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Sample records for determining seepage water

  1. A seepage meter designed for use in flowing water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.

    2008-01-01

    Seepage meters provide one of the most direct means to measure exchange of water across the sediment-water interface, but they generally have been unsuitable for use in fluvial settings. Although the seepage bag can be placed inside a rigid container to minimize velocity head concerns, the seepage cylinder installed in the sediment bed projects into and disrupts the flow field, altering both the local-scale fluid exchange as well as measurement of that exchange. A low-profile seepage meter designed for use in moving water was tested in a seepage meter flux tank where both current velocity and seepage velocity could be controlled. The conical seepage cylinder protrudes only slightly above the sediment bed and is connected via tubing to a seepage bag or flowmeter positioned inside a rigid shelter that is located nearby where current velocity is much slower. Laboratory and field tests indicate that the net effect of the small protrusion of the seepage cylinder into the surface water flow field is inconsequentially small for surface water currents up to 65 cm s-1. Current velocity affects the variability of seepage measurements; seepage standard deviation increased from ???2 to ???6 cm d-1 as current velocity increased from 9 to 65 cm s-1. Substantial bias can result if the shelter is not placed to minimize hydraulic gradient between the bag and the seepage cylinder.

  2. Seepage Reduction from Unlined Irrigation Canals: Water Quality and Seepage Reduction Effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susfalk, R. B.; Epstein, B. J.; Schmidt, M.; Goreham, J.; Fitzgerald, B.; Young, M. H.; Martin, C.; Swihart, J.; Smith, D.

    2006-12-01

    Polyacrylamide is a class of long-chain synthetic polymers that is used extensively in food packaging, paper manufacturing, wastewater treatment, and as a soil amendment to reduce erosion. More recently, linear, anionic polyacrylamides (LA-PAM) have been used to reduce seepage from unlined irrigation canals in the western United States. A diverse set of experiments spanning multiple scales has been initiated to understand the efficacy of LA-PAM usage in canal environments. The physical application of granular LA-PAM to flowing canals is straightforward. However, granular PAM requires time to hydrate and react with sediment suspended in the water column, complicating the targeting of a specific canal reach for treatment. Factors that influence PAM's ability to reduce seepage will be discussed, and can include: water temperature, water velocity, and the cation balance and suspended sediment concentration in the canal water. The application method and mass of PAM that are applied are also important considerations. If the ability of PAM to form flocs with suspended sediment is overestimated, PAM will travel further downstream, potentially having an adverse impact on water quality and/or ecology. Negative impacts include livestock drinking out of the canal, the unintentional reduction of seepage water feeding adjacent wetlands or sensitive areas, and impacts on receiving waters. A combination of results from working canals and small scale, artificial Test Troughs will be used to address the impacts that different LA-PAM applications can have on water quality and seepage reduction effectiveness.

  3. Determination of evaporation and seepage losses, Upper Lake Mary near Flagstaff, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blee, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Two mass-transfer equations were developed to compute evaporation as a part of the evaporation were seepage-loss study for the Upper Lake Mary Reservoir near Flagstaff, Arizona, which has a capacity of 15,620 acre-feet and a surface area of 876 acres. The mass-transfer equations do not require an independent measure of evaporation to define the mass-transfer coefficient. Data from other evaporation studies were used to define the mass-transfer coefficient as a function of wind shear and atmospheric stability. Long-term seepage losses were determined by use of a seepage-probability curve-derived from a stage-seepage relation and defined by several selected short-term water budgets-and a lake-stage probability curve. Seepage curves were derived for several different amounts of assumed reservoir sealing. The long-term water saving that would result from each increment of lake-bottom sealing were computed. The study revealed that the evaporation loss was 27 percent of 2 ,100 acre-feet per year of the total reservoir inflow during 1950-71; seepage loss was 45 percent or 3,500 acre-feet per year. (USGS)

  4. A system for calibrating seepage meters used to measure flow between ground water and surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, Donald O.; Menheer, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    The in-line flowmeter used with this system is incapable of measuring seepage rates below about 7 centimeters per day. Smaller seepage rates can be measured manually. The seepage- control system also can be modified for measuring slower seepage rates with the use of two flowmeters and a slightly different water-routing system, or a fluid-metering pump can be used to control flow through the flux tank instead of an adjustable-height reservoir.

  5. Water quality effects of seepage from earthen dams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yost, C., Jr.; Naney, J.W.

    1974-01-01

    Analyses of surface and seepage waters from selected floodwater retarding structures in west-central Oklahoma, U.S.A. show the salinity of seepage to be several times greater than that of the impounded waters. The increases in concentration of the several chemical components are not proportional. This phenomenon appears to be caused largely by simple solution, which is closely related to the chemical character of the geologic formation that provides the reservoir site and the earth fill of the dam. Concentration of certain chemical components in the seepage water progressively decreases as the structure ages. This is probably a function of depletion, which is related to the amounts and solubility of the parent materials subjected to solution. In contrast, the concentration of certain other components, such as iron and calcium, increases with time. The chemical activities within the accumulating mud on the bottom of the reservoir apparently cause these increases. ?? 1974.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Seepage Losses From Nighttime Water Level Changes and Water Balance Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, A.; Shukla, S.; Wu, C.

    2013-12-01

    Several techniques including Darcy's theory of one and two dimensional groundwater flow, seepage meters, and water balance have been used in the past to estimate seepage from impoundments such as reservoirs, ponds, and constructed wetlands. These methods result in varying level of errors in seepage estimates depending on method and biogeophysical setting to which they are applied. In this study, we explore a simple yet effective method of estimating groundwater fluxes for two stormwater impoundments (SIs) and a partially drained wetland located in agricultural areas using diurnal changes in surface water levels inside these systems. Days with no inflow, outflow, and rainfall were selected to minimize the effect of the error associated water balance components on seepage estimation. Difference in water levels between 20:00 hrs and 5:00 hrs was calculated for the selected days. Only nighttime change was considered keeping in mind the fact that evapotranspiration is negligible during night and hence, the change in water levels can be attributed to seepage alone. Seepage from the analysis of night-time change in the water levels was compared to the estimates from the water balance method with seepage being the residual component of the balance. Results show that seepage constitutes a large part of total outflow from the impoundments (29% and 17% for SI1 during 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 respectively, 30% for SI2 during 2009-2010 and seepage was greater than the total surface water outflow from SI2 during 2010-2011). Accuracy of this method varied from 5% to 41% for first and 4% to 29% for the second SI. Considering that errors as high as 100% have been reported with the use of Darcy's approach, the errors from our method are lower. The lower errors combined with ease of application without using the hydraulic conductivity values makes our approach feasible for other similar systems. Improved seepage estimate from the proposed method will result in quantification of

  7. Uncertainty of canal seepage losses estimated using flowing water balance with acoustic Doppler devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Chad A.; Gates, Timothy K.

    2014-09-01

    Seepage losses from unlined irrigation canals amount to a large fraction of the total volume of water diverted for agricultural use, posing problems to both water conservation and water quality. Quantifying these losses and identifying areas where they are most prominent are crucial for determining the severity of seepage-related complications and for assessing the potential benefits of seepage reduction technologies and materials. A relatively easy and inexpensive way to estimate losses over an extensive segment of a canal is the flowing water balance, or inflow-outflow, method. Such estimates, however, have long been considered fraught with ambiguity due both to measurement error and to spatial and temporal variability. This paper presents a water balance analysis that evaluates uncertainty in 60 tests on two typical earthen irrigation canals. Monte Carlo simulation is used to account for a number of different sources of uncertainty. Issues of errors in acoustic Doppler flow measurement, in water level readings, and in evaporation estimates are considered. Storage change and canal wetted perimeter area, affected by variability in the canal prism, as well as lagged vs. simultaneous measurements of discharge at the inflow and outflow ends also are addressed. Mean estimated seepage loss rates for the tested canal reaches ranged from about -0.005 (gain) to 0.110 m3 s-1 per hectare of canal wetted perimeter (or -0.043 to 0.95 m d-1) with estimated probability distributions revealing substantial uncertainty. Across the tests, the average coefficient of variation was about 240% and the average 90th inter-percentile range was 0.143 m3 s-1 per hectare (1.24 m d-1). Sensitivity analysis indicates that while the predominant influence on seepage uncertainty is error in measured discharge at the upstream and downstream ends of the canal test reach, the magnitude and uncertainty of storage change due to unsteady flow also is a significant influence. Recommendations are

  8. Methane gas seepage - Disregard of significant water column filter processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Schmale, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Marine methane seepage represents a potential contributor for greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and is discussed as a driver for climate change. The ultimate question is how much methane is released from the seafloor on a global scale and what fraction may reach the atmosphere? Dissolved fluxes from methane seepage sites on the seabed were found to be very efficiently reduced by benthic microbial oxidation, whereas transport of free gas bubbles from the seabed is considered to bypass the effective benthic methane filter. Numerical models are available today to predict the fate of such methane gas bubble release to the water column in regard to gas exchange with the ambient water column, respective bubble lifetime and rise height. However, the fate of rising gas bubbles and dissolved methane in the water column is not only governed by dissolution, but is also affected by lateral oceanographic currents and vertical bubble-induced upwelling, microbial oxidation, and physico-chemical processes that remain poorly understood so far. According to this gap of knowledge we present data from two study sites - the anthropogenic North Sea 22/4b Blowout and the natural Coal Oil point seeps - to shed light into two new processes gathered with hydro-acoustic multibeam water column imaging and microbial investigations. The newly discovered processes are hereafter termed Spiral Vortex and Bubble Transport Mechanism. Spiral Vortex describes the evolution of a complex vortical fluid motion of a bubble plume in the wake of an intense gas release site (Blowout, North Sea). It appears very likely that it dramatically changes the dissolution kinetics of the seep gas bubbles. Bubble Transport Mechanism prescribes the transport of sediment-hosted bacteria into the water column via rising gas bubbles. Both processes act as filter mechanisms in regard to vertical transport of seep related methane, but have not been considered before. Spiral Vortex and Bubble Transport Mechanism represent the

  9. Seepage-zone recognition of river water based on Cl(-) spatial difference.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hongying; Wang, Xinyi; Liu, Xiaoman; Zhao, Li

    2016-01-01

    Based on Cl(-) monitoring data of river water and shallow groundwater samples on both sides of the Dashi River, we analyzed spatial distribution of Cl(-) content in surface water and groundwater, and evaluated the retardation strength, pCl(-), the average retardation strength, pA, and the average residual retardation strength, pAR, of surface-groundwater Cl(-) content. We introduce the difference, Q, of the average retardation strength and the average residual retardation strength, which can be used to identify the seepage zone and the transition seepage zone of the river, and to quantitatively express the seepage range. The results show that Cl(-) content in the river gradually increased in areas with industrial agglomeration, but decreased in areas with non-agglomeration, and gradually decreased along the river flow. If Q ≥ 0, then there is no seepage zone in the study area, but if Q < 0, then there is a seepage zone in the study area. The sampling point is in the seepage zone when pCl(-) ≤ pA, in the transition seepage zone when pA < pCl(-) ≤ pAR, and in the no-seepage zone when pCl(-) > pAR. The recognition results are more consistent with field investigation. PMID:26877033

  10. Measuring Streambank Erosion Due to Groundwater Seepage: Correlation to Bank Pore Water Pressure, Precipitation and Stream Stage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There exists a lack of information on one of the basic mechanisms governing sediment input to streams: streambank erosion by ground water flow or seepage erosion. The objective of this research was to characterize a streambank undergoing seepage erosion and quantify subsurface flows and seepage ero...

  11. Integrating seepage heterogeneity with the use of ganged seepage meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.

    2005-01-01

    The usefulness of standard half-barrel seepage meters for measurement of fluxes between groundwater, and surface water is limited by the small bed area that each measurement represents and the relatively large associated labor costs. Standard half-barrel cylinders were ganged together to allow one measurement of the summed seepage through all of the meters, reducing labor cost and increasing the representative area of measurement. Comparisons of ganged versus individual-meter measurements at two lakes, under both inseepage and outseepage conditions, indicate little loss of efficiency resulting from routing seepage water through the ganging system. Differences between summed and ganged seepage rates were not significant for all but the fastest rates of seepage. At flow rates greater than about 250 mL min-1, ganged values were as low as 80% of summed values. Ganged-meter head losses also were calculated to determine their significance relative to hydraulic-head gradients measured at the field sites. The calculated reduction in hydraulic gradient beneath the seepage meters was significant only for the largest measured seepage rates. A calibration tank was used to determine single-meter and ganged-meter efficiencies compared to known seepage rates. Single-cylinder seepage meters required an average correction factor of 1.05 to convert measured to actual values, whereas the ganged measurements made in the tank required a larger correction factor of 1.14. Although manual measurements were used in these tests, the concept of ganging seepage cylinders also would be useful when used in conjunction with automated flowmeters. ?? 2005, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  12. Polyacrylamide and biopolymer effects on flocculation, aggregate stability, and water seepage in a silt loam

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researcher’s seek a more renewable and natural alternative for water soluble anionic polyacrylamide (PAM), a highly-effective, petroleum-derived polymer used in agriculture to control erosion and reduce water seepage from unlined irrigation structures. This study evaluated two anionic polymers: a ba...

