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Sample records for determining precise oligosaccharidic

  1. Precise Orbit Determination for ALOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Ryo; Nakamura, Shinichi; Kudo, Nobuo; Katagiri, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) has been developed to contribute to the fields of mapping, precise regional land coverage observation, disaster monitoring, and resource surveying. Because the mounted sensors need high geometrical accuracy, precise orbit determination for ALOS is essential for satisfying the mission objectives. So ALOS mounts a GPS receiver and a Laser Reflector (LR) for Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). This paper deals with the precise orbit determination experiments for ALOS using Global and High Accuracy Trajectory determination System (GUTS) and the evaluation of the orbit determination accuracy by SLR data. The results show that, even though the GPS receiver loses lock of GPS signals more frequently than expected, GPS-based orbit is consistent with SLR-based orbit. And considering the 1 sigma error, orbit determination accuracy of a few decimeters (peak-to-peak) was achieved.

  2. In vitro determination of prebiotic properties of oligosaccharides derived from an orange juice manufacturing by-product stream.

    PubMed

    Manderson, K; Pinart, M; Tuohy, K M; Grace, W E; Hotchkiss, A T; Widmer, W; Yadhav, M P; Gibson, G R; Rastall, R A

    2005-12-01

    Fermentation properties of oligosaccharides derived from orange peel pectin were assessed in mixed fecal bacterial culture. The orange peel oligosaccharide fraction contained glucose in addition to rhamnogalacturonan and xylogalacturonan pectic oligosaccharides. Twenty-four-hour, temperature- and pH-controlled, stirred anaerobic fecal batch cultures were used to determine the effects that oligosaccharides derived from orange products had on the composition of the fecal microbiota. The effects were measured through fluorescent in situ hybridization to determine changes in bacterial populations, fermentation end products were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography to assess short-chain fatty acid concentrations, and subsequently, a prebiotic index (PI) was determined. Pectic oligosaccharides (POS) were able to increase the bifidobacterial and Eubacterium rectale numbers, albeit resulting in a lower prebiotic index than that from fructo-oligosaccharide metabolism. Orange albedo maintained the growth of most bacterial populations and gave a PI similar to that of soluble starch. Fermentation of POS resulted in an increase in the Eubacterium rectale numbers and concomitantly increased butyrate production. In conclusion, this study has shown that POS can have a beneficial effect on the fecal microflora; however, a classical prebiotic effect was not found. An increase in the Eubacterium rectale population was found, and butyrate levels increased, which is of potential benefit to the host. PMID:16332825

  3. High performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) for the sensitive determination of hyaluronan oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Rothenhöfer, Martin; Grundmann, Marco; Bernhardt, Günther; Matysik, Frank-Michael; Buschauer, Armin

    2015-04-15

    High performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) with pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) was optimized for the analysis of oligosaccharides derived from the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan. Using this sensitive approach, the separation of oligosaccharides consisting of two (molecular weight ca. 0.8 kDa) up to 25-30 (molecular weight: ca. 9.5-11.4 kDa) disaccharide moieties was possible. Standard oligosaccharides (comprising 2-4 repetitive disaccharides) were detectable at very low amounts of 0.2-0.3 pmol (20-30 nM). Including 10 min of column equilibration, a complex mixture of low molecular weight hyaluronan can be analyzed within 40 min. The HPAEC method was successfully applied to the study of the size-dependency of both the action of bovine testicular hyaluronidase (BTH) and the precipitation of hyaluronan by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), a physicochemical reaction often used for the determination of hyaluronan and hyaluronidase activity. PMID:25768984

  4. Degradation of Misfolded Endoplasmic Reticulum Glycoproteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Determined by a Specific Oligosaccharide Structure

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Claude A.; Burda, Patricie; Roth, Jürgen; Aebi, Markus

    1998-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transfer of N-linked oligosaccharides is immediately followed by trimming of ER-localized glycosidases. We analyzed the influence of specific oligosaccharide structures for degradation of misfolded carboxypeptidase Y (CPY). By studying the trimming reactions in vivo, we found that removal of the terminal α1,2 glucose and the first α1,3 glucose by glucosidase I and glucosidase II respectively, occurred rapidly, whereas mannose cleavage by mannosidase I was slow. Transport and maturation of correctly folded CPY was not dependent on oligosaccharide structure. However, degradation of misfolded CPY was dependent on specific trimming steps. Degradation of misfolded CPY with N-linked oligosaccharides containing glucose residues was less efficient compared with misfolded CPY bearing the correctly trimmed Man8GlcNAc2 oligosaccharide. Reduced rate of degradation was mainly observed for mis- folded CPY bearing Man6GlcNAc2, Man7GlcNAc2 and Man9GlcNAc2 oligosaccharides, whereas Man8GlcNAc2 and, to a lesser extent, Man5GlcNAc2 oligosaccharides supported degradation. These results suggest a role for the Man8GlcNAc2 oligosaccharide in the degradation process. They may indicate the presence of a Man8GlcNAc2-binding lectin involved in targeting of misfolded glycoproteins to degradation in S. cerevisiae. PMID:9732283

  5. The Seasat Precision Orbit Determination Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.; Born, G. H.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives and conclusions reached during the Seasat Precision Orbit Determination Experiment are discussed. It is noted that the activities of the experiment team included extensive software calibration and validation and an intense effort to validate and improve the dynamic models which describe the satellite's motion. Significant improvement in the gravitational model was obtained during the experiment, and it is pointed out that the current accuracy of the Seasat altitude ephemeris is 1.5 m rms. An altitude ephemeris for the Seasat spacecraft with an accuracy of 0.5 m rms is seen as possible with further improvements in the geopotential, atmospheric drag, and solar radiation pressure models. It is concluded that since altimetry missions with a 2-cm precision altimeter are contemplated, the precision orbit determination effort initiated under the Seasat Project must be continued and expanded.

  6. Attentional Priority Determines Working Memory Precision

    PubMed Central

    Klyszejko, Zuzanna; Rahmati, Masih; Curtis, Clayton E

    2014-01-01

    Visual working memory is a system used to hold information actively in mind for a limited time. The number of items and the precision with which we can store information has limits that define its capacity. How much control do we have over the precision with which we store information when faced with these severe capacity limitations? Here, we tested the hypothesis that rank-ordered attentional priority determines the precision of multiple working memory representations. We conducted two psychophysical experiments that manipulated the priority of multiple items in a two-alternative forced choice task (2AFC) with distance discrimination. In Experiment 1, we varied the probabilities with which memorized items were likely to be tested. To generalize the effects of priority beyond simple cueing, in Experiment 2, we manipulated priority by varying monetary incentives contingent upon successful memory for items tested. Moreover, we illustrate our hypothesis using a simple model that distributed attentional resources across items with rank-ordered priorities. Indeed, we found evidence in both experiments that priority affects the precision of working memory in a monotonic fashion. Our results demonstrate that representations of priority may provide a mechanism by which resources can be allocated to increase the precision with which we encode and briefly store information. PMID:25240420

  7. Minimal oligosaccharide structures required for induction of immune responses against meningococcal immunotype L1, L2, and L3,7,9 lipopolysaccharides determined by using synthetic oligosaccharide-protein conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Verheul, A F; Boons, G J; Van der Marel, G A; Van Boom, J H; Jennings, H J; Snippe, H; Verhoef, J; Hoogerhout, P; Poolman, J T

    1991-01-01

    The 12 types of meningococcal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (immunotypes) contain immunotype-specific and cross-reactive epitopes situated on the oligosaccharide part of the LPS molecules. To identify useful cross-reactive epitopes and to determine minimal oligosaccharide structures required for the induction of an immune response against the most prevalent immunotypes, L1, L2, and L3,7,9, synthetic as well as native LPS-derived oligosaccharides were conjugated with tetanus toxoid. L3,7,9 phosphoethanolamine (PEA) group-containing oligosaccharide-tetanus toxoid conjugates evoked high immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels in rabbits which were detected by an L2-, L3,7,9-, and, depending on the antiserum, L1-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Inhibition studies revealed that an identical antibody population was detected by L1 and L3,7,9 ELISA, indicating a similar tertiary structure of the inner core oligosaccharide of these two immunotypes. These antibodies recognize PEA group-containing epitopes present on the L1 and L3,7,9 LPS. An L2 PEA group-containing oligosaccharide-tetanus toxoid conjugate elicited L2- and L3,7,9-specific IgG antibodies, but in contrast with the L3,7,9 conjugates, no L1-specific IgG antibodies were evoked. These results indicate that L1 and L2 LPS do not contain cross-reactive epitopes, whereas both L2 and L3,7,9 LPS and L1 and L3,7,9 LPS possess common determinants. Three linear oligosaccharides and one branched oligosaccharide, representing partial structures of the inner core oligosacchardes of meningococcal LPS, were synthesized. Only the branched synthetic oligosaccharide-containing conjugate was able to induce and L1- and L3,7,9-specific immune response, whereas the linear oligosaccharide-protein conjugates evoked L2-specific immune responses. The branched oligosaccharide (beta-D-Glcp(1----4)-[L-alpha-D-Hepp(1----3)]-L-alpha-D-Hepp ) is therefore considered a minimal structure required for the induction of an immune

  8. Oligosaccharides in several Philippine indigenous food legumes: determination, localization and removal.

    PubMed

    Revilleza, M J; Mendoza, E M; Raymundo, L C

    1990-01-01

    The oligosaccharide profile of raw mature seeds of seven different legumes indigenous to the Philippines was measured in 70% ethanol extracts of the seeds by thin layer chromatography using HPTLC plates and quantified by a densitometer. Based on the results, the legumes could be ranked according to decreasing oligosaccharide content or flatulence potential as follows: Sam-samping (Clitoria ternatea) greater than hyacinth bean (Dolichos lablab) greater than sabawel (Mucuna pruriens) greater than lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) greater than swordbean (Canavalia gladiata) greater than rice bean (Vigna umbellata) greater than jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis). Sam-samping had 4.79% total oligosaccharides and hyacinth bean or batao, 3.66%. A jack bean accession had 1.79% oligosaccharides. Simple processing methods were tested to detoxify the oligosaccharides. Soaking the batao seeds had no effect while boiling even resulted in a net 23-31% increase in the levels of raffinose, stachyose and verbascose. On the other hand, two min of dry roasting resulted in complete removal of oligosaccharides whereas germination resulted in about 30-40% decrease after 1 and 2 days, respectively. PMID:2345736

  9. Precision orbit determination software validation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, B. E.; Tapley, B. D.; Eanes, R. J.; Marsh, J. G.; Williamson, R. G.; Martin, T. V.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experiment which was designed to ascertain the level of agreement between GEODYN and UTOPIA, two completely independent computer programs used for precision orbit determination, and to identify the sources which limit the agreement. For a limited set of models and a seven-day data set arc length, the altitude components of the ephemeris obtained by the two programs agree at the sub-centimeter level throughout the arc.

  10. Accelerometers for Precise GNSS Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugentobler, Urs; Schlicht, Anja

    2016-07-01

    The solar radiation pressure is the largest non-gravitational acceleration on GNSS satellites limiting the accuracy of precise orbit models. Other non-gravitational accelerations may be thrusts for station keeping maneuvers. Accelerometers measure the motion of a test mass that is shielded against satellite surface forces with respect to a cage that is rigidly connected to the satellite. They can thus be used to measure these difficult-to-model non-gravitational accelerations. Accelerometers however typically show correlated noise as well as a drift of the scaling factors converting measured voltages to accelerations. The scaling thus needs to be regularly calibrated. The presented study is based on several simulated scenarios including orbit determination of accelerometer-equipped Galileo satellites. It shall evaluate different options on how to accommodate accelerometer measurements in the orbit integrator, indicate to what extent currently available accelerometers can be used to improve the modeling of non-gravitational accelerations on GNSS satellites for precise orbit determination, and assess the necessary requirements for an accelerometer that can serve this purpose.

  11. Annotation and structural elucidation of bovine milk oligosaccharides and determination of novel fucosylated structures

    PubMed Central

    Aldredge, Danielle L; Geronimo, Maria R; Hua, Serenus; Nwosu, Charles C; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Barile, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Bovine milk oligosaccharides (BMOs) are recognized by the dairy and food industries, as well as by infant formula manufacturers, as novel, high-potential bioactive food ingredients. Recent studies revealed that bovine milk contains complex oligosaccharides structurally related to those previously thought to be present in only human milk. These BMOs are microbiotic modulators involved in important biological activities, including preventing pathogen binding to the intestinal epithelium and serving as nutrients for a selected class of beneficial bacteria. Only a small number of BMO structures are fully elucidated. To better understand the potential of BMOs as a class of biotherapeutics, their detailed structure analysis is needed. This study initiated the development of a structure library of BMOs and a comprehensive evaluation of structure-related specificity. The bovine milk glycome was profiled by high-performance mass spectrometry and advanced separation techniques to obtain a comprehensive catalog of BMOs, including several novel, lower abundant neutral and fucosylated oligosaccharides that are often overlooked during analysis. Structures were identified using isomer-specific tandem mass spectroscopy and targeted exoglycosidase digestions to produce a BMO library detailing retention time, accurate mass and structure to allow their rapid identification in future studies. PMID:23436288

  12. Precise Orbit Determination for Altimeter Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelensky, N. P.; Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Beckley, B. B.; Wang, Y.; Chinn, D. S.

    2002-05-01

    Orbit error remains a critical component in the error budget for all radar altimeter missions. This paper describes the ongoing work at GSFC to improve orbits for three radar altimeter satellites: TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P), Jason, and Geosat Follow-On (GFO). T/P has demonstrated that, the time variation of ocean topography can be determined with an accuracy of a few centimeters, thanks to the availability of highly accurate orbits (2-3 cm radially) produced at GSFC. Jason, the T/P follow-on, is intended to continue measurement of the ocean surface with the same, if not better accuracy. Reaching the Jason centimeter accuracy orbit goal would greatly benefit the knowledge of ocean circulation. Several new POD strategies which promise significant improvement to the current T/P orbit are evaluated over one year of data. Also, preliminary, but very promising Jason POD results are presented. Orbit improvement for GFO has been dramatic, and has allowed this mission to provide a POESEIDON class altimeter product. The GFO Precise Orbit Ephemeris (POE) orbits are based on satellite laser ranging (SLR) tracking supplemented with GFO/GFO altimeter crossover data. The accuracy of these orbits were evaluated using several tests, including independent TOPEX/GFO altimeter crossover data. The orbit improvements are shown over the years 2000 and 2001 for which the POEs have been completed.

  13. Effect of sucrose concentration on the composition of enzymatically synthesized short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides as determined by FTIR and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Romano, Nelson; Santos, Mauricio; Mobili, Pablo; Vega, Roberto; Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) are mixtures of oligosaccharides composed of fructose and glucose units. As their composition is determined by the synthesis conditions, the goals of this work were: (a) to engineer FOS of different composition by adjusting the sucrose concentration used as initial substrate; (b) to define partial least square (PLS) based-models to quantify all the sugars present in the reaction medium directly from the FTIR spectra. The yield of each reaction was calculated as the percentage of initial sucrose converted to each oligosaccharide, as monitored by HPLC. In parallel, the reactions were followed by FTIR. Six different PLS models aiming to determine the concentration of each carbohydrate present in the reaction medium were calibrated and independently validated. The means of predicted values fitted well to those obtained by HPLC. Determining FOS composition directly from the FTIR spectra represents a useful tool to monitor enzymatic synthesis, with strong impact at both an academic and an industrial level. PMID:26920320

  14. Action patterns of amylolytic enzymes as determined by the [1-14C]malto-oligosaccharide mapping method.

    PubMed

    Pazur, J H; Marchetti, N T

    1992-04-01

    A valuable technique for oligosaccharide mapping, utilizing radioactive malto-oligosaccharides, multiple-ascent p.c., and radioautography, has been developed for identifying the action patterns of the glucoamylase isozymes, alpha-amylases, beta-amylase, glucosyltransferase, and glucanosyltransferase. The glucoamylase isozymes act by multi-chain mechanisms on malto-oligosaccharides and most likely on starch and glycogen. The alpha-amylases act endo-wise and randomly hydrolyze alpha-(1----4)- but not alpha-(1----6)-glucosidic bonds. These amylases may act by single-chain and/or multi-chain mechanisms, depending on the number of hydrolytic attacks per single encounter of the enzyme and the substrate. The beta-amylases hydrolyze malto-oligosaccharides by a multi-chain mechanism. A fungal glucosyltransferase from Aspergillus niger transfers glucose units by a single-chain mechanism from maltose to glucosyl acceptors to yield new gluco-oligosaccharides with alpha-(1----4) and alpha-(1----6) linkages. A novel type of transferase isolated from Bacillus subtilis acts by a multi-chain mechanism and transfers segments of 2 to 5 glucose residues from malto-oligosaccharides to acceptor co-substrates. An alpha-amylase from the same organism removes maltotriose units from the non-reducing ends of oligosaccharides by a multi-chain mechanism. PMID:1379885

  15. Precise and Accurate Density Determination of Explosives Using Hydrostatic Weighing

    SciTech Connect

    B. Olinger

    2005-07-01

    Precise and accurate density determination requires weight measurements in air and water using sufficiently precise analytical balances, knowledge of the densities of air and water, knowledge of thermal expansions, availability of a density standard, and a method to estimate the time to achieve thermal equilibrium with water. Density distributions in pressed explosives are inferred from the densities of elements from a central slice.

  16. GRAS NRT Precise Orbit Determination: Operational Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MartinezFadrique, Francisco M.; Mate, Alberto Agueda; Rodriquez-Portugal, Francisco Sancho

    2007-01-01

    EUMETSAT launched the meteorological satellite MetOp-A in October 2006; it is the first of the three satellites that constitute the EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) space segment. This satellite carries a challenging and innovative instrument, the GNSS Receiver for Atmospheric Sounding (GRAS). The goal of the GRAS instrument is to support the production of atmospheric profiles of temperature and humidity with high accuracy, in an operational context, based on the bending of the GPS signals traversing the atmosphere during the so-called occultation periods. One of the key aspects associated to the data processing of the GRAS instrument is the necessity to describe the satellite motion and GPS receiver clock behaviour with high accuracy and within very strict timeliness limitations. In addition to these severe requirements, the GRAS Product Processing Facility (PPF) must be integrated in the EPS core ground segment, which introduces additional complexity from the data integration and operational procedure points of view. This paper sets out the rationale for algorithm selection and the conclusions from operational experience. It describes in detail the rationale and conclusions derived from the selection and implementation of the algorithms leading to the final orbit determination requirements (0.1 mm/s in velocity and 1 ns in receiver clock error at 1 Hz). Then it describes the operational approach and extracts the ideas and conclusions derived from the operational experience.

  17. Development and validation of a HPLC method for determination of degree of polymerization of xylo-oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jianghua; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Qingchi; Wang, Yingdi; Zhou, Hui

    2016-12-15

    A reliable reversed-phase HPLC method was developed for high resolution separation and high sensitivity determination of xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) with degree of polymerization from 2 to 8. The method was carried out on a Kromasil C18 column using pre-column derivatization with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) and UV detection at 245nm. The effects of pH value of mobile phase, volume proportion of acetonitrile, concentration of ammonium acetate buffer and flow rate on the retention time and degree of separation of XOS derivatives were investigated. A satisfactory result was achieved in 25min with a mobile phase of 10mmol/L ammonium acetate buffer (pH5.5)-acetonitrile by a gradient elution at 0.8mL/min. In addition, this method was validated by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) analysis and several uncertain compounds were identified. The proposed HPLC method is suitable for the compositional analysis and quality control of XOS. PMID:27451231

  18. Linkage Determination of Linear Oligosaccharides by MSn (n > 2) Collision-Induced Dissociation of Z1 Ions in the Negative Ion Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konda, Chiharu; Bendiak, Brad; Xia, Yu

    2013-12-01

    Obtaining unambiguous linkage information between sugars in oligosaccharides is an important step in their detailed structural analysis. An approach is described that provides greater confidence in linkage determination for linear oligosaccharides based on multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry (MSn, n >2) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) of Z1 ions in the negative ion mode. Under low energy CID conditions, disaccharides 18O-labeled on the reducing carbonyl group gave rise to Z1 product ions (m/z 163) derived from the reducing sugar, which could be mass-discriminated from other possible structural isomers having m/z 161. MS3 CID of these m/z 163 ions showed distinct fragmentation fingerprints corresponding to the linkage types and largely unaffected by sugar unit identities or their anomeric configurations. This unique property allowed standard CID spectra of Z1 ions to be generated from a small set of disaccharide samples that were representative of many other possible isomeric structures. With the use of MSn CID (n = 3 - 5), model linear oligosaccharides were dissociated into overlapping disaccharide structures, which were subsequently fragmented to form their corresponding Z1 ions. CID data of these Z1 ions were collected and compared with the standard database of Z1 ion CID using spectra similarity scores for linkage determination. As the proof-of-principle tests demonstrated, we achieved correct determination of individual linkage types along with their locations within two trisaccharides and a pentasaccharide.

  19. Improved DORIS accuracy for precise orbit determination and geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Pascal; Jayles, Christian; Tavernier, Gilles

    2004-01-01

    In 2001 and 2002, 3 more DORIS satellites were launched. Since then, all DORIS results have been significantly improved. For precise orbit determination, 20 cm are now available in real-time with DIODE and 1.5 to 2 cm in post-processing. For geodesy, 1 cm precision can now be achieved regularly every week, making now DORIS an active part of a Global Observing System for Geodesy through the IDS.

  20. Sequencing of oligosaccharides using enzyme array digestion with electrochemical and fluorescent detections

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, M.; Lee, C.S.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this study is to develop a rapid and sensitive method for oligosaccharide sequencing. The oligosaccharides are subjected to the enzyme array digestion with exoglycosidases of known and well-defined specificities. The enzyme array method involves the division of oligosaccharide sample into aliquots, and the incubation of each aliquot with a precisely defined mixture of exoglycosidases. In the enzyme array method, the presence of a specific linkage anywhere in the oligosaccharide is determined by the inability of an enzyme mixture lacking a given enzyme to cleave that linkage ( a stop point) and the ability of the other enzymes to cleave the linkage up to that point. The direct quantification of released monosaccharides from the enzyme array can be achieved by using pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) or by fluorescent derivatization with a fluorophoric agent. The measured monosaccharide concentrations in combination with the enzyme array analysis provide detail characterization of oligosaccharides with their sugar composition, configuration, and linkage information, The released monosaccharides are further quantified by anion exchange chromatography and capillary electrophoresis for the comparison with the results obtained from PAD and fluorescence measurements. Our enzyme array-electrochemical (or fluorescent) detection method does not require any separation procedure and any prior labeling of oligosaccharide and have several practical advantages over the current carbohydrate sequencing techniques including simplicity, speed, and the ability to use small amounts of starting material.

  1. Structural confirmation of novel oligosaccharides isolated from sugar beet molasses.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tatsuya; Kikuchi, Hiroto; Aritsuka, Tsutomu; Takata, Yusuke; Fukushi, Eri; Fukushi, Yukiharu; Kawabata, Jun; Ueno, Keiji; Onodera, Shuichi; Shiomi, Norio

    2016-07-01

    Eleven oligosaccharides were isolated from sugar beet molasses using carbon-Celite column chromatography and HPLC. The constituent sugars and linkage positions were determined using methylation analysis, MALDI-TOF-MS, and NMR measurements. The configurations of isolated oligosaccharides were confirmed based on detailed NMR analysis. Based on our results, three of the 11 oligosaccharides were novel. PMID:26920296

  2. Precise Determination of the Strangeness Magnetic Moment of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, D.B.; Boinepalli, S.; Cloet, I.C.; Williams, A.G.; Young, R.D.; Zhang, J.B.; Thomas, A.W.; Zanotti, J.M.

    2005-06-03

    By combining the constraints of charge symmetry with new chiral extrapolation techniques and recent low mass quenched lattice-QCD simulations of the individual quark contributions to the magnetic moments of the nucleon octet, we obtain a precise determination of the strange magnetic moment of the proton. The result, namely, G{sub M}{sup s}=(-0.046{+-}0.019){mu}{sub N} is consistent with the latest experimental measurements but an order of magnitude more precise. This poses a tremendous challenge for future experiments.

  3. Precise Determination of the Strangeness Magnetic Moment of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Leinweber, D B; Boinepalli, S; Cloet, I C; Thomas, A W; Williams, A G; Young, R D; Zanotti, J M; Zhang, J B

    2005-06-01

    By combining the constraints of charge symmetry with new chiral extrapolation techniques and recent low mass lattice QCD simulations of the individual quark contributions to the magnetic moments of the nucleon octet, we obtain a precise determination of the strange magnetic moment of the proton. The result, namely G{sub M}{sup s} = -0.051 +/- 0.021 mu{sub N}, is consistent with the latest experimental measurements but an order of magnitude more precise. This poses a tremendous challenge for future experiments.

  4. Oligosaccharides of Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah and Monastrell red wines.

    PubMed

    Apolinar-Valiente, Rafael; Romero-Cascales, Inmaculada; Williams, Pascale; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna; López-Roca, José María; Ros-García, José María; Doco, Thierry

    2015-07-15

    Wine oligosaccharides were recently characterized and their concentrations, their composition and their roles on different wines remain to be determined. The concentration and composition of oligosaccharides in Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah and Monastrell wines was studied. Oligosaccharide fractions were isolated by high resolution size-exclusion chromatography. The neutral and acidic sugar composition was determined by gas chromatography. The MS spectra of the oligosaccharides were performed on an AccuTOF mass spectrometer. Molar-mass distributions were determined by coupling size exclusion chromatography with a multi-angle light scattering device (MALLS) and a differential refractive index detector. Results showed significant differences in the oligosaccharidic fraction from Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah and Monastrell wines. This study shows the influence that the grape variety seems have on the quantity, composition and structure of oligosaccharides in the finished wine. To our knowledge, this is the first report to research the oligosaccharides composition of Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah and Monastrell wines. PMID:25722170

  5. Precision Attitude Determination for an Infrared Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed performance simulations for a precision attitude determination system using a focal plane star tracker on an infrared space telescope. The telescope is being designed for the Destiny mission to measure cosmologically distant supernovae as one of the candidate implementations for the Joint Dark Energy Mission. Repeat observations of the supernovae require attitude control at the level of 0.010 arcseconds (0.05 microradians) during integrations and at repeat intervals up to and over a year. While absolute accuracy is not required, the repoint precision is challenging. We have simulated the performance of a focal plane star tracker in a multidimensional parameter space, including pixel size, read noise, and readout rate. Systematic errors such as proper motion, velocity aberration, and parallax can be measured and compensated out. Our prediction is that a relative attitude determination accuracy of 0.001 to 0.002 arcseconds (0.005 to 0.010 microradians) will be achievable.

  6. Precise Determination of the Helical Repeat of Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, A.; McDonald, M.; Stubbs, G.

    2009-06-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is widely used as a distance standard in electron microscopy, fiber diffraction, and other imaging techniques. The dimension used as a reference is the pitch of the viral helix, 23 {angstrom}. This distance, however, has never been measured with any great degree of precision. The helical pitch of TMV has been determined to be 22.92 {+-}0.03 {angstrom} by X-ray fiber diffraction methods using highly collimated synchrotron radiation.

  7. Precise determination of the helical repeat of tobacco mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Stubbs, Gerald

    2007-12-05

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is widely used as a distance standard in electron microscopy, fiber diffraction, and other imaging techniques. The dimension used as a reference is the pitch of the viral helix, 23 A. This distance, however, has never been measured with any great degree of precision. The helical pitch of TMV has been determined to be 22.92 {+-} 0.03 A by X-ray fiber diffraction methods using highly collimated synchrotron radiation.

  8. Precision orbit determination using TOPEX/Poseidon TDRSS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teles, Jerome; Putney, B.; Phelps, J.; Mccarthy, J.; Eddy, W.; Klosko, S.

    1993-01-01

    The TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) Mission carries a variety of packages to support experimental, precision and operational orbit determination. Included are a GPS transponder, laser retro-reflectors, the French-developed Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) Doppler tracking system and a Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) transponder. Presently, TDRSS tracking is used for operational orbit support and is processed with force and measurement modeling consistent with this purpose. However, the low noise and extensive geographical coverage of the TDRSS/TOPEX data allows an assessment of TDRSS Precision Orbit Determination (POD) capabilities by comparison to the T/P precision orbit determination. The Geodynamics (GEODYN) Orbit Determination System is used to process laser and DORIS data to produce the precision orbits for the T/P Project. GEODYN has been modified recently to support the TDRSS observations. TDRSS data analysis can now benefit from the extensive force modeling and reference frame stability needed to meet the orbit determination (OD) goals of the T/P Mission. This analysis has concentrated on the strongest of the TDRSS measurement types, its two-way average range rate. Both the TDRSS and T/P orbits have been assessed in combination with the global satellite laser ranging (SLR) data and by themselves. These results indicate that significant improvement in the TDRSS ephemerides is obtained when the T/P orbit is well determined by SLR, and the TDRSS/TOPEX Doppler link is used to position TDRSS. Meter-level TDRSS positioning uncertainty is achieved using this approach. When the TDRSS orbit location is provided by this approach, the two-way range rate from a single TDRSS (i.e. West only) can provide T/P orbits with sub-meter radial accuracies and two meter RMS total position agreement with SLR defined orbits. These preliminary results indicate improved modeling of the TDRSS measurement through the elimination of heretofore

  9. Strategies for high-precision Global Positioning System orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.; Border, James S.

    1987-01-01

    Various strategies for the high-precision orbit determination of the GPS satellites are explored using data from the 1985 GPS field test. Several refinements to the orbit determination strategies were found to be crucial for achieving high levels of repeatability and accuracy. These include the fine tuning of the GPS solar radiation coefficients and the ground station zenith tropospheric delays. Multiday arcs of 3-6 days provided better orbits and baselines than the 8-hr arcs from single-day passes. Highest-quality orbits and baselines were obtained with combined carrier phase and pseudorange solutions.

  10. Precise GPS orbit determination results from 1985 field tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, S. M.; Border, J. S.; Wu, S.-C.; Williams, B. G.; Yunck, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    Data from three different receiver types have been used to obtain precise orbits for the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). The data were collected during the 1985 March-April GPS experiment to test and validate GPS techniques for precision orbit determination and geodesy. A new software package developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), GIPSY (GPS Inferred Positioning SYstem), was used to process the data. To assess orbit accuracy, solutions are compared using integrated doppler data from various different receiver types, different fiducial sites, and independent data arcs, including one spanning six days. From these intercomparisons, orbit accuracy for a well-tracked GPS satellite of three meters in altitude and about five meters in each of down and cross-track components are inferred.

  11. Can an ancestral condition for milk oligosaccharides be determined? Evidence from the Tasmanian echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus setosus).

    PubMed

    Oftedal, Olav T; Nicol, Stewart C; Davies, Noel W; Sekii, Nobuhiro; Taufik, Epi; Fukuda, Kenji; Saito, Tadao; Urashima, Tadasu

    2014-09-01

    The monotreme pattern of egg-incubation followed by extended lactation represents the ancestral mammalian reproductive condition, suggesting that monotreme milk may include saccharides of an ancestral type. Saccharides were characterized from milk of the Tasmanian echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus setosus. Oligosaccharides in pooled milk from late lactation were purified by gel filtration and high-performance liquid chromatography using a porous graphitized carbon column and characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy; oligosaccharides in smaller samples from early and mid-lactation were separated by ultra-performance liquid chromatography and characterized by negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem collision mass spectroscopy (MS/MS) product ion patterns. Eight saccharides were identified by (1)H NMR: lactose, 2'-fucosyllactose, difucosyllactose (DFL), B-tetrasaccharide, B-pentasaccharide, lacto-N-fucopentaose III (LNFP3), 4-O-acetyl-3'-sialyllactose [Neu4,5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc] and 4-O-acetyl-3'-sialyl-3-fucosyllactose [Neu4,5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)[Fuc(α1-3)]Glc]. Six of these (all except DFL and LNFP3) were present in early and mid-lactation per ESI-MS, although some at trace levels. Four additional oligosaccharides examined by ESI-MS and MS/MS are proposed to be 3'-sialyllactose [Neu5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc], di-O-acetyl-3'-sialyllactose [Neu4,5,UAc3(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)Glc where U = 7, 8 or 9], 4-O-acetyl-3'-sialyllactose sulfate [Neu4,5Ac(α2-3)Gal(β1-4)GlcS, where position of the sulfate (S) is unknown] and an unidentified 800 Da oligosaccharide containing a 4-O-acetyl-3'-sialyllactose core. 4-O-acetyl-3'-sialyllactose was the predominant saccharide at all lactation stages. 4-O-Acetylation is known to protect sialyllactose from bacterial sialidases and may be critical to prevent microbial degradation on the mammary areolae and/or in the hatchling digestive tract so that sialyllactose can be available for enterocyte uptake. The ability to

  12. Precise orbit determination based on raw GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehentner, Norbert; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    Precise orbit determination is an essential part of the most scientific satellite missions. Highly accurate knowledge of the satellite position is used to geolocate measurements of the onboard sensors. For applications in the field of gravity field research, the position itself can be used as observation. In this context, kinematic orbits of low earth orbiters (LEO) are widely used, because they do not include a priori information about the gravity field. The limiting factor for the achievable accuracy of the gravity field through LEO positions is the orbit accuracy. We make use of raw global positioning system (GPS) observations to estimate the kinematic satellite positions. The method is based on the principles of precise point positioning. Systematic influences are reduced by modeling and correcting for all known error sources. Remaining effects such as the ionospheric influence on the signal propagation are either unknown or not known to a sufficient level of accuracy. These effects are modeled as unknown parameters in the estimation process. The redundancy in the adjustment is reduced; however, an improvement in orbit accuracy leads to a better gravity field estimation. This paper describes our orbit determination approach and its mathematical background. Some examples of real data applications highlight the feasibility of the orbit determination method based on raw GPS measurements. Its suitability for gravity field estimation is presented in a second step.

  13. Precise Orbit Determination of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lina; Ge, Maorong; Wang, Jiexian; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2013-04-01

    China has been developing its own independent satellite navigation system since decades. Now the COMPASS system, also known as BeiDou, is emerging and gaining more and more interest and attention in the worldwide GNSS communities. The current regional BeiDou system is ready for its operational service around the end of 2012 with a constellation including five Geostationary Earth Orbit satellites (GEO), five Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit satellites (IGSO) and four Medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellites in operation. Besides the open service with positioning accuracy of around 10m which is free to civilian users, both precise relative positioning, and precise point positioning are demonstrated as well. In order to enhance the BeiDou precise positioning service, Precise Orbit Determination (POD) which is essential of any satellite navigation system has been investigated and studied thoroughly. To further improving the orbits of different types of satellites, we study the impact of network coverage on POD data products by comparing results from tracking networks over the Chinese territory, Asian-Pacific, Asian and of global scale. Furthermore, we concentrate on the improvement of involving MEOs on the orbit quality of GEOs and IGSOs. POD with and without MEOs are undertaken and results are analyzed. Finally, integer ambiguity resolution which brings highly improvement on orbits and positions with GPS data is also carried out and its effect on POD data products is assessed and discussed in detail. Seven weeks of BeiDou data from a ground tracking network, deployed by Wuhan University is employed in this study. The test constellation includes four GEO, five IGSO and two MEO satellites in operation. The three-day solution approach is employed to enhance its strength due to the limited coverage of the tracking network and the small movement of most of the satellites. A number of tracking scenarios and processing schemas are identified and processed and overlapping orbit

  14. Precise attitude determination of defunct satellite laser ranging tragets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittet, Jean-Noel; Schildknecht, Thomas; Silha, Jiri

    2016-07-01

    The Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) technology is used to determine the dynamics of objects equipped with so-called retro-reflectors or retro-reflector arrays (RRA). This type of measurement allows to range to the spacecraft with very high precision, which leads to determination of very accurate orbits. Non-active spacecraft, which are not any more attitude controlled, tend to start to spin or tumble under influence of the external and internal torques. Such a spinning can be around one constant axis of rotation or it can be more complex, when also precession and nutation motions are present. The rotation of the RRA around the spacecraft's centre of mass can create both a oscillation pattern of laser range signal and a periodic signal interruption when the RRA is hidden behind the satellite. In our work we will demonstrate how the SLR ranging technique to cooperative targets can be used to determine precisely their attitude state. The processing of the obtained data will be discussed, as well as the attitude determination based on parameters estimation. Continuous SLR measurements to one target can allow to accurately monitor attitude change over time which can be further used for the future attitude modelling. We will show our solutions of the attitude states determined for the non-active ESA satellite ENVISAT based on measurements acquired during year 2013-2015 by Zimmerwald SLR station, Switzerland. The angular momentum shows a stable behaviour with respect to the orbital plane but is not aligned with orbital momentum. The determination of the inertial rotation over time, shows it evolving between 130 to 190 seconds within two year. Parameter estimation also bring a strong indication of a retrograde rotation. Results on other former satellites in low and medium Earth orbit such as TOPEX/Poseidon or GLONASS type will be also presented.

