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Sample records for determine overlapping network

  1. Wavelet neural networks to resolve the overlapping signal in the voltammetric determination of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel; Gutés, Albert; Céspedes, Francisco; del Valle, Manuel; Muñoz, Roberto

    2008-07-15

    Three phenolic compounds, i.e. phenol, catechol and 4-acetamidophenol, were simultaneously determined by voltammetric detection of its oxidation reaction at the surface of an epoxy-graphite transducer. Because of strong signal overlapping, Wavelet Neural Networks (WNN) were used in data treatment, in a combination of chemometrics and electrochemical sensors, already known as the electronic tongue concept. To facilitate calibration, a set of samples (concentration of each phenol ranging from 0.25 to 2.5mM) was prepared automatically by employing a Sequential Injection System. Phenolic compounds could be resolved with good prediction ability, showing correlation coefficients greater than 0.929 when the obtained values were compared with those expected for a set of samples not employed for training. PMID:18585293

  2. Detecting overlapping communities in massive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bing-Jie; Shen, Hua-Wei; Cheng, Xue-Qi

    2014-12-01

    Community detection is an essential work for network analysis. However, few methods could be used as off-the-shelf tools to detect communities in real-world networks for two main reasons: Real networks often contain millions of nodes or even hundreds of millions of nodes while most methods cannot handle networks at this scale. One node often belongs to multiple communities, posing another big challenge. In this paper, we circumvent the tricky problem of detecting overlapping communities using a two-stage framework, balancing efficiency and accuracy. Given a network, we first focus on efficiently finding its coarse-grained communities. Starting from them, we next obtain overlapping communities by optimizing a principled objective function. In this divide-and-conquer way, the framework achieves a much better performance than detecting overlapping communities from scratch. Extensive tests on synthetic and real networks demonstrate that it outperforms state-of-the-art methods in terms of both efficiency and accuracy.

  3. Correlated edge overlaps in multiplex networks.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gareth J; Bianconi, Ginestra; da Costa, Rui A; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N; Mendes, José F F

    2016-07-01

    We develop the theory of sparse multiplex networks with partially overlapping links based on their local treelikeness. This theory enables us to find the giant mutually connected component in a two-layer multiplex network with arbitrary correlations between connections of different types. We find that correlations between the overlapping and nonoverlapping links markedly change the phase diagram of the system, leading to multiple hybrid phase transitions. For assortative correlations we observe recurrent hybrid phase transitions. PMID:27575144

  4. Correlated edge overlaps in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Gareth J.; Bianconi, Ginestra; da Costa, Rui A.; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N.; Mendes, José F. F.

    2016-07-01

    We develop the theory of sparse multiplex networks with partially overlapping links based on their local treelikeness. This theory enables us to find the giant mutually connected component in a two-layer multiplex network with arbitrary correlations between connections of different types. We find that correlations between the overlapping and nonoverlapping links markedly change the phase diagram of the system, leading to multiple hybrid phase transitions. For assortative correlations we observe recurrent hybrid phase transitions.

  5. Dynamics of overlapping structures in modular networks.

    PubMed

    Almendral, J A; Leyva, I; Li, D; Sendiña-Nadal, I; Havlin, S; Boccaletti, S

    2010-07-01

    Modularity is a fundamental feature of real networks, being intimately bounded to their functionality, i.e., to their capability of performing parallel tasks in a coordinated way. Although the modular structure of real graphs has been intensively studied, very little is known on the interactions between functional modules of a graph. Here, we present a general method based on synchronization of networking oscillators, that is able to detect overlapping structures in multimodular environments. We furthermore report the full analytical and theoretical description on the relationship between the overlapping dynamics and the underlying network topology. The method is illustrated by means of a series of applications. PMID:20866697

  6. Overlapping Community Detection based on Network Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhuanlian; Zhang, Xingyi; Sun, Dengdi; Luo, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Community detection in complex network has become a vital step to understand the structure and dynamics of networks in various fields. However, traditional node clustering and relatively new proposed link clustering methods have inherent drawbacks to discover overlapping communities. Node clustering is inadequate to capture the pervasive overlaps, while link clustering is often criticized due to the high computational cost and ambiguous definition of communities. So, overlapping community detection is still a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new overlapping community detection algorithm based on network decomposition, called NDOCD. Specifically, NDOCD iteratively splits the network by removing all links in derived link communities, which are identified by utilizing node clustering technique. The network decomposition contributes to reducing the computation time and noise link elimination conduces to improving the quality of obtained communities. Besides, we employ node clustering technique rather than link similarity measure to discover link communities, thus NDOCD avoids an ambiguous definition of community and becomes less time-consuming. We test our approach on both synthetic and real-world networks. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach both in computation time and accuracy compared to state-of-the-art algorithms.

  7. Overlapping Community Detection based on Network Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhuanlian; Zhang, Xingyi; Sun, Dengdi; Luo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Community detection in complex network has become a vital step to understand the structure and dynamics of networks in various fields. However, traditional node clustering and relatively new proposed link clustering methods have inherent drawbacks to discover overlapping communities. Node clustering is inadequate to capture the pervasive overlaps, while link clustering is often criticized due to the high computational cost and ambiguous definition of communities. So, overlapping community detection is still a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new overlapping community detection algorithm based on network decomposition, called NDOCD. Specifically, NDOCD iteratively splits the network by removing all links in derived link communities, which are identified by utilizing node clustering technique. The network decomposition contributes to reducing the computation time and noise link elimination conduces to improving the quality of obtained communities. Besides, we employ node clustering technique rather than link similarity measure to discover link communities, thus NDOCD avoids an ambiguous definition of community and becomes less time-consuming. We test our approach on both synthetic and real-world networks. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach both in computation time and accuracy compared to state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:27066904

  8. Overlapping Community Detection based on Network Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhuanlian; Zhang, Xingyi; Sun, Dengdi; Luo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Community detection in complex network has become a vital step to understand the structure and dynamics of networks in various fields. However, traditional node clustering and relatively new proposed link clustering methods have inherent drawbacks to discover overlapping communities. Node clustering is inadequate to capture the pervasive overlaps, while link clustering is often criticized due to the high computational cost and ambiguous definition of communities. So, overlapping community detection is still a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new overlapping community detection algorithm based on network decomposition, called NDOCD. Specifically, NDOCD iteratively splits the network by removing all links in derived link communities, which are identified by utilizing node clustering technique. The network decomposition contributes to reducing the computation time and noise link elimination conduces to improving the quality of obtained communities. Besides, we employ node clustering technique rather than link similarity measure to discover link communities, thus NDOCD avoids an ambiguous definition of community and becomes less time-consuming. We test our approach on both synthetic and real-world networks. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach both in computation time and accuracy compared to state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:27066904

  9. Serial FBG sensor network allowing overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbenseth, S.; Lochmann, S.; Ahrens, A.; Rehm, B.

    2016-05-01

    For structure or material monitoring low impact serial fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks have attracted increasing research interest. Common sensor networks using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) for FBG interrogation are limited in their efficiency by the spectral width of their light source, the FBG tuning range and the spectral guard bands. Overlapping spectra are strictly forbidden in this case. Applying time division multiplexing (TDM) or active resonator schemes may overcome these restrictions. However, they introduce other substantial disadvantages like signal roundtrip dependency or sophisticated control of active resonating structures. Code division multiplexing (CDM) as a means of FBG interrogation by simple autocorrelation of appropriate codes has been shown to be superior in this respect. However, it came at the cost of a second spectrometer introducing additional equalization efforts. We demonstrate a new serial FBG sensor network utilizing CDM signal processing for efficient sensor interrogation without the need of a second spectrometer and additional state of polarization (SOP) controlling components. It allows overlapping spectra even when all sensing FBGs are positioned at the same centre wavelength and it shows a high degree of insensitivity to SOP. Sequence inversed keyed (SIK) serial signal processing utilizing quasi-orthogonal balanced codes ensures simple and quick sensor interrogation with high signal-to-interference/noise ratio.

  10. Overlapping community detection using a generative model for networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenwen; Hu, Yanli; Xiao, Weidong; Ge, Bin

    2013-10-01

    Detecting overlapping communities is a challenging task in analyzing networks, where nodes may belong to more than one community. Many present methods optimize quality functions to extract the communities from a network. In this paper, we present a probabilistic method for detecting overlapping communities using a generative model. The model describes the probability of generating a network with the model parameters, which reflect the communities in the network. The community memberships of each node are determined based on a probabilistic approach using those model parameters, whose values can be obtained by fitting the model to the network. This method has the advantage that the node participation degrees in each community are also computed. The proposed method is compared with some other community detection methods on both synthetic networks and real-world networks. The experiments show that this method is efficient at detecting overlapping communities and can provide better performance on the networks where a majority of nodes belong to more than one community.

  11. Spousal Network Overlap as a Basis for Spousal Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornwell, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The role social network structure plays in facilitating flows of support between spouses is often overlooked. This study examined whether levels of support between spouses depended on the degree of overlap between spouses' networks. Network overlap may enhance spouses' support capacities by increasing their understanding of each other's support…

  12. Geometrical constraint experimental determination of Raman lidar overlap profile.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Li, Chengcai; Zhao, Yiming; Li, Jing; Chu, Yiqi

    2016-06-20

    A simple experimental method to determine the overlap profile of Raman lidar is presented in this paper. Based on Mie and Raman backscattering signals and a geometrically constrained condition, the overlap profile of a Raman lidar system can be determined. Our approach simultaneously retrieves the lidar ratio of aerosols, which is one of the most important sources of uncertainty in the overlap profile determination. The results indicate that the overlap factor is significantly influenced by the lidar ratio in experimental methods. A representative case study indicates that the correction of the overlap profile obtained by this method is practical and feasible. PMID:27409119

  13. Finding overlapping communities in networks by label propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Steve

    2010-10-01

    We propose an algorithm for finding overlapping community structure in very large networks. The algorithm is based on the label propagation technique of Raghavan, Albert and Kumara, but is able to detect communities that overlap. Like the original algorithm, vertices have labels that propagate between neighbouring vertices so that members of a community reach a consensus on their community membership. Our main contribution is to extend the label and propagation step to include information about more than one community: each vertex can now belong to up to v communities, where v is the parameter of the algorithm. Our algorithm can also handle weighted and bipartite networks. Tests on an independently designed set of benchmarks, and on real networks, show the algorithm to be highly effective in recovering overlapping communities. It is also very fast and can process very large and dense networks in a short time.

  14. Efficient discovery of overlapping communities in massive networks.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, Prem K; Blei, David M

    2013-09-01

    Detecting overlapping communities is essential to analyzing and exploring natural networks such as social networks, biological networks, and citation networks. However, most existing approaches do not scale to the size of networks that we regularly observe in the real world. In this paper, we develop a scalable approach to community detection that discovers overlapping communities in massive real-world networks. Our approach is based on a Bayesian model of networks that allows nodes to participate in multiple communities, and a corresponding algorithm that naturally interleaves subsampling from the network and updating an estimate of its communities. We demonstrate how we can discover the hidden community structure of several real-world networks, including 3.7 million US patents, 575,000 physics articles from the arXiv preprint server, and 875,000 connected Web pages from the Internet. Furthermore, we demonstrate on large simulated networks that our algorithm accurately discovers the true community structure. This paper opens the door to using sophisticated statistical models to analyze massive networks. PMID:23950224

  15. Efficient discovery of overlapping communities in massive networks

    PubMed Central

    Gopalan, Prem K.; Blei, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Detecting overlapping communities is essential to analyzing and exploring natural networks such as social networks, biological networks, and citation networks. However, most existing approaches do not scale to the size of networks that we regularly observe in the real world. In this paper, we develop a scalable approach to community detection that discovers overlapping communities in massive real-world networks. Our approach is based on a Bayesian model of networks that allows nodes to participate in multiple communities, and a corresponding algorithm that naturally interleaves subsampling from the network and updating an estimate of its communities. We demonstrate how we can discover the hidden community structure of several real-world networks, including 3.7 million US patents, 575,000 physics articles from the arXiv preprint server, and 875,000 connected Web pages from the Internet. Furthermore, we demonstrate on large simulated networks that our algorithm accurately discovers the true community structure. This paper opens the door to using sophisticated statistical models to analyze massive networks. PMID:23950224

  16. Peer Network Overlap in Twin, Sibling, and Friend Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Shirley; Segal, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that sibling–peer connections are important for understanding adolescent problem behaviors. Using a novel behavioral genetic design, the current study investigated peer network overlap in 300 child–child pairs (aged 7-13 years) in 5 dyad types: monozygotic (MZ), dizygotic twins, full siblings (FSs), friend pairs, and virtual…

  17. Multisensory integration substantiates distributed and overlapping neural networks.

    PubMed

    Pasqualotto, Achille

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis that highly overlapping networks underlie brain functions (neural reuse) is decisively supported by three decades of multisensory research. Multisensory areas process information from more than one sensory modality and therefore represent the best examples of neural reuse. Recent evidence of multisensory processing in primary visual cortices further indicates that neural reuse is a basic feature of the brain. PMID:27562234

  18. Niche Overlap and Network Specialization of Flower-Visiting Bees in an Agricultural System.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, D M; Presley, S J; Santos, G M M

    2014-12-01

    Different resource use strategies manifest as differences in the realized niches of species. Niche segregation may involve several dimensions of the niche, such as diet, space, and time. We measured the level of redundancy and complementarity of a bee-plant interaction network in an agricultural system. Because flower resource diversity is high and resource abundance associated with flowering phenology varies throughout the year, we hypothesized that trophic overlap in the community would be low (i.e., high niche complementarity). In contrast, we expected a combination of physiological constraints and exploitation competition to create high temporal overlap, leading to high redundancy in the time of use of floral resources. Dietary overlap was low (NOih = 0.18): niches of 88% of species pairs had less than 30% overlap. In contrast, temporal overlap was intermediate (NOih = 0.49): niches of 65% of species pairs had 30% to 60% overlap. Network analysis showed that bees separated their dietary niches and had intermediate complementary specialization (H2' = 0.46). In terms of their temporal niches (H2' = 0.12), bees were generalists, with high temporal redundancy. Temperature was not a key factor in the determination of niche overlap, suggesting that environmental factors do not likely have a primary role in determining high redundancy in the temporal use of floral resources. Rather, temporal overlap is likely associated with the timing of nectar production by flowers. Our results suggest that bees partition a wide variety of available floral resources, resulting in low dietary overlap and intermediate temporal overlap. PMID:27194056

  19. Multifunctional proteins revealed by overlapping clustering in protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Charles E.; Guénoche, Alain; Brun, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Multifunctional proteins perform several functions. They are expected to interact specifically with distinct sets of partners, simultaneously or not, depending on the function performed. Current graph clustering methods usually allow a protein to belong to only one cluster, therefore impeding a realistic assignment of multifunctional proteins to clusters. Results: Here, we present Overlapping Cluster Generator (OCG), a novel clustering method which decomposes a network into overlapping clusters and which is, therefore, capable of correct assignment of multifunctional proteins. The principle of OCG is to cover the graph with initial overlapping classes that are iteratively fused into a hierarchy according to an extension of Newman's modularity function. By applying OCG to a human protein–protein interaction network, we show that multifunctional proteins are revealed at the intersection of clusters and demonstrate that the method outperforms other existing methods on simulated graphs and PPI networks. Availability: This software can be downloaded from http://tagc.univ-mrs.fr/welcome/spip.php?rubrique197 Contact: brun@tagc.univ-mrs.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22080466

  20. An Overlapping Structured P2P for REIK Overlay Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjun; Song, Jingjing; Yu, Jiguo

    REIK is based on a ring which embedded an inverse Kautz digraph, to enable multi-path P2P routing. It has the constant degree and the logarithmic diameter DHT scheme with constant congestion and Byzantine fault tolerance. However, REIK did not consider the interconnection of many independent smaller networks. In this paper, we propose a new approach to build overlay network, OLS-REIK which is an overlapping structured P2P for REIK overlay network. It is a more flexible interconnecting different REIK network. Peers can belong to several rings, allowing this interconnection. By connecting smaller structured overlay networks in an unstructured way, it provides a cost effective alternative to hierarchical structured P2P systems requiring costly merging. Routing of lookup messages is performed as in REIK within one ring, but a peer belonging to several rings forwards the request to the different rings it belongs to. Furthermore a small number of across point is enough to ensure a high exhaustiveness level.

  1. Overlapping communities reveal rich structure in large-scale brain networks during rest and task conditions.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mahshid; McMenamin, Brenton W; Simon, Jonathan Z; Pessoa, Luiz

    2016-07-15

    Large-scale analysis of functional MRI data has revealed that brain regions can be grouped into stable "networks" or communities. In many instances, the communities are characterized as relatively disjoint. Although recent work indicates that brain regions may participate in multiple communities (for example, hub regions), the extent of community overlap is poorly understood. To address these issues, here we investigated large-scale brain networks based on "rest" and task human functional MRI data by employing a mixed-membership Bayesian model that allows each brain region to belong to all communities simultaneously with varying membership strengths. The approach allowed us to 1) compare the structure of disjoint and overlapping communities; 2) determine the relationship between functional diversity (how diverse is a region's functional activation repertoire) and membership diversity (how diverse is a region's affiliation to communities); 3) characterize overlapping community structure; 4) characterize the degree of non-modularity in brain networks; 5) study the distribution of "bridges", including bottleneck and hub bridges. Our findings revealed the existence of dense community overlap that was not limited to "special" hubs. Furthermore, the findings revealed important differences between community organization during rest and during specific task states. Overall, we suggest that dense overlapping communities are well suited to capture the flexible and task dependent mapping between brain regions and their functions. PMID:27129758

  2. Detecting overlapping protein complexes by rough-fuzzy clustering in protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Gao, Lin; Dong, Jihua; Yang, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rough-fuzzy clustering (RFC) method to detect overlapping protein complexes in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. RFC focuses on fuzzy relation model rather than graph model by integrating fuzzy sets and rough sets, employs the upper and lower approximations of rough sets to deal with overlapping complexes, and calculates the number of complexes automatically. Fuzzy relation between proteins is established and then transformed into fuzzy equivalence relation. Non-overlapping complexes correspond to equivalence classes satisfying certain equivalence relation. To obtain overlapping complexes, we calculate the similarity between one protein and each complex, and then determine whether the protein belongs to one or multiple complexes by computing the ratio of each similarity to maximum similarity. To validate RFC quantitatively, we test it in Gavin, Collins, Krogan and BioGRID datasets. Experiment results show that there is a good correspondence to reference complexes in MIPS and SGD databases. Then we compare RFC with several previous methods, including ClusterONE, CMC, MCL, GCE, OSLOM and CFinder. Results show the precision, sensitivity and separation are 32.4%, 42.9% and 81.9% higher than mean of the five methods in four weighted networks, and are 0.5%, 11.2% and 66.1% higher than mean of the six methods in five unweighted networks. Our method RFC works well for protein complexes detection and provides a new insight of network division, and it can also be applied to identify overlapping community structure in social networks and LFR benchmark networks. PMID:24642838

  3. Detecting Overlapping Protein Complexes by Rough-Fuzzy Clustering in Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Gao, Lin; Dong, Jihua; Yang, Xiaofei

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rough-fuzzy clustering (RFC) method to detect overlapping protein complexes in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. RFC focuses on fuzzy relation model rather than graph model by integrating fuzzy sets and rough sets, employs the upper and lower approximations of rough sets to deal with overlapping complexes, and calculates the number of complexes automatically. Fuzzy relation between proteins is established and then transformed into fuzzy equivalence relation. Non-overlapping complexes correspond to equivalence classes satisfying certain equivalence relation. To obtain overlapping complexes, we calculate the similarity between one protein and each complex, and then determine whether the protein belongs to one or multiple complexes by computing the ratio of each similarity to maximum similarity. To validate RFC quantitatively, we test it in Gavin, Collins, Krogan and BioGRID datasets. Experiment results show that there is a good correspondence to reference complexes in MIPS and SGD databases. Then we compare RFC with several previous methods, including ClusterONE, CMC, MCL, GCE, OSLOM and CFinder. Results show the precision, sensitivity and separation are 32.4%, 42.9% and 81.9% higher than mean of the five methods in four weighted networks, and are 0.5%, 11.2% and 66.1% higher than mean of the six methods in five unweighted networks. Our method RFC works well for protein complexes detection and provides a new insight of network division, and it can also be applied to identify overlapping community structure in social networks and LFR benchmark networks. PMID:24642838

  4. AREA OVERLAP METHOD FOR DETERMINING ADEQUATE CHROMATOGRAPHIC RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Area Overlap method for evaluating analytical chromatograms is evaluated and compared with the Depth-of-the-Valley, IUPAC and Purnell criteria. The method is a resolution criterion based on the fraction of area contributed by an adjacent, overlapping peak. It accounts for bot...

  5. Uncovering the overlapping community structure of complex networks by maximal cliques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junqiu; Wang, Xingyuan; Cui, Yaozu

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a unique algorithm is proposed to detect overlapping communities in the un-weighted and weighted networks with considerable accuracy. The maximal cliques, overlapping vertex, bridge vertex and isolated vertex are introduced. First, all the maximal cliques are extracted by the algorithm based on the deep and bread searching. Then two maximal cliques can be merged into a larger sub-graph by some given rules. In addition, the proposed algorithm successfully finds overlapping vertices and bridge vertices between communities. Experimental results using some real-world networks data show that the performance of the proposed algorithm is satisfactory.

  6. An ant colony based algorithm for overlapping community detection in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xu; Liu, Yanheng; Zhang, Jindong; Liu, Tuming; Zhang, Di

    2015-06-01

    Community detection is of great importance to understand the structures and functions of networks. Overlap is a significant feature of networks and overlapping community detection has attracted an increasing attention. Many algorithms have been presented to detect overlapping communities. In this paper, we present an ant colony based overlapping community detection algorithm which mainly includes ants' location initialization, ants' movement and post processing phases. An ants' location initialization strategy is designed to identify initial location of ants and initialize label list stored in each node. During the ants' movement phase, the entire ants move according to the transition probability matrix, and a new heuristic information computation approach is redefined to measure similarity between two nodes. Every node keeps a label list through the cooperation made by ants until a termination criterion is reached. A post processing phase is executed on the label list to get final overlapping community structure naturally. We illustrate the capability of our algorithm by making experiments on both synthetic networks and real world networks. The results demonstrate that our algorithm will have better performance in finding overlapping communities and overlapping nodes in synthetic datasets and real world datasets comparing with state-of-the-art algorithms.

  7. Hopfield network with constraint parameter adaptation for overlapped shape recognition.

    PubMed

    Suganthan, P N; Teoh, E K; Mital, D P

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an energy formulation for homomorphic graph matching by the Hopfield network and a Lyapunov indirect method-based learning approach to adaptively learn the constraint parameter in the energy function. The adaptation scheme eliminates the need to specify the constraint parameter empirically and generates valid and better quality mappings than the analog Hopfield network with a fixed constraint parameter. The proposed Hopfield network with constraint parameter adaptation is applied to match silhouette images of keys and results are presented. PMID:18252543

  8. Identifying Overlapping and Hierarchical Thematic Structures in Networks of Scholarly Papers: A Comparison of Three Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Havemann, Frank; Gläser, Jochen; Heinz, Michael; Struck, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce and assess three algorithms for the identification of overlapping thematic structures in networks of papers. We implemented three recently proposed approaches to the identification of overlapping and hierarchical substructures in graphs and applied the corresponding algorithms to a network of 492 information-science papers coupled via their cited sources. The thematic substructures obtained and overlaps produced by the three hierarchical cluster algorithms were compared to a content-based categorisation, which we based on the interpretation of titles, abstracts, and keywords. We defined sets of papers dealing with three topics located on different levels of aggregation: h-index, webometrics, and bibliometrics. We identified these topics with branches in the dendrograms produced by the three cluster algorithms and compared the overlapping topics they detected with one another and with the three predefined paper sets. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of applying the three approaches to paper networks in research fields. PMID:22479376

  9. Identifying overlapping and hierarchical thematic structures in networks of scholarly papers: a comparison of three approaches.

    PubMed

    Havemann, Frank; Gläser, Jochen; Heinz, Michael; Struck, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce and assess three algorithms for the identification of overlapping thematic structures in networks of papers. We implemented three recently proposed approaches to the identification of overlapping and hierarchical substructures in graphs and applied the corresponding algorithms to a network of 492 information-science papers coupled via their cited sources. The thematic substructures obtained and overlaps produced by the three hierarchical cluster algorithms were compared to a content-based categorisation, which we based on the interpretation of titles, abstracts, and keywords. We defined sets of papers dealing with three topics located on different levels of aggregation: h-index, webometrics, and bibliometrics. We identified these topics with branches in the dendrograms produced by the three cluster algorithms and compared the overlapping topics they detected with one another and with the three predefined paper sets. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of applying the three approaches to paper networks in research fields. PMID:22479376

  10. Correlations between weights and overlap in ensembles of weighted multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menichetti, Giulia; Remondini, Daniel; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2014-12-01

    Multiplex networks describe a large number of systems ranging from social networks to the brain. These multilayer structure encode information in their structure. This information can be extracted by measuring the correlations present in the multiplex networks structure, such as the overlap of the links in different layers. Many multiplex networks are also weighted, and the weights of the links can be strongly correlated with the structural properties of the multiplex network. For example, in multiplex network formed by the citation and collaboration networks between PRE scientists it was found that the statistical properties of citations to coauthors differ from the one of citations to noncoauthors, i.e., the weights depend on the overlap of the links. Here we present a theoretical framework for modeling multiplex weighted networks with different types of correlations between weights and overlap. To this end, we use the framework of canonical network ensembles, and the recently introduced concept of multilinks, showing that null models of a large variety of network structures can be constructed in this way. In order to provide a concrete example of how this framework apply to real data we consider a multiplex constructed from gene expression data of healthy and cancer tissues.

  11. [Artificial neural network applied for spectral overlap interference correction in ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Liu, S; Zeng, X

    1997-10-01

    A back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) has been applied to correcting spectral overlap interference in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Some network parameters including the range of input values and training sequence for training patterns presented to the network were discussed using simulated Ce 413.380nm and Pr 413.380nm line profiles. Results show that the noise in simulated mixture spectra will slow down the network convergence and has more influence on network prediction. PMID:15810366

  12. Crosstalk analysis of pathways in breast cancer using a network model based on overlapping differentially expressed genes

    PubMed Central

    SUN, YONG; YUAN, KAI; ZHANG, PENG; MA, RONG; ZHANG, QI-WEN; TIAN, XING-SONG

    2015-01-01

    Multiple signal transduction pathways can affect each other considerably through crosstalk. However, the presence and extent of this phenomenon have not been rigorously studied. The aim of the present study was to identify strong and normal interactions between pathways in breast cancer and determine the main pathway. Five sets of breast cancer data were downloaded from the high-throughput Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and analyzed to identify differentially expressed (DE) genes using the Rank Product (RankProd) method. A list of pathways with differential expression was obtained by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. The DE genes that overlapped between pathways were identified and a crosstalk network diagram based on the overlap of DE genes was constructed. A total of 1,464 DE genes and 26 pathways were identified. In addition, the number of DE genes that overlapped between specific pathways were determined, and the greatest degree of overlap was between the extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction and Focal adhesion pathways, which had 22 overlapping DE genes. Weighted pathway analysis of the crosstalk between pathways identified that Pathways in cancer was the main pathway in breast cancer. PMID:26622386

  13. Overlapping Networks Engaged during Spoken Language Production and Its Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Richard J.S.; Mehta, Amrish; Leech, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Spoken language production is a complex brain function that relies on large-scale networks. These include domain-specific networks that mediate language-specific processes, as well as domain-general networks mediating top-down and bottom-up attentional control. Language control is thought to involve a left-lateralized fronto-temporal-parietal (FTP) system. However, these regions do not always activate for language tasks and similar regions have been implicated in nonlinguistic cognitive processes. These inconsistent findings suggest that either the left FTP is involved in multidomain cognitive control or that there are multiple spatially overlapping FTP systems. We present evidence from an fMRI study using multivariate analysis to identify spatiotemporal networks involved in spoken language production in humans. We compared spoken language production (Speech) with multiple baselines, counting (Count), nonverbal decision (Decision), and “rest,” to pull apart the multiple partially overlapping networks that are involved in speech production. A left-lateralized FTP network was activated during Speech and deactivated during Count and nonverbal Decision trials, implicating it in cognitive control specific to sentential spoken language production. A mirror right-lateralized FTP network was activated in the Count and Decision trials, but not Speech. Importantly, a second overlapping left FTP network showed relative deactivation in Speech. These three networks, with distinct time courses, overlapped in the left parietal lobe. Contrary to the standard model of the left FTP as being dominant for speech, we revealed a more complex pattern within the left FTP, including at least two left FTP networks with competing functional roles, only one of which was activated in speech production. PMID:24966373

  14. Non-negative sparse autoencoder neural networks for the detection of overlapping, hierarchical communities in networked datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michele Rajtmajer, Sarah; Smith, Brian; Phoha, Shashi

    2012-12-01

    We propose the first use of a non-negative sparse autoencoder (NNSAE) neural network for community structure detection in complex networks. The NNSAE learns a compressed representation of a set of fixed-length, weighted random walks over the network, and communities are detected as subsets of network nodes corresponding to non-negligible elements of the basis vectors of this compression. The NNSAE model is efficient and online. When utilized for community structure detection, it is able to uncover potentially overlapping and hierarchical community structure in large networks.

  15. Non-negative sparse autoencoder neural networks for the detection of overlapping, hierarchical communities in networked datasets.

    PubMed

    Michele Rajtmajer, Sarah; Smith, Brian; Phoha, Shashi

    2012-12-01

    We propose the first use of a non-negative sparse autoencoder (NNSAE) neural network for community structure detection in complex networks. The NNSAE learns a compressed representation of a set of fixed-length, weighted random walks over the network, and communities are detected as subsets of network nodes corresponding to non-negligible elements of the basis vectors of this compression. The NNSAE model is efficient and online. When utilized for community structure detection, it is able to uncover potentially overlapping and hierarchical community structure in large networks. PMID:23278076

  16. Feedforward neural network models for handling class overlap and class imbalance.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Ralf; Karayiannis, Nicolaos B; Eggimann, Fritz

    2005-10-01

    This paper proposes a framework for training feedforward neural network models capable of handling class overlap and imbalance by minimizing an error function that compensates for such imperfections of the training set. A special case of the proposed error function can be used for training variance-controlled neural networks (VCNNs), which are developed to handle class overlap by minimizing an error function involving the class-specific variance (CSV) computed at their outputs. Another special case of the proposed error function can be used for training class-balancing neural networks (CBNNs), which are developed to handle class imbalance by relying on class-specific correction (CSC). VCNNs and CBNNs are compared with conventional feedforward neural networks (FFNNs), quantum neural networks (QNNs), and resampling techniques. The properties of VCNNs and CBNNs are illustrated by experiments on artificial data. Various experiments involving real-world data reveal the advantages offered by VCNNs and CBNNs in the presence of class overlap and class imbalance. PMID:16278937

  17. Scalable Multicast Protocols for Overlapped Groups in Broker-Based Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chayoung; Ahn, Jinho

    In sensor networks, there are lots of overlapped multicast groups because of many subscribers, associated with their potentially varying specific interests, querying every event to sensors/publishers. And gossip based communication protocols are promising as one of potential solutions providing scalability in P(Publish)/ S(Subscribe) paradigm in sensor networks. Moreover, despite the importance of both guaranteeing message delivery order and supporting overlapped multicast groups in sensor or P2P networks, there exist little research works on development of gossip-based protocols to satisfy all these requirements. In this paper, we present two versions of causally ordered delivery guaranteeing protocols for overlapped multicast groups. The one is based on sensor-broker as delegates and the other is based on local views and delegates representing subscriber subgroups. In the sensor-broker based protocol, sensor-broker might lead to make overlapped multicast networks organized by subscriber's interests. The message delivery order has been guaranteed consistently and all multicast messages are delivered to overlapped subscribers using gossip based protocols by sensor-broker. Therefore, these features of the sensor-broker based protocol might be significantly scalable rather than those of the protocols by hierarchical membership list of dedicated groups like traditional committee protocols. And the subscriber-delegate based protocol is much stronger rather than fully decentralized protocols guaranteeing causally ordered delivery based on only local views because the message delivery order has been guaranteed consistently by all corresponding members of the groups including delegates. Therefore, this feature of the subscriber-delegate protocol is a hybrid approach improving the inherent scalability of multicast nature by gossip-based technique in all communications.

  18. Overlap determination for temperature measurements from a pure rotational Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Chen, Siying; Zhang, Yinchao; Guo, Pan; Chen, He; Chen, Binglong

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new method to calibrate the effect of overlap for temperature measurements made with a pure rotational Raman lidar. This method is based on the construction of a factor in the signal intensity ratio, which has an approximately linear relationship with altitude within the troposphere and can be obtained from radiosonde temperature measurements. Using this relationship, the effect of overlap on the signal intensity ratio can be calibrated. The method has been verified by simulations and an experiment. Comparisons with results obtained from using the existing calibration method show that the overlap determined using the new method is more accurate.

  19. Identifying Modular Flows on Multilayer Networks Reveals Highly Overlapping Organization in Interconnected Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Domenico, Manlio; Lancichinetti, Andrea; Arenas, Alex; Rosvall, Martin

    2015-01-01

    To comprehend interconnected systems across the social and natural sciences, researchers have developed many powerful methods to identify functional modules. For example, with interaction data aggregated into a single network layer, flow-based methods have proven useful for identifying modular dynamics in weighted and directed networks that capture constraints on flow processes. However, many interconnected systems consist of agents or components that exhibit multiple layers of interactions, possibly from several different processes. Inevitably, representing this intricate network of networks as a single aggregated network leads to information loss and may obscure the actual organization. Here, we propose a method based on a compression of network flows that can identify modular flows both within and across layers in nonaggregated multilayer networks. Our numerical experiments on synthetic multilayer networks, with some layers originating from the same interaction process, show that the analysis fails in aggregated networks or when treating the layers separately, whereas the multilayer method can accurately identify modules across layers that originate from the same interaction process. We capitalize on our findings and reveal the community structure of two multilayer collaboration networks with topics as layers: scientists affiliated with the Pierre Auger Observatory and scientists publishing works on networks on the arXiv. Compared to conventional aggregated methods, the multilayer method uncovers connected topics and reveals smaller modules with more overlap that better capture the actual organization.

  20. Community Structure Detection for Overlapping Modules through Mathematical Programming in Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Laura; Kittas, Aristotelis; Liu, Songsong; Papageorgiou, Lazaros G.; Tsoka, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Community structure detection has proven to be important in revealing the underlying properties of complex networks. The standard problem, where a partition of disjoint communities is sought, has been continually adapted to offer more realistic models of interactions in these systems. Here, a two-step procedure is outlined for exploring the concept of overlapping communities. First, a hard partition is detected by employing existing methodologies. We then propose a novel mixed integer non linear programming (MINLP) model, known as OverMod, which transforms disjoint communities to overlapping. The procedure is evaluated through its application to protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks of the rat, E. coli, yeast and human organisms. Connector nodes of hard partitions exhibit topological and functional properties indicative of their suitability as candidates for multiple module membership. OverMod identifies two types of connector nodes, inter and intra-connector, each with their own particular characteristics pertaining to their topological and functional role in the organisation of the network. Inter-connector proteins are shown to be highly conserved proteins participating in pathways that control essential cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis and their differences with intra-connectors is highlighted. Many of these proteins are shown to possess multiple roles of distinct nature through their participation in different network modules, setting them apart from proteins that are simply ‘hubs’, i.e. proteins with many interaction partners but with a more specific biochemical role. PMID:25412367

  1. Community structure detection for overlapping modules through mathematical programming in protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Laura; Kittas, Aristotelis; Liu, Songsong; Papageorgiou, Lazaros G; Tsoka, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Community structure detection has proven to be important in revealing the underlying properties of complex networks. The standard problem, where a partition of disjoint communities is sought, has been continually adapted to offer more realistic models of interactions in these systems. Here, a two-step procedure is outlined for exploring the concept of overlapping communities. First, a hard partition is detected by employing existing methodologies. We then propose a novel mixed integer non linear programming (MINLP) model, known as OverMod, which transforms disjoint communities to overlapping. The procedure is evaluated through its application to protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks of the rat, E. coli, yeast and human organisms. Connector nodes of hard partitions exhibit topological and functional properties indicative of their suitability as candidates for multiple module membership. OverMod identifies two types of connector nodes, inter and intra-connector, each with their own particular characteristics pertaining to their topological and functional role in the organisation of the network. Inter-connector proteins are shown to be highly conserved proteins participating in pathways that control essential cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis and their differences with intra-connectors is highlighted. Many of these proteins are shown to possess multiple roles of distinct nature through their participation in different network modules, setting them apart from proteins that are simply 'hubs', i.e. proteins with many interaction partners but with a more specific biochemical role. PMID:25412367

  2. A precise determination of the void percolation threshold for two distributions of overlapping spheres

    SciTech Connect

    RINTOUL,MARK DANIEL

    2000-01-25

    The void percolation threshold is calculated for a distribution of overlapping spheres with equal radii, and for a binary sized distribution of overlapping spheres, where half of the spheres have radii twice as large as the other half. Using systems much larger than previous work, the authors determine a much more precise value for the percolation thresholds and correlation length exponent. The values for the percolation thresholds are shown to be significantly different, in contrast with previous, less precise works that speculated that the threshold might be universal with respect to sphere size distribution.

  3. Model Selection and Hypothesis Testing for Large-Scale Network Models with Overlapping Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peixoto, Tiago P.

    2015-01-01

    The effort to understand network systems in increasing detail has resulted in a diversity of methods designed to extract their large-scale structure from data. Unfortunately, many of these methods yield diverging descriptions of the same network, making both the comparison and understanding of their results a difficult challenge. A possible solution to this outstanding issue is to shift the focus away from ad hoc methods and move towards more principled approaches based on statistical inference of generative models. As a result, we face instead the more well-defined task of selecting between competing generative processes, which can be done under a unified probabilistic framework. Here, we consider the comparison between a variety of generative models including features such as degree correction, where nodes with arbitrary degrees can belong to the same group, and community overlap, where nodes are allowed to belong to more than one group. Because such model variants possess an increasing number of parameters, they become prone to overfitting. In this work, we present a method of model selection based on the minimum description length criterion and posterior odds ratios that is capable of fully accounting for the increased degrees of freedom of the larger models and selects the best one according to the statistical evidence available in the data. In applying this method to many empirical unweighted networks from different fields, we observe that community overlap is very often not supported by statistical evidence and is selected as a better model only for a minority of them. On the other hand, we find that degree correction tends to be almost universally favored by the available data, implying that intrinsic node proprieties (as opposed to group properties) are often an essential ingredient of network formation.

  4. The (un)supervised NMF methods for discovering overlapping communities as well as hubs and outliers in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Cao, Xiaochun; Jin, Di; Cao, Yixin; He, Dongxiao

    2016-03-01

    For its crucial importance in the study of large-scale networks, many researchers devote to the detection of communities in various networks. It is now widely agreed that the communities usually overlap with each other. In some communities, there exist members that play a special role as hubs (also known as leaders), whose importance merits special attention. Moreover, it is also observed that some members of the network do not belong to any communities in a convincing way, and hence recognized as outliers. Failure to detect and exclude outliers will distort, sometimes significantly, the outcome of the detected communities. In short, it is preferable for a community detection method to detect all three structures altogether. This becomes even more interesting and also more challenging when we take the unsupervised assumption, that is, we do not assume the prior knowledge of the number K of communities. Our approach here is to define a novel generative model and formalize the detection of overlapping communities as well as hubs and outliers as an optimization problem on it. When K is given, we propose a normalized symmetric nonnegative matrix factorization algorithm based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence to learn the parameters of the model. Otherwise, by combining KL divergence and prior model on parameters, we introduce another parameter learning method based on Bayesian symmetric nonnegative matrix factorization to learn the parameters of the model, while determining K. Therefore, we present a community detection method arguably in the most general sense, which detects all three structures altogether without prior knowledge of the number of communities. Finally, we test the proposed method on various real-world networks. The experimental results, in contrast to several state-of-art algorithms, indicate its superior performance over other ones in terms of both clustering accuracy and community quality.

  5. Precise determination of the void percolation threshold for two distributions of overlapping spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Rintoul, M. D.

    2000-07-01

    The void percolation threshold is calculated for a distribution of overlapping spheres with equal radii, and for a binary-sized distribution of overlapping spheres, where half of the spheres have radii twice as large as the other half. Using systems much larger than previous work, we determine a much more precise value for the percolation thresholds and correlation length exponent. The value of the percolation threshold for the monodisperse case is shown to be 0.0301{+-}0.0003, whereas the value for the bidisperse case is shown to be p{sub c}=0.0287{+-}0.0005. The fact that these are significantly different is in contrast with previous, less precise works that speculated that the threshold might be universal with respect to sphere size distribution. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. Dynamic functional network connectivity reveals unique and overlapping profiles of insula subdivisions.

    PubMed

    Nomi, Jason S; Farrant, Kristafor; Damaraju, Eswar; Rachakonda, Srinivas; Calhoun, Vince D; Uddin, Lucina Q

    2016-05-01

    The human insular cortex consists of functionally diverse subdivisions that engage during tasks ranging from interoception to cognitive control. The multiplicity of functions subserved by insular subdivisions calls for a nuanced investigation of their functional connectivity profiles. Four insula subdivisions (dorsal anterior, dAI; ventral, VI; posterior, PI; middle, MI) derived using a data-driven approach were subjected to static- and dynamic functional network connectivity (s-FNC and d-FNC) analyses. Static-FNC analyses replicated previous work demonstrating a cognition-emotion-interoception division of the insula, where the dAI is functionally connected to frontal areas, the VI to limbic areas, and the PI and MI to sensorimotor areas. Dynamic-FNC analyses consisted of k-means clustering of sliding windows to identify variable insula connectivity states. The d-FNC analysis revealed that the most frequently occurring dynamic state mirrored the cognition-emotion-interoception division observed from the s-FNC analysis, with less frequently occurring states showing overlapping and unique subdivision connectivity profiles. In two of the states, all subdivisions exhibited largely overlapping profiles, consisting of subcortical, sensory, motor, and frontal connections. Two other states showed the dAI exhibited a unique connectivity profile compared with other insula subdivisions. Additionally, the dAI exhibited the most variable functional connections across the s-FNC and d-FNC analyses, and was the only subdivision to exhibit dynamic functional connections with regions of the default mode network. These results highlight how a d-FNC approach can capture functional dynamics masked by s-FNC approaches, and reveal dynamic functional connections enabling the functional flexibility of the insula across time. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1770-1787, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26880689

  7. Extrinsic calibration of a non-overlapping camera network based on close-range photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shuai; Shao, Xinxing; Kang, Xin; Yang, Fujun; He, Xiaoyuan

    2016-08-10

    In this paper, an extrinsic calibration method for a non-overlapping camera network is presented based on close-range photogrammetry. The method does not require calibration targets or the cameras to be moved. The visual sensors are relatively motionless and do not see the same area at the same time. The proposed method combines the multiple cameras using some arbitrarily distributed encoded targets. The calibration procedure consists of three steps: reconstructing the three-dimensional (3D) coordinates of the encoded targets using a hand-held digital camera, performing the intrinsic calibration of the camera network, and calibrating the extrinsic parameters of each camera with only one image. A series of experiments, including 3D reconstruction, rotation, and translation, are employed to validate the proposed approach. The results show that the relative error for the 3D reconstruction is smaller than 0.003%, the relative errors of both rotation and translation are less than 0.066%, and the re-projection error is only 0.09 pixels. PMID:27534480

  8. Experimental determination of band overlap in type II InAs/GaSb superlattice based on temperature dependent photoluminescence signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianliang; Ma, Wenquan; Zhang, Yanhua; Cao, Yulian; Liu, Ke; Huang, Wenjun; Luo, Shuai; Ji, Haiming; Yang, Tao

    2015-12-01

    We have determined the band overlap in type II InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL) structure based on the temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) results of a short wavelength SL sample. The band overlap value is treated as a temperature variable and is simulated by fitting the PL peak position using the 8K·P method. It is found that the band overlap monotonically decreases from 0.325 to 0.225 eV when temperature is increased from 12 to 90 K. The calculated e1-hh1 transition using the obtained band overlap data shows an agreement with the PL results of another SL sample.

  9. Fragmentation cross-section of relativistic oxygen ions and determination of overlap parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. D.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented for measurements of total fragmentation cross sections of relativistic O-16 ions in CsI crystals, which were performed using a monochromatic bevatron ion beam at energies of 0.5 and 2.1 GeV/nucleon. The total fragmentation cross section at each energy is determined on the basis of detected changes in the charge of the incident ions, and the values obtained at both energies are found to be the same to within the experimental errors. Values of the O-16 nucleon radius and overlap parameter are derived simultaneously from the measured cross sections.

  10. A hybrid graph-theoretic method for mining overlapping functional modules in large sparse protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihua; Liu, Hong-Wei; Ning, Xue-Mei; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2009-01-01

    Modular architecture, which encompasses groups of genes/proteins involved in elementary biological functional units, is a basic form of the organisation of interacting proteins. Here, we propose a method that combines the Line Graph Transformation (LGT) and clique percolation-clustering algorithm to detect network modules, which may overlap each other in large sparse PPI networks. The resulting modules by the present method show a high coverage among yeast, fly, and worm PPI networks, respectively. Our analysis of the yeast PPI network suggests that most of these modules have well-biological significance in context of protein localisation, function annotation, and protein complexes. PMID:19432377

  11. Transient brain activity disentangles fMRI resting-state dynamics in terms of spatially and temporally overlapping networks

    PubMed Central

    Karahanoğlu, Fikret Işik; Van De Ville, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provide a new window onto the organizational principles of brain function. Using state-of-the-art signal processing techniques, we extract innovation-driven co-activation patterns (iCAPs) from resting-state fMRI. The iCAPs' maps are spatially overlapping and their sustained-activity signals temporally overlapping. Decomposing resting-state fMRI using iCAPs reveals the rich spatiotemporal structure of functional components that dynamically assemble known resting-state networks. The temporal overlap between iCAPs is substantial; typically, three to four iCAPs occur simultaneously in combinations that are consistent with their behaviour profiles. In contrast to conventional connectivity analysis, which suggests a negative correlation between fluctuations in the default-mode network (DMN) and task-positive networks, we instead find evidence for two DMN-related iCAPs consisting the posterior cingulate cortex that differentially interact with the attention network. These findings demonstrate how the fMRI resting state can be functionally decomposed into spatially and temporally overlapping building blocks using iCAPs. PMID:26178017

  12. Using maximum spectrum of continuous wavelet transform for demodulation of an overlapped spectrum in a fiber Bragg grating sensor network.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Mo, Wenqin; Dong, Kaifeng; Jin, Fang; Song, Junlei

    2016-06-10

    The maximum spectrum of the continuous wavelet transform (MSCWT) is proposed to demodulate the central wavelengths for the overlapped spectrum in a serial fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing system. We describe the operation principle of the MSCWT method. Moreover, the influence of the interval gap between two FBG wavelengths, 3 dB bandwidths, and optical powers of the reflected spectra are discussed. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the MSCWT can resolve an overlapped spectrum and decode the central wavelength with high accuracy. More importantly, the proposed peak detection method can enhance the sensing capacity of a wavelength division multiplexing FBG sensor network. PMID:27409024

  13. CHIMERA: Top-down model for hierarchical, overlapping and directed cluster structures in directed and weighted complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, R.

    2016-11-01

    In many networks discovered in biology, medicine, neuroscience and other disciplines special properties like a certain degree distribution and hierarchical cluster structure (also called communities) can be observed as general organizing principles. Detecting the cluster structure of an unknown network promises to identify functional subdivisions, hierarchy and interactions on a mesoscale. It is not trivial choosing an appropriate detection algorithm because there are multiple network, cluster and algorithmic properties to be considered. Edges can be weighted and/or directed, clusters overlap or build a hierarchy in several ways. Algorithms differ not only in runtime, memory requirements but also in allowed network and cluster properties. They are based on a specific definition of what a cluster is, too. On the one hand, a comprehensive network creation model is needed to build a large variety of benchmark networks with different reasonable structures to compare algorithms. On the other hand, if a cluster structure is already known, it is desirable to separate effects of this structure from other network properties. This can be done with null model networks that mimic an observed cluster structure to improve statistics on other network features. A third important application is the general study of properties in networks with different cluster structures, possibly evolving over time. Currently there are good benchmark and creation models available. But what is left is a precise sandbox model to build hierarchical, overlapping and directed clusters for undirected or directed, binary or weighted complex random networks on basis of a sophisticated blueprint. This gap shall be closed by the model CHIMERA (Cluster Hierarchy Interconnection Model for Evaluation, Research and Analysis) which will be introduced and described here for the first time.

  14. Resolution of overlapped spectra for the determination of ternary mixture using different and modified spectrophotometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Bahia Abbas; El-Zaher, Asmaa Ahmed; Mahrouse, Marianne Alphonse; Ahmed, Maha Said

    2016-08-01

    Four new spectrophotometric methods were developed, applied to resolve the overlapped spectra of a ternary mixture of [aliskiren hemifumarate (ALS)-amlodipine besylate (AM)-hydrochlorothiazide (HCT)] and to determine the three drugs in pure form and in combined dosage form. Method A depends on simultaneous determination of ALS, AM and HCT using principal component regression and partial least squares chemometric methods. In Method B, a modified isosbestic spectrophotometric method was applied for the determination of the total concentration of ALS and HCT by measuring the absorbance at 274.5 nm (isosbestic point, Aiso). On the other hand, the concentration of HCT in ternary mixture with ALS and AM could be calculated without interference using first derivative spectrophotometric method by measuring the amplitude at 279 nm (zero crossing of ALS and zero value of AM). Thus, the content of ALS was calculated by subtraction. Method C, double divisor first derivative ratio spectrophotometry (double divisor 1DD method), was based on that for the determination of one drug, the ratio spectra were obtained by dividing the absorption spectra of its different concentrations by the sum of the absorption spectra of the other two drugs as a double divisor. The first derivative of the obtained ratio spectra were then recorded using the appropriate smoothing factor. The amplitudes at 291 nm, 380 nm and 274.5 nm were selected for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT in their ternary mixture, respectively. Method D was based on mean centering of ratio spectra. The mean centered values at 287, 295.5 and 269 nm were recorded and used for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT, respectively. The developed methods were validated according to ICH guidelines and proved to be accurate, precise and selective. Satisfactory results were obtained by applying the proposed methods to the analysis of pharmaceutical dosage form.

  15. Resolution of overlapped spectra for the determination of ternary mixture using different and modified spectrophotometric methods.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Bahia Abbas; El-Zaher, Asmaa Ahmed; Mahrouse, Marianne Alphonse; Ahmed, Maha Said

    2016-08-01

    Four new spectrophotometric methods were developed, applied to resolve the overlapped spectra of a ternary mixture of [aliskiren hemifumarate (ALS)-amlodipine besylate (AM)-hydrochlorothiazide (HCT)] and to determine the three drugs in pure form and in combined dosage form. Method A depends on simultaneous determination of ALS, AM and HCT using principal component regression and partial least squares chemometric methods. In Method B, a modified isosbestic spectrophotometric method was applied for the determination of the total concentration of ALS and HCT by measuring the absorbance at 274.5nm (isosbestic point, Aiso). On the other hand, the concentration of HCT in ternary mixture with ALS and AM could be calculated without interference using first derivative spectrophotometric method by measuring the amplitude at 279nm (zero crossing of ALS and zero value of AM). Thus, the content of ALS was calculated by subtraction. Method C, double divisor first derivative ratio spectrophotometry (double divisor (1)DD method), was based on that for the determination of one drug, the ratio spectra were obtained by dividing the absorption spectra of its different concentrations by the sum of the absorption spectra of the other two drugs as a double divisor. The first derivative of the obtained ratio spectra were then recorded using the appropriate smoothing factor. The amplitudes at 291nm, 380nm and 274.5nm were selected for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT in their ternary mixture, respectively. Method D was based on mean centering of ratio spectra. The mean centered values at 287, 295.5 and 269nm were recorded and used for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT, respectively. The developed methods were validated according to ICH guidelines and proved to be accurate, precise and selective. Satisfactory results were obtained by applying the proposed methods to the analysis of pharmaceutical dosage form. PMID:27128521

  16. Overlap in Bibliographic Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, William W.; Wilson, Concepcion S.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the topic of Fuzzy Set Theory to determine the overlap of coverage in bibliographic databases. Highlights include examples of comparisons of database coverage; frequency distribution of the degree of overlap; records with maximum overlap; records unique to one database; intra-database duplicates; and overlap in the top ten databases.…

  17. Overlapping activator sequences determined for two oppositely oriented promoters in halophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Martina; Marschaus, Larissa; Reuff, Muriel; Besche, Verena; Sartorius-Neef, Simone; Pfeifer, Felicitas

    2008-01-01

    Transcription of the genomic region involved in gas vesicle formation in Halobacterium salinarum (p-vac) and Haloferax mediterranei (mc-vac) is driven by two divergent promoters, PA and PD, separated by only 35 nt. Both promoters are activated by the transcription activator GvpE which in the case of PmcA requires a 20-nt sequence (UAS) consisting of two conserved 8-nt sequence portions located upstream of BRE. Here, we determined the two UAS elements in the promoter region of p-vac by scanning mutageneses using constructs containing PpD (without PpA) fused to the bgaH reporter gene encoding an enzyme with β-galactosidase activity, or the dual reporter construct pApD with PpD fused to bgaH and PpA to an altered version of gvpA. The two UAS elements found exhibited a similar extension and distance to BRE as previously determined for the UAS in PmcA. Their distal 8-nt portions almost completely overlapped in the centre of PpD–PpA, and mutations in this region negatively affected the GvpE-mediated activation of both promoters. Any alteration of the distance between BRE and UAS resulted in the loss of the GvpE activation, as did a complete substitution of the proximal 8-nt portion, underlining that a close location of UAS and BRE was very important. PMID:18056077

  18. Novel two wavelength spectrophotometric methods for simultaneous determination of binary mixtures with severely overlapping spectra.

    PubMed

    Lotfy, Hayam M; Saleh, Sarah S; Hassan, Nagiba Y; Salem, Hesham

    2015-02-01

    This work presents the application of different spectrophotometric techniques based on two wavelengths for the determination of severely overlapped spectral components in a binary mixture without prior separation. Four novel spectrophotometric methods were developed namely: induced dual wavelength method (IDW), dual wavelength resolution technique (DWRT), advanced amplitude modulation method (AAM) and induced amplitude modulation method (IAM). The results of the novel methods were compared to that of three well-established methods which were: dual wavelength method (DW), Vierordt's method (VD) and bivariate method (BV). The developed methods were applied for the analysis of the binary mixture of hydrocortisone acetate (HCA) and fusidic acid (FSA) formulated as topical cream accompanied by the determination of methyl paraben and propyl paraben present as preservatives. The specificity of the novel methods was investigated by analyzing laboratory prepared mixtures and the combined dosage form. The methods were validated as per ICH guidelines where accuracy, repeatability, inter-day precision and robustness were found to be within the acceptable limits. The results obtained from the proposed methods were statistically compared with official ones where no significant difference was observed. No difference was observed between the obtained results when compared to the reported HPLC method, which proved that the developed methods could be alternative to HPLC techniques in quality control laboratories. PMID:25467671

  19. Novel two wavelength spectrophotometric methods for simultaneous determination of binary mixtures with severely overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfy, Hayam M.; Saleh, Sarah S.; Hassan, Nagiba Y.; Salem, Hesham

    2015-02-01

    This work presents the application of different spectrophotometric techniques based on two wavelengths for the determination of severely overlapped spectral components in a binary mixture without prior separation. Four novel spectrophotometric methods were developed namely: induced dual wavelength method (IDW), dual wavelength resolution technique (DWRT), advanced amplitude modulation method (AAM) and induced amplitude modulation method (IAM). The results of the novel methods were compared to that of three well-established methods which were: dual wavelength method (DW), Vierordt's method (VD) and bivariate method (BV). The developed methods were applied for the analysis of the binary mixture of hydrocortisone acetate (HCA) and fusidic acid (FSA) formulated as topical cream accompanied by the determination of methyl paraben and propyl paraben present as preservatives. The specificity of the novel methods was investigated by analyzing laboratory prepared mixtures and the combined dosage form. The methods were validated as per ICH guidelines where accuracy, repeatability, inter-day precision and robustness were found to be within the acceptable limits. The results obtained from the proposed methods were statistically compared with official ones where no significant difference was observed. No difference was observed between the obtained results when compared to the reported HPLC method, which proved that the developed methods could be alternative to HPLC techniques in quality control laboratories.

  20. Configuring compute nodes of a parallel computer in an operational group into a plurality of independent non-overlapping collective networks

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Inglett, Todd A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-03-02

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for configuring compute nodes of a parallel computer in an operational group into a plurality of independent non-overlapping collective networks, the compute nodes in the operational group connected together for data communications through a global combining network, that include: partitioning the compute nodes in the operational group into a plurality of non-overlapping subgroups; designating one compute node from each of the non-overlapping subgroups as a master node; and assigning, to the compute nodes in each of the non-overlapping subgroups, class routing instructions that organize the compute nodes in that non-overlapping subgroup as a collective network such that the master node is a physical root.

  1. Sequence Determination from Overlapping Fragments: A Simple Model of Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, Bernard; Fink, Thomas M.

    2002-02-01

    Assembling fragments randomly sampled from along a sequence is the basis of whole-genome shotgun sequencing, a technique used to map the DNA of the human and other genomes. We calculate the probability that a random sequence can be recovered from a collection of overlapping fragments. We provide an exact solution for an infinite alphabet and in the case of constant overlaps. For the general problem we apply two assembly strategies and give the probability that the assembly puzzle can be solved in the limit of infinitely many fragments.

  2. Friending, IMing, and hanging out face-to-face: overlap in adolescents' online and offline social networks.

    PubMed

    Reich, Stephanie M; Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Espinoza, Guadalupe

    2012-03-01

    Many new and important developmental issues are encountered during adolescence, which is also a time when Internet use becomes increasingly popular. Studies have shown that adolescents are using these online spaces to address developmental issues, especially needs for intimacy and connection to others. Online communication with its potential for interacting with unknown others, may put teens at increased risk. Two hundred and fifty-one high school students completed an in-person survey, and 126 of these completed an additional online questionnaire about how and why they use the Internet, their activities on social networking sites (e.g., Facebook, MySpace) and their reasons for participation, and how they perceive these online spaces to impact their friendships. To examine the extent of overlap between online and offline friends, participants were asked to list the names of their top interaction partners offline and online (Facebook and instant messaging). Results reveal that adolescents mainly use social networking sites to connect with others, in particular with people known from offline contexts. While adolescents report little monitoring by their parents, there was no evidence that teens are putting themselves at risk by interacting with unknown others. Instead, adolescents seem to use the Internet, especially social networking sites, to connect with known others. While the study found moderate overlap between teens' closest online and offline friends, the patterns suggest that adolescents use online contexts to strengthen offline relationships. PMID:22369341

  3. SPARK: Sparsity-based analysis of reliable k-hubness and overlapping network structure in brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kangjoo; Lina, Jean-Marc; Gotman, Jean; Grova, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Functional hubs are defined as the specific brain regions with dense connections to other regions in a functional brain network. Among them, connector hubs are of great interests, as they are assumed to promote global and hierarchical communications between functionally specialized networks. Damage to connector hubs may have a more crucial effect on the system than does damage to other hubs. Hubs in graph theory are often identified from a correlation matrix, and classified as connector hubs when the hubs are more connected to regions in other networks than within the networks to which they belong. However, the identification of hubs from functional data is more complex than that from structural data, notably because of the inherent problem of multicollinearity between temporal dynamics within a functional network. In this context, we developed and validated a method to reliably identify connectors and corresponding overlapping network structure from resting-state fMRI. This new method is actually handling the multicollinearity issue, since it does not rely on counting the number of connections from a thresholded correlation matrix. The novelty of the proposed method is that besides counting the number of networks involved in each voxel, it allows us to identify which networks are actually involved in each voxel, using a data-driven sparse general linear model in order to identify brain regions involved in more than one network. Moreover, we added a bootstrap resampling strategy to assess statistically the reproducibility of our results at the single subject level. The unified framework is called SPARK, i.e. SParsity-based Analysis of Reliable k-hubness, where k-hubness denotes the number of networks overlapping in each voxel. The accuracy and robustness of SPARK were evaluated using two dimensional box simulations and realistic simulations that examined detection of artificial hubs generated on real data. Then, test/retest reliability of the method was assessed

  4. Clusters in weighted macroeconomic networks: the EU case. Introducing the overlapping index of GDP/capita fluctuation correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gligor, M.; Ausloos, M.

    2008-06-01

    GDP/capita correlations are investigated in various time windows (TW), for the time interval 1990 2005. The target group of countries is the set of 25 EU members, 15 till 2004 plus the 10 countries which joined EU later on. The TW-means of the statistical correlation coefficients are taken as the weights (links) of a fully connected network having the countries as nodes. Thereafter we define and introduce the overlapping index of weighted network nodes. A cluster structure of EU countries is derived from the statistically relevant eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix. This may be considered to yield some information about the structure, stability and evolution of the EU country clusters in a macroeconomic sense.

  5. Potato leafroll virus structural proteins manipulate overlapping, yet distinct protein interaction networks during infection.

    PubMed

    DeBlasio, Stacy L; Johnson, Richard; Sweeney, Michelle M; Karasev, Alexander; Gray, Stewart M; MacCoss, Michael J; Cilia, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) produces a readthrough protein (RTP) via translational readthrough of the coat protein amber stop codon. The RTP functions as a structural component of the virion and as a nonincorporated protein in concert with numerous insect and plant proteins to regulate virus movement/transmission and tissue tropism. Affinity purification coupled to quantitative MS was used to generate protein interaction networks for a PLRV mutant that is unable to produce the read through domain (RTD) and compared to the known wild-type PLRV protein interaction network. By quantifying differences in the protein interaction networks, we identified four distinct classes of PLRV-plant interactions: those plant and nonstructural viral proteins interacting with assembled coat protein (category I); plant proteins in complex with both coat protein and RTD (category II); plant proteins in complex with the RTD (category III); and plant proteins that had higher affinity for virions lacking the RTD (category IV). Proteins identified as interacting with the RTD are potential candidates for regulating viral processes that are mediated by the RTP such as phloem retention and systemic movement and can potentially be useful targets for the development of strategies to prevent infection and/or viral transmission of Luteoviridae species that infect important crop species. PMID:25787689

  6. Scope of partial least-squares regression applied to the enantiomeric composition determination of ketoprofen from strongly overlapped chromatographic profiles.

