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Sample records for determines cell susceptibility

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy determines the susceptibility of melanoma cells to dabrafenib

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Chao; Zhang, Ziping; Chen, Lihong; Zhou, Kunli; Li, Dongjun; Wang, Ping; Huang, Shuying; Gong, Ting; Cheng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the deadliest skin cancers and accounts for most skin-related deaths due to strong resistance to chemotherapy drugs. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of dabrafenib-induced drug resistance in human melanoma cell lines A375 and MEL624. Our studies support that both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy were induced in the melanoma cells after the treatment with dabrafenib. In addition, ER stress-induced autophagy protects melanoma cells from the toxicity of dabrafenib. Moreover, inhibition of both ER stress and autophagy promote the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. Taken together, the data suggest that ER stress-induced autophagy determines the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. These results provide us with promising evidence that the inhibition of autophagy and ER stress could serve a therapeutic effect for the conventional dabrafenib chemotherapy. PMID:27536070

  2. Pathway-based analysis of GWAs data identifies association of sex determination genes with susceptibility to testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Koster, Roelof; Mitra, Nandita; D'Andrea, Kurt; Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Chung, Charles C; Wang, Zhaoming; Loren Erickson, R; Vaughn, David J; Litchfield, Kevin; Rahman, Nazneen; Greene, Mark H; McGlynn, Katherine A; Turnbull, Clare; Chanock, Stephen J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Kanetsky, Peter A

    2014-11-15

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies of testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) have identified 18 susceptibility loci, some containing genes encoding proteins important in male germ cell development. Deletions of one of these genes, DMRT1, lead to male-to-female sex reversal and are associated with development of gonadoblastoma. To further explore genetic association with TGCT, we undertook a pathway-based analysis of SNP marker associations in the Penn GWAs (349 TGCT cases and 919 controls). We analyzed a custom-built sex determination gene set consisting of 32 genes using three different methods of pathway-based analysis. The sex determination gene set ranked highly compared with canonical gene sets, and it was associated with TGCT (FDRG = 2.28 × 10(-5), FDRM = 0.014 and FDRI = 0.008 for Gene Set Analysis-SNP (GSA-SNP), Meta-Analysis Gene Set Enrichment of Variant Associations (MAGENTA) and Improved Gene Set Enrichment Analysis for Genome-wide Association Study (i-GSEA4GWAS) analysis, respectively). The association remained after removal of DMRT1 from the gene set (FDRG = 0.0002, FDRM = 0.055 and FDRI = 0.009). Using data from the NCI GWA scan (582 TGCT cases and 1056 controls) and UK scan (986 TGCT cases and 4946 controls), we replicated these findings (NCI: FDRG = 0.006, FDRM = 0.014, FDRI = 0.033, and UK: FDRG = 1.04 × 10(-6), FDRM = 0.016, FDRI = 0.025). After removal of DMRT1 from the gene set, the sex determination gene set remains associated with TGCT in the NCI (FDRG = 0.039, FDRM = 0.050 and FDRI = 0.055) and UK scans (FDRG = 3.00 × 10(-5), FDRM = 0.056 and FDRI = 0.044). With the exception of DMRT1, genes in the sex determination gene set have not previously been identified as TGCT susceptibility loci in these GWA scans, demonstrating the complementary nature of a pathway-based approach for genome-wide analysis of TGCT. PMID:24943593

  3. CADM1/TSLC1 Identifies HTLV-1-Infected Cells and Determines Their Susceptibility to CTL-Mediated Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuetsu; Taylor, Graham P.; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) primarily infects CD4+ T cells, causing inflammatory disorders or a T cell malignancy in 5% to 10% of carriers. The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is a key factor that controls the viral load and thus the risk of disease. The ability to detect the viral protein Tax in primary cells has made it possible to estimate the rate at which Tax-expressing infected cells are eliminated by CTLs in persistently infected people. However, most HTLV-1-infected cells are Tax–at a given time, and their immunophenotype is poorly defined. Here, we aimed to identify a cell-surface molecule expressed by both Tax+ and Tax–HTLV-1-infected cells and use it to analyse the CTL response in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1/TSLC1) was the best single marker of HTLV-1 infection, identifying HTLV-1-infected cells with greater sensitivity and specificity than CD25, CCR4 or ICAM-1. CADM1+CD4+ T cells carried a median of 65% of proviral copies in peripheral blood. In a cohort of 23 individuals, we quantified the rate of CTL-mediated killing of Tax+ and Tax−CADM1+ cells. We show that CADM1 expression is associated with enhanced susceptibility of infected cells to CTL lysis: despite the immunodominance of Tax in the CTL response, Tax+CADM1– cells were inefficiently lysed by CTLs. Upregulation of the CADM1 ligand CRTAM on CD8+ T cells correlated with efficient lysis of infected cells. Tax–CADM1+ cells were lysed at a very low rate by autologous CTLs, however, were efficiently killed when loaded with exogenous peptide antigen. High expression of CADM1 on most HTLV-1-infected cells in the face of enhanced CTL counterselection implies that CADM1 confers a strong benefit on the virus. PMID:27105228

  4. CADM1/TSLC1 Identifies HTLV-1-Infected Cells and Determines Their Susceptibility to CTL-Mediated Lysis.

    PubMed

    Manivannan, Kiruthika; Rowan, Aileen G; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2016-04-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) primarily infects CD4+ T cells, causing inflammatory disorders or a T cell malignancy in 5% to 10% of carriers. The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is a key factor that controls the viral load and thus the risk of disease. The ability to detect the viral protein Tax in primary cells has made it possible to estimate the rate at which Tax-expressing infected cells are eliminated by CTLs in persistently infected people. However, most HTLV-1-infected cells are Tax-at a given time, and their immunophenotype is poorly defined. Here, we aimed to identify a cell-surface molecule expressed by both Tax+ and Tax-HTLV-1-infected cells and use it to analyse the CTL response in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1/TSLC1) was the best single marker of HTLV-1 infection, identifying HTLV-1-infected cells with greater sensitivity and specificity than CD25, CCR4 or ICAM-1. CADM1+CD4+ T cells carried a median of 65% of proviral copies in peripheral blood. In a cohort of 23 individuals, we quantified the rate of CTL-mediated killing of Tax+ and Tax-CADM1+ cells. We show that CADM1 expression is associated with enhanced susceptibility of infected cells to CTL lysis: despite the immunodominance of Tax in the CTL response, Tax+CADM1- cells were inefficiently lysed by CTLs. Upregulation of the CADM1 ligand CRTAM on CD8+ T cells correlated with efficient lysis of infected cells. Tax-CADM1+ cells were lysed at a very low rate by autologous CTLs, however, were efficiently killed when loaded with exogenous peptide antigen. High expression of CADM1 on most HTLV-1-infected cells in the face of enhanced CTL counterselection implies that CADM1 confers a strong benefit on the virus. PMID:27105228

  5. Reduced Tyk2 gene expression in β-cells due to natural mutation determines susceptibility to virus-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kenichi; Mine, Keiichiro; Inoue, Yoshitaka; Teshima, Miho; Ogawa, Shuichiro; Kai, Yuji; Kurafuji, Toshinobu; Hirakawa, Kanako; Miyakawa, Daiki; Ikeda, Haruka; Inada, Akari; Hara, Manami; Yamada, Hisakata; Akashi, Koichi; Niho, Yoshiyuki; Ina, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Takashi; Yoshikai, Yasunobu; Anzai, Keizo; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Fujimoto, Shuji; Kurisaki, Hironori; Shimoda, Kazuya; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Nagafuchi, Seiho

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that viruses play an important role in the development of diabetes. Although the diabetogenic encephalomyocarditis strain D virus induces diabetes in restricted lines of inbred mice, the susceptibility genes to virus-induced diabetes have not been identified. We report here that novel Tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2) gene mutations are present in virus-induced diabetes-sensitive SJL and SWR mice. Mice carrying the mutant Tyk2 gene on the virus-resistant C57BL/6 background are highly sensitive to virus-induced diabetes. Tyk2 gene expression is strongly reduced in Tyk2-mutant mice, associated with low Tyk2 promoter activity, and leads to decreased expression of interferon-inducible genes, resulting in significantly compromised antiviral response. Tyk2-mutant pancreatic β-cells are unresponsive even to high dose of Type I interferon. Reversal of virus-induced diabetes could be achieved by β-cell-specific Tyk2 gene expression. Thus, reduced Tyk2 gene expression in pancreatic β-cells due to natural mutation is responsible for susceptibility to virus-induced diabetes. PMID:25849081

  6. Basal-subtype and MEK-Pl3K feedback signaling determine susceptibility of breast cancer cells to MEK inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzoeva, Olga K.; Das, Debopriya; Heiser, Laura M.; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Siwak, Doris; Gendelman, Rina; Bayani, Nora; Wang, Nicholas J.; Neve, Richard M.; Knight, Zachary; Feiler, Heidi S.; Gascard, Philippe; Parvin, Bahram; Spellman, Paul T.; Shokat, Kevan M.; Wyrobek, Andrew J.; Bissell, Mina J.; McCormick, Frank; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Mills, Gordon B.; Gray, Joe W.; Korn, W. Michael

    2009-01-23

    Specific inhibitors of MEK have been developed that efficiently inhibit the oncogenic RAF-MEK-ERK pathway. We employed a systems-based approach to identify breast cancer subtypes particularly susceptible to MEK inhibitors and to understand molecular mechanisms conferring resistance to such compounds. Basal-type breast cancer cells were found to be particularly susceptible to growth-inhibition by small-molecule MEK inhibitors. Activation of the PI3 kinase pathway in response to MEK inhibition through a negative MEK-EGFR-PI3 kinase feedback loop was found to limit efficacy. Interruption of this feedback mechanism by targeting MEK and PI3 kinase produced synergistic effects, including induction of apoptosis and, in some cell lines, cell cycle arrest and protection from apoptosis induced by proapoptotic agents. These findings enhance our understanding of the interconnectivity of oncogenic signal transduction circuits and have implications for the design of future clinical trials of MEK inhibitors in breast cancer by guiding patient selection and suggesting rational combination therapies.

  7. Reduced Tyk2 gene expression in β-cells due to natural mutation determines susceptibility to virus-induced diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Kenichi; Mine, Keiichiro; Inoue, Yoshitaka; Teshima, Miho; Ogawa, Shuichiro; Kai, Yuji; Kurafuji, Toshinobu; Hirakawa, Kanako; Miyakawa, Daiki; Ikeda, Haruka; Inada, Akari; Hara, Manami; Yamada, Hisakata; Akashi, Koichi; Niho, Yoshiyuki; Ina, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Takashi; Yoshikai, Yasunobu; Anzai, Keizo; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Fujimoto, Shuji; Kurisaki, Hironori; Shimoda, Kazuya; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Nagafuchi, Seiho

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that viruses play an important role in the development of diabetes. Although the diabetogenic encephalomyocarditis strain D virus induces diabetes in restricted lines of inbred mice, the susceptibility genes to virus-induced diabetes have not been identified. We report here that novel Tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2) gene mutations are present in virus-induced diabetes-sensitive SJL and SWR mice. Mice carrying the mutant Tyk2 gene on the virus-resistant C57BL/6 background are highly sensitive to virus-induced diabetes. Tyk2 gene expression is strongly reduced in Tyk2-mutant mice, associated with low Tyk2 promoter activity, and leads to decreased expression of interferon-inducible genes, resulting in significantly compromised antiviral response. Tyk2-mutant pancreatic β-cells are unresponsive even to high dose of Type I interferon. Reversal of virus-induced diabetes could be achieved by β-cell-specific Tyk2 gene expression. Thus, reduced Tyk2 gene expression in pancreatic β-cells due to natural mutation is responsible for susceptibility to virus-induced diabetes. PMID:25849081

  8. The cortical actin determines different susceptibility of naïve and memory CD4+ T cells to HIV-1 cell-to-cell transmission and infection.

    PubMed

    Permanyer, Marc; Pauls, Eduardo; Badia, Roger; Esté, José A; Ballana, Ester

    2013-01-01

    Memory CD4+ T cells are preferentially infected by HIV-1 compared to naïve cells. HIV-1 fusion and entry is a dynamic process in which the cytoskeleton plays an important role by allowing virion internalization and uncoating. Here, we evaluate the role of the cortical actin in cell-to-cell transfer of virus antigens and infection of target CD4+ T cells. Using different actin remodeling compounds we demonstrate that efficiency of HIV-internalization was proportional to the actin polymerization of the target cell. Naïve (CD45RA+) and memory (CD45RA-) CD4+ T cells could be phenotypically differentiated by the degree of cortical actin density and their capacity to capture virus. Thus, the higher cortical actin density of memory CD4+ T cells was associated to increased efficiency of HIV-antigen internalization and the establishment of a productive infection. Conversely, the lower cortical actin density in naïve CD4+ T cells restricted viral antigen transfer and consequently HIV-1 infection. In conclusion, the cortical actin density differentially affects the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in naïve and memory CD4+ T cells by modulating the efficiency of HIV antigen internalization. PMID:24244453

  9. A plastic SQSTM1/p62-dependent autophagic reserve maintains proteostasis and determines proteasome inhibitor susceptibility in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Milan, Enrico; Perini, Tommaso; Resnati, Massimo; Orfanelli, Ugo; Oliva, Laura; Raimondi, Andrea; Cascio, Paolo; Bachi, Angela; Marcatti, Magda; Ciceri, Fabio; Cenci, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the paradigmatic proteasome inhibitor (PI) responsive cancer, but many patients fail to respond. An attractive target to enhance sensitivity is (macro)autophagy, recently found essential to bone marrow plasma cells, the normal counterpart of MM. Here, integrating proteomics with hypothesis-driven strategies, we identified the autophagic cargo receptor and adapter protein, SQSTM1/p62 as an essential component of an autophagic reserve that not only synergizes with the proteasome to maintain proteostasis, but also mediates a plastic adaptive response to PIs, and faithfully reports on inherent PI sensitivity. Lentiviral engineering revealed that SQSTM1 is essential for MM cell survival and affords specific PI protection. Under basal conditions, SQSTM1-dependent autophagy alleviates the degradative burden on the proteasome by constitutively disposing of substantial amounts of ubiquitinated proteins. Indeed, its inhibition or stimulation greatly sensitized to, or protected from, PI-induced protein aggregation and cell death. Moreover, under proteasome stress, myeloma cells selectively enhanced SQSTM1 de novo expression and reset its vast endogenous interactome, diverting SQSTM1 from signaling partners to maximize its association with ubiquitinated proteins. Saturation of such autophagic reserve, as indicated by intracellular accumulation of undigested SQSTM1-positive aggregates, specifically discriminated patient-derived myelomas inherently susceptible to PIs from primarily resistant ones. These aggregates correlated with accumulation of the endoplasmic reticulum, which comparative proteomics identified as the main cell compartment targeted by autophagy in MM. Altogether, the data integrate autophagy into our previously established proteasome load-versus-capacity model, and reveal SQSTM1 aggregation as a faithful marker of defective proteostasis, defining a novel prognostic and therapeutic framework for MM. PMID:26043024

  10. Developmental Origin of Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells Determines Response to Demyelination and Susceptibility to Age-Associated Functional Decline

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Abbe H.; Tripathi, Richa B.; Richardson, William D.; Franklin, Robin J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPs) arise from distinct ventral and dorsal domains within the ventricular germinal zones of the embryonic CNS. The functional significance, if any, of these different populations is not known. Using dual-color reporter mice to distinguish ventrally and dorsally derived OPs, we show that, in response to focal demyelination of the young adult spinal cord or corpus callosum, dorsally derived OPs undergo enhanced proliferation, recruitment, and differentiation as compared with their ventral counterparts, making a proportionally larger contribution to remyelination. However, with increasing age (up to 13 months), the dorsally derived OPs become less able to differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes. Comparison of dorsally and ventrally derived OPs in culture revealed inherent differences in their migration and differentiation capacities. Therefore, the responsiveness of OPs to demyelination, their contribution to remyelination, and their susceptibility to age-associated functional decline are markedly dependent on their developmental site of origin in the developing neural tube. PMID:27149850

  11. Two new loci and gene sets related to sex determination and cancer progression are associated with susceptibility to testicular germ cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Wenche; Karlsson, Robert; Rounge, Trine B; Whitington, Thomas; Andreassen, Bettina K; Magnusson, Patrik K; Fosså, Sophie D; Adami, Hans-Olov; Turnbull, Clare; Haugen, Trine B; Grotmol, Tom; Wiklund, Fredrik

    2015-07-15

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have reported 19 distinct susceptibility loci for testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT). A GWA study for TGCT was performed by genotyping 610 240 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1326 cases and 6687 controls from Sweden and Norway. No novel genome-wide significant associations were observed in this discovery stage. We put forward 27 SNPs from 15 novel regions and 12 SNPs previously reported, for replication in 710 case-parent triads and 289 cases and 290 controls. Predefined biological pathways and processes, in addition to a custom-built sex-determination gene set, were subject to enrichment analyses using Meta-Analysis Gene Set Enrichment of Variant Associations (M) and Improved Gene Set Enrichment Analysis for Genome-wide Association Study (I). In the combined meta-analysis, we observed genome-wide significant association for rs7501939 on chromosome 17q12 (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.72-0.84, P = 1.1 × 10(-9)) and rs2195987 on chromosome 19p12 (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.69-0.84, P = 3.2 × 10(-8)). The marker rs7501939 on chromosome 17q12 is located in an intron of the HNF1B gene, encoding a member of the homeodomain-containing superfamily of transcription factors. The sex-determination gene set (false discovery rate, FDRM < 0.001, FDRI < 0.001) and pathways related to NF-κB, glycerophospholipid and ether lipid metabolism, as well as cancer and apoptosis, was associated with TGCT (FDR < 0.1). In addition to revealing two new TGCT susceptibility loci, our results continue to support the notion that genes governing normal germ cell development in utero are implicated in the development of TGCT. PMID:25877299

  12. Expression of RIG-I, IRF3, IFN-beta and IRF7 determines resistance or susceptibility of cells to infection by Newcastle Disease Virus.

    PubMed

    Wilden, Holger; Fournier, Philippe; Zawatzky, Rainer; Schirrmacher, Volker

    2009-04-01

    Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) is an avian paramyxovirus with anti-neoplastic and immune-stimulatory properties which has raised considerable interest for cancer therapy. To better understand the molecular nature of the tumor selective replication of NDV, we investigated the cellular responses of murine normal and tumor cells after infection by NDV. To this end, we compared the basal expression of different antiviral proteins as well as the expression induced by the addition of NDV to the cells in vitro and in vivo. Primary macrophages were found to be resistant to NDV infection and exhibited a high basal and induced expression of various antiviral genes. In contrast, macrophage-derived RAW tumor cells were highly susceptible to NDV infection and displayed a low expression of several antiviral genes. Macrophage-derived J774 tumor cells were intermediate with regard to NDV replication and antiviral gene expression. The responsiveness to exogenously added IFN-alpha was found highest in normal macrophages, lowest in the RAW cells, and intermediate in the J774 cells. We also analysed dendritic cells as well as additional normal and tumor cell types. A strong inverse correlation was obeserved between the susceptibility to infection and the basal expression of the antiviral genes RIG-I, IRF3, IRF7 and IFN-beta. A strong expression of these genes can explain the resistance of normal cells to NDV infection and a weak antiviral gene expression the broad susceptibility of tumor cells. PMID:19287954

  13. IgE-FcεRI Interactions Determine HIV Coreceptor Usage and Susceptibility to Infection during Ontogeny of Mast Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrom, J. Bruce; Hair, Gregory A.; Ansari, Aftab A.; Secor, W. Evan; Gilfillan, Alasdair M.; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Kirshenbaum, Arnold S.

    2009-01-01

    Progenitor mast cells (prMCs), derived from CD34+ precursors are CD4+/CCR5+/CXCR4+ and susceptible to CCR5(R5)-tropic virus but only marginally susceptible to CXCR4(X4)-tropic HIV. As infected prMCs mature within extravascular compartments, they become both latently infected and HIV-infection resistant, and thus capable of establishing an inducible reservoir of CCR5-tropic infectious clones. In this report we provide the first evidence that IgE-FcεRI interactions, occurring during a unique period of mast cell (MC) ontogeny, enhance prMC susceptibility to X4 and R5X4 virus. IgE-FcεRI interactions significantly increased expression of CXCR4 mRNA (∼400- to 1800-fold), enhanced prMC susceptibility to X4 and R5X4 virus (∼3000- to 16,000-fold), but had no significant effect on CD4, CCR3, or CCR5 expression, susceptibility to R5 virus, or degranulation. Enhanced susceptibility to infection with X4 virus occurred during the first 3–5 wk of MC ontogeny and was completely inhibited by CXCR4-specific peptide antagonists and omalizumab, a drug that inhibits IgE-FcεRI interactions. IgE-FcεRI coaggregation mediated by HIVgp120 or Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg Ag accelerated maximal CXCR4 expression and susceptibility to X4 virus by prMCs. Our findings suggest that for HIV-positive individuals with atopic or helminthic diseases, elevated IgE levels could potentially influence the composition of CXCR4-tropic and R5X4-tropic variants archived within the long-lived tissue MC reservoir created during infection. PMID:19414793

  14. The PGE2/IL-10 Axis Determines Susceptibility of B-1 Cell-Derived Phagocytes (B-1CDP) to Leishmania major Infection.

    PubMed

    Arcanjo, Angélica F; LaRocque-de-Freitas, Isabel F; Rocha, Juliana Dutra B; Zamith, Daniel; Costa-da-Silva, Ana Caroline; Nunes, Marise Pinheiro; Mesquita-Santos, Fabio P; Morrot, Alexandre; Filardy, Alessandra A; Mariano, Mario; Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; DosReis, George A; Decote-Ricardo, Debora; Freire-de-Lima, Célio Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    B-1 cells can be differentiated from B-2 cells because they are predominantly located in the peritoneal and pleural cavities and have distinct phenotypic patterns and activation properties. A mononuclear phagocyte derived from B-1 cells (B-1CDP) has been described. As the B-1CDP cells migrate to inflammatory/infectious sites and exhibit phagocytic capacity, the microbicidal ability of these cells was investigated using the Leishmania major infection model in vitro. The data obtained in this study demonstrate that B-1CDP cells are more susceptible to infection than peritoneal macrophages, since B-1CDP cells have a higher number of intracellular amastigotes forms and consequently release a larger number of promastigotes. Exacerbated infection by L. major required lipid bodies/PGE2 and IL-10 by B-1CDP cells. Both infection and the production of IL-10 were decreased when PGE2 production was blocked by NSAIDs. The involvement of IL-10 in this mechanism was confirmed, since B-1CDP cells from IL-10 KO mice are more competent to control L. major infection than cells from wild type mice. These findings further characterize the B-1CDP cells as an important mononuclear phagocyte that plays a previously unrecognized role in host responses to L. major infection, most likely via PGE2-driven production of IL-10. PMID:25933287

  15. The PGE2/IL-10 Axis Determines Susceptibility of B-1 Cell-Derived Phagocytes (B-1CDP) to Leishmania major Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zamith, Daniel; Costa-da-Silva, Ana Caroline; Nunes, Marise Pinheiro; Mesquita-Santos, Fabio P.; Morrot, Alexandre; Filardy, Alessandra A.; Mariano, Mario; Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; DosReis, George A.; Decote-Ricardo, Debora; Freire-de-Lima, Célio Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    B-1 cells can be differentiated from B-2 cells because they are predominantly located in the peritoneal and pleural cavities and have distinct phenotypic patterns and activation properties. A mononuclear phagocyte derived from B-1 cells (B-1CDP) has been described. As the B-1CDP cells migrate to inflammatory/infectious sites and exhibit phagocytic capacity, the microbicidal ability of these cells was investigated using the Leishmania major infection model in vitro. The data obtained in this study demonstrate that B-1CDP cells are more susceptible to infection than peritoneal macrophages, since B-1CDP cells have a higher number of intracellular amastigotes forms and consequently release a larger number of promastigotes. Exacerbated infection by L. major required lipid bodies/PGE2 and IL-10 by B-1CDP cells. Both infection and the production of IL-10 were decreased when PGE2 production was blocked by NSAIDs. The involvement of IL-10 in this mechanism was confirmed, since B-1CDP cells from IL-10 KO mice are more competent to control L. major infection than cells from wild type mice. These findings further characterize the B-1CDP cells as an important mononuclear phagocyte that plays a previously unrecognized role in host responses to L. major infection, most likely via PGE2-driven production of IL-10. PMID:25933287

  16. Sialomucin and lytic susceptibility of rat mammary tumor ascites cells.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, J; Skelly, C M; Bharathan, S; Moody, C E; Sherblom, A P

    1990-11-01

    The potential role of cell surface sialomucin in preventing natural killer (NK)-mediated lysis of tumor cell targets has been addressed by comparing the properties of 2 NK-resistant [ascites (ASC) and short-term cultured (STC)] and 2 NK-susceptible [tunicamycin-treated (TUN) and long-term cultured (LTC)] preparations of 13762 MAT-B1 rat mammary tumor cells. Both the ASC and STC cell preparations contain elevated levels of the sialomucin ASGP-1 relative to TUN and LTC preparations as determined by [3H]glucosamine labeling and by binding of peanut agglutinin. The major difference in the susceptibility to NK-mediated lysis appeared to be due to the differences in the susceptibility to lysis by lytic granules, rather than to differences in the ability to bind or trigger effector cells, since TUN and LTC cells were approximately 10-fold more sensitive to lysis by lytic granules than were ASC and STC cells. All preparations inhibited the lysis of the susceptible target YAC-1 by normal rat splenocytes, indicating an ability to bind these effector cells. Triggering of effectors, as monitored either by incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylinositol or by transmethylation of phosphatidylcholine, was similar for the positive control YAC-1, STC, TUN, and LTC, whereas ASC appeared to be defective in triggering effectors. These results suggest that tumor sialomucin blocks the final phase of lysis, but not the initial recognition of tumor cells by NK effectors. PMID:2208144

  17. Susceptibility of irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, M.H.; Dong, Q.; Ts'ao, C.

    1988-11-01

    Using cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), the authors attempted to determine whether prior irradiation would alter the susceptibility of these cells to three known injurious stimuli and, if so, whether the alteration would be related to radiation dose. BAEC were irradiated with 0, 5, or 10 Gy of gamma rays and, on the third postirradiation day, exposed to fibrin, nicotine, or bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Release of prelabeled 51Cr, representing cell lysis, cell detachment, or a combination of the two, was determined. Significant differences between irradiated and control cells were determined by using paired Student's t-tests. Irradiation did not appear to have altered the sensitivity of BAEC to fibrin-induced injury. Cells irradiated with 10 Gy of gamma rays, but generally not those irradiated with half this dose, showed a heightened susceptibility to nicotine. Contrary to the nicotine results, irradiated cells showed less cell detachment and lysis after exposure to LPS. These results suggest that the susceptibility of irradiated BAEC to harmful stimuli depends largely on the nature of the stimulus as well as the radiation dose.

  18. Evaluation of a Rapid Bauer-Kirby Antibiotic Susceptibility Determination

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, Daniel F.; Robertson, Richard G.

    1975-01-01

    To reduce the incubation time requirement in the Bauer-Kirby antibiotic susceptibility test, comparisons were made of the test results at 18 to 20 h (standard) and 7 to 8 h (rapid) utilizing 100 recent clinical isolates. The zone diameters for 664 disks were monitored by using the standard classification: resistant, intermediate, or susceptible. The susceptibility determination was unchanged in 558 out of 664 instances (84.0%). An analysis of the remaining 106 sets revealed that an initial interpretation of intermediate in zone size, subsequently determined resistant or susceptible, accounted for 49 of the observed differences. The reverse changes, initial resistant or susceptible subsequently classified as intermediate, accounted for 20 of the changes. In five instances the interpretation changed from susceptible to resistant; in two cases the interpretation changed from resistant to susceptible. The remaining 30 determinations were classified as indeterminant due to (i) insufficient growth at the early (7 to 8 h) determination, and to (ii) zones which were so large that they could not be measured accurately. The data indicate that zone sizes when measured to the nearest 0.1 mm can be interpreted with reasonable accuracy and the results can be available 10 to 14 h sooner. PMID:1137377

  19. Determination of antimicrobial susceptibilities on infected urines without isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Deming, J. W.; Shrock, C. G.; Vellend, H.; Barza, M. J.; Weinstein, L. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for the quick determination of the susceptibilities of various unidentified bacteria contained in an aqueous physiological fluid sample, particularly urine, to one or more antibiotics. A bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay is carried out after the elimination of non-bacterial ATP to determine whether an infection exists. If an infection does exist, a portion of the sample is further processed, including subjecting parts of the portion to one or more antibiotics. Growth of the bacteria in the parts are determined, again by an ATP assay, to determine whether the unidentified bacteria in the sample are susceptible to the antibiotic or antibiotics under test.

  20. The large mechanosensitive channel MscL determines bacterial susceptibility to the bacteriocin sublancin 168.

    PubMed

    Kouwen, Thijs R H M; Trip, Erik N; Denham, Emma L; Sibbald, Mark J J B; Dubois, Jean-Yves F; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2009-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis strain 168 produces the extremely stable and broad-spectrum lantibiotic sublancin 168. Known sublancin 168-susceptible organisms include important pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Nevertheless, since its discovery, the mode of action of sublancin 168 has remained elusive. The present studies were, therefore, aimed at the identification of cellular determinants for bacterial susceptibility toward sublancin 168. Growth inhibition and competition assays on plates and in liquid cultures revealed that sublancin 168-mediated growth inhibition of susceptible B. subtilis and S. aureus cells is affected by the NaCl concentration in the growth medium. Added NaCl did not influence the production, activity, or stability of sublancin 168 but, instead, lowered the susceptibility of sensitive cells toward this lantibiotic. Importantly, the susceptibility of B. subtilis and S. aureus cells toward sublancin 168 was shown to depend on the presence of the large mechanosensitive channel of conductance MscL. In contrast, MscL was not involved in susceptibility toward the bacteriocin nisin or Pep5. Taken together, our unprecedented results demonstrate that MscL is a critical and specific determinant in bacterial sublancin 168 susceptibility that may serve either as a direct target for this lantibiotic or as a gate of entry to the cytoplasm. PMID:19738010

  1. Human regulatory T cells control TCR signaling and susceptibility to suppression in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Chellappa, Stalin; Lieske, Nora V; Hagness, Morten; Line, Pål D; Taskén, Kjetil; Aandahl, Einar M

    2016-07-01

    Human CD4(+)CD25(hi)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells maintain immunologic tolerance and prevent autoimmune and inflammatory immune responses. Regulatory T cells undergo a similar activation cycle as conventional CD4(+) T cells upon antigen stimulation. Here, we demonstrate that T cell receptors and costimulation are required to activate the regulatory T cell suppressive function. Regulatory T cells suppressed the T cell receptor signaling in effector T cells in a time-dependent manner that corresponded with inhibition of cytokine production and proliferation. Modulation of the activation level and thereby the suppressive capacity of regulatory T cells imposed distinct T cell receptor signaling signatures and hyporesponsiveness in suppressed and proliferating effector T cells and established a threshold for effector T cell proliferation. The immune suppression of effector T cells was completely reversible upon removal of regulatory T cells. However, the strength of prior immune suppression by regulatory T cells and corresponding T cell receptor signaling in effector T cells determined the susceptibility to suppression upon later reexposure to regulatory T cells. These findings demonstrate how the strength of the regulatory T cell suppressive function determines intracellular signaling, immune responsiveness, and the later susceptibility of effector T cells to immune suppression and contribute to unveiling the complex interactions between regulatory T cells and effector T cells. PMID:26715685

  2. New basal cell carcinoma susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Simon N.; Helgason, Hannes; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zink, Florian; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Kehr, Birte; Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R.; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Grasa, Matilde; Planelles, Dolores; Sanmartin, Onofre; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Nexø, Bjørn A.; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Jonasson, Jon G.; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kristinsdottir, Anna M.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Masson, Gisli; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Kong, Augustine; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Vogel, Ulla; Kumar, Rajiv; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Olafsson, Jon H.; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-01-01

    In an ongoing screen for DNA sequence variants that confer risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 24,988,228 SNPs and small indels detected through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders and imputed into 4,572 BCC patients and 266,358 controls. Here we show the discovery of four new BCC susceptibility loci: 2p24 MYCN (rs57244888[C], OR=0.76, P=4.7 × 10−12), 2q33 CASP8-ALS2CR12 (rs13014235[C], OR=1.15, P=1.5 × 10−9), 8q21 ZFHX4 (rs28727938[G], OR=0.70, P=3.5 × 10−12) and 10p14 GATA3 (rs73635312[A], OR=0.74, P=2.4 × 10−16). Fine mapping reveals that two variants correlated with rs73635312[A] occur in conserved binding sites for the GATA3 transcription factor. In addition, expression microarrays and RNA-seq show that rs13014235[C] and a related SNP rs700635[C] are associated with expression of CASP8 splice variants in which sequences from intron 8 are retained. PMID:25855136

  3. Does CD4+CD25+foxp3+ cell (Treg) and IL-10 profile determine susceptibility to immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in HIV disease?

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Esaki Muthu; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Velu, Vijayakumar; Murugavel, Kailapuri G; Sekar, Ramalingam; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Lloyd, Charmaine AC; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Solomon, Suniti; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran

    2008-01-01

    HIV-specific T-lymphocyte responses that underlie IRIS are incomplete and largely remain hypothetical. Of the several mechanisms presented by the host to control host immunological damage, Treg cells are believed to play a critical role. Using the available experimental evidence, it is proposed that enormous synthesis of conventional FoxP3- Th cells (responsive) often renders subjects inherently vulnerable to IRIS, whereas that of natural FoxP3+ Treg cell synthesis predominate among subjects that may not progress to IRIS. We also propose that IRIS non-developers generate precursor T-cells with a high avidity to generate CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs whereas IRIS developers generate T-cells of intermediate avidity yielding Th0 cells and effector T-cells to mediate the generation of proinflammatory cytokines in response to cell-signaling factors (IL-2, IL-6 etc.). Researchers have shown that IL-10 Tregs (along with TGF-β, a known anti-inflammatory cytokine) limit immune responses against microbial antigens in addition to effectively controlling HIV replication, the prime objective of HAART. Although certain technical limitations are described herein, we advocate measures to test the role of Tregs in IRIS. PMID:18282273

  4. Senescence affects endothelial cells susceptibility to dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    AbuBakar, Sazaly; Shu, Meng-Hooi; Johari, Jefree; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2014-01-01

    Alteration in the endothelium leading to increased vascular permeability contributes to plasma leakage seen in dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). An earlier study showed that senescent endothelial cells (ECs) altered the ECs permeability. Here we investigated the susceptibility of senescing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to dengue virus infection and determined if dengue virus infection induces HUVECs senescence. Our results suggest that DENV type-2 (DENV-2) foci forming unit (FFU) and extracellular virus RNA copy number were reduced by at least 35% and 85% in infection of the intermediate young and early senescent HUVECs, respectively, in comparison to infection of young HUVECs. No to low infectivity was recovered from infection of late senescent HUVECs. DENV infection also increases the percentage of HUVECs expressing senescence-associated (SA)-β-gal, cells arrested at the G2/M phase or 4N DNA content stage and cells with enlarged morphology, indicative of senescing cells. Alteration of HUVECs morphology was recorded using impedance-based real-time cell analysis system following DENV-2 infection. These results suggest that senescing HUVECs do not support DENV infection and DENV infection induces HUVECs senescence. The finding highlights the possible role of induction of senescence in DENV infection of the endothelial cells. PMID:24782642

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing in 90 min by bacterial cell count monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Broeren, M A C; Maas, Y; Retera, E; Arents, N L A

    2013-01-01

    The rise in antimicrobial resistance has become a serious global health problem. Restrictive use of antibiotics seems the only option to temper this accession since research in new antibiotics has halted. Antimicrobial stewardship programmes rely on quick access to susceptibility data. This study evaluated the concept of bacterial cell count monitoring as a fast method to determine susceptibility. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus strains were tested for amoxicillin/piperacillin and gentamicin by three conventional methods (VITEK2®, Etest® and broth-macrodilution). Bacterial cell count monitoring reliably predicted susceptibility after 90 min for Escherichia coli and after 120 min for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus without any minor, major or very major discrepancies. Time-to-result was reduced by 74%, 83% and 76%, respectively. Bacterial cell count monitoring shows great potential for rapid susceptibility testing. PMID:22390723

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing in 90 min by bacterial cell count monitoring.

    PubMed

    Broeren, M A C; Maas, Y; Retera, E; Arents, N L A

    2013-03-01

    The rise in antimicrobial resistance has become a serious global health problem. Restrictive use of antibiotics seems the only option to temper this accession since research in new antibiotics has halted. Antimicrobial stewardship programmes rely on quick access to susceptibility data. This study evaluated the concept of bacterial cell count monitoring as a fast method to determine susceptibility. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus strains were tested for amoxicillin/piperacillin and gentamicin by three conventional methods (VITEK2(®) , Etest(®) and broth-macrodilution). Bacterial cell count monitoring reliably predicted susceptibility after 90 min for Escherichia coli and after 120 min for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus without any minor, major or very major discrepancies. Time-to-result was reduced by 74%, 83% and 76%, respectively. Bacterial cell count monitoring shows great potential for rapid susceptibility testing. PMID:22390723

  7. Expression of HSV-1 Receptors in EBV-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disease Determines Susceptibility to Oncolytic HSV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pin-Yi; Currier, Mark A; Hansford, Loen; Kaplan, David; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Uchida, Hiroaki; Goins, William F.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Mo, Xiaokui; Cripe, Timothy P

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation remains a life-threatening complication. Expression of the virus-encoded gene product, EBER, has been shown to prevent apoptosis via blockade of PKR activation. Because PKR is a major cellular defense against Herpes simplex virus, and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) mutants have shown promising anti-tumor efficacy in preclinical models, we sought to determine whether EBV-LPD cells are susceptible to infection by oHSVs. We tested three primary EBV-infected lymphocyte cell cultures from neuroblastoma (NB) patients as models of naturally acquired EBV-LPD. NB12 was most susceptible, NB122R was intermediate, and NB88R2 was essentially resistant. Despite EBER expression, PKR was activated by oHSV infection. Susceptibility to oHSV correlated with the expression of the HSV receptor, nectin-1. The resistance of NB88R2 was reversed by exogenous nectin-1 expression, whereas down-regulation of nectin-1 on NB12 decreased viral entry. Xenografts derived from the EBV-LPDs exhibited only mild (NB12) or no (NB88R2) response to oHSV injection, compared with a neuroblastoma cell line that showed a significant response. We conclude that EBV-LPDs are relatively resistant to oHSV virotherapy, in some cases due to low virus receptor expression but also due to intact anti-viral PKR signaling. PMID:23254370

  8. Comparison of Four Methods for Determining Lysostaphin Susceptibility of Various Strains of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kusuma, Caroline M.; Kokai-Kun, John F.

    2005-01-01

    Lysostaphin is an endopeptidase that cleaves the pentaglycine cross-bridges of the staphylococcal cell wall rapidly lysing the bacteria. Recently, lysostaphin has been examined for its potential to treat infections and to clear Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization, requiring a reliable method for determining the lysostaphin susceptibility of strains of S. aureus. We compared four methods for determining the lysostaphin susceptibility of 57 strains of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, vancomycin intermediately susceptible S. aureus (VISA), mupirocin-resistant S. aureus, and various defined genetic mutants of S. aureus. Three reference lysostaphin-resistant S. aureus variants were also included in the assays as negative controls. The assays examined included turbidity, MIC, minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), and disk diffusion assays. All of the strains of S. aureus tested, including a VISA strain which had previously been reported to be lysostaphin resistant, were susceptible to lysostaphin by all four methods. The three reference lysostaphin-resistant variants were resistant by all four methods. The disk diffusion assay was the simplest method to differentiate lysostaphin-susceptible S. aureus strains from lysostaphin-resistant variants, while the MBC assay could be used as a follow-up assay if required. In the disk diffusion assay, all strains of S. aureus tested revealed zones of inhibition of ≥11 mm using a 50-μg lysostaphin disk, while the three reference lysostaphin-resistant S. aureus variants had no zones of inhibition. In MBC assays, concentrations of lysostaphin ranging from 0.16 μg/ml to 2.5 μg/ml were found to cause a 3 log or greater drop from the initial CFU of S. aureus within 30 min for all strains tested. PMID:16048934

  9. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains determined by disk diffusion].