  15. Precision Orbit Determination for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, F. G.; Mazarico, E.; Rowlands, D. D.; Torrence, M. H.; McGarry, J. F.; Neumann, G. A.; Mao, D.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2010-05-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft was launched on June 18, 2009. In mid-September 2009, the spacecraft orbit was changed from its commissioning orbit (30 x 216 km polar) to a quasi-frozen polar orbit with an average altitude of 50km (+-15km). One of the goals of the LRO mission is to develop a new lunar reference frame to facilitate future exploration. Precision Orbit Determination is used to achieve the accuracy requirements, and to precisely geolocate the high-resolution datasets obtained by the LRO instruments. In addition to the tracking data most commonly used to determine spacecraft orbits in planetary missions (radiometric Range and Doppler), LRO benefits from two other types of orbital constraints, both enabled by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument. The altimetric data collected as the instrument's primary purpose can be used to derive constraints on the orbit geometry at the times of laser groundtrack intersections (crossovers). The multi-beam configuration and high firing-rate of LOLA further improves the strength of these crossovers, compared to what was possible with the MOLA instrument onboard Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). Furthermore, one-way laser ranges (LR) between Earth International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) stations and the spacecraft are made possible by the addition of a small telescope mounted on the spacecraft high-gain antenna. The photons received from Earth are transmitted to one LOLA detector by a fiber optics bundle. Thanks to the accuracy of the LOLA timing system, the precision of 5-s LR normal points is below 10cm. We present the first results of the Precision Orbit Determination (POD) of LRO through the commissioning and nominal phases of the mission. Orbit quality is discussed, and various gravity fields are evaluated with the new (independent) LRO radio tracking data. The altimetric crossovers are used as an independent data type to evaluate the quality of the orbits. The contribution of the LR

  16. Simple column-switching ion chromatography method for determining eight monosaccharides and oligosaccharides in honeydew and nectar.

    PubMed

    Ni, Chengzhu; Zhu, Binhe; Wang, Nani; Wang, Muhua; Chen, Suqing; Zhang, Jiajie; Zhu, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Honeydew is excreted by aphids as a sweet waste and nectar is floral honey. Honeydew and nectar are complicated samples which consist of various sugars and amino acids. In this work, a simple ion chromatography with column-switching method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of 8 monosaccharides and oligosaccharides in honeydew and nectar. A reversed-phase column was used as a pretreatment column to eliminate organics on-line and sugars were eluted from a collection loop to analytical column by using column-switching technique. This method showed good linearity (r⩾0.9994) and afforded low limits of detection ranging from 1.55 to 10.17μgL(-1) for all the analytes. Recoveries ranged from 95% to 105% and repeatability results were acceptable with relative standard deviation of less than 3.21% (n=6). This method was successfully applied to quantification of these sugars in honeydew and nectar. These results showed honeydew had much more oligosaccharides than nectar. PMID:26471592

  17. Precise determination of lattice phase shifts and mixing angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Nan; Lähde, Timo A.; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a general and accurate method for determining lattice phase shifts and mixing angles, which is applicable to arbitrary, non-cubic lattices. Our method combines angular momentum projection, spherical wall boundaries and an adjustable auxiliary potential. This allows us to construct radial lattice wave functions and to determine phase shifts at arbitrary energies. For coupled partial waves, we use a complex-valued auxiliary potential that breaks time-reversal invariance. We benchmark our method using a system of two spin-1/2 particles interacting through a finite-range potential with a strong tensor component. We are able to extract phase shifts and mixing angles for all angular momenta and energies, with precision greater than that of extant methods. We discuss a wide range of applications from nuclear lattice simulations to optical lattice experiments.

  18. Improving GLONASS Precise Orbit Determination through Data Connection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Ge, Maorong; Shi, Chuang; Lou, Yidong; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the precision of GLONASS orbits, this paper presents a method to connect the data segments of a single station-satellite pair to increase the observation continuity and, consequently, the strength of the precise orbit determination (POD) solution. In this method, for each GLONASS station-satellite pair, the wide-lane ambiguities derived from the Melbourne–Wübbena combination are statistically tested and corrected for phase integer offsets and then the same is carried out for the narrow-lane ambiguities calculated from the POD solution. An experimental validation was carried out using one-month GNSS data of a global network with 175 IGS stations. The result shows that, on average, 27.1% of the GLONASS station-satellite pairs with multiple data segments could be connected to a single long observation arc and, thus, only one ambiguity parameter was estimated. Using the connected data, the GLONASS orbit overlapping RMS at the day boundaries could be reduced by 19.2% in ideal cases with an averaged reduction of about 6.3%. PMID:26633414

  19. Modeling radiation forces acting on satellites for precision orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. A.; Antreasian, P. G.; Rosborough, G. W.; Putney, B. H.

    1992-01-01

    Models of the TOPEX/Poseidon spacecraft are developed by means of finite-element analyses for use in generating acceleration histories for various orbit orientations which account for nonconservative radiation forces. The acceleration profiles are developed with an analysis based on the use of the 'box-wing' model in which the satellite is modeled as a combination of flat plates. The models account for the effects of solar, earth-albedo, earth-IR, and spacecraft-thermal radiation. The finite-element analysis gives the total force and induced accelerations acting on the satellite. The plate types used in the analysis have parameters that can be adjusted to optimize model performance according to the micromodel analysis and tracking observations. Acceleration related to solar radiation pressure is modeled effectively, and the techniques are shown to be useful for the precise orbit determinations required for spacecraft such as the TOPEX/Poseidon.

  20. Precise baseline determination for the TanDEM-X mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Rolf; Moon, Yongjin; Neumayer, Hans; Wermuth, Martin; Montenbruck, Oliver; Jäggi, Adrian

    The TanDEM-X mission will strive for generating a global precise Digital Elevation Model (DEM) by way of bi-static SAR in a close formation of the TerraSAR-X satellite, already launched on June 15, 2007, and the TanDEM-X satellite to be launched in May 2010. Both satellites carry the Tracking, Occultation and Ranging (TOR) payload supplied by the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences. The TOR consists of a high-precision dual-frequency GPS receiver, called Integrated GPS Occultation Receiver (IGOR), and a Laser retro-reflector (LRR) for precise orbit determination (POD) and atmospheric sounding. The IGOR is of vital importance for the TanDEM-X mission objectives as the millimeter level determination of the baseline or distance between the two spacecrafts is needed to derive meter level accurate DEMs. Within the TanDEM-X ground segment GFZ is responsible for the operational provision of precise baselines. For this GFZ uses two software chains, first its Earth Parameter and Orbit System (EPOS) software and second the BERNESE software, for backup purposes and quality control. In a concerted effort also the German Aerospace Center (DLR) generates precise baselines independently with a dedicated Kalman filter approach realized in its FRNS software. By the example of GRACE the generation of baselines with millimeter accuracy from on-board GPS data can be validated directly by way of comparing them to the intersatellite K-band range measurements. The K-band ranges are accurate down to the micrometer-level and therefore may be considered as truth. Both TanDEM-X baseline providers are able to generate GRACE baselines with sub-millimeter accuracy. By merging the independent baselines by GFZ and DLR, the accuracy can even be increased. The K-band validation however covers solely the along-track component as the K-band data measure just the distance between the two GRACE satellites. In addition they inhibit an un-known bias which must be modelled in the comparison, so the

  1. TOPEX/Poseidon precision orbit determination production and expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putney, Barbara; Zelensky, Nikita; Klosko, Steven

    1993-01-01

    TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) is a joint mission between NASA and the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), the French Space Agency. The TOPEX/Poseidon Precision Orbit Determination Production System (PODPS) was developed at Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) to produce the absolute orbital reference required to support the fundamental ocean science goals of this satellite altimeter mission within NASA. The orbital trajectory for T/P is required to have a RMS accuracy of 13 centimeters in its radial component. This requirement is based on the effective use of the satellite altimetry for the isolation of absolute long-wavelength ocean topography important for monitoring global changes in the ocean circulation system. This orbit modeling requirement is at an unprecedented accuracy level for this type of satellite. In order to routinely produce and evaluate these orbits, GSFC has developed a production and supporting expert system. The PODPS is a menu driven system allowing routine importation and processing of tracking data for orbit determination, and an evaluation of the quality of the orbit so produced through a progressive series of tests. Phase 1 of the expert system grades the orbit and displays test results. Later phases undergoing implementation, will prescribe corrective actions when unsatisfactory results are seen. This paper describes the design and implementation of this orbit determination production system and the basis for its orbit accuracy assessment within the expert system.

  2. Improving integer ambiguity resolution for GLONASS precise orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Ge, Maorong; Shi, Chuang; Lou, Yidong; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2016-05-01

    The frequency division multiple access adopted in present GLONASS introduces inter-frequency bias (IFB) at the receiver-end both in code and phase observables, which makes GLONASS ambiguity resolution rather difficult or even not available, especially for long baselines up to several thousand kilometers. This is one of the major reasons that GLONASS could hardly reach the orbit precision of GPS, both in terms of consistency among individual International GNSS Service (IGS) analysis centers and discontinuity at the overlapping day boundaries. Based on the fact that the GLONASS phase IFB is similar on L1 and L2 bands in unit of length and is a linear function of the frequency number, several approaches have been developed to estimate and calibrate the IFB for integer ambiguity resolution. However, they are only for short and medium baselines. In this study, a new ambiguity resolution approach is developed for GLONASS global networks. In the approach, the phase ambiguities in the ionosphere-free linear combination are directly transformed with a wavelength of about 5.3 cm, according to the special frequency relationship of GLONASS L1 and L2 signals. After such transformation, the phase IFB rate can be estimated and corrected precisely and then the corresponding double-differenced ambiguities can be directly fixed to integers even for baselines up to several thousand kilometers. To evaluate this approach, experimental validations using one-month data of a global network with 140 IGS stations was carried out for GLONASS precise orbit determination. The results show that the GLONASS double-difference ambiguity resolution for long baselines could be achieved with an average fixing-rate of 91.4 %. Applying the fixed ambiguities as constraints, the GLONASS orbit overlapping RMS at the day boundaries could be reduced by 37.2 % in ideal cases and with an averaged reduction of about 21.4 %, which is comparable with that by the GPS ambiguity resolution. The orbit improvement is

  3. Precise Orbit Determination of the GOCE Re-Entry Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gini, Francesco; Otten, Michiel; Springer, Tim; Enderle, Werner; Lemmens, Stijn; Flohrer, Tim

    2015-03-01

    During the last days of the GOCE mission, after the GOCE spacecraft ran out of fuel, it slowly decayed before finally re-entering the atmosphere on the 11th November 2013. As an integrated part of the AOCS, GOCE carried a GPS receiver that was in operations during the re-entry phase. This feature provided a unique opportunity for Precise Orbit Determination (POD) analysis. As part of the activities carried out by the Navigation Support Office (HSO-GN) at ESOC, precise ephemerides of the GOCE satellite have been reconstructed for the entire re-entry phase based on the available GPS observations of the onboard LAGRANGE receiver. All the data available from the moment the thruster was switched off on the 21st of October 2013 to the last available telemetry downlink on the 10th November 2013 have been processed, for a total of 21 daily arcs. For this period a dedicated processing sequence has been defined and implemented within the ESA/ESOC NAvigation Package for Earth Observation Satellites (NAPEOS) software. The computed results show a post-fit RMS of the GPS undifferenced carrier phase residuals (ionospheric-free linear combination) between 6 and 14 mm for the first 16 days which then progressively increases up to about 80 mm for the last available days. An orbit comparison with the Precise Science Orbits (PSO) generated at the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB, Bern, Switzerland) shows an average difference around 9 cm for the first 8 daily arcs and progressively increasing up to 17 cm for the following days. During this reentry phase (21st of October - 10th November 2013) a substantial drop in the GOCE altitude is observed, starting from about 230 km to 130 km where the last GPS measurements were taken. During this orbital decay an increment of a factor of 100 in the aerodynamic acceleration profile is observed. In order to limit the mis-modelling of the non-gravitational forces (radiation pressure and aerodynamic effects) the newly developed

  4. Improving integer ambiguity resolution for GLONASS precise orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Ge, Maorong; Shi, Chuang; Lou, Yidong; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2016-08-01

    The frequency division multiple access adopted in present GLONASS introduces inter-frequency bias (IFB) at the receiver-end both in code and phase observables, which makes GLONASS ambiguity resolution rather difficult or even not available, especially for long baselines up to several thousand kilometers. This is one of the major reasons that GLONASS could hardly reach the orbit precision of GPS, both in terms of consistency among individual International GNSS Service (IGS) analysis centers and discontinuity at the overlapping day boundaries. Based on the fact that the GLONASS phase IFB is similar on L1 and L2 bands in unit of length and is a linear function of the frequency number, several approaches have been developed to estimate and calibrate the IFB for integer ambiguity resolution. However, they are only for short and medium baselines. In this study, a new ambiguity resolution approach is developed for GLONASS global networks. In the approach, the phase ambiguities in the ionosphere-free linear combination are directly transformed with a wavelength of about 5.3 cm, according to the special frequency relationship of GLONASS L1 and L2 signals. After such transformation, the phase IFB rate can be estimated and corrected precisely and then the corresponding double-differenced ambiguities can be directly fixed to integers even for baselines up to several thousand kilometers. To evaluate this approach, experimental validations using one-month data of a global network with 140 IGS stations was carried out for GLONASS precise orbit determination. The results show that the GLONASS double-difference ambiguity resolution for long baselines could be achieved with an average fixing-rate of 91.4 %. Applying the fixed ambiguities as constraints, the GLONASS orbit overlapping RMS at the day boundaries could be reduced by 37.2 % in ideal cases and with an averaged reduction of about 21.4 %, which is comparable with that by the GPS ambiguity resolution. The orbit improvement is

  5. Analysis of HY2A precise orbit determination using DORIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fan; Peng, Bibo; Zhang, Yu; Evariste, Ngatchou Heutchi; Liu, Jihua; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhong, Min; Lin, Mingsen; Wang, Nazi; Chen, Runjing; Xu, Houze

    2015-03-01

    HY2A is the first Chinese marine dynamic environment satellite. The payloads include a radar altimeter to measure the sea surface height in combination with a high precision orbit to be determined from tracking data. Onboard satellite tracking includes GPS, SLR, and the DORIS DGXX receiver which delivers phase and pseudo-range measurements. CNES releases raw phase and pseudo-range measurements with RINEX DORIS 3.0 format and pre-processed Doppler range-rate with DORIS 2.2 data format. However, the VMSI software package developed by Van Martin Systems, Inc which is used to estimate HY2A DORIS orbits can only process Doppler range-rate but not the DORIS phase data which are available with much shorter latency. We have proposed a method of constructing the phase increment data, which are similar to range-rate data, from RINEX DORIS 3.0 phase data. We compute the HY2A orbits from June, 2013 to August, 2013 using the POD strategy described in this paper based on DORIS 2.2 range-rate data and our reconstructed phase increment data. The estimated orbits are evaluated by comparing with the CNES precise orbits and SLR residuals. Our DORIS-only orbits agree with the precise GPS + SLR + DORIS CNES orbits radially at 1-cm and about 3-cm in the other two directions. SLR test with the 50° cutoff elevation shows that the CNES orbit can achieve about 1.1-cm accuracy in radial direction and our DORIS-only POD solutions are slightly worse. In addition, other HY2A DORIS POD concerns are discussed in this paper. Firstly, we discuss the frequency offset values provided with the RINEX data and find that orbit accuracy for the case when the frequency offset is applied is worse than when it is not applied. Secondly, HY2A DORIS antenna z-offsets are estimated using two kinds of measurements from June, 2013 to August, 2013. The results show that the measurement errors contribute a total of about 2-cm difference of estimated z-offset. Finally, we estimate HY2A orbits selecting 3 days with

  6. Precise satellite orbit determination with particular application to ERS-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Maria Joana Afonso Pereira

    The motivation behind this study is twofold. First to assess the accuracy of ERS-1 long arc ephemerides using state of the art models. Second, to develop improved methods for determining precise ERS-1 orbits using either short or long arc techniques. The SATAN programs, for the computation of satellite orbits using laser data were used. Several facilities were added to the original programs: the processing of PRARE range and altimeter data, and a number of algorithms that allow more flexible solutions by adjusting a number of additional parameters. The first part of this study, before the launch of ERS-1, was done with SEAS AT data. The accuracy of SEASAT orbits computed with PRARE simulated data has been determined. The effect of temporal distribution of tracking data along the arc and the extent to which altimetry can replace range data have been investigated. The second part starts with the computation of ERS-1 long arc solutions using laser data. Some aspects of modelling the two main forces affecting ERS-l's orbit are investigated. With regard to the gravitational forces, the adjustment of a set of geopotential coefficients has been considered. With respect to atmospheric drag, extensive research has been carried out on determining the influence on orbit accuracy of the measurements of solar fluxes (P10.7 indices) and geomagnetic activity (Kp indices) used by the atmospheric model in the computation of atmospheric density at satellite height. Two new short arc methods have been developed: the Constrained and the Bayesian method. Both methods are dynamic and consist of solving for the 6 osculating elements. Using different techniques, both methods overcome the problem of normal matrix ill- conditioning by constraining the solution. The accuracy and applicability of these methods are discussed and compared with the traditional non-dynamic TAR method.

  7. Precise determination of ferrous iron in silicate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Eizo

    2002-03-01

    We have developed a highly precise method for the determination of ferrous iron (Fe 2+) in silicate rocks. Our new method is based on Wilson's procedure (1955) in which surplus V 5+ is used to oxidize Fe 2+ into Fe 3+ while equivalently reducing V 5+ into V 4+. Because V 4+ is more resistant to atmospheric oxidation than Fe 2+, Fe 2+ in the sample can be determined by measuring unreacted V 5+ by adding excess Fe 2+ after sample decomposition and then titrating the unreacted Fe 2+ with Cr 6+. With our method, which involves conditioning the sample solution with 5 M H 2SO 4 in a relatively small beaker (7 mL), the oxidation of Fe 2+ or V 4+ that leads to erroneous results can be completely avoided, even in 100-h sample decompositions at 100°C. We have measured the concentration of FeO in 15 standard silicate rock powders provided by the Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ). Analytical reproducibility was better than 0.5% (1σ) for all but those samples that had small amounts of Fe 2+ (<1.5 wt.% of FeO). Fourteen of these samples gave FeO contents significantly higher than the GSJ reference values. This likely indicates that the GSJ reference values, obtained by compiling previously published data, contain a large number of poor-quality data obtained by methods with lower recovery of Fe 2+ caused by oxidation or insufficient sample decomposition during analyses. To achieve accurate determinations of Fe 2+ in our method, several factors besides the oxidation must be considered, including: (1) long-term variations in the concentration of Fe 2+ solution must be corrected; (2) excess use of the indicator must be avoided; and (3) the formation of inert FeF + complex must be avoided during titration when using boric acid as a masking agent.

  8. High precision determination of the terrestrial 40K abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, Maria O.; Mezger, Klaus; Nägler, Thomas F.; Villa, Igor M.

    2013-12-01

    Recent improvements in the precision of mass spectrometric measurements have reduced the uncertainty of K-Ar and 39Ar-40Ar ages measured on geological materials. Now the major sources of uncertainty are the uncertainties on the 40K decay constant and the absolute abundance of 40K. In order to improve on this situation we determined the abundance of the 40K isotope in terrestrial standards. A ThermoFischer Triton+ thermal ionization mass spectrometer was used for K isotope ratio measurements of the NIST K standard reference materials SRM 918b and SRM 985. Ion beams were measured in Faraday cups with amplifiers equipped with 1010, 1011 and 1012 Ω resistors. Three measurement protocols were used: (A) dynamic measurement with in-run fractionation correction by normalization to the IUPAC recommended isotope ratio 41K/39K = 0.072 1677; (B) total evaporation; (C) a modified total evaporation with interblock baseline measurements. Different measurement protocols were combined with different loading procedures. The best results were obtained by loading samples on single oxidized tantalum filaments with 0.1 M H3PO4. The total ion yields (ionization + transmission) were tested for the evaporation procedures (B) and (C) and ranged up to 48%. The resulting best estimate for the 40K/39K ratio is 0.000 125 116 ± 57 (2σ), corresponding to an isotopic abundance 40K/K = (1.1668 ± 8) × 10-4.

  9. [Simultaneous determination of monosaccharides, disaccharides, oligosaccharides and sugar alcohols in foods by high performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detection].

    PubMed

    Ding, Hongliu; Li, Can; Jin, Ping; Yuan, Lihong; Yao, Yongqing; Chen, Ying; Li, Pei

    2013-08-01

    A simple and efficient method was established based on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to separate and detect thirteen analytes of monosaccharides, disaccharides, oligosaccharides and sugar alcohols (xylose, fructose, glucose, sucrose, maltose, lactose, 1-kestose, nystose, 1F-fructofuranosyl nystose, erythritol, mannitol, xylitol, maltitol) in foods. The separation was performed on an NH2 column with the gradient elution of acetonitrile-water as the mobile phases. The analytes were detected by an evaporative light-scattering detector (ELSD). All the thirteen sugars had good linearities within 0.1 - 5 g/L with the correlation coefficients between 0.9901 - 0.9996. The limits of detection (LOD) were all less than 0.1 g/L. The precisions of the method expressed as RSDs were in the range of 2.69% -7.21%. The recoveries of the thirteen analytes spiked in real samples ranged from 96.1% to 105.2%. This method was applied to the actual sample testings and the results showed the food labels were greatly different from the actual compositions. PMID:24369618

  10. Robust and precise baseline determination of distributed spacecraft in LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende-Alba, Gerardo; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Recent experience with prominent formation flying missions in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), such as GRACE and TanDEM-X, has shown the feasibility of precise relative navigation at millimeter and sub-millimeter levels using GPS carrier phase measurements with fixed integer ambiguities. However, the robustness and availability of the solutions provided by current algorithms may be highly dependent on the mission profile. The main challenges faced in the LEO scenario are the resulting short continuous carrier phase tracking arcs along with the observed rapidly changing ionospheric conditions, which in the particular situation of long baselines increase the difficulty of correct integer ambiguity resolution. To reduce the impact of these factors, the present study proposes a strategy based on a reduced-dynamics filtering of dual-frequency GPS measurements for precise baseline determination along with a dedicated scheme for integer ambiguity resolution, consisting of a hybrid sequential/batch algorithm based on the maximum a posteriori and integer aperture estimators. The algorithms have been tested using flight data from the GRACE, TanDEM-X and Swarm missions in order to assess their robustness to different formation and baseline configurations. Results with the GRACE mission show an average 0.7 mm consistency with the K/Ka-band ranging measurements over a period of more than two years in a baseline configuration of 220 km. Results with TanDEM-X data show an average of 3.8 mm consistency of kinematic and reduced-dynamic solutions in the along-track component over a period of 40 days in baseline configurations of 500 m and 75 km. Data from Swarm A and Swarm C spacecraft are largely affected by atmospheric scintillation and contain half cycle ambiguities. The results obtained under such conditions show an overall consistency between kinematic and reduced-dynamic solutions of 1.7 cm in the along-track component over a period of 30 days in a variable baseline of approximately 60

  11. Ion exchange chromatographic separation and isolation of oligosaccharides of intact low-molecular-weight heparin for the determination of their anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties.

    PubMed

    Shastri, Madhur D; Johns, Cameron; Hutchinson, Joseph P; Khandagale, Manish; Patel, Rahul P

    2013-07-01

    It is well known that enoxaparin, a widely used anticoagulant and low-molecular-weight heparin containing a large number of oligosaccharides, possesses anti-inflammatory activity. Whilst enoxaparin has shown promising results in various inflammatory disorders, some of its oligosaccharides have anti-inflammatory properties and others increase the risk of bleeding due to their anticoagulant effects. The aim of this study was to develop an effective ion exchange chromatographic (IC) technique which allows the separation, isolation and, consequently, the identification of different oligosaccharides of enoxaparin with or without anticoagulant activity. The developed method utilises a semi-preparative CarboPac PA100 (9 × 250 mm) ion exchange column with sodium chloride gradient elution and UV detection at 232 nm. The method successfully resolved enoxaparin into more than 30 different peaks. IC-derived oligosaccharides with high, moderate, low or no anticoagulant activity were identified using an anti-factor Xa assay. The anti-inflammatory activity of selected oligosaccharides was investigated using the Griess assay. Using this technique, the oligosaccharides of enoxaparin with low or no anticoagulant activity, whilst exhibiting significant anti-inflammatory activity, could be fractionated. This technique can provide a platform to identify the oligosaccharides which are devoid of significant anticoagulant activity and are responsible for the therapeutic effects of enoxaparin that have been observed in various inflammatory conditions. PMID:23712644

  12. GOCE: precise orbit determination for the entire mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Heike; Jäggi, Adrian; Beutler, Gerhard; Meyer, Ulrich

    2014-07-01

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) was the first Earth explorer core mission of the European Space Agency. It was launched on March 17, 2009 into a Sun-synchronous dusk-dawn orbit and re-entered into the Earth's atmosphere on November 11, 2013. The satellite altitude was between 255 and 225 km for the measurement phases. The European GOCE Gravity consortium is responsible for the Level 1b to Level 2 data processing in the frame of the GOCE High-level processing facility (HPF). The Precise Science Orbit (PSO) is one Level 2 product, which was produced under the responsibility of the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern within the HPF. This PSO product has been continuously delivered during the entire mission. Regular checks guaranteed a high consistency and quality of the orbits. A correlation between solar activity, GPS data availability and quality of the orbits was found. The accuracy of the kinematic orbit primarily suffers from this. Improvements in modeling the range corrections at the retro-reflector array for the SLR measurements were made and implemented in the independent SLR validation for the GOCE PSO products. The satellite laser ranging (SLR) validation finally states an orbit accuracy of 2.42 cm for the kinematic and 1.84 cm for the reduced-dynamic orbits over the entire mission. The common-mode accelerations from the GOCE gradiometer were not used for the official PSO product, but in addition to the operational HPF work a study was performed to investigate to which extent common-mode accelerations improve the reduced-dynamic orbit determination results. The accelerometer data may be used to derive realistic constraints for the empirical accelerations estimated for the reduced-dynamic orbit determination, which already improves the orbit quality. On top of that the accelerometer data may further improve the orbit quality if realistic constraints and state-of-the-art background models such as gravity field

  13. Task precision at transfer determines specificity of perceptual learning

    PubMed Central

    Jeter, Pamela E.; Dosher, Barbara Anne; Petrov, Alexander; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Perceptual learning, the improvement in performance with practice, reflects plasticity in the adult visual system. We challenge a standard claim that specificity of perceptual learning depends on task difficulty during training, instead showing that specificity, or conversely transfer, is primarily controlled by the precision demands (i.e., orientation difference) of the transfer task. Thus, for an orientation discrimination task, transfer of performance improvement is observed in low-precision transfer tasks, while specificity of performance improvement is observed in high-precision transfer tasks, regardless of the precision of initial training. The nature of specificity places important constraints on mechanisms of transfer in visual learning. These results contribute to understanding generalization of practiced improvements that may be key to the development of expertise and for applications in remediation. PMID:19757940

  14. Status of Precise Orbit Determination for Jason-2 Using GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melachroinos, S.; Lemoine, F. G.; Zelensky, N. P.; Rowlands, D. D.; Pavlis, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    The JASON-2 satellite, launched in June 2008, is the latest follow-on to the successful TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) and JASON-I altimetry missions. JASON-2 is equipped with a TRSR Blackjack GPS dual-frequency receiver, a laser retroreflector array, and a DORIS receiver for precise orbit determination (POD). The most recent time series of orbits computed at NASA GSFC, based on SLR/DORIS data have been completed using both ITRF2005 and ITRF2008. These orbits have been shown to agree radially at 1 cm RMS for dynamic vs SLRlDORIS reduced-dynamic orbits and in comparison with orbits produced by other analysis centers (Lemoine et al., 2010; Zelensky et al., 2010; Cerri et al., 2010). We have recently upgraded the GEODYN software to implement model improvements for GPS processing. We describe the implementation of IGS standards to the Jason2 GEODYN GPS processing, and other dynamical and measurement model improvements. Our GPS-only JASON-2 orbit accuracy is assessed using a number of tests including analysis of independent SLR and altimeter crossover residuals, orbit overlap differences, and direct comparison to orbits generated at GSFC using SLR and DORIS tracking, and to orbits generated externally at other centers. Tests based on SLR and the altimeter crossover residuals provide the best performance indicator for independent validation of the NASAlGSFC GPS-only reduced dynamic orbits. For the ITRF2005 and ITRF2008 implementation of our GPS-only obits we are using the IGS05 and IGS08 standards. Reduced dynamic versus dynamic orbit differences are used to characterize the remaining force model error and TRF instability. We evaluate the GPS vs SLR & DORIS orbits produced using the GEODYN software and assess in particular their consistency radially and the stability of the altimeter satellite reference frame in the Z direction for both ITRF2005 and ITRF2008 as a proxy to assess the consistency of the reference frame for altimeter satellite POD.

  15. Visual information throughout a reach determines endpoint precision.

    PubMed

    Ma-Wyatt, Anna; McKee, Suzanne P

    2007-05-01

    People make rapid, goal-directed movements to interact with their environment. Because these movements have consequences, it is important to be able to control them with a high level of precision and accuracy. Our hypothesis is that vision guides rapid hand movements, thereby enhancing their accuracy and precision. To test this idea, we asked observers to point to a briefly presented target (110 ms). We measured the impact of visual information on endpoint precision by using a shutter to close off view of the hand 50, 110 and 250 ms into the reach. We found that precision was degraded if the view of the hand was restricted at any time during the reach, despite the fact that the target disappeared long before the reach was completed. We therefore conclude that vision keeps the hand on the planned trajectory. We then investigated the effects of a perturbation of target position during the reach. For these experiments, the target remained visible until the reach was completed. The target position was shifted at 110, 180 or 250 ms into the reach. Early shifts in target position were easily compensated for, but late shifts led to a shift in the mean position of the endpoints; observers pointed to the center of the two locations, as a kind of best bet on the position of the target. Visual information is used to guide the hand throughout a reach and has a significant impact on endpoint precision. PMID:17109109

  16. Structural basis for the interaction between human milk oligosaccharides and the bacterial lectin PA-IIL of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    One of the mechanisms contributing to the protection by breast-feeding of the newborn against enteric diseases is related to the ability of human milk oligosaccharides to prevent the attachment of pathogenic bacteria to the duodenual epithelium. Indeed, a variety of fucosylated oligosaccharides, specific to human milk, form part of the innate immune system. In the present study, we demonstrate the specific blocking of PA-IIL, a fucose-binding lectin of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, by milk oligosaccharides. Two fucosylated epitopes, Lewis a and 3-fucosyl-lactose (Lewis x glucose analogue) bind to the lectin with dissociation constants of 2.2×10−7 M and 3.6×10−7 M respectively. Thermodynamic studies indicate that these interactions are dominated by enthalpy. The entropy contribution is slightly favourable when binding to fucose and to the highest-affinity ligand, Lewis a. The high-resolution X-ray structures of two complexes of PA-IIL with milk oligosaccharides allow the precise determination of the conformation of a trisaccharide and a pentasaccharide. The different types of interaction between the oligosaccharides and the protein involve not only hydrogen bonding, but also calcium- and water-bridged contacts, allowing a rationalization of the thermodynamic data. This study provides important structural information about compounds that could be of general application in new therapeutic strategies against bacterial infections. PMID:15790314

  17. Rapid and precise determination of ATP using a modified photometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shultz, David J.; Stephens, Doyle W.

    1980-01-01

    An inexpensive delay timer was designed to modify a commercially available ATP photometer which allows a disposable tip pipette to be used for injecting either enzyme or sample into the reaction cuvette. The disposable tip pipette is as precise and accurate as a fixed-needle syringe but eliminates the problem of sample contamination and decreases analytical time. (USGS)

  18. High precision photon flux determination for photon tagging experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Teymurazyan, A; Ahmidouch, A; Ambrozewicz, P; Asratyan, A; Baker, K; Benton, L; Burkert, V; Clinton, E; Cole, P; Collins, P; Dale, D; Danagoulian, S; Davidenko, G; Demirchyan, R; Deur, A; Dolgolenko, A; Dzyubenko, G; Ent, R; Evdokimov, A; Feng, J; Gabrielyan, M; Gan, L; Gasparian, A; Glamazdin, A; Goryachev, V; Hardy, K; He, J; Ito, M; Jiang, L; Kashy, D; Khandaker, M; Kolarkar, A; Konchatnyi, M; Korchin, A; Korsch, W; Kosinov, O; Kowalski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kubarovsky, V; Larin, I; Lawrence, D; Li, X; Martel, P; Matveev, V; McNulty, D; Mecking, B; Milbrath, B; Minehart, R; Miskimen, R; Mochalov, V; Nakagawa, I; Overby, S; Pasyuk, E; Payen, M; Pedroni, R; Prok, Y; Ritchie, B; Salgado, C; Shahinyan, A; Sitnikov, A; Sober, D; Stepanyan, S; Stevens, W; Underwood, J; Vasiliev, A; Vishnyakov, V; Wood, M; Zhou, S

    2014-07-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory PrimEx Collaboration has developed and implemented a method to control the tagged photon flux in photoproduction experiments at the 1% level over the photon energy range from 4.9 to 5.5 GeV. This method has been successfully implemented in a high precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime. Here, we outline the experimental equipment and the analysis techniques used to accomplish this. These include the use of a total absorption counter for absolute flux calibration, a pair spectrometer for online relative flux monitoring, and a new method for post-bremsstrahlung electron counting.

  19. High precision photon flux determination for photon tagging experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teymurazyan, A.; Ahmidouch, A.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Asratyan, A.; Baker, K.; Benton, L.; Burkert, V.; Clinton, E.; Cole, P.; Collins, P.; Dale, D.; Danagoulian, S.; Davidenko, G.; Demirchyan, R.; Deur, A.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dzyubenko, G.; Ent, R.; Evdokimov, A.; Feng, J.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gan, L.; Gasparian, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Goryachev, V.; Hardy, K.; He, J.; Ito, M.; Jiang, L.; Kashy, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kolarkar, A.; Konchatnyi, M.; Korchin, A.; Korsch, W.; Kosinov, O.; Kowalski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Larin, I.; Lawrence, D.; Li, X.; Martel, P.; Matveev, V.; McNulty, D.; Mecking, B.; Milbrath, B.; Minehart, R.; Miskimen, R.; Mochalov, V.; Nakagawa, I.; Overby, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Payen, M.; Pedroni, R.; Prok, Y.; Ritchie, B.; Salgado, C.; Shahinyan, A.; Sitnikov, A.; Sober, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stevens, W.; Underwood, J.; Vasiliev, A.; Vishnyakov, V.; Wood, M.; Zhou, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory PrimEx Collaboration has developed and implemented a method to control the tagged photon flux in photoproduction experiments at the 1% level over the photon energy range from 4.9 to 5.5 GeV. This method has been successfully implemented in a high precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime. Here, we outline the experimental equipment and the analysis techniques used to accomplish this. These include the use of a total absorption counter for absolute flux calibration, a pair spectrometer for online relative flux monitoring, and a new method for post-bremsstrahlung electron counting.

  20. Validation of individual GOCE accelerometers by precise orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Pieter N. A. M.