    PubMed

    Padró, Juan M; Osorio-Grisales, Jaiver; Arancibia, Juan A; Olivieri, Alejandro C; Castells, Cecilia B

    2015-07-01

    Valuable quantitative information could be obtained from strongly overlapped chromatographic profiles of two enantiomers by using proper chemometric methods. Complete separation profiles where the peaks are fully resolved are difficult to achieve in chiral separation methods, and this becomes a particularly severe problem in case that the analyst needs to measure the chiral purity, i.e., when one of the enantiomers is present in the sample in very low concentrations. In this report, we explore the scope of a multivariate chemometric technique based on unfolded partial least-squares regression, as a mathematical tool to solve this quite frequent difficulty. This technique was applied to obtain quantitative results from partially overlapped chromatographic profiles of R- and S-ketoprofen, with different values of enantioresolution factors (from 0.81 down to less than 0.2 resolution units), and also at several different S:R enantiomeric ratios. Enantiomeric purity below 1% was determined with excellent precision even from almost completely overlapped signals. All these assays were tested on the most demanding condition, i.e., when the minor peak elutes immediately after the main peak. The results were validated using univariate calibration of completely resolved profiles and the method applied to the determination of enantiomeric purity of commercial pharmaceuticals. PMID:25929676

  7. Oscillation-Driven Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity Allows Multiple Overlapping Pattern Recognition in Inhibitory Interneuron Networks.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Jesús A; Luque, Niceto R; Tolu, Silvia; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2016-08-01

    The majority of operations carried out by the brain require learning complex signal patterns for future recognition, retrieval and reuse. Although learning is thought to depend on multiple forms of long-term synaptic plasticity, the way this latter contributes to pattern recognition is still poorly understood. Here, we have used a simple model of afferent excitatory neurons and interneurons with lateral inhibition, reproducing a network topology found in many brain areas from the cerebellum to cortical columns. When endowed with spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) at the excitatory input synapses and at the inhibitory interneuron-interneuron synapses, the interneurons rapidly learned complex input patterns. Interestingly, induction of plasticity required that the network be entrained into theta-frequency band oscillations, setting the internal phase-reference required to drive STDP. Inhibitory plasticity effectively distributed multiple patterns among available interneurons, thus allowing the simultaneous detection of multiple overlapping patterns. The addition of plasticity in intrinsic excitability made the system more robust allowing self-adjustment and rescaling in response to a broad range of input patterns. The combination of plasticity in lateral inhibitory connections and homeostatic mechanisms in the inhibitory interneurons optimized mutual information (MI) transfer. The storage of multiple complex patterns in plastic interneuron networks could be critical for the generation of sparse representations of information in excitatory neuron populations falling under their control. PMID:27079422

  8. Truthful Channel Sharing for Self Coexistence of Overlapping Medical Body Area Networks.

    PubMed

    Fang, Gengfa; Orgun, Mehmet A; Shankaran, Rajan; Dutkiewicz, Eryk; Zheng, Guanglou

    2016-01-01

    As defined by IEEE 802.15.6 standard, channel sharing is a potential method to coordinate inter-network interference among Medical Body Area Networks (MBANs) that are close to one another. However, channel sharing opens up new vulnerabilities as selfish MBANs may manipulate their online channel requests to gain unfair advantage over others. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a truthful online channel sharing algorithm and a companion protocol that allocates channel efficiently and truthfully by punishing MBANs for misreporting their channel request parameters such as time, duration and bid for the channel. We first present an online channel sharing scheme for unit-length channel requests and prove that it is truthful. We then generalize our model to settings with variable-length channel requests, where we propose a critical value based channel pricing and preemption scheme. A bid adjustment procedure prevents unbeneficial preemption by artificially raising the ongoing winner's bid controlled by a penalty factor λ. Our scheme can efficiently detect selfish behaviors by monitoring a trust parameter α of each MBAN and punish MBANs from cheating by suspending their requests. Our extensive simulation results show our scheme can achieve a total profit that is more than 85% of the offline optimum method in the typical MBAN settings. PMID:26844888

  9. Truthful Channel Sharing for Self Coexistence of Overlapping Medical Body Area Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dutkiewicz, Eryk; Zheng, Guanglou

    2016-01-01

    As defined by IEEE 802.15.6 standard, channel sharing is a potential method to coordinate inter-network interference among Medical Body Area Networks (MBANs) that are close to one another. However, channel sharing opens up new vulnerabilities as selfish MBANs may manipulate their online channel requests to gain unfair advantage over others. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a truthful online channel sharing algorithm and a companion protocol that allocates channel efficiently and truthfully by punishing MBANs for misreporting their channel request parameters such as time, duration and bid for the channel. We first present an online channel sharing scheme for unit-length channel requests and prove that it is truthful. We then generalize our model to settings with variable-length channel requests, where we propose a critical value based channel pricing and preemption scheme. A bid adjustment procedure prevents unbeneficial preemption by artificially raising the ongoing winner’s bid controlled by a penalty factor λ. Our scheme can efficiently detect selfish behaviors by monitoring a trust parameter α of each MBAN and punish MBANs from cheating by suspending their requests. Our extensive simulation results show our scheme can achieve a total profit that is more than 85% of the offline optimum method in the typical MBAN settings. PMID:26844888

  10. [Determination of relative error of pressure-broadening linewidth for the experimentally indistinguishable overlapped spectral lines with Voigt profile].

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie-Li; Huang, Yi-Qing; Lu, Hong

    2005-01-01

    The simulation and fitting of the overlapped spectral lines with Voigt profile were presented in this paper. The relative errors epsilon of the fitted pressure-broadening linewidth when taking the overlapped spectral line as one spectrum were discussed in detail. The relationship between such error and the two spectral lines center distance deltav0, and theoretical pressure-broadening linewidth deltav(L)0 were analyzed. Epsilon is found to be very large and the relationship between epsilon and deltav0, deltav(L)0 is very complicated when the value of pressure-broadening linewidth is considerably less than that of Dopplerian one deltavD. When deltav(L)0 is comparative to deltaVD the relationship between epsilon and deltav0 is close to the smooth two-order polynomial curve. However, the slop of this curve is negative while deltav(L)0 is smaller than deltavD and is positive when larger. Generally, epsilon decreases with the increase of proportion of deltav(l)0 to the whole spectral linewidth. All the above conclusion and corresponding data are the significant reference to determine the precise pressure-broadening coefficient from the experimentally indistinguishable overlapped spectrum, as well as to correct the fitted pressure-broadening linewidth. PMID:15852837

  11. A Digital Ultrasonic Pulse-Echo Overlap System and Algorithm for Unambiguous Determination of Pulse Transit Time

    SciTech Connect

    Cristian,P.; Rickel, D.; Migliori, A.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Y.; Leisure, R.; Li, B.

    2005-01-01

    We report an evolution of an all-digital ultrasonic pulse technique for measurements of elastic constants of solids. An unambiguous analytical procedure is described for determining the correct time delay of echoes without any need for actual echo overlap. We also provide a simple procedure for making corrections for transducer-bond-induced phase shifts. The precision of a measurement made with this system at ambient temperature exceeds one part in 107 without the use of mixers, gates, time delays, and other complications normally associated with such measurements.

  12. Motor cortical plasticity in extrinsic hand muscles is determined by the resting thresholds of overlapping representations.

    PubMed

    Mirdamadi, J L; Suzuki, L Y; Meehan, S K

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of the properties that govern the effectiveness of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) interventions is critical to clinical application. Extrapolation to clinical populations has been limited by high inter-subject variability and a focus on intrinsic muscles of the hand in healthy populations. Therefore, the current study assessed variability of continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS), a patterned TMS protocol, across an agonist-antagonist pair of extrinsic muscles of the hand. Secondarily, we assessed whether concurrent agonist contraction could enhance the efficacy of cTBS. Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were simultaneously recorded from the agonist flexor (FCR) and antagonist extensor (ECR) carpi radialis before and after cTBS over the FCR hotspot. cTBS was delivered with the FCR relaxed (cTBS-Relax) or during isometric wrist flexion (cTBS-Contract). cTBS-Relax suppressed FCR MEPs evoked from the FCR hotspot. However, the extent of FCR MEP suppression was strongly correlated with the relative difference between FCR and ECR resting motor thresholds. cTBS-Contract decreased FCR suppression but increased suppression of ECR MEPs elicited from the FCR hotspot. The magnitude of ECR MEP suppression following cTBS-Contract was independent of the threshold-amplitude relationships observed with cTBS-Relax. Contraction alone had no effect confirming the effect of cTBS-Contract was driven by the interaction between neuromuscular activity and cTBS. Interactions across muscle representations should be taken into account when predicting cTBS outcomes in healthy and clinical populations. Contraction during cTBS may be a useful means of focusing aftereffects when differences in baseline excitability across overlapping agonist-antagonist cortical representations may mitigate the inhibitory effect of cTBS. PMID:27425211

  13. Alleviation of overlap interferences for determination of potassium isotope ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, S.J.; Houk, R.S.; Stevens, M.A.

    1988-06-01

    Positioning the sampling orifice relatively far from the load coil combined with use of low forward power and high aerosol gas flow rate causes the background mass spectrum to become dominated by NO/sup +/. Nearly all the Ar/sup +/ and ArH/sup +/ ions are suppressed under these conditions, which frees m/z 39 and 41 for potassium isotope ratio measurements. The precision is 0.3-0.9% relative standard deviation for potassium concentrations in the range 1-50 mg L/sup -1/. The determined ratios are approx. 9% higher than the accepted value and also vary with the concentration of sodium concomitant, so calibrations and chemical separations are desirable. These observations should permit use of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for rapid isotope ratio determinations of potassium from biological organisms or water sources.

  14. A Network-Based Target Overlap Score for Characterizing Drug Combinations: High Correlation with Cancer Clinical Trial Results

    PubMed Central

    Ligeti, Balázs; Pénzváltó, Zsófia; Vera, Roberto; Győrffy, Balázs; Pongor, Sándor

    2015-01-01

    Drug combinations are highly efficient in systemic treatment of complex multigene diseases such as cancer, diabetes, arthritis and hypertension. Most currently used combinations were found in empirical ways, which limits the speed of discovery for new and more effective combinations. Therefore, there is a substantial need for efficient and fast computational methods. Here, we present a principle that is based on the assumption that perturbations generated by multiple pharmaceutical agents propagate through an interaction network and can cause unexpected amplification at targets not immediately affected by the original drugs. In order to capture this phenomenon, we introduce a novel Target Overlap Score (TOS) that is defined for two pharmaceutical agents as the number of jointly perturbed targets divided by the number of all targets potentially affected by the two agents. We show that this measure is correlated with the known effects of beneficial and deleterious drug combinations taken from the DCDB, TTD and Drugs.com databases. We demonstrate the utility of TOS by correlating the score to the outcome of recent clinical trials evaluating trastuzumab, an effective anticancer agent utilized in combination with anthracycline- and taxane- based systemic chemotherapy in HER2-receptor (erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2) positive breast cancer. PMID:26047322

  15. Self-determined mechanisms in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Yuan, Jian; Shan, Xiuming; Ren, Yong; Ma, Zhengxin

    2008-03-01

    Self-organized networks are pervasive in communication systems such as the Internet, overlay networks, peer-to-peer networks, and cluster-based services. These networks evolve into complex topologies, under specific driving forces, i.e. user demands, technological innovations, design objectives and so on. Our study focuses on the driving forces behind individual evolutions of network components, and their stimulation and domination to the self-organized networks which are defined as self-determined mechanisms in this paper. Understanding forces underlying the evolution of networks should enable informed design decisions and help to avoid unwanted surprises, such as congestion collapse. A case study on the macroscopic evolution of the Internet topology of autonomous systems under a specific driving force is then presented. Using computer simulations, it is found that the power-law degree distribution can originate from a connection preference to larger numbers of users, and that the small-world property can be caused by rapid growth in the number of users. Our results provide a new feasible perspective to understand intrinsic fundamentals in the topological evolution of complex networks.

  16. Effect of an ultrafast laser induced plasma on a relativistic electron beam to determine temporal overlap in pump-probe experiments.

    PubMed

    Scoby, Cheyne M; Li, R K; Musumeci, P

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we report on a simple and robust method to measure the absolute temporal overlap of the laser and the electron beam at the sample based on the effect of a laser induced plasma on the electron beam transverse distribution, successfully extending a similar method from keV to MeV electron beams. By pumping a standard copper TEM grid to form the plasma, we gain timing information independent of the sample under study. In experiments discussed here the optical delay to achieve temporal overlap between the pump electron beam and probe laser can be determined with ~1 ps precision. PMID:22951263

  17. Partially overlapping sensorimotor networks underlie speech praxis and verbal short-term memory: evidence from apraxia of speech following acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hickok, Gregory; Rogalsky, Corianne; Chen, Rong; Herskovits, Edward H.; Townsley, Sarah; Hillis, Argye E.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that motor planning and programming of speech articulation and verbal short-term memory (vSTM) depend on partially overlapping networks of neural regions. We evaluated this proposal by testing 76 individuals with acute ischemic stroke for impairment in motor planning of speech articulation (apraxia of speech, AOS) and vSTM in the first day of stroke, before the opportunity for recovery or reorganization of structure-function relationships. We also evaluated areas of both infarct and low blood flow that might have contributed to AOS or impaired vSTM in each person. We found that AOS was associated with tissue dysfunction in motor-related areas (posterior primary motor cortex, pars opercularis; premotor cortex, insula) and sensory-related areas (primary somatosensory cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex, parietal operculum/auditory cortex); while impaired vSTM was associated with primarily motor-related areas (pars opercularis and pars triangularis, premotor cortex, and primary motor cortex). These results are consistent with the hypothesis, also supported by functional imaging data, that both speech praxis and vSTM rely on partially overlapping networks of brain regions. PMID:25202255

  18. Assessment of Overlap of Phylogenetic Transmission Clusters and Communities in Simple Sexual Contact Networks: Applications to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Villandre, Luc; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Kouyos, Roger; Stadler, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Background Transmission patterns of sexually-transmitted infections (STIs) could relate to the structure of the underlying sexual contact network, whose features are therefore of interest to clinicians. Conventionally, we represent sexual contacts in a population with a graph, that can reveal the existence of communities. Phylogenetic methods help infer the history of an epidemic and incidentally, may help detecting communities. In particular, phylogenetic analyses of HIV-1 epidemics among men who have sex with men (MSM) have revealed the existence of large transmission clusters, possibly resulting from within-community transmissions. Past studies have explored the association between contact networks and phylogenies, including transmission clusters, producing conflicting conclusions about whether network features significantly affect observed transmission history. As far as we know however, none of them thoroughly investigated the role of communities, defined with respect to the network graph, in the observation of clusters. Methods The present study investigates, through simulations, community detection from phylogenies. We simulate a large number of epidemics over both unweighted and weighted, undirected random interconnected-islands networks, with islands corresponding to communities. We use weighting to modulate distance between islands. We translate each epidemic into a phylogeny, that lets us partition our samples of infected subjects into transmission clusters, based on several common definitions from the literature. We measure similarity between subjects’ island membership indices and transmission cluster membership indices with the adjusted Rand index. Results and Conclusion Analyses reveal modest mean correspondence between communities in graphs and phylogenetic transmission clusters. We conclude that common methods often have limited success in detecting contact network communities from phylogenies. The rarely-fulfilled requirement that network

  19. Determining Application Runtimes Using Queueing Network Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, M

    2007-03-15

    Determination of application times-to-solution for large-scale clustered computers continues to be a difficult problem in high-end computing, which will only become more challenging as multi-core consumer machines become more prevalent in the market. Both researchers and consumers of these multi-core systems desire reasonable estimates of how long their programs will take to run (time-to-solution, or TTS), and how many resources will be consumed in the execution. Currently there are few methods of determining these values, and those that do exist are either overly simplistic in their assumptions or require great amounts of effort to parameterize and understand. One previously untried method is queuing network modeling (QNM), which is easy to parameterize and solve, and produces results that typically fall within 10 to 30% of the actual TTS for our test cases. Using characteristics of the computer network (bandwidth, latency) and communication patterns (number of messages, message length, time spent in communication), the QNM model of the NAS-PB CG application was applied to MCR and ALC, supercomputers at LLNL, and the Keck Cluster at USF, with average errors of 2.41%, 3.61%, and -10.73%, respectively, compared to the actual TTS observed. While additional work is necessary to improve the predictive capabilities of QNM, current results show that QNM has a great deal of promise for determining application TTS for multi-processor computer systems.

  20. Overlapping clusters for distributed computation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrokni, Vahab; Andersen, Reid; Gleich, David F.

    2010-11-01

    Scalable, distributed algorithms must address communication problems. We investigate overlapping clusters, or vertex partitions that intersect, for graph computations. This setup stores more of the graph than required but then affords the ease of implementation of vertex partitioned algorithms. Our hope is that this technique allows us to reduce communication in a computation on a distributed graph. The motivation above draws on recent work in communication avoiding algorithms. Mohiyuddin et al. (SC09) design a matrix-powers kernel that gives rise to an overlapping partition. Fritzsche et al. (CSC2009) develop an overlapping clustering for a Schwarz method. Both techniques extend an initial partitioning with overlap. Our procedure generates overlap directly. Indeed, Schwarz methods are commonly used to capitalize on overlap. Elsewhere, overlapping communities (Ahn et al, Nature 2009; Mishra et al. WAW2007) are now a popular model of structure in social networks. These have long been studied in statistics (Cole and Wishart, CompJ 1970). We present two types of results: (i) an estimated swapping probability {rho}{infinity}; and (ii) the communication volume of a parallel PageRank solution (link-following {alpha} = 0.85) using an additive Schwarz method. The volume ratio is the amount of extra storage for the overlap (2 means we store the graph twice). Below, as the ratio increases, the swapping probability and PageRank communication volume decreases.

  1. Pathway Network Analyses for Autism Reveal Multisystem Involvement, Major Overlaps with Other Diseases and Convergence upon MAPK and Calcium Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ya; Alshikho, Mohamad J; Herbert, Martha R

    2016-01-01

    We used established databases in standard ways to systematically characterize gene ontologies, pathways and functional linkages in the large set of genes now associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). These conditions are particularly challenging--they lack clear pathognomonic biological markers, they involve great heterogeneity across multiple levels (genes, systemic biological and brain characteristics, and nuances of behavioral manifestations)-and yet everyone with this diagnosis meets the same defining behavioral criteria. Using the human gene list from Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI) we performed gene set enrichment analysis with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Pathway Database, and then derived a pathway network from pathway-pathway functional interactions again in reference to KEGG. Through identifying the GO (Gene Ontology) groups in which SFARI genes were enriched, mapping the coherence between pathways and GO groups, and ranking the relative strengths of representation of pathway network components, we 1) identified 10 disease-associated and 30 function-associated pathways 2) revealed calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction as the most enriched, statistically significant pathways from the enrichment analysis, 3) showed calcium signaling pathways and MAPK signaling pathway to be interactive hubs with other pathways and also to be involved with pervasively present biological processes, 4) found convergent indications that the process "calcium-PRC (protein kinase C)-Ras-Raf-MAPK/ERK" is likely a major contributor to ASD pathophysiology, and 5) noted that perturbations associated with KEGG's category of environmental information processing were common. These findings support the idea that ASD-associated genes may contribute not only to core features of ASD themselves but also to vulnerability to other chronic and systemic problems potentially including cancer, metabolic conditions

  2. Pathway Network Analyses for Autism Reveal Multisystem Involvement, Major Overlaps with Other Diseases and Convergence upon MAPK and Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ya; Alshikho, Mohamad J.; Herbert, Martha R.

    2016-01-01

    We used established databases in standard ways to systematically characterize gene ontologies, pathways and functional linkages in the large set of genes now associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). These conditions are particularly challenging—they lack clear pathognomonic biological markers, they involve great heterogeneity across multiple levels (genes, systemic biological and brain characteristics, and nuances of behavioral manifestations)—and yet everyone with this diagnosis meets the same defining behavioral criteria. Using the human gene list from Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI) we performed gene set enrichment analysis with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Pathway Database, and then derived a pathway network from pathway-pathway functional interactions again in reference to KEGG. Through identifying the GO (Gene Ontology) groups in which SFARI genes were enriched, mapping the coherence between pathways and GO groups, and ranking the relative strengths of representation of pathway network components, we 1) identified 10 disease-associated and 30 function-associated pathways 2) revealed calcium signaling pathway and neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction as the most enriched, statistically significant pathways from the enrichment analysis, 3) showed calcium signaling pathways and MAPK signaling pathway to be interactive hubs with other pathways and also to be involved with pervasively present biological processes, 4) found convergent indications that the process “calcium-PRC (protein kinase C)-Ras-Raf-MAPK/ERK” is likely a major contributor to ASD pathophysiology, and 5) noted that perturbations associated with KEGG’s category of environmental information processing were common. These findings support the idea that ASD-associated genes may contribute not only to core features of ASD themselves but also to vulnerability to other chronic and systemic problems potentially including cancer, metabolic

  3. Heat Shock Partially Dissociates the Overlapping Modules of the Yeast Protein-Protein Interaction Network: A Systems Level Model of Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Mihalik, Ágoston; Csermely, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Network analysis became a powerful tool giving new insights to the understanding of cellular behavior. Heat shock, the archetype of stress responses, is a well-characterized and simple model of cellular dynamics. S. cerevisiae is an appropriate model organism, since both its protein-protein interaction network (interactome) and stress response at the gene expression level have been well characterized. However, the analysis of the reorganization of the yeast interactome during stress has not been investigated yet. We calculated the changes of the interaction-weights of the yeast interactome from the changes of mRNA expression levels upon heat shock. The major finding of our study is that heat shock induced a significant decrease in both the overlaps and connections of yeast interactome modules. In agreement with this the weighted diameter of the yeast interactome had a 4.9-fold increase in heat shock. Several key proteins of the heat shock response became centers of heat shock-induced local communities, as well as bridges providing a residual connection of modules after heat shock. The observed changes resemble to a ‘stratus-cumulus’ type transition of the interactome structure, since the unstressed yeast interactome had a globally connected organization, similar to that of stratus clouds, whereas the heat shocked interactome had a multifocal organization, similar to that of cumulus clouds. Our results showed that heat shock induces a partial disintegration of the global organization of the yeast interactome. This change may be rather general occurring in many types of stresses. Moreover, other complex systems, such as single proteins, social networks and ecosystems may also decrease their inter-modular links, thus develop more compact modules, and display a partial disintegration of their global structure in the initial phase of crisis. Thus, our work may provide a model of a general, system-level adaptation mechanism to environmental changes. PMID:22022244

  4. Seeding for pervasively overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Conrad; Reid, Fergal; McDaid, Aaron; Hurley, Neil

    2011-06-01

    In some social and biological networks, the majority of nodes belong to multiple communities. It has recently been shown that a number of the algorithms specifically designed to detect overlapping communities do not perform well in such highly overlapping settings. Here, we consider one class of these algorithms, those which optimize a local fitness measure, typically by using a greedy heuristic to expand a seed into a community. We perform synthetic benchmarks which indicate that an appropriate seeding strategy becomes more important as the extent of community overlap increases. We find that distinct cliques provide the best seeds. We find further support for this seeding strategy with benchmarks on a Facebook network and the yeast interactome.

  5. Smart Methods for Linezolid Determination in the Presence of Alkaline and Oxidative Degradation Products Utilizing Their Overlapped Spectral Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Monem Hegazy, M.; Shaaban Eissa, M.; Abd El-Sattar, O. I.; Abd El-Kawy, M. M.

    2014-09-01

    Linezolid (LIN) is considered the first available oxazolidinone antibacterial agent. It is susceptible to hydrolysis and oxidation. Five simple, accurate, sensitive and validated UV spectrophotometric methods were developed for LIN determination in the presence of its alkaline (ALK) and oxidative (OXD) degradation products in bulk powder and pharmaceutical formulation. Method A is a second derivative one (D2) in which LIN is determined at 240.9 nm. Method B is a pH-induced differential derivative one where LIN is determined using the fourth derivative (D4) of the difference spectra (ΔA) at 285.3 nm. Methods C, D, and E are manipulating ratio spectra, where C is the double divisor-ratio difference spectrophotometric one (DD-RD) in which LIN was determined by calculating the amplitude difference at 243.7 and 267.6 nm of the ratio spectra. Method D is the double divisor-first derivative of ratio spectra (DD-DD1) in which LIN was determined at 270.2 nm. Method E is a mean centering of ratio spectra one (MCR) in which LIN was determined at 318.0 nm. The developed methods have been validated according to ICH guidelines. The results were statistically compared to that of a reported HPLC method and there was no significant difference regarding both accuracy and precision.

  6. HUNTing the Overlap

    SciTech Connect

    Iancu, Costin; Parry, Husbands; Hargrove, Paul

    2005-07-08

    Hiding communication latency is an important optimization for parallel programs. Programmers or compilers achieve this by using non-blocking communication primitives and overlapping communication with computation or other communication operations. Using non-blocking communication raises two issues: performance and programmability. In terms of performance, optimizers need to find a good communication schedule and are sometimes constrained by lack of full application knowledge. In terms of programmability, efficiently managing non-blocking communication can prove cumbersome for complex applications. In this paper we present the design principles of HUNT, a runtime system designed to search and exploit some of the available overlap present at execution time in UPC programs. Using virtual memory support, our runtime implements demand-driven synchronization for data involved in communication operations. It also employs message decomposition and scheduling heuristics to transparently improve the non-blocking behavior of applications. We provide a user level implementation of HUNT on a variety of modern high performance computing systems. Results indicate that our approach is successful in finding some of the overlap available at execution time. While system and application characteristics influence performance, perhaps the determining factor is the time taken by the CPU to execute a signal handler. Demand driven synchronization at execution time eliminates the need for the explicit management of non-blocking communication. Besides increasing programmer productivity, this feature also simplifies compiler analysis for communication optimizations.

  7. Function approximation using adaptive and overlapping intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, R.B.

    1995-05-01

    A problem common to many disciplines is to approximate a function given only the values of the function at various points in input variable space. A method is proposed for approximating a function of several to one variable. The model takes the form of weighted averaging of overlapping basis functions defined over intervals. The number of such basis functions and their parameters (widths and centers) are automatically determined using given training data and a learning algorithm. The proposed algorithm can be seen as placing a nonuniform multidimensional grid in the input domain with overlapping cells. The non-uniformity and overlap of the cells is achieved by a learning algorithm to optimize a given objective function. This approach is motivated by the fuzzy modeling approach and a learning algorithms used for clustering and classification in pattern recognition. The basics of why and how the approach works are given. Few examples of nonlinear regression and classification are modeled. The relationship between the proposed technique, radial basis neural networks, kernel regression, probabilistic neural networks, and fuzzy modeling is explained. Finally advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  8. DETERMINANTS OF NETWORK OUTCOMES: THE IMPACT OF MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    YSA, TAMYKO; SIERRA, VICENTA; ESTEVE, MARC

    2014-01-01

    The literature on network management is extensive. However, it generally explores network structures, neglecting the impact of management strategies. In this article we assess the effect of management strategies on network outcomes, providing empirical evidence from 119 urban revitalization networks. We go beyond current work by testing a path model for the determinants of network outcomes and considering the interactions between the constructs: management strategies, trust, complexity, and facilitative leadership. Our results suggest that management strategies have a strong effect on network outcomes and that they enhance the level of trust. We also found that facilitative leadership has a positive impact on network management as well as on trust in the network. Our findings also show that complexity has a negative impact on trust. A key finding of our research is that managers may wield more influence on network dynamics than previously theorized. PMID:25520529

  9. Factors Determining Nestedness in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jonhson, Samuel; Domínguez-García, Virginia; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of network structural features is a key task in deciphering complex systems. In this context, the property of network nestedness has aroused a fair amount of interest as regards ecological networks. Indeed, Bastolla et al. introduced a simple measure of network nestedness which opened the door to analytical understanding, allowing them to conclude that biodiversity is strongly enhanced in highly nested mutualistic networks. Here, we suggest a slightly refined version of such a measure of nestedness and study how it is influenced by the most basic structural properties of networks, such as degree distribution and degree-degree correlations (i.e. assortativity). We find that most of the empirically found nestedness stems from heterogeneity in the degree distribution. Once such an influence has been discounted – as a second factor – we find that nestedness is strongly correlated with disassortativity and hence – as random networks have been recently found to be naturally disassortative – they also tend to be naturally nested just as the result of chance. PMID:24069264

  10. Approach of Complex Networks for the Determination of Brain Death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei-Gang; Cao, Jian-Ting; Wang, Ru-Bin

    2011-06-01

    In clinical practice, brain death is the irreversible end of all brain activity. Compared to current statistical methods for the determination of brain death, we focus on the approach of complex networks for real-world electroencephalography in its determination. Brain functional networks constructed by correlation analysis are derived, and statistical network quantities used for distinguishing the patients in coma or brain death state, such as average strength, clustering coefficient and average path length, are calculated. Numerical results show that the values of network quantities of patients in coma state are larger than those of patients in brain death state. Our findings might provide valuable insights on the determination of brain death.

  11. Spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra for simultaneous determination of binary mixtures with sever overlapping spectra: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, H.; Fayez, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Three simple, specific and accurate spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra were developed and validated for simultaneous determination of Rabeprazole sodium (RB) and Domperidone (DP) in their binary mixture without prior separation. Method A, is constant center spectrophotometric method (CC). Method B is a ratio difference spectrophotometric one (RD), while method C is a combined ratio isoabsorptive point-ratio difference method (RIRD). Linear correlations were obtained in range of 4-44 μg/mL for both Rabeprazole sodium and Domperidone. The mean percentage recoveries of RB were 99.69 ± 0.504 for method A, 99.83 ± 0.483 for (B) and 100.31 ± 0.499 for (C), respectively, and that of DP were 99.52 ± 0.474 for method A, 100.12 ± 0.505 for (B) and 100.16 ± 0.498 for (C), respectively. Specificity was investigated by analysis of laboratory prepared mixtures containing the cited drugs and their combined tablet dosage form. The obtained results were statistically compared with those obtained by the reported methods, showing no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision. The three methods were validated as per ICH guidelines and can be applied for routine analysis in quality control laboratories.

  12. Determining phylogenetic networks from inter-taxa distances.

    PubMed

    Bordewich, Magnus; Semple, Charles

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of determining the topological structure of a phylogenetic network given only information about the path-length distances between taxa. In particular, one of the main results of the paper shows that binary tree-child networks are essentially determined by such information. PMID:26666756

  13. Incorporation of flow injection analysis with dual-wavelength overlapping resonance Rayleigh scattering for rapid determination of malachite green and its metabolite in fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jinghui; Qin, Mingyou; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Yang, Jidong; Hu, Xiaoli

    2014-09-01

    A flow injection analysis (FIA) system combined with dual-wavelength overlapping resonance Rayleigh scattering (DWO-RRS) has been established and validated for rapid determination of malachite green (MG) and its metabolite in fish samples. Under experimental condition, MG would react with Erythrosin (Ery) to form ion-association complexes, resulting in the occurrence of two RRS peaks and a dramatic enhancement of RRS intensity. The maximum RRS peaks were located at 286 nm and 337 nm. It is noted that the increments of both of these two peaks were proportional to the concentration of MG. The detection limit of DWO-RRS was 1.5 ng/mL, which was comparable to several reported methods. Moreover, the results of real sample analysis exhibited an acceptable recovery between 97.5% and 103.6%, indicating that the method had good reproducibility.

  14. Structural determinants of criticality in biological networks

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Sergi; Ohse, Sebastian; Turalska, Malgorzata; West, Bruce J.; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Many adaptive evolutionary systems display spatial and temporal features, such as long-range correlations, typically associated with the critical point of a phase transition in statistical physics. Empirical and theoretical studies suggest that operating near criticality enhances the functionality of biological networks, such as brain and gene networks, in terms for instance of information processing, robustness, and evolvability. While previous studies have explained criticality with specific system features, we still lack a general theory of critical behavior in biological systems. Here we look at this problem from the complex systems perspective, since in principle all critical biological circuits have in common the fact that their internal organization can be described as a complex network. An important question is how self-similar structure influences self-similar dynamics. Modularity and heterogeneity, for instance, affect the location of critical points and can be used to tune the system toward criticality. We review and discuss recent studies on the criticality of neuronal and genetic networks, and discuss the implications of network theory when assessing the evolutionary features of criticality. PMID:26005422

  15. A Stochastic Model for Detecting Overlapping and Hierarchical Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiao; Jin, Di; Guo, Xiaojie; Tang, Xianchao

    2015-01-01

    Community detection is a fundamental problem in the analysis of complex networks. Recently, many researchers have concentrated on the detection of overlapping communities, where a vertex may belong to more than one community. However, most current methods require the number (or the size) of the communities as a priori information, which is usually unavailable in real-world networks. Thus, a practical algorithm should not only find the overlapping community structure, but also automatically determine the number of communities. Furthermore, it is preferable if this method is able to reveal the hierarchical structure of networks as well. In this work, we firstly propose a generative model that employs a nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) formulization with a l2,1 norm regularization term, balanced by a resolution parameter. The NMF has the nature that provides overlapping community structure by assigning soft membership variables to each vertex; the l2,1 regularization term is a technique of group sparsity which can automatically determine the number of communities by penalizing too many nonempty communities; and hence the resolution parameter enables us to explore the hierarchical structure of networks. Thereafter, we derive the multiplicative update rule to learn the model parameters, and offer the proof of its correctness. Finally, we test our approach on a variety of synthetic and real-world networks, and compare it with some state-of-the-art algorithms. The results validate the superior performance of our new method. PMID:25822148

  16. A stochastic model for detecting overlapping and hierarchical community structure.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiao; Jin, Di; Guo, Xiaojie; Tang, Xianchao

    2015-01-01

    Community detection is a fundamental problem in the analysis of complex networks. Recently, many researchers have concentrated on the detection of overlapping communities, where a vertex may belong to more than one community. However, most current methods require the number (or the size) of the communities as a priori information, which is usually unavailable in real-world networks. Thus, a practical algorithm should not only find the overlapping community structure, but also automatically determine the number of communities. Furthermore, it is preferable if this method is able to reveal the hierarchical structure of networks as well. In this work, we firstly propose a generative model that employs a nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) formulization with a l(2,1) norm regularization term, balanced by a resolution parameter. The NMF has the nature that provides overlapping community structure by assigning soft membership variables to each vertex; the l(2,1) regularization term is a technique of group sparsity which can automatically determine the number of communities by penalizing too many nonempty communities; and hence the resolution parameter enables us to explore the hierarchical structure of networks. Thereafter, we derive the multiplicative update rule to learn the model parameters, and offer the proof of its correctness. Finally, we test our approach on a variety of synthetic and real-world networks, and compare it with some state-of-the-art algorithms. The results validate the superior performance of our new method. PMID:25822148

  17. Clique graphs and overlapping communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    It is shown how to construct a clique graph in which properties of cliques of a fixed order in a given graph are represented by vertices in a weighted graph. Various definitions and motivations for these weights are given. The detection of communities or clusters is used to illustrate how a clique graph may be exploited. In particular a benchmark network is shown where clique graphs find the overlapping communities accurately while vertex partition methods fail.

  18. Overlapping Structures in Sensory-Motor Mappings

    PubMed Central

    Earland, Kevin; Lee, Mark; Shaw, Patricia; Law, James

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a biologically-inspired representation technique designed for the support of sensory-motor learning in developmental robotics. An interesting feature of the many topographic neural sheets in the brain is that closely packed receptive fields must overlap in order to fully cover a spatial region. This raises interesting scientific questions with engineering implications: e.g. is overlap detrimental? does it have any benefits? This paper examines the effects and properties of overlap between elements arranged in arrays or maps. In particular we investigate how overlap affects the representation and transmission of spatial location information on and between topographic maps. Through a series of experiments we determine the conditions under which overlap offers advantages and identify useful ranges of overlap for building mappings in cognitive robotic systems. Our motivation is to understand the phenomena of overlap in order to provide guidance for application in sensory-motor learning robots. PMID:24392118

  19. Functional Network Overlap as Revealed by fMRI Using sICA and Its Potential Relationships with Functional Heterogeneity, Balanced Excitation and Inhibition, and Sparseness of Neuron Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiansong; Calhoun, Vince D.; Worhunsky, Patrick D.; Xiang, Hui; Li, Jian; Wall, John T.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies traditionally use general linear model-based analysis (GLM-BA) and regularly report task-related activation, deactivation, or no change in activation in separate brain regions. However, several recent fMRI studies using spatial independent component analysis (sICA) find extensive overlap of functional networks (FNs), each exhibiting different task-related modulation (e.g., activation vs. deactivation), different from the dominant findings of GLM-BA. This study used sICA to assess overlap of FNs extracted from four datasets, each related to a different cognitive task. FNs extracted from each dataset overlapped with each other extensively across most or all brain regions and showed task-related concurrent increases, decreases, or no changes in activity. These findings indicate that neural substrates showing task-related concurrent but different modulations in activity intermix with each other and distribute across most of the brain. Furthermore, spatial correlation analyses found that most FNs were highly consistent in spatial patterns across different datasets. This finding indicates that these FNs probably reflect large-scale patterns of task-related brain activity. We hypothesize that FN overlaps as revealed by sICA might relate to functional heterogeneity, balanced excitation and inhibition, and population sparseness of neuron activity, three fundamental properties of the brain. These possibilities deserve further investigation. PMID:25714362

  20. Precise orbit determination of BeiDou constellation based on BETS and MGEX network.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yidong; Liu, Yang; Shi, Chuang; Yao, Xiuguang; Zheng, Fu

    2014-01-01

    Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System is officially operational as a regional constellation with five Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites, five Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbit (IGSO) satellites and four Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Observations from the BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) and the IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) network from 1 January to 31 March 2013 are processed for orbit determination of the BeiDou constellation. Various arc lengths and solar radiation pressure parameters are investigated. The reduced set of ECOM five-parameter model produces better performance than the full set of ECOM nine-parameter model for BeiDou IGSO and MEO. The orbit overlap for the middle days of 3-day arc solutions is better than 20 cm and 14 cm for IGSO and MEO in RMS, respectively. Satellite laser ranging residuals are better than 10 cm for both IGSO and MEO. For BeiDou GEO, the orbit overlap of several meters and satellite laser ranging residuals of several decimetres can be achieved. PMID:24733025

  1. Precise orbit determination of BeiDou constellation based on BETS and MGEX network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yidong; Liu, Yang; Shi, Chuang; Yao, Xiuguang; Zheng, Fu

    2014-04-01

    Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System is officially operational as a regional constellation with five Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites, five Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbit (IGSO) satellites and four Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Observations from the BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) and the IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) network from 1 January to 31 March 2013 are processed for orbit determination of the BeiDou constellation. Various arc lengths and solar radiation pressure parameters are investigated. The reduced set of ECOM five-parameter model produces better performance than the full set of ECOM nine-parameter model for BeiDou IGSO and MEO. The orbit overlap for the middle days of 3-day arc solutions is better than 20 cm and 14 cm for IGSO and MEO in RMS, respectively. Satellite laser ranging residuals are better than 10 cm for both IGSO and MEO. For BeiDou GEO, the orbit overlap of several meters and satellite laser ranging residuals of several decimetres can be achieved.

  2. Precise orbit determination of BeiDou constellation based on BETS and MGEX network

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yidong; Liu, Yang; Shi, Chuang; Yao, Xiuguang; Zheng, Fu

    2014-01-01

    Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System is officially operational as a regional constellation with five Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites, five Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbit (IGSO) satellites and four Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Observations from the BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) and the IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) network from 1 January to 31 March 2013 are processed for orbit determination of the BeiDou constellation. Various arc lengths and solar radiation pressure parameters are investigated. The reduced set of ECOM five-parameter model produces better performance than the full set of ECOM nine-parameter model for BeiDou IGSO and MEO. The orbit overlap for the middle days of 3-day arc solutions is better than 20 cm and 14 cm for IGSO and MEO in RMS, respectively. Satellite laser ranging residuals are better than 10 cm for both IGSO and MEO. For BeiDou GEO, the orbit overlap of several meters and satellite laser ranging residuals of several decimetres can be achieved. PMID:24733025

  3. Moiré fringe center determination using artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, W. H.; Yen, K. S.

    2015-07-01

    Moiré methods are commonly used in various engineering metrological practices such as deformation measurements and surface topography. In the past, most of the applications required human intervention in fringe pattern analysis and image processing development to analyze the moiré patterns. In a recent application of using circular gratings moiré pattern, researchers developed graphical analysis method to determine the in-plane (2-D) displacement change between the two circular gratings by analyzing the moiré pattern change. In this work, an artificial neural network approach was proposed to detect and locate moiré fringe centers of circular gratings without image preprocessing and curve fitting. The intensity values in columns of the transformed circular moiré pattern were extracted as the input to the neural network. Moiré fringe centers extracted using graphical analysis method were used as the target for the neural network training. The neural network produced reasonably accurate output with an average mean error of an average mean error of less than 1 unit pixel with standard deviation of less than 4 unit pixels in determining the location of the moiré fringe centers. The result showed that the neural network approach is applicable in moiré fringe centers determination and its feasibility in automating moiré pattern analysis with further improvement.

  4. Logical Reduction of Biological Networks to Their Most Determinative Components.

    PubMed

    Matache, Mihaela T; Matache, Valentin

    2016-07-01

    Boolean networks have been widely used as models for gene regulatory networks, signal transduction networks, or neural networks, among many others. One of the main difficulties in analyzing the dynamics of a Boolean network and its sensitivity to perturbations or mutations is the fact that it grows exponentially with the number of nodes. Therefore, various approaches for simplifying the computations and reducing the network to a subset of relevant nodes have been proposed in the past few years. We consider a recently introduced method for reducing a Boolean network to its most determinative nodes that yield the highest information gain. The determinative power of a node is obtained by a summation of all mutual information quantities over all nodes having the chosen node as a common input, thus representing a measure of information gain obtained by the knowledge of the node under consideration. The determinative power of nodes has been considered in the literature under the assumption that the inputs are independent in which case one can use the Bahadur orthonormal basis. In this article, we relax that assumption and use a standard orthonormal basis instead. We use techniques of Hilbert space operators and harmonic analysis to generate formulas for the sensitivity to perturbations of nodes, quantified by the notions of influence, average sensitivity, and strength. Since we work on finite-dimensional spaces, our formulas and estimates can be and are formulated in plain matrix algebra terminology. We analyze the determinative power of nodes for a Boolean model of a signal transduction network of a generic fibroblast cell. We also show the similarities and differences induced by the alternative complete orthonormal basis used. Among the similarities, we mention the fact that the knowledge of the states of the most determinative nodes reduces the entropy or uncertainty of the overall network significantly. In a special case, we obtain a stronger result than in previous

  5. Team Assembly Mechanisms Determine Collaboration Network Structure and Team Performance

    PubMed Central

    Guimerà, Roger; Uzzi, Brian; Spiro, Jarrett; Nunes Amaral, Luís A.

    2007-01-01

    Agents in creative enterprises are embedded in networks that inspire, support, and evaluate their work. Here, we investigate how the mechanisms by which creative teams self-assemble determine the structure of these collaboration networks. We propose a model for the self-assembly of creative teams that has its basis in three parameters: team size, the fraction of newcomers in new productions, and the tendency of incumbents to repeat previous collaborations. The model suggests that the emergence of a large connected community of practitioners can be described as a phase transition. We find that team assembly mechanisms determine both the structure of the collaboration network and team performance for teams derived from both artistic and scientific fields. PMID:15860629

  6. Determinants of Microvascular Network Topologies in Implanted Neovasculatures

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Carlos C.; Krishnan, Laxminarayanan; Nunes, Sara S.; Church, Kenneth H.; Edgar, Lowell T.; Boland, Eugene D.; Weiss, Jeffery A.; Williams, Stuart K.; Hoying, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives During neovascularization, the end result is a new functional microcirculation comprised of a network of mature microvessels with specific topologies. While much is known concerning the mechanisms underlying the initiation of angiogenesis, it remains unclear how the final architecture of microcirculatory beds is regulated. To begin to address this, we determined the impact of angiogenic neovessel pre-patterning on the final microvascular network topology using an implant model of implant neovascularization. Methods and Results To test this, we used 3-D direct-write bioprinting or physical constraints in a manner permitting post-angiogenesis vascular remodeling and adaptation to pattern angiogenic microvascular precursors (neovessels formed from isolated microvessel segments) in 3-dimensional collagen gels prior to implantation and subsequent network formation. Neovasculatures pre-patterned into parallel arrays formed functional networks following 4 weeks post-implantation, but lost the pre-patterned architecture. However, maintenance of uniaxial physical constraints during post-angiogenesis remodeling of the implanted neovasculatures produced networks with aligned microvessels as well as an altered proportional distribution of arterioles, capillaries and venules. Conclusions Here we show that network topology resulting from implanted microvessel precursors is independent from pre-patterning of precursors but can be influenced by a patterning stimulus involving tissue deformation during post-angiogenesis remodeling and maturation. PMID:22053070

  7. Determination of trajectories of fireballs using seismic network data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Fireballs, Bolides, which are caused by high velocity passages of meteoroids through the atmosphere, generate shockwaves. Meteor shockwave provide us very important information (arrival time and amplitude) to study meteor physics. The shockwave arrival time data enable us to determine trajectories of the fireballs. On the other hand, the shockwave amplitude tells us size and ablation history of the meteoroid. Infrasound observation is one of the ways of detecting bolide shockwaves. However, we have no infrasound observational networks extends for large area with enough spatial distribution for determination of trajectories and estimate ablation histories. We have only a few infrasound arrays that have three or four elements, in the Japanese islands. Last decade, digital seismic networks are greatly improved for the purpose of monitoring micro earthquakes. Those seismic networks are quite sensitive for detecting micro ground vibration, and then those networks could detect not only seismic wave generated by earthquakes, but also ground oscillations generated by coupling of meteor shockwave with the ground near station. Last years, I analyses this kind of ground motion data recorded by seismic network, as meteor shockwave signals. For example, we estimate some great fireball's aerial path from arrival times of shockwaves (e.g., Ishihara et. al., 2003 Earth Planets, and Space, 2004 Geophysical Research. Letters.; Pujol et al., 2006 Planetary and Space Science), and we estimate sizes and ablation history of some great fireball and a meteorite fall (Ishihara et al., 2004 Meteoroids2004). In Japan, some great fireball falls occurred during 2004 to 2005. In this presentation, I show the trajectories of these fireballs determined from shockwave analysis. Some fireballs trajectories are also determined from photographic records. The trajectories determined from shockwave and that from photos show good agreement.

  8. Illusion induced overlapped optics.

    PubMed

    Zang, XiaoFei; Shi, Cheng; Li, Zhou; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing; Zhu, HaiBin

    2014-01-13

    The traditional transformation-based cloak seems like it can only hide objects by bending the incident electromagnetic waves around the hidden region. In this paper, we prove that invisible cloaks can be applied to realize the overlapped optics. No matter how many in-phase point sources are located in the hidden region, all of them can overlap each other (this can be considered as illusion effect), leading to the perfect optical interference effect. In addition, a singular parameter-independent cloak is also designed to obtain quasi-overlapped optics. Even more amazing of overlapped optics is that if N identical separated in-phase point sources covered with the illusion media, the total power outside the transformation region is N2I0 (not NI0) (I0 is the power of just one point source, and N is the number point sources), which seems violating the law of conservation of energy. A theoretical model based on interference effect is proposed to interpret the total power of these two kinds of overlapped optics effects. Our investigation may have wide applications in high power coherent laser beams, and multiple laser diodes, and so on. PMID:24515019

  9. Developmental roles of 21 Drosophila transcription factors are determined by quantitative differences in binding to an overlapping set of thousands of genomic regions

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, Stewart; Li, Xiao-Yong; Li, Jingyi; Brown, James B.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Zeng, Lucy; Grondona, Brandi P.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Knowles, David W.; Stapleton, Mark; Bickel, Peter; Biggin, Mark D.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2009-05-15

    BACKGROUND: We previously established that six sequence-specific transcription factors that initiate anterior/posterior patterning in Drosophila bind to overlapping sets of thousands of genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. While regions bound at high levels include known and probable functional targets, more poorly bound regions are preferentially associated with housekeeping genes and/or genes not transcribed in the blastoderm, and are frequently found in protein coding sequences or in less conserved non-coding DNA, suggesting that many are likely non-functional. RESULTS: Here we show that an additional 15 transcription factors that regulate other aspects of embryo patterning show a similar quantitative continuum of function and binding to thousands of genomic regions in vivo. Collectively, the 21 regulators show a surprisingly high overlap in the regions they bind given that they belong to 11 DNA binding domain families, specify distinct developmental fates, and can act via different cis-regulatory modules. We demonstrate, however, that quantitative differences in relative levels of binding to shared targets correlate with the known biological and transcriptional regulatory specificities of these factors. CONCLUSIONS: It is likely that the overlap in binding of biochemically and functionally unrelated transcription factors arises from the high concentrations of these proteins in nuclei, which, coupled with their broad DNA binding specificities, directs them to regions of open chromatin. We suggest that most animal transcription factors will be found to show a similar broad overlapping pattern of binding in vivo, with specificity achieved by modulating the amount, rather than the identity, of bound factor.

  10. Laser tracker error determination using a network measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Ben; Forbes, Alistair; Lewis, Andrew; Sun, Wenjuan; Veal, Dan; Nasr, Karim

    2011-04-01

    We report on a fast, easily implemented method to determine all the geometrical alignment errors of a laser tracker, to high precision. The technique requires no specialist equipment and can be performed in less than an hour. The technique is based on the determination of parameters of a geometric model of the laser tracker, using measurements of a set of fixed target locations, from multiple locations of the tracker. After fitting of the model parameters to the observed data, the model can be used to perform error correction of the raw laser tracker data or to derive correction parameters in the format of the tracker manufacturer's internal error map. In addition to determination of the model parameters, the method also determines the uncertainties and correlations associated with the parameters. We have tested the technique on a commercial laser tracker in the following way. We disabled the tracker's internal error compensation, and used a five-position, fifteen-target network to estimate all the geometric errors of the instrument. Using the error map generated from this network test, the tracker was able to pass a full performance validation test, conducted according to a recognized specification standard (ASME B89.4.19-2006). We conclude that the error correction determined from the network test is as effective as the manufacturer's own error correction methodologies.

  11. The brain as a system of nested but partially overlapping networks. Heuristic relevance of the model for brain physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Agnati, L F; Guidolin, D; Fuxe, K

    2007-01-01

    A new model of the brain organization is proposed. The model is based on the assumption that a global molecular network enmeshes the entire central nervous system. Thus, brain extra-cellular and intra-cellular molecular networks are proposed to communicate at the level of special plasma membrane regions (e.g., the lipid rafts) where horizontal molecular networks can represent input/output regions allowing the cell to have informational exchanges with the extracellular environment. Furthermore, some "pervasive signals" such as field potentials, pressure waves and thermal gradients that affect large parts of the brain cellular and molecular networks are discussed. Finally, at least two learning paradigms are analyzed taking into account the possible role of Volume Transmission: the so-called model of "temporal difference learning" and the "Turing B-unorganised machine". The relevance of this new view of brain organization for a deeper understanding of some neurophysiological and neuropathological aspects of its function is briefly discussed. PMID:16906353

  12. Overlap among Environmental Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Betty

    1981-01-01

    Describes the methodology and results of a study comparing the overlap of Enviroline, Pollution, and the Environmental Periodicals Bibliography files through searches on acid rain, asbestos and water, diesel, glass recycling, Lake Erie, Concorde, reverse osmosis wastewater treatment cost, and Calspan. Nine tables are provided. (RBF)

  13. An Integrated Centroid Finding and Particle Overlap Decomposition Algorithm for Stereo Imaging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An integrated algorithm for decomposing overlapping particle images (multi-particle objects) along with determining each object s constituent particle centroid(s) has been developed using image analysis techniques. The centroid finding algorithm uses a modified eight-direction search method for finding the perimeter of any enclosed object. The centroid is calculated using the intensity-weighted center of mass of the object. The overlap decomposition algorithm further analyzes the object data and breaks it down into its constituent particle centroid(s). This is accomplished with an artificial neural network, feature based technique and provides an efficient way of decomposing overlapping particles. Combining the centroid finding and overlap decomposition routines into a single algorithm allows us to accurately predict the error associated with finding the centroid(s) of particles in our experiments. This algorithm has been tested using real, simulated, and synthetic data and the results are presented and discussed.

  14. Experimental determination of group flux control coefficients in metabolic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, T.W.; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1998-04-20

    Grouping of reactions around key metabolite branch points can facilitate the study of metabolic control of complex metabolic networks. This top-down Metabolic Control Analysis is exemplified through the introduction of group control coefficients whose magnitudes provide a measure of the relative impact of each reaction group on the overall network flux, as well as on the overall network stability, following enzymatic amplification. In this article, the authors demonstrate the application of previously developed theory to the determination of group flux control coefficients. Experimental data for the changes in metabolic fluxes obtained in response to the introduction of six different environmental perturbations are used to determine the group flux control coefficients for three reaction groups formed around the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate branch point. The consistency of the obtained group flux control coefficient estimates is systematically analyzed to ensure that all necessary conditions are satisfied. The magnitudes of the determined control coefficients suggest that the control of lysine production flux in Corynebacterium glutamicum cells at a growth base state resides within the lysine biosynthetic pathway that begins with the PEP/PYR carboxylation anaplorotic pathway.

  15. Overlap and Differences in Brain Networks Underlying the Processing of Complex Sentence Structures in Second Language Users Compared with Native Speakers.

    PubMed

    Weber, Kirsten; Luther, Lisa; Indefrey, Peter; Hagoort, Peter

    2016-05-01

    When we learn a second language later in life, do we integrate it with the established neural networks in place for the first language or is at least a partially new network recruited? While there is evidence that simple grammatical structures in a second language share a system with the native language, the story becomes more multifaceted for complex sentence structures. In this study, we investigated the underlying brain networks in native speakers compared with proficient second language users while processing complex sentences. As hypothesized, complex structures were processed by the same large-scale inferior frontal and middle temporal language networks of the brain in the second language, as seen in native speakers. These effects were seen both in activations and task-related connectivity patterns. Furthermore, the second language users showed increased task-related connectivity from inferior frontal to inferior parietal regions of the brain, regions related to attention and cognitive control, suggesting less automatic processing for these structures in a second language. PMID:26746708

  16. Motor Protein Accumulation on Antiparallel Microtubule Overlaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, Meredith D.

    2016-05-01

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Overlap motor density profiles and motor trajectories resemble experimental measurements. The phase diagram of the model is similar to the single-filament case for low switching rate, while for high switching rate we find a new low density-high density-low density-high density phase. The overlap center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would naively expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center motor density depends on total overlap length, motor speed, and motor switching rate. The size of the crowded boundary layer near the overlap ends is also dependent on the overlap length and switching rate in addition to the motor speed and bulk concentration. The antiparallel microtubule overlap geometry may offer a previously unrecognized mechanism for biological regulation of protein concentration and consequent activity.

  17. Motor Protein Accumulation on Antiparallel Microtubule Overlaps.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, Meredith D

    2016-05-10

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Overlap motor density profiles and motor trajectories resemble experimental measurements. The phase diagram of the model is similar to the single-filament case for low switching rate, while for high switching rate we find a new (to our knowledge) low density-high density-low density-high density phase. The overlap center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would naïvely expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center motor density depends on total overlap length, motor speed, and motor switching rate. The size of the crowded boundary layer near the overlap ends is also dependent on the overlap length and switching rate in addition to the motor speed and bulk concentration. The antiparallel microtubule overlap geometry may offer a previously unrecognized mechanism for biological regulation of protein concentration and consequent activity. PMID:27166811

  18. Using Neural Networks to Determine Sugeno Measures by Statistics.

    PubMed

    Zhenyuan, Wang; Jia, Wang

    1997-01-01

    To replace the traditional weighted average method, Choquet integrals or Sugeno integrals with respect to fuzzy measures are used to obtain a synthetic evaluation of a given object (or its quality, function, etc. respectively) with multi-attribute. Generally, it is not easy to determine fuzzy measures in real problems due to the subjectivity of human thinking. It is even much more difficult than determining weights in the weighted average method, because of the nonadditivity of fuzzy measures. This paper uses a neural network algorithm to optimize the inverse problem of synthetic evaluation, and thus to determine Sugeno measures by the Choquet integral and statistics of given data. Since the Choquet integral is a generalization of the weighted average method, this technology has a broad applicability in areas of multivariate analysis, decision making, pattern recognition, image and speech processing and expert systems. Copyright 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd. PMID:12662896

  19. Optical neural network system for pose determination of spinning satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Andrew; Casasent, David

    1990-01-01

    An optical neural network architecture and algorithm based on a Hopfield optimization network are presented for multitarget tracking. This tracker utilizes a neuron for every possible target track, and a quadratic energy function of neural activities which is minimized using gradient descent neural evolution. The neural net tracker is demonstrated as part of a system for determining position and orientation (pose) of spinning satellites with respect to a robotic spacecraft. The input to the system is time sequence video from a single camera. Novelty detection and filtering are utilized to locate and segment novel regions from the input images. The neural net multitarget tracker determines the correspondences (or tracks) of the novel regions as a function of time, and hence the paths of object (satellite) parts. The path traced out by a given part or region is approximately elliptical in image space, and the position, shape and orientation of the ellipse are functions of the satellite geometry and its pose. Having a geometric model of the satellite, and the elliptical path of a part in image space, the three-dimensional pose of the satellite is determined. Digital simulation results using this algorithm are presented for various satellite poses and lighting conditions.

  20. Quantitation of the area of overlap between second-derivative amide I infrared spectra to determine the structural similarity of a protein in different states.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, B S; Dong, A; Allison, S D; Manning, M C; Carpenter, J F

    1996-02-01

    Maintaining a native-like structure of protein pharmaceuticals during lyophilization is an important aspect of formulation. Infrared spectroscopy can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of formulations in protecting the secondary structural integrity of proteins in the dried solid. This necessitates making quantitative comparisons of the overall similarity of infrared spectra in the conformationally sensitive amide I region. We initially used the correlation coefficient r, as defined by Prestrelski et al. (Biophys. J. 1993, 65, 661-671), for this quantitation. Occasionally, we noticed that the r value did not agree with a visual assessment of the spectral similarity. In some cases this was due to an offset in baselines, which led artifactually to an unreasonably low r value. Conversely, if the spectra were baseline corrected and there existed a large similarity between peak positions, but differences in relative peak heights, the r value would be unreasonably high. Our approach to avoiding these problems is to use area-normalized second-derivative spectra. We have found that quantitating the area of overlap between area-normalized spectra provides a reliable, objective method to compare overall spectral similarity. In the current report, we demonstrate this method with selected protein spectra, which were taken from experiments where unfolding was induced by lyophilization or guanidine hydrochloride, and artificial data sets. With this analysis, we document how problems associated with calculation of the correlation coefficient, r, are avoided. PMID:8683440

  1. Determining Locations by Use of Networks of Passive Beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okino, Clayton; Gray, Andrew; Jennings, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Networks of passive radio beacons spanning moderate-sized terrain areas have been proposed to aid navigation of small robotic aircraft that would be used to explore Saturn s moon Titan. Such networks could also be used on Earth to aid navigation of robotic aircraft, land vehicles, or vessels engaged in exploration or reconnaissance in situations or locations (e.g., underwater locations) in which Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are unreliable or unavailable. Prior to use, it would be necessary to pre-position the beacons at known locations that would be determined by use of one or more precise independent global navigation system(s). Thereafter, while navigating over the area spanned by a given network of passive beacons, an exploratory robot would use the beacons to determine its position precisely relative to the known beacon positions (see figure). If it were necessary for the robot to explore multiple, separated terrain areas spanned by different networks of beacons, the robot could use a long-haul, relatively coarse global navigation system for the lower-precision position determination needed during transit between such areas. The proposed method of precise determination of position of an exploratory robot relative to the positions of passive radio beacons is based partly on the principles of radar and partly on the principles of radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. The robot would transmit radar-like signals that would be modified and reflected by the passive beacons. The distance to each beacon would be determined from the roundtrip propagation time and/or round-trip phase shift of the signal returning from that beacon. Signals returned from different beacons could be distinguished by means of their RFID characteristics. Alternatively or in addition, the antenna of each beacon could be designed to radiate in a unique pattern that could be identified by the navigation system. Also, alternatively or in addition, sets of identical beacons could

  2. High-Throughput Chiral LC-MS/MS Method Using Overlapping Injection Mode for the Determination of Pantoprazole Enantiomers in Human Plasma with Application to Pharmacokinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengni; Jiang, Huafang; Wang, Yiya; Liu, Yinli; Shen, Xiaohang; Liang, Wenzhong; Hong, Zhanying

    2016-07-01

    A sensitive and high-throughput chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the quantification of R-pantoprazole and S-pantoprazole in human plasma. Sample extraction was carried out by using ethyl acetate liquid-liquid extraction in 96-well plate format. The separation of pantoprazole enantiomers was performed on a CHIRALCEL OJ-RH column and an overlapping injection mode was used to achieve a run time of 5.0 min/sample. The mobile phase consisted of 1) 10 mM ammonium acetate in methanol: acetonitrile (1:1, v/v) and 2) 20 mM ammonium acetate in water. Isocratic elution was used with flow rate at 500 μL/min. The enantiomers were quantified on a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer under multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode with m/z 382.1/230.0 for pantoprazole and m/z 388.4/230.1 for pantoprazole-d7. Linearity from 20.0 to 5000 ng/mL was established for each enantiomer (r(2)  > 0.99). Extraction recovery ranged from 91.7% to 96.4% for R-pantoprazole and from 92.5% to 96.5% for S-pantoprazole and the IS-normalized matrix factor was 0.98 to 1.07 for R-pantoprazole and S-pantoprazole, respectively. The method was demonstrated with acceptable accuracy, precision, selectivity, and stability and the method was applied to support a pharmacokinetic study of a phase I clinical trial of racemic pantoprazole in healthy Chinese subjects. Chirality 28:569-575, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27349958

  3. Overlap extension PCR cloning.

    PubMed

    Bryksin, Anton; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Rising demand for recombinant proteins has motivated the development of efficient and reliable cloning methods. Here we show how a beginner can clone virtually any DNA insert into a plasmid of choice without the use of restriction endonucleases or T4 DNA ligase. Chimeric primers encoding plasmid sequence at the 5' ends and insert sequence at the 3' ends are designed and synthesized. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is utilized to amplify the desired insert by PCR. The double-stranded product is subsequently employed as a pair of mega-primers in a PCR-like reaction with circular plasmids. The original plasmids are then destroyed in restriction digests with Dpn I. The product of the overlap extension PCR is used to transform competent Escherichia coli cells. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is used for both the amplification and fusion reactions, so both steps can be monitored and optimized in the same way. PMID:23996437

  4. Securely measuring the overlap between private datasets with cryptosets.

    PubMed

    Swamidass, S Joshua; Matlock, Matthew; Rozenblit, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Many scientific questions are best approached by sharing data--collected by different groups or across large collaborative networks--into a combined analysis. Unfortunately, some of the most interesting and powerful datasets--like health records, genetic data, and drug discovery data--cannot be freely shared because they contain sensitive information. In many situations, knowing if private datasets overlap determines if it is worthwhile to navigate the institutional, ethical, and legal barriers that govern access to sensitive, private data. We report the first method of publicly measuring the overlap between private datasets that is secure under a malicious model without relying on private protocols or message passing. This method uses a publicly shareable summary of a dataset's contents, its cryptoset, to estimate its overlap with other datasets. Cryptosets approach "information-theoretic" security, the strongest type of security possible in cryptography, which is not even crackable with infinite computing power. We empirically and theoretically assess both the accuracy of these estimates and the security of the approach, demonstrating that cryptosets are informative, with a stable accuracy, and secure. PMID:25714898

  5. Arsia Mons Overlapping Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This VIS image shows overlapping flows with different suface textures. In the middle of the image there is a round, darker feature -- a small volcano. To the left of the volcano a graben cuts across the lava flows.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -18.5, Longitude 244.5 East (115.5 West). 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Generating Composite Overlapping Grids on CAD Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W.D.