  13. Preliminary studies of water seepage through rough-walled fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, J.T.; Su, G.; Pruess, K.

    1996-07-01

    For groundwater aquifers in fractured rock, fractures play a significant role in the transport of water and contaminants through the unsaturated zone to the groundwater table. Fractures can provide preferential flow paths for infiltrating liquids that dramatically accelerate contaminant transport compared to predictions based upon spatially uniform infiltration. The actual liquid distribution during infiltration determines the contact area between the flowing water and rock, and liquid residence time, which in turn affects the potential for rock-water and rock-solute interaction, as well as mass transfer between liquid and gas phases. This report summarizes flow- visualization experiments of water percolation through transparent replicas of a natural rock fracture. We have focused on phenomenological and exploratory experiments that can lead to a conceptual model which incorporates the important physical mechanisms that control flow.

  14. Study on the law of Unsteady Phreatic Water Seepage Near by Canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, P.; Tao, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Unsteady phreatic water seepage nearby canals is a classical problem in seepage mechanics. One of the classic solutions is use Boussinesq equation based on the assumption of Dupuit as the control equation, combine with the boundary conditions and initial conditions to solve it. The method can only used in the case of small hydraulic gradient. The paper take the unsteady phreatic water seepage nearby canals has larger hydraulic gradient as the research object, and establish a model suitable for this condition. Based on the first linearized Boussinesq equation and Laplace transform, the analytical solution of the model is obtained by flow integral and verified by sand tank experiment. The results showed that the free surface nearby canals is "parabolic" form changes to the "asymptotic" form when the canals water level rises. New solution is more realistic and calculate error of the original solution is larger at the beginning of canals water level variation. The law of unsteady phreatic water seepage nearby canals needs further study.

  15. Simulation of Sub-Drains Performance Using Visual MODFLOW for Slope Water Seepage Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baharuddin, M. F. T.; Tajudin, S. A. A.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Yusoff, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulation technique was used for investigating water seepage problem at the Botanic Park Kuala Lumpur. A proposed sub-drains installation in problematic site location was simulated using Modular Three-Dimensional Finite Difference Groundwater Flow (MODFLOW) software. The results of simulation heads during transient condition showed that heads in between 43 m (water seepage occurred at level 2) until 45 m (water seepage occurred at level 4) which heads measurement are referred to mean sea level. However, elevations measurements for level 2 showed the values between 41 to 42 m from mean sea level and elevations for level 4 between 42 to 45 m from mean sea level. These results indicated an increase in heads for level 2 and level 4 between 1 to 2 m when compared to elevations slope at the level 2 and level 4. The head increases surpass the elevation level of the slope area that causing water seepage at level 2 and level 4. In order to overcome this problems, the heads level need to be decrease to 1 until 2 m by using two options of sub-drain dimension size. Sub-drain with the dimension of 0.0750 m (diameter), 0.10 m (length) and using 4.90 m spacing was the best method to use as it was able to decrease the heads to the required levels of 1 to 2 m.

  16. Processes of bedrock groundwater seepage and their effects on soil water fluxes in a foot slope area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaoka, Naoya; Kosugi, Ken'ichirou; Yamakawa, Yosuke; Tsutsumi, Daizo

    2016-04-01

    The impact of bedrock groundwater seepage on surface hydrological processes in a foot slope area is an important issue in hillslope hydrology. However, properties of water flux vectors around a seepage area are poorly understood because previous studies have lacked sufficient spatial resolution to capture detailed water movements. Here, we conducted hydrometric observations using unprecedented high-resolution and three-dimensional tensiometer nests in the mountainous foot slope area of the Hirudani experimental basin (Japan). Our findings are summarized as follows: (1) a considerable quantity of groundwater seeped from the bedrock surface in the study site. A groundwater exfiltration flux occurred constantly from a seepage area regardless of rainfall conditions. Saturated lateral flow over the bedrock surface occurred constantly in the region downslope of the seepage area. Groundwater was likely to mixed with soil water infiltration and flowed toward the lower end of the slope. (2) During the wet season, the seepage area expanded ∼3 m in the upslope direction along the bedrock valley in a single season. (3) The pressure head waveform observed in the seepage area showed gradual and significant increases after large rainfall events. However, the seepage pressure propagated within a relatively narrow area: a slope distance of ∼4 m from the seepage point in the downslope direction due to the damping of seepage pressure. (4) Within the whole study area, groundwater seeped from a narrow area located at the bottom of the valley line of the bedrock surface. The shape of the seepage area changed along the valley line in the wet season. Overall, we reveal spatial and temporal variations in bedrock groundwater seepage under the soil mantle and the effects on soil water fluxes. These findings should improve the accuracy of models for predicting surface hydrogeomorphological processes in mountainous hillslopes.

  17. On Leakage andSeepage of CO2 from Geologic Storage Sites intoSurface Water

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Lewicki, J.L.

    2005-10-14

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture ofanthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) and its storage in deep geologicformations. The processes of CO2 seepage into surface water aftermigration through water-saturated sediments are reviewed. Natural CO2 andCH4 fluxes are pervasive in surface-water environments and are goodanalogues to potential leakage and seepage of CO2. Buoyancy-driven bubblerise in surface water reaches a maximum velocity of approximately 30 cms-1. CO2 rise in saturated porous media tends to occur as channel flowrather than bubble flow. A comparison of ebullition versus dispersive gastransport for CO2 and CH4 shows that bubble flow will dominate overdispersion in surface water. Gaseous CO2 solubility in variable-salinitywaters decreases as pressure decreases leading to greater likelihood ofebullition and bubble flow in surface water as CO2 migratesupward.

  18. Estimating seepage flux from ephemeral stream channels using surface water and groundwater level data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorduijn, Saskia L.; Shanafield, Margaret; Trigg, Mark A.; Harrington, Glenn A.; Cook, Peter G.; Peeters, L.

    2014-02-01

    Seepage flux from ephemeral streams can be an important component of the water balance in arid and semiarid regions. An emerging technique for quantifying this flux involves the measurement and simulation of a flood wave as it moves along an initially dry channel. This study investigates the usefulness of including surface water and groundwater data to improve model calibration when using this technique. We trialed this approach using a controlled flow event along a 1387 m reach of artificial stream channel. Observations were then simulated using a numerical model that combines the diffusion-wave approximation of the Saint-Vénant equations for streamflow routing, with Philip's infiltration equation and the groundwater flow equation. Model estimates of seepage flux for the upstream segments of the study reach, where streambed hydraulic conductivities were approximately 101 m d-1, were on the order of 10-4 m3 d-1 m-2. In the downstream segments, streambed hydraulic conductivities were generally much lower but highly variable (˜10-3 to 10-7 m d-1). A Latin Hypercube Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis showed that the flood front timing, surface water stage, groundwater heads, and the predicted streamflow seepage were most influenced by specific yield. Furthermore, inclusion of groundwater data resulted in a higher estimate of total seepage estimates than if the flood front timing were used alone.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Seepage Field of Tailing Water Channel Under Different Conditions in Operation Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feihan; Yan, Guoxin; Chen, Deling

    According to mathematical model of rock and soil, it calculated seepage field of tailing water channel under different conditions. The results showed that under condition of no.1, the seepage discharge from outside to inside of channel is 0.394 m3/h and the discharge under plastic concrete cut-off is 0.358m3/h, and that under condition of no.2, the seepage discharge from outside to inside of channel is 0.249 m3/h and the discharge under plastic concrete cut-off is 0.236m3/h. Under condition of no.1, the outflow of saturation line is at elevation of 411.0m which is under sand and gravel filling layer and near boundary of drift gravel sand layer. Under condition of no.2, the outflow of saturation line is at elevation of 403.0m which is under drift gravel sand layer and near rock foundation. The results showed that numerical simulation can be used to do with seepage problems of tailing water channel.

  20. Feasibility of water seepage monitoring in concrete with embedded smart aggregates by P-wave travel time measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Dujian; Liu, Tiejun; Huang, Yongchao; Zhang, Fuyao; Du, Chengcheng; Li, Bo

    2014-06-01

    Water seepage in concrete threatens the safety of marine constructions and reduces the durability of concrete structures. This note presents a smart aggregate-based monitoring method to monitor the travel time evolution of a harmonic stress wave during the water infiltrating process in concrete structures. An experimental investigation, in which two plain concrete columns were examined under different water infiltration cases, verified the validity of the proposed monitoring method. The test results show that the travel time of the harmonic stress wave is sensitive to the development of water seepage in concrete and decreases with increasing water seepage depth. The proposed active monitoring method provides an innovative approach to monitor water seepage in concrete structures.

  1. Periodic seepage face formation and water pressure distribution along a vertical boundary of an aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazayeri Shoushtari, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Nielsen, Peter; Cartwright, Nick; Perrochet, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Detailed measurements of the piezometric head from sand flume experiments of an idealised coastal aquifer forced by a simple harmonic boundary condition across a vertical boundary are presented. The measurements focus on the pore pressures very close to the interface (x = 0.01m) and throw light on the details of the boundary condition, particularly with respect to meniscus suction and seepage face formation during the falling tide. Between the low and the mean water level, the response is consistent with meniscus suction free models in terms of both the vertical mean head and oscillation amplitude profiles and is consistent with the observation that this area of the interface was generally within the seepage face. Above the mean water level, the influence of meniscus formation is significant with the mean pressure head being less than that predicted by capillary free theory and oscillation amplitudes decaying faster than predicted by suction free models. The reduced hydraulic conductivity in this area due to partial drainage of pores on the falling tide also causes a delay in the response to the rising tide. The combined influence of seepage face formation, meniscus suction and reduced hydraulic conductivity generate higher harmonics with amplitudes of up to 26% of the local main harmonic. To model the influence of seepage face formation and meniscus suction a numerical solution of the Richards' equation was developed and evaluated against the data. The model-data comparison shows a good agreement with the behaviour high above the water table sensitive to the choice of moisture retention parameters.

  2. A moving mesh algorithm for 3-D regional groundwater flow with water table and seepage face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knupp, P.

    A numerical algorithm is described for solving the free-surface groundwater flow equations in 3-D large-scale unconfined aquifers with strongly heterogeneous conductivity and surface recharge. The algorithm uses a moving mesh to track the water-table as it evolves according to kinematic and seepage face boundary conditions. Both steady-state and transient algorithms are implemented in the SECO-Flow 3-D code and demonstrated on stratigraphy based on the Delaware Basin of south-eastern New Mexico.

  3. Temporal variability of exchange between groundwater and surface water based on high-frequency direct measurements of seepage at the sediment-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberry, Donald O.; Sheibley, Richard W.; Cox, Stephen E.; Simonds, Frederic W.; Naftz, David L.

    2013-05-01

    Seepage at the sediment-water interface in several lakes, a large river, and an estuary exhibits substantial temporal variability when measured with temporal resolution of 1 min or less. Already substantial seepage rates changed by 7% and 16% in response to relatively small rain events at two lakes in the northeastern USA, but did not change in response to two larger rain events at a lake in Minnesota. However, seepage at that same Minnesota lake changed by 10% each day in response to withdrawals from evapotranspiration. Seepage increased by more than an order of magnitude when a seiche occurred in the Great Salt Lake, Utah. Near the head of a fjord in Puget Sound, Washington, seepage in the intertidal zone varied greatly from -115 to +217 cm d-1 in response to advancing and retreating tides when the time-averaged seepage was upward at +43 cm d-1. At all locations, seepage variability increased by one to several orders of magnitude in response to wind and associated waves. Net seepage remained unchanged by wind unless wind also induced a lake seiche. These examples from sites distributed across a broad geographic region indicate that temporal variability in seepage in response to common hydrological events is much larger than previously realized. At most locations, seepage responded within minutes to changes in surface-water stage and within minutes to hours to groundwater recharge associated with rainfall. Likely implications of this dynamism include effects on water residence time, geochemical transformations, and ecological conditions at and near the sediment-water interface.