    2012-07-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circular Explorer (GOCE) carries a gradiometer consisting of three pairs of accelerometers in an orthogonal triad. Precise GOCE science orbit solutions (PSO), which are based on Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) observations by the Global Positioning System (GPS) and which are claimed to be at the few cm precision level, can be used to validate the observations taken by the accelerometers. This has been done for each individual accelerometer by a dynamic orbit fit of the time series of position coordinates from the PSOs, where the accelerometer observations represent the non-gravitational accelerations. Since the accelerometers do not coincide with the center of mass of the GOCE satellite, the observations have to be corrected for rotational and gravity gradient terms. This is opposed to using the so-called common-mode accelerations, provided the center of the gradiometer coincides with the center of mass. Dynamic orbit fits based on these common-mode accelerations therefore served as reference. It will be shown that for all individual accelerometers similar dynamic orbit fits can be obtained, provided the above mentioned corrections are made. When using the common-mode accelerations, similar fits are obtained. In addition, attention will be paid to the possibility of estimating accelerometer calibration parameters, such as biases and scale factors.

  1. Purification, characterization and biological activities of a garlic oligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Sadaji; Okamoto, Kouji; Inanaga, Junji; Karasaki, Yuji

    2008-06-01

    A novel oligosaccharide was purified from garlic (Allium sativum L.) bulbs via hot water extraction, ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. The molecular weight of the oligosaccharide was determined to be 1800. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study showed that ten fructose molecules were connected by beta1-2 linkage to a terminal glucose. The oligosaccharide had cytotoxic activities against human malignant lymphoma cells (U937) and colon adenocarcinoma cells (WiDr) in vitro. Furthermore, this oligosaccharide significantly suppressed the growth of murine colon adenocarcinoma cells (colon 26) in vivo. The oligosaccharide also stimulated interferon-gamma production by human peripheral blood lymphocyte in vitro, indicating that it may activate the immunological pathways and suppress the growth of tumors in vivo. PMID:18655544

  2. [Determination of fructo-oligosaccharides in milk powder by high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole/electrostatic field orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Ding, Tao; Xu, Suli; Wu, Bin; Shen, Chongyu; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yan; Fei, Xiaoqing

    2015-10-01

    A method of high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole/electrostatic field Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-Q/Orbitrap MS) was developed to determine fructo-oligosaccharides in milk powder. The milk powder samples were dissolved in deionized water. Subsequently, an aqueous solution of zinc acetate was used to precipitate protein. After centrifugation, the final aqueous solution was filtered by a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane with pore size of 0.22 μm. The analytes were separated on a Carbohydrate column (100 mm x 2.1 mm, 2.6 μm) through gradient elution with the combination of acetonitrile and 0.1% formic acid aqueous solution. The target-MS/MS templates were performed at isolation window of m/z 4.0 and collision energy of 30 eV in positive mode to extract the accurate product ion mass of analytes. Under the optimal condition, 1-kestose (GF2), nystose (GF3) and 1-F-β-fructofuranosyl nystose (GF4) were well separated and the accuracy of extracted mass routinely detected was below 5 x 10(-6) (5 ppm). The whole analysis time is only ten minutes. The detection limits for GF2 and GF3 were 100 μg/kg, and the detection limit for GF4 was 55 μg/kg. Good linearities were obtained in their respective linear ranges with correlation coefficients higher than 0.998. The average recoveries at three spiked levels (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) were in the range of 75.8%-107.3% and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 1.6% - 8.3%. The proposed method is simple, sensitive, fast and only in need of precipitation of proteins. The interference of matrix can be eliminated through the selection of product ion. The results were convenient and reliable and thus can be used in the large batch determination of any milk powder. PMID:26930960

  3. High Precision 40K/39K Ratio Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, M. O.; Mezger, K.; Nagler, T. F.; Villa, I. M.

    2012-12-01

    Potassium is one of the eight most abundant chemical elements in the Earth's crust and a major element in many rock-forming minerals. The isotope 40K is radioactive and undergoes β- decay to 40Ca (ca. 89.3%) and electron capture to 40Ar (ca. 10.7%). Both decays can potentially be used as dating systems. The most commonly used branch is the decay of 40K to 40Ar because it can yield highly precise ages. Both decay schemes rely on the knowledge of the 40K branching ratio and the natural 40K abundance. A 40K abundance of 0.011672±41 % was measured on terrestrial material [1]. The relative uncertainty of 0.35 % has not been improved since. Recent improvements in the precision of mass spectrometric measurements have led to the situation that the uncertainties on the K decay constant and the abundance of 40K are a major source of uncertainty on the measured ages. A more precise definition of the 40K decay constant was attempted by different research groups within the last decade [2-9] but the goal of obtaining 0.1 % relative uncertainty on K-Ar ages for geological materials, as requested by the EARTHtime initiative, has not been achieved yet. In order to improve on this situation we studied the abundances of the K isotopes in terrestrial standards. A ThermoFischer Triton+ thermal ionisation mass spectrometer was used for K isotope ratio measurements of the NIST SRM 918b K standard loaded on Ta filaments with 0.1M phosphoric acid. Three techniques were applied: (A) dynamic measurement with in-run normalisation to the IUPAC value 41K/39K=0.072168; (B) a simple total evaporation procedure; (C) the "NBL-modified" total evaporation [10]. The 40K ion beam was measured in a Faraday cup with a 1E12 Ω resistor; 39K and 41K were collected in Faraday cups with 1E11 Ω resistors. Amplifier gains were intercalibrated by supplying fixed voltages off-line. Different measurement techniques were combined with different loading procedures. We also tested ionisation yields for the

  4. Precise Orbit Determination for the GEOSAT Follow-On Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Rowlands, David D.; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Luthcke, Scott B.; Cox, Christopher M.; Marr, Gregory C.

    1999-01-01

    The US Navy's GEOSAT Follow-On spacecraft was launched on February 10, 1998 with its primary mission objective to map the oceans using a radar altimeter. The spacecraft tracking complement consists of GPS receivers, a laser retroreflector and Doppler beacons. Since the GPS receivers have not yet returned reliable data, the only means of providing high-quality precise orbits has been though satellite laser ranging (SLR). SLR has tracked the spacecraft since April 22, 1998, and an average of 7 passes per day have been obtained from US and foreign stations. Since the predicted radial orbit error due to the gravity field is only two to three cm, the largest contributor to the high SLR residuals (10 cm) is the mismodelling of the non-conservative forces. The SLR residuals show a clear correlation with beta prime (solar elevation) angle, peaking in mid-August 1998 when the beta prime angle reached -80 to -90 degrees. We report in this paper on the analysis of the GFO tracking data (SLR, Doppler, and if available GPS) using GEODYN, and on the tuning of the non-conservative force model and the gravity model using these data.

  5. High-Precision Determination of the Neutron Coherent Scattering Length

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Apoorva G.; Abbas, Sohrab

    2005-01-01

    The neutron coherent scattering length bc has been determined interferometrically to an uncertainty of about 5 × 10−5 by measuring the nondispersive phase. We propose improving the uncertainty to about 10−6 by optimizing various parameters of the interferometric experiment. Any uncertainty in the bc determination arising from possible variations in the constitution of the ambient air can be eliminated by performing the experiment in vacuum. When such uncertainty is attained, it becomes necessary to account for the neutron beam refraction at the sample-ambient interfaces, to infer the correct bc from the observed phase. The formula for the phase used hitherto is approximate and would significantly overestimate bc. The refractive index for neutrons can thus be determined to a phenomenal uncertainty of about 10−12. PMID:27308128

  6. Precise determination of neutron binding energy of 64Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telezhnikov, S. A.; Granja, C.; Honzatko, J.; Pospisil, S.; Tomandl, I.

    2016-05-01

    The neutron binding energy in 64Cu has been accurately measured in thermal neutron capture. A composite target of natural Cu and NaCl was used on a high flux neutron beam using a large measuring time. The γ-ray spectrum emitted in the ( n, γ) reaction was measured with a HPGe detector in large statistics (up to 106 events per channel). Intrinsic limitations of HPGe detectors, which restrict the accuracy of energy calibration, were determined. The value B n of 64Cu was determined as 7915.867(24) keV.

  7. A reduced-dynamic technique for precise orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. C.; Yunck, T. P.; Thornton, C. L.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the Global Positioning System (GPS) will enable a reduced-dynamic technique for achieving subdecimeter orbit determination of earth-orbiting satellites. With this technique, information on the transition between satellite states at different observing times is furnished by both a formal dynamic model and observed satellite positional change (which is inferred kinematically from continuous GPS carrier-phase data). The relative weighting of dynamic and kinematic information can be freely varied. Covariance studies show that in situations where observing geometry is poor and the dynamic model is good, the model dominates determination of the state transition; where the dynamic model is poor and the geometry strong, carrier phase governs the determination of the transition. When neither kinematic nor dynamic information is clearly superior, the reduced-dynamic combination of the two can substantially improve the orbit-determination solution. Guidelines are given here for selecting a near-optimal weighting for the reduced-dynamic solution, and sensitivity of solution accuracy to this weighting is examined.

  8. Precision orbit determination at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putney, B.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Smith, D.; Dunn, P.; Torrence, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the GEODYN computer program developed by the Geodynamics Branch at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and outlines the procedure for accurate satellite orbit and tracking-data analyses. The capabilities of the program allow the development of gravity fields as large as 90 by 90, and a complete modeling of tidal parameters. It is also feasible to numerically integrate a continuous orbit of a satellite such as Lageos for up to 12 years. The evolution of the orbit can be studied, and, by comparison with locally determined orbits, force model improvements can be made. The GEODYN flow diagrams are presented.

  9. Towards More Precise Determinations of the Quark Mixing Phase β.

    PubMed

    Ligeti, Zoltan; Robinson, Dean J

    2015-12-18

    We derive a new flavor symmetry relation for the determination of the weak phase β=ϕ_{1} from time-dependent CP asymmetries and B→J/ψP decay rates. In this relation, the contributions to sin2β proportional to V_{ub} are parametrically suppressed compared to the contributions in the B→J/ψK^{0} time-dependent CP asymmetry alone. This relation uses only SU(3) flavor symmetry, and does not require further diagrammatic assumptions. The current data either fluctuate at the 2σ level from expectations, or may hint at effects of unexpected magnitude from contributions proportional to V_{ub} or from isospin breaking. PMID:26722914

  10. Oligosaccharides in Food and Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michelle E.; Rastall, Robert A.

    Oligosaccharides are an integral part of the daily diet for humans and animals. They are primarily used for their nutritional properties, however they are currently receiving much attention due to their physiological effect on the microflora of the gastrointestinal tract. Galacto-oligosaccharides and the fructan-type oligosaccharides, namely FOS and inulin are well established as beneficial to the host and are classified as prebiotic based on data from clinical studies. These compounds dominate this sector of the market, although there are oligosaccharides emerging which have produced very interesting in vitro results in terms of prebiotic status and human trials are required to strengthen the claim. Such compounds include pectic oligosaccharides, gluco-oligosaccharides, gentio-oligosaccharides, kojio-oligosaccharides, and alternan oligosaccharides. The raw materials for production of these prebiotic compounds are derived from natural sources such as plants but also from by products of the food processing industry. In addition to being prebiotic these compounds can be incorporated into foodstuffs due to the physiochemical properties they possess.

  11. Precise Baseline Determination for the TanDEM-X Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Y.; Koenig, R.; Wermuth, M.; Montenbruck, O.; Jaeggi, A.

    2011-12-01

    The principal goal of the TanDEM-X mission is the generation of a global Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with 2 meters relative vertical accuracy. To achieve this requirement, the relative trajectory between TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X, called baseline, should be determined with an accuracy of 1 millimeter. For this purpose, the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) has provided the Tracking, Occultation and Ranging (TOR) payload for both TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X. Using the geodetic grade GPS data from the TOR instruments installed on both satellites, GFZ has been providing operationally TanDEM-X baseline products since the launch of the TanDEM-X in June 2011. In this contribution, an overview of the TanDEM-X project, the role of the baseline and its operational provision from three different software solutions within the ground segment and future prospects are given. The quality of the different baseline products will be assessed using one-year of operationally generated baseline products from GFZ and DLR. Two baseline solutions from the EPOS and BERNESE software packages by GFZ and one solution from the GHOST/FRNS software package by DLR are compared in terms of standard deviation and mean of the differences. The long-term series provides a focus on the bias track between the baseline solutions. Then the topic of calibrating the bias of the baselines via SAR data taken over test areas is discussed. In a final step, the different baseline solutions are corrected for their bias and merged for noise reduction into an optimal baseline being input to the operational DEM production.

  12. Precise Orbit Determination of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and inferred gravity field information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, A.; Baur, O.; Krauss, S.

    2014-04-01

    This contribution deals with Precise Orbit Determination of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, which is tracked with optical laser ranges in addition to radiometric Doppler range-rates and range observations. The optimum parameterization is assessed by overlap analysis tests that indicate the inner precision of the computed orbits. Information about the very long wavelengths of the lunar gravity field is inferred from the spacecraft positions. The NASA software packages GEODYN II and SOLVE were used for orbit determination and gravity field recovery [1].

  13. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  14. Synthesis of branched cyclomalto-oligosaccharides using Pseudomonas isoamylase.

    PubMed

    Abe, J; Mizowaki, N; Hizukuri, S; Koizumi, K; Utamura, T

    1986-10-15

    Branched cyclomalto-oligosaccharides (cyclodextrins) were synthesised from cyclomalto-oligosaccharides and maltose or maltotriose through the reverse action of Pseudomonas isoamylase. The reaction rate was greater with maltotriose than with maltose, and with increasing size of the cyclomalto-oligosaccharide (cG6 less than cG7 less than cG8). Maltotriose is effective as both a side-chain donor and acceptor, and three isomers of 6-O-alpha-maltotriosylmaltotriose (branched G6) were formed through mutual condensation, but maltose was effective only as a side-chain donor. Each branched cyclomalto-oligosaccharide and G6 was purified by liquid chromatography, and their structures were determined by chemical, enzymic, and 13C-n.m.r. spectroscopic analyses. PMID:3791296

  15. Preparation and antibacterial activity of oligosaccharides derived from dandelion.

    PubMed

    Qian, Li; Zhou, Yan; Teng, Zhaolin; Du, Chun-Ling; Tian, Changrong

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we prepared oligosaccharides from dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) by hydrolysis with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and investigated their antibacterial activity. The optimum hydrolysis conditions, as determined using the response surface methodology, were as follows: reaction time, 5.12h; reaction temperature, 65.53 °C and H2O2 concentration, 3.16%. Under these conditions, the maximum yield of the oligosaccharides reached 25.43%. The sugar content in the sample was 96.8%, and the average degree of polymerisation was approximately 9. The oligosaccharides showed high antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that dandelion-derived oligosaccharides have the potential to be used as antibacterial agents. PMID:24368113

  16. Sucrose and Related Oligosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, Gillian

    Sucrose (α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1↔2)-β-D-fructofuranoside) is the most common low-molecular-weight sugar found in the plant kingdom. It is ubiquitously known as common table sugar and primarily produced industrially from sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris); the basics of the industrial manufacture of sucrose are outlined in this chapter. Commercial sucrose has a very high purity (> 99.9%) making it one of the purest organic substances produced on an industrial scale. Value-addition to sucrose via chemical and biotechnological reactions is becoming more important for the diversification of the sugar industry to maintain the industries' competitiveness in a world increasingly turning to a bio-based economy. The basis for the chemical reactivity of sucrose is the eight hydroxyl groups present on the molecule, although, sucrose chemical reactivity is regarded as difficult. Increasing use of enzymatic biotechnological techniques to derivatize sucrose is expected, to add special functionalities to sucrose products like biodegradability, biocompatibility, and non-toxicity. Analysis of sucrose by colorimetric, enzymatic, oxidation-reduction and chromatography methods are discussed. Oligosaccharides related to sucrose are outlined in detail and include sucrose-based plant, honey and in vitro oligosaccharides.

  17. Centroiding Experiment for Determining the Positions of Stars with High Precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, T.; Araki, H.; Hanada, H.; Tazawa, S.; Gouda, N.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Niwa, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We have experimented with the determination of the positions of star images on a detector with high precision such as 10 microarcseconds, required by a space astrometry satellite, JASMINE. In order to accomplish such a precision, we take the following two procedures. (1) We determine the positions of star images on the detector with the precision of about 0.01 pixel for one measurement, using an algorithm for estimating them from photon weighted means of the star images. (2) We determine the positions of star images with the precision of about 0.0001-0.00001 pixel, which corresponds to that of 10 microarcseconds, using a large amount of data over 10000 measurements, that is, the error of the positions decreases according to the amount of data. Here, we note that the procedure 2 is not accomplished when the systematic error in our data is not excluded adequately even if we use a large amount of data. We first show the method to determine the positions of star images on the detector using photon weighted means of star images. This algorithm, used in this experiment, is very useful because it is easy to calculate the photon weighted mean from the data. This is very important in treating a large amount of data. Furthermore, we need not assume the shape of the point spread function in deriving the centroid of star images. Second, we show the results in the laboratory experiment for precision of determining the positions of star images. We obtain that the precision of estimation of positions of star images on the detector is under a variance of 0.01 pixel for one measurement (procedure 1). We also obtain that the precision of the positions of star images becomes a variance of about 0.0001 pixel using about 10000 measurements (procedure 2).

  18. Determination of Precise Pre-Main-Sequence Stellar Properties through Stellar and Disk Orbital Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassun, Keivan

    2016-05-01

    We summarize the current state-of-the-art in the measurement of direct, precise stellar masses at pre-main-sequence ages through the analysis of eclipsing binary orbits and circumstellar disk dynamics. We highlight two key issues: (1) The masses determined from disk dynamics require more precise distance determinations that should become available from Gaia soon, and (2) many eclipsing binaries appear disturbed by the presence of tertiary companions that inject heat into and puff up one or both of the inner binary stars, however the dynamical mechanism by which orbital energy is injected as heat remains unknown.

  19. Precise Astronomical Azimuth Determination By Qdaedalus System to the Sun, Moon, and Planets in Daytime Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völgyesi, L.; Tóth, G.; Bürki, B.; Guillaume, S.

    2014-12-01

    The traditional method of astronomical azimuth determination involves measurements at night to stars (Polaris). QDAEDALUS, developed by the team of the Geodesy and Geodynamics Lab (GGL, led by Prof. M. Rothacher) of ETH Zürich is a unique system combining Total Stations and modern CCD technique. It provides precise astronomical azimuths within 15 minutes of observation time at night. Furthermore, observations in daytime conditions are a challenging requirement in practice of Astro-geodetic azimuth determination. In order to perform daylight measurements, the QDAEDALUS system has been improved by allowing precise azimuth measurements to Sun, Moon, and Planets in daylight conditions by expanding the processing software with precise solar, lunar, and planetary ephemerides. With such functionality the system has a unique capability to measure astronomical azimuths with an accuracy of 0.3-0.5 arcsecs in normal daylight conditions within 20 to 25 minutes of measurement time.

  20. Cashew juice containing prebiotic oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Isabel Moreira; Rabelo, Maria Cristiane; Rodrigues, Sueli

    2014-09-01

    The enzyme dextransucrase in a medium containing sucrose and an acceptor as substrate synthesizes prebiotics oligosaccharides. The cashew apple juice works as a source of acceptors because it is rich in glucose and fructose (enzyme acceptors). The use of cashew apple juice becomes interesting because it aims at harnessing the peduncle of the cashew that is wasted during the nut processing, which is the product of greater economic expression. The production of dextransucrase enzyme was done by fermentative process by inoculating the bacterium Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B512F into a culture medium containing sucrose as the only carbon source. Thus, the aim of this work was the production of prebiotic oligosaccharides by enzymatic process with addition of the dextransucrase enzyme to the clarified cashew apple juice. Dextran yield was favored by the combination of low concentrations of sucrose and reducing sugars. The formation of oligosaccharides was favored by increasing the concentration of reducing sugars and by the combination of high concentrations of sucrose and reducing sugars, the highest concentration of oligosaccharides obtained was 104.73 g/L and the qualitative analysis showed that at concentrations of 25 g/L and 75 g/L of sucrose and reducing sugar, respectively, it is possible to obtain oligosaccharides of degree of polymerization up to 12. The juice containing prebiotic oligosaccharide is a potential new functional beverage. PMID:25190866

  1. Determination of Yield and Soil Variability in Louisiana Sugarcane Using Selected Tools of Precision Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture is a production strategy that may help sugarcane producers decrease input costs, maximize profits, and minimize any negative environmental impact through better management of soil and crop variability. To determine the extent of variability present in commercial sugarcane fiel...

  2. Precise characterization of Guatemalan obsidian sources, and source determination of artifacts from Quirigua

    SciTech Connect

    Stross, F.H.; Sheets, P.; Asaro, F.; Michel, H.V.

    1983-01-01

    For the determination of provenience of obsidian artifacts, precise and accurate measurements of composition patterns of the geologic sources are necessary for definitive and cost-effective assignments. Inter-comparison of data from different laboratories is often difficult. Suggestions for maximizing the usefulness of data already in the literature are made, contributions to a useful data bank of source composition patterns are recorded, and provenience determinations of 30 artifacts excavated in Quirigua, Guatemala are presented to exemplify the technique.

  3. A randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled cross-over study to determine the gastrointestinal effects of consumption of arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides enriched bread in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prebiotics are food ingredients, usually non-digestible oligosaccharides, that are selectively fermented by populations of beneficial gut bacteria. Endoxylanases, altering the naturally present cereal arabinoxylans, are commonly used in the bread industry to improve dough and bread characteristics. Recently, an in situ method has been developed to produce arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides (AXOS) at high levels in breads through the use of a thermophilic endoxylanase. AXOS have demonstrated potentially prebiotic properties in that they have been observed to lead to beneficial shifts in the microbiota in vitro and in murine, poultry and human studies. Methods A double-blind, placebo controlled human intervention study was undertaken with 40 healthy adult volunteers to assess the impact of consumption of breads with in situ produced AXOS (containing 2.2 g AXOS) compared to non-endoxylanase treated breads. Volatile fatty acid concentrations in faeces were assessed and fluorescence in situ hybridisation was used to assess changes in gut microbial groups. Secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) levels in saliva were also measured. Results Consumption of AXOS-enriched breads led to increased faecal butyrate and a trend for reduced iso-valerate and fatty acids associated with protein fermentation. Faecal levels of bifidobacteria increased following initial control breads and remained elevated throughout the study. Lactobacilli levels were elevated following both placebo and AXOS-breads. No changes in salivary secretory IgA levels were observed during the study. Furthermore, no adverse effects on gastrointestinal symptoms were reported during AXOS-bread intake. Conclusions AXOS-breads led to a potentially beneficial shift in fermentation end products and are well tolerated. PMID:22657950

  4. A precise determination of the void percolation threshold for two distributions of overlapping spheres

    SciTech Connect

    RINTOUL,MARK DANIEL

    2000-01-25

    The void percolation threshold is calculated for a distribution of overlapping spheres with equal radii, and for a binary sized distribution of overlapping spheres, where half of the spheres have radii twice as large as the other half. Using systems much larger than previous work, the authors determine a much more precise value for the percolation thresholds and correlation length exponent. The values for the percolation thresholds are shown to be significantly different, in contrast with previous, less precise works that speculated that the threshold might be universal with respect to sphere size distribution.

  5. A high precision attitude determination and control system for the UYS-1 nanosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurais, J. R.; Ferreira, H. C.; Ishihara, J. Y.; Borges, R. A.; Kulabukhov, A. M.; Larin, V. A.; Belikov, V. V.

    This paper presents the design of a high precision attitude determination and control system for the UYS-1 Ukrainian nanosatellite. Its main task is the 3-axis stabilization with less than 0.5° angle errors, so the satellite may take high precision photos of Earth's surface. To accomplish this task, this system comprises a star tracker and three reaction wheels. To avoid external disturbances and actuators faults, a PD-type and a PID-type robust controllers are simulated and the results are compared to an empirically adjusted PD controller.

  6. The GLAS Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document for Precision Orbit Determination (POD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rim, Hyung Jin; Yoon, S. P.; Schultz, Bob E.

    2013-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) was the sole instrument for NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimetry mission. The primary purpose of the ICESat mission was to make ice sheet elevation measurements of the polar regions. Additional goals were to measure the global distribution of clouds and aerosols and to map sea ice, land topography and vegetation. ICESat was the benchmark Earth Observing System (EOS) mission to be used to determine the mass balance of the ice sheets, as well as for providing cloud property information, especially for stratospheric clouds common over polar areas. The GLAS instrument operated from 2003 to 2009 and provided multi-year elevation data needed to determine changes in sea ice freeboard, land topography and vegetation around the globe, in addition to elevation changes of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. This document describes the Precision Orbit Determination (POD) algorithm for the ICESat mission. The problem of determining an accurate ephemeris for an orbiting satellite involves estimating the position and velocity of the satellite from a sequence of observations. The ICESatGLAS elevation measurements must be very accurately geolocated, combining precise orbit information with precision pointing information. The ICESat mission POD requirement states that the position of the instrument should be determined with an accuracy of 5 and 20 cm (1-s) in radial and horizontal components, respectively, to meet the science requirements for determining elevation change.

  7. Central difference predictive filter for attitude determination with low precision sensors and model errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lu; Chen, Xiaoqian; Misra, Arun K.

    2014-12-01

    Attitude determination is one of the key technologies for Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) of a satellite. However, serious model errors may exist which will affect the estimation accuracy of ACDS, especially for a small satellite with low precision sensors. In this paper, a central difference predictive filter (CDPF) is proposed for attitude determination of small satellites with model errors and low precision sensors. The new filter is proposed by introducing the Stirling's polynomial interpolation formula to extend the traditional predictive filter (PF). It is shown that the proposed filter has higher accuracy for the estimation of system states than the traditional PF. It is known that the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) has also been used in the ADCS of small satellites with low precision sensors. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed filter, the UKF is also employed to compare it with the CDPF. Numerical simulations show that the proposed CDPF is more effective and robust in dealing with model errors and low precision sensors compared with the UKF or traditional PF.

  8. Precise Orbit Determination of LEO Satellite Using Dual-Frequency GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yoola; Lee, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Jaehoon; Yoon, Jae-Cheol

    2009-06-01

    KOrea Multi-purpose SATellite (KOMPSAT)-5 will be launched at 550km altitude in 2010. Accurate satellite position (20 cm) and velocity (0.03 cm/s) are required to treat highly precise Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image processing. Ionosphere delay was eliminated using dual frequency GPS data and double differenced GPS measurement removed common clock errors of both GPS satellites and receiver. SAC-C carrier phase data with 0.1 Hz sampling rate was used to achieve precise orbit determination (POD) with ETRI GNSS Precise Orbit Determination (EGPOD) software, which was developed by ETRI. Dynamic model approach was used and satellite's position, velocity, and the coefficients of solar radiation pressure and drag were adjusted once per arc using Batch Least Square Estimator (BLSE) filter. Empirical accelerations for sinusoidal radial, along-track, and cross track terms were also estimated once per revolution for unmodeled dynamics. Additionally piece-wise constant acceleration for cross-track direction was estimated once per arc. The performance of POD was validated by comparing with JPL's Precise Orbit Ephemeris (POE).

  9. Precise orbit determination for GRACE using undifferenced or doubly differenced GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäggi, A.; Hugentobler, U.; Bock, H.; Beutler, G.

    The two GRACE satellites provide the ideal platform to study the performance of different strategies for precise orbit determination using undifferenced or doubly differenced GPS data. We use pseudo-stochastic orbit modeling techniques in a batch least-squares environment for the two GRACE satellites to outline the mutual benefits of processing doubly differenced instead of undifferenced GPS data. We either process the space baseline only, the space-ground baselines only, or both types of baselines together, and show that the fixing of the GPS double difference carrier phase ambiguities has a significant impact on the space baseline, but also on the space-ground baselines. The validation of the relative orbit positions by inter-satellite K-band observations shows precisions of better than 1 mm in the case of fixed space baseline ambiguities, precisions of a few millimeter in the case of fixed space-ground baseline ambiguities, and precisions of about 1 cm in the case of float ambiguities. We discuss the differences between the various GRACE orbit solutions in order to formulate well suited orbit determination strategies tailored to the GRACE configuration. Satellite laser ranging observations indicate that accuracies between 2 cm and 2.5 cm are achieved.

  10. High-Precision Microwave Spectroscopy of Muonium for Determination of Muonic Magnetic Moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, H. A.; Higashi, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Mizutani, T.; Tajima, M.; Tanaka, K. S.; Ueno, Y.; Fukao, Y.; Iinuma, H.; Ikedo, Y.; Kadono, R.; Kawamura, N.; Koda, A.; Kojima, K. M.; Mibe, T.; Miyake, Y.; Nagamine, K.; Nishiyama, K.; Ogitsu, T.; Okubo, R.; Saito, N.; Sasaki, K.; Shimomura, K.; Strasser, P.; Sugano, M.; Toyoda, A.; Ueno, K.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, M.; Ishida, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Kamigaito, O.; Tomono, D.; Kanda, S.; Kubo, K.; Aoki, M.; Torikai, E.; Kawall, D.

    2016-02-01

    The muonium atom is a system suitable for precision measurements for determination of muon’s fundamental properties as well as for the test of quantum electrodynamics (QED). A microwave spectroscopy experiment of this exotic atom is being prepared at J-PARC, jointly operated by KEK and JAEA in Japan, aiming at an improved relative precision at a level of 10‑8 in determination of the muonic magnetic moment. A major improvement of statistical uncertainty is expected with the higher muon intensity of the pulsed beam at J-PARC, while reduction of various sources of systematic uncertainties are being studied: those arising from microwave power fluctuations, magnetic field inhomogeneity, muon stopping distribution and atomic collisional shift of resonance frequencies. Experimental strategy and methods are presented in this paper, with an emphasis on our recent development of apparatuses and evaluation of systematic uncertainties.

  11. Contributions of Satellite Laser Ranging to the Precise Orbit Determination of Low Earth Orbiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirnsberger, H.; Krauss, S.; Baur, O.

    2014-11-01

    Space-based monitoring and modeling of the system Earth requires precise knowledge of the orbits of artificial satellites. In this framework, since decades Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) contributes with high measurement accuracy and robust tracking data to precise orbit determination. One essential role of SLR tracking is the external validation of orbit solutions derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), such as the Global Positioning System (GPS). This valuable task of external validation is performed by the comparison of computed ranges based on orbit solutions and unambiguous SLR tracking data (observed ranges). Apart from validation, extension of the existing SLR network by passive antennas in combination with multistatic observations provides improvements in orbit determination processes with the background of sparse tracking data. Conceptually, these multistatic observations refer to the tracking of spacecraft from an active SLR-station and the detection of the diffuse reflected photons from the spacecraft at one or more passive stations.

  12. Precision Attitude Determination System (PADS) design and analysis. Two-axis gimbal star tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Development of the Precision Attitude Determination System (PADS) focused chiefly on the two-axis gimballed star tracker and electronics design improved from that of Precision Pointing Control System (PPCS), and application of the improved tracker for PADS at geosynchronous altitude. System design, system analysis, software design, and hardware design activities are reported. The system design encompasses the PADS configuration, system performance characteristics, component design summaries, and interface considerations. The PADS design and performance analysis includes error analysis, performance analysis via attitude determination simulation, and star tracker servo design analysis. The design of the star tracker and electronics are discussed. Sensor electronics schematics are included. A detailed characterization of the application software algorithms and computer requirements is provided.

  13. Precision Analysis Based on Complicated Error Simulation for the Orbit Determination with the Space Tracking Ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, YANG; Caifa, GUO; Zhengxu, DAI; Xiaoyong, LI; Shaolin, WANG

    2016-02-01

    The space tracking ship is a moving platform in the TT&C network. The orbit determination precision of the ship plays a key role in the TT&C mission. Based on the measuring data obtained by the ship-borne equipments, the paper presents the mathematic models of the complicated error from the space tracking ship, which can separate the random error and the correction residual error with secondary low frequency from the complicated error. An error simulation algorithm is proposed to analyze the orbit determination precision based on the two set of the different equipments. With this algorithm, a group of complicated error can be simulated from a measured sample. The simulated error groups can meet the requirements of sufficient complicated error for the equipment tests before the mission execution, which is helpful to the practical application.

  14. TerraSAR-X precise orbit determination with real-time GPS ephemerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wermuth, M.; Hauschild, A.; Montenbruck, O.; Kahle, R.

    2012-09-01

    For active and future Earth observation missions, the availability of near real-time precise orbit information is becoming more and more important. The latency and quality of precise orbit determination results is mainly driven by the availability of precise GPS ephemerides and clocks. In order to have high-quality GPS ephemerides and clocks available at real-time, the German Space Operations Center (GSOC) has developed the real-time clock estimation system RETICLE. The system receives data streams with GNSS observations from the global tracking network of the International GNSS Service (IGS) in real-time. Using the known station position, RETICLE estimates precise GPS satellite clock offsets and drifts based on the most recent available ultra rapid predicted orbits provided by the IGS. The clock offset estimates have an accuracy of better than 0.3 ns and are globally valid. The latency of the estimated clocks is approximately 7 s after the observation epoch. Another limiting factor is the frequency of satellite downlinks and the latency of the data transfer from the ground station to the operations center. Therefore a near real-time scenario using GPS observation data from the TerraSAR-X mission is examined in which the satellite has about one ground station contact per orbit or respectively one contact in 90 min. This test campaign shows that precise orbits can be obtained in near real-time. With the use of estimated clocks an orbit accuracy of better than 10 cm (3D-RMS) can be obtained. The evaluation of satellite laser ranging (SLR) observations shows residuals of 2.1 cm (RMS) for orbits using RECTICLE and residuals of 4.2 cm (RMS) for orbits using the IGS ultra rapid ephemerides and clocks products. Hence the use of estimated clocks improves the orbit determination accuracy significantly (˜factor 2) compared to using predicted clocks.

  15. Tests of daily time variable Earth gravity field solutions for precise orbit determination of altimetry satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, Sergei; Gruber, Christian

    2016-04-01

    This study makes use of current GFZ monthly and daily gravity field products from 2002 to 2014 based on radial basis functions (RBF) instead of time variable gravity field modeling for precise orbit determination of altimetry satellites. Since some monthly solutions are missing in the GFZ GRACE RL05a solution and in order to reach a better quality for the precise orbit determination, daily generated RBF solutions obtained from Kalman filtered GRACE data processing and interpolated in case of gaps have been used. Moreover, since the geopotential coefficients of low degrees are better determined using SLR observations to geodetic satellites like Lageos, Stella, Starlette and Ajisai than from GRACE observations, these terms are co-estimated in the RBF solutions by using apriori SLR-derived values up to degree and order 4. Precise orbits for altimetry satellites Envisat (2002-2012), Jason-1 (2002-2013) and Jason-2 (2008-2014) are then computed over the given time intervals using this approach and compared with the orbits obtained when using other models such as EIGEN-6S4. An analysis of the root-mean-square values of the observation fits of SLR and DORIS observations and the orbit arcs overlaps will allow us to draw a conclusion on the quality of the RBF solution and to use these new trajectories for sea level trend estimates and geophysical application.

  16. Precise and direct determination of the half-life of 41Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörg, Gerhard; Amelin, Yuri; Kossert, Karsten; Lierse v. Gostomski, Christoph

    2012-07-01

    Calcium-41 plays an important role in the long-term evaluation of the safety of final repositories for nuclear waste and is used to study the fine-scale chronology of the formation of the Solar System. Both applications are hindered by insufficient precision and poor consistency of previous determinations of the half-life. This work reports a half-life for 41Ca of (9.94 ± 0.15) × 104 years, which was determined with a combination of methods, chosen to provide the best possible precision. The activity was measured by liquid scintillation counting (LSC) exploiting the triple-to-double coincidence ratio method (TDCR); the absolute isotopic composition was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and isotope dilution. Enhanced precision and accuracy of the 41Ca half-life will allow the improvement of safety analyses for final deposit sites of nuclear waste and of dating first solids, and better constrain the stellar environment of the formation of the Solar System.