    2002-02-07

    We describe some algorithms and tools that have been developed to generate composite overlapping grids on geometries that have been defined with computer aided design (CAD) programs. This process consists of five main steps. Starting from a description of the surfaces defining the computational domain we (1) correct errors in the CAD representation, (2) determine topology of the patched-surface, (3) build a global triangulation of the surface, (4) construct structured surface and volume grids using hyperbolic grid generation, and (5) generate the overlapping grid by determining the holes and the interpolation points. The overlapping grid generator which is used for the final step also supports the rapid generation of grids for block-structured adaptive mesh refinement and for moving grids. These algorithms have been implemented as part of the Overture object-oriented framework.

  7. Competitive STDP Learning of Overlapping Spatial Patterns.

    PubMed

    Krunglevicius, Dalius

    2015-08-01

    Spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a set of Hebbian learning rules firmly based on biological evidence. It has been demonstrated that one of the STDP learning rules is suited for learning spatiotemporal patterns. When multiple neurons are organized in a simple competitive spiking neural network, this network is capable of learning multiple distinct patterns. If patterns overlap significantly (i.e., patterns are mutually inclusive), however, competition would not preclude trained neuron's responding to a new pattern and adjusting synaptic weights accordingly. This letter presents a simple neural network that combines vertical inhibition and Euclidean distance-dependent synaptic strength factor. This approach helps to solve the problem of pattern size-dependent parameter optimality and significantly reduces the probability of a neuron's forgetting an already learned pattern. For demonstration purposes, the network was trained for the first ten letters of the Braille alphabet. PMID:26079753

  8. Dynamical state of the network determines the efficacy of single neuron properties in shaping the network activity

    PubMed Central

    Sahasranamam, Ajith; Vlachos, Ioannis; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Spike patterns are among the most common electrophysiological descriptors of neuron types. Surprisingly, it is not clear how the diversity in firing patterns of the neurons in a network affects its activity dynamics. Here, we introduce the state-dependent stochastic bursting neuron model allowing for a change in its firing patterns independent of changes in its input-output firing rate relationship. Using this model, we show that the effect of single neuron spiking on the network dynamics is contingent on the network activity state. While spike bursting can both generate and disrupt oscillations, these patterns are ineffective in large regions of the network state space in changing the network activity qualitatively. Finally, we show that when single-neuron properties are made dependent on the population activity, a hysteresis like dynamics emerges. This novel phenomenon has important implications for determining the network response to time-varying inputs and for the network sensitivity at different operating points. PMID:27212008

  9. Dynamical state of the network determines the efficacy of single neuron properties in shaping the network activity.

    PubMed

    Sahasranamam, Ajith; Vlachos, Ioannis; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Spike patterns are among the most common electrophysiological descriptors of neuron types. Surprisingly, it is not clear how the diversity in firing patterns of the neurons in a network affects its activity dynamics. Here, we introduce the state-dependent stochastic bursting neuron model allowing for a change in its firing patterns independent of changes in its input-output firing rate relationship. Using this model, we show that the effect of single neuron spiking on the network dynamics is contingent on the network activity state. While spike bursting can both generate and disrupt oscillations, these patterns are ineffective in large regions of the network state space in changing the network activity qualitatively. Finally, we show that when single-neuron properties are made dependent on the population activity, a hysteresis like dynamics emerges. This novel phenomenon has important implications for determining the network response to time-varying inputs and for the network sensitivity at different operating points. PMID:27212008

  10. Autism and ADHD: Overlapping and Discriminating Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Mayes, Rebecca D.; Molitoris, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Children with ADHD and autism have some similar features, complicating a differential diagnosis. The purpose of our study was to determine the degree to which core ADHD and autistic symptoms overlap in and discriminate between children 2-16 years of age with autism and ADHD. Our study demonstrated that 847 children with autism were easily…

  11. Development and validation of different methods manipulating zero order and first order spectra for determination of the partially overlapped mixture benazepril and amlodipine: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemdan, A.

    2016-07-01

    Three simple, selective, and accurate spectrophotometric methods have been developed and then validated for the analysis of Benazepril (BENZ) and Amlodipine (AML) in bulk powder and pharmaceutical dosage form. The first method is the absorption factor (AF) for zero order and amplitude factor (P-F) for first order spectrum, where both BENZ and AML can be measured from their resolved zero order spectra at 238 nm or from their first order spectra at 253 nm. The second method is the constant multiplication coupled with constant subtraction (CM-CS) for zero order and successive derivative subtraction-constant multiplication (SDS-CM) for first order spectrum, where both BENZ and AML can be measured from their resolved zero order spectra at 240 nm and 238 nm, respectively, or from their first order spectra at 214 nm and 253 nm for Benazepril and Amlodipine respectively. The third method is the novel constant multiplication coupled with derivative zero crossing (CM-DZC) which is a stability indicating assay method for determination of Benazepril and Amlodipine in presence of the main degradation product of Benazepril which is Benazeprilate (BENZT). The three methods were validated as per the ICH guidelines and the standard curves were found to be linear in the range of 5-60 μg/mL for Benazepril and 5-30 for Amlodipine, with well accepted mean correlation coefficient for each analyte. The intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy results were well within the acceptable limits.

  12. A study of selective spectrophotometric methods for simultaneous determination of Itopride hydrochloride and Rabeprazole sodium binary mixture: Resolving sever overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Heba M.

    2015-02-01

    Itopride hydrochloride (IT) and Rabeprazole sodium (RB) are co-formulated together for the treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. Three simple, specific and accurate spectrophotometric methods were applied and validated for simultaneous determination of Itopride hydrochloride (IT) and Rabeprazole sodium (RB) namely; constant center (CC), ratio difference (RD) and mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR) spectrophotometric methods. Linear correlations were obtained in range of 10-110 μg/μL for Itopride hydrochloride and 4-44 μg/mL for Rabeprazole sodium. No preliminary separation steps were required prior the analysis of the two drugs using the proposed methods. Specificity was investigated by analyzing the synthetic mixtures containing the two cited drugs and their capsules dosage form. The obtained results were statistically compared with those obtained by the reported method, no significant difference was obtained with respect to accuracy and precision. The three methods were validated in accordance with ICH guidelines and can be used for quality control laboratories for IT and RB.

  13. Development and validation of different methods manipulating zero order and first order spectra for determination of the partially overlapped mixture benazepril and amlodipine: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hemdan, A

    2016-07-01

    Three simple, selective, and accurate spectrophotometric methods have been developed and then validated for the analysis of Benazepril (BENZ) and Amlodipine (AML) in bulk powder and pharmaceutical dosage form. The first method is the absorption factor (AF) for zero order and amplitude factor (P-F) for first order spectrum, where both BENZ and AML can be measured from their resolved zero order spectra at 238nm or from their first order spectra at 253nm. The second method is the constant multiplication coupled with constant subtraction (CM-CS) for zero order and successive derivative subtraction-constant multiplication (SDS-CM) for first order spectrum, where both BENZ and AML can be measured from their resolved zero order spectra at 240nm and 238nm, respectively, or from their first order spectra at 214nm and 253nm for Benazepril and Amlodipine respectively. The third method is the novel constant multiplication coupled with derivative zero crossing (CM-DZC) which is a stability indicating assay method for determination of Benazepril and Amlodipine in presence of the main degradation product of Benazepril which is Benazeprilate (BENZT). The three methods were validated as per the ICH guidelines and the standard curves were found to be linear in the range of 5-60μg/mL for Benazepril and 5-30 for Amlodipine, with well accepted mean correlation coefficient for each analyte. The intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy results were well within the acceptable limits. PMID:27078209

  14. On Determining if Tree-based Networks Contain Fixed Trees.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Maria; Anipchenko-Ulaj, Olga; Ashfaq, Aisha; Chiu, Joyce; Kaiser, Mahedi; Ohsawa, Max Shoji; Owen, Megan; Pavlechko, Ella; St John, Katherine; Suleria, Shivam; Thompson, Keith; Yap, Corrine

    2016-05-01

    We address an open question of Francis and Steel about phylogenetic networks and trees. They give a polynomial time algorithm to decide if a phylogenetic network, N, is tree-based and pose the problem: given a fixed tree T and network N, is N based on T? We show that it is [Formula: see text]-hard to decide, by reduction from 3-Dimensional Matching (3DM) and further that the problem is fixed-parameter tractable. PMID:27125655

  15. Temporal niche overlap among insectivorous small mammals.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Emerson M; Paise, Gabriela

    2011-12-01

    Being active in the same environment at different times exposes animals to the effects of very different environmental factors, both biotic and abiotic. In the present study, we used live traps equipped with timing devices to evaluate the potential role of biotic factors (competition and food abundance) on overall overlap in the temporal niche axis of 4 insectivorous small mammals in high-elevation grassland fields ('campos de altitude') of southern Brazil. Based on resources availability (invertebrates), data on animal captures were pooled in 2 seasons: 'scarcity' (June 2001-September 2001) and 'abundance' (November 2001-May 2002) seasons. We tested for non-random structure in temporal niche overlap among the species in each season. These species were the rodents Oxymycterus nasutus (Waterhouse, 1837), Deltamys sp., Akodon azarae (Fischer, 1829), and the marsupial Monodelphis brevicaudis Olfers, 1818. The studied community was mainly diurnal with crepuscular peaks. Simulations using the Pianka index of niche overlap indicated that the empirical assemblage-wide overlap was not significantly different from randomly generated patterns in the abundance season but significantly greater than expected by chance alone in the scarcity season. All the species showed an increase in temporal niche breadth during the abundance season, which appears to be related to longer daylength and high nocturnal temperatures. Patterns on both temporal niche overlap and temporal niche breadth were the opposite to those that we were expecting in the case of diel activity patterns determined by competition for dietary resources. Therefore, we conclude that competition did not seem to be preponderant for determining patterns of temporal niche overlap by the studied community. PMID:22182329

  16. 77 FR 37730 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Nomads and Networks: The...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... and Culture of Kazakhstan'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the following determinations: Pursuant... Networks: The Ancient Art and Culture of Kazakhstan,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition...

  17. Trophic network architecture of root-associated bacterial communities determines pathogen invasion and plant health

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhong; Yang, Tianjie; Friman, Ville-Petri; Xu, Yangchun; Shen, Qirong; Jousset, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Host-associated bacterial communities can function as an important line of defence against pathogens in animals and plants. Empirical evidence and theoretical predictions suggest that species-rich communities are more resistant to pathogen invasions. Yet, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we experimentally test how the underlying resource competition networks of resident bacterial communities affect invasion resistance to the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum in microcosms and in tomato plant rhizosphere. We find that bipartite resource competition networks are better predictors of invasion resistance compared with resident community diversity. Specifically, communities with a combination of stabilizing configurations (low nestedness and high connectance), and a clear niche overlap with the pathogen, reduce pathogen invasion success, constrain pathogen growth within invaded communities and have lower levels of diseased plants in greenhouse experiments. Bacterial resource competition network characteristics can thus be important in explaining positive diversity–invasion resistance relationships in bacterial rhizosphere communities. PMID:26400552

  18. Trophic network architecture of root-associated bacterial communities determines pathogen invasion and plant health.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhong; Yang, Tianjie; Friman, Ville-Petri; Xu, Yangchun; Shen, Qirong; Jousset, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Host-associated bacterial communities can function as an important line of defence against pathogens in animals and plants. Empirical evidence and theoretical predictions suggest that species-rich communities are more resistant to pathogen invasions. Yet, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we experimentally test how the underlying resource competition networks of resident bacterial communities affect invasion resistance to the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum in microcosms and in tomato plant rhizosphere. We find that bipartite resource competition networks are better predictors of invasion resistance compared with resident community diversity. Specifically, communities with a combination of stabilizing configurations (low nestedness and high connectance), and a clear niche overlap with the pathogen, reduce pathogen invasion success, constrain pathogen growth within invaded communities and have lower levels of diseased plants in greenhouse experiments. Bacterial resource competition network characteristics can thus be important in explaining positive diversity-invasion resistance relationships in bacterial rhizosphere communities. PMID:26400552

  19. Hub-Centered Gene Network Reconstruction Using Automatic Relevance Determination

    PubMed Central

    Böck, Matthias; Ogishima, Soichi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Kramer, Stefan; Kaderali, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Network inference deals with the reconstruction of biological networks from experimental data. A variety of different reverse engineering techniques are available; they differ in the underlying assumptions and mathematical models used. One common problem for all approaches stems from the complexity of the task, due to the combinatorial explosion of different network topologies for increasing network size. To handle this problem, constraints are frequently used, for example on the node degree, number of edges, or constraints on regulation functions between network components. We propose to exploit topological considerations in the inference of gene regulatory networks. Such systems are often controlled by a small number of hub genes, while most other genes have only limited influence on the network's dynamic. We model gene regulation using a Bayesian network with discrete, Boolean nodes. A hierarchical prior is employed to identify hub genes. The first layer of the prior is used to regularize weights on edges emanating from one specific node. A second prior on hyperparameters controls the magnitude of the former regularization for different nodes. The net effect is that central nodes tend to form in reconstructed networks. Network reconstruction is then performed by maximization of or sampling from the posterior distribution. We evaluate our approach on simulated and real experimental data, indicating that we can reconstruct main regulatory interactions from the data. We furthermore compare our approach to other state-of-the art methods, showing superior performance in identifying hubs. Using a large publicly available dataset of over 800 cell cycle regulated genes, we are able to identify several main hub genes. Our method may thus provide a valuable tool to identify interesting candidate genes for further study. Furthermore, the approach presented may stimulate further developments in regularization methods for network reconstruction from data. PMID:22570688

  20. Automatic segmentation of overlapping and touching chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhiqiang; Chen, Xiaohua; Zhang, Renli; Yu, Chang

    2001-09-01

    reaches to another boundary or tracing route. For overlapping chromosomes, the searching algorithm fails. We proposed a topology information based method for analyzing overlapping and touching chromosomes. Mihail Popescu adopts Cross Section Sequence Graph (CSSG) method for shape analyzing. Gady Agam proposed Discrete Curvature Function for splitting touching and overlapping chromosomes. But due to the non-rigid property of chromosomes, it is hard to determine the actual topology structure of chromosomes. In this paper we proposed a new method to produce topology information of chromosomes and had got good results in chromosome segmentation.

  1. 78 FR 1264 - CalAmp Wireless Networks Corporation, Waseca, MN; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration CalAmp Wireless Networks Corporation, Waseca, MN; Notice of Negative... workers of the subject firm (TA-W-80,399A; CalAmp Wireless Networks Corporation, Waseca, Minnesota... Wireless Networks Corporation, Waseca, Minnesota to apply for TAA, the Department determines that...

  2. Cellular and network mechanisms of genetically-determined absence seizures.

    PubMed

    Pinault, Didier; O'Brien, Terence J

    2005-01-01

    The absence epilepsies are characterized by recurrent episodes of loss of consciousness associated with generalized spike-and-wave discharges, with an abrupt onset and offset, in the thalamocortical system. In the absence of detailed neurophysiological studies in humans, many of the concepts regarding the pathophysiological basis of absence seizures are based on studies in animal models. Each of these models has its particular strengths and limitations, and the validity of findings from these models for the human condition cannot be assumed. Consequently, studies in different models have produced some conflicting findings and conclusions. A long-standing concept, based primarily from studies in vivo in cats and in vitro brain slices, is that these paroxysmal electrical events develop suddenly from sleep-related spindle oscillations. More specifically, it is proposed that the initial mechanisms that underlie absence-related spike-and-wave discharges are located in the thalamus, involving especially the thalamic reticular nucleus. By contrast, more recent studies in well-established, genetic models of absence epilepsy in rats demonstrate that spike-and-wave discharges originate in a cortical focus and develop from a wake-related natural corticothalamic sensorimotor rhythm. In this review we integrate recent findings showing that, in both the thalamus and the neocortex, genetically-determined, absence-related spike-and-wave discharges are the manifestation of hypersynchronized, cellular, rhythmic excitations and inhibitions that result from a combination of complex, intrinsic, synaptic mechanisms. Arguments are put forward supporting the hypothesis that layer VI corticothalamic neurons act as 'drivers' in the generation of spike-and-wave discharges in the somatosensory thalamocortical system that result in corticothalamic resonances particularly initially involving the thalamic reticular nucleus. However an important unresolved question is: what are the cellular and

  3. EVOG: a database for evolutionary analysis of overlapping genes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Soo; Cho, Chi-Young; Huh, Jae-Won; Kim, Heui-Soo; Cho, Hwan-Gue

    2009-01-01

    Overlapping genes are defined as a pair of genes whose transcripts are overlapped. Recently, many cases of overlapped genes have been investigated in various eukaryotic organisms; however, their origin and transcriptional control mechanism has not yet been clearly determined. In this study, we implemented evolutionary visualizer for overlapping genes (EVOG), a Web-based DB with a novel visualization interface, to investigate the evolutionary relationship between overlapping genes. Using this technique, we collected and analyzed all overlapping genes in human, chimpanzee, orangutan, marmoset, rhesus, cow, dog, mouse, rat, chicken, Xenopus, zebrafish and Drosophila. This integrated database provides a manually curated database that displays the evolutionary features of overlapping genes. The EVOG DB components included a number of overlapping genes (10074 in human, 10,009 in chimpanzee, 67,039 in orangutan, 51,001 in marmoset, 219 in rhesus, 3627 in cow, 209 in dog, 10,700 in mouse, 7987 in rat, 1439 in chicken, 597 in Xenopus, 2457 in zebrafish and 4115 in Drosophila). The EVOG database is very effective and easy to use for the analysis of the evolutionary process of overlapping genes when comparing different species. Therefore, EVOG could potentially be used as the main tool to investigate the evolution of the human genome in relation to disease by comparing the expression profiles of overlapping genes. EVOG is available at http://neobio.cs.pusan.ac.kr/evog/. PMID:18986995

  4. Form and function in gene regulatory networks: the structure of network motifs determines fundamental properties of their dynamical state space

    PubMed Central

    Ahnert, S. E.; Fink, T. M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Network motifs have been studied extensively over the past decade, and certain motifs, such as the feed-forward loop, play an important role in regulatory networks. Recent studies have used Boolean network motifs to explore the link between form and function in gene regulatory networks and have found that the structure of a motif does not strongly determine its function, if this is defined in terms of the gene expression patterns the motif can produce. Here, we offer a different, higher-level definition of the ‘function’ of a motif, in terms of two fundamental properties of its dynamical state space as a Boolean network. One is the basin entropy, which is a complexity measure of the dynamics of Boolean networks. The other is the diversity of cyclic attractor lengths that a given motif can produce. Using these two measures, we examine all 104 topologically distinct three-node motifs and show that the structural properties of a motif, such as the presence of feedback loops and feed-forward loops, predict fundamental characteristics of its dynamical state space, which in turn determine aspects of its functional versatility. We also show that these higher-level properties have a direct bearing on real regulatory networks, as both basin entropy and cycle length diversity show a close correspondence with the prevalence, in neural and genetic regulatory networks, of the 13 connected motifs without self-interactions that have been studied extensively in the literature. PMID:27440255

  5. Optimal Space Station solar array gimbal angle determination via radial basis function neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Daniel J.; Oezguener, Uemit; Graham, Ronald E.

    1994-01-01

    The potential for excessive plume impingement loads on Space Station Freedom solar arrays, caused by jet firings from an approaching Space Shuttle, is addressed. An artificial neural network is designed to determine commanded solar array beta gimbal angle for minimum plume loads. The commanded angle would be determined dynamically. The network design proposed involves radial basis functions as activation functions. Design, development, and simulation of this network design are discussed.

  6. On the Neuberger overlap operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boriçi, Artan

    1999-04-01

    We compute Neuberger's overlap operator by the Lanczos algorithm applied to the Wilson-Dirac operator. Locality of the operator for quenched QCD data and its eigenvalue spectrum in an instanton background are studied.

  7. An Exposition of Fischer's Model of Overlapping Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, T. Windsor; Hart, William R.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests how the classic model of overlapping contracts can be incorporated into the contract wage model of aggregate supply. Illustrates dynamics of macroeconomic adjustment following a shock to aggregate demand. Concludes that overlapping contracts do not prolong the adjustment process; rather, the longest remaining contract determines the time…

  8. Attractive interactions among intermediate filaments determine network mechanics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pawelzyk, Paul; Mücke, Norbert; Herrmann, Harald; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical and structural properties of K8/K18 and vimentin intermediate filament (IF) networks have been investigated using bulk mechanical rheometry and optical microrheology including diffusing wave spectroscopy and multiple particle tracking. A high elastic modulus G0 at low protein concentration c, a weak concentration dependency of G0 (G0 ∼ c(0.5 ± 0.1)) and pronounced strain stiffening are found for these systems even without external crossbridgers. Strong attractive interactions among filaments are required to maintain these characteristic mechanical features, which have also been reported for various other IF networks. Filament assembly, the persistence length of the filaments and the network mesh size remain essentially unaffected when a nonionic surfactant is added, but strain stiffening is completely suppressed, G0 drops by orders of magnitude and exhibits a scaling G0 ∼ c(1.9 ± 0.2) in agreement with microrheological measurements and as expected for entangled networks of semi-flexible polymers. Tailless K8Δ/K18ΔT and various other tailless filament networks do not exhibit strain stiffening, but still show high G0 values. Therefore, two binding sites are proposed to exist in IF networks. A weaker one mediated by hydrophobic amino acid clusters in the central rod prevents stretched filaments between adjacent cross-links from thermal equilibration and thus provides the high G0 values. Another strong one facilitating strain stiffening is located in the tail domain with its high fraction of hydrophobic amino acid sequences. Strain stiffening is less pronounced for vimentin than for K8/K18 due to electrostatic repulsion forces partly compensating the strong attraction at filament contact points. PMID:24690778

  9. Determining a bisection bandwidth for a multi-node data communications network

    DOEpatents

    Faraj, Ahmad A.

    2010-01-26

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for determining a bisection bandwidth for a multi-node data communications network that include: partitioning nodes in the network into a first sub-network and a second sub-network in dependence upon a topology of the network; sending, by each node in the first sub-network to a destination node in the second sub-network, a first message having a predetermined message size; receiving, by each node in the first sub-network from a source node in the second sub-network, a second message; measuring, by each node in the first sub-network, the elapsed communications time between the sending of the first message and the receiving of the second message; selecting the longest elapsed communications time; and calculating the bisection bandwidth for the network in dependence upon the number of the nodes in the first sub-network, the predetermined message size of the first test message, and the longest elapsed communications time.

  10. Security management based on trust determination in cognitive radio networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwu; Feng, Zebing; Wei, Zhiqing; Feng, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Security has played a major role in cognitive radio networks. Numerous researches have mainly focused on attacking detection based on source localization and detection probability. However, few of them took the penalty of attackers into consideration and neglected how to implement effective punitive measures against attackers. To address this issue, this article proposes a novel penalty mechanism based on cognitive trust value. The main feature of this mechanism has been realized by six functions: authentication, interactive, configuration, trust value collection, storage and update, and punishment. Data fusion center (FC) and cluster heads (CHs) have been put forward as a hierarchical architecture to manage trust value of cognitive users. Misbehaving users would be punished by FC by declining their trust value; thus, guaranteeing network security via distinguishing attack users is of great necessity. Simulation results verify the rationality and effectiveness of our proposed mechanism.

  11. Determination of a Limited Scope Network's Lightning Detection Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.; Blakeslee, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines a modeling technique to map lightning detection efficiency variations over a region surveyed by a sparse array of ground based detectors. A reliable flash peak current distribution (PCD) for the region serves as the technique's base. This distribution is recast as an event probability distribution function. The technique then uses the PCD together with information regarding: site signal detection thresholds, type of solution algorithm used, and range attenuation; to formulate the probability that a flash at a specified location will yield a solution. Applying this technique to the full region produces detection efficiency contour maps specific to the parameters employed. These contours facilitate a comparative analysis of each parameter's effect on the network's detection efficiency. In an alternate application, this modeling technique gives an estimate of the number, strength, and distribution of events going undetected. This approach leads to a variety of event density contour maps. This application is also illustrated. The technique's base PCD can be empirical or analytical. A process for formulating an empirical PCD specific to the region and network being studied is presented. A new method for producing an analytical representation of the empirical PCD is also introduced.

  12. Hybrid algorithm for NARX network parameters' determination using differential evolution and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salami, M. J. E.; Tijani, I. B.; Abdullateef, A. I.; Aibinu, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    A hybrid optimization algorithm using Differential Evolution (DE) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) is proposed in this study to address the problem of network parameters determination associated with the Nonlinear Autoregressive with eXogenous inputs Network (NARX-network). The proposed algorithm involves a two level optimization scheme to search for both optimal network architecture and weights. The DE at the upper level is formulated as combinatorial optimization to search for the network architecture while the associated network weights that minimize the prediction error is provided by the GA at the lower level. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated on identification of a laboratory rotary motion system. The system identification results show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm for nonparametric model development.

  13. Method and apparatus for determining and utilizing a time-expanded decision network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Matthew (Inventor); de Weck, Olivier (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method, apparatus and computer program for determining and utilizing a time-expanded decision network is presented. A set of potential system configurations is defined. Next, switching costs are quantified to create a "static network" that captures the difficulty of switching among these configurations. A time-expanded decision network is provided by expanding the static network in time, including chance and decision nodes. Minimum cost paths through the network are evaluated under plausible operating scenarios. The set of initial design configurations are iteratively modified to exploit high-leverage switches and the process is repeated to convergence. Time-expanded decision networks are applicable, but not limited to, the design of systems, products, services and contracts.

  14. Magnesium degradation as determined by artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Willumeit, Regine; Feyerabend, Frank; Huber, Norbert

    2013-11-01

    Magnesium degradation under physiological conditions is a highly complex process in which temperature, the use of cell culture growth medium and the presence of CO2, O2 and proteins can influence the corrosion rate and the composition of the resulting corrosion layer. Due to the complexity of this process it is almost impossible to predict the parameters that are most important and whether some parameters have a synergistic effect on the corrosion rate. Artificial neural networks are a mathematical tool that can be used to approximate and analyse non-linear problems with multiple inputs. In this work we present the first analysis of corrosion data obtained using this method, which reveals that CO2 and the composition of the buffer system play a crucial role in the corrosion of magnesium, whereas O2, proteins and temperature play a less prominent role. PMID:23470548

  15. Spatial reasoning to determine stream network from LANDSAT imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.; Wang, S.; Elliott, D. B.

    1983-01-01

    In LANDSAT imagery, spectral and spatial information can be used to detect the drainage network as well as the relative elevation model in mountainous terrain. To do this, mixed information of material reflectance in the original LANDSAT imagery must be separated. From the material reflectance information, big visible rivers can be detected. From the topographic modulation information, ridges and valleys can be detected and assigned relative elevations. A complete elevation model can be generated by interpolating values for nonridge and non-valley pixels. The small streams not detectable from material reflectance information can be located in the valleys with flow direction known from the elevation model. Finally, the flow directions of big visible rivers can be inferred by solving a consistent labeling problem based on a set of spatial reasoning constraints.

  16. Measurement network design including traveltime determinations to minimize model prediction uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Gijs M. C. M.; Valstar, Johan R.; van der Zee, Sjoerd E. A. T. M.

    2008-02-01

    Traveltime determinations have found increasing application in the characterization of groundwater systems. No algorithms are available, however, to optimally design sampling strategies including this information type. We propose a first-order methodology to include groundwater age or tracer arrival time determinations in measurement network design and apply the methodology in an illustrative example in which the network design is directed at contaminant breakthrough uncertainty minimization. We calculate linearized covariances between potential measurements and the goal variables of which we want to reduce the uncertainty: the groundwater age at the control plane and the breakthrough locations of the contaminant. We assume the traveltime to be lognormally distributed and therefore logtransform the age determinations in compliance with the adopted Bayesian framework. Accordingly, we derive expressions for the linearized covariances between the transformed age determinations and the parameters and states. In our synthetic numerical example, the derived expressions are shown to provide good first-order predictions of the variance of the natural logarithm of groundwater age if the variance of the natural logarithm of the conductivity is less than 3.0. The calculated covariances can be used to predict the posterior breakthrough variance belonging to a candidate network before samples are taken. A Genetic Algorithm is used to efficiently search, among all candidate networks, for a near-optimal one. We show that, in our numerical example, an age estimation network outperforms (in terms of breakthrough uncertainty reduction) equally sized head measurement networks and conductivity measurement networks even if the age estimations are highly uncertain.

  17. Fuzzy overlapping community detection based on local random walk and multidimensional scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjun; Liu, Dong; Liu, Xiao; Pan, Lin

    2013-12-01

    A fuzzy overlapping community is an important kind of overlapping community in which each node belongs to each community to different extents. It exists in many real networks but how to identify a fuzzy overlapping community is still a challenging task. In this work, the concept of local random walk and a new distance metric are introduced. Based on the new distance measurement, the dissimilarity index between each node of a network is calculated firstly. Then in order to keep the original node distance as much as possible, the network structure is mapped into low-dimensional space by the multidimensional scaling (MDS). Finally, the fuzzy c-means clustering is employed to find fuzzy communities in a network. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is effective and efficient to identify the fuzzy overlapping communities in both artificial networks and real-world networks.

  18. A dynamic and intricate regulatory network determines Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Kumari, Hansi; Mathee, Kalai

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically versatile bacterium that is found in a wide range of biotic and abiotic habitats. It is a major human opportunistic pathogen causing numerous acute and chronic infections. The critical traits contributing to the pathogenic potential of P. aeruginosa are the production of a myriad of virulence factors, formation of biofilms and antibiotic resistance. Expression of these traits is under stringent regulation, and it responds to largely unidentified environmental signals. This review is focused on providing a global picture of virulence gene regulation in P. aeruginosa. In addition to key regulatory pathways that control the transition from acute to chronic infection phenotypes, some regulators have been identified that modulate multiple virulence mechanisms. Despite of a propensity for chaotic behaviour, no chaotic motifs were readily observed in the P. aeruginosa virulence regulatory network. Having a ‘birds-eye’ view of the regulatory cascades provides the forum opportunities to pose questions, formulate hypotheses and evaluate theories in elucidating P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms involved in making P. aeruginosa a successful pathogen is essential in helping devise control strategies. PMID:23143271

  19. distal antenna and distal antenna-related function in the retinal determination network during eye development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Curtiss, Jennifer; Burnett, Micheal; Mlodzik, Marek

    2007-01-01

    Drosophila eye specification occurs through the activity of the retinal determination (RD) network, which includes the Eyeless (Ey), Eyes absent (Eya), Sine oculis (So) and Dachshund (Dac) transcription factors. Based on their abilities to transform antennal precursors towards an eye fate, the distal antenna (dan) and distal antenna-related (danr) genes encode two new RD factors. Dan and Danr are probable transcription factors localized in nuclei of eye precursors and differentiating eye tissue. Loss-of-function single and double dan/danr mutants have small, rough eyes, indicating a requirement for wild-type eye development. In addition, dan and danr participate in the transcriptional hierarchy that controls expression of RD genes, and Dan and Danr interact physically and genetically with Ey and Dac. Eye specification culminates in differentiation of ommatidia through the activities of the proneural gene atonal (ato) in the founding R8 photoreceptor and Egfr signaling in additional photoreceptors. Danr expression overlaps with Ato during R8 specification, and Dan and Danr regulate Ato expression and are required for normal R8 induction and differentiation. These data demonstrate a role for Dan and Danr in eye development and provide a link between eye specification and differentiation. PMID:17493605

  20. Overlap distributions for quantum quenches in the anisotropic Heisenberg chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Paolo P.; Stéphan, Jean-Marie; Canovi, Elena; Alba, Vincenzo; Brockmann, Michael; Haque, Masudul

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics after a quantum quench is determined by the weights of the initial state in the eigenspectrum of the final Hamiltonian, i.e. by the distribution of overlaps in the energy spectrum. We present an analysis of such overlap distributions for quenches of the anisotropy parameter in the one-dimensional anisotropic spin-1/2 Heisenberg model (XXZ chain). We provide an overview of the form of the overlap distribution for quenches from various initial anisotropies to various final ones, using numerical exact diagonalization. We show that if the system is prepared in the antiferromagnetic Néel state (infinite anisotropy) and released into a non-interacting setup (zero anisotropy, XX point) only a small fraction of the final eigenstates gives contributions to the post-quench dynamics, and that these eigenstates have identical overlap magnitudes. We derive expressions for the overlaps, and present the selection rules that determine the final eigenstates having nonzero overlap. We use these results to derive concise expressions for time-dependent quantities (Loschmidt echo, longitudinal and transverse correlators) after the quench. We use perturbative analyses to understand the overlap distribution for quenches from infinite to small nonzero anisotropies, and for quenches from large to zero anisotropy.

  1. A simple neural network model for the determination of aquifer parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samani, N.; Gohari-Moghadam, M.; Safavi, A. A.

    2007-06-01

    SummaryA simple artificial neural network (ANN) model is developed for the determination of non-leaky confined aquifer parameters by normalizing and applying the principal component analysis (PCA) on adopted training data pattern from Lin and Chen [Lin, G.F., Chen, G.R., 2006. An improved neural network approach to the determination of aquifer parameters. Journal of Hydrology 316 (1-4), 281-289]. The proposed network uses faster Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm instead of gradient descent. The application of PCA highly reduced the network topology so that it has only one neuron in the input layer and eight neurons in the hidden layer regardless of the number of drawdown records in the pumping test data. The network trained with 10,205 training sets and tested with 2000 sets of synthetic data. The network generates the coordinates of the match point for any individual pumping test case study and then the aquifer parameters are calculated using Theis' equation. The simple ANN trains faster and determines the coordinate of the match point more accurately because of the simplified topology and LM training algorithm. The accuracy, generalization ability and reliability of the proposed network is verified by two sets of real-time field data and the results are compared with that of Lin and Chen as well as graphical methods of aquifer parameters estimation. The proposed ANN appears to be a simpler and more accurate alternative to the type curve-matching techniques and previous ANN methods.

  2. A Novel Clustering Algorithm for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks Based on Determination of Virtual Links' Weight to Increase Network Stability

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Abbas; Afsharfarnia, Abbas; Zarafshan, Faraneh; Al-Haddad, S. A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The stability of clusters is a serious issue in mobile ad hoc networks. Low stability of clusters may lead to rapid failure of clusters, high energy consumption for reclustering, and decrease in the overall network stability in mobile ad hoc network. In order to improve the stability of clusters, weight-based clustering algorithms are utilized. However, these algorithms only use limited features of the nodes. Thus, they decrease the weight accuracy in determining node's competency and lead to incorrect selection of cluster heads. A new weight-based algorithm presented in this paper not only determines node's weight using its own features, but also considers the direct effect of feature of adjacent nodes. It determines the weight of virtual links between nodes and the effect of the weights on determining node's final weight. By using this strategy, the highest weight is assigned to the best choices for being the cluster heads and the accuracy of nodes selection increases. The performance of new algorithm is analyzed by using computer simulation. The results show that produced clusters have longer lifetime and higher stability. Mathematical simulation shows that this algorithm has high availability in case of failure. PMID:25114965

  3. Laser ranging network performance and routine orbit determination at D-PAF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massmann, Franz-Heinrich; Reigber, C.; Li, H.; Koenig, Rolf; Raimondo, J. C.; Rajasenan, C.; Vei, M.

    1993-01-01

    ERS-1 is now about 8 months in orbit and has been tracked by the global laser network from the very beginning of the mission. The German processing and archiving facility for ERS-1 (D-PAF) is coordinating and supporting the network and performing the different routine orbit determination tasks. This paper presents details about the global network status, the communication to D-PAF and the tracking data and orbit processing system at D-PAF. The quality of the preliminary and precise orbits are shown and some problem areas are identified.

  4. A Fast Overlapping Community Detection Algorithm with Self-Correcting Ability

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the defects of all kinds of modularity, this paper defines a weighted modularity based on the density and cohesion as the new evaluation measurement. Since the proportion of the overlapping nodes in network is very low, the number of the nodes' repeat visits can be reduced by signing the vertices with the overlapping attributes. In this paper, we propose three test conditions for overlapping nodes and present a fast overlapping community detection algorithm with self-correcting ability, which is decomposed into two processes. Under the control of overlapping properties, the complexity of the algorithm tends to be approximate linear. And we also give a new understanding on membership vector. Moreover, we improve the bridgeness function which evaluates the extent of overlapping nodes. Finally, we conduct the experiments on three networks with well known community structures and the results verify the feasibility and effectiveness of our algorithm. PMID:24757434

  5. A neural network approach to fault detection in spacecraft attitude determination and control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, John N.

    This thesis proposes a method of performing fault detection and isolation in spacecraft attitude determination and control systems. The proposed method works by deploying a trained neural network to analyze a set of residuals that are defined such that they encompass the attitude control, guidance, and attitude determination subsystems. Eight neural networks were trained using either the resilient backpropagation, Levenberg-Marquardt, or Levenberg-Marquardt with Bayesian regularization training algorithms. The results of each of the neural networks were analyzed to determine the accuracy of the networks with respect to isolating the faulty component or faulty subsystem within the ADCS. The performance of the proposed neural network-based fault detection and isolation method was compared and contrasted with other ADCS FDI methods. The results obtained via simulation showed that the best neural networks employing this method successfully detected the presence of a fault 79% of the time. The faulty subsystem was successfully isolated 75% of the time and the faulty components within the faulty subsystem were isolated 37% of the time.

  6. Differential Selection within the Drosophila Retinal Determination Network and Evidence for Functional Divergence between Paralog Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Rhea R.; Cruickshank, Tami; Kumar, Justin P.

    2011-01-01

    The retinal determination (RD) network in Drosophila comprises fourteen known nuclear proteins that include DNA binding proteins, transcriptional co-activators, kinases and phosphatases. The composition of the network varies considerably throughout the animal kingdom, with the network in several basal insects having fewer members and with vertebrates having potentially significantly higher numbers of retinal determination genes. One important contributing factor for the variation in gene number within the network is gene duplication. For example, ten members of the RD network in Drosophila are derived from duplication events. Here we present an analysis of the coding regions of the five pairs of duplicate genes from within the retinal determination network of several different Drosophila species. We demonstrate that there is differential selection across the coding regions of all RD genes. Additionally, some of the most significant differences in ratios of non-silent to silent site substitutions (dN/dS) between paralog pairs are found within regions that have no ascribed function. Previous structure/function analyses of several duplicate genes have identified areas within one gene that contain novel activities when compared to its paralog. The evolutionary analysis presented here identifies these same areas in the paralogs as being under high levels of relaxed selection. We suggest that sequence divergence between paralogs and selection signatures can be used as a reasonable predictor of functional changes in rapidly evolving motifs. PMID:21210943

  7. Hospital mergers and market overlap.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, G R; Jones, V G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To address two questions: What are the characteristics of hospitals that affect the likelihood of their being involved in a merger? What characteristics of particular pairs of hospitals affect the likelihood of the pair engaging in a merger? DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Hospitals in the 12 county region surrounding the San Francisco Bay during the period 1983 to 1992 were the focus of the study. Data were drawn from secondary sources, including the Lexis/Nexis database, the American Hospital Association, and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development of the State of California. STUDY DESIGN: Seventeen hospital mergers during the study period were identified. A random sample of pairs of hospitals that did not merge was drawn to establish a statistically efficient control set. Models constructed from hypotheses regarding hospital and market characteristics believed to be related to merger likelihood were tested using logistic regression analysis. DATA COLLECTION: See Data Sources/Study Setting. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis shows that the likelihood of a merger between a particular pair of hospitals is positively related to the degree of market overlap that exists between them. Furthermore, market overlap and performance difference interact in their effect on merger likelihood. In an analysis of individual hospitals, conditions of rivalry, hospital market share, and hospital size were not found to influence the likelihood that a hospital will engage in a merger. CONCLUSIONS: Mergers between hospitals are not driven directly by considerations of market power or efficiency as much as by the existence of specific merger opportunities in the hospitals' local markets. Market overlap is a condition that enables a merger to occur, but other factors, such as the relative performance levels of the hospitals in question and their ownership and teaching status, also play a role in influencing the likelihood that a merger will in fact take place. PMID

  8. [Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome].

    PubMed

    Odler, Balázs; Müller, Veronika

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive lung diseases represent a major health problem worldwide due to their high prevalence associated with elevated socioeconomic costs. Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are chronic obstructive ventilatory disorders with airway inflammation, however they are separate nosological entities based on thedifferent development, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and prognostic features. However, these diseases may coexist and can be defined as the coexistence of increased variability of airflow in a patient with incompletely reversible airway obstruction. This phenotype is called asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. The syndrome is a clinical and scientific challenge as the majority of these patients have been excluded from the clinical and pharmacological trials, thus well-defined clinical characteristics and therapeutic approaches are lacking. The aim of this review is to summarize the currently available literature focusing on pathophysiological and clinical features, and discuss possible therapeutic approaches of patients with asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1304-1313. PMID:27523313

  9. Item Overlap Correlations: Definitions, Interpretations, and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Louis M.

    1994-01-01

    Item overlap coefficient (IOC) formulas are discussed, providing six warnings about their calculation and interpretation and some explanations of why item overlap influences the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory factor structures. (SLD)

  10. Topological Small-World Organization of the Fibroblastic Reticular Cell Network Determines Lymph Node Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Jun; Bomze, David; Cremasco, Viviana; Scandella, Elke; Stein, Jens V.; Turley, Shannon J.; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) form the cellular scaffold of lymph nodes (LNs) and establish distinct microenvironmental niches to provide key molecules that drive innate and adaptive immune responses and control immune regulatory processes. Here, we have used a graph theory-based systems biology approach to determine topological properties and robustness of the LN FRC network in mice. We found that the FRC network exhibits an imprinted small-world topology that is fully regenerated within 4 wk after complete FRC ablation. Moreover, in silico perturbation analysis and in vivo validation revealed that LNs can tolerate a loss of approximately 50% of their FRCs without substantial impairment of immune cell recruitment, intranodal T cell migration, and dendritic cell-mediated activation of antiviral CD8+ T cells. Overall, our study reveals the high topological robustness of the FRC network and the critical role of the network integrity for the activation of adaptive immune responses. PMID:27415420

  11. Topological Small-World Organization of the Fibroblastic Reticular Cell Network Determines Lymph Node Functionality.

    PubMed

    Novkovic, Mario; Onder, Lucas; Cupovic, Jovana; Abe, Jun; Bomze, David; Cremasco, Viviana; Scandella, Elke; Stein, Jens V; Bocharov, Gennady; Turley, Shannon J; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2016-07-01

    Fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) form the cellular scaffold of lymph nodes (LNs) and establish distinct microenvironmental niches to provide key molecules that drive innate and adaptive immune responses and control immune regulatory processes. Here, we have used a graph theory-based systems biology approach to determine topological properties and robustness of the LN FRC network in mice. We found that the FRC network exhibits an imprinted small-world topology that is fully regenerated within 4 wk after complete FRC ablation. Moreover, in silico perturbation analysis and in vivo validation revealed that LNs can tolerate a loss of approximately 50% of their FRCs without substantial impairment of immune cell recruitment, intranodal T cell migration, and dendritic cell-mediated activation of antiviral CD8+ T cells. Overall, our study reveals the high topological robustness of the FRC network and the critical role of the network integrity for the activation of adaptive immune responses. PMID:27415420

  12. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... overlap does not already exists, if: (1) The total area of overlap with that station would not be... modified NCE-FM station other than a Class D (secondary) station will not be accepted if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by...

  13. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... overlap does not already exists, if: (1) The total area of overlap with that station would not be... modified NCE-FM station other than a Class D (secondary) station will not be accepted if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by...

  14. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... overlap does not already exists, if: (1) The total area of overlap with that station would not be... modified NCE-FM station other than a Class D (secondary) station will not be accepted if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by...

  15. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... overlap does not already exists, if: (1) The total area of overlap with that station would not be... modified NCE-FM station other than a Class D (secondary) station will not be accepted if the proposed operation would involve overlap of signal strength contours with any other station licensed by...

  16. Network and atomistic simulations unveil the structural determinants of mutations linked to retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Simona; Dell'Orco, Daniele; Felline, Angelo; Raimondi, Francesco; Fanelli, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    A number of incurable retinal diseases causing vision impairments derive from alterations in visual phototransduction. Unraveling the structural determinants of even monogenic retinal diseases would require network-centered approaches combined with atomistic simulations. The transducin G38D mutant associated with the Nougaret Congenital Night Blindness (NCNB) was thoroughly investigated by both mathematical modeling of visual phototransduction and atomistic simulations on the major targets of the mutational effect. Mathematical modeling, in line with electrophysiological recordings, indicates reduction of phosphodiesterase 6 (PDE) recognition and activation as the main determinants of the pathological phenotype. Sub-microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with Functional Mode Analysis improve the resolution of information, showing that such impairment is likely due to disruption of the PDEγ binding cavity in transducin. Protein Structure Network analyses additionally suggest that the observed slight reduction of theRGS9-catalyzed GTPase activity of transducin depends on perturbed communication between RGS9 and GTP binding site. These findings provide insights into the structural fundamentals of abnormal functioning of visual phototransduction caused by a missense mutation in one component of the signaling network. This combination of network-centered modeling with atomistic simulations represents a paradigm for future studies aimed at thoroughly deciphering the structural determinants of genetic retinal diseases. Analogous approaches are suitable to unveil the mechanism of information transfer in any signaling network either in physiological or pathological conditions. PMID:24009494

  17. Determination Method for Optimal Installation of Active Filters in Distribution Network with Distributed Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Shoji; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Matsuki, Junya; Kikuya, Hirotaka; Hojo, Masahide

    Recently, the harmonic troubles in a distribution network are worried in the background of the increase of the connection of distributed generation (DG) and the spread of the power electronics equipments. As one of the strategies, control the harmonic voltage by installing an active filter (AF) has been researched. In this paper, the authors propose a computation method to determine the optimal allocations, gains and installation number of AFs so as to minimize the maximum value of voltage total harmonic distortion (THD) for a distribution network with DGs. The developed method is based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) which is one of the nonlinear optimization methods. Especially, in this paper, the case where the harmonic voltage or the harmonic current in a distribution network is assumed by connecting many DGs through the inverters, and the authors propose a determination method of the optimal allocation and gain of AF that has the harmonic restrictive effect in the whole distribution network. Moreover, the authors propose also about a determination method of the necessary minimum installation number of AFs, by taking into consideration also about the case where the target value of harmonic suppression cannot be reached, by one set only of AF. In order to verify the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method, the numerical simulations are carried out by using an analytical model of distribution network with DGs.

  18. Simultaneous determination of aniline and cyclohexylamine by principal component artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Absalan, Ghodratollah; Soleimani, Mohammad

    2004-05-01

    A specterophotometric method for simultaneous determination of aniline and cyclohexylamine using principal component artificial neural networks is proposed. This method is based on the reactions involving aniline and/or cyclohexylamine, with bis(acetylacetoneethylendiamine)tributylphosphine cobalt(III) perchlorate as a complexing reagent. A nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100, was used for dissolving the complexes and intensifying the signals. The absorption data were based on the spectra registered in the range of 350 - 550 nm. An artificial neural network consisting of three layers of nodes was trained by applying a back-propagation learning rule. Sigmoid transfer functions were used in the hidden and output layers to facilitate nonlinear calibration. The predictive ability of artificial neural networks was examined for the determination of aniline and cyclohexylamine in synthetic mixtures. PMID:15171298

  19. Combining core drop policy and edge determinant threshold in TCP over OBS networks with retransmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shuping; Li, Zhengbin; He, Yongqi; Xu, Anshi

    2007-11-01

    We proposed a novel drop policy in the core nodes which is combined with the determinant strategy in the ingress edge nodes. The proposed drop policy is based on the field of Hop Number (HN) taken by the burst control packets, which is introduced to determine which burst should be dropped when the contention happened in the core nodes. In the drop policy, the long-hop traffic is given the high priority, and most of the retransmitted traffic is left to be short-hop traffic. Therefore, there is a trade-off between the short-hop traffic and the long-hop traffic. The determinant strategy in the edge nodes is an initialized threshold, Retransmission Number Threshold (RNT), which is introduced to determine whether to start a retransmission operation when NAK is received. The unnecessary retransmissions in the network are limited, and the burst loss rate is reduced. The mechanism also takes the upper layer, TCP layer, into account. When the network has already been in the state of real congestion, the retransmission will only deteriorate the network performance. In the case, the combined mechanism leaves the retransmission process to the TCP layer. It can improve the network performance cost-effectively.

  20. Orbit determination and analysis of meteors recently observed by Finnish Fireball Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, V.; Lupovla, V.; Gritsevich, M.; Lyytinen, E.; Mineeva, S.

    2015-10-01

    We perform orbit determination and analysis of three fireballs recently observed by Finnish Fireball Network (FFN). Precise orbit determination was performed by using integration of differential equations of motion. This technique was implemented into free distributable software "Meteor Toolkit". Accounting of several perturbing forces are discussed. Also estimation of accuracy of orbital elements was obtained by propagation of observational error with using covariance transformation. Long-term backward integration was provided as well.

  1. Social externalities, overlap and the poverty trap

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Chul; Loury, Glenn C.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies find that some social groups are stuck in poverty traps because of network effects. However, these studies do not carefully analyze how these groups overcome low human capital investment activities. Unlike previous studies, the model in this paper includes network externalities in both the human capital investment stage and the subsequent career stages. This implies that not only the current network quality, but also the expectations about future network quality affect the current investment decision. Consequently, the coordinated expectation among the group members can play a crucial role in the determination of the final state. We define “overlap” for some initial skill ranges, whereby the economic performance of a group can be improved simply by increasing expectations of a brighter future. We also define “poverty trap” for some ranges, wherein a disadvantaged group is constrained by its history, and we explore the egalitarian policies to mobilize the group out of the trap. PMID:25484637

  2. Hemodynamics in coronary arteries with overlapping stents.

    PubMed

    Rikhtegar, Farhad; Wyss, Christophe; Stok, Kathryn S; Poulikakos, Dimos; Müller, Ralph; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-01-22

    Coronary artery stenosis is commonly treated by stent placement via percutaneous intervention, at times requiring multiple stents that may overlap. Stent overlap is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcome. While changes in local blood flow are suspected to play a role therein, hemodynamics in arteries with overlapping stents remain poorly understood. In this study we analyzed six cases of partially overlapping stents, placed ex vivo in porcine left coronary arteries and compared them to five cases with two non-overlapping stents. The stented vessel geometries were obtained by micro-computed tomography of corrosion casts. Flow and shear stress distribution were calculated using computational fluid dynamics. We observed a significant increase in the relative area exposed to low wall shear stress (WSS<0.5 Pa) in the overlapping stent segments compared both to areas without overlap in the same samples, as well as to non-overlapping stents. We further observed that the configuration of the overlapping stent struts relative to each other influenced the size of the low WSS area: positioning of the struts in the same axial location led to larger areas of low WSS compared to alternating struts. Our results indicate that the overlap geometry is by itself sufficient to cause unfavorable flow conditions that may worsen clinical outcome. While stent overlap cannot always be avoided, improved deployment strategies or stent designs could reduce the low WSS burden. PMID:24275438

  3. Comparison of methods to determine point-to-point resistance in nearly rectangular networks with application to a ‘hammock’ network

    PubMed Central

    Essam, John W.; Izmailyan, Nikolay Sh.; Kenna, Ralph; Tan, Zhi-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Considerable progress has recently been made in the development of techniques to exactly determine two-point resistances in networks of various topologies. In particular, two types of method have emerged. One is based on potentials and the evaluation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Laplacian matrix associated with the network or its minors. The second method is based on a recurrence relation associated with the distribution of currents in the network. Here, these methods are compared and used to determine the resistance distances between any two nodes of a network with topology of a hammock. PMID:26064635

  4. An evolutionary game approach for determination of the structural conflicts in signed networks

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shaolin; Lü, Jinhu

    2016-01-01

    Social or biochemical networks can often divide into two opposite alliances in response to structural conflicts between positive (friendly, activating) and negative (hostile, inhibiting) interactions. Yet, the underlying dynamics on how the opposite alliances are spontaneously formed to minimize the structural conflicts is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that evolutionary game dynamics provides a felicitous possible tool to characterize the evolution and formation of alliances in signed networks. Indeed, an evolutionary game dynamics on signed networks is proposed such that each node can adaptively adjust its choice of alliances to maximize its own fitness, which yet leads to a minimization of the structural conflicts in the entire network. Numerical experiments show that the evolutionary game approach is universally efficient in quality and speed to find optimal solutions for all undirected or directed, unweighted or weighted signed networks. Moreover, the evolutionary game approach is inherently distributed. These characteristics thus suggest the evolutionary game dynamic approach as a feasible and effective tool for determining the structural conflicts in large-scale on-line signed networks. PMID:26915581

  5. An evolutionary game approach for determination of the structural conflicts in signed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shaolin; Lü, Jinhu

    2016-02-01

    Social or biochemical networks can often divide into two opposite alliances in response to structural conflicts between positive (friendly, activating) and negative (hostile, inhibiting) interactions. Yet, the underlying dynamics on how the opposite alliances are spontaneously formed to minimize the structural conflicts is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that evolutionary game dynamics provides a felicitous possible tool to characterize the evolution and formation of alliances in signed networks. Indeed, an evolutionary game dynamics on signed networks is proposed such that each node can adaptively adjust its choice of alliances to maximize its own fitness, which yet leads to a minimization of the structural conflicts in the entire network. Numerical experiments show that the evolutionary game approach is universally efficient in quality and speed to find optimal solutions for all undirected or directed, unweighted or weighted signed networks. Moreover, the evolutionary game approach is inherently distributed. These characteristics thus suggest the evolutionary game dynamic approach as a feasible and effective tool for determining the structural conflicts in large-scale on-line signed networks.

  6. A compact optical instrument with artificial neural network for pH determination.

    PubMed

    Capel-Cuevas, Sonia; López-Ruiz, Nuria; Martinez-Olmos, Antonio; Cuéllar, Manuel P; Pegalajar, Maria del Carmen; Palma, Alberto José; de Orbe-Payá, Ignacio; Capitán-Vallvey, Luis Fermin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was the determination of pH with a sensor array-based optical portable instrument. This sensor array consists of eleven membranes with selective colour changes at different pH intervals. The method for the pH calculation is based on the implementation of artificial neural networks that use the responses of the membranes to generate a final pH value. A multi-objective algorithm was used to select the minimum number of sensing elements required to achieve an accurate pH determination from the neural network, and also to minimise the network size. This helps to minimise instrument and array development costs and save on microprocessor energy consumption. A set of artificial neural networks that fulfils these requirements is proposed using different combinations of the membranes in the sensor array, and is evaluated in terms of accuracy and reliability. In the end, the network including the response of the eleven membranes in the sensor was selected for validation in the instrument prototype because of its high accuracy. The performance of the instrument was evaluated by measuring the pH of a large set of real samples, showing that high precision can be obtained in the full range. PMID:22778668

  7. Errors in paleomagnetism: Structural control on overlapped vectors - mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Pintó, A.; Ramón, M. J.; Oliva-Urcia, B.; Pueyo, E. L.; Pocoví, A.

    2011-05-01

    The reliability of paleomagnetic data is a keystone to obtain trustable kinematics interpretations. The determination of the real paleomagnetic component recorded at certain time in the geological evolution of a rock can be affected by several sources of errors: inclination shallowing, declination biases caused by incorrect restoration to the ancient field, internal deformation of rock volumes and lack of isolation of the paleomagnetic primary vector during the laboratory procedures (overlapping of components). These errors will limit or impede the validity of paleomagnetism as the only three-dimension reference. This paper presents the first systematic modeling of the effect of overlapped vectors referred to declination, inclination and stability tests taking into account the key variables: orientation of a primary and secondary (overlapped to the primary) vectors, degree of overlapping (intensity ratio of primary and secondary paleomagnetic vectors) and the fold axis orientation and dip of bedding plane. In this way, several scenarios of overlapping have been modeled in different fold geometries considering both polarities and all the variables aforementioned, allowing to calculate the deviations of the vector obtained in the laboratory (overlapped) with respect to the paleomagnetic reference (not overlapped). Observations from the models confirm that declination errors are larger than the inclination ones. In addition to the geometry factor, errors are mainly controlled by the relative magnitude of the primary respect to the secondary component (P/S ratio). We observe larger asymmetries and bigger magnitudes of errors along the fold location if the primary and secondary records have different polarities. If the primary record (declination) and the fold axis orientation are perpendicular ( Ω = 90°), errors reach maximum magnitudes and larger asymmetries along the fold surface (different dips). The effect of overlapping in the fold and reversal tests is also

  8. Application of the lamp mapping technique for overlap function for Raman lidar systems.

    PubMed

    Walker, Monique; Venable, Demetrius; Whiteman, David N; Sakai, Tetsu

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, the lidar water vapor mixing ratio (WVMR) is corrected for overlap using data from another instrument, such as a radiosonde. Here we introduce a new experimental method to determine the overlap function using the lamp mapping technique (LMT), which relies on the lidar optics and detection system. The LMT discussed here involves a standard halogen lamp being scanned over the aperture of a Raman lidar telescope in synchronization with the lidar detection system [Appl. Opt.50, 4622 (2011)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.50.004622, Appl. Opt.53, 8538 (2014)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.53.008535]. In this paper, we show results for a LMT-determined overlap function for individual channels, as well as a WVMR overlap function. We found that the LMT-determined WVMR overlap functions deviate within 5% of the traditional radiosonde-determined overlap. PMID:27139656

  9. Disease progression in systemic sclerosis-overlap syndrome is significantly different from limited and diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Moinzadeh, Pia; Aberer, Elisabeth; Ahmadi-Simab, Keihan; Blank, Norbert; Distler, Joerg H W; Fierlbeck, Gerhard; Genth, Ekkehard; Guenther, Claudia; Hein, Ruediger; Henes, Joerg; Herich, Lena; Herrgott, Ilka; Koetter, Ina; Kreuter, Alexander; Krieg, Thomas; Kuhr, Kathrin; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin; Meier, Florian; Melchers, Inga; Mensing, Hartwig; Mueller-Ladner, Ulf; Pfeiffer, Christiane; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Sárdy, Miklós; Schmalzing, Marc; Sunderkoetter, Cord; Susok, Laura; Tarner, Ingo H; Vaith, Peter; Worm, Margitta; Wozel, Gottfried; Zeidler, Gabriele; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Ahrazoglu, Nil Mona

    2015-01-01

    Background Systemic sclerosis (SSc)-overlap syndromes are a very heterogeneous and remarkable subgroup of SSc-patients, who present at least two connective tissue diseases (CTD) at the same time, usually with a specific autoantibody status. Objectives To determine whether patients, classified as overlap syndromes, show a disease course different from patients with limited SSc (lcSSc) or diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc). Methods The data of 3240 prospectively included patients, registered in the database of the German Network for Systemic Scleroderma and followed between 2003 and 2013, were analysed. Results Among 3240 registered patients, 10% were diagnosed as SSc-overlap syndrome. Of these, 82.5% were female. SSc-overlap patients had a mean age of 48±1.2 years and carried significantly more often ‘other antibodies’ (68.0%; p<0.0001), including anti-U1RNP, -PmScl, -Ro, -La, as well as anti-Jo-1 and -Ku antibodies. These patients developed musculoskeletal involvement earlier and more frequently (62.5%) than patients diagnosed as lcSSc (32.2%) or dcSSc (43.3%) (p<0.0001). The onset of lung fibrosis and heart involvement in SSc-overlap patients was significantly earlier than in patients with lcSSc and occurred later than in patients with dcSSc. Oesophagus, kidney and PH progression was similar to lcSSc patients, whereas dcSSc patients had a significantly earlier onset. Conclusions These data support the concept that SSc-overlap syndromes should be regarded as a separate SSc subset, distinct from lcSSc and dcSSc, due to a different progression of the disease, different proportional distribution of specific autoantibodies, and of different organ involvement. PMID:24389298

  10. What determines social capital in a social-ecological system? Insights from a network perspective.

    PubMed

    Barnes-Mauthe, Michele; Gray, Steven Allen; Arita, Shawn; Lynham, John; Leung, PingSun

    2015-02-01

    Social capital is an important resource that can be mobilized for purposive action or competitive gain. The distribution of social capital in social-ecological systems can determine who is more productive at extracting ecological resources and who emerges as influential in guiding their management, thereby empowering some while disempowering others. Despite its importance, the factors that contribute to variation in social capital among individuals have not been widely studied. We adopt a network perspective to examine what determines social capital among individuals in social-ecological systems. We begin by identifying network measures of social capital relevant for individuals in this context, and review existing evidence concerning their determinants. Using a complete social network dataset from Hawaii's longline fishery, we employ social network analysis and other statistical methods to empirically estimate these measures and determine the extent to which individual stakeholder attributes explain variation within them. We find that ethnicity is the strongest predictor of social capital. Measures of human capital (i.e., education, experience), years living in the community, and information-sharing attitudes are also important. Surprisingly, we find that when controlling for other factors, industry leaders and formal fishery representatives are generally not well connected. Our results offer new quantitative insights on the relationship between stakeholder diversity, social networks, and social capital in a coupled social-ecological system, which can aid in identifying barriers and opportunities for action to overcome resource management problems. Our results also have implications for achieving resource governance that is not only ecologically and economically sustainable, but also equitable. PMID:25376745

  11. What Determines Social Capital in a Social-Ecological System? Insights from a Network Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes-Mauthe, Michele; Gray, Steven Allen; Arita, Shawn; Lynham, John; Leung, PingSun

    2015-02-01

    Social capital is an important resource that can be mobilized for purposive action or competitive gain. The distribution of social capital in social-ecological systems can determine who is more productive at extracting ecological resources and who emerges as influential in guiding their management, thereby empowering some while disempowering others. Despite its importance, the factors that contribute to variation in social capital among individuals have not been widely studied. We adopt a network perspective to examine what determines social capital among individuals in social-ecological systems. We begin by identifying network measures of social capital relevant for individuals in this context, and review existing evidence concerning their determinants. Using a complete social network dataset from Hawaii's longline fishery, we employ social network analysis and other statistical methods to empirically estimate these measures and determine the extent to which individual stakeholder attributes explain variation within them. We find that ethnicity is the strongest predictor of social capital. Measures of human capital (i.e., education, experience), years living in the community, and information-sharing attitudes are also important. Surprisingly, we find that when controlling for other factors, industry leaders and formal fishery representatives are generally not well connected. Our results offer new quantitative insights on the relationship between stakeholder diversity, social networks, and social capital in a coupled social-ecological system, which can aid in identifying barriers and opportunities for action to overcome resource management problems. Our results also have implications for achieving resource governance that is not only ecologically and economically sustainable, but also equitable.