    PubMed

    Llanes Caballero, R; Acosta Giraldo, J C; Sosa Puente, J; Guzmán Hernández, D; Gutiérrez González, O; Llop Hernández, A

    1999-01-01

    The Gonoccocus Laboratory of "Pedro Kourí" Tropical Medicine Institute carried out a study of in vitro susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to penicillin, tetracycline, cefuroxime ceftriaxone, cefotaxine and ciprofoxacin by means of a disk diffusion method with the culture medium agar base GC plus supplement. In the first phase, the method was standardized and the reference N. gonorrhoeae ATCC 49226 strain was used whereas in the second phase, 50 gonococcal strains isolated in 8 provinces during 1995 and 1996 were examined. The results of such standardization confirmed that the antimicrobial susceptibility values were within the allowable limits. 52 and 34% of strains were resistant to penicillin and tetracycline respectively and all of them showed susceptibility to the rest of evaluated antimicrobial drugs. We recommend the use of the disk diffusion method for surveillance of gonococci resistance to these drugs in our country. PMID:10887570

  10. Establishment of a turbot fin cell line and its susceptibility to turbot reddish body iridovirus

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Bing-Xin; Geng, Xiao-Fen; Yu, Qiu-Tao; Wang, Li-Yan

    2010-01-01

    A turbot, Scophthalmusmaximus, fin (TF) cell line was established and susceptibility to turbot reddish body iridovirus (TRBIV) was determined in this study. Primary culture of TF cells was initiated from fin tissue pieces partially digested with trypsin, collagenase II and hyaluronidase. Digested tissue pieces were cultured at 24 °C in Leibovitz-15 medium (pH 7.2), supplemented with 20% fetal bovine serum, carboxymethyl chitosan, N-acetylglucosamine hydrochloride, basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor. The cultured TF cells, in fibroblast shape, proliferated to 100% confluency 50 days later. A TF cell line, with a population doubling time of 45.6 h at passage 80, has been established and subcultured to passage 133. Chromosome analyses indicated that the TF cells exhibited chromosomal aneuploidy with a modal chromosome number of 44 which displayed the normal diploid karyotype of S.maximus at least up to passage 80. TRBIV susceptibility testing demonstrated that cytopathic effect and propagated viral particles were observed in TF cells after TRBIV infection. In conclusion, a continuous TRBIV susceptible TF cell line has been established successfully, and the cell line may serve as a valuable tool for studies of cell-virus interactions and has applications for different kinds of cytotechnological studies as well. PMID:20502962

  11. New common variants affecting susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Simon N; Sulem, Patrick; Masson, Gisli; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jakobsdottir, Margret; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Scherer, Dominique; Hemminki, Kari; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Soriano, Virtudes; Juberias, Pablo; Saez, Berta; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Grasa, Matilde; Höiom, Veronica; Lindblom, Annika; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; van Rossum, Michelle M; Aben, Katja K H; de Vries, Esther; Santinami, Mario; Di Mauro, Maria G; Maurichi, Andrea; Wendt, Judith; Hochleitner, Pia; Pehamberger, Hubert; Gudmundsson, Julius; Magnusdottir, Droplaug N; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Holm, Hilma; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Frigge, Michael L; Blondal, Thorarinn; Saemundsdottir, Jona; Bjarnason, Hjördis; Kristjansson, Kristleifur; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Okamoto, Ichiro; Rivoltini, Licia; Rodolfo, Monica; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Hansson, Johan; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I; Kumar, Rajiv; Karagas, Margaret R; Nelson, Heather H; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Olafsson, Jon H; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari

    2009-08-01

    In a follow-up to our previously reported genome-wide association study of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we describe here several new susceptibility variants. SNP rs11170164, encoding a G138E substitution in the keratin 5 (KRT5) gene, affects risk of BCC (OR = 1.35, P = 2.1 x 10(-9)). A variant at 9p21 near CDKN2A and CDKN2B also confers susceptibility to BCC (rs2151280[C]; OR = 1.19, P = 6.9 x 10(-9)), as does rs157935[T] at 7q32 near the imprinted gene KLF14 (OR = 1.23, P = 5.7 x 10(-10)). The effect of rs157935[T] is dependent on the parental origin of the risk allele. None of these variants were found to be associated with melanoma or fair-pigmentation traits. A melanoma- and pigmentation-associated variant in the SLC45A2 gene, L374F, is associated with risk of both BCC and squamous cell carcinoma. Finally, we report conclusive evidence that rs401681[C] in the TERT-CLPTM1L locus confers susceptibility to BCC but protects against melanoma. PMID:19578363

  12. Red Blood Cell Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Peter A.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Howes, Rosalind E.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to Plasmodium vivax blood-stage infection has been widely recognised to result from absence of the Duffy (Fy) blood group from the surface of red blood cells (RBCs) in individuals of African descent. Interestingly, recent studies from different malaria-endemic regions have begun to reveal new perspectives on the association between Duffy gene polymorphism and P. vivax malaria. In Papua New Guinea and the Americas, heterozygous carriers of a Duffy-negative allele are less susceptible to P. vivax infection than Duffy-positive homozygotes. In Brazil, studies show that the Fya antigen, compared to Fyb, is associated with lower binding to the P. vivax Duffy-binding protein and reduced susceptibility to vivax malaria. Additionally, it is interesting that numerous studies have now shown that P. vivax can infect RBCs and cause clinical disease in Duffy-negative people. This suggests that the relationship between P. vivax and the Duffy antigen is more complex than customarily described. Evidence of P. vivax Duffy-independent red cell invasion indicates that the parasite must be evolving alternative red cell invasion pathways. In this chapter, we review the evidence for P. vivax Duffy-dependent and Duffy-independent red cell invasion. We also consider the influence of further host gene polymorphism associated with malaria endemicity on susceptibility to vivax malaria. The interaction between the parasite and the RBC has significant potential to influence the effectiveness of P. vivax-specific vaccines and drug treatments. Ultimately, the relationships between red cell polymorphisms and P. vivax blood-stage infection will influence our estimates on the population at risk and efforts to eliminate vivax malaria. PMID:23384621

  13. Genetic Susceptibility to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lacko, Martin; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J.M.; Sturgis, Erich M.; Boedeker, Carsten C.; Suárez, Carlos; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio; Takes, Robert P.

    2014-05-01

    Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence is growing. Although environmental carcinogens and carcinogenic viruses are the main etiologic factors, genetic predisposition obviously plays a risk-modulating role, given that not all individuals exposed to these carcinogens experience the disease. This review highlights some aspects of genetic susceptibility to HNSCC: among others, genetic polymorphisms in biotransformation enzymes, DNA repair pathway, apoptotic pathway, human papillomavirus-related pathways, mitochondrial polymorphisms, and polymorphism related to the bilirubin-metabolized pathway. Furthermore, epigenetic variations, familial forms of HNSCC, functional assays for HNSCC risk assessment, and the implications and perspectives of research on genetic susceptibility in HNSCC are discussed.

  14. Assessment of oxidant susceptibility of red blood cells in various species based on cell deformability.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Michael J; Meiselman, Herbert J; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya M; Pyne, Michael; Kakanis, Michael; Keane, James; Brenu, Ekua; Christy, Rhys; Baskurt, Oguz K

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the oxidant susceptibility of red blood cells (RBC) from four species (echidna, human, koala, Tasmanian devil) based on changes in cellular deformability. These species were specifically chosen based on differences in lifestyle and/or biology associated with varied levels of oxidative stress. The major focus was the influence of superoxide radicals generated within the cell (phenazine methosulfate, PMS, 50 μM) or in the extracellular medium (xanthine oxidase-hypoxanthine, XO-HX, 0.1 U/ml XO) on RBC deformability at various shear stresses (SS). RBC deformability was assessed by laser-diffraction analysis using a "slit-flow ektacytometer". Both superoxide-generating treatments resulted in significant increases of methemoglobin for all species (p < 0.01), with Tasmanian devil RBC demonstrating the most sensitivity to either treatment. PMS caused impaired RBC deformability for all species, but vast interspecies variations were observed: human and koala cells exhibited a similar sigmoid-like response to SS, short-beaked echidna values were markedly lower and only increased slightly with SS, while Tasmanian devil RBC were extremely rigid. The effect of XO-HX on RBC deformability was less when compared with PMS (i.e., smaller increase in rigidity) with the exception of Tasmanian devil RBC which exhibited essentially no deformation even at the highest SS; Tasmanian devil RBC response to XO-HX was thus comparable to that observed with PMS. Our findings indicate that ektacytometry can be used to determine the oxidant susceptibility of RBC from different species which varies significantly among mammals representing diverse lifestyles and evolutionary histories. These differences in susceptibility are consistent with species-specific discrepancies between observed and allometrically-predicted life spans and are compatible with the oxidant theory of aging. PMID:22433570

  15. Exchange anisotropy determined by magnetic field dependence of ac susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Vilela Leão, L. H.; de Aguiar, F. M.; Rezende, S. M.; Azevedo, A.

    2003-10-01

    ac susceptibility measurements of ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (FM/AF) bilayers are usually performed as a function of the temperature. In this work we describe measurements of transverse biased ac susceptibility (χt) of FM/AF bilayers as a function of the applied magnetic field H0. The measurements were carried out at room temperature by means of an ac magneto-optical Kerr effect susceptometer. The χt-1(H0) dependence, at the saturation magnetization regime, exhibits a linear behavior with the applied field parallel and perpendicular to the exchange bias direction. The linear extrapolation of χt-1 versus H0 cuts the abscissa at asymmetrical values of field due to the exchange bias coupling. The inverse susceptibility is calculated in the saturation regime by a model, which takes into account the free energy of both layers plus a term corresponding to the interfacial coupling. The exchange coupling field (HE) and uniaxial anisotropy (HU) are extracted from the best fit to the experimental results. The results obtained are crosschecked by those obtained from ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and dc magnetometry. The measurements of the exchange bias and the uniaxial field in all of the three analyzed bilayers gave values that are consistently lower when measured by FMR than those obtained by ac and dc magnetometry. It is argued that the apparently discrepant values of HE and HU, obtained by different techniques, might be explained by existence of unstable AF grains at the AF/FM interface.

  16. The importance of growth kinetic analysis in determining bacterial susceptibility against antibiotics and silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Theophel, Karsten; Schacht, Veronika J.; Schlüter, Michael; Schnell, Sylvia; Stingu, Catalina-Suzana; Schaumann, Reiner; Bunge, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Routine antibiotics susceptibility testing still relies on standardized cultivation-based analyses, including measurement of inhibition zones in conventional agar diffusion tests and endpoint turbidity-based measurements. Here, we demonstrate that common off-line monitoring and endpoint determination after 18–24 h could be insufficient for reliable growth-dependent evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility. Different minimal inhibitory concentrations were obtained in 20- and 48 h microdilution plate tests using an Enterococcus faecium clinical isolate (strain UKI-MB07) as a model organism. Hence, we used an on-line kinetic assay for simultaneous cultivation and time-resolved growth analysis in a 96-well format instead of off-line susceptibility testing. Growth of the Enterococcus test organism was delayed up to 30 h in the presence of 0.25 μg mL-1 of vancomycin and 8 μg mL-1 of fosfomycin, after which pronounced growth was observed. Despite the delayed onset of growth, treatment with fosfomycin, daptomycin, fusidic acid, cefoxitin, or gentamicin resulted in higher maximum growth rates and/or higher final optical density values compared with antibiotic-free controls, indicating that growth stimulation and hormetic effects may occur with extended exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations. Whereas neither maximum growth rate nor final cell density correlated with antibiotic concentration, the lag phase duration for some antibiotics was a more meaningful indicator of dose-dependent growth inhibition. Our results also reveal that non-temporal growth profiles are only of limited value for cultivation-based antimicrobial silver nanoparticle susceptibility testing. The exposure to Ag(0) nanoparticles led to plasma membrane damage in a concentration-dependent manner and induced oxidative stress in Enterococcus faecium UKI-MB07, as shown by intracellular ROS accumulation. PMID:25426104

  17. Susceptibility of rhabdomyosarcoma cells to macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Delia; Seitz, Guido; Fuchs, Jörg; Armeanu-Ebinger, Sorin

    2012-05-01

    The prognosis of advanced stage rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is still sobering. In recent years, outcome has not been further improved by conventional therapy. Therefore, novel treatment options such as macrophage-directed immunotherapy have to be investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze the phagocytosis of RMS cells by macrophages and to modulate the susceptibility using monoclonal antibodies and cytotoxic drugs.   Expression of the macrophage activating ligand calreticulin and CD47, the counterpart of the inhibitory receptor SIRPα, was analyzed with Affymetrix mRNA expression arrays and immunohistochemistry on 11 primary RMS samples. Results were verified in two RMS cell lines using flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Macrophage cytotoxic activity was quantified by a MTT colorimetric assay in co-culture experiments of RMS cells with monocyte-derived, GM-CSF stimulated macrophages. Gene expression analysis and immunohistochemistry revealed a high expression of CD47 and calreticulin in alveolar and embryonal RMS tissue specimens. Extracellular expression of CD47 on RMS cell lines was confirmed by flow cytometry, whereas calreticulin was exclusively detected in the endoplasmatic reticulum. After co-culturing of RMS cells with macrophages, viability dropped to 50-60%. Macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity was not influenced by a blocking antibody against CD47. However, susceptibility was significantly enhanced after pre-treatment of RMS cells with the anthracycline drug doxorubicin. Furthermore, translocation of calreticulin onto the cell surface was detected by flow cytometry. The immunologic effect of doxorubicin may improve the efficacy of adoptive cellular immunotherapy and chemotherapy of childhood RMS. PMID:22737603

  18. A freeze-thaw test to determine the frost susceptibility of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Edwin J.

    1987-01-01

    A freezing test for determining the frost susceptibility of soils is presented to supplant the standard CRREL freezing test currently specified by the Corps of Engineers. This test reduces the time required to determine the frost susceptibility of a soil in half. It also allows for the determination of both the frost heave and thaw weakening susceptibilities and considers the effects of the freeze-thaw cycling. The freeze test eliminates much of the variability in test results caused by the human element by completely automating the temperature control and data observations.

  19. The variability of autophagy and cell death susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Loos, Ben; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart; Lockshin, Richard A.; Klionsky, Daniel J; Zakeri, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Impaired autophagic machinery is implicated in a number of diseases such as heart disease, neurodegeneration and cancer. A common denominator in these pathologies is a dysregulation of autophagy that has been linked to a change in susceptibility to cell death. Although we have progressed in understanding the molecular machinery and regulation of the autophagic pathway, many unanswered questions remain. How does the metabolic contribution of autophagy connect with the cell’s history and how does its current autophagic flux affect metabolic status and susceptibility to undergo cell death? How does autophagic flux operate to switch metabolic direction and what are the underlying mechanisms in metabolite and energetic sensing, metabolite substrate provision and metabolic integration during the cellular stress response? In this article we focus on unresolved questions that address issues around the role of autophagy in sensing the energetic environment and its role in actively generating metabolite substrates. We attempt to provide answers by explaining how and when a change in autophagic pathway activity such as primary stress response is able to affect cell viability and when not. By addressing the dynamic metabolic relationship between autophagy, apoptosis and necrosis we provide a new perspective on the parameters that connect autophagic activity, severity of injury and cellular history in a logical manner. Last, by evaluating the cell’s condition and autophagic activity in a clear context of regulatory parameters in the intra- and extracellular environment, this review provides new concepts that set autophagy into an energetic feedback loop, that may assist in our understanding of autophagy in maintaining healthy cells or when it controls the threshold between cell death and cell survival. PMID:23846383

  20. Genetic Diversity of Cell-Invasive Erythromycin-Resistant and -Susceptible Group A Streptococci Determined by Analysis of the RD2 Region of the prtF1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Spinaci, Cinzia; Magi, Gloria; Zampaloni, Claudia; Vitali, Luca A.; Paoletti, Claudia; Catania, Maria R.; Prenna, Manuela; Ferrante, Luigi; Ripa, Sandro; Varaldo, Pietro E.; Facinelli, Bruna

    2004-01-01

    The RD2 region of the internalization-associated gene prtF1, which encodes the fibronectin-binding repeat domain type 2 of protein F1, plays a crucial role in the entry of group A streptococci (GAS) into epithelial cells. A molecular study of the variability of the RD2 region was carried out with 77 independent Italian GAS, 66 erythromycin resistant (ER) and 11 erythromycin susceptible (ES), which had previously been investigated for the association between erythromycin resistance and ability to enter human respiratory cells. The amplicons obtained from PCR analysis of the RD2 region were consistent with a number of RD2 repeats ranging from one to five, more frequently four (n = 30), three (n = 27), and one (n = 18). A new method to type cell-invasive GAS (RD2 typing) was developed by combining PCR analysis of the RD2 region and restriction analysis of PCR products with endonucleases HaeIII, DdeI, and HinfI. Overall, 10 RD2 types (a to j) were distinguished (all detected among the 66 ER isolates, four detected among the 11 ES isolates). Comparison and correlation of RD2 typing data with the genotype and phenotype of macrolide resistance and with data from PCR M typing and SmaI macrorestriction analysis allowed us to identify 41 different clones (31 among the 66 ER isolates and 10 among the 11 ES isolates). Three major clones accounted for 40% of the isolates (47% of ER strains). Some ES isolates appeared to be related to ER isolates with identical combinations of RD2 type and emm type. While simultaneous use of different typing methods is essential for a thorough investigation of GAS epidemiology, RD2 typing may be especially helpful in typing cell-invasive GAS. PMID:14766830

  1. Susceptibility of pancreatic cancer stem cells to reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Kozo; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Konno, Masamitsu; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Koseki, Jun; Wada, Hiroshi; Marubashi, Shigeru; Nagano, Hiroaki; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that reprogramming technologies may be useful for altering the malignant phenotype of cancer cells. Although somatic stem cells in normal tissues are more sensitive to reprogramming induction than differentiated cells, it remains to be elucidated whether any specific subpopulations are sensitive to reprogramming in heterogeneous tumor tissues. Here we examined the susceptibility of pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSC) and non-CSC to reprogramming. To characterize CSC populations, we focused on c-Met signaling, which has been identified as a marker of CSC in mouse experiments in vivo. Cells that expressed high levels of c-Met showed higher CSC properties, such as tumor-initiating capacity, and resistance to gemcitabine. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in cells expressing high levels of c-Met revealed endogenous expression of reprogramming factors, such as OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4 and cMYC. Introduction of these four factors resulted in higher alkaline phosphatase staining in cells with high c-Met expression than in controls. Therefore, the study results demonstrate that cellular reprogramming may be useful for extensive epigenetic modification of malignant features of pancreatic CSC. PMID:26298849

  2. Magnetic susceptibility tensor and heme contact shifts determinations in the Rhodobacter capsulatus ferricytochrome c': NMR and magnetic susceptibility studies.

    PubMed

    Tsan, P; Caffrey, M; Daku, M L; Cusanovich, M; Marion, D; Gans, P

    2001-03-14

    The 1H and 15N resonances of the carbon monoxide complex of ferrocytochrome c' of Rhodobacter capsulatus, a ferrous diamagnetic heme protein, have been extensively assigned by TOCSY-HSQC, NOESY-HSQC, and HSQC-NOESY-HSQC 3D heteronuclear experiments performed on a 7 mM sample labeled with 15N. Based on short-range and medium-range NOEs and H(N) exchange rates, the secondary structure consists of four helices: helix 1 (3-29), helix 2 (33-48), helix 3 (78-101), and helix 4 (103-125). The 15N, 1HN, and 1H(alpha) chemical shifts of the CO complex form are compared to those of the previously assigned oxidized (or ferric) state. From the chemical shift differences between these redox states, the orientation and the anisotropy of the paramagnetic susceptibility tensor have been determined using the crystallographic coordinates of the ferric state. The chi-tensor is axial, and the orientation of the z-axis is approximately perpendicular to the heme plane. The paramagnetic chemical shifts of the protons of the heme ligand have been determined and decomposed into the Fermi shift and dipolar shift contributions. Magnetic susceptibility studies in frozen solutions have been performed. Fits of the susceptibility data using the model of Maltempo (Maltempo, M. M. J. Chem. Phys. 1974, 61, 2540-2547) are consistent with a rather low contribution of the S = 3/2 spin state over the range of temperatures and confirm the value of the axial anisotropy. Values in the range 10.4-12.5 cm(-1) have been inferred for the axial zero-field splitting parameter (D). Analysis of the contact shift and the susceptibility data suggests that cytochrome c' of Rb. capsulatus exhibits a predominant high-spin character of the iron in the oxidized state at room temperature. PMID:11456869

  3. Zero-velocity magnetophoretic method for the determination of particle magnetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Watarai, Hitoshi; Duc, Hoang Trong Tien; Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Zhang, Tianyi; Tsukahara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    A simple zero-velocity method to determine the particle magnetic susceptibility by measuring the magnetophoretic velocity was proposed. The principle is that the magnetophoretic velocity of a particle in a liquid medium must be zero when the magnetic susceptibilities of the medium and the particle are equal, or the gravity force and the magnetophoretic force are balanced. By changing the medium magnetic susceptibility and measuring the magnetophoretic velocity of a particle, the particle magnetic susceptibility was determined from the medium magnetic susceptibility under the zero-velocity condition. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated for polystyrene particles using a Dy(III) solution in the horizontal migration mode and different organic solvents in the vertical migration mode. PMID:25007934

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies novel susceptibility loci for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chahal, Harvind S.; Lin, Yuan; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Hinds, David A.; Wu, Wenting; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Tang, Jean Y.; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma represents the second most common cutaneous malignancy, affecting 7–11% of Caucasians in the United States. The genetic determinants of susceptibility to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma remain largely unknown. Here we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, totalling 7,404 cases and 292,076 controls. Eleven loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8) including seven previously confirmed pigmentation-related loci: MC1R, ASIP, TYR, SLC45A2, OCA2, IRF4 and BNC2. We identify an additional four susceptibility loci: 11q23.3 CADM1, a metastasis suppressor gene involved in modifying tumour interaction with cell-mediated immunity; 2p22.3; 7p21.1 AHR, the dioxin receptor involved in anti-apoptotic pathways and melanoma progression; and 9q34.3 SEC16A, a putative oncogene with roles in secretion and cellular proliferation. These susceptibility loci provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27424798

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies novel susceptibility loci for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Harvind S; Lin, Yuan; Ransohoff, Katherine J; Hinds, David A; Wu, Wenting; Dai, Hong-Ji; Qureshi, Abrar A; Li, Wen-Qing; Kraft, Peter; Tang, Jean Y; Han, Jiali; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma represents the second most common cutaneous malignancy, affecting 7-11% of Caucasians in the United States. The genetic determinants of susceptibility to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma remain largely unknown. Here we report the results of a two-stage genome-wide association study of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, totalling 7,404 cases and 292,076 controls. Eleven loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)) including seven previously confirmed pigmentation-related loci: MC1R, ASIP, TYR, SLC45A2, OCA2, IRF4 and BNC2. We identify an additional four susceptibility loci: 11q23.3 CADM1, a metastasis suppressor gene involved in modifying tumour interaction with cell-mediated immunity; 2p22.3; 7p21.1 AHR, the dioxin receptor involved in anti-apoptotic pathways and melanoma progression; and 9q34.3 SEC16A, a putative oncogene with roles in secretion and cellular proliferation. These susceptibility loci provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27424798

  6. Human mesenchymal stem cells are susceptible to lysis by CD8(+) T cells and NK cells.

    PubMed

    Crop, Meindert J; Korevaar, Sander S; de Kuiper, Ronella; IJzermans, Jan N M; van Besouw, Nicole M; Baan, Carla C; Weimar, Willem; Hoogduijn, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to improve the outcome of organ transplantation. The immunogenicity of MSCs is, however, unclear and is important for the efficacy of MSC therapy and for potential sensitization against donor antigens. We investigated the susceptibility of autologous and allogeneic MSCs for lysis by CD8(+) T-lymphocytes and NK cells in a kidney transplant setting. MSCs were derived from adipose tissue of human kidney donors and were CD90(+), CD105(+), CD166(+), and HLA class I(+). They showed differentiation ability and immunosuppressive capacity. Lysis of MSCs by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), FACS-sorted CD8(+) T cells, and NK cells was measured by europium release assay. Allogeneic MSCs were susceptible for lysis by cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and NK cells, while autologous MSCs were lysed by NK cells only. NK cell-mediated lysis was inversely correlated with the expression of HLA class I on MSCs. Lysis of autologous MSCs was not dependent on culturing of MSCs in FBS, and MSCs in suspension as well as adherent to plastic were lysed by NK cells. Pretransplant recipient PBMCs did not lyse donor MSCs, but PBMCs isolated 3, 6, and 12 months after transplantation showed increasing lysing ability. After 12 months, CD8(+) T-cell-mediated lysis of donor MSCs persisted, indicating there was no evidence for desensitization against donor MSCs. Lysis of MSCs is important to take into account when MSCs are considered for clinical application. Our results suggest that the HLA background of MSCs and timing of MSC administration are important for the efficacy of MSC therapy. PMID:21396164

  7. The Microbiota Determines Susceptibility to Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis

    PubMed Central

    Heissigerova, Jarmila; Seidler Stangova, Petra; Klimova, Aneta; Svozilkova, Petra; Hrncir, Tomas; Stepankova, Renata; Kverka, Miloslav; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena; Forrester, John V.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota is a crucial modulator of the immune system. Here, we evaluated how its absence or reduction modifies the inflammatory response in the murine model of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). We induced EAU in germ-free (GF) or conventionally housed (CV) mice and in CV mice treated with a combination of broad-spectrum antibiotics either from the day of EAU induction or from one week prior to induction of disease. The severity of the inflammation was assessed by fundus biomicroscopy or by histology, including immunohistology. The immunophenotyping of T cells in local and distant lymph nodes was performed by flow cytometry. We found that GF mice and mice where the microbiota was reduced one week before EAU induction were protected from severe autoimmune inflammation. GF mice had lower numbers of infiltrating macrophages and significantly less T cell infiltration in the retina than CV mice with EAU. GF mice also had reduced numbers of IFN-γ and IL-17-producing T cells and increased numbers of regulatory T cells in the eye-draining lymph nodes. These data suggest that the presence of microbiota during autoantigen recognition regulates the inflammatory response by influencing the adaptive immune response. PMID:27294159

  8. Effect of tunicamycin on sialomucin and natural killer susceptibility of rat mammary tumor ascites cells.

    PubMed

    Bharathan, S; Moriarty, J; Moody, C E; Sherblom, A P

    1990-09-01

    The MAT-B1 and MAT-C1 ascites sublines of the 13762 rat mammary adenocarcinoma contain a dominant cell surface "complex" consisting of two glycoproteins: ascites sialoglycoprotein (ASGP)-1, a Mr 600,000-700,000 peanut agglutinin-binding sialomucin, and ASGP-2, a Mr 120,000 concancavalin A-binding glycoprotein (Sherblom et al., J. Biol. Chem., 255: 783-790, 1980; Sherblom and Carraway, J. Biol. Chem., 255: 12051-12059, 1980). Although both cell lines are resistant to lysis by natural killer cells, treatments which result in loss of cell surface ASGP-1 render the cells susceptible to natural killer cell lysis (Sherblom and Moody, Cancer Res., 46:4543-4546, 1986). Treatment of the ascites cells with 5 micrograms/ml tunicamycin for 24 h effectively inhibits glycosylation of ASGP-2 without affecting cell viability or total protein synthesis. Under these conditions, expression of ASGP-1 is depressed by at least 50% in both cell lines, as monitored by [3H]glucosamine incorporation and by binding of peanut agglutinin to intact cells. The size distribution of O-linked oligosaccharides in ASGP-1 from tunicamycin-treated versus control MAT-B1 cells is indistinguishable, as determined by Bio-Gel P-4 chromatography following alkaline-borohydride treatment. Complex isolated from either treated or control cells bands at the same density in a CsCl gradient containing Triton X-100 and contains a diffuse band corresponding to ASGP-2 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Tunicamycin-treated cells, consistent with the reduced expression of ASGP-1, are significantly more susceptible to natural killer cell-mediated lysis, when compared to untreated controls. The results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is a prerequisite for sialomucin synthesis and/or complex formation. PMID:2386935

  9. Rotenone Susceptibility Phenotype in Olfactory Derived Patient Cells as a Model of Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, M; Shan, J; Matigian, N; Todorovic, M; Cook, A L; Ravishankar, S; Dong, L F; Neuzil, J; Silburn, P; Mackay-Sim, A; Mellick, G D; Wood, S A

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Approximately 90% of Parkinson's disease cases are idiopathic, of unknown origin. The aetiology of Parkinson's disease is not fully understood but increasing evidence implies a failure in fundamental cellular processes including mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress. To dissect the cellular events underlying idiopathic Parkinson's disease, we use primary cell lines established from the olfactory mucosa of Parkinson's disease patients. Previous metabolic and transcriptomic analyses identified deficiencies in stress response pathways in patient-derived cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these deficiencies manifested as increased susceptibility, as measured by cell viability, to a range of extrinsic stressors. We identified that patient-derived cells are more sensitive to mitochondrial complex I inhibition and hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress, than controls. Exposure to low levels (50 nM) of rotenone led to increased apoptosis in patient-derived cells. We identified an endogenous deficit in mitochondrial complex I in patient-derived cells, but this did not directly correlate with rotenone-sensitivity. We further characterized the sensitivity to rotenone and identified that it was partly associated with heat shock protein 27 levels. Finally, transcriptomic analysis following rotenone exposure revealed that patient-derived cells express a diminished response to rotenone-induced stress compared with cells from healthy controls. Our cellular model of idiopathic Parkinson's disease displays a clear susceptibility phenotype to mitochondrial stress. The determination of molecular mechanisms underpinning this susceptibility may lead to the identification of biomarkers for either disease onset or progression. PMID:27123847

  10. MSUT2 is a determinant of susceptibility to tau neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Chris R; Greenup, Lynne; Leverenz, James B; Kraemer, Brian C

    2011-05-15

    Lesions containing abnormal aggregated tau protein are one of the diagnostic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathy disorders. How aggregated tau leads to dementia remains enigmatic, although neuronal dysfunction and loss clearly contribute. We previously identified sut-2 as a gene required for tau neurotoxicity in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans model of tauopathy. Here, we further explore the role of sut-2 and show that overexpression of SUT-2 protein enhances tau-induced neuronal dysfunction, neurotoxicity and accumulation of insoluble tau. We also explore the relationship between sut-2 and its human homolog, mammalian SUT-2 (MSUT2) and find both proteins to be predominantly nuclear and localized to SC35-positive nuclear speckles. Using a cell culture model for the accumulation of pathological tau, we find that high tau levels lead to increased expression of MSUT2 protein. We analyzed MSUT2 protein in age-matched post-mortem brain samples from AD patients and observe a marked decrease in overall MSUT2 levels in the temporal lobe of AD patients. Analysis of post-mortem tissue from AD cases shows a clear reduction in neuronal MSUT2 levels in brain regions affected by tau pathology, but little change in regions lacking tau pathology. RNAi knockdown of MSUT2 in cultured human cells overexpressing tau causes a marked decrease in tau aggregation. Both cell culture and post-mortem tissue studies suggest that MSUT2 levels may influence neuronal vulnerability to tau toxicity and aggregation. Thus, neuroprotective strategies targeting MSUT2 may be of therapeutic interest for tauopathy disorders. PMID:21355046

  11. MSUT2 is a determinant of susceptibility to tau neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Chris R.; Greenup, Lynne; Leverenz, James B.; Kraemer, Brian C.

    2011-01-01

    Lesions containing abnormal aggregated tau protein are one of the diagnostic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathy disorders. How aggregated tau leads to dementia remains enigmatic, although neuronal dysfunction and loss clearly contribute. We previously identified sut-2 as a gene required for tau neurotoxicity in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans model of tauopathy. Here, we further explore the role of sut-2 and show that overexpression of SUT-2 protein enhances tau-induced neuronal dysfunction, neurotoxicity and accumulation of insoluble tau. We also explore the relationship between sut-2 and its human homolog, mammalian SUT-2 (MSUT2) and find both proteins to be predominantly nuclear and localized to SC35-positive nuclear speckles. Using a cell culture model for the accumulation of pathological tau, we find that high tau levels lead to increased expression of MSUT2 protein. We analyzed MSUT2 protein in age-matched post-mortem brain samples from AD patients and observe a marked decrease in overall MSUT2 levels in the temporal lobe of AD patients. Analysis of post-mortem tissue from AD cases shows a clear reduction in neuronal MSUT2 levels in brain regions affected by tau pathology, but little change in regions lacking tau pathology. RNAi knockdown of MSUT2 in cultured human cells overexpressing tau causes a marked decrease in tau aggregation. Both cell culture and post-mortem tissue studies suggest that MSUT2 levels may influence neuronal vulnerability to tau toxicity and aggregation. Thus, neuroprotective strategies targeting MSUT2 may be of therapeutic interest for tauopathy disorders. PMID:21355046

  12. A New Reporter Cell Line to Monitor HIV Infection and Drug Susceptibility in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervaix, Alain; West, Daniel; Leoni, Lorenzo M.; Richman, Douglas D.; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Corbeil, Jacques

    1997-04-01

    Determination of HIV infectivity in vitro and its inhibition by antiretroviral drugs by monitoring reduction of production of p24 antigen is expensive and time consuming. Such assays also do not allow accurate quantitation of the number of infected cells over time. To develop a simple, rapid, and direct method for monitoring HIV infection, we generated a stable T-cell line (CEM) containing a plasmid encoding the green fluorescent protein (humanized S65T GFP) driven by the HIV-1 long terminal repeat. Clones were selected that displayed low constitutive background fluorescnece, but a high level of GFP expression upon infection with HIV. HIV-1 infection induced a 100- to 1,000-fold increase in relative fluorescence of cells over 2 to 4 days as monitored by fluorescence microscopy, cytofluorimetry, and flow cytometry. Addition of inhibitors of reverse transcriptase, protease, and other targets at different multiplicities of infection permitted the accurate determination of drug susceptibility. This technique also permitted quantitation of infectivity of viral preparations by assessment of number of cells infected in the first round of infection. In conclusion, the CEM-GFP reporter cell line provides a simple, rapid, and direct method for monitoring HIV infectivity titers and antiretroviral drug susceptibility of syncytium-inducing strains.

  13. A rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test based on single-cell morphological analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jungil; Yoo, Jungheon; Lee, Mincheol; Kim, Eun-Geun; Lee, Ji Soo; Lee, Seungok; Joo, Seik; Song, Sang Hoon; Kim, Eui-Chong; Lee, Jung Chan; Kim, Hee Chan; Jung, Yong-Gyun; Kwon, Sunghoon

    2014-12-17

    A rapid antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) is desperately needed in clinical settings for fast and appropriate antibiotic administration. Traditional ASTs, which rely on cell culture, are not suitable for urgent cases of bacterial infection and antibiotic resistance owing to their relatively long test times. We describe a novel AST called single-cell morphological analysis (SCMA) that can determine antimicrobial susceptibility by automatically analyzing and categorizing morphological changes in single bacterial cells under various antimicrobial conditions. The SCMA was tested with four Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute standard bacterial strains and 189 clinical samples, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci from hospitals. The results were compared with the gold standard broth microdilution test. The SCMA results were obtained in less than 4 hours, with 91.5% categorical agreement and 6.51% minor, 2.56% major, and 1.49% very major discrepancies. Thus, SCMA provides rapid and accurate antimicrobial susceptibility data that satisfy the recommended performance of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. PMID:25520395

  14. Susceptibility of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Cells to Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shih-Cheng; Shen, Ching-I; Lin, Ho; Chen, Chun-Jung; Chang, Chia-Yu; Chen, Sheng-Mei; Lee, Hsiu-Chin; Lai, Ping-Shan; Su, Hong-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be efficiently directed to become immature neuroepithelial precursor cells (NPCs) and functional mature neural cells, including neurotransmitter-secreting neurons and glial cells. Investigating the susceptibility of these hESCs-derived neural cells to neurotrophic viruses, such as Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), provides insight into the viral cell tropism in the infected human brain. We demonstrate that hESC-derived NPCs are highly vulnerable to JEV infection at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI). In addition, glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP)-expressing glial cells are also susceptible to JEV infection. In contrast, only a few mature neurons were infected at MOI 10 or higher on the third day post-infection. In addition, functional neurotransmitter-secreting neurons are also resistant to JEV infection at high MOI. Moreover, we discover that vimentin intermediate filament, reported as a putative neurovirulent JEV receptor, is highly expressed in NPCs and glial cells, but not mature neurons. These results indicate that the expression of vimentin in neural cells correlates to the cell tropism of JEV. Finally, we further demonstrate that membranous vimentin is necessary for the susceptibility of hESC-derived NPCs to JEV infection. PMID:25517725

  15. Degradation/oxidation susceptibility of organic photovoltaic cells in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, K.; Husain, A.; Al-Hazza, A.

    2015-12-01

    A criterion of the degradation/oxidation susceptibility of organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells in aqueous solutions was proposed for the first time. The criterion was derived based on calculating the limit of the ratio value of the polarization resistance of an OPV cell in aqueous solution (Rps) to the polarization resistance of the OPV cell in air (Rpair). In other words, the criterion lim(Rps/Rpair) = 1 was applied to determine the degradation/oxidation of the OPV cell in the aqueous solution when Rpair became equal (increased) to Rps as a function of time of the exposure of the OPV cell to the aqueous solution. This criterion was not only used to determine the degradation/oxidation of different OPV cells in a simulated operational environment but also it was used to determine the electrochemical behavior of OPV cells in deionized water and a polluted water with fine particles of sand. The values of Rps were determined by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at low frequency. In addition, the criterion can be applied under diverse test conditions with a predetermined period of OPV operations.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of milk somatic cells in mastitis resistant and susceptible sheep upon challenge with Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The existence of a genetic basis for host responses to bacterial intramammary infections has been widely documented, but the underlying mechanisms and the genes are still largely unknown. Previously, two divergent lines of sheep selected for high/low milk somatic cell scores have been shown to be respectively susceptible and resistant to intramammary infections by Staphylococcus spp. Transcriptional profiling with an 15K ovine-specific microarray of the milk somatic cells of susceptible and resistant sheep infected successively by S. epidermidis and S. aureus was performed in order to enhance our understanding of the molecular and cellular events associated with mastitis resistance. Results The bacteriological titre was lower in the resistant than in the susceptible animals in the 48 hours following inoculation, although milk somatic cell concentration was similar. Gene expression was analysed in milk somatic cells, mainly represented by neutrophils, collected 12 hours post-challenge. A high number of differentially expressed genes between the two challenges indicated that more T cells are recruited upon inoculation by S. aureus than S. epidermidis. A total of 52 genes were significantly differentially expressed between the resistant and susceptible animals. Further Gene Ontology analysis indicated that differentially expressed genes were associated with immune and inflammatory responses, leukocyte adhesion, cell migration, and signal transduction. Close biological relationships could be established between most genes using gene network analysis. Furthermore, gene expression suggests that the cell turn-over, as a consequence of apoptosis/granulopoiesis, may be enhanced in the resistant line when compared to the susceptible line. Conclusions Gene profiling in resistant and susceptible lines has provided good candidates for mapping the biological pathways and genes underlying genetically determined resistance and susceptibility towards Staphylococcus

  17. Analysis of target cell susceptibility as a basis for the development of a chemoprotective strategy against benzene-induced hematotoxicities.

    PubMed Central

    Trush, M A; Twerdok, L E; Rembish, S J; Zhu, H; Li, Y

    1996-01-01

    A goal of our research is to identify biochemical factors that underlie the susceptibility of bone marrow cell populations to benzene metabolites so as to develop a mechanistically based chemoprotective strategy that may be used in susceptible humans exposed to benzene. By doing biochemical risk analysis of bone marrow stromal cells from mice and rats and the human myeloid cell lines, HL-60 and ML-1; and by using buthionine sulfoximine and dicumarol we have observed that the susceptibility of these cell populations to hydroquinone (HQ) correlates with their concentration of glutathione (GSH) and activity of quinone reductase (QR). Accordingly, the induction of QR and GSH by 1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T) in these cell populations has resulted in a significant protection against the following hydroquinone-mediated toxicities: inhibition of cell proliferation and viability; reduced ability of stromal cells to support myelopoiesis; and altered differentiated of ML-1 cells to monocytes/macrophages. Preliminary in vivo experiments indicate that feeding mice D3T results in an induction of QR in the bone marrow compartment such that stromal cells are more resistant to hydroquinone-induced cytotoxicity in vitro. Overall, these studies suggest that in addition to hepatic cytochrome P4502E1, bone marrow QR and GSH are factors that could determine an individual's relative susceptibility to the toxic effects of benzene. PMID:9118897

  18. COMPARISON OF SUSCEPTIBILITY TO INFLUENZA INFECTION IN NASAL EPITHELIAL CELLS OBTAINED FROM SMOKERS AND NON-SMOKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have demonstrated that individuals who smoke have greater susceptibility to influenza infections, as well as other respiratory virus infections, than non-smokers, yet the role of airway epithelial cells in this response is not clear. To determine whether in vivo t...