  17. Experimental study on the precise orbit determination of the BeiDou navigation satellite system.

    PubMed

    He, Lina; Ge, Maorong; Wang, Jiexian; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2013-01-01

    The regional service of the Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation system is now in operation with a constellation including five Geostationary Earth Orbit satellites (GEO), five Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO) satellites and four Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Besides the standard positioning service with positioning accuracy of about 10 m, both precise relative positioning and precise point positioning are already demonstrated. As is well known, precise orbit and clock determination is essential in enhancing precise positioning services. To improve the satellite orbits of the BeiDou regional system, we concentrate on the impact of the tracking geometry and the involvement of MEOs, and on the effect of integer ambiguity resolution as well. About seven weeks of data collected at the BeiDou Experimental Test Service (BETS) network is employed in this experimental study. Several tracking scenarios are defined, various processing schemata are designed and carried out; and then, the estimates are compared and analyzed in detail. The results show that GEO orbits, especially the along-track component, can be significantly improved by extending the tracking network in China along longitude direction, whereas IGSOs gain more improvement if the tracking network extends in latitude. The involvement of MEOs and ambiguity-fixing also make the orbits better. PMID:23529116

  18. Experimental Study on the Precise Orbit Determination of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System

    PubMed Central

    He, Lina; Ge, Maorong; Wang, Jiexian; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2013-01-01

    The regional service of the Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation system is now in operation with a constellation including five Geostationary Earth Orbit satellites (GEO), five Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO) satellites and four Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. Besides the standard positioning service with positioning accuracy of about 10 m, both precise relative positioning and precise point positioning are already demonstrated. As is well known, precise orbit and clock determination is essential in enhancing precise positioning services. To improve the satellite orbits of the BeiDou regional system, we concentrate on the impact of the tracking geometry and the involvement of MEOs, and on the effect of integer ambiguity resolution as well. About seven weeks of data collected at the BeiDou Experimental Test Service (BETS) network is employed in this experimental study. Several tracking scenarios are defined, various processing schemata are designed and carried out; and then, the estimates are compared and analyzed in detail. The results show that GEO orbits, especially the along-track component, can be significantly improved by extending the tracking network in China along longitude direction, whereas IGSOs gain more improvement if the tracking network extends in latitude. The involvement of MEOs and ambiguity-fixing also make the orbits better. PMID:23529116

  19. Precise Orbit Determination of LAGEOS satellites: results on fundamental physics and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peron, Roberto; Lucchesi, David

    2012-07-01

    The LAGEOS satellites, launched for geodynamics and geophysics purposes, are offering also an outstanding test bench to fundamental physics. Indeed, their physical characteristics, as well as those of their orbits, and the availability of high--quality tracking data provided by the International Laser Ranging Service, allow for precise tests of gravitational theories. In this talk recent work on data analysis will be presented. A fairly large amount of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II Satellite Laser Ranging data has been analyzed with NASA/GSFC Geodyn II software, using a set of dedicated models for satellite dynamics, and the related post--fit residuals have been analyzed. In particular, general relativistic effects leave peculiar imprint on nodal longitude, argument of perigee and inclination behaviour, which have been used to obtain precise estimates of the related parameters. The most precise --- as today --- estimate of the effects on argument of perigee has been obtained, providing a direct measurement of the relativistic ``Schwarzschild'' precession in the field of the Earth. At the same time the constraints on a non--Newtonian (i.e. Yukawa--type) gravitational dynamics have been improved. The measurement error budget will be discussed, emphasizing the role of gravitational and, especially, of non--gravitational forces modeling on the overall precise orbit determination quality, as well as on future new measurements and constraints of the gravitational interaction.

  20. Inulin Potential for Enzymatic Obtaining of Prebiotic Oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Flores, Adriana C; Morlett, Jesús A; Rodríguez, Raúl

    2016-08-17

    Oligosaccharides have been marketed since the 80s as low-calorie agents and recently have gained interest in the pharmaceutical and food industry as functional sweeteners and prebiotic enriching population of Bifidobacteria. Currently, they have an approximated value of $200 per kg and recently, inulin has been proposed as a feedstock for production of oligosaccharides through selective hydrolysis by action of endoinulinase. High optimum temperature (60°C) and thermostability are two important criteria that determine suitability of this enzyme for industrial applications as well as enzyme cost, a major limiting factor. Significant reduction in cost can be achieved by employing low-value and abundant inulin-rich plants as Jerusalem artichoke, dahlia, yacon, garlic, and onion, among others. In general, the early harvested tubers of these plants contain a greater amount of highly polymerized sugar fractions, which offer more industrial value than late-harvested tubers or those after storage. Also, development of recombinant microorganisms could be useful to reduce the cost of enzyme technology for large-scale production of oligosaccharides. In the case of fungal inulinases, several studies of cloning and modification have been made to achieve greater efficiency. The present paper reviews inulin from vegetable sources as feedstock for oligosaccharides production through the action of inulinases, the impact of polymerization degree of inulin and its availability, and some strategies to increase oligosaccharide production. PMID:25746219

  1. On the Precision of Artificial Satellite Orbit Determination from Observations from an Orbiting Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murison, Marc A.

    2006-06-01

    This paper addresses the characterization of the precision of observationally determined orbit parameters when optical observations are taken of an artificial satellite ("target") from another orbiting body ("platform"). Of interest are, among others, optimal platform orbits and optimal observing strategies for a given level of observational astrometric precision and for certain types of target orbits. Classical orbit determination methods are not particularly amenable for gaining analytical insight into the characterization of the determined orbital parameter errors. Here we make an attempt to bypass classical orbit determination and look for an approach that can instead make use of certain approximations to the relative distance and velocity vectors. Furthermore, given the modern possibility for spectroscopic optical instruments in space, we also investigate what may additionally be gained from radial velocity observations. We start with the distance and velocity vectors of an orbiting target body with respect to an orbiting observation platform. We approximate the relative distance and velocity vectors, allowed by certain assumptions such as small eccentricities, relative inclination angle(s), and ratio of orbit radii. We then analytically propagate the observational errors through the equations and characterize what target orbit parameter errors we are able. It turns out this is more difficult than anticipated at first. We then perform numerical simulations to more completely characterize the behaviors of the determined orbit parameter errors.

  2. Precise orbit determination of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and first gravity field results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Andrea; Baur, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) was launched in 2009 and is expected to orbit the Moon until the end of 2014. Among other instruments, LRO has a highly precise altimeter on board demanding an orbit accuracy of one meter in the radial component. Precise orbit determination (POD) is achieved with radiometric observations (Doppler range rates, ranges) on the one hand, and optical laser ranges on the other hand. LRO is the first satellite at a distance of approximately 360 000 to 400 000 km from the Earth that is routinely tracked with optical laser ranges. This measurement type was introduced to achieve orbits of higher precision than it would be possible with radiometric observations only. In this contribution we investigate the strength of each measurement type (radiometric range rates, radiometric ranges, optical laser ranges) based on single-technique orbit estimation. In a next step all measurement types are combined in a joined analysis. In addition to POD results, preliminary gravity field coefficients are presented being a subsequent product of the orbit determination process. POD and gravity field estimation was accomplished with the NASA/GSFC software packages GEODYN and SOLVE.

  3. Precise age determinations and petrogenetic studies using the K-Ca method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, B. D.; Depaolo, D. J.

    1982-12-01

    New mass spectrometric techniques are used to reassess the capabilities of the K-40 to Ca-40 radioactive decay for yielding precise ages of various geological materials. A brief discussion of the principles underlying the system's use is presented as a preliminary, and the analytical procedures are described. To test the method, a mineral isochron has been obtained on a sample of Pikes Peak granite which has been shown to have concordant K-Ar, Rb-Sr, and U-Pb ages. Plagioclase, K-feldspar, biotite, and whole rock yield an age of 1041 + or 32 m.y., in agreement with previous age determinations. The initial Ca-40/Ca-42 indicates that assimilation of high K/Ca crust was insufficient to affect calcium isotopes. The results show that the K-Ca system can be used as a precise geochronometer for common felsic igneous and metamorphic rocks, and may prove applicable to sedimentary rocks containing authigenic K minerals.

  4. Determination of the half-life of 213Fr with high precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisichella, M.; Musumarra, A.; Farinon, F.; Nociforo, C.; Del Zoppo, A.; Figuera, P.; La Cognata, M.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Scuderi, V.; Torresi, D.; Strano, E.

    2013-07-01

    High-precision measurement of half-life and Qα value of neutral and highly charged α emitters is a major subject of investigation currently. In this framework, we recently pushed half-life measurements of neutral emitters to a precision of a few per mil. This result was achieved by using different techniques and apparatuses at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS) and GSI Darmstadt. Here we report on 213Fr half-life determination [T1/2(213Fr) = 34.14±0.06 s] at INFN-LNS, detailing the measurement protocol used. Direct comparison with the accepted value in the literature shows a discrepancy of more than three sigma. We propose this new value as a reference, discussing previous experiments.

  5. Precise determination of the void percolation threshold for two distributions of overlapping spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Rintoul, M. D.

    2000-07-01

    The void percolation threshold is calculated for a distribution of overlapping spheres with equal radii, and for a binary-sized distribution of overlapping spheres, where half of the spheres have radii twice as large as the other half. Using systems much larger than previous work, we determine a much more precise value for the percolation thresholds and correlation length exponent. The value of the percolation threshold for the monodisperse case is shown to be 0.0301{+-}0.0003, whereas the value for the bidisperse case is shown to be p{sub c}=0.0287{+-}0.0005. The fact that these are significantly different is in contrast with previous, less precise works that speculated that the threshold might be universal with respect to sphere size distribution. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. High precision Faraday collector MC-ICPMS thorium isotope ratio determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Emma-Kate; Stirling, Claudine H.; Andersen, Morten B.; Halliday, Alex N.

    2005-12-01

    Uranium-series dating of carbonate materials requires precise determination of the spike sample thorium isotope ratio, 230Th/229Th. This ratio is commonly measured using ion counting techniques, however the precision of analyses using ion counting devices suffers from beam intensity limitations, drift in multiplier gain and non-linearities in electron multiplier response. Here, we describe the application of multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) to determine thorium isotope ratios at hitherto unattained precision. For the first time, thorium isotope analyses were performed using only Faraday collectors coupled to 1011 [Omega] feedback resistors in the amplifier system. Spiked thorium solutions were concentrated to produce 230Th and 229Th signal intensities of around 50 mV and 100 mV, respectively (across a 1011 [Omega] resistor) and are run at high intensity for a short period of time (~1 min). These analyses yield a 230Th/229Th external reproducibility of better than 0.3[per mille sign] for ~25-30 pg of consumed 230Th. This is a factor of two better than the best published thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) and MC-ICPMS techniques for similar sample sizes, and represents up to an order of magnitude improvement over many other established protocols. Combined with new techniques for high precision Faraday measurement of uranium isotopic composition [1], this permits improvements in the uncertainty of U-series ages to better than 0.1 thousand years (ka) at 100 ka and 1 ka at 300 ka. It should also be possible to resolve events to ~14 ka at 600 ka. Using these techniques, the U-series dating limit can be extended from 500-600 ka to 800 ka enabling a more detailed study of the frequency of late Pleistocene climate events.

  7. High-precision determination of iron oxidation state in silicate glasses using XANES

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, Elizabeth; Kelley, Katherine A.; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Fischer, Rebecca A.

    2009-11-04

    Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and Moessbauer spectra were collected on natural basaltic glasses equilibrated over a range of oxygen fugacity (QFM - 3.5 to QFM + 4.5). The basalt compositions and fO{sub 2} conditions were chosen to bracket the natural range of redox conditions expected for basalts from mid-ocean ridge, ocean island, back-arc basin, and arc settings, in order to develop a high-precision calibration for the determination of Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe in natural basalts. The pre-edge centroid energy, corresponding to the 1s {yields} 3d transition, was determined to be the most robust proxy for Fe oxidation state, affording significant advantages compared to the use of other spectral features. A second-order polynomial models the correlation between the centroid and Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe, yielding a precision of {+-} 0.0045 in Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe for glasses with Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe > 8%, which is comparable to the precision of wet chemistry. This high precision relies on a Si (311) monochromator to better define the Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} transitions, accurate and robust modeling of the pre-edge feature, dense fO{sub 2}-coverage and compositional appropriateness of reference glasses, and application of a non-linear drift correction. Through re-analysis of the reference glasses across three synchrotron beam sessions, we show that the quoted precision can be achieved (i.e., analyses are reproducible) across multiple synchrotron beam sessions, even when spectral collection conditions (detector parameters or sample geometry) change. Rhyolitic glasses were also analyzed and yield a higher centroid energy at a given Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe than basalts, implying that major variations in melt structure affect the relationship between centroid position and Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe, and that separate calibrations are needed for the determination of oxidation state in basalts and rhyolites.

  8. Sugar loss and enzyme inhibition due to oligosaccharide accumulation during high solids-loading enzymatic hydrolysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xue, Saisi; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Bowman, Michael J.; Cavalier, David; Da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Dale, Bruce E.; Balan, Venkatesh

    2015-11-26

    inhibitory effects of oligosaccharides on commercial enzymes. In conclusion, the carbohydrate composition of the recalcitrant oligosaccharides, ratios of different DP oligomers and their distribution profiles were determined. Recalcitrance and enzyme inhibition studies help determine whether the commercial enzyme mixtures lack the enzyme activities required to completely de-polymerize the plant cell wall. Such studies clarify the reasons for oligosaccharide accumulation and contribute to strategies by which oligosaccharides can be converted into fermentable sugars and provide higher biofuel yields with less enzyme.« less

  9. Sugar loss and enzyme inhibition due to oligosaccharide accumulation during high solids-loading enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Saisi; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Bowman, Michael J.; Cavalier, David; Da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Dale, Bruce E.; Balan, Venkatesh

    2015-11-26

    inhibitory effects of oligosaccharides on commercial enzymes. In conclusion, the carbohydrate composition of the recalcitrant oligosaccharides, ratios of different DP oligomers and their distribution profiles were determined. Recalcitrance and enzyme inhibition studies help determine whether the commercial enzyme mixtures lack the enzyme activities required to completely de-polymerize the plant cell wall. Such studies clarify the reasons for oligosaccharide accumulation and contribute to strategies by which oligosaccharides can be converted into fermentable sugars and provide higher biofuel yields with less enzyme.

  10. Asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on lutropin, follitropin, and thyrotropin: distributions of sulfated and sialylated oligosaccharides on bovine, ovine, and human pituitary glycoprotein hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Green, E.D.; Baenziger, J.U.

    1988-01-05

    The asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on the pituitary glycoprotein hormones lutropin (LH), follitropin (FSH), and thyrotropin (TSH) consist of a heterogeneous array of neutral, sulfated, sialylated, and sulfated/sialylated structures. In this study, the authors determined the relative quantities of the various asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on LH, FSH, and TSH from these three animal species. The proportions of sulfated versus sialylated oligosaccharides varied markedly among the different hormones. Both hormone- and animal species-specific differences in the types and distributions of sulfated, sialylated, and sulfated/sialylated structures were evident. In particular, LH and FSH, which are synthesized in the same pituitary cell and bear ..cap alpha..-subunits with the identical amino acid sequence, contained significantly different distributions of sulfated and sialylated oligosaccharides. For all three animal species, the ratio of sialylated to sulfated oligosaccharides differed by >10-fold for LH and FSH, with sulfated structures dominating on LH and sialylated structures on FSH. Sialylated oligosaccharides were also heterogeneous with respect to sialic acid linkage (..cap alpha..2,3 versus ..cap alpha..2,6). The differences in oligosaccharide structures among the various pituitary glycoprotein hormones as well as among the various glycosylation sites within a single hormone support the hypothesis that glycosylation may serve important functional roles in the expression and/or regulation of hormone bioactivity.

  11. Quantification of neutral human milk oligosaccharides by graphitic carbon HPLC with tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuanwu; Chen, Ceng; Newburg, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Defining the biologic roles of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOS) requires an efficient, simple, reliable, and robust analytical method for simultaneous quantification of oligosaccharide profiles from multiple samples. The HMOS fraction of milk is a complex mixture of polar, highly branched, isomeric structures that contain no intrinsic facile chromophore, making their resolution and quantification challenging. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method was devised to resolve and quantify 11 major neutral oligosaccharides of human milk simultaneously. Crude HMOS fractions are reduced, resolved by porous graphitic carbon HPLC with a water/acetonitrile gradient, detected by mass spectrometric specific ion monitoring, and quantified. The HPLC separates isomers of identical molecular weights allowing 11 peaks to be fully resolved and quantified by monitoring mass to charge (m/z) ratios of the deprotonated negative ions. The standard curves for each of the 11 oligosaccharides is linear from 0.078 or 0.156 to 20 μg/mL (R2 > 0.998). Precision (CV) ranges from 1% to 9%. Accuracy is from 86% to 104%. This analytical technique provides sensitive, precise, accurate quantification for each of the 11 milk oligosaccharides and allows measurement of differences in milk oligosaccharide patterns between individuals and at different stages of lactation. PMID:23068043

  12. On the Determination of the Blank Shape Contour for Thin Precision Parts Obtained by Stamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azaouzi, M.; Delamézière, A.; Naceur, H.; Sibaud, D.; Batoz, J. L.; Belouettar, S.

    2007-05-01

    The present study deals with the "automatic" determination of the initial blank shape contour for 3D thin metallic precision parts obtained by stamping, knowing the 3D CAD geometry of the final part (the desired product). The forming process can involve several steps presented in this paper that consists in applying a heuristic method of optimization to find out the initial blank shape of thin precision metallic part in order to obtain a final part, with a required 3D geometry (specified). The purpose of the present approach is to replace the experimental trial and error optimization method used currently, which is expensive and time consuming. The principle of the "heuristic" optimization method is to first estimate the blank shape using the Inverse Approach, then to compensate the shape error calculated in each node of the blank contour. The "heuristic" optimization loop is done using a precise incremental code (Abaqus Explicit or Stampack) and, the iterations loop is stopped when the shape errors are within some initially fixed tolerances. The method is tested in the case of a special stamping process where the parts are pressed in one or more steps using a manual press, without blank holder and by the mean of tools having complex shape. The sensitivities of the process parameters regarding the optimal solution are investigated.

  13. Precise determination of stable chlorine isotopic ratios in low-concentration natural samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magenheim, A. J.; Spivack, A. J.; Volpe, C.; Ransom, B.

    1994-07-01

    Investigation of stable chlorine isotopes in geological materials has been hindered by large sample requirements and/or lack of analytical precision. Here we describe precise methods for the extraction, isolation, and isotopic analysis of low levels of chlorine in both silicate and aerosol samples. Our standard procedure uses 2 μg of Cl for each isotopic analysis. External reproducibility (1 σ) is 0.25%. for the 37Cl /35Cl measurements. Chlorine is extracted from silicate samples (typically containing at least 20 μg of Cl) via pyrohydrolysis using induction heating and water vapor as the carrier, and the volatilized chlorine is condensed in aqueous solution. Atmospheric aerosols collected on filters are simply dissolved in water. Prior to isotopic measurement, removal of high levels of SO 42-, F -, and organic compounds is necessary for the production of stable ion beams. Sulfate is removed by BaSCO 4 precipitation, F - by CaF 2 precipitation, and organic compounds are extracted with activated carbon. Chlorine is converted to stoichiometric CsCl by cation exchange, and isotopic ratios are determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry of Cs 2Cl +. We demonstrate that the sensitivity and precision of this method allow resolution of natural variations in chlorine isotopic composition, and thereby provide insight to some fundamental aspects of chlorine geochemistry.

  14. A demonstration of high precision GPS orbit determination for geodetic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, S. M.; Border, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    High precision orbit determination of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites is a key requirement for GPS-based precise geodetic measurements and precise low-earth orbiter tracking, currently under study at JPL. Different strategies for orbit determination have been explored at JPL with data from a 1985 GPS field experiment. The most successful strategy uses multi-day arcs for orbit determination and includes fine tuning of spacecraft solar pressure coefficients and station zenith tropospheric delays using the GPS data. Average rms orbit repeatability values for 5 of the GPS satellites are 1.0, 1.2, and 1.7 m in altitude, cross-track, and down-track componenets when two independent 5-day fits are compared. Orbit predictions up to 24 hours outside the multi-day arcs agree within 4 m of independent solutions obtained with well tracked satellites in the prediction interval. Baseline repeatability improves with multi-day as compared to single-day arc orbit solutions. When tropospheric delay fluctuations are modeled with process noise, significant additional improvement in baseline repeatability is achieved. For a 246-km baseline, with 6-day arc solutions for GPS orbits, baseline repeatability is 2 parts in 100 million (0.4-0.6 cm) for east, north, and length components and 8 parts in 100 million for the vertical component. For 1314 and 1509 km baselines with the same orbits, baseline repeatability is 2 parts in 100 million for the north components (2-3 cm) and 4 parts in 100 million or better for east, length, and vertical components.

  15. Precision GPS orbit determination strategies for an earth orbiter and geodetic tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.; Bertiger, Willy I.; Border, James S.

    1988-01-01

    Data from two 1985 GPS field tests were processed and precise GPS orbits were determined. With a combined carrier phase and pseudorange, the 1314-km repeatability improves substantially to 5 parts in 10 to the 9th (0.6 cm) in the north and 2 parts in 10 to the 8th (2-3 cm) in the other components. To achieve these levels of repeatability and accuracy, it is necessary to fine-tune the GPS solar radiation coefficients and ground station zenith tropospheric delays.

  16. Improved treatment of global positioning system force parameters in precise orbit determination applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigue, Y.; Lichten, S. M.; Muellerschoen, R. J.; Blewitt, G.; Heflin, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    Data collected from a worldwide 1992 experiment were processed at JPL to determine precise orbits for the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). A filtering technique was tested to improve modeling of solar-radiation pressure force parameters for GPS satellites. The new approach improves orbit quality for eclipsing satellites by a factor of two, with typical results in the 25- to 50-cm range. The resultant GPS-based estimates for geocentric coordinates of the tracking sites, which include the three DSN sites, are accurate to 2 to 8 cm, roughly equivalent to 3 to 10 nrad of angular measure.

  17. Precise phase determination with the built-in spectral interferometry in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yizhu; Yan, T-M; Jiang, Y H

    2016-09-01

    A new method determining the precise phase of pulse sequences in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is proposed merely using the already built-in spectral interferometry. The approach is easily implemented without the supplementary instrumental construction, only at the expense of a few additional scanning and data-fitting processes. This method is executed with the sample in place, effectively avoiding the phase ambiguities of the beam propagation in samples, thus calibrating the absolute phase at the exact interaction region. The new proposed method is expected to improve the phasing procedure in 2DES in a more convenient way. PMID:27607991

  18. Chromatographic Separations of Enantiomers and Underivatized Oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Ying Liu

    2004-12-19

    My graduate research has focused on separation science and bioanalytical analysis, which emphasized in method development. It includes three major areas: enantiomeric separations using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Super/subcritical fluid chromatography (SFC), and capillary electrophoresis (CE); drug-protein binding behavior studies using CE; and carbohydrate analysis using liquid chromatograph-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Enantiomeric separations continue to be extremely important in the pharmaceutical industry. An in-depth evaluation of the enantiomeric separation capabilities of macrocyclic glycopeptides CSPs with SFC mobile phases was investigated using a set of over 100 chiral compounds. It was found that the macrocyclic based CSPs were able to separate enantiomers of various compounds with different polarities and functionalities. Seventy percent of all separations were achieved in less than 4 min due to the high flow rate (4.0 ml/min) that can be used in SFC. Drug-protein binding is an important process in determining the activity and fate of a drug once it enters the body. Two drug/protein systems have been studied using frontal analysis CE method. More sensitive fluorescence detection was introduced in this assay, which overcame the problem of low sensitivity that is common when using UV detection for drug-protein studies. In addition, the first usage of an argon ion laser with 257 nm beam coupled with CCD camera as a frontal analysis detection method enabled the simultaneous observation of drug fluorescence as well as the protein fluorescence. LC-ESI-MS was used for the separation and characterization of underivatized oligosaccharide mixtures. With the limits of detection as low as 50 picograms, all individual components of oligosaccharide mixtures (up to 11 glucose-units long) were baseline resolved on a Cyclobond I 2000 column and detected using ESI-MS. This system is characterized by high chromatographic

  19. Precise determination of critical exponents and equation of state by field theory methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn-Justin, J. Z.

    2001-04-01

    Renormalization group, and in particular its quantum field theory implementation has provided us with essential tools for the description of the phase transitions and critical phenomena beyond mean field theory. We therefore review the methods, based on renormalized φ34 quantum field theory and renormalization group, which have led to a precise determination of critical exponents of the N-vector model (Le Guillou and Zinn-Justin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 39 (1977) 95; Phys. Rev. B 21 (1980) 3976; Guida and Zinn-Justin, J. Phys. A 31 (1998) 8103; cond-mat/9803240) and of the equation of state of the 3D Ising model (Guida and Zinn-Justin, Nucl. Phys. B 489 [FS] (1997) 626, hep-th/9610223). These results are among the most precise available probing field theory in a non-perturbative regime. Precise calculations first require enough terms of the perturbative expansion. However perturbation series are known to be divergent. The divergence has been characterized by relating it to instanton contributions. The information about large-order behaviour of perturbation series has then allowed to develop efficient “summation” techniques, based on Borel transformation and conformal mapping (Le Guillou and Zinn-Justin (Eds.), Large Order Behaviour of Perturbation Theory, Current Physics, vol. 7, North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1990). We first discuss exponents and describe our recent results (Guida and Zinn-Justin, 1998). Compared to exponents, the determination of the scaling equation of state of the 3D Ising model involves a few additional (non-trivial) technical steps, like the use of the parametric representation, and the order dependent mapping method. From the knowledge of the equation of state a number of ratio of critical amplitudes can also be derived. Finally we emphasize that few physical quantities which are predicted by renormalization group to be universal have been determined precisely, and much work remains to be done. Considering the steady increase in the available

  20. A Precise Position and Attitude Determination System for Lightweight Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eling, C.; Klingbeil, L.; Wieland, M.; Kuhlmann, H.

    2013-08-01

    In many unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) applications a direct georeferencing is required. The reason can be that the UAV flies autonomous and must be navigated precisely, or that the UAV performs a remote sensing operation, where the position of the camera has to be known at the moment of the recording. In our application, a project called Mapping on Demand, we are motivated by both of these reasons. The goal of this project is to develop a lightweight autonomously flying UAV that is able to identify and measure inaccessible three-dimensional objects by use of visual information. Due to payload and space limitations, precise position and attitude determination of micro- and mini-sized UAVs is very challenging. The limitations do not only affect the onboard computing capacity, but they are also noticeable when choosing the georeferencing sensors. In this article, we will present a new developed onboard direct georeferencing system which is real-time capable, applicable for lightweight UAVs and provides very precise results (position accuracy σ < 5 cm and attitude accuracy σ < 0.5 deg). In this system GPS, inertial sensors, magnetic field sensors, a barometer as well as stereo video cameras are used as georeferencing sensors. We will describe the hardware development and will go into details of the implemented software. In this context especially the RTK-GPS software and the concept of the attitude determination by use of inertial sensors, magnetic field sensors as well as an onboard GPS baseline will be highlighted. Finally, results of first field tests as well as an outlook on further developments will conclude this contribution.

  1. DPOD2005 : Realization of a DORIS terrestrial reference frame for precise orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Pascal; Ries, John C.; Soudarin, Laurent; Zelensky, Nikita; Pavlis, Erricos C.

    Scientific studies related to altimetry data (mean sea level determination and its time evolution) require centimeter-level orbit determination in the radial component of the satellite. Change in station coordinates and velocities affect the orbit determination and the derived oceanographic results. Following the release of the ITRF2005, we conducted an extensive study related to the DORIS tracking network. For all ground beacons, we verified if the ITRF2005 position and velocity can be extrapolated in time without significant loss of precision. We tried to identified discontinuities in the DORIS coordinates time series, either caused by physical reason, such as Earthquakes, or by instrumental causes. We also identified time periods for which data for a specific station should not be used for orbit determination. In particular, specific stations such as Socorro Island, on which horizontal and vertical movements are detected from the DORIS results will be presented and can be explained by a volcano deformation. Finally, a more complex example will be provided for the Arequipa station, where a major Earthquake happened on June 23, 2001 and for which some relaxation effects are noticeable in the velocity determination even 2 years after the station displacement. A complete set of positions and velocities (by intervals) is given (DPOD2005) and will be used for Jason and TOPEX orbit determination.

  2. Novel technique for high-precision Bragg-angle determination in crystal x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, J.; Bruhns, H.; Trinczek, M.; Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Ullrich, J.

    2005-07-15

    A novel technique for a high-precision large acceptance determination of the Bragg angle in crystal x-ray spectroscopy is presented and demonstrated. The method exploits visible light beams as fiducials reflected on the x-ray crystal's surface to ensure exact knowledge of the position on the crystal at which the x rays are reflected, replacing entrance slits, thus making flat crystals suitable for low x-ray fluxes. It can be shown that many error sources arising from uncertainties in the determination of geometrical properties are eliminated in this way. A flat crystal x-ray spectrometer based on this technique has been designed, built, and tested using the most precisely known wavelengths emitted by highly charged ions, namely H- and He-like argon. The result for the 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1}{yields}1s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} w-line of He-like argon exhibits a statistical uncertainty of 3.8 ppm and an estimated systematic error of about 3 ppm, thus becoming the most accurate measurement of the He-like resonance transition in highly charged ions. It is shown that achieving a systematic error of below 1 ppm is feasible with this method. Therefore, our technique should allow reaching total accuracies approaching 1 ppm on transitions of mid-Z highly charged ions, which would provide challenging tests for state-of-the-art theoretical predictions.

  3. High-precision laser-assisted absolute determination of x-ray diffraction angles

    SciTech Connect

    Kubicek, K.; Braun, J.; Bruhns, H.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Mokler, P. H.; Ullrich, J.

    2012-01-15

    A novel technique for absolute wavelength determination in high-precision crystal x-ray spectroscopy recently introduced has been upgraded reaching unprecedented accuracies. The method combines visible laser beams with the Bond method, where Bragg angles ({theta} and -{theta}) are determined without any x-ray reference lines. Using flat crystals this technique makes absolute x-ray wavelength measurements feasible even at low x-ray fluxes. The upgraded spectrometer has been used in combination with first experiments on the 1s2p {sup 1}P{sub 1}{yields} 1s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0} w-line in He-like argon. By resolving a minute curvature of the x-ray lines the accuracy reaches there the best ever reported value of 1.5 ppm. The result is sensitive to predicted second-order QED contributions at the level of two-electron screening and two-photon radiative diagrams and will allow for the first time to benchmark predicted binding energies for He-like ions at this level of precision.

  4. The GPS Topex/Poseidon precise orbit determination experiment - Implications for design of GPS global networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindqwister, Ulf J.; Lichten, Stephen M.; Davis, Edgar S.; Theiss, Harold L.

    1993-01-01

    Topex/Poseidon, a cooperative satellite mission between United States and France, aims to determine global ocean circulation patterns and to study their influence on world climate through precise measurements of sea surface height above the geoid with an on-board altimeter. To achieve the mission science aims, a goal of 13-cm orbit altitude accuracy was set. Topex/Poseidon includes a Global Positioning System (GPS) precise orbit determination (POD) system that has now demonstrated altitude accuracy better than 5 cm. The GPS POD system includes an on-board GPS receiver and a 6-station GPS global tracking network. This paper reviews early GPS results and discusses multi-mission capabilities available from a future enhanced global GPS network, which would provide ground-based geodetic and atmospheric calibrations needed for NASA deep space missions while also supplying tracking data for future low Earth orbiters. Benefits of the enhanced global GPS network include lower operations costs for deep space tracking and many scientific and societal benefits from the low Earth orbiter missions, including improved understanding of ocean circulation, ocean-weather interactions, the El Nino effect, the Earth thermal balance, and weather forecasting.

  5. TerraSAR-X precise orbit determination with real-time GPS ephemerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wermuth, Martin; Hauschild, Andre; Montenbruck, Oliver; Kahle, Ralph

    TerraSAR-X is a German Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite, which was launched in June 2007 from Baikonour. Its task is to acquire radar images of the Earth's surface. In order to locate the radar data takes precisely, the satellite is equipped with a high-quality dual-frequency GPS receiver -the Integrated Geodetic and Occultation Receiver (IGOR) provided by the GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ). Using GPS observations from the IGOR instrument in a reduced dynamic precise orbit determination (POD), the German Space Operations Center (DLR/GSOC) is computing rapid and science orbit products on a routine basis. The rapid orbit products arrive with a latency of about one hour after data reception with an accuracy of 10-20 cm. Science orbit products are computed with a latency of five days achieving an accuracy of about 5cm (3D-RMS). For active and future Earth observation missions, the availability of near real-time precise orbit information is becoming more and more important. Other applications of near real-time orbit products include the processing of GNSS radio occulation measurements for atmospheric sounding as well as altimeter measurements of ocean surface heights, which are nowadays employed in global weather and ocean circulation models with short latencies. For example after natural disasters it is necessary to evaluate the damage by satellite images as soon as possible. The latency and quality of POD results is mainly driven by the availability of precise GPS ephemerides. In order to have high-quality GPS ephemerides available at real-time, GSOC has developed the real-time clock estimation system RETICLE. The system receives NTRIP-data streams with GNSS observations from the global tracking network of IGS in real-time. Using the known station position, RETICLE estimates precise GPS satellite clock offsets and drifts based on the most recent available IGU predicted orbits. The clock offset estimates have an accuracy of better than 0.3 ns and are

  6. Robust Flight Path Determination for Mars Precision Landing Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Kohen, Hamid

    1997-01-01

    This paper documents the application of genetic algorithms (GAs) to the problem of robust flight path determination for Mars precision landing. The robust flight path problem is defined here as the determination of the flight path which delivers a low-lift open-loop controlled vehicle to its desired final landing location while minimizing the effect of perturbations due to uncertainty in the atmospheric model and entry conditions. The genetic algorithm was capable of finding solutions which reduced the landing error from 111 km RMS radial (open-loop optimal) to 43 km RMS radial (optimized with respect to perturbations) using 200 hours of computation on an Ultra-SPARC workstation. Further reduction in the landing error is possible by going to closed-loop control which can utilize the GA optimized paths as nominal trajectories for linearization.

  7. High-precision orbit determination for high-earth elliptical orbiters using the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, S. M.; Estefan, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Orbit covariance analyses pertaining to the Japanese VLBI Space Observatory Program (VSOP) MUSES-B satellite and to the International VLBI Satellite are presented. It is determined that a combination of Doppler and GPS measurements can provide the orbit accuracy required to support advanced radio interferometric experiments. For the VSOP, the required orbit accuracy of 130 m is easily met with two-way Doppler as the primary type of data; the 0.4 cm/s VSOP velocity requirement is also feasible provided that precise ground calibrations of tropospheric delays and station coordinates are available. It is concluded that combining the data from a VSOP GPS flight instrument with the ground GPS and two-way Doppler data will significantly enhance orbit determination accuracy in position and velocity.

  8. A proposed experimental method for interpreting Doppler effect measurements and determining their precision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, P. G.

    1973-01-01

    The principal problem in the measurement of the Doppler reactivity effect is separating it from the thermal reactivity effects of the expansion of the heated sample. It is shown in this proposal that the thermal effects of sample expansion can be experimentally determined by making additional measurements with porous samples having the same mass and/or volume as the primary sample. By combining these results with independent measurements of the linear temperature coefficient and the computed temperature dependence of the Doppler coefficient the magnitude of the Doppler coefficient may be extracted from the data. These addiational measurements are also useful to experimentally determine the precision of the reactivity oscillator technique used to measure the reactivity effects of the heated sample.

  9. A numerical method for determining highly precise electron energy distribution functions from Langmuir probe characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Jin-Young; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-12-15

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) were determined from probe characteristics using a numerical ac superimposed method with a distortion correction of high derivative terms by varying amplitude of a sinusoidal perturbation voltage superimposed onto the dc sweep voltage, depending on the related electron energy. Low amplitude perturbation applied around the plasma potential represented the low energy peak of the EEDF exactly, and high amplitude perturbation applied around the floating potential was effective to suppress noise or distortion of the probe characteristic, which is fatal to the tail electron distribution. When a small random noise was imposed over the stabilized prove characteristic, the numerical differentiation method was not suitable to determine the EEDF, while the numerical ac superimposed method was able to obtain a highly precise EEDF.