  4. Toxicity of Water Samples Collected in the Vicinity of F and H Seepage Basin 1990-1995

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.; Bowers, B.

    1996-09-01

    Water and contaminants from the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins outcrop as shallow groundwater seeps down gradient from the basins. In 1990, 1991, 1993, 1994, and 1995, toxicity tests were performed on water collected from a number of these seeps, as well as from several locations in Fourmile Branch and several uncontaminated reference locations.

  5. Groundwater-Seepage Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walthall, Harry G.; Reay, William G.

    1993-01-01

    Instrument measures seepage of groundwater into inland or coastal body of water. Positioned at depth as great as 40 meters, and measures flow at low rate and low pressure differential. Auxiliary pressure meter provides data for correlation of flow of groundwater with tides and sea states. Seepage meter operates independently for several weeks. Its sampling rate adjusted to suit hydrologic conditions; to measure more frequently when conditions changing rapidly. Used in water-quality management and for biological and geological research. Potential industrial uses include measurement of seepage of caustic and corrosive liquids.

  6. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-11-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package corrosion or radionuclide transport.

  7. Geochemical characterisation of seepage and drainage water quality from two sulphide mine tailings impoundments: Acid mine drainage versus neutral mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heikkinen, P.M.; Raisanen, M.L.; Johnson, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    Seepage water and drainage water geochemistry (pH, EC, O2, redox, alkalinity, dissolved cations and trace metals, major anions, total element concentrations) were studied at two active sulphide mine tailings impoundments in Finland (the Hitura Ni mine and Luikonlahti Cu mine/talc processing plant). The data were used to assess the factors influencing tailings seepage quality and to identify constraints for water treatment. Changes in seepage water quality after equilibration with atmospheric conditions were evaluated based on geochemical modelling. At Luikonlahti, annual and seasonal changes were also studied. Seepage quality was largely influenced by the tailings mineralogy, and the serpentine-rich, low sulphide Hitura tailings produced neutral mine drainage with high Ni. In contrast, drainage from the high sulphide, multi-metal tailings of Luikonlahti represented typical acid mine drainage with elevated contents of Zn, Ni, Cu, and Co. Other factors affecting the seepage quality included weathering of the tailings along the seepage flow path, process water input, local hydrological settings, and structural changes in the tailings impoundment. Geochemical modelling showed that pH increased and some heavy metals were adsorbed to Fe precipitates after net alkaline waters equilibrated with the atmosphere. In the net acidic waters, pH decreased and no adsorption occurred. A combination of aerobic and anaerobic treatments is proposed for Hitura seepages to decrease the sulphate and metal loading. For Luikonlahti, prolonged monitoring of the seepage quality is suggested instead of treatment, since the water quality is still adjusting to recent modifications to the tailings impoundment.

  8. Analysis of a mesoscale infiltration and water seepage test in unsaturated fractured rock: Spatial variabilities and discrete fracture patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, Q.; Salve, R.; Liu, H.-H.; Wang, J.S.Y.; Hudson, D.

    2006-01-01

    A mesoscale (21??m in flow distance) infiltration and seepage test was recently conducted in a deep, unsaturated fractured rock system at the crossover point of two underground tunnels. Water was released from a 3??m ?? 4??m infiltration plot on the floor of an alcove in the upper tunnel, and seepage was collected from the ceiling of a niche in the lower tunnel. Significant temporal and (particularly) spatial variabilities were observed in both measured infiltration and seepage rates. To analyze the test results, a three-dimensional unsaturated flow model was used. A column-based scheme was developed to capture heterogeneous hydraulic properties reflected by these spatial variabilities observed. Fracture permeability and van Genuchten ?? parameter [van Genuchten, M.T., 1980. A closed-form equation for predicting the hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 44, 892-898] were calibrated for each rock column in the upper and lower hydrogeologic units in the test bed. The calibrated fracture properties for the infiltration and seepage zone enabled a good match between simulated and measured (spatially varying) seepage rates. The numerical model was also able to capture the general trend of the highly transient seepage processes through a discrete fracture network. The calibrated properties and measured infiltration/seepage rates were further compared with mapped discrete fracture patterns at the top and bottom boundaries. The measured infiltration rates and calibrated fracture permeability of the upper unit were found to be partially controlled by the fracture patterns on the infiltration plot (as indicated by their positive correlations with fracture density). However, no correlation could be established between measured seepage rates and density of fractures mapped on the niche ceiling. This lack of correlation indicates the complexity of (preferential) unsaturated flow within the discrete fracture network. This also indicates that continuum

  9. Ground-water seepage and sulfur diagenesis in acidified lake sediments

    SciTech Connect

    McIntire, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    Most sulfur diagenesis models predict that porewater SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} concentrations will decrease exponentially with increasing sediment depth and will be lower than that of the overlying water throughout the sediments. Sulfate concentrations below 0.2 mM are common in Lake Anna sediments which receive acid mine drainage; however, sediment porewater containing up to 29 mM SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} is also seen at about 20 cm below the sediment surface in this section of the lake. A decision tree was used to investigate the cause of the high SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} concentrations at depth (HSD) in the sediment. The first hypothesis was that increased ground-water flow through Lake Anna HSD sediments, relative to the non-HSD sediments, increases groundwater advection of SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} or of oxygen which would induce sulfide oxidation. Stations having HSD profiles did not have higher groundwater flow than other sites samples. Alternative explanations for the HSD profiles were that the region in which they occurred had (1) unusual sediment chemical compositions; (2) groundwater seepage containing unusually high sulfate concentrations; or (3) a lateral intrusion of high SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} water from the sulfide mines which supplied SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} to the HSD region before the lake was impounded.

  10. Lake Okeechobee seepage monitoring network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, Donald J.

    1973-01-01

    This report summarizes the data collected at the five original monitoring sites along the south shore of Lake Okeechobee from January 29, 1970 to June 28, 1972. In order to use the hydrographs in this report to full advantage, they should be studied in conjunction with Meyer's graphs and text (1971). During steady-state conditions, water seeps from the lake through the filtercake and through the aquifers beneath the dike. At those sites where the filtercake is missing, or has about the same permeability as the aquifers, the seepage from the lake is about equivalent to the flow through the aquifers. Present data are insufficient to determine whether or not filtercake buildup has reduced seepage. No appreciable change in drainage occurred during the observed period.

  11. Role of a groundwater-lake interface in controlling seepage of water and nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karan, S.; Kidmose, J.; Engesgaard, P.; Nilsson, B.; Frandsen, M.; Ommen, D. A. O.; Flindt, M. R.; Andersen, F. Ø.; Pedersen, O.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of the hydraulic characteristics of a groundwater-lake interface on discharge and nitrate loading to a lake were investigated. The interface is defined as the zone separating the adjacent aquifer (10's of m) and the lake bed (10's of cm) itself. The study combines field data using several tracers (water, oxygen isotopes, and nitrate) and numerical modeling. The hydraulic head distribution, a nitrate plume and seepage rates were observed over a two-year period along a ∼100 m long transect reaching from an agricultural field into the lake. The groundwater-lake interface system was simulated with a 2D steady state flow and nitrate transport model (FEFLOW). The observations showed that discharge to the lake was doubled-peaked, with a peak discharge near the shore line followed by an almost (classical) exponential decrease, and a second peak further off-shore. The nitrate plume also extended 60-80 m off-shore. By calibrating the model to measured discharge and the outline of the nitrate plume it was demonstrated that; (1) the ratio of horizontal to vertical hydraulic conductivity (anisotropy) was very important and on the order of 50 and (2) the lake bed acted as a hydraulic barrier by having a much lower hydraulic conductivity than that of the relatively homogeneous aquifer. We suggest that the barrier is formed by an extensive plant cover that can trap finer materials and produce a surface colmation layer. The simulation results show that when a barrier is present the total groundwater discharge to the lake can be up to a factor of two lower and that approximately 50% of the nitrate bypasses the barrier. This proportion of the nitrate loading will therefore also bypass the plant cover and discharge directly to the lake off-shore potentially leading to algal blooms under N-limited conditions in the lake water column.

  12. Long-term hydrologic and biogeochemical responses of a soft water seepage lake in north central Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wentz, Dennis A.; Rose, William J.; Webster, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrologic and chemical budgets were determined for the period October 1980 through September 1988 for Vandercook Lake, a 43-ha soft water seepage lake located in predominantly sandy outwash in northern Wisconsin. The 1951-1980 mean annual precipitation for the lake, based on nearby National Weather Service (NWS) stations, was 825 mm; volume-weighted p H of bulk atmospheric deposition during the 8-year study averaged 4.7. From October 1980 through September 1983, annual precipitation was 108% of the 30-year NWS average, annual recharge was 144% of the 8-year study period average, and annual groundwater inflow to the lake ranged from 5 to 9% of the total inflow. From October 1986 through September 1988, annual precipitation was 90% of the NWS average, annual recharge was 30% of the study period average, and the lake received no groundwater inflow. During the study, the lake changed from a system whose buffering mechanism was significantly influenced by mineral weathering in inflowing groundwater to one dominated by in-lake sulfate reduction. The functional differences exhibited by this lake during the 8 years of study demonstrate the tenuousness with which conclusions based on shorter-term studies of similar systems must be considered.

  13. Modulation of Seafloor Seepage by Faulting and Cracking of Deep Water Gas-Hydrate Systems at the Vestnesa Ridge, Fram Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza-Faverola, A. A.; Bunz, S.; Mienert, J.; Johnson, J. E.; Chand, S.; Knies, J.

    2014-12-01

    Seepage of natural gas at the seafloor is a broadly observed phenomenon, associated with hydrate systems and/or with shallow gas accumulations in the sub-surface. Regardless the geological setting, global observations indicate that gas seepage is most often episodic. Seepage episodes may occur with a predictable short-term periodicity (e.g., by seasonal or tidal related pressure and temperature changes) or longer term periodicity (e.g., glacial-interglacial changes). But seepage episodes can be also irregular, modulated for instance, by cracking and faulting. Identifying the processes modulating seepage is fundamental for reconstructing seepage history and for analyzing potential implications of seepage from geological sources on past and present climatic anomalies. We document the overlapping influence of fault reactivation and possibly glacial-interglacial cycles on cracking and seepage evolution within the deep water (1-2 km water depth), > 60 km long, and gas hydrate-charged Vestnesa drift in Fram Strait. The Vestnesa drift consists of a ~125° striking eastern segment with active seepage, and a seemingly inactive ~100° striking western segment. While the eastern segment is vulnerable to deformation at the northward propagating Knipovich oceanic ridge, the westward segment is within the deformation field of the Molloy ridge and the Spitsbergen transform fault zone. High resolution 3D P-Cable seismic data reveal the link between gas chimney distributions and small scale curvilinear, nearly vertical sub-seabed cracks and faults that reflect the influence of regional tectonics on each drift segment. Our observation and analysis can be extrapolated to similar systems where the tectonic history may have implications for modern deformation and fluid flow evolution within sediment ridges, only detectable by high or very high resolution 3D acoustic data.

  14. Evidence for Recent Liquid Water on Mars: Seepage Sites in 'Aerobraking Crater' Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    (A) [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (B) [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (C) (D) You will need 3D glasses to view this anaglyph

    The first clue that there might be places on Mars where liquid groundwater seeps out onto the surface came from a picture taken by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) during the pre-mapping Orbit Insertion Phase of the mission. The picture, shown in (A)above, was taken at the end of December 1997 while the spacecraft was still in the midst of aerobraking maneuvers to put it into the circular orbit needed for the Mapping Phase of the project. The Aerobraking 1 image, AB1-07707, showed dark, v-shaped scars on the western wall of a 50 kilometer-(31 mile)-diameter impact crater in southern Noachis Terra at 65oS, 15oW (see B, above, for context). The v-shaped features taper downslope to form narrow, somewhat curved channels. The relationship seen here was interpreted by MOC scientists to be similar to seepage landforms on Earth that form where springs emerge on a slope and water runs downhill.