  12. Abnormal Policy Detection and Correction Using Overlapping Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghyun; Lee, Heejo

    Policy in security devices such as firewalls and Network Intrusion Prevention Systems (NIPS) is usually implemented as a sequence of rules. This allows network packets to proceed or to be discarded based on rule's decision. Since attack methods are increasing rapidly, a huge number of security rules are generated and maintained in security devices. Under attack or during heavy traffic, the policy configured wrong creates security holes and prevents the system from deciding quickly whether to allow or deny a packet. Anomalies between the rules occur when there is overlap among the rules. In this paper, we propose a new method to detect anomalies among rules and generate new rules without configuration error in multiple security devices as well as in a single security device. The proposed method cuts the overlap regions among rules into minimum overlap regions and finds the abnormal domain regions of rules' predicates. Classifying rules by the network traffic flow, the proposed method not only reduces computation overhead but blocks unnecessary traffic among distributed devices.

  13. E(BV) Determinations of O and B Stars Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulati, R.; Gupta, R.; Singh, H.

    1997-07-01

    We propose a new method to determine E(B-V) from low dispersion ultraviolet spectra by using artificial neural networks. This method has been applied to O and B stars in the IUE low dispersion catalog. A comparison of the ANN based determinations with the classical method of comparing observed (B-V) with intrinsic color (B-V)o is performed to assess the reliability and limitation of the new method. We have been able to determine E(B-V) to an accuracy of 0.08 magnitudes and also been able to single out a star which follows an anomalous interstellar extinction law. (SECTION: Computing and Data Analysis)

  14. Solving Partial Differential Equations on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D

    2008-09-22

    We discuss the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on overlapping grids. This is a powerful technique for efficiently solving problems in complex, possibly moving, geometry. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured grids that overlap and cover the computational domain. By allowing the grids to overlap, grids for complex geometries can be more easily constructed. The overlapping grid approach can also be used to remove coordinate singularities by, for example, covering a sphere with two or more patches. We describe the application of the overlapping grid approach to a variety of different problems. These include the solution of incompressible fluid flows with moving and deforming geometry, the solution of high-speed compressible reactive flow with rigid bodies using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), and the solution of the time-domain Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism.

  15. Epidemic threshold determined by the first moments of network with alternating degree distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kezan; Zhang, Haifeng; Fu, Xinchu; Ding, Yong; Small, Michael

    2015-02-01

    During the alternating day-night cycle, people have differing behavior and hence different connection patterns-such as going to work or home, shopping and so on. Hence, the true topological structure of human contact networks are not only time-varying but also exhibit certain distribution regularity. In this paper, we will investigate epidemic spreading on time-varying human contact networks, which follow one degree distribution during daytime, but another at night. Based on SIS (susceptible/infected/susceptible) propagation mechanism, we study the epidemic threshold of this network with alternating distributions. A surprising result is that for the discrete-time case the epidemic threshold is determined only by the first moments of the two alternating degree distributions, if the degree of each node is constant for all nights. A similar result is valid for the continuous-time case if the duration is sufficiently small. This work shows that the spreading dynamics of time-varying networks with alternating distributions is completely different from the widely studied case of static spreading networks.

  16. Overlap in Facebook Profiles Reflects Relationship Closeness.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Araceli M; Wendel, Markie L; Crockett, Erin E

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the association between self-reported Inclusion of Other in the Self (IOS) and Facebook overlap. Ninety-two participants completed online measures of IOS and investment model constructs. Researchers then recorded Facebook data from participants' profile pages. Results from multilevel models revealed that IOS predicted Facebook overlap. Furthermore, Facebook overlap was associated with commitment and investment in ways comparable to self-reported IOS. These findings suggest that overlap in Facebook profiles can be used to measure relationship closeness. PMID:25635533

  17. Determination of type and concentration of DNA nitrogenous bases by Raman spectroscopy using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptinskiy, Kirill A.; Burikov, Sergey A.; Sarmanova, Olga E.; Dolenko, Sergey A.; Dolenko, Tatiana A.

    2016-04-01

    In this article the results of solution of two-parametrical inverse problems of laser Raman spectroscopy of identification and determination of concentration of DNA nitrogenous bases in two-component solutions are presented. Elaboration of methods of control of reactions with DNA strands in remote real-time mode is necessary for solution of one of the basic problems of creation of biocomputers - increase of reliability of molecular DNA-computations. The comparative analysis of two used methods of solution of stated problems has demonstrated convincing advantages of technique of artificial neural networks. Use of artificial neural networks allowed to reach the accuracy of determination of concentration of each base in two-component solutions 0.2-0.3 g/l.

  18. Network Controllability Is Determined by the Density of Low In-Degree and Out-Degree Nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menichetti, Giulia; Dall'Asta, Luca; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2014-08-01

    The problem of controllability of the dynamical state of a network is central in network theory and has wide applications ranging from network medicine to financial markets. The driver nodes of the network are the nodes that can bring the network to the desired dynamical state if an external signal is applied to them. Using the framework of structural controllability, here, we show that the density of nodes with in degree and out degree equal to one and two determines the number of driver nodes in the network. Moreover, we show that random networks with minimum in degree and out degree greater than two, are always fully controllable by an infinitesimal fraction of driver nodes, regardless of the other properties of the degree distribution. Finally, based on these results, we propose an algorithm to improve the controllability of networks.

  19. Sarcomeric thick and thin filament overlap influences postmortem proteolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interaction between sarcomere length (SL) and proteolysis on meat tenderness is not clear. Indeed, the extent of thick and thin filament overlap alters actomyosin binding and may alter substrate availability during aging. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of sarcomere le...

  20. The complexity of the overlap method for sequencing biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Gallant, J K

    1983-03-01

    The problem of trying to reconstruct the sequence of a biopolymer by using overlapping fragments obtained from cleaving agents is shown to be computationally intractable. This strongly suggests that any computer program for overlap sequencing, even though it may work well for a limited number of inputs, will not work sufficiently for all inputs. However, if the problem is restricted so that certain crucial fragments are known, called prime strings, a sequence can be found efficiently in all cases. Graph theory techniques for doing so can also be used to count the number of sequences consistent with the fragment data to determine whether a unique sequence has been obtained. PMID:6876820

  1. Dynamics of neuromodulatory feedback determines frequency modulation in a reduced respiratory network: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Toporikova, Natalia; Butera, Robert J

    2013-02-01

    Neuromodulators, such as amines and neuropeptides, alter the activity of neurons and neuronal networks. In this work, we investigate how neuromodulators, which activate G(q)-protein second messenger systems, can modulate the bursting frequency of neurons in a critical portion of the respiratory neural network, the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC). These neurons are a vital part of the ponto-medullary neuronal network, which generates a stable respiratory rhythm whose frequency is regulated by neuromodulator release from the nearby Raphe nucleus. Using a simulated 50-cell network of excitatory preBötC neurons with a heterogeneous distribution of persistent sodium conductance and Ca(2+), we determined conditions for frequency modulation in such a network by simulating interaction between Raphe and preBötC nuclei. We found that the positive feedback between the Raphe excitability and preBötC activity induces frequency modulation in the preBötC neurons. In addition, the frequency of the respiratory rhythm can be regulated via phasic release of excitatory neuromodulators from the Raphe nucleus. We predict that the application of a G(q) antagonist will eliminate this frequency modulation by the Raphe and keep the network frequency constant and low. In contrast, application of a G(q) agonist will result in a high frequency for all levels of Raphe stimulation. Our modeling results also suggest that high [K(+)] requirement in respiratory brain slice experiments may serve as a compensatory mechanism for low neuromodulatory tone. PMID:23202052

  2. 47 CFR 73.509 - Prohibited overlap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prohibited overlap. 73.509 Section 73.509 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.509 Prohibited overlap. (a) An application for a new or modified NCE-FM station...

  3. A Co-Association Network Analysis of the Genetic Determination of Pig Conformation, Growth and Fatness

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Oliveras, Anna; Ballester, Maria; Corominas, Jordi; Revilla, Manuel; Estellé, Jordi; Fernández, Ana I.; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Folch, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several QTLs have been identified for major economically relevant traits in livestock, such as growth and meat quality, revealing the complex genetic architecture of these traits. The use of network approaches considering the interactions of multiple molecules and traits provides useful insights into the molecular underpinnings of complex traits. Here, a network based methodology, named Association Weight Matrix, was applied to study gene interactions and pathways affecting pig conformation, growth and fatness traits. Results The co-association network analysis underpinned three transcription factors, PPARγ, ELF1, and PRDM16 involved in mesoderm tissue differentiation. Fifty-four genes in the network belonged to growth-related ontologies and 46 of them were common with a similar study for growth in cattle supporting our results. The functional analysis uncovered the lipid metabolism and the corticotrophin and gonadotrophin release hormone pathways among the most important pathways influencing these traits. Our results suggest that the genes and pathways here identified are important determining either the total body weight of the animal and the fat content. For instance, a switch in the mesoderm tissue differentiation may determinate the age-related preferred pathways being in the puberty stage those related with the miogenic and osteogenic lineages; on the contrary, in the maturity stage cells may be more prone to the adipocyte fate. Hence, our results demonstrate that an integrative genomic co-association analysis is a powerful approach for identifying new connections and interactions among genes. Conclusions This work provides insights about pathways and key regulators which may be important determining the animal growth, conformation and body proportions and fatness traits. Molecular information concerning genes and pathways here described may be crucial for the improvement of genetic breeding programs applied to pork meat production. PMID:25503799

  4. Content Patterns in Topic-Based Overlapping Communities

    PubMed Central

    Ríos, Sebastián A.; Muñoz, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the underlying community structure is an important challenge in social network analysis. Most state-of-the-art algorithms only consider structural properties to detect disjoint subcommunities and do not include the fact that people can belong to more than one community and also ignore the information contained in posts that users have made. To tackle this problem, we developed a novel methodology to detect overlapping subcommunities in online social networks and a method to analyze the content patterns for each subcommunities using topic models. This paper presents our main contribution, a hybrid algorithm which combines two different overlapping sub-community detection approaches: the first one considers the graph structure of the network (topology-based subcommunities detection approach) and the second one takes the textual information of the network nodes into consideration (topic-based subcommunities detection approach). Additionally we provide a method to analyze and compare the content generated. Tests on real-world virtual communities show that our algorithm outperforms other methods. PMID:25161390

  5. How events determine spreading patterns: information transmission via internal and external influences on social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chuang; Zhan, Xiu-Xiu; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Sun, Gui-Quan; Hui, Pak Ming

    2015-11-01

    Recently, information transmission models motivated by the classical epidemic propagation, have been applied to a wide-range of social systems, generally assume that information mainly transmits among individuals via peer-to-peer interactions on social networks. In this paper, we consider one more approach for users to get information: the out-of-social-network influence. Empirical analyzes of eight typical events’ diffusion on a very large micro-blogging system, Sina Weibo, show that the external influence has significant impact on information spreading along with social activities. In addition, we propose a theoretical model to interpret the spreading process via both internal and external channels, considering three essential properties: (i) memory effect; (ii) role of spreaders; and (iii) non-redundancy of contacts. Experimental and mathematical results indicate that the information indeed spreads much quicker and broader with mutual effects of the internal and external influences. More importantly, the present model reveals that the event characteristic would highly determine the essential spreading patterns once the network structure is established. The results may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the underlying dynamics of information transmission on real social networks.

  6. Lithology determination from well logs with fuzzy associative memory neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.C.; Chen, H.C.; Fang, J.H.

    1997-05-01

    An artificial intelligence technique of fuzzy associative memory is used to determine rock types from well-log signatures. Fuzzy associative memory (FAM) is a hybrid of neutral network and fuzzy expert system. This new approach combines the learning ability of neural network and the strengths of fuzzy linguistic modeling to adaptively infer lithologies from well-log signatures based on (1) the relationships between the lithology and log signature that the neural network have learned during the training and/or (2) geologist`s knowledge about the rocks. The method is applied to a sequence of the Ordovician rock units in northern Kansas. This paper also compares the performances of two different methods, using the same data set for meaningful comparison. The advantages of FAM are (1) expert knowledge acquired by geologists is fully utilized; (2) this knowledge is augmented by the neural network learning from the data, when available; and (3) FAM is transparent in that the knowledge is explicitly stated in the fuzzy rules.

  7. Pathway structure determination in complex stochastic networks with non-exponential dwell times

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Valleriani, Angelo

    2014-05-14

    Analysis of complex networks has been widely used as a powerful tool for investigating various physical, chemical, and biological processes. To understand the emergent properties of these complex systems, one of the most basic issues is to determine the structure and topology of the underlying networks. Recently, a new theoretical approach based on first-passage analysis has been developed for investigating the relationship between structure and dynamic properties for network systems with exponential dwell time distributions. However, many real phenomena involve transitions with non-exponential waiting times. We extend the first-passage method to uncover the structure of distinct pathways in complex networks with non-exponential dwell time distributions. It is found that the analysis of early time dynamics provides explicit information on the length of the pathways associated to their dynamic properties. It reveals a universal relationship that we have condensed in one general equation, which relates the number of intermediate states on the shortest path to the early time behavior of the first-passage distributions. Our theoretical predictions are confirmed by extensive Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Potential spatial overlap of heritage sites and protected areas in a boreal region of northern Canada.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Shawn J; Schmiegelow, Fiona K A; Nagy, John A

    2007-04-01

    Under article 8-J of the Convention on Biological Diversity, governments must engage indigenous and local communities in the designation and management of protected areas. A better understanding of the relationship between community heritage sites and sites identified to protect conventional conservation features could inform conservation-planning exercises on indigenous lands. We examined the potential overlap between Gwich'in First Nations' (Northwest Territories, Canada) heritage sites and areas independently identified for the protection of conventional conservation targets. We designed nine hypothetical protected-area networks with different targets for woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) habitat, high-quality wetland areas, representative vegetation types, water bodies, environmentally significant area, territorial parks, and network aggregation. We compared the spatial overlap of heritage sites to these nine protected-area networks. The degree of spatial overlap (Jaccard similarity) between heritage sites and the protected-area networks with moderate or high aggregation was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than random spatial overlap, whereas the overlap between heritage sites and the protected-area networks with no aggregation was not significant or significantly lower (p < 0.001) than random spatial overlap. Our results suggest that protected-area networks designed to capture conventional conservation features may protect key heritage sites but only if the underlying characteristics of these sites are considered. The Gwich'in heritage sites are highly aggregated and only protected-area networks that had moderate and high aggregation had significant overlap with the heritage sites. We suggest that conventional conservation plans incorporate heritage sites into their design criteria to complement conventional conservation targets and effectively protect indigenous heritage sites. PMID:17391188

  9. Restoration and reconstruction from overlapping images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.; Kaiser, Daniel J.; Hanson, Andrew L.; Li, Jing

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for restoring and reconstructing a scene from overlapping images. In situations where there are multiple, overlapping images of the same scene, it may be desirable to create a single image that most closely approximates the scene, based on all of the data in the available images. For example, successive swaths acquired by NASA's planned Moderate Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) will overlap, particularly at wide scan angles, creating a severe visual artifact in the output image. Resampling the overlapping swaths to produce a more accurate image on a uniform grid requires restoration and reconstruction. The one-pass restoration and reconstruction technique developed in this paper yields mean-square-optimal resampling, based on a comprehensive end-to-end system model that accounts for image overlap, and subject to user-defined and data-availability constraints on the spatial support of the filter.

  10. Neural overlap in processing music and speech

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique; Lagrois, Marie-Élaine; Armony, Jorge L.

    2015-01-01

    Neural overlap in processing music and speech, as measured by the co-activation of brain regions in neuroimaging studies, may suggest that parts of the neural circuitries established for language may have been recycled during evolution for musicality, or vice versa that musicality served as a springboard for language emergence. Such a perspective has important implications for several topics of general interest besides evolutionary origins. For instance, neural overlap is an important premise for the possibility of music training to influence language acquisition and literacy. However, neural overlap in processing music and speech does not entail sharing neural circuitries. Neural separability between music and speech may occur in overlapping brain regions. In this paper, we review the evidence and outline the issues faced in interpreting such neural data, and argue that converging evidence from several methodologies is needed before neural overlap is taken as evidence of sharing. PMID:25646513

  11. Neural overlap in processing music and speech.

    PubMed

    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique; Lagrois, Marie-Élaine; Armony, Jorge L

    2015-03-19

    Neural overlap in processing music and speech, as measured by the co-activation of brain regions in neuroimaging studies, may suggest that parts of the neural circuitries established for language may have been recycled during evolution for musicality, or vice versa that musicality served as a springboard for language emergence. Such a perspective has important implications for several topics of general interest besides evolutionary origins. For instance, neural overlap is an important premise for the possibility of music training to influence language acquisition and literacy. However, neural overlap in processing music and speech does not entail sharing neural circuitries. Neural separability between music and speech may occur in overlapping brain regions. In this paper, we review the evidence and outline the issues faced in interpreting such neural data, and argue that converging evidence from several methodologies is needed before neural overlap is taken as evidence of sharing. PMID:25646513

  12. Neural Network Classification of Receiver Functions as a Step Towards Automatic Crustal Parameter Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemberie, A.; Dugda, M. T.; Reusch, D.; Nyblade, A.

    2006-12-01

    Neural networks are decision making mathematical/engineering tools, which if trained properly, can do jobs automatically (and objectively) that normally require particular expertise and/or tedious repetition. Here we explore two techniques from the field of artificial neural networks (ANNs) that seek to reduce the time requirements and increase the objectivity of quality control (QC) and Event Identification (EI) on seismic datasets. We explore to apply the multiplayer Feed Forward (FF) Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and Self- Organizing Maps (SOM) in combination with Hk stacking of receiver functions in an attempt to test the extent of the usefulness of automatic classification of receiver functions for crustal parameter determination. Feed- forward ANNs (FFNNs) are a supervised classification tool while self-organizing maps (SOMs) are able to provide unsupervised classification of large, complex geophysical data sets into a fixed number of distinct generalized patterns or modes. Hk stacking is a methodology that is used to stack receiver functions based on the relative arrival times of P-to-S converted phase and next two reverberations to determine crustal thickness H and Vp-to-Vs ratio (k). We use receiver functions from teleseismic events recorded by the 2000- 2002 Ethiopia Broadband Seismic Experiment. Preliminary results of applying FFNN neural network and Hk stacking of receiver functions for automatic receiver functions classification as a step towards an effort of automatic crustal parameter determination look encouraging. After training a FFNN neural network, the network could classify the best receiver functions from bad ones with a success rate of about 75 to 95%. Applying H? stacking on the receiver functions classified by this FFNN as the best receiver functions, we could obtain crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio of 31±4 km and 1.75±0.05, respectively, for the crust beneath station ARBA in the Main Ethiopian Rift. To make comparison, we applied Hk

  13. The GPS Topex/Poseidon precise orbit determination experiment - Implications for design of GPS global networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindqwister, Ulf J.; Lichten, Stephen M.; Davis, Edgar S.; Theiss, Harold L.

    1993-01-01

    Topex/Poseidon, a cooperative satellite mission between United States and France, aims to determine global ocean circulation patterns and to study their influence on world climate through precise measurements of sea surface height above the geoid with an on-board altimeter. To achieve the mission science aims, a goal of 13-cm orbit altitude accuracy was set. Topex/Poseidon includes a Global Positioning System (GPS) precise orbit determination (POD) system that has now demonstrated altitude accuracy better than 5 cm. The GPS POD system includes an on-board GPS receiver and a 6-station GPS global tracking network. This paper reviews early GPS results and discusses multi-mission capabilities available from a future enhanced global GPS network, which would provide ground-based geodetic and atmospheric calibrations needed for NASA deep space missions while also supplying tracking data for future low Earth orbiters. Benefits of the enhanced global GPS network include lower operations costs for deep space tracking and many scientific and societal benefits from the low Earth orbiter missions, including improved understanding of ocean circulation, ocean-weather interactions, the El Nino effect, the Earth thermal balance, and weather forecasting.

  14. k-Cone analysis: determining all candidate values for kinetic parameters on a network scale.

    PubMed

    Famili, Iman; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2005-03-01

    The absence of comprehensive measured kinetic values and the observed inconsistency in the available in vitro kinetic data has hindered the formulation of network-scale kinetic models of biochemical reaction networks. To meet this challenge we present an approach to construct a convex space, termed the k-cone, which contains all the allowable numerical values of the kinetic constants in large-scale biochemical networks. The definition of the k-cone relies on the incorporation of in vivo concentration data and a simplified approach to represent enzyme kinetics within an established constraint-based modeling approach. The k-cone approach was implemented to define the allowable combination of numerical values for a full kinetic model of human red blood cell metabolism and to study its correlated kinetic parameters. The k-cone approach can be used to determine consistency between in vitro measured kinetic values and in vivo concentration and flux measurements when used in a network-scale kinetic model. k-Cone analysis was successful in determining whether in vitro measured kinetic values used in the reconstruction of a kinetic-based model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae central metabolism could reproduce in vivo measurements. Further, the k-cone can be used to determine which numerical values of in vitro measured parameters are required to be changed in a kinetic model if in vivo measured values are not reproduced. k-Cone analysis could identify what minimum number of in vitro determined kinetic parameters needed to be adjusted in the S. cerevisiae model to be consistent with the in vivo data. Applying the k-cone analysis a priori to kinetic model development may reduce the time and effort involved in model building and parameter adjustment. With the recent developments in high-throughput profiling of metabolite concentrations at a whole-cell scale and advances in metabolomics technologies, the k-cone approach presented here may hold the promise for kinetic

  15. k-Cone Analysis: Determining All Candidate Values for Kinetic Parameters on a Network Scale

    PubMed Central

    Famili, Iman; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2005-01-01

    The absence of comprehensive measured kinetic values and the observed inconsistency in the available in vitro kinetic data has hindered the formulation of network-scale kinetic models of biochemical reaction networks. To meet this challenge we present an approach to construct a convex space, termed the k-cone, which contains all the allowable numerical values of the kinetic constants in large-scale biochemical networks. The definition of the k-cone relies on the incorporation of in vivo concentration data and a simplified approach to represent enzyme kinetics within an established constraint-based modeling approach. The k-cone approach was implemented to define the allowable combination of numerical values for a full kinetic model of human red blood cell metabolism and to study its correlated kinetic parameters. The k-cone approach can be used to determine consistency between in vitro measured kinetic values and in vivo concentration and flux measurements when used in a network-scale kinetic model. k-Cone analysis was successful in determining whether in vitro measured kinetic values used in the reconstruction of a kinetic-based model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae central metabolism could reproduce in vivo measurements. Further, the k-cone can be used to determine which numerical values of in vitro measured parameters are required to be changed in a kinetic model if in vivo measured values are not reproduced. k-Cone analysis could identify what minimum number of in vitro determined kinetic parameters needed to be adjusted in the S. cerevisiae model to be consistent with the in vivo data. Applying the k-cone analysis a priori to kinetic model development may reduce the time and effort involved in model building and parameter adjustment. With the recent developments in high-throughput profiling of metabolite concentrations at a whole-cell scale and advances in metabolomics technologies, the k-cone approach presented here may hold the promise for kinetic

  16. Auditing Complex Concepts in Overlapping Subsets of SNOMED

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Wei, Duo; Xu, Junchuan; Elhanan, Gai; Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael; Chen, Yan; Spackman, Kent A.; Hripcsak, George

    2008-01-01

    Limited resources and the sheer volume of concepts make auditing a large terminology, such as SNOMED CT, a daunting task. It is essential to devise techniques that can aid an auditor by automatically identifying concepts that deserve attention. A methodology for this purpose based on a previously introduced abstraction network (called the p-area taxonomy) for a SNOMED CT hierarchy is presented. The methodology algorithmically gathers concepts appearing in certain overlapping subsets, defined exclusively with respect to the p-area taxonomy, for review. The results of applying the methodology to SNOMED’s Specimen hierarchy are presented. These results are compared against a control sample composed of concepts residing in subsets without the overlaps. With the use of the double bootstrap, the concept group produced by our methodology is shown to yield a statistically significant higher proportion of error discoveries. PMID:18998838

  17. Earth-Mars Telecommunications and Information Management System (TIMS): Antenna Visibility Determination, Network Simulation, and Management Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odubiyi, Jide; Kocur, David; Pino, Nino; Chu, Don

    1996-01-01

    This report presents the results of our research on Earth-Mars Telecommunications and Information Management System (TIMS) network modeling and unattended network operations. The primary focus of our research is to investigate the feasibility of the TIMS architecture, which links the Earth-based Mars Operations Control Center, Science Data Processing Facility, Mars Network Management Center, and the Deep Space Network of antennae to the relay satellites and other communication network elements based in the Mars region. The investigation was enhanced by developing Build 3 of the TIMS network modeling and simulation model. The results of several 'what-if' scenarios are reported along with reports on upgraded antenna visibility determination software and unattended network management prototype.

  18. Analysis of a distributed algorithm to determine multiple routes with path diversity in ad hoc networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, Dipak; Mueller, Stephen Ng

    2005-04-01

    With multipath routing in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs), a source can establish multiple routes to a destination for routing data. In MANETs, mulitpath routing can be used to provide route resilience, smaller end-to-end delay, and better load balancing. However, when the multiple paths are close together, transmissions of different paths may interfere with each other, causing degradation in performance. Besides interference, the physical diversity of paths also improves fault tolerance. We present a purely distributed multipath protocol based on the AODV-Multipath (AODVM) protocol called AODVM with Path Diversity (AODVM/PD) that finds multiple paths with a desired degree of correlation between paths specified as an input parameter to the algorithm. We demonstrate through detailed simulation analysis that multiple paths with low degree of correlation determined by AODVM/PD provides both smaller end-to-end delay than AODVM in networks with low mobility and better route resilience in the presence of correlated node failures.

  19. Genotype 1 hepatitis C virus envelope features that determine antiviral response assessed through optimal covariance networks.

    PubMed

    Murray, John M; Moenne-Loccoz, Rémy; Velay, Aurélie; Habersetzer, François; Doffoël, Michel; Gut, Jean-Pierre; Fofana, Isabel; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Baumert, Thomas F; Schvoerer, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    The poor response to the combined antiviral therapy of pegylated alfa-interferon and ribavarin for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may be linked to mutations in the viral envelope gene E1E2 (env), which can result in escape from the immune response and higher efficacy of viral entry. Mutations that result in failure of therapy most likely require compensatory mutations to achieve sufficient change in envelope structure and function. Compensatory mutations were investigated by determining positions in the E1E2 gene where amino acids (aa) covaried across groups of individuals. We assessed networks of covarying positions in E1E2 sequences that differentiated sustained virological response (SVR) from non-response (NR) in 43 genotype 1a (17 SVR), and 49 genotype 1b (25 SVR) chronically HCV-infected individuals. Binary integer programming over covariance networks was used to extract aa combinations that differed between response groups. Genotype 1a E1E2 sequences exhibited higher degrees of covariance and clustered into 3 main groups while 1b sequences exhibited no clustering. Between 5 and 9 aa pairs were required to separate SVR from NR in each genotype. aa in hypervariable region 1 were 6 times more likely than chance to occur in the optimal networks. The pair 531-626 (EI) appeared frequently in the optimal networks and was present in 6 of 9 NR in one of the 1a clusters. The most frequent pairs representing SVR were 431-481 (EE), 500-522 (QA) in 1a, and 407-434 (AQ) in 1b. Optimal networks based on covarying aa pairs in HCV envelope can indicate features that are associated with failure or success to antiviral therapy. PMID:23840641

  20. Use of the selected overlap LIDAR experiment (SOLEX) system with the 248 nm krypton fluoride and the 355 nm neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet lasers for the calibration of LIDAR systems for water vapor determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, Francis Emmanuel Tofodji

    Water vapor is one of the most important atmospheric variables that play a key role in air quality, global warming, climate change and hurricane formation. In this dissertation, use was made of two laser systems, the 248-nm KrF laser and the 355 nm Nd-YAG laser, with the use of Raman scattering to measure water vapor in the atmosphere. These two systems have been calibrated more accurately, using the LIDAR approach named SOLEX (Selected Overlap LIDAR Experiment). All the experiments were carried out at the Howard University Beltsville campus located on a 107 acre research site, at Beltsville, MD, 15 miles from downtown Washington DC, near the National Agricultural Research Center (NARC), and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The geographical coordinates are: 39°04.01'N latitude, and 76°52.31'W longitude. The receiver system used during these experiments is a 30" (76.2 cm), f/ 9 Cassegranian telescope, while the detector system uses a prism spectrometer (Beckman), with a 2-meter, double-fold optical path and a variable slit width is placed at the image plane of the telescope. With the use of the SOLEX system, this dissertation provides an accurate calibration of the two LIDAR Systems for water vapor measurement in the troposphere at the following ranges: 83.7 ft, 600 ft, 800 ft, 1000 ft and 1080 ft. Data analysis shows a pretty high sensitivity of the LIDAR system for water vapor measurement and the efficiency of the SOLEX method.

  1. Orbit and clock determination of BDS regional navigation satellite system based on IGS M-GEX and WHU BETS tracking network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GENG, T.; Zhao, Q.; Shi, C.; Shum, C.; Guo, J.; Su, X.

    2013-12-01

    BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) began to provide the regional open service on December 27th 2012 and will provide the global open service by the end of 2020. Compared to GPS, the space segment of BDS Regional System consists of 5 Geostationary Earth Orbit satellites (GEO), 5 Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit satellites (IGSO) and 4 Medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellites. Since 2011, IGS Multiple-GNSS Experiment (M-GEX) focuses on tracking the newly available GNSS signals. This includes all signals from the modernized satellites of the GPS and GLONASS systems, as well as signals of the BDS, Galileo and QZSS systems. Up to now, BDS satellites are tracked by around 25 stations with a variety of different antennas and receivers from different GNSS manufacture communities in M-GEX network. Meanwhile, there are 17 stations with Unicore Communications Incorporation's GPS/BDS receivers in BeiDou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) network by Wuhan University. In addition, 5 BDS satellites have been tracking by the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS). BDS performance is expected to be further studied by the GNSS communities. Following an introduction of the BDS system and above different tracking network, this paper discusses the achieved BDS characterization and performance assessment. Firstly, the BDS signal and measurement quality are analyzed with different antennas and receivers in detail compared to GPS. This includes depth of coverage for satellite observation, carrier-to-noise-density ratios, code noise and multipath, carrier phase errors. Secondly, BDS Precise Orbit Determination (POD) is processed. Different arc lengths and sets of orbit parameters are tested using Position And Navigation Data Analysis software (PANDA) which is developed at the Wuhan University. GEO, IGSO and MEO satellites orbit quality will be assessed using overlap comparison, 2-day orbit fit and external validations with Satellite Laser Range (SLR). Then BDS satellites are equipped

  2. Overlap Functions for Measures in Conformal Iterated Function Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailescu, Eugen; Urbański, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    We employ thermodynamic formalism for the study of conformal iterated function systems (IFS) S = {φ _i}_{i in I} with arbitrary overlaps, and of measures μ on limit sets Λ , which are projections of equilibrium measures hat{μ } with respect to a certain lift map Φ on Σ _I^+ × Λ . No type of Open Set Condition is assumed. We introduce a notion of overlap function and overlap number for such a measure hat{μ } with respect to S; and, in particular a notion of (topological) overlap number o(S). These notions take in consideration the n-chains between points in the limit set. We prove that o(S, hat{μ }) is related to a conditional entropy of hat{μ } with respect to the lift Φ . Various types of projections to Λ of invariant measures are studied. We obtain upper estimates for the Hausdorff dimension HD(μ ) of μ on Λ , by using pressure functions and o(S, hat{μ }). In particular, this applies to projections of Bernoulli measures on Σ _I^+. Next, we apply the results to Bernoulli convolutions ν _λ for λ in (1/2, 1), which correspond to self-similar measures determined by composing, with equal probabilities, the contractions of an IFS with overlaps S_λ . We prove that for all λ in (1/2, 1), there exists a relation between HD(ν _λ ) and the overlap number o(S_λ ). We also estimate o(S_λ ) for certain values of λ.

  3. Overlaps among phenological phases in flood plain forest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartošová, Lenka; Bauer, Zdeněk; Trnka, Miroslav; Možný, Martin; Štěpánek, Petr; Žalud, Zdeněk

    2015-04-01

    There is a growing concern that climate change has significant impacts on species phenology, seasonal population dynamics, and thus interaction (a)synchrony between species. Species that have historically undergone life history events on the same seasonal calendar may lose synchrony and therefore lose the ability to interact as they have in the past. In view of the match/mismatch hypothesis, the different extents or directions of the phenological shifts among interacting species may have significant implications for community structure and dynamics. That's why our principal goal of the study is to determine the phenological responses within the ecosystem of flood plain forest and analyzed the phenological overlapping among each phenological periods of given species. The phenological observations were done at flood-plain forest experimental site during the period 1961-2012. The whole ecosystem in this study create 17 species (15 plants and 2 bird species) and each species is composed of 2 phenological phases. Phenological periods of all species of ecosystem overlap each other and 43 of these overlapping were chosen and the length, trend and correlation with temperature were elaborated. The analysis of phenophases overlapping of chosen species showed that the length of overlay is getting significantly shorter in 1 case. On the other hand the situation when the length of overlaps is getting significantly longer arose in 4 cases. Remaining overlaps (38) of all phenological periods among various species is getting shorter or longer but with no significance or have not changed anyhow. This study was funded by project "Building up a multidisciplinary scientific team focused on drought" No. CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0248. and of projects no. LD13030 supporting participation of the Czech Republic in the COST action ES1106.

  4. State-Dependent Network Connectivity Determines Gating in a K+ Channel

    PubMed Central

    Bollepalli, Murali K.; Fowler, Philip W.; Rapedius, Markus; Shang, Lijun; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Tucker, Stephen J.; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary X-ray crystallography has provided tremendous insight into the different structural states of membrane proteins and, in particular, of ion channels. However, the molecular forces that determine the thermodynamic stability of a particular state are poorly understood. Here we analyze the different X-ray structures of an inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir1.1) in relation to functional data we obtained for over 190 mutants in Kir1.1. This mutagenic perturbation analysis uncovered an extensive, state-dependent network of physically interacting residues that stabilizes the pre-open and open states of the channel, but fragments upon channel closure. We demonstrate that this gating network is an important structural determinant of the thermodynamic stability of these different gating states and determines the impact of individual mutations on channel function. These results have important implications for our understanding of not only K+ channel gating but also the more general nature of conformational transitions that occur in other allosteric proteins. PMID:24980796

  5. State-dependent network connectivity determines gating in a K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Bollepalli, Murali K; Fowler, Philip W; Rapedius, Markus; Shang, Lijun; Sansom, Mark S P; Tucker, Stephen J; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    X-ray crystallography has provided tremendous insight into the different structural states of membrane proteins and, in particular, of ion channels. However, the molecular forces that determine the thermodynamic stability of a particular state are poorly understood. Here we analyze the different X-ray structures of an inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir1.1) in relation to functional data we obtained for over 190 mutants in Kir1.1. This mutagenic perturbation analysis uncovered an extensive, state-dependent network of physically interacting residues that stabilizes the pre-open and open states of the channel, but fragments upon channel closure. We demonstrate that this gating network is an important structural determinant of the thermodynamic stability of these different gating states and determines the impact of individual mutations on channel function. These results have important implications for our understanding of not only K+ channel gating but also the more general nature of conformational transitions that occur in other allosteric proteins. PMID:24980796

  6. Event Coverage Detection and Event Source Determination in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhangbing; Xing, Riliang; Duan, Yucong; Zhu, Yueqin; Xiang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of the Internet of Underwater Things, smart things are deployed in the ocean space and establish underwater wireless sensor networks for the monitoring of vast and dynamic underwater environments. When events are found to have possibly occurred, accurate event coverage should be detected, and potential event sources should be determined for the enactment of prompt and proper responses. To address this challenge, a technique that detects event coverage and determines event sources is developed in this article. Specifically, the occurrence of possible events corresponds to a set of neighboring sensor nodes whose sensory data may deviate from a normal sensing range in a collective fashion. An appropriate sensor node is selected as the relay node for gathering and routing sensory data to sink node(s). When sensory data are collected at sink node(s), the event coverage is detected and represented as a weighted graph, where the vertices in this graph correspond to sensor nodes and the weight specified upon the edges reflects the extent of sensory data deviating from a normal sensing range. Event sources are determined, which correspond to the barycenters in this graph. The results of the experiments show that our technique is more energy efficient, especially when the network topology is relatively steady. PMID:26694394

  7. Event Coverage Detection and Event Source Determination in Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhangbing; Xing, Riliang; Duan, Yucong; Zhu, Yueqin; Xiang, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of the Internet of Underwater Things, smart things are deployed in the ocean space and establish underwater wireless sensor networks for the monitoring of vast and dynamic underwater environments. When events are found to have possibly occurred, accurate event coverage should be detected, and potential event sources should be determined for the enactment of prompt and proper responses. To address this challenge, a technique that detects event coverage and determines event sources is developed in this article. Specifically, the occurrence of possible events corresponds to a set of neighboring sensor nodes whose sensory data may deviate from a normal sensing range in a collective fashion. An appropriate sensor node is selected as the relay node for gathering and routing sensory data to sink node(s). When sensory data are collected at sink node(s), the event coverage is detected and represented as a weighted graph, where the vertices in this graph correspond to sensor nodes and the weight specified upon the edges reflects the extent of sensory data deviating from a normal sensing range. Event sources are determined, which correspond to the barycenters in this graph. The results of the experiments show that our technique is more energy efficient, especially when the network topology is relatively steady. PMID:26694394

  8. A topology-constrained distance network algorithm for protein structure determination from NOESY data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanpeng Janet; Tejero, Roberto; Powers, Robert; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2006-03-15

    This article formulates the multidimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) interpretation problem using graph theory and presents a novel, bottom-up, topology-constrained distance network analysis algorithm for NOESY cross peak interpretation using assigned resonances. AutoStructure is a software suite that implements this topology-constrained distance network analysis algorithm and iteratively generates structures using the three-dimensional (3D) protein structure calculation programs XPLOR/CNS or DYANA. The minimum input for AutoStructure includes the amino acid sequence, a list of resonance assignments, and lists of 2D, 3D, and/or 4D-NOESY cross peaks. AutoStructure can also analyze homodimeric proteins when X-filtered NOESY experiments are available. The quality of input data and final 3D structures is evaluated using recall, precision, and F-measure (RPF) scores, a statistical measure of goodness of fit with the input data. AutoStructure has been tested on three protein NMR data sets for which high-quality structures have previously been solved by an expert, and yields comparable high-quality distance constraint lists and 3D protein structures in hours. We also compare several protein structures determined using AutoStructure with corresponding homologous proteins determined with other independent methods. The program has been used in more than two dozen protein structure determinations, several of which have already been published. PMID:16374783

  9. Selected Problems of Determining the Course of Railway Routes by Use of GPS Network Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koc, Władysław; Specht, Cezary

    2011-09-01

    The main problem related to railroad surveying design and its maintenance is the necessity to operate in local geodetic reference systems caused by the long rail sections with straight lines and curvatures of the running edge. Due to that reason the geodetic railroad classical surveying methods requires to divide all track for a short measurement section and that caused additional errors. Development of the Global Navigational Satellite Systems (GNSS) positioning methods operating in the standardized World Geodetic System (WGS-84) allowed verification of capability of utilization GPS measurements for railroad surveying. It can be stated that implemented satellite measurement techniques opens a whole new perspective on applied research and enables very precise determination of data for railway line determining, modernization and design. The research works focused on implementation GNSS multi-receivers measurement positioning platform for projecting and stock-taking working based on polish active geodesic network ASG-EUPOS, as a reference frame. In order to eliminate the influence of random measurement errors and to obtain the coordinates representing the actual shape of the track few campaigns were realized in 2009 and 2010. Leica GPS Total station system 1200 SmartRover (with ATX1230 GG antennas) receivers were located in the diameter of the measurement platform. Polish Active Geodetic Network ASG-EUPOS was used as a reference network transmitted Real Time Kinematic Positioning Service according to RTCM 3.1 standard. Optimum time period were selected for GNSS campaign and testing area was chosen without large obstructions. The article presents some surveying results of the measurement campaigns and also discusses the accuracy of the course determination. Analyzes and implementation of results in railroad design process are also discussed.

  10. Partial logistic artificial neural network for competing risks regularized with automatic relevance determination.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, Paulo J G; Etchells, Terence A; Jarman, Ian H; Arsene, Corneliu T C; Aung, M S Hane; Eleuteri, Antonio; Taktak, Azzam F G; Ambrogi, Federico; Boracchi, Patrizia; Biganzoli, Elia

    2009-09-01

    Time-to-event analysis is important in a wide range of applications from clinical prognosis to risk modeling for credit scoring and insurance. In risk modeling, it is sometimes required to make a simultaneous assessment of the hazard arising from two or more mutually exclusive factors. This paper applies to an existing neural network model for competing risks (PLANNCR), a Bayesian regularization with the standard approximation of the evidence to implement automatic relevance determination (PLANNCR-ARD). The theoretical framework for the model is described and its application is illustrated with reference to local and distal recurrence of breast cancer, using the data set of Veronesi (1995). PMID:19628458

  11. [Autoimmune hepatitis and overlap syndrome: therapy].

    PubMed

    Löhr, H F

    2002-08-21

    Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) represent acute and chronic inflammatory liver diseases in which immune reactions against host antigens are found to be the major pathological mechanism. Only for AIH there is evidence of an autoimmune etiology and humoral and cellular immune reactions are found directed against various liver cell antigens. By diverse autoantibodies several subgroups of autoimmune hepatitis can be distinguished. A very important disease promoting factor seems to be the genetically determined background for autoimmunity characterized by the HLA haplotype A1, B8 and DR3, respectively DR4. Although the histopathology of AIH shows no pathognomonic features distinguishing this type of hepatitis from virus induced chronic hepatitis there are some distinct characteristic morphological lesions. If untreated the prognosis of AIH is unfavourable but the benefit from immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprin is well established. In the last years there was increasing evidence for an overlap syndrome between AIH and PBC and rarely AIH and PSC. These patients are characterized by PBC characteristic bileduct lesions and oftenly antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). They also show AIH typical inflammatory hepatic lesions in the periportal areas and portal tracts and oftenly the typical genetical background, the HLA haplotype A1, B8, DR3 or DR4. Most of these patients respond probably to a combination therapy containing prednisolon, azathioprine and ursodesoxycholic acid that leads to the reduction of the inflammatory activity. PMID:12233265

  12. Base drive and overlap protection circuit

    DOEpatents

    Gritter, David J.

    1983-01-01

    An inverter (34) which provides power to an A. C. machine (28) is controlled by a circuit (36) employing PWM control strategy whereby A. C. power is supplied to the machine at a preselectable frequency and preselectable voltage. This is accomplished by the technique of waveform notching in which the shapes of the notches are varied to determine the average energy content of the overall waveform. Through this arrangement, the operational efficiency of the A. C. machine is optimized. The control circuit includes a microcomputer and memory element which receive various parametric inputs and calculate optimized machine control data signals therefrom. The control data is asynchronously loaded into the inverter through an intermediate buffer (38). A base drive and overlap protection circuit is included to insure that both transistors of a complimentary pair are not conducting at the same time. In its preferred embodiment, the present invention is incorporated within an electric vehicle (10) employing a 144 VDC battery pack (32) and a three-phase induction motor (18).

  13. A MULTIPLEXED ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICANT EFFECTS ON SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY AND CELL VIABILITY FROM MICROELECTRODE ARRAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    AbstractTITLE: A MULTIPLEXED ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICANT EFFECTS ON SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY AND CELL VIABILITY FROM MICROELECTRODE ARRAYSABSTRACT BODY: Microelectrode array (MEA) recordings are increasingly being used as an in vitro method to detect and characte...

  14. Determining quality of caviar from Caspian Sea based on Raman spectroscopy and using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Mohamadi Monavar, H; Afseth, N K; Lozano, J; Alimardani, R; Omid, M; Wold, J P

    2013-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy for predicting purity of caviars. The 93 wild caviar samples of three different types, namely; Beluga, Asetra and Sevruga were analysed by Raman spectroscopy in the range 1995 cm(-1) to 545 cm(-1). Also, 60 samples from combinations of every two types were examined. The chemical origin of the samples was identified by reference measurements on pure samples. Linear chemometric methods like Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) were used for data visualisation and classification which permitted clear distinction between different caviars. Non-linear methods like Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) were used to classify caviar samples. Two different networks were tested in the classification: Probabilistic Neural Network with Radial-Basis Function (PNN) and Multilayer Feed Forward Networks with Back Propagation (BP-NN). In both cases, scores of principal components (PCs) were chosen as input nodes for the input layer in PC-ANN models in order to reduce the redundancy of data and time of training. Leave One Out (LOO) cross validation was applied in order to check the performance of the networks. Results of PCA indicated that, features like type and purity can be used to discriminate different caviar samples. These findings were also supported by LDA with efficiency between 83.77% and 100%. These results were confirmed with the results obtained by developed PC-ANN models, able to classify pure caviar samples with 93.55% and 71.00% accuracy in BP network and PNN, respectively. In comparison, LDA, PNN and BP-NN models for predicting caviar types have 90.3%, 73.1% and 91.4% accuracy. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) models were built under cross validation and tested with different independent data sets, yielding determination coefficients (R(2)) of 0.86, 0.83, 0.92 and 0.91 with root mean square error (RMSE) of validation of 0.32, 0.11, 0.03 and 0.09 for

  15. Rigidity and soft percolation in the glass transition of an atomistic model of ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium nitrate, from molecular dynamics simulations—Existence of infinite overlapping networks in a fragile ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Habasaki, Junko; Ngai, K. L.

    2015-04-28

    The typical ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium nitrate (EMIM-NO{sub 3}), was examined by molecular dynamics simulations of an all-atomistic model to show the characteristics of networks of cages and/or bonds in the course of vitrification of this fragile glass-former. The system shows changes of dynamics at two characteristic temperatures, T{sub B} (or T{sub c}) and the glass transition temperature T{sub g}, found in other fragile glass forming liquids [K. L. Ngai and J. Habasaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 114502 (2014)]. On decreasing temperature, the number of neighboring cation-anion pairs, N{sub B}, within the first minimum of the pair correlation function, g(r){sub min}, increases. On crossing T{sub B} (>T{sub g}), the system volume and diffusion coefficient both show changes in temperature dependence, and as usual at T{sub g}. The glass transition temperature, T{sub g}, is characterized by the saturation of the total number of “bonds,” N{sub B} and the corresponding decrease in degree of freedom, F = [(3N − 6) − N{sub B}], of the system consisting of N particles. Similar behavior holds for the other ion-ion pairs. Therefore, as an alternative, the dynamics of glass transition can be interpreted conceptually by rigidity percolation. Before saturation occurring at T{sub g}, the number of bonds shows a remarkable change at around T{sub B}. This temperature is associated with the disappearance of the loosely packed coordination polyhedra of anions around cation (or vice versa), related to the loss of geometrical freedom of the polyhedra, f{sub g}, of each coordination polyhedron, which can be defined by f{sub g} = [(3N{sub V} − 6) − N{sub b}]. Here, 3N{sub v} is the degree of freedom of N{sub V} vertices of the polyhedron, and N{sub b} is number of fictive bonds. The packing of polyhedra is characterized by the soft percolation of cages, which allows further changes with decreasing temperature. The power spectrum of displacement of the central ion

  16. Rigidity and soft percolation in the glass transition of an atomistic model of ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium nitrate, from molecular dynamics simulations—Existence of infinite overlapping networks in a fragile ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habasaki, Junko; Ngai, K. L.

    2015-04-01

    The typical ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium nitrate (EMIM-NO3), was examined by molecular dynamics simulations of an all-atomistic model to show the characteristics of networks of cages and/or bonds in the course of vitrification of this fragile glass-former. The system shows changes of dynamics at two characteristic temperatures, TB (or Tc) and the glass transition temperature Tg, found in other fragile glass forming liquids [K. L. Ngai and J. Habasaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 114502 (2014)]. On decreasing temperature, the number of neighboring cation-anion pairs, NB, within the first minimum of the pair correlation function, g(r)min, increases. On crossing TB (>Tg), the system volume and diffusion coefficient both show changes in temperature dependence, and as usual at Tg. The glass transition temperature, Tg, is characterized by the saturation of the total number of "bonds," NB and the corresponding decrease in degree of freedom, F = [(3N - 6) - NB], of the system consisting of N particles. Similar behavior holds for the other ion-ion pairs. Therefore, as an alternative, the dynamics of glass transition can be interpreted conceptually by rigidity percolation. Before saturation occurring at Tg, the number of bonds shows a remarkable change at around TB. This temperature is associated with the disappearance of the loosely packed coordination polyhedra of anions around cation (or vice versa), related to the loss of geometrical freedom of the polyhedra, fg, of each coordination polyhedron, which can be defined by fg = [(3NV - 6) - Nb]. Here, 3Nv is the degree of freedom of NV vertices of the polyhedron, and Nb is number of fictive bonds. The packing of polyhedra is characterized by the soft percolation of cages, which allows further changes with decreasing temperature. The power spectrum of displacement of the central ion in the cage is found to be correlated with the fluctuation of Nb of cation-cation (or anion-anion) pairs in the polyhedron, although the

  17. Rigidity and soft percolation in the glass transition of an atomistic model of ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium nitrate, from molecular dynamics simulations--Existence of infinite overlapping networks in a fragile ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Habasaki, Junko; Ngai, K L

    2015-04-28

    The typical ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium nitrate (EMIM-NO3), was examined by molecular dynamics simulations of an all-atomistic model to show the characteristics of networks of cages and/or bonds in the course of vitrification of this fragile glass-former. The system shows changes of dynamics at two characteristic temperatures, TB (or Tc) and the glass transition temperature Tg, found in other fragile glass forming liquids [K. L. Ngai and J. Habasaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 114502 (2014)]. On decreasing temperature, the number of neighboring cation-anion pairs, NB, within the first minimum of the pair correlation function, g(r)min, increases. On crossing TB (>Tg), the system volume and diffusion coefficient both show changes in temperature dependence, and as usual at Tg. The glass transition temperature, Tg, is characterized by the saturation of the total number of "bonds," NB and the corresponding decrease in degree of freedom, F = [(3N - 6) - NB], of the system consisting of N particles. Similar behavior holds for the other ion-ion pairs. Therefore, as an alternative, the dynamics of glass transition can be interpreted conceptually by rigidity percolation. Before saturation occurring at Tg, the number of bonds shows a remarkable change at around TB. This temperature is associated with the disappearance of the loosely packed coordination polyhedra of anions around cation (or vice versa), related to the loss of geometrical freedom of the polyhedra, fg, of each coordination polyhedron, which can be defined by fg = [(3NV - 6) - Nb]. Here, 3Nv is the degree of freedom of NV vertices of the polyhedron, and Nb is number of fictive bonds. The packing of polyhedra is characterized by the soft percolation of cages, which allows further changes with decreasing temperature. The power spectrum of displacement of the central ion in the cage is found to be correlated with the fluctuation of Nb of cation-cation (or anion-anion) pairs in the polyhedron, although the

  18. Determination of elastic properties of a film-substrate system by using the neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Baiqiang; Shen, Zhonghua; Ni, Xiaowu; Wang, Jijun; Guan, Jianfei; Lu, Jian

    2004-12-01

    An inverse method based on artificial neural network (ANN) is presented to determine the elastic properties of films from laser-genrated surface waves. The surface displacement responses are used as the inputs for the ANN model; the outputs of the ANN are the Young's modulus, density, Poisson's ratio, and thickness of the film. The finite element method is used to calculate the surface displacement responses in a film-substrate system. Levenberg Marquardt algorithm is used as numerical optimization to speed up the training process for the ANN model. In this method, the materials parameters are not recovered from the dispersion curves but rather directly from the transient surface displacement. We have also found that this procedure is very efficient for determining the materials parameters of layered systems.

  19. Integration of wireless sensor network and remote sensing for monitoring and determining irrigation demand in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapiou, Athos; Papadavid, George; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.

    2009-09-01

    This paper aims to highlight the benefits from the integration of wireless sensor network / meteorological data and remote sensing for monitoring and determine irrigation demand in Cyprus. Estimating evapotranspiration in Cyprus will help, in taking measures for an effective irrigation water management in the future in the island. For this purpose both multi-spectral satellite images (Landsat 7 ETM+ and ASTER) and hydro-meteorological data from wireless sensors and automatic meteorological stations have been used. The wireless sensor network, which consist approximately twenty wireless nodes, was placed in our case study. The wireless sensor network acts as a wide area distributed data collection system deployed to collect and reliably transmit soil and air environmental data to a remote base-station hosted at Cyprus University of Technology. Furthermore auxiliary meteorological field data, from an automatic meteorological station, nearby our case study, where used such as solar radiation, air temperature, air humidity and wind speed. These data were used in conjunction with remote sensing results. Satellite images where used in ERDAS Imagine Software after the necessary processing: geometric rectification, radiometric calibration and atmospheric corrections. The satellite images were atmospheric corrected and calibrated using spectro-radiometers and sun-photometers measurements taken in situ, in an agricultural area, south-west of the island of Cyprus. Evapotranspiration is difficult to determine since it combines various meteorological and field parameters while in literature quite many different models for estimating ET are indicated. For estimating evapotranspiration from satellite images and the hydro-meteorological data different methods have been evaluated such as FAO Penman-Monteith, Carlson-Buffum and Granger methods. These results have been compared with E-pan methods. Finally a water management irrigation schedule has been applied. The final results are

  20. Determination of DPPH free radical scavenging activity: application of artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Musa, Khalid Hamid; Abdullah, Aminah; Al-Haiqi, Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    A new computational approach for the determination of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging activity (DPPH-RSA) in food is reported, based on the concept of machine learning. Trolox standard was mix with DPPH at different concentrations to produce different colors from purple to yellow. Artificial neural network (ANN) was trained on a typical set of images of the DPPH radical reacting with different levels of Trolox. This allowed the neural network to classify future images of any sample into the correct class of RSA level. The ANN was then able to determine the DPPH-RSA of cinnamon, clove, mung bean, red bean, red rice, brown rice, black rice and tea extract and the results were compared with data obtained using a spectrophotometer. The application of ANN correlated well to the spectrophotometric classical procedure and thus do not require the use of spectrophotometer, and it could be used to obtain semi-quantitative results of DPPH-RSA. PMID:26471610

  1. Direct and indirect effects in the regulation of overlapping promoters.

    PubMed

    Bendtsen, Kristian Moss; Erdossy, János; Csiszovszki, Zsolt; Svenningsen, Sine Lo; Sneppen, Kim; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2011-09-01

    Optimal response to environmental stimuli often requires activation of certain genes and repression of others. Dual function regulatory proteins play a key role in the differential regulation of gene expression. While repression can be achieved by any DNA binding protein through steric occlusion of RNA polymerase in the promoter region, activation often requires a surface on the regulatory protein to contact RNAP and thus facilitate transcription initiation. RNAP itself is also a DNA binding protein, therefore it can function as a transcriptional repressor. Searching the Escherichia coli promoter database we found that ∼14% of the identified 'forward' promoters overlap with a promoter oriented in the opposite direction. In this article we combine a mathematical model with experimental analysis of synthetic regulatory regions to investigate interference of overlapping promoters. We find that promoter interference depends on the characteristics of overlapping promoters. The model predicts that promoter strength and interference can be regulated separately, which provides unique opportunities for regulation. Our experimental data suggest that in principle any DNA binding protein can be used for both activation and repression of promoter transcription, depending on the context. These findings can be exploited in the construction of synthetic networks. PMID:21609952

  2. Hierarchical link clustering algorithm in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodlaj, Jernej; Batagelj, Vladimir

    2015-06-01

    Hierarchical network clustering is an approach to find tightly and internally connected clusters (groups or communities) of nodes in a network based on its structure. Instead of nodes, it is possible to cluster links of the network. The sets of nodes belonging to clusters of links can overlap. While overlapping clusters of nodes are not always expected, they are natural in many applications. Using appropriate dissimilarity measures, we can complement the clustering strategy to consider, for example, the semantic meaning of links or nodes based on their properties. We propose a new hierarchical link clustering algorithm which in comparison to existing algorithms considers node and/or link properties (descriptions, attributes) of the input network alongside its structure using monotonic dissimilarity measures. The algorithm determines communities that form connected subnetworks (relational constraint) containing locally similar nodes with respect to their description. It is only implicitly based on the corresponding line graph of the input network, thus reducing its space and time complexities. We investigate both complexities analytically and statistically. Using provided dissimilarity measures, our algorithm can, in addition to the general overlapping community structure of input networks, uncover also related subregions inside these communities in a form of hierarchy. We demonstrate this ability on real-world and artificial network examples.

  3. Hierarchical link clustering algorithm in networks.

    PubMed

    Bodlaj, Jernej; Batagelj, Vladimir

    2015-06-01

    Hierarchical network clustering is an approach to find tightly and internally connected clusters (groups or communities) of nodes in a network based on its structure. Instead of nodes, it is possible to cluster links of the network. The sets of nodes belonging to clusters of links can overlap. While overlapping clusters of nodes are not always expected, they are natural in many applications. Using appropriate dissimilarity measures, we can complement the clustering strategy to consider, for example, the semantic meaning of links or nodes based on their properties. We propose a new hierarchical link clustering algorithm which in comparison to existing algorithms considers node and/or link properties (descriptions, attributes) of the input network alongside its structure using monotonic dissimilarity measures. The algorithm determines communities that form connected subnetworks (relational constraint) containing locally similar nodes with respect to their description. It is only implicitly based on the corresponding line graph of the input network, thus reducing its space and time complexities. We investigate both complexities analytically and statistically. Using provided dissimilarity measures, our algorithm can, in addition to the general overlapping community structure of input networks, uncover also related subregions inside these communities in a form of hierarchy. We demonstrate this ability on real-world and artificial network examples. PMID:26172761

  4. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, George R.; Petitto, Karen R.; McLaughlin, Don

    2001-01-01

    Describes the connectivity features and options of modern campus communication and information system networks, including signal transmission (wire-based and wireless), signal switching, convergence of networks, and network assessment variables, to enable campus leaders to make sound future-oriented decisions. (EV)

  5. Vibrational relaxation and internal conversion in the overlapped optically-allowed 1Bu+ and optically-forbidden 1Bu- or 3Ag- vibronic levels of carotenoids: Effects of diabatic mixing as determined by Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakitani, Yoshinori; Miki, Takeshi; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kanematsu, Yasuo

    2009-07-01

    The time constants of the vibrational relaxation, υ = 2 → υ = 1 and υ = 1 → υ = 0, in the 1Bu+ manifold and those of internal conversion from the 1Bu+(0) level, which is isoenergetic (so-called 'diabatic') with the 1Bu- vibronic levels in neurosporene and spheroidene and with the 3Ag- vibronic levels in lycopene and anhydrorhodovibrin, were determined by Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopy. The time constants of the vibrational relaxation were in the ˜1:2 ratio, and those of internal conversion agreed with the lifetimes of the diabatic counterparts, i.e., the 1Bu- and 3Ag- electronic states, respectively.

  6. Determination of Important Topographic Factors for Landslide Mapping Analysis Using MLP Network

    PubMed Central

    Alkhasawneh, Mutasem Sh.; Ngah, Umi Kalthum; Mat Isa, Nor Ashidi; Al-batah, Mohammad Subhi

    2013-01-01

    Landslide is one of the natural disasters that occur in Malaysia. Topographic factors such as elevation, slope angle, slope aspect, general curvature, plan curvature, and profile curvature are considered as the main causes of landslides. In order to determine the dominant topographic factors in landslide mapping analysis, a study was conducted and presented in this paper. There are three main stages involved in this study. The first stage is the extraction of extra topographic factors. Previous landslide studies had identified mainly six topographic factors. Seven new additional factors have been proposed in this study. They are longitude curvature, tangential curvature, cross section curvature, surface area, diagonal line length, surface roughness, and rugosity. The second stage is the specification of the weight of each factor using two methods. The methods are multilayer perceptron (MLP) network classification accuracy and Zhou's algorithm. At the third stage, the factors with higher weights were used to improve the MLP performance. Out of the thirteen factors, eight factors were considered as important factors, which are surface area, longitude curvature, diagonal length, slope angle, elevation, slope aspect, rugosity, and profile curvature. The classification accuracy of multilayer perceptron neural network has increased by 3% after the elimination of five less important factors. PMID:24453846

  7. Determining location and size of medical departments in a hospital network: a multiobjective decision support approach.