  10. Precise orbit determination of Multi-GNSS constellation including GPS GLONASS BDS and GALIEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiaolei

    2014-05-01

    In addition to the existing American global positioning system (GPS) and the Russian global navigation satellite system (GLONASS), the new generation of GNSS is emerging and developing, such as the Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation system (BDS) and the European GALILEO system. Multi-constellation is expected to contribute to more accurate and reliable positioning and navigation service. However, the application of multi-constellation challenges the traditional precise orbit determination (POD) strategy that was designed usually for single constellation. In this contribution, we exploit a more rigorous multi-constellation POD strategy for the ongoing IGS multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) where the common parameters are identical for each system, and the frequency- and system-specified parameters are employed to account for the inter-frequency and inter-system biases. Since the authorized BDS attitude model is not yet released, different BDS attitude model are implemented and their impact on orbit accuracy are studied. The proposed POD strategy was implemented in the PANDA (Position and Navigation Data Analyst) software and can process observations from GPS, GLONASS, BDS and GALILEO together. The strategy is evaluated with the multi-constellation observations from about 90 MGEX stations and BDS observations from the BeiDou experimental tracking network (BETN) of Wuhan University (WHU). Of all the MGEX stations, 28 stations record BDS observation, and about 80 stations record GALILEO observations. All these data were processed together in our software, resulting in the multi-constellation POD solutions. We assessed the orbit accuracy for GPS and GLONASS by comparing our solutions with the IGS final orbit, and for BDS and GALILEO by overlapping our daily orbit solution. The stability of inter-frequency bias of GLONASS and inter-system biases w.r.t. GPS for GLONASS, BDS and GALILEO were investigated. At last, we carried out precise point positioning (PPP) using the multi

  11. Phase center modeling for LEO GPS receiver antennas and its impact on precise orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäggi, Adrian; Dach, R.; Montenbruck, O.; Hugentobler, U.; Bock, H.; Beutler, G.

    2009-12-01

    Most satellites in a low-Earth orbit (LEO) with demanding requirements on precise orbit determination (POD) are equipped with on-board receivers to collect the observations from Global Navigation Satellite systems (GNSS), such as the Global Positioning System (GPS). Limiting factors for LEO POD are nowadays mainly encountered with the modeling of the carrier phase observations, where a precise knowledge of the phase center location of the GNSS antennas is a prerequisite for high-precision orbit analyses. Since 5 November 2006 (GPS week 1400), absolute instead of relative values for the phase center location of GNSS receiver and transmitter antennas are adopted in the processing standards of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The absolute phase center modeling is based on robot calibrations for a number of terrestrial receiver antennas, whereas compatible antenna models were subsequently derived for the remaining terrestrial receiver antennas by conversion (from relative corrections), and for the GNSS transmitter antennas by estimation. However, consistent receiver antenna models for space missions such as GRACE and TerraSAR-X, which are equipped with non-geodetic receiver antennas, are only available since a short time from robot calibrations. We use GPS data of the aforementioned LEOs of the year 2007 together with the absolute antenna modeling to assess the presently achieved accuracy from state-of-the-art reduced-dynamic LEO POD strategies for absolute and relative navigation. Near-field multipath and cross-talk with active GPS occultation antennas turn out to be important and significant sources for systematic carrier phase measurement errors that are encountered in the actual spacecraft environments. We assess different methodologies for the in-flight determination of empirical phase pattern corrections for LEO receiver antennas and discuss their impact on POD. By means of independent K-band measurements, we show that zero-difference GRACE orbits can be

  12. Chemical characterization of oligosaccharides in the milk of six species of New and Old World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kohta; Fukuda, Kenji; Senda, Akitsugu; Saito, Tadao; Kimura, Kazumasa; Glander, Kenneth E; Hinde, Katie; Dittus, Wolfgang; Milligan, Lauren A; Power, Michael L; Oftedal, Olav T; Urashima, Tadasu

    2010-10-01

    Human and great ape milks contain a diverse array of milk oligosaccharides, but little is known about the milk oligosaccharides of other primates, and how they differ among taxa. Neutral and acidic oligosaccharides were isolated from the milk of three species of Old World or catarrhine monkeys (Cercopithecidae: rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), toque macaque (Macaca sinica) and Hamadryas baboon (Papio hamadryas)) and three of New World or platyrrhine monkeys (Cebidae: tufted capuchin (Cebus apella) and Bolivian squirrel monkey (Saimiri boliviensis); Atelidae: mantled howler (Alouatta palliata)). The milks of these species contained 6-8% total sugar, most of which was lactose: the estimated ratio of oligosaccharides to lactose in Old World monkeys (1:4 to 1:6) was greater than in New World monkeys (1:12 to 1:23). The chemical structures of the oligosaccharides were determined mainly by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. Oligosaccharides containing the type II unit (Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc) were found in the milk of the rhesus macaque, toque macaque, Hamadryas baboon and tufted capuchin, but oligosaccharides containing the type I unit (Gal(β1-3)GlcNAc), which have been found in human and many great ape milks, were absent from the milk of all species studied. Oligosaccharides containing Lewis x (Gal(β1-4)[Fuc(α1-3)]GlcNAc) and 3-fucosyl lactose (3-FL, Gal(β1-4)[Fuc(α1-3)]Glc) were found in the milk of the three cercopithecid monkey species, while 2-fucosyl lactose (5'-FL, Fuc(α1-2)Gal(β1-4)Glc) was absent from all species studied. All of these milks contained acidic oligosaccharides that had N-acetylneuraminic acid as part of their structures, but did not contain oligosaccharides that had N-glycolylneuraminic acid, in contrast to the milk or colostrum of great apes which contain both types of acidic oligosaccharides. Two GalNAc-containing oligosaccharides, lactose 3'-O-sulfate and lacto-N-novopentaose I (Gal(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc(β1-6)]Gal(β1-4)Glc) were found only in the milk

  13. Precision Orbit Determination for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: orbit quality and gravity field estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazarico, E.; Rowlands, D. D.; Neumann, G. A.; Lemoine, F. G.; Torrence, M. H.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Mao, D.

    2010-12-01

    We present results of the Precision Orbit Determination work undertaken by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Science Team for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission, in order to meet the position knowledge accuracy requirements (50-m total position) and to precisely geolocate the LRO datasets. In addition to the radiometric tracking data, one-way laser ranges (LR) between Earth stations and the spacecraft are made possible by a small telescope mounted on the spacecraft high-gain antenna. The photons received from Earth are transmitted to one LOLA detector by a fiber optics bundle. The LOLA timing system enables 5-s LR normal points with precision better than 10cm. Other types of geodetic constraints are derived from the altimetric data itself. The orbit geometry can be constrained at the times of laser groundtrack intersections (crossovers). Due to the Moon's slow rotation, orbit solutions and normal equations including altimeter crossovers are processed and created in one month batches. Recent high-resolution topographic maps near the lunar poles are used to produce a new kind of geodetic constraints. Purely geometric, those do not necessitate actual groundtrack intersections. We assess the contributions of those data types, and the quality of our orbits. Solutions which use altimetric crossover meet the horizontal 50-m requirement, and perform usually better (10-20m). We also obtain gravity field solutions based on LRO and historical data. The various LRO data are accumulated into normal equations, separately for each one month batch and for each measurement type, which enables the final weights to be adjusted during the least-squares inversion step. Expansion coefficients to degree and order 150 are estimated, and a Kaula rule is still needed to stabilize the farside field. The gravity field solutions are compared to previous solutions (GLGM-3, LP150Q, SGM100h) and the geopotential predicted from the latest LOLA spherical harmonic expansion.

  14. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy by precision measurements in electron and muon neutrino disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.; Parke, S.J.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-07-01

    Recently a new method for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the effective values of the atmospheric {Delta}m{sup 2} measured in the electron neutrino disappearance channel, {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee), with the one measured in the muon neutrino disappearance channel, {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}), was proposed. If {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) is larger (smaller) than {Delta}m{sup 2} ({mu}{mu}) the hierarchy is of the normal (inverted) type. We re-examine this proposition in the light of two very high precision measurements: {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}) that may be accomplished by the phase II of the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) experiment, for example, and {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) that can be envisaged using the novel Moessbauer enhanced resonant {bar {nu}}{sub e} absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic uncertainties of both measurements, we estimate the parameter region of ({theta}{sub 13}, {delta}) in which the mass hierarchy can be determined. If {theta}{sub 13} is relatively large, sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} {approx}> 0.05, and both of {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) and {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}) can be measured with the precision of {approx} 0.5 % it is possible to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at > 95% CL for 0.3{pi} {approx}< {delta} {approx}< 1.7 {pi} for the current best fit values of all the other oscillation parameters.

  15. Precision Time Transfer and Obit Determination Using Laser Ranging to Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, D.; Barker, M. K.; Clarke, C. B.; Golder, J. E.; Hoffman, E.; Horvath, J. E.; Mazarico, E.; Mcgarry, J.; Neumann, G. A.; Torrence, M. H.; Rowlands, D. D.; Skillman, D.; Smith, D. E.; Sun, X.; Zuber, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    Since the commissioning of LRO in June, 2009, one-way laser ranging (LR) to Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has been conducted successfully from NASA's Next Generation Satellite Laser Ranging System (NGSLR) at Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical observatory (GGAO) in Greenbelt, Maryland. With the support of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), ten international satellite laser ranging (SLR) ground stations have participated in this experiment and over 1200 hours of ranging data have been collected. In addition to supplementing the precision orbit determination (POD) of LRO, LR is able to perform time transfer between the ground station and the spacecraft clocks. The LRO clock oscillator is stable to 1 part in 10^{12} over several hours, and as stable for much longer periods after correcting for a long-term drift rate and an aging rate. With a precisely-determined LRO ephemeris, the oscillator-determined laser pulse receive time can be differenced with ground station clock transmit times using H-maser and GPS-steered Rb oscillators as references. Simultaneous ranging to LRO among 2, 3, or 4 ground stations has made it possible for relative time transfer among the participating LR stations. Results have shown about 100 ns difference between some LR stations and the primary NGSLR station. At present, the time transfer accuracy is limited to 100 ns at NGSLR. However, an All-View GPS receiver has been installed, which, in combination with a H-maser, is expected to improve the accuracy to 1 ns r.m.s. at NGSLR. Results of new ranging and time transfer experiments using the new time base will be reported. The ability to use LR for time transfer validates the selection of a commercially-supplied, oven-controlled crystal oscillator on board LRO for one-way laser ranging.The increased clock accuracy also provides stronger orbit constraints for LRO POD. The improvements due to including LR data in the LRO POD will be presented.

  16. Evaluation of precision estimates for fiber-dimensional and electrical hygrometers for water activity determinations.

    PubMed

    Stroup, W H; Peeler, J T; Smith, K

    1987-01-01

    The precision of instruments used in 3 collaborative studies conducted within the Food and Drug Administration over a 4-year period (1981, 1982, 1984) for water activity (aw) determinations according to the official AOAC method is evaluated. Calibration responses of the instruments were tested for linearity over the aw range from 0.75 to 0.97. Average absolute percent difference between predicted and assigned aw values for the linear model ranged from 0.3 to 0.7% for a fiber-dimensional hygrometer (Abbeon) and 3 electrical hygrometers (Beckman, Rotronics, and Weather Measure). The calibration responses for another electrical hygrometer (Hygrodynamics) were nonlinear. The fiber-dimensional hygrometer yielded mean aw values and precision estimates that did not differ significantly from those obtained with the electrical hygrometers for (NH4)2SO4slush, KNO3 slush, sweetened condensed milk, pancake syrup, and cheese spread. However, the mean aw value for a soy sauce was 0.838 for the electrical hygrometers compared with 0.911 for the fiber-dimensional hygrometer. The fiber-dimensional hygrometer was affected by a volatile component(s) in the soy sauce that caused an erroneously high aw value. Pooled estimates of reproducibility (Sx) in the 3 studies were 0.008 for the fiber-dimensional hygrometer and 0.010 for the electrical hygrometers; these values were not significantly different from those reported in the study that verified the current official AOAC method. PMID:3436906

  17. Precise Determination of the Lyman-1 Transition Energy in Hydrogen-like Gold Ions with Microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Andrianov, V.; Bleile, A.; Echler, A.; Egelhof, P.; Grabitz, P.; Kilbourne, C.; Kiselev, O.; McCammon, D.; Scholz, P.

    2014-09-01

    The precise determination of the transition energy of the Lyman-1 line in hydrogen-like heavy ions provides a sensitive test of quantum electrodynamics in very strong Coulomb fields. We report the determination of the Lyman-1 transition energy of gold ions (Au) with microcalorimeters at the experimental storage ring at GSI. X-rays produced by the interaction of 125 MeV/u Au ions with an internal argon gas-jet target were detected. The detector array consisted of 14 pixels with silicon thermistors and Sn absorbers, for which an energy resolution of 50 eV for an X-ray energy of 59.5 keV was obtained in the laboratory. The Lyman-1 transition energy was determined for each pixel in the laboratory frame, then transformed into the emitter frame and averaged. A Dy-159 source was used for energy calibration. The absolute positions of the detector pixels, which are needed for an accurate correction of the Doppler shift, were determined by topographic measurements and by scanning a collimated Am-241 source across the cryostat window. The energy of the Lyman-1 line in the emitter frame is eV, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty in the position of the cryostat relative to the interaction region of beam and target.

  18. A Comparison of TOPEX/Poseidon TDRESS-based Operational Orbit Determination Results with the Precision Orbit Ephemeris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frauenholz, R. B.; Bhat, R. S.; Shapiro, B. E.; Leavitt, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    Since its' launch on August 10, 1992, the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite hs successfully observed the earth's ocean circulation using a combination of precision orbit determination (POD) and dual-frequency radar altimetry.

  19. Invited Article: A precise instrument to determine the Planck constant, and the future kilogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, D.; Seifert, F.; Chao, L. S.; Li, S.; Newell, D. B.; Pratt, J. R.; Williams, C.; Schlamminger, S.

    2016-06-01

    A precise instrument, called a watt balance, compares mechanical power measured in terms of the meter, the second, and the kilogram to electrical power measured in terms of the volt and the ohm. A direct link between mechanical action and the Planck constant is established by the practical realization of the electrical units derived from the Josephson and the quantum Hall effects. We describe in this paper the fourth-generation watt balance at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and report our initial determination of the Planck constant obtained from data taken in late 2015 and the beginning of 2016. A comprehensive analysis of the data and the associated uncertainties led to the SI value of the Planck constant, h = 6.626 069 83(22) × 10-34 J s. The relative standard uncertainty associated with this result is 34 × 10-9.

  20. SURFING: A Program for Precise Determination of Sample Position in Stress Measurements Via Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.-Q.

    2000-08-08

    Precise determination of the specimen position relative to the sampling volume for texture and stress measurements by neutron diffraction is difficult or sometimes impossible using only optical devices due to large or irregular sample dimensions and/or complicated shape of the sampling volume. The knowledge of the shape and size of the sampling volume allows development of a general mathematical model for the intensity variation with a parallelogram-shape sampling volume moving from outside to inside the specimen for both transmission and reflection geometric set-ups. Both fixed slits and radial collimators are options in defining the geometrical setup. The attenuation by the sample also has been taken into account in this model. Experimental results agree well with the model calculations. The program SURFING is based on the model calculation and was written in Labwindows/CVI{copyright}.

  1. Precise Orbit Determination for LEO Spacecraft Using GNSS Tracking Data from Multiple Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Da; Bertiger, William; Desai, Shailen; Haines, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    To support various applications, certain Earth-orbiting spacecrafts (e.g., SRTM, COSMIC) use multiple GNSS antennas to provide tracking data for precise orbit determination (POD). POD using GNSS tracking data from multiple antennas poses some special technical issues compared to the typical single-antenna approach. In this paper, we investigate some of these issues using both real and simulated data. Recommendations are provided for POD with multiple GNSS antennas and for antenna configuration design. The observability of satellite position with multiple antennas data is compared against single antenna case. The impact of differential clock (line biases) and line-of-sight (up, along-track, and cross-track) on kinematic and reduced-dynamic POD is evaluated. The accuracy of monitoring the stability of the spacecraft structure by simultaneously performing POD of the spacecraft and relative positioning of the multiple antennas is also investigated.

  2. Advanced application flight experiments precision attitude determination system. Volume 2: System tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The performance capability of each of two precision attitude determination systems (PADS), one using a strapdown star tracker, and the other using a single-axis gimbal star tracker was measured in the laboratory under simulated orbit conditions. The primary focus of the evaluation was on the contribution to the total system accuracy by the star trackers, and the effectiveness of the software algorithms in functioning with actual sensor signals. A brief description of PADS, the laboratory test configuration and the test facility, is given along with a discussion of the data handling and display, laboratory computer programs, PADS performance evaluation programs, and the strapdown and gimbal system tests. Results are presented and discussed.

  3. Analytical methodology for determination of helicopter IFR precision approach requirements. [pilot workload and acceptance level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phatak, A. V.

    1980-01-01

    A systematic analytical approach to the determination of helicopter IFR precision approach requirements is formulated. The approach is based upon the hypothesis that pilot acceptance level or opinion rating of a given system is inversely related to the degree of pilot involvement in the control task. A nonlinear simulation of the helicopter approach to landing task incorporating appropriate models for UH-1H aircraft, the environmental disturbances and the human pilot was developed as a tool for evaluating the pilot acceptance hypothesis. The simulated pilot model is generic in nature and includes analytical representation of the human information acquisition, processing, and control strategies. Simulation analyses in the flight director mode indicate that the pilot model used is reasonable. Results of the simulation are used to identify candidate pilot workload metrics and to test the well known performance-work-load relationship. A pilot acceptance analytical methodology is formulated as a basis for further investigation, development and validation.

  4. High-Precision Determination of the Electric and Magnetic Form Factors of the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Bernauer, J. C.; Achenbach, P.; Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Boehm, R.; Distler, M. O.; Doria, L.; Esser, A.; Friedrich, J.; Gomez Rodriguez de la Paz, M.; Merkel, H.; Middleton, D. G.; Mueller, U.; Nungesser, L.; Pochodzalla, J.; Sanchez Majos, S.; Schlimme, B. S.; Walcher, Th.; Weinriefer, M.; Bosnar, D.; Makek, M.

    2010-12-10

    New precise results of a measurement of the elastic electron-proton scattering cross section performed at the Mainz Microtron MAMI are presented. About 1400 cross sections were measured with negative four-momentum transfers squared up to Q{sup 2}=1 (GeV/c){sup 2} with statistical errors below 0.2%. The electric and magnetic form factors of the proton were extracted by fits of a large variety of form factor models directly to the cross sections. The form factors show some features at the scale of the pion cloud. The charge and magnetic radii are determined to be {sup 1/2}=0.879(5){sub stat}(4){sub syst}(2){sub model}(4){sub group} fm and {sup 1/2}=0.777(13){sub stat}(9){sub syst}(5){sub model}(2){sub group} fm.

  5. High-precision determination of the electric and magnetic form factors of the proton.

    PubMed

    Bernauer, J C; Achenbach, P; Ayerbe Gayoso, C; Böhm, R; Bosnar, D; Debenjak, L; Distler, M O; Doria, L; Esser, A; Fonvieille, H; Friedrich, J M; Friedrich, J; Gómez Rodríguez de la Paz, M; Makek, M; Merkel, H; Middleton, D G; Müller, U; Nungesser, L; Pochodzalla, J; Potokar, M; Sánchez Majos, S; Schlimme, B S; Sirca, S; Walcher, Th; Weinriefer, M

    2010-12-10

    New precise results of a measurement of the elastic electron-proton scattering cross section performed at the Mainz Microtron MAMI are presented. About 1400 cross sections were measured with negative four-momentum transfers squared up to Q² = 1 (GeV/c)² with statistical errors below 0.2%. The electric and magnetic form factors of the proton were extracted by fits of a large variety of form factor models directly to the cross sections. The form factors show some features at the scale of the pion cloud. The charge and magnetic radii are determined to be ½ = 0.879(5)stat(4)syst(2)model(4)group fm and ½ = 0.777(13)stat(9)syst(5)model(2)group fm. PMID:21231520

  6. Entry Abort Determination Using Non-Adaptive Neural Networks for Mars Precision Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybeal, Sarah R.; Kranzusch, Kara M.

    2005-01-01

    The 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will attempt the first precision landing on Mars using a modified version of the Apollo Earth entry guidance program. The guidance routine, Entry Terminal Point Controller (ETPC), commands the deployment of a supersonic parachute after converging the range to the landing target. For very dispersed cases, ETPC may not converge the range to the target and safely command parachute deployment within Mach number and dynamic pressure constraints. A full-lift up abort can save 85% of these failed trajectories while abandoning the precision landing objective. Though current MSL requirements do not call for an abort capability, an autonomous abort capability may be desired, for this mission or future Mars precision landers, to make the vehicle more robust. The application of artificial neural networks (NNs) as an abort determination technique was evaluated by personnel at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC). In order to implement an abort, a failed trajectory needs to be recognized in real time. Abort determination is dependent upon several trajectory parameters whose relationships to vehicle survival are not well understood, and yet the lander must be trained to recognize unsafe situations. Artificial neural networks (NNs) provide a way to model these parameters and can provide MSL with the artificial intelligence necessary to independently declare an abort. Using the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission as a case study, a non-adaptive NN was designed, trained and tested using Monte Carlo simulations of MSL descent and incorporated into ETPC. Neural network theory, the development history of the MSL NN, and initial testing with severe dust storm entry trajectory cases are discussed in Reference 1 and will not be repeated here. That analysis demonstrated that NNs are capable of recognizing failed descent trajectories and can significantly increase the survivability of MSL for very

  7. Molecular Line Parameters Precisely Determined by a Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shui-Ming; Tan, Yan; Wang, Jin; Lu, Yan; Cheng, Cunfeng; Sun, Yu Robert; Liu, An-Wen

    2015-06-01

    A cavity ring-down spectrometer calibrated with a set of precise atomic lines was built to retrieve precise line parameters in the near infrared.~[1,2] The spectrometer allows us to detect absorptions with a sensitivity of 10-11~cm-1 and a spectral precision up to 10-6~cm-1. Ro-vibrational lines in the second overtone of H_2 have been observed, including the extremely weak S_3(5) line with a line intensity less than 1× 10-30cm/molecule, which is among the weakest molecular lines detected by absorption in the gas phase. The absolute line positions of H_2 agree well with the high-level quantum chemical calculations including relativistic and QED corrections, with the deviation being less than 5× 10-4~cm-1.~[3,4] A quantitative study has also been carried out on the ν_1+5ν_3 band of CO_2.~[5] It was the first CO_2 band observed 80 years ago in the spectrum of Venus. We determined the line positions with an accuracy of 3× 10-5~cm-1, two orders of magnitude better than previous studies. Similar studies have been carried out to determine the line parameters of H_2O~[6] and CO~[7] in the spectral regions near 0.8~μm. The spectroscopic parameters can be used in varies studies, from the atmospheres of the earth-like planets to the test of fundamental physics. References [1] H. Pan, et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 103110 (2011). [2] C.-F. Cheng, Opt. Expr. 20, 9956 (2012). [3] C.-F. Cheng, et al. Phys. Rev. A 85, 024501 (2012). [4] y. Tan, et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 300, 60 (2014). [5] Y. Lu, et al. Astrophys. J. 775, 71 (2013). [6] Y. Lu, et al. JQSRT 118, 96 (2013). [7] Y. Tan, et al. ``Ro-vibrational analysis of the fifth overtone of CO at 802~nm'', under preparation.

  8. DPTRAJ/ODP - DOUBLE PRECISION TRAJECTORY ANALYSIS AND ORBIT DETERMINATION PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckheimer, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Double Precision Trajectory Analysis Program, DPTRAJ, and the Orbit Determination Program, ODP, have been developed and improved over the years to provide the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory with a highly reliable and accurate navigation capability for their deep space missions such as VOYAGER. DPTRAJ and ODP are each collections of programs which work together to provide the desired computational results. DPTRAJ, ODP, and their supporting utility programs are capable of handling the massive amounts of data and performing the various numerical calculations required for solving the navigation problems associated with planetary fly-by and lander missions. They were used extensively in support of NASA's VOYAGER project. DPTRAJ produces a spacecraft ephemeris by numerical integration of the equations of motion, which can be formulated using a full set of acceleration models. For each particular trajectory case the extent of the modeling employed and the precision of the integration process are controlled by user input specifications. The equation of motion used includes four types of terms. An acceleration term accounts for the basic conic motion of the spacecraft with respect to the central body. Terms that measure the attraction of the perturbing bodies on the spacecraft and terms that indirectly affect the motion as perturbations on the central body may be included. Terms are also provided to account for other gravitational and non-gravitational effects on the motion. ODP's function is the processing of the observational data in order to compute precise estimates of the spacecraft, or lander, position coordinate histories. This function is executed by processing the observation data and auxiliary calibration information. ODP also computes a spacecraft state vector, or a lander position vector, along with parameters which define the acceleration. The heart of the ODP process is a data fitting subprocess in which validated, edited, and corrected observational data

  9. Detection and quantitation of low abundance oligosaccharides in recombinant monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Nowak, Christine; Gonzalez, Nidia; Miano, Dino; Liu, Hongcheng

    2015-03-01

    Oligosaccharides are critical for structural integrity, stability, and biological functions of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. It is relatively easy to characterize, quantify, and determine the impact of major glycoforms. While challenging to detect and quantify, certain low abundance oligosaccharides are highly relevant to the stability and functions of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Methods were established in this study based on enzymatic digestion to consolidate peaks of the same type of oligosaccharides by removing heterogeneity and thus increase detectability of low abundance peaks. Endo H was used to collapse high mannose oligosaccharides to a single peak of GlcNAc for ease of detection and quantitation. β-Galactosidase and β-N-acetylhexosaminidase were used to convert complex oligosaccharides into two peaks containing either GlcNAc2Man3Fuc or GlcNAc2Man3, which simplified the chromatograms and data analysis. More importantly, low abundance hybrid oligosaccharides can only be detected and qualified after β-galactosidase and β-N-acetylhexosaminidase digestion. Detection and quantitation of low abundance oligosaccharides can also be achieved using a combination of all three enzymes. These methods can be applied to the development of recombinant monoclonal antibody therapeutics. PMID:25647617

  10. Precise orbit determination for the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellite mission using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Cheinway; Tseng, Tzu-Pang; Lin, Tingjung; Švehla, Dražen; Schreiner, Bill

    2009-05-01

    The joint Taiwan-US mission FORMOSAT-3/ COSMIC (COSMIC) was launched on April 17, 2006. Each of the six satellites is equipped with two POD antennas. The orbits of the six satellites are determined from GPS data using zero-difference carrier-phase measurements by the reduced dynamic and kinematic methods. The effects of satellite center of mass (COM) variation, satellite attitude, GPS antenna phase center variation (PCV), and cable delay difference on the COSMIC orbit determination are studied. Nominal attitudes estimated from satellite state vectors deliver a better orbit accuracy when compared to observed attitude. Numerical tests show that the COSMIC COM must be precisely calibrated in order not to corrupt orbit determination. Based on the analyses of the 5 and 6-h orbit overlaps of two 30-h arcs, orbit accuracies from the reduced dynamic and kinematic solutions are nearly identical and are at the 2-3 cm level. The mean RMS difference between the orbits from this paper and those from UCAR (near real-time) and WHU (post-processed) is about 10 cm, which is largely due to different uses of GPS ephemerides, high-rate GPS clocks and force models. The kinematic orbits of COSMIC are expected to be used for recovery of temporal variations in the gravity field.

  11. The ST5000: a high-precision star tracker and attitude determination system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percival, Jeffrey W.; Nordsieck, Kenneth H.; Jaehnig, Kurt P.

    2008-07-01

    The University of Wisconsin's Space Astronomy Laboratory has designed and built a Star Tracker suitable for use on sounding rockets and class D satellites. This device brings together autonomous attitude determination ("Lost in Space" mode), multi-star tracking, and a novel form of Progressive Image Transmission (US patent #5,991,816), which allows the device to be used as an ultra-low bandwidth imager. The Star Tracker 5000 (ST5000) reached operational status in a suborbital sounding rocket flight in August 2007. The ST5000 determined the rocket's inertial (FK5) attitude with arcsecond precision using its autonomous attitude determination capability, and then provided continuous sub-arc-second tracking for the full 360-second on-target portion of the flight. The ST5000 RMS tracking error was 0.54 arc-seconds in yaw and pitch, and 17 arc-seconds in roll. The vehicle RMS jitter was 0.5 arc-seconds in yaw and pitch, and 10 arc-seconds in roll. The ST5000 was funded by NASA grants NAG5-7026 and NAG5-8588.

  12. Modeling of Non-Gravitational Forces for Precise and Accurate Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, Stefan; Gisinger, Christoph; Steigenberger, Peter; Balss, Ulrich; Montenbruck, Oliver; Eineder, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Remote sensing satellites support a broad range of scientific and commercial applications. The two radar imaging satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X provide spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR data with a very high accuracy. The precise reconstruction of the satellite's trajectory is based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a geodetic-grade dual-frequency Integrated Geodetic and Occultation Receiver (IGOR) onboard the spacecraft. The increasing demand for precise radar products relies on validation methods, which require precise and accurate orbit products. An analysis of the orbit quality by means of internal and external validation methods on long and short timescales shows systematics, which reflect deficits in the employed force models. Following the proper analysis of this deficits, possible solution strategies are highlighted in the presentation. The employed Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination (RDOD) approach utilizes models for gravitational and non-gravitational forces. A detailed satellite macro model is introduced to describe the geometry and the optical surface properties of the satellite. Two major non-gravitational forces are the direct and the indirect Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). The satellite TerraSAR-X flies on a dusk-dawn orbit with an altitude of approximately 510 km above ground. Due to this constellation, the Sun almost constantly illuminates the satellite, which causes strong across-track accelerations on the plane rectangular to the solar rays. The indirect effect of the solar radiation is called Earth Radiation Pressure (ERP). This force depends on the sunlight, which is reflected by the illuminated Earth surface (visible spectra) and the emission of the Earth body in the infrared spectra. Both components of ERP require Earth models to describe the optical properties of the Earth surface. Therefore, the influence of different Earth models on the orbit quality is assessed. The scope of

  13. Real-time, autonomous precise satellite orbit determination using the global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, David Ben

    2000-10-01

    The desire for autonomously generated, rapidly available, and highly accurate satellite ephemeris is growing with the proliferation of constellations of satellites and the cost and overhead of ground tracking resources. Autonomous Orbit Determination (OD) may be done on the ground in a post-processing mode or in real-time on board a satellite and may be accomplished days, hours or immediately after observations are processed. The Global Positioning System (GPS) is now widely used as an alternative to ground tracking resources to supply observation data for satellite positioning and navigation. GPS is accurate, inexpensive, provides continuous coverage, and is an excellent choice for autonomous systems. In an effort to estimate precise satellite ephemeris in real-time on board a satellite, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) created the GPS Enhanced OD Experiment (GEODE) flight navigation software. This dissertation offers alternative methods and improvements to GEODE to increase on board autonomy and real-time total position accuracy and precision without increasing computational burden. First, GEODE is modified to include a Gravity Acceleration Approximation Function (GAAF) to replace the traditional spherical harmonic representation of the gravity field. Next, an ionospheric correction method called Differenced Range Versus Integrated Doppler (DRVID) is applied to correct for ionospheric errors in the GPS measurements used in GEODE. Then, Dynamic Model Compensation (DMC) is added to estimate unmodeled and/or mismodeled forces in the dynamic model and to provide an alternative process noise variance-covariance formulation. Finally, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) is implemented in the form of Genetic Model Compensation (GMC) to optimize DMC forcing noise parameters. Application of GAAF, DRVID and DMC improved GEODE's position estimates by 28.3% when applied to GPS/MET data collected in the presence of Selective Availability (SA), 17.5% when SA is removed from the GPS

  14. Impact of Ionosphere on GPS-based Precise Orbit Determination of Low Earth Orbiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, D.; Jaeggi, A.; Beutler, G.; Meyer, U.; Schaer, S.

    2015-12-01

    Deficiencies in geodetic products derived from the orbital trajectories of Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites determined by GPS-based Precise Orbit Determination (POD) were identified in recent years. The precise orbits of the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission are, e.g., severely affected by an increased position noise level over the geomagnetic poles and spurious signatures along the Earth's geomagnetic equator (see Fig. 1, which shows the carrier phase residuals of a reduced-dynamic orbit determination for GOCE in m). Such degradations may directly map into the gravity fields recovered from the orbits. They are related to a disturbed GPS signal propagation through the Earth's ionosphere and indicate that the GPS observation model and/or the data pre-processing need to be improved. While GOCE was the first mission where severe ionosphere-related problems became obvious, the GPS-based LEO POD of satellites of the more recent missions Swarm and Sentinel-1A turn out to be affected, as well. We characterize the stochastic and systematic behavior of the ionosphere by analyzing GPS data collected by the POD antennas of various LEO satellites covering a broad altitude range (e.g., GRACE, GOCE and Swarm) and for periods covering significant parts of an entire solar cycle, which probe substantially different ionosphere conditions. The information may provide the basis for improvements of data pre-processing to cope with the ionosphere-induced problems of LEO POD. The performance of cycle slip detection can, e.g., be degraded by large changes of ionospheric refraction from one measurement epoch to the next. Geographically resolved information on the stochastic properties of the ionosphere above the LEOs provide more realistic threshold values for cycle slip detection algorithms. Removing GPS data showing large ionospheric variations is a crude method to mitigate the ionosphere-induced artifacts in orbit and gravity field products

  15. Application of Vehicle Dynamic Modeling in Uavs for Precise Determination of Exterior Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaghani, M.; Skaloud, J.

    2016-06-01

    Advances in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and especially micro aerial vehicle (MAV) technology together with increasing quality and decreasing price of imaging devices have resulted in growing use of MAVs in photogrammetry. The practicality of MAV mapping is seriously enhanced with the ability to determine parameters of exterior orientation (EO) with sufficient accuracy, in both absolute and relative senses (change of attitude between successive images). While differential carrier phase GNSS satisfies cm-level positioning accuracy, precise attitude determination is essential for both direct sensor orientation (DiSO) and integrated sensor orientation (ISO) in corridor mapping or in block configuration imaging over surfaces with low texture. Limited cost, size, and weight of MAVs represent limitations on quality of onboard navigation sensors and puts emphasis on exploiting full capacity of available resources. Typically short flying times (10-30 minutes) also limit the possibility of estimating and/or correcting factors such as sensor misalignment and poor attitude initialization of inertial navigation system (INS). This research aims at increasing the accuracy of attitude determination in both absolute and relative senses with no extra sensors onboard. In comparison to classical INS/GNSS setup, novel approach is presented here to integrated state estimation, in which vehicle dynamic model (VDM) is used as the main process model. Such system benefits from available information from autopilot and physical properties of the platform in enhancing performance of determination of trajectory and parameters of exterior orientation consequently. The navigation system employs a differential carrier phase GNSS receiver and a micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) grade inertial measurement unit (IMU), together with MAV control input from autopilot. Monte-Carlo simulation has been performed on trajectories for typical corridor mapping and block imaging. Results reveal

  16. Precise timing of the last interglacial period from mass spectrometric determination of thorium-230 in corals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Ku, T.-L.; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    1987-01-01

    The development of mass spectrometric techniques for determination of Th-230 abundance has made it possible to reduce analytical errors in (U-238)-(U-234)-(Th-230) dating of corals even with very small samples. Samples of 6 x 10 to the 8th atoms of Th-230 can be measured to an accuracy of + or - 3 percent (2sigma), and 3 x 10 to the 10th atoms of Th-230 can be measured to an accuracy of + or - 0.2 percent. The time range over which useful age data on corals can be obtained now ranges from about 50 to about 500,000 years. For young corals, this approach may be preferable to C-14 dating. The precision with which the age of a coral can now be determined should make it possible to critically test the Milankovitch hypothesis concerning Pleistocene climate fluctuations. Analyses of a number of corals that grew during the last interglacial period yield ages of 122,000 to 130,000 years. The ages coincide with, or slightly post-date, the summer solar insolation high at 65 deg N latitude which occurred 128,000 years ago. This supports the idea that changes in Pleistocene climate can be the result of variations in the distribution of solar insolation caused by changes in the geometry of the earth's orbit and rotation axis.

  17. GOCE Precise Orbit Determination for the Entire Mission- Challenges in the Final Mission Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaggi, A.; Bock, H.; Meyer, U.

