Science.gov

Sample records for determining acceptable thermal

  1. 5 CFR 531.409 - Acceptable level of competence determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptable level of competence... REGULATIONS PAY UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Within-Grade Increases § 531.409 Acceptable level of competence... delegated shall determine which employees are performing at an acceptable level of competence. (b) Basis...

  2. 5 CFR 531.409 - Acceptable level of competence determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acceptable level of competence... REGULATIONS PAY UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Within-Grade Increases § 531.409 Acceptable level of competence... delegated shall determine which employees are performing at an acceptable level of competence. (b) Basis...

  3. 5 CFR 531.409 - Acceptable level of competence determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acceptable level of competence... REGULATIONS PAY UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Within-Grade Increases § 531.409 Acceptable level of competence... delegated shall determine which employees are performing at an acceptable level of competence. (b) Basis...

  4. 5 CFR 531.409 - Acceptable level of competence determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acceptable level of competence... REGULATIONS PAY UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Within-Grade Increases § 531.409 Acceptable level of competence... delegated shall determine which employees are performing at an acceptable level of competence. (b) Basis...

  5. Determining Performance Acceptability of Electrochemical Oxygen Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A method has been developed to screen commercial electrochemical oxygen sensors to reduce the failure rate. There are three aspects to the method: First, the sensitivity over time (several days) can be measured and the rate of change of the sensitivity can be used to predict sensor failure. Second, an improvement to this method would be to store the sensors in an oxygen-free (e.g., nitrogen) environment and intermittently measure the sensitivity over time (several days) to accomplish the same result while preserving the sensor lifetime by limiting consumption of the electrode. Third, the second time derivative of the sensor response over time can be used to determine the point in time at which the sensors are sufficiently stable for use.

  6. Determinants of debit cards acceptance: An empirical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Shafinar; Adnan, Azimah; Azizi, Amsyar; Bakri, Mohamed Hariri; Zulkepli, Jafri

    2014-12-04

    These days, most of the Malaysians realize that the consumption of debit card will help them to reduce the household debt. Thus, it is important to analyse the acceptance of debit cards for further enhancement and expanding its market share in Malaysia. In addition, there is lacked of research being conducted on the determinants affecting the acceptance of debit cards among Malaysians. Thus, the study aimed to investigate the factors affecting the acceptance of debit cards. This study focuses on payment methods, consumer attitude, and safety of debit card in acceptance of debit cards. Questionnaires were distributed to the 300 respondents. The sampling procedure adopted was stratified random sampling. The data obtained were analysed using SPSS 20.0 which involves scale reliability, descriptive and regression analysis. The result indicates that payment methods, consumer attitude and safety are the determinants of debit cards acceptance. Safety is the best predictor as most of the customers are confidents to use debit cards because of the security being developed around these debit card transactions. The analyses presented in this study can be used by policymakers and managers as a guide to promote banking products and services. The findings achieved in this study will be of interest for practitioners and academics concerned with developments of the Malaysian banking industry.

  7. Determinants of debit cards acceptance: An empirical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Shafinar; Bakri, Mohamed Hariri; Zulkepli, Jafri; Adnan, Azimah; Azizi, Amsyar

    2014-12-01

    These days, most of the Malaysians realize that the consumption of debit card will help them to reduce the household debt. Thus, it is important to analyse the acceptance of debit cards for further enhancement and expanding its market share in Malaysia. In addition, there is lacked of research being conducted on the determinants affecting the acceptance of debit cards among Malaysians. Thus, the study aimed to investigate the factors affecting the acceptance of debit cards. This study focuses on payment methods, consumer attitude, and safety of debit card in acceptance of debit cards. Questionnaires were distributed to the 300 respondents. The sampling procedure adopted was stratified random sampling. The data obtained were analysed using SPSS 20.0 which involves scale reliability, descriptive and regression analysis. The result indicates that payment methods, consumer attitude and safety are the determinants of debit cards acceptance. Safety is the best predictor as most of the customers are confidents to use debit cards because of the security being developed around these debit card transactions. The analyses presented in this study can be used by policymakers and managers as a guide to promote banking products and services. The findings achieved in this study will be of interest for practitioners and academics concerned with developments of the Malaysian banking industry.

  8. The indicator performance estimate approach to determining acceptable wilderness conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenhorst, Steven; Gardner, Lisa

    1994-11-01

    Using data from a study conducted in the Cranberry Wilderness Area of West Virginia, United States, this paper describes how a modified importance—performance approach can be used to prioritize wilderness indicators and determine how much change from the pristine is acceptable. The approach uses two key types of information: (1) indicator importance, or visitor opinion as to which wilderness indicators have the greatest influence on their experience, and (2) management performance, or the extent to which actual indicator conditions exceed or are within visitor expectations. Performance was represented by calculating indicator performance estimates (IPEs), as defined by standardized differences between actual conditions and visitor preferences for each indicator. The results for each indicator are then presented graphically on a four-quadrant matrix for objective interpretation. Each quadrant represents a management response: keep up the good work, concentrate here, low priority, or possible overkill. The technique allows managers to more systematically and effectively utilize information routinely collected during the limits of acceptable change wilderness planning process.

  9. Pulsed electric fields versus thermal treatment: equivalent processes to obtain equally acceptable citrus juices.

    PubMed

    Sentandreu, E; Carbonell, L; Rodrigo, D; Carbonell, J V

    2006-08-01

    Pulsed electric field treatment has been claimed to produce more acceptable chilled citrus juices than those obtained by conventional thermal treatment. The pectin methylesterase activity and the acceptability of nine juices obtained from Clementine mandarins, Valencia oranges, and Ortanique fruits (hybrid of mandarin and orange), untreated, pasteurized (85 degrees C for 10 s), and treated by pulsed electric fields (25 kV/cm for 330 micros), were evaluated. The treatments, selected to reach a similar level of pectin methylesterase inactivation, produced juices that did not differ in acceptability from each other for the three varieties and in all cases were less acceptable than the untreated juice. PMID:16924935

  10. 5 CFR 531.409 - Acceptable level of competence determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS PAY UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Within-Grade Increases § 531.409 Acceptable level of competence... competence in his or her current position, and the employee has not been given a performance rating in any... acceptable level of competence, the within-grade increase will be granted retroactively to the beginning...

  11. Determinants of Taste Preference and Acceptability: Quality vs. Hedonics

    PubMed Central

    Loney, Gregory C.; Blonde, Ginger D.; Eckel, Lisa A.; Spector, Alan C.

    2012-01-01

    Several methods exist for reliably determining the motivational valence of a taste stimulus in animals, but few to determine its perceptual quality independent of its apparent affective properties. Individual differences in taste preference and acceptability could result from variance in the perceptual qualities of the stimulus leading to different hedonic evaluations. Alternatively, taste perception might be identical across subjects whereas processing of the sensory signals in reward circuits could differ. Utilizing an operant-based taste cue discrimination/generalization task involving a gustometer, we trained male Long-Evans rats to report the degree to which a test stimulus resembled the taste quality of either sucrose or quinine irrespective of its intensity. The rats, grouped by a characteristic bimodal phenotypic difference in their preference for sucralose, treated this artificial sweetener as qualitatively different with the sucralose-preferring rats finding the stimulus much more perceptually similar to sucrose, relative to sucralose-avoiding rats. Although the possibility that stimulus palatability may have served as a discriminative cue cannot entirely be ruled out, the profile of results suggested otherwise. Subsequent brief-access licking tests revealed that affective licking responses of the same sucralose-avoiding and -preferring rats differed across concentration in a manner roughly similar to that found in the stimulus generalization task. Thus, the perceived taste quality of sucralose alone may be sufficient to drive the observed behavioral avoidance of the compound. By virtue of its potential ability to dissociate the sensory and motivational consequences of a given experimental manipulation on taste-related behavior, this approach could be interpretively valuable. PMID:22815522

  12. Determinants of taste preference and acceptability: quality versus hedonics.

    PubMed

    Loney, Gregory C; Blonde, Ginger D; Eckel, Lisa A; Spector, Alan C

    2012-07-18

    Several methods exist for reliably determining the motivational valence of a taste stimulus in animals, but few to determine its perceptual quality independent of its apparent affective properties. Individual differences in taste preference and acceptability could result from variance in the perceptual qualities of the stimulus leading to different hedonic evaluations. Alternatively, taste perception might be identical across subjects, but the processing of the sensory signals in reward circuits could differ. Using an operant-based taste cue discrimination/generalization task involving a gustometer, we trained male Long-Evans rats to report the degree to which a test stimulus resembled the taste quality of either sucrose or quinine regardless of its intensity. The rats, grouped by a characteristic bimodal phenotypic difference in their preference for sucralose, treated this artificial sweetener as qualitatively different-compared to sucralose-avoiding rats, the sucralose-preferring rats found the stimulus much more perceptually similar to sucrose. Although the possibility that stimulus palatability may have served as a discriminative cue cannot entirely be ruled out, the profile of results suggests otherwise. Subsequent brief-access licking tests revealed that affective licking responses of the same sucralose-avoiding and -preferring rats differed across concentration in a manner approximately similar to that found in the stimulus generalization task. Thus, the perceived taste quality of sucralose alone may be sufficient to drive the observed behavioral avoidance of the compound. By virtue of its potential ability to dissociate the sensory and motivational consequences of a given experimental manipulation on taste-related behavior, this approach could be interpretively valuable. PMID:22815522

  13. Porosity determination of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Roode, Mark; Beardsley, Brad

    1988-01-01

    Coating porosity is believed to be a critical factor for the thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). A number of different techniques have been used to determine the porosities of thermal barrier coatings for diesel applications as part of a NASA/DOE sponsored study. A comparison is made between methods based on water immersion, optical microscopy, eddy current thickness measurements, and Archimedes principle for TBC porosity determination.

  14. Effect of addition of thermally modified cowpea protein on sensory acceptability and textural properties of wheat bread and sponge cake.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lydia; Euston, Stephen R; Ahmed, Mohamed A

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the sensory acceptability and textural properties of leavened wheat bread and sponge cake fortified with cow protein isolates that had been denatured and glycated by thermal treatment. Defatted cowpea flour was prepared from cow pea beans and the protein isolate was prepared (CPI) and thermally denatured (DCPI). To prepare glycated cowpea protein isolate (GCPI) the cowpea flour slurry was heat treated before isolation of the protein. CPI was more susceptible to thermal denaturation than GCPI as determined by turbidity and sulphydryl groups resulting in greater loss of solubility. This is attributed to the higher glycation degree and higher carbohydrate content of GCPI as demonstrated by glycoprotein staining of SDS PAGE gels. Water absorption of bread dough was significantly enhanced by DCPI and to a larger extent GCPI compared to the control, resulting in softer texture. CPI resulted in significantly increased crumb hardness in baked bread than the control whereas DCPI or GCPI resulted in significantly softer crumb. Bread fortified with 4% DCPI or GCPI was similar to control as regards sensory and textural properties whereas 4% CPI was significantly different, limiting its inclusion level to 2%. There was a trend for higher sensory acceptability scores for GCPI containing bread compared DCPI. Whole egg was replaced by 20% by GCPI (3.5%) in sponge cake without affecting the sensory acceptability, whereas CPI and DCPI supplemented cakes were significantly different than the control. PMID:26471676

  15. Determining the drivers' acceptance of EFTCD in highway work zones.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yong; Li, Yingfeng

    2011-05-01

    Traffic safety is a major concern in the temporary one-lane, two-way highway work zones due to the increasing of construction and maintenance operations. To prevent rear-end crashes and to mitigate the severity of these crashes caused by the inattentive driving, the utilization of the Emergency Flasher Traffic Control Device (EFTCD) was under consideration by government agencies, in addition to existing temporary traffic control devices installed in the one-lane, two-way highway work zones. The EFTCD was a newly proposed traffic warning device implemented through the use of vehicles' hazard warning flashers. The primary objective of the research project was to investigate the drivers' acceptance of the proposed EFTCD by measuring the mean speed changes of vehicles with and without EFTCD and by evaluating the drivers' opinions of the EFTCD using the survey method. Field experimental results revealed that the EFTCD effectively reduced the mean vehicle speeds in the upstream of two work zones. A slow speed is more likely to reduce the severity of a crash in work zones. In addition, survey results indicated that 60% of the drivers thought the EFTCD signified a need for speed reduction and 82% of drivers recommended the implementation of the EFTCD in one-lane, two-way work zones. These results provide the necessary scientific justifications for the government agencies to decide if the EFTCD should be implemented in the one-lane, two-way highway work zones to prevent rear-end crashes and to mitigate the severity of these crashes. PMID:21376864

  16. Determination of thermal/dynamic characteristics of lava flow from surface thermal measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Melnik, Oleg; Korotkii, Alexander; Tsepelev, Igor; Kovtunov, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    Rapid development of ground based thermal cameras, drones and satellite data allows getting repeated thermal images of the surface of the lava flow. Available instrumentation allows getting a large amount of data during a single lava flow eruption. These data require development of appropriate quantitative techniques to link subsurface dynamics with observations. We present a new approach to assimilation of thermal measurements at lava's surface to the bottom of the lava flow to determine lava's thermal and dynamic characteristics. Mathematically this problem is reduced to solving an inverse boundary problem. Namely, using known conditions at one part of the model boundary we determine the missing condition at the remaining part of the boundary. Using an adjoint method we develop a numerical approach to the mathematical problem based on the determination of the missing boundary condition and lava flow characteristics. Numerical results show that in the case of smooth input data lava temperature and velocity can be determined with a high accuracy. A noise imposed on the smooth input data results in a less accurate solution, but still acceptable below some noise level. The proposed approach to assimilate measured data brings an opportunity to estimate thermal budget of the lava flow.

  17. Of Acceptable Risk: Science and the Determination of Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrance, William W.

    This book looks at the problems of determination of safety and the underlying concept of safety itself. It is believed that if certain pervasive themes are properly appreciated, the whole field of safety will be better understood. The first chapter of the book sketches the general nature of safety decisions, defining safety as a measure of the…

  18. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) Instrument: Flight Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) Acceptance Thermal Vacuum Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Charles; Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Grob, Eric; Swanson, Ted; Nikitkin, Michael; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Two loop heat pipes (LHPs) are to be used for tight thermal control of the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instrument, planned for flight in late 2001. The LHPs are charged with Propylene as a working fluid. One LHP will be used to transport 110 W from a laser to a radiator, the other will transport 160 W from electronic boxes to a separate radiator. The application includes a large amount of thermal mass in each LHP system and low initial startup powers. The initial design had some non-ideal flight design compromises, resulted in a less than ideal charge level for this design concept with a symmetrical secondary wick. This less than ideal charge was identified as the source of inadequate performance of the flight LHPs during the flight thermal vacuum test in October of 2000. We modified the compensation chamber design, re-built and charged the LHPs for a final LHP acceptance thermal vacuum test. This test performed March of 2001 was 100% successful. This is the last testing to be performed on the LHPs prior to instrument thermal vacuum test. This sensitivity to charge level was shown through varying the charge on a Development Model Loop Heat Pipe (DM LHP) and evaluating performance at various fill levels. At lower fills similar to the original charge in the flight units, the same poor performance was observed. When the flight units were re-designed and filled to the levels similar to the initial successful DM LHP test, the flight units also successfully fulfilled all requirements. This final flight Acceptance test assessed performance with respect to startup, low power operation, conductance, and control heater power, and steady state control. The results of the testing showed that both LHPs operated within specification. Startup on one of the LHPs was better than the other LHP because of the starter heater placement and a difference in evaporator design. These differences resulted in a variation in the achieved superheat prior to startup. The LHP with

  19. Determination of Thermal Properties of Composting Bulking Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal properties of compost bulking materials affect temperature and biodegradation during the composting process. Well determined thermal properties of compost feedstocks will therefore contribute to practical thermodynamic approaches. Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric hea...

  20. Determination of Thermal Properties of Composting Bulking Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal properties of compost bulking materials affect temperature and biodegradation during the composting process. Well-determined thermal properties of compost feedstocks will therefore contribute to practical thermodynamic approaches. Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric hea...

  1. Acceptance of Disability: Determinants of Overcoming Social Frustration

    PubMed Central

    Morozova, Elena Valeryevna; Shmeleva, Svetlana Vasilyevna; Sorokoumova, Elena Aleksandrovna; Nikishina, Vera Borisovna; Abdalina, Larisa Vasilyevna

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to the subjective reaction of patients at different stages of disabling disease, in the context of the formation of a specific cognitive-emotional and motivational model of “internal picture of disability”, depending on the severity of social frustration as the most important deconditioning factor. We wanted to identify psychological determinant of the specificity of adaptive activity of the patient to the situation disabling disease, depending on the level of increase social frustration. Nature of adaptation to the disabling disease depending on the level of increase social frustration expressed by: 1) decrease in self-esteem of patient self-efficacy with an increase in subjective experience of disability; 2) the growing tension of personal protective mechanisms; 3) reductions coping competence, which, depending on the rise of frustration, becomes effective instead of the rational-intelligent, more maladaptive emotional. PMID:25948469

  2. 41 CFR 102-75.1150 - What happens to the gift if GSA determines it to be acceptable?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... if GSA determines it to be acceptable? 102-75.1150 Section 102-75.1150 Public Contracts and Property...-75.1150 What happens to the gift if GSA determines it to be acceptable? When GSA determines that the gift is acceptable and can be accepted and used in the form in which it was offered, GSA must...

  3. Determinants of Intention to Use eLearning Based on the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punnoose, Alfie Chacko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find some of the predominant factors that determine the intention of students to use eLearning in the future. Since eLearning is not just a technology acceptance decision but also involves cognition, this study extended its search beyond the normal technology acceptance variables into variables that could affect…

  4. Novel method of thermal-inertia determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLennan, E.; Emery, J.

    2014-07-01

    Spacecraft missions have shown how asteroids can be covered by a regolith ranging from fine-grained to large cobbles and boulders. Regolith properties for many objects can give information on processes altering the surfaces of these bodies, yet only a few have been imaged in sufficient detail to directly investigate their regoliths. For objects not visited by spacecraft, thermal inertia can be used to infer the physical properties of the regolith [1]. In general, surfaces of bare rock have a higher thermal inertia, whereas the presence of small regolith grains yields a lower thermal inertia. Thermal inertia is a quantity indicative of how resistive a material is to changes in temperature. An insulating layer of fine-grained material will cause large diurnal changes in temperature, whereas a ''bare rock'' surface causes temperatures to be longitudinally isothermal. Thermal inertia is thus also important for understanding the radiative forces acting to alter the dynamical properties of airless bodies (e.g. Yarkovsky and YORP; [2]). Traditional methods of thermal inertia determination require knowledge of the spin axis as input for thermophysical models (TPMs). TPMs invoke the heat diffusion equation in order to calculate surface temperatures for a rotating asteroid [3]. Asteroid spin axes provide the boundary condition needed to calculate the incident solar energy across the surface. Since spin axes for only small fraction of the total asteroid population are known [4], application of the traditional method is limited. Here, we assess the effectiveness of a method that does not require previous knowledge of an object's spin axis. This method uses multi-epoch observations of asteroid thermal emission at different viewing geometries. Many such observations of objects were made in 2010 by the WISE mission during its all sky survey [5]. As a result, object flux data for a warmer "afternoon" and cooler ''morning'' side are gathered at two wavelengths (12 & 22 μ m). This

  5. Human papilloma virus vaccine: determinants of acceptability by mothers for adolescents in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ezeanochie, Michael C; Olagbuji, Biodun N

    2014-09-01

    Vaccination of adolescent females against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), the causative agent for cervical cancer has recently become available. As minors, parental acceptance of the vaccines for adolescent daughters requires exploration. This was a cross-sectional survey of 201 mothers attending the gynaecology clinic in a University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria on acceptability of the HPV vaccines and its determinants. Although 70% accepted vaccination of their daughters, 30% were unwilling and the commonest reason for unwillingness was that it may encourage sexual promiscuity (62.3%). Mothers with poor knowledge of STI were significantly more unwilling to accept HPV vaccines compared to those with average or good knowledge (p = 0.002). Furthermore, perception of susceptibility to HPV infection by daughters was significantly associated with acceptance of the vaccines (p = 0.0001). Increased advocacy and public enlightenment on cervical cancer control and the role of HPV vaccines in its prevention is still necessary especially in developing countries. PMID:25508051

  6. Human papilloma virus vaccine: determinants of acceptability by mothers for adolescents in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ezeanochie, Michael C; Olagbuji, Biodun N

    2014-09-01

    Vaccination of adolescent females against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), the causative agent for cervical cancer has recently become available. As minors, parental acceptance of the vaccines for adolescent daughters requires exploration. This was a cross-sectional survey of 201 mothers attending the gynaecology clinic in a University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria on acceptability of the HPV vaccines and its determinants. Although 70% accepted vaccination of their daughters, 30% were unwilling and the commonest reason for unwillingness was that it may encourage sexual promiscuity (62.3%). Mothers with poor knowledge of STI were significantly more unwilling to accept HPV vaccines compared to those with average or good knowledge (p = 0.002). Furthermore, perception of susceptibility to HPV infection by daughters was significantly associated with acceptance of the vaccines (p = 0.0001). Increased advocacy and public enlightenment on cervical cancer control and the role of HPV vaccines in its prevention is still necessary especially in developing countries. PMID:25438520

  7. Determination of the thermal stability of perfluoroalkylethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmick, Larry S.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal decomposition temperatures of several commercial and custom synthesized perfluoroalkylether fluids were determined with a computerized tensimeter. In general, the decomposition temperatures of the commercial fluids were all similar and significantly higher than those for custom synthesized fluids. Correlation of the decomposition temperatures with the molecular structures of the primary components of the commercial fluids revealed that the stability of the fluids is not affected by intrinsic factors such as carbon chain length, branching, or cumulated difluoroformal groups. Instead, correlation with extrinsic factors revealed that the stability may be limited by the presence of small quantities of thermally unstable material and/or chlorine-containing material arising from the use of chlorine-containing solvents during synthesis. Finally, correlation of decomposition temperatures with molecular weights for Demnum and Krytox fluids supports a chain cleavage reaction mechanism for Demnum fluids and an unzipping reaction mechanism for Krytox fluids.

  8. Acceptance Performance Test Guideline for Utility Scale Parabolic Trough and Other CSP Solar Thermal Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Mehos, M. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kearney, D. W.

    2011-08-01

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. Progress on interim guidelines was presented at SolarPACES 2010. Significant additions and modifications were made to the guidelines since that time, resulting in a final report published by NREL in April 2011. This paper summarizes those changes, which emphasize criteria for assuring thermal equilibrium and steady state conditions within the solar field.

  9. 32 CFR 644.543 - Determination of acceptable offers after advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Sale Procedure § 644.543 Determination of acceptable... experienced real estate employee who need not be a real estate appraiser. This determination may be in the... responsible bidder. (2) Conforms to the Invitation for Bids. (3) Equals or exceeds the appraised fair...

  10. 18 CFR Appendix A to Part 2 - Guidance for Determining the Acceptable Construction Area for Replacements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Determining the Acceptable Construction Area for Replacements A Appendix A to Part 2 Conservation of Power and... Construction Area for Replacements These guidelines shall be followed to determine what area may be used to... physical evidence in the area. Areas obviously not cleared during the original construction, as...

  11. Determining heat tolerance in finishing pigs using thermal imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat production from modern pigs has been determined to be significantly higher than previously defined in the standards. This increase in heat production changes the thermal needs of growing swine. A study was designed to evaluate thermal images to determine the thermal status of swine. Thermal ...

  12. Socio-psychological determinants of public acceptance of technologies: A review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nidhi; Fischer, Arnout R.H.; Frewer, Lynn J.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, many technologies have been associated with societal controversies, leading to public rejection of their use. It is therefore important to understand the psychological determinants of societal acceptance of emerging technologies. Socio-psychological determinants of public acceptance of 10 (controversial) technologies are reviewed. The results indicate that there has been an increased interest in and focus on public acceptance of technologies in academia. Risk, trust, perceived benefit, knowledge, individual differences and attitude were found to have been a focus of research in 60% of articles. The results of correspondence analysis suggest that some determinants have been used more extensively in association with some technologies compared to others. As the published research has predominantly been conducted in North America and Europe, research across different cultural contexts internationally is required if globally relevant conclusions are to be reached. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:23832558

  13. Experimental methods of determining thermal properties of granite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of thermal properties of granite using the block method is discussed and compared with other methods. Problems that limit the accuracy of contact method in determining thermal properties of porous media are evaluated. Thermal properties of granite is determined in the laboratory with a...

  14. 18 CFR Appendix A to Part 2 - Guidance for Determining the Acceptable Construction Area for Replacements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Guidance for Determining the Acceptable Construction Area for Replacements A Appendix A to Part 2 Conservation of Power and... temporary and permanent rights-of-way and associated work space that was used to construct the...

  15. 18 CFR Appendix A to Part 2 - Guidance for Determining the Acceptable Construction Area for Replacements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Guidance for Determining the Acceptable Construction Area for Replacements A Appendix A to Part 2 Conservation of Power and... temporary and permanent rights-of-way and associated work space that was used to construct the...

  16. Thermal parameters determination of battery cells by local heat flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashko, K. A.; Mityakov, A. V.; Pyrhönen, J.; Mityakov, V. Y.; Sapozhnikov, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    A new approach to define of the thermal parameters, such as heat capacity and through-plane thermal conductivity, of pouch-type cells is introduced. Application of local heat flux measurement with a gradient heat flux sensor (GHFS) allows determination of the cell thermal parameters in different surface points of the cell. The suggested method is not cell destructive as it does not require deep discharge of the cell or application of any charge/discharge cycles during the measurements of the thermal parameters of the cell. The complete procedure is demonstrated on a high-power lithium-ion (Li-ion) pouch cell, and it is verified on a sample with well-known thermal parameters. A comparison of the experimental results with conventional thermal characterization methods shows an acceptably low error. The dependence of the cell thermal parameters on the state of charge (SoC) and measurement points on the surface was studied by the proposed measurement approach.

  17. Determinants of Acceptance and Subsequent Uptake of the HPV Vaccine in a Cohort in Eldoret, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Vermandere, Heleen; Naanyu, Violet; Mabeya, Hillary; Vanden Broeck, Davy; Michielsen, Kristien; Degomme, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The development of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines provides new opportunities in the fight against cervical cancer. Many acceptability studies have revealed high interest in these vaccines, but acceptance is only a precursor of behavior, and many factors, at personal, community and provider level, may inhibit the translation of willingness to vaccinate into actual uptake. Through a longitudinal study in Eldoret, Kenya, HPV vaccine acceptability was measured before a vaccination program (n = 287) and vaccine uptake, as reported by mothers, once the program was finished (n = 256). In between baseline and follow-up, a pilot HPV vaccination program was implemented via the GARDASIL Access Program, in which parents could have their daughter vaccinated for free at the referral hospital. The program was promoted at schools: Health staff informed teachers who were then asked to inform students and parents. Even though baseline acceptance was very high (88.1%), only 31.1% of the women reported at follow-up that their daughter had been vaccinated. The vaccine was declined by 17.7%, while another 51.2% had wanted the vaccination but were obstructed by practical barriers. Being well-informed about the program and baseline awareness of cervical cancer were independently associated with vaccine uptake, while baseline acceptance was correlated in bivariate analysis. Side effects were of great concern, even among those whose daughter was vaccinated. Possible partner disapproval lowered acceptance at baseline, and women indeed reported at follow-up that they had encountered his opposition. In Kenya, women prove to be very willing to have their daughter vaccinated against cervical cancer. However, in this study, uptake was more determined by program awareness than by HPV vaccine acceptance. School-based vaccination might improve coverage since it reduces operational problems for parents. In addition, future HPV vaccination campaigns should address concerns about side

  18. Determinants of acceptance and subsequent uptake of the HPV vaccine in a cohort in Eldoret, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Vermandere, Heleen; Naanyu, Violet; Mabeya, Hillary; Vanden Broeck, Davy; Michielsen, Kristien; Degomme, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The development of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines provides new opportunities in the fight against cervical cancer. Many acceptability studies have revealed high interest in these vaccines, but acceptance is only a precursor of behavior, and many factors, at personal, community and provider level, may inhibit the translation of willingness to vaccinate into actual uptake. Through a longitudinal study in Eldoret, Kenya, HPV vaccine acceptability was measured before a vaccination program (n = 287) and vaccine uptake, as reported by mothers, once the program was finished (n = 256). In between baseline and follow-up, a pilot HPV vaccination program was implemented via the GARDASIL Access Program, in which parents could have their daughter vaccinated for free at the referral hospital. The program was promoted at schools: Health staff informed teachers who were then asked to inform students and parents. Even though baseline acceptance was very high (88.1%), only 31.1% of the women reported at follow-up that their daughter had been vaccinated. The vaccine was declined by 17.7%, while another 51.2% had wanted the vaccination but were obstructed by practical barriers. Being well-informed about the program and baseline awareness of cervical cancer were independently associated with vaccine uptake, while baseline acceptance was correlated in bivariate analysis. Side effects were of great concern, even among those whose daughter was vaccinated. Possible partner disapproval lowered acceptance at baseline, and women indeed reported at follow-up that they had encountered his opposition. In Kenya, women prove to be very willing to have their daughter vaccinated against cervical cancer. However, in this study, uptake was more determined by program awareness than by HPV vaccine acceptance. School-based vaccination might improve coverage since it reduces operational problems for parents. In addition, future HPV vaccination campaigns should address concerns about side

  19. Analytical methodology for determination of helicopter IFR precision approach requirements. [pilot workload and acceptance level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phatak, A. V.

    1980-01-01

    A systematic analytical approach to the determination of helicopter IFR precision approach requirements is formulated. The approach is based upon the hypothesis that pilot acceptance level or opinion rating of a given system is inversely related to the degree of pilot involvement in the control task. A nonlinear simulation of the helicopter approach to landing task incorporating appropriate models for UH-1H aircraft, the environmental disturbances and the human pilot was developed as a tool for evaluating the pilot acceptance hypothesis. The simulated pilot model is generic in nature and includes analytical representation of the human information acquisition, processing, and control strategies. Simulation analyses in the flight director mode indicate that the pilot model used is reasonable. Results of the simulation are used to identify candidate pilot workload metrics and to test the well known performance-work-load relationship. A pilot acceptance analytical methodology is formulated as a basis for further investigation, development and validation.

  20. Intention to Accept Pertussis Vaccination for Cocooning: A Qualitative Study of the Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Hautvast, Jeannine L. A.; van der Velden, Koos; Hulscher, Marlies E. J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Context Several countries have reported a resurgence of pertussis in the last decades. This puts infants (especially <6 months) at risk of severe complications, because they are too young to be fully protected by vaccination. The global pertussis initiative has proposed pertussis vaccination of young infants’ close contacts, in order to reduce pertussis transmission and the burden of the disease on infants. Our aim is to explore the perceived determinants (barriers and facilitators) of intention to accept vaccination among the possible target groups of pertussis vaccination for cocooning. Consideration of these determinants is necessary to optimise the uptake of the vaccination. Methods We conducted 13 focus groups and six individual semi-structured interviews with members of possible target groups for pertussis cocooning (i.e. parents, maternity assistants, midwives, and paediatric nurses) in the Netherlands. Here, both maternal pertussis vaccination as well as pertussis cocooning has not been implemented. The topic list was based on a literature review and a barrier framework. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and two researchers performed thematic content analysis. Findings The participants’ risk perception, outcome expectations, general vaccination beliefs, moral norms, opinion of others, perceived autonomy, anticipated regret, decisional uncertainty, and perceived organisational barriers were all factors that influenced the intention to accept pertussis vaccination for cocooning. Discussion This study has identified nine perceived determinants that influence the intention to accept pertussis cocooning vaccination. We add the following determinants to the literature: perceived cost-effectiveness (as a concept of outcome expectations), justice (as a concept of moral norms), anticipated regret, and decisional uncertainty. We recommend considering these determinants in vaccination programmes for pertussis cocooning vaccination. Experience, information

  1. Determinants of telemedicine acceptance in selected public hospitals in Malaysia: clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Zailani, Suhaiza; Gilani, Mina Sayyah; Nikbin, Davoud; Iranmanesh, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the determinants of telemedicine acceptance in selected public hospitals in Malaysia and to investigate the effect of health culture on the relationship between these determinants and telemedicine acceptance. Data were gathered by means of a survey of physicians and nurses as the main group of users of telemedicine technology from hospitals that are currently using telemedicine technology. The results indicated that government policies, top management support, perception of usefulness and computer self-efficiency have a positive and significant impact on telemedicine acceptance by public hospitals in Malaysia. The results also confirmed the moderating role of health culture on the relationship between government policies as well as perceived usefulness on telemedicine acceptance by Malaysian hospitals. The results are useful for decision-makers as well as managers to recognize the potential role of telemedicine and assist in the process of implementation, adoption and utilization, and, therefore, spread the usage of telemedicine technology in more hospitals in the country. PMID:25038891

  2. 45 CFR 2544.130 - How will the Corporation determine whether to solicit or accept a donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... solicit or accept a donation? 2544.130 Section 2544.130 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... DONATIONS § 2544.130 How will the Corporation determine whether to solicit or accept a donation? (a) The Corporation will solicit and accept a donation only for the purpose of furthering the mission and goals of...

  3. 45 CFR 2544.130 - How will the Corporation determine whether to solicit or accept a donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... solicit or accept a donation? 2544.130 Section 2544.130 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... DONATIONS § 2544.130 How will the Corporation determine whether to solicit or accept a donation? (a) The Corporation will solicit and accept a donation only for the purpose of furthering the mission and goals of...

  4. 45 CFR 2544.130 - How will the Corporation determine whether to solicit or accept a donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... solicit or accept a donation? 2544.130 Section 2544.130 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... DONATIONS § 2544.130 How will the Corporation determine whether to solicit or accept a donation? (a) The Corporation will solicit and accept a donation only for the purpose of furthering the mission and goals of...

  5. Social and individual determinants of adolescents' acceptance of novel healthy and cool snack products.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Maria Kümpel; Sørensen, Bjarne Taulo; Grunert, Klaus G

    2014-12-01

    Four new, healthy snack products, consisting of fruit, vegetables, bread, dip and topping, were tested with 600 Danish adolescents aged 9-16. Participants could view, handle, and test the products in a school setting. Acceptance was measured by overall buying intention, as well as buying intention contingent on specific substitutes and on the social situation. Price consciousness, health consciousness, snack neophobia, peer influence, social activities and word-of-mouth were measured as potential determinants of acceptance of the novel products. An exploratory analysis in TETRAD suggested that the measured constructs form three layers, with overall buying intention as the terminal causal effect, health consciousness, word of mouth, snack neophobia and peer influence as endogenous determinants, and social activities and the contingent buying intentions as mediators. Estimation of the causal relationships was conducted in LISREL. Findings show a predominance of social factors as determinants of novel snack acceptance, whereas health consciousness had only a weak and indirect effect on buying intentions and the effect of snack neophobia was partly mediated by social factors. PMID:25173064

  6. Effective thermal conductivity determination for low-density insulating materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. D.; Curry, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    That nonlinear least squares can be used to determine effective thermal conductivity was demonstrated, and a method for assessing the relative error associated with these predicted values was provided. The differences between dynamic and static determination of effective thermal conductivity of low-density materials that transfer heat by a combination of conduction, convection, and radiation were discussed.

  7. Pathway analysis approach for determining acceptable levels of contamination of radionuclides in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Till, J.E.; Moore, R.E.

    1988-09-01

    A methodology for determining acceptable levels for decontamination of soil containing radionuclides at waste sites is described. This methodology calculates the annual radiation dose that an individual receives while living on property that has been decommissioned and decontaminated. Pathways of exposure include direct radiation from ground surfaces, ingestion of contaminated food, inhalation of resuspended radionuclides and drinking contaminated water. Results calculated using this methodology were compared with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for a southeastern U.S. site. There is good agreement between the two methods provided similar assumptions are used.

  8. Determining the Thermal Properties of Space Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maldonado, Christina M.

    2004-01-01

    Many mechanisms used in spacecrafts, such as satellites or the space shuttle, employ ball bearings or gears that need to be lubricated. Normally this is not a problem, but in outer space the regular lubricants that are used on Earth will not function properly. Regular lubricants will quickly vaporize in the near vacuum of space. A unique liquid called a perfluoropolyalkylether (PFPE) has an extremely low vapor pressure, around l0(exp -10) torr at 20 C, and has been used in numerous satellites and is currently used in the space shuttle. Many people refer to the PFPEs as "liquid Teflon". PFPE lubricants however, have a number of problems with them. Lubricants need many soluble additives, especially boundary and anti-wear additives, in them to function properly. All the regular known boundary additives are insoluble in PFPEs and so PFPEs lubricate poorly under highly loaded conditions leading to many malfunctioning ball bearings and gears. JAXA, the Japanese Space Agency, is designing and building a centrifuge rotor to be installed in the International Space Station. The centrifuge rotor is part of a biology lab module. They have selected a PFPE lubricant to lubricate the rotor s ball bearings and NASA bearing experts feel this is not a wise choice. An assessment of the centrifuge rotor design is being conducted by NASA and part of the assessment entails knowing the physical and thermal properties of the PFPE lubricant. One important property, the thermal diffusivity, is not known. An experimental apparatus was set up in order to measure the thermal diffusivity of the PFPE. The apparatus consists of a constant temperature heat source, cylindrical Pyrex glassware, a thermal couple and digital thermometer. The apparatus was tested and calibrated using water since the thermal diffusivity of water is known.

  9. Thermal diffusivity of seasonal snow determined from temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldroyd, H. J.; Higgins, C. W.; Huwald, H.; Selker, J. S.; Parlange, M. B.

    2013-05-01

    Thermal diffusivity of snow is an important thermodynamic property associated with key hydrological phenomena such as snow melt and heat and water vapor exchange with the atmosphere. Direct determination of snow thermal diffusivity requires coupled point measurements of thermal conductivity and density, which continually change due to snow metamorphism. Traditional methods for determining these two quantities are generally limited by temporal resolution. In this study we present a method to determine the thermal diffusivity of snow with high temporal resolution using snow temperature profile measurements. High resolution (between 2.5 and 10 cm at 1 min) temperature measurements from the seasonal snow pack at the Plaine-Morte glacier in Switzerland are used as initial conditions and Neumann (heat flux) boundary conditions to numerically solve the one-dimensional heat equation and iteratively optimize for thermal diffusivity. The implementation of Neumann boundary conditions and a t-test, ensuring statistical significance between solutions of varied thermal diffusivity, are important to help constrain thermal diffusivity such that spurious high and low values as seen with Dirichlet (temperature) boundary conditions are reduced. The results show that time resolved thermal diffusivity can be determined from temperature measurements of seasonal snow and support density-based empirical parameterizations for thermal conductivity.

  10. Structural features determining thermal adaptation of esterases.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Filip; Mandrysch, Agathe; Poojari, Chetan; Strodel, Birgit; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2016-02-01

    The adaptation of microorganisms to extreme living temperatures requires the evolution of enzymes with a high catalytic efficiency under these conditions. Such extremophilic enzymes represent valuable tools to study the relationship between protein stability, dynamics and function. Nevertheless, the multiple effects of temperature on the structure and function of enzymes are still poorly understood at the molecular level. Our analysis of four homologous esterases isolated from bacteria living at temperatures ranging from 10°C to 70°C suggested an adaptation route for the modulation of protein thermal properties through the optimization of local flexibility at the protein surface. While the biochemical properties of the recombinant esterases are conserved, their thermal properties have evolved to resemble those of the respective bacterial habitats. Molecular dynamics simulations at temperatures around the optimal temperatures for enzyme catalysis revealed temperature-dependent flexibility of four surface-exposed loops. While the flexibility of some loops increased with raising the temperature and decreased with lowering the temperature, as expected for those loops contributing to the protein stability, other loops showed an increment of flexibility upon lowering and raising the temperature. Preserved flexibility in these regions seems to be important for proper enzyme function. The structural differences of these four loops, distant from the active site, are substantially larger than for the overall protein structure, indicating that amino acid exchanges within these loops occurred more frequently thereby allowing the bacteria to tune atomic interactions for different temperature requirements without interfering with the overall enzyme function. PMID:26647400

  11. Biological and chemical tests of contaminated soils to determine bioavailability and environmentally acceptable endpoints (EAE)

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, C.R.; Menzie, C.A.; Pauwells, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The understanding of the concept of bioavailability of soil contaminants to receptors and its use in supporting the development of EAE is growing but still incomplete. Nonetheless, there is increased awareness of the importance of such data to determine acceptable cleanup levels and achieve timely site closures. This presentation discusses a framework for biological and chemical testing of contaminated soils developed as part of a Gas Research Institute (GRI) project entitled ``Environmentally Acceptable Endpoints in Soil Using a Risk Based Approach to Contaminated Site Management Based on Bioavailability of Chemicals in Soil.`` The presentation reviews the GRI program, and summarizes the findings of the biological and chemical testing section published in the GRI report. The three primary components of the presentation are: (1) defining the concept of bioavailability within the existing risk assessment paradigm, (2) assessing the usefulness of the existing tests to measure bioavailability and test frameworks used to interpret these measurements, and (3) suggesting how a small selection of relevant tests could be incorporated into a flexible testing scheme for soils to address this issue.

  12. DECOM: A pathway analysis approach for determining acceptable levels of contamination of radionuclides in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Till, J.E.; Moore, R.E.

    1986-02-28

    The purpose of this report is to describe a method for determining acceptable levels for decontamination of soil containing radionuclides at waste sites located on the Savannah River Plant. This task was achieved through development of a computer program called ''DECOM.'' The DECOM code is written in BASIC, runs on an IBM microcomputer (AT, XT, or compatible), is interactive, and calculates the annual radiation dose that an individual receives while living on property that has been decommissioned and decontaminated. User selected pathways of exposure include direct radiation from ground surface, ingestion of contaminated food, inhalation of resuspended radionuclides, and drinking contaminated water. The program requires a minimum of knowledge in radiological assessment. Although default values have been provided for most parameters, the methodology requires the user to define an acceptable effective dose equivalent that the resident can receive. Other input data required to run the code include the concentration of radionuclides in soil and some site specific parameters relating to the characteristics of the area. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Coupled inverse and forward modelling to assess the range of acceptable thermal histories, a case study from SE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogné, N.; Gallagher, K.; Cobbold, P. R.

    2012-04-01

    We performed a new thermochronological study (fission track analysis and (U-Th)/He dating on apatite) in SE Brazil and integrate those data with inverse and forward modelling via QTQt software (Gallagher, 2012) to obtain thermal histories. The inversion results were used to characterize the general thermal histories and the associated uncertainties. For most of the samples we had a first phase of cooling during Late Cretaceous or Early Tertiary with subsequent reheating followed by Neogene cooling. The inverse modelling does not provide a unique solution and the associated uncertainties can be quite significant. Moreover the Tertiary parts of thermal histories were usually near the accepted resolution of the thermochronometric methods (~50-40°C). Therefore we performed deterministic forward modelling within the range of uncertainties to assess which solution is the most consistent with the data and independent geological information. These results are always conditional on the assumed kinetics for fission track annealing and diffusion of He, so we do not test the validity of that aspect. However, we can look at the range of predictions for the different forward models tested. This apporach implies that the reheating is required only for the samples around onshore Tertiary basins. For other samples we cannot conclude but geological information are against this hypothesis. However the Neogene cooling is required for all the samples.The combination of forward and inverse modelling allows us to better constrain the thermal histories for each sample in exploring the range of uncertainties and to reconcile a range of possible thermal histories with independent geological information. It also provides new information on the contrasting thermal evolution between different regions of the onshore SE Brazilian margin. Gallagher, K. 2012, Transdimensional Inverse thermal history modeling for quantitative thermochronology, Journal of Geophysical Research, in press.

  14. Evidence contrary to the accepted Diels-Alder mechanism in the thermal modification of vegetable oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A transesterified oleochemical product has been made using two routes. Soybean oil was thermally polymerized anaerobically at 330 deg C. and the material was then transesterified using base catalyst and methanol. Alternatively, a similar product can be obtained by heating methyl linoleate to the sam...

  15. A technique for determining thermal parameters using measured temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dincer, I.; Dost, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a simple but accurate technique for determining thermal parameters during direct cooling of solid objects, in terms of the cooling coefficient, lag factor, thermal diffusivity, and heat transfer coefficient. Solid objects are assumed to be cooled in a fluid medium. In the modeling the objects are approximated to infinite slabs, infinite cylinders or spherical bodies. A one-dimensional unsteady-state heat transfer analysis is carried out under three different conditions: Bi < 0.01, 0.1 < Bi < 100, and Bi > 100. A technique is then developed for determining the thermal parameters during cooling of such objects. The developed technique is illustrated by examples using actual temperature measurements taken from the studies presented previously. Results show that the technique presented here is capable of determining the thermal parameters during such a cooling process accurately.

  16. Research to Support the Determination of Spacecraft Maximum Acceptable Concentrations of Potential Atmospheric Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, John L.

    1997-01-01

    In many ways, the typical approach to the handling of bibliographic material for generating review articles and similar manuscripts has changed little since the use of xerographic reproduction has become widespread. The basic approach is to collect reprints of the relevant material and place it in folders or stacks based on its dominant content. As the amount of information available increases with the passage of time, the viability of this mechanical approach to bibliographic management decreases. The personal computer revolution has changed the way we deal with many familiar tasks. For example, word processing on personal computers has supplanted the typewriter for many applications. Similarly, spreadsheets have not only replaced many routine uses of calculators but have also made possible new applications because the cost of calculation is extremely low. Objective The objective of this research was to use personal computer bibliographic software technology to support the determination of spacecraft maximum acceptable concentration (SMAC) values. Specific Aims The specific aims were to produce draft SMAC documents for hydrogen sulfide and tetrachloroethylene taking maximum advantage of the bibliographic software.

  17. Experimental determination of thermal properties of alluvial soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, N. G.; Bhandarkar, U. V.; Puranik, B. P.; Rao, A. B.

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, thermal conductivity and specific heat of a particular type of alluvial soil used in brick making in a certain region of India (Karad, Maharashtra State) are experimentally determined for later use in the estimation of ground heat loss in clamp type kilns. These properties are determined simultaneously using the steady-state and the transient temperature data measured in the setup constructed for this purpose. Additionally, physical properties of the soil are experimentally determined for use with six models for the prediction of the thermal conductivity of soil. The predictions from the models are compared with the experimental data. A separate data fitting exercise revealed a small temperature dependence of the soil thermal conductivity on the soil mean temperature.

  18. The meaning of air quality and flue gas emission standards for public acceptance of new thermal power plants.

    PubMed

    Barbalić, N; Marijan, G; Marić, M

    2000-06-01

    For the time being only 30-40% of the electric energy supply in Croatia comes from burning fossil fuel. New capacities of 800-1400 MW for the next decade will have to rely on the exclusive use of fossil fuels in thermal power plants (TPP). Public opinion will probably have a decisive influence on the issuing of construction permissions. The potential adverse effects on air seem to be the main argument against construction of TPPs. The priority is therefore to unambiguously state what air quality is warranted in the influenced area for the whole operation period of a TPP. It is important that the public should understand the real meaning of current air quality standards and emission limits. The only known way to do it today is through comparison with the corresponding standards and limits accepted worldwide. This paper discusses some important aspects of such comparison. PMID:11103526

  19. Determination of the Thermal Noise Limit of Graphene Biotransistors.

    PubMed

    Crosser, Michael S; Brown, Morgan A; McEuen, Paul L; Minot, Ethan D

    2015-08-12

    To determine the thermal noise limit of graphene biotransistors, we have measured the complex impedance between the basal plane of single-layer graphene and an aqueous electrolyte. The impedance is dominated by an imaginary component but has a finite real component. Invoking the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we determine the power spectral density of thermally driven voltage fluctuations at the graphene/electrolyte interface. The fluctuations have 1/f(p) dependence, with p = 0.75-0.85, and the magnitude of fluctuations scales inversely with area. Our results explain noise spectra previously measured in liquid-gated suspended graphene devices and provide realistic targets for future device performance. PMID:26176844

  20. Determination of thermal diffusivities of cylindrical bodies being cooled

    SciTech Connect

    Dincer, I.

    1996-09-01

    This paper deals with the development of an analytical model for determining the thermal diffusivities of the individual solid cylindrical bodies subjected to cooling is presented. Applications of this model were made using the experimental center temperature data obtained from the cylindrical products (e.g., cucumber and grape) during air cooling at the flow velocity of 2 m/s. As an experimental result, the thermal diffusivities of products were found to be 1.45{times}10{sup {minus}7} m{sup 2}/s for cucumber and 1.68{times}10{sup {minus}7} m{sup 2}/s for grape. It can be concluded that the present model is capable of determining the thermal diffusivities of cylindrical bodies during cooling in a simple and effective form.

  1. Determination of thermal diffusion coefficient of nanofluid: Fullerene-toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Alain; Bou-Ali, M. Mounir

    2011-05-01

    Thermodiffusion coefficient at fullerene mass concentrations of 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.15%, and 0.2% was established for pure fullerene (C 60) diluted in toluene solutions. For this, the thermogravitational technique has been used in planar configuration with 4 extraction points. The determination of the concentration distribution along the column in steady state is determined by the method of analysis based on density measurements. In order to determine the thermal diffusion coefficient all thermophysical properties such as density, viscosity, thermal expansion coefficient and mass expansion coefficients were determined. All these studies coincide with the importance of the knowledge of the thermophysics and transport properties of the nanofluids to develop new applications and to optimize the existing ones.

  2. Development of acceptance criteria for batches of silane primer for external tank thermal protection system bonding applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikes, F.

    1984-01-01

    Silane primers for use as thermal protection on external tanks were subjected to various analytic techniques to determine the most effective testing method for silane lot evaluation. The analytic methods included high performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, thermogravimetry (TGA), and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It is suggested that FTIR be used as the method for silane lot evaluation. Chromatograms, TGA profiles, bar graphs showing IR absorbances, and FTIR spectra are presented.

  3. Probing the physical determinants of thermal expansion of folded proteins.

    PubMed

    Dellarole, Mariano; Kobayashi, Kei; Rouget, Jean-Baptiste; Caro, José Alfredo; Roche, Julien; Islam, Mohammad M; Garcia-Moreno E, Bertrand; Kuroda, Yutaka; Royer, Catherine A

    2013-10-24

    The magnitude and sign of the volume change upon protein unfolding are strongly dependent on temperature. This temperature dependence reflects differences in the thermal expansivity of the folded and unfolded states. The factors that determine protein molar expansivities and the large differences in thermal expansivity for proteins of similar molar volume are not well understood. Model compound studies have suggested that a major contribution is made by differences in the molar volume of water molecules as they transfer from the protein surface to the bulk upon heating. The expansion of internal solvent-excluded voids upon heating is another possible contributing factor. Here, the contribution from hydration density to the molar thermal expansivity of a protein was examined by comparing bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and variants with alanine substitutions at or near the protein-water interface. Variants of two of these proteins with an additional mutation that unfolded them under native conditions were also examined. A modest decrease in thermal expansivity was observed in both the folded and unfolded states for the alanine variants compared with the parent protein, revealing that large changes can be made to the external polarity of a protein without causing large ensuing changes in thermal expansivity. This modest effect is not surprising, given the small molar volume of the alanine residue. Contributions of the expansion of the internal void volume were probed by measuring the thermal expansion for cavity-containing variants of a highly stable form of staphylococcal nuclease. Significantly larger (2-3-fold) molar expansivities were found for these cavity-containing proteins relative to the reference protein. Taken together, these results suggest that a key determinant of the thermal expansivities of folded proteins lies in the expansion of internal solvent-excluded voids. PMID:23646824

  4. An active thermal control surfaces experiment. [spacecraft temperature determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, D. R.; Brown, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    An active flight experiment is described that has the objectives to determine the effects of the low earth natural environment and the Shuttle induced environment on selected thermal control and optical surfaces. The optical and thermal properties of test samples will be measured in-situ using an integrating sphere reflectrometer and using calorimetric methods. This experiment has been selected for the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) flight which will be carried to orbit by the NASA Space Shuttle. The LDEF will remain in orbit to be picked up by a later Shuttle mission and returned for postflight evaluation.

  5. Determinants of Social Networking Software Acceptance: A Multi-Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shittu, Ahmed Tajudeen; Madarsha, Kamal Basha; AbduRahman, Nik Suryani Nik; Ahmad, Tunku Badariah Tunku

    2013-01-01

    Understanding reasons why students use social media has become a major preoccupation of researchers in recent time due to the rate of its adoption among the present generation of students. Some of the few study on social media phenomenon employed a single theory as a framework in order to understand the factors that influence the acceptance of it…

  6. Investigating the Determinants and Age and Gender Differences in the Acceptance of Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yi-Shun; Wu, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Hsiu-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    With the proliferation of mobile computing technology, mobile learning (m-learning) will play a vital role in the rapidly growing electronic learning market. M-learning is the delivery of learning to students anytime and anywhere through the use of wireless Internet and mobile devices. However, acceptance of m-learning by individuals is critical…

  7. 76 FR 61269 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: acceptability Determination 26 for Significant New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... SNAP rulemaking published in the Federal Register on March 18, 1994 (59 FR 13044). Notices and... 18, 1994, 59 FR 13044; August 26, 1994, 59 FR 44240; January 13, 1995, 60 FR 3318; September 5, 1996, 61 FR 47012; December 20, 2002, 67 FR 77927). Today's decision finds R- 507A acceptable as...

  8. Determination of Thermal-Diffusivity Dependence on Temperature of Transparent Samples by Thermal Wave Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaźmierczak-Bałata, Anna; Bodzenta, Jerzy; Trefon-Radziejewska, Dominika

    2010-01-01

    The use of a typical measuring cryostat with a standard temperature controller was proposed for investigation of the temperature dependence of the thermal diffusivity of transparent samples. The basic idea is to use the cryostat heater to control the mean sample temperature and to generate the thermal wave in it, simultaneously. Because of the relatively high thermal inertia of the system, the measurements are carried out at frequencies not exceeding 50 mHz. The periodic temperature disturbance in the sample was detected optically by the use of the mirage effect. The proposed method was used for determination of the thermal diffusivity of yttrium aluminum garnet single crystals in a temperature range from 20 °C to 200 °C.

  9. Determination of BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly Effective Thermal Conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew D. Hinds

    2001-10-17

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide an effective thermal conductivity for use in predicting peak cladding temperatures in boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with 7x7,8x8, and 9x9 rod arrays. The first objective of this calculation is to describe the development and application of a finite element representation that predicts peak spent nuclear fuel temperatures for BWR assemblies. The second objective is to use the discrete representation to develop a basis for determining an effective thermal conductivity (described later) for a BWR assembly with srneared/homogeneous properties and to investigate the thermal behavior of a spent fuel assembly. The scope of this calculation is limited to a steady-state two-dimensional representation of the waste package interior region. This calculation is subject to procedure AP-3.124, Calculations (Ref. 27) and guided by the applicable technical work plan (Ref. 14). While these evaluations were originally developed for the thermal analysis of conceptual waste package designs emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, the methodology applies to storage and transportation thermal analyses as well. Note that the waste package sketch in Attachment V depicts a preliminary design, and should not be interpreted otherwise.

  10. Rapid Determination of the Thermal Nociceptive Threshold in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Alshahrani, Saeed; Fernandez-Conti, Filipe; Araujo, Amanda; DiFulvio, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is characterized by hyperalgesia i.e., increased sensitivity to noxious stimulus, and allodynia i.e., hypersensitivity to normally innocuous stimuli1. Hyperalgesia and allodynia have been studied in many different rodent models of diabetes mellitus2. However, as stated by Bölcskei et al, determination of "pain" in animal models is challenging due to its subjective nature3. Moreover, the traditional methods used to determine behavioral responses to noxious thermal stimuli usually lack reproducibility and pharmacological sensitivity3. For instance, by using the hot-plate method of Ankier4, flinch, withdrawal and/or licking of either hind- and/or fore-paws is quantified as reflex latencies at constant high thermal stimuli (52-55 °C). However, animals that are hyperalgesic to thermal stimulus do not reproducibly show differences in reflex latencies using those supra-threshold temperatures3,5. As the recently described method of Bölcskei et al.6, the procedures described here allows for the rapid, sensitive and reproducible determination of thermal nociceptive thresholds (TNTs) in mice and rats. The method uses slowly increasing thermal stimulus applied mostly to the skin of mouse/rat plantar surface. The method is particularly sensitive to study anti-nociception during hyperalgesic states such as PDN. The procedures described bellow are based on the ones published in detail by Almási et al5 and Bölcskei et al3. The procedures described here have been approved the Laboratory Animal Care and Use Committee (LACUC), Wright State University. PMID:22643870

  11. Soil thermal resistivity and thermal stability measuring instrument. Volume 1. Determination of soil thermal stability and other soil thermal properties. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, S.A.; Radhakrishna, H.S.