  19. Decreased Polysaccharide Feruloylation Compromises Plant Cell Wall Integrity and Increases Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Reem, Nathan T; Pogorelko, Gennady; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Chambers, Lauran; Held, Michael A; Bellincampi, Daniela; Zabotina, Olga A

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of cell wall composition and structure determines the strength, flexibility, and function of the primary cell wall in plants. However, the contribution of the various components to cell wall integrity (CWI) and function remains unclear. Modifications of cell wall composition can induce plant responses known as CWI control. In this study, we used transgenic expression of the fungal feruloyl esterase AnFAE to examine the effect of post-synthetic modification of Arabidopsis and Brachypodium cell walls. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing AnFAE showed a significant reduction of monomeric ferulic acid, decreased amounts of wall-associated extensins, and increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, compared with wild type. Transgenic Brachypodium showed reductions in monomeric and dimeric ferulic acids and increased susceptibility to Bipolaris sorokiniana. Upon infection, transgenic Arabidopsis and Brachypodium plants also showed increased expression of several defense-related genes compared with wild type. These results demonstrate a role, in both monocot and dicot plants, of polysaccharide feruloylation in plant CWI, which contributes to plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens. PMID:27242834

  20. Decreased Polysaccharide Feruloylation Compromises Plant Cell Wall Integrity and Increases Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Reem, Nathan T.; Pogorelko, Gennady; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Chambers, Lauran; Held, Michael A.; Bellincampi, Daniela; Zabotina, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of cell wall composition and structure determines the strength, flexibility, and function of the primary cell wall in plants. However, the contribution of the various components to cell wall integrity (CWI) and function remains unclear. Modifications of cell wall composition can induce plant responses known as CWI control. In this study, we used transgenic expression of the fungal feruloyl esterase AnFAE to examine the effect of post-synthetic modification of Arabidopsis and Brachypodium cell walls. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing AnFAE showed a significant reduction of monomeric ferulic acid, decreased amounts of wall-associated extensins, and increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, compared with wild type. Transgenic Brachypodium showed reductions in monomeric and dimeric ferulic acids and increased susceptibility to Bipolaris sorokiniana. Upon infection, transgenic Arabidopsis and Brachypodium plants also showed increased expression of several defense-related genes compared with wild type. These results demonstrate a role, in both monocot and dicot plants, of polysaccharide feruloylation in plant CWI, which contributes to plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens. PMID:27242834

  1. Genetically Determined Susceptibility to Tuberculosis in Mice Causally Involves Accelerated and Enhanced Recruitment of Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Christine; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Lang, Roland; Brandau, Sven; Hermann, Corinna; Ehlers, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Classical twin studies and recent linkage analyses of African populations have revealed a potential involvement of host genetic factors in susceptibility or resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In order to identify the candidate genes involved and test their causal implication, we capitalized on the mouse model of tuberculosis, since inbred mouse strains also differ substantially in their susceptibility to infection. Two susceptible and two resistant mouse strains were aerogenically infected with 1,000 CFU of M. tuberculosis, and the regulation of gene expression was examined by Affymetrix GeneChip U74A array with total lung RNA 2 and 4 weeks postinfection. Four weeks after infection, 96 genes, many of which are involved in inflammatory cell recruitment and activation, were regulated in common. One hundred seven genes were differentially regulated in susceptible mouse strains, whereas 43 genes were differentially expressed only in resistant mice. Data mining revealed a bias towards the expression of genes involved in granulocyte pathophysiology in susceptible mice, such as an upregulation of those for the neutrophil chemoattractant LIX (CXCL5), interleukin 17 receptor, phosphoinositide kinase 3 delta, or gamma interferon-inducible protein 10. Following M. tuberculosis challenge in both airways or peritoneum, granulocytes were recruited significantly faster and at higher numbers in susceptible than in resistant mice. When granulocytes were efficiently depleted by either of two regimens at the onset of infection, only susceptible mice survived aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis significantly longer than control mice. We conclude that initially enhanced recruitment of granulocytes contributes to susceptibility to tuberculosis. PMID:16790804

  2. Host genetics determine susceptibility to avian influenza infection and transmission dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Mwangi, William; Peroval, Marylene; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Ascough, Stephanie; Balkissoon, Devanand; Staines, Karen; Boyd, Amy; McCauley, John; Smith, Adrian; Butter, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Host-genetic control of influenza virus infection has been the object of little attention. In this study we determined that two inbred lines of chicken differing in their genetic background , Lines 0 and C-B12, were respectively relatively resistant and susceptible to infection with the low pathogenicity influenza virus A/Turkey/England/647/77 as defined by substantial differences in viral shedding trajectories. Resistant birds, although infected, were unable to transmit virus to contact birds, as ultimately only the presence of a sustained cloacal shedding (and not oropharyngeal shedding) was critical for transmission. Restriction of within-bird transmission of virus occurred in the resistant line, with intra-nares or cloacal infection resulting in only local shedding and failing to transmit fully through the gastro-intestinal-pulmonary tract. Resistance to infection was independent of adaptive immune responses, including the expansion of specific IFNγ secreting cells or production of influenza-specific antibody. Genetic resistance to a novel H9N2 virus was less robust, though significant differences between host genotypes were still clearly evident. The existence of host-genetic determination of the outcome of influenza infection offers tools for the further dissection of this regulation and also for understanding the mechanisms of influenza transmission within and between birds. PMID:27279280

  3. Host genetics determine susceptibility to avian influenza infection and transmission dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Mwangi, William; Peroval, Marylene; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Ascough, Stephanie; Balkissoon, Devanand; Staines, Karen; Boyd, Amy; McCauley, John; Smith, Adrian; Butter, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Host-genetic control of influenza virus infection has been the object of little attention. In this study we determined that two inbred lines of chicken differing in their genetic background , Lines 0 and C-B12, were respectively relatively resistant and susceptible to infection with the low pathogenicity influenza virus A/Turkey/England/647/77 as defined by substantial differences in viral shedding trajectories. Resistant birds, although infected, were unable to transmit virus to contact birds, as ultimately only the presence of a sustained cloacal shedding (and not oropharyngeal shedding) was critical for transmission. Restriction of within-bird transmission of virus occurred in the resistant line, with intra-nares or cloacal infection resulting in only local shedding and failing to transmit fully through the gastro-intestinal-pulmonary tract. Resistance to infection was independent of adaptive immune responses, including the expansion of specific IFNγ secreting cells or production of influenza-specific antibody. Genetic resistance to a novel H9N2 virus was less robust, though significant differences between host genotypes were still clearly evident. The existence of host-genetic determination of the outcome of influenza infection offers tools for the further dissection of this regulation and also for understanding the mechanisms of influenza transmission within and between birds. PMID:27279280

  4. Quantitative Microplate-Based Growth Assay for Determination of Antifungal Susceptibility of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Goughenour, Kristie D.; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Standardized methodologies for determining the antifungal susceptibility of fungal pathogens is central to the clinical management of invasive fungal disease. Yeast-form fungi can be tested using broth macrodilution and microdilution assays. Reference procedures exist for Candida species and Cryptococcus yeasts; however, no standardized methods have been developed for testing the antifungal susceptibility of yeast forms of the dimorphic systemic fungal pathogens. For the dimorphic fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum, susceptibility to echinocandins differs for the yeast and the filamentous forms, which highlights the need to employ Histoplasma yeasts, not hyphae, in antifungal susceptibility tests. To address this, we developed and optimized methodology for the 96-well microtiter plate-based measurement of Histoplasma yeast growth in vitro. Using optical density, the assay is quantitative for fungal growth with a dynamic range greater than 30-fold. Concentration and assay reaction time parameters were also optimized for colorimetric (MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] reduction) and fluorescent (resazurin reduction) indicators of fungal vitality. We employed this microtiter-based assay to determine the antifungal susceptibility patterns of multiple clinical isolates of Histoplasma representing different phylogenetic groups. This methodology fulfills a critical need for the ability to monitor the effectiveness of antifungals on Histoplasma yeasts, the morphological form present in mammalian hosts and, thus, the form most relevant to disease. PMID:26246483

  5. An embryonic heart cell line is susceptible to dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Angel-Ambrocio, Antonio H; Soto-Acosta, Rubén; Tammineni, Eshwar R; Carrillo, Elba D; Bautista-Carbajal, Patricia; Hernández, Ascención; Sánchez, Jorge A; del Angel, Rosa M

    2015-02-16

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the causative agent of dengue fever. In recent years, patients with more severe form of the disease with acute heart failure or progression to cardiogenic shock and death have been reported. However, the pathogenesis of myocardial lesions and susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to DENV infection have not been evaluated. Under this perspective, the susceptibility of the myoblast cell line H9c2, obtained from embryonic rat heart, to DENV infection was analyzed. Our findings indicate that H9c2 cells are susceptible to the infection with the four DENV serotypes. Moreover, virus translation/replication and viral production in this cell line is as efficient as in other susceptible cell lines, supporting the idea that DENV may target heart cells as evidenced by infection of H9c2 cells. This cell line may thus represent an excellent model for the study and characterization of cardiac physiopathology in DENV infection. PMID:25598317

  6. Bacterial Manipulation of NK Cell Regulatory Activity Increases Susceptibility to Listeria monocytogenes Infection.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah E; Filak, Holly C; Guthrie, Brandon S; Schmidt, Rebecca L; Jamieson, Amanda; Merkel, Patricia; Knight, Vijaya; Cole, Caroline M; Raulet, David H; Lenz, Laurel L

    2016-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells produce interferon (IFN)-γ and thus have been suggested to promote type I immunity during bacterial infections. Yet, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) and some other pathogens encode proteins that cause increased NK cell activation. Here, we show that stimulation of NK cell activation increases susceptibility during Lm infection despite and independent from robust NK cell production of IFNγ. The increased susceptibility correlated with IL-10 production by responding NK cells. NK cells produced IL-10 as their IFNγ production waned and the Lm virulence protein p60 promoted induction of IL-10 production by mouse and human NK cells. NK cells consequently exerted regulatory effects to suppress accumulation and activation of inflammatory myeloid cells. Our results reveal new dimensions of the role played by NK cells during Lm infection and demonstrate the ability of this bacterial pathogen to exploit the induction of regulatory NK cell activity to increase host susceptibility. PMID:27295349

  7. Bacterial Manipulation of NK Cell Regulatory Activity Increases Susceptibility to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Brandon S.; Schmidt, Rebecca L.; Jamieson, Amanda; Merkel, Patricia; Knight, Vijaya; Cole, Caroline M.; Raulet, David H.; Lenz, Laurel L.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells produce interferon (IFN)-γ and thus have been suggested to promote type I immunity during bacterial infections. Yet, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) and some other pathogens encode proteins that cause increased NK cell activation. Here, we show that stimulation of NK cell activation increases susceptibility during Lm infection despite and independent from robust NK cell production of IFNγ. The increased susceptibility correlated with IL-10 production by responding NK cells. NK cells produced IL-10 as their IFNγ production waned and the Lm virulence protein p60 promoted induction of IL-10 production by mouse and human NK cells. NK cells consequently exerted regulatory effects to suppress accumulation and activation of inflammatory myeloid cells. Our results reveal new dimensions of the role played by NK cells during Lm infection and demonstrate the ability of this bacterial pathogen to exploit the induction of regulatory NK cell activity to increase host susceptibility. PMID:27295349

  8. Differential innate immune response programs in neuronal subtypes determine susceptibility to infection in the brain by positive stranded RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyelim; Proll, Sean C.; Szretter, Kristy J.; Katze, Michael G.; Gale, Michael; Diamond, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Although susceptibility of neurons in the brain to microbial infection is a major determinant of clinical outcome, little is known about the molecular factors governing this. Here, we show that two types of neurons from distinct brain regions exhibited differential permissivity to replication of several positive-stranded RNA viruses. Granule cell neurons (GCN) of the cerebellum and cortical neurons (CN) from the cerebral cortex have unique innate immune programs that confer differential susceptibility to viral infection ex vivo and in vivo. By transducing CN with genes that were expressed more highly in GCN, we identified three interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs; Ifi27, Irg1, and Rsad2/Viperin) that mediated antiviral effects against different neurotropic viruses. Moreover, we found that the epigenetic state and microRNA-mediated regulation of ISGs correlates with enhanced antiviral response in GCN. Thus, neurons from evolutionarily distinct brain regions have unique innate immune signatures, which likely contribute to their relative permissiveness to infection. PMID:23455712

  9. Determination of the Magnetic Ground State of a Polycrystalline Compound Based on Susceptibility Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fishman, Randy Scott; Miller, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    The diruthenium compound [Ru2(O2CMe)4]3[Cr(CN)6] contains two interpenetrating sublattices that behave like giant antiferromagnetically-coupled moments with strong anisotropy. The preferred orientations of the total moment of each sublattice are determined from susceptibility measurements on a polycrystalline sample. In agreement with previous mean-field calculations for the magnetic ground state, the fits to the experimental magnetization imply that the sublattice moments are restricted to cubic diagonals rather than the cubic axis or the edge diagonals. The parameterization of the sublattice susceptibility indicates that the sublattice spin states are more distorted when they are aligned antiparallel.

  10. In Vitro Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Yersinia pestis Determined by Broth Microdilution following CLSI Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hershfield, Jeremy; Marchand, Charles; Miller, Lynda; Halasohoris, Stephanie; Purcell, Bret K.; Worsham, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro susceptibilities to 45 antibiotics were determined for 30 genetically and geographically diverse strains of Yersinia pestis by the broth microdilution method at two temperatures, 28°C and 35°C, following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. The Y. pestis strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, quinolones, tetracyclines, β-lactams, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. Only a 1-well shift was observed for the majority of antibiotics between the two temperatures. Establishing and comparing antibiotic susceptibilities of a diverse but specific set of Y. pestis strains by standardized methods and establishing population ranges and MIC50 and MIC90 values provide reference information for assessing new antibiotic agents and also provide a baseline for use in monitoring any future emergence of resistance. PMID:25583720

  11. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Determination of atomic site susceptibility tensors from neutron diffraction data on polycrystalline samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukasov, A.; Brown, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Polarized neutron diffraction can provide information about the atomic site susceptibility tensor χij characterizing the magnetic response of individual atoms to an external magnetic field (Gukasov and Brown 2002 J. Phys.: Condens. Mater. 14 8831). The six independent atomic susceptibility parameters (ASPs) can be determined from polarized neutron flipping ratio measurements on single crystals and visualized as magnetic ellipsoids which are analogous to the thermal ellipsoids obtained from atomic displacement parameters (ADPs). We demonstrate now that the information about local magnetic susceptibility at different magnetic sites in a crystal can also be obtained from polarized and unpolarized neutron diffraction measurements on magnetized powder samples. The validity of the method is illustrated by the results of such measurements on a polycrystalline sample of Tb2Sn2O7.

  12. Intestinal glutathione: determinant of mucosal peroxide transport, metabolism, and oxidative susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Aw, Tak Yee . E-mail: taw@lsuhsc.edu

    2005-05-01

    The intestine is a primary site of nutrient absorption and a critical defense barrier against dietary-derived mutagens, carcinogens, and oxidants. Accumulation of oxidants like peroxidized lipids in the gut lumen can contribute to impairment of mucosal metabolic pathways, enterocyte dysfunction independent of cell injury, and development of gut pathologies, such as inflammation and cancer. Despite this recognition, we know little of the pathways of intestinal transport, metabolism, and luminal disposition of dietary peroxides in vivo or of the underlying mechanisms of lipid peroxide-induced genesis of intestinal disease processes. This chapter summarizes our current understanding of the determinants of intestinal absorption and metabolism of peroxidized lipids. I will review experimental evidence from our laboratory and others (Table 1) supporting the pivotal role that glutathione (GSH) and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) play in mucosal transport and metabolism of lipid hydroperoxides and how reductant availability can be compromised under chronic stress such as hypoxia, and the influence of GSH on oxidative susceptibility, and redox contribution to genesis of gut disorders. The discussion is pertinent to understanding dietary lipid peroxides and GSH redox balance in intestinal physiology and pathophysiology and the significance of luminal GSH in preserving the integrity of the intestinal epithelium.

  13. Functional BCL-2 regulatory genetic variants contribute to susceptibility of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenting; Yang, Jinyun; Wei, Jinyu; Chen, Hongwei; Ge, Yunxia; Zhang, Jingfeng; Wang, Zhiqiong; Zhou, Changchun; Yuan, Qipeng; Zhou, Liqing; Yang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) prevents apoptosis and its overexpression could promote cancer cell survival. Multiple functional BCL-2 genetic polymorphisms, such as rs2279115, rs1801018 and rs1564483, have been identified previously and might be involved in cancer development through deregulating BCL-2 expression. Therefore, we examined associations between these three polymorphisms and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) susceptibility as well as its biological function in vivo. Genotypes were determined in two independent case-control sets consisted of 1588 ESCC patients and 1600 controls from two regions of China. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by logistic regression. The impact of the rs2279115 polymorphism on BCL-2 expression was detected using esophagus tissues. Our results demonstrated that the BCL-2 rs2279115 AA genotype was significantly associated with decreased ESCC risk compared with the CC genotype (OR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.57-0.90, P = 0.005), especially in nonsmokers (OR = 0.42, 95% CI = 0.29-0.59, P = 0.001) or nondrinkers (OR = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.32-0.62, P =  .002). Genotype-phenotype correlation studies demonstrated that subjects with the rs2279115 CA and AA genotypes had a statistically significant decrease of BCL-2 mRNA expression compared to the CC genotype in both normal and cancerous esophagus tissues. Our results indicate that the BCL-2 rs2279115 polymorphism contributes to ESCC susceptibility in Chinese populations. PMID:26132559

  14. Determination of Receiver Susceptibility to Radio Frequency Interference from Portable Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.

    2002-01-01

    With the increasing pressures to allow wireless devices on aircraft, the susceptibility of aircraft receivers to interference from Portable Electronic Devices (PEDs) becomes an increasing concern. Many investigations were conducted in the past, with limited success, to quantify device emissions, path loss, and receiver interference susceptibility thresholds. This paper outlines the recent effort in determining the receiver susceptibility thresholds for ILS, VOR and GPS systems. The effort primarily consists of analysis of data available openly as reported in many RTCA and ICAO documents as well as manufacturers data on receiver sensitivity. Shortcomings with the susceptibility threshold data reported in the RTCA documents are presented, and an approach for an in-depth study is suggested. In addition, intermodulation products were observed and demonstrated in a laboratory experiment when multiple PEDs were in the proximity of each other. These intermodulation effects generate spurious frequencies that may fall within aircraft communication or navigation bands causing undesirable effects. Results from a preliminary analysis are presented that show possible harmful combinations of PEDs and the potentially affected aircraft bands.

  15. [Susceptibility of induced sickle in samples of heterozygous hemoglobin S patients (sickle cell trait) suffering diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Piedra, Pablo; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto Rafael; Ramos-Jiménez, Raúl; Presno-Bernal, José Miguel; Cervantes-Villagrana, Rodolfo Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobin S is an abnormal protein that induces morphological changes in erythrocyte in low-oxygen conditions. In Mexico, it is reported that up to 13.7% of the population with mutation in one allele are considered asymptomatic (sickle cell trait). The sickle cell trait and diabetes mellitus are conditions that occur together in more than one million patients worldwide. Both diseases possibly produce microvascular changes in retinopathy and acute chest syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the induction of sickle cells in samples of diabetic patients with sickle cell trait to identify altered red cell parameters. We obtained samples of diabetic patients to determine hemoglobin A1c and S; furthermore, red blood cell biometrics data were analyzed. We found that older men with diabetes were susceptible to generate sickle cells and this correlated with reduced red blood cell count and an increase in media cell volume. In samples of women diabetes, there were no differences. We conclude that samples from patients with sickle cell trait and diabetes can cause sickle cells with high frequency in men, with lower red blood cells count and increased mean corpuscular volume as susceptibility parameters. PMID:26581534

  16. Plasmid-borne cadmium resistant determinants are associated with the susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes to bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Bao, Hongduo; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Ran; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2015-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular pathogen causing gastroenteritis, central nervous system infections and abortions. Chromosomal virulence determinants have been extensively investigated. However, the function of genes encoded by plasmids in L. monocytogenes has not been fully understood. In this study, we determined the prevalence and molecular profile of plasmids in food isolates of L. monocytogenes and examined the contribution of four plasmid-borne cadmium-resistant genes to the susceptibility of L. monocytogenes to bacteriophage infection. The results showed that plasmids were isolated from 55% (11/20) of the isolates and the plasmids exhibited 10 molecular types as determined by restriction enzyme digestion. Furthermore, 65% and 15% of the isolates were tolerant to cadmium and benzalkonium chloride (BC), respectively. All the BC-resistant isolates were resistant to cadmium. The prevalence of predicted cadmium resistance determinants (cadA1, cadA2, cadA3 and cadC) was determined and the results showed that cadA1 (35%) in isolates of serotypes 1/2a and 1/2b was much more prevalent than cadC (15%). As expected, both cadA and cadC mutants had reduced resistance to cadmium, while the resistance to BC was not significantly affected. Interestingly, both cadA and cadC mutants showed significantly higher susceptibility against L. monocytogenes phage LipG2-5 and FWLLm3 compared with the wide-type strain. Based on these results, we concluded that plasmids from L. monocytogenes encoded important functional determinants that are not only associated with cadmium resistance, but also phage susceptibility. PMID:25721472

  17. Early kinetic window of target T cell susceptibility to CD25+ regulatory T cell activity.

    PubMed

    Sojka, Dorothy K; Hughson, Angela; Sukiennicki, Teresa L; Fowell, Deborah J

    2005-12-01

    Peripheral tolerance is maintained in part by thymically derived CD25+CD4+ T cells (regulatory T cells (Tregs)). Their mechanism of action has not been well characterized. Therefore, to get a better understanding of Treg action, we investigated the kinetics of murine Treg activity in vitro. Tregs were suppressive within a surprisingly narrow kinetic window: necessary and sufficient only in the first 6-10 h of culture. Visualization of this time frame, using a sensitive single-cell assay for IL-2, revealed the early elaboration of target cell IL-2 producers in the first 6 h despite the presence of CD25+CD4+ Tregs. However, after 6 h, a rapid rise in the number of IL-2 producers in the absence of Tregs was dramatically abrogated by the presence of Tregs. Importantly, the timing of suppression was dictated by the kinetics of target T cell activation suggesting that early target T cell signals may alter susceptibility to suppression. Modulating target T cell activation signals with provision of CD28, IL-2, or high Ag dose all abrogated suppression of proliferation late in culture. However, only CD28 signals enabled target T cells to resist the early Treg-induced down-regulation of IL-2. Therefore the quality of early target T cell activation signals, in particular engagement of CD28, represents an important control point in the balance between vulnerability and resistance to Treg suppression. PMID:16301632

  18. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  19. Apparatus and process for determining the susceptibility of microorganisms to antibiotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Sandra F. (Inventor); Fadler, Norman L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process for determining the susceptibility of microorganisms to antibiotics involves introducing a diluted specimen into discrete quantities of a selective culture medium which favors a specific microorganism in that the microorganism is sustained by the medium and when so sustained will change the optical characteristics of the medium. Only the specific microorganism will alter the optical characteristics. Some of the discrete quantities are blended with known antibiotics, while at least one is not. If the specimen contains the microorganisms favored by the selective medium, the optical characteristics of the discrete quantity of pure selective medium, that is the one without antibiotics, will change. If the antibiotics in any of the other discrete quantities are ineffective against the favored microorganisms, the optical characteristics of those quantities will likewise change. No change in the optical characteristics of a discrete quantity indicates that the favored microorganism is susceptible to the antibiotic in the quantity.

  20. Development of an Accelerated Test Method for the Determination of Susceptibility to Atmospheric Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical rationale is presented for use of a repetitive cyclic current reversal voltammetric technique for characterization of localized corrosion processes, including atmospheric corrosion. Applicability of this proposed experimental protocol is applied to characterization of susceptibility to crevice and pitting corrosion, atmospheric corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Criteria upon which relative susceptibility is based were determined and tested using two iron based alloys commonly in use at NASA-Kennedy; A36 (a low carbon steel) and 4130 (a low alloy steel). Practicality of the procedure was demonstrated by measuring changes in anodic polarization behavior during high frequency current reversal cycles of 25 cycles per second with 1 mA/sq cm current density amplitude in solutions containing Cl anions. The results demonstrated that, due to excessive polarization which affects conductivity of barrier corrosion product layers, A36 was less resistant to atmospheric corrosion than its 4130 counterpart; behavior which was also demonstrated during exposure tests.

  1. Imatinib enhances human melanoma cell susceptibility to TRAIL-induced cell death: Relationship to Bcl-2 family and caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Hamaï, A; Richon, C; Meslin, F; Faure, F; Kauffmann, A; Lecluse, Y; Jalil, A; Larue, L; Avril, M F; Chouaib, S; Mehrpour, M

    2006-12-01

    In order to define genetic determinants of primary and metastatic melanoma cell susceptibility to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), we have applied oligonucleotide microarrays to TRAIL-sensitive primary T1 cells and TRAIL-resistant metastatic G1 cells treated or not with TRAIL. T1 and G1 cells are isogenic melanoma cell subclones. We examined 22 000 spots, 4.2% of which displayed differential expression in G1 and T1 cells. Cell susceptibility to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis was found to be correlated with gene expression signatures in this model. Some of the differentially expressed genes were identified as involved in ATP-binding and signaling pathways, based on previously published data. Further analysis provided evidences that c-kit was overexpressed in G1 cells while it was absent in T1 cells. The c-kit inhibitor, imatinib, did not restore TRAIL sensitivity, excluding a role for c-kit in TRAIL resistance in G1 cells. Surprisingly, imatinib inhibited cell proliferation and TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in melanoma cells. We investigated the possible involvement of several molecules, including c-ABL, platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), cellular FADD-like interleukin-1 alpha-converting enzyme-like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP)(L/S), Fas-associated DD kinase, p53, p21(WAF1), proteins of B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family and cytochrome c. Imatinib did not modulate the expression or activation of its own targets, such as c-ABL, PDGFRalpha and PDGFRbeta, but it did affect the expression of c-FLIP(L), BCL2-associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl-2. Moreover, c-FLIP(L) knockdown sensitized T1 cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis, with a sensitivity similar to that of cells previously treated with imatinib. More notably, we found that the resistance to TRAIL in G1 cells was correlated with constitutive c-FLIP(L) recruitment to the DISC and the inhibition of caspase 8, 3 and 9 processing. Moreover, c-FLIP(L) knockdown partly restored TRAIL

  2. Establishment, characterization and viral susceptibility of a new cell line derived from goldfish, Carassius auratus (L.), tail fin.

    PubMed

    Yan, W; Nie, P; Lu, Y

    2011-10-01

    A continuous cell line [goldfish tail fin (GFTF)] derived from a goldfish tail fin, Carassius auratus, was established and characterized. GFTF cells predominantly consist of fibroblast-like cells that were maintained and subcultured more than 50 times over a period of 15 months. Cells grew at temperatures between 15 and 37°C, with an optimum temperature of 25°C. The growth rate of GFTF cells increased proportionally with the foetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration (5-20%), with optimum growth at 20% FBS. The chromosome numbers were 88-112, with a modal peak of 104 chromosomes. Five known fish viruses were tested to determine susceptibility. Results demonstrated that GFTF is susceptible to snakehead rhabdovirus, spring viraemia of carp virus and channel catfish virus (CCV). In addition, GFTF demonstrated a higher sensitivity to, and increased viral production of, CCV than that observed in the control cell line, channel catfish ovary cells. This suggests that GFTF cells would be useful as a diagnostic tool for viral diseases in this fish species, as well as for the isolation and study of goldfish viruses in the future. Furthermore, these cells were transfected with pEGFP-N1 vector DNA and some fluorescent signals were observed, suggesting that GFTF cells could be a useful tool for transgenic and genetic manipulation studies. PMID:21916901

  3. Age-related changes in red blood cell complement regulatory proteins and susceptibility to severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Waitumbi, John N; Donvito, Béatrice; Kisserli, Aymric; Cohen, Jacques H M; Stoute, José A

    2004-09-15

    Severe malaria-associated anemia and cerebral malaria are life-threatening complications of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Red blood cell (RBC) complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of both. We sought to determine whether there are age-related changes in the expression of CRPs that could explain the susceptibility to severe malaria-associated anemia in young children and the susceptibility to cerebral malaria in older children and adults. In cross-sectional surveys in malaria-endemic and -nonendemic areas of Kenya and in Reims, France, the level of RBC CRPs was lowest in young children and increased into adulthood. In case-control studies, patients with cerebral malaria and matched control subjects had higher levels of RBC CRPs than did patients with severe anemia and matched control subjects, especially during convalescence. We conclude that RBC CRP levels vary with age and that the lower levels of these proteins in young children in areas of high transmission, such as western Kenya, may place these children at greater risk of severe malaria-associated anemia than cerebral malaria. PMID:15319870

  4. T-Cell Lineage Determination

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Bell, J. Jeremiah; Bhandoola, Avinash

    2010-01-01

    Summary T cells originate from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow but complete their development in the thymus. HSCs give rise to a variety of non-renewing hematopoietic progenitors, among which a rare subset migrates to the thymus via the bloodstream. The earliest T-cell progenitors identified in the thymus are not T-lineage restricted but possess the ability to give rise to cells of many different lineages. Alternative lineage potentials are gradually lost as progenitors progress towards later developmental stages. Here, we review the early developmental events that might be involved in T-cell lineage fate determination, including the properties of possible thymus settling progenitors, their homing into the thymus, and their T-cell lineage specification and commitment. PMID:20969581

  5. Goat uterine epithelial cells are susceptible to infection with Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus (CAEV) in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, using immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization, whether CAEV is capable of infecting goat uterine epithelial cells in vivo. Five CAEV seropositive goats confirmed as infected using double nested polymerase chain reaction (dnPCR) on leucocytes and on vaginal secretions were used as CAEV positive goats. Five CAEV-free goats were used as controls. Samples from the uterine horn were prepared for dnPCR, in situ hybridization, and immunofluorescence. The results from dnPCR confirmed the presence of CAEV proviral DNA in the uterine horn samples of infected goats whereas no CAEV proviral DNA was detected in samples taken from the uninfected control goats. The in situ hybridization probe was complementary to part of the CAEV gag gene and confirmed the presence of CAEV nucleic acids in uterine samples. The positively staining cells were seen concentrated in the mucosa of the lamina propria of uterine sections. Finally, laser confocal analysis of double p28/cytokeratin immunolabelled transverse sections of CAEV infected goat uterus, demonstrated that the virus was localized in glandular and epithelial cells. This study clearly demonstrates that goat uterine epithelial cells are susceptible to CAEV infection in vivo. This finding could help to further our understanding of the epidemiology of CAEV, and in particular the possibility of vertical transmission. PMID:22276529

  6. The costs of infection and resistance as determinants of West Nile virus susceptibility in Culex mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the phenotypic consequences of interactions between arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) and their mosquito hosts has direct implications for predicting the evolution of these relationships and the potential for changes in epidemiological patterns. Although arboviruses are generally not highly pathogenic to mosquitoes, pathology has at times been noted. Here, in order to evaluate the potential costs of West Nile virus (WNV) infection and resistance in a primary WNV vector, and to assess the extent to which virus-vector relationships are species-specific, we performed fitness studies with and without WNV exposure using a highly susceptible Culex pipiens mosquito colony. Specifically, we measured and compared survival, fecundity, and feeding rates in bloodfed mosquitoes that were (i) infected following WNV exposure (susceptible), (ii) uninfected following WNV exposure (resistant), or (iii) unexposed. Results In contrast to our previous findings with a relatively resistant Cx. tarsalis colony, WNV infection did not alter fecundity or blood-feeding behaviour of Cx. pipiens, yet results do indicate that resistance to infection is associated with a fitness cost in terms of mosquito survival. Conclusions The identification of species-specific differences provides an evolutionary explanation for variability in vector susceptibility to arboviruses and suggests that understanding the costs of infection and resistance are important factors in determining the potential competence of vector populations for arboviruses. PMID:21975028

  7. Galectin-3 binds to CD45 on diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells to regulate susceptibility to cell death

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Mary C.; Pang, Mabel; Hsu, Daniel K.; Liu, Fu-Tong; de Vos, Sven; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Said, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma and an aggressive malignancy. Galectin-3 (gal-3), the only antiapoptotic member of the galectin family, is overexpressed in DLBCL. While gal-3 can localize to intracellular sites, gal-3 is secreted by DLBCL cells and binds back to the cell surface in a carbohydrate-dependent manner. The major counterreceptor for gal-3 on DLBCL cells was identified as the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45. Removal of cell-surface gal-3 from CD45 with the polyvalent glycan inhibitor GCS-100 rendered DLBCL cells susceptible to chemotherapeutic agents. Binding of gal-3 to CD45 modulated tyrosine phosphatase activity; removal of endogenous cell-surface gal-3 from CD45 with GCS-100 increased phosphatase activity, while addition of exogenous gal-3 reduced phosphatase activity. Moreover, the increased susceptibility of DLBCL cells to chemotherapeutic agents after removal of gal-3 by GCS-100 required CD45 phosphatase activity. Gal-3 binding to a subset of highly glycosylated CD45 glycoforms was regulated by the C2GnT-1 glycosyltransferase, indicating that specific glycosylation of CD45 is important for regulation of gal-3–mediated signaling. These data identify a novel role for cell-surface gal-3 and CD45 in DLBCL survival and suggest novel therapeutic targets to sensitize DLBCL cells to death. PMID:23065155

  8. [Testing the susceptibility of cultured cells to infection with bovine leukemia virus].

    PubMed

    Bobáková, M; Lesník, F; Vrtiak, O J

    1985-05-01

    Different cell cultures were studied for their susceptibility to bovine leucosis virus infection. Syncytial assay was used for this study. The FLS/BLV+ cell line served as virus source. Cell lines BHK-21 and ZP-1/58 were found to be susceptible to syncytium formation. Large cells with one to three large nuclei, and loose nuclei reaching the size of syncytium were observed to occur in the BHK-21 and ZP-1/58 cell lines, apart from the syncytial formations. The virus specificity of the syncytia arising in these two cell lines was confirmed by the immunofluorescence assay. In the case of the immunoperoxidase assay, a positive result was obtained only in the BHK-21 cell line. The occurrence of syncytia and large nuclei was observed even in the cases when the BHK-21 cells were infected with the lymphocytes of leucotic cows. PMID:2992148

  9. Protein carbonylation after traumatic brain injury: cell specificity, regional susceptibility, and gender differences.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Rachel C; Buonora, John E; Jacobowitz, David M; Mueller, Gregory P

    2015-01-01

    Protein carbonylation is a well-documented and quantifiable consequence of oxidative stress in several neuropathologies, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer׳s disease, and Parkinson׳s disease. Although oxidative stress is a hallmark of traumatic brain injury (TBI), little work has explored the specific neural regions and cell types in which protein carbonylation occurs. Furthermore, the effect of gender on protein carbonylation after TBI has not been studied. The present investigation was designed to determine the regional and cell specificity of TBI-induced protein carbonylation and how this response to injury is affected by gender. Immunohistochemistry was used to visualize protein carbonylation in the brains of adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI) as an injury model of TBI. Cell-specific markers were used to colocalize the presence of carbonylated proteins in specific cell types, including astrocytes, neurons, microglia, and oligodendrocytes. Results also indicated that the injury lesion site, ventral portion of the dorsal third ventricle, and ventricular lining above the median eminence showed dramatic increases in protein carbonylation after injury. Specifically, astrocytes and limited regions of ependymal cells adjacent to the dorsal third ventricle and the median eminence were most susceptible to postinjury protein carbonylation. However, these patterns of differential susceptibility to protein carbonylation were gender dependent, with males showing significantly greater protein carbonylation at sites distant from the lesion. Proteomic analyses were also conducted and determined that the proteins most affected by carbonylation in response to TBI include glial fibrillary acidic protein, dihydropyrimidase-related protein 2, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase C, and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase A. Many other proteins, however, were not carbonylated by CCI. These findings indicate that there is both regional

  10. Technique for magnetic susceptibility determination in the highly doped semiconductors by electron spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Veinger, A. I.; Zabrodskii, A. G.; Tisnek, T. V.; Goloshchapov, S. I.; Semenikhin, P. V.

    2014-08-20

    A method for determining the magnetic susceptibility in the highly doped semiconductors is considered. It is suitable for the semiconductors near the metal - insulator transition when the conductivity changes very quickly with the temperature and the resonance line form distorts. A procedure that is based on double integration of the positive part of the derivative of the absorption line having a Dyson shape and takes into account the depth of the skin layer is described. Analysis is made for the example of arsenic-doped germanium samples at a rather high concentration corresponding to the insulator-metal phase transition.

  11. Genetic background affects susceptibility to tumoral stem cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramírez, Idoia; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Martín-Lorenzo, Alberto; Blanco, Óscar; García-Cenador, María Begoña; García-Criado, Francisco Javier; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2013-01-01

    The latest studies of the interactions between oncogenes and its target cell have shown that certain oncogenes may act as passengers to reprogram tissue-specific stem/progenitor cell into a malignant cancer stem cell state. In this study, we show that the genetic background influences this tumoral stem cell reprogramming capacity of the oncogenes using as a model the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice, where the type of tumor they develop, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), is a function of tumoral stem cell reprogramming. Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice containing FVB genetic components were significantly more resistant to CML. However, pure Sca1-BCRABLp210 FVB mice developed thymomas that were not seen in the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice into the B6 background. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that tumoral stem cell reprogramming fate is subject to polymorphic genetic control. PMID:23839033

  12. The Y chromosome as a regulatory element shaping immune cell transcriptomes and susceptibility to autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Case, Laure K; Wall, Emma H; Dragon, Julie A; Saligrama, Naresha; Krementsov, Dimitry N; Moussawi, Mohamad; Zachary, James F; Huber, Sally A; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P; Teuscher, Cory

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the DNA elements that constitute and control the regulatory genome is critical for the appropriate therapeutic management of complex diseases. Here, using chromosome Y (ChrY) consomic mouse strains on the C57BL/6J (B6) background, we show that susceptibility to two diverse animal models of autoimmune disease, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) and experimental myocarditis, correlates with the natural variation in copy number of Sly and Rbmy multicopy ChrY genes. On the B6 background, ChrY possesses gene regulatory properties that impact genome-wide gene expression in pathogenic CD4(+) T cells. Using a ChrY consomic strain on the SJL background, we discovered a preference for ChrY-mediated gene regulation in macrophages, the immune cell subset underlying the EAE sexual dimorphism in SJL mice, rather than CD4(+) T cells. Importantly, in both genetic backgrounds, an inverse correlation exists between the number of Sly and Rbmy ChrY gene copies and the number of significantly up-regulated genes in immune cells, thereby supporting a link between copy number variation of Sly and Rbmy with the ChrY genetic element exerting regulatory properties. Additionally, we show that ChrY polymorphism can determine the sexual dimorphism in EAE and myocarditis. In humans, an analysis of the CD4(+) T cell transcriptome from male multiple sclerosis patients versus healthy controls provides further evidence for an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of gene regulation by ChrY. Thus, as in Drosophila, these data establish the mammalian ChrY as a member of the regulatory genome due to its ability to epigenetically regulate genome-wide gene expression in immune cells. PMID:23800453

  13. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Biofilm Cells and Molecular Characterisation of Staphylococcus hominis Isolates from Blood

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Olazarán, Soraya; Morfín-Otero, Rayo; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Llaca-Díaz, Jorge; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; González, Gloria M.; Casillas-Vega, Néstor; Garza-González, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to characterise the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type, genetic relatedness, biofilm formation and composition, icaADBC genes detection, icaD expression, and antibiotic susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm cells of Staphylococcus hominis isolates from blood. Methods The study included 67 S. hominis blood isolates. Methicillin resistance was evaluated with the cefoxitin disk test. mecA gene and SCCmec were detected by multiplex PCR. Genetic relatedness was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Biofilm formation and composition were evaluated by staining with crystal violet and by detachment assay, respectively; and the biofilm index (BI) was determined. Detection and expression of icaADBC genes were performed by multiplex PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibilities of planktonic cells (minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC) and biofilm cells (minimum biofilm eradication concentration, MBEC) were determined by the broth dilution method. Results Eighty-five percent (57/67) of isolates were methicillin resistant and mecA positive. Of the mecA-positive isolates, 66.7% (38/57) carried a new putative SCCmec type. Four clones were detected, with two to five isolates each. Among all isolates, 91% (61/67) were categorised as strong biofilm producers. Biofilm biomass composition was heterogeneous (polysaccharides, proteins and DNA). All isolates presented the icaD gene, and 6.66% (1/15) isolates expressed icaD. This isolate presented the five genes of ica operon. Higher BI and MBEC values than the MIC values were observed for amikacin, vancomycin, linezolid, oxacillin, ciprofloxacin, and chloramphenicol. Conclusions S. hominis isolates were highly resistant to methicillin and other antimicrobials. Most of the detected SCCmec types were different than those described for S. aureus. Isolates indicated low clonality. The results indicate that S. hominis is a strong biofilm producer with an extracellular

  14. A Rapid Molecular Test for Determining Yersinia pestis Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin by the Quantification of Differentially Expressed Marker Genes.