    2015-03-01

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE), ESA’s first Earth Explorer core mission, was launched on March 17, 2009 into a sun-synchronous dusk-dawn orbit and eventually re-entered into the Earth’s atmosphere on November 11, 2013. A precise science orbit (PSO) product was provided by the GOCE High-level Processing Facility (HPF) from the GPS high-low Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (hl-SST) data from the beginning until the very last days of the mission. We recapitulate the PSO procedure and refer to the results achieved until the official end of the GOCE mission on October 21, 2013, where independent validations with Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) measurements confirmed a high quality of the PSO product of about 2 cm 1-D RMS. We then focus on the period after the official end of the mission, where orbits could still be determined thanks to the continuously running GPS receivers delivering high quality data until a few hours before the re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere. We address the challenges encountered for orbit determination during these last days and report on adaptions in the PSO procedure to also obtain good orbit results at the unprecedented low orbital altitudes below 224 km.

  18. The Human Milk Metabolome Reveals Diverse Oligosaccharide Profiles123

    PubMed Central

    Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; O’Sullivan, Aifric; Barile, Daniela; German, J. Bruce; Lönnerdal, Bo; Slupsky, Carolyn M.

    2013-01-01

    Breast milk delivers nutrition and protection to the developing infant. There has been considerable research on the high-molecular-weight milk components; however, low-molecular-weight metabolites have received less attention. To determine the effect of maternal phenotype and diet on the human milk metabolome, milk collected at day 90 postpartum from 52 healthy women was analyzed by using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Sixty-five milk metabolites were quantified (mono-, di-, and oligosaccharides; amino acids and derivatives; energy metabolites; fatty acids and associated metabolites; vitamins, nucleotides, and derivatives; and others). The biological variation, represented as the percentage CV of each metabolite, varied widely (4–120%), with several metabolites having low variation (<20%), including lactose, urea, glutamate, myo-inositol, and creatinine. Principal components analysis identified 2 clear groups of participants who were differentiable on the basis of milk oligosaccharide concentration and who were classified as secretors or nonsecretors of fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2) gene products according to the concentration of 2′-fucosyllactose, lactodifucotetraose, and lacto-N-fucopentaose I. Exploration of the interrelations between the milk sugars by using Spearman rank correlations revealed significant positive and negative associations, including positive correlations between fucose and products of the FUT2 gene and negative correlations between fucose and products of the fucosyltransferase 3 (FUT3) gene. The total concentration of milk oligosaccharides was conserved among participants (%CV = 18%), suggesting tight regulation of total oligosaccharide production; however, concentrations of specific oligosaccharides varied widely between participants (%CV = 30.4–84.3%). The variability in certain milk metabolites suggests possible roles in infant or infant gut microbial development. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT

  19. Analysis of Prebiotic Oligosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, M. L.; Ruiz-Matute, A. I.; Corzo, N.; Martínez-Castro, I.

    Carbohydrates and more specifically prebiotics, are complex mixtures of isomers with different degrees of polymerization (DP), monosaccharide units and/or glycosidic linkages. Many efforts are focused on the search for new products and the determination of their biological activity. However, the study of their chemical structure is fundamental to both acquire a basic knowledge of the carbohydrate and to increase the understanding of the mechanisms for their metabolic effect.

  20. High Precision, Directly Determined Radii and Effective Temperatures for Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Belle, Gerard

    have demonstrated the potential of all aspects of this program, and through the proposed effort will unify the diverse components to study these giants. A homogenous catalog of linear radii and effective temperatures for hundreds of giants will be generated, which in turn will be used to calibrate radius and temperature scales for application to the broad population of giants. Significance. Fundamental temperature and radius scales are used throughout stellar astrophysics, including stellar structure studies, stellar modeling, galactic spectral synthesis, planet detection studies, and star formation theory. We expect to reduce the error in effective temperature calibration by 2-4x, and the error in linear radius by 2-3x or more. A high- precision improvement to these scales will, in turn, broadly advance a wide swath of studies that depend on precisely knowing the radii and temperature of stars. This proposal aims to produce the definitive linear radius and effective temperature scales for giants. A significant improvement in the determinations of the radii and effective temperatures of giant stars across the HR diagram will have far reaching consequences across the broad expanse of astrophysical research. Relevance to NASA. High-precision calibrations of temperature scales are essential to flux calibrations of past and ongoing NASA science satellite observations, such as those from Spitzer and WISE, and a significantly improved linear radius reference markedly improves Kepler discoveries in both the exoplanet and asteroseismology areas. In addition to the high scientific potential of this program, it also provides technical benefits by furthering interferometric techniques that will be critical for future high angular resolution astronomy.

  1. Precise Orbit Determination of the two LAGEOS and LARES satellites and the LARASE activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massimo Lucchesi, David; Peron, Roberto; Anselmo, Luciano; Bassan, Massimo; Magnafico, Carmelo; Nobili, Anna Maria; Pardini, Carmen; Pucacco, Giuseppe; Stanga, Ruggero; Visco, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The LAser RAnged Satellites Experiment (LARASE) research program aims to provide an original contribution in testing and verifying Einstein's theory of General Relativity (GR) in its Weak-Field and Slow-Motion (WFSM) limit by means of the powerful Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) technique. Therefore, in this perspective, a Precise Orbit Determination (POD) of a dedicated set of passive laser-ranged satellites is required. In particular, the joint analysis of the orbit of the two LAGEOS (LAser GEOdynamic Satellite) satellites with that of the more recently launched LARES (LAser RElativity Satellite) satellite will be exploited in order to obtain precise measurements of the gravitational interaction in the field of the Earth. A major point to be reached within the activities of LARASE is to provide the relativistic measurements with an error budget of the various systematic effects (both gravitational and non-gravitational) that be robust and reliable. This requires a careful analysis of the various disturbing effects on the orbit of the considered satellites, especially for the new LARES. This activity has been planned both for the gravitational and the non-gravitational perturbations (NGP). Therefore, we started to re-visit, update and improve previous dynamical models, especially for the NGP, and we also developed new models in such a way to improve the current dynamical models used in space geodesy to account for the main perturbations acting on the orbit of LAGEOS and LARES. We focused especially on the spin dynamics, the drag effects (especially for LARES, because of its much lower height with respect to the two LAGEOS) and, at a preliminary level, the thermal ones that, as it is well known from the literature, are very important for the LAGEOS satellites. These studies are of fundamental importance not only for the objective of a reliable error budget, but also in order to improve the POD. In this context, because of the importance of the LAGEOS satellites in

  2. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography for the separation, purification, and quantification of raffinose family oligosaccharides from Lycopus lucidus Turcz.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tu; Fu, Qing; Li, Fangbing; Zhou, Wei; Xin, Huaxia; Wang, Hui; Jin, Yu; Liang, Xinmiao

    2015-08-01

    A systematic strategy based on hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography was developed for the separation, purification and quantification of raffinose family oligosaccharides from Lycopus lucidus Turcz. Methods with enough hydrophilicity and selectivity were utilized to resolve the problems encountered in the separation of oligosaccharides such as low retention, low resolution and poor solubility. The raffinose family oligosaccharides in L. lucidus Turcz. were isolated using solid-phase extraction followed by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography at semi-preparative scale to obtain standards of stachyose, verbascose and ajugose. Utilizing the obtained oligosaccharides as standards, a quantitative determination method was developed, validated and applied for the content determination of raffinose family oligosaccharides both in the aerial and root parts of L. lucidus Turcz. There were no oligosaccharides in the aerial parts, while in the root parts, the total content was 686.5 mg/g with the average distribution: raffinose 66.5 mg/g, stachyose 289.0 mg/g, verbascose 212.4 mg/g, and ajugose 118.6 mg/g. The result provided the potential of roots of L. lucidus Turcz. as new raffinose family oligosaccharides sources for functional food. Moreover, since the present systematic strategy is efficient, sensitive and robust, separation, purification and quantification of oligosaccharides by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography seems to be possible. PMID:26011699

  3. Generalized interval-valued fuzzy variable precision rough sets determined by fuzzy logical operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing Hu, Bao

    2015-11-01

    The fuzzy rough set model and interval-valued fuzzy rough set model have been introduced to handle databases with real values and interval values, respectively. Variable precision rough set was advanced by Ziarko to overcome the shortcomings of misclassification and/or perturbation in Pawlak rough sets. By combining fuzzy rough set and variable precision rough set, a variety of fuzzy variable precision rough sets were studied, which cannot only handle numerical data, but are also less sensitive to misclassification. However, fuzzy variable precision rough sets cannot effectively handle interval-valued data-sets. Research into interval-valued fuzzy rough sets for interval-valued fuzzy data-sets has commenced; however, variable precision problems have not been considered in interval-valued fuzzy rough sets and generalized interval-valued fuzzy rough sets based on fuzzy logical operators nor have interval-valued fuzzy sets been considered in variable precision rough sets and fuzzy variable precision rough sets. These current models are incapable of wide application, especially on misclassification and/or perturbation and on interval-valued fuzzy data-sets. In this paper, these models are generalized to a more integrative approach that not only considers interval-valued fuzzy sets, but also variable precision. First, we review generalized interval-valued fuzzy rough sets based on two fuzzy logical operators: interval-valued fuzzy triangular norms and interval-valued fuzzy residual implicators. Second, we propose generalized interval-valued fuzzy variable precision rough sets based on the above two fuzzy logical operators. Finally, we confirm that some existing models, including rough sets, fuzzy variable precision rough sets, interval-valued fuzzy rough sets, generalized fuzzy rough sets and generalized interval-valued fuzzy variable precision rough sets based on fuzzy logical operators, are special cases of the proposed models.

  4. Factors determining the stability, resolution, and precision of a conventional Raman spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Fukura, Satoshi; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Odake, Shoko; Kagi, Hiroyuki

    2006-08-01

    We verified the performance of a conventional Raman spectrometer, which is composed of a 30 cm single polychromator, a Si based charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, and a holographic supernotch filter. For that purpose, the time change of the peak positions of Raman spectra of naphthalene and fluorescence spectra of ruby (Cr-doped Al(2)O(3)) were monitored continually. A time-dependent deviation composed of two components was observed: a monotonous drift up to 0.4 cm(-1) and a periodic oscillation with a range of 0.15 cm(-1). The former component was stabilized at approximately 2000 s after the CCD detector was cooled, indicating that incomplete refrigeration of the CCD detector induced the drift. The latter component synchronized with the periodic oscillation of the room temperature, indicating that thermal expansion or contraction of the whole apparatus induced this oscillation. The implemental deviation is reduced when measurements are conducted using a sufficiently cooled CCD detector at a constant room temperature. Moreover, the effect of the room temperature oscillation is lowered in a spectrum acquired over a duration that is longer than one cycle of this oscillation. Applying the least squares fitting method to carefully measured spectra enhanced the precision of the determination of the peak position to 0.05 cm(-1) using the spectrometer with pixel resolution of 1.5 cm(-1). PMID:16925934

  5. A Novel Method for Precise Onboard Real-Time Orbit Determination with a Standalone GPS Receiver

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fuhong; Gong, Xuewen; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing systems require accurate, autonomous and real-time orbit determinations (RTOD) for geo-referencing. Onboard Global Positioning System (GPS) has widely been used to undertake such tasks. In this paper, a novel RTOD method achieving decimeter precision using GPS carrier phases, required by China’s HY2A and ZY3 missions, is presented. A key to the algorithm success is the introduction of a new parameter, termed pseudo-ambiguity. This parameter combines the phase ambiguity, the orbit, and clock offset errors of the GPS broadcast ephemeris together to absorb a large part of the combined error. Based on the analysis of the characteristics of the orbit and clock offset errors, the pseudo-ambiguity can be modeled as a random walk, and estimated in an extended Kalman filter. Experiments of processing real data from HY2A and ZY3, simulating onboard operational scenarios of these two missions, are performed using the developed software SATODS. Results have demonstrated that the position and velocity accuracy (3D RMS) of 0.2–0.4 m and 0.2–0.4 mm/s, respectively, are achieved using dual-frequency carrier phases for HY2A, and slightly worse results for ZY3. These results show it is feasible to obtain orbit accuracy at decimeter level of 3–5 dm for position and 0.3–0.5 mm/s for velocity with this RTOD method. PMID:26690149

  6. Determination of the 154Sm ionization energy by high-precision laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, A.; Bushaw, B. A.; Wendt, K.

    2004-04-01

    High-resolution resonance ionization mass spectrometry has been used to determine the ionization energy of 154Sm. Three-step resonant excitation with single-frequency lasers populates a series of ell = 3, J = 4 Rydberg levels in the range of n = 60-160, covering the range of 30 cm-1 to 4 cm-1 below the first ionization limit. Although samarium has a complex electronic structure with eight valence electrons, series of nearly unperturbed levels could be observed. Analysis includes shifts caused by a single perturbing state, an extended Ritz term for quantum defect variation at lower n, and corrections for residual electric fields. The resulting series convergence limit has an uncertainty of 4 × 10-5 cm-1, while the final value EI (154Sm) = 45 519.307 93(43) cm-1 also accounts for the uncertainty in absolute laser frequencies coupling the Rydberg spectrum to the J = 0 ground state and other systematic errors. Precision is improved by nearly four orders of magnitude over previous values.

  7. A Novel Method for Precise Onboard Real-Time Orbit Determination with a Standalone GPS Receiver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuhong; Gong, Xuewen; Sang, Jizhang; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing systems require accurate, autonomous and real-time orbit determinations (RTOD) for geo-referencing. Onboard Global Positioning System (GPS) has widely been used to undertake such tasks. In this paper, a novel RTOD method achieving decimeter precision using GPS carrier phases, required by China's HY2A and ZY3 missions, is presented. A key to the algorithm success is the introduction of a new parameter, termed pseudo-ambiguity. This parameter combines the phase ambiguity, the orbit, and clock offset errors of the GPS broadcast ephemeris together to absorb a large part of the combined error. Based on the analysis of the characteristics of the orbit and clock offset errors, the pseudo-ambiguity can be modeled as a random walk, and estimated in an extended Kalman filter. Experiments of processing real data from HY2A and ZY3, simulating onboard operational scenarios of these two missions, are performed using the developed software SATODS. Results have demonstrated that the position and velocity accuracy (3D RMS) of 0.2-0.4 m and 0.2-0.4 mm/s, respectively, are achieved using dual-frequency carrier phases for HY2A, and slightly worse results for ZY3. These results show it is feasible to obtain orbit accuracy at decimeter level of 3-5 dm for position and 0.3-0.5 mm/s for velocity with this RTOD method. PMID:26690149

  8. Precise timing of the last interglacial period from mass spectrometric determination of thorium-230 in corals

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.L.; Chen, J.H.; Ku, T.L.; Wasserburg, G.J.

    1987-06-19

    The development of mass spectrometric techniques for determination of STTh abundance has made it possible to reduce analytical errors in STYU-STUU-STTh dating of corals even with very small samples. Samples of 6 x 10Y atoms of STTh can be measured to an accuracy of +/- 3% (2sigma) and 3 x 10 atoms of STTh can be measured to an accuracy of +/- 0.2%. The time range over which useful age data on corals can be obtained now ranges from about 50 to about 500,000 years. For young corals, this approach may be preferable to UC dating. The precision should make it possible to critically test the Milankovitch hypothesis concerning Pleistocene climate fluctuations. Analyses of a number of corals that grew during the last interglacial period yield ages of 122,000 to 130,000 years. The ages coincide with, or slightly postdate, the summer solar insolation high at 65N latitude which occurred 128,000 years ago. This supports the idea that changes in Pleistocene climate can be the result of variations in the distribution of solar insolation caused by changes in the geometry of the earth's orbit and rotation axis.

  9. Determination of earthquake magnitude using GPS displacement waveforms from real-time precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Rongxin; Shi, Chuang; Song, Weiwei; Wang, Guangxing; Liu, Jingnan

    2014-01-01

    For earthquake and tsunami early warning and emergency response, earthquake magnitude is the crucial parameter to be determined rapidly and correctly. However, a reliable and rapid measurement of the magnitude of an earthquake is a challenging problem, especially for large earthquakes (M > 8). Here, the magnitude is determined based on the GPS displacement waveform derived from real-time precise point positioning (RTPPP). RTPPP results are evaluated with an accuracy of 1 cm in the horizontal components and 2-3 cm in the vertical components, indicating that the RTPPP is capable of detecting seismic waves with amplitude of 1 cm horizontally and 2-3 cm vertically with a confidence level of 95 per cent. In order to estimate the magnitude, the unique information provided by the GPS displacement waveform is the horizontal peak displacement amplitude. We show that the empirical relation of Gutenberg (1945) between peak displacement and magnitude holds up to nearly magnitude 9.0 when displacements are measured with GPS. We tested the proposed method for three large earthquakes. For the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, our method provides a magnitude of M7.18 ± 0.18. For the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake the estimated magnitude is M8.74 ± 0.06, and for the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake the value is M8.7 ± 0.1 after excluding some near-field stations. We, therefore, conclude that depending on the availability of high-rate GPS observations, a robust value of magnitude up to 9.0 for a point source earthquake can be estimated within tens of seconds or a few minutes after an event using a few GPS stations close to the epicentre. The rapid magnitude could be as a pre-requisite for tsunami early warning, fast source inversion and emergency response is feasible.

  10. Structure, oligosaccharide structures, and posttranslationally modified sites of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Poulter, L; Earnest, J P; Stroud, R M; Burlingame, A L

    1989-01-01

    Using mass spectrometry, we have examined the transmembrane topography of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, a five-subunit glycosylated protein complex that forms a gated ion channel in the neuromuscular junction. The primary sequences of the four polypeptide chains making up the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica contain many possible sites for glycosylation or phosphorylation. We have used liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry to identify posttranslationally modified residues and to determine the intact oligosaccharide structures of the carbohydrate present on the acetylcholine receptor. Asparagine-143 of the alpha subunit (in consensus numbering) is shown to be glycosylated with high-mannose oligosaccharide. Asparagine-453 of the gamma subunit is not glycosylated, a fact that bears on the question of the orientations of putative transmembranous helices M3, MA, and M4. The structures of the six major acetylcholine receptor oligosaccharides are determined: the major components (70%) are of the high-mannose type, with bi-, tri-, and tetraantennary complex oligosaccharides making up approximately equal to 22 mol% of the total carbohydrate. This application of a multichannel array detector mass spectrometer provided a breakthrough in sensitivity that allowed us to identify the site of attachment of, and the sequence of, oligosaccharides on a 300-kDa membrane protein from only 5 pmol of the isolated oligosaccharide. Images PMID:2771948

  11. Preparation of κ-carra-oligosaccharides with microwave assisted acid hydrolysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangsheng; Zhao, Xia; Lv, Youjing; Li, Miaomiao; Yu, Guangli

    2015-04-01

    A rapid method of microwave assisted acid hydrolysis was established to prepare κ-carra-oligosaccharides. The optimal hydrolysis condition was determined by an orthogonal test. The degree of polymerization (DP) of oligosaccharides was detected by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Considering the results of HPTLC and PAGE, the optimum condition of microwave assisted acid hydrolysis was determined. The concentration of κ-carrageenan was 5 mg mL-1; the reaction solution was adjusted to pH 3 with diluted hydrochloric acid; the solution was hydrolyzed under microwave irradiation at 100 for 15 °C min. Oligosaccharides were separated by a Superdex 30 column (2.6 cm × 90 cm) using AKTA Purifier UPC100 and detected with an online refractive index detector. Each fraction was characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The data showed that odd-numbered κ-carra-oligosaccharides with DP ranging from 3 to 21 could be obtained with this method, and the structures of the oligosaccharides were consistent with those obtained by traditional mild acid hydrolysis. The new method was more convenient, efficient and environment-friendly than traditional mild acid hydrolysis. Our results provided a useful reference for the preparation of oligosaccharides from other polysaccharides.

  12. U-Pb systematics of the unique achondrite Ibitira: Precise age determination and petrogenetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Tsuyoshi; Amelin, Yuri; Kaltenbach, Angela; Koefoed, Piers; Stirling, Claudine H.

    2014-05-01

    Ibitira is an unbrecciated, equilibrated vesicular basaltic achondrite that is considered to have originated on a parent body distinct from all other known meteorites. We present the first combined high-precision U and Pb isotopic data for this unique meteorite. The 238U/235U value of 137.777 ± 0.013 determined for the whole rock is comparable to values determined for bulk chondrites and other basaltic achondrites. This value results in corrections of -1.1 Ma for Pb-Pb dates calculated using the previously assumed invariant 238U/235U value of 137.88. Using the determined 238U/235U value, the 7 most radiogenic Pb isotopic analyses for acid-leached pyroxene-rich and whole rock fractions yield an isochron Pb-Pb age of 4556.75 ± 0.57 Ma, in excellent agreement with the results of Mn-Cr chronology which give the ages of 4557.4 ± 2.5 Ma and 4555.9 ± 3.2 Ma using the U-corrected Pb-Pb age of D'Orbigny as a time anchor. Along with the previously proposed thermal history of Ibitira and our closure temperature estimates for Pb diffusion, the Pb-Pb age is interpreted as the timing of the last chemical equilibration and coarse pyroxene exsolution that occurred during high temperature metamorphism. The metamorphism may have been caused by burial of Ibitira lava under successive lava flows and, if so, the Pb-Pb age should post-date the crystallization by a short time interval. The Pb isotopic data for acid leachates suggest partial re-equilibration of Pb between plagioclase and phosphate, perhaps during an impact event at 4.49 Ga, as recorded by K-Ar systematics. The whole rock 238U/204Pb indicates that compared to CI chondrites, Ibitira is less depleted in Pb than in some alkali elements despite a lower condensation temperature of Pb than the alkali elements. The restricted Pb depletion may reflect preferential concentration of metals with high fluid/melt partition coefficients including Pb and Zn as a result of fluid exsolution and migration within the parent magma. We

  13. The Ability of Bifidobacteria To Degrade Arabinoxylan Oligosaccharide Constituents and Derived Oligosaccharides Is Strain Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Audrey; Moens, Frédéric; Selak, Marija; Maes, Dominique; Weckx, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Arabinoxylan oligosaccharides (AXOS) are prebiotic carbohydrates with promising health-promoting properties that stimulate the activity of specific colon bacteria, in particular bifidobacteria. However, the mechanisms by which bifidobacterial strains break down these compounds in the colon is still unknown. This study investigates AXOS consumption of a large number of bifidobacterial strains (36), belonging to 11 different species, systematically. To determine their degradation mechanisms, all strains were grown on a mixture of arabinose and xylose, xylo-oligosaccharides, and complex AXOS molecules as the sole added energy sources. Based on principal component and cluster analyses of their different arabinose substituent and/or xylose backbone consumption patterns, five clusters that were species independent could be distinguished among the bifidobacterial strains tested. In parallel, the strains were screened for the presence of genes encoding several putative AXOS-degrading enzymes, but no clear-cut correlation could be made with the different degradation mechanisms. The intra- and interspecies differences in the consumption patterns of AXOS indicate that bifidobacterial strains could avoid competition among each other or even could cooperate jointly to degrade these complex prebiotics. The knowledge gained on the AXOS degradation mechanisms in bifidobacteria can be of importance in the rational design of prebiotics with tailor-made composition and thus increased specificity in the colon. PMID:24141124

  14. A Rapid, Convenient, and Precise Method for the Absolute Determination of the Acceleration of Gravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manche, Emanuel P.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a compact and portable apparatus for the measurement, with a high degree of precision, the value of the gravitational acceleration g. The apparatus consists of a falling mercury drop and an electronic timing circuit. (GA)

  15. The challenge of precise orbit determination for STSAT-2C using extremely sparse SLR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Rok; Park, Eunseo; Kucharski, Daniel; Lim, Hyung-Chul; Kim, Byoungsoo

    2016-03-01

    The Science and Technology Satellite (STSAT)-2C is the first Korean satellite equipped with a laser retro-reflector array for satellite laser ranging (SLR). SLR is the only on-board tracking source for precise orbit determination (POD) of STSAT-2C. However, POD for the STSAT-2C is a challenging issue, as the laser measurements of the satellite are extremely sparse, largely due to the inaccurate two-line element (TLE)-based orbit predictions used by the SLR tracking stations. In this study, POD for the STSAT-2C using extremely sparse SLR data is successfully implemented, and new laser-based orbit predictions are obtained. The NASA/GSFC GEODYN II software and seven-day arcs are used for the SLR data processing of two years of normal points from March 2013 to May 2015. To compensate for the extremely sparse laser tracking, the number of estimation parameters are minimized, and only the atmospheric drag coefficients are estimated with various intervals. The POD results show that the weighted root mean square (RMS) post-fit residuals are less than 10 m, and the 3D day boundaries vary from 30 m to 3 km. The average four-day orbit overlaps are less than 20/330/20 m for the radial/along-track/cross-track components. The quality of the new laser-based prediction is verified by SLR observations, and the SLR residuals show better results than those of previous TLE-based predictions. This study demonstrates that POD for the STSAT-2C can be successfully achieved against extreme sparseness of SLR data, and the results can deliver more accurate predictions.

  16. High precision determination of the gluon fusion Higgs boson cross-section at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Gehrmann, Thomas; Herzog, Franz; Lazopoulos, Achilleas; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    We present the most precise value for the Higgs boson cross-section in the gluon-fusion production mode at the LHC. Our result is based on a perturbative expansion through N3LO in QCD, in an effective theory where the top-quark is assumed to be infinitely heavy, while all other Standard Model quarks are massless. We combine this result with QCD corrections to the cross-section where all finite quark-mass effects are included exactly through NLO. In addition, electroweak corrections and the first corrections in the inverse mass of the top-quark are incorporated at three loops. We also investigate the effects of threshold resummation, both in the traditional QCD framework and following a SCET approach, which resums a class of π2 contributions to all orders. We assess the uncertainty of the cross-section from missing higher-order corrections due to both perturbative QCD effects beyond N3LO and unknown mixed QCD-electroweak effects. In addition, we determine the sensitivity of the cross-section to the choice of parton distribution function (PDF) sets and to the parametric uncertainty in the strong coupling constant and quark masses. For a Higgs mass of m H = 125 GeV and an LHC center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, our best prediction for the gluon fusion cross-section is σ =48.58{pb}_{-3.27pb}^{+2.22pb}(theory)± 1.56pb(3.20%)(PDF+{α}_s).

  17. Determination of the Thermal Offset of the Eppley Precision Spectral Pyranometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haeffelin, Martial; Kato, Seiji; Smith, Amie M.; Rutledge, C. Ken; Charlock, Thomas P.; Mahan, J. Robert

    2001-01-01

    Eppley's precision spectral pyranometer (PSP) is used in networks around the world to measure downwelling diffuse and global solar irradiance at the surface of the Earth. In recent years several studies have shown significant discrepancy between irradiances measured by pyranometers and those computed by atmospheric radiative transfer models. Pyranometer measurements have been questioned because observed diffuse irradiances sometimes are below theoretical minimum values for a pure molecular atmosphere, and at night the instruments often produce nonzero signals ranging between + 5 and - 10 W/sq m. We install thermistor sondes in the body of a PSP as well as on its inner dome to monitor the temperature gradients within the instrument, and we operate a pyrgeometer (PIR) instrument side by side with the PSP. We derive a relationship between the PSP output and thermal radiative exchange by the dome and the detector and a relationship between the PSP output and the PIR thermopile output (net-IR). We determine the true PSP offset by quickly capping the instrument at set time intervals. For a ventilated and shaded PSP, the thermal offset can reach - 15 W/sq m under clear skies, whereas it remains close to zero for low overcast clouds. We estimate the PSP thermal offset by two methods: (1) using the PSP temperatures and (2) using the PIR net-IR signal. The offset computed from the PSP temperatures yields a reliable estimate of the true offset (+/- 1 W/sq m). The offset computed from net-IR is consistent with the true offset at night and under overcast skies but predicts only part of the true range under clear skies.

  18. Initial results of precise orbit and clock determination for COMPASS navigation satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Li, Min; Qu, Lizhong; Hu, Zhigang; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan

    2013-05-01

    The development of the COMPASS satellite system is introduced, and the regional tracking network and data availability are described. The precise orbit determination strategy of COMPASS satellites is presented. Data of June 2012 are processed. The obtained orbits are evaluated by analysis of post-fit residuals, orbit overlap comparison and SLR (satellite laser ranging) validation. The RMS (root mean square) values of post-fit residuals for one month's data are smaller than 2.0 cm for ionosphere-free phase measurements and 2.6 m for ionosphere-free code observations. The 48-h orbit overlap comparison shows that the RMS values of differences in the radial component are much smaller than 10 cm and those of the cross-track component are smaller than 20 cm. The SLR validation shows that the overall RMS of observed minus computed residuals is 68.5 cm for G01 and 10.8 cm for I03. The static and kinematic PPP solutions are produced to further evaluate the accuracy of COMPASS orbit and clock products. The static daily COMPASS PPP solutions achieve an accuracy of better than 1 cm in horizontal and 3 cm in vertical. The accuracy of the COMPASS kinematic PPP solutions is within 1-2 cm in the horizontal and 4-7 cm in the vertical. In addition, we find that the COMPASS kinematic solutions are generally better than the GPS ones for the selected location. Furthermore, the COMPASS/GPS combinations significantly improve the accuracy of GPS only PPP solutions. The RMS values are basically smaller than 1 cm in the horizontal components and 3-4 cm in the vertical component.

  19. Nature and biosynthesis of galacto-oligosaccharides related to oligosaccharides in human breast milk

    PubMed Central

    Intanon, Montira; Arreola, Sheryl Lozel; Pham, Ngoc Hung; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Haltrich, Dietmar; Nguyen, Thu-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) are prominent among the functional components of human breast milk. While HMO have potential applications in both infants and adults, this potential is limited by the difficulties in manufacturing these complex structures. Consequently, functional alternatives such as galacto-oligosaccharides are under investigation, and nowadays, infant formulae are supplemented with galacto-oligosaccharides to mimic the biological effects of HMO. Recently, approaches toward the production of defined human milk oligosaccharide structures using microbial, fermentative methods employing single, appropriately engineered microorganisms were introduced. Furthermore, galactose-containing hetero-oligosaccharides have attracted an increasing amount of attention because they are structurally more closely related to HMO. The synthesis of these novel oligosaccharides, which resemble the core of HMO, is of great interest for applications in the food industry. PMID:24571717

  20. A new sequencing approach for N-unsubstituted heparin/heparan sulfate oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qun Tao; Xiao, Xiao Mao; Lin, Jian Hui; Wei, Zheng

    2015-07-01

    The rare N-unsubstituted glucosamine (GlcNH(3)(+)) residues in heparan sulfate (HS) have important biological and pathophysiological roles. Because of their low natural abundance, the use of chemically generated, structurally defined, N-unsubstituted heparin/HS oligosaccharides can greatly contribute to the investigation of their natural role in HS. However, the sequencing of mixtures of chemically generated oligosaccharides presents major challenges due to the difficulties in separating isomers and the available detection methods. In this study, we developed and validated a simple and sensitive method for the sequence analysis of N-unsubstituted heparin/HS oligosaccharides. This protocol involves pH 4 nitrous acid (HNO(2)) degradation, size-exclusion HPLC and ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography-ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IPRP-LC-ITTOF MS). We unexpectedly found that absorbance at 232 nm (normally used for specific detection of C4-C5 unsaturated oligosaccharides) was, in most cases, still sufficiently sensitive to also simultaneously detect saturated oligosaccharides during HPLC, thus simplifying the positional analysis of GlcNH(3)(+)) residues. The IPRP-LC-ITTOF MS system can supply further structural information leading to full sequence determination of the original oligosaccharide. This new methodology has been used to separate and sequence a variety of chemically generated, N-unsubstituted dp6 species containing between 1 and 3 GlcNH(3)(+)) residues per oligosaccharide in different positional combinations. This strategy offers possibilities for the sequencing of natural N-unsubstituted oligosaccharides from HS and should also be applicable, with minor modification, for sequencing at N-sulfated residues using alternative pH 1.5 HNO(2) scission. PMID:25677303

  1. Advances in Analysis of Human Milk Oligosaccharides123

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2012-01-01

    Oligosaccharides in human milk strongly influence the composition of the gut microflora of neonates. Because it is now clear that the microflora play important roles in the development of the infant immune system, human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) are studied frequently. Milk samples contain complex mixtures of HMO, usually comprising several isomeric structures that can be either linear or branched. Traditionally, HMO profiling was performed using HPLC with fluorescence or UV detection. By using porous graphitic carbon liquid chromatography MS, it is now possible to separate and identify most of the isomers, facilitating linkage-specific analysis. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis allows fast profiling, but does not allow isomer separation. Novel MS fragmentation techniques have facilitated structural characterization of HMO that are present at lower concentrations. These techniques now facilitate more accurate studies of HMO consumption as well as Lewis blood group determinations. PMID:22585919

  2. Comparative Analysis of Archaeal Lipid-linked Oligosaccharides That Serve as Oligosaccharide Donors for Asn Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yuya; Fujinami, Daisuke; Kohda, Daisuke

    2016-05-20

    The glycosylation of asparagine residues is the predominant protein modification in all three domains of life. An oligosaccharide chain is preassembled on a lipid-phospho carrier and transferred onto asparagine residues by the action of a membrane-bound enzyme, oligosaccharyltransferase. The oligosaccharide donor for the oligosaccharyl transfer reaction is dolichol-diphosphate-oligosaccharide in Eukaryota and polyprenol-diphosphate-oligosaccharide in Eubacteria. The donor in some archaeal species was reportedly dolichol-monophosphate-oligosaccharide. Thus, the difference in the number of phosphate groups aroused interest in whether the use of the dolichol-monophosphate type donors is widespread in the domain Archaea. Currently, all of the archaeal species with identified oligosaccharide donors have belonged to the phylum Euryarchaeota. Here, we analyzed the donor structures of two species belonging to the phylum Crenarchaeota, Pyrobaculum calidifontis and Sulfolobus solfataricus, in addition to two species from the Euryarchaeota, Pyrococcus furiosus and Archaeoglobus fulgidus The electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analyses confirmed that the two euryarchaeal oligosaccharide donors were the dolichol-monophosphate type and newly revealed that the two crenarchaeal oligosaccharide donors were the dolichol-diphosphate type. This novel finding is consistent with the hypothesis that the ancestor of Eukaryota is rooted within the TACK (Thaum-, Aig-, Cren-, and Korarchaeota) superphylum, which includes Crenarchaea. Our comprehensive study also revealed that one archaeal species could contain two distinct oligosaccharide donors for the oligosaccharyl transfer reaction. The A. fulgidus cells contained two oligosaccharide donors bearing oligosaccharide moieties with different backbone structures, and the S. solfataricus cells contained two oligosaccharide donors bearing stereochemically different dolichol chains. PMID:27015803

  3. Lactodifucotetraose, a human milk oligosaccharide, attenuates platelet function and inflammatory cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Newburg, David S; Tanritanir, Ayse C; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2016-07-01

    Human milk strongly quenches inflammatory processes in vitro, and breastfed infants have lower incidence of inflammatory diseases than those fed artificially. Platelets from neonates, in contrast to those from adults, are less responsive to platelet agonists such as collagen, thrombin, ADP, and epinephrine. Breastfed infants absorb oligosaccharides intact from the human milk in their gut to the circulation. This study was to determine whether these oligosaccharides can attenuate platelet function and platelet secretion of pro-inflammatory proteins, and to identify the active component. The natural mixture of oligosaccharides from human milk and pure individual human milk oligosaccharides were tested for their ability to modulate responses of platelets isolated from human blood following exposure to thrombin, ADP, and collagen. Human milk and the natural mixture of human milk oligosaccharides inhibited platelet release of inflammatory proteins. Of the purified human milk oligosaccharides tested, only lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) significantly inhibited thrombin induced release of the pro-inflammatory proteins RANTES and sCD40L. LDFT also inhibited platelet adhesion to a collagen-coated surface, as well as platelet aggregation induced by ADP or collagen. These data indicate that LDFT may help modulate hemostasis by suppressing platelet-induced inflammatory processes in breastfed infants. This activity suggests further study of LDFT for its potential as a therapeutic agent in infants and adults. PMID:26743063

  4. Towards the GEOSAT Follow-On Precise Orbit Determination Goals of High Accuracy and Near-Real-Time Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Beckley, Brian D.; Lillibridge, John L.