    Once MGS achieved its Mapping Orbit in March 1999, the MOC was in a better position to take pictures of 10 times higher resolution than the Aerobraking AB1-07707 image. The opportunity to take a new picture of the proposed 'seepage' sites on the wall of the crater in southern Noachis finally arose in January 2000. The result is MOC image M11-00530, shown above in (top) and (C). This new close-up shows that the darkly-shaped scars host many small channels of only a few meters (yards) across. These small channels run downslope and coalesce at the apex (or point) of each 'v'. Amid the small channels are many large boulders, some of them the size of houses, that have eroded out of the crater wall. A 3-D view created using the AB1 and M11 images is shown in (D). The stereo picture (red-blue '3D' glasses required) emphasizes the presence of small channels and valleys, and shows that these valleys start

  15. Subsurface sediment mobilization and active pockmarks from sublacustrine ground-water seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, A.; Moernaut, J.; Loher, M.; Hilbe, M.; Meinecke, G.; Kipfer, R.; Anselmetti, F.; Bouffard, D.; Strasser, M.

    2014-12-01

    Lakes can be used as "model basins" to study fluid-flow processes with a multi-method approach in a well-defined environment. We present unprecedented insight into newly discovered pockmarks and associated subsurface sediment-mobilization structures in Lake Neuchâtel, Switzerland. A geophysical approach using multiple tools provides precise high-resolution bathymetric data and subsurface information of the sedimentary infill. We combine geophysical (300 kHz Kongsberg EM2040 multibeam, 3.5 kHz pinger seismic, deep-towed multi-frequency chirp seismic, mounted on an AUV), sedimentological (piston cores), hydrological (CTD), geochemical (methane, δ18O) and visual (ROV survey) data and observations. The data show several circular, crater-shaped pockmarks of up to 160 m in diameter and up to 30 m depth. The pockmarks are partially filled with mud in a fluid-like state. It is hypothesized that this mud is a result of active fluid flow within the pockmark. The levees of the pockmarks are characterized by high-amplitude wedge-shaped seismic reflections being intercalated with the background sediments. They are interpreted as overflow deposits originating from episodic increases in fluid flow from inside the pockmarks, causing sediment to be spilled over the margin and deposited on the levees. Data show multiple phases of sediment expulsion during discrete periods throughout the Holocene. Geochemical sediment analyses of headspace methane indicate the presence of purely microbial methane at low concentrations, thus no indications of active gas seepage. Elevated temperature values and depleted δ18O signals within the pockmark, compared to the reference sites, hint towards different water sources. We interpret these data to show two water bodies: (i) lake bottom-water, and (ii) groundwater entering as focused fluid flow through the pockmark. This multi-proxy approach shows that the newly discovered pockmarks of Lake Neuchâtel are sublacustrine springs, possibly related to

  16. Characterization of Preferential Ground-Water Seepage From a Chlorinated Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer to West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, 2002-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majcher, Emily H.; Phelan, Daniel J.; Lorah, Michelle M.; McGinty, Angela L.

    2007-01-01

    , relatively low concentrations of chlorinated daughter compounds, and insignificant concentrations of methane in shallow pore water samples. These seeps were primarily along the creek edge or formed a dendritic-like pattern between the wetland and creek channel. In contrast, seep locations characterized as diffuse seeps contained relatively high concentrations of chlorinated daughter compounds (or a mixture of daughter and parent compounds) and detectable methane concentrations in shallow pore water samples. These seeps were primarily along the wetland boundary. Qualitative thermal infrared surveys coupled with quantitative verification of temperature differences, and screening for volatile organic compound and methane concentrations proved to be effective tools in determining the overall extent of preferential seepage. Hydrologic and physical properties of wetland sediments were characterized at two focused and one diffuse seep location. In the seeps with focused discharge, measured seepage was consistent over the tidal cycle, whereas more variability with tidal fluctuation was measured in the diffuse seep location. At all locations, areas were identified within the general seep boundaries where discharge was minimal. In all cases, the geometric mean of non-zero vertical flux measurements was greater than those previously reported in the non-seep wetland sediments using flow-net analysis. Flux was greater in the focused discharge areas than in the diffuse discharge area, and all fluxes were within the range reported in the literature for wetland discharge. Vertical hydraulic conductivity estimated from seepage flux and a mean vertical gradient at seeps with focused discharge resulted in a minimum hydraulic conductivity two orders of magnitude greater than those estimated in the non-seep sediment. In contrast, vertical conductivity estimates at a diffuse seep were similar to estimates along a nearby line of section through a non-seep area. Horizontal hydraulic cond

  17. Seepage from channeled flows as influenced by PAM and sediment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage from water streams into unlined channels determines the proportion of water distributed to adjacent soil for plant use or soil or groundwater recharge, or conveyed to downstream reaches. We conducted a laboratory study to determine how sediment type (none, clay, silt), sediment concentratio...

  18. Sediment and polyacrylamide effects on seepage losses from channeled flows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage from water streams into unlined channels determines the proportion of water distributed to adjacent soil for plant use or soil or groundwater recharge, or conveyed to downstream reaches. We conducted a laboratory study to determine how inflow amendment and related factors, sediment type (no...

  19. Investigation of water seepage through porous media using X-ray imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung Yong; Lim, Seungmin; Lee, Sang Joon

    2012-07-01

    SummaryDynamic movement of wetting front and variation of water contents through three different porous media were investigated using X-ray radiography. Water and natural sand particles were used as liquid and porous media in this study. To minimize the effects of minor X-ray attenuation and uneven illumination, the flat field correction (FFC) was applied before determining the position of wetting front. In addition, the thickness-averaged (in the direction of the X-ray penetration) water content was obtained by employing the Beer-Lambert law. The initial inertia of water droplet influences more strongly on the vertical migration, compared to the horizontal migration. The effect of initial inertia on the horizontal migration is enhanced as sand size decreases. The pattern of water transport is observed to be significantly affected by the initial water contents. As the initial water contents increases, the bulb-type transport pattern is shifted to a trapezoidal shape. With increasing surface temperature, water droplets are easily broken on the sand surface. This consequently decreases the length of the initial inertia region. Different from the wetting front migration, the water contents at the initial stage clearly exhibit a preferential flow along the vertical direction. The water transport becomes nearly uniform in all directions beyond the saturation state.

  20. Cycling of mercury across the sediment-water interface in seepage lakes: Chapter 13, Advances in Chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurley, James P.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Babiarz, C.L.; Andren, Anders

    1994-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of Hg fluxes across the sediment—water interface were estimated by groundwater, dry bulk sediment, sediment pore water, sediment trap, and water-column analyses in two northern Wisconsin seepage lakes. Little Rock Lake (Treatment Basin) received no groundwater discharge during the study period (1988—1990), and Follette Lake received continuous groundwater discharge. In Little Rock Lake, settling of particulate matter accounted for the major Hg delivery mechanism to the sediment—water interface. Upward diffusion of Hg from sediment pore waters below 2—4-cm sediment depth was apparently a minor source during summer stratification. Time-series comparisons suggested that the observed buildup of Hg in the hypolimnion of Little Rock Lake was attributable to dissolution and diffusion of Hg from recently fallen particulate matter close to the sediment—water interface. Groundwater inflow represented an important source of new Hg, and groundwater outflow accounted for significant removal of Hg from Pallette Lake. Equilibrium speciation calculations revealed that association of Hg with organic matter may control solubility in well-oxygenated waters, whereas in anoxic environments sulfur (polysulfide and bisulfide) complexation governs dissolved total Hg levels.

  1. An Analytical Solution for Predicting Transient Seepage into Partially Penetrating Ditch Drains Receiving Water from a Ponded Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barua, Gautam; Sarmah, Ratan

    2016-02-01

    A transient analytical model is worked out for predicting seepage from a ponded field of infinite extent to a network of equally spaced ditch drains in a homogeneous and anisotropic soil underlain by an impervious barrier at a finite distance from the surface of the soil. The solution can account for finite width and finite level of water in the ditches, finite penetration of the drains in the soil, and also a variable ponding field at the surface of the soil. The study highlights the fact that the transient state duration of a partially penetrating ponded drainage scenario may be considerable should the drains be dug in a lowly conductive soil with a high storage coefficient, particularly if the underlying impervious layer lies at a large distance from the bottom of the ditches and the separation between the adjacent ditches is also large at the same time.

  2. Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Bryan

    2005-02-17

    The purpose of this report (REV04) is to document the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) seepage model, which simulates the composition of waters that could potentially seep into emplacement drifts, and the composition of the gas phase. The THC seepage model is processed and abstracted for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This report has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 172761]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The plan for validation of the models documented in this report is given in Section 2.2.2, ''Model Validation for the DS THC Seepage Model,'' of the TWP. The TWP (Section 3.2.2) identifies Acceptance Criteria 1 to 4 for ''Quantity and Chemistry of Water Contacting Engineered Barriers and Waste Forms'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) as being applicable to this report; however, in variance to the TWP, Acceptance Criterion 5 has also been determined to be applicable, and is addressed, along with the other Acceptance Criteria, in Section 4.2 of this report. Also, three FEPS not listed in the TWP (2.2.10.01.0A, 2.2.10.06.0A, and 2.2.11.02.0A) are partially addressed in this report, and have been added to the list of excluded FEPS in Table 6.1-2. This report has been developed in accordance with LP-SIII.10Q-BSC, ''Models''. This report documents the THC seepage model and a derivative used for validation, the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC submodel. The THC seepage model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC submodel uses a drift

  3. Hydrogeologic setting, water budget, and preliminary analysis of ground-water exchange at Lake Starr, a seepage lake in Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swancar, Amy; Lee, T.M.; O'Hare, T. M.

    2000-01-01

    Lake Starr, a 134-acre seepage lake of multiple-sinkhole origin on the Lake Wales Ridge of central Florida, was the subject of a detailed water-budget study from August 1996 through July 1998. The study monitored the effects of hydrogeologic setting, climate, and ground-water pumping on the water budget and lake stage. The hydrogeologic setting of the Lake Starr basin differs markedly on the two sides of the lake. Ground water from the surficial aquifer system flows into the lake from the northwest side of the basin, and lake water leaks out to the surficial aquifer system on the southeast side of the basin. Lake Starr and the surrounding surficial aquifer system recharge the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer. The rate of recharge to the Upper Floridan aquifer is determined by the integrity of the intermediate confining unit and by the downward head gradient between the two aquifers. On the inflow side of the lake, the intermediate confining unit is more continuous, allowing ground water from the surficial aquifer system to flow laterally into the lake. Beneath the lake and on the southeast side of the basin, breaches in the intermediate confining unit enhance downward flow to the Upper Floridan aquifer, so that water flows both downward and laterally away from the lake through the ground-water flow system in these areas. An accurate water budget, including evaporation measured by the energy-budget method, was used to calculate net ground-water flow to the lake, and to do a preliminary analysis of the relation of net ground-water fluxes to other variables. Water budgets constructed over different timeframes provided insight on processes that affect ground-water interactions with Lake Starr. Weekly estimates of net ground-water flow provided evidence for the occurrence of transient inflows from the nearshore basin, as well as the short-term effects of head in the Upper Floridan aquifer on ground-water exchange with the lake. Monthly water budgets showed the effects

  4. Interaction between hydrocarbon seepage, chemosynthetic communities, and bottom water redox at cold seeps of the Makran accretionary prism: insights from habitat-specific pore water sampling and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, D.; Sahling, H.; Nöthen, K.; Bohrmann, G.; Zabel, M.; Kasten, S.

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between fluid seepage, bottom water redox, and chemosynthetic communities was studied at cold seeps across one of the world's largest oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) located at the Makran convergent continental margin. Push cores were obtained from seeps within and below the core-OMZ with a remotely operated vehicle. Extracted sediment pore water was analyzed for sulfide and sulfate concentrations. Depending on oxygen availability in the bottom water, seeps were either colonized by microbial mats or by mats and macrofauna. The latter, including ampharetid polychaetes and vesicomyid clams, occurred in distinct benthic habitats, which were arranged in a concentric fashion around gas orifices. At most sites colonized by microbial mats, hydrogen sulfide was exported into the bottom water. Where macrofauna was widely abundant, hydrogen sulfide was retained within the sediment. Numerical modeling of pore water profiles was performed in order to assess rates of fluid advection and bioirrigation. While the magnitude of upward fluid flow decreased from 11 cm yr-1 to <1 cm yr-1 and the sulfate/methane transition (SMT) deepened with increasing distance from the central gas orifice, the fluxes of sulfate into the SMT did not significantly differ (6.6-9.3 mol m-2 yr-1). Depth-integrated rates of bioirrigation increased from 120 cm yr-1 in the central habitat, characterized by microbial mats and sparse macrofauna, to 297 cm yr-1 in the habitat of large and few small vesicomyid clams. These results reveal that chemosynthetic macrofauna inhabiting the outer seep habitats below the core-OMZ efficiently bioirrigate and thus transport sulfate down into the upper 10 to 15 cm of the sediment. In this way the animals deal with the lower upward flux of methane in outer habitats by stimulating rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate high enough to provide hydrogen sulfide for chemosynthesis. Through bioirrigation, macrofauna engineer their geochemical

  5. Interaction between hydrocarbon seepage, chemosynthetic communities and bottom water redox at cold seeps of the Makran accretionary prism: insights from habitat-specific pore water sampling and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, D.; Sahling, H.; Nöthen, K.; Bohrmann, G.; Zabel, M.; Kasten, S.