    PubMed

    Stummer, Christian; Doerner, Karl; Focke, Axel; Heidenberger, Kurt

    2004-02-01

    Decisions on the location and size of medical departments in a given hospital network are prime examples of priority setting in health care, which is an issue of growing political importance. As such decisions are regularly characterized by multiple and often conflicting objectives in real-life, this paper integrates the fields of hospital planning and multiobjective decision support. The proposed two-phase solution procedure for our corresponding mathematical programming model does not require a priori preference information. Instead, it seeks efficient solutions by means of multiobjective tabu search in the first phase, while applying clustering in the second phase to allow the decision makers to interactively explore the solution space until the "best" configuration is determined. The real-world applicability of our approach is illustrated through a numerical example based on hospital data from Germany. PMID:14977095

  8. Determination of Electron Optical Properties for Aperture Zoom Lenses Using an Artificial Neural Network Method.

    PubMed

    Isik, Nimet

    2016-04-01

    Multi-element electrostatic aperture lens systems are widely used to control electron or charged particle beams in many scientific instruments. By means of applied voltages, these lens systems can be operated for different purposes. In this context, numerous methods have been performed to calculate focal properties of these lenses. In this study, an artificial neural network (ANN) classification method is utilized to determine the focused/unfocused charged particle beam in the image point as a function of lens voltages for multi-element electrostatic aperture lenses. A data set for training and testing of ANN is taken from the SIMION 8.1 simulation program, which is a well known and proven accuracy program in charged particle optics. Mean squared error results of this study indicate that the ANN classification method provides notable performance characteristics for electrostatic aperture zoom lenses. PMID:26879447

  9. Neural networks applied to determine the thermophysical properties of amino acid based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Cancilla, John C; Perez, Ana; Wierzchoś, Kacper; Torrecilla, José S

    2016-03-01

    A series of models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been designed to estimate the thermophysical properties of different amino acid-based ionic liquids (AAILs). Three different databases of AAILs were modeled using these algorithms with the goal set to estimate the density, viscosity, refractive index, ionic conductivity, and thermal expansion coefficient, and requiring only data regarding temperature and electronic polarizability of the chemicals. Additionally, a global model was designed combining all of the databases to determine the robustness of the method. In general, the results were successful, reaching mean prediction errors below 1% in many cases, as well as a statistically reliable and accurate global model. Attaining these successful models is a relevant fact as AAILs are novel biodegradable and biocompatible compounds which may soon make their way into the health sector forming a part of useful biomedical applications. Therefore, understanding the behavior and being able to estimate their thermophysical properties becomes crucial. PMID:26899458

  10. Efficient construction of robust artificial neural networks for accurate determination of superficial sample optical properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2015-03-01

    In general, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) systems work with photon diffusion models to determine the absorption coefficient μa and reduced scattering coefficient μs' of turbid samples. However, in some DRS measurement scenarios, such as using short source-detector separations to investigate superficial tissues with comparable μa and μs', photon diffusion models might be invalid or might not have analytical solutions. In this study, a systematic workflow of constructing a rapid, accurate photon transport model that is valid at short source-detector separations (SDSs) and at a wide range of sample albedo is revealed. To create such a model, we first employed a GPU (Graphic Processing Unit) based Monte Carlo model to calculate the reflectance at various sample optical property combinations and established a database at high speed. The database was then utilized to train an artificial neural network (ANN) for determining the sample absorption and reduced scattering coefficients from the reflectance measured at several SDSs without applying spectral constraints. The robustness of the produced ANN model was rigorously validated. We evaluated the performance of a successfully trained ANN using tissue simulating phantoms. We also determined the 500-1000 nm absorption and reduced scattering spectra of in-vivo skin using our ANN model and found that the values agree well with those reported in several independent studies. PMID:25798300

  11. Mapping the nomological network of employee self-determined safety motivation: A preliminary measure in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Tetrick, Lois E

    2016-09-01

    The present study introduced a preliminary measure of employee safety motivation based on the definition of self-determination theory from Fleming (2012) research and validated the structure of self-determined safety motivation (SDSM) by surveying 375 employees in a Chinese high-risk organization. First, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to examine the factor structure of SDSM, and indices of five-factor model CFA met the requirements. Second, a nomological network was examined to provide evidence of the construct validity of SDSM. Beyond construct validity, the analysis also produced some interesting results concerning the relationship between leadership antecedents and safety motivation, and between safety motivation and safety behavior. Autonomous motivation was positively related to transformational leadership, negatively related to abusive supervision, and positively related to safety behavior. Controlled motivation with the exception of introjected regulation was negatively related to transformational leadership, positively related to abusive supervision, and negatively related to safety behavior. The unique role of introjected regulation and future research based on self-determination theory were discussed. PMID:27240123

  12. Sub-Plate Overlap Code Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.; Bucciarelli, B.; Zarate, N.

    1997-01-01

    An expansion of the plate overlap method of astrometric data reduction to a single plate has been proposed and successfully tested. Each plate is (artificially) divided into sub-plates which can then be overlapped. This reduces the area of a 'plate' over which a plate model needs to accurately represent the relationship between measured coordinates and standard coordinates. Application is made to non-astrographic plates such as Schmidt plates and to wide-field astrographic plates. Indeed, the method is completely general and can be applied to any type of recording media.

  13. Entry Abort Determination Using Non-Adaptive Neural Networks for Mars Precision Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybeal, Sarah R.; Kranzusch, Kara M.

    2005-01-01

    The 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will attempt the first precision landing on Mars using a modified version of the Apollo Earth entry guidance program. The guidance routine, Entry Terminal Point Controller (ETPC), commands the deployment of a supersonic parachute after converging the range to the landing target. For very dispersed cases, ETPC may not converge the range to the target and safely command parachute deployment within Mach number and dynamic pressure constraints. A full-lift up abort can save 85% of these failed trajectories while abandoning the precision landing objective. Though current MSL requirements do not call for an abort capability, an autonomous abort capability may be desired, for this mission or future Mars precision landers, to make the vehicle more robust. The application of artificial neural networks (NNs) as an abort determination technique was evaluated by personnel at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC). In order to implement an abort, a failed trajectory needs to be recognized in real time. Abort determination is dependent upon several trajectory parameters whose relationships to vehicle survival are not well understood, and yet the lander must be trained to recognize unsafe situations. Artificial neural networks (NNs) provide a way to model these parameters and can provide MSL with the artificial intelligence necessary to independently declare an abort. Using the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission as a case study, a non-adaptive NN was designed, trained and tested using Monte Carlo simulations of MSL descent and incorporated into ETPC. Neural network theory, the development history of the MSL NN, and initial testing with severe dust storm entry trajectory cases are discussed in Reference 1 and will not be repeated here. That analysis demonstrated that NNs are capable of recognizing failed descent trajectories and can significantly increase the survivability of MSL for very

  14. Registration of partially overlapping laser-radar range images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Dan; Sun, Jian-Feng; Li, Qi; Wang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    To register partially overlapping three-dimensional point sets from different viewpoints, it is necessary to remove spurious corresponding point pairs that are not located in overlapping regions. Most variants of the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm require users to manually select the rejection parameters for discarding spurious point pairs between the registering views. This requirement often results in unreliable and inaccurate registration. To overcome this problem, we present an improved ICP algorithm that can automatically determine the rejection percentage to reliably and accurately align partially overlapping laser-radar (ladar) range images. The similarity of k neighboring features of each nonplanar point is employed to determine reasonable point pairs in nonplanar regions, and the distance measurement method is used to find reasonable point pairs in planar regions. The rejection percentage can be obtained from these two sets of reasonable pairs. The performance of our algorithm is compared with that of five other algorithms using various models with low and high curvatures. The experimental results show that our algorithm is more accurate and robust than the other algorithms.

  15. Multifractal spectrum of self-similar measures with overlap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Cameron; Hare, Kathryn E.; Mak, Cheuk Yu

    2014-02-01

    It is well known that the multifractal spectrum of a self-similar measure satisfying the open set condition is a closed interval. Recently, there has been interest in the overlapping case and it is known that in this case there can be isolated points. We prove that for an interesting class of self-similar measures with overlap the spectrum consists of a closed interval union together with at most two isolated points. In the case of convolutions of uniform Cantor measures we determine the end points of the interval and the isolated points. We also give an example of a related self-similar measure where the spectrum is a union of two disjoint intervals. In contrast, we prove that if one considers quotient measures of this class on the quotient group [0, 1], rather than the real line, the multifractal spectrum is a closed interval.

  16. Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, Betty

    Networking is an information giving and receiving system, a support system, and a means whereby women can get ahead in careers--either in new jobs or in current positions. Networking information can create many opportunities: women can talk about how other women handle situations and tasks, and previously established contacts can be used in…

  17. Power divergences in overlapping Wilson lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berwein, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the divergence structure of Wilson line operators with partially overlapping segments on the basis of the cyclic Wilson loop as an explicit example. The generalized exponentiation theorem is used to show the exponentiation and factorization of power divergences for certain linear combinations of associated loop functions.

  18. Liberal Education: An Overlapping Pragmatic Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, David C.; Kimball, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests in Bruce Kimball's thesis that a pragmatic consensus was emerging about the understanding of liberal education offers that it might be best understood by comparing it to J. Rawl's idea of an "overlapping consensus." States that by comparing and contrasting these ideas that the emerging consensus is pragmatic in nature. (CMK)

  19. Stochastic Cooling with Schottky Band Overlap

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Valeri

    2006-03-20

    Optimal use of stochastic cooling is essential to maximize the antiproton stacking rate for Tevatron Run II. Good understanding and characterization of the cooling is important for the optimization. The paper is devoted to derivation of the Fokker-Plank equations justified in the case of near or full Schottky base overlap for both longitudinal and transverse coolings.

  20. Non-overlapped random decrement technique for parameter identification in operational modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Song, H. W.

    2016-03-01

    The random decrement technique (RDT) is used to estimate free vibration response from output data generated by Gaussian white noise. The principle is to decay the excitation via averaging of segments in output data. With RDT, the triggering condition for determining the initial points of segments causes overlap during averaging; the consequence is a residual excitation, peaking at the first natural frequency. This paper presents a modified RDT with non-overlapped segments to eliminate this peak. Numerical comparison between non-overlapped RDT (NRDT) and RDT shows the accuracy improvement of damping. However, time history data is sometimes not long enough in NRDT, which results in an inevitable overlap. In order to keep the accuracy of NRDT, the first natural period is viewed as the critical length between adjacent initial points to distinguish the inevitable overlap from that in RDT.

  1. The Quality of Social Networks: Its Determinants and Impacts on Helping and Volunteering in Macao

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tong, Kwok Kit; Hung, Eva P. W.; Yuen, Sze Man

    2011-01-01

    Pro-social behaviors serve essential societal functions. This study examines the factors affecting the quality of social networks, in terms of network size and perceived respect. It further explores the role of social networks in enhancing helping intention and helping behaviors. Eight hundred and eighty people were randomly interviewed by phone.…

  2. Artificial neural network approach for moiré fringe center determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Wing Hon; Ratnam, Mani Maran; Yen, Kin Sam

    2015-11-01

    The moiré effect has been used in high-accuracy positioning and alignment systems for decades. Various methods have been proposed to identify and locate moiré fringes in order to relate the pattern information to dimensional and displacement measurement. These methods can be broadly categorized into manual interpretation based on human knowledge and image processing based on computational algorithms. An artificial neural network (ANN) is proposed to locate moiré fringe centers within circular grating moiré patterns. This ANN approach aims to mimic human decision making by eliminating complex mathematical computations or time-consuming image processing algorithms in moiré fringe recognition. A feed-forward backpropagation ANN architecture was adopted in this work. Parametric studies were performed to optimize the ANN architecture. The finalized ANN approach was able to determine the location of the fringe centers with average deviations of 3.167 pixels out of 200 pixels (≈1.6%) and 6.166 pixels out of 200 pixels (≈3.1%) for real moiré patterns that lie within and outside the training intervals, respectively. In addition, a reduction of 43.4% in the computational time was reported using the ANN approach. Finally, the applicability of the ANN approach for moiré fringe center determination was confirmed.

  3. Characterization of a photoacoustic system through neural networks to determine multicomponent samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajarevich, N. M.; Peuriot, A. L.; Slezak, V. B.

    2016-07-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy for trace gases detection, based on a CO2 laser, can be used in a wide range of applications. The tunability of this laser in the mid-infrared (9.4-10.6 μm) allows the quantitative determination of different substances in multicomponent samples. In general, at traces level, the total photoacoustic amplitude at a certain wavelength may be approximated by a linear superposition of the amplitudes given by each of the species absorbing at that wavelength. However, in some cases, the sum of the individual signals is no longer valid. In particular, it is known the presence of CO2 delays the acoustic signal in relation to the laser excitation due to the exchange of vibrational energy between CO2 and N2. This phenomenon generates a slow V-T energy relaxation from a metastable N2 vibrational level and the sum of individual contributions may no longer be valid. Moreover, the resolution of a linear equation system has limitations, so the possibility to determine concentrations in photoacoustics based on neural network is proposed in this work. This procedure is tried in a particular case of a volatile organic compound, such as C2H4, and CO2 in air. The results are compared with the ones obtained with a model based on rate equations.

  4. Bayesian belief network analysis applied to determine the progression of temporomandibular disorders using MRI

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the applicability of a Bayesian belief network (BBN) to MR images to diagnose temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Our aim was to determine the progression of TMDs, focusing on how each finding affects the other. Methods: We selected 1.5-T MRI findings (33 variables) and diagnoses (bone changes and disc displacement) of patients with TMD from 2007 to 2008. There were a total of 295 cases with 590 sides of temporomandibular joints (TMJs). The data were modified according to the research diagnostic criteria of TMD. We compared the accuracy of the BBN using 11 algorithms (necessary path condition, path condition, greedy search-and-score with Bayesian information criterion, Chow–Liu tree, Rebane–Pearl poly tree, tree augmented naïve Bayes model, maximum log likelihood, Akaike information criterion, minimum description length, K2 and C4.5), a multiple regression analysis and an artificial neural network using resubstitution validation and 10-fold cross-validation. Results: There were 191 TMJs (32.4%) with bone changes and 340 (57.6%) with articular disc displacement. The BBN path condition algorithm using resubstitution validation and 10-fold cross-validation was >99% accurate. However, the main advantage of a BBN is that it can represent the causal relationships between different findings and assign conditional probabilities, which can then be used to interpret the progression of TMD. Conclusions: Osteoarthritic bone changes progressed from condyle to articular fossa and finally to mandibular bone contours. Disc displacement was directly related to severe bone changes. Early bone changes were not directly related to disc displacement. TMJ functional factors (condylar translation, bony space and disc form) and age mediated between bone changes and disc displacement. PMID:25472616

  5. Identifying overlapping communities as well as hubs and outliers via nonnegative matrix factorization

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiao; Jin, Di; Cao, Yixin; He, Dongxiao

    2013-01-01

    Community detection is important for understanding networks. Previous studies observed that communities are not necessarily disjoint and might overlap. It is also agreed that some outlier vertices participate in no community, and some hubs in a community might take more important roles than others. Each of these facts has been independently addressed in previous work. But there is no algorithm, to our knowledge, that can identify these three structures altogether. To overcome this limitation, we propose a novel model where vertices are measured by their centrality in communities, and define the identification of overlapping communities, hubs, and outliers as an optimization problem, calculated by nonnegative matrix factorization. We test this method on various real networks, and compare it with several competing algorithms. The experimental results not only demonstrate its ability of identifying overlapping communities, hubs, and outliers, but also validate its superior performance in terms of clustering quality. PMID:24129402

  6. The clinical and genetic features of the COPD asthma overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael; McDonald, Merry-Lynn; Beaty, Terri; Ramsdell, Joe; Bhatt, Surya; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Make, Barry J.; Crapo, James D.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with COPD and asthma are an important but poorly characterized group. The genetic determinants of COPD-asthma overlap have not been studied. Objective Identify clinical features and genetic risk factors for COPD-asthma overlap. Methods Subjects were current or former smoking non-Hispanic whites (NHW) or African-Americans (AA) with COPD. Overlap subjects reported a history of physician-diagnosed asthma before the age of 40. We compared clinical and radiographic features between COPD and overlap subjects. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in the NHW and AA populations, and combined these results in a meta-analysis. Results More women and African Americans reported a history of asthma. Overlap subjects had more severe and more frequent respiratory exacerbations, less emphysema, and greater airway wall thickness compared to subjects with COPD alone. The NHW GWAS identified SNPs in CSMD1 (rs11779254, P=1.57×10−6) and SOX5(rs59569785, P=1.61×10−6) and the meta-analysis identified SNPs in the gene GPR65 (rs6574978, P=1.18×10−7) associated with COPD-asthma overlap. Conclusions Overlap subjects have more exacerbations, less emphysema and more airway disease for any degree of lung function impairment compared to COPD alone. We identified novel genetic variants associated with this syndrome. COPD-asthma overlap is an important syndrome and may require distinct clinical management. PMID:24876173

  7. An Interactive network of long non-coding RNAs facilitates the Drosophila sex determination decision

    PubMed Central

    Mulvey, Brett B.; Olcese, Ursula; Cabrera, Janel R.; Horabin, Jamila I.

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis in several eukaryotes shows a surprising number of transcripts which do not encode conventional messenger RNAs. Once considered noise, these non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) appear capable of controlling gene expression by various means. We find Drosophila sex determination, specifically the master-switch gene Sex-lethal (Sxl), is regulated by long ncRNAs (>200 nt). The lncRNAs influence the dose sensitive establishment promoter of Sxl, SxlPe, which must be activated to specify female sex. They are primarily from two regions, R1 and R2, upstream of SxlPeand show a dynamic developmental profile. Of the four lncRNA strands only one, R2 antisense, has its peak coincident with SxlPe transcription, suggesting it may promote activation. Indeed, its expression is regulated by the X chromosome counting genes, whose dose determines whether SxlPe is transcribed. Transgenic lines which ectopically express each of the lncRNAs show they can act in trans, impacting the process of sex determination but also altering the levels of the other lncRNAs. Generally, expression of R1 is negative whereas R2 is positive to females. This ectopic expression also results in a change in the local chromatin marks, affecting the timing and strength of SxlPe transcription. The chromatin marks are those deposited by the Polycomb and Trithorax groups of chromatin modifying proteins, which we find bind to the lncRNAs. We suggest the increasing numbers of non-coding transcripts being identified are a harbinger of interacting networks similar to the one we describe. PMID:24954180

  8. Obtaining Arbitrary Prescribed Mean Field Dynamics for Recurrently Coupled Networks of Type-I Spiking Neurons with Analytically Determined Weights

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, Wilten; Tripp, Bryan; Scott, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental question in computational neuroscience is how to connect a network of spiking neurons to produce desired macroscopic or mean field dynamics. One possible approach is through the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF). The NEF approach requires quantities called decoders which are solved through an optimization problem requiring large matrix inversion. Here, we show how a decoder can be obtained analytically for type I and certain type II firing rates as a function of the heterogeneity of its associated neuron. These decoders generate approximants for functions that converge to the desired function in mean-squared error like 1/N, where N is the number of neurons in the network. We refer to these decoders as scale-invariant decoders due to their structure. These decoders generate weights for a network of neurons through the NEF formula for weights. These weights force the spiking network to have arbitrary and prescribed mean field dynamics. The weights generated with scale-invariant decoders all lie on low dimensional hypersurfaces asymptotically. We demonstrate the applicability of these scale-invariant decoders and weight surfaces by constructing networks of spiking theta neurons that replicate the dynamics of various well known dynamical systems such as the neural integrator, Van der Pol system and the Lorenz system. As these decoders are analytically determined and non-unique, the weights are also analytically determined and non-unique. We discuss the implications for measured weights of neuronal networks. PMID:26973503

  9. Quantitative Determination of Flexible Pharmacological Mechanisms Based On Topological Variation in Mice Anti-Ischemic Modular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yin-ying; Yu, Ya-nan; Zhang, Ying-ying; Li, Bing; Liu, Jun; Li, Dong-feng; Wu, Ping; Wang, Jie; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Yong-yan

    2016-01-01

    Targeting modules or signalings may open a new path to understanding the complex pharmacological mechanisms of reversing disease processes. However, determining how to quantify the structural alteration of these signalings or modules in pharmacological networks poses a great challenge towards realizing rational drug use in clinical medicine. Here, we explore a novel approach for dynamic comparative and quantitative analysis of the topological structural variation of modules in molecular networks, proposing the concept of allosteric modules (AMs). Based on the ischemic brain of mice, we optimize module distribution in different compound-dependent modular networks by using the minimum entropy criterion and then calculate the variation in similarity values of AMs under various conditions using a novel method of SimiNEF. The diverse pharmacological dynamic stereo-scrolls of AMs with functional gradient alteration, which consist of five types of AMs, may robustly deconstruct modular networks under the same ischemic conditions. The concept of AMs can not only integrate the responsive mechanisms of different compounds based on topological cascading variation but also obtain valuable structural information about disease and pharmacological networks beyond pathway analysis. We thereby provide a new systemic quantitative strategy for rationally determining pharmacological mechanisms of altered modular networks based on topological variation. PMID:27383195

  10. Securely Measuring the Overlap between Private Datasets with Cryptosets

    PubMed Central

    Swamidass, S. Joshua; Matlock, Matthew; Rozenblit, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Many scientific questions are best approached by sharing data—collected by different groups or across large collaborative networks—into a combined analysis. Unfortunately, some of the most interesting and powerful datasets—like health records, genetic data, and drug discovery data—cannot be freely shared because they contain sensitive information. In many situations, knowing if private datasets overlap determines if it is worthwhile to navigate the institutional, ethical, and legal barriers that govern access to sensitive, private data. We report the first method of publicly measuring the overlap between private datasets that is secure under a malicious model without relying on private protocols or message passing. This method uses a publicly shareable summary of a dataset’s contents, its cryptoset, to estimate its overlap with other datasets. Cryptosets approach “information-theoretic” security, the strongest type of security possible in cryptography, which is not even crackable with infinite computing power. We empirically and theoretically assess both the accuracy of these estimates and the security of the approach, demonstrating that cryptosets are informative, with a stable accuracy, and secure. PMID:25714898

  11. Elucidation of the transcription network governing mammalian sex determination by exploiting strain-specific susceptibility to sex reversal

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Steven C.; Aylor, David L.; Syed, Haider Ali; Magwene, Paul M.; Threadgill, David W.; Capel, Blanche

    2009-01-01

    Despite the identification of some key genes that regulate sex determination, most cases of disorders of sexual development remain unexplained. Evidence suggests that the sexual fate decision in the developing gonad depends on a complex network of interacting factors that converge on a critical threshold. To elucidate the transcriptional network underlying sex determination, we took the first expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) approach in a developing organ. We identified reproducible differences in the transcriptome of the embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) XY gonad between C57BL/6J (B6) and 129S1/SvImJ (129S1), indicating that the reported sensitivity of B6 to sex reversal is consistent with a higher expression of a female-like transcriptome in B6. Gene expression is highly variable in F2 XY gonads from B6 and 129S1 intercrosses, yet strong correlations emerged. We estimated the F2 coexpression network and predicted roles for genes of unknown function based on their connectivity and position within the network. A genetic analysis of the F2 population detected autosomal regions that control the expression of many sex-related genes, including Sry (sex-determining region of the Y chromosome) and Sox9 (Sry-box containing gene 9), the key regulators of male sex determination. Our results reveal the complex transcription architecture underlying sex determination, and provide a mechanism by which individuals may be sensitized for sex reversal. PMID:19884258

  12. Radial basis function neural networks in non-destructive determination of compound aspirin tablets on NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Ying; Mi, Hong; Zhao, Lingzhi; Ren, Yuqiu; Ren, Yulin

    2006-09-01

    The application of the second most popular artificial neural networks (ANNs), namely, the radial basis function (RBF) networks, has been developed for quantitative analysis of drugs during the last decade. In this paper, the two components (aspirin and phenacetin) were simultaneously determined in compound aspirin tablets by using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and RBF networks. The total database was randomly divided into a training set (50) and a testing set (17). Different preprocessing methods (standard normal variate (SNV), multiplicative scatter correction (MSC), first-derivative and second-derivative) were applied to two sets of NIR spectra of compound aspirin tablets with different concentrations of two active components and compared each other. After that, the performance of RBF learning algorithm adopted the nearest neighbor clustering algorithm (NNCA) and the criterion for selection used a cross-validation technique. Results show that using RBF networks to quantificationally analyze tablets is reliable, and the best RBF model was obtained by first-derivative spectra.

  13. Overlapping Modularity at the Critical Point of k-Clique Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Bálint; Vicsek, Tamás; Palla, Gergely

    2013-05-01

    One of the most remarkable social phenomena is the formation of communities in social networks corresponding to families, friendship circles, work teams, etc. Since people usually belong to several different communities at the same time, the induced overlaps result in an extremely complicated web of the communities themselves. Thus, uncovering the intricate community structure of social networks is a non-trivial task with great potential for practical applications, gaining a notable interest in the recent years. The Clique Percolation Method (CPM) is one of the earliest overlapping community finding methods, which was already used in the analysis of several different social networks. In this approach the communities correspond to k-clique percolation clusters, and the general heuristic for setting the parameters of the method is to tune the system just below the critical point of k-clique percolation. However, this rule is based on simple physical principles and its validity was never subject to quantitative analysis. Here we examine the quality of the partitioning in the vicinity of the critical point using recently introduced overlapping modularity measures. According to our results on real social and other networks, the overlapping modularities show a maximum close to the critical point, justifying the original criteria for the optimal parameter settings.

  14. Evaluation of attractors and basins of asynchronous random Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Chu, Tianguang

    2012-05-01

    We present an algebraic approach for determining the attractors and their basins of random Boolean networks under an asynchronous stochastic update based on the recently developed matrix semitensor product theory, which allows for converting the logical dynamics of a Boolean network into a standard iterative dynamics. In this setting, all attractors and basins are specified by the network transition matrices. We then devise procedures that can find all attractors and their basins exactly. We also discuss the issue of overlapping basins in asynchronous random Boolean networks, and we propose methods to compute the weight of each attractor and the basin entropy of the systems.

  15. Determining Regulatory Networks Governing the Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells to Pancreatic Lineage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Ipsita

    2009-03-01

    Knowledge of pathways governing cellular differentiation to specific phenotype will enable generation of desired cell fates by careful alteration of the governing network by adequate manipulation of the cellular environment. With this aim, we have developed a novel method to reconstruct the underlying regulatory architecture of a differentiating cell population from discrete temporal gene expression data. We utilize an inherent feature of biological networks, that of sparsity, in formulating the network reconstruction problem as a bi-level mixed-integer programming problem. The formulation optimizes the network topology at the upper level and the network connectivity strength at the lower level. The method is first validated by in-silico data, before applying it to the complex system of embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. This formulation enables efficient identification of the underlying network topology which could accurately predict steps necessary for directing differentiation to subsequent stages. Concurrent experimental verification demonstrated excellent agreement with model prediction.

  16. Vacuum structure as seen by overlap fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Koller, K.; Koma, Y.; Schierholz, G.; Streuer, T.; Weinberg, V.

    2007-02-27

    Three complementary views on the QCD vacuum structure, all based on eigenmodes of the overlap operator, are reported in their interrelation: (i) spectral density, localization and chiral properties of the modes, (ii) the possibility of filtering the field strength with the aim to detect selfdual and antiselfdual domains and (iii) the various faces of the topological charge density, with and without a cutoff {lambda}cut = O({lambda}QCD). The techniques are tested on quenched SU(3) configurations.

  17. A new method for satellite orbit determination using an operational worldwide transponder network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, J. J.; Schmid, P. E.; Anderson, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The method utilizes computer programs developed for the forthcoming ATS-F/NIMBUS-F tracking and data relay experiment where the basic tracking measurements are multiple path round-trip propagation times and rates. This method of orbit computation has recently been successfully evaluated by tracking a geostationary satellite (ATS-3) using an existing VHF (150 MHz) network of automatic transponders. A master station sequentially interrogates each transponder via the ATS-3. The master site is located at Schenectady, N. Y. and four automatic transponders were located at Shannon, Reykajavik, Buenos Aires, and Seattle respectively. Data at hourly intervals were collected during a 24 hour period on April 18-19, 1973. After correcting this data for known systematic errors it was provided as input to an orbit determination program where all satellite motions during signal propagation are rigorously accounted for. The resulting estimated ATS-3 orbit yielded observational residuals on the order of 100 meters. By using more than one satellite the present scheme is further capable of accurately locating several stationary or mobile terminals as part of the overall orbital solution.

  18. Utilizing multiobjective analysis to determine an air quality monitoring network in an industrial district

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Jehng-Jung; Hsieh, Ming-Ru

    An industrial district with polluting factories operating inside poses a potential threat to the air quality in the surrounding areas. Therefore, establishing a proper air quality monitoring network (AQMN) is essential for assessing the effectiveness of imposed pollution controls, strategies, and facilities in reducing pollutants. The geographic layout of such an AQMN should assure the quality of the monitored data. Monitoring stations located at inappropriate sites will likely affect data validity. In this study, a multiobjective approach was explored for configuring an AQMN for an industrial district. A dispersion model was employed to simulate hourly distribution of pollutant concentrations in the study area. Models optimizing pollution detection, dosage, coverage, and population protection were established. Alternative AQMNs with varied station numbers and spatial distributions were obtained using the models. The resulting AQMNs were compared and evaluated for effectiveness in monitoring the temporal and spatial variation of pollutants. Discussion of the differences among the AQMNs is provided. This multiobjective analysis is expected to facilitate a decision-making process for determining an appropriate AQMN.

  19. Female mating preferences determine system-level evolution in a gene network model.

    PubMed

    Fierst, Janna L

    2013-06-01

    Environmental patterns of directional, stabilizing and fluctuating selection can influence the evolution of system-level properties like evolvability and mutational robustness. Intersexual selection produces strong phenotypic selection and these dynamics may also affect the response to mutation and the potential for future adaptation. In order to to assess the influence of mating preferences on these evolutionary properties, I modeled a male trait and female preference determined by separate gene regulatory networks. I studied three sexual selection scenarios: sexual conflict, a Gaussian model of the Fisher process described in Lande (in Proc Natl Acad Sci 78(6):3721-3725, 1981) and a good genes model in which the male trait signalled his mutational condition. I measured the effects these mating preferences had on the potential for traits and preferences to evolve towards new states, and mutational robustness of both the phenotype and the individual's overall viability. All types of sexual selection increased male phenotypic robustness relative to a randomly mating population. The Fisher model also reduced male evolvability and mutational robustness for viability. Under good genes sexual selection, males evolved an increased mutational robustness for viability. Females choosing their mates is a scenario that is sufficient to create selective forces that impact genetic evolution and shape the evolutionary response to mutation and environmental selection. These dynamics will inevitably develop in any population where sexual selection is operating, and affect the potential for future adaptation. PMID:23584953

  20. Determining the appropriate amount of anesthetic gas using DWT and EMD combined with neural network.

    PubMed

    Coşkun, Mustafa; Gürüler, Hüseyin; Istanbullu, Ayhan; Peker, Musa

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of EEG has been studied to predict the depth of anesthesia using variety of signal processing methods up to date. Those standard models have used the full spectrum of EEG signals together with the systolic-diastolic pressure and pulse values. As it is generally agreed today that the brain is in stable state and the delta-theta bands of the EEG spectrum remain active during anesthesia. Considering this background, two questions that motivates this paper. First, determining the amount of gas to be administered is whether feasable from the spectrum of EEG during the maintenance stage of surgical operations. Second, more specifically, the delta-theta bands of the EEG spectrum are whether sufficient alone for this aim. This research aims to answer these two questions together. Discrete wavelet transformation (DWT) and empirical mode decomposition (EMD) were applied to the EEG signals to extract delta-theta bands. The power density spectrum (PSD) values of target bands were presented as inputs to multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network (NN), which predicted the gas level. The present study has practical implications in terms of using less data, in an effective way and also saves time as well. PMID:25472730

  1. Determinants of Low Cloud Properties - An Artificial Neural Network Approach Using Observation Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Hendrik; Cermak, Jan

    2015-04-01

    This contribution studies the determinants of low cloud properties based on the application of various global observation data sets in machine learning algorithms. Clouds play a crucial role in the climate system as their radiative properties and precipitation patterns significantly impact the Earth's energy balance. Cloud properties are determined by environmental conditions, as cloud formation requires the availability of water vapour ("precipitable water") and condensation nuclei in sufficiently saturated conditions. A main challenge in the research of aerosol-cloud interactions is the separation of aerosol effects from meteorological influence. To gain understanding of the processes that govern low cloud properties in order to increase accuracy of climate models and predictions of future changes in the climate system is thus of great importance. In this study, artificial neural networks are used to relate a selection of predictors (meteorological parameters, aerosol loading) to a set of predictands (cloud microphysical and optical properties). As meteorological parameters, wind direction and velocity, sea level pressure, static stability of the lower troposphere, atmospheric water vapour and temperature at the surface are used (re-analysis data by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts). In addition to meteorological conditions, aerosol loading is used as a predictor of cloud properties (MODIS collection 6 aerosol optical depth). The statistical model reveals significant relationships between predictors and predictands and is able to represent the aerosol-cloud-meteorology system better than frequently used bivariate relationships. The most important predictors can be identified by the additional error when excluding one predictor at a time. The sensitivity of each predictand to each of the predictors is analyzed.

  2. Application of neural networks to determine moisture content on humidity-attenuated NIR spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, T.; Philipp, B.L.; Thompson-Bachmeier, S.

    1995-12-31

    Moisture has been identified as one of the critical tank waste parameters that impacts the safety status of the wastes, particularly tanks containing ferro/ferricyanide materials. Since water content is affected by a number of factors, including gravity, one hypothesis, currently being tested by Westinghouse Hanford`s Waste Tank Safety organization, is that the surface of the waste contains a minimum of water compared to the material deeper in the tank. Assuming this hypothesis is correct, a minimum internal waste water content will be obtained by measuring the surface water content. Near infrared analysis is a nondestructive technique that takes advantage of the tendency of water molecules to absorb specific wavelengths of NIR energy. When a sample containing water is exposed to those wavelengths, a certain portion of the energy will be absorbed by the water, and the remainder will be reflected. By measuring the reflected energy, the concentration of water in the sample can be determined. An initial investigation into the feasibility of remote sensing for hot cell and waste tank applications was performed at the University of Washington`s Center for Process Analytical Chemistry (CPAC) under the direction of Westinghouse Hanford Company. The BY-104 waste tank simulant test data showed that for these samples, ten percent of the incident radiation is scattered. When collected, this signal is available for determining moisture content because the moisture content of the waste affects the scattering. However, atmospheric relative humidity causes a signal attenuation that will impact any in situ measurements being obtained. For simulation, this spectra was used along with software generated atmospheric transmission data from 0-60 meters to produce a modified sample set. These data are analyzed using a backpropagation neural network algorithm to construct a model that would predict surface moisture content.

  3. Burnout-depression overlap: a review.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Renzo; Schonfeld, Irvin Sam; Laurent, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Whether burnout is a form of depression or a distinct phenomenon is an object of controversy. The aim of the present article was to provide an up-to-date review of the literature dedicated to the question of burnout-depression overlap. A systematic literature search was carried out in PubMed, PsycINFO, and IngentaConnect. A total of 92 studies were identified as informing the issue of burnout-depression overlap. The current state of the art suggests that the distinction between burnout and depression is conceptually fragile. It is notably unclear how the state of burnout (i.e., the end stage of the burnout process) is conceived to differ from clinical depression. Empirically, evidence for the distinctiveness of the burnout phenomenon has been inconsistent, with the most recent studies casting doubt on that distinctiveness. The absence of consensual diagnostic criteria for burnout and burnout research's insufficient consideration of the heterogeneity of depressive disorders constitute major obstacles to the resolution of the raised issue. In conclusion, the epistemic status of the seminal, field-dominating definition of burnout is questioned. It is suggested that systematic clinical observation should be given a central place in future research on burnout-depression overlap. PMID:25638755

  4. PeerShield: determining control and resilience criticality of collaborative cyber assets in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cam, Hasan

    2012-06-01

    As attackers get more coordinated and advanced in cyber attacks, cyber assets are required to have much more resilience, control effectiveness, and collaboration in networks. Such a requirement makes it essential to take a comprehensive and objective approach for measuring the individual and relative performances of cyber security assets in network nodes. To this end, this paper presents four techniques as to how the relative importance of cyber assets can be measured more comprehensively and objectively by considering together the main variables of risk assessment (e.g., threats, vulnerabilities), multiple attributes (e.g., resilience, control, and influence), network connectivity and controllability among collaborative cyber assets in networks. In the first technique, a Bayesian network is used to include the random variables for control, recovery, and resilience attributes of nodes, in addition to the random variables of threats, vulnerabilities, and risk. The second technique shows how graph matching and coloring can be utilized to form collaborative pairs of nodes to shield together against threats and vulnerabilities. The third technique ranks the security assets of nodes by incorporating multiple weights and thresholds of attributes into a decision-making algorithm. In the fourth technique, the hierarchically well-separated tree is enhanced to first identify critical nodes of a network with respect to their attributes and network connectivity, and then selecting some nodes as driver nodes for network controllability.

  5. Influence of slice overlap on positron emission tomography image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Clare; Gillen, Gerry; Dempsey, Mary Frances; Findlay, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    PET scans use overlapping acquisition beds to correct for reduced sensitivity at bed edges. The optimum overlap size for the General Electric (GE) Discovery 690 has not been established. This study assesses how image quality is affected by slice overlap. Efficacy of 23% overlaps (recommended by GE) and 49% overlaps (maximum possible overlap) were specifically assessed. European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) guidelines for calculating minimum injected activities based on overlap size were also reviewed. A uniform flood phantom was used to assess noise (coefficient of variation, (COV)) and voxel accuracy (activity concentrations, Bq ml-1). A NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) body phantom with hot/cold spheres in a background activity was used to assess contrast recovery coefficients (CRCs) and signal to noise ratios (SNR). Different overlap sizes and sphere-to-background ratios were assessed. COVs for 49% and 23% overlaps were 9% and 13% respectively. This increased noise was difficult to visualise on the 23% overlap images. Mean voxel activity concentrations were not affected by overlap size. No clinically significant differences in CRCs were observed. However, visibility and SNR of small, low contrast spheres (⩽13 mm diameter, 2:1 sphere to background ratio) may be affected by overlap size in low count studies if they are located in the overlap area. There was minimal detectable influence on image quality in terms of noise, mean activity concentrations or mean CRCs when comparing 23% overlap with 49% overlap. Detectability of small, low contrast lesions may be affected in low count studies—however, this is a worst-case scenario. The marginal benefits of increasing overlap from 23% to 49% are likely to be offset by increased patient scan times. A 23% overlap is therefore appropriate for clinical use. An amendment to EANM guidelines for calculating injected activities is also proposed which better reflects the effect overlap size has

  6. Experimental model for determining developmental stage of chicken embryo using infrared images and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seung Kwon "Paul"; Hsieh, Sheng-Jen "Tony"; Chen, Che-Hao

    2013-05-01

    Development of a chicken embryo is conventionally assumed to follow a set growth pattern over the course of 21 days. However, despite identical incubation settings, many factors may contribute to an egg developing at a different rate from those around it. Being able to determine an embryo's actual development instead of relying on chronological assumptions of normal growth should prove to be a useful tool in the poultry industry for responding early to abnormal development and improving hatch rates. Previous studies have used infrared imaging to enhance candling observation, but relatively little has been done to implement infrared imaging in problem-solving. The purpose of this research is to construct a quantitative model for predicting the development stage and early viability of a chicken embryo during incubation. It may be noted that a similar project was conducted previously using different input parameters. This study seeks to improve upon the results from the earlier project. In this project, infrared images of eggs were processed to calculate air cell volumes and cooling rates, and daily measurements of egg weight and ambient temperature were compiled. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were "trained" using multiple input parameters to recognize patterns in the data. Various training functions and topologies were evaluated in order to optimize prediction rates and consistency. The prediction rates obtained for the ANNs were around 81% for development stage and around 92% for viability. It is recommended for future research to expand the potential combinations of input parameters used in order to increase this model's versatility in the field.

  7. Can Network Linkage Effects Determine Return? Evidence from Chinese Stock Market.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Haishu; Xia, Yue; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study used the dynamic conditional correlations (DCC) method to identify the linkage effects of Chinese stock market, and further detected the influence of network linkage effects on magnitude of security returns across different industries. Applying two physics-derived techniques, the minimum spanning tree and the hierarchical tree, we analyzed the stock interdependence within the network of the China Securities Index (CSI) industry index basket. We observed that that obvious linkage effects existed among stock networks. CII and CCE, CAG and ITH as well as COU, CHA and REI were confirmed as the core nodes in the three different networks respectively. We also investigated the stability of linkage effects by estimating the mean correlations and mean distances, as well as the normalized tree length of these indices. In addition, using the GMM model approach, we found inter-node influence within the stock network had a pronounced effect on stock returns. Our results generally suggested that there appeared to be greater clustering effect among the indexes belonging to related industrial sectors than those of diverse sectors, and network comovement was significantly affected by impactive financial events in the reality. Besides, stocks that were more central within the network of stock market usually had higher returns for compensation because they endured greater exposure to correlation risk. PMID:27257816

  8. Can Network Linkage Effects Determine Return? Evidence from Chinese Stock Market

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Haishu; Xia, Yue; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study used the dynamic conditional correlations (DCC) method to identify the linkage effects of Chinese stock market, and further detected the influence of network linkage effects on magnitude of security returns across different industries. Applying two physics-derived techniques, the minimum spanning tree and the hierarchical tree, we analyzed the stock interdependence within the network of the China Securities Index (CSI) industry index basket. We observed that that obvious linkage effects existed among stock networks. CII and CCE, CAG and ITH as well as COU, CHA and REI were confirmed as the core nodes in the three different networks respectively. We also investigated the stability of linkage effects by estimating the mean correlations and mean distances, as well as the normalized tree length of these indices. In addition, using the GMM model approach, we found inter-node influence within the stock network had a pronounced effect on stock returns. Our results generally suggested that there appeared to be greater clustering effect among the indexes belonging to related industrial sectors than those of diverse sectors, and network comovement was significantly affected by impactive financial events in the reality. Besides, stocks that were more central within the network of stock market usually had higher returns for compensation because they endured greater exposure to correlation risk. PMID:27257816

  9. Cenozoic Motion of Greenland - Overlaps and Seaways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawver, L. A.; Norton, I. O.; Gahagan, L.

    2014-12-01

    Using the seafloor magnetic anomalies found in the Labrador Sea, North Atlantic and Eurasian basin to constrain the Cenozoic motion of Greenland, we have produced a new model for the tectonic evolution of the region. The aeromagnetic data collected by the Naval Research Lab [Brozena et al., 2003] in the Eurasian Basin and Canadian data from the Labrador Sea have been re-evaluated using new gridding algorithms and profile modeling using ModMag (Mendel et al., 2005). As a consequence, we have changed the published correlations, mostly prior to Chron C6 [19.05 Ma]. Presently published seafloor magnetic anomalies from the Labrador Sea assume that seafloor spreading ceased at C13 [33.06 Ma] but such an assumption produces an unacceptable overlap of Kronprins Christian Land of northeast Greenland with Svalbard, up to 140 km of overlap in some models. Our new model does not need any "unacceptable" overlap but does produce a slight amount of Eocene compression on Svalbard as is found on land there. Our model allows for an Early Eocene seaway between Ellesmere Island and northwest Greenland that may have connected the Labrador Sea through Baffin Bay and ultimately to the nascent Eurasian Basin, although its depth or even its essential existence is unknowable. During the Miocene, there is no room for a deepwater seaway in Fram Strait until at least the very end of the Early Miocene and perhaps not until Middle Miocene. Brozena, J. and six others, 2003. New aerogeophysical study of the Eurasia Basin and Lomonosov Ridge: Implications for basin development. Geology 31, 825-828. Mendel, V., M. Munschy and D.Sauter, 2005, MODMAG, a MATLAB program to model marine magnetic anomalies, Comp. Geosci., 31, .589-597

  10. Shaft drill bit with overlapping cutter arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, R.A.; Pessier, R.C.

    1981-02-03

    An earth boring drill bit for large diameter shafts has an improved cutter arrangement. The drill bit has a cutter support member with a number of cutters mounted to it for disintegrating the earth formation face. At least one inner cutter is mounted near the center for cutting the center area. A number of gage cutters are mounted at the periphery to cut the gage area of the shaft. A number of intermediate cutters are spaced between the inner and gage cutters. Each intermediate cutter overlaps onehalf of its width with an adjacent intermediate cutter.

  11. Technology initiatives with government/business overlap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Robert H., Jr.

    2015-03-01

    Three important present-day technology development settings involve significant overlap between government and private sectors. The Advanced Research Project Agency for Energy (ARPA-E) supports a wide range of "high risk, high return" projects carried out in academic, non-profit or private business settings. The Materials Genome Initiative (MGI), based in the White House, aims at radical acceleration of the development process for advanced materials. California public utilities such as Pacific Gas & Electric operate under a structure of financial returns and political program mandates that make them arms of public policy as much as independent businesses.

  12. Structure and role of metal clusters in a metal-organic coordination network determined by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svane, K. L.; Linderoth, T. R.; Hammer, B.

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive theoretical investigation of the structures formed by self-assembly of tetrahydroxybenzene (THB)-derivatives on Cu(111). The THB molecule is known to dehydrogenate completely during annealing, forming a reactive radical which assembles into a close-packed structure or a porous metal-coordinated network depending on the coverage of the system. Here, we present details on how the structures are determined by density functional theory calculations, using scanning tunneling microscopy-derived information on the periodicity. The porous network is based on adatom trimers. By analysing the charge distribution of the structure, it is found that this unusual coordination motif is preferred because it simultaneously provides a good coordination of all oxygen atoms and allows for the formation of a two-dimensional network on the surface.

  13. Determinants of Network News Coverage of the Oil Industry during the Late 1970s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erfle, Stephen; McMillan, Henry

    1989-01-01

    Examines which firms and products best predict media coverage of the oil industry. Reports that price variations in testing oil and gasoline correlate with the extent of news coverage provided by network television. (MM)

  14. 77 FR 7229 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Nomads and Networks: The...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... Networks: The Ancient Art and Culture of Kazakhstan,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within... objects at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University, New York, New York,...

  15. D Extention of the Vor Algorithm to Determine and Optimize the Coverage of Geosensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doodman, S.; Afghantoloee, A.; Mostafavi, M. A.; Karimipour, F.

    2014-10-01

    Recent advances in electrical, mechanical and communication systems have led to development of efficient low-cost and multi-function geosensor networks. The efficiency of a geosensor network is significantly based on network coverage, which is the result of network deployment. Several optimization methods have been proposed to enhance the deployment efficiency and hence increase the coverage, but most of them considered the problem in the 2D environment models, which is usually far from the real situation. This paper extends a Voronoi-based deployment algorithm to 3D environment, which takes the 3D features into account. The proposed approach is applied on two case studies whose results are evaluated and discussed.

  16. Determination of the elastic constants of a composite plate using wavelet transforms and neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Cheng, Jianchun; Berthelot, Yves H.

    2002-03-01

    An inverse method based on a combination of the wavelet transform and artificial neural networks is presented. The method is used to recover the elastic constants of a fiber-reinforced composite plate from experimental measurements of ultrasonic Lamb waves generated and detected with lasers. In this method, the elastic constants are not recovered from the dispersion curves but rather directly from the measured waveforms. Transient waveforms obtained by numerical simulations for different elastic constants are used as input to train the neural network. The wavelet transform is used to extract the eigenvectors from the Lamb wave signals to simplify the structure of the neutral network. The eigenvectors are then introduced into a multilayer internally recurrent neural network with a back-propagation algorithm. Finally, experimental waveforms recoded on a titanium-graphite composite plate are used as input to recover the elastic constants of the material.

  17. Branching and capping determine the force-velocity relationships of branching actin networks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel B; Liu, Jian

    2013-02-01

    A branching actin network is the major engine that drives cell motility. A measure of the effectiveness of an engine is the velocity the engine is able to produce at a given resistance-the force-velocity relationship. Concave force-velocity relationships consist of a force-insensitive region, indicative of an adaptive response. In contrast, convex force-velocity relationships would reflect a passive response. Even in in vitro experiments, branching actin networks can exhibit both concave and convex force-velocity curves. However, the exact mechanism that can explain both force-velocity curves is not yet known. We carried out an agent-based stochastic simulation to explore such a mechanism. We discovered an emergent behavior of a branching actin network: Upon resistance, it remodels itself by increasing the number of filaments growing in contact with the load. The remodeling is favored by branching events and limited by capping. The force-velocity relationship hinges on the relative time-scale between the intrinsic kinetics of the branching actin network and the loading. Shortly after encountering resistance (∼seconds), the force-velocity relationship of the actin network is always convex, as it does not have enough time to remodel itself. A concave force-velocity relationship requires network remodeling at longer time-scales (∼tens of seconds to minutes) and the faster branching event relative to capping. Furthermore, our model explains the observed hysteresis in the force-velocity relationship of actin networks. Our model thus establishes a unified mechanism that can account for both convex and concave force-velocity relationships observed in branching actin networks. PMID:23358606

  18. The use of complex network techniques to determine (future) climate transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qingyi; Viebahn, Jan; Dijkstra, Henk A.

    2015-04-01

    In recent years much research activity has focused on the application of complex network techniques to problems in climate variability. This has been particularly successful in climate transition problems, where relatively simple topological properties of reconstructed interaction networks have provided useful early warning indicators of transitions in the ocean circulation and vegetation patterns. In this presentation, a critical evaluation will be given on recent results on such transition problems, with a focus on the collapse of the Atlantic Ocean circulation.

  19. Bacteriophage phiX174: gene A overlaps gene B.

    PubMed Central

    Weisbeek, P J; Borrias, W E; Langeveld, S A; Baas, P D; Van Arkel, G A

    1977-01-01

    The map position of several phiX174 mutations in the genes A and B was determined by marker rescue with DNA fragments produced by the restriction enzymes Hha I, HindII, Hae III, and Alu I. All the gene B mutants were found to be located within gene A. Genetic complementation and analysis of phage-specific protein synthesis show that, under restrictive conditions, nonsense mutants in gene A do not block the synthesis and activity of the B protein and nonsense mutants in gene B do not affect the gene A function. The map position of the COOH-terminal end of gene A was determined using an amber mutant that synthesizes slightly shortened A and A proteins. It is concluded from these experiments that gene A overlaps gene B completely (or almost completely) and that the overlap region can be translated in two ways with different reading frames: one frame for the synthesis of the A and A proteins and another for the synthesis of the B protein. Images PMID:267943

  20. Computational assessment of the influence of the overlap ratio on the power characteristics of a Classical Savonius wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacprzak, Konrad; Sobczak, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    An influence of the overlap on the performance of the Classical Savonius wind turbine was investigated. Unsteady two-dimensional numerical simulations were carried out for a wide range of overlap ratios. For selected configurations computation quality was verified by comparison with three-dimensional simulations and the wind tunnel experimental data available in literature. A satisfactory agreement was achieved. Power characteristics were determined for all the investigated overlap ratios for selected tip speed ratios. Obtained results indicate that the maximum device performance is achieved for the buckets overlap ratio close to 0.

  1. Reducing complexity: An iterative strategy for parameter determination in biological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Sebastian C.; Hernandez-Vargas, Esteban A.; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The dynamics of biological networks are fundamental to a variety of processes in many areas of biology and medicine. Understanding of such networks on a systemic level is facilitated by mathematical models describing these networks. However, since mathematical models of signalling networks commonly aim to describe several highly connected biological quantities and many model parameters cannot be measured directly, quantitative dynamic models often present challenges with respect to model calibration. Here, we propose an iterative fitting routine to decompose the problem of fitting a system of coupled ordinary differential equations describing a signalling network into smaller subproblems. Parameters for each differential equation are estimated separately using a Differential Evolution algorithm while all other dynamic quantities in the model are treated as input to the system. The performance of this algorithm is evaluated on artificial networks with known structure and known model parameters and compared to a conventional optimisation procedure for the same problem. Our analysis indicates that the procedure results in a significantly higher quality of fit and more efficient reconstruction of the true parameters than the conventional algorithm.

  2. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d'Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting. PMID:27256916

  3. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif

    PubMed Central

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d’Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting. PMID:27256916

  4. Molt-breeding overlap alters molt dynamics and behavior in zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata castanotis.

    PubMed

    Echeverry-Galvis, Maria A; Hau, Michaela

    2012-06-01

    Costly events in the life history cycle of organisms such as reproduction, migration and pelage/plumage replacement are typically separated in time to maximize their outcome. Such temporal separation is thought to be necessitated by energetical trade-offs, and mediated through physiological processes. However, certain species, such as tropical birds, are able to overlap two costly life history stages: reproduction and feather replacement. It has remained unclear how both events progress when they co-occur over extended periods of time. Here we determined the consequences and potential costs of such overlap by comparing molt and behavioral patterns in both sexes of captive zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata castanotis) that were solely molting or were overlapping breeding and molt. Individuals overlapping the early stages of breeding with molt showed a roughly 40% decrease in the growth rate of individual feathers compared with birds that were molting but not breeding. Further, individuals that overlapped breeding and molt tended to molt fewer feathers simultaneously and exhibited longer intervals between shedding consecutive feathers on the tail or the same wing as well as delays in shedding corresponding flight feathers on opposite sides. Overlapping individuals also altered their time budgets: they devoted more than twice the time to feeding while halving the time spent for feather care in comparison to molt-only individuals. These data provide experimental support for the previously untested hypothesis that when molt and reproduction overlap in time, feather replacement will occur at a slower and less intense rate. There were no sex differences in any of the variables assessed, except for a tendency in females to decline body condition more strongly over time during the overlap than males. Our data indicate the existence of major consequences of overlapping breeding and molt, manifested in changes in both molt dynamics and time budgets of both sexes. It is

  5. The carbon assimilation network in Escherichia coli is densely connected and largely sign-determined by directions of metabolic fluxes.

    PubMed

    Baldazzi, Valentina; Ropers, Delphine; Markowicz, Yves; Kahn, Daniel; Geiselmann, Johannes; de Jong, Hidde

    2010-06-01

    Gene regulatory networks consist of direct interactions but also include indirect interactions mediated by metabolites and signaling molecules. We describe how these indirect interactions can be derived from a model of the underlying biochemical reaction network, using weak time-scale assumptions in combination with sensitivity criteria from metabolic control analysis. We apply this approach to a model of the carbon assimilation network in Escherichia coli. Our results show that the derived gene regulatory network is densely connected, contrary to what is usually assumed. Moreover, the network is largely sign-determined, meaning that the signs of the indirect interactions are fixed by the flux directions of biochemical reactions, independently of specific parameter values and rate laws. An inversion of the fluxes following a change in growth conditions may affect the signs of the indirect interactions though. This leads to a feedback structure that is at the same time robust to changes in the kinetic properties of enzymes and that has the flexibility to accommodate radical changes in the environment. PMID:20548959

  6. Improvement of overlapping nuclear track densitometry.

    PubMed

    Ghergherehchi, M; Kim, S Y; Afarideh, H; Kim, Y S; Chai, J S

    2015-03-01

    Detection of tracks produced by α particles, protons or nuclear fission fragments in plastic detectors, viz., solid-state nuclear track detectors, constitutes a very important tool in various areas. It is not easy for humans to count CR-39 nuclear tracks manually, especially when the track density is very high. An automated computer program called KTTMS2, written in C++ and running with a user friendly interface, has been developed for recognition and parametric measurements of etched tracks in images captured from the surface of solid-state nuclear track detectors. Well-known edge detection methods were applied to estimate the precision and accuracy of nuclear track densitometry using the CR-39 detector. Among the various routine edge detection methods, the Canny method was chosen because it was the most accurate technique. Because accuracy becomes more important as the track density increases, this allows more overlapping tracks to be detected. KTTMS2 (the proposed system) has an efficiency of 95% and can identify the noise as a background track (5%). Experimental results showed that the error percentage was reduced from 7.63% to 3.23% for high-density tracks when the count was adjusted by the estimated overlapping tracks. PMID:25581623

  7. Earthquake location determination using data from DOMERAPI and BMKG seismic networks: A preliminary result of DOMERAPI project

    SciTech Connect

    Ramdhan, Mohamad; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Widiyantoro, Sri; Métaxian, Jean-Philippe; Valencia, Ayunda Aulia

    2015-04-24

    DOMERAPI project has been conducted to comprehensively study the internal structure of Merapi volcano, especially about deep structural features beneath the volcano. DOMERAPI earthquake monitoring network consists of 46 broad-band seismometers installed around the Merapi volcano. Earthquake hypocenter determination is a very important step for further studies, such as hypocenter relocation and seismic tomographic imaging. Ray paths from earthquake events occurring outside the Merapi region can be utilized to delineate the deep magma structure. Earthquakes occurring outside the DOMERAPI seismic network will produce an azimuthal gap greater than 180{sup 0}. Owing to this situation the stations from BMKG seismic network can be used jointly to minimize the azimuthal gap. We identified earthquake events manually and carefully, and then picked arrival times of P and S waves. The data from the DOMERAPI seismic network were combined with the BMKG data catalogue to determine earthquake events outside the Merapi region. For future work, we will also use the BPPTKG (Center for Research and Development of Geological Disaster Technology) data catalogue in order to study shallow structures beneath the Merapi volcano. The application of all data catalogues will provide good information as input for further advanced studies and volcano hazards mitigation.

  8. Separation and sequence detection of overlapped fingerprints: experiments and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärgel, Rainer; Giebel, Sascha; Leich, Marcus; Dittmann, Jana

    2011-11-01

    Latent fingerprints provide vital information in modern crime scene investigation. On frequently touched surfaces the fingerprints may overlap which poses a major problem for forensic analysis. In order to make such overlapping fingerprints available for analysis, they have to be separated. An additional evaluation of the sequence in which the fingerprints were brought onto the surface can help to reconstruct the progression of events. Advances in both tasks can considerably aid crime investigation agencies and are the subject of this work. Here, a statistical approach, initially devised for the separation of overlapping text patterns by Tonazzini et al.,1 is employed to separate overlapping fingerprints. The method involves a maximum a posteriori estimation of the single fingerprints and the mixing coefficients, computed by an expectation-maximization algorithm. A fingerprint age determination feature based on corrosion is evaluated for sequence estimation. The approaches are evaluated using 30 samples of overlapping latent fingerprints on two different substrates. The fingerprint images are acquired with a non-destructive chromatic white light surface measurement device, each sample containing exactly two fingerprints that overlap in the center of the image. Since forensic investigations rely on manual assessment of acquired fingerprints by forensics experts, a subjective scale ranging from 0 to 8 is used to rate the separation results. Our results indicate that the chosen method can separate overlapped fingerprints which exhibit strong differences in contrast, since results gradually improve with the growing contrast difference of the overlapping fingerprints. Investigating the effects of corrosion leads to a reliable determination of the fingerprints' sequence as the timespan between their leaving increases.

  9. Phonological and Orthographic Overlap Effects in Fast and Masked Priming

    PubMed Central

    Frisson, Steven; Bélanger, Nathalie N.; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how orthographic and phonological information is activated during reading, using a fast priming task, and during single word recognition, using masked priming. Specifically, different types of overlap between prime and target were contrasted: high orthographic and high phonological overlap (track-crack), high orthographic and low phonological overlap (bear-gear), or low orthographic and high phonological overlap (fruit-chute). In addition, we examined whether (orthographic) beginning overlap (swoop-swoon) yielded the same priming pattern as end (rhyme) overlap (track-crack). Prime durations were 32 and 50ms in the fast priming version, and 50ms in the masked priming version, and mode of presentation (prime and target in lower case) was identical. The fast priming experiment showed facilitatory priming effects when both orthography and phonology overlapped, with no apparent differences between beginning and end overlap pairs. Facilitation was also found when prime and target only overlapped orthographically. In contrast, the masked priming experiment showed inhibition for both types of end overlap pairs (with and without phonological overlap), and no difference for begin overlap items. When prime and target only shared principally phonological information, facilitation was only found with a long prime duration in the fast priming experiment, while no differences were found in the masked priming version. These contrasting results suggest that fast priming and masked priming do not necessarily tap into the same type of processing. PMID:24365065

  10. Phonological and orthographic overlap effects in fast and masked priming.

    PubMed

    Frisson, Steven; Bélanger, Nathalie N; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how orthographic and phonological information is activated during reading, using a fast priming task, and during single-word recognition, using masked priming. Specifically, different types of overlap between prime and target were contrasted: high orthographic and high phonological overlap (track-crack), high orthographic and low phonological overlap (bear-gear), or low orthographic and high phonological overlap (fruit-chute). In addition, we examined whether (orthographic) beginning overlap (swoop-swoon) yielded the same priming pattern as end (rhyme) overlap (track-crack). Prime durations were 32 and 50 ms in the fast priming version and 50 ms in the masked priming version, and mode of presentation (prime and target in lower case) was identical. The fast priming experiment showed facilitatory priming effects when both orthography and phonology overlapped, with no apparent differences between beginning and end overlap pairs. Facilitation was also found when prime and target only overlapped orthographically. In contrast, the masked priming experiment showed inhibition for both types of end overlap pairs (with and without phonological overlap) and no difference for begin overlap items. When prime and target only shared principally phonological information, facilitation was only found with a long prime duration in the fast priming experiment, while no differences were found in the masked priming version. These contrasting results suggest that fast priming and masked priming do not necessarily tap into the same type of processing. PMID:24365065

  11. Online Monitoring And Determination Of Environmental Dose Rate, Using Radiological Network In Albania

    SciTech Connect

    Telhaj, Ervis; Deda, Antoneta

    2010-01-21

    From May 2004, in the Institute of Nuclear Physics is installed Albanian Radiological Monitoring Network, in the framework of emergency monitoring in the territory of Albania. In this network, this is unique monitoring on-line system in our country. are included 5(five) monitoring stations, respectively in Tirane, Shkoder, Kukes, Korce and Vlore. The last four stations are near Albanian borders The network performs measures of ambient dose rate in a range from 5 nSv/h up to 10 Sv/h. For measurements are used detector of type VACUTEC 70045 A, which are calibrated in the Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, University of Tirana, using standard radiation source Cs-137. This monitoring help to warn in real time the relative authorities, in case of radiological accidents of 5th degree (for example accidents in nuclear power plants, near Albanian territory).

  12. Determinants and consequences of sexual networks as they affect the spread of sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Irene A; Padian, Nancy S; Marlow, Cameron; Aral, Sevgi O

    2005-02-01

    Because pathogens spread only within the unique context of a sexual union between people when one person is infectious, the other is susceptible to new infection, and condoms are not used to prevent transmission, the epidemiological study of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is particularly challenging. Social network analysis entails the study of ties among people and how the structure and quality of such ties affect individuals and overall group dynamics. Although ascertaining complete sexual networks is difficult, application of this approach has provided unique insights into the spread of STIs that traditional individual-based epidemiological methods do not capture. This article provides a brief background on the design and assessments of studies of social networks, to illustrate how these methods have been applied to understanding the distribution of STIs, to inform the development of interventions for STI control. PMID:15627230

  13. Time-quefrency analysis of overlapping similar microseismic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Koji

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, I describe a new technique to determine the interval between P-waves in similar, overlapping microseismic events. The similar microseismic events that occur with overlapping waveforms are called `proximate microseismic doublets' herein. Proximate microseismic doublets had been discarded in previous studies because we had not noticed their usefulness. Analysis of similar events can show relative locations of sources between them. Analysis of proximate microseismic doublets can provide more precise relative source locations because variation in the velocity structure has little influence on their relative travel times. It is necessary to measure the interval between the P-waves in the proximate microseismic doublets to determine their relative source locations. A `proximate microseismic doublet' is a pair of microseismic events in which the second event arrives before the attenuation of the first event. Cepstrum analysis can provide the interval even though the second event overlaps the first event. However, a cepstrum of a proximate microseismic doublet generally has two peaks, one representing the interval between the arrivals of the two P-waves, and the other representing the interval between the arrivals of the two S-waves. It is therefore difficult to determine the peak that represents the P-wave interval from the cepstrum alone. I used window functions in cepstrum analysis to isolate the first and second P-waves and to suppress the second S-wave. I change the length of the window function and calculate the cepstrum for each window length. The result is represented in a three-dimensional contour plot of length-quefrency-cepstrum data. The contour plot allows me to identify the cepstrum peak that represents the P-wave interval. The precise quefrency can be determined from a two-dimensional quefrency-cepstrum graph, provided that the length of the window is appropriately chosen. I have used both synthetic and field data to demonstrate that this

  14. A Review of Journal Coverage Overlap with an Extension to the Definition of Overlap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Myke

    1990-01-01

    Examines the definition of journal coverage overlap in abstracting and indexing services during the past 30 years of research and expands the definition using a matrix of dissimilarity values. Multidimensional scaling analysis is applied to graphically demonstrate this definition and a naive secondary tool selection algorithm is presented. (43…

  15. Grid adaptation using chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite overlapping meshes in regions of large gradient to accurately capture the salient features during computation. The chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using trilinear interpolation. Application to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well-resolved.