    PubMed

    Steinberger-Levy, Ida; Shifman, Ohad; Zvi, Anat; Ariel, Naomi; Beth-Din, Adi; Israeli, Ofir; Gur, David; Aftalion, Moshe; Maoz, Sharon; Ber, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Standard antimicrobial susceptibility tests used to determine bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are growth dependent and time consuming. The long incubation time required for standard tests may render susceptibility results irrelevant, particularly for patients infected with lethal bacteria that are slow growing on agar but progress rapidly in vivo, such as Yersinia pestis. Here, we present an alternative approach for the rapid determination of antimicrobial susceptibility, based on the quantification of the changes in the expression levels of specific marker genes following exposure to growth-inhibiting concentrations of the antibiotic, using Y. pestis and ciprofloxacin as a model. The marker genes were identified by transcriptomic DNA microarray analysis of the virulent Y. pestis Kimberley53 strain after exposure to specific concentrations of ciprofloxacin for various time periods. We identified several marker genes that were induced following exposure to growth-inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, and we confirmed the marker expression profiles at additional ciprofloxacin concentrations using quantitative RT-PCR. Eleven candidate marker transcripts were identified, of which four mRNA markers were selected for a rapid quantitative RT-PCR susceptibility test that correctly determined the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values and the categories of susceptibility of several Y. pestis strains and isolates harboring various ciprofloxacin MIC values. The novel molecular susceptibility test requires just 2 h of antibiotic exposure in a 7-h overall test time, in contrast to the 24 h of antibiotic exposure required for a standard microdilution test. PMID:27242774

  15. A Rapid Molecular Test for Determining Yersinia pestis Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin by the Quantification of Differentially Expressed Marker Genes

    PubMed Central

    Steinberger-Levy, Ida; Shifman, Ohad; Zvi, Anat; Ariel, Naomi; Beth-Din, Adi; Israeli, Ofir; Gur, David; Aftalion, Moshe; Maoz, Sharon; Ber, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Standard antimicrobial susceptibility tests used to determine bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are growth dependent and time consuming. The long incubation time required for standard tests may render susceptibility results irrelevant, particularly for patients infected with lethal bacteria that are slow growing on agar but progress rapidly in vivo, such as Yersinia pestis. Here, we present an alternative approach for the rapid determination of antimicrobial susceptibility, based on the quantification of the changes in the expression levels of specific marker genes following exposure to growth-inhibiting concentrations of the antibiotic, using Y. pestis and ciprofloxacin as a model. The marker genes were identified by transcriptomic DNA microarray analysis of the virulent Y. pestis Kimberley53 strain after exposure to specific concentrations of ciprofloxacin for various time periods. We identified several marker genes that were induced following exposure to growth-inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, and we confirmed the marker expression profiles at additional ciprofloxacin concentrations using quantitative RT-PCR. Eleven candidate marker transcripts were identified, of which four mRNA markers were selected for a rapid quantitative RT-PCR susceptibility test that correctly determined the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values and the categories of susceptibility of several Y. pestis strains and isolates harboring various ciprofloxacin MIC values. The novel molecular susceptibility test requires just 2 h of antibiotic exposure in a 7-h overall test time, in contrast to the 24 h of antibiotic exposure required for a standard microdilution test. PMID:27242774

  16. Initial site of synthesis of virus during rescue of simian virus 40 from heterokaryons of simian virus 40-transformed and susceptible cells.

    PubMed

    Wever, G H; Kit, S; Dubbs, D R

    1970-05-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) can be rescued from certain SV40-transformed hamster cells by fusion with susceptible African green monkey kidney (CV-1) cells, in the presence of ultraviolet-irradiated Sendai virus. We have determined the sites in which SV40 is produced during rescue in these heterokaryons. To determine the sequence, nuclei were isolated from fused cells at various times after fusion, separated on sucrose-density gradients, and assayed for infectious center formation and virus content on CV-1 monolayers. Virus was first detected in the transformed nucleus (40 hr postfusion), and later associated with both transformed and susceptible nuclei (68 to 72 hr). Viral rescue apparently does not depend upon the transfer of SV40 deoxyribonucleic acid to a susceptible CV-1 nucleus, since the transformed nucleus is the primary site of virus production. The time course of certain cytological events in the rescue process and in productive infection was found to be similar. PMID:4315957

  17. Rotenone Susceptibility Phenotype in Olfactory Derived Patient Cells as a Model of Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matigian, N.; Todorovic, M.; Cook, A. L.; Ravishankar, S.; Dong, L. F.; Neuzil, J.; Silburn, P.; Mackay-Sim, A.; Mellick, G. D.; Wood, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a complex age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Approximately 90% of Parkinson’s disease cases are idiopathic, of unknown origin. The aetiology of Parkinson’s disease is not fully understood but increasing evidence implies a failure in fundamental cellular processes including mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress. To dissect the cellular events underlying idiopathic Parkinson’s disease, we use primary cell lines established from the olfactory mucosa of Parkinson’s disease patients. Previous metabolic and transcriptomic analyses identified deficiencies in stress response pathways in patient-derived cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these deficiencies manifested as increased susceptibility, as measured by cell viability, to a range of extrinsic stressors. We identified that patient-derived cells are more sensitive to mitochondrial complex I inhibition and hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress, than controls. Exposure to low levels (50 nM) of rotenone led to increased apoptosis in patient-derived cells. We identified an endogenous deficit in mitochondrial complex I in patient-derived cells, but this did not directly correlate with rotenone-sensitivity. We further characterized the sensitivity to rotenone and identified that it was partly associated with heat shock protein 27 levels. Finally, transcriptomic analysis following rotenone exposure revealed that patient-derived cells express a diminished response to rotenone-induced stress compared with cells from healthy controls. Our cellular model of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease displays a clear susceptibility phenotype to mitochondrial stress. The determination of molecular mechanisms underpinning this susceptibility may lead to the identification of biomarkers for either disease onset or progression. PMID:27123847

  18. Cell cycle constraints on capsulation and bacteriophage susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Ardissone, Silvia; Fumeaux, Coralie; Bergé, Matthieu; Beaussart, Audrey; Théraulaz, Laurence; Radhakrishnan, Sunish Kumar; Dufrêne, Yves F; Viollier, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of bacterial capsules in pathogenesis, it is still unknown if systemic cues such as the cell cycle can control capsule biogenesis. In this study, we show that the capsule of the synchronizable model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is cell cycle regulated and we unearth a bacterial transglutaminase homolog, HvyA, as restriction factor that prevents capsulation in G1-phase cells. This capsule protects cells from infection by a generalized transducing Caulobacter phage (φCr30), and the loss of HvyA confers insensitivity towards φCr30. Control of capsulation during the cell cycle could serve as a simple means to prevent steric hindrance of flagellar motility or to ensure that phage-mediated genetic exchange happens before the onset of DNA replication. Moreover, the multi-layered regulatory circuitry directing HvyA expression to G1-phase is conserved during evolution, and HvyA orthologues from related Sinorhizobia can prevent capsulation in Caulobacter, indicating that alpha-proteobacteria have retained HvyA activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03587.001 PMID:25421297

  19. Mitochondrial glutathione transport is a key determinant of neuronal susceptibility to oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Heather M; Kirchhof, Danielle; Manning, Evan; Joseph, Jamie W; Linseman, Daniel A

    2013-02-15

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress significantly contributes to the underlying pathology of several devastating neurodegenerative disorders. Mitochondria are highly sensitive to the damaging effects of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; therefore, these organelles are equipped with a number of free radical scavenging systems. In particular, the mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) pool is a critical antioxidant reserve that is derived entirely from the larger cytosolic pool via facilitated transport. The mechanism of mitochondrial GSH transport has not been extensively studied in the brain. However, the dicarboxylate (DIC) and 2-oxoglutarate (OGC) carriers localized to the inner mitochondrial membrane have been established as GSH transporters in liver and kidney. Here, we investigated the role of these carriers in protecting neurons from oxidative and nitrosative stress. Immunoblot analysis of DIC and OGC in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) and cerebellar astrocytes showed differential expression of these carriers, with CGNs expressing only DIC and astrocytes expressing both DIC and OGC. Consistent with these findings, butylmalonate specifically reduced mitochondrial GSH in CGNs, whereas both butylmalonate and phenylsuccinate diminished mitochondrial GSH in astrocytes. Moreover, preincubation with butylmalonate but not phenylsuccinate significantly enhanced susceptibility of CGNs to oxidative and nitrosative stressors. This increased vulnerability was largely prevented by incubation with cell-permeable GSH monoethylester but not malate. Finally, knockdown of DIC with adenoviral siRNA also rendered CGNs more susceptible to oxidative stress. These findings demonstrate that maintenance of the mitochondrial GSH pool via sustained mitochondrial GSH transport is essential to protect neurons from oxidative and nitrosative stress. PMID:23283974

  20. Mitochondrial Glutathione Transport Is a Key Determinant of Neuronal Susceptibility to Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Heather M.; Kirchhof, Danielle; Manning, Evan; Joseph, Jamie W.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress significantly contributes to the underlying pathology of several devastating neurodegenerative disorders. Mitochondria are highly sensitive to the damaging effects of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; therefore, these organelles are equipped with a number of free radical scavenging systems. In particular, the mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) pool is a critical antioxidant reserve that is derived entirely from the larger cytosolic pool via facilitated transport. The mechanism of mitochondrial GSH transport has not been extensively studied in the brain. However, the dicarboxylate (DIC) and 2-oxoglutarate (OGC) carriers localized to the inner mitochondrial membrane have been established as GSH transporters in liver and kidney. Here, we investigated the role of these carriers in protecting neurons from oxidative and nitrosative stress. Immunoblot analysis of DIC and OGC in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) and cerebellar astrocytes showed differential expression of these carriers, with CGNs expressing only DIC and astrocytes expressing both DIC and OGC. Consistent with these findings, butylmalonate specifically reduced mitochondrial GSH in CGNs, whereas both butylmalonate and phenylsuccinate diminished mitochondrial GSH in astrocytes. Moreover, preincubation with butylmalonate but not phenylsuccinate significantly enhanced susceptibility of CGNs to oxidative and nitrosative stressors. This increased vulnerability was largely prevented by incubation with cell-permeable GSH monoethylester but not malate. Finally, knockdown of DIC with adenoviral siRNA also rendered CGNs more susceptible to oxidative stress. These findings demonstrate that maintenance of the mitochondrial GSH pool via sustained mitochondrial GSH transport is essential to protect neurons from oxidative and nitrosative stress. PMID:23283974

  1. Gold nanoparticles do not induce myotube cytotoxicity but increase the susceptibility to cell death.

    PubMed

    Leite, Paulo Emílio Corrêa; Pereira, Mariana Rodrigues; do Nascimento Santos, Carlos Antonio; Campos, Andrea Porto Carreiro; Esteves, Ticiana Mota; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2015-08-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have been widely used for many applications, including as biological carriers. A better understanding concerning AuNP safety on muscle cells is crucial, since it could be a potential tool in the nanomedicine field. Here, we describe the impact of polyethylene glycol-coated gold nanoparticles (PEG-AuNP) interaction with differentiated skeletal muscle C2C12 cells on cell viability, mitochondria function, cell signaling related to survival, cytokine levels and susceptibility to apoptosis. Intracellular localization of 4.5 nm PEG-AuNP diameter size was evidenced by STEM-in-SEM in myotube cells. Methods for cytotoxicity analysis showed that PEG-AuNP did not affect cell viability, but intracellular ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential increased. Phosphorylation of ERK was not altered but p-AKT levels reduced (p<0.01). Pre-treatment of cells with PEG-AuNP followed by staurosporine induction increased the caspases-3/7 activity. Indeed, cytokines analysis revealed a sharp increase of IFN-γ and TGF-β1 levels after PEG-AuNP treatment, suggesting that inflammatory and fibrotic phenotypes process were activated. These data demonstrate that PEG-AuNP affect the myotube physiology leading these cells to be more susceptible to death stimuli in the presence of staurosporine. Altogether, these results present evidence that PEG-AuNP affect the susceptibility to apoptosis of muscle cells, contributing to development of safer strategies for intramuscular delivery. PMID:25790728

  2. Determination of the Landau Lifshitz damping parameter by means of complex susceptibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannin, P. C.; Marin, C. N.

    2006-04-01

    A new experimental method for the determination of the Landau-Lifshitz damping parameter, α, based on measurements of the frequency and field dependence of the complex magnetic susceptibility, χ(ω,H)=χ'(ω,H)-iχ″(ω,H), is proposed. The method centres on evaluating the ratio of fmax/ fres, where fres is the resonance frequency and fmax is the maximum absorption frequency at resonance, of the sample susceptibility spectra, measured in strong polarizing fields. We have investigated three magnetic fluid samples, namely sample 1, sample 2 and sample 3. Sample 1 consisted of particles of Mn 0.6Fe 0.4Fe 2O 4 dispersed in kerosene, sample 2 consisted of magnetite particles dispersed in Isopar M and sample 3 was composed of particles of Mn 0.66Zn 0.34Fe 2O 4 dispersed in Isopar M. The results obtained for the mean damping parameter of particles within the magnetic fluid samples are as follows: <α(MnFeFeO)>=0.057 with the corresponding standard deviation SD=0.0104; <α(FeO)>=0.1105 with the corresponding standard deviation, SD=0.034 and <α(MnZnFeO)>=0.096 with the corresponding standard deviation, SD=0.037.

  3. Bleaching susceptibility and mortality of corals are determined by fine-scale differences in symbiont type

    PubMed Central

    Sampayo, E. M.; Ridgway, T.; Bongaerts, P.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.

    2008-01-01

    Coral bleaching has been identified as one of the major contributors to coral reef decline, and the occurrence of different symbionts determined by broad genetic groupings (clades A–H) is commonly used to explain thermal responses of reef-building corals. By using Stylophora pistillata as a model, we monitored individual tagged colonies in situ over a two-year period and show that fine level genetic variability within clade C is correlated to differences in bleaching susceptibility. Based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of the internal transcribed spacer region 2, visual bleaching assessments, symbiont densities, host protein, and pulse amplitude modulated fluorometry, we show that subcladal types C78 and C8/a are more thermally tolerant than C79 and C35/a, which suffered significant bleaching and postbleaching mortality. Although additional symbiont types were detected during bleaching in colonies harboring types C79 and C35/a, all colonies reverted back to their original symbionts postbleaching. Most importantly, the data propose that the differential mortality of hosts harboring thermally sensitive versus resistant symbionts rather than symbiont shuffling/switching within a single host is responsible for the observed symbiont composition changes of coral communities after bleaching. This study therefore highlights that the use of broad cladal designations may not be suitable to describe differences in bleaching susceptibility, and that differential mortality results in a loss of both symbiont and host genetic diversity and therefore represents an important mechanism in explaining how coral reef communities may respond to changing conditions. PMID:18645181

  4. Comparative susceptibility of peripheral blood leucocytes and related cell lines to killing by T-cell perforin.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J; Morgan, B P

    1994-01-01

    The comparative susceptibility of lymphocyte subsets, monocytes and polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) to killing by murine perforin was measured using physical separation techniques, cell-surface phenotyping and scatter characteristics to isolate cell types, together with propidium iodide (PI) uptake as a measure of cell death. In the majority of individuals, PMN were more resistant to perforin than other peripheral blood cells including natural killer (NK) cells and CD8+ lymphocytes. Among the lymphocytes, CD4+ cells were the most susceptible subset, followed by CD19+, CD8+ and CD56+ lymphocytes respectively. The human promyelocytic leukaemia cell line, HL-60, and the human histiocytic lymphoma cell line, U937, were readily killed by perforin. When HL-60 were differentiated to either macrophage- or neutrophil-like end cells, and U937 differentiated to macrophage-like end cells, there was no difference between differentiated and undifferentiated cells in their relative susceptibility to perforin. The relative resistance of PMN to perforin may be important in protecting them from damage in in vivo situations where both NK cells and neutrophils are localized in the same inflammatory areas. PMID:7835917

  5. Recent Development in Determining Spontaneous Heating Susceptibility of Indian Coals and Its Correlation with Intrinsic Parameters of Coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Santosh Kumar; Panigrahi, Durga Charan

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes a new electro-chemical method called wet oxidation potential technique for determining the susceptibility of coal to spontaneous combustion. Altogether 78 coal samples collected from thirteen different mining companies spreading over most of the Indian coalfields have been used for this experimental investigation. Experiments have also been carried out for proximate and ultimate analyses of coal. Susceptibility index obtained from wet oxidation potential was correlated with intrinsic parameters of coal. It has been found that susceptibility index bears a good correlation with moisture content, volatile matter, oxygen, hydrogen and carbon content of coal.

  6. Differences in irradiation susceptibility and turnover between mucosal and connective tissue-type mast cells of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuzumi, T.; Waki, N.; Kanakura, Y.; Nagoshi, J.; Hirota, S.; Yoshikawa, K.; Kitamura, Y. )

    1990-08-01

    Although precursors of mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, phenotypes of mast cells are influenced by the tissues in which final differentiation occurs. Connective tissue-type mast cells (CTMC) and mucosal mast cells (MMC) are different in morphological, biochemical, immunological, and functional criteria. The purpose of the present study was to obtain information about the differentiation process of MMC. First, we compared changes in irradiation susceptibility in mice during the differentiation process of CTMC and MMC. The decrease in irradiation susceptibility was remarkable in the CTMC differentiation process, but it was moderate in that of MMC. Some morphologically identifiable CTMC in the peritoneal cavity had proliferative potential and were highly radioresistant, whereas such a radioresistant population of MMC was not detectable in the gastric mucosa. Second, we estimated the turnover of CTMC and MMC by determining the proportion of mast cells that were labeled with continuously administered bromodeoxyuridine. The turnover of MMC was significantly faster than that of CTMC. The absence of the radioresistant mast cell population in the gastric mucosa appeared to be related to the short life span of MMC.

  7. Impact of EZH2 Polymorphisms on Urothelial Cell Carcinoma Susceptibility and Clinicopathologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Wang, Shian-Shiang; Wang, Po-Hui; Weng, Wei-Chun; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Background The gene EZH2, the polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste 2, encodes a transcriptional repressor that also serves as a histone methyltransferase that is associated with progression to more advanced disease in a variety of malignancies. EZH2 expression level in urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) is highly correlated with tumor aggressiveness, but it has not been determined if specific EZH2 genetic variants are associated with UCC risk. This study investigated the potential associations of EZH2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms with UCC susceptibility and its clinicopathologic characteristics. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 233 UCC patients and 552 cancer-free controls, all of whom were from Taiwan, were analyzed for four EZH2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs6950683, rs2302427, rs3757441, and rs41277434) using real-time PCR genotyping. After adjusting for other co-variants, we found that individuals carrying at least one C allele at EZH2 rs6950683 had a lower risk of developing UCC than did major allele carriers. The CCCA or TGTA haplotype among the four EZH2 sites was also associated with a reduced risk of UCC. Furthermore, UCC patients who carried at least one G allele at rs2302427 had a lower invasive tumor stage than did patients carrying the major allele. Conclusions The rs6950683 SNPs of EZH2 might contribute to the prediction of UCC susceptibility. This is the first study to provide insight into risk factors associated with EZH2 variants in carcinogenesis of UCC in Taiwan. PMID:24691023

  8. Innate immune defense defines susceptibility of sarcoma cells to measles vaccine virus-based oncolysis.

    PubMed

    Berchtold, Susanne; Lampe, Johanna; Weiland, Timo; Smirnow, Irina; Schleicher, Sabine; Handgretinger, Rupert; Kopp, Hans-Georg; Reiser, Jeanette; Stubenrauch, Frank; Mayer, Nora; Malek, Nisar P; Bitzer, Michael; Lauer, Ulrich M

    2013-03-01

    The oncolytic potential of measles vaccine virus (MeV) has been demonstrated in several tumor entities. Here, we investigated the susceptibility of eight sarcoma cell lines to MeV-mediated oncolysis and found five to be susceptible, whereas three proved to be resistant. In the MeV-resistant cell lines, we often observed an inhibition of viral replication along with a strong upregulation of the intracellular virus-sensing molecule RIG-I and of the interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene IFIT1. Not only expression of IFIT1 but also phosphorylation of IFN-stimulated Stat1 took place rapidly and were found to be persistent over time. In contrast, susceptible cell lines showed a much weaker, delayed, or completely missing expression of IFIT1 as well as a delayed or only transient phosphorylation of Stat1, whereas exogenic stimulation with beta interferon (IFN-β) resulted in a comparable profound activation of Stat1 and expression of IFIT1 in all cell lines. Pretreatment with IFN-β rendered three of the susceptible cell lines more resistant to MeV-mediated oncolysis. These data suggest that differences in the innate immune defense often account for different degrees of susceptibility of sarcoma cell lines to MeV-mediated oncolysis. From a therapeutic perspective, we were able to overcome resistance to MeV by increasing the multiplicity of infection (MOI) and by addition of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (FC), thereby exploiting the suicide gene function of virotherapeutic vector MeV-SCD armed with the SCD fusion protein, which consists of yeast cytosine deaminase and yeast uracil phosphoribosyltransferase. PMID:23302892

  9. Innate Immune Defense Defines Susceptibility of Sarcoma Cells to Measles Vaccine Virus-Based Oncolysis

    PubMed Central

    Berchtold, Susanne; Lampe, Johanna; Weiland, Timo; Smirnow, Irina; Schleicher, Sabine; Handgretinger, Rupert; Kopp, Hans-Georg; Reiser, Jeanette; Stubenrauch, Frank; Mayer, Nora; Malek, Nisar P.; Bitzer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The oncolytic potential of measles vaccine virus (MeV) has been demonstrated in several tumor entities. Here, we investigated the susceptibility of eight sarcoma cell lines to MeV-mediated oncolysis and found five to be susceptible, whereas three proved to be resistant. In the MeV-resistant cell lines, we often observed an inhibition of viral replication along with a strong upregulation of the intracellular virus-sensing molecule RIG-I and of the interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene IFIT1. Not only expression of IFIT1 but also phosphorylation of IFN-stimulated Stat1 took place rapidly and were found to be persistent over time. In contrast, susceptible cell lines showed a much weaker, delayed, or completely missing expression of IFIT1 as well as a delayed or only transient phosphorylation of Stat1, whereas exogenic stimulation with beta interferon (IFN-β) resulted in a comparable profound activation of Stat1 and expression of IFIT1 in all cell lines. Pretreatment with IFN-β rendered three of the susceptible cell lines more resistant to MeV-mediated oncolysis. These data suggest that differences in the innate immune defense often account for different degrees of susceptibility of sarcoma cell lines to MeV-mediated oncolysis. From a therapeutic perspective, we were able to overcome resistance to MeV by increasing the multiplicity of infection (MOI) and by addition of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (FC), thereby exploiting the suicide gene function of virotherapeutic vector MeV-SCD armed with the SCD fusion protein, which consists of yeast cytosine deaminase and yeast uracil phosphoribosyltransferase. PMID:23302892

  10. Type 1 diabetes genetic susceptibility and dendritic cell function: potential targets for treatment.

    PubMed

    Hotta-Iwamura, Chie; Tarbell, Kristin V

    2016-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results from the defective induction or maintenance of T cell tolerance against islet β cell self-antigens. Under steady-state conditions, dendritic cells with tolerogenic properties are critical for peripheral immune tolerance. Tolerogenic dendritic cells can induce T cell anergy and deletion and, in some contexts, induce or expand regulatory T cells. Dendritic cells contribute to both immunomodulatory effects and triggering of pathogenesis in type 1 diabetes. This immune equilibrium is affected by both genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the development of type 1 diabetes. Genome-wide association studies and disease association studies have identified >50 polymorphic loci that lend susceptibility or resistance to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In parallel, diabetes susceptibility regions known as insulin-dependent diabetes loci have been identified in the nonobese diabetic mouse, a model for human type 1 diabetes, providing a better understanding of potential immunomodulatory factors in type 1 diabetes risk. Most genetic candidates have annotated immune cell functions, but the focus has been on changes to T and B cells. However, it is likely that some of the genomic susceptibility in type 1 diabetes directly interrupts the tolerogenic potential of dendritic cells in the pathogenic context of ongoing autoimmunity. Here, we will review how gene polymorphisms associated with autoimmune diabetes may influence dendritic cell development and maturation processes that could lead to alterations in the tolerogenic function of dendritic cells. These insights into potential tolerogenic and pathogenic roles for dendritic cells have practical implications for the clinical manipulation of dendritic cells toward tolerance to prevent and treat type 1 diabetes. PMID:26792821

  11. [Detection of cell death markers as a tool for bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility testing].

    PubMed

    Mlynárčik, P; Kolář, M

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance among nosocomial pathogens has emerged as one of the most important health care problems in the new millennium. In this review, we present new methods for bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility testing, based on the detection of antibiotic-mediated cell death markers that could provide valuable alternatives to existing phenotypic approaches in the very near future. PMID:27467325

  12. Expression of sulfotransferase SULT1A1 in cancer cells predicts susceptibility to the novel anticancer agent NSC-743380

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Wu, Shuhong; Liu, Xiaoying; Li, Hongyu; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Rui-Yu; Sun, Xiaoping; Wei, Caimiao; Baggerly, Keith A.; Roth, Jack A.; Wang, Michael; Swisher, Stephen G.; Fang, Bingliang

    2015-01-01

    The small molecule anticancer agent NSC-743380 modulates functions of multiple cancer-related pathways and is highly active in a subset of cancer cell lines in the NCI-60 cell line panel. It also has promising in vivo anticancer activity. However, the mechanisms underlying NSC-743380's selective anticancer activity remain uncharacterized. To determine biomarkers that may be used to identify responders to this novel anticancer agent, we performed correlation analysis on NSC-743380's anticancer activity and the gene expression levels in NCI-60 cell lines and characterized the functions of the top associated genes in NSC-743380–mediated anticancer activity. We found sulfotransferase SULT1A1 is causally associated with NSC-743380's anticancer activity. SULT1A1 was expressed in NSC-743380–sensitive cell lines but was undetectable in resistant cancer cells. Ectopic expression of SULT1A1 in NSC743380 resistant cancer cells dramatically sensitized the resistant cells to NSC-743380. Knockdown of the SULT1A1 in the NSC-743380 sensitive cancer cell line rendered it resistance to NSC-743380. The SULT1A1 protein levels in cell lysates from 18 leukemia cell lines reliably predicted the susceptibility of the cell lines to NSC-743380. Thus, expression of SULT1A1 in cancer cells is required for NSC-743380's anticancer activity and can be used as a biomarker for identification of NSC-743380 responders. PMID:25514600

  13. Red Blood Cell Susceptibility to Pneumolysin: CORRELATION WITH MEMBRANE BIOCHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES.

    PubMed

    Bokori-Brown, Monika; Petrov, Peter G; Khafaji, Mawya A; Mughal, Muhammad K; Naylor, Claire E; Shore, Angela C; Gooding, Kim M; Casanova, Francesco; Mitchell, Tim J; Titball, Richard W; Winlove, C Peter

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the biochemical and biophysical properties of the plasma membrane as well as membrane morphology on the susceptibility of human red blood cells to the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin, a key virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae, using single cell studies. We show a correlation between the physical properties of the membrane (bending rigidity and surface and dipole electrostatic potentials) and the susceptibility of red blood cells to pneumolysin-induced hemolysis. We demonstrate that biochemical modifications of the membrane induced by oxidative stress, lipid scrambling, and artificial cell aging modulate the cell response to the toxin. We provide evidence that the diversity of response to pneumolysin in diabetic red blood cells correlates with levels of glycated hemoglobin and that the mechanical properties of the red blood cell plasma membrane are altered in diabetes. Finally, we show that diabetic red blood cells are more resistant to pneumolysin and the related toxin perfringolysin O relative to healthy red blood cells. Taken together, these studies indicate that the diversity of cell response to pneumolysin within a population of human red blood cells is influenced by the biophysical and biochemical status of the plasma membrane and the chemical and/or oxidative stress pre-history of the cell. PMID:26984406

  14. Determination of Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Susceptibility of GaN Films on Sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Takashi; Hasegawa, Tatsuo; Haraguchi, Masanobu; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Fukui, Masuo; Nakamura, Syuji

    2000-05-01

    The second-order nonlinear susceptibilities of GaN films on sapphire were determined by the Maker fringe technique. In deriving the second-harmonic intensity, the bound wave propagating from the GaN-air interface to the GaN-sapphire interface and that propagating in the opposite direction were taken into account. We obtained |χ(2)zxx|=14.7±0.2 pm/V, |χ(2)xzx|=14.4±0.2 pm/V and |χ(2)zzz|=29.7±0.7 pm/V for the GaN film with a thickness of 2.55 μm using fundamental light with a wavelength of 1.064 μm.

  15. Determination of Isavuconazole Susceptibility of Aspergillus and Candida Species by the EUCAST Method

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Susan J.; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Isavuconazole is a novel expanded-spectrum triazole, which has recently been approved by the FDA as an orphan drug to treat invasive aspergillosis and is currently being studied in phase III clinical trials for invasive candidiasis. The susceptibility of relatively few clinical isolates has been reported. In this study, the isavuconazole susceptibilities of 1,237 Aspergillus and 2,010 Candida geographically diverse clinical isolates were determined by EUCAST methodology at four European mycology laboratories, producing the largest multicenter data set thus far for this compound. In addition, a blinded collection of 30 cyp51A mutant Aspergillus fumigatus clinical isolates and 10 wild-type isolates was tested. From these two data sets, the following preliminary epidemiological cutoff (ECOFF) values were suggested: 2 mg/liter for Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus, and Aspergillus flavus; 4 mg/liter for Aspergillus niger; 0.25 mg/liter for Aspergillus nidulans; and 0.03 mg/liter for Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, and Candida tropicalis. Unfortunately, ECOFFs could not be determined for Candida glabrata or Candida krusei due to an unexplained interlaboratory MIC variation. For the blinded collection of A. fumigatus isolates, all MICs were ≤2 mg/liter for wild-type isolates. Differential isavuconazole MICs were observed for triazole-resistant A. fumigatus isolates with different cyp51A alterations: TR34/L98H mutants had elevated isavuconazole MICs, whereas isolates with G54 and M220 alterations had MICs in the wild-type range, suggesting that the efficacy of isavuconazole may not be affected by these alterations. This study will be an aid in interpreting isavuconazole MICs for clinical care and an important step in the future process of setting official clinical breakpoints. PMID:23959309

  16. Bulk magnetic susceptibility induced broadening in the 19F NMR of suspended leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Adebodun, F; Post, J F

    1993-01-01

    The relevance of bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) induced broadening to in vivo NMR studies of intact cells has been examined and the significance of the contribution of BMS difference to the resolution of intra- and extracellular resonances was demonstrated. BMS difference between intra- and extracellular compartments was found to limit the resolution of intra- and extracellular 19F resonances of fluoro compounds in leukemic cells. PMID:8499242

  17. In situ measurement of alternating current magnetic susceptibility of Pd-hydrogen system for determination of hydrogen concentration in bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamaru, Satoshi; Hara, Masanori; Matsuyama, Masao

    2012-07-01

    An alternating current magnetic susceptometer for use as a hydrogen gauge for hydrogen-storage materials was designed and developed. The experimental system can simultaneously measure the hydrogen equilibrium pressure and the magnetic susceptibility of metal hydrides. The background voltage of the susceptometer was stabilized for a long period of time, without any adjustments, by attaching an efficient compensation circuit. The performance of the susceptometer at a static hydrogen concentration was demonstrated by measuring the magnetic susceptibility of a Pd-hydrogen system under equilibrium conditions. The in situ measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of Pd during hydrogen absorption was carried out using the susceptometer. Since the in situ magnetic susceptibility obtained at a lower initial hydrogen pressure agreed with the magnetic susceptibility measured at a static hydrogen concentration, the susceptometer could be used to determine the hydrogen concentration in Pd in situ. At a higher initial hydrogen pressure, enhancement of the magnetic susceptibility was observed at the beginning of hydrogen absorption because the magnetic moments induced by the large temporary strain generated in the Pd affected the magnetic susceptibility.

  18. In situ measurement of alternating current magnetic susceptibility of Pd-hydrogen system for determination of hydrogen concentration in bulk.

    PubMed

    Akamaru, Satoshi; Hara, Masanori; Matsuyama, Masao

    2012-07-01

    An alternating current magnetic susceptometer for use as a hydrogen gauge for hydrogen-storage materials was designed and developed. The experimental system can simultaneously measure the hydrogen equilibrium pressure and the magnetic susceptibility of metal hydrides. The background voltage of the susceptometer was stabilized for a long period of time, without any adjustments, by attaching an efficient compensation circuit. The performance of the susceptometer at a static hydrogen concentration was demonstrated by measuring the magnetic susceptibility of a Pd-hydrogen system under equilibrium conditions. The in situ measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of Pd during hydrogen absorption was carried out using the susceptometer. Since the in situ magnetic susceptibility obtained at a lower initial hydrogen pressure agreed with the magnetic susceptibility measured at a static hydrogen concentration, the susceptometer could be used to determine the hydrogen concentration in Pd in situ. At a higher initial hydrogen pressure, enhancement of the magnetic susceptibility was observed at the beginning of hydrogen absorption because the magnetic moments induced by the large temporary strain generated in the Pd affected the magnetic susceptibility. PMID:22852719

  19. Cell-type-specific enrichment of risk-associated regulatory elements at ovarian cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Simon G.; Shen, Howard C.; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Lawrenson, Kate; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Tyrer, Jonathan; Rhie, Suhn K.; Levanon, Keren; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny; Ramus, Susan J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Antoniou, Antonis; Freedman, Matthew; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Noushmehr, Houtan; Gayther, Simon A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory landscape of the human genome is a central question in complex trait genetics. Most single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with cancer risk lie in non-protein-coding regions, implicating regulatory DNA elements as functional targets of susceptibility variants. Here, we describe genome-wide annotation of regions of open chromatin and histone modification in fallopian tube and ovarian surface epithelial cells (FTSECs, OSECs), the debated cellular origins of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOCs) and in endometriosis epithelial cells (EECs), the likely precursor of clear cell ovarian carcinomas (CCOCs). The regulatory architecture of these cell types was compared with normal human mammary epithelial cells and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We observed similar positional patterns of global enhancer signatures across the three different ovarian cancer precursor cell types, and evidence of tissue-specific regulatory signatures compared to non-gynecological cell types. We found significant enrichment for risk-associated SNPs intersecting regulatory biofeatures at 17 known HGSOC susceptibility loci in FTSECs (P = 3.8 × 10−30), OSECs (P = 2.4 × 10−23) and HMECs (P = 6.7 × 10−15) but not for EECs (P = 0.45) or LNCaP cells (P = 0.88). Hierarchical clustering of risk SNPs conditioned on the six different cell types indicates FTSECs and OSECs are highly related (96% of samples using multi-scale bootstrapping) suggesting both cell types may be precursors of HGSOC. These data represent the first description of regulatory catalogues of normal precursor cells for different ovarian cancer subtypes, and provide unique insights into the tissue specific regulatory variation with respect to the likely functional targets of germline genetic susceptibility variants for ovarian cancer. PMID:25804953

  20. Determination of the slow crack growth susceptibility coefficient of dental ceramics using different methods.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Miranda, Walter Gomes; Yoshimura, Humberto Naoyuki

    2011-11-01

    This study compared three methods for the determination of the slow crack growth susceptibility coefficient (n) of two veneering ceramics (VM7 and d.Sign), two glass-ceramics (Empress and Empress 2) and a glass-infiltrated alumina composite (In-Ceram Alumina). Discs (n = 10) were prepared according to manufacturers' recommendations and polished. The constant stress-rate test was performed at five constant stress rates to calculate n(d) . For the indentation fracture test to determine n(IF) , Vickers indentations were performed and the crack lengths were measured under an optical microscope. For the constant stress test (performed only for d.Sign for the determination of n(s) ) four constant stresses were applied and held constant until the specimens' fracture and the time to failure was recorded. All tests were performed in artificial saliva at 37°C. The n(d) values were 17.2 for Empress 2, followed by d.Sign (20.5), VM7 (26.5), Empress (30.2), and In-Ceram Alumina (31.1). In-Ceram Alumina and Empress 2 showed the highest n(IF) values, 66.0 and 40.2, respectively. The n(IF) values determined for Empress (25.2), d.Sign (25.6), and VM7 (20.1) were similar. The n(s) value determined for d.Sign was 31.4. It can be concluded that the n values determined for the dental ceramics evaluated were significantly influenced by the test method used. PMID:21714087

  1. Low SAMHD1 expression following T-cell activation and proliferation renders CD4+ T cells susceptible to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Ruffin, Nicolas; Brezar, Vedran; Ayinde, Diana; Lefebvre, Cécile; Wiesch, Julian Schulze Zur; van Lunzen, Jan; Bockhorn, Maximilian; Schwartz, Olivier; Hocini, Hakim; Lelievre, Jean-Daniel; Banchereau, Jacques; Levy, Yves; Seddiki, Nabila

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: HIV-1 replication depends on the state of cell activation and division. It is established that SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 infection of resting CD4+ T cells. The modulation of SAMHD1 expression during T-cell activation and proliferation, however, remains unclear, as well as a role for SAMHD1 during HIV-1 pathogenesis. Methods: SAMHD1 expression was assessed in CD4+ T cells after their activation and in-vitro HIV-1 infection. We performed phenotype analyzes using flow cytometry on CD4+ T cells from peripheral blood and lymph nodes from cohorts of HIV-1-infected individuals under antiretroviral treatment or not, and controls. Results: We show that SAMHD1 expression decreased during CD4+ T-cell proliferation in association with an increased susceptibility to in-vitro HIV-1 infection. Additionally, circulating memory CD4+ T cells are enriched in cells with low levels of SAMHD1. These SAMHD1low cells are highly differentiated, exhibit a large proportion of Ki67+ cycling cells and are enriched in T-helper 17 cells. Importantly, memory SAMHD1low cells were depleted from peripheral blood of HIV-infected individuals. We also found that follicular helper T cells present in secondary lymphoid organs lacked the expression of SAMHD1, which was accompanied by a higher susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in vitro. Conclusion: We demonstrate that SAMHD1 expression is decreased during CD4+ T-cell activation and proliferation. Also, CD4+ T-cell subsets known to be more susceptible to HIV-1 infection, for example, T-helper 17 and follicular helper T cells, display lower levels of SAMHD1. These results pin point a role for SAMHD1 expression in HIV-1 infection and the concomitant depletion of CD4+ T cells. PMID:25715102

  2. Modeling Bone Marrow Progenitor Cell Differentiation and Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alexaki, Aikaterini; Quiterio, Shane J; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Shah, Sonia; Liu, Yujie; Banerjee, Anupam; Li, Luna; Passic, Shendra; Pirrone, Vanessa; Kilareski, Evelyn; Petrovas, Constantinos; Wigdahl, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of the monocytic lineage is involved in the pathologic events associated with AIDS and HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). Hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) within the bone marrow are refractile to HIV-1 infection, while their progeny of the monocyte-macrophage lineage are susceptible. Previous studies, using phorbol-myristate-acetate (PMA) as a differentiating agent, have suggested that the CD34+/CD38+ TF-1 cell line may be used as one model to study the differentiation processes of HPCs. In the present study, medium that has been conditioned by PMA-treated TF-1 cells but is devoid of any traces of PMA, was utilized to induce differentiation of TF-1 cells. The conditioned medium (CM) from this bone marrow-derived cell population is enriched with respect to numerous cytokines and induces differentiation and activation of TF-1 cells, as indicated by changes in the expression of CD34, CD38, and CD69 cell surface molecules. Furthermore, treatment with CM was also shown to induce the expression of CCR5 and CXCR4, while maintaining the expression of CD4, which was ultimately correlated with increased susceptibility to HIV-1. Additionally, the activation of the TF-1 cells was shown to lead to increased LTR activity, with specificity protein (Sp) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) NF-κB factors playing a crucial role in HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR)-mediated transcription and possibly overall TF-1 permissivity. Interleukin (IL)-1β, which is elevated in the CM, recapitulates some of the CM effects. In summary, these studies suggest that the TF-1 cell line could serve as a model to study the susceptibility of bone marrow progenitor cells to HIV-1 infection. PMID:26229980

  3. Diabetes increases susceptibility of primary cultures of rat proximal tubular cells to chemically induced injury

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Qing; Terlecky, Stanley R.; Lash, Lawrence H.