    2011-09-01

    The interaction between fluid seepage, bottom water redox, and chemosynthetic communities was studied at cold seeps across one of the world's largest oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) located at the Makran convergent continental margin. Push cores were obtained from seeps within and at the lower boundary of the core-OMZ with a remotely operated vehicle. Extracted pore water was analyzed for sulfide and sulfate contents. Depending on oxygen availability, seeps were either colonized by microbial mats or by mats and macrofauna. The latter, including ampharetid polychaetes and vesicomyid clams, occurred in distinct benthic habitats which were arranged in a concentric fashion around gas orifices. At most sites colonized by microbial mats, hydrogen sulfide was exported into the bottom water. Where macrofauna was widely abundant, hydrogen sulfide was consumed within the sediment. Numerical modeling of pore water profiles was performed in order to assess rates of fluid advection and bioirrigation. While the magnitude of upward fluid flow decreased from 11 cm yr-1 to <1 cm yr-1 and the sulfate/methane transition zone (SMTZ) deepened with increasing distance from the central gas orifice, the fluxes of sulfate into the SMTZ did not significantly differ (6.6-9.3 mol m-2 yr-1). Depth-integrated rates of bioirrigation increased from 162 cm yr-1 in central habitats characterized by microbial mats and sparse macrofauna to 348 cm yr-1 in habitats of large and small vesicomyid clams. These results reveal that chemosynthetic macrofauna inhabiting the outer seep habitats at the lower boundary of the OMZ efficiently bioirrigate and thus transport sulfate into the upper 10 to 15 cm of the sediment. In this way bioirrigation compensates for the lower upward flux of methane in outer habitats and stimulates rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate high enough to provide sulfide for chemosynthesis. Through bioirrigation macrofauna engineer their geochemical environment and fuel

  6. The Role of Groundwater for Lake-Water Quality and Quantification of N Seepage.

    PubMed

    Kidmose, Jacob; Engesgaard, Peter; Ommen, Daniela A Oliveira; Nilsson, Bertel; Flindt, Mogens R; Andersen, Frede Ø

    2015-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of both groundwater discharge to a lake (inflow) and nitrate concentrations in groundwater can lead to significant errors in calculations of nutrient loading. Therefore, an integrated approach, combining groundwater flow and transport modelling with observed nitrate and ammonium groundwater concentrations, was used to estimate nitrate loading from a catchment via groundwater to an oligotrophic flow-through lake (Lake Hampen, Denmark). The transport model was calibrated against three vertical nitrate profiles from multi-level wells and 17 shallow wells bordering a crop field near the lake. Nitrate concentrations in groundwater discharging to the lake from the crop field were on average 70 times higher than in groundwater from forested areas. The crop field was responsible for 96% of the total nitrate loading (16.2 t NO3 /year) to the lake even though the field only covered 4.5% of the catchment area. Consequently, a small change in land use in the catchment will have a large effect on the lake nutrient balance and possible lake restoration. The study is the first known attempt to estimate the decrease of nitrate loading via groundwater to a seepage lake when an identified catchment source (a crop field) is removed. PMID:25324021

  7. Influence of Groundwater Seepage on Water Quality and Ecological Health of the Ria Formosa Lagoon, Southern Portugal (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, A. Y.; Newton, A.

    2009-12-01

    Groundwater seepage from coastal aquifers has recently been recognized as an overlooked major source of nutrients (N, P) and contaminants to the coastal environment (Biddanda et al., 2009; Fear, Paerl and Braddy, 2007; Kluge et al., 2007; Kroeger and Charette, 2008). Nutrient and contaminants concentrations in groundwater are often much higher than those in river water, compensating for the lower flux of groundwater relative to the lagoon surface water. The Ria Formosa is a coastal lagoon located in the south of Portugal (Algarve, Faro) and surrounded by an intensely farmed area. We hypothesize that water quality and ecological health of the Ria Formosa environments are influenced by past and on-going contamination of terrestrial groundwaters with nutrients from fertilizer, sewage and industry. According to Leote, Ibanhez and Rocha (2005) estimated submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into the lagoon to be 3.6 m3 day-1 per linear meter of coastline with freshwater contributions (per volume) ranging from 10% to 50%. SGD as an important nutrient source to the Ria Formosa, estimating annual loads of 36.2 mol (0.507 kg) of Nitrogen, 1.1 mol (0.034 kg) of Phosphorus and 18.6 mol (0.522 kg) of Silicon per meter of coastline. Based on these results, it was suggested that SGD is a potential contributor to the observed nutrification status of the Ria Formosa lagoon. We are testing the following two hypotheses: (1) Anthropogenically impacted sites of the Ria Formosa having higher concentration of inorganic nutrients in groundwater will be characterized by higher density of Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) distribution, and higher chlorophyll and phycocyanin concentration, oxygen demand, and sediment organic carbon than the pristine site; (2) Anthropogenically impacted sites of the Ria Formosa having higher concentration of contaminants in groundwater will be characterized by lower AIS dispersal and colonization, and lower chlorophyll and phycocyanin concentration, oxygen

  8. Simulation procedure of unconfined seepage with an inner seepage face in a heterogeneous field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, MengXi; Yang, LianZhi; Yu, Ting

    2013-06-01

    An inner seepage face phenomenon is given and a numerical simulation procedure has been developed. It may appear at the interface of two materials when an unconfined seepage flows from a porous media to a coarser porous media with a higher permeability. Inaccuracy and divergent problems may arise both in a saturated-only and in a variably saturated analysis while an inner seepage face is not simulated with a special procedure. The position of the seepage face is determined during the nonlinear iteration process and the flux of the inner seepage face nodes is transferred to the downstream side nodes. Validity and efficiency of the procedure are illustrated by the simulation of two dimensional steady state seepage examples of heterogeneous zoned dams which is usually used to validate algorithms. An analysis of a three-dimensional earth core rockfill dam is also presented here. The procedure can also be applied to general transient seepage problems.

  9. Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-17

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the Seepage Calibration Model (SCM). The SCM is developed (1) to establish the conceptual basis for the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (SMPA), and (2) to derive seepage-relevant, model-related parameters and their distributions for use in the SMPA and seepage abstraction in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SCM is intended to be used only within this Model Report for the estimation of seepage-relevant parameters through calibration of the model against seepage-rate data from liquid-release tests performed in several niches along the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Main Drift and in the Cross Drift. The SCM does not predict seepage into waste emplacement drifts under thermal or ambient conditions. Seepage predictions for waste emplacement drifts under ambient conditions will be performed with the SMPA (see upcoming REV 02 of CRWMS M&O 2000 [153314]), which inherits the conceptual basis and model-related parameters from the SCM. Seepage during the thermal period is examined separately in the Thermal Hydrologic (TH) Seepage Model (see BSC 2003 [161530]). The scope of this work is (1) to evaluate seepage rates measured during liquid-release experiments performed in several niches in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and in the Cross Drift, which was excavated for enhanced characterization of the repository block (ECRB); (2) to evaluate air-permeability data measured in boreholes above the niches and the Cross Drift to obtain the permeability structure for the seepage model; (3) to use inverse modeling to calibrate the SCM and to estimate seepage-relevant, model-related parameters on the drift scale; (4) to estimate the epistemic uncertainty of the derived parameters, based on the goodness-of-fit to the observed data and the sensitivity of calculated seepage with respect to the parameters of interest; (5) to characterize the aleatory uncertainty of

  10. Seepage meters and Bernoulli's revenge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, E.A.; Reich, C.D.; Hickey, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of seepage data from a network of 50 permanently deployed submarine seepage meters, specially constructed from fiberglass, indicates that the devices artificially advect (Bernoulli effect) shallow ground water. Reverse flow into the rock was not observed even when adjacent piezometers installed 2-m to 20-m below the rock-water interface indicated negative groundwater heads. Quantitative testing of five different designs, including conventional end-of-oil-drum designs, indicates that meters presenting positive relief on the sea floor are subject to the Bernoulli effect when placed in areas where there are waves and/or currents. Advection does not appear to be caused by flexing of the collection bags.

  11. Seepage measurements from Long Lake, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isiorho, S.A.; Beeching, F.M.; Stewart, P.M.; Whitman, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Long Lake, located near Lake Michigan within the dune-complexes of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, USA, was formed some time during the Pleistocene and Holocene epochs. A surficial aquifer underlies Long Lake, which is either a source or sink for the later. The hydrologic processes in the lakeshore and surrounding environs have been significantly altered during the agricultural, municipal, and industrial development of the region. Limited data suggest that the organisms of Long Lake have elevated levels of several contaminants. This study attempts to quantify seepage within the lake to assess the potential threat to groundwater quality. Seepage measurements and minipiezometric tests were used to determine seepage within the lake. Seepage measurements and minipiezometric tests suggest that water seeps out of Long Lake, thus recharging the groundwater that flows southwest away from the lake. There is a great deal of variability in the seepage rate, with a mean of 11.5×10-4±11.2×10-4 m d-1. The mean seepage rate of 0.3 m yr-1 for Long Lake is greater than the 0.2 m yr-1 recharge rate estimated for the drainage basin area. The Long Lake recharge volume of 2.5 × 105 m3 yr-1 is approximately 22% of the volume of the lake and is significant when compared to the total surface recharge volume of 4.8 × 105 m3 yr-1 to the upper aquifer of the drainage area. There is a potential for contamination of the groundwater system through seepage from the lake from contaminants derived from aerial depositions.

  12. R Reactor seepage basins soil moisture and resistivity field investigation using cone penetrometer technology, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.K.

    2000-02-17

    The focus of this report is the summer 1999 investigation of the shallow groundwater system using cone penetrometer technology characterization methods to determine if the water table is perched beneath the R Reactor Seepage Basins (RRSBs).

  13. Active seepage and water infiltration in Lake Baikal sediments: new thermal data from TTR-Baikal 2014 (Class@Baikal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poort, Jeffrey; Khlystov, Oleg M.; Akhmanov, Grigorii G.; Khabuev, Andrei V.; Belousov, Oleg V.

    2015-04-01

    New thermal data from the sediments of Lake Baikal were collected in July 2014 during the first Training-Through-Research cruise on Lake Baikal (Class@Baikal) organized by MGU and LIN. TTR-Baikal is a comprehensive multidisciplinary program to train students on the field on pertinent scientific topics. The cruise program focused on seafloor sampling, acoustic investigations and heat flow measurements of gas seeps, flares, mud volcanoes, slumps and debris flows, canyons and channels in the coastal proximity. The thermal data were acquired using autonomous temperature sensors on a 3 meter long gravity corer that allowed analysis at the same spot of sediments, pore fluids, hydrates and microbiology. A total of eight thermal measurements were performed in five structures located on the lake floor of the Central Baikal Basin at 333-1530 meter water depths: 3 mud volcanoes (Novosibirsk, Unshuy and Krest), 1 seep site (Seep 13), and one fault outcrop in the Selenga transfer zone. All studied structures show signals of active seepage, water infiltration and/or hydrate dynamics. The strongest thermal gradient has been measured in Seep 13, suggesting a strong upflow of warm fluids similar to the Gorevoy Utes seep. At the three mud volcanoes, hydrate presence have been evidenced and both enhanced and reduced thermal gradients have been observed. This is similar to the hydrate-bearing K-2 mud volcano in Baikal (Poort et al., 2012). A strongly reduced thermal gradient was observed in the Krest mud volcano where the presence of oxidized channels at 30-40 cm under the sediment surface indicate an infiltration of cold lake water. The water infiltration process at hydrate bearing seep sites will be discussed and compared with other seep areas in the world.