  16. Grid adaptation using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  17. Parkinsonism and frontotemporal dementia: the clinical overlap.

    PubMed

    Espay, Alberto J; Litvan, Irene

    2011-11-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is commonly associated with parkinsonism in several sporadic (i.e., progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration) and familial neurodegenerative disorders (i.e., frontotemporal dementia associated with parkinsonism and MAPT or progranulin mutations in chromosome 17). The clinical diagnosis of these disorders may be challenging in view of overlapping clinical features, particularly in speech, language, and behavior. The motor and cognitive phenotypes can be viewed within a spectrum of clinical, pathologic, and genetic disorders with no discrete clinicopathologic correlations but rather lying within a dementia-parkinsonism continuum. Neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis can be helpful, but the poor specificity of clinical and imaging features has enormously challenged the development of biological markers that could differentiate these disorders premortem. This gap is critical to bridge in order to allow testing of novel biological therapies that may slow the progression of these proteinopathies. PMID:21892619

  18. Recombining overlapping BACs into single large BACs.

    PubMed

    Kotzamanis, George; Kotsinas, Athanassios

    2015-01-01

    BAC clones containing the entire genomic region of a gene including the long-range regulatory elements are very useful for gene functional analysis. However, large genes often span more than the insert of a BAC clone, and single BACs covering the entire region of interest are not available. Here, we describe a general system for linking two or more overlapping BACs into a single clone. Two rounds of homologous recombination are used. In the first, the BAC inserts are subcloned into the pBACLink vectors. In the second, the two BACs are combined together. Multiple BACs in a contig can be combined by alternating use of the pBACLInk vectors, resulting in several BAC clones containing as much of the genomic region of a gene as required. Such BACs can then be used in gene expression studies and/or gene therapy applications. PMID:25239744

  19. Overlapped Fourier coding for optical aberration removal

    PubMed Central

    Horstmeyer, Roarke; Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Zheng, Guoan; Yang, Changhuei

    2014-01-01

    We present an imaging procedure that simultaneously optimizes a camera’s resolution and retrieves a sample’s phase over a sequence of snapshots. The technique, termed overlapped Fourier coding (OFC), first digitally pans a small aperture across a camera’s pupil plane with a spatial light modulator. At each aperture location, a unique image is acquired. The OFC algorithm then fuses these low-resolution images into a full-resolution estimate of the complex optical field incident upon the detector. Simultaneously, the algorithm utilizes redundancies within the acquired dataset to computationally estimate and remove unknown optical aberrations and system misalignments via simulated annealing. The result is an imaging system that can computationally overcome its optical imperfections to offer enhanced resolution, at the expense of taking multiple snapshots over time. PMID:25321982

  20. Grid adaption using Chimera composite overlapping meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to perform grid adaptation using composite over-lapping meshes in regions of large gradient to capture the salient features accurately during computation. The Chimera grid scheme, a multiple overset mesh technique, is used in combination with a Navier-Stokes solver. The numerical solution is first converged to a steady state based on an initial coarse mesh. Solution-adaptive enhancement is then performed by using a secondary fine grid system which oversets on top of the base grid in the high-gradient region, but without requiring the mesh boundaries to join in any special way. Communications through boundary interfaces between those separated grids are carried out using tri-linear interpolation. Applications to the Euler equations for shock reflections and to a shock wave/boundary layer interaction problem are tested. With the present method, the salient features are well resolved.

  1. Plasticity of gene-regulatory networks controlling sex determination: of masters, slaves, usual suspects, newcomers, and usurpators.

    PubMed

    Herpin, Amaury; Schartl, Manfred

    2015-10-01

    Sexual dimorphism is one of the most pervasive and diverse features of animal morphology, physiology, and behavior. Despite the generality of the phenomenon itself, the mechanisms controlling how sex is determined differ considerably among various organismic groups, have evolved repeatedly and independently, and the underlying molecular pathways can change quickly during evolution. Even within closely related groups of organisms for which the development of gonads on the morphological, histological, and cell biological level is undistinguishable, the molecular control and the regulation of the factors involved in sex determination and gonad differentiation can be substantially different. The biological meaning of the high molecular plasticity of an otherwise common developmental program is unknown. While comparative studies suggest that the downstream effectors of sex-determining pathways tend to be more stable than the triggering mechanisms at the top, it is still unclear how conserved the downstream networks are and how all components work together. After many years of stasis, when the molecular basis of sex determination was amenable only in the few classical model organisms (fly, worm, mouse), recently, sex-determining genes from several animal species have been identified and new studies have elucidated some novel regulatory interactions and biological functions of the downstream network, particularly in vertebrates. These data have considerably changed our classical perception of a simple linear developmental cascade that makes the decision for the embryo to develop as male or female, and how it evolves. PMID:26358957

  2. Autoimmune thrombocytopenia (AITP) and thyroid autoimmune disease (TAD): overlapping syndromes?

    PubMed Central

    Cordiano, I; Betterle, C; Spadaccino, C A; Soini, B; Girolami, A; Fabris, F

    1998-01-01

    The pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia associated with TAD and the occurrence of overlapping traits between TAD and AITP are still a matter of debate. For this reason, we investigated for the presence and specificity of platelet and thyroid autoantibodies in 18 TAD patients with thrombocytopenia, 19 TAD patients without thrombocytopenia and in 22 patients with primary AITP without clinical signs of TAD. Platelet-associated IgG and/or specific circulating platelet autoantibodies were detected in 83% of patients with TAD and thrombocytopenia, in 10% of patients with TAD without thrombocytopenia and in 86% of patients with primary AITP. The reactivity of serum autoantibodies, assayed by MoAb immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA), was directed against platelet glycoproteins Ib and/or IIb/IIIa in 50% of the patients with TAD and thrombocytopenia, as in 46% of the patients with primary AITP. Thyroid autoantibodies were found in 89% of patients with TAD and thrombocytopenia, in 95% of patients with TAD without thrombocytopenia, and in 18% of patients with primary AITP. Thyrotropin (TSH) levels determined in three of four AITP patients with thyroid autoantibodies revealed a subclinical hyperthyroidism in one patient. The present study supports the autoimmune aetiology of thrombocytopenia associated with TAD, since the prevalence and specificity of platelet autoantibodies are similar in TAD and primary AITP. The results indicate also that there exists an overlap between thyroid and platelet autoimmunity with or without clinical manifestations. PMID:9737665

  3. Trophic overlap between native and invasive stream crayfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magoulick, Daniel D.; Piercey, Glenn L.

    2016-01-01

    We examined trophic dynamics of a stream food web where invasive Orconectes neglectusappear to be displacing native O. eupunctus in the Spring River drainage of the Ozark Highlands, Missouri and Arkansas, USA. We collected crayfish species and possible food sources seasonally from a site of sympatry on the South Fork Spring River. We determined diet overlap and potential for competition between O. eupunctus and O. neglectus, and investigated seasonal variation using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses and gut content analyses. Gut content analysis showed both species of crayfish consumed mainly detritus during summer and spring, with other prey categories varying by species and season. Stable isotope analysis showed that O. eupunctus and O. neglectus relied on invertebrates as a major energy and nutrient source throughout summer, autumn, and spring, and the two species showed differences in their stable isotope signatures during spring and summer, but not autumn. Given the trophic overlap between O. eupunctus and O. neglectus, there is a potential for the two species to compete for food and to be ecologically redundant. Ecological redundancy can lead to reduced effects on ecosystem function post-invasion, and therefore examining ecological redundancy of potential invaders should be a conservation priority.

  4. Home range overlap as a driver of intelligence in primates.

    PubMed

    Grueter, Cyril C

    2015-04-01

    Various socioecological factors have been suggested to influence cognitive capacity in primates, including challenges associated with foraging and dealing with the complexities of social life. Alexander [Alexander, 1989]. Evolution of the human psyche. In: Mellars P, Stringer C, editors. The human revolution: Behavioural and biological perspectives on the origins of modern humans. Princeton: Princeton University Press. p 455-513] proposed an integrative model for the evolution of human cognitive abilities and complex sociality that incorporates competition among coalitions of conspecifics (inter-group conflict) as a major selective pressure. However, one of the premises of this model, i.e., that when confronted with inter-group conflict selection should favor enhanced cognition, has remained empirically untested. Using a comparative approach on species data, I aimed to test the prediction that primate species (n = 104) that face greater inter-group conflict have higher cognitive abilities (indexed by endocranial volume). The degree of inter-group conflict/complexity was approximated via the variable home range overlap among groups. I found a significant relationship between home range overlap and endocranial volume, even after controlling for other predictor variables and covariates such as group size and body mass. I conclude that brain size evolution cannot be attributed exclusively to social factors such as group size, but likely reflects a variety of social and ecological determinants including inter-group conflict which poses cognitive demands on monitoring both the wider social milieu as well as spatial attributes of the habitat. PMID:25412994

  5. On the Connectivity, Lifetime and Hop Count of Routes Determined Using the City Section and Manhattan Mobility Models for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghanathan, Natarajan

    The high-level contribution of this paper is a simulation based analysis of the network connectivity, hop count and lifetime of the routes determined for vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) using the City Section and Manhattan mobility models. The Random Waypoint mobility model is used as a benchmark in the simulation studies. Two kinds of paths are determined on the sequence of static graphs representing the topology over the duration of the network session: paths with the minimum hop count (using the Dijkstra algorithm) and stable paths with the longest lifetime (using our recently proposed OptPathTrans algorithm). Simulation results indicate that the City Section model provided higher network connectivity compared to the Manhattan model for all the network scenarios. Minimum hop paths and stable paths determined under the Manhattan model have a smaller lifetime and larger hop count compared to those determined using the City Section and Random Waypoint mobility models.

  6. Determining Associations between Human Diseases and non-coding RNAs with Critical Roles in Network Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagami, Haruna; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Maegawa, Shingo; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Nacher, Jose C.

    2015-10-01

    Deciphering the association between life molecules and human diseases is currently an important task in systems biology. Research over the past decade has unveiled that the human genome is almost entirely transcribed, producing a vast number of non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) with potential regulatory functions. More recent findings suggest that many diseases may not be exclusively linked to mutations in protein-coding genes. The combination of these arguments poses the question of whether ncRNAs that play a critical role in network control are also enriched with disease-associated ncRNAs. To address this question, we mapped the available annotated information of more than 350 human disorders to the largest collection of human ncRNA-protein interactions, which define a bipartite network of almost 93,000 interactions. Using a novel algorithmic-based controllability framework applied to the constructed bipartite network, we found that ncRNAs engaged in critical network control are also statistically linked to human disorders (P-value of P = 9.8 × 10-109). Taken together, these findings suggest that the addition of those genes that encode optimized subsets of ncRNAs engaged in critical control within the pool of candidate genes could aid disease gene prioritization studies.

  7. Determining Associations between Human Diseases and non-coding RNAs with Critical Roles in Network Control.

    PubMed

    Kagami, Haruna; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Maegawa, Shingo; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Nacher, Jose C

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering the association between life molecules and human diseases is currently an important task in systems biology. Research over the past decade has unveiled that the human genome is almost entirely transcribed, producing a vast number of non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) with potential regulatory functions. More recent findings suggest that many diseases may not be exclusively linked to mutations in protein-coding genes. The combination of these arguments poses the question of whether ncRNAs that play a critical role in network control are also enriched with disease-associated ncRNAs. To address this question, we mapped the available annotated information of more than 350 human disorders to the largest collection of human ncRNA-protein interactions, which define a bipartite network of almost 93,000 interactions. Using a novel algorithmic-based controllability framework applied to the constructed bipartite network, we found that ncRNAs engaged in critical network control are also statistically linked to human disorders (P-value of P = 9.8 × 10(-109)). Taken together, these findings suggest that the addition of those genes that encode optimized subsets of ncRNAs engaged in critical control within the pool of candidate genes could aid disease gene prioritization studies. PMID:26459019

  8. Determine the optimal carrier selection for a logistics network based on multi-commodity reliability criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Kuei; Yeh, Cheng-Ta

    2013-05-01

    From the perspective of supply chain management, the selected carrier plays an important role in freight delivery. This article proposes a new criterion of multi-commodity reliability and optimises the carrier selection based on such a criterion for logistics networks with routes and nodes, over which multiple commodities are delivered. Carrier selection concerns the selection of exactly one carrier to deliver freight on each route. The capacity of each carrier has several available values associated with a probability distribution, since some of a carrier's capacity may be reserved for various orders. Therefore, the logistics network, given any carrier selection, is a multi-commodity multi-state logistics network. Multi-commodity reliability is defined as a probability that the logistics network can satisfy a customer's demand for various commodities, and is a performance indicator for freight delivery. To solve this problem, this study proposes an optimisation algorithm that integrates genetic algorithm, minimal paths and Recursive Sum of Disjoint Products. A practical example in which multi-sized LCD monitors are delivered from China to Germany is considered to illustrate the solution procedure.

  9. Contribution of Network Connectivity in Determining the Relationship between Gene Expression and Metabolite Concentration Changes

    PubMed Central

    Zelezniak, Aleksej; Sheridan, Steven; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary mechanisms through which a cell exerts control over its metabolic state is by modulating expression levels of its enzyme-coding genes. However, the changes at the level of enzyme expression allow only indirect control over metabolite levels, for two main reasons. First, at the level of individual reactions, metabolite levels are non-linearly dependent on enzyme abundances as per the reaction kinetics mechanisms. Secondly, specific metabolite pools are tightly interlinked with the rest of the metabolic network through their production and consumption reactions. While the role of reaction kinetics in metabolite concentration control is well studied at the level of individual reactions, the contribution of network connectivity has remained relatively unclear. Here we report a modeling framework that integrates both reaction kinetics and network connectivity constraints for describing the interplay between metabolite concentrations and mRNA levels. We used this framework to investigate correlations between the gene expression and the metabolite concentration changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during its metabolic cycle, as well as in response to three fundamentally different biological perturbations, namely gene knockout, nutrient shock and nutrient change. While the kinetic constraints applied at the level of individual reactions were found to be poor descriptors of the mRNA-metabolite relationship, their use in the context of the network enabled us to correlate changes in the expression of enzyme-coding genes to the alterations in metabolite levels. Our results highlight the key contribution of metabolic network connectivity in mediating cellular control over metabolite levels, and have implications towards bridging the gap between genotype and metabolic phenotype. PMID:24762675

  10. Earthquake locations determined by the Southern Alaska seismograph network for October 1971 through May 1989

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogleman, Kent A.; Lahr, John C.; Stephens, Christopher D.; Page, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the instrumentation and evolution of the U.S. Geological Survey's regional seismograph network in southern Alaska, provides phase and hypocenter data for seismic events from October 1971 through May 1989, reviews the location methods used, and discusses the completeness of the catalog and the accuracy of the computed hypocenters. Included are arrival time data for explosions detonated under the Trans-Alaska Crustal Transect (TACT) in 1984 and 1985. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operated a regional network of seismographs in southern Alaska from 1971 to the mid 1990s. The principal purpose of this network was to record seismic data to be used to precisely locate earthquakes in the seismic zones of southern Alaska, delineate seismically active faults, assess seismic risks, document potential premonitory earthquake phenomena, investigate current tectonic deformation, and study the structure and physical properties of the crust and upper mantle. A task fundamental to all of these goals was the routine cataloging of parameters for earthquakes located within and adjacent to the seismograph network. The initial network of 10 stations, 7 around Cook Inlet and 3 near Valdez, was installed in 1971. In subsequent summers additions or modifications to the network were made. By the fall of 1973, 26 stations extended from western Cook Inlet to eastern Prince William Sound, and 4 stations were located to the east between Cordova and Yakutat. A year later 20 additional stations were installed. Thirteen of these were placed along the eastern Gulf of Alaska with support from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program to investigate the seismicity of the outer continental shelf, a region of interest for oil exploration. Since then the region covered by the network remained relatively fixed while efforts were made to make the stations more reliable through improved electronic

  11. The clinical and genetic features of COPD-asthma overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Megan; Cho, Michael; McDonald, Merry-Lynn; Beaty, Terri; Ramsdell, Joe; Bhatt, Surya; van Beek, Edwin J R; Make, Barry J; Crapo, James D; Silverman, Edwin K; Hersh, Craig P

    2014-08-01

    Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma are an important but poorly characterised group. The genetic determinants of COPD and asthma overlap have not been studied. The aim of this study was to identify clinical features and genetic risk factors for COPD and asthma overlap. Subjects were current or former smoking non-Hispanic whites or African-Americans with COPD. Overlap subjects reported a history of physician-diagnosed asthma before the age of 40 years. We compared clinical and radiographic features between COPD and overlap subjects. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in the non-Hispanic whites and African-American populations, and combined these results in a meta-analysis. More females and African-Americans reported a history of asthma. Overlap subjects had more severe and more frequent respiratory exacerbations, less emphysema and greater airway wall thickness compared to subjects with COPD alone. The non-Hispanic white GWAS identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes CSMD1 (rs11779254, p=1.57 × 10(-6)) and SOX5 (rs59569785, p=1.61 × 10(-6)) and the meta-analysis identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene GPR65 (rs6574978, p=1.18 × 10(-7)) associated with COPD and asthma overlap. Overlap subjects have more exacerbations, less emphysema and more airway disease for any degree of lung function impairment compared to COPD alone. We identified novel genetic variants associated with this syndrome. COPD and asthma overlap is an important syndrome and may require distinct clinical management. PMID:24876173

  12. Speech networks at rest and in action: interactions between functional brain networks controlling speech production

    PubMed Central

    Fuertinger, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Speech production is one of the most complex human behaviors. Although brain activation during speaking has been well investigated, our understanding of interactions between the brain regions and neural networks remains scarce. We combined seed-based interregional correlation analysis with graph theoretical analysis of functional MRI data during the resting state and sentence production in healthy subjects to investigate the interface and topology of functional networks originating from the key brain regions controlling speech, i.e., the laryngeal/orofacial motor cortex, inferior frontal and superior temporal gyri, supplementary motor area, cingulate cortex, putamen, and thalamus. During both resting and speaking, the interactions between these networks were bilaterally distributed and centered on the sensorimotor brain regions. However, speech production preferentially recruited the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and cerebellum into the large-scale network, suggesting the importance of these regions in facilitation of the transition from the resting state to speaking. Furthermore, the cerebellum (lobule VI) was the most prominent region showing functional influences on speech-network integration and segregation. Although networks were bilaterally distributed, interregional connectivity during speaking was stronger in the left vs. right hemisphere, which may have underlined a more homogeneous overlap between the examined networks in the left hemisphere. Among these, the laryngeal motor cortex (LMC) established a core network that fully overlapped with all other speech-related networks, determining the extent of network interactions. Our data demonstrate complex interactions of large-scale brain networks controlling speech production and point to the critical role of the LMC, IPL, and cerebellum in the formation of speech production network. PMID:25673742

  13. Speech networks at rest and in action: interactions between functional brain networks controlling speech production.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, Kristina; Fuertinger, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Speech production is one of the most complex human behaviors. Although brain activation during speaking has been well investigated, our understanding of interactions between the brain regions and neural networks remains scarce. We combined seed-based interregional correlation analysis with graph theoretical analysis of functional MRI data during the resting state and sentence production in healthy subjects to investigate the interface and topology of functional networks originating from the key brain regions controlling speech, i.e., the laryngeal/orofacial motor cortex, inferior frontal and superior temporal gyri, supplementary motor area, cingulate cortex, putamen, and thalamus. During both resting and speaking, the interactions between these networks were bilaterally distributed and centered on the sensorimotor brain regions. However, speech production preferentially recruited the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and cerebellum into the large-scale network, suggesting the importance of these regions in facilitation of the transition from the resting state to speaking. Furthermore, the cerebellum (lobule VI) was the most prominent region showing functional influences on speech-network integration and segregation. Although networks were bilaterally distributed, interregional connectivity during speaking was stronger in the left vs. right hemisphere, which may have underlined a more homogeneous overlap between the examined networks in the left hemisphere. Among these, the laryngeal motor cortex (LMC) established a core network that fully overlapped with all other speech-related networks, determining the extent of network interactions. Our data demonstrate complex interactions of large-scale brain networks controlling speech production and point to the critical role of the LMC, IPL, and cerebellum in the formation of speech production network. PMID:25673742

  14. Local Tissue Geometry Determines Contractile Force Generation of Engineered Muscle Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Weining; Juhas, Mark; Pfeiler, Terry W.

    2012-01-01

    The field of skeletal muscle tissue engineering is currently hampered by the lack of methods to form large muscle constructs composed of dense, aligned, and mature myofibers and limited understanding of structure-function relationships in developing muscle tissues. In our previous studies, engineered muscle sheets with elliptical pores (“muscle networks”) were fabricated by casting cells and fibrin gel inside elastomeric tissue molds with staggered hexagonal posts. In these networks, alignment of cells around the elliptical pores followed the local distribution of tissue strains that were generated by cell-mediated compaction of fibrin gel against the hexagonal posts. The goal of this study was to assess how systematic variations in pore elongation affect the morphology and contractile function of muscle networks. We found that in muscle networks with more elongated pores the force production of individual myofibers was not altered, but the myofiber alignment and efficiency of myofiber formation were significantly increased yielding an increase in the total contractile force despite a decrease in the total tissue volume. Beyond a certain pore length, increase in generated contractile force was mainly contributed by more efficient myofiber formation rather than enhanced myofiber alignment. Collectively, these studies show that changes in local tissue geometry can exert both direct structural and indirect myogenic effects on the functional output of engineered muscle. Different hydrogel formulations and pore geometries will be explored in the future to further augment contractile function of engineered muscle networks and promote their use for basic structure-function studies in vitro and, eventually, for efficient muscle repair in vivo. PMID:22115339

  15. Interplay of retinal determination gene network with TGF-β signaling pathway in epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Kong, Deguang; Wu, Hua; Yuan, Xun; Xu, Hanxiao; Zhang, Cuntai; Wu, Gaosong; Wu, Kongming

    2015-01-01

    As a fundamental event in the generation of tissues and organs during embryogenesis, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has also been implicated in cancer progression by its ability to alter the plasticity of epithelial cells to acquire invasive properties. Evidence is mounting that ectopic activation of transforming growth factors β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) superfamily members to enhance tumorigenesis and metastasis. In this respect, the Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN), which was identified to govern the normal initiation of the morphogenetic furrow in Drosophila, has now been found to be de-regulated in various types of cancers, and the key members of this network, DACH, SIX, and EYA, have emerged as novel co-regulators of TGF- signaling during EMT. Understanding the molecular mechanism by which RDGN regulates TGF-β/BMP signaling to influence EMT may lead to novel strategies for targeted therapies. PMID:27358880

  16. Interplay of retinal determination gene network with TGF-β signaling pathway in epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Kong, Deguang; Wu, Hua; Yuan, Xun; Xu, Hanxiao; Zhang, Cuntai; Wu, Gaosong

    2015-01-01

    As a fundamental event in the generation of tissues and organs during embryogenesis, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has also been implicated in cancer progression by its ability to alter the plasticity of epithelial cells to acquire invasive properties. Evidence is mounting that ectopic activation of transforming growth factors β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) superfamily members to enhance tumorigenesis and metastasis. In this respect, the Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN), which was identified to govern the normal initiation of the morphogenetic furrow in Drosophila, has now been found to be de-regulated in various types of cancers, and the key members of this network, DACH, SIX, and EYA, have emerged as novel co-regulators of TGF- signaling during EMT. Understanding the molecular mechanism by which RDGN regulates TGF-β/BMP signaling to influence EMT may lead to novel strategies for targeted therapies. PMID:27358880

  17. Depression-Burnout Overlap in Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Wurm, Walter; Vogel, Katrin; Holl, Anna; Ebner, Christoph; Bayer, Dietmar; Mörkl, Sabrina; Szilagyi, Istvan-Szilard; Hotter, Erich; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Hofmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether burnout is a distinct phenomenon rather than a type of depression and whether it is a syndrome, limited to three “core” components (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment) are subjects of current debate. We investigated the depression-burnout overlap, and the pertinence of these three components in a large, representative sample of physicians. Methods In a cross-sectional study, all Austrian physicians were invited to answer a questionnaire that included the Major Depression Inventory (MDI), the Hamburg Burnout Inventory (HBI), as well as demographic and job-related parameters. Of the 40093 physicians who received an invitation, a total of 6351 (15.8%) participated. The data of 5897 participants were suitable for analysis. Results Of the participants, 10.3% were affected by major depression. Our study results suggest that potentially 50.7% of the participants were affected by symptoms of burnout. Compared to physicians unaffected by burnout, the odds ratio of suffering from major depression was 2.99 (95% CI 2.21–4.06) for physicians with mild, 10.14 (95% CI 7.58–13.59) for physicians with moderate, 46.84 (95% CI 35.25–62.24) for physicians with severe burnout and 92.78 (95% CI 62.96–136.74) for the 3% of participants with the highest HBI_sum (sum score of all ten HBI components). The HBI components Emotional Exhaustion, Personal Accomplishment and Detachment (representing depersonalization) tend to correlate more highly with the main symptoms of major depression (sadness, lack of interest and lack of energy) than with each other. A combination of the HBI components Emotional Exhaustion, Helplessness, Inner Void and Tedium (adj.R2 = 0.92) explained more HBI_sum variance than the three “core” components (adj.R2 = 0.85) of burnout combined. Cronbach’s alpha for Emotional Exhaustion, Helplessness, Inner Void and Tedium combined was 0.90 compared to α = 0.54 for the combination of the three

  18. Background Mole Fractions of Hydrocarbons in North America Determined from NOAA Global Reference Network Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke-Maday, I.

    2015-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) maintains a global reference network for over 50 trace gas species and analyzes discrete air samples collected by this network throughout the world at the Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado. In particular, flask samples are analyzed for a number of hydrocarbons with policy and health relevance such as ozone precursors, greenhouse gases, and hazardous air pollutants. Because this global network's sites are remote and therefore minimally influenced by local anthropogenic emissions, these data yield information about background ambient mole fractions and can provide a context for observations collected in intensive field campaigns, such as the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE), the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study, and the DISCOVER-AQ deployments. Information about background mole fractions during field campaigns is critical for calculating hydrocarbon enhancements in the region of study and for assessing the extent to which a particular region's local emissions sources contribute to these enhancements. Understanding the geographic variability of the background and its contribution to regional ambient mole fractions is also crucial for the development of realistic regulations. We present background hydrocarbon mole fractions and their ratios in North America using data from air samples collected in the planetary boundary layer at tall towers and aboard aircraft from 2008 to 2014. We discuss the spatial and seasonal variability in these data. We present trends over the time period of measurements and propose possible explanations for these trends.

  19. Communications overlapping in fast multipole particle dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzak, Jakub; Pettitt, B. Montgomery . E-mail: pettitt@uh.edu

    2005-03-01

    In molecular dynamics the fast multipole method (FMM) is an attractive alternative to Ewald summation for calculating electrostatic interactions due to the operation counts. However when applied to small particle systems and taken to many processors it has a high demand for interprocessor communication. In a distributed memory environment this demand severely limits applicability of the FMM to systems with O(10 K atoms). We present an algorithm that allows for fine grained overlap of communication and computation, while not sacrificing synchronization and determinism in the equations of motion. The method avoids contention in the communication subsystem making it feasible to use the FMM for smaller systems on larger numbers of processors. Our algorithm also facilitates application of multiple time stepping techniques within the FMM. We present scaling at a reasonably high level of accuracy compared with optimized Ewald methods.

  20. Electrochemical synthesis of a polyaniline network on a poly(o-aminophenol) modified glassy carbon electrode and its use for the simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Li-Lin

    2012-01-01

    A polyaniline (PAN) network structure was fabricated on a poly(o-aminophenol) (POAP) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by using a three-step electrochemical deposition procedure, and applied to the electro-catalytic oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) have been employed to investigate the PAN network structure on a POAP modified GCE (PAN-OAP/GCE), which indicated the formation of a 3-dimensional (3D) non-periodic PAN network with good electrical contract and the maintenance of the electro-activity of PAN in neutral and even in alkaline media. Because of its different catalytic effect towards the electro-oxidation of AA and UA, the PAN-OAP/GCE could resolve the overlapped voltammetric response of AA and UA into two sharp and well-defined voltammetric peaks with both CV and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), which could be applied for the selective and simultaneous determination of AA and UA in their binary mixture. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration curves for AA and UA were in the range of 2.5 - 6200 and 0.5 - 450 μmol L(-1) with correlation coefficients of 0.998 and 0.998, respectively. The detection limits (S/N = 3) are 1.4 and 0.3 μmol L(-1) for AA and UA, respectively. Besides good stability and reproducibility, the PAN-OAP/GCE also exhibited good sensitivity and selectivity. The proposed method has been applied to the simultaneous detection of AA and UA in human urine with satisfactory result. PMID:23059997

  1. Directed network modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Gergely; Farkas, Illés J.; Pollner, Péter; Derényi, Imre; Vicsek, Tamás

    2007-06-01

    A search technique locating network modules, i.e. internally densely connected groups of nodes in directed networks is introduced by extending the clique percolation method originally proposed for undirected networks. After giving a suitable definition for directed modules we investigate their percolation transition in the Erdos Rényi graph both analytically and numerically. We also analyse four real-world directed networks, including Google's own web-pages, an email network, a word association graph and the transcriptional regulatory network of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The obtained directed modules are validated by additional information available for the nodes. We find that directed modules of real-world graphs inherently overlap and the investigated networks can be classified into two major groups in terms of the overlaps between the modules. Accordingly, in the word-association network and Google's web-pages, overlaps are likely to contain in-hubs, whereas the modules in the email and transcriptional regulatory network tend to overlap via out-hubs.

  2. Two independent transcription initiation codes overlap on vertebrate core promoters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, Vanja; Li, Nan; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Plessy, Charles; Previti, Christopher; Nepal, Chirag; Gehrig, Jochen; Dong, Xianjun; Akalin, Altuna; Suzuki, Ana Maria; van Ijcken, Wilfred F. J.; Armant, Olivier; Ferg, Marco; Strähle, Uwe; Carninci, Piero; Müller, Ferenc; Lenhard, Boris

    2014-03-01

    A core promoter is a stretch of DNA surrounding the transcription start site (TSS) that integrates regulatory inputs and recruits general transcription factors to initiate transcription. The nature and causative relationship of the DNA sequence and chromatin signals that govern the selection of most TSSs by RNA polymerase II remain unresolved. Maternal to zygotic transition represents the most marked change of the transcriptome repertoire in the vertebrate life cycle. Early embryonic development in zebrafish is characterized by a series of transcriptionally silent cell cycles regulated by inherited maternal gene products: zygotic genome activation commences at the tenth cell cycle, marking the mid-blastula transition. This transition provides a unique opportunity to study the rules of TSS selection and the hierarchy of events linking transcription initiation with key chromatin modifications. We analysed TSS usage during zebrafish early embryonic development at high resolution using cap analysis of gene expression, and determined the positions of H3K4me3-marked promoter-associated nucleosomes. Here we show that the transition from the maternal to zygotic transcriptome is characterized by a switch between two fundamentally different modes of defining transcription initiation, which drive the dynamic change of TSS usage and promoter shape. A maternal-specific TSS selection, which requires an A/T-rich (W-box) motif, is replaced with a zygotic TSS selection grammar characterized by broader patterns of dinucleotide enrichments, precisely aligned with the first downstream (+1) nucleosome. The developmental dynamics of the H3K4me3-marked nucleosomes reveal their DNA-sequence-associated positioning at promoters before zygotic transcription and subsequent transcription-independent adjustment to the final position downstream of the zygotic TSS. The two TSS-defining grammars coexist, often physically overlapping, in core promoters of constitutively expressed genes to enable

  3. Enzymatic assembly of overlapping DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Three methods for assembling multiple, overlapping DNA molecules are described. Each method shares the same basic approach: (i) an exonuclease removes nucleotides from the ends of double-stranded (ds) DNA molecules, exposing complementary single-stranded (ss) DNA overhangs that are specifically annealed; (ii) the ssDNA gaps of the joined molecules are filled in by DNA polymerase, and the nicks are covalently sealed by DNA ligase. The first method employs the 3'-exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase (T4 pol), Taq DNA polymerase (Taq pol), and Taq DNA ligase (Taq lig) in a two-step thermocycled reaction. The second method uses 3'-exonuclease III (ExoIII), antibody-bound Taq pol, and Taq lig in a one-step thermocycled reaction. The third method employs 5'-T5 exonuclease, Phusion® DNA polymerase, and Taq lig in a one-step isothermal reaction and can be used to assemble both ssDNA and dsDNA. These assembly methods can be used to seamlessly construct synthetic and natural genes, genetic pathways, and entire genomes and could be very useful for molecular engineering tools. PMID:21601685

  4. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possiblemore » effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.« less

  5. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possible effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.

  6. A solution for parallel network architectures applied to network defense appliances and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naber, Eric C.; Velez, Paul G.; Johal, Amanpreet S.

    2012-06-01

    Network defense has more technologies available for purchase today than ever before. As the number of threats increase, organizations are deploying multiple defense technologies to defend their networks. For instance, an enterprise network boundary often implements multiple network defense appliances, some with overlapping capabilities (e.g., firewalls, IDS/IPS, DNS Defense). These appliances are applied in a serial fashion to create a chain of network processing specifically designed to drop bad traffic from the network. In these architectures, once a packet is dropped by an appliance subsequent appliances do not process it. This introduces significant limitations; (1) Stateful appliances will maintain an internal state which differs from network reality; (2) The network manager cannot determine, or unit test, how each appliance would have treated each packet; (3) The appliance "votes" cannot be combined to achieve higherlevel functionality. To address these limitations, we have developed a novel, backwards-compatible Parallel Architecture for Network Defense Appliances (PANDA). Our approach allows every appliance to process all network traffic and cast a vote to drop or allow each packet. This "crowd-sourcing" approach allows the network designer to take full advantage of each appliance, understand how each appliance is behaving, and achieve new collaborative appliance behavior.

  7. Topographic Hub Maps of the Human Structural Neocortical Network

    PubMed Central

    Nijhuis, Emil H. J.; van Cappellen van Walsum, Anne-Marie; Norris, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Hubs within the neocortical structural network determined by graph theoretical analysis play a crucial role in brain function. We mapped neocortical hubs topographically, using a sample population of 63 young adults. Subjects were imaged with high resolution structural and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Multiple network configurations were then constructed per subject, using random parcellations to define the nodes and using fibre tractography to determine the connectivity between the nodes. The networks were analysed with graph theoretical measures. Our results give reference maps of hub distribution measured with betweenness centrality and node degree. The loci of the hubs correspond with key areas from known overlapping cognitive networks. Several hubs were asymmetrically organized across hemispheres. Furthermore, females have hubs with higher betweenness centrality and males have hubs with higher node degree. Female networks have higher small-world indices. PMID:23935801

  8. Geometric Quality Assessment of LIDAR Data Based on Swath Overlap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, A.; Heidemann, H. K.; Stensaas, G. L.

    2016-06-01

    ) It is suggested that 4000-5000 points are uniformly sampled in the overlapping regions of the point cloud, and depending on the surface roughness, to measure the discrepancy between swaths. Care must be taken to sample only areas of single return points only. Point-to-Plane distance based data quality measures are determined for each sample point. These measurements are used to determine the above mentioned parameters. This paper details the measurements and analysis of measurements required to determine these metrics, i.e. Discrepancy Angle, Mean and RMSD of errors in flat regions and horizontal errors obtained using measurements extracted from sloping regions (slope greater than 10 degrees). The research is a result of an ad-hoc joint working group of the US Geological Survey and the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) Airborne Lidar Committee.

  9. Artificial neural network for the determination of Hubble Space Telescope aberration from stellar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Todd K.; Sandler, David G.

    1993-01-01

    An artificial-neural-network method, first developed for the measurement and control of atmospheric phase distortion, using stellar images, was used to estimate the optical aberration of the Hubble Space Telescope. A total of 26 estimates of distortion was obtained from 23 stellar images acquired at several secondary-mirror axial positions. The results were expressed as coefficients of eight orthogonal Zernike polynomials: focus through third-order spherical. For all modes other than spherical the measured aberration was small. The average spherical aberration of the estimates was -0.299 micron rms, which is in good agreement with predictions obtained when iterative phase-retrieval algorithms were used.

  10. A Lower Bound for Quantifying Overlap Effects: An Empirical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bassetti, Federico

    1997-12-31

    Among the many features that are implemented in today`s microprocessors there are some that have the capability of reducing the execution time via overlapping of different operations. Overlapping of instructions with other instructions, and overlapping of computation with memory activities are the main way in which execution time is reduced. In this paper we will introduce a notion of overlap and its definition, and a few different ways to capture its effects. We will characterize some of the DOE Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) benchmarks using the overlap and some other quantities related to it. Also, we will present a characterization of the overlap effects using a lower bound derived empirically from measured data. We will conclude by using the lower bound to estimate other components of the overall execution time.

  11. Discrimination Analysis of Earthquakes and Man-Made Events Using ARMA Coefficients Determination by Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    AllamehZadeh, Mostafa

    2011-12-15

    A Quadratic Neural Networks (QNNs) model has been developed for identifying seismic source classification problem at regional distances using ARMA coefficients determination by Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). We have devised a supervised neural system to discriminate between earthquakes and chemical explosions with filter coefficients obtained by windowed P-wave phase spectra (15 s). First, we preprocess the recording's signals to cancel out instrumental and attenuation site effects and obtain a compact representation of seismic records. Second, we use a QNNs system to obtain ARMA coefficients for feature extraction in the discrimination problem. The derived coefficients are then applied to the neural system to train and classification. In this study, we explore the possibility of using single station three-component (3C) covariance matrix traces from a priori-known explosion sites (learning) for automatically recognizing subsequent explosions from the same site. The results have shown that this feature extraction gives the best classifier for seismic signals and performs significantly better than other classification methods. The events have been tested, which include 36 chemical explosions at the Semipalatinsk test site in Kazakhstan and 61 earthquakes (mb = 5.0-6.5) recorded by the Iranian National Seismic Network (INSN). The 100% correct decisions were obtained between site explosions and some of non-site events. The above approach to event discrimination is very flexible as we can combine several 3C stations.

  12. Determination of cost coefficients of a priority-based water allocation linear programming model - a network flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, F. N.-F.; Wu, C.-W.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a method to establish the objective function of a network flow programming model for simulating river-reservoir system operations and associated water allocation, with an emphasis on situations when the links other than demand or storage have to be assigned with nonzero cost coefficients. The method preserves the priorities defined by rule curves of reservoir, operational preferences for conveying water, allocation of storage among multiple reservoirs, and transbasin water diversions. Path enumeration analysis transforms these water allocation rules into linear constraints that can be solved to determine link cost coefficients. An approach to prune the original system into a reduced network is proposed to establish the precise constraints of nonzero cost coefficients, which can then be efficiently solved. The cost coefficients for the water allocation in the Feitsui and Shihmen reservoirs' joint operating system of northern Taiwan was adequately assigned by the proposed method. This case study demonstrates how practitioners can correctly utilize network-flow-based models to allocate water supply throughout complex systems that are subject to strict operating rules.

  13. Determination of cost coefficients of priority-based water allocation linear programming model - a network flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, F. N.-F.; Wu, C.-W.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a method to establish the objective function of a network flow programming model for simulating river/reservoir system operations and associated water allocation, with an emphasis on situations when the links other than demand or storage have to be assigned with nonzero cost coefficients. The method preserves the priorities defined by rule curves of reservoir, operational preferences for conveying water, allocation of storage among multiple reservoirs, and trans-basin water diversions. Path enumeration analysis transforms these water allocation rules into linear constraints that can be solved to determine link cost coefficients. An approach to prune the original system into a reduced network is proposed to establish the precise constraints of nonzero cost coefficients which can then be efficiently solved. The cost coefficients for the water allocation in the Feitsui and Shihmen Reservoirs joint operating system of northern Taiwan was adequately assigned by the proposed method. This case study demonstrates how practitioners can correctly utilize network-flow-based models to allocate water supply throughout complex systems that are subject to strict operating rules.

  14. Information theoretic approach using neural network for determining radiometer observations from radar and vice versa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Srinivasa Ramanujam; Chandrasekar, V.

    2016-05-01

    Even though both the rain measuring instruments, radar and radiometer onboard the TRMM observe the same rain scenes, they both are fundamentally different instruments. Radar is an active instrument and measures backscatter component from vertical rain structure; whereas radiometer is a passive instrument that obtains integrated observation of full depth of the cloud and rain structure. Further, their spatial resolutions on ground are different. Nevertheless, both the instruments are observing the same rain scene and retrieve three dimensional rainfall products. Hence it is only natural to seek answer to the question, what type of information about radiometric observations can be directly retrieved from radar observations. While there are several ways to answer this question, an informational theoretic approach using neural networks has been described in the present work to find if radiometer observations can be predicted from radar observations. A database of TMI brightness temperature and collocated TRMM vertical attenuation corrected reflectivity factor from the year 2012 was considered. The entire database is further classified according to surface type. Separate neural networks were trained for land and ocean and the results are presented.

  15. Deployment of a retinal determination gene network drives directed cell migration in the sea urchin embryo

    PubMed Central

    Martik, Megan L; McClay, David R

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) provide a systems-level orchestration of an organism's genome encoded anatomy. As biological networks are revealed, they continue to answer many questions including knowledge of how GRNs control morphogenetic movements and how GRNs evolve. The migration of the small micromeres to the coelomic pouches in the sea urchin embryo provides an exceptional model for understanding the genomic regulatory control of morphogenesis. An assay using the robust homing potential of these cells reveals a ‘coherent feed-forward’ transcriptional subcircuit composed of Pax6, Six3, Six1/2, Eya, and Dach1 that is responsible for the directed homing mechanism of these multipotent progenitors. The linkages of that circuit are strikingly similar to a circuit involved in retinal specification in Drosophila suggesting that systems-level tasks can be highly conserved even though the tasks drive unrelated processes in different animals. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08827.001 PMID:26402456

  16. Precise Determination of Hypocenters and Focal Mechanisms of Volcanic Earthquakes by the Volcano Observation Network of NIED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, H.; Kohno, Y.; Nagai, M.; Miyagi, Y.; Fujita, E.; Kozono, T.; Tanada, T.

    2012-12-01

    Volcanic earthquakes are usually observed by a seismometer network on a volcano before and during eruptions, caused by crustal stress changes due to underground magma movements or an accumulation into a magma chamber. Precise hypocentral locations and focal mechanisms of the earthquakes provide information on the magmatic process and allow us to assess and predict the volcanic activity. However, focal mechanisms of volcanic earthquakes are not monitored except for relatively large earthquakes because of small size of volcanic earthquakes (M<3) and heterogeneity of volcanic structures. The obstacles also prevent automatic determination of hypocentral locations which are needed for short term eruption prediction. National Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) has been developing the volcano observation networks near the major active volcanos in Japan since 2009. The observation networks are equipped with short period seismometers and pendulum type tiltmeters at the bottom of borehole 200 m deep, and broad band seismometers and GPS antennas on the ground. We developed a monitoring technique for precise determination of hypocenters and focal mechanisms of volcanic earthquakes by using similarity of seismic wave forms and the high quality short period seismometer data of the volcano observation networks. Firstly, we extract earthquake groups which have similar seismic wave forms including P and S waves with correlation coefficient of more than 0.9 on more than three stations. Secondly, we display the wave forms with the similar phases in a row and stack them to reduce noises, and then precisely pick again the phases and first motion polarities of P waves. Thirdly, we relocate the hypocenters by Double-Difference method (Waldhauser and Ellsworth, 2000, BSSA) and estimate focal mechanisms by using P wave first motion polarity and S/P amplitude ratios (Hardebeck and Shearer, 2003, BSSA). We applied the technique to earthquake catalogs of Mt. Fuji and

  17. Solving Fluid Flow Problems on Moving and Adaptive Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W

    2005-07-28

    Solution of fluid dynamics problems on overlapping grids will be discussed. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured component grids that cover a domain and overlap where they meet. Overlapping grids provide an effective approach for developing efficient and accurate approximations for complex, possibly moving geometry. Topics to be addressed include the reactive Euler equations, the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and elliptic equations solved with a multigrid algorithm. Recent developments coupling moving grids and adaptive mesh refinement and preliminary parallel results will also be presented.

  18. A neural network approach for determining gait modifications to reduce the contact force in knee joint implant.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Marzieh Mostafavizadeh; Chen, Zhenxian; Wang, Ling; Lian, Qin; Liu, Yaxiong; He, Jiankang; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-10-01

    There is a growing interest in non-surgical gait rehabilitation treatments to reduce the loading in the knee joint. In particular, synergetic kinematic changes required for joint offloading should be determined individually for each subject. Previous studies for gait rehabilitation designs are typically relied on a "trial-and-error" approach, using multi-body dynamic (MBD) analysis. However MBD is fairly time demanding which prevents it to be used iteratively for each subject. This study employed an artificial neural network to develop a cost-effective computational framework for designing gait rehabilitation patterns. A feed forward artificial neural network (FFANN) was trained based on a number of experimental gait trials obtained from literature. The trained network was then hired to calculate the appropriate kinematic waveforms (output) needed to achieve desired knee joint loading patterns (input). An auxiliary neural network was also developed to update the ground reaction force and moment profiles with respect to the predicted kinematic waveforms. The feasibility and efficiency of the predicted kinematic patterns were then evaluated through MBD analysis. Results showed that FFANN-based predicted kinematics could effectively decrease the total knee joint reaction forces. Peak values of the resultant knee joint forces, with respect to the bodyweight (BW), were reduced by 20% BW and 25% BW in the midstance and the terminal stance phases. Impulse values of the knee joint loading patterns were also decreased by 17% BW*s and 24%BW*s in the corresponding phases. The FFANN-based framework suggested a cost-effective forward solution which directly calculated the kinematic variations needed to implement a given desired knee joint loading pattern. It is therefore expected that this approach provides potential advantages and further insights into knee rehabilitation designs. PMID:25066584

  19. Evolving Digital Ecological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Aaron P.; Ofria, Charles

    2013-01-01

    “It is hard to realize that the living world as we know it is just one among many possibilities” [1]. Evolving digital ecological networks are webs of interacting, self-replicating, and evolving computer programs (i.e., digital organisms) that experience the same major ecological interactions as biological organisms (e.g., competition, predation, parasitism, and mutualism). Despite being computational, these programs evolve quickly in an open-ended way, and starting from only one or two ancestral organisms, the formation of ecological networks can be observed in real-time by tracking interactions between the constantly evolving organism phenotypes. These phenotypes may be defined by combinations of logical computations (hereafter tasks) that digital organisms perform and by expressed behaviors that have evolved. The types and outcomes of interactions between phenotypes are determined by task overlap for logic-defined phenotypes and by responses to encounters in the case of behavioral phenotypes. Biologists use these evolving networks to study active and fundamental topics within evolutionary ecology (e.g., the extent to which the architecture of multispecies networks shape coevolutionary outcomes, and the processes involved). PMID:23533370

  20. Competitive epidemic spreading over arbitrary multilayer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi Sahneh, Faryad; Scoglio, Caterina

    2014-06-01

    This study extends the Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) epidemic model for single-virus propagation over an arbitrary graph to an Susceptible-Infected by virus 1-Susceptible-Infected by virus 2-Susceptible (SI1SI2S) epidemic model of two exclusive, competitive viruses over a two-layer network with generic structure, where network layers represent the distinct transmission routes of the viruses. We find analytical expressions determining extinction, coexistence, and absolute dominance of the viruses after we introduce the concepts of survival threshold and absolute-dominance threshold. The main outcome of our analysis is the discovery and proof of a region for long-term coexistence of competitive viruses in nontrivial multilayer networks. We show coexistence is impossible if network layers are identical yet possible if network layers are distinct. Not only do we rigorously prove a region of coexistence, but we can quantitate it via interrelation of central nodes across the network layers. Little to no overlapping of the layers' central nodes is the key determinant of coexistence. For example, we show both analytically and numerically that positive correlation of network layers makes it difficult for a virus to survive, while in a network with negatively correlated layers, survival is easier, but total removal of the other virus is more difficult.

  1. FAB overlapping: a strategy for sequencing homologous proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferranti, P.; Malorni, A.; Marino, G.; Pucci, P.; di Luccia, A.; Ferrara, L.

    1991-12-01

    Extensive similarity has been shown to exist between the primary structures of closely related proteins from different species, the only differences being restricted to a few amino acid variations. A new mass spectrometric procedure, which has been called FAB-overlapping, has been developed for sequencing highly homologous proteins based on the detection of these small differences as compared with a known protein used as a reference. Several complementary peptide maps are constructed using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) analysis of different proteolytic digests of the unknown protein and the mass values are related to those expected on the basis of the sequence of the reference protein. The mass signals exhibiting unusual mass values identify those regions where variations have taken place; fine location of the mutations can be obtained by coupling simple protein chemistry methodologies with FAB-MS. Using the FAB-overlapping procedure, it was possible to determine the sequence of [alpha]1, [alpha]3 and [beta] globins from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis hemoglobins (phenotype AA). Two amino acid substitutions were detected in the buffalo [beta] chain (Lys16 --> His and Asn118 --> His) whereas the [alpha]1 chains were found the [alpha]1 and [alpha]3 chains were found to contain four amino acid replacements, three of which were identical (Glu23 --> Asp, Glu71 --> Gly, Phe117 --> Cys), and the insertion of an alanine residue in position 124. The only differences between [alpha]1 and [alpha]3 globins were identified in the C -terminal region; [alpha]1 contains a Phe residue at position 130 whereas [alpha]3 shows serine at position 132.

  2. Determining concentration depth profiles in fluorinated networks by means of electric force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miccio, Luis A.; Schwartz, Gustavo A.

    2011-08-14

    By means of electric force microscopy, composition depth profiles were measured with nanometric resolution for a series of fluorinated networks. By mapping the dielectric permittivity along a line going from the surface to the bulk, we were able to experimentally access to the fluorine concentration profile. Obtained data show composition gradient lengths ranging from 30 nm to 80 nm in the near surface area for samples containing from 0.5 to 5 wt. % F, respectively. In contrast, no gradients of concentration were detected in bulk. This method has several advantages over other techniques because it allows profiling directly on a sectional cut of the sample. By combining the obtained results with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we were also able to quantify F/C ratio as a function of depth with nanoscale resolution.

  3. In-vivo determination of chewing patterns using FBG and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegorini, Vinicius; Zen Karam, Leandro; Rocha Pitta, Christiano S.; Ribeiro, Richardson; Simioni Assmann, Tangriani; Cardozo da Silva, Jean Carlos; Bertotti, Fábio L.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.; Cardoso, Rafael

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports the process of pattern classification of the chewing process of ruminants. We propose a simplified signal processing scheme for optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors based on machine learning techniques. The FBG sensors measure the biomechanical forces during jaw movements and an artificial neural network is responsible for the classification of the associated chewing pattern. In this study, three patterns associated to dietary supplement, hay and ryegrass were considered. Additionally, two other important events for ingestive behavior studies were monitored, rumination and idle period. Experimental results show that the proposed approach for pattern classification has been capable of differentiating the materials involved in the chewing process with a small classification error.

  4. Crustal deformation measurements in central Japan determined by a Global Positioning System fixed-point network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, Seiichi; Bock, Yehuda

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from temporally dense measurements of crustal deformation associated with the convergence of the Eurasian (EUR), Pacific, North American, and Philippine Sea (PHS) plates, carried out in April 1988 by a 10-station GPS fixed-point network established in central Japan. Using regional orbit relaxation methods, the analysis of the first 17-month data revealed significant horizontal deformation across the Suruga trough. Namely, it was found that a site in the northern tip of PHS plate moved nearly westward with a velocity of 28 +/-5 mm per year, and a site at the southeastern tip of EUR plate moved south-southwestward with a velocity of 18 +/-5 mm per year. A significant vertical uplift with a velocity of 20 mm/yr was detected at a site inland of the Tokai district located in the Akaishi uplift zone and at a site on the Hatsushima Island in Sagami Bay.

  5. Evidence for Overlapping Genetic Influences on Autistic and ADHD Behaviours in a Community Twin Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronald, Angelica; Simonoff, Emily; Kuntsi, Jonna; Asherson, Philip; Plomin, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Background: High levels of clinical comorbidity have been reported between autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study takes an individual differences approach to determine the degree of phenotypic and aetiological overlap between autistic traits and ADHD behaviours in the general population.…

  6. Overlapping of heterogeneous and purely thermally activated solid-state processes in the combustion of a bituminous coal

    SciTech Connect

    Senneca, Osvalda; Salatino, Piero

    2006-02-01

    Mechanistic studies of coal combustion have long highlighted the variety of reaction pathways along which gasification may take place. These involve chemisorption of reactants, formation of surface oxides, surface mobility of chemisorbed species, and product desorption. At the same time, exposure of the solid fuel to high temperatures is associated with solid-state thermally activated processes. Altogether, the course of gasification may be profoundly affected by the overlapping and interplay of heterogeneous oxidation with purely thermally activated solid-state reactions. In the present work the combustion of a South African bituminous coal is analyzed in the framework of a simplified reaction network that embodies heterogeneous oxidative and thermally activated processes (pyrolysis, thermal annealing, coal combustion, char combustion, oxygen chemisorption) active both on the raw coal and on its char. The kinetics of each process of the network is assessed by a combination of thermogravimetric and gas analysis on coal and char samples. The analysis is directed to the determination of the prevailing combustion pathway, established from the interplay of oxidative and solid-state thermally activated processes, as a function of combustion conditions (temperature, heating rate, particle size). (author)

  7. A reexamination of the small overlap frontal crash.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Paul; Morgan, Richard M; Mohan, Pradeep; Kan, Cing-Dao; Shanks, Kurt; Jin, Wook; Tangirala, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine and rank the Small Overlap Frontal Crash as one of the eight-group taxonomy proposed by Ford. The Ford taxonomy classifies real-world frontal-impact crashes based on the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS). Frontally-impacted vehicles were identified for 1985 - 2008 model year passenger vehicles with Collision Deformation Classification (CDC) data from the 1995 - 2008 years of NASS. Small overlap frontal cases were identified where there was no engagement of the vehicle frame rails, and the direct damage was located entirely outside of the vehicle frame rails. The results are that full engagement and offset (offset category means the direct damage overlaps the vehicle frame rail, with the center of direct damage between the frame rails) were the most frequent crashes contributing 35% each. The frequency of the small overlap frontal was 6%. The risks of injury (AIS ≥ 2) for the full engagement, offset, and small overlap were 8%, 6%, and 3% respectively. For this study, the number of small overlap vehicles was 1,118 and the number of injured nearside occupants was 100. This study-following the Ford approach and reasonably identifying the location of the longitudinal rails based on CDC-suggests that the small overlap is at worst a moderately dangerous crash in the overall scheme of frontal crashes. The implications of this study are that the safety community should reexamine the significance of the small overlap frontal crash against an overall taxonomy of crashes. PMID:21050598

  8. Overlaps and Accumulation in the Use of Rehabilitation Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulkki, Jutta M.; Rissanen, Pekka; Raitanen, Jani A.; Viitanen, Elina A.

    2011-01-01

    The Finnish rehabilitation system is considered fragmented and multisectoral, and thus it may produce "multiclients" receiving inefficient and overlapping services. This paper addresses the overlaps and accumulation in the delivery of rehabilitation services in Finnish rehabilitation subsystems. Data were drawn from several administrative…

  9. Identifying Cluster Overlap with NORMIX Population Membership Probabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Lydia J.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of the NORMIX algorithm to recover overlapping population structures was compared to the OVERCLUS procedure and another clustering procedure in a Monte Carlo study. NORMIX is found to be more accurate than other procedures in recovering overlapping population structure when appropriate implementation options are specified. (SLD)

  10. "Listenership" in Japanese: An Examination of Overlapping Listener Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikeda, Keiko

    2004-01-01

    This study focuses on a particular listening pattern in Japanese which occurs by overlapping with the current speaker's incrementing utterance. Applying the Conversational Analysis approach to conversational data, the study delineates how native speakers utilize overlapping listener responses to indicate their strong alignment, and why learners of…

  11. Shake for Sigma, Pray for Pi: Classroom Orbital Overlap Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    An introductory organic classroom demonstration is discussed where analogies are made between common societal hand contact and covalent bond formation. A handshake signifies creation of a [sigma] bond ("head-on" orbital overlap), whereas the action of praying illustrates "sideways" overlap and generation of a [pi] bond. The nature of orbital and…

  12. Overlap loss of manually and automatically guided mowers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Overlap loss in harvesting machinery has been observed as a necessary inefficiency for many years. Each time a non-row-crop machine makes a pass in the field, it is favorable for the operator to overlap slightly into the previous pass (where the crop has already been cut), as opposed to undercutting...

  13. Fitting Multidimensional Amotivation into the Self-Determination Theory Nomological Network: Application in School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlachopoulos, Symeon P.; Katartzi, Ermioni S.; Kontou, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the nomological validity of the Amotivation Inventory-Physical Education (Shen, Wingert, Li, Sun, & Rukavina, 2010b) scores by examining the associations of ability, effort, value, and task characteristics amotivation beliefs with self-determination theory variables. Data were collected from 401 fifth- and…

  14. Overlapping and Non-overlapping Functions of Condensins I and II in Neural Stem Cell Divisions

    PubMed Central

    Nishide, Kenji; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    During development of the cerebral cortex, neural stem cells (NSCs) divide symmetrically to proliferate and asymmetrically to generate neurons. Although faithful segregation of mitotic chromosomes is critical for NSC divisions, its fundamental mechanism remains unclear. A class of evolutionarily conserved protein complexes, known as condensins, is thought to be central to chromosome assembly and segregation among eukaryotes. Here we report the first comprehensive genetic study of mammalian condensins, demonstrating that two different types of condensin complexes (condensins I and II) are both essential for NSC divisions and survival in mice. Simultaneous depletion of both condensins leads to severe defects in chromosome assembly and segregation, which in turn cause DNA damage and trigger p53-induced apoptosis. Individual depletions of condensins I and II lead to slower loss of NSCs compared to simultaneous depletion, but they display distinct mitotic defects: chromosome missegregation was observed more prominently in NSCs depleted of condensin II, whereas mitotic delays were detectable only in condensin I-depleted NSCs. Remarkably, NSCs depleted of condensin II display hyperclustering of pericentric heterochromatin and nucleoli, indicating that condensin II, but not condensin I, plays a critical role in establishing interphase nuclear architecture. Intriguingly, these defects are taken over to postmitotic neurons. Our results demonstrate that condensins I and II have overlapping and non-overlapping functions in NSCs, and also provide evolutionary insight into intricate balancing acts of the two condensin complexes. PMID:25474630

  15. Genetic determination of nephrogenesis: the Pax/Eya/Six gene network.

    PubMed

    Brodbeck, Stephan; Englert, Christoph

    2004-03-01

    Development of the kidney serves as a paradigm to understand the mechanisms underlying the formation of an organ. The first sign of kidney development is the interaction between two tissues derived from the intermediate mesoderm, the metanephrogenic mesenchyme and the nephric duct. Many of the genes that play a crucial role in early kidney development, such as Pax2, Eya1, Six1, Six2, Sall1, Foxc1, Wt1, and the Hox11 genes, are expressed in the mesenchyme and encode transcription factors that--with few exceptions--are involved in regulation of the Gdnf gene. Moreover, mutations in a number of these genes in humans are associated with kidney diseases. Interestingly, many of the components regulating early kidney development are conserved throughout evolution and are also involved in eye and muscle formation in mammals, as well as in eye development in Drosophila. Genetic and biochemical studies in Drosophila and mice indicate that these genes and their respective products act in a complex network of interdependencies and positive and negative feedback loops. Genetic experiments have allowed us to begin to characterize the complex interactions between the individual components, but it will require additional biochemical and functional experiments to eventually understand the molecular functions of each of the participating proteins. PMID:14673635

  16. Overlapped optics induced perfect coherent effects.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian Jie; Zang, Xiao Fei; Mao, Jun Fa; Tang, Min; Zhu, Yi Ming; Zhuang, Song Lin

    2013-01-01

    For traditional coherent effects, two separated identical point sources can be interfered with each other only when the optical path difference is integer number of wavelengths, leading to alternate dark and bright fringes for different optical path difference. For hundreds of years, such a perfect coherent condition seems insurmountable. However, in this paper, based on transformation optics, two separated in-phase identical point sources can induce perfect interference with each other without satisfying the traditional coherent condition. This shifting illusion media is realized by inductor-capacitor transmission line network. Theoretical analysis, numerical simulations and experimental results are performed to confirm such a kind of perfect coherent effect and it is found that the total radiation power of multiple elements system can be greatly enhanced. Our investigation may be applicable to National Ignition Facility (NIF), Inertial Confined Fusion (ICF) of China, LED lighting technology, terahertz communication, and so on. PMID:24356577

  17. Compressed Sensing Inspired Image Reconstruction from Overlapped Projections

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Lu, Yang; Wang, Ge

    2010-01-01

    The key idea discussed in this paper is to reconstruct an image from overlapped projections so that the data acquisition process can be shortened while the image quality remains essentially uncompromised. To perform image reconstruction from overlapped projections, the conventional reconstruction approach (e.g., filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms) cannot be directly used because of two problems. First, overlapped projections represent an imaging system in terms of summed exponentials, which cannot be transformed into a linear form. Second, the overlapped measurement carries less information than the traditional line integrals. To meet these challenges, we propose a compressive sensing-(CS-) based iterative algorithm for reconstruction from overlapped data. This algorithm starts with a good initial guess, relies on adaptive linearization, and minimizes the total variation (TV). Then, we demonstrated the feasibility of this algorithm in numerical tests. PMID:20689701

  18. Using a Neural Network to Determine the Hatch Status of the AERI at the ARM North Slope of Alaska Site

    SciTech Connect

    Zwink, AB; Turner, DD

    2012-03-19

    The fore-optics of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) are protected by an automated hatch to prevent precipitation from fouling the instrument's scene mirror (Knuteson et al. 2004). Limit switches connected with the hatch controller provide a signal of the hatch state: open, closed, undetermined (typically associated with the hatch being between fully open or fully closed during the instrument's sky view period), or an error condition. The instrument then records the state of the hatch with the radiance data so that samples taken when the hatch is not open can be removed from any subsequent analysis. However, the hatch controller suffered a multi-year failure for the AERI located at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Central Facility in Barrow, Alaska, from July 2006-February 2008. The failure resulted in misreporting the state of the hatch in the 'hatchOpen' field within the AERI data files. With this error there is no simple solution to translate what was reported back to the correct hatch status, thereby making it difficult for an analysis to determine when the AERI was actually viewing the sky. As only the data collected when the hatch is fully open are scientifically useful, an algorithm was developed to determine whether the hatch was open or closed based on spectral radiance data from the AERI. Determining if the hatch is open or closed in a scene with low clouds is non-trivial, as low opaque clouds may look very similar spectrally as the closed hatch. This algorithm used a backpropagation neural network; these types of neural networks have been used with increasing frequency in atmospheric science applications.