    1981-11-01

    Numerous considerations influence the thermal design of an underground power cable, including the soil thermal resistivity, thermal diffusivity and thermal stability. Each of these properties is a function of soil moisture which is, in turn, a function of past weather, soil composition, and biological burden. The Neher-McGrath formalism has been widely used for thermal cable design. However, this formalism assumes knowledge of soil thermal properties (resistivity and diffusivity). For design purposes, these parameters should be treated statistically, since weather varies greatly from year-to-year. As well, soil thermal property surveys are normally required along the route to assess the thermal quality of the native soil. This project is intended to fill the gap between the need to carry out thermal design and the use of the Neher-McGrath formalism which is normally employed. This goal has been addressed through: (1) development of instrumentation and methods of measuring soil thermal properties in situ and in the laboratory; (2) recommendation of methods for conducting soil surveys along a proposed cable route and of assessing the thermal quality of soils; and (3) development of a computerized method to treat soil thermal design parameters on a statistical basis using computerized weather records as supplied by the US Environmental Data Service. This volume discussed methods for determining the thermal properties of soils. The use of the methods and instrumentation developed as a result of this contract should permit less conservative thermal design thereby improving the economics of underground transmission. As well, these techniques and instrumentation facilitate weather-dependent prediction of cable ampacity for installed cables, monitoring of backfill thermal stability, and many other new practices.

  12. What determines the acceptability of genetically modified food that can improve human nutrition?

    SciTech Connect

    Purchase, Iain F.H. . E-mail: ifhp@chadzombe.u-net.com

    2005-09-01

    It has been predicted that by 2025 there will be an annual shortfall of cereals for feeding the human population of 68.5 million tonnes. One possible solution is the use of genetically modified (GM) crops, which are already grown extensively (59 million ha of GM crops were planted in 2002) in the USA, South America, Africa and China. Nevertheless, there is considerable disagreement about the advisability of using such crops, particularly in Europe. Obviously, the safety of the food derived from the GM crops is a primary consideration. Safety assessment relies on establishing that the food is substantially equivalent to its non-GM counterpart and specific testing for allergenicity of proteins and toxicity of metabolites and the whole food. There appears to be international agreement on the principles of safety assessment. Safety to the environment is equally important, but will not be covered in this presentation. The public's perception of the risk of new technology is critical to its acceptance. Perception of risk, in turn, depends on the credibility of the source of the information and trust in the regulatory process. In many countries, the public appears to have lost its trust in the scientists and government dealing with GM food, making the acceptability of GM crops uncertain. Of equal importance are the socio-economic factors that impinge on the viability of GM produce. These include intellectual property protection, trade liberalisation (through subsidy and tariff barriers in developed countries) and the intensity of bio safety regulations. The socio-economic interests of developed and developing countries may diverge and may even be contradictory in any one country. Acceptance of GM crops will thus depend on detailed issues surrounding particular crops and economies.

  13. What determines the acceptability of genetically modified food that can improve human nutrition?

    PubMed

    Purchase, Iain F H

    2005-09-01

    It has been predicted that by 2025 there will be an annual shortfall of cereals for feeding the human population of 68.5 million tones. One possible solution is the use of genetically modified (GM) crops, which are already grown extensively (59 million ha of GM crops were planted in 2002) in the USA, South America, Africa and China. Nevertheless, there is considerable disagreement about the advisability of using such crops, particularly in Europe. Obviously, the safety of the food derived from the GM crops is a primary consideration. Safety assessment relies on establishing that the food is substantially equivalent to its non-GM counterpart and specific testing for allergenicity of proteins and toxicity of metabolites and the whole food. There appears to be international agreement on the principles of safety assessment. Safety to the environment is equally important, but will not be covered in this presentation. The public's perception of the risk of new technology is critical to its acceptance. Perception of risk, in turn, depends on the credibility of the source of the information and trust in the regulatory process. In many countries, the public appears to have lost its trust in the scientists and government dealing with GM food, making the acceptability of GM crops uncertain. Of equal importance are the socio-economic factors that impinge on the viability of GM produce. These include intellectual property protection, trade liberalization (through subsidy and tariff barriers in developed countries) and the intensity of bio safety regulations. The socio-economic interests of developed and developing countries may diverge and may even be contradictory in any one country. Acceptance of GM crops will thus depend on detailed issues surrounding particular crops and economies. PMID:15982686

  14. Determining the primary drivers of liking to predict consumers' acceptance of fresh nectarines and peaches.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Claudia; Crisosto, Gayle M; Heymann, Hildegarde; Crisosto, Carlos H

    2013-04-01

    A generic descriptive analysis using 11 judges provided 16 sensory attributes that described the aroma, flavor, and texture characteristics of 7 nectarine and peach cultivars selected for their predominant sensory attributes. Simultaneously, the "in-store" acceptability of these cultivars was evaluated by 120 consumers from northern California. The relationships among instrumental measurements (flesh firmness, ripe soluble solids concentration (RSSC), and ripe titratable acidity (RTA), sensory panel descriptors, and consumer hedonic responses were studied. In these cultivars, RSSC was the only instrumental measurement significantly related to overall liking. Cultivars with medium acidity and/or flavor/aroma were liked "very much," and consumer willingness to pay more was correlated with overall liking without regard to cultivar. Cluster analysis revealed 3 segments that were associated with ethnicity and consumer preferences within each segment. Sweetness was the main driver of liking for 2 consumer clusters; however, for the 3rd cluster, the perception of fruit aromas described as grassy/green fruit and pit aromas were the main drivers of liking. There was a high correlation between instrumental measurements and their sensory perception; however, the sensory attribute measurements explained cultivar characteristics better than instrumental measurements alone. Sweetness correlated positively with overall liking and consumer acceptance. PMID:23464630

  15. [Evaluation of consumer's acceptance of a peach palm snack (Bactris gasipaes) and determination of its potential as a functional food].

    PubMed

    López-Calvo, Rebeca; Pérez, Ana M; Ivankovich Guillén, Carmen; Calderón Villaplana, Sandra; Pineda Castro, Maria Lourdes

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate consumers' acceptance of a peach palm snack and to determine its potential as a functional food by chemical characterization. An assessment was conducted with 100 consumers to determine the acceptance of different snack formulations and the results were subjected to cluster analysis. This analysis revealed two groups. Group 2 included people that consume snacks and peach palm frequently and showed the highest grades for the snack evaluated characteristics. All the consumers in group 2 and approximately 85% of the consumers in group 1 indicated that they would buy the product suggesting that there is a niche market for the developed peach palm snack. Also, a qualitative evaluation, using mini focus groups, of the two most widely accepted formulas of the snack (chosen according to previously described study) was performed. The sessions considered the opinion of middle class professionals and housewives. It was determined that the combination of tara gum and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) allows a positive synergistic effect on the sensory characteristics of the snack, highlighting natural peach flavor and improving crunchiness. In a dry basis, the snack contains per 100 g: 9 ± 4 g of fat, 14.0 ± 0.3 g of dietary fiber, 15500 ± 32 µg of carotenoids and has an antioxidant capacity of 4700 ± 8 µmol TE, which demonstrates its potential as a functional food. PMID:26320306

  16. Temperature measurement by thermal strain imaging with diagnostic power ultrasound, with potential for thermal index determination.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Dong; Zhou, Li-Xia; Wells, Peter N T; Halliwell, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Over the years, there has been a substantial increase in acoustic exposure in diagnostic ultrasound as new imaging modalities with higher intensities and frame rates have been introduced; and more electronic components have been packed into the probe head, so that there is a tendency for it to become hotter. With respect to potential thermal effects, including those which may be hazardous occurring during ultrasound scanning, there is a correspondingly growing need for in vivo techniques to guide the operator as to the actual temperature rise occurring in the examined tissues. Therefore, an in vivo temperature estimator would be of considerable practical value. The commonly-used method of tissue thermal index (TI) measurement with a hydrophone in water could underestimate the actual value of TI (in one report by as much as 2.9 times). To obtain meaningful results, it is necessary to map the temperature elevation in 2-D (or 3-D) space. We present methodology, results and validation of a 2-D spatial and temporal thermal strain ultrasound temperature estimation technique in phantoms, and its apparently novel application in tracking the evolution of heat deposition at diagnostic exposure levels. The same ultrasound probe is used for both transmission and reception. The displacement and thermal strain estimation methods are similar to those used in high-intensity focused ultrasound thermal monitoring. The use of radiofrequency signals permits the application of cross correlation as a similarity measurement for tracking feature displacement. The displacement is used to calculate the thermal strain directly related to the temperature rise. Good agreement was observed between the temperature rise and the ultrasound power and scan duration. Thermal strain up to 1.4% was observed during 4000-s scan. Based on the results obtained for the temperature range studied in this work, the technique demonstrates potential for applicability in phantom (and possibly in vivo tissue

  17. Method for determining thermal conductivity and thermal capacity per unit volume of earth in situ

    DOEpatents

    Poppendiek, Heinz F.

    1982-01-01

    A method for determining the thermal conductivity of the earth in situ is based upon a cylindrical probe (10) having a thermopile (16) for measuring the temperature gradient between sets of thermocouple junctions (18 and 20) of the probe after it has been positioned in a borehole and has reached thermal equilibrium with its surroundings, and having means (14) for heating one set of thermocouple junctions (20) of the probe at a constant rate while the temperature gradient of the probe is recorded as a rise in temperature over several hours (more than about 3 hours). A fluid annulus thermally couples the probe to the surrounding earth. The recorded temperature curves are related to the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and to the thermal capacity per unit volume, (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin., by comparison with calculated curves using estimates of k.sub..infin. and (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin. in an equation which relates these parameters to a rise in the earth's temperature for a known and constant heating rate.

  18. Determination of the thermal stability of perfluoropolyalkyl ethers by tensimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmick, Larry A.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal decomposition temperatures of several perfluoropolyalkyl ether fluids were determined with a computerized tensimeter. In general, the decomposition temperatures of the commercial fluids were all similar and significantly higher than those for noncommercial fluids. Correlation of the decomposition temperatures with the molecular structures of the primary components of the commercial fluids revealed that the stability of the fluids was not affected by carbon chain length, branching, or adjacent difluoroformal groups. Instead, stability was limited by the presence of small quantities of thermally unstable material and/or chlorine-containing material arising from the use of chlorine containing solvents during synthesis. Finally, correlation of decomposition temperatures with molecular weights for two fluids supports a chain cleavage reaction mechanism for one and an unzipping reaction mechanism for the other.

  19. Experimental determination of satellite bolted joints thermal resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantelli, Marcia Barbosa Henriques; Basto, Jose Edson

    1990-01-01

    The thermal resistance was experimentally determined of the bolted joints of the first Brazilian satellite (SCD 01). These joints, used to connect the satellite structural panels, are reproduced in an experimental apparatus, keeping, as much as possible, the actual dimensions and materials. A controlled amount of heat is forced to pass through the joint and the difference of temperature between the panels is measured. The tests are conducted in a vacuum chamber with liquid nitrogen cooled walls, that simulates the space environment. Experimental procedures are used to avoid much heat losses, which are carefully calculated. Important observations about the behavior of the joint thermal resistance with the variation of the mean temperature are made.

  20. Determination of thermal properties of commercial Ni-MH cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric C.

    1994-01-01

    The test objectives were to evaluate the electrical and thermal performance of commercial Ni-MH cells, evaluate the effectiveness of commercial charge control circuits, assess the abuse tolerance of these cells, and correlate performance and abuse tolerances to cell design via disassembly. Design objectives were to determine which cell designs are most suitable for scale-up and to guide the design of future shuttle and space station based battery chargers. Results, displayed in viewgraph format, include: reflex charging with ICS circuit resulted in premature charge termination; Ni-MH cells appear very tolerant to overcharge at low rates; Enstore's charger is more electrically and thermally efficient at high rates; and Ni-MH cycles much more efficiently than Ni-Cd with the delta-V/delta-t termination.

  1. Determination of Thermal State of Charge in Solar Heat Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glakpe, E. K.; Cannon, J. N.; Hall, C. A., III; Grimmett, I. W.

    1996-01-01

    The research project at Howard University seeks to develop analytical and numerical capabilities to study heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics, and the prediction of the performance of solar heat receivers for space applications. Specifically, the study seeks to elucidate the effects of internal and external thermal radiation, geometrical and applicable dimensionless parameters on the overall heat transfer in space solar heat receivers. Over the last year, a procedure for the characterization of the state-of-charge (SOC) in solar heat receivers for space applications has been developed. By identifying the various factors that affect the SOC, a dimensional analysis is performed resulting in a number of dimensionless groups of parameters. Although not accomplished during the first phase of the research, data generated from a thermal simulation program can be used to determine values of the dimensionless parameters and the state-of-charge and thereby obtain a correlation for the SOC. The simulation program selected for the purpose is HOTTube, a thermal numerical computer code based on a transient time-explicit, axisymmetric model of the total solar heat receiver. Simulation results obtained with the computer program are presented the minimum and maximum insolation orbits. In the absence of any validation of the code with experimental data, results from HOTTube appear reasonable qualitatively in representing the physical situations modeled.

  2. Interactions among thermal parameters determine offspring sex under temperature-dependent sex determination

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Daniel A.; Shine, Richard

    2011-01-01

    In many animals, temperatures experienced by developing embryos determine offspring sex (e.g. temperature-dependent sex determination, TSD), but most studies focus strictly on the effects of mean temperature, with little emphasis on the importance of thermal fluctuations. In the jacky dragon (Amphibolurus muricatus), an Australian lizard with TSD, data from nests in the field demonstrate that offspring sex ratios are predictable from thermal fluctuations but not from mean nest temperatures. To clarify this paradox, we incubated eggs in a factorial experiment with two levels of mean temperature and three levels of diel fluctuation. We show that offspring sex is determined by an interaction between these critical thermal parameters. Intriguingly, because these two thermal descriptors shift in opposing directions throughout the incubation season, this interactive effect inhibits seasonal shifts in sex ratio. Hence, our results suggest that TSD can yield offspring sex ratios that resemble those produced under genotypic sex-determining systems. These findings raise important considerations for understanding the diversity of TSD reaction norms, for designing experiments that evaluate the evolutionary significance of TSD, and for predicting sex ratios under past and future climate change scenarios. PMID:20685704

  3. Determinations of TSD facility acceptability under the CERCLA Off-Site Rule

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    On September 22, 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the ``Off-Site Rule`` to implement section 121(d)(3) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). CERCLA {section}121(d)(3) requires that wastes generated as a result of remediation activities taken under CERCLA authority and transferred off-site be managed only at facilities that comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. In 1994, the DOE`s Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance (OEPA), RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413) published a CERCLA Information Brief titled ``The Off-Site Rule`` which describes the content of the Off-Site Rule and clarifies some of its implications for DOE remedial actions under CERCLA. Additionally, EH-413 published the Guide on Selecting Compliant Off-Site Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities which provides a regulatory roadmap for accomplishing off-site transfers of environmental restoration and process hazardous waste at DOE facilities in a manner compliant with the Off-Site Rule and other relevant Federal regulations. Those guidance documents concentrate primarily on DOE`s perspective as a hazardous waste generator. The purpose of this Information Brief is to address the implications of the Off-Site Rule for DOE-owned hazardous waste treatment, storage or disposal facilities that accept CERCLA remediation wastes from off-site locations.

  4. Determination of Fe(II) by Optimized Thermal Lens Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Humberto; Korte, Dorota; Franko, Mladen

    2015-09-01

    A simple and accurate method for the determination of Fe(II) species in liquid solutions was developed. The measurement principle was realized by the photothermal effect and performed by the use of a thermal lens microscope (TLM) in its optimized, mode-mismatched configuration with a counter-propagating probe beam (PB) and an excitation beam (EB). Additionally, due to the combination of the collimated PB and tightly focused EB measurement, the detection limit was significantly decreased. Our preliminary results demonstrated that a TLM enables the detection of iron ions at the levels of \\upmu g{\\cdot }{L}^{-1}, which makes this technique an alternative to traditional spectroscopic methods as a promising detector for the ultrasensitive determination of different compounds in liquid solutions.

  5. Determination of Viral Capsid Elastic Properties from Equilibrium Thermal Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Eric R.; Brooks, Charles L., III

    2011-05-01

    We apply two-dimensional elasticity theory to viral capsids to develop a framework for calculating elastic properties of viruses from equilibrium thermal fluctuations of the capsid surface in molecular dynamics and elastic network model trajectories. We show that the magnitudes of the long wavelength modes of motion available in a simulation with all atomic degrees of freedom are recapitulated by an elastic network model. For the mode spectra to match, the elastic network model must be scaled appropriately by a factor which can be determined from an icosahedrally constrained all-atom simulation. With this method we calculate the two-dimensional Young’s modulus Y, bending modulus κ, and Föppl-von Kármán number γ, for the T=1 mutant of the Sesbania mosaic virus. The values determined are in the range of previous theoretical estimates.

  6. Determinant of Mobile Devices Acceptance for Learning among Students in Developing Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tajudeen, Shittu Ahmed; Basha, Madarsha Kamal; Michael, Fakomogbon O.; Mukthar, Alhaji Liman

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to understand the determinant of mobile devices for learning among students in the developing world. A sample of 247 undergraduate students from Malaysia and Nigeria were involved in the study. An adapted but modified survey instrument was used to gather the data of the study. The variable of the study are perceived…

  7. Psycho-vibratory evaluation of timber floors - Towards the determination of design indicators of vibration acceptability and vibration annoyance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreira, J.; Trollé, A.; Jarnerö, K.; Sjökvist, L.-G.; Bard, D.

    2015-03-01

    In timber housing constructions, vibrations can be a nuisance for inhabitants. Notably, the vibrational response of wooden floor systems is an issue in need of being dealt with more adequately in the designing of such buildings. Studies addressing human response to vibrations are needed in order to be able to better estimate what level of vibrations in dwellings can be seen as acceptable. In the present study, measurements on five different wooden floors were performed in a laboratory environment at two locations in Sweden (SP in Växjö and LU in Lund). Acceleration measurements were carried out while a person either was walking on a particular floor or was seated in a chair placed there as the test leader was walking on the floor. These participants filled out a questionnaire regarding their perception and experiencing of the vibrations in question. Independently of the subjective tests, several static and dynamic characteristics of the floors were determined through measurements. The ultimate aim was to develop indicators of human response to floor vibrations, specifically those regarding vibration acceptability and vibration annoyance, their being drawn based on relationships between the questionnaire responses obtained and the parameter values determined on the basis of the measurements carried out. To that end, use was made of multilevel regression. Although the sample of floors tested was small, certain clear trends could be noted. The first eigenfrequency (calculated in accordance with Eurocode 5) and Hu and Chui's criterion (calculated from measured quantities) proved to be the best indicators of vibration annoyance, and the Maximum Transient Vibration Value (computed on the basis of the accelerations experienced by the test subjects) to be the best indicator of vibration acceptability.

  8. Stress determination in thermally grown alumina scales using ruby luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Renusch, D.; Veal, B.W.; Koshelev, I.; Natesan, K.; Grimsditch; Hou, P.Y.

    1996-06-01

    By exploiting the strain dependence of the ruby luminescence line, we have measured the strain in alumina scales thermally grown on Fe-Cr- Al alloys. Results are compared and found to be reasonably consistent with strains determined using x rays. Oxidation studies were carried out on alloys Fe - 5Cr - 28Al and Fe - 18Cr - 10Al (at.%). Significantly different levels of strain buildup were observed in scales on these alloys. Results on similar alloys containing a ``reactive element`` (Zr or Hf) in dilute quantity are also presented. Scales on alloys containing a reactive element (RE) can support significantly higher strains than scales on RE-free alloys. With the luminescence technique, strain relief associated with spallation thresholds is readily observed.

  9. A thermal approach to waveform-independent energy determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhring, Tobias; Spiegel, Thomas; Funck, Torsten

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a new device for power and rms value measurement is presented. Unlike the commercially available measurement equipment, this device is not limited to special waveforms. As a reaction to the increasing use of energy harvesters, which gather energy from the ambience to power low-power electronics, it is necessary to develop new measurement equipment that is not limited to sinusoidal signals (harvesters generally deliver nonsinusoidal signals). Therefore, a new device is presented based on an isothermal operating mode of a planar multijunction thermal converter (PMJTC). Unlike previous PMJTCs, this one is equipped with an additional gold heater and is operated by a regulating circuit, which is electrically isolated from the input. The output signal of the regulator is recorded and analyzed to determine the power and rms value of the input signal.

  10. Psychological Determinants of Consumer Acceptance of Personalised Nutrition in 9 European Countries

    PubMed Central

    Poínhos, Rui; van der Lans, Ivo A.; Rankin, Audrey; Fischer, Arnout R. H.; Bunting, Brendan; Kuznesof, Sharron; Stewart-Knox, Barbara; Frewer, Lynn J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a model of the psychological factors which predict people’s intention to adopt personalised nutrition. Potential determinants of adoption included perceived risk and benefit, perceived self-efficacy, internal locus of control and health commitment. Methods A questionnaire, developed from exploratory study data and the existing theoretical literature, and including validated psychological scales was administered to N = 9381 participants from 9 European countries (Germany, Greece, Ireland, Poland, Portugal, Spain, the Netherlands, the UK, and Norway). Results Structural equation modelling indicated that the greater participants’ perceived benefits to be associated with personalised nutrition, the more positive their attitudes were towards personalised nutrition, and the greater their intention to adopt it. Higher levels of nutrition self-efficacy were related to more positive attitudes towards, and a greater expressed intention to adopt, personalised nutrition. Other constructs positively impacting attitudes towards personalised nutrition included more positive perceptions of the efficacy of regulatory control to protect consumers (e.g. in relation to personal data protection), higher self-reported internal health locus of control, and health commitment. Although higher perceived risk had a negative relationship with attitude and an inverse relationship with perceived benefit, its effects on attitude and intention to adopt personalised nutrition was less influential than perceived benefit. The model was stable across the different European countries, suggesting that psychological factors determining adoption of personalised nutrition have generic applicability across different European countries. Conclusion The results suggest that transparent provision of information about potential benefits, and protection of consumers’ personal data is important for adoption, delivery of public health benefits, and commercialisation of personalised

  11. A Study to Develop a Scale for Determining the Social Acceptance Levels of Special-Needs Students, Participating in Inclusion Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Erdinc; Sahbaz, Umit

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a scale of social acceptance for determining the social acceptance levels of special-needs students, participating in inclusion practices. The target population of the research is 8th grade students of all primary schools in the provincial center of Burdur in the 2008 to 2009 academic year and the target study…

  12. Determination of thermal stability of oils by pyrolytic gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtseva, N.A.; Mikhailov, I.A.; Nikonorov, E.M.; Rakova, L.A.

    1984-03-01

    This article demonstrates how pyrolytic gas chromatography (PGC) offers a means for unambiguous differentiation of the decomposition products from the accompanying products of oil vaporization. The proposed method based on PGC uses a furnace-type pyrolyzer connected to an LKhM-7A chromatograph. The common peak of propane with propylene was selected as a characteristic peak to indicate the oil decomposition temperature. Propane and propylene, along with lighter hydrocarbons, are always present in the decomposition products. A volume graph method is used to determine the temperature of vaporization or decomposition of the substance, based on plotting a curve for the relationship between the heating temperature and the relative volume (or pressure) of the test sample. The decomposition temperatures determined by the PGC method agree with the values report by foreign manufacturers (deviation no greater than 2/sup 0/C). The accuracy of calculation of the thermal stability of the hydrocarbon oils by the PGC method was 5-10/sup 0/C as a result of deficiencies in the heating device in the pyrolytic unit. Includes a table.

  13. Thermal perception thresholds: influence of determination paradigm and reference temperature.

    PubMed

    Hilz, M J; Glorius, S; Berić, A

    1995-04-01

    The use of different paradigms and initial skin and thermode reference temperatures in quantitative thermal testing does not allow strict comparison of results generated from different laboratories. We tested (a) whether the reproducibility of the method of limits is higher for measurement of isolated warm and cold thresholds (WT, CT) as compared to difference limen (DL) thresholds, i.e. values derived from alternating warm and cold stimulation, and (b) whether WT-, CT- and DL-thresholds depend on the value of baseline skin and thermode temperatures. In 20 healthy volunteers WT-, CT-, and DL-thresholds were determined at the volar wrist using a Somedic-Thermotest. In condition A the baseline thermode temperature was set at 30 degrees C, and in conditions B and C at 35 degrees C; in condition C the tested skin area was also warmed to 35 degrees C prior to the test. The randomized tests were repeated within 1-8 days. WT-, CT-, and DL-values were reproducible, but DL-values were more widely spread than WT and CT. CT variability was lowest in condition A, and WT variability in condition C. We conclude that DL determination should be abandoned, since CT and WT better differentiate normal from abnormal thresholds than the coarse DL-values. We recommend the use of the lower baseline thermode temperature (30 degrees C) and elimination of warming of the tested skin area prior to the test. PMID:7608727

  14. Numerical Determination of Critical Conditions for Thermal Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, W.; Wake, G. C.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    The determination of ignition or thermal explosion in an oxidizing porous body of material, as described by a dimensionless reaction-diffusion equation of the form .tu = .2u + .e-1/u over the bounded region O, is critically reexamined from a modern perspective using numerical methodologies. First, the classic stationary model is revisited to establish the proper reference frame for the steady-state solution space, and it is demonstrated how the resulting nonlinear two-point boundary value problem can be reexpressed as an initial value problem for a system of first-order differential equations, which may be readily solved using standard algorithms. Then, the numerical procedure is implemented and thoroughly validated against previous computational results based on sophisticated path-following techniques. Next, the transient nonstationary model is attacked, and the full nonlinear form of the reaction-diffusion equation, including a generalized convective boundary condition, is discretized and expressed as a system of linear algebraic equations. The numerical methodology is implemented as a computer algorithm, and validation computations are carried out as a prelude to a broad-ranging evaluation of the assembly problem and identification of the watershed critical initial temperature conditions for thermal ignition. This numerical methodology is then used as the basis for studying the relationship between the shape of the critical initial temperature distribution and the corresponding spatial moments of its energy content integral and an attempt to forge a fundamental conjecture governing this relation. Finally, the effects of dynamic boundary conditions on the classic storage problem are investigated and the groundwork is laid for the development of an approximate solution methodology based on adaptation of the standard stationary model.

  15. A Flight Investigation to Determine the Lateral Oscillatory Damping Acceptable for an Airplane in the Landing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeill, Walter E.; Vomaske, Richard F.

    1959-01-01

    An F-86E airplane, in which servo actuation of the ailerons and rudder provides artificial variation of the important lateral and directional aerodynamic stability parameters, has been flown by test pilots of the NASA, U.S. Air Force, and one aircraft manufacturer to determine satisfactory and acceptable levels of lateral oscillatory damping in the landing approach. In addition to normal operational use, particular consideration was given to the emergency condition of failure of stability-augmentation equipment. In this study, the pilots' opinions of the airplane dynamic stability and control characteristics in smooth and simulated rough air have been recorded according to a numerical rating scale. The results are presented in the form of boundaries in terms of cycles to damp to half amplitude, 1/C(sub 1/2), or time to damp to half amplitude, 1/T(1/2) and bank-to-sideslip ratio, and are discussed in relation to existing flying-qualities criteria. Though the present results, which were obtained at 170 knots indicated airspeed and 10,000-feet altitude, indicated that increased damping is required with increased bank-to-sideslip ratio (as found in previous work), consideration of the dampers-failed condition indicated a great reduction in the minimum acceptable damping. At moderate values of bank-to-sideslip ratio, effects of lateral-oscillation period on pilot-opinion variation with damping appeared to be taken into account by use of the parameter 1/T(sub 1/2).

  16. Mass and thermal diffusivity algorithms: reduced algorithms for mass and thermal diffusivity determinations.

    PubMed

    Banish, R Michael; Albert, Lyle B J; Pourpoint, Timothee L; Alexander, J Iwan D; Sekerka, Robert F

    2002-10-01

    Mass and thermal diffusivity measurements conducted on Earth are prone to contamination by uncontrollable convective contributions to the overall transport. Previous studies of mass and thermal diffusivities conducted on spacecraft have demonstration the gain in precision, and lower absolute values, resulting from the reduced convective transport possible in a low-gravity environment. We have developed and extensively tested real-time techniques for diffusivity measurements, where several measurements may be obtained on a single sample. This is particularly advantageous for low gravity research were there is limited experiment time. The mass diffusivity methodology uses a cylindrical sample geometry. A radiotracer, initially located at one end of the host is used as the diffusant. The sample is positioned in a concentric isothermal radiation shield with collimation bores located at defined positions along its axis. The intensity of the radiation emitted through the collimators is measured versus time with solid-state detectors and associated energy discrimination electronics. For the mathematical algorithm that we use, only a single pair of collimation bores and detectors are necessary for single temperature measurements. However, by employing a second, offset, pair of collimation holes and radiation detectors, diffusivities can be determined at several temperatures per sample. For thermal diffusivity measurements a disk geometry is used. A heat pulse is applied in the center of the sample and the temperature response of the sample is measured at several locations. Thus, several values of the diffusivity are measured versus time. The exact analytic solution to a heat pulse in the disk geometry leads to a unique heated area and measurement locations. Knowledge of the starting time and duration of he heating pulse is not used in the data evaluation. Thus, this methodology represents an experimentally simpler and more robust scheme. PMID:12446321

  17. Method And Apparatus For Determining Health Of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Alok Mani; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Devitt, John William; Ruud, James Anthony; Brewer, Luke Nathaniel

    2005-09-13

    A method for determining past-service conditions and/or remaining useful life of a component of a combustion engine and/or a thermal barrier coating ("TBC") of the component comprises providing a photoluminescent ("PL") material in the TBC, directing an exciting radiation at the TBC, measuring the intensity of a characteristic peak in the emission spectrum of the PL material, and correlating the intensity of the characteristic peak or another quantity derived therefrom to an amount of a new phase that has been formed as a result of the exposure of the component to extreme temperatures. An apparatus for carrying out the method comprises a radiation source that provides the exciting radiation to the TBC, a radiation detector for detecting radiation emitted by the PL material, and means for relating a characteristic of the emission spectrum of the PL material to the amount of the new phase in the TBC, thereby inferring the past-service conditions or the remaining useful life of the component.

  18. Computer-aided methods of determining thyristor thermal transients

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, E.; Bronner, G.

    1988-08-01

    An accurate tracing of the thyristor thermal response is investigated. This paper offers several alternatives for thermal modeling and analysis by using an electrical circuit analog: topological method, convolution integral method, etc. These methods are adaptable to numerical solutions and well suited to the use of the digital computer. The thermal analysis of thyristors was performed for the 1000 MVA converter system at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Transient thermal impedance curves for individual thyristors in a given cooling arrangement were known from measurements and from manufacturer's data. The analysis pertains to almost any loading case, and the results are obtained in a numerical or a graphical format. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Development of acceptance criteria for batches of silane primer for external tank thermal protection system bonding applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikes, F.

    1985-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is currently the best technique for observing hydrolytic changes in DC 1200 silane the primers caused by moisture in the atmosphere. To further prove that FTIR can be used as a criterion test for acceptance of silane primer lots, intensities of the FTIR OH- band are being compared with primer adhesive bond strength using a mechanical test suggested by NASA. Results of tests for shear strength and Oh-absorption are tabulated and compared with FTIR absorption intensities in the OH-region.

  20. Determination of the sensitivity of thermoluminescent detectors to thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhilov, Y.N.; Erkin, V.G.; Kuchomov, V.A.; Lebedev, O.V.; Tyurin, G.A.

    1985-10-01

    The authors show how the considerable difference in sensitivity to thermal neutrons of the TLD-6-05 and TLD-7-05 detectors allows them to be used jointly for the separate recording of thermal neutrons and -radiation in mixed fields. For detectors with the natural content of lithium isotopes, the sensitivity to thermal neutrons is an order of magnitude lower than for the TLD-6-05, which corresponds to the ratio of the Li-6 concentrations in these detectors. These detectors may be found useful in individual neutron dosimeters of the albedo type for monitoring the radiation safety of personnel.

  1. Spectrophotometric method for the determination, validation, spectroscopic and thermal analysis of diphenhydramine in pharmaceutical preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulu, Sevgi Tatar; Elmali, Fikriye Tuncel

    2010-09-01

    A sensitive, simple and rapid spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of diphenhydramine in pharmaceutical preparation. The method was based on the charge-transfer complex of the drug, as n-electron donor, with 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano- p-benzoquinone (DDQ), as π-acceptor. The formation of this complex was also confirmed by UV-vis, FTIR and 1H NMR spectra techniques and thermal analysis. The proposed method was validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy, precision, recovery and robustness. The linearity range for concentrations of diphenhydramine was found to be 12.5-150 μg/mL with acceptable correlation coefficients. The detection and quantification limits were found to be 2.09 and 6.27 μg/mL, respectively. The proposed and references methods were applied to the determination of drug in syrup. This preparation were also analyzed with an reference method and statistical comparison by t- and F-tests revealed that there was no significant difference between the results of the two methods with respect to mean values and standard deviations at the 95% confidence level.

  2. Spectrophotometric method for the determination, validation, spectroscopic and thermal analysis of diphenhydramine in pharmaceutical preparation.

    PubMed

    Ulu, Sevgi Tatar; Elmali, Fikriye Tuncel

    2010-09-15

    A sensitive, simple and rapid spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of diphenhydramine in pharmaceutical preparation. The method was based on the charge-transfer complex of the drug, as n-electron donor, with 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ), as pi-acceptor. The formation of this complex was also confirmed by UV-vis, FTIR and (1)H NMR spectra techniques and thermal analysis. The proposed method was validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy, precision, recovery and robustness. The linearity range for concentrations of diphenhydramine was found to be 12.5-150 microg/mL with acceptable correlation coefficients. The detection and quantification limits were found to be 2.09 and 6.27 microg/mL, respectively. The proposed and references methods were applied to the determination of drug in syrup. This preparation were also analyzed with an reference method and statistical comparison by t- and F-tests revealed that there was no significant difference between the results of the two methods with respect to mean values and standard deviations at the 95% confidence level. PMID:20621611

  3. 45 CFR 2544.130 - How will the Corporation determine whether to solicit or accept a donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SOLICITATION AND ACCEPTANCE OF... business relationship, financial interest, litigation, or other factors that may indicate such a...

  4. 45 CFR 2544.130 - How will the Corporation determine whether to solicit or accept a donation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SOLICITATION AND ACCEPTANCE OF... business relationship, financial interest, litigation, or other factors that may indicate such a...

  5. Experimental Determination of Thermal Conductivity of Low-Density Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, Willard D.

    1954-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of low-density ice has been computed from data obtained in an experimental investigation of the heat transfer and mass transfer by sublimation for an iced surface on a flat plate in a high-velocity tangential air stream. The results are compared with data from several sources on the thermal conductivity of packed snow and solid glaze ice. The results show good agreement with the equations for the thermal conductivity of packed snow as a function of snow density. The agreement of the curves for packed snow near the solid ice regime with the values of thermal conductivity, of ice indicates that the curves are applicable over the entire-ice-density range.

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Advanced Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by a Steady-state Laser Heat-flux Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The development of low conductivity and high temperature capable thermal barrier coatings requires advanced testing techniques that can accurately and effectively evaluate coating thermal conductivity under future high-performance and low-emission engine heat-flux conditions. In this paper, a unique steady-state CO2 laser (wavelength 10.6 microns) heat-flux approach is described for determining the thermal conductivity and conductivity deduced cyclic durability of ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coating systems at very high temperatures (up to 1700 C) under large thermal gradients. The thermal conductivity behavior of advanced thermal and environmental barrier coatings for metallic and Si-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) component applications has also been investigated using the laser conductivity approach. The relationships between the lattice and radiation conductivities as a function of heat flux and thermal gradient at high temperatures have been examined for the ceramic coating systems. The steady-state laser heat-flux conductivity approach has been demonstrated as a viable means for the development and life prediction of advanced thermal barrier coatings for future turbine engine applications.

  7. Computer code for determination of thermally perfect gas properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, David W.; Tatum, Kenneth E.

    1994-01-01

    A set of one-dimensional compressible flow relations for a thermally perfect, calorically imperfect gas is derived for the specific heat c(sub p), expressed as a polynomial function of temperature, and developed into the thermally perfect gas (TPG) computer code. The code produces tables of compressible flow properties similar to those of NACA Rep. 1135. Unlike the tables of NACA Rep. 1135 which are valid only in the calorically perfect temperature regime, the TPG code results are also valid in the thermally perfect calorically imperfect temperature regime which considerably extends the range of temperature application. Accuracy of the TPG code in the calorically perfect temperature regime is verified by comparisons with the tables of NACA Rep. 1135. In the thermally perfect, calorically imperfect temperature regime, the TPG code is validated by comparisons with results obtained from the method of NACA Rep. 1135 for calculating the thermally perfect calorically imperfect compressible flow properties. The temperature limits for application of the TPG code are also examined. The advantage of the TPG code is its applicability to any type of gas (monatomic, diatomic, triatomic, or polyatomic) or any specified mixture thereof, whereas the method of NACA Rep. 1135 is restricted to only diatomic gases.

  8. Determining in-situ thermal conductivity of coarse textured materials through numerical analysis of thermal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, H.; Hamamoto, S.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems use ground or groundwater as a heat/cooling source, typically by circulating anti-freezing solution inside a vertically installed closed-loop tube known as a U-tube to transfer heat to/from the ground. Since GSHP systems are based on renewable energy and can achieve much higher coefficient of performance (COP) than conventional air source heat pump systems, use of GSHP systems has been rapidly increasing worldwide. However, environmental impacts by GSHP systems including thermal effects on subsurface physical-chemical and microbiological properties have not been fully investigated. To rigorously assess GSHP impact on the subsurface environment, ground thermal properties including thermal conductivity and heat capacity need to be accurately characterized. Ground thermal properties were investigated at two experimental sites at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TAT) and Saitama University (SA), both located in the Kanto area of Japan. Thermal properties were evaluated both by thermal probe measurements on boring core samples and by performing in-situ Thermal Response Tests (TRT) in 50-80 m deep U-tubes. At both TAT and SU sites, heat-pulse probe measurements gave unrealistic low thermal conductivities for coarse textured materials (dominated by particles > 75 micrometers). Such underestimation can be partly due to poor contact between probe and porous material and partly to markedly decreasing sample water content during drilling, carrying, and storing sandy/gravelly samples. A more reliable approach for estimating in-situ thermal conductivity of coarse textured materials is therefore needed, and may be based on the commonly used TRT test. However, analyses of TRT data is typically based on Kelvin's line source model and provides an average (effective) thermal property for the whole soil profile around the U-tube but not for each geological layer. The main objective of this study was therefore to develop a method

  9. A water framework directive (WFD) compliant determination of eologically acceptable flows in alpine rivers - a river type specific approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Paul; Zitek, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Currently the EU-Water Framework Directive (WFD) represents the driving force behind the assessment for rehabilitation and conservation of aquatic resources throughout Europe. Hydropower production, often considered as "green energy", in the past has put significant pressures on river systems like fragmentation by weirs, impoundment, hydropeaking and water abstraction. Due to the limited availability of data for determining ecologically acceptable flow for rivers at water abstraction sites, a special monitoring program was conducted in the federal state of Salzburg in Austria from 2006 to 2009. Water abstraction sites at 19 hydropower plants, mostly within the trout region of the River Salzach catchment, were assessed in detail with regard to the effect of water abstraction on fish and macrozoobenthos. Based on a detailed assessment of the specific local hydro-morphological and biological situations, the validity of natural low flow criteria (Absolute Minimum Flow - AMF, the lowest daily average flow ever measured and Mean Annual Daily Low Flow - MADLF) as starting points for the determination of an ecologically acceptable flow was tested. It was assessed, if a good ecological status in accordance with the EU-WFD can be maintained at natural AMF. Additionally it was tested, if important habitat parameters describing connectivity, river type specific flow variability and river type specific habitats are maintained at this discharge. Habitat modelling was applied in some situations. Hydraulic results showed that at AMF the highest flow velocity classes were lost in most situations. When AMF was significantly undercut, flow velocities between 0,0 - 0,4 m/s became dominant, describing the loss of the river type specific flow character, leading to a loss of river type specific flow variability and habitats and increased sedimentation of fines. Furthermore limits for parameters describing connectivity for fish like maximum depth at the pessimum profile and minimum flow

  10. Method to determine thermal profiles of nanoscale circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K; Begtrup, Gavi E

    2013-04-30

    A platform that can measure the thermal profiles of devices with nanoscale resolution has been developed. The system measures the local temperature by using an array of nanoscale thermometers. This process can be observed in real time using a high resolution imagining technique such as electron microscopy. The platform can operate at extremely high temperatures.

  11. Thermal Applications as a Determiner of Joint Flexibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grobaker, Mark Randolph; Stull, G. Alan

    This study investigates the relative effects of thermal applications of varying temperatures on the flexibility of specified joints. Subjects were 14 male college students ranging in age from 17 to 22 years with no previous joint injury or orthopedic disability. Each subject became familiar with the experimental design and was asked not to engage…

  12. Determination of Thermal Spray Coating Property with Curvature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Nakamura, Toshio; Sampath, Sanjay

    2013-12-01

    Real-time curvature measurement of a coating-substrate system during deposition has facilitated the monitoring of coating stresses and provided additional insights into thermal spray deposition mechanisms. However, the non-equilibrium state of coating formation along with harsh spray booth environment introduces complexity not only in data interpretation but also in the coating properties estimation. In this paper, a new procedure is proposed to estimate the elastic modulus of thermal sprayed ceramic coatings using in situ curvature and temperature measurements. In order to correlate the measurable parameters to coating elastic modulus, a systematic study is conducted to develop a suitable methodology. First, various finite element model analyses are carried out to formulate suitable relations between the measurements and elastic modulus. Subsequently, experiments are conducted to validate the procedure to estimate coating moduli. The results are compared with more accurate measurements obtained from post-deposition characterization technique under low temperature thermal cycles. The comparison suggests that the moduli estimated using the proposed procedure are in good agreements with those obtained from the post-deposition technique. Further, the nonlinear response of coatings are evaluated from the estimated moduli during deposition and cool down, which offer additional information on the characteristics of thermal spray coatings.

  13. Sociocultural determinants of anticipated vaccine acceptance for acute watery diarrhea in early childhood in Katanga Province, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Merten, Sonja; Schaetti, Christian; Manianga, Cele; Lapika, Bruno; Hutubessy, Raymond; Chaignat, Claire-Lise; Weiss, Mitchell

    2013-09-01

    Rotavirus and oral cholera vaccines have the potential to reduce diarrhea-related child mortality in low-income settings and are recommended by the World Health Organization. Uptake of vaccination depends on community support, and is based on local priorities. This study investigates local perceptions of acute watery diarrhea in childhood and anticipated vaccine acceptance in two sites in the Democratic Republic of Congo. In 2010, 360 randomly selected non-affected adults were interviewed by using a semi-structured questionnaire. Witchcraft and breastfeeding were perceived as potential cause of acute watery diarrhea by 51% and 48% of respondents. Despite misperceptions, anticipated vaccine acceptance at no cost was 99%. The strongest predictor of anticipated vaccine acceptance if costs were assumed was the educational level of the respondents. Results suggest that the introduction of vaccines is a local priority and local (mis)perceptions of illness do not compromise vaccine acceptability if the vaccine is affordable. PMID:23878187

  14. Sociocultural Determinants of Anticipated Vaccine Acceptance for Acute Watery Diarrhea in Early Childhood in Katanga Province, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Sonja; Schaetti, Christian; Manianga, Cele; Lapika, Bruno; Hutubessy, Raymond; Chaignat, Claire-Lise; Weiss, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus and oral cholera vaccines have the potential to reduce diarrhea-related child mortality in low-income settings and are recommended by the World Health Organization. Uptake of vaccination depends on community support, and is based on local priorities. This study investigates local perceptions of acute watery diarrhea in childhood and anticipated vaccine acceptance in two sites in the Democratic Republic of Congo. In 2010, 360 randomly selected non-affected adults were interviewed by using a semi-structured questionnaire. Witchcraft and breastfeeding were perceived as potential cause of acute watery diarrhea by 51% and 48% of respondents. Despite misperceptions, anticipated vaccine acceptance at no cost was 99%. The strongest predictor of anticipated vaccine acceptance if costs were assumed was the educational level of the respondents. Results suggest that the introduction of vaccines is a local priority and local (mis)perceptions of illness do not compromise vaccine acceptability if the vaccine is affordable. PMID:23878187

  15. Placebo use in pain management: the role of medical context, treatment efficacy, and deception in determining placebo acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Kisaalita, Nkaku; Staud, Roland; Hurley, Robert; Robinson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Placebo effects can act as powerful pain relievers. While the ethics of therapeutic placebo use is highly controversial, recent evidence suggests that medical providers frequently utilize placebo treatments, and patients may be open to these interventions under certain contexts. This investigation used a patient-centered approach to answer essential questions about placebo treatment acceptability. People with chronic musculoskeletal pain completed a placebo survey where they: 1) rated their knowledge of placebo and its efficacy for alleviating pain; 2) evaluated the acceptability of a placebo analgesic interventions across several unique medical contexts; and 3) responded to six different patient-physician treatment scenarios to assess the role of deception and placebo effectiveness on mood and provider trust. Results showed that participants had limited knowledge of placebo and it’s efficacy for alleviating pain. Placebo acceptability was highly dependent on the context of the intervention, as placebo treatments were considered acceptable when used as complementary/adjunct treatments and when no other established treatments were available. Also, an analgesic placebo response mitigated the negative consequences of deception by improving provider trust and decreasing negative mood. These findings suggest that patients may be rather pragmatic in their appraisals of placebo treatment acceptability and may consider a variety of treatments/contexts as permissible for managing their pain. This is the first study of its kind to quantify perceptions of placebo analgesia knowledge and efficacy among individuals with chronic pain, and to assess the role of different medical contexts in treatment acceptability. PMID:25267208

  16. Scanning thermal probe microscope method for the determination of thermal diffusivity of nanocomposite thin films.

    PubMed

    Varandani, Deepak; Agarwal, Khushboo; Brugger, Juergen; Mehta, Bodh Raj

    2016-08-01

    A commercial scanning thermal microscope has been upgraded to facilitate its use in estimating the radial thermal diffusivity of thin films close to room temperature. The modified setup includes a microcontroller driven microhotplate coupled with a Bluetooth module for wireless control. The microcontroller board (Arduino Leonardo) is used to generate a bias of suitable voltage amplitude and pulse duration which is applied across the microhotplate contact pads. A corresponding heat pulse from the Pt heating element (1 mm(2)) embedded within the microhotplate is delivered to the lower surface of the thin film (25 mm(2)) deposited over it. The large difference in the dimensions of the heating source and the thin film surface causes heat to flow radially outwards on the top surface of the latter. The decay of this radial heat wave as it flows outwards is recorded by the scanning thermal microscope in terms of temperature-time (T-t) profiles at varying positions around the central heating zone. A fitting procedure is suggested to extract the thermal diffusivity value from the array of T-t profiles. The efficacy of the above setup has been established by evaluating the thermal diffusivities of Bi2Te3 and Bi2Te3:Si thin film samples. Further, with only minor alterations in design the capabilities of the above setup can be extended to estimate the axial thermal diffusivity and specific heat of thin films, as a function of temperature. PMID:27587146

  17. Scanning thermal probe microscope method for the determination of thermal diffusivity of nanocomposite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varandani, Deepak; Agarwal, Khushboo; Brugger, Juergen; Mehta, Bodh Raj

    2016-08-01

    A commercial scanning thermal microscope has been upgraded to facilitate its use in estimating the radial thermal diffusivity of thin films close to room temperature. The modified setup includes a microcontroller driven microhotplate coupled with a Bluetooth module for wireless control. The microcontroller board (Arduino Leonardo) is used to generate a bias of suitable voltage amplitude and pulse duration which is applied across the microhotplate contact pads. A corresponding heat pulse from the Pt heating element (1 mm2) embedded within the microhotplate is delivered to the lower surface of the thin film (25 mm2) deposited over it. The large difference in the dimensions of the heating source and the thin film surface causes heat to flow radially outwards on the top surface of the latter. The decay of this radial heat wave as it flows outwards is recorded by the scanning thermal microscope in terms of temperature-time (T-t) profiles at varying positions around the central heating zone. A fitting procedure is suggested to extract the thermal diffusivity value from the array of T-t profiles. The efficacy of the above setup has been established by evaluating the thermal diffusivities of Bi2Te3 and Bi2Te3:Si thin film samples. Further, with only minor alterations in design the capabilities of the above setup can be extended to estimate the axial thermal diffusivity and specific heat of thin films, as a function of temperature.

  18. Determines the Thermal and Optical Properties of Fenestration Systems

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-01-27

    WINDOW4.1 computes the thermal properties of windows and other fenestration elements used in typical residential and commercial buildings. Manufactures, specifiers, architects, consumers, and the energy code specialists all need to know these properties (U-values, Solar Heat Gain Coefficients, optical properties). The use of this program to calculate these properties is typically much more cost effective than laboratory test procedures. Properties of complete window systems are based on libraries (or user input) component data.

  19. Silver nanoparticle assisted urine sugar determination using thermal lens spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Lincy; John, Jisha; George, Nibu A.; Kurian, Achamma

    2014-11-01

    Nanotechnology plays a vital role in the development of biosensors by enhancing their sensitivity and performance. In this paper, we report a novel urine sugar sensing method that makes use of the unique properties of silver-nanofluids in combination with the laser induced photothermal lens technique. The thermal lens signal decreases with increase in sugar levels in urine samples, which may be attributed to the enhanced interaction of glucose and conduction electrons of silver-nanoparticles, thereby changing the surface plasmon energy.

  20. Thermal Conductivity Change Kinetics of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by the Steady-State Laser Heat Flux Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    A steady-state laser heat flux technique has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to obtain critical thermal conductivity data of ceramic thermal barrier coatings under the temperature and thermal gradients that are realistically expected to be encountered in advanced engine systems. In this study, thermal conductivity change kinetics of a plasma-sprayed, 254-mm-thick ZrO2-8 wt % Y2O3 ceramic coating were obtained at high temperatures. During the testing, the temperature gradients across the coating system were carefully measured by the surface and back pyrometers and an embedded miniature thermocouple in the substrate. The actual heat flux passing through the coating system was determined from the metal substrate temperature drop (measured by the embedded miniature thermocouple and the back pyrometer) combined with one-dimensional heat transfer models.

  1. Development of acceptance criteria for batches of silane primer for external tank thermal protection system bonding applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikes, F.

    1985-01-01

    Concluding tests for the thermogravimetric and FTIR analyses of DC 1200 silane primers are discussed as well as methods for HPLC and GC analyses and for determining titanium and silicon by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Tables summarizes results obtained for residue, ash, titanium, silicone, Si/Ti ratio, OH-absorption, the lap-shear test, and the GC headspace for alcohols.

  2. Quantitative scanning thermal microscopy based on determination of thermal probe dynamic resistance.

    PubMed

    Bodzenta, J; Juszczyk, J; Chirtoc, M

    2013-09-01

    Resistive thermal probes used in scanning thermal microscopy provide high spatial resolution of measurement accompanied with high sensitivity to temperature changes. At the same time their sensitivity to variations of thermal conductivity of a sample is relatively low. In typical dc operation mode the static resistance of the thermal probe is measured. It is shown both analytically and experimentally that the sensitivity of measurement can be improved by a factor of three by measuring the dynamic resistance of a dc biased probe superimposed with small ac current. The dynamic resistance can be treated as a complex value. Its amplitude represents the slope of the static voltage-current U-I characteristic for a given I while its phase describes the delay between the measured ac voltage and applied ac current component in the probe. The phase signal also reveals dependence on the sample thermal conductivity. Signal changes are relatively small but very repeatable. In contrast, the difference between dynamic and static resistance has higher sensitivity (the same maximum value as that of the 2nd and 3rd harmonics), and also much higher amplitude than higher harmonics. The proposed dc + ac excitation scheme combines the benefits of dc excitation (mechanical stability of probe-sample contact, average temperature control) with those of ac excitation (base-line stability, rejection of ambient temperature influence, high sensitivity, lock-in signal processing), when the experimental conditions prohibit large ac excitation. PMID:24089831

  3. Simultaneous determination of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat in sI methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, W.F.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat of sI methane hydrate were measured as functions of temperature and pressure using a needle probe technique. The temperature dependence was measured between −20°C and 17°C at 31.5 MPa. The pressure dependence was measured between 31.5 and 102 MPa at 14.4°C. Only weak temperature and pressure dependencies were observed. Methane hydrate thermal conductivity differs from that of water by less than 10 per cent, too little to provide a sensitive measure of hydrate content in water-saturated systems. Thermal diffusivity of methane hydrate is more than twice that of water, however, and its specific heat is about half that of water. Thus, when drilling into or through hydrate-rich sediment, heat from the borehole can raise the formation temperature more than 20 per cent faster than if the formation's pore space contains only water. Thermal properties of methane hydrate should be considered in safety and economic assessments of hydrate-bearing sediment.

  4. Procedure to Determine Thermal Characteristics and Groundwater Influence in Heterogeneous Subsoil by an Enhanced Thermal Response Test and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranzabal, Nordin; Martos, Julio; Montero, Álvaro; Monreal, Llúcia; Soret, Jesús; Torres, José; García-Olcina, Raimundo

    2016-04-01

    Ground thermal conductivity and borehole thermal resistance are indispensable parameters for the optimal design of subsoil thermal processes and energy storage characterization. The standard method to determine these parameters is the Thermal Response Test (TRT) which results are evaluated by models considering the ground being homogeneous and isotropic. This method obtains an effective ground thermal conductivity which represents an average of the thermal conductivity along the different layers crossed by perforation. In order to obtain a ground thermal conductivity profile as a function of depth two additional key factors are required, first, a new significant data set: a temperature profile along the borehole; and second, a new analysis procedure to extract ground heterogeneity from the recorded data. This research work presents the results of an analysis procedure, complementing the standard TRT analysis, which allows to estimate the thermal conductivity profile from a temperature profile measured along the borehole during a TRT. In the analysis procedure, a 3D Finite Element Model (FEM) is used to fit simulation results with experimental data, by a set of iterative simulations. This methodology is applied to a data set obtained throughout a TRT of 1kW heat power injection in a 30m depth Borehole Heat Exchange (BHE) facility. A highly conductive layer have been detected and located at 25 m depth. In addition, a novel automated device to obtain temperature profiles along geothermal pipes with or without fluid flow is presented. This sensor system is intended to improve the standard TRT and it allows the collection of depth depending thermal characteristics of the subsoil geological structure. Currently, some studies are being conducted in double U-pipe borehole installations in order to improve previously introduced analysis procedure. From a numerical model simulation that takes into account advective effects is pretended to estimate underground water velocity

  5. Determination of cytotoxic thermal dose during HIFU ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandlall, Sacha D.; Bazán-Peregrino, Miriam; Mo, Steven; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2012-10-01

    Thermal dose has been proposed for various hyperthermic cancer treatment modalities as a measure of heat-induced cell and tissue damage. However, many of the models that are currently used for calculating thermal dose have not been validated or suitably adapted for the elevated temperatures and rates of heating encountered during ablation by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). This work quantifies the performance of the widely employed Cumulative Equivalent Minutes at 43°C (CEM43) thermal dose metric under HIFU-relevant heating. A total of 36 agar phantoms were embedded with different human cancer cell lines (PC3, 22RV1, or ZR75.1) as well as calcein AM and propidium iodide assays. The phantoms were cast in sterile molds with internal dimensions of 7 cm × 7 cm × 2 mm. Using a water bath, 12 of the phantoms were treated with mild hyperthermia (43-46°C for up to 60 minutes), while another 12 were subjected to HIFU-relevant temperature profiles (60-80°C peak temperature, 2-3°C/s peak heating rate). In each of the remaining 12 phantoms, 8 HIFU exposures were carried out in a 37°C water tank (1.067 MHz, 95% duty cycle, 3-6 MPa peak rarefaction pressure, 2-20 s exposure duration). Cavitation emissions were monitored passively with a detector transducer that was confocally and co-axially aligned with the HIFU source. Cell death was quantified by measuring the locally averaged fluorescence intensity of the assays relative to unheated and severely heat-shocked phantoms. The results show that the CEM43 dose required to achieve the same level of heat-induced cell death varies considerably across cell lines, and that inertial cavitation can cause significant mechanical damage at ablation-relevant intensities even when no significant thermal dose is delivered (CEM43 < 5 s). These findings demonstrate the need for improved models of cell death at ablation-relevant temperatures.