  14. Influence of evaporation, ground water, and uncertainty in the hydrologic budget of Lake Lucerne, a seepage lake in Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Terrie Mackin; Swancar, Amy

    1997-01-01

    A detailed hydrologic budget was constructed of a seepage lake of sinkhole origin in the karst terrain of central Florida. During the drought period studied, lake evaporation computed by the energy-budget and mass-transfer methods was the largest component in the budget, followed by rainfall. Ground-water inflow contributed about one-third of the total inflow. Lake leakage was about one-fourth of the evaporative losses and was increased substantially by pumping from the Upper Floridan aquifer.

  15. Effects on ground-water quality of seepage from a phosphatic clayey waste settling pond, north-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, J.D.; Seaber, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    Water samples were taken from test wells drilled near an inactive phosphatic clayey waste storage settling pond, from the settling pond and its perimeter ditch, and from an active settling pond near White Springs, Hamilton County, in north-central Florida. The purpose was to document the seepage of chemical constituents from the inactive settling pond and ditch into the adjacent surficial groundwater system, and to assess the potential for movement of these constituents into the deeper Floridan aquifer system which is the major source of public supply in the area. The study area is underlain by a 2 ,500-ft-thick sequence of Coastal Plain sediments of Early Cretaceous to Holocene age. The rocks of Tertiary and Quaternary age that underlie the test site area can be grouped into three major geohydrologic units. In descending order, these units are: surficial aquifer, Hawthorn confining unit, and Floridan aquifer system. Phosphate deposits occur in the upper part of the surficial aquifer. Water in the active settling pond is a calcium magnesium sulfate type with a dissolved solids concentration of 250 mg/L, containing greater amounts of phosphorus, iron, aluminum, barium, zinc, and chromium than the other surface waters. Water in the perimeter ditch is a calcium sulfate type with a dissolved solids concentration of 360 to 390 mg/L, containing greater amounts of calcium, sulfate, nitrogen, and fluoride than other surface waters. Water from the inactive settling pond is a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type with a dissolved solids concentration of 140 mg/L, containing more bicarbonate than the other surface waters. Large amounts of chemical constituents in the phosphate waste disposal slurry are apparently trapped in the sediments of the settling ponds. The quality of water in the upper part of the surficial aquifer from wells within 200 to 400 ft of the inactive settling pond shows no signs of chemical contamination from phosphate industry operations. The horizontal

  16. SEEPAGE/BACKFILL INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Mariner

    2000-04-14

    As directed by written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a sub-model of seepage/backfill interactions is developed and presented in this document to support the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Physical and Chemical Environment Model. The purpose of this analysis is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and the Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift. In this analysis, a conceptual model is developed to provide PAO a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). The development plan calls for a sub-model that evaluates the effect on water chemistry of chemical reactions between water that enters the drift and backfill materials in the drift. The development plan specifically requests an evaluation of the following important chemical reaction processes: dissolution-precipitation, aqueous complexation, and oxidation-reduction. The development plan also requests the evaluation of the effects of varying seepage and drainage fluxes, varying temperature, and varying evaporation and condensation fluxes. Many of these effects are evaluated in a separate Analysis/Model Report (AMR), ''Precipitates Salts Analysis AMR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000), so the results of that AMR are referenced throughout this AMR.

  17. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations in the perched ground water under seepage-irrigated potato cropping systems.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Arboleda, F; Mylavarapu, R; Hutchinson, C; Portier, K

    2008-01-01

    Excessive nitrogen rates for potato production in northeast Florida have been declared as a potential source of nitrate pollution in the St. Johns River watershed. This 3-yr study examined the effect of N rates (0, 168, and 280 kg ha(-1)) split between planting and 40 d after planting on the NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water under potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Atlantic) in rotation with sorghum sudan grass hybrid (Sorghum vulgare x Sorghum vulgare var. sudanese, cv. SX17), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata cv. Iron Clay), and greenbean (Phaseolus vulgare cv. Espada). Soil solution from the root zone and water from the perched ground water under potato were sampled periodically using lysimeters and wells, respectively. Fertilization at planting increased the NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water, but no effect of the legumes in rotation with potatoes on nitrate leaching was detected. Fertilization of green bean increased NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water under potato planted in the following season. The NO(3)-N concentration in the soil solution within the potato root zone followed a similar pattern to that of the perched ground water but with higher initial values. The NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water was proportional to the rainfall magnitude after potato planting. A significant increase in NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water under cowpea planted in summer after potato was detected for the side-dressing of 168 kg ha(-1) N applied to potato 40 d after planting but not at the 56 kg ha(-1) N side-dress. Elevation in NO(3)-N concentration in the perched ground water under sorghum was not significant, supporting its use as an effective N catch crop. PMID:18268301

  18. Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data

    SciTech Connect

    S. Finsterle

    2004-09-02

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the Seepage Calibration Model (SCM). The SCM was developed (1) to establish the conceptual basis for the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (SMPA), and (2) to derive seepage-relevant, model-related parameters and their distributions for use in the SMPA and seepage abstraction in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). This Model Report has been revised in response to a comprehensive, regulatory-focused evaluation performed by the Regulatory Integration Team [''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Evaluation of Analysis and Model Reports Supporting the TSPA-LA'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169653])]. The SCM is intended to be used only within this Model Report for the estimation of seepage-relevant parameters through calibration of the model against seepage-rate data from liquid-release tests performed in several niches along the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Main Drift and in the Cross-Drift. The SCM does not predict seepage into waste emplacement drifts under thermal or ambient conditions. Seepage predictions for waste emplacement drifts under ambient conditions will be performed with the SMPA [''Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167652])], which inherits the conceptual basis and model-related parameters from the SCM. Seepage during the thermal period is examined separately in the Thermal Hydrologic (TH) Seepage Model [see ''Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170338])]. The scope of this work is (1) to evaluate seepage rates measured during liquid-release experiments performed in several niches in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and in the Cross-Drift, which was excavated for enhanced characterization of the repository block (ECRB); (2) to evaluate air-permeability data measured in boreholes above the niches and the Cross-Drift to obtain the permeability structure for the seepage model

  19. H-Area Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, G.

    1990-12-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium.

  20. Impact of aquifer desaturation on steady-state river seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel-Seytoux, Hubert J.; Miracapillo, Cinzia; Mehl, Steffen

    2016-02-01

    Flow exchange between surface and ground water is of great importance be it for beneficial allocation and use of the water resources or for the proper exercise of water rights. That exchange can take place under a saturated or unsaturated flow regime. Which regimes occur depend on conditions in the vicinity of the interactive area. Withdrawals partially sustained by seepage may not bring about desaturation but greater amounts eventually will. The problem considered in this paper deals only with the steady-state case. It is meant as a first step toward a simple, yet accurate and physically based treatment of the transient situation. The primary purpose of the article is to provide simple criteria for determination of the initiation of desaturation in an aquifer originally in saturated hydraulic connection with a river or a recharge area. The extent of the unsaturated zone in the aquifer will increase with increasing withdrawals while at the same time the seepage rate from the river increases. However the seepage increase will stop once infiltration takes place strictly by gravity in the aquifer and is no longer opposed by the capillary rise from the water table below the riverbed. Following desaturation simple criteria are derived and simple analytical formulae provided to estimate the river seepage based on the position of the water table mound below the clogging layer and at some distance away from the river bank. They fully account for the unsaturated flow phenomena, including the existence of a drainage entry pressure. Two secondary objectives were to verify that (1) the assumption of uniform vertical flow through a clogging layer and that (2) the approximation of the water table mound below the seepage area as a flat surface were both reasonably legitimate. This approach will be especially advantageous for the implementation of the methodology in large-scale applications of integrated hydrologic models used for management.

  1. Seepage Model for PA Including Dift Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    G. Li; C. Tsang

    2000-12-20

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to

  2. Effects of seepage from fly-ash settling ponds and construction dewatering on ground-water levels in the Cowles unit, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, William R.; Tucci, Patrick

    1979-01-01

    Part of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore shares a common boundary with the Northern Indiana Public Service Company (NIPSCO). This area is underlain by unconsolidated deposits approximately 180 feet thick. NIPSCO accumulates fly ash from the burning of coal in electric-power generating units in settling ponds. Seepage from the ponds has raised ground-water levels above natural levels approximately 15 feet under the ponds and more than 10 feet within the Lakeshore. NIPSCO is presently (1977) constructing a nuclear powerplant, and construction activities include pumping ground water to dewater the construction site. The company has installed a slurry wall around the site to prevent lowering of ground-water levels within the Lakeshore. Plans call for continuous pumping through at least December 1979. A multilayered digital flow model was constructed to simulate the ground-water system. The model was used to demonstrate the effects of seepage from the fly-ash ponds on ground-water levels. Also, the model indicated a decline of 3 feet or less in the upper sand unit and 5 feet or less in the lower sand unit within the Lakeshore.

  3. Water chemistry, seepage investigation, streamflow, reservoir storage, and annual availability of water for the San Juan-Chama Project, northern New Mexico, 1942-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKean, Sarah E.; Anderholm, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    The Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority supplements the municipal water supply for the Albuquerque metropolitan area, in central New Mexico, with surface water diverted from the Rio Grande. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority, undertook this study in which water-chemistry data and historical streamflow were compiled and new water-chemistry data were collected to characterize the water chemistry and streamflow of the San Juan-Chama Project (SJCP). Characterization of streamflow included analysis of the variability of annual streamflow and comparison of the theoretical amount of water that could have been diverted into the SJCP to the actual amount of water that was diverted for the SJCP. Additionally, a seepage investigation was conducted along the channel between Azotea Tunnel Outlet and the streamflow-gaging station at Willow Creek above Heron Reservoir to estimate the magnitude of the gain or loss in streamflow resulting from groundwater interaction over the approximately 10-mile reach. Generally, surface-water chemistry varied with streamflow throughout the year. Streamflow ranged from high flow to low flow on the basis of the quantity of water diverted from the Rio Blanco, Little Navajo River, and Navajo River for the SJCP. Vertical profiles of the water temperature over the depth of the water column at Heron Reservoir indicated that the reservoir is seasonally stratified. The results from the seepage investigations indicated a small amount of loss of streamflow along the channel. Annual variability in streamflow for the SJCP was an indication of the variation in the climate parameters that interact to contribute to streamflow in the Rio Blanco, Little Navajo River, Navajo River, and Willow Creek watersheds. For most years, streamflow at Azotea Tunnel Outlet started in March and continued for approximately 3 months until the middle of July. The majority of annual streamflow

  4. Use of an Electromagnetic Seepage Meter to Investigate Temporal Variability in Lake Seepage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.; Morin, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    A commercially available electromagnetic flowmeter is attached to a seepage cylinder to create an electromagnetic seepage meter (ESM) for automating measurement of fluxes across the sediment/water interface between ground water and surface water. The ESM is evaluated through its application at two lakes in New England, one where water seeps into the lake and one where water seeps out of the lake. The electromagnetic flowmeter replaces the seepage-meter bag and provides a continuous series of measurements from which temporal seepage processes can be investigated. It provides flow measurements over a range of three orders of magnitude, and contains no protruding components or moving parts. The ESM was used to evaluate duration of seepage disturbance following meter installation and indicated natural seepage rates resumed approximately one hour following meter insertion in a sandy lakebed. Lakebed seepage also varied considerably in response to lakebed disturbances, near-shore waves, and rain-falls, indicating hydrologic processes are occurring in shallow lakebed settings at time scales that have largely gone unobserved.

  5. ANL-W 779 pond seepage test

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.R.

    1992-11-01

    The ANL-W 779 sanitary wastewater treatment ponds are located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), north of the Argonne National Laboratory -- West (ANL-W) site A seepage test was performed for two Argonne National Laboratory -- West (ANL-W) sanitary wastewater treatment ponds, Facility 779. Seepage rates were measured to determine if the ponds are a wastewater land application facility. The common industry standard for wastewater land application facilities is a field-measured seepage rate of one quarter inch per day or greater.

  6. Use of geophysical methods to map subsurface features at levee seepage locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackett, Thomas C.

