbonate beam, Octinoxate sunscreen was applied. The next steps were similar to those of the control sample. All DCB samples were then let out to dry for two hours in a dry box in order for the moisture from the lab to be extracted. Each DCB sample was tested

  18. How-to-Do-It: Herbivory-Induced Alteration of Community Structure--A Classroom Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a laboratory study designed to demonstrate loss of vegetation, alterations in the species composition of a community, and the impoverishment of a community with respect to desirable food plant species when herbivore feeding exceeds the rate of vegetation regrowth. The laboratory uses a classroom aquarium. (CW)

  19. Pregnancy Complicated by Obesity Induces Global Transcript Expression Alterations in Visceral and Subcutaneous Fat

    PubMed Central

    Bashiri, Asher; Heo, Hye J.; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Mazor, Moshe; Budagov, Temuri; Einstein, Francine H.; Atzmon, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for development of both maternal and fetal metabolic complications. Increase in visceral fat and insulin resistance is a metabolic hallmark of pregnancy, yet little is known how obesity alters adipose cellular function and how this may contribute to pregnancy morbidities. We sought to identify alterations in genome-wide transcription expression in both visceral (omental) and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits in pregnancy complicated by obesity. Visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat deposits were collected from normal weight and obese pregnant women (n=4/group) at time of scheduled uncomplicated cesarean section. A genome-wide expression array (Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 st platform), validated by quantitative real-time PCR, was utilized to establish the gene transcript expression profile in both visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat in normal weight and obese pregnant women. Global alteration in gene expression was identified in pregnancy complicated by obesity. These regions of variations lead to identification of indolethylamine N-methyltransferase (INMT), tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2), and ephrin type-B receptor 6 (EPHB6), not previously associated with fat metabolism during pregnancy. In addition, subcutaneous fat of obese pregnant women demonstrated increased coding protein transcripts associated with apoptosis compared to lean counterparts. Global alteration of gene expression in adipose tissue may contribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with obesity. PMID:24696292

  20. Hypokalemia-induced ultrastructural, histochemical and connexin-43 alterations resulting in atrial and ventricular fibrillations.

    PubMed

    Tribulová, N; Manoach, M; Varon, D; Okruhlicová, L; Slobodová, Z; Kubovcáková, L

    1999-12-01

    Perfusion of the isolated guinea pig heart with hypokalemic solution provide simple model for examination of the molecular mechanisms involved in the incidence of atrial and/or ventricular fibrillations. The results point out that dispersion of the metabolic and subcellular alterations and heterogenously impaired intercellular coupling might account for electrical disturbances and desynchronization of the myocardium thus facilitate occurrence of fibrillation. PMID:10707826

  1. Mercury induced haemocyte alterations in the terrestrial snail Cantareus apertus as novel biomarker.

    PubMed

    Leomanni, Alessandro; Schettino, Trifone; Calisi, Antonio; Lionetto, Maria Giulia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the response of a suite of cellular and biochemical markers in the terrestrial snail Cantareus apertus exposed to mercury in view of future use as sensitive tool suitable for mercury polluted soil monitoring and assessment. Besides standardized biomarkers (metallothionein, acetylcholinesterase, and lysosomal membrane stability) novel cellular biomarkers on haemolymph cells were analyzed, including changes in the spread cells/round cells ratio and haemocyte morphometric alterations. The animals were exposed for 14 days to Lactuca sativa soaked for 1h in HgCl2 solutions (0.5 e 1 μM). The temporal dynamics of the responses were assessed by measurements at 3, 7 and 14 days. Following exposure to HgCl2 a significant alteration in the relative frequencies of round cells and spread cells was evident, with a time and dose-dependent increase of the frequencies of round cells with respect to spread cells. These changes were accompanied by cellular morphometric alterations. Concomitantly, a high correspondence between these cellular responses and metallothionein tissutal concentration, lysosomal membrane stability and inhibition of AChE was evident. The study highlights the usefulness of the terrestrial snail C. apertus as bioindicator organism for mercury pollution biomonitoring and, in particular, the use of haemocyte alterations as a suitable biomarker of pollutant effect to be included in a multibiomarker strategy. PMID:26811906

  2. Naringenin Mitigates Iron-Induced Anxiety-Like Behavioral Impairment, Mitochondrial Dysfunctions, Ectonucleotidases and Acetylcholinesterase Alteration Activities in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chtourou, Yassine; Slima, Ahlem Ben; Gdoura, Radhouane; Fetoui, Hamadi

    2015-08-01

    Studies demonstrated that the iron chelating antioxidant restores brain dysfunction induced by iron toxicity in animals. Earlier, we found that iron overload-induced cerebral cortex apoptosis correlated with oxidative stress could be protected by naringenin (NGEN). In this respect, the present study is focused on the mechanisms associated with the protective efficacy of NGEN, natural flavonoid compound abundant in the peels of citrus fruit, on iron induced impairment of the anxiogenic-like behaviour, purinergic and cholinergic dysfunctions with oxidative stress related disorders on mitochondrial function in the rat hippocampus. Results showed that administration of NGEN (50 mg/kg/day) by gavage significantly ameliorated anxiogenic-like behaviour impairment induced by the exposure to 50 mg of Fe-dextran/kg/day intraperitoneally for 28 days in rats, decreased iron-induced reactive oxygen species formation and restored the iron-induced decrease of the acetylcholinesterase expression level, mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial complexes activities in the hippocampus of rats. Moreover, NGEN was able to restore the alteration on the activity and expression of ectonucleotidases such as adenosine triphosphate diphosphohydrolase and 5'-nucleotidase, enzymes which hydrolyze and therefore control extracellular ATP and adenosine concentrations in the synaptic cleft. These results may contribute to a better understanding of the neuroprotective role of NGEN, emphasizing the influence of including this flavonoid in the diet for human health, possibly preventing brain injury associated with iron overload. PMID:26050208