    2009-11-15

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. In the present study, we prepared primary cultures of proximal tubular (PT) cells from diabetic rats 30 days after an ip injection of streptozotocin and compared their susceptibility to oxidants (tert-butyl hydroperoxide, methyl vinyl ketone) and a mitochondrial toxicant (antimycin A) with that of PT cells isolated from age-matched control rats, to test the hypothesis that PT cells from diabetic rats exhibit more cellular and mitochondrial injury than those from control rats when exposed to these toxicants. PT cells from diabetic rats exhibited higher basal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and higher mitochondrial membrane potential, demonstrating that the PT cells maintain the diabetic phenotype in primary culture. Incubation with either the oxidants or mitochondrial toxicant resulted in greater necrotic and apoptotic cell death, greater evidence of morphological damage, greater increases in ROS, and greater decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential in PT cells from diabetic rats than in those from control rats. Pretreatment with either the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine or a catalase mimetic provided equivalent protection of PT cells from both diabetic and control rats. Despite the greater susceptibility to oxidative and mitochondrial injury, both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial glutathione concentrations were markedly higher in PT cells from diabetic rats, suggesting an upregulation of antioxidant processes in diabetic kidney. These results support the hypothesis that primary cultures of PT cells from diabetic rats are a valid model in which to study renal cellular function in the diabetic state.

  4. A genomics approach to identify susceptibilities of breast cancer cells to “fever-range” hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Preclinical and clinical studies have shown for decades that tumor cells demonstrate significantly enhanced sensitivity to “fever range” hyperthermia (increasing the intratumoral temperature to 42-45°C) than normal cells, although it is unknown why cancer cells exhibit this distinctive susceptibility. Methods To address this issue, mammary epithelial cells and three malignant breast cancer lines were subjected to hyperthermic shock and microarray, bioinformatics, and network analysis of the global transcription changes was subsequently performed. Results Bioinformatics analysis differentiated the gene expression patterns that distinguish the heat shock response of normal cells from malignant breast cancer cells, revealing that the gene expression profiles of mammary epithelial cells are completely distinct from malignant breast cancer lines following this treatment. Using gene network analysis, we identified altered expression of transcripts involved in mitotic regulators, histones, and non-protein coding RNAs as the significant processes that differed between the hyperthermic response of mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. We confirmed our data via qPCR and flow cytometric analysis to demonstrate that hyperthermia specifically disrupts the expression of key mitotic regulators and G2/M phase progression in the breast cancer cells. Conclusion These data have identified molecular mechanisms by which breast cancer lines may exhibit enhanced susceptibility to hyperthermic shock. PMID:24511912

  5. Analysis of Spleen Cells in Susceptible and Resistant Mice with Experimental Lagochilascariosis

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Priscila Guirão; Prudente, Mariana Felix de Souza; Dias, Neusa Mariana Costa; Tambourgi, Denise Vilarinho; Lino-Junior, Ruy de Souza; Spadafora-Ferreira, Mônica; Carvalhaes, Mara Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Lagochilascariosis is an emerging parasitic disease caused by the helminth Lagochilascaris minor. The experimental mouse model has been used to study the immune response against L. minor infection. In the present work, immunohistochemistry analysis of spleen cells populations was evaluated in susceptible (C57BL/6) and resistant (BALB/c) mice experimentally infected with L. minor. The BALB/c mice exhibited increased spleen cell indexes as follows: F4/80+ at 100 days after infection (DPI), CD4+ at 100 and 250 DPI, CD8+ at 35 and 100 DPI, and CD19+ at 100, 150, and 250 DPI. In the spleens of the infected C57BL/6 mice, increased indexes of the following spleen cells were observed: F4/80+ cells at 250 DPI, CD4+ cells at 150 DPI, CD8+ cells at 35, 150, and 250 DPI, and CD19+ cells at 150 to 250 DPI. The index of spleen cells confirmed the differences between the control and infected groups at several time points following the infection. These data demonstrate an association between a preferential increase in the number of CD4+ and CD19+ spleen cells and resistance to experimental lagochilascariosis in BALB/c mice and between a preferential increase in the number of CD8+ spleen cells and susceptibility in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:27335846

  6. Susceptibility of the VERO line of African green monkey kidney cells to human enteroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Patricia M.; Phillpotts, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The relative susceptibility of VERO cells and primary rhesus monkey kidney cells to 47 prototype strains of human enteroviruses is described. Of these strains, types 4, 14, 16, 17, 18, 21, 31 and 34 and Coxsackie virus A 9 failed to cause CPE in the VERO cells whilst only one, echovirus type 34, failed to cause CPE in the monkey kidney cells. A comparison is given of the efficiency of the two cell cultures for enterovirus isolation from clinical material. Results show that VERO cells are as useful as primary monkey kidney for the isolation of Coxsackie B viruses but less satisfactory for isolating echoviruses. They are satisfactory for the isolation of single types of poliovirus and appear to be more satisfactory than primary monkey kidney cells for the isolation of mixtures of polioviruses. The identification of enteroviruses by neutralization tests in VERO cells is successful. PMID:4361500

  7. The influence of arboviral infection on the susceptibility of cultured cells to immune injury in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Catanzaro, P. J.; Brandt, W. E.; Russell, P. K.

    1975-01-01

    The susceptibility of LLC-MK2 monkey kidney cells to antivirus (antibodies versus viral antigens in the plasma membrane) and anticell (antibodies versus plasma membrane antigens) immune cytolysis in vitro was observed during the course of 100 continuous subcultures of these cells. In that period, LLC-MK2 cells infected with the Group B arboviruses, Japanese encephalitis virus and dengue 2 virus, became progressively refractory to the complement-dependent antivirus immune cytolysis as measured by 51-Cr release. In addition, the LLC-MK2 cells themselves exhibited a decreasing susceptibility to immune lysis with anticell anti-body. In contrast, during the same period, similar immune cytolysis experiments with the Group A arboviruses, Sindbis virus and Eastern equine encephalitis virus, remained constant. It was observed that arboviral infection of lytic refractory LLC-MK2 cells restored their susceptability to immune cytolysis with anticell antibodies. The kinetics of this restoration were unique for both Group A and B arboviruses and exhibited a constant relationship to the viral growth curve. It was concluded that the above findings could be explained on the basis of differential membrane antigenic density coupled with changes in the properties of the plasma membrane on which subculture and arboviral infection had antagonistic effects. PMID:808137

  8. Insect Gut Symbiont Susceptibility to Host Antimicrobial Peptides Caused by Alteration of the Bacterial Cell Envelope*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Son, Dae Woo; Kim, Chan-Hee; Cho, Jae Hyun; Marchetti, Roberta; Silipo, Alba; Sturiale, Luisa; Park, Ha Young; Huh, Ye Rang; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Fukatsu, Takema; Molinaro, Antonio; Lee, Bok Luel

    2015-01-01

    The molecular characterization of symbionts is pivotal for understanding the cross-talk between symbionts and hosts. In addition to valuable knowledge obtained from symbiont genomic studies, the biochemical characterization of symbionts is important to fully understand symbiotic interactions. The bean bug (Riptortus pedestris) has been recognized as a useful experimental insect gut symbiosis model system because of its cultivatable Burkholderia symbionts. This system is greatly advantageous because it allows the acquisition of a large quantity of homogeneous symbionts from the host midgut. Using these naïve gut symbionts, it is possible to directly compare in vivo symbiotic cells with in vitro cultured cells using biochemical approaches. With the goal of understanding molecular changes that occur in Burkholderia cells as they adapt to the Riptortus gut environment, we first elucidated that symbiotic Burkholderia cells are highly susceptible to purified Riptortus antimicrobial peptides. In search of the mechanisms of the increased immunosusceptibility of symbionts, we found striking differences in cell envelope structures between cultured and symbiotic Burkholderia cells. The bacterial lipopolysaccharide O antigen was absent from symbiotic cells examined by gel electrophoretic and mass spectrometric analyses, and their membranes were more sensitive to detergent lysis. These changes in the cell envelope were responsible for the increased susceptibility of the Burkholderia symbionts to host innate immunity. Our results suggest that the symbiotic interactions between the Riptortus host and Burkholderia gut symbionts induce bacterial cell envelope changes to achieve successful gut symbiosis. PMID:26116716

  9. Miniaturized Antimicrobial Susceptibility Test by Combining Concentration Gradient Generation and Rapid Cell Culturing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Samuel C.; Cestellos-Blanco, Stefano; Inoue, Keisuke; Zare, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Effective treatment of bacterial infection relies on timely diagnosis and proper prescription of antibiotic drugs. The antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) is one of the most crucial experimental procedures, providing the baseline information for choosing effective antibiotic agents and their dosages. Conventional methods, however, require long incubation times or significant instrumentation costs to obtain test results. We propose a lab-on-a-chip approach to perform AST in a simple, economic, and rapid manner. Our assay platform miniaturizes the standard broth microdilution method on a microfluidic device (20 × 20 mm) that generates an antibiotic concentration gradient and delivers antibiotic-containing culture media to eight 30-nL chambers for cell culture. When tested with 20 μL samples of a model bacterial strain (E. coli ATCC 25922) treated with ampicillin or streptomycin, our method allows for the determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations consistent with the microdilution test in three hours, which is almost a factor of ten more rapid than the standard method. PMID:27025635

  10. In vitro susceptibilities of suspected periodontopathic anaerobes as determined by membrane transfer assay.

    PubMed Central

    Caufield, P W; Allen, D N; Childers, N K

    1987-01-01

    Attempts to devise an antimicrobial approach to combating dentomicrobial infections such as periodontal diseases continue to be hampered by the lack of a relevant in vitro method for determining the susceptibility of suspected periodontopathogens to topically applied antimicrobial agents. Proposed here is a novel in vitro method called the membrane transfer technique, which acknowledges those aspects unique to localized pathogenic infections, particularly those associated with anaerobic bacteria. Bacterial lawns representing six suspected periodontopathic bacteria were prepared on membranes and then placed in contact with different concentrations of antimicrobial agents for 5 min. After incubation for 12 to 24 h, MBCs were determined with the aid of a tetrazolium chloride indicator. Four antimicrobial agents (chlorhexidine, iodine, stannous fluoride, and sodium fluoride) were used to test the applicability of the proposed in vitro method. MBCs were derived for each agent except sodium fluoride against all or most of the six bacterial strains tested. The proposed method may also be useful for examining the bactericidal action of topically applied antimicrobial agents against nonoral infections. Images PMID:3439806

  11. Turbulent transport and deposition of the Ito pyroclastic flow: Determinations using anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, E.M.; Fisher, R.V.; Fuller, M.; Valentine, G.

    1997-10-01

    The Ito pyroclastic flow erupted about 22,000 years ago from Aira caldera in southern Kyushu, Japan. Flow directions were determined by anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), which measured the preferential alignment of magnetite microphenocrysts, usually {le}0.25mm in diameter. The microphenocrysts are aligned with the long axis of the clasts during strain and fracture in the vent. The grains are then deposited parallel to the flow direction with an imbrication. There is no evidence of rolling of clasts or nonflow parallel lineations, and thus AMS can be used to determine flow directions that occurred immediately before deposition. Beyond 30 km from the center of the caldera, flow directions were predominantly down paleogradient, indicating expanded flow and that the depositional system was gravity driven and largely decoupled from the transport system. Within 30 km, measured flow directions are random, indicating that sedimentation occurred from a depositional system that was closely coupled to the turbulent transport system. Individual flow directions at all sites except one varied more than the analytical error, demonstrating that a variety of flow directions existed even within a small area of the flow. This implies that the depositional system was turbulent.{copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union

  12. Phenotypic characterization in mice of thymus target cells susceptible to productive infection by the radiation leukemia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Boniver, J.; Decleve, A.; Honsik, C.; Libermann, M.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1981-11-01

    The spread of virus repliction was studied by electron microscopy in the thymuses of inbred C57BL/Ka mice after intrathymic inoculation of the radiation leukemia virus (RadLV). The first type C-budding virus particles appeared in scarce blast cells of the subcapsular zone. Most of these blast cells were ''X-cells,'' i.e., the thymus lymphoid cells most actively engaged in DNA synthesis. Virus replication spread to the entire cortical blast cell population and, from day 7 on, to the small cortical lymphocytes. The first virus-producing cells were derived from a very few target cells (approx. =0.001-0.003% of thymocytes) susceptible to RadLV infection. For determination of the phenotypes of these target cells, various thymocyte subpopulations obtained through a battery of cell separation methods were tested for their ability to support the replication of RadLV/VL/sub 3/ virus in short-term culture. Most of these target cells were sensitive to the lytic effect of hydrocortisone and migrated in the fastest fraction of a 1Xg sedimentation gradient, together with the majority of (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporating blast cells. They exhibited an intermediate density and expressed H-2 and Thy 1.2 cell surface antigens, although they were not found preferentially among the high Thy 1.2 population to which most of the cortical blast cells belonged. The spread of RadLV within the thymus and the surface phenotype characteristics of target cells indicate that these cells correspond to a thymocyte subset at the earliest stage of thymic lymphopoiesis and may be transitional between the prothymocytes and the subcapsular blast cell population.

  13. B cell VLA-4-deficiency reduces leukocyte recruitment and susceptibility to central nervous system autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Sagan, Sharon A.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.; Zamvil, Scott S.

    2015-01-01

    Natalizumab, which binds very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), is a potent therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS). Studies have focused primarily upon its capacity to interfere with T cell-migration into the central nervous system (CNS). B cells are important in MS pathogenesis and express high levels of VLA-4. Here, we report that the selective inhibition of VLA-4-expression on B cells impedes CNS accumulation of B cells, recruitment of Th17 cells and macrophages, and reduces susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). These results underscore the importance of B cell VLA-4-expression in pathogenesis of CNS autoimmunity and provide insight regarding mechanisms that may contribute to the benefit of natalizumab in MS, as well as candidate therapeutics that selectively target B cells. PMID:25712734

  14. Barley disease susceptibility factor RACB acts in epidermal cell polarity and positioning of the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Scheler, Björn; Schnepf, Vera; Galgenmüller, Carolina; Ranf, Stefanie; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    RHO GTPases are regulators of cell polarity and immunity in eukaryotes. In plants, RHO-like RAC/ROP GTPases are regulators of cell shaping, hormone responses, and responses to microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) RAC/ROP protein RACB is required for full susceptibility to penetration by Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh), the barley powdery mildew fungus. Disease susceptibility factors often control host immune responses. Here we show that RACB does not interfere with early microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered immune responses such as the oxidative burst or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. RACB also supports rather than restricts expression of defence-related genes in barley. Instead, silencing of RACB expression by RNAi leads to defects in cell polarity. In particular, initiation and maintenance of root hair growth and development of stomatal subsidiary cells by asymmetric cell division is affected by silencing expression of RACB. Nucleus migration is a common factor of developmental cell polarity and cell-autonomous interaction with Bgh. RACB is required for positioning of the nucleus near the site of attack from Bgh. We therefore suggest that Bgh profits from RACB’s function in cell polarity rather than from immunity-regulating functions of RACB. PMID:27056842

  15. Barley disease susceptibility factor RACB acts in epidermal cell polarity and positioning of the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Björn; Schnepf, Vera; Galgenmüller, Carolina; Ranf, Stefanie; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2016-05-01

    RHO GTPases are regulators of cell polarity and immunity in eukaryotes. In plants, RHO-like RAC/ROP GTPases are regulators of cell shaping, hormone responses, and responses to microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) RAC/ROP protein RACB is required for full susceptibility to penetration by Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh), the barley powdery mildew fungus. Disease susceptibility factors often control host immune responses. Here we show that RACB does not interfere with early microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered immune responses such as the oxidative burst or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. RACB also supports rather than restricts expression of defence-related genes in barley. Instead, silencing of RACB expression by RNAi leads to defects in cell polarity. In particular, initiation and maintenance of root hair growth and development of stomatal subsidiary cells by asymmetric cell division is affected by silencing expression of RACB. Nucleus migration is a common factor of developmental cell polarity and cell-autonomous interaction with Bgh RACB is required for positioning of the nucleus near the site of attack from Bgh We therefore suggest that Bgh profits from RACB's function in cell polarity rather than from immunity-regulating functions of RACB. PMID:27056842

  16. Hypoxia-inducible miR-210 regulates the susceptibility of tumor cells to lysis by cytotoxic T cells.

    PubMed

    Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Buart, Stéphanie; Romero, Pedro; Ketari, Sami; Janji, Bassam; Mari, Bernard; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Chouaib, Salem

    2012-09-15

    Hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment plays a central role in the evolution of immune escape mechanisms by tumor cells. In this study, we report the definition of miR-210 as a miRNA regulated by hypoxia in lung cancer and melanoma, documenting its involvement in blunting the susceptibility of tumor cells to lysis by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). miR-210 was induced in hypoxic zones of human tumor tissues. Its attenuation in hypoxic cells significantly restored susceptibility to autologous CTL-mediated lysis, independent of tumor cell recognition and CTL reactivity. A comprehensive approach using transcriptome analysis, argonaute protein immunoprecipitation, and luciferase reporter assay revealed that the genes PTPN1, HOXA1, and TP53I11 were miR-210 target genes regulated in hypoxic cells. In support of their primary importance in mediating the immunosuppressive effects of miR-210, coordinate silencing of PTPN1, HOXA1, and TP53I11 dramatically decreased tumor cell susceptibility to CTL-mediated lysis. Our findings show how miR-210 induction links hypoxia to immune escape from CTL-mediated lysis, by providing a mechanistic understanding of how this miRNA mediates immunosuppression in oxygen-deprived regions of tumors where cancer stem-like cells and metastatic cellular behaviors are known to evolve. PMID:22962263

  17. Detecting bacteria and Determining Their Susceptibility to Antibiotics by Stochastic Confinement in Nanoliter Droplets using Plug-Based Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Boedicker, J.; Li, L; Kline, T; Ismagilov, R

    2008-01-01

    This article describes plug-based microfluidic technology that enables rapid detection and drug susceptibility screening of bacteria in samples, including complex biological matrices, without pre-incubation. Unlike conventional bacterial culture and detection methods, which rely on incubation of a sample to increase the concentration of bacteria to detectable levels, this method confines individual bacteria into droplets nanoliters in volume. When single cells are confined into plugs of small volume such that the loading is less than one bacterium per plug, the detection time is proportional to plug volume. Confinement increases cell density and allows released molecules to accumulate around the cell, eliminating the pre-incubation step and reducing the time required to detect the bacteria. We refer to this approach as stochastic confinement. Using the microfluidic hybrid method, this technology was used to determine the antibiogram - or chart of antibiotic sensitivity - of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to many antibiotics in a single experiment and to measure the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drug cefoxitin (CFX) against this strain. In addition, this technology was used to distinguish between sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus in samples of human blood plasma. High-throughput microfluidic techniques combined with single-cell measurements also enable multiple tests to be performed simultaneously on a single sample containing bacteria. This technology may provide a method of rapid and effective patient-specific treatment of bacterial infections and could be extended to a variety of applications that require multiple functional tests of bacterial samples on reduced timescales.

  18. Pre-B cell leukemia homeobox 1 is associated with lupus susceptibility in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Cuda, Carla M.; Li, Shiwu; Liang, Shujuan; Yin, Yiming; Potula, Hari Hara S.K.; Xu, Zhiwei; Sengupta, Mayami; Chen, Yifang; Butfiloski, Edward; Baker, Henry; Chang, Lung-Ji; Dozmorov, Igor; Sobel, Eric S.; Morel, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Sle1a.1 is part of the Sle1 susceptibility locus, which has the strongest association with lupus nephritis in the NZM2410 mouse model. Here we show that Sle1a.1 results in the production of activated and autoreactive CD4+ T cells. In addition, Sle1a.1 expression reduces the peripheral regulatory T cell (Treg) pool, as well as induces a defective response of CD4+ T cells to the retinoic acid (RA) expansion of TGFβ-induced Tregs. At the molecular level, Sle1a.1 corresponds to an increased expression of a novel splice isoform of Pbx1, Pbx1-d. Pbx1-d over-expression is sufficient to induce an activated/inflammatory phenotype in Jurkat T cells, and to decrease their apoptotic response to RA. PBX1-d is expressed more frequently in the CD4+ T cells from lupus patients than from healthy controls, and its presence correlates with an increased central memory T cell population. These findings indicate that Pbx1 is a novel lupus susceptibility gene that regulates T cell activation and tolerance. PMID:22180614

  19. Association of cancer stem cell markers genetic variants with gallbladder cancer susceptibility, prognosis, and survival.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anu; Gupta, Annapurna; Rastogi, Neeraj; Agrawal, Sushma; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Vijay; Mittal, Balraj

    2016-02-01

    Genes important to stem cell progression have been involved in the genetics and clinical outcome of cancers. We investigated germ line variants in cancer stem cell (CSC) genes to predict susceptibility and efficacy of chemoradiotherapy treatment in gallbladder cancer (GBC) patients. In this study, we assessed the effect of SNPs in CSC genes (surface markers CD44, ALCAM, EpCAM, CD133) and (molecular markers NANOG, SOX-2, LIN-28A, ALDH1A1, OCT-4) with GBC susceptibility and prognosis. Total 610 GBC patients and 250 controls were genotyped by using PCR-RFLP, ARMS-PCR, and TaqMan allelic discrimination assays. Chemotoxicity graded 2-4 in 200 patients and tumor response was recorded in 140 patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). Differences in genotype and haplotype frequency distributions were calculated by binary logistic regression. Gene-gene interaction model was analyzed by generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR). Overall survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier survival curve and multivariate Cox-proportional methods. ALCAM Ars1157Crs10511244 (P = 0.0035) haplotype was significantly associated with GBC susceptibility. In GMDR analysis, ALCAM rs1157G>A, EpCAM rs1126497T>C emerged as best significant interaction model with GBC susceptibility and ALDH1A1 rs13959T>G with increased risk of grade 3-4 hematological toxicity. SOX-2 rs11915160A>C, OCT-4 rs3130932T>G, and NANOG rs11055786T>C were found best gene-gene interaction model for predicting response to NACT. In both Cox-proportional and recursive partitioning ALCAM rs1157GA+AA genotype showed higher mortality and hazard ratio. ALCAM gene polymorphisms associated with GBC susceptibility and survival while OCT-4, SOX-2, and NANOG variants showed an interactive role with treatment response. PMID:26318430

  20. FT-IR spectrometry utilization for determining changes in erythrocyte susceptibility to oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petibois, Cyril; Deleris, Gdrard Y. R.

    2004-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that FT-IR spectrometry was useful for determining oxidative stress damage on erythrocytes. Endurance-trained subjects performed a standardized endurance-training session at 75% of maximal oxygen consumption each week over 19 consecutive weeks. Capillary blood samples were taken before and after test-sessions and plasma and erythrocytes were separately analyzed using Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry. Exercise-induced change in plasma concentrations and erythrocyte IR absorptivities (vC-Hn of fatty acyl moieties, vC=O and δN-H of proteins, vP=O of phospholipids, vCOO- of amino-acids, and vC-O of lactate) were monitored and compared to training level. First training weeks induced normalization of plasma concentration changes during exercise (unchanged for glucose, moderately increased for lactate, high increases for triglycerides, glycerol, and fatty acids) while erythrocyte phospholipids alteration remained elevated (P < 0.05). Further, training reduced the exercise-induced erythrocyte lactate content increase (vC-O; P < 0.05) and phospholipids alteration (vC-Hn and vP=O; P < 0.05) during exercise. These changes paralleled the lowering of exercise-induced hemoconcentration (P < 0.05) and plasma lactate concentration increase during exercise (P < 0.05). These correlated changes between plasma and erythrocyte parameters suggest that hemoconcentration and lactate acidosis (plasmatic and intracellular) are important factors contributing to reduce erythrocyte susceptibility to oxidative stress during chronic endurance training.

  1. Susceptibilities of genital mycoplasmas to the newer quinolones as determined by the agar dilution method.

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, G E; Hooton, T M; Roberts, M C; Cartwright, F D; Hoyt, J

    1989-01-01

    The increasing resistance of genital mycoplasmas to tetracycline poses a problem because tetracycline is one of the few antimicrobial agents active against Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, chlamydiae, gonococci, and other agents of genitourinary-tract disease. Since the quinolones are a promising group of antimicrobial agents, the susceptibilities of M. hominis and U. urealyticum to the newer 6-fluoroquinolones were determined by the agar dilution method. Ciprofloxacin, difloxacin, and ofloxacin had good activity against M. hominis, with the MIC for 50% of isolates tested (MIC50) being 1 microgram/ml. Fleroxacin, lomefloxacin, pefloxacin, and rosoxacin had MIC50s of 2 micrograms/ml. Enoxacin, norfloxacin, and amifloxacin had MIC50s of 8 to 16 micrograms/ml, and cinoxacin and nalidixic acid were inactive (MIC50, greater than or equal to 256 micrograms/ml). Overall, the activities of 6-fluoroquinolones for ureaplasmas were similar to those for M. hominis, with MICs being the same or twofold greater. The most active 6-fluoroquinolones against ureaplasmas were difloxacin, ofloxacin, and pefloxacin, with MIC50s of 1 to 2 micrograms/ml. Ciprofloxacin was unusual in that the MIC50 for M. hominis was 1 microgram/ml, whereas the MIC50 for ureaplasmas was 8 micrograms/ml. Since the MIC50s for the most active quinolones approximate achievable concentrations in blood and urine, quinolones have promise in treating mycoplasmal infections. PMID:2712541

  2. Susceptibility of mammary tumor cells to complement-mediated cytolysis after in vitro or in vivo fatty acid manipulation.

    PubMed

    Erickson, K L; Thomas, I K

    1985-08-01

    The susceptibility of line 168 murine mammary tumor cells to complement (C)-mediated lysis was tested after in vitro treatment with several saturated or unsaturated fatty acids dissolved in different solvents or presented in the form of micelles to the cells. The lytic susceptibility of these cultured cells was compared with similar tumor cells obtained either from mice maintained on diets containing different concentrations and saturations of fatty acids or from cultures supplemented with serum from tumor-free control mice fed pair-matched diets. Although changes in dietary fat concentration and saturation resulted in alterations of the tumor cell fatty acid composition, those alterations did not influence the susceptibility of tumor cells to C-mediated lysis. However, single, or combinations of, unsaturated fatty acids dissolved in ethanol, unlike saturated fatty acids, reduced the lytic susceptibility of tumor cells in vitro. Hexane added to culture medium significantly suppressed the lytic susceptibility; however, when used as a carrier no significant differences were observed among treatments with the individual fatty acids at several concentrations. This result may be due to the effect of hexane on the cell membrane because this treatment also affected the osmotic fragility of the cells. Fatty acids as micelles did not influence the susceptibility of tumor cells to lysis. We concluded that only in vitro manipulation of fatty acids in some vehicles influenced the susceptibility of target tumor cells to C-mediated lysis; this finding did not parallel the situation that occurred in vivo. Moreover, the use of different vehicles to present fatty acids to tumor cells may further alter the susceptibility to C-mediated lysis. PMID:3860685

  3. Virulence of Sporothrix schenckii conidia and yeast cells, and their susceptibility to nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, K S S; Coelho, A L J; Bezerra, L M Lopes; Barja-Fidalgo, C

    2000-01-01

    The involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in macrophage (Mφ) fungicidal activity against Sporothrix schenckii, and the relationship between NO susceptibility and the differential virulence of conidia and yeast cells, were investigated. Confirming a previously reported correlation between the length of time in culture and virulence of S. schenckii, conidia isolated from 12-day mycelial cultures (Ss-12) were less virulent to mice than conidia from 7-day cultures (Ss-7) or yeast cells. Indicative of NO production, infected animals showed a significant increase in serum levels of nitrite that was lower in mice infected with Ss-12 than in mice infected with Ss-7 or yeast. Stimulation of murine Mφ with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) induced NO production and inhibition of fungal growth. The cytotoxic activity of Mφ against Ss-12 was significantly greater than against Ss-7 or yeast cells, the highly virulent fungal forms. The addition of NO synthase inhibitors abrogated Mφ cytotoxic activity against all fungal forms. The phagocytic activity of Mφ against Ss-7 was significantly lower than against Ss-12 or yeast cells. Although the ingestion of fungal cells triggered the oxidative burst in Mφ, the fungicidal activity was not altered in the presence of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. In addition, Ss-12 and yeast cells were more susceptible than Ss-7 to the direct fungicidal activity of the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine (SNAP), S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1). The results of this study indicate that NO is a key cytotoxic mediator involved in the murine Mφ defence against S. schenckii, and that the virulence of Ss-7, Ss-12 and yeast cells may be related to a differential susceptibility to NO. PMID:11122461

  4. Susceptibility of chicken lymphoid cells to infectious bursal disease virus does not correlate with the presence of specific binding sites.

    PubMed

    Nieper, H; Müller, H

    1996-06-01

    Pathogenic serotype 1 strains of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) replicate efficiently in lymphoid cells of the bursa of Fabricius of chicken. Lymphoid cells in other organs are not susceptible. Apathogenic serotype 2 strains do not replicate in lymphoid bursa cells or in other lymphoid cells. Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF), however, efficiently replicate strains of either serotype. Binding studies showed that strains of both IBDV serotypes bind to lymphoid cells isolated from the bursa, thymus or spleen, indicating that restriction of IBDV replication to lymphoid B cells is not determined by the presence of specific receptor sites. The specificity of binding was demonstrated by saturation and competition experiments. These revealed the presence of different receptors: CEF had receptors common to both serotypes and specific ones for each serotype. Receptor sites common to both serotypes were also present on lymphoid cells; however, additional serotype-specific sites were only demonstrated for the apathogenic serotype 2 strain. Strains of both serotypes specifically bound to proteins with molecular masses of 40 kDa and 46 kDa, exposed on the surface of CEF and lymphoid cells. Competition experiments indicated that these proteins might represent the common receptor sites of IBDV. PMID:8683211

  5. Transforming growth factor-beta mediates intestinal healing and susceptibility to injury in vitro and in vivo through epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Beck, Paul L; Rosenberg, Ian M; Xavier, Ramnik J; Koh, Theodore; Wong, Josée F; Podolsky, Daniel K

    2003-02-01

    In vitro studies suggest that transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has potent effects on gastrointestinal mucosal integrity, wound repair, and neoplasia. However, the multiplicity of actions of this peptide on many different cell types confounds efforts to define the role of TGF-beta within the intestinal epithelium in vivo. To delineate these effects selective blockade of intestinal epithelial TGF-beta activity was undertaken through targeted expression of a dominant-negative (DN) TGF-beta RII to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Stable intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-6 lines overexpressing TGF-beta RII-DN (nucleotides -7 to 573) were established. Transgenic mice overexpressing TGF-beta RII-DN under the regulation of a modified liver fatty acid-binding promoter (LFABP-PTS4) were constructed. In vitro healing was assessed by wounding of confluent monolayers. Colitis was induced by the addition of dextran sodium sulfate (2.5 to 7.5% w/v) to their drinking water. Overexpression of TGF-beta RII-DN in intestinal epithelial cell-6 cells resulted in a marked reduction in cell migration and TGF-beta-stimulated wound healing in vitro. TGF-beta RII-DN transgenic mice did not exhibit baseline intestinal inflammation or changes in survival, body weight, epithelial cell proliferation, aberrant crypt foci, or tumor formation. TGF-beta RII-DN mice were markedly more susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and exhibited impaired recovery after colonic injury. TGF-beta is required for intestinal mucosal healing and TGF-beta modulation of the intestinal epithelium plays a central role in determining susceptibility to injury. PMID:12547717

  6. The Type I Interferon Response Determines Differences in Choroid Plexus Susceptibility between Newborns and Adults in Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Douglas R.; Folmsbee, Stephen S.; Muller, William J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Newborns are significantly more susceptible to severe viral encephalitis than adults, with differences in the host response to infection implicated as a major factor. However, the specific host signaling pathways responsible for differences in susceptibility and neurologic morbidity have remained unknown. In a murine model of HSV encephalitis, we demonstrated that the choroid plexus (CP) is susceptible to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) early in infection of the newborn but not the adult brain. We confirmed susceptibility of the CP to HSV infection in a human case of newborn HSV encephalitis. We investigated components of the type I interferon (IFN) response in the murine brain that might account for differences in cell susceptibility and found that newborns have a dampened interferon response and significantly lower basal levels of the alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) receptor (IFNAR) than do adults. To test the contribution of IFNAR to restricting infection from the CP, we infected IFNAR knockout (KO) adult mice, which showed restored CP susceptibility to HSV-1 infection in the adult. Furthermore, reduced IFNAR levels did not account for differences we found in the basal levels of several other innate signaling proteins in the wild-type newborn and the adult, including protein kinase R (PKR), that suggested specific regulation of innate immunity in the developing brain. Viral targeting of the CP, a region of the brain that plays a critical role in neurodevelopment, provides a link between newborn susceptibility to HSV and long-term neurologic morbidity among survivors of newborn HSV encephalitis. PMID:27073094

  7. Specific dysregulation of IFNγ production by natural killer cells confers susceptibility to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Fodil, Nassima; Langlais, David; Moussa, Peter; Boivin, Gregory Allan; Di Pietrantonio, Tania; Radovanovic, Irena; Dumaine, Anne; Blanchette, Mathieu; Schurr, Erwin; Gros, Philippe; Vidal, Silvia Marina

    2014-12-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells contribute to the control of viral infection by directly killing target cells and mediating cytokine release. In C57BL/6 mice, the Ly49H activating NK cell receptor plays a key role in early resistance to mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection through specific recognition of the MCMV-encoded MHC class I-like molecule m157 expressed on infected cells. Here we show that transgenic expression of Ly49H failed to provide protection against MCMV infection in the naturally susceptible A/J mouse strain. Characterization of Ly49H(+) NK cells from Ly49h-A transgenic animals showed that they were able to mount a robust cytotoxic response and proliferate to high numbers during the course of infection. However, compared to NK cells from C57BL/6 mice, we observed an intrinsic defect in their ability to produce IFNγ when challenged by either m157-expressing target cells, exogenous cytokines or chemical stimulants. This effect was limited to NK cells as T cells from C57BL/6 and Ly49h-A mice produced comparable cytokine levels. Using a panel of recombinant congenic strains derived from A/J and C57BL/6 progenitors, we mapped the genetic basis of defective IFNγ production to a single 6.6 Mb genetic interval overlapping the Ifng gene on chromosome 10. Inspection of the genetic interval failed to reveal molecular differences between A/J and several mouse strains showing normal IFNγ production. The chromosome 10 locus is independent of MAPK signalling or decreased mRNA stability and linked to MCMV susceptibility. This study highlights the existence of a previously uncovered NK cell-specific cis-regulatory mechanism of Ifnγ transcript expression potentially relevant to NK cell function in health and disease. PMID:25473962

  8. Adenovirus E1A gene induction of susceptibility to lysis by natural killer cells and activated macrophages in infected rodent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J L; May, D L; Lewis, A M; Walker, T A

    1987-01-01

    Rodent cells immortalized by the E1A gene of nononcogenic adenoviruses are susceptible to lysis by natural killer (NK) cells and activated macrophages. This cytolysis-susceptible phenotype may contribute to the rejection of adenovirus-transformed cells by immunocompetent animals. Such increased cytolytic susceptibility has also been observed with infected rodent cells. This infection model provided a means to study the role of E1A gene products in induction of cytolytic susceptibility without cell selection during transformation. Deletion mutations outside of the E1A gene had no effect on adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) or Ad5 induction of cytolytic susceptibility in infected hamster cells, while E1A-minus mutant viruses could not induce this phenotype. E1A mutant viruses that induced expression of either E1A 12S or 13S mRNA in infected cells were competent to induce cytolytic susceptibility. Furthermore, there was a correlation between the accumulation of E1A gene products in Ad5-infected cells and the level of susceptibility of such target cells to lysis by NK cells. The results of coinfection studies indicated that the E1A gene products of highly oncogenic Ad12 could not complement the lack of induction of cytolytic susceptibility by E1A-minus Ad5 virus in infected cells and also could not block induction of this infected-cell phenotype by Ad5. These data suggest that expression of the E1A gene of nononcogenic adenoviruses may cause the elimination of infected cells by the immunologically nonspecific host inflammatory cell response prior to cellular transformation. The lack of induction of this cytolysis-susceptible phenotype by Ad12 E1A may result in an increased persistence of Ad12-infected cells in vivo and may lead to an increased Ad12-transformed cell burden for the host. Images PMID:2959793

  9. A novel function of the human oncogene Stil: Regulation of PC12 cell toxic susceptibility through the Shh pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Carr, Aprell L; Sun, Lei; Drewing, Audrey; Lee, Jessica; Rao, Zihe

    2015-01-01

    The human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) is highly conserved in vertebrate species. Here, we report new findings of Stil in the regulation of toxic susceptibility in mammalian dopaminergic (DA)-like PC12 cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Stil expression did not affect the survival of proliferating PC12 cells but caused a significant amount of cell death in differentiated neurons after toxic drug treatment. In contrast, overexpression of Stil increased toxic susceptibility only in proliferating cells but produced no effect in mature neurons. Exogenetic inactivation or activation of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling transduction mimicked the effect of Stil knockdown or overexpression in regulation of PC12 cell toxic susceptibility, suggesting that Stil exerts its role through the Shh pathway. Together, the data provide evidence for novel functions of the human oncogene Stil in neural toxic susceptibility. PMID:26549353

  10. A novel function of the human oncogene Stil: Regulation of PC12 cell toxic susceptibility through the Shh pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Carr, Aprell L.; Sun, Lei; Drewing, Audrey; Lee, Jessica; Rao, Zihe

    2015-01-01

    The human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) is highly conserved in vertebrate species. Here, we report new findings of Stil in the regulation of toxic susceptibility in mammalian dopaminergic (DA)-like PC12 cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Stil expression did not affect the survival of proliferating PC12 cells but caused a significant amount of cell death in differentiated neurons after toxic drug treatment. In contrast, overexpression of Stil increased toxic susceptibility only in proliferating cells but produced no effect in mature neurons. Exogenetic inactivation or activation of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling transduction mimicked the effect of Stil knockdown or overexpression in regulation of PC12 cell toxic susceptibility, suggesting that Stil exerts its role through the Shh pathway. Together, the data provide evidence for novel functions of the human oncogene Stil in neural toxic susceptibility. PMID:26549353

  11. Free amino acids - determinant of sugarcane resistance/susceptibility to stalk borer and sap feeders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two relatively new key species in Louisiana that conform to the plant stress hypothesis are the Mexican rice borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar) and the sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner). High performance liquid chromatography differentiated insect resistant and susceptible sugarcane cultiva...