  6. A Study to Determine the Acceptance and Effectiveness of an Experimental Mobile Unit Which Serves Milford, Beaver, Delta, and Fillmore in Southern Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widmer, Grant W.

    The study determined the acceptance by high school students of a mobile-classroom approach to the teaching of electronics. Also investigated was the effectiveness of this teaching method with high school students in the southern Utah communities of Milford, Beaver, Delta, and Fillmore during the 1968-69 school year. As ascertained by the attitude…

  7. Development of a consensus standard for determining thermal performance of high-concentration-ratio solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, J. B.; Linskens, M. C.; Reed, K. A.

    1982-12-01

    Consensus standard test method, for determining the thermal performance of concentrating solar collectors is described. The method applies to outdoor testing of one or two axis concentrating collectors with heat fluids for use in thermal systems and whose design is such that the effects of diffuse sky irradiance is negligible. The procedures determine the optical response of the collector for various angles of incidence of solar radiation, and the thermal performance of the collector at various operating temperatures for the condition of maximum optical response. The method requires quasi steady state conditions, measurement of enviromental parameters, and determination of the fluidmass flow rate specific heat product and temperature difference of the heat transfer fluid between the inlet and outlet of the collector. These quantities determine the rate of heat gain for the solar irradiance condition encountered. Thermal performance is determined as the rate of heat gain of the collector relative to the solar power incident on the plane of the collector aperture.

  8. 40 CFR Appendix Xv to Part 86 - Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test Schedule for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... freedom. 6. If (Aprop)1/2 ≥ tp / ts × (Bstd)1/2 the proposed plan is acceptable. Table I to Appendix XV... Periodically Regenerating Trap Oxidizer Systems Certifying to the Provisions of Part 86, Subpart R XV Appendix XV to Part 86 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix Xv to Part 86 - Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test Schedule for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... freedom. 6. If (Aprop)1/2 ≥ tp / ts × (Bstd)1/2 the proposed plan is acceptable. Table I to Appendix XV... Periodically Regenerating Trap Oxidizer Systems Certifying to the Provisions of Part 86, Subpart R XV Appendix XV to Part 86 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  10. 41 CFR 102-80.125 - Who has the responsibility for determining the acceptability of each equivalent level of safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80.125 Who has the responsibility for... acceptability must include a review of the fire protection engineer's qualifications, the appropriateness of...

  11. 41 CFR 102-80.125 - Who has the responsibility for determining the acceptability of each equivalent level of safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80.125 Who has the responsibility for... acceptability must include a review of the fire protection engineer's qualifications, the appropriateness of...

  12. 41 CFR 102-80.125 - Who has the responsibility for determining the acceptability of each equivalent level of safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention Equivalent Level of Safety Analysis § 102-80.125 Who has the responsibility for... acceptability must include a review of the fire protection engineer's qualifications, the appropriateness of...

  13. Learning with Interactive Whiteboards: Determining the Factors on Promoting Interactive Whiteboards to Students by Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic, Eylem; Güler, Çetin; Çelik, H. Eray; Tatli, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors which might affect the intention to use interactive whiteboards (IWBs) by university students, using Technology Acceptance Model by the structural equation modeling approach. The following hypothesis guided the current study: H1. There is a positive relationship between IWB…

  14. Temperature determines toxicity: bisphenol A reduces thermal tolerance in fish.

    PubMed

    Little, Alexander G; Seebacher, Frank

    2015-02-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous pollutant around the globe, but whether environmental concentrations have toxic effects remains controversial. BPA interferes with a number of nuclear receptor pathways, including several that mediate animal responses to environmental input. Because thermal acclimation is regulated by these pathways in fish, we hypothesized that the toxicity of BPA would change with ambient temperature. We exposed zebrafish (Danio rerio) to ecologically relevant and artificially high concentrations of BPA at two acclimation temperatures, and tested physiological responses at two test temperatures that corresponded to acclimation temperatures. We found ecologically relevant concentrations of BPA (20 μg l(-1)) impair swimming performance, heart rate, muscle and cardiac SERCA activity and gene expression. We show many of these responses are temperature-specific and non-monotonic. Our results suggest that BPA pollution can compound the effects of climate change, and that its effects are more dynamic than toxicological assessments currently account for. PMID:25514059

  15. The Experimental Determination of Thermal Neutron Flux in the Radiochemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Patrick M.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment for determining the thermal neutron flux of the light-water nuclear reactor at the University of California, Irvine. The difficulty of the activity can be varied to match the student's level of proficiency. (SL)

  16. Determination of the Thermal and Non-Thermal Emissions in the X-Ray Spectrum of Kepler's Supernova Remnant.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decourchelle, Anne

    The XTE/PCA instrument, with its large efficiency and wide energy range, offers an unique opportunity to observe the high energy X-ray emission of Kepler's supernova remnant. Previous observations in the 0.1-10 keV range (EINSTEIN, EXOSAT, GINGA, ROSAT and ASCA) have favored non-equilibrium ionization reverse shock models. A very high temperature (24 keV) is predicted in the shocked interstellar medium by these models. Observation of this high energy component will put strong constraints on the SN type and SNR evolution. The other major objective is to seek for an X-ray synchrotron emission in addition to the thermally produced X-rays. The observational goal for XTE PCA is thus to determine both these thermal and non-thermal contributions in the Kepler's high energy spectrum.

  17. Thermal stability of ladderane lipids as determined by hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaeschke, A.; Lewan, M.D.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe, Damste J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has been recognized as a major process resulting in loss of fixed inorganic nitrogen in the marine environment. Ladderane lipids, membrane lipids unique to anammox bacteria, have been used as markers for the detection of anammox in marine settings. However, the fate of ladderane lipids after sediment burial and maturation is unknown. In this study, anammox bacterial cell material was artificially matured by hydrous pyrolysis at constant temperatures ranging from 120 to 365 ??C for 72 h to study the stability of ladderane lipids during progressive dia- and catagenesis. HPLC-MS/MS analysis revealed that structural alterations of ladderane lipids already occurred at 120 ??C. At temperatures >140 ??C, ladderane lipids were absent and only more thermally stable products could be detected, i.e., ladderane derivatives in which some of the cyclobutane rings were opened. These diagenetic products of ladderane lipids were still detectable up to temperatures of 260 ??C using GC-MS. Thus, ladderane lipids are unlikely to occur in ancient sediments and sedimentary rocks, but specific diagenetic products of ladderane lipids will likely be present in sediments and sedimentary rocks of relatively low maturity (i.e., C31 hopane 22S/(22S + 22R) ratio 0.5). ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Determination of physical properties of fibrous thermal insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilioua, A.; Libessart, L.; Joulin, A.; Lassue, S.; Monod, B.; Jeandel, G.

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize both experimentally and theoretically, conductive and radiative heat transfer within polyester batting. This material is derived from recycled bottles (PET) with fibres of constant diameters. Two other mineral and plant fibrous insulation materials, (glass wool and hemp wool) are also characterized for comparative purposes. To determine the overall thermophysical properties of the tested materials, heat flux measurement are carried out using a device developed in house. The radiative properties of the material are determined by an inverse method based on measurements of transmittance and reflectance using a FTIR spectrometer and by solving the equation of radiative heat transfer. These measures are compared to results of numerical simulations.

  19. On-Line, Self-Learning, Predictive Tool for Determining Payload Thermal Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jen, Chian-Li; Tilwick, Leon

    2000-01-01

    This paper will present the results of a joint ManTech / Goddard R&D effort, currently under way, to develop and test a computer based, on-line, predictive simulation model for use by facility operators to predict the thermal response of a payload during thermal vacuum testing. Thermal response was identified as an area that could benefit from the algorithms developed by Dr. Jeri for complex computer simulations. Most thermal vacuum test setups are unique since no two payloads have the same thermal properties. This requires that the operators depend on their past experiences to conduct the test which requires time for them to learn how the payload responds while at the same time limiting any risk of exceeding hot or cold temperature limits. The predictive tool being developed is intended to be used with the new Thermal Vacuum Data System (TVDS) developed at Goddard for the Thermal Vacuum Test Operations group. This model can learn the thermal response of the payload by reading a few data points from the TVDS, accepting the payload's current temperature as the initial condition for prediction. The model can then be used as a predictive tool to estimate the future payload temperatures according to a predetermined shroud temperature profile. If the error of prediction is too big, the model can be asked to re-learn the new situation on-line in real-time and give a new prediction. Based on some preliminary tests, we feel this predictive model can forecast the payload temperature of the entire test cycle within 5 degrees Celsius after it has learned 3 times during the beginning of the test. The tool will allow the operator to play "what-if' experiments to decide what is his best shroud temperature set-point control strategy. This tool will save money by minimizing guess work and optimizing transitions as well as making the testing process safer and easier to conduct.

  20. LATERAL HEAT FLOW INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY FOR THICKNESS INDEPENDENT DETERMINATION OF THERMAL DIFFUSIVITY IN CFRP

    SciTech Connect

    Tralshawala, Nilesh; Howard, Don; Knight, Bryon; Plotnikov, Yuri; Ringermacher, Harry

    2008-02-28

    In conventional infrared thermography, determination of thermal diffusivity requires thickness information. Recently GE has been experimenting with the use of lateral heat flow to determine thermal diffusivity without thickness information. This work builds on previous work at NASA Langley and Wayne State University but we incorporate thermal time of flight (tof) analysis rather than curve fitting to obtain quantitative information. We have developed appropriate theoretical models and a tof based data analysis framework to experimentally determine all components of thermal diffusivity from the time-temperature measurements. Initial validation was carried out using finite difference simulations. Experimental validation was done using anisotropic carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. We found that in the CFRP samples used, the in-plane component of diffusivity is about eight times larger than the through-thickness component.

  1. Lateral Heat Flow Infrared Thermography for Thickness Independent Determination of Thermal Diffusivity in CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tralshawala, Nilesh; Howard, Don; Knight, Bryon; Plotnikov, Yuri; Ringermacher, Harry

    2008-02-01

    In conventional infrared thermography, determination of thermal diffusivity requires thickness information. Recently GE has been experimenting with the use of lateral heat flow to determine thermal diffusivity without thickness information. This work builds on previous work at NASA Langley and Wayne State University but we incorporate thermal time of flight (tof) analysis rather than curve fitting to obtain quantitative information. We have developed appropriate theoretical models and a tof based data analysis framework to experimentally determine all components of thermal diffusivity from the time-temperature measurements. Initial validation was carried out using finite difference simulations. Experimental validation was done using anisotropic carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. We found that in the CFRP samples used, the in-plane component of diffusivity is about eight times larger than the through-thickness component.

  2. Atmospheric effects on the remote determination of thermal inertia on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Jakosky, B. M.

    1991-04-01

    Measurements of the IR brightness temperature at the Martian surface at many different times of day are presently compared with temperatures predicted by thermal models which allow sunlight to reach the surface unattenuated, in order to determine the thermal inertia of the uppermost 1-10 cm of the Martian surface. The consequences of the assumptions made are assessed in view of results from a different thermal model which invokes radiation-transfer through a dusty CO2 atmosphere, as well as sensible heat-exchange with the surface. Smaller thermal inertias imply smaller particle sizes; the results obtained suggest that low thermal-inertia regions consist of 5-micron, rather than 50-micron, particle sizes.

  3. Atmospheric effects on the remote determination of thermal inertia on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert M.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the IR brightness temperature at the Martian surface at many different times of day are presently compared with temperatures predicted by thermal models which allow sunlight to reach the surface unattenuated, in order to determine the thermal inertia of the uppermost 1-10 cm of the Martian surface. The consequences of the assumptions made are assessed in view of results from a different thermal model which invokes radiation-transfer through a dusty CO2 atmosphere, as well as sensible heat-exchange with the surface. Smaller thermal inertias imply smaller particle sizes; the results obtained suggest that low thermal-inertia regions consist of 5-micron, rather than 50-micron, particle sizes.

  4. Simultaneous determination of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity by an inverse technique

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbury, K.A.; Boohaker, C.G.

    1996-12-31

    Determination of thermal properties by inverse methods often involves limited thermal excitation of a relatively small sample. If these thermal properties are to be found as functions of temperature, then this procedure must be replicated at several artificially elevated temperatures. For some types of materials (for example, those bearing moisture) this approach is impractical. In this paper, a procedure is developed for determining thermal properties (conductivity k and volumetric heat capacity C {equivalent_to} {rho}c{sub p}) as functions of temperature from a single experiment. This procedure is targeted for determination of k(T) and C(T) for sand molds used in castings. An inverse method based on a Gauss linearization is used to estimate these functions. The experiment used to determine these properties consists of heating a one-dimensional specimen of the material from one end. The variation of thermal properties with temperature is assumed to be a piecewise linear function, with values of properties to be determined at prescribed temperatures. A numerical experiment is used to demonstrate the technique.

  5. Electropyroelectric technique: A methodology free of fitting procedures for thermal effusivity determination in liquids.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, R; Marin, E; Villa, J; Gonzalez, E; Rodríguez, C I; Olvera, J E

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an alternative methodology to determine the thermal effusivity of a liquid sample using the recently proposed electropyroelectric technique, without fitting the experimental data with a theoretical model and without having to know the pyroelectric sensor related parameters, as in most previous reported approaches. The method is not absolute, because a reference liquid with known thermal properties is needed. Experiments have been performed that demonstrate the high reliability and accuracy of the method with measurement uncertainties smaller than 3%. PMID:26133860

  6. Impacts of small-scale variability on the determination of bulk thermal diffusivity in snowpacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldroyd, H. J.; Higgins, C. W.; Huwald, H.; Selker, J. S.; Parlange, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal diffusivity of snow is an important physical property associated with key hydrological phenomena such as snowmelt and heat and water vapor exchange with the atmosphere. These phenomena have broad implications in studies of climate and heat and water budgets on many scales. Furthermore, sub grid scale phenomena may enhance these heat and mass exchanges in the snow pack due to its porous nature. We hypothesize that the heat transfer effects of these small-scale variabilities may be seen as an increased bulk thermal diffusivity of the snow. Direct measurements of snow thermal diffusivity require coupled measurements of thermal conductivity and density, which are nonstationary due to snow metamorphism. Furthermore, thermal conductivity measurements are typically obtained with specialized heating probes or plates and snow density measurements require digging snow pits. Therefore, direct measurements are difficult to obtain with high enough temporal resolution such that direct comparisons with atmospheric conditions can be made. This study uses highly resolved temperature measurements from the Plaine Morte glacier in Switzerland as initial and boundary conditions to numerically solve the 1D heat equation and iteratively optimize for thermal diffusivity. The method uses flux boundary conditions to constrain thermal diffusivity such that spuriously high values in thermal diffusivity are eliminated. Additionally, a t-test ensuring statistical significance between solutions of varied thermal diffusivity results in further constraints on thermal diffusivity that eliminate spuriously low values. The results show that time resolved thermal diffusivity can be determined from easily implemented and inexpensive temperature measurements of seasonal snow with good agreement to widely used parameterizations based on snow density. This high time resolution further affords the ability to explore possible turbulence-induced enhancements to heat and mass transfer in the snow.

  7. Thermal power output determination of 2 MW heat source by using of thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holubcik, Michal; Vician, Peter; Palacka, Matej

    2016-06-01

    Experiment is an operation or procedure carried out under controlled conditions in order to discover an unknown effect or law, to test or establish a hypothesis, or to illustrate a known law. The most important part of the experiment is to evaluate the measured values. Measurement accuracy depends on a number of factors. Deviations of instruments cannot eliminate or influence if it is neglect the possibility of using more precise measuring equipment. Another way for the most accurate results can be calibration. Calibration allows achieve measurement values with relatively high accuracy using less precision instruments. The paper deals about the problematic of thermal power measurement accuracy. Thermal power was measured on heat source with nominal thermal power 2 MW by using direct calorimetric method. There were used ultrasonic flow meter and type K thermocouples. Type K thermocouples are not very suitable for these applications because of their low precision. The paper presents the possibility of using calibrated thermocouples for the thermal power measurement with acceptable accuracy.

  8. Determination of Elastic Properties and Characterization of Thermal Barrier Coatings using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical properties of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are extremely important to engine design. However, the determination of these properties is often difficult because of the unique and complicated microstructure of the coatings. In this presentation the determination of the elastic constants of plasma sprayed Yttria stabilized Zirconia thermal barrier coatings using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy will be described along with an analysis that enables the determination of the elastic constants as a function of temperature and coating direction. In this work, results on the following issues will be discussed: 1) the elastic anisotropy of thermal barrier coatings, which is associated with coating failure modes; 2) sintering effects on coating compliance comparing with thermal behavior, which is important to coating performance on engineering structures, such as turbine engines; 3) coating elastic modulus at high temperatures close to the service condition, which provides insights of coating mechanical behavior in both fundamental and practical studies.

  9. Time Resolved Thermal Diffusivity of Seasonal Snow Determined from Inexpensive, Easily-Implemented Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldroyd, H. J.; Higgins, C. W.; Huwald, H.; Selker, J. S.; Parlange, M. B.

    2011-12-01

    Thermal diffusivity of snow is an important physical property associated with key hydrological phenomena such as snow melt and heat and water vapor exchange with the atmosphere. These phenomena have broad implications in studies of climate and heat and water budgets on many scales. However, direct measurements of snow thermal diffusivity require coupled point measurements of thermal conductivity and density, which are nonstationary due to snow metamorphism. Furthermore, thermal conductivity measurements are typically obtained with specialized heating probes or plates and snow density measurements require digging snow pits. Therefore, direct measurements are difficult to obtain with high enough temporal resolution such that direct comparisons with atmospheric conditions can be made. This study uses highly resolved (7.5 to 10 cm for depth and 1min for time) temperature measurements from the Plaine Morte glacier in Switzerland as initial and boundary conditions to numerically solve the 1D heat equation and iteratively optimize for thermal diffusivity. The method uses flux boundary conditions to constrain thermal diffusivity such that spuriously high values in thermal diffusivity are eliminated. Additionally, a t-test ensuring statistical significance between solutions of varied thermal diffusivity result in further constraints on thermal diffusivity that eliminate spuriously low values. The results show that time resolved (1 minute) thermal diffusivity can be determined from easily implemented and inexpensive temperature measurements of seasonal snow with good agreement to widely used parameterizations based on snow density. This high time resolution further affords the ability to explore possible turbulence-induced enhancements to heat and mass transfer in the snow.

  10. Electron-accepting potential of solvents determines photolysis rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: experimental and density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jianping; Chen, Jingwen; Xie, Qing; Wang, Ying; Li, Xuehua; Hao, Ce

    2010-07-15

    Photochemical behaviour of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is strongly dependent on the physical and chemical nature of the media in/on which they exist. To understand the media effects, the photolysis of phenanthrene (PHE) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in several solvents was investigated. Distinct photolysis rate constants for PHE and BaP in the different solvents were observed. Some theoretical parameters reflecting the solvent properties were computed and employed to explain the solvent effects. Acetone competitively absorbed light with PHE and BaP, and the excited acetone molecules played different roles for the photodegradation of PHE and BaP. The photolysis rate constants of PHE and BaP in hexane, isopropanol, ethanol, methanol, acetonitrile and dichloromethane were observed to correlate with the electron-accepting potential of the solvent molecules. Absolute electronegativity of the solvents linearly correlated with the photolytic activity (log k) of the PAHs significantly. The results are important for better understanding the photodegradation mechanism of PAHs in different media. PMID:20303660

  11. Determining the cation exchange capacity of montmorillonite by simultaneous thermal analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeva, N. M.; Bocharnikova, Yu. I.; Belousov, P. E.; Zhigarev, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    A way of determining the cation exchange capacity of montmorillonite by simultaneous thermal analysis is developed using as an example the bentonites of the 10th Khutor deposit (Republic of Khakassia) and the Vodopadnyi area (Sakhalin Island). A correlation is established between the cation exchange capacity of smectite and its weight loss upon heating in the range of dehydration; the enthalpy of dehydration of montmorillonite; and the weight loss and the enthalpy of thermal dissociation of ethylene glycol contained in the interlayer space of the mineral's crystal structure. These data open up new possibilities for determining the cation exchange capacity of montmorillonite, the most important technological indicator of the natural clay nanomineral.

  12. Determination of Creep Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Laser Imposed High Thermal and Stress Gradient Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    A laser sintering/creep technique has been established to determine the creep behavior of thermal barrier coatings under steady-state high heat flux conditions. For a plasma sprayed zirconia-8 wt. % yttria coating, a significant primary creep strain and a low apparent creep activation energy were observed. Possible creep mechanisms involved include stress induced mechanical sliding and temperature and stress enhanced cation diffusion through the splat and grain boundaries. The elastic modulus evolution, stress response, and total accumulated creep strain variation across the ceramic coating are simulated using a finite difference approach. The modeled creep response is consistent with experimental observations.

  13. The application of thermal methods for determining chemical composition of carbonaceous aerosols: a review.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Yu, Jian Zhen; Watson, John G; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Bohannan, Theresa L; Hays, Michael D; Fung, Kochy K

    2007-09-01

    Thermal methods of various forms have been used to quantify carbonaceous materials. Thermal/optical carbon analysis provides measurements of organic and elemental carbon concentrations as well as fractions evolving at specific temperatures in ambient and source aerosols. Detection of thermally desorbed organic compounds with thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS) identifies and quantifies over 100 individual organic compounds in particulate matter (PM) samples. The resulting mass spectra contain information that is consistent among, but different between, source emissions even in the absence of association with specific organic compounds. TD-GC/MS is a demonstrated alternative to solvent extraction for many organic compounds and can be applied to samples from existing networks. It is amenable to field-deployable instruments capable of measuring organic aerosol composition in near real-time. In this review, thermal stability of organic compounds is related to chemical structures, providing a basis for understanding thermochemical properties of carbonaceous aerosols. Recent advances in thermal methods applied to determine aerosol chemical compositions are summarized and their potential for uncovering aerosol chemistry are evaluated. Current limitations and future research needs of the thermal methods are included. PMID:17849294

  14. Molecular simulations and lattice dynamics determination of Stillinger-Weber GaN thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Zhi; Jain, Ankit; McGaughey, Alan J. H.; Keblinski, Pawel

    2015-09-28

    The bulk thermal conductivity of Stillinger-Weber (SW) wurtzite GaN in the [0001] direction at a temperature of 300 K is calculated using equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD), non-equilibrium MD (NEMD), and lattice dynamics (LD) methods. While the NEMD method predicts a thermal conductivity of 166 ± 11 W/m·K, both the EMD and LD methods predict thermal conductivities that are an order of magnitude greater. We attribute the discrepancy to significant contributions to thermal conductivity from long-mean free path phonons. We propose that the Grüneisen parameter for low-frequency phonons is a good predictor of the severity of the size effects in NEMD thermal conductivity prediction. For weakly anharmonic crystals characterized by small Grüneisen parameters, accurate determination of thermal conductivity by NEMD is computationally impractical. The simulation results also indicate the GaN SW potential, which was originally developed for studying the atomic-level structure of dislocations, is not suitable for prediction of its thermal conductivity.

  15. Determinants of accepting non-invasive ventilation treatment in motor neurone disease: a quantitative analysis at point of need

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Rosanna; Ando, Hikari; Thornton, Everard; Chakrabarti, Biswajit; Angus, Robert; Young, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Motor neurone disease (MND) progressively damages the nervous system causing wasting to muscles, including those used for breathing. There is robust evidence that non-invasive ventilation (NIV) relieves respiratory symptoms and improves quality of life in MND. Nevertheless, about a third of those who would benefit from NIV decline the treatment. The purpose of the study was to understand this phenomenon. Design: A cross-sectional quantitative analysis. Methods: Data including age, sex, MND symptomatology, general physical and mental health and psychological measures were collected from 27 patients and their family caregivers at the point of being offered ventilatory support based on physiological markers. Results: Quantitative analyses indicated no difference in patient characteristics or symptomatology between those who tolerated (n = 17) and those who declined (n = 10) NIV treatment. A comparison of family caregivers found no differences in physical or mental health or in caregiving distress, emphasising that this was high in both groups; however, family caregivers supporting NIV treatment were significantly more resilient, less neurotic and less anxious than family caregivers who did not. Regression analyses, forcing MND symptoms to enter the equation first, found caregiver resilience:commitment the strongest predictor of uptake of NIV treatment adding 22% to the 56% explained variance. Conclusion: Patients who tolerated NIV treatment had family caregivers who cope through finding meaning and purpose in their situation. Psychological support and proactive involvement for family caregivers in the management of the illness situation is indicated if acceptance of NIV treatment is to be maximised in MND. PMID:25264500

  16. Determination of Thermal Contact Conductance of Metal Tabs for Battery Ultrasonic Welding Process

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili

    2012-01-01

    A new experimental apparatus and data analysis algorithm were used to determine the thermal contact conductance between 0.2-mm-thick pure aluminum battery tabs as a function of contact pressure from 3.6 to 14.4 MPa. Specimens were sandwiched between one optically transparent and one infrared (IR) transparent glass windows, and heated up from one side by an intense short pulse of flash light. The temperature transient on the other side was measured by an IR camera. In order to determine the thermal contact conductance, two experiment configurations having different number of Al specimen layers were used. Numerical heat conduction simulations showed that the thermal contact conductance strongly depended on the ratio of the maximum temperature rise between the two configurations. Moreover, this ratio was not sensitive to the uncertainties of other thermal properties. Through the simulation results, a simple correlation between the gap conductance and the ratio was established. Therefore, once the ratio of the temperature rise between two configurations was experimentally measured, the thermal contact conductance could be readily determined from the correlation. The new method was fast and robust. Most importantly, the data analysis algorithm improved the measurement accuracy by considerably reducing the uncertainties associated with the thermophysical properties of materials and measurement system.

  17. The direct determination of HgS by thermal desorption coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coufalík, Pavel; Zvěřina, Ondřej; Komárek, Josef

    2016-04-01

    This research was aimed at the direct determination of HgS in environmental samples by means of thermal desorption coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry. Operating parameters of the apparatus used for thermal desorption (including a prototype desorption unit) are described in this work, as well as the procedure for measuring mercury release curves together with an evaluation of the analytical signal including two methods of peak integration. The results of thermal desorption were compared with HgS contents obtained by sequential extraction. The limits of quantification of the proposed method for the selective determination of the black and red forms of HgS were 4 μg kg- 1 and 5 μg kg- 1, respectively. The limit of quantification of red HgS in soils was 35 μg kg- 1. The developed analytical procedure was applied to soil and sediment samples from historical mining areas.

  18. Composite tube and plate manufacturing repeatability as determined by precision measurements of thermal strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Lenn A.; Tucker, James R.; Bluth, A. Marcel

    2013-09-01

    Composite materials often carry the reputation of demonstrating high variability in critical material properties. The JWST telescope metering structure is fabricated of several thousand separate composite piece parts. The stringent dimensional stability requirements on the metering structure require the critical thermal strain response of every composite piece be verified either at the billet or piece part level. JWST is a unique composite space structure in that it has required the manufacturing of several hundred composite billets that cover many lots of prepreg and many years of fabrication. The flight billet thermal expansion acceptance criteria limits the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) to a tolerance ranging between +/-0.014 ppm/K to +/-0.04 ppm/K around a prescribed nominal when measured from 293 K down to 40 K. The different tolerance values represent different material forms including flat plates and different tube cross-section dimensions. A precision measurement facility was developed that could measure at the required accuracy and at a pace that supported the composite part fabrication rate. The test method and facility is discussed and the results of a statistical process analysis of the flight composite billets are surveyed.

  19. Releasing-addition method for the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, J.J.

    1963-01-01

    Study of the interferences of silica and sulfate in the flame-photometric determination of calcium in thermal waters has led to the development of a method requiring no prior chemical separations. The interference effects of silica, sulfate, potassium, sodium, aluminum, and phosphate are overcome by an addition technique coupled with the use of magnesium as a releasing agent. ?? 1963.

  20. Computer program determines thermal environment and temperature history of lunar orbiting space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, D. E.; Mitchell, K. L.

    1967-01-01

    Program computes the thermal environment of a spacecraft in a lunar orbit. The quantities determined include the incident flux /solar and lunar emitted radiation/, total radiation absorbed by a surface, and the resulting surface temperature as a function of time and orbital position.

  1. 40 CFR Appendix Xv to Part 86 - Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test Schedule for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 5,000, 25,000, 50,000, 75,000, and 100,000 miles will be designated as the standard (std) test... = [∑(Xs)2 − ((∑Xs)2 / Ns))std Where: Xs = Individual mileages at which the vehicle will be tested. Ns... to table I and determine tp at (Np − 2)prop degrees of freedom and ts at (Ns − 2)std degrees...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix Xv to Part 86 - Procedure for Determining an Acceptable Exhaust Regeneration Durability-Data Test Schedule for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 5,000, 25,000, 50,000, 75,000, and 100,000 miles will be designated as the standard (std) test... = [∑(Xs)2 − ((∑Xs)2 / Ns))std Where: Xs = Individual mileages at which the vehicle will be tested. Ns... to table I and determine tp at (Np − 2)prop degrees of freedom and ts at (Ns − 2)std degrees...

  3. 7 CFR 3300.13 - Determination of the efficiency of the thermal appliances as installed in the insulated body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Determination of the efficiency of the thermal appliances as installed in the insulated body. 3300.13 Section 3300.13 Agriculture Regulations of the... Determination of the efficiency of the thermal appliances as installed in the insulated body. In determining...

  4. 7 CFR 3300.13 - Determination of the efficiency of the thermal appliances as installed in the insulated body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Determination of the efficiency of the thermal appliances as installed in the insulated body. 3300.13 Section 3300.13 Agriculture Regulations of the... Determination of the efficiency of the thermal appliances as installed in the insulated body. In determining...

  5. 7 CFR 3300.13 - Determination of the efficiency of the thermal appliances as installed in the insulated body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Determination of the efficiency of the thermal appliances as installed in the insulated body. 3300.13 Section 3300.13 Agriculture Regulations of the... Determination of the efficiency of the thermal appliances as installed in the insulated body. In determining...

  6. 7 CFR 3300.13 - Determination of the efficiency of the thermal appliances as installed in the insulated body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Determination of the efficiency of the thermal appliances as installed in the insulated body. 3300.13 Section 3300.13 Agriculture Regulations of the... Determination of the efficiency of the thermal appliances as installed in the insulated body. In determining...

  7. Determination of the effective thermal diffusivity of nanofluids by the double hot-wire technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murshed, S. M. S.; Leong, K. C.; Yang, C.

    2006-12-01

    This paper introduces a new transient double hot-wire technique for the direct measurement of the thermal diffusivity of nanofluids. A correlation to be used with the double hot-wire technique to calculate the effective thermal diffusivity of nanofluids is also developed. Several types of nanofluids were prepared by suspending different volume percentages (1-5%) of titanium dioxide (TiO2), aluminium oxide (Al2O3) and aluminium (Al) nanoparticles in ethylene glycol and engine oil. The thermal diffusivities of these nanofluids determined directly by this technique were found to increase substantially with the increased volume fraction of nanoparticles in base fluids. Based on the calibration results obtained for the base fluids, ethylene glycol and engine oil, the measurement error is estimated to be within 1.2%. The measured thermal diffusivities of nanofluids were found to be significantly higher than those calculated from the thermal diffusivity expression (i.e. αeff = keff/(ρ cp)eff) by using the effective thermal conductivities and volumetric specific heats obtained from the conventional hot-wire method and from the volume fraction mixture rule, respectively.

  8. Acoustical determination of the parameters governing thermal dissipation in porous media.

    PubMed

    Olny, Xavier; Panneton, Raymond

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, the question of the acoustical determination of macroscopic thermal parameters used to describe heat exchanges in rigid open-cell porous media subjected to acoustical excitations is addressed. The proposed method is based on the measurement of the dynamic bulk modulus of the material, and analytical inverse solutions derived from different semiphenomenological models governing the thermal dissipation of acoustic waves in the material. Three models are considered: (1) Champoux-Allard model [J. Appl. Phys. 20, 1975-1979 (1991)] requiring knowledge of the porosity and thermal characteristic length, (2) Lafarge et al. model [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 1995-2006 (1997)] using the same parameters and the thermal permeability, and (3) Wilson model [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 94, 1136-1145 (1993)] that requires two adjusted parameters. Except for the porosity that is obtained from direct measurement, all the other thermal parameters are derived from the analytical inversion of the models. The method is applied to three porous materials-a foam, a glass wool, and a rock wool-with very different thermal properties. It is shown that the method can be used to assess the validity of the descriptive models for a given material. PMID:18247886

  9. Bench-scale experimental determination of the thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Ryder, E.E.; Finley, R.E.; George, J.T.; Ho, C.K.; Longenbaugh, R.S.; Connolly, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    A bench-scale experiment was designed and constructed to determine the effective thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff. Crushed tuff particles ranging from 12.5 mm to 37.5 mm (0.5 in. to 1.5 in.) were used to fill a cylindrical volume of 1.58 m{sup 3} at an effective porosity of 0.48. Two iterations of the experiment were completed; the first spanning approximately 502 hours and the second 237 hours. Temperatures near the axial heater reached 700 degrees C, with a significant volume of the test bed exceeding 100 degrees C. Three post-test analysis techniques were used to estimate the thermal diffusivity of the crushed tuff. The first approach used nonlinear parameter estimation linked to a one dimensional radial conduction model to estimate thermal diffusivity from the first 6 hours of test data. The second method used the multiphase TOUGH2 code in conjunction with the first 20 hours of test data not only to estimate the crushed tuffs thermal diffusivity, but also to explore convective behavior within the test bed. Finally, the nonlinear conduction code COYOTE-II was used to determine thermal properties based on 111 hours of cool-down data. The post-test thermal diffusivity estimates of 5.0 x 10-7 m{sup 2}/s to 6.6 x 10-7 m{sup 2}/s were converted to effective thermal conductivities and compared to estimates obtained from published porosity-based relationships. No obvious match between the experimental data and published relationships was found to exist; however, additional data for other particle sizes and porosities are needed.

  10. ASME PTC 46 -- Acceptance test code for overall plant performance

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, J.R.; Yost, J.G.

    1999-11-01

    ASME published PTC 46 in 1996 after five years of development. PTC 46 is the first industry standard providing explicit procedures for conducting acceptance tests to determine the overall thermal performance and output of power generating units. It is applicable to any heat cycle power generating unit. This survey paper provides an overview of PTC 46 and discusses how PTC 46 can be used for acceptance testing of new combined cycle and fossil steam power generating units. Several technical papers have been previously presented that provide more detailed information and discussion on the use of PTC 46 in acceptance testing.

  11. Evaluation of Glass Capillary Tube and TDT Disk Methods for Determining Thermal Inactivation Kinetics of Salmonella in Liquid Whole Egg

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA liquid egg pasteurization standards are based on the thermal inactivation of Salmonella. Glass capillary tubes have been traditionally used to determine thermal death times of microorganisms in liquid foods. A new thermal-death-time (TDT) disk is a reportedly simpler means for evaluating ...

  12. Method and apparatus for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material in an object

    DOEpatents

    Crane, Thomas W.

    1986-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material within an object. Neutrons having an energy higher than thermal neutrons are generated and thermalized. The thermal neutrons are detected and counted. The object is placed between the neutron generator and the neutron detector. The reduction in the neutron flux corresponds to the amount of thermal neutron absorbing material in the object. The object is advanced past the neutron generator and neutron detector to obtain neutron flux data for each segment of the object. The object may comprise a space reactor heat pipe and the thermal neutron absorbing material may comprise lithium.

  13. Method and apparatus for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material in an object

    DOEpatents

    Crane, T.W.

    1983-12-21

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material within an object. Neutrons having an energy higher than thermal neutrons are generated and thermalized. The thermal neutrons are detected and counted. The object is placed between the neutron generator and the neutron detector. The reduction in the neutron flux corresponds to the amount of thermal neutron absorbing material in the object. The object is advanced past the neutron generator and neutron detector to obtain neutron flux data for each segment of the object. The object may comprise a space reactor heat pipe and the thermal neutron absorbing material may comprise lithium.

  14. Noncontact technique for determining the thermal diffusivity coefficient on acoustically levitated liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Rednikov, A.; Sadhal, S. S.

    2003-02-01

    We present a technique that can be used to determine the thermal diffusivity coefficient of undercooled liquids, which exist at temperatures below their freezing points. The technique involves levitation of a small amount of liquid in a flattened drop shape using an acoustic levitator and heating it with a laser beam. The heated drop is then subjected to natural cooling by heat loss from the surface. Due to acoustic streaming, the heat loss mainly occurs through the equator section of the drop. The measured cooling rate in combination with a radial heat conduction model allows us to calculate the thermal diffusivity coefficient of the drop. We demonstrate the feasibility of the technique using glycerin drops as a model liquid. The technique is well suited if the thermal diffusivity coefficient of the liquid in the normal state (i.e., above the freezing point) is known or can be measured by conventional techniques.

  15. Determination of thermal accommodation coefficients from heat transfer measurements between parallel plates.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Rader, Daniel John; Torczynski, John Robert; Trott, Wayne Merle

    2010-10-01

    Thermal accommodation coefficients have been derived for a variety of gas-surface combinations using an experimental apparatus developed to measure the pressure dependence of the conductive heat flux between parallel plates at unequal temperature separated by a gas-filled gap. The heat flux is inferred from temperature-difference measurements across the plates in a configuration where the plate temperatures are set with two carefully controlled thermal baths. Temperature-controlled shrouds provide for environmental isolation of the opposing test plates. Since the measured temperature differences in these experiments are very small (typically 0.3 C or less over the entire pressure range), high-precision thermistors are used to acquire the requisite temperature data. High-precision components have also been utilized on the other control and measurement subsystems in this apparatus, including system pressure, gas flow rate, plate alignment, and plate positions. The apparatus also includes the capability for in situ plasma cleaning of the installed test plates. Measured heat-flux results are used in a formula based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code calculations to determine the thermal accommodation coefficients. Thermal accommodation coefficients have been determined for three different gases (argon, nitrogen, helium) in contact with various surfaces. Materials include metals and alloys such as aluminum, gold, platinum, and 304 stainless steel. A number of materials important to fabrication of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices have also been examined. For most surfaces, coefficient values are near 0.95, 0.85, and 0.45 for argon, nitrogen, and helium, respectively. Only slight differences in accommodation as a function of surface roughness have been seen. Surface contamination appears to have a more significant effect: argon plasma treatment has been observed to reduce thermal accommodation by as much as 0.10 for helium. Mixtures of argon and

  16. A high temperature thermal diffusivity determination procedure for solids and liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayazitoglu, Yildiz; Suryanarayana, P. V. R.; Sathuvalli, Udaya B.

    1990-01-01

    A new method for measuring the thermal diffusivity of materials at high temperatures is presented. The method is applicable to solids on Earth, and to liquids in the reduced gravity environment of space. It is especially suited to levitated liquid metals at elevated temperatures where thermal diffusivity data is not available. The method is applied in two parts, such that lumped analysis is valid in the first part, and Fourier's law of conduction is valid in the second. In both parts, the spherical specimen is assumed to have been heated to a desired temperature and cooled. An inverse conduction problem is then formulated and solved using Laplace transformation techniques. Using this solution, sample sizes, and experimentally obtained surface temperature history, the thermal diffusivity is determined by minimizing a function that satisifies the heat balance at the surface. Minimization is performed using a modified quasilinearization algorithm. Accuracy is very sensitive to error in the temperature data and increases with better curve fits to the temperature data. An error analysis is also performed, and the effect of errors in the various parameters on the evaluated thermal diffusivity is determined. An experimental study for solids on Earth is suggested, before development for implementation in space.

  17. Determination of the pK of an Indicator by Thermal Lens Spectroscopy: A Laser Experiment for Instrumental Analysis Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erskine, Steven R.; Bobbitt, Donald R.

    1989-01-01

    Gives upper level chemistry students a better understanding of the application of lasers in the field of spectroscopy. Provides three experiments to demonstrate the thermal lens effect: determination of beam profile, cell position optimization, and pKa determination. (MVL)

  18. Metallurgical characterization and determination of residual stresses of coatings formed by thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laribi, M.; Mesrati, N.; Vannes, A. B.; Treheux, D.

    2003-06-01

    This work presents an experimental determination of residual stresses in 35CrMo4 (Euronorm) low alloyed steel substrates with thermally sprayed coatings. Two different materials were separately deposited. The first one consisted of a blend of two superalloys: Cr-Ni steel and Cr-Mn steel, designated 55E and 65E, respectively. The second material was molybdenum. In a first part, basic characteristics of the deposited layers (metallographic analysis, hardness, and adhesion) are presented. In a second part, the determination of the residual stresses, in both substrate and thermal sprayed layers is performed using an extensometric method in combination with a simultaneous progressive electrolytic polishing. The influence of a nickel-aluminum (80:20%) bond-coat and/or a post-annealing at 850 °C in air for 1 h is studied.

  19. Determination of Thermal Neutron Capture Cross-Sections at Budapest PGAA Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Revay, Zsolt; Belgya, Tamas; Firestone, Richard B.

    2007-10-26

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) is a powerful nuclear analytical technique to determine the elemental and isotopic composition of materials. The PGAA facility at Budapest, Hungary is one of the leading laboratories of the world, determining spectroscopic data for chemical analysis to be used in other laboratories. These partial gamma-ray production cross-sections and k{sub 0} values, being proportional to the analytical sensitivities of the chemical elements, can be transformed into thermal neutron capture cross-sections, i.e. the probabilities of the (n,{gamma}) reactions, which are of broader interest in different fields of nuclear physics. Some preliminary results on thermal neutron capture cross-sections are presented.

  20. Thermal diffusivity coefficient of glycerin determined on an acoustically levitated drop.

    PubMed

    Ohsaka, K; Rednikov, A; Sadhal, S S

    2002-10-01

    We present a technique that can be used to determine the thermal diffusivity coefficient of undercooled liquids that exist at temperatures below their freezing points. The technique involves levitation of a small amount of liquid in the shape of a flattened drop using an acoustic levitator and heating it with a CO2 laser. The heated drop is then allowed to cool naturally by heat loss from the surface. Due to acoustic streaming, heat loss is highly non-uniform and appears to mainly occur at the drop circumference (equatorial region). This fact allows us to relate the heat loss rate with a heat transfer model to determine the thermal diffusion coefficient. We demonstrate the feasibility of the technique using glycerin drops as a model liquid. PMID:12446319

  1. 7 CFR 3300.13 - Determination of the efficiency of the thermal appliances as installed in the insulated body.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Determination of the efficiency of the thermal appliances as installed in the insulated body. In determining the efficiency of a thermal appliance with respect to maintaining a prescribed temperature inside the body, the... appliances as installed in the insulated body. 3300.13 Section 3300.13 Agriculture Regulations of...

  2. Determination of nitrate in atmospheric particulate matter by thermal decomposition and chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, C.W.; Joseph, D.W.; Schumacher, P.M.

    1985-10-01

    A thermal decomposition/chemiluminescence method is presented for determining nitrate in atmospheric particular matter. Nitrate in the sample is thermally decomposed to NO/sub x/, which is then determined with a commercial chemiluminescence NO/sub x/ monitor. The nitrate in a filter sample can be determined directly by heating a segment of the filter in a furnace or after extraction of the filter by flash heating the aqueous extract in a sample loop. In either case, the sample is decomposed in a nitrogen atmosphere to avoid interference from ammonium. The NO/sub x/ peak from nitrate decomposition can be quantified by integrating the chemiluminescence signal or by integrating the gas sample in a Tedlar bag prior to the chemiluminescence measurement. The technique is straightforward, fast, and sensitive, and interferences in atmospheric samples are negligible. A comparison of the thermal decomposition/chemiluminescence method with ion chromatography using filter samples collected in ambient air showed good agreement over a wide range of concentrations. 26 references.

  3. Determination of physical properties of the Asteroid (41) Daphne from interferometric observations in the thermal infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, Alexis; Delbo, Marco; Ligori, Sebastiano; Crouzet, Nicolas; Tanga, Paolo

    2011-09-01

    We describe interferometric observations of the Asteroid (41) Daphne in the thermal infrared obtained with the Mid-Infrared Interferometric Instrument (MIDI) and the Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). We derived the size and the surface thermal properties of (41) Daphne by means of a thermophysical model (TPM), which is used for the interpretation of interferometric data for the first time. From our TPM analysis, we derived a volume equivalent diameter for (41) Daphne of 189 km, using a non-convex 3-D shape model derived from optical lightcurves and adaptive optics images (B. Carry, private communication). On the other hand, when using the convex shape of Kaasalainen et al. (Kaasalainen, M., Mottola, S., Fulchignoni, M. [2002]. Icarus 159, 369-395) in our TPM analysis, the resulting volume equivalent diameter of (41) Daphne is between 194 and 209 km, depending on the surface roughness. The shape of the asteroid is used as an a priori information in our TPM analysis. No attempt is made to adjust the shape to the data. Only the size of the asteroid and its thermal parameters such as, albedo, thermal inertia and roughness are adjusted to the data. We estimated our model systematic uncertainty to be of 4% and of 7% on the determination of the asteroid volume equivalent diameter depending on whether the non-convex or the convex shape is used, respectively. In terms of thermal properties, we derived a value of the surface thermal inertia smaller than 50 J m -2 s -0.5 K -1 and preferably in the range between 0 and ˜30 J m -2 s -0.5 K -1. Our TPM analysis also shows that Daphne has a moderate macroscopic surface roughness.

  4. Determination of water content by capillary gas chromatography coupled with thermal conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Lodi, A; Bellini, M S; Clavel, A; Pijnenburg, N

    2011-11-01

    This article presents some experience obtained by applying capillary gas chromatography coupled with thermal conductivity detection (GC/TCD) to the determination of water in substances for pharmaceutical use. This technique represents a useful, orthogonal tool complementary to water determination methods based on volumetric or coulometric titration. It can also represent an alternative technique when such titrations are not applicable. This article presents the preliminary results obtained in a number of case studies where a GC/TCD procedure was applied in comparison with pharmacopoeial methods to substances with different water contents. PMID:22225767

  5. Determination of the thermal properties of leaves by non-invasive contact‑free laser probing.

    PubMed

    Buyel, J F; Gruchow, H M; Tödter, N; Wehner, M

    2016-01-10

    The thermal properties of materials provide valuable data for quality monitoring and the rational design of process steps where heating is required. Here we report a rapid, simple and reliable technique that determines the most important thermal properties of leaves, i.e. the specific heat capacity (cp) and thermal conductivity (λ). Such data are useful when leaves are heated during processing, e.g. for the precipitation of host cell proteins during the extraction of high-value products such as recombinant proteins produced by molecular farming. The cp of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves was determined by infrared measurement of the temperature increase caused by a near-infrared laser pulse of defined length and intensity. We used the sample temperature profiles to calculate λ based on exponential fits of the temperature decline, taking convective heat transfer and thermal radiation into account. We found that the average cp was 3661 ± 323 J kg(-1) K(-1) (n=19) for tobacco and 2253 ± 285 J kg(-1) K(-1) (n=25) for N. benthamiana, whereas the average λ was 0.49 ± 0.13 (n=19) for tobacco and 0.41 ± 0.20 (n=25) Jm(-1) s(-1)K(-1) for N. benthamiana. These values are similar to those established for other plant species by photothermal imaging and other methods. The cp and λ values of leaves can be determined easily using our non-invasive method, which is therefore suitable for the in-line or at-line monitoring of plants, e.g. during the highly regulated production of biopharmaceutical proteins. PMID:26608794

  6. Determining thermal diffusivity and defect attributes in ceramic matrix composites by infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Sanjay; Ellingson, William A.; Stuckey, J. B.; Koehl, E. R.

    1996-03-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are being developed for numerous high temperature applications, including rotors and combustors for advanced turbine engines, heat exchanger and hot-gas filters for coal gasification plants. Among the materials of interest are silicon-carbide-fiber- reinforced-silicon-carbide (SiC(f)/SiC), silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced-silicon-nitride (SiC(f)/Si3N4), aluminum-oxide-reinforced-alumina (Al2O3(f)/Al2O3, etc. In the manufacturing of these ceramic composites, the conditions of the fiber/matrix interface are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component. Defects such as delaminations and non-uniform porosity can directly affect the performance. A nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method, developed at Argonne National Laboratory has proved beneficial in analyzing as-processed conditions and defect detection created during manufacturing. This NDE method uses infrared thermal imaging for full-field quantitative measurement of the distribution of thermal diffusivity in large components. Intensity transform algorithms have been used for contrast enhancement of the output image. Nonuniformity correction and automatic gain control are used to dynamically optimize video contrast and brightness, providing additional resolution in the acquired images. Digital filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques have been incorporated for noise reduction and data acquisition. The Argonne NDE system has been utilized to determine thermal shock damage, density variations, and variations in fiber coating in a full array of test specimens.

  7. Acceptance speech.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, M

    1994-01-01

    In Bangladesh, the assistant administrator of USAID gave an acceptance speech at an awards ceremony on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of oral rehydration solution (ORS). The ceremony celebrated the key role of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) in the discovery of ORS. Its research activities over the last 25 years have brought ORS to every village in the world, preventing more than a million deaths each year. ORS is the most important medical advance of the 20th century. It is affordable and client-oriented, a true appropriate technology. USAID has provided more than US$ 40 million to ICDDR,B for diarrheal disease and measles research, urban and rural applied family planning and maternal and child health research, and vaccine development. ICDDR,B began as the relatively small Cholera Research Laboratory and has grown into an acclaimed international center for health, family planning, and population research. It leads the world in diarrheal disease research. ICDDR,B is the leading center for applied health research in South Asia. It trains public health specialists from around the world. The government of Bangladesh and the international donor community have actively joined in support of ICDDR,B. The government applies the results of ICDDR,B research to its programs to improve the health and well-being of Bangladeshis. ICDDR,B now also studies acute respiratory diseases and measles. Population and health comprise 1 of USAID's 4 strategic priorities, the others being economic growth, environment, and democracy, USAID promotes people's participation in these 4 areas and in the design and implementation of development projects. USAID is committed to the use and improvement of ORS and to complementary strategies that further reduce diarrhea-related deaths. Continued collaboration with a strong user perspective and integrated services will lead to sustainable development. PMID:12345470

  8. Acceptance speech.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, C K

    1994-01-01

    I am proud and honored to accept this award on behalf of the Government of Bangladesh, and the millions of Bangladeshi children saved by oral rehydration solution. The Government of Bangladesh is grateful for this recognition of its commitment to international health and population research and cost-effective health care for all. The Government of Bangladesh has already made remarkable strides forward in the health and population sector, and this was recognized in UNICEF's 1993 "State of the World's Children". The national contraceptive prevalence rate, at 40%, is higher than that of many developed countries. It is appropriate that Bangladesh, where ORS was discovered, has the largest ORS production capacity in the world. It was remarkable that after the devastating cyclone in 1991, the country was able to produce enough ORS to meet the needs and remain self-sufficient. Similarly, Bangladesh has one of the most effective, flexible and efficient control of diarrheal disease and epidemic response program in the world. Through the country, doctors have been trained in diarrheal disease management, and stores of ORS are maintained ready for any outbreak. Despite grim predictions after the 1991 cyclone and the 1993 floods, relatively few people died from diarrheal disease. This is indicative of the strength of the national program. I want to take this opportunity to acknowledge the contribution of ICDDR, B and the important role it plays in supporting the Government's efforts in the health and population sector. The partnership between the Government of Bangladesh and ICDDR, B has already borne great fruit, and I hope and believe that it will continue to do so for many years in the future. Thank you. PMID:12345479

  9. Development of a Test Technique to Determine the Thermal Conductivity of Large Refractory Ceramic Test Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Loveland, Erick R; Prigmore, Andre L

    2012-01-01

    A method has been developed to utilize the High Intensity Infrared lamp located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the measurement of thermal conductivity of bulk refractory materials at elevated temperatures. The applicability of standardized test methods to determine the thermal conductivity of refractory materials at elevated temperatures is limited to small sample sizes (laser flash) or older test methods (hot wire, guarded hot plate), which have their own inherent problems. A new method, based on the principle of the laser flash method, but capable of evaluating test specimens on the order of 200 x 250 x 50 mm has been developed. Tests have been performed to validate the method and preliminary results are presented in this paper.

  10. High accuracy determination of the thermal properties of supported 2D materials

    PubMed Central

    Judek, Jarosław; Gertych, Arkadiusz P.; Świniarski, Michał; Łapińska, Anna; Dużyńska, Anna; Zdrojek, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel approach for the simultaneous determination of the thermal conductivity κ and the total interface conductance g of supported 2D materials by the enhanced opto-thermal method. We harness the property of the Gaussian laser beam that acts as a heat source, whose size can easily and precisely be controlled. The experimental data for multi-layer graphene and MoS2 flakes are supplemented using numerical simulations of the heat distribution in the Si/SiO2/2D material system. The procedure of κ and g extraction is tested in a statistical approach, demonstrating the high accuracy and repeatability of our method. PMID:26179785

  11. Determination of the Thermal Decomposition Products of Terephthalic Acid by Using Curie-Point Pyrolyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begüm Elmas Kimyonok, A.; Ulutürk, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    The thermal decomposition behavior of terephthalic acid (TA) was investigated by thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) and Curie-point pyrolysis. TG/DTA analysis showed that TA is sublimed at 276°C prior to decomposition. Pyrolysis studies were carried out at various temperatures ranging from 160 to 764°C. Decomposition products were analyzed and their structures were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 11 degradation products were identified at 764°C, whereas no peak was observed below 445°C. Benzene, benzoic acid, and 1,1‧-biphenyl were identified as the major decomposition products, and other degradation products such as toluene, benzophenone, diphenylmethane, styrene, benzaldehyde, phenol, 9H-fluorene, and 9-phenyl 9H-fluorene were also detected. A pyrolysis mechanism was proposed based on the findings.

  12. Novel methodology to determine thermal conductivity of thermoelectric materials and comparison with device performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddux, Jay R.; Taylor, Patrick J.

    2012-06-01

    Accuracy of thermal conductivity measurements is an ongoing area of controversy in thermoelectric materials development. In this work, we demonstrate a novel steady-state method for characterizing thermal conductivity of bulk materials and devices under isothermal and near-isothermal conditions. The isothermal condition is achieved by exactly balancing Peltier heat flow against an externally imposed heat flow in the material. Under steady-state, isothermal conditions, heat flow in the material can be determined with high accuracy because external parasitic heat flows become negligible. We compare our results with conventional measurement techniques and also with measured thermoelectric device performance. Agreement between predicted and measured thermoelectric cooler performance is within 2%. Results for thermoelectric power generators will also be discussed.

  13. Why do the Abundances of Ions Generated by MALDI Look Thermally Determined?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Yong Jin; Choe, Joong Chul; Moon, Jeong Hee; Kim, Myung Soo

    2013-11-01

    In a previous study ( J. Mass Spectrom. 48, 299-305, 2013), we observed that the abundance of each ion in a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) spectrum looked thermally determined. To find out the explanation for the phenomenon, we estimated the ionization efficiency and the reaction quotient (QA) for the autoprotolysis of matrix, M + M → [M + H]+ + [M - H]-, from the temperature-controlled laser desorption ionization spectra of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB). We also evaluated the equilibrium constants (KA) for the autoprotolysis at various temperatures by quantum chemical calculation. Primary ion formation via various thermal models followed by autoprotolysis-recombination was compatible with the observations. The upper limit of the effective temperature of the plume where autoprotolysis-recombination occurs was estimated by equating QA with the calculated equilibrium constant. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Determination of thermal inactivation kinetics of hepatitis A virus in blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) homogenate.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Hayriye; D'Souza, Doris H; Davidson, P Michael

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is a food-borne enteric virus responsible for outbreaks of hepatitis associated with shellfish consumption. The objectives of this study were to determine the thermal inactivation behavior of HAV in blue mussels, to compare the first-order and Weibull models to describe the data, to calculate Arrhenius activation energy for each model, and to evaluate model efficiency by using selected statistical criteria. The times required to reduce the population by 1 log cycle (D-values) calculated from the first-order model (50 to 72°C) ranged from 1.07 to 54.17 min for HAV. Using the Weibull model, the times required to destroy 1 log unit (tD = 1) of HAV at the same temperatures were 1.57 to 37.91 min. At 72°C, the treatment times required to achieve a 6-log reduction were 7.49 min for the first-order model and 8.47 min for the Weibull model. The z-values (changes in temperature required for a 90% change in the log D-values) calculated for HAV were 15.88 ± 3.97°C (R(2), 0.94) with the Weibull model and 12.97 ± 0.59°C (R(2), 0.93) with the first-order model. The calculated activation energies for the first-order model and the Weibull model were 165 and 153 kJ/mol, respectively. The results revealed that the Weibull model was more appropriate for representing the thermal inactivation behavior of HAV in blue mussels. Correct understanding of the thermal inactivation behavior of HAV could allow precise determination of the thermal process conditions to prevent food-borne viral outbreaks associated with the consumption of contaminated mussels. PMID:24632250

  15. Simultaneous Determination of Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Diffusivity of Food and Agricultural Materials Using a Transient Plane-Source Method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity are two important physical properties essential for designing any food engineering processes. Recently a new transient plane-source method was developed to measure a variety of materials, but its application in foods has not been documented. Therefore, ...