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in tissue local necrosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cip, Ondrej; Buchta, Zdenek; Lesundak, Adam; Randula, Antonin; Mikel, Bretislav; Lazar, Josef; Veverkova, Lenka

    2014-03-01

    The recent effort leads to reliable imaging techniques which can help to a surgeon during operations. The fluorescence spectroscopy was selected as very useful online in vivo imaging method to organics and biological materials analysis. The presented work scopes to a laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique to detect tissue local necrosis in small intestine surgery. In first experiments, we tested tissue auto-fluorescence technique but a signal-to-noise ratio didn't express significant results. Then we applied a contrast dye - IndoCyanine Green (ICG) which absorbs and emits wavelengths in the near IR. We arranged the pilot experimental setup based on highly coherent extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) used for stimulating of some critical areas of the small intestine tissue with injected ICG dye. We demonstrated the distribution of the ICG exciter with the first file of shots of small intestine tissue of a rabbit that was captured by high sensitivity fluorescent cam.

  4. Hot electron induced NIR detection in CdS films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Alka; Kumar, Rahul; Bhattacharyya, Biplab; Husale, Sudhir

    2016-03-01

    We report the use of random Au nanoislands to enhance the absorption of CdS photodetectors at wavelengths beyond its intrinsic absorption properties from visible to NIR spectrum enabling a high performance visible-NIR photodetector. The temperature dependent annealing method was employed to form random sized Au nanoparticles on CdS films. The hot electron induced NIR photo-detection shows high responsivity of ~780 mA/W for an area of ~57 μm2. The simulated optical response (absorption and responsivity) of Au nanoislands integrated in CdS films confirms the strong dependence of NIR sensitivity on the size and shape of Au nanoislands. The demonstration of plasmon enhanced IR sensitivity along with the cost-effective device fabrication method using CdS film enables the possibility of economical light harvesting applications which can be implemented in future technological applications.

  5. Hot electron induced NIR detection in CdS films.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alka; Kumar, Rahul; Bhattacharyya, Biplab; Husale, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    We report the use of random Au nanoislands to enhance the absorption of CdS photodetectors at wavelengths beyond its intrinsic absorption properties from visible to NIR spectrum enabling a high performance visible-NIR photodetector. The temperature dependent annealing method was employed to form random sized Au nanoparticles on CdS films. The hot electron induced NIR photo-detection shows high responsivity of ~780 mA/W for an area of ~57 μm(2). The simulated optical response (absorption and responsivity) of Au nanoislands integrated in CdS films confirms the strong dependence of NIR sensitivity on the size and shape of Au nanoislands. The demonstration of plasmon enhanced IR sensitivity along with the cost-effective device fabrication method using CdS film enables the possibility of economical light harvesting applications which can be implemented in future technological applications. PMID:26965055

  6. Hot electron induced NIR detection in CdS films

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Alka; Kumar, Rahul; Bhattacharyya, Biplab; Husale, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    We report the use of random Au nanoislands to enhance the absorption of CdS photodetectors at wavelengths beyond its intrinsic absorption properties from visible to NIR spectrum enabling a high performance visible-NIR photodetector. The temperature dependent annealing method was employed to form random sized Au nanoparticles on CdS films. The hot electron induced NIR photo-detection shows high responsivity of ~780 mA/W for an area of ~57 μm2. The simulated optical response (absorption and responsivity) of Au nanoislands integrated in CdS films confirms the strong dependence of NIR sensitivity on the size and shape of Au nanoislands. The demonstration of plasmon enhanced IR sensitivity along with the cost-effective device fabrication method using CdS film enables the possibility of economical light harvesting applications which can be implemented in future technological applications. PMID:26965055

  7. Mechano-growth factor induces migration of rat mesenchymal stem cells by altering its mechanical properties and activating ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiamin; Wu, Kewen; Lin, Feng; Luo, Qing; Yang, Li; Shi, Yisong; Song, Guanbin; Sung, Kuo-Li Paul

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •MGF induced the migration of rat MSC in a concentration-dependent manner. •MGF enhanced the mechanical properties of rMSC in inducing its migration. •MGF activated the ERK 1/2 signaling pathway of rMSC in inducing its migration. •rMSC mechanics may synergy with ERK 1/2 pathway in MGF-induced rMSC migration. -- Abstract: Mechano-growth factor (MGF) generated by cells in response to mechanical stimulation has been identified as a mechano effector molecule, playing a key role in regulating mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) function, including proliferation and migration. However, the mechanism(s) underlying how MGF-induced MSC migration occurs is still unclear. In the present study, MGF motivated migration of rat MSCs (rMSCs) in a concentration-dependent manner and optimal concentration of MGF at 50 n