  12. Susceptibility of fish to Chattonella marina is determined by its tolerance to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Min; Xu, Jingliang; Chan, Alice K Y; Au, Doris W T

    2011-01-01

    The harmful alga Chattonella marina has caused massive fish kills and economic losses worldwide. However, the fish kill mechanisms by C. marina have not been identified. The present study has confirmed that a significant elevation of blood osmolality is the universal response in moribund fish exposed to C. marina and the possible reasons leading to contradictory reports were identified. Both osmotic distress and respiratory impairment are important mechanisms leading to fish kill by C. marina. The susceptibility of marine fish to C. marina appears to be inversely related to their tolerance to hypoxia, with the hypoxia intolerant goldlined seabream being the most susceptible, and the hypoxia tolerant green grouper being the most tolerant to C. marina. Further studies in the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) showed that fish susceptibility to C. marina is directly related to susceptibility of the fish to hypoxia, but not related to its tolerance to hypersalinity stress. PMID:21704342

  13. Human RHOH deficiency causes T cell defects and susceptibility to EV-HPV infections

    PubMed Central

    Crequer, Amandine; Troeger, Anja; Patin, Etienne; Ma, Cindy S.; Picard, Capucine; Pedergnana, Vincent; Fieschi, Claire; Lim, Annick; Abhyankar, Avinash; Gineau, Laure; Mueller-Fleckenstein, Ingrid; Schmidt, Monika; Taieb, Alain; Krueger, James; Abel, Laurent; Tangye, Stuart G.; Orth, Gérard; Williams, David A.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle

    2012-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by increased susceptibility to specific human papillomaviruses, the betapapillomaviruses. These EV-HPVs cause warts and increase the risk of skin carcinomas in otherwise healthy individuals. Inactivating mutations in epidermodysplasia verruciformis 1 (EVER1) or EVER2 have been identified in most, but not all, patients with autosomal recessive EV. We found that 2 young adult siblings presenting with T cell deficiency and various infectious diseases, including persistent EV-HPV infections, were homozygous for a mutation creating a stop codon in the ras homolog gene family member H (RHOH) gene. RHOH encodes an atypical Rho GTPase expressed predominantly in hematopoietic cells. Patients’ circulating T cells contained predominantly effector memory T cells, which displayed impaired TCR signaling. Additionally, very few circulating T cells expressed the β7 integrin subunit, which homes T cells to specific tissues. Similarly, Rhoh-null mice exhibited a severe overall T cell defect and abnormally small numbers of circulating β7-positive cells. Expression of the WT, but not of the mutated RHOH, allele in Rhoh–/– hematopoietic stem cells corrected the T cell lymphopenia in mice after bone marrow transplantation. We conclude that RHOH deficiency leads to T cell defects and persistent EV-HPV infections, suggesting that T cells play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic EV-HPV infections. PMID:22850876

  14. Mechanisms of genetic resistance to Friend virus leukemia. III. Susceptibility of mitogen-responsive lymphocytes mediated by T cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Caruso, T; Bennett, M

    1976-04-01

    Friend leukemia virus (FV) suppressed the proliferative responses of spleen, lymph node, marrow, and thymus cell populations to various T- and B-cell mitogens. Cells taken from mice, e.g. BALB/c genetically susceptible to leukemogenesis in vivo were much more susceptible to suppression of mitogenesis in vitro than similar cells from genetically resistant mice, e.g., C57BL/6. Nylon wool-purified splenic T cells from BALB/c and C3H mice lost susceptibility to FV-induced suppression of mitogenesis but became suppressible by addition of 10% unfiltered spleen cell. Thus, FV mediates in vitro suppression of lymphocyte proliferation indirectly by "activating" a suppressor cell. The suppressor cell adhered to nylon wool but not to glass wool or rayon wool columns. Pretreatment of spleen cells with carbonyl iron and a magnet did not abrogate the suppressor cell function. Suppressor cells were not eliminated by treatment with rabbit antimouse immunoglobulin (7S) and complement (C). However, high concentrations of anti-Thy-1 plus C destroyed suppressor cells of the spleen; thymic suppressor cells were much more susceptible to anti-Thy-1 serum. Nude athymic mice were devoid of suppressor cells and their B-cell proliferation was relatively resistant to FV-induced suppression in vitro. The suppressor cells in the thymus (but not in the spleen) were eliminated by treatment of mice with cortisol. Thus, FV appears to mediate its suppressive effect on mitogen-responsive lymphocytes by affecting "T-suppressor cells." Spleen cells from C57BL/6 mice treated with 89Sr to destroy marrow-dependent (M) cells were much more suppressible by FV in virto than normal C57BL/6 spleen cells. However, nylon-filtered spleen cells of 89Sr-treated C57BL/6 mice were resistant to FV-induced suppression in vitro, indicating that the susceptibility of spleen cells from 89Sr-treated B6 mice is also mediated by suppressor cells. Normal B6 splenic T cells were rendered susceptible to FV-induced suppression

  15. Phase Determination of Second-Order Surface Susceptibility Tensor of Liquid Crystal Monolayer Using Ultra-Thin Film Local Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sei, Masaki; Nagayama, Kohei; Kajikawa, Kotaro; Ishii, Hisao; Seki, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Katsumi; Matsumoto, Yoshiyasu; Ouchi, Yukio

    1998-04-01

    We demonstrated full determination of second-order nonlinear susceptibility of a 4‧-n-octyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) liquid crystal (LC) monolayer adsorbed on a second-harmonic (SH) active polyimide (PI) substrate. In order to separate the SH signal of the LC film from that of the PI film, we adopted an interferometry technique of second-harmonic generation (SHG) using an ultra-thin film local oscillator. We have found a variety of phases in the components of susceptibility: those of χzii and χizi are almost the same but the phase of χzzz differs by 80° from the other two. The phases of the components of the surface susceptibility tensor are not always identical. This fact indicates that the surface SH response is more complicated than what we expected.

  16. Testosterone Increases Susceptibility to Amebic Liver Abscess in Mice and Mediates Inhibition of IFNγ Secretion in Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lotter, Hannelore; Helk, Elena; Bernin, Hannah; Jacobs, Thomas; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; González-Roldán, Nestor; Holst, Otto; Tannich, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA), a parasitic disease due to infection with the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, occurs age and gender dependent with strong preferences for adult males. Using a mouse model for ALA with a similar male bias for the disease, we have investigated the role of female and male sexual hormones and provide evidence for a strong contribution of testosterone. Removal of testosterone by orchiectomy significantly reduced sizes of abscesses in male mice, while substitution of testosterone increased development of ALA in female mice. Activation of natural killer T (NKT) cells, which are known to be important for the control of ALA, is influenced by testosterone. Specifically activated NKT cells isolated from female mice produce more IFNγ compared to NKT cells derived from male mice. This high level production of IFNγ in female derived NKT cells was inhibited by testosterone substitution, while the IFNγ production in male derived NKT cells was increased by orchiectomy. Gender dependent differences were not a result of differences in the total number of NKT cells, but a result of a higher activation potential for the CD4− NKT cell subpopulation in female mice. Taken together, we conclude that the hormone status of the host, in particular the testosterone level, determines susceptibility to ALA at least in a mouse model of the disease. PMID:23424637

  17. Testosterone increases susceptibility to amebic liver abscess in mice and mediates inhibition of IFNγ secretion in natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Hannelore; Helk, Elena; Bernin, Hannah; Jacobs, Thomas; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; González-Roldán, Nestor; Holst, Otto; Tannich, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA), a parasitic disease due to infection with the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, occurs age and gender dependent with strong preferences for adult males. Using a mouse model for ALA with a similar male bias for the disease, we have investigated the role of female and male sexual hormones and provide evidence for a strong contribution of testosterone. Removal of testosterone by orchiectomy significantly reduced sizes of abscesses in male mice, while substitution of testosterone increased development of ALA in female mice. Activation of natural killer T (NKT) cells, which are known to be important for the control of ALA, is influenced by testosterone. Specifically activated NKT cells isolated from female mice produce more IFNγ compared to NKT cells derived from male mice. This high level production of IFNγ in female derived NKT cells was inhibited by testosterone substitution, while the IFNγ production in male derived NKT cells was increased by orchiectomy. Gender dependent differences were not a result of differences in the total number of NKT cells, but a result of a higher activation potential for the CD4(-) NKT cell subpopulation in female mice. Taken together, we conclude that the hormone status of the host, in particular the testosterone level, determines susceptibility to ALA at least in a mouse model of the disease. PMID:23424637

  18. Human skin neural crest progenitor cells are susceptible to BRAFV600E-induced transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, SM; Dai, J; Li, S; Yang, R; Yu, H; Nathanson, KL; Liu, S; Zhou, H; Guo, J; Xu, X

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells are multipotent and persist in small numbers in adult tissues throughout the lifespan of an organism. Unlike differentiated cells, adult stem cells are intrinsically resistant to senescence. It is unclear how adult stem cells in solid organs respond to oncogenic stimulation and whether these cells have a role in tumor initiation. We report here that expression of BRAFV600E in human neural crest progenitor cells (hNCPCs) did not induce growth arrest as seen in human melanocytes, but instead, increased their cell proliferation capacity. These cells (hNCPCsV600E) acquired anchorage-independent growth ability and were weakly tumorigenic in vivo. Unlike in human melanocytes, BRAFV600E expression in hNCPCs did not induce p16INK4a expression. BRAFV600E induced elevated expression of CDK2, CDK4, MITF and EST1/2 protein in hNCPCs, and also induced melanocytic differentiation of these cells. Furthermore, overexpression of MITF in hNCPCsV600E dramatically increased their tumorigenicity and resulted in fully transformed tumor cells. These findings indicate that hNCPCs are susceptible to BRAFV600E-induced transformation, and MITF potentiates the oncogenic effect of BRAFV600E in these progenitor cells. These results suggest that the hNCPCs are potential targets for BRAFV600E-induced melanocytic tumor formation. PMID:23334329

  19. Reduced expression IRF7 in nasal epithelial cells from smokers as a potential mechanism mediating enhanced susceptibility to influenza

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Smokers are more susceptible to viral infections, including influenza virus, yet the mechanisms mediating this effect are not known. Methods: We have established an in vitro model of differentiated nasal epithelial cells from smokers, which maintain enhanced levels...

  20. HIV Susceptibility of human antigen-specific CD4 T cells in AIDS pathogenesis and vaccine response.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haitao; Liu, Fengliang; Kim, Jerome; Ratto-Kim, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    HIV causes infection and progressive depletion of human CD4 T cells. Emerging data have shown that antigen-specific CD4 T-cell subsets manifest differential susceptibility to HIV, potentially leading to pathogen-specific immune failure and opportunistic infections. This concept was recently explored in context of vectors utilized in HIV vaccine trials, and the data suggest that adenovirus type 5(Ad5)-specific CD4 T cells elicited by Ad5-HIV vaccine may be particularly susceptible to HIV, potentially rendering Ad5 vaccine recipients susceptible to HIV acquisition. We here examined recent data regarding the HIV susceptibility of antigen-specific CD4 T cells induced during infection or HIV vaccination and discussed its potential impact on HIV acquisition risk posed by HIV vaccination. PMID:26814372

  1. [Comparative analysis of the susceptibility and productivity of respiratory tract target cells of mice and rats exposed to inflienza virus in vitro].

    PubMed

    Zhukov, V A; Shishkina, L N; Sergeev, A A; Malkova, E M; Riabchikova, E I; Petrishchenko, V A; Sergeev, A N; Ustiuzhanina, N V; Nesvizhskiĭ, Iu V; Vorob'ev, A A

    2008-01-01

    The levels of susceptibility to influenza virus A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2 and the virus yield were determined using primary cells of the trachea and lungs of CD-1 mice and Wistar rats, and for 3 sets of cells obtained from primary lung cells of the both species by centrifugation in the gradient of density and by sedimentation on a surface. The values of ID50 virus dose for 10(6) cells and virus yield per 1 infected cell determined for primary mice cells were 4.0+/-0.47 and 3.2+/-0.27 IgEID50 (lung cells), 3.8+/-0.17 and 3.3+/-0.20 IgEID50 (tracheal cells), and those determined for primary rat cells were 4.0+/-0.35 and 2.1+/-0.24 IgEID50 (lung cells), 3.7+/-0.27 and 2.2+/-0.46 IgEID50 (tracheal cells). The values of ID50 and yield measured for mixtures of cells obtained from primary lung cells by centrifugation in gradient of density and by sedimentation on a surface differed insignificantly (p = 0.05) from the values of the corresponding parameters measured for lung and tracheal cells for both rats and mice. The analysis of data on the variation of the concentrations of different cell types in the experimental cell mixtures shows that type 1 and 2 alveolocytes possess significantly lower (p = 0.05) susceptibility and productivity vs. ciliated cells of the both species. The investigation was conducted within the frame of the ISTC/DARPA#450p project. PMID:18368764

  2. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Geetika S; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  3. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Geetika S.; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A.; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  4. Human-Mouse Hybrid Cell Lines and Susceptibility to Poliovirus 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Richard; Pollack, Robert; Kusano, Toshihisa; Green, Howard

    1970-01-01

    A number of human-mouse somatic hybrid cell lines have been prepared, containing from 3 to 12 human biarmed chromosomes. These lines were susceptible to poliovirus type 1, producing viral yields comparable to those of the human parental cells. A small proportion of the cells of these lines survived the polio infection, and their progeny were solidly resistant to reinfection with the virus. Both sensitive and resistant hybrids produced virus following infection with viral ribonucleic acid, indicating that the cytoplasm of the resistant hybrids was able to support viral multiplication. Viral adsorption studies carried out at 4 C showed that the resistant sublines had negligible ability to adsorb the virus. It was concluded that the hybrid cells became resistant to polio through loss of the human chromosome bearing the gene for the receptor substance. PMID:4317112

  5. Mutations in the Primary Sigma Factor σA and Termination Factor Rho That Reduce Susceptibility to Cell Wall Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Heon

    2014-01-01

    Combinations of glycopeptides and β-lactams exert synergistic antibacterial activity, but the evolutionary mechanisms driving resistance to both antibiotics remain largely unexplored. By repeated subculturing with increasing vancomycin (VAN) and cefuroxime (CEF) concentrations, we isolated an evolved strain of the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis with reduced susceptibility to both antibiotics. Whole-genome sequencing revealed point mutations in genes encoding the major σ factor of RNA polymerase (sigA), a cell shape-determining protein (mreB), and the ρ termination factor (rho). Genetic-reconstruction experiments demonstrated that the G-to-C substitution at position 336 encoded by sigA (sigAG336C), in the domain that recognizes the −35 promoter region, is sufficient to reduce susceptibility to VAN and works cooperatively with the rhoG56C substitution to increase CEF resistance. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the sigAG336C substitution has wide-ranging effects, including elevated expression of the general stress σ factor (σB) regulon, which is required for CEF resistance, and decreased expression of the glpTQ genes, which leads to fosfomycin (FOS) resistance. Our findings suggest that mutations in the core transcriptional machinery may facilitate the evolution of resistance to multiple cell wall antibiotics. PMID:25112476

  6. Susceptibility of human tonsillar epithelial cells to enterovirus 71 with normal cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guang-Cheng; Guo, Ni-Jun; Grénman, Reidar; Wang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Vuorenmma, Minna; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Shuang; Li, Hui-Ying; Pang, Li-Li; Li, Dan-Di; Jin, Miao; Sun, Xiao-Man; Kong, Xiang-Yu; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    A recent histopathologic study implicated human tonsillar crypt epithelium as an important site for EV71 replication in EV71-caused fatal cases. This study aimed to confirm the susceptibility of human tonsillar epithelium to EV71. Two human tonsillar epithelial cell lines (UT-SCC-60A and UT-SCC-60B) were susceptive to EV71, and PI3K/AKT, p38, ERK1/2, and JNK1/2 signal pathways were activated. Interferon-α, IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12p40 were induced and regulated by PI3K/AKT, p38, ERK1/2, and JNK1/2 signal pathways. PI3K/AKT pathway activation appeared to suppress the induction of TNF-α, which induced cell survival by inhibiting GSK-3β. The activation of NF-κB was observed but inhibited by these pathways in EV71 infection. Furthermore, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 were essential for efficient EV71 replication. Human tonsillar epithelial cells support EV71 replication and display innate antiviral immunity in vitro, indicating that human tonsillar epithelial cells may be novel targets for EV71 infection and replication in vivo. PMID:27107253

  7. Towards in vitro DT/DNT testing: Assaying chemical susceptibility in early differentiating NT2 cells.

    PubMed

    Menzner, Ann-Katrin; Abolpour Mofrad, Sepideh; Friedrich, Oliver; Gilbert, Daniel F

    2015-12-01

    Human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma (NT2) cells are increasingly considered as a suitable model for in vitro toxicity testing, e.g. developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity (DT/DNT) studies, as they undergo neuronal differentiation upon stimulation with retinoic acid (RA) and permit toxicity testing at different stages of maturation. NT2 cells have recently been reported to show specific changes in dielectric resistance profiles during differentiation which can be observed as early as 24h upon RA-stimulation. These observations suggest altered susceptibility to chemicals at an early stage of differentiation. However, chemical susceptibility of early differentiating NT cells has not yet been studied. To address this question, we have established a cell fitness screening assay based on the analysis of intracellular ATP levels and we applied the assay in a large-scale drug screening experiment in NT2 stem cells and early differentiating NT2 cells. Subsequent analysis of ranked fitness phenotypes revealed 19 chemicals with differential toxicity profile in early differentiating NT2 cells. To evaluate whether any of the identified drugs have previously been associated with DT/DNT, we conducted a literature search on the identified molecules and quantified the fraction of chemicals assigned to the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) pregnancy risk categories (PRC) N, A, B, C, D, and X in the hit list and the small molecule library. While the fractions of the categories N and B were decreased (0.81 and 0.35-fold), the classes C, D and X were increased (1.35, 1.47 and 3.27-fold) in the hit list compared to the chemical library. From these data as well as from the literature review, identifying large fractions of chemicals being directly (∼42%) and indirectly associated with DT/DNT (∼32%), we conclude that our method may be beneficial to systematic in vitro-based primary screening for developmental toxicants and neurotoxicants and we propose cell fitness screening in

  8. CD9, a tetraspan transmembrane protein, renders cells susceptible to canine distemper virus.

    PubMed Central

    Löffler, S; Lottspeich, F; Lanza, F; Azorsa, D O; ter Meulen, V; Schneider-Schaulies, J

    1997-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a lymphotropic and neurotropic negative-stranded RNA virus of the Morbillivirus genus, causes a life-threatening disease in several carnivores, including domestic dogs. To identify the cellular receptor(s) involved in the uptake of CDV by susceptible cells, we isolated a monoclonal antibody (MAb K41) which binds to the cell surface and inhibits the CDV infection of several cell lines from various species. Pretreatment of cells with MAb K41 reduces the number of infectious centers and the size of the syncytia. Using affinity chromatography with MAb K41, we purified from HeLa and Vero cell extracts a 26-kDa protein which contained the amino acid sequence TKDEPQRETLK of human CD9, a member of the tetraspan transmembrane or transmembrane 4 superfamily of cell surface proteins. Transfection of NIH 3T3 or MDBK cells with a CD9 expression plasmid rendered these cells permissive for viral infection and raised virus production by a factor of 10 to 100. The mechanism involved is still unclear, since we were unable to detect direct binding of CDV to CD9 by using immunoprecipitation and a virus overlay protein binding assay. These findings indicate that human CD9 and its homologs in other species are necessary factors for the uptake of CDV by target cells, the formation of syncytia, and the production of progeny virus. PMID:8985321

  9. The reprogrammed pancreatic progenitor-like intermediate state of hepatic cells is more susceptible to pancreatic beta cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiwei; Wang, Hai; Sun, Yu; Li, Shi-Wu; Donelan, William; Chang, Lung-Ji; Jin, Shouguang; Terada, Naohiro; Cheng, Henrique; Reeves, Westley H; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-08-15

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for cell therapy. However, their low efficiency of lineage-specific differentiation and tumorigenesis severely hinder clinical translation. We hypothesized that reprogramming of somatic cells into lineage-specific progenitor cells might allow for large-scale expansion, avoiding the tumorigenesis inherent with iPSCs and simultaneously facilitating lineage-specific differentiation. Here we aimed at reprogramming rat hepatic WB cells, using four Yamanaka factors, into pancreatic progenitor cells (PPCs) or intermediate (IM) cells that have characteristics of PPCs. IM clones were selected based on their specific morphology and alkaline phosphatase activity and stably passaged under defined culture conditions. IM cells did not have iPSC properties, could be stably expanded in large quantity, and expressed all 14 genes that are used to define the PPC developmental stage. Directed differentiation of IM and WB cells by Pdx1-Ngn3-MafA (PNM) into pancreatic beta-like cells revealed that the IM cells are more susceptible to directed beta cell differentiation because of their open chromatin configuration, as demonstrated by expression of key pancreatic beta cell genes, secretion of insulin in response to glucose stimulation, and easy access to exogenous PNM proteins at the rat insulin 1 and Pdx1 promoters. This notion that IM cells are superior to their parental cells is further supported by the epigenetic demonstration of accessibility of Pdx1 and insulin 1 promoters. In conclusion, we have developed a strategy to derive and expand PPC cells from hepatic WB cells using conventional cell reprogramming. This proof-of-principal study may offer a novel, safe and effective way to generate autologous pancreatic beta cells for cell therapy of diabetes. PMID:23750005

  10. Recovery of Infectious Pariacoto Virus from cDNA Clones and Identification of Susceptible Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Karyn N.; Ball, L. Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Pariacoto virus (PaV) is a nodavirus that was recently isolated in Peru from the Southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania. Virus particles are non enveloped and about 30 nm in diameter and have T=3 icosahedral symmetry. The 3.0-Å crystal structure shows that about 35% of the genomic RNA is icosahedrally ordered, with the RNA forming a dodecahedral cage of 25-nucleotide (nt) duplexes that underlie the inner surface of the capsid. The PaV genome comprises two single-stranded, positive-sense RNAs: RNA1 (3,011 nt), which encodes the 108-kDa catalytic subunit of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and RNA2 (1,311 nt), which encodes the 43-kDa capsid protein precursor α. In order to apply molecular genetics to the structure and assembly of PaV, we identified susceptible cell lines and developed a reverse genetic system for this virus. Cell lines that were susceptible to infection by PaV included those from Spodoptera exigua, Helicoverpa zea and Aedes albopictus, whereas cells from Drosophila melanogaster and Spodoptera frugiperda were refractory to infection. To recover virus from molecular clones, full-length cDNAs of PaV RNAs 1 and 2 were cotranscribed by T7 RNA polymerase in baby hamster kidney cells that expressed T7 RNA polymerase. Lysates of these cells were infectious both for cultured cells from Helicoverpa zea (corn earworm) and for larvae of Galleria mellonella (greater wax moth). The combination of infectious cDNA clones, cell culture infectivity, and the ability to produce milligram amounts of virus allows the application of DNA-based genetic methods to the study of PaV structure and assembly. PMID:11711613

  11. Recovery of infectious pariacoto virus from cDNA clones and identification of susceptible cell lines.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K N; Ball, L A

    2001-12-01

    Pariacoto virus (PaV) is a nodavirus that was recently isolated in Peru from the Southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania. Virus particles are non enveloped and about 30 nm in diameter and have T=3 icosahedral symmetry. The 3.0-A crystal structure shows that about 35% of the genomic RNA is icosahedrally ordered, with the RNA forming a dodecahedral cage of 25-nucleotide (nt) duplexes that underlie the inner surface of the capsid. The PaV genome comprises two single-stranded, positive-sense RNAs: RNA1 (3,011 nt), which encodes the 108-kDa catalytic subunit of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and RNA2 (1,311 nt), which encodes the 43-kDa capsid protein precursor alpha. In order to apply molecular genetics to the structure and assembly of PaV, we identified susceptible cell lines and developed a reverse genetic system for this virus. Cell lines that were susceptible to infection by PaV included those from Spodoptera exigua, Helicoverpa zea and Aedes albopictus, whereas cells from Drosophila melanogaster and Spodoptera frugiperda were refractory to infection. To recover virus from molecular clones, full-length cDNAs of PaV RNAs 1 and 2 were cotranscribed by T7 RNA polymerase in baby hamster kidney cells that expressed T7 RNA polymerase. Lysates of these cells were infectious both for cultured cells from Helicoverpa zea (corn earworm) and for larvae of Galleria mellonella (greater wax moth). The combination of infectious cDNA clones, cell culture infectivity, and the ability to produce milligram amounts of virus allows the application of DNA-based genetic methods to the study of PaV structure and assembly. PMID:11711613

  12. Distinct host cell proteins incorporated by SIV replicating in CD4+ T Cells from natural disease resistant versus non-natural disease susceptible hosts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Enveloped viruses including the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replicating within host cells acquire host proteins upon egress from the host cells. A number of studies have catalogued such host proteins, and a few have documented the potential positive and negative biological functions of such host proteins. The studies conducted herein utilized proteomic analysis to identify differences in the spectrum of host proteins acquired by a single source of SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from disease resistant sooty mangabeys and disease susceptible rhesus macaques. Results While a total of 202 host derived proteins were present in viral preparations from CD4+ T cells from both species, there were 4 host-derived proteins that consistently and uniquely associated with SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from rhesus macaques but not sooty mangabeys; and, similarly, 28 host-derived proteins that uniquely associated with SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from sooty mangabeys, but not rhesus macaques. Of interest was the finding that of the 4 proteins uniquely present in SIV preparations from rhesus macaques was a 26 S protease subunit 7 (MSS1) that was shown to enhance HIV-1 'tat" mediated transactivation. Among the 28 proteins found in SIV preparations from sooty mangabeys included several molecules associated with immune function such as CD2, CD3ε, TLR4, TLR9 and TNFR and a bioactive form of IL-13. Conclusions The finding of 4 host proteins that are uniquely associated with SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from disease susceptible rhesus macaques and 28 host proteins that are uniquely associated with SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from disease resistant sooty mangabeys provide the foundation for determining the potential role of each of these unique host-derived proteins in contributing to the polarized clinical outcome in these 2 species of nonhuman primates. PMID:21162735

  13. Characterisation of Mesothelioma-Initiating Cells and Their Susceptibility to Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Pasdar, Elham Alizadeh; Smits, Michael; Stapelberg, Michael; Bajzikova, Martina; Stantic, Marina; Goodwin, Jacob; Yan, Bing; Stursa, Jan; Kovarova, Jaromira; Sachaphibulkij, Karishma; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Sobol, Margaryta; Filimonenko, Anatoly; Tomasetti, Marco; Zobalova, Renata; Hozak, Pavel; Dong, Lan-Feng; Neuzil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive type of tumour causing high mortality. One reason for this paradigm may be the existence of a subpopulation of tumour-initiating cells (TICs) that endow MM with drug resistance and recurrence. The objective of this study was to identify and characterise a TIC subpopulation in MM cells, using spheroid cultures, mesospheres, as a model of MM TICs. Mesospheres, typified by the stemness markers CD24, ABCG2 and OCT4, initiated tumours in immunodeficient mice more efficiently than adherent cells. CD24 knock-down cells lost the sphere-forming capacity and featured lower tumorigenicity. Upon serial transplantation, mesospheres were gradually more efficiently tumrigenic with increased level of stem cell markers. We also show that mesospheres feature mitochondrial and metabolic properties similar to those of normal and cancer stem cells. Finally, we show that mesothelioma-initiating cells are highly susceptible to mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate. This study documents that mesospheres can be used as a plausible model of mesothelioma-initiating cells and that they can be utilised in the search for efficient agents against MM. PMID:25932953

  14. Internal-External Control and Others' Susceptibility to Influence as Determinants of Interpersonal Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, William L.; Taylor, Alan L.

    The relationship between internal-external control of reinforcement and attraction to others who vary in susceptibility to persuasion was investigated. Internals are defined as persons who believe that reinforcement is contingent on their behavior, while externals are those who believe that reinforcement is independent of their actions and is…

  15. Methodology for determining susceptibility of rough rice to Rhyzopertha dominica (L.) and Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Varieties of rough rice, Oryzae sativa (L)., were obtained from different sources in the south-central United States and evaluated for susceptibility to the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (Fab.), and the Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier), in laboratory studies. Adult R. ...

  16. Carbapenem Susceptibility Patterns for Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus Determined by the Etest Method▿

    PubMed Central

    Chihara, Shingo; Smith, Geremy; Petti, Cathy A.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is resistant to multiple antibiotics, creating treatment challenges. Carbapenems are tested to increase therapeutic alternatives. We performed in vitro susceptibility testing by Etest of four carbapenems for M. abscessus isolates. Imipenem demonstrated the most in vitro activity, and testing of other carbapenems provided no additional value. PMID:20018813

  17. Space Systems - Safety and Compatibility of Materials - Method to Determine the Ignition Susceptibility of Materials or Components to Particle Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David B.

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this International Technical Specification is to provide a method to determine the ignition susceptibility of materials and components to particle impact. The method can be used to determine the conditions at which ignition and consumption of a specimen material occurs when impacted by single or multiple particles entrained in a flow of gaseous oxygen (GOX). Alternatively, the method can be used to determine if a specific material or component is subject to ignition and sustained combustion in a given flow environment when impacted by single or multiple particles entrained in a flow of GOX.

  18. Experimental and theoretical determination of the magnetic susceptibility of C60 and C70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddon, R. C.; Schneemeyer, L. F.; Waszczak, J. V.; Glarum, S. H.; Tycko, R.; Dabbagh, G.; Kortan, A. R.; Muller, A. J.; Mujsce, A. M.; Rosseinsky, M. J.; Zahurak, S. M.; Makhija, A. V.; Thiel, F. A.; Raghavachari, K.; Cockayne, E.; Elser, V.

    1991-03-01

    THE magnetic susceptibility of C60 and the possibility of magnetic-field-induced π-electron ring currents in this carbon spheroid have been of interest since the initial experiments on carbon clusters1. If the molecule is regarded as a sphere with a radius of 3.5 Å, on which 60 electrons are free to move, the Pauling ring-current model predicts a ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility 41 times the π-electron ring-current magnetic susceptibility of benzene with the field normal to the plane of the six-membered ring2,3. London theory predicts, however, that the π-electron ring currents in C60 should be weakly paramagnetic or diamagnetic, depending on the relative bond strengths used in the calculation2,3. With the availability of macroscopic quantities of C60 (ref. 4), it is now possible to study experimentally the magnetic properties of the molecule. Here we report on such measurements. We find that the diamagnetism of C60 is small, a result that we attribute to excited-state paramagnetic contributions to the π-electron ring-current magnetic susceptibility. Thus C60 seems to be an aromatic molecule with a vanishingly small π-electron ring-current magnetic susceptibility. We have performed similar measurements on C70, which indicate an appreciable π-electron diamagnetism, consistent with theoretical calculations. We attribute the differences in magnetic properties of these two molecules to their different fractions of five-membered ring structures. The fullerenes may thus constitute a class of compounds of 'ambiguous' aromatic character, traditional measures of which will not provide an adequate classification.

  19. A dichotomy in cortical actin and chemotactic actin activity between human memory and naive T cells contributes to their differential susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weifeng; Guo, Jia; Yu, Dongyang; Vorster, Paul J; Chen, WanJun; Wu, Yuntao

    2012-10-12

    Human memory and naive CD4 T cells can mainly be identified by the reciprocal expression of the CD45RO or CD45RA isoforms. In HIV-1 infection, blood CD45RO memory CD4 T cells are preferentially infected and serve as a major viral reservoir. The molecular mechanism dictating this differential susceptibility to HIV-1 remains largely obscure. Here, we report that the different susceptibility of memory and naive T cells to HIV is not determined by restriction factors such as Apobec3G or BST2. However, we observed a phenotypic distinction between human CD45RO and CD45RA resting CD4 T cells in their cortical actin density and actin dynamics. CD45RO CD4 T cells possess a higher cortical actin density and can be distinguished as CD45RO(+)Actin(high). In contrast, CD45RA T cells are phenotypically CD45RA(+)Actin(low). In addition, the cortical actin in CD45RO memory CD4 T cells is more dynamic and can respond to low dosages of chemotactic induction by SDF-1, whereas that of naive cells cannot, despite a similar level of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 present on both cells. We further demonstrate that this difference in the cortical actin contributes to their differential susceptibility to HIV-1; resting memory but not naive T cells are highly responsive to HIV-mediated actin dynamics that promote higher levels of viral entry and early DNA synthesis in resting memory CD4 T cells. Furthermore, transient induction of actin dynamics in resting naive T cells rescues HIV latent infection following CD3/CD28 stimulation. These results suggest a key role of chemotactic actin activity in facilitating HIV-1 latent infection of these T cell subsets. PMID:22879601

  20. Hypergravity Alters the Susceptibility of Cells to Anoxia-Reoxygenation Injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloud, Henry; Pink, Yulondo; Harris-Hooker, Sandra A.; Melhado, Caroline D.; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    Gravity is a physical force, much like shear stress or mechanical stretch, and should affect organ and cellular function. Researchers have shown that gravity plays a role in ventilation and blood flow distribution, gas exchange, alveolar size and mechanical stresses within the lung. Short exposure to microgravity produced marked alterations in lung blood flow and ventilation distribution while hypergravity exaggerated the regional differences in lung structure and function resulting in reduced ventilation at the base and no ventilation of the upper half of the lung. Microgravity also decreased metabolic activity in cardiac cells, WI-38 embryonic lung cells, and human lymphocytes. Rats, in the tail-suspended head-down tilt model, experienced transient loss of lung water, contrary to an expected increase due to pooling of blood in the pulmonary vasculature. Hypergravity has also been found to increase the proliferation of several different cell lines (e.g., chick embryo fibroblasts) while decreasing cell motility and slowing liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy. These studies show that changes in the gravity environment will affect several aspects of organ and cellular function and produce major change in blood flow and tissue/organ perfusion. However, these past studies have not addressed whether ischemia-reperfusion injury will be exacerbated or ameliorated by changes in the gravity environment, e.g., space flight. Currently, nothing is known about how gravity will affect the susceptibility of different lung and vascular cells to this type of injury. We conducted studies that addressed the following question: Does the susceptibility of lung fibroblasts, vascular smooth muscle, and endothelial cells to anoxia/reoxygenation injury change following exposure to hypergravity conditions?

  1. Abscisic Acid Determines Basal Susceptibility of Tomato to Botrytis cinerea and Suppresses Salicylic Acid-Dependent Signaling Mechanisms1

    PubMed Central

    Audenaert, Kris; De Meyer, Geert B.; Höfte, Monica M.

    2002-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is one of the plant hormones involved in the interaction between plants and pathogens. In this work, we show that tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Moneymaker) mutants with reduced ABA levels (sitiens plants) are much more resistant to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea than wild-type (WT) plants. Exogenous application of ABA restored susceptibility to B. cinerea in sitiens plants and increased susceptibility in WT plants. These results indicate that ABA plays a major role in the susceptibility of tomato to B. cinerea. ABA appeared to interact with a functional plant defense response against B. cinerea. Experiments with transgenic NahG tomato plants and benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid demonstrated the importance of salicylic acid in the tomato-B. cinerea interaction. In addition, upon infection with B. cinerea, sitiens plants showed a clear increase in phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity, which was not observed in infected WT plants, indicating that the ABA levels in healthy WT tomato plants partly repress phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity. In addition, sitiens plants became more sensitive to benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid root treatment. The threshold values for PR1a gene expression declined with a factor 10 to 100 in sitiens compared with WT plants. Thus, ABA appears to negatively modulate the salicylic acid-dependent defense pathway in tomato, which may be one of the mechanisms by which ABA levels determine susceptibility to B. cinerea. PMID:11842153

  2. Macrophage production during murine listeriosis: colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) and CSF-1-binding cells in genetically resistant and susceptible mice.

    PubMed Central

    Cheers, C; Stanley, E R

    1988-01-01

    The concentration of the macrophage-specific colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1) and the numbers of bone marrow and spleen cells with specific receptors for that factor have been investigated in a number of mouse strains under normal conditions and after infection with the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. The CSF-1 concentration in serum and tissue was markedly elevated in infected mice, the degree of stimulation reflecting the dose of L. monocytogenes. The CSF-1 titer did not correlate with genetic resistance or susceptibility of the mice to L. monocytogenes. In contrast to the effect of lipopolysaccharide, Listeria infection was able to increase the level of CSF-1 in the lipopolysaccharide nonresponder strain C3H/HeJ. In line with earlier findings on colony-forming cells, cells bearing receptors for CSF-1 in uninfected susceptible BALB/cJ mice were only half those in resistant C57BL/6J mice. After infection the majority of these cells disappeared from the bone marrow and spleen cells of both resistant and susceptible mice. The number of CSF-1 receptor-bearing cells in the normal bone marrow may determine the degree of resistance to L. monocytogenes. PMID:3262588

  3. The Lupus Susceptibility Gene Pbx1 Regulates the Balance between Follicular Helper T Cell and Regulatory T Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung-Chul; Hutchinson, Tarun E; Titov, Anton A; Seay, Howard R; Li, Shiwu; Brusko, Todd M; Croker, Byron P; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Morel, Laurence

    2016-07-15

    Pbx1 controls chromatin accessibility to a large number of genes and is entirely conserved between mice and humans. The Pbx1-d dominant-negative isoform is more frequent in CD4(+) T cells from lupus patients than from healthy controls. Pbx1-d is associated with the production of autoreactive T cells in mice carrying the Sle1a1 lupus-susceptibility locus. Transgenic (Tg) expression of Pbx1-d in CD4(+) T cells reproduced the phenotypes of Sle1a1 mice, with increased inflammatory functions of CD4(+) T cells and impaired Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell (Treg) homeostasis. Pbx1-d-Tg expression also expanded the number of follicular helper T cells (TFHs) in a cell-intrinsic and Ag-specific manner, which was enhanced in recall responses and resulted in Th1-biased Abs. Moreover, Pbx1-d-Tg CD4(+) T cells upregulated the expression of miR-10a, miR-21, and miR-155, which were implicated in Treg and follicular helper T cell homeostasis. Our results suggest that Pbx1-d impacts lupus development by regulating effector T cell differentiation and promoting TFHs at the expense of Tregs. In addition, our results identify Pbx1 as a novel regulator of CD4(+) T cell effector function. PMID:27296664

  4. Activated T cells exhibit increased uptake of silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 and increased susceptibility to Pc 4-photodynamic therapy-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Soler, David C; Ohtola, Jennifer; Sugiyama, Hideaki; Rodriguez, Myriam E; Han, Ling; Oleinick, Nancy L; Lam, Minh; Baron, Elma D; Cooper, Kevin D; McCormick, Thomas S

    2016-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging treatment for malignant and inflammatory dermal disorders. Photoirradiation of the silicon phthalocyanine (Pc) 4 photosensitizer with red light generates singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species to induce cell death. We previously reported that Pc 4-PDT elicited cell death in lymphoid-derived (Jurkat) and epithelial-derived (A431) cell lines in vitro, and furthermore that Jurkat cells were more sensitive than A431 cells to treatment. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of Pc 4-PDT on primary human CD3(+) T cells in vitro. Fluorometric analyses of lysed T cells confirmed the dose-dependent uptake of Pc 4 in non-stimulated and stimulated T cells. Flow cytometric analyses measuring annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of T cell apoptosis (6.6-59.9%) at Pc 4 doses ranging from 0-300 nM. Following T cell stimulation through the T cell receptor using a combination of anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, activated T cells exhibited increased susceptibility to Pc 4-PDT-induced apoptosis (10.6-81.2%) as determined by Pc 4 fluorescence in each cell, in both non-stimulated and stimulated T cells, Pc 4 uptake increased with Pc 4 dose up to 300 nM as assessed by flow cytometry. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of Pc 4 uptake measured in stimulated T cells was significantly increased over the uptake of resting T cells at each dose of Pc 4 tested (50, 100, 150 and 300 nM, p < 0.001 between 50 and 150 nM, n = 8). Treg uptake was diminished relative to other T cells. Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) T cells appeared to take up somewhat more Pc 4 than normal resting T cells at 100 and 150 nm Pc 4. Confocal imaging revealed that Pc 4 localized in cytoplasmic organelles, with approximately half of the Pc 4 co-localized with mitochondria in T cells. Thus, Pc 4-PDT exerts an enhanced apoptotic effect on activated CD3(+) T cells that may be exploited in targeting T cell-mediated skin

  5. Third order nonlinear optical susceptibility of fluorescein-containing polymers determined by electro-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Sosa, Gustavo; Beristain, Miriam F.; Ortega, Alejandra; Martínez-Viramontes, Jaquelin; Ogawa, Takeshi; Fernández-Hernández, Roberto C.; Tamayo-Rivera, Lis; Reyes-Esqueda, Jorge-Alejandro; Isoshima, Takashi; Hara, Masahiko

    2012-03-01

    Novel polymers containing xanthene groups with high dye concentrations were prepared, and their third order nonlinear optical properties were studied by electroabsorption spectroscopy technique. The polymers were amorphous with refractive indices above 1.6 in the non-resonant region. The UV-Visible absorption spectra indicate the fluoresceins molecules in the polymers are H-aggregated. They showed third order nonlinear susceptibility, χ(3) (-ω:ω, 0, 0), of 2.5-3.5 × 10-12 esu.

  6. Relationship between genetic polymorphisms of DNA ligase 1 and non-small cell lung cancer susceptibility and radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tian, H; He, X; Yin, L; Guo, W J; Xia, Y Y; Jiang, Z X

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between genetic polymorphisms in DNA ligase 1 (LIG1) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) susceptibility and radiosensitivity in a Chinese population. This was a case-control study that included 352 NSCLC patients and 448 healthy controls. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was conducted to detect HaeIII polymorphisms in exon 6 of the LIG1 gene in this popula-tion. This information was used to observe the effects of radiation in pa-tients with different genotypes in order to determine the genotypes as-sociated with radiosensitivity. The CC genotype and C allele frequency were significantly higher in the NSCLC group than in the control group (P = 0.012 and P = 0.023, respectively). The relative risk of experienc-ing NSCLC was 2.55 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-3.98] for CC homozygous patients and 0.87 (95%CI, 0.46-1.88) for AA homozygous patients. Analysis of LIG1 genetic polymorphisms and radiosensitiv-ity of NSCLC patients showed that AA homozygous patients were sig-nificantly more radiosensitive than the control group (AA vs AC, P = 0.014; AA vs CC, P < 0.001; AC vs CC, P = 0.023). Therefore, the LIG1 CC genotype was associated with susceptibility to NSCLC, and the AA genotype demonstrated increased radiosensitivity compared to the AC and CC genotypes. PMID:26125914

  7. Relative susceptibilities of male germ cells to genetic defects induced by cancer chemotherapies

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A J; Schmid, T E; Marchetti, F

    2004-06-15

    Some chemotherapy regimens include agents that are mutagenic or clastogenic in model systems. This raises concerns that cancer survivors, who were treated before or during their reproductive years, may be at increased risks for abnormal reproductive outcomes. However, the available data from offspring of cancer survivors are limited, representing diverse cancers, therapies, time-to-pregnancies, and reproductive outcomes. Rodent breeding data after paternal exposures to individual chemotherapeutic agents illustrate the complexity of factors that influence the risk for transmitted genetic damage including agent, dose, endpoint, and the germ-cell susceptibility profiles that vary across agents. Direct measurements of chromosomal abnormalities in sperm of mice and humans by sperm FISH have corroborated the differences in germ-cell susceptibilities. The available evidence suggests that the risk of producing chromosomally defective sperm is highest during the first few weeks after the end of chemotherapy, and decays with time. Thus, sperm samples provided immediately after the initiation of cancer therapies may contain treatment-induced genetic defects that will jeopardize the genetic health of offspring.