  16. Application of Photothermal Techniques in the Determination of the Water-Vapor Diffusion Coefficient and Thermal Effusivity of Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymundo-Ortiz, A. I.; Ramos-Ramirez, E. G.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Salazar-Montoya, J. A.

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this work is to determine the effect of different sodium alginate concentrations in hydrogels on their water-vapor diffusion coefficient (WVDC) and thermal effusivity (. These physical parameters were measured by photoacoustic and pyroelectric techniques, respectively. The results indicate that the higher values for the WVDC are presented at a concentration of 2 % sodium alginate. At lower concentrations of sodium alginate, the sample thermal effusivity increases, with a value close to the water thermal effusivity.

  17. Thermal conductivity profile determination in proton-irradiated ZrC by spatial and frequency scanning thermal wave methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, C.; Chirtoc, M.; Horny, N.; Antoniow, J. S.; Pron, H.; Ban, H.

    2013-10-01

    Using complementary thermal wave methods, the irradiation damaged region of zirconium carbide (ZrC) is characterized by quantifiably profiling the thermophysical property degradation. The ZrC sample was irradiated by a 2.6 MeV proton beam at 600 °C to a dose of 1.75 displacements per atom. Spatial scanning techniques including scanning thermal microscopy (SThM), lock-in infrared thermography (lock-in IRT), and photothermal radiometry (PTR) were used to directly map the in-depth profile of thermal conductivity on a cross section of the ZrC sample. The advantages and limitations of each system are discussed and compared, finding consistent results from all techniques. SThM provides the best resolution finding a very uniform thermal conductivity envelope in the damaged region measuring ˜52 ± 2 μm deep. Frequency-based scanning PTR provides quantification of the thermal parameters of the sample using the SThM measured profile to provide validation of a heating model. Measured irradiated and virgin thermal conductivities are found to be 11.9 ± 0.5 W m-1 K-1 and 26.7 ±1 W m-1 K-1, respectively. A thermal resistance evidenced in the frequency spectra of the PTR results was calculated to be (1.58 ± 0.1) × 10-6 m2 K W-1. The measured thermal conductivity values compare well with the thermal conductivity extracted from the SThM calibrated signal and the spatially scanned PTR. Combined spatial and frequency scanning techniques are shown to provide a valuable, complementary combination for thermal property characterization of proton-irradiated ZrC. Such methodology could be useful for other studies of ion-irradiated materials.

  18. Thermal conductivity profile determination in proton-irradiated ZrC by spatial and frequency scanning thermal wave methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, C.; Chirtoc, M.; Horny, N.; Antoniow, J. S.; Pron, H.; Ban, H.

    2013-10-07

    Using complementary thermal wave methods, the irradiation damaged region of zirconium carbide (ZrC) is characterized by quantifiably profiling the thermophysical property degradation. The ZrC sample was irradiated by a 2.6 MeV proton beam at 600 °C to a dose of 1.75 displacements per atom. Spatial scanning techniques including scanning thermal microscopy (SThM), lock-in infrared thermography (lock-in IRT), and photothermal radiometry (PTR) were used to directly map the in-depth profile of thermal conductivity on a cross section of the ZrC sample. The advantages and limitations of each system are discussed and compared, finding consistent results from all techniques. SThM provides the best resolution finding a very uniform thermal conductivity envelope in the damaged region measuring ∼52 ± 2 μm deep. Frequency-based scanning PTR provides quantification of the thermal parameters of the sample using the SThM measured profile to provide validation of a heating model. Measured irradiated and virgin thermal conductivities are found to be 11.9 ± 0.5 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1} and 26.7 ±1 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1}, respectively. A thermal resistance evidenced in the frequency spectra of the PTR results was calculated to be (1.58 ± 0.1) × 10{sup −6} m{sup 2} K W{sup −1}. The measured thermal conductivity values compare well with the thermal conductivity extracted from the SThM calibrated signal and the spatially scanned PTR. Combined spatial and frequency scanning techniques are shown to provide a valuable, complementary combination for thermal property characterization of proton-irradiated ZrC. Such methodology could be useful for other studies of ion-irradiated materials.

  19. Determination of femtogram quantities of protactinium in geologic samples by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, D.A.; Murrell, M.T.; Williams, R.W. )

    1994-04-01

    We describe a procedure for measurement of [sup 231]Pa in geologic samples by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry, using [sup 233]Pa as a spike isotope, which provides marked improvements in precision and sample size relative to established decay counting techniques. This method allows determination of as little as a few tens of femtograms of [sup 231]Pa (approximately 10[sup 3] atoms) with a conservative estimated uncertainty of [+-]1% (95% confidence level). Applications of [sup 231]Pa-[sup 235]U systematics to uranium-series geochemistry and geochronology should be greatly enhanced by this approach. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. A unified approach to combine temperature estimation and elastography for thermal lesion determination in focused ultrasound thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Li, Meng-Lin; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Lin, Ming-Shi; Huang, Sheng-Min; Bai, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Sonogram-based temperature estimation and elastography have both shown promise as methods of monitoring focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments to induce thermal ablation in tissue. However, each method has important limitations. Temperature estimates based on echo delays become invalid when the relationship between sound speed and temperature is nonlinear, and are further complicated by thermal expansion and other changes in tissue. Elastography can track thermal lesion formation over a wider range of elasticity, but with low specificity and high noise. Furthermore, this method is poor at small lesion detection. This study proposes integrating the two estimates to improve the quality of monitoring FUS-induced thermal lesions. Our unified computational kernel is tested on three types of phantoms. Experiments with type I and type II phantoms were conducted to calibrate the thermal mapping and elastography methods, respectively. The optimal settings were then used in experiments with the type III phantom, which contains ex vivo swine liver tissue. Three different spatial-peak temporal-average intensities (I(spta); 35, 133 and 240 W cm(-2)) were delivered with a sonication time of 60 s. The new procedure can closely monitor heating while identifying the dimensions of the thermal lesion, and is significantly better at the latter task than either approach alone. This work may help improve the current clinical practice, which employs sonograms to guide the FUS-induced thermal ablation procedure. PMID:21149945

  1. A unified approach to combine temperature estimation and elastography for thermal lesion determination in focused ultrasound thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Li, Meng-Lin; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Lin, Ming-Shi; Huang, Sheng-Min; Bai, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Sonogram-based temperature estimation and elastography have both shown promise as methods of monitoring focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments to induce thermal ablation in tissue. However, each method has important limitations. Temperature estimates based on echo delays become invalid when the relationship between sound speed and temperature is nonlinear, and are further complicated by thermal expansion and other changes in tissue. Elastography can track thermal lesion formation over a wider range of elasticity, but with low specificity and high noise. Furthermore, this method is poor at small lesion detection. This study proposes integrating the two estimates to improve the quality of monitoring FUS-induced thermal lesions. Our unified computational kernel is tested on three types of phantoms. Experiments with type I and type II phantoms were conducted to calibrate the thermal mapping and elastography methods, respectively. The optimal settings were then used in experiments with the type III phantom, which contains ex vivo swine liver tissue. Three different spatial-peak temporal-average intensities (Ispta; 35, 133 and 240 W cm-2) were delivered with a sonication time of 60 s. The new procedure can closely monitor heating while identifying the dimensions of the thermal lesion, and is significantly better at the latter task than either approach alone. This work may help improve the current clinical practice, which employs sonograms to guide the FUS-induced thermal ablation procedure.

  2. Determination of the coefficient of thermal expansion with embedded long-gauge fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xin; Sun, Changsen; Zhang, Xiaotan; Ansari, Farhad

    2010-06-01

    A novel methodology for the determination of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is proposed by using long-gauge fiber optic sensors. Current approaches either neglect the shear-lag effects or do not compensate for the thermo-optic effects in optical fibers leading to precision errors. The embedded long-gauge sensor measures not only the thermo-optic effect due to temperature fluctuations, but also the strain-optic effect created by thermal stresses. However, it is difficult to directly separate these two effects in the measurements. Given that only the strain-optic effect correlates to the CTE of a host material, it is necessary to compensate for the thermo-optic effect. An additional error is attributed to the fact that the shear-lag effect is ignored, i.e. assumption is made that the strain distribution in the optical fiber is the same as that in the host material. This study reports on the development of a methodology for the computation of the coefficient of thermal expansion in structural materials using long-gauge fiber optic sensors. The proposed formulations account for both the shear-lag and thermo-optic effects.

  3. Determination of core design thermal safety limits for a two-loop pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kostadinov, V.

    1996-04-01

    Results are given of independent research of core thermal design limits for the Nuklearna Elektrarna Krsko (NEK) nuclear power plant; procedures for two-loop pressurized water reactor plant core design safety limit calculation are used. Emphasis is placed on researching the vessel exit boiling and the hot-channel exit quality limits and their impact on the maximum available design safety operating range and thermal operating margin of the NEK reactor core. For this purpose, the LIMITS computer code is developed. Based on the modified, well-tried COBRA-IV-I computer code, the departure of nuclear boiling ratio core safety limits are calculated. The original results complement well those of the NEK Final Safety Analysis Report. The procedures and the methods for determining the reactor core design thermal limits are successfully proven despite the unavailability of proprietary data, different models, and computer codes. In addition to the acquired capability of in-house independent checking of the vendor`s results, the bases are set for further independent analyses of the limiting safety system settings for the NEK core.

  4. Experimental determination of in situ utilization of lunar regolith for thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1992-01-01

    A Lunar Thermal Energy from Regolith (LUTHER) experiment has been designed and fabricated at the NASA Lewis Research Center to determine the feasibility of using lunar soil as thermal energy storage media. The experimental apparatus includes an alumina ceramic canister which contains simulated lunar regolith, a heater, nine heat shields, a heat transfer cold jacket, and 19 type-B platinum rhodium thermocouples. The simulated lunar regolith is a basalt that closely resembles the lunar basalt returned to earth by the Apollo missions. The experiment will test the effects of vacuum, particle size, and density on the thermophysical properties of the regolith, which include melt temperature, specific heat thermal conductivity, and latent heat of storage. Two separate tests, using two different heaters, will be performed to study the effect of heating the system using radiative and conductive heat transfer. A finite differencing SINDA model was developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to predict the performance of the LUTHER experiment. The code will predict the effects of vacuum, particle size, and density has on the heat transfer to the simulated regolith.

  5. DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Coyner, Aaron J.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2011-12-01

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  6. Sensitivity of the interpretation of the experimental ion thermal diffusivity to the determination of the ion conductive heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W. M.

    2014-04-15

    A moments equation formalism for the interpretation of the experimental ion thermal diffusivity from experimental data is used to determine the radial ion thermal conduction flux that must be used to interpret the measured data. It is shown that the total ion energy flux must be corrected for thermal and rotational energy convection, for the work done by the flowing plasma against the pressure and viscosity, and for ion orbit loss of particles and energy, and expressions are presented for these corrections. Each of these factors is shown to have a significant effect on the interpreted ion thermal diffusivity in a representative DIII-D [J. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] discharge.

  7. Determination of the thermal stability of perfluoroalkylethers by tensimetry: Instrumentation and Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmick, Larry S.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A computerized tensimeter and experimental procedure for determination of the thermal decomposition temperature (T sub d) of perfluoro alkylethers were developed and tested. Both the apparatus and the procedure are described in detail. Results of testing with bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and trimethylolpropane triheptanoate demonstrate that the reciprocal of the decomposition temperature is a linear function of the logarithm of the gas volume/heated liquid volume ratio. The T sub d obtained for each compound at a gas volume/heated liquid volume ration of one was similar to the value previously reported using an isoteniscope technique. Results of testing with a polymer of hexafluoropropylene oxide demonstrate that this instrument and procedure can be used to determine the T sub d of perfluoroalkylethers.

  8. Determination of the thermal stability of fluids by tensimetry - Instrumentation and procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmick, Larry S.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A computerized tensimeter and experimental procedure for determination of the thermal decomposition temperature (T sub d) of perfluoro alkylethers were developed and tested. Both the apparatus and the procedure are described in detail. Results of testing with bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and trimethylolpropane triheptanoate demonstrate that the reciprocal of the decomposition temperature is a linear function of the logarithm of the gas volume/heated liquid volume ratio. The T sub d obtained for each compound at a gas volume/heated liquid volume ration of one was similar to the value previously reported using an isoteniscope technique. Results of testing with a polymer of hexafluoropropylene oxide demonstrate that this instrument and procedure can be used to determine the T sub d of perfluoro alkylethers.

  9. Determination of absorption coefficient based on laser beam thermal blooming in gas-filled tube.

    PubMed

    Hafizi, B; Peñano, J; Fischer, R; DiComo, G; Ting, A

    2014-08-01

    Thermal blooming of a laser beam propagating in a gas-filled tube is investigated both analytically and experimentally. A self-consistent formulation taking into account heating of the gas and the resultant laser beam spreading (including diffraction) is presented. The heat equation is used to determine the temperature variation while the paraxial wave equation is solved in the eikonal approximation to determine the temporal and spatial variation of the Gaussian laser spot radius, Gouy phase (longitudinal phase delay), and wavefront curvature. The analysis is benchmarked against a thermal blooming experiment in the literature using a CO₂ laser beam propagating in a tube filled with air and propane. New experimental results are presented in which a CW fiber laser (1 μm) propagates in a tube filled with nitrogen and water vapor. By matching laboratory and theoretical results, the absorption coefficient of water vapor is found to agree with calculations using MODTRAN (the MODerate-resolution atmospheric TRANsmission molecular absorption database) and HITRAN (the HIgh-resolution atmospheric TRANsmission molecular absorption database). PMID:25090334

  10. Determination of enzyme thermal parameters for rational enzyme engineering and environmental/evolutionary studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Charles K; Monk, Colin R; Daniel, Roy M

    2013-01-01

    Of the two independent processes by which enzymes lose activity with increasing temperature, irreversible thermal inactivation and rapid reversible equilibration with an inactive form, the latter is only describable by the Equilibrium Model. Any investigation of the effect of temperature upon enzymes, a mandatory step in rational enzyme engineering and study of enzyme temperature adaptation, thus requires determining the enzymes' thermodynamic parameters as defined by the Equilibrium Model. The necessary data for this procedure can be collected by carrying out multiple isothermal enzyme assays at 3-5°C intervals over a suitable temperature range. If the collected data meet requirements for V max determination (i.e., if the enzyme kinetics are "ideal"), then the enzyme's Equilibrium Model parameters (ΔH eq, T eq, ΔG (‡) cat, and ΔG (‡) inact) can be determined using a freely available iterative model-fitting software package designed for this purpose.Although "ideal" enzyme reactions are required for determination of all four Equilibrium Model parameters, ΔH eq, T eq, and ΔG (‡) cat can be determined from initial (zero-time) rates for most nonideal enzyme reactions, with substrate saturation being the only requirement. PMID:23504427

  11. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Simultaneous determination of anisotropic thermal conductivities of liquid crystals by means of a photothermal self-diffracting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroshi; Shibata, Kazuaki

    2000-11-01

    Anisotropic thermal conductivities of liquid crystals were simultaneously determined by means of a photothermal self-diffracting technique. A single-mode laser beam with Gaussian profile excited refractive index distribution due to the photothermal effect in homogeneously-aligned liquid-crystal films. The refractive index distribution, which is affected by thermal conductivities of liquid crystals, transformed the incident Gaussian beam. The laser beam was self-diffracted and thermal conductivities of liquid crystals were determined by characterizing the beam profile by both Kirchhoff's diffraction theory and heat conduction analysis.

  12. Acceptance dependence of fluctuation measures near the QCD critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Bo; Stephanov, Mikhail A.

    2016-03-01

    We argue that a crucial determinant of the acceptance dependence of fluctuation measures in heavy-ion collisions is the range of correlations in the momentum space, e.g., in rapidity, Δ ycorr . The value of Δ ycorr˜1 for critical thermal fluctuations is determined by the thermal rapidity spread of the particles at freeze-out, and has little to do with position space correlations, even near the critical point where the spatial correlation length ξ becomes as large as 2-3 fm (this is in contrast to the magnitudes of the cumulants, which are sensitive to ξ ). When the acceptance window is large, Δ y ≫Δ ycorr , the cumulants of a given particle multiplicity, κk, scale linearly with Δ y , or mean multiplicity in acceptance, , and cumulant ratios are acceptance independent. In the opposite regime, Δ y ≪Δ ycorr , the factorial cumulants, κ̂k, scale as (Δy ) k, or k. We demonstrate this general behavior quantitatively in a model for critical point fluctuations, which also shows that the dependence on transverse momentum acceptance is very significant. We conclude that the extension of rapidity coverage as proposed by the STAR Collaboration should significantly increase the magnitude of the critical point fluctuation signatures.

  13. Approaches to acceptable risk

    SciTech Connect

    Whipple, C.

    1997-04-30

    Several alternative approaches to address the question {open_quotes}How safe is safe enough?{close_quotes} are reviewed and an attempt is made to apply the reasoning behind these approaches to the issue of acceptability of radiation exposures received in space. The approaches to the issue of the acceptability of technological risk described here are primarily analytical, and are drawn from examples in the management of environmental health risks. These include risk-based approaches, in which specific quantitative risk targets determine the acceptability of an activity, and cost-benefit and decision analysis, which generally focus on the estimation and evaluation of risks, benefits and costs, in a framework that balances these factors against each other. These analytical methods tend by their quantitative nature to emphasize the magnitude of risks, costs and alternatives, and to downplay other factors, especially those that are not easily expressed in quantitative terms, that affect acceptance or rejection of risk. Such other factors include the issues of risk perceptions and how and by whom risk decisions are made.

  14. Determination of the Thermal Offset of the Eppley Precision Spectral Pyranometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haeffelin, Martial; Kato, Seiji; Smith, Amie M.; Rutledge, C. Ken; Charlock, Thomas P.; Mahan, J. Robert

    2001-01-01

    Eppley's precision spectral pyranometer (PSP) is used in networks around the world to measure downwelling diffuse and global solar irradiance at the surface of the Earth. In recent years several studies have shown significant discrepancy between irradiances measured by pyranometers and those computed by atmospheric radiative transfer models. Pyranometer measurements have been questioned because observed diffuse irradiances sometimes are below theoretical minimum values for a pure molecular atmosphere, and at night the instruments often produce nonzero signals ranging between + 5 and - 10 W/sq m. We install thermistor sondes in the body of a PSP as well as on its inner dome to monitor the temperature gradients within the instrument, and we operate a pyrgeometer (PIR) instrument side by side with the PSP. We derive a relationship between the PSP output and thermal radiative exchange by the dome and the detector and a relationship between the PSP output and the PIR thermopile output (net-IR). We determine the true PSP offset by quickly capping the instrument at set time intervals. For a ventilated and shaded PSP, the thermal offset can reach - 15 W/sq m under clear skies, whereas it remains close to zero for low overcast clouds. We estimate the PSP thermal offset by two methods: (1) using the PSP temperatures and (2) using the PIR net-IR signal. The offset computed from the PSP temperatures yields a reliable estimate of the true offset (+/- 1 W/sq m). The offset computed from net-IR is consistent with the true offset at night and under overcast skies but predicts only part of the true range under clear skies.

  15. Experimental Determination of in Situ Utilization of Lunar Regolith for Thermal Energy Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Scott W.

    1993-01-01

    A Lunar Thermal Energy from Regolith (LUTHER) experiment has been designed and fabricated at the NASA Lewis Research Center to determine the feasibility of using lunar soil as thermal energy storage media. The experimental apparatus includes an alumina ceramic canister (25.4 cm diameter by 45.7 cm length) which contains simulated lunar regolith, a heater (either radiative or conductive), 9 heat shields, a heat transfer cold jacket, and 19 type B platinum rhodium thermocouples. The simulated lunar regolith is a basalt, mined and processed by the University of Minnesota, that closely resembles the lunar basalt returned to earth by the Apollo missions. The experiment will test the effects of vacuum, particle size, and density on the thermophysical properties of the regolith. The properties include melt temperature (range), specific heat, thermal conductivity, and latent heat of storage. Two separate tests, using two different heaters, will be performed to study the effect of heating the system using radiative and conductive heat transfer. The physical characteristics of the melt pattern, material compatibility of the molten regolith, and the volatile gas emission will be investigated by heating a portion of the lunar regolith to its melting temperature (1435 K) in a 10(exp -4) pascal vacuum chamber, equipped with a gas spectrum analyzer. A finite differencing SINDA model was developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to predict the performance of the LUTHER experiment. The analytical results of the code will be compared with the experimental data generated by the LUTHER experiment. The code will predict the effects of vacuum, particle size, and density has on the heat transfer to the simulated regolith.

  16. Thermal resistance of Salmonella enteritidis and Escherichia coli K12 in liquid egg determined by thermal-death-time disks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A thermal-death-time (TDT) disk was designed to evaluate microbiological inactivation kinetics by heat. A first order inactivation kinetic model is described by the D value as the hold time at a specific temperature that causes 90% reduction in microbial viability and the z value as the increase in ...

  17. Simplified estimation method for the determination of the thermal effusivity and thermal conductivity using a low cost hot strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannot, Yves; Meukam, Pierre

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents the study of a hot strip made of thin rectangular electrical resistance with a thermocouple placed on its centre. The purpose was to simultaneously estimate thermal effusivity and conductivity in a limited time (t2 < 180 s) using a low cost probe. Heat transfer has been modelled with the quadrupole formalism to simulate the evolution of the temperature at the centre of a hot strip set between two samples of material to be characterized when a heat flux step is applied. Simulation is used to fix the optimal dimensions of a hot strip that behaves as a hot plate (1D transfer) during a minimal time t1 (>20 s) and that has higher sensitivity to the thermal conductivity between t1 and t2 (2D transfer). The thermal effusivity is estimated between 0 and t1 by minimization of the quadratic errors between the experimental curve and the curve calculated by the classical hot plate model. The thermal conductivity is estimated between t1 and t2 but using the complete 2D model. To validate the model and the estimation process, experimental tests were realized on three materials with low diffusivities (a < 2 × 10-7 m2 s-1) and having typical area of 6 cm × 4 cm and typical thickness of 1.5 cm.

  18. Clothing resultant thermal insulation determined on a movable thermal manikin. Part I: effects of wind and body movement on total insulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Wan, Xianfu; Song, Guowen; Shi, Wen; Zhang, Chengjiao

    2015-10-01

    In this serial study, 486 thermal manikin tests were carried out to examine the effects of air velocity and walking speed on both total and local clothing thermal insulations. Seventeen clothing ensembles with different layers (i.e., one, two, or three layers) were selected for the study. Three different wind speeds (0.15, 1.55, 4.0 m/s) and three levels of walking speed (0, 0.75, 1.2 m/s) were chosen. Thus, there are totally nine different testing conditions. The clothing total insulation and local clothing insulation at different body parts under those nine conditions were determined. In part I, empirical equations for estimating total resultant clothing insulation as a function of the static thermal insulation, relative air velocity, and walking speed were developed. In part II, the local thermal insulation of various garments was analyzed and correction equations on local resultant insulation for each body part were developed. This study provides critical database for potential applications in thermal comfort study, modeling of human thermal strain, and functional clothing design and engineering. PMID:25597033

  19. Clothing resultant thermal insulation determined on a movable thermal manikin. Part I: effects of wind and body movement on total insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Wan, Xianfu; Song, Guowen; Shi, Wen; Zhang, Chengjiao

    2015-10-01

    In this serial study, 486 thermal manikin tests were carried out to examine the effects of air velocity and walking speed on both total and local clothing thermal insulations. Seventeen clothing ensembles with different layers (i.e., one, two, or three layers) were selected for the study. Three different wind speeds (0.15, 1.55, 4.0 m/s) and three levels of walking speed (0, 0.75, 1.2 m/s) were chosen. Thus, there are totally nine different testing conditions. The clothing total insulation and local clothing insulation at different body parts under those nine conditions were determined. In part I, empirical equations for estimating total resultant clothing insulation as a function of the static thermal insulation, relative air velocity, and walking speed were developed. In part II, the local thermal insulation of various garments was analyzed and correction equations on local resultant insulation for each body part were developed. This study provides critical database for potential applications in thermal comfort study, modeling of human thermal strain, and functional clothing design and engineering.

  20. Drought stress determination of crops by means of ground based thermal remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, P.; Linke, R.; Richter, K.; Eitzinger, J.; Berger, L.; Besnard, T.

    2009-04-01

    Drought stress is known to have a restricting effect on plant growth and thus inevitably decreases crop yield. In the presence of drought stress, occurring whenever the evaporative demand of the atmosphere can no longer be met by the water uptake of the plant, transpiration rates of the leaves are reduced leading to higher leaf-temperatures. Remote Sensing in the thermal infrared region has been proved to be useful for acquiring information about canopy temperature and thus crop condition. Consequently, the adequate interpretation of these observations provides an instrument for irrigation scheduling, needed to avoid the negative effects of yield losses and to support a sustainable use of water in agriculture. In this study, thermal measurements by means of CIR-5 were routinely performed during the growth period from May to July 2006, on an irrigated and a rainfed wheat (Triticum aestivum L. (cv. Xenos)) plot at the study test site ‘Augarten', Vienna. Physiological measurements, such as leaf water potential and relative water content, were performed on the youngest fully expanded leaf at the three developmental stages. Additionally, spectral measurements with a portable field spectrometer were performed and meteorological data including net radiation and shortwave global radiation were continuously recorded. The objective of the present study was to assess the potential of crop water stress indices (CWSI, WDI) to determine the level of drought stress and thus irrigation needs. The results of the analyses will be presented and discussed, also in terms of a potential application in irrigation management systems.

  1. A New Method to Determine the Thermal Properties of Soil Formations from In Situ Field Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Shonder, J.A.

    2000-05-02

    local regulations; water is heated and pumped through the U-tube (using a field generator to power the equipment, or line voltage where available); and the inlet and outlet water temperatures are measured as a function of time. Data on inlet and outlet temperature, power input to the heater and pump, and water flow rate are collected at regular intervals--typically 1 to 15 min--for the duration of the experiment, which may be as long as 60 h. Two common methods for determining soil thermal properties from such measurements are the line source method and the cylinder source method. Both are based on long-term approximate solutions to the classical heat conduction problem of an infinitely long heat source in an infinite homogeneous medium. Although there are some differences in the way the two methods are implemented, the only difference between the two models is whether the heat source is considered to be a line or a cylinder. In both methods, power input to the water loop is assumed to be constant. The simplicity of these methods makes them attractive, but they also have some disadvantages. First of all, because the line source and cylinder source approximations are inaccurate for early time behavior, some of the initial data from the field test must be discarded. The amount of data discarded can affect the property measurement. Also, both methods assume that the heat transfer to the ground loop is constant. In practice, heat input to the loop may vary significantly over the course of a field test due to rough operation of the generator or short-term sags and swells in power line voltage. Presumably, this variation affects the accuracy of the thermal property measurement, but error analysis is rarely performed. This report presents a new method for determining thermal properties from short-term in situ tests using a parameter estimation technique. Because it is based on numerical solutions to the heat conduction equation, the new method is not affected by short

  2. Ionic liquid based in situ solvent formation microextraction coupled to thermal desorption for chlorophenols determination in waters by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Galán-Cano, Francisco; Lucena, Rafael; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2012-03-16

    A simple and efficient method for the determination of ten chlorophenols (including mono, di, tri, tetra and pentachlorophenols) in water samples is presented. The analytical method is based on a previous derivatization of the target compounds with acetic anhydride, being the derivatized compounds finally isolated/preconcentrated by an in situ solvent formation microextraction. Later on the extractant (an ionic liquid) containing the analytes is recovered by centrifugation and thermally desorbed. The analytes are finally separated and determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The main variables involved in the extraction and thermal desorption steps have been studied in depth. Once evaluated, the analytical method has been characterized in terms of linearity, sensitivity, precision and accuracy. The limits of detection were in the range from 60 ng L(-1) (4-chlorophenol) to 440 ng L(-1) (pentachlorophenol) while the precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was in the interval from 4.5% (2,6-dichlorophenol) to 9.9% (3-chlorophenol). In addition, acceptable recovery values were obtained in samples of different nature, including river, tap and reservoir water samples. PMID:22307153

  3. Mesoscopic Nonlinear Elastic Modulus of Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by Cylindrical Punch Indentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Cylindrical punch indentations are performed to determine the effective modulus of a plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8Wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coating (TBC) as a function of coating depth. Cylindrical punch indentations offer significant advantages over pointed (Vickers, Berkovich, or Knoop) indentations for materials that do not exhibit linear elastic behavior. Cyclic loading with a cylindrical punch clearly shows the TBCs to exhibit nonlinear elastic behavior with significant hysteresis that is related to the compaction and internal sliding within the plasma-spray splat microstructure. In addition, the effect of a high heat flux laser treatment was shown to produce a gradient both in the effective TBC modulus and degree of loading/unloading hysteresis with depth.

  4. Determination of Flaw Size and Depth From Temporal Evolution of Thermal Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, William P.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Cramer, Elliott; Howell, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Simple methods for reducing the pulsed thermographic responses of flaws have tended to be based on either the spatial or temporal response. This independent assessment limits the accuracy of characterization. A variational approach is presented for reducing the thermographic data to produce an estimated size for a flaw that incorporates both the temporal and spatial response to improve the characterization. The size and depth are determined from both the temporal and spatial thermal response of the exterior surface above a flaw and constraints on the length of the contour surrounding the delamination. Examples of the application of the technique to simulation and experimental data acquired are presented to investigate the limitations of the technique.

  5. Age determination of ballpoint pen ink by thermal desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen H; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2008-07-01

    Two main approaches can be used for determining the age of an ink: indirect dating and direct dating. Indirect dating is based on the chemical analysis of an ink followed by comparison with known samples in a reference collection. The collection should contain information about the inks including the market introduction dates. This approach may allow for an anachronism to be detected. The second concept is based on measuring ink components that change with age. The analysis of solvents in ballpoint inks may be a useful parameter for determining the age of ink on paper. In a previous study, the authors demonstrated that thermal desorption of ink directly from paper, followed by chemical analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), is a promising procedure for characterizing ink-binder resins and solvents. Preliminary tests showed that monitoring the evaporation of ink solvent from ink on paper is not a suitable method for ink dating. Thermal analysis of ink on paper in two steps revealed that fresh ink releases a relative amount of solvent at a certain low temperature in a defined period of time, which decreases as the ink ages. As a consequence, this relative amount of solvent released at a certain low temperature, and its decrease with time, can be used to estimate ink age. This age-dependent parameter was studied in 85 different inks ranging in age from 1 week to 1.5 years. It was found that some inks showed a significant decrease of this parameter up to an age of several months, and that the aging process can be monitored within this period. For other inks, however, the age-dependent parameter decreases relatively fast, e.g., within a few days, to a constant level, which can be too fast for casework. Based on these results, a general procedure for assessing the age of ballpoint pen inks on paper was developed. PMID:18503526

  6. Rapid Determination of the Chemical Oxygen Demand of Water Using a Thermal Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Na; Wang, Jinqi; Zhou, Yikai

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe a thermal biosensor with a flow injection analysis system for the determination of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of water samples. Glucose solutions of different concentrations and actual water samples were tested, and their COD values were determined by measuring the heat generated when the samples passed through a column containing periodic acid. The biosensor exhibited a large linear range (5 to 3000 mg/L) and a low detection limit (1.84 mg/L). It could tolerate the presence of chloride ions in concentrations of 0.015 M without requiring a masking agent. The sensor was successfully used for detecting the COD values of actual samples. The COD values of water samples from various sources were correlated with those obtained by the standard dichromate method; the linear regression coefficient was found to be 0.996. The sensor is environmentally friendly, economical, and highly stable, and exhibits good reproducibility and accuracy. In addition, its response time is short, and there is no danger of hazardous emissions or external contamination. Finally, the samples to be tested do not have to be pretreated. These results suggest that the biosensor is suitable for the continuous monitoring of the COD values of actual wastewater samples. PMID:24915178

  7. Microfluidic Flow Injection Analysis with Thermal Lens Microscopic Detection for Determination of NGAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovanović, Tatjana; Liu, Mingqiang; Likar, Polona; Klemenc, Matjaž; Franko, Mladen

    2015-06-01

    A combined microfluidic flow injection analysis-thermal lens microscopy (FIA-TLM) system was applied for determination of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL)—a biomarker of acute kidney injury. NGAL was determined following a commercial ELISA assay and transfer of the resulting solution into the FIA-TLM system with a 100 m deep microchannel. At an excitation power of 100 mW, the FIA-TLM provided about seven times lower limits of detection (1.5 pg as compared to a conventional ELISA test, and a sample throughput of six samples per minute, which compares favorably with sample throughput of the microtiter plate reader, which reads 96 wells in about 30 min. Comparison of results for NGAL in plasma samples from healthy individuals and for NGAL dynamics in patients undergoing coronary angiography measured with transmission mode spectrometry on a microtiter plate reader and with FIA-TLM showed good agreement. In addition to improved LOD, the high sensitivity of FIA-TLM offers possibilities of a further reduction of the total reaction time of the NGAL ELISA test by sacrificing some of the sensitivity while reducing the duration of individual incubation steps.

  8. Determining Experimental Parameters for Thermal-Mechanical Forming Simulation considering Martensite Formation in Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Philipp; Liewald, Mathias

    2011-08-01

    The forming behavior of metastable austenitic stainless steel is mainly dominated by the temperature-dependent TRIP effect (transformation induced plasticity). Of course, the high dependency of material properties on the temperature level during forming means the temperature must be considered during the FE analysis. The strain-induced formation of α'-martensite from austenite can be represented by using finite element programs utilizing suitable models such as the Haensel-model. This paper discusses the determination of parameters for a completely thermal-mechanical forming simulation in LS-DYNA based on the material model of Haensel. The measurement of the martensite evolution in non-isothermal tensile tests was performed with metastable austenitic stainless steel EN 1.4301 at different rolling directions between 0° and 90 °. This allows an estimation of the influence of the rolling direction to the martensite formation. Of specific importance is the accuracy of the martensite content measured by magnetic induction methods (Feritscope). The observation of different factors, such as stress dependence of the magnetisation, blank thickness and numerous calibration curves discloses a substantial important influence on the parameter determination for the material models. The parameters obtained for use of Haensel model and temperature-dependent friction coefficients are used to simulate forming process of a real component and to validate its implementation in the commercial code LS-DYNA.

  9. Physical and thermal properties of human teeth determined by photomechanical, photothermal images to rapidly diagnose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsharkawy, Yasser H.

    2009-02-01

    This paper details the current techniques for the detection of caries using non-invasive techniques, A promising option is tooth trans-illumination which is based on an increase of light scattering or light absorption in the affected tissue region. In this study trans-illumination applied to detect microscopic caries lesions was investigated using premolar teeth containing affected caries lesions. One line coincides with a carious absorption line, while the other is used as a reference. By this referencing the system is auto-calibrated continuously. Normal and carious human teeth were applied for the determination of NIR absorption by using a micro-spectrophotometer. Relative NIR absorption value for normal tooth and for carious one distributed in different quantity relating to the tooth structure, whereas the value showed much higher in enamel than in dentine. This paper suggests a way to use a commercially available system, which has the capability to carious detection. It is based on photomechanical and photothermal monitoring of teeth response. This technique is based on irradiation of the teeth with a short pulse Nd:YAG laser (1064 μm, 12 ns) and monitoring the laser-induced local thermal effects. This is realized with thermal imagers that locate the heated teeth absorbing zones. The photothermal (PT) image represents a two-dimensional depth-integrated temperature distribution in the irradiated volume and correlates with the conventional optical absorption coefficients. In addition to a description as to how each of the modalities function, consideration is given to recent advances and changes in the relevant technologies, and a comparison of relative benefits and shortfalls of the systems.

  10. Triple sorbent thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry determination of vapor phase organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C.Y.; Skeen, J.T.; Dindal, A.B.; Higgins, C.E.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    A thermal desorption/ps chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) has been evaluated for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in vapor phase samples using Carbosieve S-III/Carbotrap/Carotrap C triple sorbent traps (TST) similar to those available from a commercial source. The analysis was carried out with a Hewlett-Packard 5985A or 5995 GC/MS system with a modified injector to adapt an inhouse manufactured short-path desorber for transferring desorbate directly onto a cryofocusing loop for subsequent GC/MS analysis. Vapor phase standards generated from twenty six compounds were used for method validation, including alkanes, alkyl alcohols, alkyl ketones, and alkyl nitrites, a group of representative compounds that have previously been identified in a target airborne matrix. The method was validated based on the satisfactory results in terms of reproducibility, recovery rate, stability, and linearity. A relative, standard deviation of 0.55 to 24.3 % was obtained for the entire TD process (generation of gas phase standards, spiking the standards on and desorbing from TST) over a concentration range of 20 to 500 ng/trap. Linear correlation coefficients for the calibration curves as determined ranged from 0.81 to 0.99 and limits of detection ranged from 3 to 76 ng. For a majority of standards, recoveries of greater than 90% were observed. For three selected standards spiked on TSTS, minimal loss (10 to 22%) was observed after storing the spiked in, a 4{degree}C refrigerator for 29 days. The only chromatographable artifact observed was a 5% conversion of isopropanol to acetone. The validated method been successfully applied, to the determination of VOCs collected from various emission sources in a diversified concentration range.

  11. Determining majors fluid-flow zones in a geothermal sandstone reservoir from thermal conductivity and temperature logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffen, S.; Géraud, Y.; Diraison, M.; Dezayes, C.

    2012-04-01

    A method, based on thermal gradient analysis, is presented for locating hot fluid flow in a rock formation. The method involves determining the thermal gradient from thermal conductivity measurements on core samples and also from borehole temperature logs run in the same borehole. With a heat flow density calculation and thermal conductivity measurements, one can apply Fourier's law to calculate the thermal gradient in a rock system where the heat transfer is assumed to be controlled only by conduction. The thermal gradient calculated from a measured temperature log profile takes into account both the conductive and the convective or advective part due to fluid circulation. On the one hand, if the thermal gradient deduced from temperature logs indicates similar values to the thermal gradient calculated with Fourier's law, the heat transfer is assumed to be controlled solely by conduction in the rock formation and thus involves no relative hot or cold fluid circulation. If, on the other hand, the thermal gradient deduced from the temperature logs indicates higher or lower values than that calculated with Fourier's law, then respectively hot or cold fluid flow could be suspected. We applied this method to borehole EPS1 (Soultz-sous-Forêts, Upper Rhine Graben) for which temperature logs and core samples from the Buntsandstein are available. Variations between the two determined thermal gradient curves revealed three main hot fluid flow levels alternating with non-flow zones in the sandstone formation. The pattern was then compared against the fracture distribution, and also against sedimentological analyses determined from the borehole cores, in order to determine the driving components of the fluid flows. The flow zones in the Buntsandstein are controlled on the one hand by a macroscopic network with two major fault zones providing a flow path for the deep heat source and on the other hand by a matrix network formed during sedimentary or diagenetic processes within

  12. Determination of 30 elements in coal and fly ash by thermal and epithermal neutron-activation analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, J.J.; Steinnes, E.

    1977-01-01

    Thirty elements are determined in coal and fly ash by instrumental neutron-activation analysis using both thermal and epithermal irradiation. Gamma-ray spectra were recorded 7 and 20 days after the irradiations. The procedure is applicable to the routine analysis of coals and fly ash. Epithermal irradiation was found preferable for the determination of Ni, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Mo, Sb, Cs, Ba, Sm, Tb, Hf, Ta, W, Th and U, whereas thermal irradiation was best for Sc, Cr, Fe, Co, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Yb and Lu. Results for SRM 1632 (coal) and SRM 1633 (fly ash) agree with those of other investigators. ?? 1977.

  13. Determination of elemental carbon in lake sediments using a thermal-optical transmittance (TOT) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A. J.; Swami, Kamal; Ahmed, Tanveer; Bari, A.; Shareef, Akhtar; Husain, Liaquat

    2009-12-01

    An improved chemical oxidation pretreatment method has been developed for the determination of elemental carbon (EC) [also known as black carbon (BC) or soot] in lake sediments, using a thermal-optical transmittance (TOT) carbon analyzer. The method employs six steps: (1) removal of carbonates by treatment with HCl; (2) removal of silicates by treatment with HF + HCl; (3) removal of any remaining carbonates by treatment with HCl; (4) removal of humic acids by treatment with NaOH; and (5) oxidation of kerogens by K 2Cr 2O 7 + H 2SO 4. A critical step of zinc chloride treatment was added; this apparently changes EC's morphology and enhances retention on quartz fiber filter, resulting in several-fold increased chemical yield. EC was determined using the TOT method with modified combustion timings. Carbon black (acetylene) and four NIST standard reference materials (SRMs) were used for quality control, and to assess the precision of the analysis. The EC recoveries from 18 carbon black samples varied from 90 to 111%, with a mean value of 99 ± 6%. The high EC recoveries confirmed the validity of the method. Char reference materials (i.e. chestnut wood and grass char) were used to determine potential contribution to EC in our measurements. The char references containing about 700 mg total organic carbon (OC) contributed ˜1.5% EC. The measured EC values from four NIST standards were 17.0 ± 0.6, 24.2 ± 3.2, 5.6, and 1.9 ± 0.1 mg g dw-1 for SRM-1648, SRM-1649a, SRM-1941b and SRM-8704, respectively. These values in SRMs were in agreement (<±4%) with the previously reported values. The method was applied to determine the EC in sediment cores from an urban lake and a remote mountain lake in the Northeastern United States. The EC concentrations in two lakes mimic the model EC emissions from the industrial revolution in United States.

  14. Rapid determination of nicotine in urine by direct thermal desorption ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.B.; Ilgner, R.H.; Guerin, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of nicotine and cotinine in physiological fluids (urine, blood serum, and saliva) is widely used as a means of assessing human exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Although numerous analytical methods exist for these measurements, they generally involve extensive sample preparation which increases cost and decreases sample throughput. We report the use of thermal desorption directly into an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) for the rapid determination of nicotine and cotinine in urine. A 1{mu}L aliquot of urine is injected into a specially designed inlet and flash vaporized directly into an ITMS through an open-split capillary restrictor interface. Isobutane chemical ionization is used to generate (M+H){sup +} ions of the analytes and collision induced dissociation is used to generate characteristic fragment ions which are used to confirm their identity. Quantification is achieved by integrating the ion current for the characteristic ions and comparing with an external working curve. Detection limits are approximately 50 pg per analyte and the sample turnaround time is approximately 3 minutes without the need for extensive sample preparation. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Use of thermal inertia determined by HCMM to predict nocturnal cold prone areas in Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, L. H., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Chen, E.; Martsolf, J. D.; Jones, P. H.

    1981-01-01

    The HCMM transparency scenes for the available winter of 1978-1979 were evaluated; scenes were identified on processed magnetic tapes; other remote sensing information was identified; and a soil heat flux model with variable-depth thermal profile was developed. The Image 100 system was used to compare HCMM and GOES transparent images of surface thermal patterns. Excellent correspondence of patterns was found, with HCMM giving the greater resolution. One image shows details of thermal patterns in Florida that are attributable to difference in near surface water contents. The wide range of surface temperatures attributable to surface thermal inertia that exist in the relatively flat Florida topography is demonstrated.

  16. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepuetz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T. -C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-03

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations (h) over bar omega(j) (q), phonon densities of states g((h) over bar omega), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv (T). We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found tomore » be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv (T), computed within the harmonic approximation from (h) over bar omega(j) (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 100 K to 1.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 200 K and 1.9 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp (T) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲ θc where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲ 10 nm.« less

  17. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepütz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T.-C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations ℏ ωj (q), phonon densities of states g (ℏ ω ), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv(T ) . We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found to be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv(T ) , computed within the harmonic approximation from ℏ ωj (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 ×10-4eV /atom K at 100 K to 1.4 ×10-4eV /atom K at 200 K and 1.9 ×10-4eV /atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp(T ) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲θc , where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲10 nm .

  18. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepuetz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T. -C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-03

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations (h) over bar omega(j) (q), phonon densities of states g((h) over bar omega), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv (T). We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found to be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv (T), computed within the harmonic approximation from (h) over bar omega(j) (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 100 K to 1.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 200 K and 1.9 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp (T) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲ θc where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲ 10 nm.

  19. Determination of trace iron in zirconium by isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliot, N. L.; Campbell, M. A.; Green, L. W.

    1995-08-01

    An isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry method for the determination of parts-per-million levels of iron in zirconium is required for precise, accurate analyses in studies of the effects of iron on the irradiation deformation of nuclear alloys. A two-stage purification procedure was developed to avoid the signal suppression and interference caused by the zirconium matrix. After sample dissolution and spiking with 54Fe, the bulk of the zirconium is removed by ion exchange chromatography, and the eluted Fe(III) is further purified by micro-solvent extraction into tributyl phosphate-impregnated resin beads. The iron is back-extracted, submicrogram amounts are loaded onto previously outgassed zone-refined Re filaments, and 54/56 ratios are measured at 1170°C. A silica gel/boric acid ionization enhancer is used to obtain stable Fe+ currents as strong as 2 × 10-14. A from nanogram loadings of pure iron. The procedural blank of 20 ± 6 ng is sufficiently low to allow determination of ppm levels of iron in 0.1 g zirconium samples. The analyses of solution standards showed agreement within 2% between measured and expected values, and a good fit, r2 = 0.99997, to a linear regression. The analyses of metal standards exhibited a similar good fit to a linear regression of measured against expected values, and showed good agreement with other methods. The method meets the requirements for zirconium metallurgical studies, and may be extended to other applications.

  20. Reflectance and Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Mars: Relationship Between ISM and TES for Compositional Determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Joseph (Technical Monitor); Mustard, John

    2004-01-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy has demonstrated that high albedo surfaces on Mars contain heavily altered materials with some component of hematite, poorly crystalline ferric oxides, and an undefined silicate matrix. The spectral properties of many low albedo regions indicate crystalline basalts containing both low and high calcium pyroxene, a mineralogy consistent with the basaltic SNC meteorites. The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) experiment on the Mars Geochemical Surveyor has acquired critical new data relevant to surface composition and mineralogy, but in a wavelength region that is complementary to reflectance spectroscopy. The essence of the completed research was to analyze TES data in the context of reflectance data obtained by the French ISM imaging spectrometer experiment in 1989. This approach increased our understanding of the complementary nature of these wavelength regions for mineralogic determinations using actual observations of the martian surface. The research effort focused on three regions of scientific importance: Syrtis Major-Isidis Basin, Oxia Palus-Arabia, and Valles Marineris. In each region distinct spatial variations related to reflectance, and in derived mineralogic information and interpreted compositional units were analyzed. In addition, specific science questions related to the composition of volcanics and crustal evolution, soil compositions and pedogenic processes, and the relationship between pristine lithologies and weathering provided an overall science-driven framework for the work. The detailed work plan involved colocation of TES and ISM data, extraction of reflectance and emissivity spectra from areas of known reflectance variability, and quantitative analysis using factor analysis and statistical techniques to determine the degree of correspondence between these different wavelength regions. Identified coherent variations in TES spectroscopy were assessed against known atmospheric effects to validate that the variations

  1. 24 CFR 3282.355 - Submission acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Submission acceptance. 3282.355... § 3282.355 Submission acceptance. (a) A party whose submission is determined by the Department to be adequate shall be granted provisional acceptance until December 15, 1976, or for a six month period...

  2. 24 CFR 3282.355 - Submission acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Submission acceptance. 3282.355... § 3282.355 Submission acceptance. (a) A party whose submission is determined by the Department to be adequate shall be granted provisional acceptance until December 15, 1976, or for a six month period...

  3. Determination of the thermal expansion and thermo-optic coefficients of a bacteriorhodopsin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang Song, Q.; Zhang, Chunping; Ku, Chin-Yu; Huang, Ming-Chieh; Gross, Richard B.; Birge, Robert R.

    1995-02-01

    The linear expansion and thermo-optic coefficients of a bacteriorhodopsin film were measured by using an interferometric method. The experimental results confirm the previous suspicions that the large refractive nonlinearity which occurs at high illumination intensities arises form a thermal effect. The results also suggest a possible way to increase the usable thermal nonlinearity by four times.

  4. Introduction of Differential Scanning Calorimetry in a General Chemistry Laboratory Course: Determination of Thermal Properties of Organic Hydrocarbons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amelia, Ronald; Franks, Thomas; Nirode, William F.

    2007-01-01

    In first-year general chemistry undergraduate courses, thermodynamics and thermal properties such as melting points and changes in enthalpy ([Delta]H) and entropy ([Delta]S) of phase changes are frequently discussed. Typically, classical calorimetric methods of analysis are used to determine [Delta]H of reactions. Differential scanning calorimetry…

  5. Photothermal determination of thermal diffusivity and polymerization depth profiles of polymerized dental resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Torres, P.; Mandelis, A.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    The degree and depth of curing due to photopolymerization in a commercial dental resin have been studied using photothermal radiometry. The sample consisted of a thick layer of resin on which a thin metallic gold layer was deposited, thus guaranteeing full opacity. Purely thermal-wave inverse problem techniques without the interference of optical profiles were used. Thermal depth profiles were obtained by heating the gold coating with a modulated laser beam and by performing a frequency scan. Prior to each frequency scan, photopolymerization was induced using a high power blue light emitted diode (LED). Due to the highly light dispersive nature of dental resins, the polymerization process depends strongly on optical absorption of the blue light, thereby inducing a depth dependent thermal diffusivity profile in the sample. A robust depth profilometric method for reconstructing the thermal diffusivity depth dependence on degree and depth of polymerization has been developed. The thermal diffusivity depth profile was linked to the polymerization kinetics.

  6. Determination of thermal stability of specific biomarker lipids of the freshwater fern Azolla through hydrous pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sap, Merel; Speelman, Eveline N.; Lewan, Michael D.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Reichart, Gert-Jan

    2010-05-01

    Enormous blooms of the free-floating freshwater fern Azolla occurred within the Arctic Basin during an extended period of ~1.2 Ma during the middle Eocene (Brinkhuis et al. 2006; Speelman et al., GB, 2009). The sustained growth of Azolla, currently ranking among the fastest growing plants on Earth, in a major anoxic basin may have substantially contributed to decreasing atmospheric CO2 levels by burial of Azolla-derived organic matter. Speelman et al. (OG, 2009) reported biomarkers for Azolla (1,w20 C32 - C36 diols, structurally related C29 ω20,ω21 diols, C29 1,20,21 triols, C29 dihydroxy fatty acids as well as a series of wax esters containing these mono- and dihydroxy lipids), which can be used to reconstruct palaeo-environmental conditions. Here we assess the thermal stability of these compounds, to extend their biomarker potential. We specifically focused on the thermal stability of the Azolla biomarkers using hydrous pyrolysis in order to determine which burial conditions allow reconstruction of past occurrences of Azolla. In addition, hydrous pyrolysis was also performed on samples from the Eocene Arctic Ocean (ACEX core), to test if and how the biomarkers change under higher temperatures and pressures in situ. During hydrous pyrolysis, the biomass was heated under high pressure at temperatures ranging between 220 and 365°C for 72 hours. Four experiments were also run using different durations to explore the kinetics of biomarker degradation at specific temperatures. First results indicate that the Azolla specific diols are still present at 220°C, while the corresponding wax esters are already absent. At 300°C all Azolla specific biomarkers are destroyed. More specific determination of the different biomarkers' stability and kinetics would potentially allow the reconstruction of the temperature and pressure history of Azolla deposits. Literature: • Brinkhuis, H., Schouten, S., Collinson, M. E., Sluijs, A., Sinninghe Damste, J. S., Dickens, G. R., Huber

  7. Contributions of the Complementarity Determining Regions to the Thermal Stability of a Single-Domain Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Zabetakis, Dan; Anderson, George P.; Bayya, Nikhil; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2013-01-01

    Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) are the recombinantly-expressed variable domain from camelid (or shark) heavy chain only antibodies and provide rugged recognition elements. Many sdAbs possess excellent affinity and specificity; most refold and are able to bind antigen after thermal denaturation. The sdAb A3, specific for the toxin Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), shows both sub-nanomolar affinity for its cognate antigen (0.14 nM) and an unusually high melting point of 85°C. Understanding the source of sdAb A3’s high melting temperature could provide a route for engineering improved melting temperatures into other sdAbs. The goal of this work was to determine how much of sdAb A3’s stability is derived from its complementarity determining regions (CDRs) versus its framework. Towards answering this question we constructed a series of CDR swap mutants in which the CDRs from unrelated sdAbs were integrated into A3’s framework and where A3’s CDRs were integrated into the framework of the other sdAbs. All three CDRs from A3 were moved to the frameworks of sdAb D1 (a ricin binder that melts at 50°C) and the anti-ricin sdAb C8 (melting point of 60°C). Similarly, the CDRs from sdAb D1 and sdAb C8 were moved to the sdAb A3 framework. In addition individual CDRs of sdAb A3 and sdAb D1 were swapped. Melting temperature and binding ability were assessed for each of the CDR-exchange mutants. This work showed that CDR2 plays a critical role in sdAb A3’s binding and stability. Overall, results from the CDR swaps indicate CDR interactions play a major role in the protein stability. PMID:24143255

  8. ANALYSIS OF TWO SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD H II REGIONS CONSIDERING THERMAL INHOMOGENEITIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DETERMINATIONS OF EXTRAGALACTIC CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Pena-Guerrero, Maria A.; Peimbert, Antonio; Peimbert, Manuel; Ruiz, Maria Teresa E-mail: antonio@astroscu.unam.mx E-mail: mtruiz@das.uchile.cl

    2012-02-20

    We present long-slit spectrophotometry considering the presence of thermal inhomogeneities (t{sup 2}) of two H II regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC): NGC 456 and NGC 460. Physical conditions and chemical abundances were determined for three positions in NGC 456 and one position in NGC 460, first under the assumption of uniform temperature and then allowing for the possibility of thermal inhomogeneities. We determined t{sup 2} values based on three different methods: (1) by comparing the temperature derived using oxygen forbidden lines with the temperature derived using helium recombination lines (RLs), (2) by comparing the abundances derived from oxygen forbidden lines with those derived from oxygen RLs, and (3) by comparing the abundances derived from ultraviolet carbon forbidden lines with those derived from optical carbon RLs. The first two methods averaged t{sup 2} = 0.067 {+-} 0.013 for NGC 456 and t{sup 2} = 0.036 {+-} 0.027 for NGC 460. These values of t{sup 2} imply that when gaseous abundances are determined with collisionally excited lines they are underestimated by a factor of nearly two. From these objects and others in the literature, we find that in order to account for thermal inhomogeneities and dust depletion, the O/H ratio in low-metallicity H II regions should be corrected by 0.25-0.45 dex depending on the thermal structure of the nebula or by 0.35 dex if such information is not available.

  9. Determination of biogenic amines by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-DAD) in probiotic cow's and goat's fermented milks and acceptance.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marion P; Balthazar, Celso F; Rodrigues, Bruna L; Lazaro, Cesar A; Silva, Adriana C O; Cruz, Adriano G; Conte Junior, Carlos A

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the presence of biogenic amines in fermented cow's and goat's milks containing probiotic bacteria, during the first 10 days of chilled storage (4 ± 2°C), when the probiotic strains are most viable. The overall acceptance of both fermented milks, produced using the same starter culture and probiotics, was tested. In both products, the initially high levels of tyramine (560 mg kg(-1) means for both fermented milks), the predominant biogenic amine, increased during the storage period, which may be considered this amine as a quality index for fermented milks. The other principal biogenic amines (putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, and spermidine) were produced on days 1-5 of storage, and thereafter decreased. At the end of the 10th day, these amines, respectively, showed values of fermented cow's milk 20.26, 29.09, 17.97, and 82.07 mg kg(-1); and values of fermented goat's milk 22.92, 29.09, 34.85, and 53.85 mg kg(-1), in fermented cow's and goat's milk. Fermented cow's milk was well accepted compared to fermented goat's milk. The results suggested that the content of biogenic amines may be a criterion for selecting lactic acid bacteria used to produce fermented milks. PMID:25987991

  10. Determination of biogenic amines by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-DAD) in probiotic cow's and goat's fermented milks and acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marion P; Balthazar, Celso F; Rodrigues, Bruna L; Lazaro, Cesar A; Silva, Adriana C O; Cruz, Adriano G; Conte Junior, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the presence of biogenic amines in fermented cow's and goat's milks containing probiotic bacteria, during the first 10 days of chilled storage (4 ± 2°C), when the probiotic strains are most viable. The overall acceptance of both fermented milks, produced using the same starter culture and probiotics, was tested. In both products, the initially high levels of tyramine (560 mg kg−1 means for both fermented milks), the predominant biogenic amine, increased during the storage period, which may be considered this amine as a quality index for fermented milks. The other principal biogenic amines (putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, and spermidine) were produced on days 1–5 of storage, and thereafter decreased. At the end of the 10th day, these amines, respectively, showed values of fermented cow's milk 20.26, 29.09, 17.97, and 82.07 mg kg−1; and values of fermented goat's milk 22.92, 29.09, 34.85, and 53.85 mg kg−1, in fermented cow's and goat's milk. Fermented cow's milk was well accepted compared to fermented goat's milk. The results suggested that the content of biogenic amines may be a criterion for selecting lactic acid bacteria used to produce fermented milks. PMID:25987991

  11. Accurate determination of the temperature dependent thermalization coefficient (Q) in InAs/AlAsSb quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaielpour, Hamidreza; Tang, Jinfeng; Whiteside, Vincent R.; Vijeyaragunathan, Sangeetha; Mishima, Tetsuya D.; Santos, Michael B.; Sellers, Ian R.