    2006-01-01

    The US Navy's GEOSAT Follow-On spacecraft (GFO) primary mission objective is to map the oceans using a radar altimeter. Satellite laser ranging data, especially in combination with altimeter crossover data, offer the only means of determining high-quality precise orbits. Two tuned gravity models, PGS7727 and PGS7777b, were created at NASA GSFC for GFO that reduce the predicted radial orbit through degree 70 to 13.7 and 10.0 mm. A macromodel was developed to model the nonconservative forces and the SLR spacecraft measurement offset was adjusted to remove a mean bias. Using these improved models, satellite-ranging data, altimeter crossover data, and Doppler data are used to compute both daily medium precision orbits with a latency of less than 24 hours. Final precise orbits are also computed using these tracking data and exported with a latency of three to four weeks to NOAA for use on the GFO Geophysical Data Records (GDR s). The estimated orbit precision of the daily orbits is between 10 and 20 cm, whereas the precise orbits have a precision of 5 cm.

  5. Important factors determining the nanoscale tracking precision of dynamic microtubule ends.

    PubMed

    Bohner, G; Gustafsson, N; Cade, N I; Maurer, S P; Griffin, L D; Surrey, T

    2016-01-01

    Tracking dynamic microtubule ends in fluorescence microscopy movies provides insight into the statistical properties of microtubule dynamics and is vital for further analysis that requires knowledge of the trajectories of the microtubule ends. Here we analyse the performance of a previously developed automated microtubule end tracking routine; this has been optimized for comparatively low signal-to-noise image sequences that are characteristic of microscopy movies of dynamic microtubules growing in vitro. Sequences of simulated microtubule images were generated assuming a variety of different experimental conditions. The simulated movies were then tracked and the tracking errors were characterized. We found that the growth characteristics of the microtubules within realistic ranges had a negligible effect on the tracking precision. The fluorophore labelling density, the pixel size of the images, and the exposure times were found to be important parameters limiting the tracking precision which could be explained using concepts of single molecule localization microscopy. The signal-to-noise ratio was found to be a good single predictor of the tracking precision: typical experimental signal-to-noise ratios lead to tracking precisions in the range of tens of nanometres, making the tracking program described here a useful tool for dynamic microtubule end tracking with close to molecular precision. PMID:26444439

  6. Important factors determining the nanoscale tracking precision of dynamic microtubule ends

    PubMed Central

    BOHNER, G.; GUSTAFSSON, N.; CADE, N.I.; MAURER, S.P.; GRIFFIN, L.D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tracking dynamic microtubule ends in fluorescence microscopy movies provides insight into the statistical properties of microtubule dynamics and is vital for further analysis that requires knowledge of the trajectories of the microtubule ends. Here we analyse the performance of a previously developed automated microtubule end tracking routine; this has been optimized for comparatively low signal‐to‐noise image sequences that are characteristic of microscopy movies of dynamic microtubules growing in vitro. Sequences of simulated microtubule images were generated assuming a variety of different experimental conditions. The simulated movies were then tracked and the tracking errors were characterized. We found that the growth characteristics of the microtubules within realistic ranges had a negligible effect on the tracking precision. The fluorophore labelling density, the pixel size of the images, and the exposure times were found to be important parameters limiting the tracking precision which could be explained using concepts of single molecule localization microscopy. The signal‐to‐noise ratio was found to be a good single predictor of the tracking precision: typical experimental signal‐to‐noise ratios lead to tracking precisions in the range of tens of nanometres, making the tracking program described here a useful tool for dynamic microtubule end tracking with close to molecular precision. PMID:26444439

  7. A Precise, Simple, and Low-Cost Experiment to Determine the Isobaric Expansion Coefficient for Physical Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pe´rez, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The procedure of a physical chemistry experiment for university students must be designed in a way that the accuracy and precision of the measurements is properly maintained. However, in many cases, that requires costly and sophisticated equipment not readily available in developing countries. A simple, low-cost experiment to determine isobaric…

  8. Purity of potassium hydrogen phthalate, determination with precision coulometric and volumetric titration--a comparison.

    PubMed

    Recknagel, Sebastian; Breitenbach, Martin; Pautz, Joachim; Lück, Detlef

    2007-09-19

    The mass fraction of potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) from a specific batch was certified as an acidimetric standard. Two different analytical methods on a metrological level were used to carry out certification analysis: precision constant current coulometric and volumetric titration with NaOH. It could be shown that with a commercial automatic titration system in combination with a reliable software for the end-point detection it is possible to produce equivalent results with the same accuracy in comparison to a definite method handled by a fundamental apparatus for traceable precision coulometry. Prerequisite for titrations are that a high number of single measurement are applied which are calibrated with a high precision certified reference material. PMID:17870288

  9. Cooperative Interactions of Oligosaccharide and Peptide Moieties of a Glycopeptide Derived from IgE with Galectin-9.

    PubMed

    Nakakita, Shin-Ichi; Itoh, Aiko; Nakakita, Yukari; Nonaka, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Takashi; Nakamura, Takanori; Nishi, Nozomu

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that galectin-9 suppresses degranulation of mast cells through protein-glycan interaction with IgE. To elucidate the mechanism of the interaction in detail, we focused on identification and structural analysis of IgE glycans responsible for the galectin-9-induced suppression using mouse monoclonal IgE (TIB-141). TIB-141 in combination with the antigen induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells, which was almost completely inhibited by human and mouse galectin-9. Sequential digestion of TIB-141 with lysyl endopeptidase and trypsin resulted in the identification of a glycopeptide (H-Lys13-Try3; 48 amino acid residues) with a single N-linked oligosaccharide near the N terminus capable of neutralizing the effect of galectin-9 and another glycopeptide with two N-linked oligosaccharides (H-Lys13-Try1; 16 amino acid residues) having lower activity. Enzymatic elimination of the oligosaccharide chain from H-Lys13-Try3 and H-Lys13-Try1 completely abolished the activity. Removal of the C-terminal 38 amino acid residues of H-Lys13-Try3 with glutamyl endopeptidase, however, also resulted in loss of the activity. We determined the structures of N-linked oligosaccharides of H-Lys13-Try1. The galectin-9-binding fraction of pyridylaminated oligosaccharides contained asialo- and monosialylated bi/tri-antennary complex type oligosaccharides with a core fucose residue. The structures of the oligosaccharides were consistent with the sugar-binding specificity of galectin-9, whereas the nonbinding fraction contained monosialylated and disialylated biantennary complex type oligosaccharides with a core fucose residue. Although the oligosaccharides linked to H-Lys13-Try3 could not be fully characterized, these results indicate the possibility that cooperative binding of oligosaccharide and neighboring polypeptide structures of TIB-141 to galectin-9 affects the overall affinity and specificity of the IgE-lectin interaction. PMID:26582205

  10. Precise orbit determination for quad-constellation satellites at Wuhan University: strategy, result validation, and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Xu, Xiaolong; Zhao, Qile; Liu, Jingnan

    2016-02-01

    This contribution summarizes the strategy used by Wuhan University (WHU) to determine precise orbit and clock products for Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). In particular, the satellite attitude, phase center corrections, solar radiation pressure model developed and used for BDS satellites are addressed. In addition, this contribution analyzes the orbit and clock quality of the quad-constellation products from MGEX Analysis Centers (ACs) for a common time period of 1 year (2014). With IGS final GPS and GLONASS products as the reference, Multi-GNSS products of WHU (indicated by WUM) show the best agreement among these products from all MGEX ACs in both accuracy and stability. 3D Day Boundary Discontinuities (DBDs) range from 8 to 27 cm for Galileo-IOV satellites among all ACs' products, whereas WUM ones are the largest (about 26.2 cm). Among three types of BDS satellites, MEOs show the smallest DBDs from 10 to 27 cm, whereas the DBDs for all ACs products are at decimeter to meter level for GEOs and one to three decimeter for IGSOs, respectively. As to the satellite laser ranging (SLR) validation for Galileo-IOV satellites, the accuracy evaluated by SLR residuals is at the one decimeter level with the well-known systematic bias of about -5 cm for all ACs. For BDS satellites, the accuracy could reach decimeter level, one decimeter level, and centimeter level for GEOs, IGSOs, and MEOs, respectively. However, there is a noticeable bias in GEO SLR residuals. In addition, systematic errors dependent on orbit angle related to mismodeled solar radiation pressure (SRP) are present for BDS GEOs and IGSOs. The results of Multi-GNSS combined kinematic PPP demonstrate that the best accuracy of position and fastest convergence speed have been achieved using WUM products, particularly in the Up direction. Furthermore, the accuracy of static BDS only PPP degrades when the BDS IGSO and MEO satellites switches to orbit-normal orientation

  11. A precise determination of the triplet energy of C sub 60 by photoacoustic calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, R.R.; Grabowski, J.J. )

    1991-08-08

    The relatively new technique of time-resolved, pulsed-laser photoacoustic calorimetry has been exploited to precisely determine the triplet-state energy of C{sub 60}, the newly discovered spheroidal allotrope of carbon. Excitation at 510 nm, in the long-wavelength absorption band of C{sub 60}, produces C{sub 60}(T{sub 1}) with unit efficiency; in the presence of dioxygen, triplet C{sub 60} is readily quenched by energy transfer. Photoacoustic waves were recorded for C{sub 60} in argon-saturated, air-saturated, and partially argon-saturated toluene solutions. Each experimental wave was then fit to a two-component model, the first component of which corresponds to production of C{sub 60}(T{sub 1}) and the second of which relates to its decay. The recovered heat-deposition parameters are {phi}{sub 1} = 0.359 {plus minus} 0.005 and {phi}{sub 2} = 0.237 {plus minus} 0.011; these correspond to the fraction of the absorbed photon energy that is released in forming C{sub 60}(T{sub 1}) and in the quenching of C{sub 60}(T{sub 1}) by dioxygen. Since the quantum yield for intersystem crossing of C{sub 60}, from S{sub 1} to T{sub 1}, is unity, {phi}{sub 1} corresponds to a C{sub 60}(T{sub 1}) energy of 36.0 {plus minus} 0.6 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}. Since the energy of C{sub 60}(T{sub 1}) is defined by {phi}{sub 1} and the energy of O{sub 2}({sup 1}{Delta}) is known {phi}{sub 2} is used to calculate a singlet oxygen sensitization quantum yield of 1.01 {plus minus} 0.03. The lifetime of C{sub 60}(T{sub 1}) in argon-saturated toluene is found to be > 10 {mu}s, and in air-saturated toluene, to be 290 {plus minus} 40 ns.

  12. Urine oligosaccharide pattern in patients with hyperprolactinaemia.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Bertil; Wahlberg, Jeanette; Landberg, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Free milk-type oligosaccharides are produced during pregnancy and lactation and may have an impact on several cells in the immune system. Our aim was to investigate if patients with isolated hyperprolactinaemia, not related to pregnancy, also have increased synthesis and urinary excretion of milk-type oligosaccharides and to compare the excretion pattern with that found during pregnancy. Urine samples were collected as morning sample from 18 patients with hyperprolactinaemia, 13 healthy controls with normal prolactin levels and four pregnant women. After purification, lactose and free oligosaccharides were analysed and quantified by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. The identity of peaks was confirmed by exoglycosidase treatment and comparison with oligosaccharide standards. Prolactin was measured in serum collected between 09 and 11 a.m. by a standardized immunochemical method. Patients with hyperprolactinaemia had higher urinary excretion of lactose than normoprolactinemic controls and urinary lactose correlated positively to prolactin levels (r = 0.51, p < 0.05). Increased levels of the fucosylated oligosaccharides 2-fucosyl lactose and lacto-di-fucotetraose were found in urine from three and two patients, respectively. The acidic oligosaccharide 3-sialyl lactose was found in high amount in urine from two patients with prolactin of >10,000 mU/l. However, pregnant women in their third trimester had the highest concentration of all these oligosaccharides and excretion increased during pregnancy. This study is first to show that both lactose and certain fucosylated and sialylated milk-type oligosaccharides are increased in some patients with hyperprolactinaemia. It remains to elucidate the functional importance of these findings. PMID:26275984

  13. Gliding Motility of Mycoplasma mobile on Uniform Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Taishi; Hamaguchi, Tasuku

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The binding and gliding of Mycoplasma mobile on a plastic plate covered by 53 uniform oligosaccharides were analyzed. Mycoplasmas bound to and glided on only 21 of the fixed sialylated oligosaccharides (SOs), showing that sialic acid is essential as the binding target. The affinities were mostly consistent with our previous results on the inhibitory effects of free SOs and suggested that M. mobile recognizes SOs from the nonreducing end with four continuous sites as follows. (i and ii) A sialic acid at the nonreducing end is tightly recognized by tandemly connected two sites. (iii) The third site is recognized by a loose groove that may be affected by branches. (iv) The fourth site is recognized by a large groove that may be enhanced by branches, especially those with a negative charge. The cells glided on uniform SOs in manners apparently similar to those of the gliding on mixed SOs. The gliding speed was related inversely to the mycoplasma's affinity for SO, suggesting that the detaching step may be one of the speed determinants. The cells glided faster and with smaller fluctuations on the uniform SOs than on the mixtures, suggesting that the drag caused by the variation in SOs influences gliding behaviors. IMPORTANCE Mycoplasma is a group of bacteria generally parasitic to animals and plants. Some Mycoplasma species form a protrusion at a pole, bind to solid surfaces, and glide in the direction of the protrusion. These procedures are essential for parasitism. Usually, mycoplasmas glide on mixed sialylated oligosaccharides (SOs) derived from glycoprotein and glycolipid. Since gliding motility on uniform oligosaccharides has never been observed, this study gives critical information about recognition and interaction between receptors and SOs. PMID:26148712

  14. Piping inspection instrument carriage with precise and repeatable position control and location determination

    DOEpatents

    Hapstack, M.; Talarek, T.R.; Zollinger, W.T.; Heckendorn, F.M. II; Park, L.R.

    1994-02-15

    An instrument carriage for inspection of piping comprises front and rear leg assemblies for engaging the interior of the piping and supporting and centering the carriage therein, and an instrumentation arm carried by a shaft system running from the front to rear leg assemblies. The shaft system has a screw shaft for moving the arm axially and a spline gear for moving the arm azimuthally. The arm has a pair of air cylinders that raise and lower a plate in the radial direction. On the plate are probes including an eddy current probe and an ultrasonic testing probe. The ultrasonic testing probe is capable of spinning 360[degree] about its axis. The instrument carriage uses servo motors and pressurized air cylinders for precise actuation of instrument components and precise, repeatable actuation of position control mechanisms. 8 figures.

  15. Piping inspection instrument carriage with precise and repeatable position control and location determination

    DOEpatents

    Hapstack, Mark; Talarek, Ted R.; Zollinger, W. Thor; Heckendorn, II, Frank M.; Park, Larry R.

    1994-01-01

    An instrument carriage for inspection of piping comprises front and rear leg assemblies for engaging the interior of the piping and supporting and centering the carriage therein, and an instrumentation arm carried by a shaft system running from the front to rear leg assemblies. The shaft system has a screw shaft for moving the arm axially and a spline gear for moving the arm azimuthally. The arm has a pair of air cylinders that raise and lower a plate in the radial direction. On the plate are probes including an eddy current probe and an ultrasonic testing probe. The ultrasonic testing probe is capable of spinning 360.degree. about its axis. The instrument carriage uses servo motors and pressurized air cylinders for precise actuation of instrument components and precise, repeatable actuation of position control mechanisms.

  16. Profiling N-linked oligosaccharides from IgG by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, Jeffrey S; Basumallick, Lipika; Hurum, Deanna C

    2016-06-01

    Understanding and characterizing protein therapeutic glycosylation is important with growing evidence that glycosylation impacts biological efficacy, pharmacokinetics and cellular toxicity. Protein expression systems and reactor conditions can impact glycosylation, leading to potentially undesirable glycosylation. For example, high-mannose species may be present, which are atypical of human antibody glycosylation. Their presence in the Fc domain has been linked to increased serum clearance of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAE-PAD) is an effective tool for determining glycans present in glycoprotein therapeutics. We report an improved HPAE-PAD method for IgG oligosaccharide separation. The neutral glycans are well resolved, including separation of high-mannose species from typical human IgG glycans. Oligosaccharide identification was performed by comparison to known standards in conjunction with selective exoglycosidase digestion of both standards and released glycans. Retention times (RTs) of known glycans were compared with the retention times of maltose, maltotriose and maltotetraose standards to define a retention index value for each glycan. These retention indices were used to aid identification of glycans from an example monoclonal antibody sample of unknown glycosylation. Method ruggedness was evaluated across duplicate systems, analysts and triplicate column lots. Comparing two systems with different analysts and columns, retention time precision relative standard deviations (RSDs) were between 0.63 and 4.0% while retention indices precision RSDs ranged from 0.27 to 0.56%. The separation is orthogonal to capillary electrophoresis-based separation of labeled IgG oligosaccharides. PMID:26786498

  17. An evaluation of the precision of fin ray, otolith, and scale age determinations for brook trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolarski, J.T.; Hartman, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    The ages of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis are typically estimated using scales despite a lack of research documenting the effectiveness of this technique. The use of scales is often preferred because it is nonlethal and is believed to require less effort than alternative methods. To evaluate the relative effectiveness of different age estimation methodologies for brook trout, we measured the precision and processing times of scale, sagittal otolith, and pectoral fin ray age estimation techniques. Three independent readers, age bias plots, coefficients of variation (CV = 100 x SD/mean), and percent agreement (PA) were used to measure within-reader, among-structure bias and within-structure, among-reader precision. Bias was generally minimal; however, the age estimates derived from scales tended to be lower than those derived from otoliths within older (age > 2) cohorts. Otolith, fin ray, and scale age estimates were within 1 year of each other for 95% of the comparisons. The measures of precision for scales (CV = 6.59; PA = 82.30) and otoliths (CV = 7.45; PA = 81.48) suggest higher agreement between these structures than with fin rays (CV = 11.30; PA = 65.84). The mean per-sample processing times were lower for scale (13.88 min) and otolith techniques (12.23 min) than for fin ray techniques (22.68 min). The comparable processing times of scales and otoliths contradict popular belief and are probably a result of the high proportion of regenerated scales within samples and the ability to infer age from whole (as opposed to sectioned) otoliths. This research suggests that while scales produce age estimates rivaling those of otoliths for younger (age > 3) cohorts, they may be biased within older cohorts and therefore should be used with caution. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  18. Precise determination of the open ocean 234U/238U composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, M. B.; Stirling, C. H.; Zimmermann, B.; Halliday, A. N.

    2010-12-01

    Uranium has a long residence time in the open oceans, and therefore, its salinity-normalized U concentration and 234U/238U activity ratio (expressed herein as δ234U, the ‰ deviation from secular equilibrium) are assumed to be uniform. The marine 234U/238U activity ratio is currently in radioactive disequilibrium and shows a ˜15% excess of 234U with respect to the secular equilibrium value due to continuous input from riverine sources. Knowledge of the marine δ234U, and how it has evolved through the Quaternary, is important for validating age accuracy in the U series dating of marine carbonates, which is increasingly relied upon for providing a chronological basis in paleoclimate research. However, accurate and precise measurements of δ234U are technically difficult. Thus, existing compilations of the open ocean δ234U value vary by up to ˜10‰, and the assumed uniformity in the oceanic δ234U remains to be confirmed. Using MC-ICPMS techniques and a suite of multiple Faraday cups instead of the typical configurations based on a combined Faraday cup-multiplier array, a long-term reproducibility of better than ±0.3‰ (2σ) is achieved for δ234U measurements. Applying these very high precision techniques to open ocean seawater samples, an average δ234U of 146.8 ± 0.1‰ (2σm, n = 19) is obtained. These high-precision seawater measurements yield an external reproducibility of better than ±0.4‰ (2σ) and show that the open oceans have a uniform δ234U on the sub-‰ level. These new data constrain the vertical mixing time of the open oceans to less than 1000 years.

  19. Precise Determination of the Neutron Magnetic Form Factor to Higher Q{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    William K. Brooks; Jeffery D. Lachniet

    2004-10-01

    The neutron elastic magnetic form factor G{sub M}{sup n} has been extracted from quasielastic scattering from deuterium in the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, CLAS. The kinematic coverage of the measurement is continuous over a broad range, extending from below 1 GeV{sup 2} to nearly 5 GeV{sup 2} in four-momentum transfer squared. High precision is achieved by employing a ratio technique in which most uncertainties cancel, and by a simultaneous in-situ calibration of the neutron detection efficiency, the largest correction to the data. Preliminary results are shown with statistical errors only.

  20. Fixed-point single-precision estimation. [Kalman filtering for NASA Standard Spacecraft Computer orbit determination algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, E. H.; Farrell, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of autonomous orbit determination has validated the use of an 18-bit NASA Standard Spacecraft Computer (NSSC) for the extended Kalman filter. Dimensionally consistent scales are chosen for all variables in the algorithm, such that nearly all of the onboard computation can be performed in single precision without matrix square root formulations. Allowable simplifications in algorithm implementation and practical means of ensuring convergence are verified for accuracies of a few km provided by star/vertical observations

  1. A Study into the Method of Precise Orbit Determination of a HEO Orbiter by GPS and Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikenaga, Toshinori; Hashida, Yoshi; Unwin, Martin

    2007-01-01

    In the present day, orbit determination by Global Positioning System (GPS) is not unusual. Especially for low-cost small satellites, position determination by an on-board GPS receiver provides a cheap, reliable and precise method. However, the original purpose of GPS is for ground users, so the transmissions from all of the GPS satellites are directed toward the Earth s surface. Hence there are some restrictions for users above the GPS constellation to detect those signals. On the other hand, a desire for precise orbit determination for users in orbits higher than GPS constellation exists. For example, the next Japanese Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) mission "ASTRO-G" is trying to determine its orbit in an accuracy of a few centimeters at apogee. The use of GPS is essential for such ultra accurate orbit determination. This study aims to construct a method for precise orbit determination for such high orbit users, especially in High Elliptical Orbits (HEOs). There are several approaches for this objective. In this study, a hybrid method with GPS and an accelerometer is chosen. Basically, while the position cannot be determined by an on-board GPS receiver or other Range and Range Rate (RARR) method, all we can do to estimate the user satellite s position is to propagate the orbit along with the force model, which is not perfectly correct. However if it has an accelerometer (ACC), the coefficients of the air drag and the solar radiation pressure applied to the user satellite can be updated and then the propagation along with the "updated" force model can improve the fitting accuracy of the user satellite s orbit. In this study, it is assumed to use an accelerometer available in the present market. The effects by a bias error of an accelerometer will also be discussed in this paper.

  2. Oligosaccharide Binding Proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis Reveal a Preference for Host Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Daniel; Kim, Jae Han; German, J. Bruce; Raybould, Helen E.; Mills, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs), part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB) and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. PMID:21423604

  3. Calibration and validation of individual GOCE accelerometers by precise orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, P. N. A. M.; IJssel, J. A. A. van den

    2016-01-01

    The European Space Agency Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circular Explorer (GOCE) carries a gradiometer consisting of three pairs of accelerometers in an orthogonal triad. Precise GOCE science orbit solutions (PSO), which are based on satellite-to-satellite tracking observations by the Global Positioning System and which are claimed to be at the few cm precision level, can be used to calibrate and validate the observations taken by the accelerometers. This has been done for each individual accelerometer by a dynamic orbit fit of the time series of position co-ordinates from the PSOs, where the accelerometer observations represent the non-gravitational accelerations. Since the accelerometers do not coincide with the center of mass of the GOCE satellite, the observations have to be corrected for rotational and gravity gradient terms. This is not required when using the so-called common-mode accelerometer observations, provided the center of the gradiometer coincides with the GOCE center of mass. Dynamic orbit fits based on these common-mode accelerations therefore served as reference. It is shown that for all individual accelerometers, similar dynamic orbit fits can be obtained provided the above-mentioned corrections are made. In addition, accelerometer bias estimates are obtained that are consistent with offsets in the gravity gradients that are derived from the GOCE gradiometer observations.

  4. Modeling radiation forces acting on TOPEX/Poseidon for precision orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. A.; Luthcke, S. B.; Antreasian, P. G.; Rosborough, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    Geodetic satellites such as GEOSAT, SPOT, ERS-1, and TOPEX/Poseidon require accurate orbital computations to support the scientific data they collect. Until recently, gravity field mismodeling was the major source of error in precise orbit definition. However, albedo and infrared re-radiation, and spacecraft thermal imbalances produce in combination no more than a 6-cm radial root-mean-square (RMS) error over a 10-day period. This requires the development of nonconservative force models that take the satellite's complex geometry, attitude, and surface properties into account. For TOPEX/Poseidon, a 'box-wing' satellite form was investigated that models the satellite as a combination of flat plates arranged in a box shape with a connected solar array. The nonconservative forces acting on each of the eight surfaces are computed independently, yielding vector accelerations which are summed to compute the total aggregate effect on the satellite center-of-mass. In order to test the validity of this concept, 'micro-models' based on finite element analysis of TOPEX/Poseidon were used to generate acceleration histories in a wide variety of orbit orientations. These profiles are then compared to the box-wing model. The results of these simulations and their implication on the ability to precisely model the TOPEX/Poseidon orbit are discussed.

  5. Precise determination of the mass of a Cooper pair of electrons in superconducting niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, J.

    1988-01-01

    A superconducting, thin-film niobium ring deposited on the equator of a precision quartz hemispherical rotor was used to measure the ratio of Planck's constant to the mass of a Cooper pair of electrons, h/m*. A precision of 5 ppm (statistical) and an accuracy of 30 ppm (systematic) were obtained for a combined, root sum of squares error of 30 ppm. As a result of two macroscopic quantum phenomena-flux quantization and the London moment, the flux through a rotating, superconducting ring is a multivalued function of its rotation frequency. The flux goes to zero at certain equally spaced frequencies. The ratio h/m* is proportional to this frequency spacing. It is also proportional to the cross sectional area of the niobium ring. Using the values for Planck's constant and the rest mass of the electron recommended in the most recent fundamental constants revision, the mass measured in this experiment is larger than twice the free electron mass by 84 +/- 30 ppm. The result disagrees with theoretical predictions that this experiment would observe a mass smaller than twice the free electron mass by 8 ppm.

  6. Precision Determination of Atmospheric Extinction at Optical and Near IR Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, David L.; Axelrod, T.; Blondin, Stephane; Claver, Chuck; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, Lynne; Saha, Abhijit; Smith, Allyn; Smith, R.Chris; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-08-24

    The science goals for future ground-based all-sky surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey, PanSTARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, require calibration of broadband photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the sky to precisions of a per cent or better, and absolute calibration of color measurements that are similarly accurate. This performance will need to be achieved with measurements made from multiple images taken over the course of many years, and these surveys will observe in less than ideal conditions. This paper describes a technique to implement a new strategy to directly measure variations of atmospheric transmittance at optical wavelengths and application of these measurements to calibration of ground-based observations. This strategy makes use of measurements of the spectra of a small catalog of bright 'probe' stars as they progress across the sky and back-light the atmosphere. The signatures of optical absorption by different atmospheric constituents are recognized in these spectra by their characteristic dependences on wavelength and airmass. State-of-the-art models of atmospheric radiation transport and modern codes are used to accurately compute atmospheric extinction over a wide range of observing conditions. We present results of an observing campaign that demonstrate that correction for extinction due to molecular constituents and aerosols can be done with precisions of a few millimagnitudes with this technique.

  7. Xyloglucan oligosaccharides promote growth and activate cellulase: Evidence for a role of cellulase in cell expansion. [Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    McDougall, G.J.; Fry, S.C. )

    1990-07-01

    Oligosaccharides produced by the action of fungal cellulase on xyloglucans promoted the elongation of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) stem segments in a straight-growth bioassay designed for the determination of auxins. The oligosaccharides were most active at about 1 micromolar. We tested the relative growth-promoting activities of four HPLC-purified oligosaccharides which shared a common glucose{sub 4} {center dot} xylose{sub 3} (XG7) core. The substituted oligosaccharides XG8 (glucose{sub 4} {center dot} xylose{sub 3} {center dot} galactose) and XG9n (glucose{sub 4} {center dot} xylose{sub 3} {center dot} galactose{sub 2}) were more effective than XG7 itself and XG9 (glucose{sub 4} {center dot} xylose{sub 3} {center dot} galactose {center dot} fucose). The same oligosaccharides also promoted the degradation, assayed viscometrically, of xyloglucan by an acidic cellulase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaves. The oligosaccharides were highly active at 10{sup {minus}4} molar, causing up to a fourfold increase in activity, but the effect was still detectable at 1 micromolar. Those oligosaccharides (XG8 and XG9n) which best promoted growth, stimulated cellulase activity to the greatest extent. The oligosaccharides did not stimulate the action of the cellulase in an assay based on the conversion of ({sup 3}H)xyloglucan to ethanol-soluble fragments. This suggests that the oligosaccharides enhanced the midchain hydrolysis of xyloglucan molecules (which would rapidly reduce the viscosity of the solution), at the expense of cleavage near the termini (which would yield ethanol-soluble products).

  8. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  9. Grafting of oligosaccharides onto synthetic polymer colloids.

    PubMed

    Mange, Siyabonga; Dever, Cédric; De Bruyn, Hank; Gaborieau, Marianne; Castignolles, Patrice; Gilbert, Robert G

    2007-06-01

    A new method to form colloidally stable oligosaccharide-grafted synthetic polymer particles has been developed. The oligosaccharides, of weight-average degree of polymerization approximately 38, were obtained by enzymatic debranching of amylopectin. Through the use of a cerium(IV)-based redox initiation process, oligosaccharide chains are grafted onto a synthetic polymer colloid comprising electrostatically stabilized poly(methyl methacrylate) or polystyrene latex particles swollen with methyl methacrylate monomer. Ce(IV) creates a radical species on these oligosaccharides, which then propagates, initially with aqueous-phase monomer, then with the methyl methacrylate monomer inside the particles. Ultracentrifugation, NMR, and total starch analyses together prove that the grafting process has occurred, with at least 7.7 wt % starch grafted and a grafting efficiency of 33%. The surfactant used in latex preparation was removed by dialysis, resulting in particles colloidally stabilized with only linear starch as a steric stabilizer. The debranched starch that comprises these oligosaccharides is found to be a remarkably effective colloidal stabilizer, albeit at low electrolyte concentration, stabilizing particles with very sparse surface coverage. PMID:17497920

  10. Precise determination of strontium isotope ratios by TIMS to authenticate tomato geographical origin.

    PubMed

    Trincherini, P R; Baffi, C; Barbero, P; Pizzoglio, E; Spalla, S

    2014-02-15

    Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) was applied to discriminate a total of 118 tomato samples (berries, "passata", tinned tomatoes, sauce, double and triple concentrate) coming from two different countries. The TIMS technique gave significantly different results for the (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios and δ‰ values between Chinese and Italian tomato samples, irrespective of the treatment type. This technique proved to be a "robust" method, suitable for a precise discrimination of the two geographical origins. TIMS was able, within the Italian samples, to discriminate different geographical production areas, by virtue of different (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratios and δ‰ values. This technique could be employed in the field of food safety and quality, as a profitable tool for authenticating tomato geographical origin. PMID:24128488

  11. The Coyote Universe. I. Precision Determination of the Nonlinear Matter Power Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitmann, Katrin; White, Martin; Wagner, Christian; Habib, Salman; Higdon, David

    2010-05-01

    Near-future cosmological observations targeted at investigations of dark energy pose stringent requirements on the accuracy of theoretical predictions for the nonlinear clustering of matter. Currently, N-body simulations comprise the only viable approach to this problem. In this paper, we study various sources of computational error and methods to control them. By applying our methodology to a large suite of cosmological simulations we show that results for the (gravity-only) nonlinear matter power spectrum can be obtained at 1% accuracy out to k ~ 1 h Mpc-1. The key components of these high accuracy simulations are precise initial conditions, very large simulation volumes, sufficient mass resolution, and accurate time stepping. This paper is the first in a series of three; the final aim is a high-accuracy prediction scheme for the nonlinear matter power spectrum that improves current fitting formulae by an order of magnitude.

  12. THE COYOTE UNIVERSE. I. PRECISION DETERMINATION OF THE NONLINEAR MATTER POWER SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Heitmann, Katrin; White, Martin; Wagner, Christian; Habib, Salman; Higdon, David

    2010-05-20

    Near-future cosmological observations targeted at investigations of dark energy pose stringent requirements on the accuracy of theoretical predictions for the nonlinear clustering of matter. Currently, N-body simulations comprise the only viable approach to this problem. In this paper, we study various sources of computational error and methods to control them. By applying our methodology to a large suite of cosmological simulations we show that results for the (gravity-only) nonlinear matter power spectrum can be obtained at 1% accuracy out to k {approx} 1 h Mpc{sup -1}. The key components of these high accuracy simulations are precise initial conditions, very large simulation volumes, sufficient mass resolution, and accurate time stepping. This paper is the first in a series of three; the final aim is a high-accuracy prediction scheme for the nonlinear matter power spectrum that improves current fitting formulae by an order of magnitude.

  13. Determination of Personalized IOL-Constants for the Haigis Formula under Consideration of Measurement Precision

    PubMed Central

    Leydolt, Christina; Menapace, Rupert; Eppig, Timo; Langenbucher, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The capabilities of a weighted least squares approach for the optimization of the intraocular lens (IOL) constants for the Haigis formula are studied in comparison to an ordinary least squares approach. The weights are set to the inverse variances of the effective optical anterior chamber depth. The effect of random measurement noise is simulated 100000 times using data from N = 69 cataract patients and the measurement uncertainty of two different biometers. A second, independent data set (N = 33) is used to show the differences that can be expected between both methods. The weighted least squares formalism reduces the effect of measurement error on the final constants. In more than 64% it will result in a better approximation, if the measurement errors are estimated correctly. The IOL constants can be calculated with higher precision using the weighted least squares method. PMID:27391100

  14. Precise major component determinations in deep-sea sediments using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Timothy D.; Tom, Brian A.; Burnett, Chris

    1992-04-01

    Experiments using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) on a set of powdered deep-sea sediment samples show that it is an efficient method of quantifying the relative abundances of quartz, clay, and calcite. Ratios of absorption bands characteristic of different minerals are precise and reproducible to a relative error of about 1 % provided that samples are ground to <2 μm. FTIR results, calibrated to geochemical measurements, therefore offer a more rapid means of producing sedimentary time series data than do elemental or phase-specific extractions. Calibration of results to absolute amounts of sedimentary phases is possible for minerals with unique absorption bands. Highly IR-absorbant minerals such as quartz and calcite are quantitatively detectable in amounts as low as 5% in a mixture. In addition, FTIR measurements complement elemental analyses by allowing the accurate partitioning of elements, such as Si, which may occur in several phases.

  15. The use of laser altimetry data in Chang'E-1 precision orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sheng-Qi; Huang, Yong; Li, Pei-Jia; Hu, Xiao-Gong; Fan, Min

    2016-09-01

    Accurate altimetric measurement not only can be applied to the calculation of a topography model but also can be used to improve the quality of the orbit reconstruction in the form of crossovers. Altimetry data from the Chang'E-1 (CE-1) laser altimeter are analyzed in this paper. The differences between the crossover constraint equation in the form of height discrepancies and in the form of minimum distances are mainly discussed. The results demonstrate that the crossover constraint equation in the form of minimum distances improves the CE-1 orbit precision. The overlap orbit performance has increased ∼ 30% compared to the orbit using only tracking data. External assessment using the topography model also shows orbit improvement. The results will be helpful for recomputing ephemeris and improving the CE-1 topography model.

  16. Complete NMR assignment of a bisecting hybrid-type oligosaccharide transferred by Mucor hiemalis endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase.

    PubMed

    Yamanoi, Takashi; Oda, Yoshiki; Katsuraya, Kaname; Inazu, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    This study describes the complete nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral assignment of a bisecting hybrid-type oligosaccharide 1, transferred by Mucor hiemalis endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Endo-M). Through (1)H- and (13)C-NMR, DQF-COSY, HSQC, HMBC, TOCSY, and NOESY experiments, we determine the structure of the glycoside linkage formed by the Endo-M transglycosylation, i.e., the connection between GlcNAc and GlcNAc in oligosaccharide 1. PMID:27131291

  17. Precision laser surveying instrument using atmospheric turbulence compensation by determining the absolute displacement between two laser beam components

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric effects on sighting measurements are compensated for by adjusting any sighting measurements using a correction factor that does not depend on atmospheric state conditions such as temperature, pressure, density or turbulence. The correction factor is accurately determined using a precisely measured physical separation between two color components of a light beam (or beams) that has been generated using either a two-color laser or two lasers that project different colored beams. The physical separation is precisely measured by fixing the position of a short beam pulse and measuring the physical separation between the two fixed-in-position components of the beam. This precisely measured physical separation is then used in a relationship that includes the indexes of refraction for each of the two colors of the laser beam in the atmosphere through which the beam is projected, thereby to determine the absolute displacement of one wavelength component of the laser beam from a straight line of sight for that projected component of the beam. This absolute displacement is useful to correct optical measurements, such as those developed in surveying measurements that are made in a test area that includes the same dispersion effects of the atmosphere on the optical measurements. The means and method of the invention are suitable for use with either single-ended systems or a double-ended systems.