  19. Earthquakes and Volcanic Processes at San Miguel Volcano, El Salvador, Determined from a Small, Temporary Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, S.; Schiek, C. G.; Zeiler, C. P.; Velasco, A. A.; Hurtado, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    The San Miguel volcano lies within the Central American volcanic chain in eastern El Salvador. The volcano has experienced at least 29 eruptions with Volcano Explosivity Index (VEI) of 2. Since 1970, however, eruptions have decreased in intensity to an average of VEI 1, with the most recent eruption occurring in 2002. Eruptions at San Miguel volcano consist mostly of central vent and phreatic eruptions. A critical challenge related to the explosive nature of this volcano is to understand the relationships between precursory surface deformation, earthquake activity, and volcanic activity. In this project, we seek to determine sub-surface structures within and near the volcano, relate the local deformation to these structures, and better understand the hazard that the volcano presents in the region. To accomplish these goals, we deployed a six station, broadband seismic network around San Miguel volcano in collaboration with researchers from Servicio Nacional de Estudios Territoriales (SNET). This network operated continuously from 23 March 2007 to 15 January 2008 and had a high data recovery rate. The data were processed to determine earthquake locations, magnitudes, and, for some of the larger events, focal mechanisms. We obtained high precision locations using a double-difference approach and identified at least 25 events near the volcano. Ongoing analysis will seek to identify earthquake types (e.g., long period, tectonic, and hybrid events) that occurred in the vicinity of San Miguel volcano. These results will be combined with radar interferometric measurements of surface deformation in order to determine the relationship between surface and subsurface processes at the volcano.

  20. Prevention of overlapping prescriptions of psychotropic drugs by community pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Shimane, Takuya; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Wada, Kiyoshi

    2012-10-01

    The nonmedical use or abuse of prescription drugs, including psychotropic medicines, is a growing health problem in Japan. Patient access to psychotropic drugs, specifically from the oversupply of medications due to overlapping prescriptions, may increase the risk of drug abuse and dependence. However, very little is known about such overlapping prescriptions. Today, the dispensing of prescriptions is generally moving from inside to outside of hospitals, with psychotropic drugs mainly dispensed at community pharmacies. In this study, we used health insurance claims (i.e., receipts) for dispensing as the main source of information in an investigation of overlapping prescriptions of psychotropic drugs. A total of 119 patients were found to have received overlapping prescriptions, as identified by community pharmacists who were members of the Saitama Pharmaceutical Association, using patient medication records, followed by medication counseling and prescription notes for the patient. According to our findings, the most frequently overlapping medication was etizolam. Etizolam can be prescribed for more than 30 days since it is not regulated under Japanese law as a "psychotropic drug." Generally, when a drug can be prescribed for a greater number of days, it increases the likelihood of an overlapping prescription during the same period. As a result, the long-term prescription of etizolam increases the risk of overlapping prescriptions. We also found that the patients who received overlapping prescriptions of etizolam were mostly elderly and the most common pattern was prescription from both internal medicine and orthopedics physicians. Etizolam has wide range of indications that are covered by health insurance. Our results suggest that patients who received overlapping prescriptions of etizolam may receive prescriptions from different prescribers for different purposes. Therefore, it may be appropriate to regulate etizolam as a "psychotropic drug" under Japanese law

  1. The Antsy Social Network: Determinants of Nest Structure and Arrangement in Asian Weaver Ants

    PubMed Central

    Devarajan, Kadambari

    2016-01-01

    Asian weaver ants (Oecophylla smaragdina) are arboreal ants that are known to form mutualistic complexes with their host trees. They are eusocial ants that build elaborate nests in the canopy in tropical areas. A colony comprises of multiple nests, usually on multiple trees, and the boundaries of the colony may be difficult to identify. However, they provide the ideal model for studying group living in invertebrates since there are a definite number of nests for a given substrate, the tree. Here, we briefly examine the structure of the nests and the processes involved in the construction and maintenance of these nests. We have described the spatial arrangement of weaver ant nests on trees in two distinct tropical clusters, a few hundred kilometres apart in India. Measurements were made for 13 trees with a total of 71 nests in the two field sites. We have considered a host of biotic and abiotic factors that may be crucial in determining the location of the nesting site by Asian weaver ants. Our results indicate that tree characteristics and architecture followed by leaf features help determine nest location in Asian weaver ants. While environmental factors may not be as influential to nest arrangement, they seem to be important determinants of nest structure. The parameters that may be considered in establishing the nests could be crucial in picking the evolutionary drivers for colonial living in social organisms. PMID:27271037

  2. The Antsy Social Network: Determinants of Nest Structure and Arrangement in Asian Weaver Ants.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Kadambari

    2016-01-01

    Asian weaver ants (Oecophylla smaragdina) are arboreal ants that are known to form mutualistic complexes with their host trees. They are eusocial ants that build elaborate nests in the canopy in tropical areas. A colony comprises of multiple nests, usually on multiple trees, and the boundaries of the colony may be difficult to identify. However, they provide the ideal model for studying group living in invertebrates since there are a definite number of nests for a given substrate, the tree. Here, we briefly examine the structure of the nests and the processes involved in the construction and maintenance of these nests. We have described the spatial arrangement of weaver ant nests on trees in two distinct tropical clusters, a few hundred kilometres apart in India. Measurements were made for 13 trees with a total of 71 nests in the two field sites. We have considered a host of biotic and abiotic factors that may be crucial in determining the location of the nesting site by Asian weaver ants. Our results indicate that tree characteristics and architecture followed by leaf features help determine nest location in Asian weaver ants. While environmental factors may not be as influential to nest arrangement, they seem to be important determinants of nest structure. The parameters that may be considered in establishing the nests could be crucial in picking the evolutionary drivers for colonial living in social organisms. PMID:27271037

  3. An extension to artifact-free projection overlaps

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jianyu

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: In multipinhole single photon emission computed tomography, the overlapping of projections has been used to increase sensitivity. Avoiding artifacts in the reconstructed image associated with projection overlaps (multiplexing) is a critical issue. In our previous report, two types of artifact-free projection overlaps, i.e., projection overlaps that do not lead to artifacts in the reconstructed image, were formally defined and proved, and were validated via simulations. In this work, a new proposition is introduced to extend the previously defined type-II artifact-free projection overlaps so that a broader range of artifact-free overlaps is accommodated. One practical purpose of the new extension is to design a baffle window multipinhole system with artifact-free projection overlaps. Methods: First, the extended type-II artifact-free overlap was theoretically defined and proved. The new proposition accommodates the situation where the extended type-II artifact-free projection overlaps can be produced with incorrectly reconstructed portions in the reconstructed image. Next, to validate the theory, the extended-type-II artifact-free overlaps were employed in designing the multiplexing multipinhole spiral orbit imaging systems with a baffle window. Numerical validations were performed via simulations, where the corresponding 1-pinhole nonmultiplexing reconstruction results were used as the benchmark for artifact-free reconstructions. The mean square error (MSE) was the metric used for comparisons of noise-free reconstructed images. Noisy reconstructions were also performed as part of the validations. Results: Simulation results show that for noise-free reconstructions, the MSEs of the reconstructed images of the artifact-free multiplexing systems are very similar to those of the corresponding 1-pinhole systems. No artifacts were observed in the reconstructed images. Therefore, the testing results for artifact-free multiplexing systems designed using the

  4. Evaluation of methods for determining the pore size distribution and pore-network connectivity of porous carbons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Q; Buts, A; Biggs, M J; Seaton, N A

    2007-07-31

    The pore size distribution (PSD) and the pore-network connectivity of a porous material determine its properties in applications such as gas storage, adsorptive separations, and catalysis. Methods for the characterization of the pore structure of porous carbons are widely used, but the relationship between the structural parameters measured and the real structure of the material is not yet clear. We have evaluated two widely used and powerful characterization methods based on adsorption measurements by applying the methods to a model carbon which captures the essential characteristics of real carbons but (unlike a real material) has a structure that is completely known. We used three species (CH4, CF4, and SF6) as adsorptives and analyzed the results using an intersecting capillaries model (ICM) which was modeled using a combination of Monte Carlo simulation and percolation theory to obtain the PSD and the pore-network connectivity. There was broad agreement between the PSDs measured using the ICM and the geometric PSD of the model carbon, as well as some systematic differences which are interpreted in terms of the pore structure of the carbon. The measured PSD and connectivity are shown to be able to predict adsorption in the model carbon, supporting the use of the ICM to characterize real porous carbons. PMID:17602506

  5. Determining Methane Leak Locations and Rates with a Wireless Network Composed of Low-Cost, Printed Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. J.; Kim, B.; Zhang, Y.; Ng, T. N.; Beck, V.; Ganguli, A.; Saha, B.; Daniel, G.; Lee, J.; Whiting, G.; Meyyappan, M.; Schwartz, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    We will present our progress on the development of a wireless sensor network that will determine the source and rate of detected methane leaks. The targeted leak detection threshold is 2 g/min with a rate estimation error of 20% and localization error of 1 m within an outdoor area of 100 m2. The network itself is composed of low-cost, high-performance sensor nodes based on printed nanomaterials with expected sensitivity below 1 ppmv methane. High sensitivity to methane is achieved by modifying high surface-area-to-volume-ratio single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with materials that adsorb methane molecules. Because the modified SWNTs are not perfectly selective to methane, the sensor nodes contain arrays of variously-modified SWNTs to build diversity of response towards gases with adsorption affinity. Methane selectivity is achieved through advanced pattern-matching algorithms of the array's ensemble response. The system is low power and designed to operate for a year on a single small battery. The SWNT sensing elements consume only microwatts. The largest power consumer is the wireless communication, which provides robust, real-time measurement data. Methane leak localization and rate estimation will be performed by machine-learning algorithms built with the aid of computational fluid dynamics simulations of gas plume formation. This sensor system can be broadly applied at gas wells, distribution systems, refineries, and other downstream facilities. It also can be utilized for industrial and residential safety applications, and adapted to other gases and gas combinations.

  6. A New Method for the Determination of Potassium Sorbate Combining Fluorescence Spectra Method with PSO-BP Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-tao; Chen, Dong-ying; Wang, Xing-long; Wei, Meng; Wang, Zhi-fang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, fluorescence spectra properties of potassium sorbate in aqueous solution and orange juice are studied, and the result.shows that in two solution there are many difference in fluorescence spectra of potassium sorbate, but the fluorescence characteristic peak exists in λ(ex)/λ(em) = 375/490 nm. It can be seen from the two dimensional fluorescence spectra that the relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of potassium sorbate is very complex, so there is no linear relationship between them. To determine the concentration of potassium sorbate in orange juice, a new method combining Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm with Back Propagation (BP) neural network is proposed. The relative error of two predicted concentrations is 1.83% and 1.53% respectively, which indicate that the method is feasible. The PSO-BP neural network can accurately measure the concentration of potassium sorbate in orange juice in the range of 0.1-2.0 g · L⁻¹. PMID:26964248

  7. Introduction to focus issue: mesoscales in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Almendral, Juan A; Criado, Regino; Leyva, Inmaculada; Buldú, Javier M; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene

    2011-03-01

    Although the functioning of real complex networks is greatly determined by modularity, the majority of articles have focused, until recently, on either their local scale structure or their macroscopical properties. However, neither of these descriptions can adequately describe the important features that complex networks exhibit due to their organization in modules. This Focus Issue precisely presents the state of the art on the study of complex networks at that intermediate level. The reader will find out why this mesoscale level has become an important topic of research through the latest advances carried out to improve our understanding of the dynamical behavior of modular networks. The contributions presented here have been chosen to cover, from different viewpoints, the many open questions in the field as different aspects of community definition and detection algorithms, moduli overlapping, dynamics on modular networks, interplay between scales, and applications to biological, social, and technological fields. PMID:21456843

  8. Introduction to Focus Issue: Mesoscales in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendral, Juan A.; Criado, Regino; Leyva, Inmaculada; Buldú, Javier M.; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene

    2011-03-01

    Although the functioning of real complex networks is greatly determined by modularity, the majority of articles have focused, until recently, on either their local scale structure or their macroscopical properties. However, neither of these descriptions can adequately describe the important features that complex networks exhibit due to their organization in modules. This Focus Issue precisely presents the state of the art on the study of complex networks at that intermediate level. The reader will find out why this mesoscale level has become an important topic of research through the latest advances carried out to improve our understanding of the dynamical behavior of modular networks. The contributions presented here have been chosen to cover, from different viewpoints, the many open questions in the field as different aspects of community definition and detection algorithms, moduli overlapping, dynamics on modular networks, interplay between scales, and applications to biological, social, and technological fields.

  9. Implications of network topology on stability.

    PubMed

    Kinkhabwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In analogy to chemical reaction networks, I demonstrate the utility of expressing the governing equations of an arbitrary dynamical system (interaction network) as sums of real functions (generalized reactions) multiplied by real scalars (generalized stoichiometries) for analysis of its stability. The reaction stoichiometries and first derivatives define the network's "influence topology", a signed directed bipartite graph. Parameter reduction of the influence topology permits simplified expression of the principal minors (sums of products of non-overlapping bipartite cycles) and Hurwitz determinants (sums of products of the principal minors or the bipartite cycles directly) for assessing the network's steady state stability. Visualization of the Hurwitz determinants over the reduced parameters defines the network's stability phase space, delimiting the range of its dynamics (specifically, the possible numbers of unstable roots at each steady state solution). Any further explicit algebraic specification of the network will project onto this stability phase space. Stability analysis via this hierarchical approach is demonstrated on classical networks from multiple fields. PMID:25826219

  10. Characterizing the interplay betwen mulitple levels of organization within bacterial sigma factor regulatory networks

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Qiu; Nagarajan, Harish; Embree, Mallory; Shieu, Wendy; Abate, Elisa; Juarez, Katy; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Elkins, James G; Nevin, Kelly P.; Barrett, Christian; Lovley, Derek; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Zengler, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria contain multiple sigma factors, each targeting diverse, but often overlapping sets of promoters, thereby forming a complex network. The layout and deployment of such a sigma factor network directly impacts global transcriptional regulation and ultimately dictates the phenotype. Here we integrate multi-omic data sets to determine the topology, the operational, and functional states of the sigma factor network in Geobacter sulfurreducens, revealing a unique network topology of interacting sigma factors. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network shows a highly modular structure with sN being the major regulator of energy metabolism. Surprisingly, the functional state of the network during the two most divergent growth conditions is nearly static, with sigma factor binding profiles almost invariant to environmental stimuli. This first comprehensive elucidation of the interplay between different levels of the sigma factor network organization is fundamental to characterize transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in bacteria.

  11. Space-use scaling and home range overlap in primates

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Fiona; Carbone, Chris; Cowlishaw, Guy; Isaac, Nick J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Space use is an important aspect of animal ecology, yet our understanding is limited by a lack of synthesis between interspecific and intraspecific studies. We present analyses of a dataset of 286 estimates of home range overlap from 100 primate species, with comparable samples for other space-use traits. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first multispecies study using overlap data estimated directly from field observations. We find that space-use traits in primates are only weakly related to body mass, reflecting their largely arboreal habits. Our results confirm a theory that home range overlap explains the differences in allometric scaling between population density and home range size. We then test a suite of hypotheses to explain home range overlap, both among and within species. We find that overlap is highest for larger-bodied species living in large home ranges at high population densities, where annual rainfall is low, and is higher for arboreal than terrestrial species. Most of these results are consistent with the economics of resource defence, although the predictions of one specific theory of home range overlap are not supported. We conclude that home range overlap is somewhat predictable, but the theoretical basis of animal space use remains patchy. PMID:23193124

  12. Genome-wide analysis captures the determinants of the antibiotic cross-resistance interaction network.

    PubMed

    Lázár, Viktória; Nagy, István; Spohn, Réka; Csörgő, Bálint; Györkei, Ádám; Nyerges, Ákos; Horváth, Balázs; Vörös, Andrea; Busa-Fekete, Róbert; Hrtyan, Mónika; Bogos, Balázs; Méhi, Orsolya; Fekete, Gergely; Szappanos, Balázs; Kégl, Balázs; Papp, Balázs; Pál, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how evolution of antimicrobial resistance increases resistance to other drugs is a challenge of profound importance. By combining experimental evolution and genome sequencing of 63 laboratory-evolved lines, we charted a map of cross-resistance interactions between antibiotics in Escherichia coli, and explored the driving evolutionary principles. Here, we show that (1) convergent molecular evolution is prevalent across antibiotic treatments, (2) resistance conferring mutations simultaneously enhance sensitivity to many other drugs and (3) 27% of the accumulated mutations generate proteins with compromised activities, suggesting that antibiotic adaptation can partly be achieved without gain of novel function. By using knowledge on antibiotic properties, we examined the determinants of cross-resistance and identified chemogenomic profile similarity between antibiotics as the strongest predictor. In contrast, cross-resistance between two antibiotics is independent of whether they show synergistic effects in combination. These results have important implications on the development of novel antimicrobial strategies. PMID:25000950

  13. Determination of integrated cloud liquid water and total precipitable water using a neural network algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Emmanuel; Mallet, Cecile; Casagrande, Luc; Klapisz, Claude

    1998-08-01

    A new algorithms is developed whereby the cloud liquid water path (LWP) and the total precipitable water (TPW) may be determined from microwave radiometric data. A large meteorological database obtained from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts forecast model is used to simulate, with a radiative transfer model, brightness temperatures (TB) at the top of the atmosphere for the special sensor microwave imagery frequencies. A single- hidden-layer ANN was used. An error backpropagation training algorithm was applied to train the ANN. A first comparison with a log-linear regression algorithm, shows that the ANN can represent more accurately the underlying relationship between TB and, TPW and LWP. The ANN seems to be able to give a better fit at large values of LWP. Furthermore in the case of TPW, a validation is made with radiosonde data, with another new algorithm.

  14. Genome-wide analysis captures the determinants of the antibiotic cross-resistance interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Lázár, Viktória; Nagy, István; Spohn, Réka; Csörgő, Bálint; Györkei, Ádám; Nyerges, Ákos; Horváth, Balázs; Vörös, Andrea; Busa-Fekete, Róbert; Hrtyan, Mónika; Bogos, Balázs; Méhi, Orsolya; Fekete, Gergely; Szappanos, Balázs; Kégl, Balázs; Papp, Balázs; Pál, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how evolution of antimicrobial resistance increases resistance to other drugs is a challenge of profound importance. By combining experimental evolution and genome sequencing of 63 laboratory-evolved lines, we charted a map of cross-resistance interactions between antibiotics in Escherichia coli, and explored the driving evolutionary principles. Here, we show that (1) convergent molecular evolution is prevalent across antibiotic treatments, (2) resistance conferring mutations simultaneously enhance sensitivity to many other drugs and (3) 27% of the accumulated mutations generate proteins with compromised activities, suggesting that antibiotic adaptation can partly be achieved without gain of novel function. By using knowledge on antibiotic properties, we examined the determinants of cross-resistance and identified chemogenomic profile similarity between antibiotics as the strongest predictor. In contrast, cross-resistance between two antibiotics is independent of whether they show synergistic effects in combination. These results have important implications on the development of novel antimicrobial strategies. PMID:25000950

  15. Automatic correction scheme for the temperature dependent overlap function of CHM15k ceilometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefele, Alexander; Poltera, Yann; Hervo, Maxime

    2016-04-01

    Imperfections in a lidar's overlap function lead to artefacts in the background, range and overlap corrected lidar signals. These artefacts can erroneously be interpreted as aerosol gradient or, in extreme cases, as cloud base leading to false cloud detection. A correct specification of the overlap function is hence crucial to use automatic elastic lidars (ceilometers) for the detection of the planetary boundary layer or low clouds. In this study an algorithm is presented to correct such artefacts. It is based on the assumption of a homogeneous boundary layer and a correct specification of the overlap function down to a minimum range, which must be situated within the boundary layer. The strength of the algorithm lies in a sophisticated quality check scheme which allows to reliably identify favorable atmospheric conditions. The algorithm has been applied to 2 years of data from a CHM15k ceilometer from Lufft. Backscatter signals corrected for background, range and overlap have been compared using the overlap function provided by the manufacturer and the one corrected with the presented algorithm. Differences between corrected and uncorrected signals reach up to 45% in the first 300m above ground. The amplitude of the correction turned out to be temperature dependent being larger for higher temperatures. A linear model of the correction as a function of the instrument's internal temperature has been derived from the experimental data. Case studies and a statistical analysis of the strongest gradient derived from corrected signals reveal that the temperature model is capable to correct overlap artefacts with high quality, in particular such due to diurnal variations. The presented correction method has the potential to significantly improve the detection of the boundary layer with gradient based methods because it removes false candidates and hence simplifies the attribution of the detected gradients to the planetary boundary layer. A particularly high benefit can be

  16. Trophic overlap between fish and riparian spiders: potential impacts of an invasive fish on terrestrial consumers.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michelle C; Woodford, Darragh J; Bellingan, Terence A; Weyl, Olaf L F; Potgieter, Michael J; Rivers-Moore, Nick A; Ellender, Bruce R; Fourie, Hermina E; Chimimba, Christian T

    2016-03-01

    Studies on resource sharing and partitioning generally consider species that occur in the same habitat. However, subsidies between linked habitats, such as streams and riparian zones, create potential for competition between populations which never directly interact. Evidence suggests that the abundance of riparian consumers declines after fish invasion and a subsequent increase in resource sharing of emerging insects. However, diet overlap has not been investigated. Here, we examine the trophic niche of native fish, invasive fish, and native spiders in South Africa using stable isotope analysis. We compared spider abundance and diet at upstream fishless and downstream fish sites and quantified niche overlap with invasive and native fish. Spider abundance was consistently higher at upstream fishless sites compared with paired downstream fish sites, suggesting that the fish reduced aquatic resource availability to riparian consumers. Spiders incorporated more aquatic than terrestrial insects in their diet, with aquatic insects accounting for 45-90% of spider mass. In three of four invaded trout rivers, we found that the average proportion of aquatic resources in web-building spider diet was higher at fishless sites compared to fish sites. The probability of web-building and ground spiders overlapping into the trophic niche of invasive brown and rainbow trout was as high as 26 and 51%, respectively. In contrast, the probability of spiders overlapping into the trophic niche of native fish was always less than 5%. Our results suggest that spiders share resources with invasive fish. In contrast, spiders had a low probability of trophic overlap with native fish indicating that the traits of invaders may be important in determining their influence on ecosystem subsidies. We have added to the growing body of evidence that invaders can have cross-ecosystem impacts and demonstrated that this can be due to niche overlap. PMID:27087934

  17. Orbit determination and time synchronization for a GEO/IGSO satellite navigation constellation with regional tracking network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, ShanShi; Hu, XiaoGong; Wu, Bin; Liu, Li; Qu, WeiJing; Guo, Rui; He, Feng; Cao, YueLing; Wu, XiaoLi; Zhu, LingFeng; Shi, Xin; Tan, HongLi

    2011-06-01

    Aiming at regional services, the space segment of COMPASS (Phase I) satellite navigation system is a constellation of Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), Inclined Geostationary Earth Orbit (IGSO) and Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Precise orbit determination (POD) for the satellites is limited by the geographic distribution of regional tracking stations. Independent time synchronization (TS) system is developed to supplement the regional tracking network, and satellite clock errors and orbit data may be obtained by simultaneously processing both tracking data and TS data. Consequently, inconsistency between tracking system and TS system caused by remaining instrumental errors not calibrated may decrease navigation accuracy. On the other hand, POD for the mixed constellation of GEO/IGSO/MEO with the regional tracking network leads to parameter estimations that are highly correlated. Notorious example of correlation is found between GEO's orbital elements and its clock errors. We estimate orbital elements and clock errors for a 3GEO+2IGSO constellation in this study using a multi-satellite precise orbit determination (MPOD) strategy, with which clock error elimination algorithm is applied to separate orbital and clock estimates to improve numerical efficiency. Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data are used to evaluate User Ranging Error (URE), which is the orbital error projected on a receiver's line-of-sight direction. Two-way radio-wave time transfer measurements are used to evaluate clock errors. Experimenting with data from the regional tracking network, we conclude that the fitting of code data is better than 1 m in terms of Root-Mean-Square (RMS), and fitting of carrier phase is better than 1 cm. For orbital evaluation, difference between computed receiver-satellite ranging based on estimated orbits and SLR measurements is better than 1 m (RMS). For clock estimates evaluation, 2-hour linear-fitting shows that the satellite clock rates are about 1.E-10 s

  18. Determination of Blood Glucose Concentration by Using Wavelet Transform and Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Vajravelu; Kumar, Nirmal

    2013-01-01

    Background: Early and non-invasive determination of blood glucose level is of great importance. We aimed to present a new technique to accurately infer the blood glucose concentration in peripheral blood flow using non-invasive optical monitoring system. Methods: The data for the research were obtained from 900 individuals. Of them, 750 people had diabetes mellitus (DM). The system was designed using a helium neon laser source of 632.8 nm wavelength with 5mW power, photo detectors and digital storage oscilloscope. The laser beam was directed through a single optical fiber to the index finger and the scattered beams were collected by the photo detectors placed circumferentially to the transmitting fiber. The received signals were filtered using band pass filter and finally sent to a digital storage oscilloscope. These signals were then decomposed into approximation and detail coefficients using modified Haar Wavelet Transform. Back propagation neural and radial basis functions were employed for the prediction of blood glucose concentration. Results: The data of 450 patients were randomly used for training, 225 for testing and the rest for validation. The data showed that outputs from radial basis function were nearer to the clinical value. Significant variations could be seen from signals obtained from patients with DM and those without DM. Conclusion: The proposed non-invasive optical glucose monitoring system is able to predict the glucose concentration by proving that there is a definite variation in hematological distribution between patients with DM and those without DM. PMID:23645958

  19. Radio interferometric determination of source positions utilizing deep space network antennas - 1971 to 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanselow, J. L.; Sovers, O. J.; Thomas, J. B.; Purcell, G. H., Jr.; Cohen, E. J.; Rogstad, D. H.; Skjerve, L. J.; Spitzmesser, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Approximately 2400 observations of extragalactic radio sources were made between August 1971 and February 1980 during 48 separate sessions. These consisted of 259 delay rate observations at 2.3 GHz (S-band), 796 delay and delay rate observations at either S-band of 8.3 GHz (X-band) and 1325 delay and delay rate observations recorded simultaneously at both S- and X-band. A single multiparameter fit has been applied to the observed values of delay and delay rate to extract astrometric and geophysical parameters from this decade-long sequence. The fit produced estimates of 784 parameters, including station locations, radio source positions, polar motion, Universal Time, the precession constant, and solid earth tides. The a priori model included gravitational bending, the 1980 IAU nutation series, the 1976 IAU expressions for Greenwich mean sidereal time and precession, BIH estimates of Universal Time and polar motion, and monthly mean values for zenith troposphere delay. The rms residuals were 0.52 nsec for delay and 0.30 psec/sec for delay rate. Intercontinental baseline lengths were determined with formal uncertainties of 5 to 10 cm. Universal Time and polar motion were measured at 49 epochs, with formal uncertainties (for the more recent data) of 0.5 msec for UT1 and 6 and 2 mas, respectively, for the X and Y components of polar motion. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28038

  20. Communications Overlapping in Fast Multipole Particle Dynamics Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzak, Jakub; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2005-03-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In molecular dynamics the fast multipole method (FMM) is an attractive alternative to Ewald summation for calculating electrostatic interactions due to the operation counts. However when applied to small particle systems and taken to many processors it has a high demand for interprocessor communication. In a distributed memory environment this demand severely limits applicability of the FMM to systems with O(10 K atoms). We present an algorithm that allows for fine grained overlap of communication and computation, while not sacrificing synchronization and determinism in the equations of motion. The method avoids contention in the communication subsystem making it feasible to use the FMM for smaller systems on larger numbers of processors. Our algorithm also facilitates application of multiple time stepping techniques within the FMM. We present scaling at a reasonably high level of accuracy compared with optimized Ewald methods.

  1. Optical axis jitter rejection for double overlapped adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qi; Luo, Xi; Li, Xinyang

    2016-04-01

    Optical axis jitters, or vibrations, which arise from wind shaking and structural oscillations of optical platforms, etc., cause a deleterious impact on the performance of adaptive optics systems. When conventional integrators are utilized to reject such high frequency and narrow-band disturbance, the benefits are quite small despite their acceptable capabilities to reject atmospheric turbulence. In our case, two suits of complete adaptive optics systems called double overlapped adaptive optics systems (DOAOS) are used to counteract both optical jitters and atmospheric turbulence. A novel algorithm aiming to remove vibrations is proposed by resorting to combine the Smith predictor and notch filer. With the help of loop shaping method, the algorithm will lead to an effective and stable controller, which makes the characteristics of error transfer function close to notch filters. On the basis of the spectral analysis of observed data, the peak frequency and bandwidth of vibrations can be identified in advance. Afterwards, the number of notch filters and their parameters will be determined using coordination descending method. The relationship between controller parameters and filtering features is discussed, and the robustness of the controller against varying parameters of the control object is investigated. Preliminary experiments are carried out to validate the proposed algorithms. The overall control performance of DOAOS is simulated. Results show that time delays are a limit of the performance, but the algorithm can be successfully implemented on our systems, which indicate that it has a great potential to reject jitters.

  2. An Artificial Neural Network Embedded Position and Orientation Determination Algorithm for Low Cost MEMS INS/GPS Integrated Sensors.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Chang, Hsiu-Wen; Li, Chia-Yuan; Huang, Yun-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Digital mobile mapping, which integrates digital imaging with direct geo-referencing, has developed rapidly over the past fifteen years. Direct geo-referencing is the determination of the time-variable position and orientation parameters for a mobile digital imager. The most common technologies used for this purpose today are satellite positioning using Global Positioning System (GPS) and Inertial Navigation System (INS) using an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). They are usually integrated in such a way that the GPS receiver is the main position sensor, while the IMU is the main orientation sensor. The Kalman Filter (KF) is considered as the optimal estimation tool for real-time INS/GPS integrated kinematic position and orientation determination. An intelligent hybrid scheme consisting of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and KF has been proposed to overcome the limitations of KF and to improve the performance of the INS/GPS integrated system in previous studies. However, the accuracy requirements of general mobile mapping applications can't be achieved easily, even by the use of the ANN-KF scheme. Therefore, this study proposes an intelligent position and orientation determination scheme that embeds ANN with conventional Rauch-Tung-Striebel (RTS) smoother to improve the overall accuracy of a MEMS INS/GPS integrated system in post-mission mode. By combining the Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) INS/GPS integrated system and the intelligent ANN-RTS smoother scheme proposed in this study, a cheaper but still reasonably accurate position and orientation determination scheme can be anticipated. PMID:22574034

  3. An Artificial Neural Network Embedded Position and Orientation Determination Algorithm for Low Cost MEMS INS/GPS Integrated Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Chang, Hsiu-Wen; Li, Chia-Yuan; Huang, Yun-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Digital mobile mapping, which integrates digital imaging with direct geo-referencing, has developed rapidly over the past fifteen years. Direct geo-referencing is the determination of the time-variable position and orientation parameters for a mobile digital imager. The most common technologies used for this purpose today are satellite positioning using Global Positioning System (GPS) and Inertial Navigation System (INS) using an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). They are usually integrated in such a way that the GPS receiver is the main position sensor, while the IMU is the main orientation sensor. The Kalman Filter (KF) is considered as the optimal estimation tool for real-time INS/GPS integrated kinematic position and orientation determination. An intelligent hybrid scheme consisting of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and KF has been proposed to overcome the limitations of KF and to improve the performance of the INS/GPS integrated system in previous studies. However, the accuracy requirements of general mobile mapping applications can’t be achieved easily, even by the use of the ANN-KF scheme. Therefore, this study proposes an intelligent position and orientation determination scheme that embeds ANN with conventional Rauch-Tung-Striebel (RTS) smoother to improve the overall accuracy of a MEMS INS/GPS integrated system in post-mission mode. By combining the Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) INS/GPS integrated system and the intelligent ANN-RTS smoother scheme proposed in this study, a cheaper but still reasonably accurate position and orientation determination scheme can be anticipated. PMID:22574034

  4. Phase Shifting Capacity of the Circadian Pacemaker Determined by the SCN Neuronal Network Organization

    PubMed Central

    vanderLeest, Henk Tjebbe; Rohling, Jos H. T.; Michel, Stephan; Meijer, Johanna H.

    2009-01-01

    Background In mammals, a major circadian pacemaker that drives daily rhythms is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), at the base of the hypothalamus. The SCN receive direct light input via the retino-hypothalamic tract. Light during the early night induces phase delays of circadian rhythms while during the late night it leads to phase advances. The effects of light on the circadian system are strongly dependent on the photoperiod to which animals are exposed. An explanation for this phenomenon is currently lacking. Methodology and Principal Findings We recorded running wheel activity in C57 mice and observed large amplitude phase shifts in short photoperiods and small shifts in long photoperiods. We investigated whether these different light responses under short and long days are expressed within the SCN by electrophysiological recordings of electrical impulse frequency in SCN slices. Application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) induced sustained increments in electrical activity that were not significantly different in the slices from long and short photoperiods. These responses led to large phase shifts in slices from short days and small phase shifts in slices from long days. An analysis of neuronal subpopulation activity revealed that in short days the amplitude of the rhythm was larger than in long days. Conclusions The data indicate that the photoperiodic dependent phase responses are intrinsic to the SCN. In contrast to earlier predictions from limit cycle theory, we observed large phase shifting responses in high amplitude rhythms in slices from short days, and small shifts in low amplitude rhythms in slices from long days. We conclude that the photoperiodic dependent phase responses are determined by the SCN and propose that synchronization among SCN neurons enhances the phase shifting capacity of the circadian system. PMID:19305510

  5. 42 CFR 73.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... have been genetically modified. (d) Overlap select agents or toxins that meet any of the following... Elements, Recombinant and/or Synthetic Nucleic Acids, and Recombinant and/or Synthetic Organisms:...

  6. 42 CFR 73.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... genetically modified. (d) Overlap select agents or toxins that meet any of the following criteria are excluded... Equine Encephalitis virus (c) Genetic Elements, Recombinant Nucleic Acids, and Recombinant Organisms:...

  7. 42 CFR 73.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... genetically modified. (d) Overlap select agents or toxins that meet any of the following criteria are excluded... Equine Encephalitis virus (c) Genetic Elements, Recombinant Nucleic Acids, and Recombinant Organisms:...

  8. 42 CFR 73.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... have been genetically modified. (d) Overlap select agents or toxins that meet any of the following... Elements, Recombinant and/or Synthetic Nucleic Acids, and Recombinant and/or Synthetic Organisms:...

  9. 42 CFR 73.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... genetically modified. (d) Overlap select agents or toxins that meet any of the following criteria are excluded... Equine Encephalitis virus (c) Genetic Elements, Recombinant Nucleic Acids, and Recombinant Organisms:...

  10. General Properties of Overlap Operators in Disordered Quantum Spin Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoi, C.

    2016-04-01

    We study short-range quantum spin systems with Gaussian disorder. We obtain quantum mechanical extensions of the Ghirlanda-Guerra identities. We discuss properties of overlap spin operators with these identities.

  11. Analysis of Surface Roughness at Overlapping Laser Shock Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F. Z.; Zhang, Z. D.; Zhou, J. Z.; Lu, J. Z.; Zhang, Y. K.

    2016-02-01

    The overlapping effects on surface roughness are studied when samples are treated by laser shock peening (LSP). Surface roughness of overlapped circular laser spot is calculated by ISO 25178 height parameters. The usually used overlapping styles namely isosceles-right-triangle-style (AAP) and equilateral-triangle-style (AAA) are carefully investigated when the overlapping degree in x-axis (ηx) is below 50%. Surface roughness of isosceles-right-triangle-style attains its minimum value at ηx of 29.3%, and attains its maximum value at ηx of 43.6%. Surface roughness of equilateral-triangle-style attains its minimum value at ηx of 42.3%, and attains its maximum value at ηx of 32%. Experimental results are well consistent with theoretical analysis.

  12. SART-Type Image Reconstruction from Overlapped Projections

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hengyong; Ji, Changguo; Wang, Ge

    2011-01-01

    To maximize the time-integrated X-ray flux from multiple X-ray sources and shorten the data acquisition process, a promising way is to allow overlapped projections from multiple sources being simultaneously on without involving the source multiplexing technology. The most challenging task in this configuration is to perform image reconstruction effectively and efficiently from overlapped projections. Inspired by the single-source simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART), we hereby develop a multisource SART-type reconstruction algorithm regularized by a sparsity-oriented constraint in the soft-threshold filtering framework to reconstruct images from overlapped projections. Our numerical simulation results verify the correctness of the proposed algorithm and demonstrate the advantage of image reconstruction from overlapped projections. PMID:20871854

  13. Melt ponds on Arctic sea ice determined from MODIS satellite data using an artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösel, A.; Kaleschke, L.; Birnbaum, G.

    2012-04-01

    Melt ponds on sea ice strongly reduce the surface albedo and accelerate the decay of Arctic sea ice. Due to different spectral properties of snow, ice, and water, the fractional coverage of these distinct surface types can be derived from multispectral sensors like the Moderate Resolution Image Spectroradiometer (MODIS) using a spectral unmixing algorithm. The unmixing was implemented using a multilayer perceptron to reduce computational costs. Arctic-wide melt pond fractions and sea ice concentrations are derived from the level 3 MODIS surface reflectance product. The validation of the MODIS melt pond data set was conducted with aerial photos from the MELTEX campaign 2008 in the Beaufort Sea, data sets from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) for 2000 and 2001 from four sites spread over the entire Arctic, and with ship observations from the trans-Arctic HOTRAX cruise in 2005. The root-mean-square errors range from 3.8 % for the comparison with HOTRAX data, over 10.7 % for the comparison with NSIDC data, to 10.3 % and 11.4 % for the comparison with MELTEX data, with coefficient of determination ranging from R2=0.28 to R2=0.45. The mean annual cycle of the melt pond fraction per grid cell for the entire Arctic shows a strong increase in June, reaching a maximum of 15 % by the end of June. The zonal mean of melt pond fractions indicates a dependence of the temporal development of melt ponds on the geographical latitude, and has its maximum in mid-July at latitudes between 80° and 88° N. Furthermore, the MODIS results are used to estimate the influence of melt ponds on retrievals of sea ice concentrations from passive microwave data. Results from a case study comparing sea ice concentrations from ARTIST Sea Ice-, NASA Team 2-, and Bootstrap-algorithms with MODIS sea ice concentrations indicate an underestimation of around 40 % for sea ice concentrations retrieved with microwave algorithms.

  14. Simultaneous determination of thiocyanate and salicylate by a combined UV-spectrophotometric detection principal component artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hajir; Ghaedi, Mehrorang

    2006-01-01

    A modified principle component artificial neural network (PC-ANN) model is developed for simultaneous determination of thiocyanate and salycilate concentration after passing through the bulk of a liquid membrane by tri-phenyl benzyl phosphonium chloride. All calibration, and test samples data were obtained using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. In this way, a modified PC-ANN consisting of three layers of nodes was trained by combination of Bayesian-Levenberg-Marquardt as training rule. Sigmoid and liner transfer functions were used in the hidden and output layers respectively to facilitate nonlinear calibration. The model could accurately estimate the concentration of components with acceptable precision and accuracy, for mixtures. The PC-ANN model exhibits a good ability for the simultaneous determination of the thiocyanate and salycilate in concentration range 0.5 x 10(-4) mol.l(-1) up to 5.0 x 10(-4) mol.l(-1) with Root Mean square error (2.22% and 2.20%, for thiocyanate and salycilate, respectively) and high correlation coefficients (R2= 0.998 or greater). Results obtained with modified trained PC-ANN were compared with stepwise linear regression (SMLR) model. Validation of the two models shows a better ability in estimation of the modified PC-ANN as compared with the SMLR model (MSRE given are 3.12%, 6.31%.). PMID:17217170

  15. Artificial neural network for Cu quantitative determination in soil using a portable Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Edilene C.; Milori, Débora M. B. P.; Ferreira, Ednaldo J.; Da Silva, Robson M.; Martin-Neto, Ladislau

    2008-10-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an advanced analytical technique for elemental determination based on direct measurement of optical emission of excited species on a laser induced plasma. In the realm of elemental analysis, LIBS has great potential to accomplish direct analysis independently of physical sample state (solid, liquid or gas). Presently, LIBS has been easily employed for qualitative analysis, nevertheless, in order to perform quantitative analysis, some effort is still required since calibration represents a difficult issue. Artificial neural network (ANN) is a machine learning paradigm inspired on biological nervous systems. Recently, ANNs have been used in many applications and its classification and prediction capabilities are especially useful for spectral analysis. In this paper an ANN was used as calibration strategy for LIBS, aiming Cu determination in soil samples. Spectra of 59 samples from a heterogenic set of reference soil samples and their respective Cu concentration were used for calibration and validation. Simple linear regression (SLR) and wrapper approach were the two strategies employed to select a set of wavelengths for ANN learning. Cross validation was applied, following ANN training, for verification of prediction accuracy. The ANN showed good efficiency for Cu predictions although the features of portable instrumentation employed. The proposed method presented a limit of detection (LOD) of 2.3 mg dm - 3 of Cu and a mean squared error (MSE) of 0.5 for the predictions.

  16. A Reexamination of the Small Overlap Frontal Crash

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Paul; Morgan, Richard M.; Mohan, Pradeep; Kan, Cing-Dao; Shanks, Kurt; Jin, Wook; Tangirala, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine and rank the Small Overlap Frontal Crash as one of the eight-group taxonomy proposed by Ford. The Ford taxonomy classifies real-world frontal-impact crashes based on the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS). Frontally-impacted vehicles were identified for 1985 – 2008 model year passenger vehicles with Collision Deformation Classification (CDC) data from the 1995 – 2008 years of NASS. Small overlap frontal cases were identified where there was no engagement of the vehicle frame rails, and the direct damage was located entirely outside of the vehicle frame rails. The results are that full engagement and offset (offset category means the direct damage overlaps the vehicle frame rail, with the center of direct damage between the frame rails) were the most frequent crashes contributing 35% each. The frequency of the small overlap frontal was 6%. The risks of injury (AIS ≥ 2) for the full engagement, offset, and small overlap were 8%, 6%, and 3% respectively. For this study, the number of small overlap vehicles was 1,118 and the number of injured nearside occupants was 100. This study—following the Ford approach and reasonably identifying the location of the longitudinal rails based on CDC—suggests that the small overlap is at worst a moderately dangerous crash in the overall scheme of frontal crashes. The implications of this study are that the safety community should reexamine the significance of the small overlap frontal crash against an overall taxonomy of crashes. PMID:21050598

  17. Dynamical overlap fermions in the epsilon-regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukaya, Hidenori

    2006-12-01

    We report on the two-flavor QCD simulation in the ɛ-regime using the overlap fermion formu- lation. Sea quark mass is reduced to ˜ 2 MeV on a 163 × 32 lattice with the lattice spacing a 0.11 fm. Topological charge is fixed at Q = 0. We compare the eigenvalue distribution of the overlap-Dirac operator with the prediction of the chiral random matrix theory. Preliminary results on meson correlators are also reported.

  18. Overlap in prevalence between various types of environmental intolerance.

    PubMed

    Palmquist, Eva; Claeson, Anna-Sara; Neely, Gregory; Stenberg, Berndt; Nordin, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Environmental intolerance (EI) is characterized by attribution of several, multisystem symptoms to specific environmental exposures, such as exposure to odorous/pungent chemicals, certain buildings, electromagnetic fields (EMFs) and everyday sounds. The symptoms are medically unexplained, non-specific and the symptoms overlap between different types of EI. To approach the issue of underlying mechanisms the matter of overlap in prevalence between intolerances can provide valuable information. The aim of the study was to examine if the overlap between intolerance to odorous/pungent chemicals, certain buildings, EMFs and sounds is larger than the expected overlap if no association would exist between them. The study was using cross-sectional data from the Västerbotten Environmental Health Study in Sweden; a large questionnaire-based survey. 8520 adults (18-79 years) were randomly selected after stratification for age and sex, of whom 3406 (40%) participated. Individuals with the four types of intolerance were identified either through self-report, or by having been physician-diagnosed with a specific EI. The overlaps between the four EIs were greater than predictions based on coincidence for both self-reported and diagnosed cases (except for the overlap between diagnosed intolerance to sounds and EMFs). The results raise the question whether different types of EI share similar underlying mechanisms, or at least that the sufferers of EI share some predisposition to acquire the conditions. PMID:24029726

  19. Radial sets: interactive visual analysis of large overlapping sets.

    PubMed

    Alsallakh, Bilal; Aigner, Wolfgang; Miksch, Silvia; Hauser, Helwig

    2013-12-01

    In many applications, data tables contain multi-valued attributes that often store the memberships of the table entities to multiple sets such as which languages a person masters, which skills an applicant documents, or which features a product comes with. With a growing number of entities, the resulting element-set membership matrix becomes very rich of information about how these sets overlap. Many analysis tasks targeted at set-typed data are concerned with these overlaps as salient features of such data. This paper presents Radial Sets, a novel visual technique to analyze set memberships for a large number of elements. Our technique uses frequency-based representations to enable quickly finding and analyzing different kinds of overlaps between the sets, and relating these overlaps to other attributes of the table entities. Furthermore, it enables various interactions to select elements of interest, find out if they are over-represented in specific sets or overlaps, and if they exhibit a different distribution for a specific attribute compared to the rest of the elements. These interactions allow formulating highly-expressive visual queries on the elements in terms of their set memberships and attribute values. As we demonstrate via two usage scenarios, Radial Sets enable revealing and analyzing a multitude of overlapping patterns between large sets, beyond the limits of state-of-the-art techniques. PMID:24051816

  20. A Bayesian variable selection procedure to rank overlapping gene sets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome-wide expression profiling using microarrays or sequence-based technologies allows us to identify genes and genetic pathways whose expression patterns influence complex traits. Different methods to prioritize gene sets, such as the genes in a given molecular pathway, have been described. In many cases, these methods test one gene set at a time, and therefore do not consider overlaps among the pathways. Here, we present a Bayesian variable selection method to prioritize gene sets that overcomes this limitation by considering all gene sets simultaneously. We applied Bayesian variable selection to differential expression to prioritize the molecular and genetic pathways involved in the responses to Escherichia coli infection in Danish Holstein cows. Results We used a Bayesian variable selection method to prioritize Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. We used our data to study how the variable selection method was affected by overlaps among the pathways. In addition, we compared our approach to another that ignores the overlaps, and studied the differences in the prioritization. The variable selection method was robust to a change in prior probability and stable given a limited number of observations. Conclusions Bayesian variable selection is a useful way to prioritize gene sets while considering their overlaps. Ignoring the overlaps gives different and possibly misleading results. Additional procedures may be needed in cases of highly overlapping pathways that are hard to prioritize. PMID:22554182

  1. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  2. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution.

    PubMed

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  3. Analysis of speech signals' characteristics based on MF-DFA with moving overlapping windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huan; He, Shaofang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, multi-fractal characteristics of speech signals are analyzed based on MF-DFA, and it is found that the multi-fractal features are influenced greatly by frame length and noise, besides, there is a little difference between them among speech frames. Secondly, motivated by framing and using frame shift to ensure the continuity and smooth transition of speech in speech signals processing, an advanced MF-DFA (MF-DFA with forward moving overlapping windows) is proposed. The length of moving overlapping windows is determined by parameter θ. Given the value of time scale s, we have MF-DFA with the maximum moving overlapping windows and MF-DFA with half overlapping windows when θ = 1 / s and θ = 1 / 2 respectively. Moreover, when θ = 1 we exactly have MF-DFA. Numerical experiments and analysis illustrate that the multi-fractal characteristics based on AMF-DFA outperform MF-DFA and MF-DMA in stability, noise immunity and discrimination.

  4. A new probabilistic method for quantifying n-dimensional ecological niches and niche overlap.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Heidi K; Lysy, Martin; Power, Michael; Stasko, Ashley D; Johnson, Jim D; Reist, James D

    2015-02-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the development of statistical tools to quantify trophic relationships using stable isotope ratios, including tools that address size and overlap of isotopic niches. We build upon recent progress and propose a new probabilistic method for determining niche region and pairwise niche overlap that can be extended beyond two dimensions, provides directional estimates of niche overlap, accounts for species-specific distributions in niche space, and, unlike geometric methods, produces consistent and unique bivariate projections of multivariate data. We define the niche region (NR) as a given 95% (or user-defined a) probability region in multivariate space. Overlap is calculated as the probability that an individual from species A is found in the N(R) of species B. Uncertainty is accounted for in a Bayesian framework, and is the only aspect of the methodology that depends on sample size. Application is illustrated with three-dimensional stable isotope data, but practitioners could use any continuous indicator of ecological niche in any number of dimensions. We suggest that this represents an advance in our ability to quantify and compare ecological niches in a way that is more consistent with Hutchinson's concept of an "n-dimensional hypervolume". PMID:26240852

  5. Identifying hierarchical and overlapping protein complexes based on essential protein-protein interactions and "seed-expanding" method.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Many evidences have demonstrated that protein complexes are overlapping and hierarchically organized in PPI networks. Meanwhile, the large size of PPI network wants complex detection methods have low time complexity. Up to now, few methods can identify overlapping and hierarchical protein complexes in a PPI network quickly. In this paper, a novel method, called MCSE, is proposed based on λ-module and "seed-expanding." First, it chooses seeds as essential PPIs or edges with high edge clustering values. Then, it identifies protein complexes by expanding each seed to a λ-module. MCSE is suitable for large PPI networks because of its low time complexity. MCSE can identify overlapping protein complexes naturally because a protein can be visited by different seeds. MCSE uses the parameter λ_th to control the range of seed expanding and can detect a hierarchical organization of protein complexes by tuning the value of λ_th. Experimental results of S. cerevisiae show that this hierarchical organization is similar to that of known complexes in MIPS database. The experimental results also show that MCSE outperforms other previous competing algorithms, such as CPM, CMC, Core-Attachment, Dpclus, HC-PIN, MCL, and NFC, in terms of the functional enrichment and matching with known protein complexes. PMID:25143945

  6. Identifying Hierarchical and Overlapping Protein Complexes Based on Essential Protein-Protein Interactions and “Seed-Expanding” Method

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jun; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Many evidences have demonstrated that protein complexes are overlapping and hierarchically organized in PPI networks. Meanwhile, the large size of PPI network wants complex detection methods have low time complexity. Up to now, few methods can identify overlapping and hierarchical protein complexes in a PPI network quickly. In this paper, a novel method, called MCSE, is proposed based on λ-module and “seed-expanding.” First, it chooses seeds as essential PPIs or edges with high edge clustering values. Then, it identifies protein complexes by expanding each seed to a λ-module. MCSE is suitable for large PPI networks because of its low time complexity. MCSE can identify overlapping protein complexes naturally because a protein can be visited by different seeds. MCSE uses the parameter λ_th to control the range of seed expanding and can detect a hierarchical organization of protein complexes by tuning the value of λ_th. Experimental results of S. cerevisiae show that this hierarchical organization is similar to that of known complexes in MIPS database. The experimental results also show that MCSE outperforms other previous competing algorithms, such as CPM, CMC, Core-Attachment, Dpclus, HC-PIN, MCL, and NFC, in terms of the functional enrichment and matching with known protein complexes. PMID:25143945

  7. Determination of Spatio-Temporal Characteristics of D-region Electron Density during Annular Solar Eclipse from VLF Network Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, T.; Hobara, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A major part of the path of the annular solar eclipse of May 20, 2012 (magnitude 0.9439) was over southern Japan. The D-region ionospheric changes associated with that eclipse, led to several degree of observable perturbations of sub-ionospheric very low frequency (VLF) radio signal. The University of Electro-Communications (UEC) operates VLF observation network over Japan. The solar eclipse associated signal changes were recorded in several receiving stations (Rx) simultaneously for the VLF signals coming from NWC/19.8kHz, JJI/22.2kHz, JJY/40.0kHz, NLK/24.8kHz and other VLF transmitters (Tx). These temporal dependences of VLF signal perturbation have been analyzed and the spatio-temporal characteristics of respective sub-ionospheric perturbations has already been studied by earlier workers using 2D-Finite Difference Time Domain method of simulation. In this work, we determine the spatial scale, depth and temporal dependence of lower ionospheric perturbation in consistence with umbral and penumbral motion. We considered the 2-parameter D-region ionospheric model with exponential electron density profile. To model the solar obscuration effect over it, we assumed a generalized space-time dependent 2-dimensional elliptical Gaussian distribution for ionospheric parameters, such as, effective reflection height (h') and sharpness factor (β). The depth (△hmax, △βmax), center of shadow (lato(t), lono(t)) and spatial scale (σlat,lon) of that Gaussian distribution are used as model parameters. In the vicinity of the eclipse zone, we compute the VLF signal perturbations using Long Wave Propagation Capability (LWPC) code for several signal propagation paths. The propagation path characteristics, such as, ground and water conductivity and geomagnetic effect on ionosphere are considered from standard LWPC prescriptions. The model parameters are tuned to set an optimum agreement between our computation and observed positive and negative type of VLF perturbations. Thus

  8. Investigation of the Chirikov resonance overlap criteria for equatorial magnetosonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. N.; Balikhin, M. A.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Moiseenko, I.

    2015-10-01

    Observations of equatorial magnetosonic waves made during the Cluster Inner Magnetospheric Campaign clearly show discrete spectra consisting of emissions around harmonics of the proton gyrofrequency. Equatorial magnetosonic waves are important because of their ability to efficiently scatter electrons in energy and pitch angle. This wave-particle interaction is numerically modeled through the use of diffusion coefficients, calculated based on a continuous spectrum such as that observed by spectrum analyzers. Using the Chirikov overlap resonance criterion, the calculation of the diffusion coefficient will be assessed to determine whether they should be calculated based on the discrete spectral features as opposed to a continuous spectrum. For the period studied, it is determined that the discrete nature of the waves does fulfill the Chirikov overlap criterion and so the use of quasi-linear theory with the assumption of a continuous frequency spectrum is valid for the calculation of diffusion coefficients.

  9. Determination of the mechanical and physical properties of cartilage by coupling poroelastic-based finite element models of indentation with artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Arbabi, Vahid; Pouran, Behdad; Campoli, Gianni; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2016-03-21

    One of the most widely used techniques to determine the mechanical properties of cartilage is based on indentation tests and interpretation of the obtained force-time or displacement-time data. In the current computational approaches, one needs to simulate the indentation test with finite element models and use an optimization algorithm to estimate the mechanical properties of cartilage. The modeling procedure is cumbersome, and the simulations need to be repeated for every new experiment. For the first time, we propose a method for fast and accurate estimation of the mechanical and physical properties of cartilage as a poroelastic material with the aid of artificial neural networks. In our study, we used finite element models to simulate the indentation for poroelastic materials with wide combinations of mechanical and physical properties. The obtained force-time curves are then divided into three parts: the first two parts of the data is used for training and validation of an artificial neural network, while the third part is used for testing the trained network. The trained neural network receives the force-time curves as the input and provides the properties of cartilage as the output. We observed that the trained network could accurately predict the properties of cartilage within the range of properties for which it was trained. The mechanical and physical properties of cartilage could therefore be estimated very fast, since no additional finite element modeling is required once the neural network is trained. The robustness of the trained artificial neural network in determining the properties of cartilage based on noisy force-time data was assessed by introducing noise to the simulated force-time data. We found that the training procedure could be optimized so as to maximize the robustness of the neural network against noisy force-time data. PMID:26944689

  10. Presentation of dynamically overlapping auditory messages in user interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, A.L.

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation describes a methodology and example implementation for the dynamic regulation of temporally overlapping auditory messages in computer-user interfaces. The regulation mechanism exists to schedule numerous overlapping auditory messages in such a way that each individual message remains perceptually distinct from all others. The method is based on the research conducted in the area of auditory scene analysis. While numerous applications have been engineered to present the user with temporally overlapped auditory output, they have generally been designed without any structured method of controlling the perceptual aspects of the sound. The method of scheduling temporally overlapping sounds has been extended to function in an environment where numerous applications can present sound independently of each other. The Centralized Audio Presentation System is a global regulation mechanism that controls all audio output requests made from all currently running applications. The notion of multimodal objects is explored in this system as well. Each audio request that represents a particular message can include numerous auditory representations, such as musical motives and voice. The Presentation System scheduling algorithm selects the best representation according to the current global auditory system state, and presents it to the user within the request constraints of priority and maximum acceptable latency. The perceptual conflicts between temporally overlapping audio messages are examined in depth through the Computational Auditory Scene Synthesizer. At the heart of this system is a heuristic-based auditory scene synthesis scheduling method. Different schedules of overlapped sounds are evaluated and assigned penalty scores. High scores represent presentations that include perceptual conflicts between over-lapping sounds. Low scores indicate fewer and less serious conflicts. A user study was conducted to validate that the perceptual difficulties predicted by

  11. Different patterns of codon usage in the overlapping polymerase and surface genes of hepatitis B virus suggest a de novo origin by modular evolution.

    PubMed

    Pavesi, Angelo

    2015-12-01

    The polymerase (P) and surface (S) genes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) show the longest gene overlap in animal viruses. Gene overlaps originate by the overprinting of a novel frame onto an ancestral pre-existing frame. Identifying which frame is ancestral and which frame is de novo (the genealogy of the overlap) is an appealing topic. However, the P/S overlap of HBV is an intriguing paradox, because both genes are indispensable for virus survival. Thus, the hypothesis of a primordial virus without the surface protein or without the polymerase makes no biological sense. With the aim to determine the genealogy of the overlap, the codon usage of the overlapping frames P and S was compared to that of the non-overlapping region. It was found that the overlap of human HBV had two patterns of codon usage. One was localized in the 59 one-third of the overlap and the other in the 39 two-thirds. By extending the analysis to non-human HBVs, it was found that this feature occurred in all hepadnaviruses. Under the assumption that the ancestral frame has a codon usage significantly closer to that of the non-overlapping region than the de novo frame, the ancestral frames in the 59 and 39 region of the overlap could be predicted. They were, respectively, frame S and frame P. These results suggest that the spacer domain of the polymerase and the S domain of the surface protein originated de novo by overprinting. They support a modular evolution hypothesis for the origin of the overlap. PMID:26446206

  12. Habitat selection and overlap of Atlantic salmon and smallmouth bass juveniles in nursery streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wathen, G.; Coghlan, S.M., Jr.; Zydlewski, J.; Trial, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Introduced smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu have invaded much of the historic freshwater habitat ofAtlantic salmon Salmo salar in North America, yet little is known about the ecological interactions between the two species.We investigated the possibility of competition for habitat between age-0 Atlantic salmon and age-0 and age-1 smallmouth bass by means of in situ observations and a mesocosm experiment.We used snorkel observation to identify the degree and timing of overlap in habitat use in our in situ observations and to describe habitat shifts by Atlantic salmon in the presence of smallmouth bass in our mesocosm experiments. In late July 2008, we observed substantial overlap in the depths and mean water column velocities used by both species in sympatric in situ conditions and an apparent shift by age-0 Atlantic salmon to shallower water that coincided with the period of high overlap. In the mesocosm experiments, we detected no overlap or habitat shifts by age-0 Atlantic salmon in the presence age-1 smallmouth bass and low overlap and no habitat shifts of Atlantic salmon and age-0 smallmouth bass in fall 2009. In 2009, summer floods with sustained high flows and low temperatures resulted in the nearly complete reproductive failure of the smallmouth bass in our study streams, and we did not observe a midsummer habitat shift by Atlantic salmon similar to that seen in 2008. Although this prevented us from replicating our 2008 experiments under similar conditions, the virtual year-class failure of smallmouth bass itself is enlightening. We suggest that future studies incorporate the effects of varying temperature and discharge to determine how abiotic factors affect the interactions between these species and thus mediate the outcomes of potential competition. ?? American Fisheries Society 2011.

  13. Increasing efficiency in intermediate band solar cells with overlapping absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Akshay; Krich, Jacob J.

    2016-07-01

    Intermediate band (IB) materials are promising candidates for realizing high efficiency solar cells. In IB photovoltaics, photons are absorbed in one of three possible electronic transitions—valence to conduction band, valence to intermediate band, or intermediate to conduction band. With fully concentrated sunlight, when the band gaps have been chosen appropriately, the highest efficiency IB solar cells require that these three absorptions be non-overlapping, so absorbed photons of fixed energy contribute to only one transition. The realistic case of overlapping absorptions, where the transitions compete for photons, is generally considered to be a source of loss. We show that overlapping absorptions can in fact lead to significant improvements in IB solar cell efficiencies, especially for IB that are near the middle of the band gap. At low to moderate concentration, the highest efficiency requires overlapping absorptions. We use the detailed-balance method and indicate how much overlap of the absorptions is required to achieve efficiency improvements, comparing with some known cases. These results substantially broaden the set of materials that can be suitable for high-efficiency IB solar cells.