    2015-03-01

    We present an investigation of hot carriers in InAs/AlAsSb quantum wells as a practical candidate for a hot carrier solar cell absorber. The thermalization coefficient (Q) of the sample is investigated using continuous wave photoluminescence (PL). The Q is accurately determined through transfer matrix calculations of the absorption, analysis of the power density, penetration depth, diffusion, and recombination rates using a combination of simulation and empirical methods. A precise measurement of laser spot size is important in order to determine the absorbed power density. Simulations were performed based on our PL geometry in order to calculate the excitation spot size, which was compared with experiment by measurements using variable diameter pinholes to determine beam radius. Here, these techniques are described, in addition to, the temperature dependent hot carrier dynamics and phonon mediated thermalization coefficient for the InAs/AlAsSb quantum well structure.

  12. Photothermal radiometric determination of thermal diffusivity depth profiles in a dental resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Torres, P.; Mandelis, A.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2010-03-01

    The depth of curing due to photopolymerization in a commercial dental resin is studied using photothermal radiometry. The sample consists of a thick layer of resin on which a thin metallic layer is deposited guaranteeing full opacity of the sample. In this case, purely thermal-wave inverse problem techniques without the interference of optical profiles can be used. Thermal profiles are obtained by heating the coating with a modulated laser beam and performing a modulation frequency scan. Before each frequency scan, photopolymerization was induced using a high power blue LED. However due to the fact that dental resins are highly light dispersive materials, the polymerization process depends strongly on the optical absorption coefficient inducing a depth dependent thermal diffusion in the sample. It is shown that using a robust depth profilometric inverse method one can reconstruct the thermal diffusivity profile of the photopolymerized resin.

  13. Thermal boundary resistance in Si/Ge interfaces determined by approach-to-equilibrium simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puligheddu, Marcello; Hahn, Konstanze; Melis, Claudio; Colombo, Luciano

    2015-03-01

    Nanostructured materials hold great promises as efficient thermoelectrics. In such materials, the propagation of phonons is hindered by the internal interfaces (grain boundaries), leading to a reduced overall thermal conductivity and, therefore, to a larger figure of merit. Any further improvement in this field does, however, require a better fundamental understanding of the specific interface effects on thermal transport. In the present work we use approach-to-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (AEMD) to investigate the interfacial thermal resistance (ITR) of Si/Ge interfaces, occurring in very promising nanostructured SiGe alloys. We discuss how ITR depends on the thickness of the interface layer, as well as on its composition. Furthermore, the effect of the heat flux direction has been investigated at ambient temperature showing lower ITR for thermal transport from Si to Ge than vice versa. This feature is discussed in connection to possible rectification effects. Present address: The Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago.

  14. Photothermal model fitting in the complex plane for thermal properties determination in solids.

    PubMed

    Zambrano-Arjona, M A; Peñuñuri, F; Acosta, M; Riech, I; Medina-Esquivel, R A; Martínez-Torres, P; Alvarado-Gil, J J

    2013-02-01

    Thermal properties of solids are obtained by fitting the exact complex photothermal model to the normalized photoacoustic (PA) signal in the front configuration. Simple closed-form expressions for the amplitude and phase are presented in all frequency ranges. In photoacoustic it has been common practice to assume that all the absorptions of radiation take place in the sample. However, in order to obtain the accurate thermal properties it is necessary to consider the PA signal contributions produced at the cell walls. Such contributions were considered in our study. To demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed methodology, commercial stainless steel layers AISI 302 were analyzed. It is shown that using our approach the obtained thermal diffusivity and effusivity were in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Also, a detailed procedure for the calculation of the standard error in the thermal properties is discussed. PMID:23464238

  15. Photothermal model fitting in the complex plane for thermal properties determination in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano-Arjona, M. A.; Peñuñuri, F.; Acosta, M.; Riech, I.; Medina-Esquivel, R. A.; Martínez-Torres, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2013-02-01

    Thermal properties of solids are obtained by fitting the exact complex photothermal model to the normalized photoacoustic (PA) signal in the front configuration. Simple closed-form expressions for the amplitude and phase are presented in all frequency ranges. In photoacoustic it has been common practice to assume that all the absorptions of radiation take place in the sample. However, in order to obtain the accurate thermal properties it is necessary to consider the PA signal contributions produced at the cell walls. Such contributions were considered in our study. To demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed methodology, commercial stainless steel layers AISI 302 were analyzed. It is shown that using our approach the obtained thermal diffusivity and effusivity were in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Also, a detailed procedure for the calculation of the standard error in the thermal properties is discussed.

  16. Field mapping for heat capacity mapping determinations: Ground support for airborne thermal surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, R. J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal models independently derived by Watson, Outcalt, and Rosema were compared using similar input data and found to yield very different results. Each model has a varying degree of sensitivity to any specified parameter. Data collected at Pisgah Crater-Lavic Lake was re-examined to indicate serious discrepancy in results for thermal inertia from Jet Lab Propulsion Laboratory calculations, when made using the same orginal data sets.

  17. Theoretical principles of experimental methods for determining the thermal diffusivity of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikayilov, F. D.; Shein, E. V.

    2010-05-01

    Mathematical models for predicting the heat transfer in soils are used for the management of the soil thermal conditions; the development of different soil constructions; the analysis of the thermal effects related to the loosening or compaction of the surface soil layers, the sanding of peat, and the application of friable mulching materials; and the description of many other phenomena and processes. The experimental support of the development and functioning of these models is provided by the function of thermal diffusivity, which describes the thermal diffusivity as a function of the water content and can be derived using the methods based on the solution of direct and inverse problems of heat transfer. On the basis of the different boundary conditions and sine-shaped daily and annual temperature cycles, a number of equations were proposed for calculating the thermal diffusivity that contained logarithms, arctangents of amplitudes, and the phase shift between the daily temperatures at two depths. A mean-integral solution was obtained for the estimation of the average temperature in a specific soil layer. A number of methods were developed starting from the analysis of the temperature dynamics on the basis of four daily observations at the same depth with 6-hour intervals, and nomograms were given for the rapid and simple calculation of the soil thermal diffusivity at a specific depth. The developed methods can be used for assessing the soil thermal diffusivity under natural conditions, which should improve the reliability, accuracy, and adequacy and expand the application range of predictive mathematical models for the thermal regime of soils.

  18. Thermophysical Properties of Te-based II-VI Semiconductors: Reduced Algorithms for Thermal Diffusivity Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banish, R. Michael; Brantschen, Segolene; Pourpoint, Timothee L.; Wessling, Francis; Sekerka, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents methodologies for measuring the thermal diffusivity using the difference between temperatures measured at two, essentially independent, locations. A heat pulse is applied for an arbitrary time to one region of the sample; either the inner core or the outer wall. Temperature changes are then monitored versus time. The thermal diffusivity is calculated from the temperature difference versus time. No initial conditions are used directly in the final results.

  19. Through-thickness determination of phase composition and residual stresses in thermall barrier coatings using high- energy x-rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Weyant, , C. M.; Almer, J. D.; Faber, K. T.; Stony Brook Univ.

    2009-01-01

    High-energy X-rays were used to determine the local phase composition and residual stresses through the thickness of as-sprayed and heat-treated plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings consisting of a NiCoCrAlY bond coat and an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) topcoat produced with through-thickness segmentation cracks. The as-sprayed residual stresses reflected the combined influence of quenching stresses from the plasma spray process, thermal expansion mismatch between the topcoat, bond coat and substrate, and stress relief from the segmentation cracks. Heat treatments led to the formation of a thermally grown oxide (TGO) which was in compression in the plane, as well as relief of quenching stresses and development of a stress gradient in the YSZ topcoat. The high-energy X-ray technique used in this study revealed the effects that TGO and segmentation cracks have on the in-plane stress state of the entire coating.

  20. Soil thermal resistivity and thermal stability measuring instrument. Volume 2. Manual for operation and use of the thermal property analyzer and statistical weather analysis program to determine thermal design parameters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, S.A.; Radhakrishna, H.S.

    1981-11-01

    Numerous considerations influence the thermal design of an underground power cable, including the soil thermal resistivity, thermal diffusivity and thermal stability. Each of these properties is a function of soil moisture which is, in turn, a function of past weather, soil composition, and biological burden. The Neher-McGrath formalism has been widely used for thermal cable design. However, this formalism assumes knowledge of soil thermal properties (resistivity and diffusivity). For design purposes, these parameters should be treated statistically, since weather varies greatly from year-to-year. As well, soil thermal property surveys are normally required along the route to assess the thermal quality of the native soil. This project is intended to fill the gap between the need to carry out thermal design and the use of the Neher-McGrath formalism which is normally employed. This goal has been addressed through: development of instrumentation and methods of measuring soil thermal properties in situ and in the laboratory; recommendation of methods for conducting soil surveys along a proposed cable route and of assessing the thermal quality of soils; and development of a computerized method to treat soil thermal design parameters on a statistical basis using computerized weather records as supplied by the US Environmental Data Service. The use of the methods and instrumentation developed as a result of this contract should permit less conservative thermal design thereby improving the economics of underground transmission. As well, these techniques and instrumentation facilitate weather-dependent prediction of cable ampacity for installed cables, monitoring of backfill thermal stability, and many other new practices.

  1. On the determination of the thermal comfort conditions of a metropolitan city underground railway.

    PubMed

    Katavoutas, George; Assimakopoulos, Margarita N; Asimakopoulos, Dimosthenis N

    2016-10-01

    Although the indoor thermal comfort concept has received increasing research attention, the vast majority of published work has been focused on the building environment, such as offices, residential and non-residential buildings. The present study aims to investigate the thermal comfort conditions in the unique and complex underground railway environment. Field measurements of air temperature, air humidity, air velocity, globe temperature and the number of passengers were conducted in the modern underground railway of Athens, Greece. Environmental monitoring was performed in the interior of two types of trains (air-conditioned and forced air ventilation cabins) and on selected platforms during the summer period. The thermal comfort was estimated using the PMV (predicted mean vote) and the PPD (predicted percentage dissatisfied) scales. The results reveal that the recommended thermal comfort requirements, although at relatively low percentages are met only in air-conditioned cabins. It is found that only 33% of the PPD values in air-conditioned cabins can be classified in the less restrictive comfort class C, as proposed by ISO-7730. The thermal environment is "slightly warm" in air-conditioned cabins and "warm" in forced air ventilation cabins. In addition, differences of the thermal comfort conditions on the platforms are shown to be associated with the depth and the design characteristics of the stations. The average PMV at the station with small depth is 0.9 scale points higher than that of the station with great depth. The number of passengers who are waiting at the platforms during daytime reveals a U-shaped pattern for a deep level station and an inverted course of PMV for a small depth station. Further, preliminary observations are made on the distribution of air velocity on the platforms and on the impact of air velocity on the thermal comfort conditions. PMID:27280378

  2. Role of microstructure and thermal transport in determining the rate of hot spot growth in aluminized PBX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Kaushik; Chaudhuri, Santanu

    The mechanisms of initiation and propagation of a hot spot in non-ideal explosives with aluminum additives are poorly understood due to greater complexity introduced by the different thermal and mechanical behavior of the components. In aluminized composites such as PBXN-109, the binder, RDX and Aluminum phases have been studied separately. However, not much is known about deflection of hot spots in the microstructured composite. Especially, the role of adhesion, debonding and thermal conductivity of binder phase is critical in moderating the sensitivity of such interfaces. Using reactive molecular dynamics simulations, the primary binder interfaces in PBXN-109 was investigated. Depending on the temperature of the growing hot spot reaching an RDX or Al/Al2O3 grain, the thermal conductivity and viscoplastic behavior of the binder interface determine the attenuation of reaction front and thermal shock leading the hot spot. Different mechanisms like melt-dispersion and failure of oxide layer for the release of Al in the hot spot regions remain underexplored to connect the chemistry to the microstructure. Although Al/Al2O3/RDX and Al/Al2O3/HTPB interfaces are chemically stable, the hot spot melts the AlxOy layers and create shear bands in aluminum domain due to thermomechanical strain created due to different thermal environment. In a shock-compressed microstructure without voids, the cohesive interaction and chemical composition of such interfaces for different phases of RDX will be presented.

  3. Use of thermal inertia determined by HCMM to predict nocturnal cold prone areas in Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, L. H., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Pairs of HCMM day-night thermal infrared (IR) data were selected during the 1978-79 winter to examine patterns of surface temperature and thermal inertia (TI) of peninsular Florida. The GOES and NOAA-6 thermal IR, as well as National Climatic Center temperatures and rainfall, were also used. The HCMM apparent thermal inertia (ATI) images closely corresponded to the general soil map of Florida, based on soil drainage classes. Areas with low ATI overlay well-drained soils, such as deep sands and drained organic soils, whereas with high ATI overlay areas with wetlands and bodies of water. The HCMM ATI images also corresponded well with GOES-detected winter nocturnal cold-prone areas. Use of HCMM data with Carlson's energy balance model showed both high moisture availability (MA) and high thermal inertia (TI) of wetland-type surfaces and low MA and low TI of upland, well-drained soils. Since soil areas with low TI develop higher temperatures during the day, then antecedent patterns of highest maximum daytime surface temperature can also be used to predict nocturnal cold-prone areas in Florida.

  4. The impact of martian mesoscale winds on surface temperature and on the determination of thermal inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Forget, François; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Montabone, Luca; Lewis, Stephen R.; Millour, Ehouarn

    2011-04-01

    Radiative control of surface temperature is a key characteristic of the martian environment and its low-density atmosphere. Here we show through meteorological modeling that surface temperature can be far from radiative equilibrium over numerous sloping terrains on Mars, where nighttime mesoscale katabatic winds impact the surface energy budget. Katabatic circulations induce both adiabatic atmospheric heating and enhancement of downward sensible heat flux, which then becomes comparable to radiative flux and acts to warm the ground. Through this mechanism, surface temperature can increase up to 20 K. One consequence is that warm signatures of surface temperature over slopes, observed through infrared spectrometry, cannot be systematically associated with contrasts of intrinsic soil thermal inertia. Apparent thermal inertia maps retrieved thus far possibly contain wind-induced structures. Another consequence is that surface temperature observations close to sloping terrains could allow the validation of model predictions for martian katabatic winds, provided contrasts in intrinsic thermal inertia can be ruled out. The thermal impact of winds is mostly discussed in this paper in the particular cases of Olympus Mons/Lycus Sulci and Terra Meridiani but is generally significant over any sloped terrains in low thermal inertia areas. It is even general enough to apply under daytime conditions, thereby providing a possible explanation for observed afternoon surface cooling, and to ice-covered terrains, thereby providing new insights on how winds could have shaped the present surface of Mars.

  5. Determination of electron and ion thermal conductivities by analysis of Alcator-A profile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liewer, P. C.; Pfeiffer, W.; Waltz, R. E.

    1983-02-01

    Profile data from the Alcator-A tokamak are analyzed using the onetwo transport code to study thermal conductivities and power balance. It is found that the observed central ion temperatures can be explained by assuming an ion thermal conductivity equal to the neoclassical value as calculated recently by Bolton and Ware. For low density, n¯=1×1014 cm-3, the possible anomaly in the ion conductivity is small: ±30% of the Bolton-Ware value. The anomalous electron thermal conductivity as deduced from the profile data is = ≂2.5(±1.5)×1017 cm-1 sec-1. The power balance study shows that at low densities, electron energy losses from radiation and thermal conduction are equally important, and both are larger than the exchanges loss to the ions. At higher densities, n¯≥2×1014 cm-3, electron energy losses by thermal conduction and exchange are equally important, and both are larger than the radiation loss. Convective losses, as calculated from measured particle confinement times, are negligible for all densities analyzed.

  6. Using thermal balance model to determine optimal reactor volume and insulation material needed in a laboratory-scale composting reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjiang; Pang, Li; Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Yuansheng; Zhou, Kexun; Luo, Fei

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive model of thermal balance and degradation kinetics was developed to determine the optimal reactor volume and insulation material. Biological heat production and five channels of heat loss were considered in the thermal balance model for a representative reactor. Degradation kinetics was developed to make the model applicable to different types of substrates. Simulation of the model showed that the internal energy accumulation of compost was the significant heat loss channel, following by heat loss through reactor wall, and latent heat of water evaporation. Lower proportion of heat loss occurred through the reactor wall when the reactor volume was larger. Insulating materials with low densities and low conductive coefficients were more desirable for building small reactor systems. Model developed could be used to determine the optimal reactor volume and insulation material needed before the fabrication of a lab-scale composting system. PMID:26871299

  7. Determination of the succinonitrile-benzene and succinonitrile-cyclohexanol phase diagrams by thermal and UV spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B.

    1984-01-01

    Equilibrium temperature-composition diagrams were determined for the two organic systems, succinonitrile-benzene and succinonitrile-cyclohexanol. Measurements were made using the common thermal analysis methods and UV spectrophotometry. Succinonitrile-benzene monotectic was chosen for its low affinity for water and because UV analysis would be simplified. Succinonitrile-cyclohexanol was chosen because both components are transparent models for metallic solidification, as opposed to the other known succinonitrile-based monotectics.

  8. First-Principles Determination of Ultralow Thermal Conductivity of monolayer WSe2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    By using first-principles calculations combined with the phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we systematically investigate the phonon transport of monolayer WSe2. Compared with other 2D materials, the monolayer WSe2 is found to have an ultralow thermal conductivity due to the ultralow Debye frequency and heavy atom mass. The room temperature thermal conductivity for a typical sample size of 1 μm is 3.935 W/m K, which is one order of magnitude lower than that of MoS2. And the room temperature thermal conductivity can be further decreased by about 95% in 10 nm sized samples. Moreover, we also find the ZA phonons have the dominant contribution to the thermal conductivity, and the relative contribution is almost 80% at room temperature, which is remarkably higher than that for monolayer MoS2. This is because the ZA phonons have longer lifetime than that of LA and TA phonons in monolayer WSe2. PMID:26464052

  9. Destructive materials thermal characteristics determination with application for spacecraft structures testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alifanov, O. M.; Budnik, S. A.; Nenarokomov, A. V.; Netelev, A. V.; Titov, D. M.

    2013-04-01

    In many practical situations it is impossible to measure directly thermal and thermokinetic properties of analyzed composite materials. The only way that can often be used to overcome these difficulties is indirect measurements. This type of measurements is usually formulated as the solution of inverse heat transfer problems. Such problems are ill-posed in mathematical sense and their main feature shows itself in the solution instabilities. That is why special regularizing methods are needed to solve them. The general method of iterative regularization is concerned with application to the estimation of materials properties. The objective of this paper is to estimate thermal and thermokinetic properties of advanced materials using the approach based on inverse methods. An experimental-computational system is presented for investigating the thermal and kinetics properties of composite materials by methods of inverse heat transfer problems and which is developed at the Thermal Laboratory of Department Space Systems Engineering, of Moscow Aviation Institute (MAI). The system is aimed at investigating the materials in conditions of unsteady contact and/or radiation heating over a wide range of temperature changes and heating rates in a vacuum, air and inert gas medium.

  10. Determination of phonon dispersion relations by X-ray thermal diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, R.; Chiang, T.-C.

    2010-07-20

    Thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) of X-rays from crystals contains information on phonons. This paper reviews the general theory of TDS and some recent experiments aimed at further developing TDS into a useful and efficient method for studying phonon dispersion relations.

  11. First-Principles Determination of Ultralow Thermal Conductivity of monolayer WSe2

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    By using first-principles calculations combined with the phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we systematically investigate the phonon transport of monolayer WSe2. Compared with other 2D materials, the monolayer WSe2 is found to have an ultralow thermal conductivity due to the ultralow Debye frequency and heavy atom mass. The room temperature thermal conductivity for a typical sample size of 1 μm is 3.935  W/m K, which is one order of magnitude lower than that of MoS2. And the room temperature thermal conductivity can be further decreased by about 95% in 10 nm sized samples. Moreover, we also find the ZA phonons have the dominant contribution to the thermal conductivity, and the relative contribution is almost 80% at room temperature, which is remarkably higher than that for monolayer MoS2. This is because the ZA phonons have longer lifetime than that of LA and TA phonons in monolayer WSe2. PMID:26464052

  12. Determination of the thermal and physical properties of black tattoo ink using compound analysis.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Alexander; Lister, Tom S; Wright, Philip A; Hughes, Michael P

    2013-07-01

    Despite the widespread use of laser therapy in the removal of tattoos, comparatively little is known about its mechanism of action. There is a need for an improved understanding of the composition and thermal properties of the tattoo ink in order that simulations of laser therapy may be better informed and treatment parameters optimised. Scanning electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry identified that the relative proportions of the constituent compounds of the ink likely to exist in vivo are the following: carbon black pigment (89 %), carvacrol (5 %), eugenol (2 %), hexenol (3 %) and propylene glycol (1 %). Chemical compound property tables identify that changes in phase of these compounds lead to a considerable reduction in the density and thermal conductivity of the ink and an increase in its specific heat as temperature increases. These temperature-dependent values of density, thermal conductivity and specific heat are substantially different to the constant values, derived from water or graphite at a fixed temperature, which have been applied in the simulations of laser therapy as previously described in the literature. Accordingly, the thermal properties of black tattoo ink described in this study provide valuable information that may be used to improve simulations of tattoo laser therapy. PMID:22983425

  13. The determination of cloud masses and dust characteristics from submillimetre thermal emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The principles by which the dust and masses and total masses of interstellar clouds and certain characteristics of interstellar dust grains can be derived from observations of far infrared and submillimeter thermal emission are reviewed. To the extent possible, the discussion will be independent of particular grain models.

  14. Noninvasive determination of burn depth in children by digital infrared thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Preciado, Jose David; Kolosovas-Machuca, Eleazar Samuel; Velez-Gomez, Ezequiel; Miranda-Altamirano, Ariel; González, Francisco Javier

    2013-06-01

    Digital infrared thermal imaging is used to assess noninvasively the severity of burn wounds in 13 pediatric patients. A delta-T (ΔT) parameter obtained by subtracting the temperature of a healthy contralateral region from the temperature of the burn wound is compared with the burn depth measured histopathologically. Thermal imaging results show that superficial dermal burns (IIa) show increased temperature compared with their contralateral healthy region, while deep dermal burns (IIb) show a lower temperature than their contralateral healthy region. This difference in temperature is statistically significant (p<0.0001) and provides a way of distinguishing deep dermal from superficial dermal burns. These results show that digital infrared thermal imaging could be used as a noninvasive procedure to assess burn wounds. An additional advantage of using thermal imaging, which can image a large skin surface area, is that it can be used to identify regions with different burn depths and estimate the size of the grafts needed for deep dermal burns.

  15. Effects of thermal maturation on steroid hydrocarbons as determined by hydrous pyrolysis of Phosphoria Retort Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewan, M. D.; Bjorøy, M.; Dolcater, D. L.

    1986-09-01

    Hydrous pyrolysis experiments on the Phosphoria Retort Shale generate bitumen extracts and expelled oils that have steroid hydrocarbons with m/z 217-, 231-, and 253-mass Chromatographic distributions that are similar to those of bitumens and crude oils in the natural system. These experiments agree with the natural observations that diasteroid hydrocarbons increase relative to their regular counterparts with increasing thermal stress, while their C 27 through C 29 proportionality shows a slight enrichment in C 27. Relative concentrations of 20S to 20R configurations of 24-ethyl-14α,17α-cholestane show the expected increase with increasing thermal stress into the early part of the primary oil generation stage, but thereafter decrease with increasing thermal stress. If this reversal is found in high maturity sections of the natural system, the utility of this transformation as a maturity index will be limited. Triaromatic- to monoaromatic-steroid hydrocarbon concentrations increase with increasing thermal stress as observed in the natural system. Preferred migration of monoaromatic steroid hydrocarbons from bitumen extracts to expelled oils places considerable doubt on currently employed kinetic models for this aromatization reaction. As in the natural system, the experiments show relative concentrations of low-molecular weight- to high-molecular weight-triaromatic steroid hydrocarbons to increase with increasing thermal stress. Assuming a first-order reaction rate, the apparent activation energy and pre-exponential factor for this apparent side-chain cleavage reaction are 175.59 kJ mol -1 and 2.82 × 10 13hr-1, respectively. These kinetic parameters are geologically reasonable and are similar to those for the overall generation of expelled oil.

  16. Development and validation of a sensitive thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method for the determination of phosgene in air samples.

    PubMed

    Juillet, Y; Dubois, C; Bintein, F; Dissard, J; Bossée, A

    2014-08-01

    A new rapid, sensitive and reliable method was developed for the determination of phosgene in air samples using thermal desorption (TD) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The method is based on a fast (10 min) active sampling of only 1 L of air onto a Tenax® GR tube doped with 0.5 mL of derivatizing mixture containing dimercaptotoluene and triethylamine in hexane solution. Validation of the TD-GC-MS method showed a low limit of detection (40 ppbv), acceptable repeatability, intermediate fidelity (relative standard deviation within 12 %) and excellent accuracy (>95%). Linearity was demonstrated for two concentration ranges (0.04 to 2.5 ppmv and 2.5 to 10 ppmv) owing to variation of derivatization recovery between low and high concentration levels. Due to its simple on-site implementation and its close similarity with recommended operating procedure (ROP) for chemical warfare agents vapour sampling, the method is particularly useful in the process of verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention. PMID:24817348

  17. Development and application of a thermal desorption-based method for the determination of nicotine in inddor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.A.; Thompson, C.V.; Higgins, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    A personal monitoring system for the determination of exposure to nicotine has been developed. The system consists of a sampling cartidge packed with 200 mg of Tenax GC/sup R/ and a small, constant flow, personal sampling pump. After sampling, the cartridges are analyzed by triethylamine-assisted thermal desorption gas chromatography with nitrogen-selective detection. Collection and desorption efficiencies for the cartridges have been determined. The system has been applied in a variety of work sites, and in 36 restaurants, where measured concentrations of nicotine ranged from 0.5 to 37.2 ..mu..gm/sup /minus/3/. 25 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. The Role of Oxygen in Determining Upper Thermal Limits in Lottia digitalis under Air Exposure and Submersion.

    PubMed

    Bjelde, Brittany E; Miller, Nathan A; Stillman, Jonathon H; Todgham, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen limitation of aerobic metabolism is hypothesized to drive organismal thermal tolerance limits. Differences in oxygen availability in air and water may underlie observed differences in upper thermal tolerance of intertidal limpets if oxygen is limiting in submerged environments. We explored how cardiac performance (heart rate, breakpoint temperature [BPT], flat-line temperature [FLT], and temperature sensitivity) was affected by hyperoxia and hypoxia in the finger limpet, Lottia digitalis, under air exposure and submersion. Upper thermal tolerance limits were unchanged by increasing availability of oxygen, although air-exposed limpets were able to maintain cardiac function to higher temperatures than submerged limpets. Maximum heart rate did not increase with greater partial pressure of oxygen (Po2), suggesting that tissue Po2 levels are likely maximized during normoxia. Hypoxia reduced breakpoint BPTs and FLTs in air-exposed and submerged limpets and accentuated the difference in BPTs between the two groups through greater reductions in BPT in submerged limpets. Differences in respiratory structures and the degree to which thermal limits are already maximized may play significant roles in determining how oxygen availability influences upper temperature tolerance. PMID:26658246

  19. First-Principles Determination of Ultrahigh Thermal Conductivity of Boron Arsenide: A Competitor for Diamond?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, L.; Broido, D. A.; Reinecke, T. L.

    2013-07-01

    We have calculated the thermal conductivities (κ) of cubic III-V boron compounds using a predictive first principles approach. Boron arsenide is found to have a remarkable room temperature κ over 2000Wm-1K-1; this is comparable to those in diamond and graphite, which are the highest bulk values known. We trace this behavior in boron arsenide to an interplay of certain basic vibrational properties that lie outside of the conventional guidelines in searching for high κ materials, and to relatively weak phonon-isotope scattering. We also find that cubic boron nitride and boron antimonide will have high κ with isotopic purification. This work provides new insight into the nature of thermal transport at a quantitative level and predicts a new ultrahigh κ material of potential interest for passive cooling applications.

  20. Determination of the 243,246,248Cm thermal neutron induced fission cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serot, O.; Wagemans, C.; Vermote, S.; Heyse, J.; Soldner, T.; Geltenbort, P.

    2005-11-01

    The minor actinide waste produced in nuclear power plants contains various Cm-isotopes, and transmutation scenarios require improved fission cross section data. The available thermal neutron induced fission cross section data for 243Cm, 246Cm and 248Cm are not very accurate, so new cross section measurements have been performed at the high flux reactor of the ILL in Grenoble (France) under better experimental conditions (highly enriched samples, very intense and clean neutron beam). The measurements were performed at a neutron energy of 5.38 meV, yielding fission cross section values of (1240±28)b for 243Cm, (25±47)mb for 246Cm and (685±84)mb for 248Cm. From these results, thermal fission cross section values of (572±14)b; (12±25)mb and (316±43)mb have been deduced for 243Cm, 246Cm and 248Cm, respectively.

  1. Determination of water surface temperature based on the use of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James E.

    1992-01-01

    A straightforward method for compensating Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) digital data for the influence of atmospheric path radiance and the attenuation of target energy by the atmosphere is presented. A band ratioing model useful for estimating water surface temperatures, which requires no ground truth measurements, is included. A study conducted to test the potential of the model and the magnitudes of the corrections for atmosphere encountered is presented. Results of the study, which was based on data collected during an engineering evaluation flight of TIMS, indicate errors in the estimate of the surface temperature of the water fall from +/- 1.0 C for uncorrected data to +/- 0.4 C when data have been corrected according to the model presented. This value approaches the noise-limited thermal resolution of the sensor at the time of the flight.

  2. Determination of the strain rate dependent thermal softening behavior of thermoplastic materials for crash simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Christian; Klein, Jan; Schöngart, Maximilian

    2016-03-01

    Thermoplastic materials are increasingly used as a light weight replacement for metal, especially in automotive applications. Typical examples are frontends and bumpers. The loads on these structures are very often impulsive, for example in a crash situation. A high rate of loading causes a high strain rate in the material which has a major impact on the mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials. The stiffness as well as the rigidity of polymers increases to higher strain rates. The increase of the mechanical properties is superimposed at higher rates of loading by another effect which works reducing on stiffness and rigidity, the increase of temperature caused by plastic deformation. The mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials is influenced by temperature opposing to strain rate. The stiffness and rigidity are decreased to higher values of temperature. The effect of thermal softening on thermoplastic materials is investigated at IKV. For this purpose high-speed tensile tests are performed on a blend, consisting of Polybutylenterephthalate (PBT) and Polycarbonate (PC). In preliminary investigations the effects of strain rate on the thermomechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials was studied by different authors. Tensile impact as well as split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests were conducted in combination with high-speed temperature measurement, though, the authors struggled especially with temperature measurement. This paper presents an approach which uses high-speed strain measurement to transpire the link between strain, strain rate and thermal softening as well as the interdependency between strain hardening and thermal softening. The results show a superimposition of strain hardening and thermal softening, which is consistent to preliminary investigations. The advantage of the presented research is that the results can be used to calibrate damage and material models to perform mechanical simulations using Finite Element Analysis.

  3. Evidence of phase transition in Nd3+ doped phosphate glass determined by thermal lens spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Acácio A; Lourenço, Sidney A; Pilla, Viviane; Silva, Anielle C Almeida; Dantas, Noelio O

    2014-01-28

    Thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) techniques were applied to the thermo-optical property analysis of a new phosphate glass matrix PANK with nominal composition 40P2O5·20Al2O3·35Na2O·5K2O (mol%), doped with different Nd(3+) compositions. This glass system, synthesized by the fusion protocol, presents high transparency from UV to the near infrared, excellent thermo-optical properties at room temperature and high fluorescence quantum efficiency. Thermal lens phase shift parameters, thermal diffusivity and the DSC signal present pronounced changes at about 61 °C for the PANK glass system. This anomalous behavior was associated with a phase transition in the nanostructured glass materials. The FTIR signal confirms the presence of isolated PO4 tetrahedron groups connected to different cations in PANK glass. As a main result, our experimental data suggest that these tetrahedron groups present a structural phase transition, paraelectric-ferroelectric phase transition, similar to that in potassium dihydrogen phosphate, KH2PO4, nanocrystals and which TLS technique can be used as a sensitive method to investigate changes in the structural level of nanostructured materials. PMID:24310914

  4. Transcriptional Response to Acute Thermal Exposure in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Determined by RNAseq

    PubMed Central

    Tomalty, Katharine M. H.; Meek, Mariah H.; Stephens, Molly R.; Rincón, Gonzalo; Fangue, Nann A.; May, Bernie P.; Baerwald, Melinda R.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal exposure is a serious and growing challenge facing fish species worldwide. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) living in the southern portion of their native range are particularly likely to encounter warmer water due to a confluence of factors. River alterations have increased the likelihood that juveniles will be exposed to warm water temperatures during their freshwater life stage, which can negatively impact survival, growth, and development and pose a threat to dwindling salmon populations. To better understand how acute thermal exposure affects the biology of salmon, we performed a transcriptional analysis of gill tissue from Chinook salmon juveniles reared at 12° and exposed acutely to water temperatures ranging from ideal to potentially lethal (12° to 25°). Reverse-transcribed RNA libraries were sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq2000 platform and a de novo reference transcriptome was created. Differentially expressed transcripts were annotated using Blast2GO and relevant gene clusters were identified. In addition to a high degree of downregulation of a wide range of genes, we found upregulation of genes involved in protein folding/rescue, protein degradation, cell death, oxidative stress, metabolism, inflammation/immunity, transcription/translation, ion transport, cell cycle/growth, cell signaling, cellular trafficking, and structure/cytoskeleton. These results demonstrate the complex multi-modal cellular response to thermal stress in juvenile salmon. PMID:25911227

  5. 40 CFR Appendix Xiv to Part 86 - Determination of Acceptable Durability Test Schedule for Light-Duty Vehicles and Light Light-Duty...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... schedule in step 1 of this appendix. This schedule will be designated as the standard (std) test schedule...)2/Ns))std Where: Xs = Individual mileages at which the vehicle will be tested. Ns = Total number of.... Refer to table I and determine tp at (Np − 2)prop degrees of freedom and ts at (Ns − 2)std. 6. If...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix Xiv to Part 86 - Determination of Acceptable Durability Test Schedule for Light-Duty Vehicles and Light Light-Duty...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... schedule in step 1 of this appendix. This schedule will be designated as the standard (std) test schedule...)2/Ns))std Where: Xs = Individual mileages at which the vehicle will be tested. Ns = Total number of.... Refer to table I and determine tp at (Np − 2)prop degrees of freedom and ts at (Ns − 2)std. 6. If...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix Xiv to Part 86 - Determination of Acceptable Durability Test Schedule for Light-Duty Vehicles and Light Light-Duty...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... schedule in step 1 of this appendix. This schedule will be designated as the standard (std) test schedule...)2/Ns))std Where: Xs = Individual mileages at which the vehicle will be tested. Ns = Total number of.... Refer to table I and determine tp at (Np − 2)prop degrees of freedom and ts at (Ns − 2)std. 6. If...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix Xiv to Part 86 - Determination of Acceptable Durability Test Schedule for Light-Duty Vehicles and Light Light-Duty...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... schedule in step 1 of this appendix. This schedule will be designated as the standard (std) test schedule...)2/Ns))std Where: Xs = Individual mileages at which the vehicle will be tested. Ns = Total number of.... Refer to table I and determine tp at (Np − 2)prop degrees of freedom and ts at (Ns − 2)std. 6. If...

  9. Acceptability of GM foods among Pakistani consumers.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhter; Rahut, Dil Bahadur; Imtiaz, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    In Pakistan majority of the consumers do not have information about genetically modified (GM) foods. In developing countries particularly in Pakistan few studies have focused on consumers' acceptability about GM foods. Using comprehensive primary dataset collected from 320 consumers in 2013 from Pakistan, this study analyzes the determinants of consumers' acceptability of GM foods. The data was analyzed by employing the bivariate probit model and censored least absolute deviation (CLAD) models. The empirical results indicated that urban consumers are more aware of GM foods compared to rural consumers. The acceptance of GM foods was more among females' consumers as compared to male consumers. In addition, the older consumers were more willing to accept GM food compared to young consumers. The acceptability of GM foods was also higher among wealthier households. Low price is the key factor leading to the acceptability of GM foods. The acceptability of the GM foods also reduces the risks among Pakistani consumers. PMID:27494790

  10. Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method to determine phthalate and organophosphate esters from air samples.

    PubMed

    Aragón, M; Borrull, F; Marcé, R M

    2013-08-16

    A method based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) has been developed to determine four organophosphate esters, seven phthalate esters, and bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate in the gas phase from harbour and urban air samples. The method involves the sampling of 1.5L of air in a Tenax TA sorbent tube followed by thermal desorption (using a Tenax TA cryogenic trap) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The repeatability of the method expressed as %RSD (n=3) is less than 15% and the MQLs are between 0.007μgm(-3) (DMP, TBP, BBP, TPP and DnOP) and 6.7μgm(-3) (DEHP). The method was successfully applied in two areas (urban and harbour) testing two and three points in each one, respectively. Some of these compounds were found in both urban and harbour samples. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was the most abundant compound found in both areas at concentration levels between 6.7μgm(-3) and 136.4μgm(-3). This study demonstrates that thermal desorption is an efficient method for the determination of these semi-volatile compounds in the gas phase fraction of air samples. PMID:23859797

  11. A multi-thermogram-based Bayesian model for the determination of the thermal diffusivity of a material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Alexandre; Fischer, Nicolas; Ebrard, Géraldine; Hay, Bruno; Harris, Peter; Wright, Louise; Rochais, Denis; Mattout, Jeremie

    2016-02-01

    The determination of thermal diffusivity is at the heart of modern materials characterisation. The evaluation of the associated uncertainty is difficult because the determination is performed in an indirect way, in the sense that the thermal diffusivity cannot be measured directly. The well-known GUM uncertainty framework does not provide a reliable evaluation of measurement uncertainty for such inverse problems, because in that framework the underlying measurement model is supposed to be a direct relationship between the measurand (the quantity intended to be measured) and the input quantities on which the measurand depends. This paper is concerned with the development of a Bayesian approach to evaluate the measurement uncertainty associated with thermal diffusivity. A Bayesian model is first developed for a single thermogram and is then extended to the case of several thermograms obtained under repeatability and reproducibility conditions. This multi-thermogram based model is able to take into consideration a large set of influencing quantities that occur during the measurements and yields a more reliable uncertainty evaluation than the one obtained from a single thermogram. Different aspects of the Bayesian model are discussed, including the sensitivity to the choice of the prior distribution, the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm used for the inference and the convergence of the Markov chains.

  12. Determination of temperature and thermal stresses distribution in power boiler elements with use inverse heat conduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grądziel, sławomir

    2011-12-01

    The following paper presents the method for solving one-dimensional inverse boundary heat conduction problems. The method is used to estimate the unknown thermal boundary condition on inner surface of a thick-walled Y-branch. Solution is based on measured temperature transients at two points inside the element's wall thickness. Y-branch is installed in a fresh steam pipeline in a power plant in Poland. Determination of an unknown boundary condition allows for the calculation of transient temperature distribution in the whole element. Next, stresses caused by non-uniform transient temperature distribution and by steam pressure inside a Y-branch are calculated using the finite element method. The proposed algorithm can be used for thermal-strength state monitoring in similar elements, when it is not possible to determine a 3-D thermal boundary condition. The calculated temperature and stress transients can be used for the calculation of element durability. More accurate temperature and stress monitoring will contribute to a substantial decrease of maximal stresses that occur during transient start-up and shut-down processes.

  13. A method for determination of heat storage capacity of the mold materials using a differential thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ol'khovik, E.

    2016-04-01

    The article proposes a method for determining of the heat storage capacity of the mould materials. Modern materials for mouldsare made using a variety of technologies, and the manufacturers of binders and additives ensure thermal properties of certain materials only when using a certain recipe. In practice, for management of the casting solidification process (creation of the volume or directed mode) it is favorable to apply various technological methods, including modification of one of the important properties of the casting mould, which is heat storage capacity. A rather simple technique based on the application of the differential thermal analysis was developed for its experimental definition. The obtained data showed a possibility of industrial application of the method.

  14. Determining the influence of Itaipu Lake on thermal conditions for soybean development in adjacent lands.

    PubMed

    Wagner-Riddle, C; Werner, S S; Caramori, P; Ricce, W S; Nitsche, P; von Bertoldi, P; de Souza, E F

    2015-10-01

    Previous numerical simulations have suggested that the area adjacent to Itaipu Lake in Southern Brazil is significantly affecting the local thermal regime through development of a lake breeze. This has led to concerns that soybean growth and development, and consequently yield, has been affected by the creation of the artificial lake in this important agricultural region, but a systematic climatological study of the thermal effects of Itaipu Lake has not been conducted. The objectives of this study were to assess the spatial pattern of minimum and maximum air temperatures in a 10-km-wide area adjacent to Itaipu Lake as affected by distance from the water. Measurements were conducted over 3 years in seven transects along the shore of Itaipu Lake, with five weather stations placed in each transect. Phenological observations in soybean fields surrounding the weather stations were also conducted. Generalized additive models for location, scale, and shape (GAMLSS) analysis indicated no difference in the temperature time series as distance from water increased. Semivariograms showed that the random components in the air temperature were predominant and that there was no spatial structure to the signal. Wind direction measured over the three growing seasons demonstrated that, on average, the development of a lake breeze is limited to a few locations and a few hours of the day, supporting the temporal and spatial analysis. Phenological observations did not show differences in the timing of critical soybean stages. We suggest that the concerns that soybean development is potentially affected by the presence of Itaipu Lake are not supported by the thermal environment observed. PMID:25716222

  15. Determining the influence of Itaipu Lake on thermal conditions for soybean development in adjacent lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner-Riddle, C.; Werner, S. S.; Caramori, P.; Ricce, W. S.; Nitsche, P.; von Bertoldi, P.; de Souza, E. F.

    2015-10-01

    Previous numerical simulations have suggested that the area adjacent to Itaipu Lake in Southern Brazil is significantly affecting the local thermal regime through development of a lake breeze. This has led to concerns that soybean growth and development, and consequently yield, has been affected by the creation of the artificial lake in this important agricultural region, but a systematic climatological study of the thermal effects of Itaipu Lake has not been conducted. The objectives of this study were to assess the spatial pattern of minimum and maximum air temperatures in a 10-km-wide area adjacent to Itaipu Lake as affected by distance from the water. Measurements were conducted over 3 years in seven transects along the shore of Itaipu Lake, with five weather stations placed in each transect. Phenological observations in soybean fields surrounding the weather stations were also conducted. Generalized additive models for location, scale, and shape (GAMLSS) analysis indicated no difference in the temperature time series as distance from water increased. Semivariograms showed that the random components in the air temperature were predominant and that there was no spatial structure to the signal. Wind direction measured over the three growing seasons demonstrated that, on average, the development of a lake breeze is limited to a few locations and a few hours of the day, supporting the temporal and spatial analysis. Phenological observations did not show differences in the timing of critical soybean stages. We suggest that the concerns that soybean development is potentially affected by the presence of Itaipu Lake are not supported by the thermal environment observed.

  16. Could thermal sensitivity of mitochondria determine species distribution in a changing climate?

    PubMed

    Iftikar, Fathima I; MacDonald, Julia R; Baker, Daniel W; Renshaw, Gillian M C; Hickey, Anthony J R

    2014-07-01

    For many aquatic species, the upper thermal limit (Tmax) and the heart failure temperature (THF) are only a few degrees away from the species' current environmental temperatures. While the mechanisms mediating temperature-induced heart failure (HF) remain unresolved, energy flow and/or oxygen supply disruptions to cardiac mitochondria may be impacted by heat stress. Recent work using a New Zealand wrasse (Notolabrus celidotus) found that ATP synthesis capacity of cardiac mitochondria collapses prior to T(HF). However, whether this effect is limited to one species from one thermal habitat remains unknown. The present study confirmed that cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to heat stress-induced HF in two additional wrasses that occupy cold temperate (Notolabrus fucicola) and tropical (Thalassoma lunare) habitats. With exposure to heat stress, T. lunare had the least scope to maintain heart function with increasing temperature. Heat-exposed fish of all species showed elevated plasma succinate, and the heart mitochondria from the cold temperate N. fucicola showed decreased phosphorylation efficiencies (depressed respiratory control ratio, RCR), cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) flux and electron transport system (ETS) flux. In situ assays conducted across a range of temperatures using naive tissues showed depressed complex II (CII) and CCO capacity, limited ETS reserve capacities and lowered efficiencies of pyruvate uptake in T. lunare and N. celidotus. Notably, alterations of mitochondrial function were detectable at saturating oxygen levels, indicating that cardiac mitochondrial insufficiency can occur prior to HF without oxygen limitation. Our data support the view that species distribution may be related to the thermal limits of mitochondrial stability and function, which will be important as oceans continue to warm. PMID:25141346

  17. Testing to determine the vacuum-ultraviolet degradation rate of thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Samples of S-13G that had been exposed to the salt air environment of Cape Kennedy, Florida were irradiated with simulated solar ultraviolet radiation after various cleaning treatments. In both of the the tests conducted two of the salt air exposed samples were not cleaned, two were lightly cleaned with water and detergent (i.e. rinsed), and two were vigorously scrubbed. Several other white thermal control coatings were also irradiated. The solar absorptance values of these coatings before and as a result of the ultraviolet irradiation are reported for exposure levels up to approximately 2000 ESH.

  18. Determination of Thermal Properties and Morphology of Eucalyptus Wood Residue Filled High Density Polyethylene Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mengeloglu, Fatih; Kabakci, Ayse

    2008-01-01

    Thermal behaviors of eucalyptus wood residue (EWR) filled recycled high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites have been measured applying the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Morphology of the materials was also studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Addition of the EWR into the recycled HDPE matrix reduced the starting of degradation temperature. EWR filled recycled HDPE had two main decomposition peaks, one for EWR around 350 °C and one for recycled HDPE around 460 °C. Addition of EWR did not affect the melting temperature of the recycled HDPE. Morphological study showed that addition of coupling agent improved the compatibility between wood residue and recycled HDPE. PMID:19325736

  19. Determining the nucleation rate curve for lithium disilicate glass by differential thermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chandra S.; Day, Delbert E.

    1990-01-01

    The crystallization of lithium disilicate (Li2O+2SiO2) glass nucleated at various temperatures was studied by differential thermal analysis (DTA). A plot of the DTA crystallization peak height versus nucleation temperature closely resembles the classical nucleation rate curve for lithium disilicate glass whose maximum is at 453 C. The glass becomes saturated with internal nuclei when heated at 453 C for 10 h. The activation energy for crystallization and the heat of crystallization are independent of the concentration of nuclei and are 249 + or - 10 and 67 + or - 3 kJ/mol, respectively. The Avrami exponent, n, depends strongly on the concentration of nuclei in the glass.

  20. Drying characteristics and heat requirement of coconut endocarp determined by simultaneous thermal analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Duan, Kejun; Song, Fei; Chen, Weijun; Zhao, Songlin

    2015-11-01

    Drying characteristics and heat requirement of coconut endocarp at 40, 50 and 60 °C were investigated by a simultaneous thermal analyzer (TG-DSC). Results showed that Page model was the suitable model to describe and estimate the drying characteristics of coconut endocarp with a relatively higher R 2 value and lower χ2 value. Effective moisture diffusivity (D eff) ranged from 9.90 × 10-9 to 1.10 × 10-8 m2/s. Activation energies were 4.70 kJ/mol and heat requirements ranged from 59.3 to 55.9 kJ/kg.

  1. Determination of dispersion parameters of thermally deposited CdTe thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhimmar, J. M.; Desai, H. N.; Modi, B. P.

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin film was deposited onto glass substrates under a vacuum of 5 × 10-6 torr by using thermal evaporation technique. The prepared film was characterized for dispersion analysis from reflectance spectra within the wavelength range of 300 nm - 1100 nm which was recorded by using UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The dispersion parameters (oscillator strength, oscillator wavelength, high frequency dielectric constant, long wavelength refractive index, lattice dielectric constant and plasma resonance frequency) of CdTe thin film were investigated using single sellimeir oscillator model.

  2. Thermal summation model and instar determination of all developmental stages of necrophagous beetle, Sciodrepoides watsoni (Spence) (Coleoptera: Leiodidae: Cholevinae)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Necrophagous beetles are underrepresented in forensic entomology studies despite their undeniable utility for the field. In the present article, information is presented regarding the developmental biology and instar determination of Sciodrepoides watsoni (Spence, 1813), a very common species occurring across the Holarctic region. Wild collected beetles were kept in climate chambers at constant temperature (12, 15, 18, 21 and 28 °C) and their development was regularly documented. Parameters of thermal summation models and standard errors were calculated for each developmental stage. These models may be used for an estimation of post-mortem interval in legal investigations after further validation on local populations of S. watsoni. An additional methodology is introduced for future studies of size-based characteristics, addressing instar identification bias. The methodology provided estimations (mean, standard error and standard deviation) of S. watsoni larval head capsule width for preliminary larval instar determination. The methodology may be used with other morphological features to improve instar determination accuracy. PMID:27123379

  3. Cellular thermal shift and clickable chemical probe assays for the determination of drug-target engagement in live cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua; Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Hett, Erik C; Salter, Shores; Aulabaugh, Ann; Kyne, Robert E; Pierce, Betsy; Jones, Lyn H

    2016-07-14

    Proof of drug-target engagement in physiologically-relevant contexts is a key pillar of successful therapeutic target validation. We developed two orthogonal technologies, the cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA) and a covalent chemical probe reporter approach (harnessing sulfonyl fluoride tyrosine labeling and subsequent click chemistry) to measure the occupancy of the mRNA-decapping scavenger enzyme DcpS by a small molecule inhibitor in live cells. Enzyme affinity determined using isothermal dose response fingerprinting (ITDRFCETSA) and the concentration required to occupy 50% of the enzyme (OC50) using the chemical probe reporter assay were very similar. In this case, the chemical probe method worked well due to the long offset kinetics of the reversible inhibitor (determined using a fluorescent dye-tagged probe). This work suggests that CETSA could become the first choice assay to determine in-cell target engagement due to its simplicity. PMID:27216142

  4. Determination of Thermal-Diffusivity Dependence on Temperature of YAG Single Crystals with Different Concentrations of Yb3+ and V3+ Doping Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefon-Radziejewska, D.; Bodzenta, J.; Kaźmierczak-Bałata, A.; Łukasiewicz, T.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal diffusivities of pure and doped yttrium aluminum garnet single crystals were measured as a function of temperature. Samples doped with rare earth ions (3 at% and 25 at% of Yb 3+, and 0.8 at% and 2.1 at% of V 3+) were investigated in the temperature range from 34 °C to 300 °C. Determination of the thermal diffusivity was based on an analysis of propagation of a thermal wave in the sample. The frequency of the thermal wave was 100 mHz. A temperature disturbance connected with the thermal wave propagating in the sample was detected using the mirage effect. The results showed that the thermal diffusivity of all investigated samples decreases with an increase of sample temperature. A drop in the thermal diffusivity is more pronounced for pure and low-doped crystals.

  5. ATLAS ACCEPTANCE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. COCHRANE; J.V. PARKER; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    The acceptance test program for Atlas, a 23 MJ pulsed power facility for use in the Los Alamos High Energy Density Hydrodynamics program, has been completed. Completion of this program officially releases Atlas from the construction phase and readies it for experiments. Details of the acceptance test program results and of machine capabilities for experiments will be presented.

  6. A method to determine stratification efficiency of thermal energy storage processes independently from storage heat losses

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Michel Y.; Streicher, Wolfgang; Bales, Chris

    2010-06-15

    A new method for the calculation of a stratification efficiency of thermal energy storages based on the second law of thermodynamics is presented. The biasing influence of heat losses is studied theoretically and experimentally. Theoretically, it does not make a difference if the stratification efficiency is calculated based on entropy balances or based on exergy balances. In practice, however, exergy balances are less affected by measurement uncertainties, whereas entropy balances can not be recommended if measurement uncertainties are not corrected in a way that the energy balance of the storage process is in agreement with the first law of thermodynamics. A comparison of the stratification efficiencies obtained from experimental results of charging, standby, and discharging processes gives meaningful insights into the different mixing behaviors of a storage tank that is charged and discharged directly, and a tank-in-tank system whose outer tank is charged and the inner tank is discharged thereafter. The new method has a great potential for the comparison of the stratification efficiencies of thermal energy storages and storage components such as stratifying devices. (author)

  7. Determination of rock type on Mercury and the moon through remote sensing in the thermal infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, Ann L.; Kozlowski, Richard W. H.; Lebofsky, Larry A.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal infrared emission spectra of the moon and Mercury have been obtained using the Si:As photoconductor and circular variable filter at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Lunar spectra from 7.2 to 12.2 microns for two different locations in the south polar highlands have Christiansen frequency peaks at 8.1 microns and 7.9 microns, respectively. This indicates different compositions at the two locations; mafic in the first case, more felsic in the second. Emission spectra from Mercury are not as spatially localized,; however, the longitude of maximum contribution to the spectrum can be calculated from thermal models of the earth-facing disk. Results for areas centered at two longitudes have been obtained. Two locations in the intercrater plains were observed. At 40-deg longitude (very near the crater Homer), a peak at 7.9 microns indicates mafic igneous rock type. Spectra emanating from 46-deg longitude have peaks at 7.8 microns, indicating a region borderline between mafic and intermediate composition.

  8. Sonic boom acceptability studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Leatherwood, Jack D.; McCurdy, David A.

    1992-04-01

    The determination of the magnitude of sonic boom exposure which would be acceptable to the general population requires, as a starting point, a method to assess and compare individual sonic booms. There is no consensus within the scientific and regulatory communities regarding an appropriate sonic boom assessment metric. Loudness, being a fundamental and well-understood attribute of human hearing was chosen as a means of comparing sonic booms of differing shapes and amplitudes. The figure illustrates the basic steps which yield a calculated value of loudness. Based upon the aircraft configuration and its operating conditions, the sonic boom pressure signature which reaches the ground is calculated. This pressure-time history is transformed to the frequency domain and converted into a one-third octave band spectrum. The essence of the loudness method is to account for the frequency response and integration characteristics of the auditory system. The result of the calculation procedure is a numerical description (perceived level, dB) which represents the loudness of the sonic boom waveform.

  9. Sonic boom acceptability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Sullivan, Brenda M.; Leatherwood, Jack D.; Mccurdy, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of the magnitude of sonic boom exposure which would be acceptable to the general population requires, as a starting point, a method to assess and compare individual sonic booms. There is no consensus within the scientific and regulatory communities regarding an appropriate sonic boom assessment metric. Loudness, being a fundamental and well-understood attribute of human hearing was chosen as a means of comparing sonic booms of differing shapes and amplitudes. The figure illustrates the basic steps which yield a calculated value of loudness. Based upon the aircraft configuration and its operating conditions, the sonic boom pressure signature which reaches the ground is calculated. This pressure-time history is transformed to the frequency domain and converted into a one-third octave band spectrum. The essence of the loudness method is to account for the frequency response and integration characteristics of the auditory system. The result of the calculation procedure is a numerical description (perceived level, dB) which represents the loudness of the sonic boom waveform.