  18. High-precision onboard orbit determination for small satellites - the GPS-based XNSon X-SAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, E.; Montenbruck, O.; Arichandran, K.; Tan, S.H.; Bretschneider

    2004-11-01

    X-SAT is a mini-satellite developed by the Satellite Engineering Centre of the Nanyang Technological University at Singapore. The focus of the technology- driven mission is the high-resolution remote sensing of the Southeast Asian region for environmental monitoring. To achieve the ambitious mission objectives, the GPS-based X-SAT Navigation System (XNS) will provide high-precision onboard orbit determination solutions as well as orbit forecasts. With a targeted real-time position accuracy of about 1-2 m 3D r.m.s., the XNS provides an unprecedented accuracy performance and thus enables the support of any satellite mission which requires precise onboard position knowledge.

  19. Metabolism of Oligosaccharides and Starch in Lactobacilli: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gänzle, Michael G.; Follador, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Oligosaccharides, compounds that are composed of 2–10 monosaccharide residues, are major carbohydrate sources in habitats populated by lactobacilli. Moreover, oligosaccharide metabolism is essential for ecological fitness of lactobacilli. Disaccharide metabolism by lactobacilli is well understood; however, few data on the metabolism of higher oligosaccharides are available. Research on the ecology of intestinal microbiota as well as the commercial application of prebiotics has shifted the interest from (digestible) disaccharides to (indigestible) higher oligosaccharides. This review provides an overview on oligosaccharide metabolism in lactobacilli. Emphasis is placed on maltodextrins, isomalto-oligosaccharides, fructo-oligosaccharides, galacto-oligosaccharides, and raffinose-family oligosaccharides. Starch is also considered. Metabolism is discussed on the basis of metabolic studies related to oligosaccharide metabolism, information on the cellular location and substrate specificity of carbohydrate transport systems, glycosyl hydrolases and phosphorylases, and the presence of metabolic genes in genomes of 38 strains of lactobacilli. Metabolic pathways for disaccharide metabolism often also enable the metabolism of tri- and tetrasaccharides. However, with the exception of amylase and levansucrase, metabolic enzymes for oligosaccharide conversion are intracellular and oligosaccharide metabolism is limited by transport. This general restriction to intracellular glycosyl hydrolases differentiates lactobacilli from other bacteria that adapted to intestinal habitats, particularly Bifidobacterium spp. PMID:23055996

  20. Enzymatic production of specifically distributed hyaluronan oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Panhong; Lv, Mengxian; Jin, Peng; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Kang, Zhen

    2015-09-20

    High-molecular-mass hyaluronan (HA) was controllably depolymerized in pure aqueous solution with recombinant leech hyaluronidase (HAase). The HAase concentration per unit HA and hydrolysis time played important roles in molecular mass distribution. By modulating the concentrations of HAase and controlling the hydrolysis time, any molar-mass-defined HA oligomers could be efficiently and specifically produced on a large scale (40 g/L), such as HA oligosaccharides with weight-average molar mass of 4000, 10,000, and 30,000Da and end hydrolysates containing only HA6 and HA4. High performance liquid chromatography-size exclusion chromatography, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, capillary zone electrophoresis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry confirmed low polydispersity of the produced molar-mass-defined HA oligosaccharides. Therefore, large-scale production of defined HA oligosaccharides with narrow molecular mass distribution will significantly promote progress in related research and its potential applications. PMID:26050905

  1. Cell-associated oligosaccharides of Bradyrhizobium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, K J; Gore, R S; Johnson, R; Benesi, A J; Reinhold, V N

    1990-01-01

    We report the initial characterization of the cell-associated oligosaccharides produced by four Bradyrhizobium strains: Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110, USDA 94, and ATCC 10324 and Bradyrhizobium sp. strain 32H1. The cell-associated oligosaccharides of these strains were found to be composed solely of glucose and were predominantly smaller than the cyclic beta-1,2-glucans produced by Agrobacterium and Rhizobium species. Linkage studies and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses demonstrated that the bradyrhizobial glucans are linked primarily by beta-1,6 and beta-1,3 glycosidic bonds. Thus, the bradyrhizobia appear to synthesize cell-associated oligosaccharides of structural character substantially different from that of the cyclic beta-1,2-glucans produced by Agrobacterium and Rhizobium species. PMID:2294083

  2. Composition and antioxidant activity of water-soluble oligosaccharides from Hericium erinaceus.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yiling; Ding, Xiang; Hou, Wanru

    2015-05-01

    Oligosaccharide are carbohydrate molecules, comprising repeating units joined together by glycosidic bonds. In recent years, an increasing number of oligosaccharides have been reported to exhibit various biological activities, including antitumor, immune-stimulation and antioxidation effects. In the present study, crude water‑soluble oligosaccharides were extracted from the fruiting bodies of Hericium erinaceus with water and then successively purified by diethylaminoethyl‑cellulose 52 and Sephadex G‑100 column chromatography, yielding one major oligosaccharide fraction: Hericium erinaceus oligosaccharide (HEO‑A). The structural features of HEO‑A were investigated by a combination of monosaccharide component analysis by thin layer chromatography, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and high‑performance gel permeation chromatography. The results indicated that HEO‑A was composed of D‑xylose and D‑glucose, and the average molecular size was ~1,877 Da. The antioxidant activity of HEO‑A was evaluated using three biochemical methods to determine the scavenging activity of HEO‑A on 1,1‑diphenyl‑2‑picrylhydrazyl, hydrogen peroxide and 2,2'‑azino‑bis(3‑ethylbenzthiazoline‑6‑sufonic acid) diammonium radicals. The results indicated that HEO‑A may serve as an effective healthcare food and source of natural antioxidant compounds. PMID:25529054

  3. Precise Determination of the Baseline Between the TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Rolf; Rothacher, Markus; Michalak, Grzegorz; Moon, Yongjin

    TerraSAR-X, launched on June 15, 2007, and TanDEM-X, to be launched in September 2009, both carry the Tracking, Occultation and Ranging (TOR) category A payload instrument package. The TOR consists of a high-precision dual-frequency GPS receiver, called Integrated GPS Occultation Receiver (IGOR), for precise orbit determination and atmospheric sounding and a Laser retro-reflector (LRR) serving as target for the global Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) ground station network. The TOR is supplied by the GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ) Germany, and the Center for Space Research (CSR), Austin, Texas. The objective of the German/US collaboration is twofold: provision of atmospheric profiles for use in numerical weather predictions and climate studies from the occultation data and precision SAR data processing based on precise orbits and atmospheric products. For the scientific objectives of the TanDEM- X mission, i.e., bi-static SAR together with TerraSAR-X, the dual-frequency GPS receiver is of vital importance for the millimeter level determination of the baseline or distance between the two spacecrafts. The paper discusses the feasibility of generating millimeter baselines by the example of GRACE, where for validation the distance between the two GRACE satellites is directly available from the micrometer-level intersatellite link measurements. The distance of the GRACE satellites is some 200 km, the distance of the TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X formation will be some 200 meters. Therefore the proposed approach is then subject to a simulation of the foreseen TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X formation. The effect of varying space environmental conditions, of possible phase center variations, multi path, and of varying center of mass of the spacecrafts are evaluated and discussed.

  4. Impact of the ionosphere on GPS-based precise orbit determination of Low Earth Orbiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Daniel; Jäggi, Adrian; Meyer, Ulrich; Beutler, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    GPS-derived kinematic precise Swarm orbits are significantly affected by increased position noise over the geomagnetic poles and spurious signatures along the geomagnetic equator. The latter deficiencies were identified for the first time for the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission and are attributed to the distortion of the GPS carrier signal when propagating through portions of the Earth's ionosphere with a large free electron content. Via the GPS-derived kinematic Swarm positions, the spurious signatures along the geomagnetic equator map directly into the derived gravity fields. This was already the case for GOCE and obviously is also true for Swarm. To identify the root cause of the problem, the stochastic and deterministic behavior of the ionosphere is characterized by analyzing data collected by the GPS receivers on various LEO satellites. We compare in particular the performance of the Swarm and the GRACE receivers, because no obvious degradations occur in GRACE orbit and gravity field solutions. Removing GPS data with large ionospheric variations mitigates the ionosphere-induced artifacts in orbits and gravity fields. We illustrate the impact of this measure on the Swarm orbit and gravity field solutions. Making use of the geographically resolved ionosphere characteristics, e.g., to establish better data weighting schemes, results in a better POD performance for LEO satellites.

  5. Composite tube and plate manufacturing repeatability as determined by precision measurements of thermal strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Lenn A.; Tucker, James R.; Bluth, A. Marcel

    2013-09-01

    Composite materials often carry the reputation of demonstrating high variability in critical material properties. The JWST telescope metering structure is fabricated of several thousand separate composite piece parts. The stringent dimensional stability requirements on the metering structure require the critical thermal strain response of every composite piece be verified either at the billet or piece part level. JWST is a unique composite space structure in that it has required the manufacturing of several hundred composite billets that cover many lots of prepreg and many years of fabrication. The flight billet thermal expansion acceptance criteria limits the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) to a tolerance ranging between +/-0.014 ppm/K to +/-0.04 ppm/K around a prescribed nominal when measured from 293 K down to 40 K. The different tolerance values represent different material forms including flat plates and different tube cross-section dimensions. A precision measurement facility was developed that could measure at the required accuracy and at a pace that supported the composite part fabrication rate. The test method and facility is discussed and the results of a statistical process analysis of the flight composite billets are surveyed.

  6. Precise, fast, and flexible determination of protein interactions by affinity capillary electrophoresis: part 3: anions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanhong; Redweik, Sabine; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Albishri, Hassan M; Preu, Lutz; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-08-01

    The binding of physiologically anionic species or negatively charged drug molecules to proteins is of great importance in biochemistry and medicine. Since affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) has already proven to be a suitable analytical tool to study the influence of ions on proteins, this technique was applied here for comprehensively studying the influence of various anions on proteins of BSA, β-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin, myoglobin, and lysozyme. The analysis was performed using different selected anions of succinate, glutamate, phosphate, acetate, nitrate, iodide, thiocyanate, and pharmaceuticals (salicylic acid, aspirin, and ibuprofen) that exist in the anionic form at physiological pH 7.4. Due to the excellent repeatability and precision of the ACE measurements, not necessarily strong but significant influences of the anions on the proteins were found in many cases. Different influences in the observed bindings indicated change of charge, mass, or conformational changes of the proteins due to the binding with the studied anions. Combining the mobility-shift and pre-equilibrium ACE modes, rapidity and reversibility of the protein-anion bindings were discussed. Further, circular dichroism has been used as an orthogonal approach to characterize the interactions between the studied proteins and anions to confirm the ACE results. Since phosphate and various anions from amino acids and small organic acids such as succinate or acetate are present in very high concentrations in the cellular environment, even weak influences are certainly relevant as well. PMID:24436007

  7. Precision determination of electroweak coupling from atomic parity violation and implications for particle physics.

    PubMed

    Porsev, S G; Beloy, K; Derevianko, A

    2009-05-01

    We carry out high-precision calculation of parity violation in a cesium atom, reducing theoretical uncertainty by a factor of 2 compared to previous evaluations. We combine previous measurements with calculations and extract the weak charge of the 133Cs nucleus, QW=-73.16(29)expt(20)theor. The result is in agreement with the standard model (SM) of elementary particles. This is the most accurate to-date test of the low-energy electroweak sector of the SM. In combination with the results of high-energy collider experiments, we confirm the energy dependence (or "running") of the electroweak force over an energy range spanning 4 orders of magnitude (from approximately 10 MeV to approximately 100 GeV). Additionally, our result places constraints on a variety of new physics scenarios beyond the SM. In particular, we increase the lower limit on the masses of extra Z bosons predicted by models of grand unification and string theories. PMID:19518856

  8. Generation and structural validation of a library of diverse xyloglucan-derived oligosaccharides, including an update on xyloglucan nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Tuomivaara, Sami T; Yaoi, Katsuro; O'Neill, Malcolm A; York, William S

    2015-01-30

    Xyloglucans are structurally complex plant cell wall polysaccharides that are involved in cell growth and expansion, energy metabolism, and signaling. Determining the structure-function relationships of xyloglucans would benefit from the availability of a comprehensive and structurally diverse collection of rigorously characterized xyloglucan oligosaccharides. Here, we present a workflow for the semi-preparative scale generation and purification of neutral and acidic xyloglucan oligosaccharides using a combination of enzymatic and chemical treatments and size-exclusion chromatography. Twenty-six of these oligosaccharides were purified to near homogeneity and their structures validated using a combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, high-performance anion exchange chromatography, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mass spectrometry and analytical chromatography were compared as methods for xyloglucan oligosaccharide quantification. 1H chemical shifts were assigned using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy. A comprehensive update of the nomenclature describing xyloglucan side-chain structures is provided for reference. PMID:25497333

  9. Precision Determination of Electron Scattering Angle by Differential Nuclear Recoil Energy Method

    SciTech Connect

    Liyanage, Nilanga; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak

    2015-09-01

    The accurate determination of the scattered electron angle is crucial to electron scattering experiments, both with open-geometry large-acceptance spectrometers and ones with dipole-type magnetic spectrometers for electron detection. In particular, for small central-angle experiments using dipole-type magnetic spectrometers, in which surveys are used to measure the spectrometer angle with respect to the primary electron beam, the importance of the scattering angle determination is emphasized. However, given the complexities of large experiments and spectrometers, the accuracy of such surveys is limited and insufficient to meet demands of some experiments. In this article, we present a new technique for determination of the electron scattering angle based on an accurate measurement of the primary beam energy and the principle of differential nuclear recoil. This technique was used to determine the scattering angle for several experiments carried out at the Experimental Hall A, Jefferson Lab. Results have shown that the new technique greatly improved the accuracy of the angle determination compared to surveys.

  10. Precision determination of electron scattering angle by differential nuclear recoil energy method

    SciTech Connect

    Liyanage, N.; Saenboonruang, K.

    2015-12-01

    The accurate determination of the scattered electron angle is crucial to electron scattering experiments, both with open-geometry large-acceptance spectrometers and ones with dipole-type magnetic spectrometers for electron detection. In particular, for small central-angle experiments using dipole-type magnetic spectrometers, in which surveys are used to measure the spectrometer angle with respect to the primary electron beam, the importance of the scattering angle determination is emphasized. However, given the complexities of large experiments and spectrometers, the accuracy of such surveys is limited and insufficient to meet demands of some experiments. In this article, we present a new technique for determination of the electron scattering angle based on an accurate measurement of the primary beam energy and the principle of differential nuclear recoil. This technique was used to determine the scattering angle for several experiments carried out at the Experimental Hall A, Jefferson Lab. Results have shown that the new technique greatly improved the accuracy of the angle determination compared to surveys.

  11. Precise determination of earth's center of mass using measurements from the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigue, Yvonne; Lichten, Stephen M.; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Heflin, Michael B.; Malla, Rajendra P.

    1992-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) data from a worldwide geodetic experiment were collected during a 3-week period early in 1991. Geocentric station coordinates were estimated using the GPS data, thus defining a dynamically determined reference frame origin which should coincide with the earth center of mass, or geocenter. The 3-week GPS average geocenter estimates agree to 7-13 cm with geocenter estimates determined from satellite laser ranging, a well-established technique. The RMS of daily GPS geocenter estimates were 4 cm for x and y, and 30 cm for z.

  12. 13 Years of TOPEX/POSEIDON Precision Orbit Determination and the 10-fold Improvement in Expected Orbit Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, F. G.; Zelensky, N. P.; Luthcke, S. B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Beckley, B. D.; Klosko, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    Launched in the summer of 1992, TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) was a joint mission between NASA and the Centre National d Etudes Spatiales (CNES), the French Space Agency, to make precise radar altimeter measurements of the ocean surface. After the remarkably successful 13-years of mapping the ocean surface T/P lost its ability to maneuver and was de-commissioned January 2006. T/P revolutionized the study of the Earth s oceans by vastly exceeding pre-launch estimates of surface height accuracy recoverable from radar altimeter measurements. The precision orbit lies at the heart of the altimeter measurement providing the reference frame from which the radar altimeter measurements are made. The expected quality of orbit knowledge had limited the measurement accuracy expectations of past altimeter missions, and still remains a major component in the error budget of all altimeter missions. This paper describes critical improvements made to the T/P orbit time series over the 13-years of precise orbit determination (POD) provided by the GSFC Space Geodesy Laboratory. The POD improvements from the pre-launch T/P expectation of radial orbit accuracy and Mission requirement of 13-cm to an expected accuracy of about 1.5-cm with today s latest orbits will be discussed. The latest orbits with 1.5 cm RMS radial accuracy represent a significant improvement to the 2.0-cm accuracy orbits currently available on the T/P Geophysical Data Record (GDR) altimeter product.

  13. Using GLONASS for precise determination of navigation parameters under interference from various sources*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyapkin, V. N.; Fateev, Yu L.; Dmitriev, D. D.; Kartsan, I. N.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Goncharov, A. E.; Nasyrov, I. R.

    2016-04-01

    This article discusses the main approaches to the designs of systems for determining location and spatial attitude based on satellite navigation equipment. The article describes possible solutions for constructing an angular attitude measurement system capable of spatial interference selection on the basis of a single antenna system.

  14. Precise determination of the refractive index of suspended particles: light transmission as a function of refractive index mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClymer, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    Many fluids appear white because refractive index differences lead to multiple scattering. In this paper, we use safe, low-cost commercial index matching fluids to quantitatively study light transmission as a function of index mismatch, reduce multiple scattering to allow single scattering probes, and to precisely determine the index of refraction of suspended material. The transmission profile is compared with Rayleigh-Gans and Mie theory predictions. The procedure is accessible as a student laboratory project, while providing advantages over other standard methods of measuring the refractive index of an unknown nanoparticle, making it valuable to researchers.

  15. Detection and Quantitation of Afucosylated N-Linked Oligosaccharides in Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies Using Enzymatic Digestion and LC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi; May, Kimberly; Xu, Wei; Liu, Hongcheng

    2012-07-01

    The presence of N-linked oligosaccharides in the CH2 domain has a significant impact on the structure, stability, and biological functions of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. The impact is also highly dependent on the specific oligosaccharide structures. The absence of core-fucose has been demonstrated to result in increased binding affinity to Fcγ receptors and, thus, enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Therefore, a method that can specifically determine the level of oligosaccharides without the core-fucose (afucosylation) is highly desired. In the current study, recombinant monoclonal antibodies and tryptic peptides from the antibodies were digested using endoglycosidases F2 and H, which cleaves the glycosidic bond between the two primary GlcNAc residues. As a result, various oligosaccharides of either complex type or high mannose type that are commonly observed for recombinant monoclonal antibodies are converted to either GlcNAc residue only or GlcNAc with the core-fucose. The level of GlcNAc represents the sum of all afucosylated oligosaccharides, whereas the level of GlcNAc with the core-fucose represents the sum of all fucosylated oligosaccharides. LC-MS analysis of the enzymatically digested antibodies after reduction provided a quick estimate of the levels of afucosylation. An accurate determination of the level of afucosylation was obtained by LC-MS analysis of glycopeptides after trypsin digestion.

  16. Atom-chip based quantum gravimetry for the precise determination of absolute local gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abend, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel technique for the precise measurement of absolute local gravity based on cold atom interferometry. Atom interferometry utilizes the interference of matter waves interrogated by laser light to read out inertial forces. Today's generation of these devices typically operate with test mass samples, that consists of ensembles of laser cooled atoms. Their performance is limited by the velocity spread and finite-size of the test masses that impose systematic uncertainties at the level of a few μGal. Rather than laser cooled atoms we employ quantum degenerate ensembles, so called Bose-Einstein condensates, as ultra-sensitive probes for gravity. These sources offer unique properties in temperature as well as in ensemble size that will allow to overcome the current limitations with the next generation of sensors. Furthermore, atom-chip technologies offer the possibility to generate Bose-Einstein condensates in a fast and reliable way. We show a lab-based prototype that uses the atom-chip itself to retro-reflect the interrogation laser and thus serving as inertial reference inside the vacuum. With this setup it is possible to demonstrate all necessary steps to measure gravity, including the preparation of the source, spanning an interferometer as well as the detection of the output signal, within an area of 1 cm3 right below the atom-chip and to analyze relevant systematic effects. In the framework of the center of excellence geoQ a next generation device is under construction at the Institut für Quantenoptik, that will allow for in-field measurements. This device will feature a state-of-the-art atom-chip source with a high-flux of ultra-cold atoms at a repetition rate of 1-2 Hz. In cooperation with the Müller group at the Institut für Erdmessung the sensor will be characterized in the laboratory first, to be ultimately employed in campaigns to measure the Fennoscandian uplift at the level of 1 μGal. The presented work is part of the center of

  17. Sub-meter GPS orbit determination and high precision user positioning - A demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, Stephen M.; Bertiger, Willy I.; Katsigris, Eugenia C.

    1988-01-01

    High-accuracy orbit solutions have been obtained for GPS satellites, and submeter orbit accuracy is demonstrated for two well-tracked satellites. Orbit accuracy was tested based upon orbit repeatability from independent data sets, orbit prediction, ground baseline determination, and formal errors. Baselines of up to 2000 km in North America found with the GPS orbits show a daily repeatability of 0.3-1.5 parts in 10 to the 8th, and are found to agree well with VLBI solutions at the level of 0.3-3 parts in 10 to the 8th. Baselines were also determined between Florida and sites in the Caribbean region over 1000 km away, with a daily repeatability of 1-4 parts in 10 to the 8th.

  18. In-situ and non-destructive focus determination device for high-precision laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Oskar; Naghilou, Aida; Pöhl, Hannes; Kautek, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    A non-destructive, in-line, and low-cost focusing device based on an image sensor has been developed and demonstrated. It allows an in situ focus determination for a broad variety of laser types (e.g. cw and pulsed lasers). It provides stringent focusing conditions with high numerical apertures. This approach does not require sub-picosecond and/or auxiliary lasers, or high fluences above damage thresholds. Applications of this system include, but are not limited to the laser-illumination of micro-electrodes, pump-probe microscopy on thin films, and laser ablation of small samples without sufficient surface area for focus determination by ablation. An uncertainty of the focus position by an order of magnitude less than the respective Rayleigh length could be demonstrated.

  19. Variations in prebiotic oligosaccharide fermentation by intestinal lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akihito; Nakamura, Saki; Konishi, Kenta; Nakagawa, Junichi; Tochio, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Prebiotic oligosaccharides confer health benefits on the host by modulating the gut microbiota. Intestinal lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are potential targets of prebiotics; however, the metabolism of oligosaccharides by LAB has not been fully characterized. Here, we studied the metabolism of eight oligosaccharides by 19 strains of intestinal LAB. Among the eight oligosaccharides used, 1-kestose, lactosucrose and galactooligosaccharides (GOSs) led to the greatest increases in the numbers of the strains tested. However, mono- and disaccharides accounted for more than half of the GOSs used, and several strains only metabolized the mono- and di-saccharides in GOSs. End product profiles indicated that the amounts of lactate produced were generally consistent with the bacterial growth recorded. Oligosaccharide profiling revealed the interesting metabolic manner in Lactobacillus paracasei strains, which metabolized all oligosaccharides, but left sucrose when cultured with fructooligosaccharides. The present study clearly indicated that the prebiotic potential of each oligosaccharide differs. PMID:26888650

  20. New Food Oligosaccharides via Alternansucrase Acceptor Reactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternansucrase [EC 2.4.1.140] is a glycosyltransferase from food-grade bacteria that is capable of synthesizing unique polysaccharides and oligosaccharides from sucrose. The enzyme typically produces the high-molecular weight polysaccharide alternan. However, in the presence of low-molecular weig...

  1. The GLAS Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document for Precision Attitude Determination (PAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Sungkoo; Smith, Noah; Schutz, Bob E.

    2013-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) was the sole instrument for NASAs Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimetry mission. The primary purpose of the ICESat mission was to make ice sheet elevation measurements of the polar regions. Additional goals were to measure the global distribution of clouds and aerosols and to map sea ice, land topography and vegetation. ICESat was the benchmark Earth Observing System (EOS) mission to be used to determine the mass balance of the ice sheets, as well as for providing cloud property information, especially for stratospheric clouds common over polar areas.

  2. Standardisation and precise determination of the half-life of (44)Sc.

    PubMed

    García-Toraño, E; Peyrés, V; Roteta, M; Sánchez-Cabezudo, A I; Romero, E; Martínez Ortega, A

    2016-03-01

    The half-life of the positron-emitter (44)Sc has been determined by following the decay rate with two measurement systems; an Ionisation Chamber and a HPGe detector. The combination of seven results gives a value of T1/2=4.042 (25)h, about 2% higher than the recommended value of T1/2=3.97 (4)h (Browne, 2011) and with a lower uncertainty. This radionuclide has also been standardised by coincidence counting, and liquid scintillation counting techniques. A (44)Ti/(44)Sc generator developed at CIEMAT was used to obtain the (44)Sc solutions used in all measurements. PMID:26701659

  3. High Fidelity Non-Gravitational Force Models for Precise and Accurate Orbit Determination of TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, Stefan; Montenbruck, Oliver; Steigenberger, -Peter; Eineder, Michael; Gisinger, Christoph

    Remote sensing satellites support a broad range of scientific and commercial applications. The two radar imaging satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X provide spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and interferometric SAR data with a very high accuracy. The increasing demand for precise radar products relies on sophisticated validation methods, which require precise and accurate orbit products. Basically, the precise reconstruction of the satellite’s trajectory is based on the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from a geodetic-grade dual-frequency receiver onboard the spacecraft. The Reduced Dynamic Orbit Determination (RDOD) approach utilizes models for the gravitational and non-gravitational forces. Following a proper analysis of the orbit quality, systematics in the orbit products have been identified, which reflect deficits in the non-gravitational force models. A detailed satellite macro model is introduced to describe the geometry and the optical surface properties of the satellite. Two major non-gravitational forces are the direct and the indirect Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP). Due to the dusk-dawn orbit configuration of TerraSAR-X, the satellite is almost constantly illuminated by the Sun. Therefore, the direct SRP has an effect on the lateral stability of the determined orbit. The indirect effect of the solar radiation principally contributes to the Earth Radiation Pressure (ERP). The resulting force depends on the sunlight, which is reflected by the illuminated Earth surface in the visible, and the emission of the Earth body in the infrared spectra. Both components of ERP require Earth models to describe the optical properties of the Earth surface. Therefore, the influence of different Earth models on the orbit quality is assessed within the presentation. The presentation highlights the influence of non-gravitational force and satellite macro models on the orbit quality of TerraSAR-X.

  4. Application of MC-ICPMS to the precise determination of tellurium isotope compositions in chondrites, iron meteorites and sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, Manuela A.; Rehkämper, Mark; Halliday, Alex N.

    2004-03-01

    New mass spectrometric techniques have been developed for the precise and accurate determination of Te isotope compositions. The methods are suitable for the analysis of stony and iron meteorites as well as sulfide mineral separates, such that they can be applied to search for Te isotope anomalies in various solar system materials. Tellurium is first separated from its matrix with a two-stage liquid chromatographic procedure. For iron meteorites, solvent-extraction is used to isolate Te from Fe prior to the column separation. The isotope composition of Te is then determined by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). Tellurium has a very high first ionization potential and thus MC-ICPMS is much more suitable for the isotopic analyses than positive ion thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Only about 100 ng Te are required for a single high precision measurement. Analyses of two terrestrial sulfides, the carbonaceous chondrite Allende and the iron meteorite Canyon Diablo reveal that these have Te isotope compositions that are identical to the terrestrial standard within uncertainty. The Te isotope data acquired for standard solutions as well as meteorites and sulfides display reproducibilities (2[sigma]) of approximately +/-4500 ppm for 120Te/128Te, +/-140 ppm for 122Te/128Te, +/-100 ppm for 124Te/128Te, +/-30 ppm for 126Te/128Te, and +/-60 ppm for 130Te/128Te. Compared to published results for meteorite samples obtained by TIMS, this represents an improvement in precision of about one to two orders of magnitude for 122-130Te/128Te and by a factor of 4 for 120Te/128Te. A number of experiments furthermore demonstrate that the isotope data acquired by MC-ICPMS are accurate, even for complex geological samples.

  5. A Complication in Determining the Precise Age of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennecka, G. A.

    2010-01-01

    Primitive components in meteorites contain a detailed record of the conditions and processes in the solar nebula, the cloud of dust and gas surrounding the infant Sun. Determining accurately when the first materials formed requires the lead-lead (Pb-Pb) dating method, a method based on the decay of uranium (U) isotopes to Pb isotopes. The initial ratio of U-238 to U-235 is critical to determining the ages correctly, and many studies have concluded that the ratio is constant for any given age. However, my colleagues at Arizona State University, Institut fur Geowissenschaften, Goethe-Universitat (Frankfurt, Germany), and the Senckenberg Forschungsinstitut und Naturmuseum (also in Frankfurt) and I have found that some calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in chondritic meteorites deviate from the conventional value for the U-238/U-235 ratio. This could lead to inaccuracies of up to 5 million years in the age of these objects, if no correction is made. Variations in the concentrations of thorium and neodymium with the U-238/U-235 ratio suggest that the ratio may have been lowered by the decay of curium-247, which decays to U-235 with a half-life of 15.6 million years. Curium-247 is created in certain types of energetic supernovae, so its presence suggests that a supernova added material to the pre-solar interstellar cloud between 110 and 140 million years before the Solar System began to form.

  6. High-precision temperature determination of evaporating light-absorbing and non-light-absorbing droplets.

    PubMed

    Derkachov, G; Jakubczyk, D; Woźniak, M; Archer, J; Kolwas, M

    2014-10-30

    Models describing evaporation or condensation of a droplet have existed for over a century, and the temporal evolutions of droplet radius and temperature could be predicted. However, the accuracy of results was questionable, since the models contain free parameters and the means of accurate calibration were not available. In previous work (Hołyst et al. Soft Matter 2013, 9, 7766), a model with an efficacious parametrization in terms of the mean free path was proposed and calibrated with molecular dynamics numerical experiment. It was shown that it is essentially possible to determine reliably the temperature of a steadily evaporating/condensing homogeneous droplet relative to ambient temperature when the evolution of the droplet radius is known. The accuracy of such measurement can reach fractions of mK. In the case of an evaporating droplet of pure liquid, the (droplet) temperature is constant during the stationary stage of evaporation. In this paper, we show that, in many cases, it is also possible to determine the temporal evolution of droplet temperature from the evolution of the droplet radius if the droplet (initial) composition is known. We found the droplet radius evolution with high accuracy and obtained the evolution of droplet temperature (and composition) for droplets of (i) a two-component mixture of pure liquids; (ii) solutions of solid in liquid, one that is non-surface-active and another that is; and (iii) suspensions of non-light-absorbing and light-absorbing particles. PMID:25290035

  7. Enhancing the kinematic precise orbit determination of low earth orbiters using GPS receiver clock modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Yue, Xiaokui; Yuan, Jianping; Rizos, Chris

    2014-11-01

    Clock error estimation has been the focus of a great deal of research because of the extensive usage of clocks in GPS positioning applications. The receiver clock error in the spacecraft orbit determination is commonly estimated on an epoch-by-epoch basis, along with the spacecraft’s position. However, due to the high correlation between the spacecraft orbit altitude and the receiver clock parameters, estimates of the radial component are degraded in the kinematic approach. Using clocks with high stability, the predictable behaviour of the receiver oscillator can be exploited to improve the positioning accuracy, especially for the radial component. This paper introduces two GPS receiver clock models to describe the deterministic and stochastic property of the receiver clock, both of which can improve the accuracy of kinematic orbit determination for spacecraft in low earth orbit. In particular, the clock parameters are estimated as time offset and frequency offset in the two-state model. The frequency drift is also estimated as an unknown parameter in the three-state model. Additionally, residual non-deterministic random errors such as frequency white noise, frequency random walk noise and frequency random run noise are modelled. Test results indicate that the positioning accuracy could be improved significantly using one day of GRACE flight data. In particular, the error of the radial component was reduced by over 40.0% in the real-time scenario.

  8. A precise ionization method for determination of the energy deposited in small sites of irradiated objects

    SciTech Connect

    Bigildeev, E.A.; Lappa, A.V.

    1994-09-01

    The ionization method for determination of the energy deposited in sensitive sites of irradiated objects is usually used with the assumption that deposited energy is directly proportional to the number of ionization in a site. This assumption fails in two cases important for nanometer-sized sites: (1) when the fluctuation characteristics of deposited energy such as higher moments, probability distributions, etc. are determined instead of the mean value; (2) when the radiation field in a site is spatially non-uniform. In this paper both cases are investigated. Exact formulae connecting energy and ionization quantities (moments, cumulants, probability distributions) are established as well as practical procedures to obtain energy quantities from those of ionization. The validity of the direct proportionality principle is analyzed and approximate methods to correct it are propose. Some microdosimetric results are presented. The solution of these problems required that we refine some known notions and introduce new terms. In particular, in the paper the necessity of distinguishing two distinct types of events and correspondingly two sets of microdosimetric quantities is noted; new radiation parameters such as the fluctuation W value and non-equivalence factor for the events are defined and investigated numerically. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Precise equilibrium structure determination of hydrazoic acid (HN{sub 3}) by millimeter-wave spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Amberger, Brent K.; Esselman, Brian J.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.; Stanton, John F.

    2015-09-14

    The millimeter-wave spectrum of hydrazoic acid (HN{sub 3}) was analyzed in the frequency region of 235-450 GHz. Transitions from a total of 14 isotopologues were observed and fit using the A-reduced or S-reduced Hamiltonian. Coupled-cluster calculations were performed to obtain a theoretical geometry, as well as rotation-vibration interaction corrections. These calculated vibration-rotation correction terms were applied to the experimental rotational constants to obtain mixed theoretical/experimental equilibrium rotational constants (A{sub e}, B{sub e}, and C{sub e}). These equilibrium rotational constants were then used to obtain an equilibrium (R{sub e}) structure using a least-squares fitting routine. The R{sub e} structural parameters are consistent with a previously published R{sub s} structure, largely falling within the uncertainty limits of that R{sub s} structure. The present R{sub e} geometric parameters of HN{sub 3} are determined with exceptionally high accuracy, as a consequence of the large number of isotopologues measured experimentally and the sophisticated (coupled-cluster theoretical treatment (CCSD(T))/ANO2) of the vibration-rotation interactions. The R{sub e} structure exhibits remarkable agreement with the CCSD(T)/cc-pCV5Z predicted structure, validating both the accuracy of the ab initio method and the claimed uncertainties of the theoretical/experimental structure determination.

  10. GPS-Based Precision Orbit Determination for a New Era of Altimeter Satellites: Jason-1 and ICESat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, Scott B.; Rowlands, David D.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Zelensky, Nikita P.; Williams, Teresa A.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate positioning of the satellite center of mass is necessary in meeting an altimeter mission's science goals. The fundamental science observation is an altimetric derived topographic height. Errors in positioning the satellite's center of mass directly impact this fundamental observation. Therefore, orbit error is a critical Component in the error budget of altimeter satellites. With the launch of the Jason-1 radar altimeter (Dec. 2001) and the ICESat laser altimeter (Jan. 2003) a new era of satellite altimetry has begun. Both missions pose several challenges for precision orbit determination (POD). The Jason-1 radial orbit accuracy goal is 1 cm, while ICESat (600 km) at a much lower altitude than Jason-1 (1300 km), has a radial orbit accuracy requirement of less than 5 cm. Fortunately, Jason-1 and ICESat POD can rely on near continuous tracking data from the dual frequency codeless BlackJack GPS receiver and Satellite Laser Ranging. Analysis of current GPS-based solution performance indicates the l-cm radial orbit accuracy goal is being met for Jason-1, while radial orbit accuracy for ICESat is well below the 54x1 mission requirement. A brief overview of the GPS precision orbit determination methodology and results for both Jason-1 and ICESat are presented.