  8. The leukotriene B₄/BLT₁ axis is a key determinant in susceptibility and resistance to histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Secatto, Adriana; Soares, Elyara Maria; Locachevic, Gisele Aparecida; Assis, Patricia Aparecida; Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderlei Garcia; Serezani, Carlos Henrique; de Medeiros, Alexandra Ivo; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2014-01-01

    The bioactive lipid mediator leukotriene B4 (LTB4) greatly enhances phagocyte antimicrobial functions against a myriad of pathogens. In murine histoplasmosis, inhibition of the LT-generating enzyme 5-lypoxigenase (5-LO) increases the susceptibility of the host to infection. In this study, we investigated whether murine resistance or susceptibility to Histoplasma capsulatum infection is associated with leukotriene production and an enhancement of in vivo and/or in vitro antimicrobial effector function. We show that susceptible C57BL/6 mice exhibit a higher fungal burden in the lung and spleen, increased mortality, lower expression levels of 5-LO and leukotriene B4 receptor 1 (BLT1) and decreased LTB4 production compared to the resistant 129/Sv mice. Moreover, we demonstrate that endogenous and exogenous LTs are required for the optimal phagocytosis of H. capsulatum by macrophages from both murine strains, although C57BL/6 macrophages are more sensitive to the effects of LTB4 than 129/Sv macrophages. Therefore, our results provide novel evidence that LTB4 production and BLT1 signaling are required for a histoplasmosis-resistant phenotype. PMID:24465479

  9. T Regulatory Cells Control Susceptibility to Invasive Pneumococcal Pneumonia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Neill, Daniel R.; Fernandes, Vitor E.; Wisby, Laura; Haynes, Andrew R.; Ferreira, Daniela M.; Laher, Ameera; Strickland, Natalie; Gordon, Stephen B.; Denny, Paul; Kadioglu, Aras; Andrew, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important human pathogen responsible for a spectrum of diseases including pneumonia. Immunological and pro-inflammatory processes induced in the lung during pneumococcal infection are well documented, but little is known about the role played by immunoregulatory cells and cytokines in the control of such responses. We demonstrate considerable differences in the immunomodulatory cytokine transforming growth factor (TGF)-β between the pneumococcal pneumonia resistant BALB/c and susceptible CBA/Ca mouse strains. Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry reveal higher levels of TGF-β protein in BALB/c lungs during pneumococcal pneumonia that correlates with a rapid rise in lung Foxp3+Helios+ T regulatory cells. These cells have protective functions during pneumococcal pneumonia, because blocking their induction with an inhibitor of TGF-β impairs BALB/c resistance to infection and aids bacterial dissemination from lungs. Conversely, adoptive transfer of T regulatory cells to CBA/Ca mice, prior to infection, prolongs survival and decreases bacterial dissemination from lungs to blood. Importantly, strong T regulatory cell responses also correlate with disease-resistance in outbred MF1 mice, confirming the importance of immunoregulatory cells in controlling protective responses to the pneumococcus. This study provides exciting new evidence for the importance of immunomodulation during pulmonary pneumococcal infection and suggests that TGF-β signalling is a potential target for immunotherapy or drug design. PMID:22563306

  10. Gangliosides GM1 and GM3 in the Living Cell Membrane Form Clusters Susceptible to Cholesterol Depletion and Chilling

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Akikazu; Cheng, Jinglei; Hirakawa, Minako; Furukawa, Koichi; Kusunoki, Susumu

    2007-01-01

    Presence of microdomains has been postulated in the cell membrane, but two-dimensional distribution of lipid molecules has been difficult to determine in the submicrometer scale. In the present paper, we examined the distribution of gangliosides GM1 and GM3, putative raft molecules in the cell membrane, by immunoelectron microscopy using quick-frozen and freeze-fractured specimens. This method physically immobilized molecules in situ and thus minimized the possibility of artifactual perturbation. By point pattern analysis of immunogold labeling, GM1 was shown to make clusters of <100 nm in diameter in normal mouse fibroblasts. GM1-null fibroblasts were not labeled, but developed a similar clustered pattern when GM1 was administered. On cholesterol depletion or chilling, the clustering of both endogenous and exogenously-loaded GM1 decreased significantly, but the distribution showed marked regional heterogeneity in the cells. GM3 also showed cholesterol-dependent clustering, and although clusters of GM1 and GM3 were found to occasionally coincide, these aggregates were separated in most cases, suggesting the presence of heterogeneous microdomains. The present method enabled to capture the molecular distribution of lipids in the cell membrane, and demonstrated that GM1 and GM3 form clusters that are susceptible to cholesterol depletion and chilling. PMID:17392511

  11. Antibiotic susceptibility of members of the Lactobacillus acidophilus group using broth microdilution and molecular identification of their resistance determinants.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, Sigrid; van Hoek, Angela H A M; Mair, Christiane; Huys, Geert; Aarts, Henk J M; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Domig, Konrad J

    2010-11-15

    The range of antibiotic susceptibility to 13 antibiotics in 101 strains of the Lactobacillus acidophilus group was examined using the lactic acid bacteria susceptibility test medium (LSM) and broth microdilution. Additionally, microarray analysis and PCR were applied to identify resistance genes responsible for the displayed resistant phenotypes in a selection of strains. In general, narrow as well as broad unimodal and bimodal MIC distributions were observed for the Lactobacillus acidophilus group and the tested antimicrobial agents. Atypically resistant strains could be determined by visual inspection of the obtained MIC ranges for ampicillin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, erythromycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, streptomycin and tetracycline. For most of these atypically resistant strains underlying resistance determinants were found. To our knowledge erm(A) was detected in lactobacilli for the first time within this study. Data derived from this study can be used as a basis for reviewing present microbiological breakpoints for categorization of susceptible and resistant strains within the Lactobacillus acidophilus group to assess the safety of microorganisms intended for use in food and feed applications. PMID:20888656

  12. Performance assessment of the (Trans)Varestraint tests for determining solidification cracking susceptibility when using welding processes with filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal Mendes da Silva, Celina; Scotti, Américo

    2004-11-01

    This work is aimed at verifying if the Varestraint and Transvarestraint tests are adequate to assess solidification cracking susceptibility in welding of aluminium when a process with filler metal is employed. The main goal was to compare the performance of a reasonably new process (double pulsed GMAW) for welding aluminium alloys. Both tests and three cracking quantification criteria were analysed and compared to determine which was the most robust and reliable. The results showed that the most adequate ones were the Transvarestraint test and the maximum cracking length criterion. Some steps must be taken so as to guarantee reliability of the results if a small number of experiments are expected. The application of this methodology in comparison between a conventional pulsed GMAW and a double pulsed GMAW still showed that the latter reduces cracking susceptibility, appearing as an alternative solution for this critical phenomenon in aluminium welding.

  13. Susceptibility of Chinese Perch Brain (CPB) Cell and Mandarin Fish to Red-Spotted Grouper Nervous Necrosis Virus (RGNNV) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jiagang; Chen, Wenjie; Fu, Xiaozhe; Lin, Qiang; Chang, Ouqin; Zhao, Lijuan; Lan, Jiangfeng; Li, Ningqiu; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Nervous necrosis virus (NNV) is the causative agent of viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER), a neurological disease responsible for high mortality of fish species worldwide. Taking advantage of our established Chinese perch brain (CPB) cell line derived from brain tissues of Mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi), the susceptibility of CPB cell to Red-Spotted Grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) was evaluated. The results showed that RGNNV replicated well in CPB cells, resulting in cellular apoptosis. Moreover, the susceptibility of Mandarin fish to RGNNV was also evaluated. Abnormal swimming was observed in RGNNV-infected Mandarin fish. In addition, the cellular vacuolation and viral particles were also observed in brain tissues of RGNNV-infected Mandarin fish by Hematoxylin-eosin staining or electronic microscopy. The established RGNNV susceptible brain cell line from freshwater fish will pave a new way for the study of the pathogenicity and replication of NNV in the future. PMID:27213348

  14. Susceptibility of Chinese Perch Brain (CPB) Cell and Mandarin Fish to Red-Spotted Grouper Nervous Necrosis Virus (RGNNV) Infection.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jiagang; Chen, Wenjie; Fu, Xiaozhe; Lin, Qiang; Chang, Ouqin; Zhao, Lijuan; Lan, Jiangfeng; Li, Ningqiu; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Nervous necrosis virus (NNV) is the causative agent of viral encephalopathy and retinopathy (VER), a neurological disease responsible for high mortality of fish species worldwide. Taking advantage of our established Chinese perch brain (CPB) cell line derived from brain tissues of Mandarin fish (Siniperca chuatsi), the susceptibility of CPB cell to Red-Spotted Grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) was evaluated. The results showed that RGNNV replicated well in CPB cells, resulting in cellular apoptosis. Moreover, the susceptibility of Mandarin fish to RGNNV was also evaluated. Abnormal swimming was observed in RGNNV-infected Mandarin fish. In addition, the cellular vacuolation and viral particles were also observed in brain tissues of RGNNV-infected Mandarin fish by Hematoxylin-eosin staining or electronic microscopy. The established RGNNV susceptible brain cell line from freshwater fish will pave a new way for the study of the pathogenicity and replication of NNV in the future. PMID:27213348

  15. Susceptibility of Mink (Mustera vision)-Derived Cells to Replication by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Koito, Atsushi; Kameyama, Yuichi; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2003-01-01

    In vivo studies for understanding viral transmission and replication, host immune responses, and pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection would greatly benefit from the establishment of a small-animal model. In this study, we explored the potential of American mink (Mustera vison) as a susceptible host. We found that primary cells and cell lines derived from this species efficiently supported trans-activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat by Tat. Accordingly, the cysteine residue at position 261, which has been shown to be important for interaction of the human cyclin T1 with the HIV-1 regulatory protein Tat, is conserved in the mink homologue. No species-specific defect in Rev function could be detected in mink cells. In addition, primary splenocytes, fibroblasts, and the Mv.1.Lu cell line from American mink supported early as well as late HIV-1 gene expression following infection with vesicular stomatitis G protein-pseudotyped HIV-1 viruses, at levels comparable to those seen with permissive human cells. Furthermore, the mink Mv.1.Lu cell line stably expressing human CD4 and CCR5 receptors supported a spreading HIV-1 infection with few, if any, deficiencies compared to findings in human cell lines. This indicates the potential of HIV-1 to replicate in these cells once the blockade at the stage of virus entry has been removed. These results clearly show that cells from American mink generally pose no functional intracellular block to HIV-1 replication, and collectively they raise the possibility that this animal species could be engineered to support HIV-1 infection, providing a useful small-animal model for evaluating de novo infection by HIV-1. PMID:12692213

  16. Differential susceptibility of macrophage cell lines to Bacillus anthracis-Vollum 1B.

    PubMed

    Gutting, B W; Gaske, K S; Schilling, A S; Slaterbeck, A F; Sobota, L; Mackie, R S; Buhr, T L

    2005-03-01

    Bacillus anthracis (BA) is a spore forming bacterium and the causative agent of anthrax disease. Macrophages (Mphis) play a central role in anthrax disease. An important step in disease progression is the ability of BA to secrete lethal toxin (LeTx) that kills Mphis. LeTx is a heterodimer composed of protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor (LF). Researchers have shown that Mphi cell lines demonstrate differential susceptibility to purified LeTx; for example RAW264.7 and J774A.1 Mphis are sensitive to LeTx whereas IC-21 Mphis are resistant. Research has also suggested that exogenous factors, including other BA proteins, can influence the activity of LeTx. For this reason, the objective of the current work was to examine if RAW264.7, J774A.1, and IC-21 Mphis demonstrated differential susceptibility when cultured with a LeTx-producing strain of BA. Here, we co-cultured Mphis with LeTx+ Vollum 1B (V1B) spores for >15 h and assayed for Mphi cell death by morphology, trypan blue (TB) staining, neutral red (NR) activity, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the culture media. Following the addition of V1B spores, necrosis (approximately 50% mortality) was observed in RAW264.7 and J774A.1 Mphis at 7.5 and 10 h, respectively. By 15 h, both RAW264.7 and J774A.1 Mphis demonstrated 100% mortality. In contrast, IC-21 Mphis, under identical culture conditions, remained viable (98%) and activated throughout the course of the experiment (>24 h). The mechanism of RAW264.7 cell death appeared to involve LeTx because the V1B-induced cytotoxicity was dose-dependently reversed by the addition of anti-PA antibody to the culture media. These observations suggest there is differential susceptibility of Mphi cell lines to the LeTx+ V1B strain of BA. Further development of this in vitro model may be useful to further characterize the interactions between Mphis and BA spores. PMID:15649636

  17. CD52-Negative NK Cells Are Abundant in the Liver and Less Susceptible to Alemtuzumab Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Toshiharu; Muraoka, Izumi; Tryphonopoulos, Panagiotis; Fan, Ji; Tekin, Akin; Selvaggi, Gennaro; Levi, David; Ruiz, Phillip; Ricordi, Camillo; Vianna, Rodrigo; Ohdan, Hideki; Waldmann, Herman; Tzakis, Andreas G.; Nishida, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    Background T-cell depleting strategies have become an integral part of immunosuppressive regimens in organ transplantation. Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody against CD52, a cell-surface antigen on several immune cells. It has been suggested that lymphocyte depletion increases the risk of serious infections. However, this has not been observed with short-term alemtuzumab treatment in an organ transplant setting. For induction therapy using alemtuzumab following liver transplantation, we found that T- and B-cell numbers declined rapidly after alemtuzumab therapy; however, the natural killer (NK) cell number was sustained. NK cells are important effectors of innate immunity. Since the effects of alemtuzumab on NK cell functions, especially those of liver NK cells, are unknown, this study aimed to investigate this in detail. Methods To assess the effect of alemtuzumab on NK cells, samples were obtained from 7 organ donors and examined by flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide. Phenotypical and functional differences within subsets of NK cells with different levels of CD52 expression were determined by flow cytometry and in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Results CD52 expression on NK cells was lower than that on other lymphocyte subsets. The liver contained a large number of CD52− NK cells compared with the peripheral blood. In vitro treatment of liver-derived NK cells with alemtuzumab did not result in cell death. In contrast, co-incubation with alemtuzumab induced cell death in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and non-NK cells in the liver. Furthermore, CD52− liver NK cells were more cytotoxic and produced more IFN-γ than CD52+ NK cells after cytokine activation. Conclusion The liver contains a large number of CD52− NK cells. These cells are refractory to alemtuzumab and have robust activity. These findings indicate that CD52− NK cells persist and could protect against infection after alemtuzumab-based lymphocyte depletion. PMID

  18. Determining Outdoor CPV Cell Temperature (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, M.

    2011-04-01

    An accurate method is needed for determining cell temperature when measuring CPV modules outdoors. It has been suggested that cell temperature can be calculated though a procedure that shutters sunlight to the cells while measuring the transients in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and heat sink temperature. This presentation documents application of this shutter procedure to multiple CPV modules at NREL. The challenges and limitations are presented along with an alternate approach to measuring CPV cell operating temperature.

  19. Determining Outdoor CPV Cell Temperature: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, M.; Deline, C.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S.; Bosco, N.

    2011-07-01

    An accurate method is needed for determining cell temperature when measuring CPV modules outdoors. It has been suggested that cell temperature can be calculated though a procedure that shutters sunlight to the cells while measuring the transients in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and heat sink temperature. This paper documents application of this shutter procedure to multiple CPV modules at NREL. The challenges and limitations are presented along with an alternate approach to measuring CPV cell operating temperature.

  20. Automated determination of chemical functionalisation addition routes based on magnetic susceptibility and nucleus independent chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Lier, G.; Ewels, C. P.; Geerlings, P.

    2008-07-01

    We present a modified version of our previously reported meta-code SACHA, for systematic analysis of chemical addition. The code automates the generation of structures, running of quantum chemical codes, and selection of preferential isomers based on chosen selection rules. While the selection rules for the previous version were based on the total system energy, predicting purely thermodynamic addition patterns, we examine here the possibility of using other system parameters, notably magnetic susceptibility as a descriptor of global aromaticity, and nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS) as local aromaticity descriptor.

  1. Mechanism of shape determination in motile cells

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Kinneret; Pincus, Zachary; Allen, Greg M.; Barnhart, Erin L.; Marriott, Gerard; Mogilner, Alex; Theriot, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    The shape of motile cells is determined by many dynamic processes spanning several orders of magnitude in space and time, from local polymerization of actin monomers at subsecond timescales to global, cell-scale geometry that may persist for hours. Understanding the mechanism of shape determination in cells has proved to be extremely challenging due to the numerous components involved and the complexity of their interactions. Here we harness the natural phenotypic variability in a large population of motile epithelial keratocytes from fish (Hypsophrys nicaraguensis) to reveal mechanisms of shape determination. We find that the cells inhabit a low-dimensional, highly correlated spectrum of possible functional states. We further show that a model of actin network treadmilling in an inextensible membrane bag can quantitatively recapitulate this spectrum and predict both cell shape and speed. Our model provides a simple biochemical and biophysical basis for the observed morphology and behaviour of motile cells. PMID:18497816

  2. Prospects and limitations for determining the parameters in physical-based regional landslide susceptibility model using back analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jia-Jyun; Liu, Chia-Nan; Lin, Yan-Cheng; Chen, Ci-Ren

    2010-05-01

    Landslide susceptibility analysis is crucial from viewpoint of hazard mitigation. Statistical and deterministic approaches are frequently adopted for landslide susceptibility analysis. Based on physical models, deterministic approaches are superior to the statistical approaches for they fully take the mechanical mechanisms into account. However, it is difficult to input the appropriate mechanical parameters (including strength and hydraulic) in a deterministic model. Back analysis is a promising way to calibrate the required parameters though few researches have paid attention to evaluate the performance of back analysis approach. This research use hypothetical cases (100 cells) to investigate the prospects and limitations for estimating the parameters of a deterministic model by using back-analysis approach. Based on the assigned hydraulic and strength parameters, the corresponding safety factor and landslide inventory (cell with safety factor less than 1), as well as the depth of ground water table for each cell, were calculated using a deterministic model, TRIGRS. The landslide inventory derived from the forward calculation is then used to back-calculate the pre-assigned parameters. Two scenarios of back analysis approaches were examined in this research. The results reveal that the non-uniqueness of back-analyzed hydraulic and strength parameters is detrimental to the performance if only the landslide inventory is utilized to back-calculate the parameters. However, the performance of back-calculation will be improved if the spatial and temporal variation of ground water table is used to calibrate the hydraulic parameters first. Thereafter, the multiple landslide inventories are hopefully helpful to soothe the non-uniqueness on back-calculating the hydraulic and strength parameters for a deterministic landslide susceptibility analysis in regional scale.

  3. Neural stem cell-encoded temporal patterning delineates an early window of malignant susceptibility in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Narbonne-Reveau, Karine; Lanet, Elodie; Dillard, Caroline; Foppolo, Sophie; Chen, Ching-Huan; Parrinello, Hugues; Rialle, Stéphanie; Sokol, Nicholas S; Maurange, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric neural tumors are often initiated during early development and can undergo very rapid transformation. However, the molecular basis of this early malignant susceptibility remains unknown. During Drosophila development, neural stem cells (NSCs) divide asymmetrically and generate intermediate progenitors that rapidly differentiate in neurons. Upon gene inactivation, these progeny can dedifferentiate and generate malignant tumors. Here, we find that intermediate progenitors are prone to malignancy only when born during an early window of development while expressing the transcription factor Chinmo, and the mRNA-binding proteins Imp/IGF2BP and Lin-28. These genes compose an oncogenic module that is coopted upon dedifferentiation of early-born intermediate progenitors to drive unlimited tumor growth. In late larvae, temporal transcription factor progression in NSCs silences the module, thereby limiting mitotic potential and terminating the window of malignant susceptibility. Thus, this study identifies the gene regulatory network that confers malignant potential to neural tumors with early developmental origins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13463.001 PMID:27296804

  4. Impacts of CA9 Gene Polymorphisms on Urothelial Cell Carcinoma Susceptibility and Clinicopathologic Characteristics in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Yen-Chuan; Chen, Chuan-Shu; Li, Jian-Ri; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2013-01-01

    Background Carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) is reportedly overexpressed in several types of carcinomas and is generally considered a marker of malignancy. The current study explored the effect of CA9 gene polymorphisms on the susceptibility of developing urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) and the clinicopathological status. Methodology and Principal Findings A total of 442 participants, including 221 healthy people and 221 patients with UCC, were recruited for this study. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the CA9 gene were assessed by a real-time PCR with the TaqMan assay. After adjusting for other co-variants, the individuals carrying at least one A allele at CA9 rs1048638 had a 2.303-fold risk of developing UCC than did wild-type (CC) carriers. Furthermore, UCC patients who carried at least one A allele at rs1048638 had a higher invasive stage risk (p< 0.05) than did patients carrying the wild-type allele. Moreover, among the UCC patients with smoker, people with at least one A allele of CA9 polymorphisms (rs1048638) had a 4.75-fold (95% CI = 1.204–18.746) increased risk of invasive cancer. Conclusion The rs1048638 polymorphic genotypes of CA9 might contribute to the prediction of susceptibility to and pathological development of UCC. This is the first study to provide insight into risk factors associated with CA9 variants in carcinogenesis of UCC in Taiwan. PMID:24349364

  5. Lack of Apoptosis of Infiltrating Cells as the Mechanism of High Susceptibility to EAE in DA Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mensah-Brown, Eric; Galadari, Sehamuddin; Shahin, Allen

    2001-01-01

    Dark Agouti (DA) rats are highly susceptible to induction of Th-l-mediated autoimmunity disease, including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). In contrast to other susceptible rat strains in which disease is induced only with encephalitogen emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvants (CFA), in DA rats EAE develops after injection of encephalitogen in incomplete Freund's adjuvants (IFA) or Titermax, putative Th-2 directed adjuvant. Lymph node cells derived from immunized DA rats and stimulated in vitro produce significantly more Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) than resistant Albino Oxford (AO) rats. However, cells derived from both strains produce large amounts of IL-10 but not IL-4. Immunized lymph node cells derived from EAE susceptible (AO × DA) F1rats induce clinical signs of disease in sublethally irradiated parental DA but not AO rats. The pathohistology of the target tissue in these recipients clearly demonstrated infiltration of mononuclear cells in both parental strains. However, the number of CD4+ cells was significantly higher and number of apoptotic cells significantly lower in DA rats sacrificed 8 days after passive transfer. We postulate that in addition to higher IFN-γ and TNF-α production, resistance to early apoptosis of the invading cells in the target tissue possibly due to lack of downregulation by TGF-β leads to exceptional susceptibility to EAE in DA rats. PMID:11785669

  6. Genetic variation in SIRT1 affects susceptibility of lung squamous cell carcinomas in former uranium miners from the Colorado plateau

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuguang; Picchi, Maria A.; Liu, Yushi; Thomas, Cynthia L.; Willis, Derall G.; Bernauer, Amanda M.; Carr, Teara G.; Mabel, Padilla T.; Han, Younghun; Amos, Christopher I.; Lin, Yong; Stidley, Christine A.; Gilliland, Frank D.; Jacobson, Marty R.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of underground miners suggested that occupational exposure to radon causes lung cancer with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as the predominant histological type. However, the genetic determinants for susceptibility of radon-induced SCC in miners are unclear. Double-strand breaks induced by radioactive radon daughters are repaired primarily by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) that is accompanied by the dynamic changes in surrounding chromatin, including nucleosome repositioning and histone modifications. Thus, a molecular epidemiological study was conducted to assess whether genetic variation in 16 genes involved in NHEJ and related histone modification affected susceptibility for SCC in radon-exposed former miners (267 SCC cases and 383 controls) from the Colorado plateau. A global association between genetic variation in the haplotype block where SIRT1 resides and the risk for SCC in miners (P = 0.003) was identified. Haplotype alleles tagged by the A allele of SIRT1 rs7097008 were associated with increased risk for SCC (odds ratio = 1.69, P = 8.2×10−5) and greater survival in SCC cases (hazard ratio = 0.79, P = 0.03) in miners. Functional validation of rs7097008 demonstrated that the A allele was associated with reduced gene expression in bronchial epithelial cells and compromised DNA repair capacity in peripheral lymphocytes. Together, these findings substantiate genetic variation in SIRT1 as a risk modifier for developing SCC in miners and suggest that SIRT1 may also play a tumor suppressor role in radon-induced cancer in miners. PMID:23354305

  7. Development of Similar Broth Microdilution Methods to Determine the Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Flavobacterium columnare and F. psychrophilum.

    PubMed

    Gieseker, Charles M; Crosby, Tina C; Mayer, Tamara D; Bodeis, Sonya M; Stine, Cynthia B

    2016-03-01

    Flavobacterium columnare and F. psychrophilum are major fish pathogens that cause diseases that may require antimicrobial therapy. Choice of appropriate treatment is dependent upon determining the antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates. Therefore we optimized methods for broth microdilution testing of F. columnare and F. psychrophilum to facilitate standardizing an antimicrobial susceptibility test. We developed adaptations to make reproducible broth inoculums and confirmed the proper incubation time and media composition. We tested the stability of potential quality-control bacteria and compared test results between different operators. Log phase occurred at 48 h for F. columnare and 72-96 h for F. psychrophilum, confirming the test should be incubated at 28°C for approximately 48 h and at 18°C for approximately 96 h, respectively. The most consistent susceptibility results were achieved with plain, 4-g/L, dilute Mueller-Hinton broth supplemented with dilute calcium and magnesium. Supplementing the broth with horse serum did not improve growth. The quality-control strains, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC 33658, yielded stable minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against all seven antimicrobials tested after 30 passes at 28°C and 15 passes at 18°C. In comparison tests, most MICs of the isolates agreed 100% within one drug dilution for ampicillin, florfenicol, and oxytetracycline. The agreement was lower with the ormetoprim-sulfdimethoxine combination, but there was at least 75% agreement for all but one isolate. These experiments have provided methods to help standardize antimicrobial susceptibility testing of these nutritionally fastidious aquatic bacteria. Received June 24, 2015; accepted October 2, 2015. PMID:26949840

  8. Myeloid Dendritic Cells (DCs) of Mice Susceptible to Paracoccidioidomycosis Suppress T Cell Responses whereas Myeloid and Plasmacytoid DCs from Resistant Mice Induce Effector and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Adriana; Frank de Araujo, Eliseu; Felonato, Maíra; Loures, Flávio V.; Feriotti, Claudia; Bernardino, Simone; Barbuto, José Alexandre M.

    2013-01-01

    The protective adaptive immune response in paracoccidioidomycosis, a mycosis endemic among humans, is mediated by T cell immunity, whereas impaired T cell responses are associated with severe, progressive disease. The early host response to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection is not known since the disease is diagnosed at later phases of infection. Our laboratory established a murine model of infection where susceptible mice reproduce the severe disease, while resistant mice develop a mild infection. This work aimed to characterize the influence of dendritic cells in the innate and adaptive immunity of susceptible and resistant mice. We verified that P. brasiliensis infection induced in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) of susceptible mice a prevalent proinflammatory myeloid phenotype that secreted high levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12), tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-β, whereas in resistant mice, a mixed population of myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs secreting proinflammatory cytokines and expressing elevated levels of secreted and membrane-bound transforming growth factor β was observed. In proliferation assays, the proinflammatory DCs from B10.A mice induced anergy of naïve T cells, whereas the mixed DC subsets from resistant mice induced the concomitant proliferation of effector and regulatory T cells (Tregs). Equivalent results were observed during pulmonary infection. The susceptible mice displayed preferential expansion of proinflammatory myeloid DCs, resulting in impaired proliferation of effector T cells. Conversely, the resistant mice developed myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs that efficiently expanded gamma interferon-, IL-4-, and IL-17-positive effector T cells associated with increased development of Tregs. Our work highlights the deleterious effect of excessive innate proinflammatory reactions and provides new evidence for the importance of immunomodulation during pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:23340311

  9. Increased NHC Cells in the Peritoneal Cavity of Plasmacytoma Susceptible BALB/c Mouse.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Berenice; García-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Farfán-Morales, José Eduardo; Jiménez-Zamudio, Luis Antonio

    2015-01-01

    BALB/c strain mice are unique in that they develop murine plasmacytoma (MPC) as a consequence of the inflammation induced by pristane oil injection in the peritoneal cavity. In this work the Treg, Th17, B1, B2, and NHC lymphocyte populations from the peritoneal environment of BALB/c, the susceptible strain, and C57BL/6 mice, which do not develop MPC after oil treatment, were studied. Both oil-treated strains showed decreased levels of Th17 lymphocytes, no significant variation in Treg lymphocytes, and a drastic decrease of all B lymphocyte populations. However, only oil-induced BALB/c showed increased levels of natural helper cells (NHC) which could be important in the myeloma induction. PMID:26504358

  10. Increased NHC Cells in the Peritoneal Cavity of Plasmacytoma Susceptible BALB/c Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-González, Berenice; García-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Farfán-Morales, José Eduardo; Jiménez-Zamudio, Luis Antonio

    2015-01-01

    BALB/c strain mice are unique in that they develop murine plasmacytoma (MPC) as a consequence of the inflammation induced by pristane oil injection in the peritoneal cavity. In this work the Treg, Th17, B1, B2, and NHC lymphocyte populations from the peritoneal environment of BALB/c, the susceptible strain, and C57BL/6 mice, which do not develop MPC after oil treatment, were studied. Both oil-treated strains showed decreased levels of Th17 lymphocytes, no significant variation in Treg lymphocytes, and a drastic decrease of all B lymphocyte populations. However, only oil-induced BALB/c showed increased levels of natural helper cells (NHC) which could be important in the myeloma induction. PMID:26504358

  11. Use of an advanced composite material in construction of a high pressure cell for magnetic ac susceptibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Misek, M.; Jacobsen, M. K.; Kamenev, K. V.

    2014-10-01

    The applicability of fibre-reinforced polymers for fabrication of high pressure cells was assessed using finite element analysis and experimental testing. Performance and failure modes for the key components of the cell working in tension and in compression were evaluated and the ways for optimising the designs were established. These models were used in construction of a miniature fully non-metallic diamond anvil cell for magnetic ac susceptibility measurements in a magnetic property measurement system. The cell is approximately 14 mm long, 8.5 mm in diameter and was demonstrated to reach a pressure of 5.6 GPa. AC susceptibility data collected on Dy2O3 demonstrate the performance of the cell in magnetic property measurements and confirm that there is no screening of the sample by the environment which typically accompanies the use of conventional metallic high pressure cells in oscillating magnetic fields.

  12. Virulence determinants, antimicrobial susceptibility, and molecular profiles of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains isolated from China

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhang, Jianmin; Yang, Longsheng; Wang, Xiangru; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the epidemiology, serotype, antibiotic sensitivity, and clonal structure of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains in China. Forty-eight strains were collected from seven provinces during the period from 2012 to 2013. Pulse-field electrophoresis identified 32 different patterns which were classified into clonal groups A–D. Most pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns were observed in clonal complex A and B, suggesting high diversity of genetic characterization in these two predominant clonal complexes. Antibiotic sensitivity test shows that all the stains were susceptible to ampicillin, erythromycin, and cefotaxime, and resistant to kanamycin, cefazolin, sulfadiazine, and amikacin. Erythromycin and ampicillin are recommended as first-line antibiotics for treatment of E. rhusiopathiae in China. The high variation in PFGE pattern among the main clonal groups shows that the E. rhusiopathiae in China may originate from different lineages and sources instead of from expansion of a single clonal lineage across different regions. PMID:26975059

  13. Neurite formation by neurons derived from adult rat hippocampal progenitor cells is susceptible to myelin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mellough, Carla B; Cho, Seongeun; Wood, Andrew; Przyborski, Stefan

    2011-09-01

    Myelin-associated inhibitors expressed following injury to the adult central nervous system (CNS) induce growth cone collapse and retraction of the axonal cytoskeleton. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) is a bi-functional molecule that promotes neuritogenesis in some immature neurons during development then becomes inhibitory to neurite outgrowth as neurons mature. Progress is being made towards the elucidation of the downstream events that regulate myelin inhibition of regeneration in neuronal populations. However it is not known how adult-derived neural stem cells or progenitors respond to myelin during neuronal differentiation and neuritogenesis. Here we examine the effect of MAG on neurons derived from an adult rat hippocampal progenitor cell line (AHPCs). We show that, unlike their developmental counterparts, AHPC-derived neurons are susceptible to MAG inhibition of neuritogenesis during differentiation and display a 57% reduction in neurite outgrowth when compared with controls. We demonstrate that this effect can be overcome (by up to 69%) by activation of the neurotrophin, cyclic AMP and protein kinase A pathways or by Rho-kinase suppression. We also demonstrate that combination of these factors enhanced neurite outgrowth from differentiating neurons in the presence of MAG. This work provides important information for the successful generation of new neurons from adult neural stem cell populations within compromised adult circuitry and is thus directly relevant to endogenous repair and regeneration of the adult CNS. PMID:21256909

  14. Differential susceptibility of primary cultured human skin cells to hypericin PDT in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Popovic, A; Wiggins, T; Davids, L M

    2015-08-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence rate in South Africa is increasing. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective treatment modality, through topical administration, for treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers. Our group investigates hypericin-induced PDT (HYP-PDT) for the treatment of both non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. However, a prerequisite for effective cancer treatments is efficient and selective targeting of the tumoral cells with minimal collateral damage to the surrounding normal cells, as it is well established that cancer therapies have bystander effects on normal cells in the body, often causing undesirable side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular and molecular effects of HYP-PDT on normal primary human keratinocytes (Kc), melanocytes (Mc) and fibroblasts (Fb) in an in vitro tissue culture model which represented both the epidermal and dermal cellular compartments of human skin. Cell viability analysis revealed a differential cytotoxic response to a range of HYP-PDT doses in all the human skin cell types, showing that Fb (LD50=1.75μM) were the most susceptible to HYP-PDT, followed by Mc (LD50=3.5μM) and Kc (LD50>4μM HYP-PDT) These results correlated with the morphological analysis which displayed distinct morphological changes in Fb and Mc, 24h post treatment with non-lethal (1μM) and lethal (3μM) doses of HYP-PDT, but the highest HYP-PDT doses had no effect on Kc morphology. Fluorescent microscopy displayed cytoplasmic localization of HYP in all the 3 skin cell types and additionally, HYP was excluded from the nuclei in all the cell types. Intracellular ROS levels measured in Fb at 3μM HYP-PDT, displayed a significant 3.8 fold (p<0.05) increase in ROS, but no significant difference in ROS levels occurred in Mc or Kc. Furthermore, 64% (p<0.005) early apoptotic Fb and 20% (p<0.05) early apoptotic Mc were evident; using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), 24

  15. Structural determinants of HIV-1 Vif susceptibility and DNA binding in APOBEC3F

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Karen K.; Sultana, Azmiri; Azimi, Farshad C.; Lee, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 family of DNA cytosine deaminases serves as a front-line intrinsic immune response to inhibit the replication of diverse retroviruses. APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G are the most potent factors against HIV-1. As a countermeasure, HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) targets APOBEC3s for proteasomal degradation. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Vif-binding domain in APOBEC3F and a novel assay to assess Vif-APOBEC3 binding. Our results point to an amphipathic surface that is conserved in APOBEC3s as critical for Vif susceptibility in APOBEC3F. Electrostatic interactions likely mediate Vif binding. Moreover, structure-guided mutagenesis reveals a straight ssDNA-binding groove distinct from the Vif-binding site, and a novel ‘aromatic switch’ is proposed to explain DNA substrate specificities across the APOBEC3 family. This study opens new lines of inquiry that will further our understanding of APOBEC3-mediated retroviral restriction and provides an accurate template for structure-guided development of inhibitors targeting the APOBEC3-Vif axis. PMID:24185281

  16. Air pollution metric analysis while determining susceptible periods of pregnancy for low birth weight.

    PubMed

    Warren, Joshua L; Fuentes, Montserrat; Herring, Amy H; Langlois, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Multiple metrics to characterize air pollution are available for use in environmental health analyses in addition to the standard Air Quality System (AQS) pollution monitoring data. These metrics have complete spatial-temporal coverage across a domain and are therefore crucial in calculating pollution exposures in geographic areas where AQS monitors are not present. We investigate the impact that two of these metrics, output from a deterministic chemistry model (CMAQ) and from a spatial-temporal downscaler statistical model which combines information from AQS and CMAQ (DS), have on risk assessment. Using each metric, we analyze ambient ozone's effect on low birth weight utilizing a Bayesian temporal probit regression model. Weekly windows of susceptibility are identified and analyzed jointly for all births in a subdomain of Texas, 2001-2004, and results from the different pollution metrics are compared. Increased exposures during weeks 20-23 of the pregnancy are identified as being associated with low birth weight by the DS metric. Use of the CMAQ output alone results in increased variability of the final risk assessment estimates, while calibrating the CMAQ through use of the DS metric provides results more closely resembling those of the AQS. The AQS data are still preferred when available. PMID:23431464

  17. Air Pollution Metric Analysis While Determining Susceptible Periods of Pregnancy for Low Birth Weight

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Joshua L.; Fuentes, Montserrat; Herring, Amy H.; Langlois, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple metrics to characterize air pollution are available for use in environmental health analyses in addition to the standard Air Quality System (AQS) pollution monitoring data. These metrics have complete spatial-temporal coverage across a domain and are therefore crucial in calculating pollution exposures in geographic areas where AQS monitors are not present. We investigate the impact that two of these metrics, output from a deterministic chemistry model (CMAQ) and from a spatial-temporal downscaler statistical model which combines information from AQS and CMAQ (DS), have on risk assessment. Using each metric, we analyze ambient ozone's effect on low birth weight utilizing a Bayesian temporal probit regression model. Weekly windows of susceptibility are identified and analyzed jointly for all births in a subdomain of Texas, 2001–2004, and results from the different pollution metrics are compared. Increased exposures during weeks 20–23 of the pregnancy are identified as being associated with low birth weight by the DS metric. Use of the CMAQ output alone results in increased variability of the final risk assessment estimates, while calibrating the CMAQ through use of the DS metric provides results more closely resembling those of the AQS. The AQS data are still preferred when available. PMID:23431464

  18. Cytokinetically quiescent (G0/G1) human multiple myeloma cells are susceptible to simultaneous inhibition of Chk1 and MEK1/2.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xin-Yan; Dai, Yun; Youssefian, Leena E; Chen, Shuang; Bodie, Wesley W; Takabatake, Yukie; Felthousen, Jessica; Almenara, Jorge A; Kramer, Lora B; Dent, Paul; Grant, Steven

    2011-11-10

    Effects of Chk1 and MEK1/2 inhibition were investigated in cytokinetically quiescent multiple myeloma (MM) and primary CD138(+) cells. Coexposure to the Chk1 and MEK1/2 inhibitors AZD7762 and selumetinib (AZD6244) robustly induced apoptosis in various MM cells and CD138(+) primary samples, but spared normal CD138(-) and CD34(+) cells. Furthermore, Chk1/MEK1/2 inhibitor treatment of asynchronized cells induced G(0)/G(1) arrest and increased apoptosis in all cell-cycle phases, including G(0)/G(1). To determine whether this regimen is active against quiescent G(0)/G(1) MM cells, cells were cultured in low-serum medium to enrich the G(0)/G(1) population. G(0)/G(1)-enriched cells exhibited diminished sensitivity to conventional agents (eg, Taxol and VP-16) but significantly increased susceptibility to Chk1 ± MEK1/2 inhibitors or Chk1 shRNA knock-down. These events were associated with increased γH2A.X expression/foci formation and Bim up-regulation, whereas Bim shRNA knock-down markedly attenuated lethality. Immunofluorescent analysis of G(0)/G(1)-enriched or primary MM cells demonstrated colocalization of activated caspase-3 and the quiescent (G(0)) marker statin, a nuclear envelope protein. Finally, Chk1/MEK1/2 inhibition increased cell death in the Hoechst-positive (Hst(+)), low pyronin Y (PY)-staining (2N Hst(+)/PY(-)) G(0) population and in sorted small side-population (SSP) MM cells. These findings provide evidence that cytokinetically quiescent MM cells are highly susceptible to simultaneous Chk1 and MEK1/2 inhibition. PMID:21911831

  19. Follicular dendritic cell dedifferentiation reduces scrapie susceptibility following inoculation via the skin.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Joanne; Bruce, Moira E; Mabbott, Neil A

    2005-02-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of subacute infectious neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by the accumulation in affected tissues of PrP(Sc), an abnormal isoform of the host prion protein (PrPc). Following peripheral exposure, TSE infectivity and PrP(Sc) usually accumulate in lymphoid tissues prior to neuroinvasion. Studies in mice have shown that exposure through scarified skin is an effective means of TSE transmission. Following inoculation via the skin, a functional immune system is critical for the transmission of TSEs to the brain, but until now, it has not been known which components of the immune system are required for efficient neuroinvasion. Temporary dedifferentiation of follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) by treatment with an inhibitor of the lymphotoxin-beta receptor signalling pathway (LTbetaR-Ig) 3 days before or 14 days after inoculation via the skin, blocked the early accumulation of PrP(Sc) and TSE infectivity within the draining lymph node. Furthermore, in the temporary absence of FDCs before inoculation, disease susceptibility was reduced and survival time significantly extended. Treatment with LTbetaR-Ig 14 days after TSE inoculation also significantly extended the disease incubation period. However, treatment 42 days after inoculation did not affect disease susceptibility or survival time, suggesting that the infection may have already have spread to the nervous system. Together these data show that FDCs are essential for the accumulation of PrP(Sc) and infectivity within lymphoid tissues and subsequent neuroinvasion following TSE exposure via the skin. PMID:15667567

  20. Genotype is an important determinant factor of host susceptibility to periodontitis in the Collaborative Cross and inbred mouse populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontal infection (Periodontitis) is a chronic inflammatory disease, which results in the breakdown of the supporting tissues of the teeth. Previous epidemiological studies have suggested that resistance to chronic periodontitis is controlled to some extent by genetic factors of the host. The aim of this study was to determine the phenotypic response of inbred and Collaborative Cross (CC) mouse populations to periodontal bacterial challenge, using an experimental periodontitis model. In this model, mice are co-infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, bacterial strains associated with human periodontal disease. Six weeks following the infection, the maxillary jaws were harvested and analyzed for alveolar bone loss relative to uninfected controls, using computerized microtomography (microCT). Initially, four commercial inbred mouse strains were examined to calibrate the procedure and test for gender effects. Subsequently, we applied the same protocol to 23 lines (at inbreeding generations 10–18) from the newly developed mouse genetic reference population, the Collaborative Cross (CC) to determine heritability and genetic variation of control bone volume prior to infection (CBV, naïve bone volume around the teeth of uninfected mice), and residual bone volume (RBV, bone volume after infection) and loss of bone volume (LBV, the difference between CBV and RBV) following infection. Results BALB/CJ mice were highly susceptible (P<0.05) whereas DBA/2J, C57BL/6J and A/J mice were resistant. Six lines of the tested CC population were susceptible, whereas the remaining lines were resistant to alveolar bone loss. Gender effects on bone volume were tested across the four inbred and 23 CC lines, and found not to be significant. Based on ANOVA analyses, broad-sense heritabilities were statistically significant and equal to 0.4 for CBV and 0.2 for LBV. Conclusions The moderate heritability values indicate that the variation in host

  1. Development of cell lines from the cactophagous insect: Cactoblastis cactorum (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and their susceptibility to three baculoviruses.