  10. [Determination of volatile organic compounds in ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Feng, Lili; Hu, Xiaofang; Yu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Wenying

    2016-02-01

    A method was established for the simultaneous determination of 23 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air with combination of thermal desorption (TD) and gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The air samples were collected by active sampling method using Tenax-TA sorbent tubes, and desorbed by thermal desorption. The analytes were determined by GC-MS/MS in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode, and internal standard method was applied to quantify the VOCs. The results of all the 23 VOCs showed good linearities in low level (0. 01-1 ng) and high level (1-100 ng) with all the correlation coefficients (r2) more than 0. 99. The method quantification limits were between 0. 000 08-1 µg/m3. The method was validated by means of recovery experiments (n = 6) at three spiked levels of 2, 10 and 50 ng. The recoveries between 77% and 124% were generally obtained. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) in all cases were lower than 20%, except for chlorobenzene at the low spiked level. The developed method was applied to determine VOCs in ambient air collected at three sites in Shanghai. Several compounds, like benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylenes, p-xylenes, styrene, 1, 2, 4-trimethylbenzene and hexachlorobutadiene were detected and confirmed in all the samples analyzed. The method is highly accurate, reliable and sensitive for monitoring the VOCs in ambient air. PMID:27382728

  11. Determination of Natural 14C Abundances in Dissolved Organic Carbon in Organic-Rich Marine Sediment Porewaters by Thermal Sulfate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L.; Komada, T.

    2010-12-01

    The abundances of natural 14C in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the marine environment hold clues regarding the processes that influence the biogeochemical cycling of this large carbon reservoir. At present, UV irradiation is the widely accepted method for oxidizing seawater DOC for determination of their 14C abundances. This technique yields precise and accurate values with low blanks, but it requires a dedicated vacuum line, and hence can be difficult to implement. As an alternative technique that can be conducted on a standard preparatory vacuum line, we modified and tested a thermal sulfate reduction method that was previously developed to determine δ13C values of marine DOC (Fry B. et al., 1996. Analysis of marine DOC using a dry combustion method. Mar. Chem., 54: 191-201.) to determine the 14C abundances of DOC in marine sediment porewaters. In this method, the sample is dried in a 100 ml round-bottom Pyrex flask in the presence of excess oxidant (K2SO4) and acid (H3PO4), and combusted at 550 deg.C. The combustion products are cryogenically processed to collect and quantify CO2 using standard procedures. Materials we have oxidized to date range from 6-24 ml in volume, and 95-1500 μgC in size. The oxidation efficiency of this method was tested by processing known amounts of reagent-grade dextrose and sucrose (as examples of labile organic matter), tannic acid and humic acid (as examples of complex natural organic matter), and porewater DOC extracted from organic-rich nearshore sediments. The carbon yields for all of these materials averaged 99±4% (n=18). The 14C abundances of standard materials IAEA C-6 and IAEA C-5 processed by this method using >1mgC aliquots were within error of certified values. The size and the isotopic value of the blank were determined by a standard dilution technique using IAEA C-6 and IAEA C-5 that ranged in size from 150 to 1500 μgC (n=4 and 2, respectively). This yielded a blank size of 6.7±0.7 μgC, and a blank isotopic

  12. 7 CFR 42.107 - Lot acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lot acceptance criteria. 42.107 Section 42.107... § 42.107 Lot acceptance criteria. (a) The acceptability of the lot is determined by relating the number and class of defects enumerated on the worksheet to the acceptance and rejection numbers shown...

  13. 7 CFR 42.107 - Lot acceptance criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lot acceptance criteria. 42.107 Section 42.107... § 42.107 Lot acceptance criteria. (a) The acceptability of the lot is determined by relating the number and class of defects enumerated on the worksheet to the acceptance and rejection numbers shown...

  14. Apparatus for determining past-service conditions and remaining life of thermal barrier coatings and components having such coatings

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Alok Mani; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Devitt, John William; Ruud, James Anthony; Brewer, Luke Nathaniel

    2004-05-04

    An apparatus for determining past-service conditions and/or remaining useful life of a component of a combustion engine and/or a thermal barrier coating ("TBC") of the component comprises a radiation source that provides the exciting radiation to the TBC to excite a photoluminescent ("PL") material contained therein, a radiation detector for detecting radiation emitted by the PL material, and means for relating a characteristic of an emission spectrum of the PL material to the amount of a crystalline phase in the TBC, thereby inferring the past-service conditions or the remaining useful life of the component or the TBC.

  15. Formation energy of oxygen vacancies in ZnO determined by investigating thermal behavior of Al and In impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsuda, S.; Sato, W.; Ohkubo, Y.

    2014-11-14

    Thermal behavior and interacting nature of 100-ppm Al and ∼100-ppt In impurities doped in zinc oxide (ZnO) were investigated by means of the time-differential perturbed angular correlation method with the {sup 111}In(→{sup 111}Cd) probe. Contrasting interactions between Al and In impurities were observed depending on different atmospheric conditions: (1) in air, Al and In impurities irreversibly associate with each other in the process of their thermal diffusion, but (2) in vacuum, their bound state formed in air dissociates by heat treatment at temperatures higher than 873 K, and this process is enhanced with increasing temperature. Detailed investigation of the thermal behavior of the impurities has revealed that the dissociation reaction is triggered by the formation of oxygen vacancies in the vicinity of the locally associated In-Al structure. A unique method to determine the activation energy of the oxygen-vacancy formation is presented with the estimated experimental value of E{sub a} = 0.72(6) eV.

  16. Optothermophysical properties of demineralized human dental enamel determined using photothermally generated diffuse photon density and thermal-wave fields.

    PubMed

    Hellen, Adam; Matvienko, Anna; Mandelis, Andreas; Finer, Yoav; Amaechi, Bennett T

    2010-12-20

    Noninvasive dental diagnostics is a growing discipline since it has been established that early detection and quantification of tooth mineral loss can reverse caries lesions in their incipient state. A theoretical coupled diffuse photon density and thermal-wave model was developed and applied to photothermal radiometric frequency responses, fitted to experimental data using a multiparameter simplex downhill minimization algorithm for the extraction of optothermophysical properties from artificially demineralized human enamel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and robustness of the advanced fitting algorithm. The results showed a select group of optical and thermal transport parameters and thicknesses were reliably extracted from the computational fitting algorithm. Theoretically derived thicknesses were accurately predicted, within about 20% error, while the estimated error in the optical and thermal property evaluation was within the values determined from early studies using destructive analyses. The high fidelity of the theoretical model illustrates its efficacy, reliability, and applicability toward the nondestructive characterization of depthwise inhomogeneous sound enamel and complex enamel caries lesions. PMID:21173829

  17. Determination of Acreage Thermal Protection Foam Loss From Ice and Foam Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, Kelly S.; Lawrence, Charles

    2015-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to establish Thermal Protection System (TPS) loss from foam and ice impact conditions similar to what might occur on the Space Launch System. This study was based upon the large amount of testing and analysis that was conducted with both ice and foam debris impacts on TPS acreage foam for the Space Shuttle Project External Tank. Test verified material models and modeling techniques that resulted from Space Shuttle related testing were utilized for this parametric study. Parameters varied include projectile mass, impact velocity and impact angle (5 degree and 10 degree impacts). The amount of TPS acreage foam loss as a result of the various impact conditions is presented.

  18. Experimental determination of thermal and adhesion stress in particle filled thermoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Vollenberg, P.; Heikens, D.; Ladan, H.C.B.

    1988-12-01

    The phenomena of dewetting in filled thermoplastics were studied by light microscopy and were correlated with variations in the slope of stress-strain diagrams in constant strain rate tests. In such diagrams, kinks in the plots were found to correspond to the dewetting stress. The corresponding local stress at a filler particle is then equal to the sum of the thermal compressive stress and the adhesion stress. It was shown that the adhesion stress was proportional to the reciprocal root of the particle radius. Also, values of dewetting stress predicted for inorganic particles with radii smaller than 2-4 micrometers are higher than the stresses at which crazes and shear-bands are formed near such particles, indicating that dewetting will not occur in those cases, and adhesion aids may be superfluous. 10 references.

  19. The determination of the elastic constants of isotropic solids by means of transient thermal surface gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fivez, J.

    2016-01-01

    Starting from the coupled thermoelastic equations, an analytic formula is obtained for the surface deformation of a semi-infinite homogeneous and isotropic solid in an impulsive stimulated scattering (ISS) experiment. The surface ripple consists of a transient diffusive grating and a standing Rayleigh wave. The time evolution of the diffusive part directly reveals the thermal diffusivity. The oscillatory part then reveals the elastic properties, and explicit formulae are presented for retrieving the elastic moduli as a function of the frequency and amplitude of the standing Rayleigh wave. The analytic formulae not only allow to avoid time-consuming and delicate numerical integration but they also demonstrate the uniqueness of the inversion from signal to material parameters and offer direct insight into the error propagation. The formulae are applied to real experimental data, illustrating the strength and the limitations of the ISS technique.

  20. Determination of thermoelastic material properties by differential heterodyne detection of impulsive stimulated thermal scattering.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, B; Sermeus, J; Salenbien, R; Fivez, J; Shkerdin, G; Glorieux, C

    2015-06-01

    The underlying working principle of detecting impulsive stimulated scattering signals in a differential configuration of heterodyne diffraction detection is unraveled by involving optical scattering theory. The feasibility of the method for the thermoelastic characterization of coating-substrate systems is demonstrated on the basis of simulated data containing typical levels of noise. Besides the classical analysis of the photoacoustic part of the signals, which involves fitting surface acoustic wave dispersion curves, the photothermal part of the signals is analyzed by introducing thermal wave dispersion curves to represent and interpret their grating wavelength dependence. The intrinsic possibilities and limitations of both inverse problems are quantified by making use of least and most squares analysis. PMID:26236643

  1. Determination of thermoelastic material properties by differential heterodyne detection of impulsive stimulated thermal scattering

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, B.; Sermeus, J.; Salenbien, R.; Fivez, J.; Shkerdin, G.; Glorieux, C.

    2015-01-01

    The underlying working principle of detecting impulsive stimulated scattering signals in a differential configuration of heterodyne diffraction detection is unraveled by involving optical scattering theory. The feasibility of the method for the thermoelastic characterization of coating-substrate systems is demonstrated on the basis of simulated data containing typical levels of noise. Besides the classical analysis of the photoacoustic part of the signals, which involves fitting surface acoustic wave dispersion curves, the photothermal part of the signals is analyzed by introducing thermal wave dispersion curves to represent and interpret their grating wavelength dependence. The intrinsic possibilities and limitations of both inverse problems are quantified by making use of least and most squares analysis. PMID:26236643

  2. The satellite-determined thermal structure of heat low during Indian south-west monsoon season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Prakash C.; Desai, Pranav S.

    One of the important climatic features of the south-west (SW) monsoon period in the Indian subcontinent is the appearance of a shallow heat low centred around Pakistan region. The details of this system are not easy to observe, as the region lies mostly over a desert area. However, satellite soundings provide a frequent and synoptic view of the system. We have undertaken a study of the properties of this system through lower level and upper level thermal structure around the region using NOAA temperature soundings. The results for the months of April, May and June in the year 1982 are presented here. The temperature changes in the region are studied in relation to the date of the onset of SW-monsoon and its activity in the Indian sub-continent.

  3. Molecular determinant modulates thermal recovery kinetics and structural integrity of the bacterial BLUF photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Tanwar, Meenakshi; Nahar, Smita; Gulati, Sahil; Veetil, Sindhu Kandoth; Kateriya, Suneel

    2016-07-01

    BLUF domains are flavin-based photoreceptors which receive the blue light signal and are involved in the sensory transduction. We report a short BLUF photoreceptor (SnfB) in Stenotrophomonas sp. We have investigated photodynamic properties of C terminus truncated and several mutated SnfB proteins. Deletion of the extended C-terminal residues alters the thermal recovery kinetics and also affects the integrity of the SnfB protein. Mutagenesis studies demonstrated that the conserved residues within and outside the flavin-binding pocket also regulates the photocycle properties of the protein. These studies suggest that the C-terminal residues outside the BLUF domain can tune the photodynamic properties of the BLUF protein. PMID:27230699

  4. 48 CFR 411.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Market acceptance. 411.103 Section 411.103 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMPETITION AND... acceptance. (a) The head of the contracting activity (HCA) may determine that offerors must demonstrate,...

  5. 48 CFR 411.103 - Market acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market acceptance. 411.103 Section 411.103 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMPETITION AND... acceptance. (a) The head of the contracting activity (HCA) may determine that offerors must demonstrate,...

  6. Determination of hydration properties and thermal behavior of Paecilomyces variotii by differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Canel, R S; Ludemann, V; De La Osa, O; Wagner, J R

    2013-01-01

    Due to the structure and the composition of Paecilomyces variotii, the mycelia of this fungus could have potential applications as ingredients in wettable foods. For this use, drying could be employed, justifying the study of thermal behavior of P. variotii. The objectives of this work were to perform a study of thermal behavior of P. variotii isolates, to evaluate the hydration properties of these mycelia and to analyze the effect of different technological parameters on the latter properties. Wet cultures exhibited a wide endothermic transition, with mean values of peak temperature of 61 degrees C and denaturation enthalpy of4 J/g dry matter. Initial (50 degrees C) and final (80 degrees C) temperatures of the endothermic transition were used to dry the mycelia. Freeze-drying was also assayed. For all dried mycelia, a decrease in denaturation enthalpy between 40 and 50% was observed for drying at 50 degrees C and freeze-drying, and a drastic decrease of almost 100% for drying at 80 degrees C. According to the hydration properties, wet mycelia exhibited water holding capacity (WHC) value of 45 g water/g dry matter. Significant differences among dried mycelia, resulting WHC values in order: 50 degrees C > freeze-dried > 80 degrees C (p < 0.05) were revealed for each P. variotii strain. Fungi obtained by drying at 50 degrees C and by freeze-drying, showed a rapid water absorption (t(1/2) < 0.1 min). Ionic strength, pH and particle size of dried mycelia influenced the hydration properties. PMID:25507782

  7. Automated determinations of selenium in thermal power plant wastewater by sequential hydride generation and chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ezoe, Kentaro; Ohyama, Seiichi; Hashem, Md Abul; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei

    2016-02-01

    After the Fukushima disaster, power generation from nuclear power plants in Japan was completely stopped and old coal-based power plants were re-commissioned to compensate for the decrease in power generation capacity. Although coal is a relatively inexpensive fuel for power generation, it contains high levels (mgkg(-1)) of selenium, which could contaminate the wastewater from thermal power plants. In this work, an automated selenium monitoring system was developed based on sequential hydride generation and chemiluminescence detection. This method could be applied to control of wastewater contamination. In this method, selenium is vaporized as H2Se, which reacts with ozone to produce chemiluminescence. However, interference from arsenic is of concern because the ozone-induced chemiluminescence intensity of H2Se is much lower than that of AsH3. This problem was successfully addressed by vaporizing arsenic and selenium individually in a sequential procedure using a syringe pump equipped with an eight-port selection valve and hot and cold reactors. Oxidative decomposition of organoselenium compounds and pre-reduction of the selenium were performed in the hot reactor, and vapor generation of arsenic and selenium were performed separately in the cold reactor. Sample transfers between the reactors were carried out by a pneumatic air operation by switching with three-way solenoid valves. The detection limit for selenium was 0.008 mg L(-1) and calibration curve was linear up to 1.0 mg L(-1), which provided suitable performance for controlling selenium in wastewater to around the allowable limit (0.1 mg L(-1)). This system consumes few chemicals and is stable for more than a month without any maintenance. Wastewater samples from thermal power plants were collected, and data obtained by the proposed method were compared with those from batchwise water treatment followed by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. PMID:26653491

  8. Thermal infrared remote sensing and its usefulness in determining regional stream temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkauer, K. A.; Handcock, R. N.; Kay, J. E.; Kampf, S. K.; Gillespie, A. R.; Burges, S. J.

    2003-12-01

    Stream temperatures are an important water quality variable in the Pacific Northwest, especially due their impact on health of regional salmon and steelhead runs. With several of these runs classified as threatened or endangered by the National Marine Fisheries Service in the last decade, monitoring of regional stream temperatures has never been more important. Networks of in-situ temperature observation sites tend to be costly to install and maintain, limiting their ability to monitor large regions in detail. Thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing from aircraft and satellite based platforms have the potential to provide high resolution regional information about stream temperatures at a specific time. We present results from a three-year study, conducted to investigate the usefulness of TIR images in monitoring and observing regional stream temperatures. This project compared satellite-, aircraft- and ground-based TIR sensors with a network of in-stream temperature loggers and volunteer observations to assess the accuracy and uncertainty of TIR derived stream temperatures. Accuracy and uncertainty of temperatures extracted from the TIR images are strongly related to our ability to correct imagery for the effects of surface emissivity, atmospheric conditions and thermal scattering from the near-bank environment. Limited observations of atmospheric water vapor are of particular concern, however, total column water predictions from a meso-scale atmospheric model can be a useful substitute. The biggest limiting factor in using remote sensing for the evaluation of regional stream temperatures is the resolution of the sensor. Satellite-based sensors are unable to fully resolve all but the largest regional rivers. Higher-resolution aircraft-based images can resolve most regional rivers and stream, but may be unable to yield accurate temperatures in the presence of dense riparian zone vegetation. Very high-resolution images from the ground-based TIR sensors can resolve

  9. CEQATR Thermal Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balusek, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    A thermal test overview of the Constellation Environmental Qualification and Acceptance Test Requirement (CEQATR) is presented. The contents include: 1) CEQATR Thermal Test Overview; 2) CxP Environments; 3) CEQATR Table 1.2-1; 4) Levels of Assembly; 5) Definitions for Levels of Assembly; 6) Hardware Applicability; 7) CEQATR Thermal-Related Definitions; 8) Requirements for unit-level thermal testing; 9) Requirements for major assembly level thermal testing; 10) General thermal testing requirements; 11) General thermal cycle, thermal vacuum profiles; 12) Test tolerances; 13) Vacuum vs Ambient; 14) Thermal Gradient; 15) Sequence of Testing; 16) Alternative Strategies; 17) Protoflight; 18) Halt/Hass; 19) Humidity; and 20) Tailoring.

  10. Encapsulation efficiency of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots by liposomes determined by thermal lens microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batalla, Jessica; Cabrera, Humberto; San Martín-Martínez, Eduardo; Korte, Dorota; Calderón, Antonio; Marín, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    In this study the encapsulation of core shell carboxyl CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) by phospholipids liposome complexes is presented. It makes the quantum dots water soluble and photo-stable. Fluorescence self-quenching of the QDs inside the liposomes was observed. Therefore, the thermal lens microscopy (TLM) was found to be an useful tool for measuring the encapsulation efficiency of the QDs by the liposomes, for which an optimum value of 36% was determined. The obtained limit of detection (LOD) for determining QDs concentration by TLM was 0.13 nM. Moreover, the encapsulated QDs showed no prominent cytotoxicity toward Breast cancer cells line MDA-MB-231. This study was supported by UV-visible spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and dynamic light scattering measurements (DLS). PMID:26504640

  11. Determining soil moisture and sediment availability at White Sands Dune Field, New Mexico, from apparent thermal inertia data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidt, Stephen; Ramsey, Michael; Lancaster, Nicholas

    2010-06-01

    Determinations of soil moisture and sediment availability in arid regions are important indicators of local climate variability and the potential for future dust storm events. Data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) radiometer were used to derive the relationships among potential soil erosion, soil moisture, and thermal inertia (TI) at the spatial scale of aeolian landforms for the White Sands Dune Field between May 2000 and March 2008. Land surface apparent thermal inertia (ATI) data were used to derive an approximation of actual TI in order to estimate the wind threshold velocity ratio (WTR). The WTR is a ratio of the wind velocity thresholds at which soil erosion occurs for wet soil versus dry soil. The ASTER-derived soil moisture retrievals and the changes through time at White Sands were interpreted to be driven primarily by precipitation, but the presence of a perched groundwater table may also influence certain areas. The sediment availability of dunes, active playa surfaces and the margin of the alluvial fans to the west were determined to be consistently higher than the surrounding area. The sediment availability can be primarily explained by precipitation events and the number of dry days prior to the data acquisition. Other factors such as vegetation and the amount of surface crusting may also influence soil mobility, but these were not measured in the field. This approach showed the highest modeled sediment availability values just days prior to the largest dust emission event at White Sands in decades. Such an approach could be extended to a global monitoring technique for arid land systems that are prone to dust storms and for other regional land surface studies in the Sahara.

  12. Determination of refraction nonlinear index, for effect thermal, of solutions with nanoparticles of gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Vargas, A.; Trejo-Durán, M.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.; Cornejo-Monroy, D.; Mata-Chávez, R. I.; Estudillo-Ayala, J. M.; Castaño-Meneses, V.

    2013-09-01

    Research of nonlinear optical properties of materials for manufacturing opto-electronic devices, had a great growth in the last years. The solutions with nanoparticle metals present nonlinear optical properties. In this work we present the results of characterizing, analyzing and determining the magnitude and sign of the nonlinear refractive index, using the z-scan technique in solutions with nanoparticles of gold, lipoic acid and sodium chloride. We used a continuous Argon laser at 514 nm with variable power, an 18 cms lens, and a chopper. We determined the nonlinear refractive index in the order of 10-9. These materials have potential applications mainly as optical limiters.

  13. Acceptance, values, and probability.

    PubMed

    Steel, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    This essay makes a case for regarding personal probabilities used in Bayesian analyses of confirmation as objects of acceptance and rejection. That in turn entails that personal probabilities are subject to the argument from inductive risk, which aims to show non-epistemic values can legitimately influence scientific decisions about which hypotheses to accept. In a Bayesian context, the argument from inductive risk suggests that value judgments can influence decisions about which probability models to accept for likelihoods and priors. As a consequence, if the argument from inductive risk is sound, then non-epistemic values can affect not only the level of evidence deemed necessary to accept a hypothesis but also degrees of confirmation themselves. PMID:26386533

  14. Newbery Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Russell

    1988-01-01

    Presents the Newbery Medal acceptance speech of Russell Freedman, writer of children's nonfiction. Discusses the place of nonfiction in the world of children's literature, the evolution of children's biographies, and the author's work on "Lincoln." (ARH)

  15. Newbery Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Beverly

    1984-01-01

    Reprints the text of Ms. Cleary's Newbery medal acceptance speech in which she gives personal history concerning her development as a writer and her response to the letters she receives from children. (CRH)

  16. Caldecott Medal Acceptance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provensen, Alice; Provensen, Martin

    1984-01-01

    Reprints the text of the Provensens' Caldecott medal acceptance speech in which they describe their early interest in libraries and literature, the collaborative aspect of their work, and their current interest in aviation. (CRH)

  17. Anisotropic elastic properties of thermal spray coatings determined via resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Yang; Shyam, Amit; Choi, Wanhuk Brian; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Sampath, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    The determination of elastic properties of plasma-sprayed ceramic and metallic coatings is difficult due to their complex microstructure, which involves a myriad array of pores, interfaces and other defects. Furthermore, the splat-based build-up of the coating results in transverse anisotropy in the elastic properties. In this paper, we report on the anisotropic elastic properties of these coatings determined by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS). This approach along with the analysis presented enables, for the first time, the determination of elastic properties as a function of direction and temperature for these complex systems with concomitant implications for design. The coating systems investigated included plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and nickel. An additional nickel coating deposited by high-velocity oxygen-fuel process was investigated and its elastic properties were compared to those of plasma-sprayed nickel. Average Young s moduli of the coatings were independently measured by using the instrumented indentation method. The elastic properties determined from the RUS and indentation methodologies allowed description of the microstructure elastic property relationships in the coatings.

  18. Determination of heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed: Extension to high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Jarrett A.; Pokorny, Richard; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2014-06-01

    The heat conductivity ({lambda}) and the thermal diffusivity (a) of reacting glass batch, or melter feed, control the heat flux into and within the cold cap, a layer of reacting material floating on the pool of molten glass in an all-electric continuous waste glass melter. After previously estimating {lambda} of melter feed at temperatures up to 680 deg C, we focus in this work on the {lambda}(T) function at T > 680 deg C, at which the feed material becomes foamy. We used a customized experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples, which monitored the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible with feed was heated at a constant rate from room temperature up to 1100°C. Approximating measured temperature profiles by polynomial functions, we used the heat transfer equation to estimate the {lambda}(T) approximation function, which we subsequently optimized using the finite-volume method combined with least-squares analysis. The heat conductivity increased as the temperature increased until the feed began to expand into foam, at which point the conductivity dropped. It began to increase again as the foam turned into a bubble-free glass melt. We discuss the implications of this behavior for the mathematical modeling of the cold cap.

  19. Thermally insensitive determination of the linewidth broadening factor in nanostructured semiconductor lasers using optical injection locking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Schires, Kevin; Osiński, Marek; Poole, Philip J; Grillot, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    In semiconductor lasers, current injection not only provides the optical gain, but also induces variation of the refractive index, as governed by the Kramers-Krönig relation. The linear coupling between the changes of the effective refractive index and the modal gain is described by the linewidth broadening factor, which is responsible for many static and dynamic features of semiconductor lasers. Intensive efforts have been made to characterize this factor in the past three decades. In this paper, we propose a simple, flexible technique for measuring the linewidth broadening factor of semiconductor lasers. It relies on the stable optical injection locking of semiconductor lasers, and the linewidth broadening factor is extracted from the residual side-modes, which are supported by the amplified spontaneous emission. This new technique has great advantages of insensitivity to thermal effects, the bias current, and the choice of injection-locked mode. In addition, it does not require the explicit knowledge of optical injection conditions, including the injection strength and the frequency detuning. The standard deviation of the measurements is less than 15%. PMID:27302301

  20. Thermally insensitive determination of the linewidth broadening factor in nanostructured semiconductor lasers using optical injection locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Schires, Kevin; Osiński, Marek; Poole, Philip J.; Grillot, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    In semiconductor lasers, current injection not only provides the optical gain, but also induces variation of the refractive index, as governed by the Kramers-Krönig relation. The linear coupling between the changes of the effective refractive index and the modal gain is described by the linewidth broadening factor, which is responsible for many static and dynamic features of semiconductor lasers. Intensive efforts have been made to characterize this factor in the past three decades. In this paper, we propose a simple, flexible technique for measuring the linewidth broadening factor of semiconductor lasers. It relies on the stable optical injection locking of semiconductor lasers, and the linewidth broadening factor is extracted from the residual side-modes, which are supported by the amplified spontaneous emission. This new technique has great advantages of insensitivity to thermal effects, the bias current, and the choice of injection-locked mode. In addition, it does not require the explicit knowledge of optical injection conditions, including the injection strength and the frequency detuning. The standard deviation of the measurements is less than 15%.

  1. Determination of mechanical and thermal properties of electrical insulation material at 4.2 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, K.-P.; Westenfelder, S.; Jung, A.; Bagrets, N.; Fietz, W.

    2012-06-01

    For the electrical insulation of superconducting magnets or magnet components, different insulation materials are used that ensure mechanical stability and good electrical insulation properties at low temperatures. Especially glass-fiber-reinforced or sand-filled epoxies are typical material composites that can be used at temperatures down to 4.2 K. For current lead construction within fusion technology, an optimized filled epoxy with respect to mechanical shear strength had to be identified. Therefore different steel/epoxy compositions where examined using the standardized three point bending method. The test specimen were formed putting five layers of glass-fiber lubricated with epoxy between two 1.4429 (316LN) steel frames. The epoxy facing surface of the steel was blasted with glass or corundum. A systematic investigation was performed using different epoxies to get an optimized mechanical performance. The results will be discussed together with data from a sand-filled epoxy compound. For both compounds beside the mechanical properties thermal conductivity and expansion are given in addition.

  2. Thermally insensitive determination of the linewidth broadening factor in nanostructured semiconductor lasers using optical injection locking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Schires, Kevin; Osiński, Marek; Poole, Philip J.; Grillot, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    In semiconductor lasers, current injection not only provides the optical gain, but also induces variation of the refractive index, as governed by the Kramers-Krönig relation. The linear coupling between the changes of the effective refractive index and the modal gain is described by the linewidth broadening factor, which is responsible for many static and dynamic features of semiconductor lasers. Intensive efforts have been made to characterize this factor in the past three decades. In this paper, we propose a simple, flexible technique for measuring the linewidth broadening factor of semiconductor lasers. It relies on the stable optical injection locking of semiconductor lasers, and the linewidth broadening factor is extracted from the residual side-modes, which are supported by the amplified spontaneous emission. This new technique has great advantages of insensitivity to thermal effects, the bias current, and the choice of injection-locked mode. In addition, it does not require the explicit knowledge of optical injection conditions, including the injection strength and the frequency detuning. The standard deviation of the measurements is less than 15%. PMID:27302301

  3. Determining Acceptable Explosive Charge Mass Under Different Geological Conditions / Problematyka Wyznaczania Dopuszczalnych Ładunków Mw W Zróżnicowanych Warunkach Geologicznych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyra, Józef; Sołtys, Anna; Winzer, Jan; Dworzak, Michał; Biessikirski, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    This article presents a procedure for determining the safety of explosive charges for their surrounding environment, using a limestone mine as a case study. Varied geological structures, as well as other constructions in the surrounding area of a mine, sometimes necessitate the use of two or more ground vibration propagation equations, and thus a variety of explosive charges, depending on the area of rock blasting. This is a crucial issue for the contractor, as it is important to blast the rock as few times as possible, while using the maximum amount of explosive charge for each blast. Wykonywanie robót strzałowych w górnictwie polega na odpalaniu mas materiału wybuchowego (MW) celem uzyskania dużej ilości odpowiednio rozdrobnionego urobku. W momencie zwiększonego popytu na surowce skalne zakłady górnicze zmuszone są do zwielokrotnienia wykonywania prac strzałowych aby zapewnić regularne dostawy produktu. Konsekwencją takich działań jest ponoszenie dodatkowych kosztów operacyjnych. Celem ich minimalizacji oraz uzyskania jak największej efektywności prowadzonych robót strzałowych jest wydłużanie serii, a więc stosowanie coraz to większych mas ładunków materiałów wybuchowych. Efektem takiego postępowanie jest możliwość wystąpienia w otoczeniu oddziaływania o potencjalnie szkodliwym charakterze m. in. drgania parasejsmiczne. Aby wyeliminować powyższy problem oraz zapewnić niezbędny komfort mieszkańcom, Prawo geologiczne i górnicze, Prawo ochrony środowiska i rozporządzenia wykonawcze nakładają na podmiot wykonujący roboty strzałowe obowiązek ochrony otoczenia, poprzez prowadzenie działalności profilaktycznej w zakresie kontroli, monitorowania oraz wyznaczania dopuszczalnych mas ładunków MW. W momencie gdy nie ma możliwości ograniczenia niepożądanych wpływów dynamicznych po przez zmianę parametrów siatki strzałowej czy modyfikację struktury czasowo-częstotliwościowej drgań, jedyną możliwością staje si

  4. Determining the range parameters of observation thermal cameras on the basis of laboratory measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareła, Jarosław; Kastek, Mariusz; Firmanty, Krzysztof; Trzaskawka, Piotr

    2013-10-01

    Range parameters are main factors in assessing the performance of observation devices. They can be determined on the basis of computer simulations, field or laboratory measurements, with the latter method being the most reliable and practical. The paper presents the methods used for the determination of detection, recognition and identification ranges based on well-known Johnson criteria and recently emerged TTP model. Theoretical background for both approaches are given, and the laboratory test stand is described together with brief methodology adopted for the measurements of selected, necessary characteristics of a tested observation system. The measurement results are presented and the calculated ranges for a selected set of IR cameras are given, obtained on the basis of both Johnson criteria and TTP model. Finally the results are discussed and the final thoughts on the TTP model application are presented.

  5. Signal intensity transfer function determination on thermal systems with stray light or scattering present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, Stephen D.; Haefner, David P.; Burks, Thomas J.

    2015-05-01

    Accurate Signal Intensity Transfer Functions (SITF) measurements are necessary to determine the calibration factor in the 3D noise calculation of an electro-optical imaging system. The typical means for measuring a sensor's SITF is to place the sensor in a flooded field environment at a distance that is relatively close to the aperture of the emitter. Unfortunately, this arrangement has the potential to allow for additional contributions to the SITF in the form of scattering or stray light if the optics are not designed properly in the system under test. Engineers at the US Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate are working to determine a means of evaluating the contribution due to scatting or stray light.

  6. Could Behaviour and Not Physiological Thermal Tolerance Determine Winter Survival of Aphids in Cereal Fields?

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Lucy; Andrade, Thiago Oliveira; Georges, Romain; Burel, Françoise; van Baaren, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Traits of physiological thermotolerance are commonly measured in the laboratory as predictors of the field success of ectotherms at unfavourable temperatures (e.g. during harsh winters, heatwaves, or under conditions of predicted global warming). Due to being more complicated to measure, behavioural thermoregulation is less commonly studied, although both physiology and behaviour interact to explain the survival of ectotherms. The aphids Metopolophium dirhodum, Rhopalosiphum padi and Sitobion avenae are commercially important pests of temperate cereal crops. Although coexisting, these species markedly differ in winter success, with R. padi being the most abundant species during cold winters, followed by S. avenae and lastly M. dirhodum. To better understand the thermal physiology and behavioural factors contributing to differential winter success, the lethal temperature (physiological thermotolerance) and the behaviour of aphids in a declining temperature regime (behavioural thermotolerance) of these three species were investigated. Physiological thermotolerance significantly differed between the three species, with R. padi consistently the least cold tolerant and S. avenae the most cold tolerant. However, although the least cold tolerant of the study species, significantly more R. padi remained attached to the host plant at extreme sub-zero temperatures than S. avenae and M. dirhodum. Given the success of anholocyclic R. padi in harsh winters compared to its anholocyclic counterparts, this study illustrates that behavioural differences could be more important than physiological thermotolerance in explaining resistance to extreme temperatures. Furthermore it highlights that there is a danger to studying physiological thermotolerance in isolation when ascertaining risks of ectotherm invasions, the establishment potential of exotic species in glasshouses, or predicting species impacts under climate change scenarios. PMID:25490555

  7. Could behaviour and not physiological thermal tolerance determine winter survival of aphids in cereal fields?

    PubMed

    Alford, Lucy; Andrade, Thiago Oliveira; Georges, Romain; Burel, Françoise; van Baaren, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Traits of physiological thermotolerance are commonly measured in the laboratory as predictors of the field success of ectotherms at unfavourable temperatures (e.g. during harsh winters, heatwaves, or under conditions of predicted global warming). Due to being more complicated to measure, behavioural thermoregulation is less commonly studied, although both physiology and behaviour interact to explain the survival of ectotherms. The aphids Metopolophium dirhodum, Rhopalosiphum padi and Sitobion avenae are commercially important pests of temperate cereal crops. Although coexisting, these species markedly differ in winter success, with R. padi being the most abundant species during cold winters, followed by S. avenae and lastly M. dirhodum. To better understand the thermal physiology and behavioural factors contributing to differential winter success, the lethal temperature (physiological thermotolerance) and the behaviour of aphids in a declining temperature regime (behavioural thermotolerance) of these three species were investigated. Physiological thermotolerance significantly differed between the three species, with R. padi consistently the least cold tolerant and S. avenae the most cold tolerant. However, although the least cold tolerant of the study species, significantly more R. padi remained attached to the host plant at extreme sub-zero temperatures than S. avenae and M. dirhodum. Given the success of anholocyclic R. padi in harsh winters compared to its anholocyclic counterparts, this study illustrates that behavioural differences could be more important than physiological thermotolerance in explaining resistance to extreme temperatures. Furthermore it highlights that there is a danger to studying physiological thermotolerance in isolation when ascertaining risks of ectotherm invasions, the establishment potential of exotic species in glasshouses, or predicting species impacts under climate change scenarios. PMID:25490555

  8. Heat stress yields a unique MADS box transcription factor in determining seed size and thermal sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Begcy, Kevin; Liu, Kan; Folsom, Jing J; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Chi; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-05-01

    Early seed development events are highly sensitive to increased temperature. This high sensitivity to a short-duration temperature spike reduces seed viability and seed size at maturity. The molecular basis of heat stress sensitivity during early seed development is not known. We selected rice (Oryza sativa), a highly heat-sensitive species, to explore this phenomenon. Here, we elucidate the molecular pathways that contribute to the heat sensitivity of a critical developmental window during which the endosperm transitions from syncytium to the cellularization stage in young seeds. A transcriptomic comparison of seeds exposed to moderate (35°C) and severe (39°C) heat stress with control (28°C) seeds identified a set of putative imprinted genes, which were down-regulated under severe heat stress. Several type I MADS box genes specifically expressed during the syncytial stage were differentially regulated under moderate and severe heat stress. The suppression and overaccumulation of these genes are associated with precocious and delayed cellularization under moderate and severe stress, respectively. We show that modulating the expression of OsMADS87, one of the heat-sensitive, imprinted genes associated with syncytial stage endosperm, regulates rice seed size. Transgenic seeds deficient in OsMADS87 exhibit accelerated endosperm cellularization. These seeds also have lower sensitivity to a moderate heat stress in terms of seed size reduction compared with seeds from wild-type plants and plants overexpressing OsMADS87 Our findings suggest that OsMADS87 and several other genes identified in this study could be potential targets for improving the thermal resilience of rice during reproductive development. PMID:26936896

  9. An assessment of thermal infrared remote sensing and its usefulness in determining regional stream temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkauer, K. A.; Handcock, R.; Kay, J. E.; Kampf, S. K.; Burges, S. J.; Gillespie, A. R.

    2006-12-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing is an important tool for the assessment of regional stream temperatures. Stream temperatures are an important water quality variable in the Pacific Northwest, especially due its impact on health of regional salmon and steelhead runs. Traditional measurements rely on networks of in-situ temperature observation sites, which are costly to install and maintain, limiting their ability to monitor large regions in detail. States have been collecting aircraft-based TIR measurements for several years now to assess the health of many of the smaller reaches that are not currently monitored with in-situ sensors but play a significant role in controlling water temperatures in the larger downstream reaches. Satellite-based TIR measurements with their repeating coverage and large fields of view hold a great deal of potential for monitoring and management of regional stream temperatures but are currently limited by low resolutions. TIR imagery from multiple streams and rivers in Washington State were collected along with in-situ measurements of water temperatures to assess the ability of current TIR technology to obtain accurate water temperature measurements in streams. A procedure for correcting TIR imagery for atmospheric and emissivity effects is presented. Corrected temperatures can provide accuracies within a degree Celsius of in-situ observations in most cases. The largest source of error was directly related to the TIR images resolution. Poorly resolved stream channels mix bank temperatures with water temperatures, so the most accurate stream temperatures are obtained when image resolution is 1/3 the width of the stream channel. Current satellite TIR resolutions are limited to monitoring only 6% of the reaches in Washington operating under temperature TMDLs.

  10. Thermal stability of photovoltaic a-Si:H determined by neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Qviller, A. J. Haug, H.; You, C. C.; Hasle, I. M.; Marstein, E. S.; Frommen, C.; Hauback, B. C.; Dennison, A. J. C.; Vorobiev, A.; Østreng, E.; Fjellvåg, H.; Hjörvarsson, B.

    2014-12-08

    Neutron and X-ray reflectometry were used to determine the layer structure and hydrogen content of thin films of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited onto crystalline silicon (Si) wafers for surface passivation in solar cells. The combination of these two reflectometry techniques is well suited for non-destructive probing of the structure of a-Si:H due to being able to probe buried interfaces and having sub-nanometer resolution. Neutron reflectometry is also unique in its ability to allow determination of density gradients of light elements such as hydrogen (H). The neutron scattering contrast between Si and H is strong, making it possible to determine the H concentration in the deposited a-Si:H. In order to correlate the surface passivation properties supplied by the a-Si:H thin films, as quantified by obtainable effective minority carrier lifetime, photoconductance measurements were also performed. It is shown that the minority carrier lifetime falls sharply when H has been desorbed from a-Si:H by annealing.

  11. Determination of the recombination efficiency of thermal control coatings for hypersonic vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.K.; Cunnington, G.R. Jr.; Wiedemann, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the recombination efficiency of coatings for hypersonic vehicle applications. The approach uses experimental results from arc-jet tests with an analysis to determine the efficiency for the recombination of atomic species present in the boundary layer. The analysis employs analytical solutions to the laminar boundary-layer heat-transfer equations with experimental heating-rate, temperature, and pressure measurements. The authors discuss experimental difficulties in achieving reliable materials-performance data. The utility of the method is that it provides a rapid and efficient tool for use in qualitative screening and development of materials. The effects of second-order heat-transfer terms may be as high as 50% for low-catalysis surfaces. With the second-order terms included, the maximum uncertainty in recombination-efficiency data for low-catalysis surfaces is 45%. The discussions are based on experimental data and calculations for arc-jet tests of the titanium alloy Ti-14Al-21Nb with a borosilicate-like glass coating that has a recombination efficiency of about 0.006 to 0.01. 20 refs.

  12. Determining detection, recognition, and identification ranges of thermal cameras on the basis of laboratory measurements and TTP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareła, J.; Kastek, M.; Firmanty, K.; Trzaskawka, P.; Dulski, R.

    2012-06-01

    TTP (Targeting Task Performance) model is widely used for the estimation of theoretical performance of observation devices. It is used, for example, in the NVTERM software and makes it possible to determine the detection, recognition and identification ranges for a standard target types on the basis of known technical parameters of analyzed device. Many theoretical analysis concerning TTP model can be found, as well as a few experimental, field test results. However the usability of the TTP model for the calculation of range parameters on the basis of laboratory test results has not been widely analyzed. The paper presents an attempt to apply TTP model for the estimation of range parameters of thermal cameras using laboratory measurement results of camera properties. The test stand consists of an IR collimator, a standard IR source, a set of test targets and a computer with data acquisition card. The method used for the measurement of aforementioned characteristics will be described and the algorithms used to finally estimate the range parameters of a tested thermal camera using TTP model.

  13. Determination of the effective thermal diffusivity in a porous bed containing rice grains: effects of moisture content and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotto, G. L.; Pinto, L. A. A.; Moreira, M. F. P.

    2016-04-01

    The effective thermal diffusivity ( α ef ) of a porous bed containing rice grains was determined under different experimental conditions. The α ef values were estimated by the Log method. The effects of rice moisture content (2, 12 and 22 % w.b.) and temperature (15, 35, 55 and 75 °C) on the α ef values were investigated. Finally, an empirical model was proposed to represent the effective thermal diffusivity as a function of the moisture content ( X) and temperature ( T). The results revealed that the increase in the rice moisture content and temperature caused an increase in α ef values, which ranged from 0.91 × 10-7 to 3.23 × 10-7 m2 s-1. In the studied range, the dependence of α ef with the rice moisture content and temperature can be represented as: α ef (m2s-1) = (0.63 + 5.63 × 10-2 X + 1.51 × 10-2 T + 1.17 × 10-4 XT) × 10-7. The proposed empirical model was suitable to predict the α ef values with mean absolute percentage deviation of 3.8 % and is a tool for future modeling purposes.

  14. Cloud point extraction and gas chromatography with direct microvial insert thermal desorption for the determination of haloanisoles in alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Cacho, J I; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2016-11-01

    A sensitive analytical procedure for the determination of four haloanisoles (2,4,6 trichloroanisole, 2,4,6-tribromoanisole, 2,3,4,6-tetrachloroanisole and pentachloroanisole) related with cork taint defects in wines, in different types of alcoholic beverages has been developed. The analytes were extracted from the matrix samples by cloud point extraction (CPE) using Triton X-114 heated to 75°C, and the surfactant rich phase was separated by centrifugation. By means of direct microvial insert thermal desorption, 20µL of the CPE obtained extract was submitted to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The parameters affecting the CPE and microvial insert thermal desorption were optimized. Quantification was carried by matrix-matched calibration using an internal standard. Detection limits ranged between 12.9 and 20.8ngL(-1), depending on the compound, for beer and wine samples, whereas for whiskies values in the 46.3-48ngL(-1) range were obtained, since these samples were diluted for analysis. Recoveries for alcoholic beverages were in the 89-111% range, depending on the analyte and the sample. PMID:27591615

  15. Study of Model Systems for Bilirubin and Bilin Chromophores: Determination and Modification of Thermal and Photochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    García-Iriepa, Cristina; Ernst, Hanna A; Liang, Yu; Unterreiner, Andreas-Neil; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Sampedro, Diego

    2016-08-01

    Bilin chromophores and bilirubin are involved in relevant biological functions such as light perception in plants and as protective agents against Alzheimer and other diseases. Despite their extensive use, a deep rationalization of the main factors controlling the thermal and photochemical properties has not been performed yet, which in turn hampers further applications of these versatile molecules. In an effort to understand those factors and allow control of the relevant properties, a combined experimental and computational study has been carried out for diverse model systems to understand the interconversion between Z and E isomers. In this study, we have demonstrated the crucial role of steric hindrance and hydrogen-bond interactions in thermal stability and the ability to control them by designing novel compounds. We also determined several photochemical properties and studied the photodynamics of two model systems in more detail, observing a fast relaxation of the excited state shorter than 2 ps in both cases. Finally, the computational study allowed us to rationalize the experimental evidence. PMID:27391671

  16. Anisotropic Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings at High Temperature Determined by Ultrasonic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qin; Zhu, Jianguo; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    The mechanical properties of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are of great scientific and technological significance for the design and fabrication of TBC systems. The ultrasonic method combined with a sing-around method for mechanical properties measurement of TBC is deduced and the elastic modulus can be determined in the spray, or longitudinal, direction, and the transverse direction. Tested specimens of plasma-sprayed TBC are detached from the substrate and treated with thermal exposure at 1400 °C. The elastic moduli along the longitudinal and transverse directions of the TBCs are measured by different types of ultrasonic waves combined with a sing-around method, while the Poisson's ratio is also obtained simultaneously. The experimental results indicate that the magnitude of longitudinal elastic modulus is larger than that of the transverse one, and thus the plasma-sprayed TBC has an anisotropic mechanical property. Moreover, the elastic moduli along both longitudinal and transverse directions change with high-temperature exposure time, which consists of a rapid increasing stage followed by a slow decreasing stage. In addition, the magnitude of Poisson's ratio increases slightly from 0.05 to 0.2 with the high-temperature exposure time. Generally, the microstructures in the plasma-sprayed coatings and their evolution in a high-temperature environment are the main causes of the varying anisotropic mechanical properties.

  17. Bulk thermal capacity determination for Li/BCX and Li/SOClN2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalu, E. E.; White, R. E.; Darcy, E. C.

    1992-01-01

    The bulk heat capacities of Li/BCX and Li/SOClN2 cells were determined at 0 and 100 percent depth-of-discharge for 2.0 V cut-off voltage, in the temperature range 0 to 60 C by a method that did not involve the destruction of the cell nor the contact of cell with a liquid. The heat capacities are found to be dependent on state-of-charge, increasing with depth-of-discharge. The Li/BCX DD-cell has a lower heat capacity than a high rate Li/SOCl2 D-cell. The results obtained by this method compare favorably well with results reported in the literature through other methods. The bulk heat capacities of the cells did not change significantly in the temperature range 0 to 60 C.

  18. Modulated IR radiometry for determining thermal properties and basic characteristics of titanium thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Apreutesei, Mihai; Lopes, Claudia; Vaz, Filipe; Macedo, Francisco; Borges, Joel

    2014-07-01

    Titanium thin films of different thicknesses were prepared by direct current magnetron sputtering to study modulated infrared (IR) radiometry as a tool for analyzing film thickness. Thickness was varied by regularly increasing the deposition time, keeping all the other deposition parameters constant. The influence of film thickness on morphological, structural, and electrical properties of the titanium coatings also was investigated. The experimental results revealed a systematic grain growth with increasing film thickness, along with enhanced film crystallinity, which led to increased electrical conductivity. Using the results obtained by modulated IR radiometry, the thickness of each thin film was calculated. These thickness values were then compared with the coating thickness measurements obtained by scanning electron microscopy. The values confirmed the reliability of modulated IR radiometry as an analysis tool for thin films and coatings, and for determining thicknesses in the micrometer range, in particular.

  19. Thermal conductivity of magnetorheological suspensions in the presence of shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Demchuk, S.A.; Khusid, B.M.; Kordonskii, V.I.; Prokhorov, I.V.; Zal'tsgendler, E.A.

    1985-07-01

    The authors used an accepted microscopic model of the structure and physical properties of magnetorheological suspensions (MRS) in shear flows in order to determine the effective coefficient of thermal conductivity of the MRS. The thermal conductivity tensor is calculated by the self-consistent field method.

  20. Photothermal techniques applied to the determination of the water vapor diffusion coefficient and thermal diffusivity of edible films.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Mendez, M A; Martin-Martinez, E San; Morales, J E; Cruz-Orea, A; Jaime-Fonseca, M R

    2007-04-01

    Water vapor diffusion coefficient (WVDC) and thermal diffusivity (alpha) were determined in gelatin-starch films through photothermal techniques. The effect of different variables in the elaboration of these films, such as starch and glycerol concentrations and pH, were evaluated through the response surface methodology. The results indicated that an increase in the glycerol concentration and pH favored the WVDC of the films. On the other hand, alpha was influenced principally by the starch content and pH of the film-forming solution. The minimum alpha value was 4.5 x 10(-4) cm2/s, which is compared with alpha values reported for commercial synthetic polymers. PMID:17420552

  1. Thermal and Physical Property Determinations for Ionsiv IE-911 Crystalline Silicotitanate and Savannah River Site Waste Simulant Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, D.T.; Steele, W.V.

    1999-08-01

    This document describes physical and thermophysical property determinations that were made in order to resolve questions associated with the decontamination of Savannah River Site (SRS) waste streams using ion exchange on crystalline silicotitanate (CST). The research will aid in the understanding of potential issues associated with cooling of feed streams within SRS waste treatment processes. Toward this end, the thermophysical properties of engineered CST, manufactured under the trade name, Ionsive{reg_sign} IE-911 by UOP, Mobile, AL, were determined. The heating profiles of CST samples from several manufacturers' production runs were observed using differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) measurements. DSC data were obtained over the region of 10 to 215 C to check for the possibility of a phase transition or any other enthalpic event in that temperature region. Finally, the heat capacity, thermal conductivity, density, viscosity, and salting-out point were determined for SRS waste simulants designated as Average, High NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and High OH{sup {minus}} simulants.

  2. Determination of sensible heat flux over sparse canopy using thermal infrared data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kustas, W.P.; Choudhury, B.J.; Moran, M.S.; Reginato, R. J.; Jackson, R. D.; Gay, L.W.; Weaver, H.L.

    1989-01-01

    Surface temperatures, Ts, were estimated for a natural vegetative surface in Owens Valley, California, with infrared thermometric observations collected from an aircraft. The region is quite arid and is composed primarily of bushes (???30%) and bare soil (???70%). Application of the bulk transfer equation for the estimation of sensible heat, H, gave unsatisfactory values when compared to Bowen ratio and eddy correlation methods over a particular site. This was attributed to the inability with existing data to properly evaluate the resistance to heat transfer, rah. To obtain appropriate rah-values the added resistance to heat transfer, kB-1, was allowed to vary although there is both theoretical and experimental evidence that kB-1 for vegetative surfaces can be treated as constant. The present data indicate that for partial canopy cover under arid conditions kB-1 may be a function of Ts measured radiometrically. The equation determining kB-1 was simplified and tested over another arid site with good results; however, this had a limited data set (i.e., 6 data points). The dimensionless kB-1 equation is simplified for use over full canopy cover and is shown to give satisfactory estimates of H over a fully-grown wheat crop. ?? 1989.

  3. A generic method for the determination of acrylamide in thermally processed foods.

    PubMed

    Gökmen, Vural; Senyuva, Hamide Z

    2006-07-01

    A generic sample preparation method for the determination of acrylamide in foods was developed. The method entails extraction with methanol, purification with Carrez I and II solutions, evaporation and solvent change to water, and cleanup with Oasis HLB solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. The final extract was analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for quantitation. The chromatographic separation was performed on ODS-3 column using the isocratic mixture of 0.01 mM acetic acid in 0.2% aqueous solution of formic acid at a flow rate of 0.6 ml/min at 25 degrees C. The recoveries of acrylamide from potato chips, biscuits and coffee ranged between 92.8 and 101.5% with relative standard deviations of 4.1% or less. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) were 2 ng/g and 6 ng/g in the basis of signal to noise ratios of 3:1 and 9:1, respectively. PMID:16464456

  4. Determinants of bovine thermal response to heat and solar radiation exposures in a field environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharf, Brad; Leonard, Michael J.; Weaber, Robert L.; Mader, Terry L.; Hahn, G. Leroy; Spiers, Donald E.

    2011-07-01

    Continuous exposure of cattle to summer heat in the absence of shade results in significant hyperthermia and impairs growth and general health. Reliable predictors of heat strain are needed to identify this condition. A 12-day study was conducted during a moderate summer heat period using 12 Angus x Simmental ( Bos taurus) steers (533 ± 12 kg average body weight) to identify animal and ambient determinations of core body temperature ( T core) and respiration rate (RR) responses to heat stress. Steers were provided standard diet and water ad libitum, and implanted intraperitoneally with telemetric transmitters to monitor T core hourly. Visual count of flank movement at 0800 and 1500 hours was used for RR. Dataloggers recorded air temperature ( T a), and black globe temperatures ( T bg) hourly to assess radiant heat load. Analysis was across four periods and 2 consecutive days averaged within each period. Average T a and T bg increased progressively from 21.7 to 30.3°C and 25.3 to 34.0°C, respectively, from the first to fourth periods. A model utilizing a quadratic function of T a explained the most variation in T core ( R 2 = 0.56). A delay in response from 1 to 3 h did not significantly improve R 2 for this relationship. Measurements at 0800 and 1500 hours alone are sufficient to predict heat strain. Daily minimum core body temperature and initial 2-h rise in T a were predictors of maximum core temperature and RR. Further studies using continuous monitoring are needed to expand prediction of heat stress impact under different conditions.

  5. Accept or divert?

    PubMed

    Angelucci, P A

    1999-09-01

    Stretching scarce resources is more than a managerial issue. Should you accept the patient to an understaffed ICU or divert him to another facility? The intense "medical utility" controversy focuses on a situation that critical care nurses now face every day. PMID:10614370

  6. 1984 Newbery Acceptance Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Beverly

    1984-01-01

    This acceptance speech for an award honoring "Dear Mr. Henshaw," a book about feelings of a lonely child of divorce intended for eight-, nine-, and ten-year-olds, highlights children's letters to author. Changes in society that affect children, the inception of "Dear Mr. Henshaw," and children's reactions to books are highlighted. (EJS)

  7. Why was Relativity Accepted?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, S. G.

    Historians of science have published many studies of the reception of Einstein's special and general theories of relativity. Based on a review of these studies, and my own research on the role of the light-bending prediction in the reception of general relativity, I discuss the role of three kinds of reasons for accepting relativity (1) empirical predictions and explanations; (2) social-psychological factors; and (3) aesthetic-mathematical factors. According to the historical studies, acceptance was a three-stage process. First, a few leading scientists adopted the special theory for aesthetic-mathematical reasons. In the second stage, their enthusiastic advocacy persuaded other scientists to work on the theory and apply it to problems currently of interest in atomic physics. The special theory was accepted by many German physicists by 1910 and had begun to attract some interest in other countries. In the third stage, the confirmation of Einstein's light-bending prediction attracted much public attention and forced all physicists to take the general theory of relativity seriously. In addition to light-bending, the explanation of the advance of Mercury's perihelion was considered strong evidence by theoretical physicists. The American astronomers who conducted successful tests of general relativity became defenders of the theory. There is little evidence that relativity was `socially constructed' but its initial acceptance was facilitated by the prestige and resources of its advocates.

  8. UGV acceptance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Jeffrey A.; Murphy, Robin R.

    2006-05-01

    With over 100 models of unmanned vehicles now available for military and civilian safety, security or rescue applications, it is important to for agencies to establish acceptance testing. However, there appears to be no general guidelines for what constitutes a reasonable acceptance test. This paper describes i) a preliminary method for acceptance testing by a customer of the mechanical and electrical components of an unmanned ground vehicle system, ii) how it has been applied to a man-packable micro-robot, and iii) discusses the value of testing both to ensure that the customer has a workable system and to improve design. The test method automated the operation of the robot to repeatedly exercise all aspects and combinations of components on the robot for 6 hours. The acceptance testing process uncovered many failures consistent with those shown to occur in the field, showing that testing by the user does predict failures. The process also demonstrated that the testing by the manufacturer can provide important design data that can be used to identify, diagnose, and prevent long-term problems. Also, the structured testing environment showed that sensor systems can be used to predict errors and changes in performance, as well as uncovering unmodeled behavior in subsystems.