    The Great Flood of 2011 caused moderate to severe seepage and piping along the Mississippi River levees in Northwest Mississippi. The aim of this thesis was to implement geophysical techniques at two seepage locations in order to give a better understanding of the causes of underseepage and information on how to mitigate the problem. Sites near Rena Lara in Coahoma County and near Francis in Bolivar County were chosen to conduct this survey. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Electromagnetic Induction (EM) surveys were conducted on and adjacent to levees to identify seepage pathways and any dominant geological features at the sites. Results from geophysical surveys revealed that Francis and Rena Laura each had a prominent geomorphologic feature that was attributing to underseepage. Seepage at Francis was the result of a sand filled channel capped by a clay overburden. Permeable materials at the base of the channel served as a conduit for transporting river water beneath the levee. The seepage surfaced as sand boils where the overlying clay overburden was thin or non-existent. Investigations at the Rena Lara site revealed a large, clay-filled swale extending beneath the levee. The clay within the swale has relatively low horizontal permeability, and concentrated the seepage flow towards more permeable zones on the flanks of the swale. This resulted in the formation of sand boils at the base of the levee. Both geomorphic features at Francis and Rena Lara were identified as surface drainages using remote sensing data. With the assistance of borehole and elevation data, geophysics was successfully used to characterize the features at each site. Properties such as permeability and clay content were derived from responses in electrical conductivity and used to build seepage models at each site. These models will hopefully be considered when determining seepage conditions and mitigation techniques at other sites along the levee.

  7. Field Analogues of Shallow-water Hydrocarbon Seepages in the Pleistocene Argille Azzurre Formation: the Chimneys Field of Enza River, Northern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppo, D.; Capozzi, R.; Dinelli, E.; Negri, A.; Montagna, P.; Picotti, V.; Scarponi, D.; Taviani, M.

    2012-12-01

    The geologically young Northern Apennines contain various natural seeps documenting a variability of reservoirs and fluids in terms of origin, age and evolution. Hydrocarbon and saline water seepages are controlled by the structures of the chain and the foredeep. In the geological record, the witness of these natural seepages are represented by authigenic carbonates. Their isotopic content allows to understand the carbon source and the processes of carbonate precipitation. The better known regional examples of Methane Derived Authigenic Carbonates (MDAC) and chemoherm build-ups, clustered in the Upper Miocene and Lower-Upper Pliocene successions, are formed in deep water (> 300 m) sediments. Occurrences in shallow water (shelf) settings have never been reported. Our case study describes the palisade chimneys field, recently exposed along the Enza riverbanks in the Northern Apennines in the Argille Azzurre Formation (blue mudstones) of Pleistocene age. The paleontological content (mainly bivalves) documents that this unit was deposited in an open marine muddy shelfal setting, in a bathymetric range of about 50-70 m, with local anoxic condition, documented by benthic foraminifer assemblages. The succession is biostratigraphically dated at the Early Pleistocene (Calabrian, nannoplancton zone MNN19e). A number of subvertical, metric-high columnar chimneys, ranging in diameter from 10 to 35 cm, in association with discontinuous planar carbonate concretions, intervening along the bedding planes, outcrop within the mudstones. Such concretions are clearly formed by the moderate cementation of the hosting pelitic sediments. The tubular concretions show central conduits running along the whole length, locally filled by sediments. The grain size within the concretions is homogeneous, both in the chimneys and planar concretions and irrespective of the bedding planes, suggesting a process of transport and homogenization prior to the cementation. Within the Enza river succession

  8. POST-PROCESSING ANALYSIS FOR THC SEEPAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Y. SUN

    2004-09-29

    This report describes the selection of water compositions for the total system performance assessment (TSPA) model of results from the thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) seepage model documented in ''Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169856]). The selection has been conducted in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Post-Processing Analysis for THC Seepage) Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171334]). This technical work plan (TWP) was prepared in accordance with AP-2.27Q, ''Planning for Science Activities''. Section 1.2.3 of the TWP describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this report. The post-processing analysis for THC seepage (THC-PPA) documented in this report provides a methodology for evaluating the near-field compositions of water and gas around a typical waste emplacement drift as these relate to the chemistry of seepage, if any, into the drift. The THC-PPA inherits the conceptual basis of the THC seepage model, but is an independently developed process. The relationship between the post-processing analysis and other closely related models, together with their main functions in providing seepage chemistry information for the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA), are illustrated in Figure 1-1. The THC-PPA provides a data selection concept and direct input to the physical and chemical environment (P&CE) report that supports the TSPA model. The purpose of the THC-PPA is further discussed in Section 1.2. The data selection methodology of the post-processing analysis (Section 6.2.1) was initially applied to results of the THC seepage model as presented in ''Drift-Scale THC Seepage Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169856]). Other outputs from the THC seepage model (DTN: LB0302DSCPTHCS.002 [DIRS 161976]) used in the P&CE (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860

  9. An annotated bibliography of devices developed for direct measurement of seepage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Mark R.; Winter, Thomas C.

    1980-01-01

    The need for information on the interrelationship of groundwater and surface water is causing a growing interest in methods used for direct measurement of seepage to and from surface-water bodies. Instruments developed for measurement of seepage date from about the mid 1940 's largely in response to the need for knowing the quantity of seepage loss from canals. This bibliography includes abstracts, summaries, or conclusions from papers describing seepage measurement devices. Illustrations of the instruments are included. (USGS)

  10. Seepage Erosion Impacts on Edge-of-Field Gully Erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have found that the dominant source of sediment in streams can be from bank erosion. Subsurface flow contributes directly to bank failure by seepage erosion and soil-pipe erosion and indirectly by the impact of increased soil water pressures on loss of soil shear strength. Seepage erosion in...

  11. Field Evaluation of Seepage Meters in the Coastal Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, J. E.; Burnett, W. C.; Chanton, J. P.; Corbett, D. R.; Cable, P. H.

    1997-09-01

    The response of seepage meters was evaluated in a nearshore marine environment where water motion effects are more pronounced than in lake settings, where these meters have been used traditionally. Temporal and spatial variations of seepage, as well as potential artifacts, were evaluated using empty and 1000-ml pre-filled bag measurements. Time-series measurements confirmed earlier observations that anomalously high fluxes occur during the early stages (≤10 min) of collection. As deployment times increased (30-60 min), measured flow rates stabilized at a level thought to represent the actual seepage flux. Pre-filling the plastic measurement bags effectively alleviated this anomalous, short-term influx. Reliable seepage measurements required deployment times sufficient to allow a net volume of at least 150 ml into the collection bag. Control experiments, designed by placing seepage meters inside sand-filled plastic swimming pools, served as indicators of external effects on these measurements, i.e. they served as seepage meter blanks. When winds were under 15 knots, little evidence was found that water motion caused artifacts in the seepage measurements. Tidal cycle influences on seepage rates were negligible in the present study area, but long-term temporal variations (weeks to months) proved substantial. Observed long-term changes in groundwater flux into the Gulf of Mexico correlated with water table elevation at a nearby monitoring well.

  12. Groundwater quality assessment/corrective action feasibility plan: New TNX Seepage Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, R.L.

    1989-12-05

    The New TNX Seepage Basin is located across River Road east of the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site. Currently the basin is out of service and is awaiting closure in accordance with the Consent Decree settled under Civil Act No. 1:85-2583. Groundwater monitoring data from the detection monitoring network around the New TNX Seepage Basin was recently analyzed using South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations R.61-79.264.92 methods to determine if groundwater downgradient of the New TNX Seepage Basin had been impacted. Results from the data analysis indicate that the groundwater has been impacted by inorganic constituents with no associated health risks. The impacts resulting from elevated levels of inorganic constituents, such as Mn, Na, and Total PO{sub 4} in the water table, do not pose a threat to human health and the environment.

  13. Effect of ground-water recharge on configuration of the water table beneath sand dunes and on seepage in lakes in the sandhills of Nebraska, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of water-level fluctuations in about 30 observation wells and 5 lakes in the Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge in the sandhills of Nebraska indicates water-table configuration beneath sand dunes in this area varies considerably, depending on the configuration of the topography of the dunes. If the topography of an interlake dunal area is hummocky, ground-water recharge is focused at topographic lows causing formation of water-table mounds. These mounds prevent ground-water movement from topographically high lakes to adjacent lower lakes. If a dune ridge is sharp, the opportunity for focused recharge does not exist, resulting in water-table troughs between lakes. Lakes aligned in descending altitudes, parallel to the principal direction of regional ground-water movement, generally have seepage from higher lakes toward lower lakes. ?? 1986.

  14. Effect of ground-water recharge on configuration of the water table beneath sand dunes and on seepage in lakes in the sandhills of Nebraska, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Thomas C.

    1986-10-01

    Analysis of water-level fluctuations in about 30 observation wells and 5 lakes in the Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge in the sandhills of Nebraska indicates water-table configuration beneath sand dunes in this area varies considerably, depending on the configuration of the topography of the dunes. If the topography of an interlake dunal area is hummocky, ground-water recharge is focused at topographic lows causing formation of water-table mounds. These mounds prevent ground-water movement from topographically high lakes to adjacent lower lakes. If a dune ridge is sharp, the opportunity for focused recharge does not exist, resulting in water-table troughs between lakes. Lakes aligned in descending altitudes, parallel to the principal direction of regional ground-water movement, generally have seepage from higher lakes toward lower lakes.

  15. Determining TOC in Waters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehoe, Thomas J.

    1977-01-01

    The instrumental method for detecting total organic carbon (TOC) in water samples is detailed. The method's limitations are discussed and certain precautions that must be taken are emphasized. The subject of TOC versus COD and BOD is investigated and TOC is determined to be a valid indication of biological demand. (BT)

  16. Computer-aided structural engineering (CASE) project: Application of finite-element, grid generation, and scientific visualization techniques to 2-D and 3-d seepage and ground-water modeling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, F.T.

    1991-09-01

    This report describes new advances in the computational modeling of ground water and seepage using the finite element method (FEM) in conjunction with tools and techniques typically used by the aerospace engineers. The unsolved environmental issues regarding our hazardous and toxic waste problems must be resolved, and significant resources must be placed on this effort. Some military bases are contaminated with hazardous waste that has entered the groundwater domain. A groundwater model that takes into account contaminant flow is therefore critical. First, an extension of the technique of generating an orthogonal structured grid (using the Cauchy-Riemann equations) to automatically generate a flow net for two-dimensional (2-D) steady-state seepage problems is presented for various boundary conditions. Second, a complete implementation of a three-dimensional (3-D) seepage package is described where (1) grid generation is accomplished using the EAGLE program, (2) the seepage and groundwater analysis for either confined or unconfined steady-state flow, homogeneous or inhomogeneous media, and isotropic or anisotropic soil is accomplished with no restriction on the FE grid or requirement of an initial guess of the free surface for unconfined flow problems, and (3) scientific visualization is accomplished using the program FAST developed by NASA.

  17. The air-water exchange of C{sub 15}-C{sub 31} n-alkanes in a precipitation-dominated seepage lake.

    SciTech Connect

    Doskey, P. V.; Environmental Research

    2000-01-01

    The air-water exchange of semivolatile n-alkanes in Crystal Lake, a small precipitation-dominated seepage lake in northern Wisconsin, was investigated with modeling and mass balance approaches. The results suggest that atmospheric deposition contributes approximately 80% of the allochthonous input of n-alkanes to Crystal Lake. Atmospheric deposition accounts for about 50% of the total annual input of n-alkanes to Crystal Lake, and an additional 30% is contributed by in situ production of planktonic n-alkanes ({Sigma}C{sub 15}, C{sub 17}, C{sub 19}). Contributions to the particle dry flux of terrestrial n-alkanes ({Sigma}C{sub 25}, C{sub 27}, C{sub 29}, C{sub 31}) by pine pollen dispersal and by dry deposition of particles containing leaf waxes are similar in magnitude and constitute about 60% of the atmospheric input, with particle wet deposition being responsible for the remainder. Approximately 30% of the atmospheric input of the n-alkanes occurs during a two-week episode of pine pollen dispersal in spring. Concentration gradients between gaseous n-alkanes in the atmosphere and dissolved n-alkanes in the water column of Crystal Lake favor volatilization of n-alkanes from the lake surface; however, distributions of dissolved n-alkanes are characteristic of bacteria, and therefore are contained in organic matter and not available for air-water exchange. The estimated net atmospheric input of terrestrial n-alkanes is about 20% less than the settling sediment flux. Additional allochthonous sources of the terrestrial n-alkanes might include diffuse surface runoff or episodes of coarse-particle deposition. The discrepancies in the results from the modeling and mass balance approaches indicate that direct measurements of air-water exchange rates and measurements of the seasonal variations of particle size distributions in air and rain would greatly improve our ability to quantify air-water exchange rates of n-alkanes.