    PubMed

    Grasela, James J; McIntosh, Arthur H; Ringbauer, Joseph; Goodman, Cynthia L; Carpenter, James E; Popham, Holly J R

    2012-05-01

    refractive to an HzSNPV challenge at an MOI of 10. In this study, we have demonstrated both the successful development of a C. cactorum cell line and its ability to support a complete baculovirus infection. The potential is also there to pursue further investigations to determine the susceptibility of the cactus moth cell line to other viruses. Additionally, the availability of a cactus moth cell line will facilitate the analysis of viruses prior to using the more expensive bioassay test. Finally, it is hoped with the knowledge presented here that baculoviruses may also be considered as an alternative biocontrol method for the cactus moth. PMID:22580906

  2. Effects of EZH2 promoter polymorphisms and methylation status on oral squamous cell carcinoma susceptibility and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Su, Kuo-Jung; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Yang, Shun-Fa; Yu, Yung-Luen

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), which is malignant tumors in oral cavity, is the fourth most common male cancer in Taiwan. EZH2 plays a key role in transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and in cancer development. Although the EZH2 expression in OSCC is highly correlated with tumorigenesis, it has not been determined if specific EZH2 genetic variants are associated with OSCC risk. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between genetic polymorphisms of EZH2 and susceptibility to OSCC in Taiwan. Here, four SNPs of EZH2 (rs6950683, rs2302427, rs3757441, and rs41277434) were analyzed by a real-time PCR genotyping in 576 patients with oral cancer and 552 cancer-free controls. After adjusting for other co-variants, we found that carrying CC genotype at EZH2 rs6950683 and rs3757441 had a lower risk of developing OSCC than did wild-type carriers. The CCCA or CCTA haplotype among the four EZH2 sites was also associated with a reduced risk of OSCC. Furthermore, OSCC patients who carried CC genotype at EZH2 rs6950683 had a higher methylation than TC genotype. Our results suggest that the two SNPs of EZH2 (rs6950683 and rs3757441) might contribute to the prediction of OSCC susceptibility. Moreover, rs6950683 CC genotype exhibits hypermethylation in EZH2 promoter. This is the first study to provide insight into risk factors associated with EZH2 variants and epigenetic changes in carcinogenesis of OSCC in Taiwan. PMID:26807327

  3. FOXO1 Deletion Reduces Dendritic Cell Function and Enhances Susceptibility to Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wenmei; Dong, Guangyu; Pacios, Sandra; Alnammary, Maher; Barger, Laura A.; Wang, Yu; Wu, Yingying; Graves, Dana T.

    2016-01-01

    The host response plays both protective and destructive roles in periodontitis. FOXO1 is a transcription factor that is activated in dendritic cells (DCs), but its function in vivo has not been examined. We investigated the role of FOXO1 in activating DCs in experimental (CD11c.Cre+.FOXO1L/L) compared with matched control mice (CD11c.Cre−.FOXO1L/L) in response to oral pathogens. Lineage-specific FOXO1 deletion reduced the recruitment of DCs to oral mucosal epithelium by approximately 40%. FOXO1 was needed for expression of genes that regulate migration, including integrins αν and β3 and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Ablation of FOXO1 in DCs significantly decreased IL-12 produced by DCs in mucosal surfaces. Moreover, FOXO1 deletion reduced migration of DCs to lymph nodes, reduced capacity of DCs to induce formation of plasma cells, and reduced production of bacteria-specific antibody. The decrease in DC function in the experimental mice led to increased susceptibility to periodontitis through a mechanism that involved a compensatory increase in osteoclastogenic factors, IL-1β, IL-17, and RANKL. Thus, we reveal a critical role for FOXO1 in DC recruitment to oral mucosal epithelium and activation of adaptive immunity induced by oral inoculation of bacteria. PMID:25794707

  4. The human T-cell cloning assay: identifying genotypes susceptible to drug toxicity and somatic mutation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sai-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Humans exhibit marked genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism that contribute to high incidence of adverse effects in susceptible individuals due to altered balance between metabolic activation and detoxification. The T-cell cloning assay, which detects mutations in the gene for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT), is the most well-developed reporter system for studying specific locus mutation in human somatic cells. The assay is based on a mitogen- and growth factor-dependent clonal expansion of peripheral T-lymphocytes in which the 6-thioguanine-resistant HPRT mutants can be selected, enumerated, and collected for molecular analysis of the mutational nature. The assay provides a unique tool for studying in vivo and in vitro mutagenesis, for investigating the functional impact of common polymorphism in metabolism and repair genes, and for identifying risk genotypes for drug-induced toxicity and mutagenicity. This chapter presents a simple and reliable method for the enumeration of HPRT mutant frequency induced in vitro without using any source of recombinant interleukin-2. The other main feature is that only truly induced and unique mutants are collected for further analysis. PMID:24623236

  5. Effect of dietary fat levels on the susceptibility of colonic cells to nuclear-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, R.P.; Bruce, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of two levels and types of dietary fats on the susceptibility of colonic cells to the nuclear-damaging effect of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH), 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline (MeIQ), and gamma-radiation was investigated. Corn oil and beef tallow were added to the semisynthetic diet at 5% and 20% levels (weight/weight). A diet-related effect was not evident until after two weeks of feeding. Animals (C57BL/6J female mice) that were given the 20% corn oil or beef tallow diets had significantly (p less than 0.05) more nuclear aberrations in their colons 24 hours following treatment with DMH (5 mg or 10 mg/kg body wt or MeIQ (100 mg/kg body weight) than did those given low-fat diets (5% corn oil or beef tallow). The nuclear-damaging effect of gamma radiation was unaffected by dietary treatments. A high-fat diet had the most pronounced effect on DMH-treated animals, and maximum nuclear aberrations were observed 24 hours following the treatment. Thus, we concluded that increased levels of dietary fats elevate the toxicity of DMH and MeIQ to colonic epithelial cells.

  6. Antifungal Susceptibility in Serum and Virulence Determinants of Candida Bloodstream Isolates from Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Chaminda J; Rajan, Suhasini; Wong, Sarah S W; Tsang, Dominic N C; Lai, Christopher K C; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Candida bloodstream infections (CBI) are one of the most common nosocomial infections globally, and they account for a high mortality rate. The increasing global prevalence of drug-resistant Candida strains has also been posing a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the biofilm formation and production of hemolysin and proteinase of 63 CBI isolates derived from a hospital setting in Hong Kong as well as their antifungal susceptibility both in the presence and in the absence of human serum, using standard methodology. Candida albicans was the predominant species among the 63 CBI isolates collected, and non-albicans Candida species accounted for approximately one third of the isolates (36.5%). Of them, Candida tropicalis was the most common non-albicans Candida species. A high proportion (31.7%) of the CBI isolates (40% of C. albicans isolates, 10% of C. tropicalis isolates, 11% of C. parapsilosis isolates, and 100% of C. glabrata isolates) were found to be resistant to fluconazole. One of the isolates (C. tropicalis) was resistant to amphotericin B. A rising prevalence of drug-resistance CBI isolates in Hong Kong was observed with reference to a previous study. Notably, all non-albicans Candida species, showed increased hemolytic activity relative to C. albicans, whilst C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis exhibited proteinase activities. Majority of the isolates were capable of forming mature biofilms. Interestingly, the presence of serum distorted the yeast sensitivity to fluconazole, but not amphotericin B. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CBI isolates of Candida have the potential to express to varying extent their virulence attributes (e.g., biofilm formation, hemolysin production, and proteinase activity) and these, together with perturbations in their antifungal sensitivity in the presence of serum, may contribute to treatment complication in candidemia. The effect of serum on antifungal activity

  7. Antifungal Susceptibility in Serum and Virulence Determinants of Candida Bloodstream Isolates from Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Rajan, Suhasini; Wong, Sarah S. W.; Tsang, Dominic N. C.; Lai, Christopher K. C.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Candida bloodstream infections (CBI) are one of the most common nosocomial infections globally, and they account for a high mortality rate. The increasing global prevalence of drug-resistant Candida strains has also been posing a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the biofilm formation and production of hemolysin and proteinase of 63 CBI isolates derived from a hospital setting in Hong Kong as well as their antifungal susceptibility both in the presence and in the absence of human serum, using standard methodology. Candida albicans was the predominant species among the 63 CBI isolates collected, and non-albicans Candida species accounted for approximately one third of the isolates (36.5%). Of them, Candida tropicalis was the most common non-albicans Candida species. A high proportion (31.7%) of the CBI isolates (40% of C. albicans isolates, 10% of C. tropicalis isolates, 11% of C. parapsilosis isolates, and 100% of C. glabrata isolates) were found to be resistant to fluconazole. One of the isolates (C. tropicalis) was resistant to amphotericin B. A rising prevalence of drug-resistance CBI isolates in Hong Kong was observed with reference to a previous study. Notably, all non-albicans Candida species, showed increased hemolytic activity relative to C. albicans, whilst C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis exhibited proteinase activities. Majority of the isolates were capable of forming mature biofilms. Interestingly, the presence of serum distorted the yeast sensitivity to fluconazole, but not amphotericin B. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CBI isolates of Candida have the potential to express to varying extent their virulence attributes (e.g., biofilm formation, hemolysin production, and proteinase activity) and these, together with perturbations in their antifungal sensitivity in the presence of serum, may contribute to treatment complication in candidemia. The effect of serum on antifungal activity

  8. Rapid method for determination of antimicrobial susceptibilities pattern of urinary bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chapelle, E. W.; Barza, M. J.; Weinstein, L.; Tuttle, S. A.; Vellend, H.

    1975-01-01

    Method determines bacterial sensitivity to antimicrobial agents by measuring level of adenosine triphosphate remaining in the bacteria. Light emitted during reaction of sample with a mixture of luciferase and luciferin is measured.

  9. Cytokine production in arthritis susceptible and resistant rats: a study with arthritogenic and non-arthritogenic Lactobacillus cell walls.

    PubMed

    Simelyte, E; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Zhang, X; Toivanen, P

    2001-02-01

    The basis of the different susceptibility to bacterial cell wall-induced arthritis between Lewis and Fischer rats is unclear. Likewise, it is not known why cell walls of some species of Lactobacillus are arthritogenic and those of others are not. With these two questions in mind, we investigated the role of anti-inflammatory (interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4) and proinflammatory (tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, IL-1 beta) cytokines in Lewis and Fischer rats injected intraperitoneally with cell walls from arthritogenic or nonarthritogenic species of Lactobacillus. Cytokine levels in the serum and in vitro production by peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes were studied. The results obtained indicate that the differences in the production of IL-10, IL-4, TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta do not explain the difference in the arthritis susceptibility between Lewis and Fischer rats. Likewise, the arthritogenicity of different Lactobacillus cell walls appears not to be dependent on their capacity to stimulate cytokine production. PMID:11169216

  10. Plant cell wall dynamics and wall-related susceptibility in plant–pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bellincampi, Daniela; Cervone, Felice; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that often determines the outcome of the interactions between plants and pathogens. It is a barrier that pathogens need to breach to colonize the plant tissue. While fungal necrotrophs extensively destroy the integrity of the cell wall through the combined action of degrading enzymes, biotrophic fungi require a more localized and controlled degradation of the cell wall in order to keep the host cells alive and utilize their feeding structures. Also bacteria and nematodes need to degrade the plant cell wall at a certain stage of their infection process, to obtain nutrients for their growth. Plants have developed a system for sensing pathogens and monitoring the cell wall integrity, upon which they activate defense responses that lead to a dynamic cell wall remodeling required to prevent the disease. Pathogens, on the other hand, may exploit the host cell wall metabolism to support the infection. We review here the strategies utilized by both plants and pathogens to prevail in the cell wall battleground. PMID:24904623

  11. Airway epithelial cell PPARγ modulates cigarette smoke-induced chemokine expression and emphysema susceptibility in mice.

    PubMed

    Solleti, Siva Kumar; Simon, Dawn M; Srisuma, Sorachai; Arikan, Meltem C; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Rangasamy, Tirumalai; Bijli, Kaiser M; Rahman, Arshad; Crossno, Joseph T; Shapiro, Steven D; Mariani, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a highly prevalent, chronic inflammatory lung disease with limited existing therapeutic options. While modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor (PPAR)-γ activity can modify inflammatory responses in several models of lung injury, the relevance of the PPARG pathway in COPD pathogenesis has not been previously explored. Mice lacking Pparg specifically in airway epithelial cells displayed increased susceptibility to chronic cigarette smoke (CS)-induced emphysema, with excessive macrophage accumulation associated with increased expression of chemokines, Ccl5, Cxcl10, and Cxcl15. Conversely, treatment of mice with a pharmacological PPARγ activator attenuated Cxcl10 and Cxcl15 expression and macrophage accumulation in response to CS. In vitro, CS increased lung epithelial cell chemokine expression in a PPARγ activation-dependent fashion. The ability of PPARγ to regulate CS-induced chemokine expression in vitro was not specifically associated with peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE)-mediated transactivation activity but was correlated with PPARγ-mediated transrepression of NF-κB activity. Pharmacological or genetic activation of PPARγ activity abrogated CS-dependent induction of NF-κB activity. Regulation of NF-κB activity involved direct PPARγ-NF-κB interaction and PPARγ-mediated effects on IKK activation, IκBα degradation, and nuclear translocation of p65. Our data indicate that PPARG represents a disease-relevant pathophysiological and pharmacological target in COPD. Its activation state likely contributes to NF-κB-dependent, CS-induced chemokine-mediated regulation of inflammatory cell accumulation. PMID:26024894

  12. Respiratory protease/antiprotease balance determines susceptibility to viral infection and can be modified by nutritional antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Megan; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-06-15

    The respiratory epithelium functions as a central orchestrator to initiate and organize responses to inhaled stimuli. Proteases and antiproteases are secreted from the respiratory epithelium and are involved in respiratory homeostasis. Modifications to the protease/antiprotease balance can lead to the development of lung diseases such as emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Furthermore, altered protease/antiprotease balance, in favor for increased protease activity, is associated with increased susceptibility to respiratory viral infections such as influenza virus. However, nutritional antioxidants induce antiprotease expression/secretion and decrease protease expression/activity, to protect against viral infection. As such, this review will elucidate the impact of this balance in the context of respiratory viral infection and lung disease, to further highlight the role epithelial cell-derived proteases and antiproteases contribute to respiratory immune function. Furthermore, this review will offer the use of nutritional antioxidants as possible therapeutics to boost respiratory mucosal responses and/or protect against infection. PMID:25888573

  13. Respiratory protease/antiprotease balance determines susceptibility to viral infection and can be modified by nutritional antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Megan

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory epithelium functions as a central orchestrator to initiate and organize responses to inhaled stimuli. Proteases and antiproteases are secreted from the respiratory epithelium and are involved in respiratory homeostasis. Modifications to the protease/antiprotease balance can lead to the development of lung diseases such as emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Furthermore, altered protease/antiprotease balance, in favor for increased protease activity, is associated with increased susceptibility to respiratory viral infections such as influenza virus. However, nutritional antioxidants induce antiprotease expression/secretion and decrease protease expression/activity, to protect against viral infection. As such, this review will elucidate the impact of this balance in the context of respiratory viral infection and lung disease, to further highlight the role epithelial cell-derived proteases and antiproteases contribute to respiratory immune function. Furthermore, this review will offer the use of nutritional antioxidants as possible therapeutics to boost respiratory mucosal responses and/or protect against infection. PMID:25888573

  14. High vancomycin MICs within the susceptible range in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia isolates are associated with increased cell wall thickness and reduced intracellular killing by human phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Falcón, Rocío; Martínez, Alba; Albert, Eliseo; Madrid, Silvia; Oltra, Rosa; Giménez, Estela; Soriano, Mario; Vinuesa, Víctor; Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, María Luisa; Navarro, David

    2016-05-01

    Vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) at the upper end of the susceptible range for Staphylococcus aureus have been associated with poor clinical outcomes of bloodstream infections. We tested the hypothesis that high vancomycin MICs in S. aureus bacteraemia isolates are associated with increased cell wall thickness and suboptimal bacterial internalisation or lysis by human phagocytes. In total, 95 isolates were evaluated. Original vancomycin MICs were determined by Etest. The susceptibility of S. aureus isolates to killing by phagocytes was assessed in a human whole blood assay. Internalisation of bacterial cells by phagocytes was investigated by flow cytometry. Cell wall thickness was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. Genotypic analysis of S. aureus isolates was performed using a DNA microarray system. Vancomycin MICs were significantly higher (P=0.006) in isolates that were killed suboptimally (killing index <60%) compared with those killed efficiently (killing index >70%) and tended to correlate inversely (P=0.08) with the killing indices. Isolates in both killing groups were internalised by human neutrophils and monocytes with comparable efficiency. The cell wall was significantly thicker (P=0.03) in isolates in the low killing group. No genotypic differences were found between the isolates in both killing groups. In summary, high vancomycin MICs in S. aureus bacteraemia isolates were associated with increased cell wall thickness and reduced intracellular killing by phagocytes. PMID:27056298

  15. Determination of hot-spot susceptibility of multistring photovoltaic modules in a central-station application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Weaver, R. W.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Spencer, R.; Arnett, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Part of the effort of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA) includes a program to improve module and array reliability. A collaborative activity with industry dealing with the problem of hot-spot heating due to the shadowing of photovoltaic cells in modules and arrays containing several paralleled cell strings is described. The use of multiparallel strings in large central-station arrays introduces the likelihood of unequal current sharing and increased heating levels. Test results that relate power dissipated, current imbalance, cross-strapping frequency, and shadow configuration to hot-spot heating levels are presented. Recommendations for circuit design configurations appropriate to central-station applications that reduce the risk of hot-spot problems are offered. Guidelines are provided for developing hot-spot tests for arrays when current imbalance is a threat.

  16. Determination of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in blood by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Horká, Marie; Tesařová, Marie; Karásek, Pavel; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Sittová, Martina; Roth, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Serious bloodstream infections are a significant complication in critically ill patients. The treatment of these infections has become more difficult because of the increasing prevalence of multiresistant strains, especially methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Rapid differentiation of low number of MRSA from methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) cells (10(1)-10(2) cells mL(-1)) in blood is necessary for fast effective antibiotic therapy. Currently, three groups of techniques, phenotyping, genotyping, and mass spectrometry, are used for MRSA and MSSA strains differentiation. Most of these techniques are time-consuming. PCR and other molecular techniques allow the detection and differentiation between MSSA and MRSA directly from blood cultures. These methods alone are rapid and they have good reproducibility and repeatability. Potential disadvantages of the genotyping methods include their discrimination ability, technical complexity, financial costs, and difficult interpretation of the results. Recently, capillary electrophoresis (CZE) was successfully used to differentiate between the agar-cultivated MRSA and MSSA strains in fused silica capillaries etched with supercritical water and modified with (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane. The possible use of CZE as a fast and low-cost method for distinguishing between the blood-incubated MRSA or MSSA cells has been tested in this manuscript. Our goal was to test low amounts of bacteria (∼10(2) cell mL(-1)) similar to those in clinical samples. The migration times of the purified blood-incubated cells and the agar-cultivated cells were different from each other. However, their isoelectric point was the same for all strains. PMID:25813236

  17. In Vitro Amphotericin B Susceptibility of Malassezia pachydermatis Determined by the CLSI Broth Microdilution Method and Etest Using Lipid-Enriched Media

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; Peláez, Teresa; Cutuli, Maite; García, Marta E.

    2014-01-01

    We determined the in vitro amphotericin B susceptibility of 60 Malassezia pachydermatis isolates by the CLSI broth microdilution method and the Etest using lipid-enriched media. All isolates were susceptible at MICs of ≤1 μg/ml, confirming the high activity of amphotericin B against this yeast species. Overall, the essential agreement between the tested methods was high (80% and 96.7% after 48 h and 72 h, respectively), and all discrepancies were regarded as nonsubstantial. PMID:24752258

  18. Identification of four new susceptibility loci for testicular germ cell tumour.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, Kevin; Holroyd, Amy; Lloyd, Amy; Broderick, Peter; Nsengimana, Jérémie; Eeles, Rosalind; Easton, Douglas F; Dudakia, Darshna; Bishop, D Timothy; Reid, Alison; Huddart, Robert A; Grotmol, Tom; Wiklund, Fredrik; Shipley, Janet; Houlston, Richard S; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple risk loci for testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT), revealing a polygenic model of disease susceptibility strongly influenced by common variation. To identify additional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with TGCT, we conducted a multistage GWAS with a combined data set of >25,000 individuals (6,059 cases and 19,094 controls). We identified new risk loci for TGCT at 3q23 (rs11705932, TFDP2, P=1.5 × 10(-9)), 11q14.1 (rs7107174, GAB2, P=9.7 × 10(-11)), 16p13.13 (rs4561483, GSPT1, P=1.6 × 10(-8)) and 16q24.2 (rs55637647, ZFPM1, P=3.4 × 10(-9)). We additionally present detailed functional analysis of these loci, identifying a statistically significant relationship between rs4561483 risk genotype and increased GSPT1 expression in TGCT patient samples. These findings provide additional support for a polygenic model of TGCT risk and further insight into the biological basis of disease development. PMID:26503584

  19. Identification of four new susceptibility loci for testicular germ cell tumour

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Kevin; Holroyd, Amy; Lloyd, Amy; Broderick, Peter; Nsengimana, Jérémie; Eeles, Rosalind; Easton, Douglas F; Dudakia, Darshna; Bishop, D. Timothy; Reid, Alison; Huddart, Robert A.; Grotmol, Tom; Wiklund, Fredrik; Shipley, Janet; Houlston, Richard S.; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple risk loci for testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT), revealing a polygenic model of disease susceptibility strongly influenced by common variation. To identify additional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with TGCT, we conducted a multistage GWAS with a combined data set of >25,000 individuals (6,059 cases and 19,094 controls). We identified new risk loci for TGCT at 3q23 (rs11705932, TFDP2, P=1.5 × 10−9), 11q14.1 (rs7107174, GAB2, P=9.7 × 10−11), 16p13.13 (rs4561483, GSPT1, P=1.6 × 10−8) and 16q24.2 (rs55637647, ZFPM1, P=3.4 × 10−9). We additionally present detailed functional analysis of these loci, identifying a statistically significant relationship between rs4561483 risk genotype and increased GSPT1 expression in TGCT patient samples. These findings provide additional support for a polygenic model of TGCT risk and further insight into the biological basis of disease development. PMID:26503584

  20. Testicular germ cell tumor susceptibility associated with the UCK2 locus on chromosome 1q23.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Fredrick R; Wang, Zhaoming; Skotheim, Rolf I; Koster, Roelof; Chung, Charles C; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Kratz, Christian P; Bakken, Anne C; Bishop, D Timothy; Cook, Michael B; Erickson, R Loren; Fosså, Sophie D; Greene, Mark H; Jacobs, Kevin B; Kanetsky, Peter A; Kolonel, Laurence N; Loud, Jennifer T; Korde, Larissa A; Le Marchand, Loic; Lewinger, Juan Pablo; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Pike, Malcolm C; Rahman, Nazneen; Rubertone, Mark V; Schwartz, Stephen M; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Skinner, Eila C; Turnbull, Clare; Van Den Berg, David J; Wu, Xifeng; Yeager, Meredith; Nathanson, Katherine L; Chanock, Stephen J; Cortessis, Victoria K; McGlynn, Katherine A

    2013-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). A previous GWAS reported a possible TGCT susceptibility locus on chromosome 1q23 in the UCK2 gene, but failed to reach genome-wide significance following replication. We interrogated this region by conducting a meta-analysis of two independent GWASs including a total of 940 TGCT cases and 1559 controls for 122 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 1q23 and followed up the most significant SNPs in an additional 2202 TGCT cases and 2386 controls from four case-control studies. We observed genome-wide significant associations for several UCK2 markers, the most significant of which was for rs3790665 (PCombined = 6.0 × 10(-9)). Additional support is provided from an independent familial study of TGCT where a significant over-transmission for rs3790665 with TGCT risk was observed (PFBAT = 2.3 × 10(-3)). Here, we provide substantial evidence for the association between UCK2 genetic variation and TGCT risk. PMID:23462292

  1. Localization to Xq27 of a susceptibility gene for testicular germ-cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Rapley, E A; Crockford, G P; Teare, D; Biggs, P; Seal, S; Barfoot, R; Edwards, S; Hamoudi, R; Heimdal, K; Fossâ, S D; Tucker, K; Donald, J; Collins, F; Friedlander, M; Hogg, D; Goss, P; Heidenreich, A; Ormiston, W; Daly, P A; Forman, D; Oliver, T D; Leahy, M; Huddart, R; Cooper, C S; Bodmer, J G; Easton, D F; Stratton, M R; Bishop, D T

    2000-02-01

    Testicular germ-cell tumours (TGCT) affect 1 in 500 men and are the most common cancer in males aged 15-40 in Western European populations. The incidence of TGCT has risen dramatically over the last century. Known risk factors for TGCT include a history of undescended testis (UDT), testicular dysgenesis, infertility, previously diagnosed TGCT (ref. 7) and a family history of the disease. Brothers of men with TGCT have an 8-10-fold risk of developing TGCT (refs 8,9), whereas the relative risk to fathers and sons is fourfold (ref. 9). This familial relative risk is much higher than that for most other types of cancer. We have collected samples from 134 families with two or more cases of TGCT, 87 of which are affected sibpairs. A genome-wide linkage search yielded a heterogeneity lod (hlod) score of 2.01 on chromosome Xq27 using all families compatible with X inheritance. We obtained a hlod score of 4.7 from families with at least one bilateral case, corresponding to a genome-wide significance level of P=0.034. The proportion of families with UDT linked to this locus was 73% compared with 26% of families without UDT (P=0.03). Our results provide evidence for a TGCT susceptibility gene on chromosome Xq27 that may also predispose to UDT. PMID:10655070

  2. Determination of surface complex nonlinear optical susceptibilities and molecular orientational distribution functions using resonant surface second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byoungchoo; Yoo, Jeong-Geun; Sakai, Takahiro; Hoshi, Hajime; Ishikawa, Ken; Takezoe, Hideo

    1998-10-01

    Using the resonant optical surface second-harmonic generation (SHG), we have determined the relative values of the complex nonlinear optical (NLO) components (χzzz, χzxx, and χxxz) at isotropic interfaces (C∞v) of a polymer with SHG active side chains. The introduced configuration of the SHG experiment was a polarizer-rotating quarter wave plate-sample-analyzer. It was shown that this configuration gives information on complex NLO coefficients without using the Kleinmann symmetry. For the experiments, we measured resonant surface SHG from the air-polymer and the substrate-polymer interfaces of a thick polymer film. By theoretically fitting the SHG data, we unambiguously determined the nonlinear susceptibility components at the both interfaces of the polymer film. Moreover, unbiased molecular orientational distribution functions (ODFs) at both interfaces were also determined using the modified maximum entropy method. The obtained ODFs were found to be quite different from the previous ones obtained by assuming the Kleinmann symmetry, indicating the important role of the imaginary part of χ's played when determining ODFs.

  3. Arsenic mediated disruption of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies induces ganciclovir susceptibility in Epstein-Barr positive epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Mark D.; Block, Gregory J.; Shan, Bin; Esteves, Kyle C.; Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K.; Lasky, Joseph A.

    2011-06-20

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML NBs) have been implicated in host immune response to viral infection. PML NBs are targeted for degradation during reactivation of herpes viruses, suggesting that disruption of PML NB function supports this aspect of the viral life cycle. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) has been shown to suppress EBV reactivation. Our finding that LMP1 induces PML NB immunofluorescence intensity led to the hypothesis that LMP1 may modulate PML NBs as a means of maintaining EBV latency. Increased PML protein and morphometric changes in PML NBs were observed in EBV infected alveolar epithelial cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Treatment with low dose arsenic trioxide disrupted PML NBs, induced expression of EBV lytic proteins, and conferred ganciclovir susceptibility. This study introduces an effective modality to induce susceptibility to ganciclovir in epithelial cells with implications for the treatment of EBV associated pathologies.

  4. Arsenic mediated disruption of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies induces ganciclovir susceptibility in Epstein-Barr positive epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sides, Mark D; Block, Gregory J; Shan, Bin; Esteves, Kyle C; Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K; Lasky, Joseph A

    2011-07-20

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML NBs) have been implicated in host immune response to viral infection. PML NBs are targeted for degradation during reactivation of herpes viruses, suggesting that disruption of PML NB function supports this aspect of the viral life cycle. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) has been shown to suppress EBV reactivation. Our finding that LMP1 induces PML NB immunofluorescence intensity led to the hypothesis that LMP1 may modulate PML NBs as a means of maintaining EBV latency. Increased PML protein and morphometric changes in PML NBs were observed in EBV infected alveolar epithelial cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Treatment with low dose arsenic trioxide disrupted PML NBs, induced expression of EBV lytic proteins, and conferred ganciclovir susceptibility. This study introduces an effective modality to induce susceptibility to ganciclovir in epithelial cells with implications for the treatment of EBV associated pathologies. PMID:21605886

  5. Genetic variants of CDH13 determine the susceptibility to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yi-ming; Zhang, Jin-long; Xu, Si-cheng; Ye, Ren-song; Xu, Dan; Zhang, You; Zhang, Yan-Jie; Chen, Yu-long; Liu, Yu-lan; Su, Zhi-guang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Adiponectin has been implicated in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The CDH13 gene encodes T-cadherin that is an adiponectin receptor, and genetic variants of CDH13 determine blood adiponectin levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of CDH13 variants on COPD susceptibility in a Chinese population. Methods: Ten single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in CDH13 were screened using the SNaPshot method in 279 COPD patients and 367 control subjects. Association of genotypes or haplotypes constructed from these loci with COPD was analyzed in different genetic models. Results: Among the 10 SNPs tested, rs4783244 and rs12922394 exhibited significant differences in allele or genotype frequencies between COPD patients and control subjects, whereas 8 other SNPs did not. The minor allele T was associated with decreased risk of COPD in the recessive model at rs4783244 (OR=0.42, P=0.023) and in the dominant model at rs12922394 (OR=0.70, P=0.022). The genotype TT at either rs4783244 or rs12922394 was associated with a significantly low level of plasma adiponectin when compared to genotypes GG and CC (P<0.05). Haplotypes GC in block 1 (rs4783244-rs12922394) as well as GTAC and ATGT in block 3 (rs4783266-rs11640522-rs11646849-rs11860282) significantly increased the risk of COPD, whereas haplotypes TT in block 1, TG in block 2 (rs11646011- rs11640875) and ATGC in block 3 were protective against COPD. Conclusion: CDH13 genetic variants determine Chinese individuals' susceptibility to COPD and thus are efficient genetic biomarkers for early detection of COPD. PMID:26806298

  6. Identification and Determination of Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Brucella Strains Isolated from Patients in Van, Turkey by Conventional and Molecular Methods

    PubMed Central

    Parlak, Mehmet; Güdücüoğlu, Hüseyin; Bayram, Yasemin; Çıkman, Aytekin; Aypak, Cenk; Kılıç, Selçuk; Berktaş, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease and still constitutes a major public health problem. In this study, we aimed to identify biovars of Brucella strains isolated from clinical specimens taken from brucellosis patients from the Eastern Anatolia region as well determine the susceptibility of these isolates to tigecycline and azithromycin, drugs that may serve as alternatives to the conventional drugs used in the therapy. Materials and methods: Seventy-five Brucella spp. isolates were included in the study. All strains were identified by both conventional and molecular methods. Brucella Multiplex PCR kit (FC-Biotech, Code: 0301, Turkey) and B. melitensis biovar typing PCR kit (FC-Biotech, Code: 0302, Turkey) were used for molecular typing. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of all strains were determined by E-tests. Results: By conventional biotyping, 73 strains were identified as B. melitensis biovar 3 and two strains as B. abortus biovar 3. Molecular typing results were compatible with conventional methods. The MIC50 and MIC90 values of doxycycline were 0.047 and 0.094; tigecycline 0.094 and 0.125; trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole 0.064 and 0.19; ciprofloxacin 0.19 for both; streptomycin 0.75 and 1; rifampin 1 and 2 and azithromycin 4 and 8. According to the MIC values, doxycycline was found to be the most effective antibiotic, followed by tigecycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin. Conclusion: Currently recommended antibiotics for the treatment of brucellosis such as doxycycline, rifampin, streptomycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin were found to be still effective. While our results showed that tigecycline can be used an alternative agent in the treatment of brucellosis, azithromycin has not been confirmed as an appropriate agent for the treatment. PMID:23983603

  7. Differential susceptibility of human trophoblastic (BeWo) and uterine cervical (HeLa) cells to Neospora caninum infection.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Julianne V; Alves, Celene M O S; Cardoso, Mariana R D; Mota, Caroline M; Barbosa, Bellisa F; Ferro, Eloísa A V; Silva, Neide M; Mineo, Tiago W P; Mineo, José R; Silva, Deise A O

    2010-12-01

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite, closely related to Toxoplasma gondii, and causes abortion and congenital neosporosis in cattle worldwide. Trophoblast cells act in mechanisms of innate immune defense at the fetal-maternal interface and no data are available about the interaction of Neospora with human trophoblasts. Thus, this study aimed to verify the susceptibility of human trophoblastic (BeWo) compared with uterine cervical (HeLa) cell lines to N. caninum. BeWo and HeLa cells were infected with different parasite:cell ratios of N. caninum tachyzoites and analyzed at different times after infection for cell viability using thiazolyl blue tetrazole and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Both cell lines were also evaluated for cytokine production and parasite infection/replication assays when pre-treated or not with Neospora lysate antigen (NLA) or human recombinant IFN-γ. Cell viability was increased up to 48 h of infection in both types of cells, suggesting that infection could inhibit early cell death and/or induce cell proliferation. Neospora infection induced up-regulation of the macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), mainly in HeLa cells, which was enhanced by cell pre-treatment by NLA or IFN-γ. Conversely, parasite infection induced down-regulation of the transforming growth factor (TGF-β), mostly in BeWo cells, which was decreased with NLA or IFN-γ pre-treatment. HeLa cells were more susceptible to Neospora infection than BeWo cells and IFN-γ pre-treatment resulted in reduced infection indices in both cell lines. Control of parasite growth was mediated by IFN-γ through an indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase-dependent mechanism in HeLa cells alone. Based on these results, we concluded that BeWo and HeLa cells are readily infected by N. caninum, although presenting differences in susceptibility to infection, cytokine production and cell viability. Thus, these host cells can be considered in comparative approaches to understand strategies used by N

  8. Autophagy deficiency in myeloid cells increases susceptibility to obesity-induced diabetes and experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Youn; Kim, Jinyoung; Quan, Wenying; Lee, June-Chul; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Bae, Jin-Woo; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy, which is critical for the proper turnover of organelles such as endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, affects diverse aspects of metabolism, and its dysregulation has been incriminated in various metabolic disorders. However, the role of autophagy of myeloid cells in adipose tissue inflammation and type 2 diabetes has not been addressed. We produced mice with myeloid cell-specific deletion of Atg7 (autophagy-related 7), an essential autophagy gene (Atg7 conditional knockout [cKO] mice). While Atg7 cKO mice were metabolically indistinguishable from control mice, they developed diabetes when bred to ob/w mice (Atg7 cKO-ob/ob mice), accompanied by increases in the crown-like structure, inflammatory cytokine expression and inflammasome activation in adipose tissue. Mφs (macrophages) from Atg7 cKO mice showed significantly higher interleukin 1 β release and inflammasome activation in response to a palmitic acid plus lipopolysaccharide combination. Moreover, a decrease in the NAD(+):NADH ratio and increase in intracellular ROS content after treatment with palmitic acid in combination with lipopolysaccharide were more pronounced in Mφs from Atg7 cKO mice, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction in autophagy-deficient Mφs leads to an increase in lipid-induced inflammasome and metabolic deterioration in Atg7 cKO-ob/ob mice. Atg7 cKO mice were more susceptible to experimental colitis, accompanied by increased colonic cytokine expression, T helper 1 skewing and systemic bacterial invasion. These results suggest that autophagy of Mφs is important for the control of inflammasome activation in response to metabolic or extrinsic stress, and autophagy deficiency in Mφs may contribute to the progression of metabolic syndrome associated with lipid injury and colitis. PMID:27337687

  9. Observation of reversible, rapid changes in drug susceptibility of hypoxic tumor cells in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Germain, Todd; Ansari, Megan; Pappas, Dimitri

    2016-09-14

    Hypoxia is a major stimulus for increased drug resistance and for survival of tumor cells. Work from our group and others has shown that hypoxia increases resistance to anti-cancer compounds, radiation, and other damage-pathway cytotoxic agents. In this work we utilize a microfluidic culture system capable of rapid switching of local oxygen concentrations to determine changes in drug resistance in prostate cancer cells. We observed rapid adaptation to hypoxia, with drug resistance to 2 μM staurosporine established within 30 min of hypoxia. Annexin-V/Sytox Green apoptosis assays over 9 h showed 78.0% viability, compared to 84.5% viability in control cells (normoxic cells with no staurosporine). Normoxic cells exposed to the same staurosporine concentration had a viability of 48.6% after 9 h. Hypoxia adaptation was rapid and reversible, with Hypoxic cells treated with 20% oxygen for 30 min responding to staurosporine with 51.6% viability after drug treatment for 9 h. Induction of apoptosis through the receptor-mediated pathway, which bypasses anti-apoptosis mechanisms induced by hypoxia, resulted in 39.4 ± 7% cell viability. The rapid reversibility indicates co-treatment of oxygen with anti-cancer compounds may be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27566353

  10. Cell Fate Determination by Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Gurdon, John B

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors fulfill a key role in the formation and maintenance of different cell-types during development. It is known that transcription factors largely dissociate from chromosomes during mitosis. We found, previously, that mitosis is also a time when somatic nuclei can be far more easily reprogrammed after nuclear transfer than the nuclei of interphase cells. We refer to this as a mitotic advantage. Here, the rate of exchange of a transcription factor on its designated DNA-binding site is discussed. It is proposed that the Xenopus oocyte could serve as an experimental system in which the duration of binding site occupancy could be usefully analyzed. In particular, the Xenopus oocyte has several characteristics which make it possible to determine accurately the concentration and duration of transcription factor binding. It is proposed that the concentration and time are the key variables which govern the action of transcription factors when they activate genes needed for cell lineage determination. PMID:26970633