  9. Experimental determination of single-crystal halite thermal conductivity, diffusivity and specific heat from -75°C to 300°C

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Urquhart, Alexander; Bauer, Stephen

    2015-05-19

    The thermal properties of halite have broad practical importance, from design and long-term modeling of nuclear waste repositories to analysis and performance assessment of underground natural gas, petroleum and air storage facilities. Using a computer-controlled transient plane source method, single-crystal halite thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat were measured from -75°C to 300°C. These measurements reproduce historical high-temperature experiments and extend the lower temperature extreme into cryogenic conditions. Measurements were taken in 25-degree increments from -75°C to 300°C. Over this temperature range, thermal conductivity decreases by a factor of 3.7, from 9.975 to 2.699 W/mK , and thermal diffusivitymore » decreases by a factor of 3.6, from 5.032 to 1.396 mm²/s. Specific heat does not appear to be temperature dependent, remaining near 2.0 MJ/m³K at all temperatures. This work is intended to develop and expand the existing dataset of halite thermal properties, which are of particular value in defining the parameters of salt storage thermophysical models. The work was motivated by a need for thermal conductivity values in a mixture theory model used to determine bulk thermal conductivity of reconsolidating crushed salt.« less

  10. Experimental determination of single-crystal halite thermal conductivity, diffusivity and specific heat from -75°C to 300°C

    SciTech Connect

    Urquhart, Alexander; Bauer, Stephen

    2015-05-19

    The thermal properties of halite have broad practical importance, from design and long-term modeling of nuclear waste repositories to analysis and performance assessment of underground natural gas, petroleum and air storage facilities. Using a computer-controlled transient plane source method, single-crystal halite thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat were measured from -75°C to 300°C. These measurements reproduce historical high-temperature experiments and extend the lower temperature extreme into cryogenic conditions. Measurements were taken in 25-degree increments from -75°C to 300°C. Over this temperature range, thermal conductivity decreases by a factor of 3.7, from 9.975 to 2.699 W/mK , and thermal diffusivity decreases by a factor of 3.6, from 5.032 to 1.396 mm²/s. Specific heat does not appear to be temperature dependent, remaining near 2.0 MJ/m³K at all temperatures. This work is intended to develop and expand the existing dataset of halite thermal properties, which are of particular value in defining the parameters of salt storage thermophysical models. The work was motivated by a need for thermal conductivity values in a mixture theory model used to determine bulk thermal conductivity of reconsolidating crushed salt.

  11. The Use of the Airborne Thermal/Visible Land Application Sensor (ATLAS) to Determine the Thermal Response Numbers for Urban Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Doug; Quattroch, Dale; Estes. Maury

    2007-01-01

    Although satellite data are very useful for analysis of the urban heat island effect at a coarse scale, they do not lend themselves to developing a better understanding of which surfaces across the city contribute or drive the development of the urban heat island effect. Analysis of thermal energy responses for specific or discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape (e.g., asphalt, building rooftops, vegetation) requires measurements at a very fine spatial scale (i.e., < 15m) to adequately resolve these surfaces and their attendant thermal energy regimes. Additionally, very fine scale spatial resolution thermal infrared data, such as that obtained from aircraft, are very useful for demonstrating to planning officials, policy makers, and the general populace the benefits of the urban forest. These benefits include mitigating the urban heat island effect, making cities more aesthetically pleasing and more habitable environments, and aid in overall cooling of the community. High spatial resolution thermal data are required to quantify how artificial surfaces within the city contribute to an increase in urban heating and the benefit of cool surfaces (e.g., surface coatings that reflect much of the incoming solar radiation as opposed to absorbing it thereby lowering urban temperatures). The TRN (thermal response number)(Luvall and Holbo 1989) is a technique using aircraft remotely sensed surface temperatures to quantify the thermal response of urban surfaces. The TRN was used to quantify the thermal response of various urban surface types ranging from completely vegetated surfaces to asphalt and concrete parking lots for several cities in the United States.

  12. Consumer acceptance of ginseng food products.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hee Sook; Lee, Young-Chul; Rhee, Young Kyung; Lee, Soo-Yeun

    2011-01-01

    Ginseng has been utilized less in food products than in dietary supplements in the United States. Sensory acceptance of ginseng food products by U.S. consumers has not been reported. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine the sensory acceptance of commercial ginseng food products and (2) assess influence of the addition of sweeteners to ginseng tea and ginseng extract to chocolate on consumer acceptance. Total of 126 consumers participated in 3 sessions for (1) 7 commercial red ginseng food products, (2) 10 ginseng teas varying in levels of sugar or honey, and (3) 10 ginseng milk or dark chocolates varying in levels of ginseng extract. Ginseng candy with vitamin C and ginseng crunchy white chocolate were the most highly accepted, while sliced ginseng root product was the least accepted among the seven commercial products. Sensory acceptance increased in proportion to the content of sugar and honey in ginseng tea, whereas acceptance decreased with increasing content of ginseng extract in milk and dark chocolates. Findings demonstrate that ginseng food product types with which consumers have been already familiar, such as candy and chocolate, will have potential for success in the U.S. market. Chocolate could be suggested as a food matrix into which ginseng can be incorporated, as containing more bioactive compounds than ginseng tea at a similar acceptance level. Future research may include a descriptive analysis with ginseng-based products to identify the key drivers of liking and disliking for successful new product development. PMID:22416723

  13. Technology Acceptance in an Academic Context: Faculty Acceptance of Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Shanan G.; Harris, Michael L.; Colaric, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors surveyed faculty from a college of business and a college of education regarding their attitudes toward online education. Results of the survey were examined to determine the degree to which the technology acceptance model was able to adequately explain faculty acceptance of online education. Results indicate that perceived usefulness…

  14. Determination of volatile N-nitrosamines in irradiated fermented sausage by gas chromatography coupled to a thermal energy analyzer.

    PubMed

    Byun, Myung-Woo; Ahn, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Yook, Hong-Sun; Han, Sang-Bae

    2004-10-29

    Volatile N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) in irradiated pepperoni and salami sausages were determined using a gas chromatography coupled to a thermal energy analyzer (GC-TEA). These fermented sausages with aerobic or vacuum packaging were irradiated at 0, 5, 10, and 20 kGy, and then stored for 4 weeks at 4 degrees C. Both NDMA and NPYR in the fermented sausage were significantly reduced by irradiation. The vacuum packaging showed significantly lower (P < 0.05) N-nitrosamine levels than that of the aerobic ones. After storage, the contents of NDMA and NPYR in the irradiated sausage were lower than those of the non-irradiated control. Results indicated that a high dose of irradiation (>10 kGy) was needed to reduce the carcinogenic N-nitrosamines in the fermented sausage during storage and the GC-TEA analysis was effective in determining the N-nitrosamines in irradiated meats even at low trace levels. PMID:15553169

  15. Intercomparison of thermal-optical methods for the determination of organic and elemental carbon: influences of aerosol composition and implications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan; Duan, Feng-kui; He, Ke-bin; Zheng, Mei; Du, Zhen-yu; Ma, Yong-liang; Tan, Ji-hua

    2011-12-01

    An intercomparison of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) measurements was conducted based on ambient aerosol samples collected during four seasons in Beijing, China. Dependence of OC and EC values on the temperature protocol and the charring correction method is presented and influences of aerosol composition are investigated. EC was found to decrease with the peak inert mode temperature (T(peak)) such that EC determined by the IMPROVE (the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments)-A protocol (T(peak) was 580 °C) was 2.85 ± 1.31 and 3.83 ± 2.58 times that measured by an alternative protocol with a T(peak) of 850 °C when using the transmittance and reflectance correction, respectively. It was also found that reflectance correction tends to classify more carbon as EC compared with transmittance; results from the IMPROVE-A protocol showed that the ratio of EC defined by reflectance correction (EC(R)) to that based on transmittance (EC(T)) averaged 1.50 ± 0.42. Moreover, it was demonstrated that emissions from biomass burning would increase the discrepancy between EC values determined by different temperature protocols. On the other hand, the discrepancy between EC(R) and EC(T) was strongly associated with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) which was shown to be an important source of the organics that pyrolyze during the inert mode of thermal-optical analysis. PMID:22044188

  16. Consumer Acceptance of Dry Dog Food Variations

    PubMed Central

    Donfrancesco, Brizio Di; Koppel, Kadri; Swaney-Stueve, Marianne; Chambers, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary The objectives of this study were to compare the acceptance of different dry dog food products by consumers, determine consumer clusters for acceptance, and identify the characteristics of dog food that drive consumer acceptance. Pet owners evaluated dry dog food samples available in the US market. The results indicated that appearance of the sample, especially the color, influenced pet owner’s overall liking more than the aroma of the product. Abstract The objectives of this study were to compare the acceptance of different dry dog food products by consumers, determine consumer clusters for acceptance, and identify the characteristics of dog food that drive consumer acceptance. Eight dry dog food samples available in the US market were evaluated by pet owners. In this study, consumers evaluated overall liking, aroma, and appearance liking of the products. Consumers were also asked to predict their purchase intent, their dog’s liking, and cost of the samples. The results indicated that appearance of the sample, especially the color, influenced pet owner’s overall liking more than the aroma of the product. Overall liking clusters were not related to income, age, gender, or education, indicating that general consumer demographics do not appear to play a main role in individual consumer acceptance of dog food products. PMID:26480043

  17. Clothing resultant thermal insulation determined on a movable thermal manikin. Part II: effects of wind and body movement on local insulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Wan, Xianfu; Song, Guowen; Zhang, Chengjiao; Shi, Wen

    2015-10-01

    Part II of this two-part series study was focused on examining the effects of wind and body movement on local clothing thermal insulation. Seventeen clothing ensembles with different layers (i.e., 1, 2, or 3 layers) were selected for this study. Local thermal insulation with different air velocities (0.15, 1.55, and 4.0 m/s) and walking speeds (0, 0.75, and 1.17 m/s) were investigated on a thermal manikin. Empirical equations for estimating local resultant clothing insulation as a function of local insulation, air velocity, and walking speed were developed. The results showed that the effects of wind and body movement on local resultant thermal resistance are complex and differ distinctively among different body parts. In general, the reductions of local insulation with wind at the chest, abdomen, and pelvis were greater than those at the lower leg and back, and the changes at the body extremity such as the forearm, thigh, and lower leg were higher than such immobile body parts as the chest and back. In addition, the wind effect interacted with the walking effect. This study may have important applications in human local thermal comfort modeling and functional clothing design. PMID:25605409

  18. Clothing resultant thermal insulation determined on a movable thermal manikin. Part II: effects of wind and body movement on local insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Wan, Xianfu; Song, Guowen; Zhang, Chengjiao; Shi, Wen

    2015-10-01

    Part II of this two-part series study was focused on examining the effects of wind and body movement on local clothing thermal insulation. Seventeen clothing ensembles with different layers (i.e., 1, 2, or 3 layers) were selected for this study. Local thermal insulation with different air velocities (0.15, 1.55, and 4.0 m/s) and walking speeds (0, 0.75, and 1.17 m/s) were investigated on a thermal manikin. Empirical equations for estimating local resultant clothing insulation as a function of local insulation, air velocity, and walking speed were developed. The results showed that the effects of wind and body movement on local resultant thermal resistance are complex and differ distinctively among different body parts. In general, the reductions of local insulation with wind at the chest, abdomen, and pelvis were greater than those at the lower leg and back, and the changes at the body extremity such as the forearm, thigh, and lower leg were higher than such immobile body parts as the chest and back. In addition, the wind effect interacted with the walking effect. This study may have important applications in human local thermal comfort modeling and functional clothing design.

  19. Thermal history of type 3 chondrites from the Antarctic meteorite collection determined by Raman spectroscopy of their polyaromatic carbonaceous matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, Lydie; Quirico, Eric; Flandinet, Laurène; Montagnac, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    This paper is focused on the characterization of the thermal history of 151 CV, CO and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (UOCs) from the NASA Antarctic meteorite collection, using an approach based on the structure of the included polyaromatic carbonaceous matter determined by Raman spectroscopy. 114 out of these 151 chondrites provided Raman spectra of carbonaceous matter and allowing to assign a petrologic type, which mostly reflects the peak temperature experienced by the rock on the parent body. A thorough review of literature shows however that it is not possible to deduce a peak temperature because accurate calibration is not available. Twenty-three new weakly metamorphosed chondrites have been identified: MIL 07671 (CV3.1); DOM 08006 (CO3.0); DOM 03238, MIL 05024, MIL 05104, MIL 07193 (CO3.1); TIL 82408, LAR 06279 (LL3.05-3.1); EET 90628 (L3.0); GRO 06054, QUE 97008 (L3.05), ALHA 77176, EET 90066, LAR 04380, MET 96515, MIL 05050 (L3.1); ALHA 78133, EET 87735, EET 90909, LEW 87208, PRE 95401 (L3.05-3.1); MCY 05218 (H3.05-3.1) and MET 00506 (H3.1). This study confirms that the width of the D band (FWHMD) and the ratio of the peak intensity of the D and G bands (ID/IG) are the most adapted tracers of the extent of thermal metamorphism in type 3 chondrites. It also unambiguously shows, thanks to the large number of samples, that the width of the G band (FWHMG) does not correlate with the maturity of polyaromatic carbonaceous matter. This parameter is nevertheless very valuable because it shows that Raman spectra of CV chondrites preserve memory of either the metamorphic conditions (possibly oxidation controlled by aqueous alteration) or the nature of the organic precursor. Oxidation memory is our preferred interpretation, however an extensive petrologic characterization of this CV series is required to get firm conclusions. Pre-graphitic carbonaceous matter is reported in seven chondrites and is even the only carbonaceous material detected in the chondrites

  20. Relationship of roughness of building stones on the effective thermal conductivity determined by transient hot-wire method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Merckx; Jean-Didier, Mertz; Patrick, Dudoignon; David, Giovannacci; Jean-Philippe, Garnier

    2013-04-01

    Alteration of inorganic materials in monuments is mainly related to relative humidity change in the porous network. Characterization of water content is a complex issue, specially in case of non-intrusive measurement. An innovative method is developed to quantify the water content using a direct calculation of the thermal conductivity. In order to validate the non-intrusive application to heritage stone, a control of the influence of the rock-sensor interface is required. The study was carried out on five sedimentary french rocks : three limestones (lithographic, oolithic and micritic), a sandstone of Fontainebleau and the so-called Tuffeau limestone. The textural properties are characterized by optical and electronical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. The transient hot-wire method is useful to obtain a quick value of effective conductivity of material. Initially used in liquids and gas, It's now more and more used for solid materials. The calculation of one effective thermal conductivity is formulated by the slope of recorded DT/ln(t) diagrams. In case of continuous and homogeneous media, only one slope can be measured. For heterogeneous solids a typical curve present two slopes : the first one measured in the short time acquisitions (<1s) mainly depends on the contact between the wire and grains and thus micro texture of the material. The second one, measured for longer time acquisitions, characterizes the mean effective thermal conductivity of the material. In the case of surface measurement, the first part of curve is relevant from the texture and roughness of the material. Roughness properties are determined by an interferometer system on different polished surfaces of the materials. For all studied stones, the arithmetic average roughness (Sa) is ranged between 44 µm and 1 µm, respectively for the coarse-grained limestone (Bretigny) and the finest one (Migné). According to the relative error of the apparatus (10%), the

  1. Finite element modeling to determine thermal residual strain distribution of bonded composite repairs for structural health monitoring design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Wayne; Jones, Rhys; Davis, Claire; Galea, Stephen C.

    2002-11-01

    The economic implication of fleet upgrades, particularly in Australia with military aircraft such as the F-111 and F/A-18, has led to an increasing reliance on composite repair technology to address fatigue and corrosion-affected aircraft components. The increasing use of such repairs has led to a research effort to develop various in-situ health monitoring systems that may be incorporated with a repair. This paper reports on the development of a theoretical methodology that uses finite element analysis (FEA) to model the strain profiles which optical sensors, on or within the patch, will be exposed to under various operational scenarios, including load and disbond. Numerical techniques are then used to predict the fibre Bragg grating (FBG) reflections which occur with these strain profiles. The quality of these reflection are a key consideration when designing FBG based structural health monitoring (SHM) systems. This information can be used to optimise the location of both surface mounted, and embedded sensors, and determine feasibility of SHM system design. Research was conducted into the thermal residual strain (TRS) within the patch. A finite element study revealed the presence of significant thermal residual strain gradients along the surface of the tapered region of the patch. As Bragg gratings are particularly sensitive to strain gradients, (producing a result similar to a chirped grating) the strain gradient on the composite at potential sensor locations both under load, and in the event of disbond was considered. A sufficiently high gradient leads to an altered Bragg reflection. These spurious reflections need to be considered, and theoretically obtained reflections can provide information to allow for load scenarios where the Bragg shift is not a smooth, well defined peak. It can also be shown that embedded fibres offer a higher average thermal residual strain reading, while being subject to a much lower strain gradient. This particularly favors the

  2. Acceptability of human risk.

    PubMed Central

    Kasperson, R E

    1983-01-01

    This paper has three objectives: to explore the nature of the problem implicit in the term "risk acceptability," to examine the possible contributions of scientific information to risk standard-setting, and to argue that societal response is best guided by considerations of process rather than formal methods of analysis. Most technological risks are not accepted but are imposed. There is also little reason to expect consensus among individuals on their tolerance of risk. Moreover, debates about risk levels are often at base debates over the adequacy of the institutions which manage the risks. Scientific information can contribute three broad types of analyses to risk-setting deliberations: contextual analysis, equity assessment, and public preference analysis. More effective risk-setting decisions will involve attention to the process used, particularly in regard to the requirements of procedural justice and democratic responsibility. PMID:6418541

  3. Thermal Diffused Scattering (TDS) - a new tool for determining single crystal elasticity at high-pressure condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    X-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) has been used to determine phonon dispersion relation of solids since 1940s (Wehinger et al. 2013; Ding et al. 2006; Xu and Chiang 2005). However, its application in high-pressure mineral physics has not been widely recognized. Sound velocities of Earth materials at relevant high pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions are essential for interpreting seismic data, which provides by now the most accurate image of the Earth interior. Comparing with other commonly used techniques for measuring sound velocities in the high-pressure mineral physics community, it has significant advantages and disadvantages. Firstly, it could be used for measuring any single crystals at extreme P-T conditions using diamond anvil cell (DAC), not limited to transparent samples or nuclear resonant isotopes; Secondly, single-crystal elastic constants could be obtained through TDS, and hence directional dependences of sound velocities are available; Finally, experimental setup for TDS measurement is very easy, essentially identical to what is used for routine high-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments. However, TDS is much less straightforward in data interpretation, which usually involves micro force constant modeling between the nearest neighbor atoms. We developed dependable data collection procedures for TDS measurement under high-pressure conditions. Measurements with single-crystal Si and foresterite under ambient and high-pressure conditions are successful. Using the python code package we developed for analyzing TDS data, we successfully reproduced the previously determined single-crystal elastic moduli of Si and foresterite using Brillouin spectroscopy and ultrasonics. The experimental uncertainty of the single crystal elastic moduli determined from TDS approach is within 4% or better.

  4. Age and Acceptance of Euthanasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Russell A.

    1980-01-01

    Study explores relationship between age (and sex and race) and acceptance of euthanasia. Women and non-Whites were less accepting because of religiosity. Among older people less acceptance was attributable to their lesser education and greater religiosity. Results suggest that quality of life in old age affects acceptability of euthanasia. (Author)

  5. Management applications for thermal IR imagery of lake processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, J. M.; Haynes, R. B.

    1971-01-01

    A thermal infrared scanning program was conducted in the Lake Ontario Basin region in an effort to determine: (1) limonologic data that could be collected by remote sensing techniques, and (2) local interest in and routine use of such data in water management programs. Difficulties encountered in the development of an infrared survey program in New York suggest that some of the major obstacles to acceptance of remotely sensed data for routine use are factors of psychology rather than technology. Also, terminology used should suit the measurement technique in order to encourage acceptance of the surface thermal data obtained.

  6. Determination of unsaturation grade and trans isomers generated during thermal oxidation of edible oils and fats by FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya Moreno, M. C. M.; Mendoza Olivares, D.; Amézquita López, F. J.; Gimeno Adelantado, J. V.; Bosch Reig, F.

    1999-05-01

    The oxidative deterioration of culinary oils and fats during episodes of heating associated with normal usage (80°C-300°C, 20-40 min) was monitored by FTIR spectroscopy. The thermal oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids during heating was studied by the determination of unsaturation percentage and trans isomers at various temperatures and heating times. Oils frequently used in food frying such as olive oil, sunflower oil, corn oil and seeds oil (sunflower, safflower and canola seed), and lard were studied. The Absorbance Correction Method is proposed to correct the spectral interference and allows the analytic use of signal which would not be initially valid for quantitative analysis. The results show that there is a decrease in unsaturation and an increase in trans isomers starting at 150°C and becomes more pronounced at temperatures around 250°C. This variation in unsaturation grade and conformation provides evidence of the transformation of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids and subsequent decrease in the oils' nutritional value.

  7. Temperature and velocity determination of shock-heated flows with non-resonant heterodyne laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, F. J.; Baab, S.; Lamanna, G.; Weigand, B.

    2015-12-01

    Non-resonant laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), a four-wave mixing technique, was applied to post-shock flows within a shock tube. Simultaneous single-shot determination of temperature, speed of sound and flow velocity behind incident and reflected shock waves at different pressure and temperature levels are presented. Measurements were performed non-intrusively and without any seeding. The paper describes the technique and outlines its advantages compared to more established laser-based methods with respect to the challenges of shock tube experiments. The experiments include argon and nitrogen as test gas at temperatures of up to 1000 K and pressures of up to 43 bar. The experimental data are compared to calculated values based on inviscid one-dimensional shock wave theory. The single-shot uncertainty of the technique is investigated for worst-case test conditions resulting in relative standard deviations of 1, 1.7 and 3.4 % for Mach number, speed of sound and temperature, respectively. For all further experimental conditions, calculated values stay well within the 95 % confidence intervals of the LITA measurement.

  8. Determination of volatile organic compounds in workplace air by multisorbent adsorption/thermal desorption-GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Hou; Feng, Chien-Tai; Lo, Yu-Shiu; Lin, Tsai-Yin; Lo, Jiunn-Guang

    2004-07-01

    Investigation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was first conducted in the air of class-100 cleanrooms at liquid crystal display (LCD) fabrication facilities. Air samples were collected on multisorbent tubes (including Carbopack B, Carbopack C, and Carbosieve S-III) and analyzed using adsorption/thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Optimal conditions lead to average recoveries in the range of 96.2-98.2%, and method detection limits between 0.38 and 0.78 ppb, under the condition of 1-l sampling volume and 80% relative humidity. The method appears to be accurate, sensitive, simple and well-suited for determining VOC distributions from various stages of LCD manufacturing process and temporal variations of the analyte concentrations. About 15 VOCs were identified in workplace air. The major pollutants such as propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (PGMEA), butyl acetate, and acetone that are commonly used in the opto-electronics industry were detected and accurately quantified with the established method. PMID:15109881

  9. Accuracy of Young's Modulus of Thermal Barrier Coating Layer Determined by Bending Resonance of a Multilayered Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waki, Hiroyuki; Takizawa, Kensuke; Kato, Masahiko; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-04-01

    The Young's modulus of individual layer in thermal barrier coating (TBC) system is an important mechanical property because it allows determining the parameters of materials mechanics in the TBC system. In this study, we investigated the accuracy of the evaluation method for the Young's modulus of a TBC layer according to the first bending resonance of a multilayered specimen comprising a substrate, bond coating, and TBC. First, we derived a closed-form solution for the Young's modulus of the TBC layer using the equation of motion for the bending vibration of a composite beam. The solution for the three-layered model provided the Young's modulus of the TBC layer according to the measured resonance frequency and the known values for the dimensions, mass, and Young's moduli of all the other layers. Next, we analyzed the sensitivity of these input errors to the evaluated Young's modulus and revealed the important inputs for accurate evaluation. Finally, we experimentally confirmed that the Young's modulus of the TBC layer was obtained accurately by the developed method.

  10. Optical backscatter method for determining thermal denaturation of β-lactoglobulin and other whey proteins in milk.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Alisa; Payne, Fred; Xiong, Youling L; Castillo, Manuel

    2013-03-01

    The heat denaturation of whey proteins affects the functional properties of milk. Correlations of β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) denaturation to gelation time, gel firmness, and gel moisture content have been widely documented. Currently, no technique is available for quantifying β-LG denaturation in milk without altering its native composition or requiring a laborious procedure. The goal of this study was to establish if an optical backscatter response of whey protein denaturation during milk heat treatment could be determined that would be the basis for an inline optical measurement technology. The experimental design consisted of 1 factor (time at 80°C) and 6 levels (0, 3, 5, 7, 12, and 25 min). Physicochemical analysis performed indicated that β-LG denaturation followed a first-order response during thermal treatment. The light backscatter response, measured as a ratio of two 25-nm wave bands (832.5 nm/382.5 nm), significantly correlated to β-LG denaturation and had a 14% increase for milk with 75% β-LG denaturation. The strength of the optical response at the proposed wave bands and their correlation to denaturation suggests that light backscatter could potentially be used to measure β-LG and other whey protein denaturation inline. PMID:23357014

  11. Influence of soil water content on the thermal infrared emissivity of bare soils: Implication for land surface temperature determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mira, M.; Valor, E.; Boluda, R.; Caselles, V.; Coll, C.

    2007-12-01

    The influence of soil water content in thermal infrared emissivity is a known fact but has been poorly studied in the past. A laboratory study for quantifying the dependence of emissivity on soil moisture was carried out. Six samples of surface horizons of different soil types were selected for the experiment. The gravimetric method was chosen for determining the soil moisture, whereas the emissivity was measured at different soil water contents using the two-lid variant of the box method. As a result, the study showed that emissivity increases from 1.7% to 16% when water content becomes higher, especially in sandy soils in the 8.2-9.2 μm range. Accordingly, a set of equations was derived to obtain emissivity from soil moisture at different spectral bands for the analyzed mineral soils. Moreover, results showed that the spectral ratio decreases with increasing soil water content. Finally, the study showed that systematic errors from 0.1 to 2 K can be caused by soil moisture influence on emissivity.

  12. Determination of the thermal diffusivity of pure and doped yttrium orthovanadate by Ångström's method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodzenta, J.; Kaźmierczak-Bałata, A.; Łukasiewicz, T.; Pyka, M.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal diffusivities of pure YVO{4} single crystal and single crystals doped with Nd, Tm and Ca ions are measured using a modified Ångström's method. Measurements were carried out for main crystallographic directions ([100], [010] and [001]). Obtained results show that the thermal diffusivity in [001] direction is considerably higher than in (001) plane. Decrease of the thermal diffusivity is observed with growing concentration of dopants. For the heavier doped sample (5% at. of Tm + 0.4% at. of Ca) a drop of the thermal diffusivity is about 35%. The current investigation is a part of research project 3 T08A 035 29.

  13. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  14. Baby-Crying Acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Tiago; de Magalhães, Sérgio Tenreiro

    The baby's crying is his most important mean of communication. The crying monitoring performed by devices that have been developed doesn't ensure the complete safety of the child. It is necessary to join, to these technological resources, means of communicating the results to the responsible, which would involve the digital processing of information available from crying. The survey carried out, enabled to understand the level of adoption, in the continental territory of Portugal, of a technology that will be able to do such a digital processing. It was used the TAM as the theoretical referential. The statistical analysis showed that there is a good probability of acceptance of such a system.

  15. High acceptance recoil polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    The HARP Collaboration

    1992-12-05

    In order to detect neutrons and protons in the 50 to 600 MeV energy range and measure their polarization, an efficient, low-noise, self-calibrating device is being designed. This detector, known as the High Acceptance Recoil Polarimeter (HARP), is based on the recoil principle of proton detection from np[r arrow]n[prime]p[prime] or pp[r arrow]p[prime]p[prime] scattering (detected particles are underlined) which intrinsically yields polarization information on the incoming particle. HARP will be commissioned to carry out experiments in 1994.

  16. On Determining Wood Thermal Diffusivity and Probe Spacing for Sap Flow Measurements using In-Situ Heat Response Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Miller, G.; Baldocchi, D.; Rubin, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The heat pulse method is widely used to measure water flux in plants and soil; it works by inferring the velocity of water in a porous medium from the speed at which a heat pulse is propagated through the system. No systematic, non-destructive calibration procedure exists to determine the site-specific parameters necessary for calculating sap velocity: wood thermal diffusivity and probe spacing. Such parameter calibration is crucial to obtaining the correct transpiration amount from the sap flow measurements at the plant scale and consequently to the up-scaling of water flux to a larger scale and to the water cycle modeling along the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. The purpose of this study is to present a statistical framework to simultaneously estimate these parameters from in-situ heat response curves collected by the implanted probes of heat ratio apparatus. Conditioned on the heat response data, the parameters are inferred using a Bayesian inversion technique with Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling method. The primary advantage of the proposed methodology is that, unlike most of the existing work, it does not require known probe spacing or any further intrusive sampling of sapwood. The Bayesian framework also enables direct quantification of uncertainty in estimated sap flow velocity. Experiments using synthetic data show that multiple tests on the same apparatus are essential to obtain reliable, accurate solutions. When applied to field conditions, these tests are conducted during different seasons and automated using the existing data logging system. The seasonality of wood thermal diffusivity is obtained as a by-product of the parameter estimation process, and it shows consistency with the seasonal change of tree diameters monitored using tree dendrometer. An empirical factor is adopted to account for flow deformation caused by the implanted probes, and it is also estimated in this study. The proposed methodology is ready to be applied to calibrate

  17. Analysis of temperature variability and determination of apparent thermal diffusivity in sandy intertidal sediments at the German North Sea coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricklefs, Klaus; Vanselow, Klaus Heinrich

    2012-08-01

    Temperature was measured at depths of 1, 10, 30, 75, and 170 cm in fine sandy intertidal sediments by means of specially-designed "temperature lances". The measurements cover a period from February to October 2007 and have a temporal resolution of 5 min. Stochastic as well as recurrent processes due to the solar cycle and due to tide induces flooding and drying of the sediment surface lead to a complex composition of the time series curves. Spectral analyses based on Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) reveal that temperature variability at the sediment water/air interface is widely controlled by recurrent processes with period lengths of 4.93, 6.1, 8.19, ˜12, ˜24 h, and 354 h (14.7 days). The importance of the higher frequencies decreases with increasing sediment depth. At a depth of 30 cm the 24 h and the 14.7 days cycles mainly determine the temperature development over time, while at 75 cm sediment depth contour temperature varies only along the 14.7 days cycle, as well as within the seasonal cycle. Using cross-correlation-analysis the time necessary for a temperature signal at the surface to trigger a response at a sediment depth of 10, 30, and 75 cm was calculated as 1.4, 7.0, and 73.1 h respectively. Utilizing an alternate approach, FFT derived temperature peak-to-peak amplitude values and phase angles of up to 9 different cycles were used to calculate apparent thermal diffusivity in different sediment depths. The thermal diffusivity decreases from approximately 6-9 × 10-7 m2 s-1 from the surface down to a sediment depth of 75 cm. The specially-designed instrumentation has proven to be robust and precise enough to record high resolution time series of sediment temperature in different depths. The time series analysis of the data clearly shows that the temperature variability in the intertidal sediments to a high degree can be explained by recurrent solar and/or tidal effects. So the methods and results presented in this paper can help to answer questions

  18. Development of an acceptance test for solar energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joncich, D. M.; Johnson, D. L.

    1981-06-01

    This report describes the development and field evaluation of a short-duration procedure and an instrumentation package for testing whether a newly installed solar energy system is performing to design specifications. The U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory: (1) defined a general solar system schematic and identified its major components; (2) developed test procedures for determining the thermal performance of these components; (3) bought and programmed equipment to perform the prescribed component test and to produce the test data; (4) subjected the acceptance test concept and instrumentation package to a field evaluation at a newly installed Army solar energy system; and (5) incorporated the results of the field evaluation as modifications to the solar acceptance test. This report concludes that a simple, quantitative test of short duration can determine whether a newly installed solar system is operating as specified. The results of the research have revealed the potential for performing such a test with low-cost metering installed at the time of building construction.

  19. Determination of off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin, in salmon fillets using stir bar sorptive extraction–thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A sensitive and solvent-less method for the determination of musty and earthy off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin (GSM), in salmon tissue was developed using stir bar sorptive extraction -thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography -mass spectrometry (SBSE -TD -GCMS). M...

  20. Thermal Diffusivity of Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel Determined by the Time Domain Photoacoustic Piezoelectric Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Binxing; Wang, Yafei; Gao, Chunming; Sun, Qiming; Wang, Pinghuai

    2015-06-01

    The thermal diffusivity of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (CLF-1), which is recognized as the primary candidate structural material for the test blanket module of the international thermal-nuclear experimental reactor, has been studied by the time-domain (TD) photoacoustic piezoelectric (PAPE) technique. The TD PAPE model based on a simplified thermoelastic theory under square-wave modulated laser excitation is presented, relating the TD PAPE signal to the modulation frequency, thermal diffusivity, and other material parameters. Thermal diffusivities of reference samples such as copper and nickel were measured and analyzed, by which the validity of the technique is verified. The thermal diffusivity of the CLF-1 sample was measured to be , which is at a medium level among the ordinary steel materials ( to and has decent heat-dissipation ability. The results show that the TD PAPE technique can provide a fast and economic way for the investigation of the thermophysical properties of fusion reactor structural materials.

  1. Soil water content determination with cosmic-ray neutron sensor: Correcting aboveground hydrogen effects with thermal/fast neutron ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhengchao; Li, Zizhong; Liu, Gang; Li, Baoguo; Ren, Tusheng

    2016-09-01

    The cosmic-ray neutron sensor (CRNS), which estimates field scale soil water content, bridges the gap between point measurement and remote sensing. The accuracy of CRNS measurements, however, is affected by additional hydrogen pools (e.g., vegetation, snow, and rainfall interception). The objectives of this study are to: (i) evaluate the accuracy of CRNS estimates in a farmland system using depth and horizontal weighted point measurements, (ii) introduce a novel method for estimating the amounts of hydrogen from biomass and snow cover in CRNS data, and (iii) propose a simple approach for correcting the influences of aboveground hydrogen pool (expressed as aboveground water equivalent, AWE) on CRNS measurements. A field experiment was conducted in northeast China to compare soil water content results from CRNS to in-situ data with time domain reflectometry (TDR) and neutron probe (NP) in the 0-40 cm soil layers. The biomass water equivalent (BWE) and snow water equivalent (SWE) were observed to have separate linear relationships with the thermal/fast neutron ratio, and the dynamics of BWE and SWE were estimated correctly in the crop seasons and snow-covered seasons, respectively. A simple approach, which considered the AWE, AWE at calibration, and the effective measurement depth of CRNS, was introduced to correct the errors caused by BWE and SWE. After correction, the correlation coefficients between soil water contents determined by CRNS and TDR were 0.79 and 0.77 during the 2014 and 2015 crop seasons, respectively, and CRNS measurements had RMSEs of 0.028, 0.030, and 0.039 m3 m-3 in the 2014 and 2015 crop seasons and the snow-covered seasons, respectively. The experimental results also indicated that the accuracies of CRNS estimated BWE and SWE were affected by the distributions of aboveground hydrogen pools, which were related to the height of the CRNS device above ground surface.

  2. Combining climatic and geo-hydrological preconditions as a method to determine world potential for aquifer thermal energy storage.

    PubMed

    Bloemendal, Martin; Olsthoorn, Theo; van de Ven, Frans

    2015-12-15

    A heat pump combined with Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) is proven technology to economically and sustainably provide space heating and cooling. The two most important preconditions for the applicability of ATES are favorable climatic conditions and the availability of a suitable aquifer. This paper shows how these two preconditions can be combined to identify where in the world ATES potential is present, or will become present as a consequence of climate change. Countries and regions are identified where regulation and stimulation measures may increase application of ATES technologies and thus help reduce CO2-emissions. Two types of data determine ATES suitability, and their combination with a 3rd identifies potential hot-spots in the world: 1) geo-hydrological conditions, 2) current and projected climate classification and 3) urbanization. Our method combines the data into an ATES-suitability score as explained in this paper. On the one hand the results confirm the suitability for ATES where it is already applied and on the other they identify places where the technology is or will become suitable. About 15% of urban population lived in areas with high potential for ATES at the start of the 21st century, but this figure will decrease to about 5% during the 21st century as a consequence of expected climate change. Around 50% of urban population currently lives in areas of medium ATES suitability, a percentage that will remain constant. Demand for ATES is likely to exceed available subsurface space in a significant part of the urban areas. PMID:26322727

  3. Determination of formal kinetic constants of thermal decomposition of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution in a mixture of magnetic powder, based on experimental thermogram, obtained in adiabatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaripov, Jamshed; Borisov, Boris; Bondarchuk, Sergey

    2014-08-01

    Process of thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide aqueous solution with the addition of magnetic powder in the form of toner for printers and lanthanum manganite were considered. Obtained resulting from an experiment in the Dewar container conducted thermogram analyzed using mass balance equations and heat. Formal kinetic parameters determined, and conclude that the magnetic powder in the mixture does not have catalytic properties. The described technique is recommended as a rapid analysis of the kinetics of the various reactions to substances having predefined thermal and thermodynamic properties.

  4. Application of complex geometrical optics to determination of thermal, transport, and optical parameters of thin films by the photothermal beam deflection technique.

    PubMed

    Korte, Dorota; Franko, Mladen

    2015-01-01

    In this work, complex geometrical optics is, for what we believe is the first time, applied instead of geometrical or wave optics to describe the probe beam interaction with the field of the thermal wave in photothermal beam deflection (photothermal deflection spectroscopy) experiments on thin films. On the basis of this approach the thermal (thermal diffusivity and conductivity), optical (energy band gap), and transport (carrier lifetime) parameters of the semiconductor thin films (pure TiO2, N- and C-doped TiO2, or TiO2/SiO2 composites deposited on a glass or aluminum support) were determined with better accuracy and simultaneously during one measurement. The results are in good agreement with results obtained by the use of other methods and reported in the literature. PMID:26366490

  5. Retained gas sampler system acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-18

    Acceptance test results for the Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS) obtained in the 306E laboratory are reported. The RGSS will be utilized to retrieve and analyze samples from the Hanford flammable gas watch-list tanks to determine the quantity and chemistry of gases confined within the waste.

  6. 75 FR 44046 - Noise Exposure Map Acceptance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Acceptance ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by the... on the noise exposure maps is June 1, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Edward S. Gabsewics,...

  7. Treatment Acceptability among Mexican American Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrego, Joaquin, Jr.; Ibanez, Elizabeth S.; Spendlove, Stuart J.; Pemberton, Joy R.

    2007-01-01

    There is a void in the literature with regard to Hispanic parents' views about common interventions for children with behavior problems. The purpose of this study was to examine the treatment acceptability of child management techniques in a Mexican American sample. Parents' acculturation was also examined to determine if it would account for…

  8. Simplified preparation of crude and functional coagulogen by thermal inactivation of serine proteases in Limulus amebocyte lysate and its application for rapid endotoxin determination.

    PubMed

    Yabusaki, Katsumi; Aoyagi, Hideki

    2012-03-01

    The effects of thermal treatment on Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) reagent were studied. Thermal resistances of enzymes and coagulogen in LAL reagent were evaluated by aggregometry and SDS-PAGE. Although enzyme activities of LAL reagent were completely lost after heating at temperatures above 60 °C for 10 min, gelating activities of coagulogen were retained even over 80 °C. Phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF; 1 mmol/mL), a strong non-specific serine-protease inhibitor, did not completely inactivate serine-protease activities of LAL. As a result, complete hydrolysis of coagulogen to coagulin was unexpectedly obtained. Solvent treatment of LAL was similar in effect to thermal treatment of LAL, but there were 2 problems: complete removal of solvent from samples and increased solution turbidity during preparation. To study the application of thermal-treated LAL, we conjugated it with titania particles. LAL-conjugated titania particles were obtained as small aggregates between titania nanoparticles and thermal-treated LAL (LAL-conjugated microbeads; LCM). When the mixture of LCMs and fresh LAL reagent was reacted with endotoxin an acute aggregation of LCMs was induced prior to the aggregate formation of LAL as monitored by stirring turbidimetry. This method, endotoxin microbeads aggregometry (EMA) may provide a rapid and sensitive method for endotoxin determination. PMID:22143069

  9. Experimental investigations and theoretical determination of thermal conductivity and viscosity of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekar, M.; Suresh, S.; Chandra Bose, A.

    2010-02-15

    Experimental investigations and theoretical determination of effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O nanofluid are reported in this paper. The nanofluid was prepared by synthesizing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles using microwave assisted chemical precipitation method, and then dispersing them in distilled water using a sonicator. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid with a nominal diameter of 43 nm at different volume concentrations (0.33-5%) at room temperature were used for the investigation. The thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids are measured and it is found that the viscosity increase is substantially higher than the increase in thermal conductivity. Both the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids increase with the nanoparticle volume concentration. Theoretical models are developed to predict thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids without resorting to the well established Maxwell and Einstein models, respectively. The proposed models show reasonably good agreement with our experimental results. (author)

  10. Elastic constants of B-HMX and tantalum, equations of state of supercritical fluids and fluid mixtures and thermal transport determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Zaug, J M

    1998-08-21

    Ultrasonic sound speed measurements via Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering (ISLS) were made in single crystals of b-HMX and tantalum over an extended range of temperatures. Elastic constants are consequently determined for b-HMX. Sound speeds are calculated for tantalum, from known elastic constants, and compare favorably with the results presented here. ISLS time-domain fits of tantalum records allowed for thermal diffusion determinations and, correspondingly, thermal conductivity. Measurements of the speed of sound and of the thermal diffusivities of fluid oxygen up to pressures of 13 GPa and at several temperatures are presented. Between 0.1 and 13 GPa the fluid's density increases by a factor of three. Thermal diffusivities rise slowly over this range, and are substantially smaller than those previously measured for the solid b-phase. Additional sound speed measurements were made along the 250 C isotherm in a 1:1 molar ratio mixture of liquid oxygen and nitrogen. These experiments demonstrate the versatility and potential application of a new laboratory within the U. S. DOD and DOE complex. 1

  11. Development of a clinical trial to determine whether watchful waiting is an acceptable alternative to surgical repair for patients with oligosymptomatic incisional hernia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Incisional hernia is a frequent complication in abdominal surgery. This article describes the development of a prospective randomized clinical trial designed to determine whether watchful waiting is an acceptable alternative to surgical repair for patients with oligosymptomatic incisional hernia. Methods/Design This clinical multicenter trial has been designed to compare watchful waiting and surgical repair for patients with oligosymptomatic incisional hernia. Participants are randomized to watchful waiting or surgery and followed up for two years. The primary efficacy endpoint is pain/discomfort during normal activities as a result of the hernia or hernia repair two years after enrolment, as measured by the hernia-specific Surgical Pain Scales (SPS). The target sample size of six hundred thirty-six patients was calculated to detect non-inferiority of the experimental intervention (watchful waiting) in the primary endpoint. Sixteen surgical centers will take part in the study and have submitted their declaration of commitment giving the estimated number of participating patients per year. A three-person data safety monitoring board will meet annually to monitor and supervise the trial. Discussion To date, we could find no published data on the natural course of incisional hernias. To our knowledge, watchful waiting has never been compared to standard surgical repair as a treatment option for incisional hernias. A trial to compare the outcome of the two approaches in patients with oligosymptomatic incisional hernias is urgently needed to provide data that can facilitate the choice between treatment options. If watchful waiting was equal to surgical repair, the high costs of surgical repair could be saved. The design for such a trial is described here. This multicenter trial will be funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The ethics committee of the Charité has approved the study protocol. Approval has been obtained from ten study sites at time of

  12. A new heat propagation velocity prevails over Brownian particle velocities in determining the thermal conductivities of nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An alternative insight is presented concerning heat propagation velocity scales in predicting the effective thermal conductivities of nanofluids. The widely applied Brownian particle velocities in published literature are often found too slow to describe the relatively higher nanofluid conductivities. In contrast, the present model proposes a faster heat transfer velocity at the same order as the speed of sound, rooted in a modified kinetic principle. In addition, this model accounts for both nanoparticle heat dissipation as well as coagulation effects. This novel model of effective thermal conductivities of nanofluids agrees well with an extended range of experimental data. PMID:21711892

  13. A novel pulse technique for thermal diffusivity determination of high-temperature levitated materials - Inverse analysis and experimental set-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, F.; Khodadadi, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    In order to determine the thermal diffusivity of materials at high temperatures, a two-step extended flash technique, which is applicable to levitated spherical samples, is proposed. The containerless flash method is modeled as an axisymmetric transient conduction heat transfer problem within the sphere subjected to a radiative boundary condition on its surface. The problem of nonlinearity which arises from the radiative heat transfer boundary condition is solved by replacing it with the measured time-dependent surface temperature data, thus giving rise to an 'Inverse Analysis'. Upon obtaining the analytic solution for the temperature field, the determination of the thermal diffusivity turns into a minimization problem, whereby the difference between the actual surface boundary condition and the analytic solution is minimized. In performing the proposed experiments, there is a need to undertake a cool-down experiment which should be governed by the lumped parameter analysis.

  14. Error compensation for thermally induced errors on a machine tool

    SciTech Connect

    Krulewich, D.A.

    1996-11-08

    Heat flow from internal and external sources and the environment create machine deformations, resulting in positioning errors between the tool and workpiece. There is no industrially accepted method for thermal error compensation. A simple model has been selected that linearly relates discrete temperature measurements to the deflection. The biggest problem is how to locate the temperature sensors and to determine the number of required temperature sensors. This research develops a method to determine the number and location of temperature measurements.

  15. Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures, Part 1: Method assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.

    1993-04-01

    This report presents results of a literature search performed to identify analytical techniques suitable for accelerated screening of chemical and thermal stabilities of different refrigerant/lubricant combinations. Search focused on three areas: Chemical stability data of HFC-134a and other non-chlorine containing refrigerant candidates; chemical stability data of CFC-12, HCFC-22, and other chlorine containing refrigerants; and accelerated thermal analytical techniques. Literature was catalogued and an abstract was written for each journal article or technical report. Several thermal analytical techniques were identified as candidates for development into accelerated screening tests. They are easy to operate, are common to most laboratories, and are expected to produce refrigerant/lubricant stability evaluations which agree with the current stability test ANSI/ASHRAE (American National Standards Institute/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers) Standard 97-1989, ``Sealed Glass Tube Method to Test the Chemical Stability of Material for Use Within Refrigerant Systems.`` Initial results of one accelerated thermal analytical candidate, DTA, are presented for CFC-12/mineral oil and HCFC-22/mineral oil combinations. Also described is research which will be performed in Part II to optimize the selected candidate.

  16. The promise of acceptance as an NGO security management approach.

    PubMed

    Fast, Larissa; Freeman, Faith; O'Neill, Michael; Rowley, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    This paper explores three questions related to acceptance as a security management approach. Acceptance draws upon relationships with community members, authorities, belligerents and other stakeholders to provide consent for the presence and activities of a non-governmental organisation (NGO), thereby reducing threats from these actors. Little is documented about how NGOs gain and maintain acceptance, how they assess and monitor the presence and degree of acceptance, or how they determine whether acceptance is effective in a particular context. Based on field research conducted in April 2011 in Kenya, South Sudan and Uganda, we address each of these three issues and argue that acceptance must be actively sought as both a programme and a security management strategy. In the paper we delineate elements common to all three contexts as well as missed opportunities, which identify areas that NGOs can and should address as part of an acceptance approach. PMID:25440000

  17. Effects of thermal maturation on stable organic carbon isotopes as determined by hydrous pyrolysis of Woodford Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewan, M. D.

    1983-08-01

    Acquiring crude oils that have been expelled from the same rock unit at different levels of thermal maturation is currently not feasible in the natural system. This prevents direct correlation of compositional changes between the organic matter retained in a source rock and its expelled crude oil at different levels of thermal maturation. Alleviation of this deficiency in studying the natural system requires the use of laboratory experiments. Natural generation of petroleum from amorphous type-II kerogen in the Woodford Shale may be simulated by hydrous pyrolysis, which involves heating crushed rock in contact with water at subcritical temperatures (<374°C). Four distinct stages of petroleum generation are observed from this type of pyrolysis; (1) pre-oil generation, (2) incipient-oil generation, (3) primary-oil generation, and (4) post-oil generation. The effects of thermal maturation on the δ 13C values of kerogen, bitumen, and expelled oil-like pyrolysate from the Woodford Shale have been studied through these four stages of petroleum generation. Similar to the natural system, the kerogens isolated from the pyrolyzed rock showed no significant change in δ 13C. This suggests that the δ 13C value of kerogens may be useful in kerogen typing and oil-to-source rock correlations. δ 13C values of bitumens extracted from the pyrolyzed rock showed an initial decrease during the incipient-oil generation stage, followed by depletion during the primary- and post-oil generation stages. This reversal is not favorable for geochemical correlation or maturity evaluation. Saturated and polar components of the bitumen show the greatest δ 13C variations with increasing thermal maturation. The difference between the δ 13C of these two components gives a unidirectional trend that serves as a general indicator of thermal maturation and is referred to as the bitumen isotope index (BII). δ 13C values of the expelled pyrolysates show a unidirectional increase with increasing

  18. Conditions for the acceptance of deontic conditionals.

    PubMed

    Over, D E; Manktelow, K I; Hadjichristidis, C

    2004-06-01

    Recent psychological research has investigated how people assess the probability of an indicative conditional. Most people give the conditional probability of q given p as the probability of if p then q. Asking about the probability of an indicative conditional, one is in effect asking about its acceptability. But on what basis are deontic conditionals judged to be acceptable or unacceptable? Using a decision theoretic analysis, we argue that a deontic conditional, of the form if p then must q or if p then may q, will be judged acceptable to the extent that the p & q possibility is preferred to the p & not-q possibility. Two experiments are reported in which this prediction was upheld. There was also evidence that the pragmatic suitability of permission rules is partly determined by evaluations of the not-p & q possibility. Implications of these results for theories of deontic reasoning are discussed. PMID:15285599

  19. Sensitive determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples using monolithic capillary solid-phase extraction and on-line thermal desorption prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Galán-Cano, Francisco; Bernabé-Zafón, Virginia; Lucena, Rafael; Cárdenas, Soledad; Herrero-Martínez, José Manuel; Ramis-Ramos, Guillermo; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2011-04-01

    A methacrylate-based monolithic capillary column has been evaluated for the preconcentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from environmental water samples. For this purpose, the monolyte was in situ synthesized in a 6cm×0.32mm id fused-silica capillary. The microextraction unit was fitted to a micro-HPLC pump to pass 10mL of sample. The isolated pollutants were eluted by means of 10μL of methanol, the organic phase being directly collected in a specific interface that can be fitted to the injection port of the gas chromatograph without modification. The interface allows the on-line thermal desorption of the PAHs, avoiding the dilution and providing enough sensitivity to reach the legal limits established for these pollutants in the matrices selected. The limits of detection achieved for 10mL of water ranged between 2.8ng/L (indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene) and 11.5ng/L (acenaphthene) with acceptable precision (between 4.5 and 18.2% RSD). The method was applied to the determination of the selected PAHs in tap, river waters and sewage, being fluoranthene and pyrene detected in all of them at concentrations lower than the legal limits established for these compounds in the matrices assayed. PMID:21377161

  20. Influence of the Duration of Thermal Action on the Errors in Determining the Thermophysical Characteristics of Ceramic Materials by a Laser Pulse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, G. V.; Kats, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    An analysis of the errors involved in determining the thermophysical characteristics of a special-purpose ceramic material — zirconium carbide — is made. It is shown that the errors of determining the heat capacity and thermal diffusivity of the indicated material under conditions corresponding to the implementation of the laser pulse method vary nonmonotonically depending on the pulse duration. The possibility of attaining minimum values of methodical errors by appropriately selecting the thickness of a sample and of the time of its heating is shown.

  1. Physiologic correlates to background noise acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampas, Joanna; Harkrider, Ashley; Nabelek, Anna

    2001-05-01

    Acceptance of background noise can be evaluated by having listeners indicate the highest background noise level (BNL) they are willing to accept while following the words of a story presented at their most comfortable listening level (MCL). The difference between the selected MCL and BNL is termed the acceptable noise level (ANL). One of the consistent findings in previous studies of ANL is large intersubject variability in acceptance of background noise. This variability is not related to age, gender, hearing sensitivity, personality, type of background noise, or speech perception in noise performance. The purpose of the current experiment was to determine if individual differences in physiological activity measured from the peripheral and central auditory systems of young female adults with normal hearing can account for the variability observed in ANL. Correlations between ANL and various physiological responses, including spontaneous, click-evoked, and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions, auditory brainstem and middle latency evoked potentials, and electroencephalography will be presented. Results may increase understanding of the regions of the auditory system that contribute to individual noise acceptance.

  2. Determination of the thermal diffusivity of bulk and layered samples by time domain thermoreflectance: Interest of lateral heat diffusion investigation in nanoscale time range

    SciTech Connect

    Belliard, L. Charron, E.; Vincent, S.; Perrin, B.; Fournier, D.; Frétigny, C.

    2015-02-14

    We report on thermal investigations performed in a time resolved experimental scheme. The time domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) is applied in an unusual geometry where the pump and probe beams are not superimposed but focused and shifted. In this way, the determination of the in-plane thermal diffusivity is achieved from temperature snapshots at different time delays. In the first part, taking into account the specific generation process and the detection inherent to the time domain thermoreflectance approach, an analytical solution for the temperature field is obtained for bulk samples, and compared to experimental data. A comparison with the frequency domain thermoreflectance microscopy is also outlined. In Part II section, the lateral heat diffusion in a layered structure is investigated. The comparison of the heat diffusion spreading in case of a highly conductive layer deposited on an insulator substrate and the reverse situation are carefully studied. Finally, we show how the time dependence is efficient to probe and identify material thermal properties or thermal interfacial resistance.

  3. Determination of Thermal Expansion Coefficients and Locating the Temperature-Induced Phase Transition in Methylammonium Lead Perovskites Using X-ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Jacobsson, T Jesper; Schwan, L Josef; Ottosson, Mikael; Hagfeldt, Anders; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2015-11-16

    Lead halogen perovskites, and particularly methylammonium lead iodine, CH3NH3PbI3, have recently attracted considerable interest as alternative solar cell materials, and record solar cell efficiencies have now surpassed 20%. Concerns have, however, been raised about the thermal stability of methylammonium lead iodine, and a phase transformation from a tetragonal to a cubic phase has been reported at elevated temperature. Here, this phase transition has been investigated in detail using temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction measurements. The phase transformation is pinpointed to 54 °C, which is well within the normal operating range of a typical solar cell. The cell parameters were extracted as a function of the temperature, from which the thermal expansion coefficient was calculated. The latter was found to be rather high (αv = 1.57 × 10(-4) K(-1)) for both the tetragonal and cubic phases. This is 6 times higher than the thermal expansion coefficient for soda lime glass and CIGS and 11 times larger than that of CdTe. This could potentially be of importance for the mechanical stability of perovskite solar cells in the temperature cycling experienced under normal day-night operation. The experimental knowledge of the thermal expansion coefficients and precise determination of the cell parameters can potentially also be valuable while conducting density functional theory simulations on these systems in order to deliver more accurate band structure calculations. PMID:26457861

  4. Soil water content and evaporation determined by thermal parameters obtained from ground-based and remote measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Vedder, J. F.; Blanchard, M. B.; Goettelman, R.

    1976-01-01

    Soil water contents from both smooth and rough bare soil were estimated from remotely sensed surface soil and air temperatures. An inverse relationship between two thermal parameters and gravimetric soil water content was found for Avondale loam when its water content was between air-dry and field capacity. These parameters, daily maximum minus minimum surface soil temperature and daily maximum soil minus air temperature, appear to describe the relationship reasonably well. These two parameters also describe relative soil water evaporation (actual/potential). Surface soil temperatures showed good agreement among three measurement techniques: in situ thermocouples, a ground-based infrared radiation thermometer, and the thermal infrared band of an airborne multispectral scanner.