  14. [Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome among patients with stable COPD].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, M-S; Nguyen Dang, D; Schleich, F; Manise, M; Corhay, J-L; Louis, R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe the frequency and characteristics of the overlap syndrome among stable COPD patients (stage 2 to 4 according to GOLD). Material and method: We studied 46 patients with stable COPD recruited from the outpatient clinic of the CHU of Liege from May 2013 to April 2014. Definition of the overlap syndrome was based on the coexistence of post-bronchodilation FEV1/FVC < 70% and, either, an asthmatic history before the age of 40, or, at least, two functional and immune-inflammatory asthmatic traits : 1) significant FEV1 reversibility to inhaled bronchodilator (FEVI change >/= 200 ml and >/= 12% after bronchodilation), 2) eosinophilic inflammation : sputum eosinophils ≥ 3%,blood eosinophils ≥ 400/μl, or FENO ≥ 45 ppb, 3) clinical history of airway allergy, or total serum IgE ≥ 113 KU/l, or RAST ≥ 0,35 KU/l against major aeroallergens. 37% patients had the COPD-asthma overlap syndrome and this group had a higher CAT score reflecting more severe symptoms (24,6 ± 8,1 vs 19,4 ± 8, p < 0,05) despite similar level of airway obstruction. The transfer coefficient DLCO/VA was preserved in the overlap group (97 ± 24%), but altered in the pure COPD group (80 ± 20%), p < 0,05. Approximately one third of COPD patients present with the overlap syndrome and they are more symptomatic without any evidence of more severe airway obstruction. PMID:25902605

  15. Control of the crystalline structure of inkjet-printed semiconductor layers using overlap condition and surface wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Byung Ju; Oh, Je Hoon

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate the effects of overlap condition and surface wettability of dielectric layers on the drying process and crystalline structure of inkjet-printed semiconductor layers. 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS pentacene) was utilized to inkjet-print the semiconductor layer. Using various overlap conditions, semiconductor layers were inkjet-printed on dielectric layers with different surface wettabilities. It is observed that crystal growth and the resulting crystalline structures in inkjet-printed semiconductor layers are primarily determined by evaporation behavior, particularly the contact line movement of the drying semiconductor layers, which can be controlled via the overlap condition. With inappropriate overlap conditions, randomly oriented TIPS pentacene crystalline structures are generated in the semiconductor layer through irregular contact line recession. One-dimensionally oriented TIPS pentacene crystal structures can be obtained using the optimized overlap condition of 50% as a result of the uniform contact line movement. Relatively hydrophobic dielectric layers help to generate good crystallinity in the semiconductor layer. All-inkjet-printed organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) with well-oriented TIPS pentacene crystalline structures in the semiconductor layer show a high field effect mobility of ~0.1 cm2 V-1s-1, suggesting that, when printing inkjet semiconductor layers, the overlap condition and surface wettability of the dielectric layer are important factors for generating a well-oriented crystalline structure and thereby fabricating high-performance all-inkjet-printed OTFTs.

  16. Cloud Overlapping Detection Algorithm Using Solar and IR Wavelengths With GOSE Data Over ARM/SGP Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamoto, Kazuaki; Minnis, Patrick; Smith, William L., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most perplexing problems in satellite cloud remote sensing is the overlapping of cloud layers. Although most techniques assume a 1-layer cloud system in a given retrieval of cloud properties, many observations are affected by radiation from more than one cloud layer. As such, cloud overlap can cause errors in the retrieval of many properties including cloud height, optical depth, phase, and particle size. A variety of methods have been developed to identify overlapped clouds in a given satellite imager pixel. Baum el al. (1995) used CO2 slicing and a spatial coherence method to demonstrate a possible analysis method for nighttime detection of multilayered clouds. Jin and Rossow (1997) also used a multispectral CO2 slicing technique for a global analysis of overlapped cloud amount. Lin et al. (1999) used a combination infrared, visible, and microwave data to detect overlapped clouds over water. Recently, Baum and Spinhirne (2000) proposed 1.6 and 11 microns. bispectral threshold method. While all of these methods have made progress in solving this stubborn problem, none have yet proven satisfactory for continuous and consistent monitoring of multilayer cloud systems. It is clear that detection of overlapping clouds from passive instruments such as satellite radiometers is in an immature stage of development and requires additional research. Overlapped cloud systems also affect the retrievals of cloud properties over the ARM domains (e.g., Minnis et al 1998) and hence should identified as accurately as possible. To reach this goal, it is necessary to determine which information can be exploited for detecting multilayered clouds from operational meteorological satellite data used by ARM. This paper examines the potential information available in spectral data available on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imager and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) used over the ARM SGP and NSA sites to study the

  17. Cloud Overlapping Detection Algorithm Using Solar and IR Wavelengths with GOES Data Over ARM/SGP Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamoto, K.; Minnis, P.; Smith, W. L., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most perplexing problems in satellite cloud remote sensing is the overlapping of cloud layers. Although most techniques assume a one layer cloud system in a given retrieval of cloud properties, many observations are affected by radiation from more than one cloud layer. As such, cloud overlap can cause errors in the retrieval of many properties including cloud height, optical depth, phase, and particle size. A variety of methods have been developed to identify overlapped clouds in a given satellite imager pixel. Baum et al used CO2 slicing and a spatial coherence method to demonstrate a possible analysis method for nighttime detection of multilayered clouds. Jin and Rossow also used a multispectral CO2 slicing technique for a global analysis of overlapped cloud amount. Lin et al. used a combination infrared (IR), visible (VIS), and microwave data to detect overlapped clouds over water. Recently, Baum and Spinhirne proposed a 1.6 and 11 micron bispectral threshold method. While all of these methods have made progress in solving this stubborn problem none have yet proven satisfactory for continuous and consistent monitoring of multilayer cloud systems. It is clear that detection of overlapping clouds from passive instruments such as satellite radiometers is in an immature stage of development and requires additional research. Overlapped cloud systems also affect the retrievals of cloud properties over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) domains and hence should be identified as accurately as possible. To reach this goal, it is necessary to determine which information can be exploited for detecting multilayered clouds from operational meteorological satellite data used by ARM. This paper examines the potential information available in spectral data available on the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imager and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) used over the

  18. Flight performance and feather quality: paying the price of overlapping moult and breeding in a tropical highland bird.

    PubMed

    Echeverry-Galvis, Maria Angela; Hau, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    A temporal separation of energetically costly life history events like reproduction and maintenance of the integumentary system is thought to be promoted by selection to avoid trade-offs and maximize fitness. It has therefore remained somewhat of a paradox that certain vertebrate species can undergo both events simultaneously. Identifying potential costs of overlapping two demanding life history stages will further our understanding of the selection pressures that shape the temporal regulation of life history events in vertebrates. We studied free-living tropical Slaty brush-finches (Atlapetes schistaceus), in which individuals spontaneously overlap reproduction and moult or undergo both events in separation. To assess possible costs of such an overlap we quantified feather quality and flight performance of individuals in different states. We determined individual's life history state by measuring gonad size and scoring moult stage, and collected a newly grown 7(th) primary wing feather for later analysis of feather quality. Finally, we quantified flight performance for each individual in the wild. Overlapping individuals produced lighter and shorter wing feathers than individuals just moulting, with females decreasing feather quality more strongly during the overlap than males. Moreover, overlapping individuals had a reduced flight speed during escape flights, while their foraging flight speed was unaffected. Despite overlappers being larger and having a smaller wing area, their lower body mass resulted in a similar wing load as in breeders or moulters. Individuals measured repeatedly in different states also showed significant decreases in feather quality and escape flight speed during the overlap. Reduced escape flight speed may represent a major consequence of the overlap by increasing predation risk. Our data document costs to undergoing two life history stages simultaneously, which likely arise from energetic trade-offs. Impairments in individual quality and

  19. Climate-induced range overlap among closely related species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krosby, Meade; Wilsey, Chad B.; McGuire, Jenny L.; Duggan, Jennifer M.; Nogeire, Theresa M.; Heinrichs, Julie A.; Tewksbury, Joshua J.; Lawler, Joshua J.

    2015-09-01

    Contemporary climate change is causing large shifts in biotic distributions, which has the potential to bring previously isolated, closely related species into contact. This has led to concern that hybridization and competition could threaten species persistence. Here, we use bioclimatic models to show that future range overlap by the end of the century is predicted for only 6.4% of isolated, congeneric species pairs of New World birds, mammals and amphibians. Projected rates of climate-induced overlap are higher for birds (11.6%) than for mammals (4.4%) or amphibians (3.6%). As many species will have difficulty tracking shifting climates, actual rates of future overlap are likely to be far lower, suggesting that hybridization and competition impacts may be relatively modest.

  20. Evaluation of overlaps between arbitrary fermionic quasiparticle vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avez, B.; Bender, M.

    2012-03-01

    We derive an expression that allows for the unambiguous evaluation of the overlap between two arbitrary quasiparticle vacua, including its sign. Our expression is based on the Pfaffian of a skew-symmetric matrix, extending the overlap formula recently proposed by Robledo [Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.79.021302 79, 021302(R) (2009)] to the most general case of quasiparticle vacua, including the one of the overlap between two different blocked n-quasiparticle states for either even or odd systems. The powerfulness of the method is illustrated for a few typical matrix elements that appear in realistic angular-momentum-restored generator coordinate method calculations when breaking time-reversal invariance and using the full model space of occupied single-particle states.

  1. Novel Definition and Algorithm for Chaining Fragments with Proportional Overlaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uricaru, Raluca; Mancheron, Alban; Rivals, Eric

    Chaining fragments is a crucial step in genome alignment. Existing chaining algorithms compute a maximum weighted chain with no overlaps allowed between adjacent fragments. In practice, using local alignments as fragments, instead of MEMs, generates frequent overlaps between fragments, due to combinatorial reasons and biological factors, i.e. variable tandem repeat structures that differ in number of copies between genomic sequences. In this paper, in order to raise this limitation, we formulate a novel definition of a chain, allowing overlaps proportional to the fragments lengths, and exhibit an efficient algorithm for computing such a maximum weighted chain. We tested our algorithm on a dataset composed of 694 genome couples and accounted for significant improvements in terms of coverage, while keeping the running times below reasonable limits.

  2. 78 FR 79649 - Energy Conservation Program: Proposed Determination of Set-Top Boxes and Network Equipment as a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... network equipment qualify as a covered product. 76 FR 34914. Subsequently, DOE initiated the rulemaking... procedures used by industry to measure the energy consumption of STBs and network equipment. 76 FR 78174. DOE... procedure focused exclusively on STBs. 78 FR 5076. DOE held a public meeting and requested...

  3. Determination of 3D surface displacement rates in the Upper Rhine Graben based on GURN (GNSS Upper Rhine Graben Network)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Knöpfler, A.; Masson, F.; Ulrich, P.; Heck, B.

    2012-04-01

    regional network GURN actually consists of approx. 80 permanently operating GNSS sites of different data providers in Germany, France and Switzerland. The first work steps in the context of GURN were dominated by a detailed analysis of the GNSS data base (e.g., instrumental change artefacts). This analysis included a comparison of the working group related results (EOST, GIK), where different software packages and data handling strategies were used to derive 3D coordinate time series as basis for the determination of a 3D surface displacement field. Due to very small expected velocities in the URG region, the recent GURN focus is on the reliable derivation of site velocities, therefore effects of datum realisation have to be handled with care. The presentation gives an insight into the joint venture GURN focussing on recent results (e.g., 3D surface velocity field).

  4. Charmonium Spectrum from Quenched QCD with Overlap Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    S. Tamhankar; A. Alexandru; Y. Chen; S.J. Dong; T. Draper; I. Horvath; F.X. Lee; K.F. Liu; N. Mathur; J.B. Zhang

    2005-07-20

    We present the first study of the charmonium spectrum using overlap fermions, on quenched configurations. Simulations are performed on 16{sup 3} x 72 lattices, with Wilson gauge action at {beta} = 6.3345. We demonstrate that we have discretization errors under control at about 5%. We obtain 88(4) MeV for hyperfine splitting using the {sub 0} scale, and 121(6) MeV using the (1{bar P}-1{bar S}) scale. This paper raises the possibility that the discrepancy between the lattice results and the experimental value for charmonium hyperfine splitting can be resolved using overlap fermions to simulate the charm quark on lattice.

  5. Overlapping illusions by transformation optics without any negative refraction material

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to achieve an overlapping illusion without any negative refraction index material is introduced with the help of the optic-null medium (ONM) designed by an extremely stretching spatial transformation. Unlike the previous methods to achieve such an optical illusion by transformation optics (TO), our method can achieve a power combination and reshape the radiation pattern at the same time. Unlike the overlapping illusion with some negative refraction index material, our method is not sensitive to the loss of the materials. Other advantages over existing methods are discussed. Numerical simulations are given to verify the performance of the proposed devices. PMID:26751285

  6. Verification of overlap and fringing capacitance models for MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakita, Naoki; Shigyo, Naoyuki

    2000-06-01

    Parasitic capacitance and resistance limit the VLSI device performance. Hence, a circuit model is needed to treat these effects correctly. This article focuses on the circuit models for the overlap capacitance ( Cgd,overlap) and the fringing capacitance ( Cgd,fringe) of MOSFETs. Comparisons between the models and the device simulations are carried out for verification of the models. Also, a limitation of Cgd,fringe model for a future device miniaturization is found based on SIA Road Map. We propose a modified Cgd,fringe model. The effectiveness of the modified model is demonstrated using two circuits.

  7. Segmental overlap: foot drop in S1 radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Voermans, N C; Koetsveld, A C; Zwarts, M J

    2006-07-01

    Knowledge of segmental innervation of skeletal muscles is essential for diagnosing lumbar radiculopathy. Myotomes and dermatomes are traditionally thought to be innervated by a single spinal segment, but experimental studies have shown that this pattern of segmental innervation allows considerable overlap. This implies that muscles (or dermatomes) are innervated not only by axons of one spinal segment, but also partially by axons of adjacent spinal levels. We describe a patient in whom overlap in segmental innervation complicated adequate diagnosis of a recurrent lumbar hernia. Further, we present an outline of electrophysiological and anatomical studies on segmental innervation. PMID:16523224

  8. Detecting consistency of overlapping quantum marginals by separability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianxin; Ji, Zhengfeng; Yu, Nengkun; Zeng, Bei

    2016-03-01

    The quantum marginal problem asks whether a set of given density matrices are consistent, i.e., whether they can be the reduced density matrices of a global quantum state. Not many nontrivial analytic necessary (or sufficient) conditions are known for the problem in general. We propose a method to detect consistency of overlapping quantum marginals by considering the separability of some derived states. Our method works well for the k -symmetric extension problem in general and for the general overlapping marginal problems in some cases. Our work is, in some sense, the converse to the well-known k -symmetric extension criterion for separability.

  9. Social, Relational and Network Determinants of Unprotected Anal Sex and HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Beirut, Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Glenn J.; Hoover, Matthew; Green, Harold; Tohme, Johnny; Mokhbat, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Social, relational and network determinants of condom use and HIV testing were examined among 213 men who have sex with men (MSM) in Beirut. 64% reported unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), including 23% who had UAI with unknown HIV status partners (UAIU); 62% had HIV-tested. In multivariate analysis, being in a relationship was associated with UAI and HIV testing; lower condom self-efficacy was associated with UAIU and HIV testing; gay discrimination was associated with UAIU; MSM disclosure was associated with UAI, UAIU and HIV testing; and network centralization was associated with HIV testing. Multi-level social factors influence sexual health in MSM. PMID:26535073

  10. The "eyes absent" (eya) gene in the eye-bearing hydrozoan jellyfish Cladonema radiatum: conservation of the retinal determination network.

    PubMed

    Graziussi, Daria Federica; Suga, Hiroshi; Schmid, Volker; Gehring, Walter Jakob

    2012-06-01

    Eyes absent (Eya) is a member of the Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN), a set of genes responsible for eye specification in Drosophila. Eya is a dual function protein, working as a transcription factor in the nucleus and as a tyrosine phosphatase in the cytoplasm. It had been shown that Pax and Six family genes, main components of the RDGN, are present in the hydrozoan Cladonema radiatum and that they are expressed in the eye. However, nothing had been known about the Eya family in hydrozoan jellyfish. Here we report the presence of an Eya homologue (CrEya) in Cladonema. Real-time PCR analysis and in situ hybridization showed that CrEya is expressed in the eye. Furthermore, the comprehensive survey of eukaryote genomes revealed that the acquisition of the N-terminal transactivation domain, including the EYA Domain 2 and its adjacent sequence shared by all eumetazoans, happened early in evolution, before the separation of Cnidaria and Bilateria. Our results uncover the evolution of the two domains and show a conservation of the expression pattern of the Eya gene between Cnidaria and Bilateria, which, together with previous data, supports the hypothesis of the monophyletic origin of metazoans eyes. We additionally show that CrEya is also expressed in the oocytes, where two other members of the RDGN, CrPaxB, and Six4/5-Cr, are known to be expressed. These data suggest that several members of the RDGN have begun to be localized also into the different context of egg development early in the course of metazoan evolution. PMID:22821862

  11. Self-consistent determination of the spike-train power spectrum in a neural network with sparse connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Dummer, Benjamin; Wieland, Stefan; Lindner, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    A major source of random variability in cortical networks is the quasi-random arrival of presynaptic action potentials from many other cells. In network studies as well as in the study of the response properties of single cells embedded in a network, synaptic background input is often approximated by Poissonian spike trains. However, the output statistics of the cells is in most cases far from being Poisson. This is inconsistent with the assumption of similar spike-train statistics for pre- and postsynaptic cells in a recurrent network. Here we tackle this problem for the popular class of integrate-and-fire neurons and study a self-consistent statistics of input and output spectra of neural spike trains. Instead of actually using a large network, we use an iterative scheme, in which we simulate a single neuron over several generations. In each of these generations, the neuron is stimulated with surrogate stochastic input that has a similar statistics as the output of the previous generation. For the surrogate input, we employ two distinct approximations: (i) a superposition of renewal spike trains with the same interspike interval density as observed in the previous generation and (ii) a Gaussian current with a power spectrum proportional to that observed in the previous generation. For input parameters that correspond to balanced input in the network, both the renewal and the Gaussian iteration procedure converge quickly and yield comparable results for the self-consistent spike-train power spectrum. We compare our results to large-scale simulations of a random sparsely connected network of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons (Brunel, 2000) and show that in the asynchronous regime close to a state of balanced synaptic input from the network, our iterative schemes provide an excellent approximations to the autocorrelation of spike trains in the recurrent network. PMID:25278869

  12. Role extraction in complex networks and its application in control of networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Mingyang; He, Xingsheng; Fu, Zhongqian; Zhuo, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Given a large network, dynamics of the network are determined by both nodes' features and network connections. Some features could be extracted from node labels and other kinds of priori knowledge. But how to perform the feature classification without priori knowledge is a challenge. This paper addresses the key problem: how do we conduct role extraction in networks with only edge connections known? On the basis of behavior differences in dynamics, nodes are classified into three role groups: Leaders(L), Communicators(C) and Members(M). Unlike traditional community detections, we detect overlapping communities by link clustering first and then classify nodes according to the community entropy, which describes the disorder of how many different communities a node connects to. We propose a time saving and unsupervised learning approach for automatically discovering nodes' roles based solely on network topology. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated on six real-world networks through pinning control. By controlling communicator nodes, the controllability is enhanced and the cost for control is reduced obviously in networks with strong community structure.

  13. Driven synchronization in random networks of oscillators.

    PubMed

    Hindes, Jason; Myers, Christopher R

    2015-07-01

    Synchronization is a universal phenomenon found in many non-equilibrium systems. Much recent interest in this area has overlapped with the study of complex networks, where a major focus is determining how a system's connectivity patterns affect the types of behavior that it can produce. Thus far, modeling efforts have focused on the tendency of networks of oscillators to mutually synchronize themselves, with less emphasis on the effects of external driving. In this work, we discuss the interplay between mutual and driven synchronization in networks of phase oscillators of the Kuramoto type, and explore how the structure and emergence of such states depend on the underlying network topology for simple random networks with a given degree distribution. We find a variety of interesting dynamical behaviors, including bifurcations and bistability patterns that are qualitatively different for heterogeneous and homogeneous networks, and which are separated by a Takens-Bogdanov-Cusp singularity in the parameter region where the coupling strength between oscillators is weak. Our analysis is connected to the underlying dynamics of oscillator clusters for important states and transitions. PMID:26232970

  14. 9 CFR 121.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... this section that have been genetically modified. (d) Overlap select agents or toxins that meet any of... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS POSSESSION, USE...) Genetic elements, recombinant and/or synthetic nucleic acids, and recombinant and/or synthetic...

  15. 9 CFR 121.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in paragraph (b) of this section that have been genetically modified. (d) Overlap select agents or... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS POSSESSION, USE... elements, recombinant nucleic acids, and recombinant organisms: (1) Nucleic acids that can...

  16. 9 CFR 121.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... in paragraph (b) of this section that have been genetically modified. (d) Overlap select agents or... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS POSSESSION, USE... elements, recombinant nucleic acids, and recombinant organisms: (1) Nucleic acids that can...

  17. 9 CFR 121.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... this section that have been genetically modified. (d) Overlap select agents or toxins that meet any of... OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS POSSESSION, USE...) Genetic elements, recombinant and/or synthetic nucleic acids, and recombinant and/or synthetic...

  18. A Longitudinal Assessment of the Victim-Offender Overlap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Wesley G.; Higgins, George E.; Tewksbury, Richard; Gover, Angela R.; Piquero, Alex R.

    2010-01-01

    Although research has established an offending/victimization overlap and that offenders and victims share similar characteristics, much less work has examined the longitudinal sequencing of victimization and offending in the same developmental period and whether key risk/protective factors significantly distinguish both offenders and victims. This…

  19. Recognition of highly overlapping ellipse-like bubble images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkanen, Markus; Saarenrinne, Pentti; Stoor, Tuomas; Niinimäki, Jouko

    2005-09-01

    This study describes a robust bubble image recognition algorithm that detects the in-focus, ellipse-like bubble images from experimental images with heavily overlapping bubbles. The principle of the overlapping object recognition (OOR) algorithm is that it calculates the overall perimeter of a segment, finds the points at the perimeter that represent the connecting points of overlapping objects, clusters the perimeter arcs that belong to the same object and fits ellipses on the clustered arcs of the perimeter. The accuracy of the algorithm is studied with simulated images of overlapping ellipses, providing an RMS error of 0.9 pixels in size measurement. The algorithm is utilized in measurements of bubble size distributions with a direct imaging (DI) technique in which a digital camera and a pulsed back light are used to detect bubble outlines. The measurement system is calibrated with stagnant bubbles in a gel in order to define the bubble size dependent effective thickness of the measurement volume and the grey scale gradient threshold as a focus criterion. The described concept with a novel bubble recognition algorithm enables DI measurements in denser bubbly flows with increased reliability and accuracy of the measurement results. The measurement technique is applied to the study of the turbulent bubbly flow in a papermaking machine, in the outlet pipe of a centrifugal pump.

  20. 9 CFR 121.4 - Overlap select agents and toxins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... elements, recombinant nucleic acids, and recombinant organisms: (1) Nucleic acids that can produce...) Recombinant nucleic acids that encode for the functional forms of any overlap toxin listed in paragraph (b) of this section if the nucleic acids: (i) Can be expressed in vivo or in vitro; or (ii) Are in a vector...

  1. Australia's National Research Collection: Overlap, Uniqueness, and Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genoni, Paul; Wright, Janette

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of an overlap study of Australian research library collections. The study used OCLC's WorldCat Collection Analysis software to mine data recording Australian holdings on the WorldCat database. The data is analysed according to the results obtained for six "groups" which represent various coalitions of academic,…

  2. Track with overlapping links for dry coal extrusion pumps

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, Timothy; Brady, John D

    2014-01-21

    A chain for a particulate material extrusion pump includes a plurality of links, each of the plurality of links having a link body and a link ledge, wherein each link ledge of the plurality of links at least partially overlaps the link body of an adjacent one of the plurality of links.

  3. A Laser Lock System using Multiple Overlapping Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Stuart; Francis, Ben; Erickson, Christopher; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-10-01

    We describe a system wherein the lock of trapping, ionizing, and ion resonance lasers for a Sr experiment are bootstrapped together in a single neutral atom vapor cell. This is done by overlapping beams to optically pump the atoms into the necessary states.

  4. Overlapping Issues in Medical Psychology, Rehabilitation Psychology and Behavioral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Wayne A.

    Behavioral medicine is a field which attempts to integrate social, behavioral, and biological sciences through an application of bio-behavioral methods to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of illness. Because behavioral medicine overlaps many psychological disciplines, some disciplines of psychology such as medical psychology and…

  5. Overlapping Statistical Segmentation for Effective Indexing of Japanese Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogawa, Yasushi; Matsuda, Toru

    1999-01-01

    Discusses statistical word indexing for Japanese information-retrieval systems and proposes a new method that uses statistics about characters to evaluate a bi-gram's likelihood of being a word boundary. Describes a new segmentation strategy that extracts some overlapping segments and results in higher retrieval effectiveness. (Author/LRW)

  6. Functional overlap of top-down emotion regulation and generation: an fMRI study identifying common neural substrates between cognitive reappraisal and cognitively generated emotions.

    PubMed

    Otto, Benjamin; Misra, Supriya; Prasad, Aditya; McRae, Kateri

    2014-09-01

    One factor that influences the success of emotion regulation is the manner in which the regulated emotion was generated. Recent research has suggested that reappraisal, a top-down emotion regulation strategy, is more effective in decreasing self-reported negative affect when emotions were generated from the top-down, versus the bottom-up. On the basis of a process overlap framework, we hypothesized that the neural regions active during reappraisal would overlap more with emotions that were generated from the top-down, rather than from the bottom-up. In addition, we hypothesized that increased neural overlap between reappraisal and the history effects of top-down emotion generation would be associated with increased reappraisal success. The results of several analyses suggested that reappraisal and emotions that were generated from the top-down share a core network of prefrontal, temporal, and cingulate regions. This overlap is specific; no such overlap was observed between reappraisal and emotions that were generated in a bottom-up fashion. This network consists of regions previously implicated in linguistic processing, cognitive control, and self-relevant appraisals, which are processes thought to be crucial to both reappraisal and top-down emotion generation. Furthermore, individuals with high reappraisal success demonstrated greater neural overlap between reappraisal and the history of top-down emotion generation than did those with low reappraisal success. The overlap of these key regions, reflecting overlapping processes, provides an initial insight into the mechanism by which generation history may facilitate emotion regulation. PMID:24430617

  7. Application of neural networks for determining optical parameters of strongly scattering media from the intensity profile of backscattered radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kotova, S P; Maiorov, I V; Maiorova, A M

    2007-01-31

    We analyse the possibilities of simultaneous measuring three optical parameters of scattering media, namely, the scattering and absorption coefficients and the scattering anisotropy parameter by the intensity profile of backscattered radiation by using the neural network inversion method and the method of adaptive-network-based fuzzy inference system. The measurement errors of the absorption and scattering coefficients and the scattering anisotropy parameter are 20%, 5%, and 10%, respectively. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  8. Measuring image quality in overlapping areas of panoramic composed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitjà, Carles; Bover, Toni; Escofet, Jaume

    2012-06-01

    Several professional photographic applications uses the merging of consecutive overlapping images in order to obtain bigger files by means of stitching techniques or extended field of view (FOV) for panoramic images. All of those applications share the fact that the final composed image is obtained by overlapping the neighboring areas of consecutive individual images taken as a mosaic or a series of tiles over the scene, from the same point of view. Any individual image taken with a given lens can carry residual aberrations and several of them will affect more probably the borders of the image frame. Furthermore, the amount of distortion aberration present in the images of a given lens will be reversed in position for the two overlapping areas of a pair of consecutive takings. Finally, the different images used in composing the final one have corresponding overlapping areas taken with different perspective. From all the previously stated can be derived that the software employed must remap all the pixel information in order to resize and match image features in those overlapping areas, providing a final composed image with the desired perspective projection. The work presented analyse two panoramic format images taken with a pair of lenses and composed by means of a state of the art stitching software. Then, a series of images are taken to cover an FOV three times the original lens FOV, the images are merged by means of a software of common use in professional panoramic photography and the final image quality is evaluated through a series of targets positioned in strategic locations over the whole taking field of view. That allows measuring the resulting Resolution and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). The results are shown compared with the previous measures on the original individual images.

  9. High-Order Moving Overlapping Grid Methodology in a Spectral Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Brandon E.

    A moving overlapping mesh methodology that achieves spectral accuracy in space and up to second-order accuracy in time is developed for solution of unsteady incompressible flow equations in three-dimensional domains. The targeted applications are in aerospace and mechanical engineering domains and involve problems in turbomachinery, rotary aircrafts, wind turbines and others. The methodology is built within the dual-session communication framework initially developed for stationary overlapping meshes. The methodology employs semi-implicit spectral element discretization of equations in each subdomain and explicit treatment of subdomain interfaces with spectrally-accurate spatial interpolation and high-order accurate temporal extrapolation, and requires few, if any, iterations, yet maintains the global accuracy and stability of the underlying flow solver. Mesh movement is enabled through the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation of the governing equations, which allows for prescription of arbitrary velocity values at discrete mesh points. The stationary and moving overlapping mesh methodologies are thoroughly validated using two- and three-dimensional benchmark problems in laminar and turbulent flows. The spatial and temporal global convergence, for both methods, is documented and is in agreement with the nominal order of accuracy of the underlying solver. Stationary overlapping mesh methodology was validated to assess the influence of long integration times and inflow-outflow global boundary conditions on the performance. In a turbulent benchmark of fully-developed turbulent pipe flow, the turbulent statistics are validated against the available data. Moving overlapping mesh simulations are validated on the problems of two-dimensional oscillating cylinder and a three-dimensional rotating sphere. The aerodynamic forces acting on these moving rigid bodies are determined, and all results are compared with published data. Scaling tests, with both methodologies

  10. The control network of Iapetus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. E.; Katayama, F. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A control network of the Saturnian satellite Iapetus has been established photogrammetrically from pictures taken by the two Voyager spacecraft. Coordinates of 62 control points have been computed and listed; pixel measurements of these points were made on 14 Voyager 1 and 66 Voyager 2 pictures. Some of these points are identified on the preliminary U.S. Geological Survey map of Iapetus and many are identified by name. The Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 pictures covered limited regions of the satellite's surface and contained no overlapping areas. The longitude system on Iapetus is defined by the crater Almeric; the 276 deg meridian passes through the center of this crater. The obliquity of Iapetus has been measured as 0.4 deg + or - 1.6 deg. The mean radius of Iapetus has been determined at 718 + or - 8 km.

  11. Neural Networks-Based Real-Time Determination of the Laser Beam Spatial Profile and Vibrational-to-Translational Relaxation Time Within Pulsed Photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukić, M.; Ćojbašić, Ž.; Rabasović, M. D.; Markushev, D. D.; Todorović, D. M.

    2013-09-01

    This paper concerns with the possibilities of computational intelligence application for simultaneous determination of the laser beam spatial profile and vibrational-to-translational relaxation time of the polyatomic molecules in gases by pulsed photoacoustics. Results regarding the application of neural computing through the use of feed-forward multilayer perception networks are presented. Feed-forward multilayer perception networks are trained in an offline batch training regime to estimate simultaneously, and in real-time, the laser beam spatial profile (profile shape class) and the vibrational-to-translational relaxation time from given (theoretical) photoacoustic signals. The proposed method significantly shortens the time required for the simultaneous determination of the laser beam spatial profile and relaxation time and has the advantage of accurately calculating the aforementioned quantities.

  12. Resource niche overlap promotes stability of bacterial community metabolism in experimental microcosms.

    PubMed

    Hunting, Ellard R; Vijver, Martina G; van der Geest, Harm G; Mulder, Christian; Kraak, Michiel H S; Breure, Anton M; Admiraal, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Decomposition of organic matter is an important ecosystem process governed in part by bacteria. The process of decomposition is expected to benefit from interspecific bacterial interactions such as resource partitioning and facilitation. However, the relative importance of resource niche breadth (metabolic diversity) and resource niche overlap (functional redundancy) on decomposition and the temporal stability of ecosystem processes received little scientific attention. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the effect of an increase in bacterial community resemblance on both decomposition and the stability of bacterial metabolism in aquatic sediments. To this end, we performed laboratory microcosm experiments in which we examined the influence of bacterial consortia differing in number and composition of species on bacterial activity (Electron Transport System Activity, ETSA), dissolved organic carbon production and wavelet transformed measurements of redox potential (Eh). Single substrate affinities of the individual bacterial species were determined in order to calculate the metabolic diversity of the microbial community. Results presented here indicate that bacterial activity and organic matter decomposition increase with widening of the resource niche breadth, and that metabolic stability increases with increasing overlap in bacterial resource niches, hinting that resource niche overlap can promote the stability of bacterial community metabolism. PMID:25759686

  13. The effectiveness of morphology and street networks in determining models of urban growth at different spatial scales analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaninno, Nicola; Alhaddad, Bahaaeddin; Cladera, Josep Roca

    2009-09-01

    Urban morphology "implies 'form,' 'land use,' and 'density,' and has connotations with the shape, structure, pattern and organization of land use, and the system of relation between them" (Donnay, Barnsley, and Longley, 2001). It reflects the combination of complex special artificial areas such as buildings, roads, parks, gardens and even ecological systems of soil and water. To understand the dynamics and patterns of urban extend related with their interactions in heterogeneous landscapes, the spatial complexity needs to be quantified accurately, depending upon the morphological analysis and their relation with territory. Morphological analysis, which refers to the geometric characteristics of urban sites, illustrates its usefulness in determining the analogies between patterns of cities and their "physical" characters providing indicators of the aspect of settlement form and structure. Remote sensing might be helpful on the regional scale in evaluating the role that landscape play in connecting different settlements within urban regions and in separating the core city from the surrounding countryside. It used to map urban morphology of human settlements and monitoring urban growth (Batty and Longley, 1987). The information produced by remote sensing is spatially referenced through an implicit geometric location of the pixels. Various urban forms are potentially discernible using such devices, including linear objects (Sohn and Bowman, 2001). The aim of this paper is to classify, evaluate and compare different urban forms related to street networks and land characters, also considering the morphological typologies of urban settlements by moving from the spatial scale of a municipality to a wider territorial. The intent is to discover secure principals to find the most likely urban models of cities, taking topographical parameters into account. This research carried out focusing upon the metropolitan region of Barcelona, with urban sites defined according to the

  14. Detection of overlapping protein complexes in gene expression, phenotype and pathways of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using Prorank based Fuzzy algorithm.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, P; Ramyachitra, D; Banupriya, D

    2016-04-15

    Proteins show their functional activity by interacting with other proteins and forms protein complexes since it is playing an important role in cellular organization and function. To understand the higher order protein organization, overlapping is an important step towards unveiling functional and evolutionary mechanisms behind biological networks. Most of the clustering algorithms do not consider the weighted as well as overlapping complexes. In this research, Prorank based Fuzzy algorithm has been proposed to find the overlapping protein complexes. The Fuzzy detection algorithm is incorporated in the Prorank algorithm after ranking step to find the overlapping community. The proposed algorithm executes in an iterative manner to compute the probability of robust clusters. The proposed and the existing algorithms were tested on different datasets such as PPI-D1, PPI-D2, Collins, DIP, Krogan Core and Krogan-Extended, gene expression such as GSE7645, GSE22269, GSE26923, pathways such as Meiosis, MAPK, Cell Cycle, phenotypes such as Yeast Heterogeneous and Yeast Homogeneous datasets. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm predicts protein complexes with better accuracy compared to other state of art algorithms. PMID:26809099

  15. Spectral-overlap approach to multiframe superresolution image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Edward; Picard, Richard H; Crabtree, Peter N

    2016-05-20

    Various techniques and algorithms have been developed to improve the resolution of sensor-aliased imagery captured with multiple subpixel-displaced frames on an undersampled pixelated image plane. These dealiasing algorithms are typically known as multiframe superresolution (SR), or geometric SR to emphasize the role of the focal-plane array. Multiple low-resolution (LR) aliased frames of the same scene are captured and allocated to a common high-resolution (HR) reconstruction grid, leading to the possibility of an alias-free reconstruction, as long as the HR sampling rate is above the Nyquist rate. Allocating LR-frame irradiances to HR frames requires the use of appropriate weights. Here we present a novel approach in the spectral domain to calculating exactly weights based on spatial overlap areas, which we call the spectral-overlap (SO) method. We emphasize that the SO method is not a spectral approach but rather an approach to calculating spatial weights that uses spectral decompositions to exploit the array properties of the HR and LR pixels. The method is capable of dealing with arbitrary aliasing factors and interframe motions consisting of in-plane translations and rotations. We calculate example reconstructed HR images (the inverse problem) from synthetic aliased images for integer and for fractional aliasing factors. We show the utility of the SO-generated overlap-area weights in both noniterative and iterative reconstructions with known or unknown aliasing factor. We show how the overlap weights can be used to generate the Green's function (pixel response function) for noniterative dealiasing. In addition, we show how the overlap-area weights can be used to generate synthetic aliased images (the forward problem). We compare the SO approach to the spatial-domain geometric approach of O'Rourke and find virtually identical high accuracy but with significant enhancements in speed for SO. We also compare the SO weights to interpolated weights and find that

  16. The Overlap Syndrome of Depression and Delirium in Older Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Givens, Jane L.; Jones, Richard N.; Inouye, Sharon K.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To measure the prevalence, predictors and post-hospitalization outcomes associated with the overlap syndrome of coexisting depression and incident delirium in older hospitalized patients. Design Secondary analysis of prospective cohort data from the control group of the Delirium Prevention Trial. Setting General medical service of an academic medical center. Follow-up interviews at one month and one year post-hospital discharge. Participants Four hundred and fifty nine patients aged 70 and over who were not delirious at hospital admission. Measurements Depressive symptoms assessed at hospital admission using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (cutoff score of 6 used to define depression), daily assessments of incident delirium from admission to discharge using the Confusion Assessment Method. Activities of daily living at admission and one month post-discharge. New nursing home placement and mortality determined at one year. Results Of 459 participants, 23 (5%) had the overlap syndrome, 39 (9%) delirium alone, 121 (26%) depression alone and 276 (60%) neither condition. In adjusted analysis, patients with the overlap syndrome had higher odds of new nursing home placement or death at one year (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 5.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.57– 18.38) and one month functional decline (AOR 3.30, 95% CI = 1.14–9.56) compared to patients with neither condition. Conclusion The overlap syndrome of depression and delirium is associated with significant risk of functional decline, institutionalization and death. Efforts to identify, prevent and treat this condition may reduce the risk of adverse outcomes in older hospitalized patients. PMID:19558475

  17. Spatial overlap between environmental policy instruments and areas of high conservation value in forest.

    PubMed

    Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne; Søgaard, Gunnhild; Rusch, Graciela M; Barton, David N

    2014-01-01

    In order to safeguard biodiversity in forest we need to know how forest policy instruments work. Here we use a nationwide network of 9400 plots in productive forest to analyze to what extent large-scale policy instruments, individually and together, target forest of high conservation value in Norway. We studied both instruments working through direct regulation; Strict Protection and Landscape Protection, and instruments working through management planning and voluntary schemes of forest certification; Wilderness Area and Mountain Forest. As forest of high conservation value (HCV-forest) we considered the extent of 12 Biodiversity Habitats and the extent of Old-Age Forest. We found that 22% of productive forest area contained Biodiversity Habitats. More than 70% of this area was not covered by any large-scale instruments. Mountain Forest covered 23%, while Strict Protection and Wilderness both covered 5% of the Biodiversity Habitat area. A total of 9% of productive forest area contained Old-Age Forest, and the relative coverage of the four instruments was similar as for Biodiversity Habitats. For all instruments, except Landscape Protection, the targeted areas contained significantly higher proportions of HCV-forest than areas not targeted by these instruments. Areas targeted by Strict Protection had higher proportions of HCV-forest than areas targeted by other instruments, except for areas targeted by Wilderness Area which showed similar proportions of Biodiversity Habitats. There was a substantial amount of spatial overlap between the policy tools, but no incremental conservation effect of overlapping instruments in terms of contributing to higher percentages of targeted HCV-forest. Our results reveal that although the current policy mix has an above average representation of forest of high conservation value, the targeting efficiency in terms of area overlap is limited. There is a need to improve forest conservation and a potential to cover this need by better

  18. Spatial Overlap between Environmental Policy Instruments and Areas of High Conservation Value in Forest

    PubMed Central

    Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne; Søgaard, Gunnhild; Rusch, Graciela M.; Barton, David N.

    2014-01-01

    In order to safeguard biodiversity in forest we need to know how forest policy instruments work. Here we use a nationwide network of 9400 plots in productive forest to analyze to what extent large-scale policy instruments, individually and together, target forest of high conservation value in Norway. We studied both instruments working through direct regulation; Strict Protection and Landscape Protection, and instruments working through management planning and voluntary schemes of forest certification; Wilderness Area and Mountain Forest. As forest of high conservation value (HCV-forest) we considered the extent of 12 Biodiversity Habitats and the extent of Old-Age Forest. We found that 22% of productive forest area contained Biodiversity Habitats. More than 70% of this area was not covered by any large-scale instruments. Mountain Forest covered 23%, while Strict Protection and Wilderness both covered 5% of the Biodiversity Habitat area. A total of 9% of productive forest area contained Old-Age Forest, and the relative coverage of the four instruments was similar as for Biodiversity Habitats. For all instruments, except Landscape Protection, the targeted areas contained significantly higher proportions of HCV-forest than areas not targeted by these instruments. Areas targeted by Strict Protection had higher proportions of HCV-forest than areas targeted by other instruments, except for areas targeted by Wilderness Area which showed similar proportions of Biodiversity Habitats. There was a substantial amount of spatial overlap between the policy tools, but no incremental conservation effect of overlapping instruments in terms of contributing to higher percentages of targeted HCV-forest. Our results reveal that although the current policy mix has an above average representation of forest of high conservation value, the targeting efficiency in terms of area overlap is limited. There is a need to improve forest conservation and a potential to cover this need by better

  19. Weighted network modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Illés; Ábel, Dániel; Palla, Gergely; Vicsek, Tamás

    2007-06-01

    The inclusion of link weights into the analysis of network properties allows a deeper insight into the (often overlapping) modular structure of real-world webs. We introduce a clustering algorithm clique percolation method with weights (CPMw) for weighted networks based on the concept of percolating k-cliques with high enough intensity. The algorithm allows overlaps between the modules. First, we give detailed analytical and numerical results about the critical point of weighted k-clique percolation on (weighted) Erdos Rényi graphs. Then, for a scientist collaboration web and a stock correlation graph we compute three-link weight correlations and with the CPMw the weighted modules. After reshuffling link weights in both networks and computing the same quantities for the randomized control graphs as well, we show that groups of three or more strong links prefer to cluster together in both original graphs.

  20. Foraging behavior of lactating South American sea lions (Otaria flavescens) and spatial-temporal resource overlap with the Uruguayan fisheries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riet-Sapriza, Federico G.; Costa, Daniel P.; Franco-Trecu, Valentina; Marín, Yamandú; Chocca, Julio; González, Bernardo; Beathyate, Gastón; Louise Chilvers, B.; Hückstadt, Luis A.

    2013-04-01

    Resource competition between fisheries and marine mammal continue to raise concern worldwide. Understanding this complex conflict requires data on spatial and dietary overlap of marine mammal and fisheries. In Uruguay the South American sea lions population has been dramatically declining over the past decade. The reasons for this population decline are unknown but may include the following: (1) direct harvesting; (2) reduced prey availability and distribution as a consequence of environmental change; or (3) biological interaction with fisheries. This study aims to determine resource overlap and competition between South American sea lions (SASL, Otaria flavescens, n=10) and the artisanal fisheries (AF), and the coastal bottom trawl fisheries (CBTF). We integrated data on sea lions diet (scat analysis), spatial and annual consumption estimates; and foraging behavior-satellite-tracking data from lactating SASL with data on fishing effort areas and fisheries landings. We found that lactating SASL are benthic divers and forage in shallow water within the continental shelf. SASL's foraging areas overlapped with CBTF and AF fisheries operational areas. Dietary analysis indicated a high degree of overlap between the diet of SASL and the AF and CBTF fisheries catch. The results of our work show differing degrees of spatial resource overlap with AF and CBTF, highlighting that there are differences in potential impact from each fishery; and that different management/conservation approaches may need to be taken to solve the fisheries-SASL conflict.

  1. Micropattern-Guided Assembly of Overlapping Pairs of Dynamic Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Fourniol, Franck J.; Li, Tai-De; Bieling, Peter; Mullins, R. Dyche; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Surrey, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between antiparallel microtubules are essential for the organization of spindles in dividing cells. The ability to form immobilized antiparallel microtubule pairs in vitro, combined with the ability to image them via TIRF microscopy, permits detailed biochemical characterization of microtubule cross-linking proteins and their effects on microtubule dynamics. Here, we describe methods for chemical micropatterning of microtubule seeds on glass surfaces in configurations that specifically promote the formation of antiparallel microtubule overlaps in vitro. We demonstrate that this assay is especially well suited for reconstitution of minimal midzone overlaps stabilized by the antiparallel microtubule cross-linking protein PRC1 and its binding partners. The micropatterning method is suitable for use with a broad range of proteins, and the assay is generally applicable to any microtubule cross-linking protein. PMID:24630116

  2. Discriminating crop and other canopies by overlapping binary image layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Ryoichi

    2013-02-01

    For optimal management of agricultural fields by remote sensing, discrimination of the crop canopy from weeds and other objects is essential. In a digital photograph, a rice canopy was discriminated from a variety of weed and tree canopies and other objects by overlapping binary image layers of red-green-blue and other color components indicating the pixels with target canopy-specific (intensity) values based on the ranges of means ±(3×) standard deviations. By overlapping and merging the binary image layers, the target canopy specificity improved to 0.0015 from 0.027 for the yellow 1× standard deviation binary image layer, which was the best among all combinations of color components and means ±(3×) standard deviations. The most target rice canopy-likely pixels were further identified by limiting the pixels at different luminosity values. The discriminatory power was also visually demonstrated in this manner.

  3. A longitudinal assessment of the victim-offender overlap.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Wesley G; Higgins, George E; Tewksbury, Richard; Gover, Angela R; Piquero, Alex R

    2010-12-01

    Although research has established an offending/victimization overlap and that offenders and victims share similar characteristics, much less work has examined the longitudinal sequencing of victimization and offending in the same developmental period and whether key risk/protective factors significantly distinguish both offenders and victims.This study uses longitudinal data from a large sample of adolescents to examine these issues and does so using a novel methodological approach, the trajectory methodology, which allows for the examination of covariation between offending and victimization. Results indicate that there is a considerable degree of overlap between victims of physical violence and offenders over time and that certain covariates including school commitment, parental monitoring, low self-control, and sex significantly discriminate victim and offender groups. Furthermore, low self-control appears to be the most salient risk factor for distinguishing both victimization and delinquency trajectories.Theoretical and policy implications and directions for future research are identified. PMID:20068116

  4. Measuring droplet size distributions from overlapping interferometric particle images.

    PubMed

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Dam, Nico; van der Voort, Dennis; Bertens, Guus; van de Water, Willem

    2015-02-01

    Interferometric particle imaging provides a simple way to measure the probability density function (PDF) of droplet sizes from out-focus images. The optical setup is straightforward, but the interpretation of the data is a problem when particle images overlap. We propose a new way to analyze the images. The emphasis is not on a precise identification of droplets, but on obtaining a good estimate of the PDF of droplet sizes in the case of overlapping particle images. The algorithm is tested using synthetic and experimental data. We next use these methods to measure the PDF of droplet sizes produced by spinning disk aerosol generators. The mean primary droplet diameter agrees with predictions from the literature, but we find a broad distribution of satellite droplet sizes. PMID:25725854

  5. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a history of allergic disease, and smoke exposure are important components in the classification of ACOS. Each phenotype has a different underlying pathophysiology, set of characteristics, and prognosis. Medical treatment for ACOS should be tailored according to phenotype. A narrower definition of ACOS that includes both spirometric and clinical criteria is needed. PMID:26161009

  6. Severe Cutaneous Drug Reactions: Do Overlapping Forms Exist?

    PubMed

    Horcajada-Reales, C; Pulido-Pérez, A; Suárez-Fernández, R

    2016-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms are all severe hypersensitivity reactions to medications. While each of these reactions is a well-established entity with specific diagnostic criteria, clinicians see cases that fulfill criteria for more than one form, prompting discussion on the possibility of combined forms. Such overlapping clinical pictures meeting the criteria for 2 conditions have thus become a topic of debate in dermatology in recent years. We describe 2 patients with cutaneous drug reactions having the characteristics of both acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome -toxic epidermal necrolysis. We also review previously published cases and current thinking on such overlapping conditions. PMID:26520037

  7. Overlap in Eating Disorders and Obesity in Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Rancourt, Diana; McCullough, Mary Beth

    2015-10-01

    While eating disorders and obesity have traditionally been conceptualized as separate conditions, recent research suggests important overlap in several areas including etiology, comorbidity, risk factors, and prevention approaches. Examining the commonality among these conditions is particularly important as adolescents who present with both eating disorder symptomology and obesity demonstrate poorer outcomes within weight control treatments and are at greater risk for future development of full threshold eating disorders and additional weight gain. The purpose of this paper is to review the research examining the overlap in prevalence rates for eating disorders and obesity in adolescents, as well as shared etiology, risk factors, and psychiatric and medical comorbidities. Current preventive and treatment approaches also will be discussed, while highlighting the need for more integrated assessment, prevention, and treatment efforts that focus on maladaptive eating and activity patterns shared by both eating disorders and obesity. PMID:26303593

  8. From domain wall to overlap in 2 + 1d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hands, Simon

    2016-03-01

    The equivalence of domain wall and overlap fermion formulations is demonstrated for lattice gauge theories in 2 + 1 spacetime dimensions with parity-invariant mass terms. Even though the domain wall approach distinguishes propagation along a third direction with projectors 1/2 (1 ±γ3), the truncated overlap operator obtained for finite wall separation Ls is invariant under interchange of γ3 and γ5. In the limit Ls → ∞ the resulting Ginsparg-Wilson relations recover the expected U (2Nf) global symmetry up to O (a) corrections. Finally it is shown that finite-Ls corrections to bilinear condensates associated with dynamical mass generation are characterised by whether even powers of the symmetry-breaking mass are present; such terms are absent for antihermitian bilinears such as i ψ bar γ3 ψ, markedly improving the approach to the large-Ls limit.

  9. Disentangling Overlapping Astronomical Sources Using Spatial and Spectral Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David E.; Kashyap, Vinay L.; van Dyk, David A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a powerful new algorithm that combines both spatial information (event locations and the point-spread function) and spectral information (photon energies) to separate photons from overlapping sources. We use Bayesian statistical methods to simultaneously infer the number of overlapping sources, to probabilistically separate the photons among the sources, and to fit the parameters describing the individual sources. Using the Bayesian joint posterior distribution, we are able to coherently quantify the uncertainties associated with all these parameters. The advantages of combining spatial and spectral information are demonstrated through a simulation study. The utility of the approach is then illustrated by analysis of observations of FK Aqr and FL Aqr with the XMM-Newton Observatory and the central region of the Orion Nebula Cluster with the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  10. Functional overlap of the Arabidopsis leaf and root microbiota.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Müller, Daniel B; Srinivas, Girish; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Potthoff, Eva; Rott, Matthias; Dombrowski, Nina; Münch, Philipp C; Spaepen, Stijn; Remus-Emsermann, Mitja; Hüttel, Bruno; McHardy, Alice C; Vorholt, Julia A; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-12-17

    Roots and leaves of healthy plants host taxonomically structured bacterial assemblies, and members of these communities contribute to plant growth and health. We established Arabidopsis leaf- and root-derived microbiota culture collections representing the majority of bacterial species that are reproducibly detectable by culture-independent community sequencing. We found an extensive taxonomic overlap between the leaf and root microbiota. Genome drafts of 400 isolates revealed a large overlap of genome-encoded functional capabilities between leaf- and root-derived bacteria with few significant differences at the level of individual functional categories. Using defined bacterial communities and a gnotobiotic Arabidopsis plant system we show that the isolates form assemblies resembling natural microbiota on their cognate host organs, but are also capable of ectopic leaf or root colonization. While this raises the possibility of reciprocal relocation between root and leaf microbiota members, genome information and recolonization experiments also provide evidence for microbiota specialization to their respective niche. PMID:26633631

  11. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chin Kook

    2015-07-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a history of allergic disease, and smoke exposure are important components in the classification of ACOS. Each phenotype has a different underlying pathophysiology, set of characteristics, and prognosis. Medical treatment for ACOS should be tailored according to phenotype. A narrower definition of ACOS that includes both spirometric and clinical criteria is needed. PMID:26161009

  12. Overture: An Object-Oriented Framework for Overlapping Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W.D.

    2002-04-04

    The Overture framework is an object-oriented environment for solving partial differential equations on over-lapping grids. We describe some of the tools in Overture that can be used to generate grids and solve partial differential equations (PDEs). Overture contains a collection of C++ classes that can be used to write PDE solvers either at a high level or at a lower level for efficiency. There are also a number of tools provided with Overture that can be used with no programming effort. These tools include capabilities to: repair computer-aided-design (CAD) geometries and build global surface triangulations; generate surface and volume grids with hyperbolic grid generation; generate composite overlapping grids; generate hybrid (unstructured) grids; and solve particular PDEs such as the incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  13. Quantum statistics of overlapping modes in open resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Hackenbroich, Gregor; Viviescas, Carlos; Haake, Fritz

    2003-12-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of optical fields in weakly confining resonators with overlapping modes. Employing a recently developed quantization scheme involving a discrete set of resonator modes and continua of external modes we derive Langevin equations and a master equation for the resonator modes. Langevin dynamics and the master equation are proved to be equivalent in the Markovian limit. Our open-resonator dynamics may be used as a starting point for a quantum theory of random lasers.

  14. Structural Design Strategies for Improved Small Overlap Crashworthiness Performance.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Becky C; Brethwaite, Andrew S; Zuby, David S; Nolan, Joseph M

    2014-11-01

    In 2012, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) began a 64 km/h small overlap frontal crash test consumer information test program. Thirteen automakers already have redesigned models to improve test performance. One or more distinct strategies are evident in these redesigns: reinforcement of the occupant compartment, use of energy-absorbing fender structures, and the addition of engagement structures to induce vehicle lateral translation. Each strategy influences vehicle kinematics, posing additional challenges for the restraint systems. The objective of this two-part study was to examine how vehicles were modified to improve small overlap test performance and then to examine how these modifications affect dummy response and restraint system performance. Among eight models tested before and after design changes, occupant compartment intrusion reductions ranged from 6 cm to 45 cm, with the highest reductions observed in models with the largest number of modifications. All redesigns included additional occupant compartment reinforcement, one-third added structures to engage the barrier, and two modified a shotgun load path. Designs with engagement structures produced greater glance-off from the barrier and exhibited lower delta Vs but experienced more lateral outboard motion of the dummy. Designs with heavy reinforcement of the occupant compartment had higher vehicle accelerations and delta V. In three cases, these apparent trade-offs were not well addressed by concurrent changes in restraint systems and resulted in increased injury risk compared with the original tests. Among the 36 models tested after design changes, the extent of design changes correlated to structural performance. Half of the vehicles with the lowest intrusion levels incorporated aspects of all three design strategies. Vehicle kinematics and dummy and restraint system characteristics were similar to those observed in the before/after pairs. Different combinations of structural

  15. Pollination niche overlap between a parasitic plant and its host.

    PubMed

    Ollerton, Jeff; Stott, Adrian; Allnutt, Emma; Shove, Sam; Taylor, Chloe; Lamborn, Ellen

    2007-03-01

    Niche theory predicts that species which share resources should evolve strategies to minimise competition for those resources, or the less competitive species would be extirpated. Some plant species are constrained to co-occur, for example parasitic plants and their hosts, and may overlap in their pollination niche if they flower at the same time and attract the same pollinators. Using field observations and experiments between 1996 and 2006, we tested a series of hypotheses regarding pollination niche overlap between a specialist parasitic plant Orobanche elatior (Orobanchaceae) and its host Centaurea scabiosa (Asteraceae). These species flower more or less at the same time, with some year-to-year variation. The host is pollinated by a diverse range of insects, which vary in their effectiveness, whilst the parasite is pollinated by a single species of bumblebee, Bombus pascuorum, which is also an effective pollinator of the host plant. The two species therefore have partially overlapping pollination niches. These niches are not finely subdivided by differential pollen placement, or by diurnal segregation of the niches. We therefore found no evidence of character displacement within the pollination niches of these species, possibly because pollinators are not a limiting resource for these plants. Direct observation of pollinator movements, coupled with experimental manipulations of host plant inflorescence density, showed that Bombus pascuorum only rarely moves between inflorescences of the host and the parasite and therefore the presence of one plant is unlikely to be facilitating pollination in the other. This is the first detailed examination of pollination niche overlap in a plant parasite system and we suggest avenues for future research in relation to pollination and other shared interactions between parasitic plants and their hosts. PMID:17146683

  16. Pin diode calibration - beam overlap monitoring for low energy cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, A.; Montag, C.; Thieberger, P.

    2015-09-30

    We were trying to address the question whether or not the Pin Diodes, currently installed approximately 1 meter downstream of the RHIC primary collimators, are suitable to monitor a recombination signal from the future RHIC low energy cooling section. A maximized recombination signal, with the Au+78 ions being lost on the collimator, will indicate optimal Au-electron beam overlap as well as velocity matching of the electron beam in the cooling section.

  17. Rock1 & 2 Perform Overlapping and Unique Roles in Angiogenesis and Angiosarcoma Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Montalvo, J; Spencer, C; Hackathorn, A; Masterjohn, K; Perkins, A; Doty, C; Arumugam, A; Ongusaha, PP; Lakshmanaswamy, R; Liao, JK; Mitchell, DC; Bryan, BA

    2013-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase paralogs ROCK1 & 2 have been implicated as essential modulators of angiogenesis; however their paralog-specific roles in endothelial function are unknown. shRNA knockdown of ROCK1 or 2 in endothelial cells resulted in a significant disruption of in vitro capillary network formation, cell polarization, and cell migration compared to cells harboring non-targeting control shRNA plasmids. Knockdowns led to alterations in cytoskeletal dynamics due to ROCK1 & 2-mediated reductions in actin isoform expression, and ROCK2-specific reduction in myosin phosphatase and cofilin phosphorylation. Knockdowns enhanced cell survival and led to ROCK1 & 2-mediated reduction in caspase 6 and 9 cleavage, and a ROCK2-specific reduction in caspase 3 cleavage. Microarray analysis of ROCK knockdown lines revealed overlapping and unique control of global transcription by the paralogs, and a reduction in the transcriptional regulation of just under 50% of VEGF responsive genes. Finally, paralog knockdown in xenograft angiosarcoma tumors resulted in a significant reduction in tumor formation. Our data reveals that ROCK1 & 2 exhibit overlapping and unique roles in normal and dysfunctional endothelial cells, that alterations in cytoskeletal dynamics are capable of overriding mitogen activated transcription, and that therapeutic targeting of ROCK signaling may have profound impacts for targeting angiogenesis. PMID:22934846

  18. ROCK1 & 2 perform overlapping and unique roles in angiogenesis and angiosarcoma tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Montalvo, J; Spencer, C; Hackathorn, A; Masterjohn, K; Perkins, A; Doty, C; Arumugam, A; Ongusaha, P P; Lakshmanaswamy, R; Liao, J K; Mitchell, D C; Bryan, B A

    2013-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase paralogs ROCK1 & 2 have been implicated as essential modulators of angiogenesis; however their paralog-specific roles in endothelial function are unknown. shRNA knockdown of ROCK1 or 2 in endothelial cells resulted in a significant disruption of in vitro capillary network formation, cell polarization, and cell migration compared to cells harboring non-targeting control shRNA plasmids. Knockdowns led to alterations in cytoskeletal dynamics due to ROCK1 & 2-mediated reductions in actin isoform expression, and ROCK2-specific reduction in myosin phosphatase and cofilin phosphorylation. Knockdowns enhanced cell survival and led to ROCK1 & 2-mediated reduction in caspase 6 and 9 cleavage, and a ROCK2-specific reduction in caspase 3 cleavage. Microarray analysis of ROCK knockdown lines revealed overlapping and unique control of global transcription by the paralogs, and a reduction in the transcriptional regulation of just under 50% of VEGF responsive genes. Finally, paralog knockdown in xenograft angiosarcoma tumors resulted in a significant reduction in tumor formation. Our data reveals that ROCK1 & 2 exhibit overlapping and unique roles in normal and dysfunctional endothelial cells, that alterations in cytoskeletal dynamics are capable of overriding mitogen activated transcription, and that therapeutic targeting of ROCK signaling may have profound impacts for targeting angiogenesis. PMID:22934846

  19. Cardiolipin and Mitochondrial Phosphatidylethanolamine Have Overlapping Functions in Mitochondrial Fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Amit S.; Thompson, Morgan N.; Fei, Naomi; Hüttemann, Maik; Greenberg, Miriam L.

    2012-01-01

    The two non-bilayer forming mitochondrial phospholipids cardiolipin (CL) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) play crucial roles in maintaining mitochondrial morphology. We have shown previously that CL and PE have overlapping functions, and the loss of both is synthetically lethal. Because the lack of CL does not lead to defects in the mitochondrial network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we hypothesized that PE may compensate for CL in the maintenance of mitochondrial tubular morphology and fusion. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a conditional mutant crd1Δpsd1Δ containing null alleles of CRD1 (CL synthase) and PSD1 (mitochondrial phosphatidylserine decarboxylase), in which the wild type CRD1 gene is expressed on a plasmid under control of the TETOFF promoter. In the presence of tetracycline, the mutant exhibited highly fragmented mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial DNA, and reduced membrane potential, characteristic of fusion mutants. Deletion of DNM1, required for mitochondrial fission, restored the tubular mitochondrial morphology. Loss of CL and mitochondrial PE led to reduced levels of small and large isoforms of the fusion protein Mgm1p, possibly accounting for the fusion defect. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time in vivo that CL and mitochondrial PE are required to maintain tubular mitochondrial morphology and have overlapping functions in mitochondrial fusion. PMID:22433850

  20. How do keratinizing disorders and blistering disorders overlap?

    PubMed

    Hamada, Takahiro; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Fukuda, Shunpei; Ishii, Norito; Teye, Kwesi; Numata, Sanae; Dainichi, Teruki; Karashima, Tadashi; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Inherited keratinizing disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding cornified cell envelope proteins, enzymes and their inhibitors, adhesion molecules, cytoskeletal proteins and others in the epidermis. These molecules are known to regulate differentiation, proliferation and cell adhesions. Intriguingly, some keratinizing disorders show blistering skin lesions, while some inherited blistering disorders show abnormal keratinization. Therefore, hereditary keratinizing and blistering diseases are closely related and show overlapping genetic backgrounds. In this review, we overviewed keratinizing and blistering disorders in terms of overlapping of the two disease groups. Gene mutations in desmosomal components cause striate keratoderma, Naxos disease, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma and plakophilin deficiency, which first show skin fragility and blisters and later hyperkeratosis. Gene mutations in hemidesmosomal components cause various forms of epidermolysis bullosa, some of which show hyperkeratosis on the nails, palms and soles, in addition to blister formation. Diseases with gene mutations in calcium pump proteins are Darier disease and Hailey-Hailey disease, which show clinicopathological overlaps and develop both keratinizing and blistering skin lesions. Finally, gene mutations in epidermal keratins cause epidermolysis bullosa simplex, epidermolytic ichthyosis, superficial epidermolytic ichthyosis, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma and pachyonychia congenita/focal palmoplantar keratoderma, which show thickening of the palms and soles with underlying blister formation. In general, responsible proteins for diseases developing both keratinizing and blistering conditions are adhesion molecules, calcium pump proteins and keratins, but not connexins, cornified cell envelop proteins, enzymes or inhibitors. It is still unknown how particular keratinizing diseases develop blisters and vice versa. PMID:23039137