  5. Frequency-dependent hydrodynamic inductance and the determination of the thermal and quantum noise of a superfluid gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin

    2005-04-01

    We reexamine mass flow in a superfluid gyroscope containing a superfluid Josephson weak link. We introduce a frequency-dependent hydrodynamic inductance to account for an oscillatory flow of the normal fluid component in the sensing loop. With this hydrodynamic inductance, we derive the thermal phase noise, and hence the thermal rotational noise of the gyroscope. We examine the thermodynamic stability of the system based on an analysis of the free energy. We derive a quantum phase noise, which is analogous to the zero-point motion of a simple harmonic oscillator. The configuration of the studied gyroscope is analogous to a conventional superconducting RF SQUID. We show that the gyroscope has very low intrinsic noise (1.9x10{sup -13} rad s{sup -1}/{radical}(Hz)), and it can potentially be applied to study general relativity, Earth science, and to improve global positioning systems (GPS)

  6. Study Task for Determining the Effects of Boost-Phase Environments on Densified Propellants Thermal Conditions for Expendable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberbusch, Mark S.; Meyer, Michael L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermodynamic study has been conducted that investigated the effects of the boost-phase environment on densified propellant thermal conditions for expendable launch vehicles. Two thermodynamic models were developed and utilized to bound the expected thermodynamic conditions inside the cryogenic liquid hydrogen and oxygen propellant tanks of an Atlas IIAS/Centaur launch vehicle during the initial phases of flight. The ideal isentropic compression model was developed to predict minimum pressurant gas requirements. The thermal equilibrium model was developed to predict the maximum pressurant gas requirements. The models were modified to simulate the required flight tank pressure profiles through ramp pressurization, liquid expulsion, and tank venting. The transient parameters investigated were: liquid temperature, liquid level, and pressurant gas consumption. Several mission scenarios were analyzed using the thermodynamic models, and the results indicate that flying an Atlas IIAS launch vehicle with densified propellants is feasible and beneficial but may require some minor changes to the vehicle.

  7. Ground-Atmosphere Interactions at Gale: Determination of the Surface Energy Budget, Thermal Inertia and Water Sorption on the Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, German; Renno, Nilton; Fischer, Erik; Borlina, Caue; Hallet, Bernard; De la Torre Juarez, Manuel; Vasavada, Aswhin; Gomez-Elvira, Javier

    2014-05-01

    The analysis of the Surface Energy Budget (SEB) yields insights into the local climate and the soil-atmosphere interactions, while the analysis of the thermal inertia of the shallow subsurface augments surface observations, providing information about the local geology. The Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System have measured near subsurface thermal inertia from orbit at scales of ~104 m2 to ~10 km2. Here we report analysis of the thermal inertia at a few locations at Gale Crater at scales of 100 m2. The thermal inertia is calculated by solving the heat conduction equation in the soil using hourly measurements by the Rover Environmental Station (REMS) ground temperature sensor as an upper boundary condition. Three Sols representative of different environmental conditions and soil properties, namely, Sol 82 at Rocknest (RCK), Sol 112 at Point Lake (PL) and Sol 139 at Yellowknife Bay (YKB) are analyzed in detail. The largest thermal inertia (I) value is found at YKB, I = 445 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2 or 445 tiu (thermal inertia unit), followed by PL with I= 300 tiu and RCK withI = 280 tiu [1]. These values are consistent with the type of terrain imaged by MastCam and with previous satellite estimates at Gale Crater [2,3]. The SEB is calculated by using all REMS data products as well as dust opacity values derived from MastCam measurements, whereas previously, the SEB has been calculated using numerical models only [4]. At each location and during the daytime, the SEB is dominated by the downwelling shortwave (SW) solar radiation (~450-500 W/m2) and the upwelling longwave (LW) radiation emitted by the surface (~300-400 W/m2). The sum of these two terms accounts for at least 70% of the net surface heating rate between 0900 and 1400 local solar time. At nighttime, the SEB is dominated by the upwelling LW radiation emitted by the surface (~50-100 W/m2) and the downwelling LW radiation from the atmosphere (~50 W/m2

  8. Determination of kinetic law for toxic metals release during thermal treatment of model waste in a fluid-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Abanades, S; Gauthier, D; Flamant, G; Zheng, Chuguang; Lu, Jidong

    2005-12-01

    Accumulation of toxic metals generated by thermal treatment of municipal solid waste presents a serious threat to the environment. A study was carried out to investigate the kinetic law of toxic metal release from municipal solid waste during their thermal treatment. Both direct and inverse models were developed in transient conditions. The direct mathematical model of the fluid-bed reactor is based on Kunii and Levenspiel's two-phase flow model for Geldart Group B particles. The inverse model intends to predict the metal's rate of vaporization from its concentration in the outlet gas. The derived models were found to predict reasonably well the experimental observations. A method to derive the kinetic law of toxic metals release during fluidized bed thermal treatment of model waste from the global model and the experimental measurements is derived and illustrated. A first-order law was fitted for the mineral matrix, and a second-order law (simplified) was fitted for the realistic model waste. The kinetic law obtained in this way could be integrated in a global model of combustion of municipal solid waste in order to simulate the effects of operating parameters on the metal's behavior. PMID:16382960

  9. Accepters and Rejecters of Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Harriett A.; Elton, Charles F.

    Personality differences between students who accept or reject proffered counseling assistance were investigated by comparing personality traits of 116 male students at the University of Kentucky who accepted or rejected letters of invitation to group counseling. Factor analysis of Omnibus Personality Inventory (OPI) scores to two groups of 60 and…

  10. Cone penetrometer acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Boechler, G.N.

    1996-09-19

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance test procedure WHC-SD-WM-ATR-151. Included in this report is a summary of the tests, the results and issues, the signature and sign- off ATP pages, and a summarized table of the specification vs. ATP section that satisfied the specification.

  11. Acceptance of Swedish e-health services

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mary-Louise; Loria, Karla

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate older people’s acceptance of e-health services, in order to identify determinants of, and barriers to, their intention to use e-health. Method: Based on one of the best-established models of technology acceptance, Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), in-depth exploratory interviews with twelve individuals over 45 years of age and of varying backgrounds are conducted. Results: This investigation could find support for the importance of usefulness and perceived ease of use of the e-health service offered as the main determinants of people’s intention to use the service. Additional factors critical to the acceptance of e-health are identified, such as the importance of the compatibility of the services with citizens’ needs and trust in the service provider. Most interviewees expressed positive attitudes towards using e-health and find these services useful, convenient, and easy to use. Conclusion: E-health services are perceived as a good complement to traditional health care service delivery, even among older people. These people, however, need to become aware of the e-health alternatives that are offered to them and the benefits they provide. PMID:21289860

  12. Emperical Tests of Acceptance Sampling Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. Preston, Jr.; Johnson, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    Acceptance sampling is a quality control procedure applied as an alternative to 100% inspection. A random sample of items is drawn from a lot to determine the fraction of items which have a required quality characteristic. Both the number of items to be inspected and the criterion for determining conformance of the lot to the requirement are given by an appropriate sampling plan with specified risks of Type I and Type II sampling errors. In this paper, we present the results of empirical tests of the accuracy of selected sampling plans reported in the literature. These plans are for measureable quality characteristics which are known have either binomial, exponential, normal, gamma, Weibull, inverse Gaussian, or Poisson distributions. In the main, results support the accepted wisdom that variables acceptance plans are superior to attributes (binomial) acceptance plans, in the sense that these provide comparable protection against risks at reduced sampling cost. For the Gaussian and Weibull plans, however, there are ranges of the shape parameters for which the required sample sizes are in fact larger than the corresponding attributes plans, dramatically so for instances of large skew. Tests further confirm that the published inverse-Gaussian (IG) plan is flawed, as reported by White and Johnson (2011).

  13. To prepare and characterize microcrystalline cellulose granules using water and isopropyl alcohol as granulating agents and determine its end-point by thermal and rheological tools.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Smruti P; Dave, Rutesh H

    2015-05-01

    Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC-102) is one of the most commonly used excipient in the pharmaceutical industry. For this research purpose, authors have developed a different technique to determine the end point for MCC-102 using water and isopropyl alcohol 70% (IPA) as granulating agent. Wet and dry granules obtained were characterized for their flow properties using the powder rheometer and thermal analysis. Powder rheometer was used to measure basic flowability energy (BFE), specific energy (SE), percentage compressibility, permeability and aeration. Thermal analysis includes effusivity and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. BFE and SE results showed water granules requires high energy as compared to IPA granules. Permeability and compressibility results suggest IPA forms more porous granules and have better compressibility as compared to water granules. Hardness data reveals interesting phenomena in which as the amount of water increases, hardness decreases and vice-versa for IPA. Optimal granules were obtained in the range of 45-55% w/w. DSC data supported the formation of optimal granules. Empirical measurements like angle of repose did not reveal any significant differences between powder flow among various granules. In this paper, with the help of thermal effusivity and powder rheology we were able to differentiate between various powder flows and determine the optimal range for granule formation. PMID:24654935

  14. Determination of seven pyrethroids biocides and their synergist in indoor air by thermal-desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after sampling on Tenax TA ® passive tubes.

    PubMed

    Raeppel, Caroline; Appenzeller, Brice M; Millet, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    A method coupling thermal desorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of 7 pyrethroids (allethrin, bifenthrin, cyphenothrin, imiprothrin, permethrin, prallethrin and tetramethrin) and piperonyl butoxide adsorbed on Tenax TA(®) passive samplers after exposure in indoor air. Thermal desorption was selected as it permits efficient and rapid extraction without solvent used together with a good sensitivity. Detection (S/N>3) and quantification (S/N>10) limits varied between 0.001 ng and 2.5 ng and between 0.005 and 10 ng respectively with a reproducibility varied between 14% (bifenthrin) and 39% (permethrin). The method was used for the comparison indoor air contamination after low-pressure spraying and fumigation application in a rubbish chute situated in the basement of a building. PMID:25281107

  15. 48 CFR 52.214-16 - Minimum Bid Acceptance Period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum Bid Acceptance....214-16 Minimum Bid Acceptance Period. As prescribed in 14.201-6(j), insert the following provision in invitations for bids, except for construction, if the contracting officer determines that a minimum...

  16. 48 CFR 52.214-16 - Minimum Bid Acceptance Period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum Bid Acceptance....214-16 Minimum Bid Acceptance Period. As prescribed in 14.201-6(j), insert the following provision in invitations for bids, except for construction, if the contracting officer determines that a minimum...

  17. 20 CFR 655.143 - Notice of acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice of acceptance. 655.143 Section 655.143 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT OF... § 655.143 Notice of acceptance. (a) Notification timeline. When the CO determines the Application...

  18. Overcoming Denial through the Group: A Test of Acceptance Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugel, Robert P.; Barry, Denise

    1990-01-01

    Found participants (N=28) in alcohol treatment groups showed decreases in denial of drinking problems and decreases in psychopathology following 12 weeks of group counseling. Determined greater self-acceptance was associated with experiencing acceptance by group and with greater decreases in denial; decreases in denial and psychopathology were…

  19. User Acceptance of Information Technology: Theories and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Andrew; Morris, Michael G.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews literature in user acceptance and resistance to information technology design and implementation. Examines innovation diffusion, technology design and implementation, human-computer interaction, and information systems. Concentrates on the determinants of user acceptance and resistance and emphasizes how researchers and developers can…

  20. Determination of Transient Thermal Interface Resistance Between Two Bonded Metal Bodies using the Laser-Flash Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, N. D.

    2008-12-01

    The paper presents the data reduction analysis for measurements of the transient thermal interface resistance between two bonded metal bodies using the laser-flash method. By using two different mathematical models, i.e., a two-layered and a three-layered model, whose complete analytical solutions for realistic conditions are provided, different results for final values and their uncertainties can be obtained. The analysis has been applied to experimental data measured from samples prepared with three different bonding materials, cyanoacrylate, metal epoxy resin, and silicone rubber.

  1. Thermal gain shutter control. Final report, preliminary design phase

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzdrall, J.A.

    1983-10-01

    The Thermal Gain Sensor is an insulation control system for manual and motorized solar shutters. Unlike ordinary systems, control is based on the actual net thermal flow through the window, rather than a tenuous or indirect measure. The sensor continuously and directly tracks the conduction, convection, and radiation losses as well as the attenuated solar input. Although basically simple and inexpensive, the Thermal Gain Sensor (TGS) reacts to the thermal flow with near perfect accuracy. It operates with equal effectiveness in both summer and winter. The hardware consists of a sensor, a control box, and an optional power controller for motorized shutters. The first objective of the preliminary design phase was to determine if, with properly selected materials and dimensions, a practical sensor could accurately determine the real thermal gain threshold under the wide range of installations, geographic locations, and weather conditions. The second objective, having found the best possible sensor design, was to determine whether the level of performance attainable produced significantly more energy savings than competitive control systems, namely time and sunlight activated systems. Another objective of this phase was to assure that the product could be made for an acceptable cost. To this end, a schematic design, including conceptual drawings, was prepared. From this conceptual design, manufacturing cost estimates were made using industry accepted estimating procedures. Finally, it was required to determine whether there was public interest in the product. For this, a preliminary assessment of the market was made, based on unsolicited inquiries and local discussions.

  2. Simultaneous determination of the quantity and isotopic ratios of uranium in individual micro-particles by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS).

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Ho; Choi, Eun-Ju

    2016-11-01

    A method to determine the quantity and isotopic ratios of uranium in individual micro-particles simultaneously by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) has been developed. This method consists of sequential sample and spike loading, ID-TIMS for isotopic measurement, and application of a series of mathematical procedures to remove the contribution of uranium in the spike. The homogeneity of evaporation and ionization of uranium content was confirmed by the consistent ratio of n((233)U)/n((238)U) determined by TIMS measurements. Verification of the method was performed using U030 solution droplets and U030 particles. Good agreements of resulting uranium quantity, n((235)U)/n((238)U), and n((236)U)/n((238)U) with the estimated or certified values showed the validity of this newly developed method for particle analysis when simultaneous determination of the quantity and isotopic ratios of uranium is required. PMID:27591656

  3. Short loop length and high thermal stability determine genomic instability induced by G-quadruplex-forming minisatellites

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Aurèle; Adrian, Michael; Samazan, Frédéric; Heddi, Brahim; Hamon, Florian; Serero, Alexandre; Lopes, Judith; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Phan, Anh Tuân; Nicolas, Alain

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are polymorphic four-stranded structures formed by certain G-rich nucleic acids, with various biological roles. However, structural features dictating their formation and/or functionin vivo are unknown. InS. cerevisiae, the pathological persistency of G4 within the CEB1 minisatellite induces its rearrangement during leading-strand replication. We now show that several other G4-forming sequences remain stable. Extensive mutagenesis of the CEB25 minisatellite motif reveals that only variants with very short (≤ 4 nt) G4 loops preferentially containing pyrimidine bases trigger genomic instability. Parallel biophysical analyses demonstrate that shortening loop length does not change the monomorphic G4 structure of CEB25 variants but drastically increases its thermal stability, in correlation with thein vivo instability. Finally, bioinformatics analyses reveal that the threat for genomic stability posed by G4 bearing short pyrimidine loops is conserved inC. elegans and humans. This work provides a framework explanation for the heterogeneous instability behavior of G4-forming sequencesin vivo, highlights the importance of structure thermal stability, and questions the prevailing assumption that G4 structures with short or longer loops are as likely to formin vivo. PMID:25956747

  4. Viscoelastic properties of single polysaccharide molecules determined by analysis of thermally driven oscillations of an atomic force microscope cantilever.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Masaru; Byrne, Katherine; Khatri, Bhavin; McLeish, Tom C B; Radford, Sheena E; Smith, D Alastair

    2004-10-12

    We report on single molecule measurements of the viscoelastic properties of the polysaccharide dextran using a new approach which involves acquiring the power spectral density of the thermal noise of an atomic force microscope cantilever while holding the single molecule of interest under force-clamp conditions. The attractiveness of this approach when compared with techniques which use forced oscillations under constant loading rate conditions is that it is a near-equilibrium measure of mechanical response which provides a more relevant probe of thermally driven biomolecular dynamics. Using a simple harmonic oscillator model of the cantilever-molecule system and by subtracting the response of the free cantilever taking into account hydrodynamic effects, the effective damping zetamol and elastic constant kmol of a single molecule are obtained. The molecular elasticity measured by this new technique shows a dependence on applied force that reflects the chair-boat conformational transition of the pyranose rings of the dextran molecule which is in good agreement with values obtained directly from the gradient of a conventional constant loading rate force-extension curve. The molecular damping is also seen to follow a nontrivial dependence on loading which we suggest indicates that it is internal friction and not work done on the solvent that is the dominant dissipative process. PMID:15461521

  5. Theoretical determination of anisotropic thermal conductivity for crystalline 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroonblawd, Matthew P.; Sewell, Thomas D.

    2013-08-01

    Bond stretching and three-center angle bending potentials have been developed to extend an existing rigid-bond 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene molecular dynamics force field [D. Bedrov, O. Borodin, G. D. Smith, T. D. Sewell, D. M. Dattelbaum, and L. L. Stevens, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 224703 (2009), 10.1063/1.3264972] for simulations requiring fully flexible molecules. The potentials were fit to experimental vibrational spectra and electronic structure predictions of vibrational normal modes using a combination of zero kelvin eigenmode analysis for the isolated molecule and power spectra for the isolated molecule and crystal. A reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics method [F. Müller-Plathe, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 6082 (1997), 10.1063/1.473271] was used to obtain the room temperature, atmospheric pressure thermal conductivity along three directions in a well-defined, non-orthogonal basis. The thermal conductivity was found to be significantly anisotropic with values 1.13 ± 0.07, 1.07 ± 0.07, and 0.65 ± 0.03 W m-1 K-1 for directions nominally parallel to the a, b, and c lattice vectors, respectively.

  6. Space thermal control development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, M. J.; Grodzka, P. G.; Oneill, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations on a number of various phase change materials (PCMs) and PCMs in combination with metals and other materials are reported. The evaluations include the following PCM system performance characteristics: PCM and PCM/filler thermal diffusivities, the effects of long-term thermal cycling, PCM-container compatibility, and catalyst effectiveness and stability. Three PCMs demonstrated performance acceptable enough to be considered for use in prototype aluminum thermal control devices. These three PCMs are lithium nitrate trihydrate with zinc hydroxy nitrate catalyst, acetamide, and myristic acid. Of the fillers tested, aluminum honeycomb filler was found to offer the most increase in system thermal diffusivity.

  7. Payload test philosophy. [JPL views on qualification/acceptance testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gindorf, T.

    1979-01-01

    The general philosophy of how JPL views payload qualification/acceptance testing for programs that are done either in-house or by contractors is described. Particular attention is given to mission risk classifications, preliminary critical design reviews, environmental design requirements, the thermal and dynamics development tests, and the flight spacecraft system test.

  8. 40 CFR 240.200 - Solid wastes accepted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Solid wastes accepted. 240.200 Section 240.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.200...

  9. 40 CFR 240.200 - Solid wastes accepted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Solid wastes accepted. 240.200 Section 240.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.200...

  10. 40 CFR 240.200 - Solid wastes accepted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Solid wastes accepted. 240.200 Section 240.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.200...

  11. 40 CFR 240.200 - Solid wastes accepted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Solid wastes accepted. 240.200 Section 240.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.200...

  12. 40 CFR 240.200 - Solid wastes accepted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Solid wastes accepted. 240.200 Section 240.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.200...

  13. Differences in HIV vaccine acceptability between genders.

    PubMed

    Kakinami, Lisa; Newman, Peter A; Lee, Sung-Jae; Duan, Naihua

    2008-05-01

    The development of safe and efficacious preventive HIV vaccines offers the best long-term hope of controlling the AIDS pandemic. Nevertheless, suboptimal uptake of safe and efficacious vaccines that already exist suggest that HIV vaccine acceptability cannot be assumed, particularly among communities most vulnerable to HIV. The present study aimed to identify barriers and motivators to future HIV vaccine acceptability among low socioeconomic, ethnically diverse men and women in Los Angeles County. Participants completed a cross-sectional survey assessing their attitudes and beliefs regarding future HIV vaccines. Hypothetical HIV vaccine scenarios were administered to determine HIV vaccine acceptability. Two-sided t-tests were performed, stratified by gender, to examine the association between vaccine acceptability and potential barriers and motivators. Barriers to HIV vaccine acceptability differed between men and women. For women, barriers to HIV vaccine acceptability were related to their intimate relationships (p<0.05), negative experiences with health care providers (p<0.05) and anticipated difficulties procuring insurance (p<0.01). Men were concerned that the vaccine would weaken the immune system (p<0.005) or would affect their HIV test results (p<0.05). Motivators for women included the ability to conceive a child without worrying about contracting HIV (p<0.10) and support from their spouse/significant other for being vaccinated (p<0.10). Motivators for men included feeling safer with sex partners (p<0.05) and social influence from friends to get vaccinated (p<0.005). Family support for HIV immunization was a motivator for both men and women (p<0.10). Gender-specific interventions may increase vaccine acceptability among men and women at elevated risk for HIV infection. Among women, interventions need to focus on addressing barriers due to gendered power dynamics in relationships and discrimination in health care. Among men, education that addresses fears

  14. Thermal-stress modeling of an optical microphone at high temperature.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, Casey Anderson

    2010-08-01

    To help determine the capability range of a MEMS optical microphone design in harsh conditions computer simulations were carried out. Thermal stress modeling was performed up to temperatures of 1000 C. Particular concern was over stress and strain profiles due to the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the polysilicon device and alumina packaging. Preliminary results with simplified models indicate acceptable levels of deformation within the device.

  15. Radiative thermal neutron-capture cross sections for the 180W(n ,γ ) reaction and determination of the neutron-separation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, A. M.; Firestone, R. B.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Sleaford, B. W.; Basunia, M. S.; Belgya, T.; Escher, J. E.; Krtička, M.; Révay, Zs.; Summers, N. C.

    2015-09-01

    Prompt thermal neutron-capture partial γ -ray production cross sections were measured for the first time for the 180W(n ,γ ) reaction using a cold guided-neutron beam at the Budapest Research Reactor. Absolute 181Wγ -ray cross sections were internally standardized using well-known comparator γ -ray cross sections belonging to the other tungsten isotopes present in the 11.35% enriched 180W sample. Transitions were assigned to levels in 181W based largely upon information available in the literature. The total radiative thermal neutron-capture cross section σ0 was determined from the sum of direct prompt γ -ray cross sections populating the ground state and a modeled contribution accounting for ground-state feeding from the quasicontinuum. In this work, we find σ0=21.67 (77 ) b. A new measurement of the cross section for the 5 /2- metastable isomer at 365.6 keV, σ5 /2-(181Wm,14.6 μ s ) =19.96 (55 ) b, is also determined. Additionally, primary γ rays, observed for the first time in the 180W(n ,γ ) reaction, provide the most precise determination for the 181W neutron-separation energy, Sn=6669.02 (16 ) keV.

  16. Micro-solid phase extraction followed by thermal extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass selective detector for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water.

    PubMed

    Naing, Nyi Nyi; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Lee, Hian Kee

    2016-08-01

    A method of analyzing environmental contaminants in water based on micro-solid phase extraction (μ-SPE) followed by thermal extraction (TE) and a cold-trapping step, coupled with gas chromatography-mass selective detection (GC-MSD) was developed and validated. μ-SPE-TE- GC-MSD was employed in the determination of five polybrominated diphenyl ethers. The μ-SPE sorbent was chitosan-graphene oxide (CS-GO) composite, which was prepared by mixing CS and GO by means of ultrasonication. The CS in the composite was cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. After μ-SPE, the analytes in the extract were extracted thermally in a thermal desorption unit tube combined with a cooled injection system, coupled to GC-MSD. The extraction conditions were optimized for the detection of the target compounds in water. This method provided linearity ranges of between 0.1 and 20μgL(-1) (depending on the analytes), with coefficients of determination, r(2), ≥0.9982. The calculated relative recoveries were between 71.52 and 96.15% whereas precision (based on % relative standard deviations) was between 3.54 and 11.36%. The method showed limit of detection and limit of quantification ranges of between 0.007 and 0.016μgL(-1), and between 0.023 and 0.054μgL(-1), for the two groups of analytes, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of the target analytes in water. PMID:27373376

  17. Accepted scientific research works (abstracts).

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    These are the 39 accepted abstracts for IAYT's Symposium on Yoga Research (SYR) September 24-24, 2014 at the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health and published in the Final Program Guide and Abstracts. PMID:25645134

  18. L-286 Acceptance Test Record

    SciTech Connect

    HARMON, B.C.

    2000-01-14

    This document provides a detailed account of how the acceptance testing was conducted for Project L-286, ''200E Area Sanitary Water Plant Effluent Stream Reduction''. The testing of the L-286 instrumentation system was conducted under the direct supervision

  19. Acceptance of sugar reduction in flavored yogurt.

    PubMed

    Chollet, M; Gille, D; Schmid, A; Walther, B; Piccinali, P

    2013-09-01

    To investigate what level of sugar reduction is accepted in flavored yogurt, we conducted a hedonic test focusing on the degree of liking of the products and on optimal sweetness and aroma levels. For both flavorings (strawberry and coffee), consumers preferred yogurt containing 10% added sugar. However, yogurt containing 7% added sugar was also acceptable. On the just-about-right scale, yogurt containing 10% sugar was more often described as too sweet compared with yogurt containing 7% sugar. On the other hand, the sweetness and aroma intensity for yogurt containing 5% sugar was judged as too low. A second test was conducted to determine the effect of flavoring concentration on the acceptance of yogurt containing 7% sugar. Yogurts containing the highest concentrations of flavoring (11% strawberry, 0.75% coffee) were less appreciated. Additionally, the largest percentage of consumers perceived these yogurts as "not sweet enough." These results indicate that consumers would accept flavored yogurts with 7% added sugar instead of 10%, but 5% sugar would be too low. Additionally, an increase in flavor concentration is undesirable for yogurt containing 7% added sugar. PMID:23871368

  20. User Acceptance of YouTube for Procedural Learning: An Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Doo Young; Lehto, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was framed using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to identify determinants affecting behavioral intention to use YouTube. Most importantly, this research emphasizes the motives for using YouTube, which is notable given its extrinsic task goal of being used for procedural learning tasks. Our conceptual framework included two…

  1. Thermal and physical property determination for IONSIV/256 IE-911 crystalline silicotitanate and Savannah River Site waste simulant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    1999-12-08

    This document describes physical and thermophysical property determinations that were made in order to resolve questions associated with the decontamination of Savannah River Site waste streams using ion exchange on crystalline silicotitanate.

  2. Fast capillary GC using a low thermal mass column oven for the determination of residual solvents in pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    David, Frank; Szücs, Roman; Makwana, Jay; Sandra, Pat

    2006-03-01

    A low thermal mass column oven was used for fast capillary GC analysis (high throughput) of residual solvents in pharmaceutical products. A dedicated capillary column, 20 m L x 180 microm ID x 1 microm DB-624 was programmed from 35 degrees C (30 s) to 150 degrees C at 100 degrees C/min and to 250 degrees C (30 s) at 200 degrees C/min, resulting in a total GC cycle time of less than 4 min. Complete separation of a target 20-component mixture was achieved, while method performance in terms of repeatability, sensitivity, and linearity was maintained in comparison to the generic method currently applied in our laboratories. PMID:16605090

  3. Latent heat thermal energy storage: Determination of properties of storage media and development of a new transfer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhat, A.; Aboul-Enein, S.; Malatidis, N. A.

    1982-01-01

    A latent heat storage system for low temperature solar heating applications was developed. Latent heat storage materials were studied and a heat exchanger design was evaluated. Thermophysical properties of 14 organic and inorganic heat storage materials, including 5 inexpensive commercial paraffins, 2 fatty acids, and 5 salt hydrates, were measured with a precision differential scanning calorimeter. Data pertaining to phase transition temperature, enthalphy and, specific heat of the heat storage materials in solid and liquid phases were taken. The influence of thermal cycling on the melting and freezing behavior of the materials and on changes in thermophysical properties was analyzed. A heat exchanger with finned annulus heat exchanger elements was investigated. Tests were performed, using two laboratory models that employed a paraffin, two fatty acids and one salt hydrate as heat storage materials.

  4. Thermal gain shutter control. Preliminary design phase. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzdrall, J.A.

    1983-10-01

    The Thermal Gain Sensor is an insulation control system for manual and motorized solar shutters. Unlike ordinary systems, control is based on the actual net thermal flow through the window, rather than a tenuous or indirect measure. The sensor continuously and directly tracks the conduction, convection, and radiation losses as well as the attenuated solar input. The hardware consists of a sensor, a control box, and an optional power controller for motorized shutters. The purpose of the preliminary design phase, the first of a four phase product development program, is to assure that there are no technical, cost, or acceptance barriers to the potential product. Accordingly, the first objective of this phase was to determine if, with properly selected materials and dimensions, a practical sensor could accurately determine the real thermal gain threshold under the wide range of installations, geographic locations, and weather conditions. The second objective, having found the best possible sensor design, was to determine whether the level of performance attainable produced significantly more energy savings than competitive control systems, namely time and sunlight activated systems. Another objective of this phase was to assure that the product could be made for an acceptable cost. To this end, a schematic design, including conceptual drawings, was prepared. From this conceptual design, manufacturing cost estimates were made using industry accepted estimating procedures. Finally, it was required to determine whether there was public interest in the product. For this, a preliminary assessment of the market was made, based on unsolicited inquiries and local discussions.

  5. Determination of trichloroanisole and trichlorophenol in wineries' ambient air by passive sampling and thermal desorption-gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Camino-Sánchez, F J; Bermúdez-Peinado, R; Zafra-Gómez, A; Ruíz-García, J; Vílchez-Quero, J L

    2015-02-01

    The present paper describes the calibration of selected passive samplers used in the quantitation of trichlorophenol and trichloroanisole in wineries' ambient air, by calculating the corresponding sampling rates. The method is based on passive sampling with sorbent tubes and involves thermal desorption-gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis. Three commercially available sorbents were tested using sampling cartridges with a radial design instead of axial ones. The best results were found for Tenax TA™. Sampling rates (R-values) for the selected sorbents were determined. Passive sampling was also used for accurately determining the amount of compounds present in the air. Adequate correlation coefficients between the mass of the target analytes and exposure time were obtained. The proposed validated method is a useful tool for the early detection of trichloroanisole and its precursor trichlorophenol in wineries' ambient air while avoiding contamination of wine or winery facilities. PMID:25576042

  6. Determination of clothing evaporative resistance on a sweating thermal manikin in an isothermal condition: heat loss method or mass loss method?

    PubMed

    Wang, Faming; Gao, Chuansi; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmér, Ingvar

    2011-08-01

    This paper addresses selection between two calculation options, i.e heat loss option and mass loss option, for thermal manikin measurements on clothing evaporative resistance conducted in an isothermal condition (T(manikin) = T(a) = T(r)). Five vocational clothing ensembles with a thermal insulation range of 1.05-2.58 clo were selected and measured on a sweating thermal manikin 'Tore'. The reasons why the isothermal heat loss method generates a higher evaporative resistance than that of the mass loss method were thoroughly investigated. In addition, an indirect approach was applied to determine the amount of evaporative heat energy taken from the environment. It was found that clothing evaporative resistance values by the heat loss option were 11.2-37.1% greater than those based on the mass loss option. The percentage of evaporative heat loss taken from the environment (H(e,env)) for all test scenarios ranged from 10.9 to 23.8%. The real evaporative cooling efficiency ranged from 0.762 to 0.891, respectively. Furthermore, it is evident that the evaporative heat loss difference introduced by those two options was equal to the heat energy taken from the environment. In order to eliminate the combined effects of dry heat transfer, condensation, and heat pipe on clothing evaporative resistance, it is suggested that manikin measurements on the determination of clothing evaporative resistance should be performed in an isothermal condition. Moreover, the mass loss method should be applied to calculate clothing evaporative resistance. The isothermal heat loss method would appear to overestimate heat stress and thus should be corrected before use. PMID:21669906

  7. Thermal Remote Anemometer Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Heath, D. Michele; Winfree, William P.; Miller, William E.; Welch, Christopher S.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal Remote Anemometer Device developed for remote, noncontacting, passive measurement of thermal properties of sample. Model heated locally by scanning laser beam and cooled by wind in tunnel. Thermal image of model analyzed to deduce pattern of airflow around model. For materials applications, system used for evaluation of thin films and determination of thermal diffusivity and adhesive-layer contact. For medical applications, measures perfusion through skin to characterize blood flow and used to determine viabilities of grafts and to characterize tissues.

  8. In Situ Determination of Clostridium Endospore Membrane Fluidity during Pressure-Assisted Thermal Processing in Combination with Nisin or Reutericyclin

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, S.; Winter, R.; McMullen, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    This study determined the membrane fluidity of clostridial endospores during treatment with heat and pressure with nisin or reutericyclin. Heating (90°C) reduced laurdan (6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene) general polarization, corresponding to membrane fluidization. Pressure (200 MPa) stabilized membrane order. Reutericyclin and nisin exhibit divergent effects on heat- and pressure-induced spore inactivation and membrane fluidity. PMID:23335780

  9. In situ determination of Clostridium endospore membrane fluidity during pressure-assisted thermal processing in combination with nisin or reutericyclin.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, S; Winter, R; McMullen, L M; Gänzle, M G

    2013-03-01

    This study determined the membrane fluidity of clostridial endospores during treatment with heat and pressure with nisin or reutericyclin. Heating (90°C) reduced laurdan (6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene) general polarization, corresponding to membrane fluidization. Pressure (200 MPa) stabilized membrane order. Reutericyclin and nisin exhibit divergent effects on heat- and pressure-induced spore inactivation and membrane fluidity. PMID:23335780

  10. Using Variable Temperature Powder X-Ray Diffraction to Determine the Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Solid MgO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsepius, Nicholas C.; DeVore, Thomas C.; Reisner, Barbara A.; Warnaar, Deborah L.

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory exercise was developed by using variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) to determine [alpha] for MgO (periclase)and was tested in the Applied Physical Chemistry and Materials Characterization Laboratories at James Madison University. The experiment which was originally designed to provide undergraduate students with a…

  11. Residual Stress Determination in Thermally Sprayed Coatings – A Comparison of Curvature Models and X-Ray Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Totemeier; J.K. Wright

    2006-03-01

    Residual stresses were calculated from the curvature of coating-substrate coupons using three different models: a simple two-beam elastic model; the Tsui-Clyne progressive deposition model; and the Tsui-Clyne progressive deposition model with substrate plasticity. The coatings studied were metallic and prepared by high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying. The calculated stresses were compared to those measured on the same coupons using x-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Coating surface stresses calculated using the two-beam elastic model disagreed with those measured using XRD for coupons with significant curvature. Trends in residual stresses (with varying coating and substrate thickness, substrate material, and HVOF spray particle velocity) predicted by the elastic and elastic-plastic versions of the Tsui-Clyne progressive deposition model agreed with the trends measured by XRD. The magnitudes of stresses calculated using the Tsui-Clyne model agreed with the XRD measurements for coatings sprayed at low particle velocities but were significantly more compressive for coatings sprayed at higher velocities. Accounting for substrate plasticity in the Tsui-Clyne model improved the agreement with the XRD results, but only slightly.

  12. Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

    2010-01-15

    Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

  13. Simultaneous determination of structural and thermodynamic effects of carbohydrate solutes on the thermal stability of ribonuclease A.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Thomas F; Debenedetti, Pablo G; Carbeck, Jeffrey D

    2004-09-29

    This communication describes a new technique for the study of the effects of carbohydrates on the thermal stability of proteins. This approach combines capillary electrophoresis (CE) and protein charge ladders, collections of proteins that differ incrementally in number of chemically modified charged groups, to provide information on both the thermodynamics (i.e., the free energy, DeltaGN-D, of denaturation), and structural changes (i.e., the effective hydrodynamic radius, RH, of proteins in both the native and denatured states) associated with stability. This information, obtained in a single set of electrophoresis experiments, allows a simple microscopic interpretation of the effects of carbohydrate solutes on protein stability. We use this technique to show that the stabilization of ribonuclease A at pH 8.4 by sucrose and fructose can be explained entirely by the contribution these solutes make to the entropy of formation of the protein-solution interface. There is no need, in this case, to refer to quasichemical concepts such as preferential hydration, binding, or exchange of solutes with water at specific sites on the protein to account for the stabilizing effects observed. PMID:15382905

  14. Validation and acceptance of synthetic infrared imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Moira I.; Bernhardt, Mark; Angell, Christopher R.; Hickman, Duncan; Whitehead, Philip; Patel, Dilip

    2004-08-01

    This paper describes the use of an image query database (IQ-DB) tool as a means of implementing a validation strategy for synthetic long-wave infrared images of sea clutter. Specifically it was required to determine the validity of the synthetic imagery for use in developing and testing automatic target detection algorithms. The strategy adopted for exploiting synthetic imagery is outlined and the key issues of validation and acceptance are discussed in detail. A wide range of image metrics has been developed to achieve pre-defined validation criteria. A number of these metrics, which include post processing algorithms, are presented. Furthermore, the IQ-DB provides a robust mechanism for configuration management and control of the large volume of data used. The implementation of the IQ-DB is reviewed in terms of its cardinal point specification and its central role in synthetic imagery validation and EOSS progressive acceptance.

  15. Dynamic thermal environment and thermal comfort.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Ouyang, Q; Cao, B; Zhou, X; Yu, J

    2016-02-01

    Research has shown that a stable thermal environment with tight temperature control cannot bring occupants more thermal comfort. Instead, such an environment will incur higher energy costs and produce greater CO2 emissions. Furthermore, this may lead to the degeneration of occupants' inherent ability to combat thermal stress, thereby weakening thermal adaptability. Measured data from many field investigations have shown that the human body has a higher acceptance to the thermal environment in free-running buildings than to that in air-conditioned buildings with similar average parameters. In naturally ventilated environments, occupants have reported superior thermal comfort votes and much greater thermal comfort temperature ranges compared to air-conditioned environments. This phenomenon is an integral part of the adaptive thermal comfort model. In addition, climate chamber experiments have proven that people prefer natural wind to mechanical wind in warm conditions; in other words, dynamic airflow can provide a superior cooling effect. However, these findings also indicate that significant questions related to thermal comfort remain unanswered. For example, what is the cause of these phenomena? How we can build a comfortable and healthy indoor environment for human beings? This article summarizes a series of research achievements in recent decades, tries to address some of these unanswered questions, and attempts to summarize certain problems for future research. PMID:26171688

  16. Microbicide acceptability research: current approaches and future directions.

    PubMed

    Mantell, Joanne E; Myer, Landon; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Stein, Zena; Ramjee, Gita; Morar, Neetha S; Harrison, Polly F

    2005-01-01

    With growing recognition of the potential value of microbicides for HIV/STI prevention, the importance of the acceptability of this brand-new technology has been widely acknowledged. We review the current body of microbicide acceptability research, characterize the limitations in assessment approaches, and suggest strategies for improvement. Electronic databases and abstracts of recent meetings were searched for acceptability data regarding vaginal and rectal products that may be used for HIV prevention. Of the 61 studies reviewed, more than half assessed acceptability based primarily on the description of a hypothetical microbicide, or with the demonstration of a spermicide or lubricant. Physical characteristics of microbicidal products, their effects after insertion, and their effects on sensation during intercourse (for both partners) were the dimensions most frequently assessed (measured in 77%, 49% and 49% of studies, respectively). Attention to the social context of use was inadequate. As acceptability is likely to be a key determinant in the use-effectiveness of microbicides, in-depth understanding of the social processes that shape microbicide acceptability across diverse populations will become increasingly valuable. This includes exploring the effects that sexual partners, health care providers, and key opinion leaders have on the acceptability of microbicides among women and men, including youth and people living with HIV. Future research will benefit from studies of the acceptability of other contraceptive-barrier methods (especially the female condom), use of an agreed-upon operationalization of acceptability, use of acceptability assessments within clinical trials, expansion of measurement domains, and assessment of changes in perceptions of acceptability and use over time. Failure to understand the key factors associated with microbicide acceptability is likely to hinder the adoption and continued use of products that are effective in preventing HIV

  17. 24 CFR 266.300 - HFAs accepting 50 percent or more of risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... acceptability of the proposed mortgagor and management agent; (4) Approve the Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing Plan; and (5) Make any other determinations necessary to ensure acceptability of the proposed...

  18. 24 CFR 266.305 - HFAs accepting less than 50 percent of risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... acceptability of the proposed mortgagor and management agent; (4) Approve the Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing Plan; and (5) Make any other determinations necessary to ensure acceptability of the proposed...

  19. 24 CFR 266.300 - HFAs accepting 50 percent or more of risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... acceptability of the proposed mortgagor and management agent; (4) Approve the Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing Plan; and (5) Make any other determinations necessary to ensure acceptability of the proposed...

  20. 24 CFR 266.300 - HFAs accepting 50 percent or more of risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... acceptability of the proposed mortgagor and management agent; (4) Approve the Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing Plan; and (5) Make any other determinations necessary to ensure acceptability of the proposed...

  1. 24 CFR 266.305 - HFAs accepting less than 50 percent of risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... acceptability of the proposed mortgagor and management agent; (4) Approve the Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing Plan; and (5) Make any other determinations necessary to ensure acceptability of the proposed...

  2. 24 CFR 266.305 - HFAs accepting less than 50 percent of risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... acceptability of the proposed mortgagor and management agent; (4) Approve the Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing Plan; and (5) Make any other determinations necessary to ensure acceptability of the proposed...

  3. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) The acceptability of a weld is determined according to the standards in Section 9 of API 1104. However... Appendix A to API 1104 (incorporated by reference, see § 195.3) applies to the weld, the acceptability...

  4. Determination of the hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic materials and hydrous minerals using thermal combustion laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Geoff; Wassenaar, Leonard I

    2012-04-17

    Hydrogen isotopic compositions of hydrous minerals and organic materials were measured by combustion to water, followed by optical isotopic analysis of the water vapor by off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions were calculated by numerical integration of the individual isotopologue concentrations measured by the optical spectrometer. Rapid oxygen isotope exchange occurs within the combustion reactor between water vapor and molecular oxygen so that only hydrogen isotope compositions may be determined. Over a wide range in sample sizes, precisions were ±3-4 per mil. This is comparable but worse than continuous flow-isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (CF-IRMS) methods owing to memory effects inherent in water vapor transfer. Nevertheless, the simplicity and reduced cost of this analysis compared to classical IRMS or CF-IRMS methods make this an attractive option to determine the hydrogen isotopic composition of organic materials where the utmost precision or small sample sizes are not needed. PMID:22432837

  5. Defining acceptable conditions in wilderness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggenbuck, J. W.; Williams, D. R.; Watson, A. E.

    1993-03-01

    The limits of acceptable change (LAC) planning framework recognizes that forest managers must decide what indicators of wilderness conditions best represent resource naturalness and high-quality visitor experiences and how much change from the pristine is acceptable for each indicator. Visitor opinions on the aspects of the wilderness that have great impact on their experience can provide valuable input to selection of indicators. Cohutta, Georgia; Caney Creek, Arkansas; Upland Island, Texas; and Rattlesnake, Montana, wilderness visitors have high shared agreement that littering and damage to trees in campsites, noise, and seeing wildlife are very important influences on wilderness experiences. Camping within sight or sound of other people influences experience quality more than do encounters on the trails. Visitors’ standards of acceptable conditions within wilderness vary considerably, suggesting a potential need to manage different zones within wilderness for different clientele groups and experiences. Standards across wildernesses, however, are remarkably similar.

  6. From requirements to acceptance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Lionel; Pasquier, Helene

    1993-01-01

    From user requirements definition to accepted software system, the software project management wants to be sure that the system will meet the requirements. For the development of a telecommunication satellites Control Centre, C.N.E.S. has used new rules to make the use of tracing matrix easier. From Requirements to Acceptance Tests, each item of a document must have an identifier. A unique matrix traces the system and allows the tracking of the consequences of a change in the requirements. A tool has been developed, to import documents into a relational data base. Each record of the data base corresponds to an item of a document, the access key is the item identifier. Tracing matrix is also processed, providing automatically links between the different documents. It enables the reading on the same screen of traced items. For example one can read simultaneously the User Requirements items, the corresponding Software Requirements items and the Acceptance Tests.

  7. Heat stress yields a unique MADS box transcription factor in determining seed size and thermal sensitivity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Begcy, Kevin; Liu, Kan; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Early seed development events are highly sensitive to increased temperature. This high sensitivity to a short-duration temperature spike reduces seed viability and seed size at maturity. The molecular basis of heat stress sensitivity during early seed development is not known. We selected rice (Oryza sativa), a highly heat-sensitive species, to explore this phenomenon. Here, we elucidate the molecular pathways that contribute to the heat sensitivity of a critical developmental window during which the endosperm transitions from syncytium to the cellularization stage in young seeds. A transcriptomic comparison of seeds exposed to moderate (35°C) and severe (39°C) heat stress with control (28°C) seeds identified a set of putative imprinted genes, which were down-regulated under severe heat stress. Several type I MADS box genes specifically expressed during the syncytial stage were differentially regulated under moderate and severe heat stress. The suppression and overaccumulation of these genes are associated with precocious and delayed cellularization under moderate and severe stress, respectively. We show that modulating the expression of OsMADS87, one of the heat-sensitive, imprinted genes associated with syncytial stage endosperm, regulates rice seed size. Transgenic seeds deficient in OsMADS87 exhibit accelerated endosperm cellularization. These seeds also have lower sensitivity to a moderate heat stress in terms of seed size reduction compared with seeds from wild-type plants and plants overexpressing OsMADS87. Our findings suggest that OsMADS87 and several other genes identified in this study could be potential targets for improving the thermal resilience of rice during reproductive development. PMID:26936896

  8. The MAGNEX large acceptance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cunsolo, A.; Carbone, D.; Foti, A.

    2010-03-01

    The main features of the MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer are described. It has a quadrupole + dipole layout and a hybrid detector located at the focal plane. The aberrations due to the large angular (50 msr) and momentum (+- 13%) acceptance are reduced by an accurate hardware design and then compensated by an innovative software ray-reconstruction technique. The obtained resolution in energy, angle and mass are presented in the paper. MAGNEX has been used up to now for different experiments in nuclear physics and astrophysics confirming to be a multipurpose device.

  9. Simultaneous determination of airborne carbonyls and aromatic hydrocarbons using mixed sorbent collection and thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yeh-Chung; Yin, Ko-Ghun

    2009-05-01

    Volatile organic chemicals (VOC) such as aromatics and carbonyls are ubiquitous, and have environmental and health significance. This work presents a novel analytical method for simultaneously monitoring airborne carbonyls compounds and aromatic hydrocarbons. Carbonyls were collected onto an adsorbent (Tenax TA, coated with pentafluorophenyl hydrazine (PFPH)) that reacted with carbonyl groups to form thermo-stable derivatives that are suitable for subsequent analysis by thermal-desorption and GC/MS. Aromatic hydrocarbons were collected onto Tenax TA that was packed in the same sampling tube, and analyzed using the same method as carbonyls. Six carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzaldehyde, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone and methyl isobutyl ketone) and five aromatics (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes and styrene) were evaluated following standard test protocols. Calibration ranges were 30-200 ng per tube for most test chemicals, and 200-1000 ng per tube for formaldehyde. The analytical precision was 7% or better, and the collection efficiency, tested using a static sampling bag, was between 94 and 98%. PFPH-coated Tenax TA (for collecting carbonyls) needs to be placed in the front section of the tube, and Tenax TA in the back section (for collecting aromatics). The method detection limits of the current method ranged between 0.2 and 25 ng per tube, which corresponded to sub- to 17.2 ppbv (for formaldehyde), based on a typical 6 l sample from a sampling rate of 25 ml/min. Samples were stable for at least ten days under ambient conditions. The proposed method was also tested in the field and proved satisfactory. The proposed method is simple, feasible and has an acceptable accuracy and precision. It can thus be adopted as a reference method for making relevant measurements. PMID:19436859

  10. Selected contribution: ambient temperature for experiments in rats: a new method for determining the zone of thermal neutrality.

    PubMed

    Romanovsky, Andrej A; Ivanov, Andrei I; Shimansky, Yury P

    2002-06-01

    There is a misbelief that the same animal has the same thermoneutral zone (TNZ) in different experimental setups. In reality, TNZ strongly depends on the physical environment and varies widely across setups. Current methods for determining TNZ require elaborate equipment and can be applied only to a limited set of experimental conditions. A new, broadly applicable approach that rapidly determines whether given conditions are neutral for a given animal is needed. Consistent with the definition of TNZ [the range of ambient temperature (T(a)) at which body core temperature (T(c)) regulation is achieved only by control of sensible heat loss], we propose three criteria of thermoneutrality: 1) the presence of high-magnitude fluctuations in skin temperature (T(sk)) of body parts serving as specialized heat exchangers with the environment (e.g., rat tail), 2) the closeness of T(sk) to the median of its operational range, and 3) a strong negative correlation between T(sk) and T(c). Thermocouple thermometry and liquid crystal thermography were performed in five rat strains at 13 T(a). Under the conditions tested (no bedding or filter tops, no group thermoregulation), the T(a) range of 29.5-30.5 degrees C satisfied all three TNZ criteria in Wistar, BDIX, Long-Evans, and Zucker lean rats; Zucker fatty rats had a slightly lower TNZ (28.0-29.0 degrees C). Skin thermometry or thermography is a definition-based, simple, and inexpensive technique to determine whether experimental or housing conditions are neutral, subneutral, or supraneutral for a given animal. PMID:12015388

  11. Thermal neutron diffraction determination of the magnetic structure of EuCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Rowan-Weetaluktuk, W. N.; Ryan, D. H.; Lemoine, P.; Cadogan, J. M.

    2014-05-07

    The magnetic structure of EuCu{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} has been determined by flat-plate neutron powder diffraction. Two magnetic phases are present in the neutron diffraction pattern at 3.5 K. They have the same moment, within error, and a common transition temperature. Both {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy show that the two magnetic phases belong to the same crystallographic phase. Both phases can be modelled by planar helimagnetic structures: one with a propagation vector of [0.654(1), 0, 0], the other with a propagation vector of [0.410(1), 0.225(1), 0].

  12. Thermal comfort of various building layouts with a proposed discomfort index range for tropical climate.

    PubMed

    Md Din, Mohd Fadhil; Lee, Yee Yong; Ponraj, Mohanadoss; Ossen, Dilshan Remaz; Iwao, Kenzo; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan

    2014-04-01

    Recent years have seen issues related to thermal comfort gaining more momentum in tropical countries. The thermal adaptation and thermal comfort index play a significant role in evaluating the outdoor thermal comfort. In this study, the aim is to capture the thermal sensation of respondents at outdoor environment through questionnaire survey and to determine the discomfort index (DI) to measure the thermal discomfort level. The results indicated that most respondents had thermally accepted the existing environment conditions although they felt slightly warm and hot. A strong correlation between thermal sensation and measured DI was also identified. As a result, a new discomfort index range had been proposed in association with local climate and thermal sensation of occupants to evaluate thermal comfort. The results had proved that the respondents can adapt to a wider range of thermal conditions.Validation of the questionnaire data at Putrajaya was done to prove that the thermal sensation in both Putrajaya and UTM was almost similar since they are located in the same tropical climate region. Hence, a quantitative field study on building layouts was done to facilitate the outdoor human discomfort level based on newly proposed discomfort index range. The results showed that slightly shaded building layouts of type- A and B exhibited higher temperature and discomfort index. The resultant adaptive thermal comfort theory was incorporated into the field studies as well. Finally, the study also showed that the DI values were highly dependent on ambient temperature and relative humidity but had fewer effects for solar radiation intensity. PMID:24679966

  13. Analysis of Thermal Expansivity of Solids Under High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, K.; Singh, P. K.; Sharma, B. S.

    2012-08-01

    For investigating the thermal expansivity of solids under high pressures we have developed a formulation using the relationship between the reciprocal of pressure derivative of bulk modulus and the ratio of pressure and bulk modulus. The formulation presented here satisfies the boundary conditions both at zero-pressure and also in the limit of infinite pressure at extreme compression. A physically acceptable relationship has been obtained between the Anderson-Grüneisen parameter and the pressure derivatives of bulk modulus. The formulation has been applied to determine the pressure dependence of thermal expansivity of NaCl, MgO and the earth lower mantle minerals.

  14. Refinements in the Method of Total Body Nitrogen Determination Based on Measurement of Gamma Radiation Following Thermal Neutron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamen, Yakov

    1992-01-01

    While measurements of Total Body Nitrogen (TBN) based on observation of capture radiation from ^{14}N(n,gamma)^ {15}N have been made for over a decade, the basis on which they were analyzed did not properly account for the effects of body size on the results obtained. This research investigates that dependence and thus removes a significant systematic error which otherwise limits the accuracy attainable to an undesirable level. These studies were carried out using two Monte Carlo codes, MCNP and EGS4, to calculate neutron transport in the body and gamma transport in the detector respectively. The results of each of the calculations were verified by comparison with measurement and proved satisfactory. The detector responses to neutron capture at various portions of the body were determined. These were combined with calculations of the spatial distribution of neutron capture in the body and, by integration, the response to a body of given size was determined. Comparisons of simulation and measurements for several phantoms of different sizes and shapes showed excellent agreement. Simulation studies were made for a very wide range of phantoms and the results used to permit the correction of analyzed data for body size and shape. At the same time, studies were made to guide a modified design of the TBN facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Improvements made in source shielding, material choices, collimator and premoderator sizes and detector shielding have led to improvements in the systematic error previously attainable.

  15. Nitrogen trailer acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1996-02-12

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0249. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-108 Rev.0. The equipment being tested is a portable contained nitrogen supply. The test was conducted at Norco`s facility.

  16. Helping Our Children Accept Themselves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Mae

    1984-01-01

    Parents of a child with muscular dystrophy recount their reactions to learning of the diagnosis, their gradual acceptance, and their son's resistance, which was gradually lessened when he was provided with more information and treated more normally as a member of the family. (CL)

  17. Acceptability of Treatments for Plagiarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Stacy L.; Punyanunt-Carter, Narissra Maria

    2007-01-01

    This study focused on various treatments for addressing incidents of plagiarism by college students. College students rated the acceptability of different responses by college faculty to a case description of a college student who engaged in plagiarism. The findings revealed that students found some methods of addressing this problem behavior by…

  18. Euthanasia Acceptance: An Attitudinal Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klopfer, Fredrick J.; Price, William F.

    The study presented was conducted to examine potential relationships between attitudes regarding the dying process, including acceptance of euthanasia, and other attitudinal or demographic attributes. The data of the survey was comprised of responses given by 331 respondents to a door-to-door interview. Results are discussed in terms of preferred…

  19. Parametric Studies Of Failure Mechanisms In Thermal Barrier Coatings During Thermal Cycling Using FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivathsa, B.; Das, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are widely used on different hot components of gas turbine engines such as blades and vanes. Although, several mechanisms for the failure of the TBCs have been suggested, it is largely accepted that the durability of these coatings is primarily determined by the residual stresses that are developed during the thermal cycling. In the present study, the residual stress build-up in an electron beam physical vapour deposition (EB-PVD) based TBCs on a coupon during thermal cycling has been studied by varying three parameters such as the cooling rate, TBC thickness and substrate thickness. A two-dimensional thermomechanical generalized plane strain finite element simulations have been performed for thousand cycles. It was observed that these variations change the stress profile significantly and the stress severity factor increases non-linearly. Overall, the predictions of the model agree with reported experimental results and help in predicting the failure mechanisms.

  20. Spectrally resolved modulated infrared radiometry of photothermal, photocarrier, and photoluminescence response of CdSe crystals: Determination of optical, thermal, and electronic transport parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, M.; Chirtoc, M.; Horny, N.; Pelzl, J.

    2016-03-01

    Spectrally resolved modulated infrared radiometry (SR-MIRR) with super-band gap photoexcitation is introduced as a self-consistent method for semiconductor characterization (CdSe crystals grown under different conditions). Starting from a theoretical model combining the contributions of the photothermal (PT) and photocarrier (PC) signal components, an expression is derived for the thermal-to-plasma wave transition frequency ftc which is found to be wavelength-independent. The deviation of the PC component from the model at high frequency is quantitatively explained by a quasi-continuous distribution of carrier recombination lifetimes. The integral, broad frequency band (0.1 Hz-1 MHz) MIRR measurements simultaneously yielded the thermal diffusivity a, the effective IR optical absorption coefficient βeff, and the bulk carrier lifetime τc. Spectrally resolved frequency scans were conducted with interchangeable IR bandpass filters (2.2-11.3 μm) in front of the detector. The perfect spectral match of the PT and PC components is the direct experimental evidence of the key assumption in MIRR that de-exciting carriers are equivalent to blackbody (Planck) radiators. The exploitation of the β spectrum measured by MIRR allowed determining the background (equilibrium) free carrier concentration n0. At the shortest wavelength (3.3 μm), the photoluminescence (PL) component supersedes the PC one and has distinct features. The average sample temperature influences the PC component but not the PT one.