  18. Inverse and predictive modeling of seepage into underground openings.

    PubMed

    Finsterle, S; Ahlers, C F; Trautz, R C; Cook, P J

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the development and calibration of a model for predicting seepage into underground openings. Seepage is a key factor affecting the performance of the potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Three-dimensional numerical models were developed to simulate field tests in which water was released from boreholes above excavated niches. Data from air-injection tests were geostatistically analyzed to infer the heterogeneous structure of the fracture permeability field. The heterogeneous continuum model was then calibrated against the measured amount of water that seeped into the opening. This approach resulted in the estimation of model-related, seepage-specific parameters on the scale of interest. The ability of the calibrated model to predict seepage was examined by comparing calculated with measured seepage rates from additional experiments conducted in different portions of the fracture network. We conclude that an effective capillary strength parameter is suitable to characterize seepage-related features and processes for use in a prediction model of average seepage into potential waste-emplacement drifts. PMID:12714286

  19. Tectonically induced methane seepage into a nearly anoxic water column at the Costa Rican continental margin (Quepos Slide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehder, G. J.; Schleicher, T.; Linke, P.

    2011-12-01

    The continental margin off Cost Rica is characterized by active cold venting induced by the subduction of the Cocos Plate underneath the Caribbean Plate. Submarine landslides, often triggered by the subduction of seamounts, have been shown to considerably contribute to the fluid discharge in the area. At the same time, the hydrographic conditions are characterized by very low oxygen conditions in the oxygen minimum zone centred around 400m, as a result of the reinforcement of the already low oxygen content in the Eastern Tropical Pacific by the local upwelling of the Costa Rica Dome. Here we report on the injection of methane-rich fluids into nearly oxygen-free waters at Quepos Slide. The slide resulted in the formation of a plateau at approximately 400 m water depth, with walls in the NW and NE. In the northern part of the slide, the seafloor is paved with bacterial mats along an elongated, weakly pronounced elevation oriented in NW-SE direction, dominated by filamentous Beggiatoa, often covering more than 80% of the seafloor for more than 200m. The colour of the bacterial assemblages shows strong zoning from white to yellow-orange, while grey assemblages were often associated with bathymetric elevations and smaller, circular- shaped patches. A remarkable characteristic in this unique settin is the almost complete lack of all other forms of vent-specific fauna. A quantitative description of the benthos fauna was achieved using quantitative video analysis based on ROV-based video mapping. The methane inventory in the water column within the embayment defined by the landslide was investigated with a grid of 17 hydrocast stations, verifying the highest methane emission in the northern corner of the slope, with concentrations more than two orders of magnitude above local background. Measurements of the stable carbon isotopic ratio on most of the methane samples were used to assess mixing and oxidation processes within this water body. Together with current meter data

  20. Flow rate logging seepage meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reay, William G. (Inventor); Walthall, Harry G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely measuring and logging the flow rate of groundwater seepage into surface water bodies. As groundwater seeps into a cavity created by a bottomless housing, it displaces water through an inlet and into a waterproof sealed upper compartment, at which point, the water is collected by a collection bag, which is contained in a bag chamber. A magnet on the collection bag approaches a proximity switch as the collection bag fills, and eventually enables the proximity switch to activate a control circuit. The control circuit then rotates a three-way valve from the collection path to a discharge path, enables a data logger to record the time, and enables a pump, which discharges the water from the collection bag, through the three-way valve and pump, and into the sea. As the collection bag empties, the magnet leaves the proximity of the proximity switch, and the control circuit turns off the pump, resets the valve to provide a collection path, and restarts the collection cycle.

  1. Identifying the Cause of Toxicity of a Saline Mine Water

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, Rick A.; Harford, Andrew J.; Lunn, Simon A.; Gagnon, Marthe M.

    2014-01-01

    Elevated major ions (or salinity) are recognised as being a key contributor to the toxicity of many mine waste waters but the complex interactions between the major ions and large inter-species variability in response to salinity, make it difficult to relate toxicity to causal factors. This study aimed to determine if the toxicity of a typical saline seepage water was solely due to its major ion constituents; and determine which major ions were the leading contributors to the toxicity. Standardised toxicity tests using two tropical freshwater species Chlorella sp. (alga) and Moinodaphnia macleayi (cladoceran) were used to compare the toxicity of 1) mine and synthetic seepage water; 2) key major ions (e.g. Na, Cl, SO4 and HCO3); 3) synthetic seepage water that were modified by excluding key major ions. For Chlorella sp., the toxicity of the seepage water was not solely due to its major ion concentrations because there were differences in effects caused by the mine seepage and synthetic seepage. However, for M. macleayi this hypothesis was supported because similar effects caused by mine seepage and synthetic seepage. Sulfate was identified as a major ion that could predict the toxicity of the synthetic waters, which might be expected as it was the dominant major ion in the seepage water. However, sulfate was not the primary cause of toxicity in the seepage water and electrical conductivity was a better predictor of effects. Ultimately, the results show that specific major ions do not clearly drive the toxicity of saline seepage waters and the effects are probably due to the electrical conductivity of the mine waste waters. PMID:25180579

  2. Chemical Properties of Pore Water and Sediment at Three Wetland Sites Near the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Friday, G.P.

    2001-05-15

    In 1980, vegetative stress and arboreal mortality in wetland plant communities down-gradient from the F- and H-Area seepage basins were detected using aerial imagery. By 1988, approximately six acres in H-Area and four acres in F-Area had been adversely impacted. Today, wetland plant communities have become well established at the H-Area tree-kill zone.

  3. Modeling Coupled Evaporation and Seepage in Ventilated Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    T. Ghezzehei; R. Trautz; S. Finsterle; P. Cook; C. Ahlers

    2004-07-01

    Cavities excavated in unsaturated geological formations are important to activities such as nuclear waste disposal and mining. Such cavities provide a unique setting for simultaneous occurrence of seepage and evaporation. Previously, inverse numerical modeling of field liquid-release tests and associated seepage into cavities were used to provide seepage-related large-scale formation properties by ignoring the impact of evaporation. The applicability of such models was limited to the narrow range of ventilation conditions under which the models were calibrated. The objective of this study was to alleviate this limitation by incorporating evaporation into the seepage models. We modeled evaporation as an isothermal vapor diffusion process. The semi-physical model accounts for the relative humidity, temperature, and ventilation conditions of the cavities. The evaporation boundary layer thickness (BLT) over which diffusion occurs was estimated by calibration against free-water evaporation data collected inside the experimental cavities. The estimated values of BLT were 5 to 7 mm for the open underground drifts and 20 mm for niches closed off by bulkheads. Compared to previous models that neglected the effect of evaporation, this new approach showed significant improvement in capturing seepage fluctuations into open cavities of low relative humidity. At high relative-humidity values (greater than 85%), the effect of evaporation on seepage was very small.

  4. Analysis of seepage from a pond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Govinda C.; Saha, Amitava; Kansal, Mitthan L.; Gupta, Ravi P.

    2011-05-01

    A semi-analytical solution has been derived for predicting the time of emptying a pond due to seepage. The time for the seeping water to reach the water table since the pond was initially filled has been calculated applying the Green-Ampt infiltration theory. The recharge rate after the wetting front joins the water table has been computed using a non-linear relationship between seepage head and recharge rate proposed by earlier investigators. The maximum rise in the water table beneath the center of the pond consequent to the time-varying recharge is calculated applying kernel coefficients obtained from solution of the linearized Boussinesq equation. It was observed that a pond with 50-m initial diameter at the water surface and 3-m maximum depth of water is dry after 168 days, where the subsoil is sandy clay. If the subsoil happens to be clay, the depth of water in the pond at the end of 9 months, i.e., after completion of the non-monsoon period, is 0.62 m. The maximum mound heights beneath the pond for constant recharge rate and uniform recharging area calculated from the present solution compare well with existing numerical as well as analytical solutions.

  5. Hydrological and chemical estimates of the water balance of a closed-basin lake in north central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaBaugh, J.W.; Winter, T.C.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Schuster, P.F.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    Chemical mass balances for sodium, magnesium, chloride, dissolved organic carbon, and oxygen 18 were used to estimate groundwater seepage to and from Williams Lake, Minnesota, over a 15-month period, from April 1991 through June 1992. Groundwater seepage to the lake and seepage from the lake to groundwater were determined independently using a flow net approach using data from water table wells installed as part of the study. Hydrogeological analysis indicated groundwater seepage to the lake accounted for 74% of annual water input to the lake; the remainder came from atmospheric precipitation, as determined from a gage in the watershed and from nearby National Weather Service gages. Seepage from the lake accounted for 69% of annual water losses from the lake; the remainder was removed by evaporation, as determined by the energy budget method. Calculated annual water loss exceeded calculated annual water gain, and this imbalance was double the value of the independently measured decrease in lake volume. Seepage to the lake determined from oxygen 18 was larger (79% of annual water input) than that determined from the flow net approach and made the difference between calculated annual water gain and loss consistent with the independently measured decrease in lake volume. Although the net difference between volume of seepage to the lake and volume of seepage from the lake was 1% of average lake volume, movement of water into and out of the lake by seepage represented an annual exchange of groundwater with the lake equal to 26-27% of lake volume. Estimates of seepage to the lake from sodium, magnesium, chloride, and dissolved organic carbon did not agree with the values determined from flow net approach or oxygen 18. These results indicated the importance of using a combination of hydrogeological and chemical approaches to define volume of seepage to and from Williams Lake and identify uncertainties in chemical fluxes.

  6. Modelling river bank retreat by combining fluvial erosion, seepage and mass failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapporto, S.; Rinaldi, M.

    2003-04-01

    Streambank erosion processes contribute significantly to the sediment yielded from a river system and represent an important issue in the contexts of soil degradation and river management. Bank retreat is controlled by a complex interaction of hydrologic, geotechnical, and hydraulic processes. The capability of modelling these different components allows for a full reconstruction and comprehension of the causes and rates of bank erosion. River bank retreat during a single flow event has been modelled by combining simulation of fluvial erosion, seepage, and mass failures. The study site, along the Sieve River (Central Italy), has been subject to extensive researches, including monitoring of pore water pressures for a period of 4 years. The simulation reconstructs fairly faithfully the observed changes, and is used to: a) test the potentiality and discuss advantages and limitations of such type of methodology for modelling bank retreat; c) quantify the contribution and mutual role of the different processes determining bank retreat. The hydrograph of the event is divided in a series of time steps. Modelling of the riverbank retreat includes for each step the following components: a) fluvial erosion and consequent changes in bank geometry; b) finite element seepage analysis; c) stability analysis by limit equilibrium method. Direct fluvial shear erosion is computed using empirically derived relationships expressing lateral erosion rate as a function of the excess of shear stress to the critical entrainment value for the different materials along the bank profile. Lateral erosion rate has been calibrated on the basis of the total bank retreat measured by digital terrestrial photogrammetry. Finite element seepage analysis is then conducted to reconstruct the saturated and unsaturated flow within the bank and the pore water pressure distribution for each time step. The safety factor for mass failures is then computed, using the pore water pressure distribution obtained

  7. Temporal constraints on hydrate-controlled methane seepage off Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Berndt, C; Feseker, T; Treude, T; Krastel, S; Liebetrau, V; Niemann, H; Bertics, V J; Dumke, I; Dünnbier, K; Ferré, B; Graves, C; Gross, F; Hissmann, K; Hühnerbach, V; Krause, S; Lieser, K; Schauer, J; Steinle, L

    2014-01-17

    Methane hydrate is an icelike substance that is stable at high pressure and low temperature in continental margin sediments. Since the discovery of a large number of gas flares at the landward termination of the gas hydrate stability zone off Svalbard, there has been concern that warming bottom waters have started to dissociate large amounts of gas hydrate and that the resulting methane release may possibly accelerate global warming. Here, we corroborate that hydrates play a role in the observed seepage of gas, but we present evidence that seepage off Svalbard has been ongoing for at least 3000 years and that seasonal fluctuations of 1° to 2°C in the bottom-water temperature cause periodic gas hydrate formation and dissociation, which focus seepage at the observed sites. PMID:24385604

  8. Liquid chromatographic determination of water

    DOEpatents

    Fortier, N.E.; Fritz, J.S.

    1990-11-13

    A sensitive method for the determination of water in the presence of common interferences is presented. The detection system is based on the effect of water on the equilibrium which results from the reaction aryl aldehydes, such as cinnamaldehyde and methanol in the eluent to form cinnamaldehyde dimethylacetal, plus water. This equilibrium is shifted in a catalytic atmosphere of a hydrogen ion form past column reactor. The extent of the shift and the resulting change in absorbance are proportional to the amount of water present. 1 fig.

  9. Liquid chromatographic determination of water

    DOEpatents

    Fortier, Nancy E.; Fritz, James S.

    1990-11-13

    A sensitive method for the determination of water in the presence of common interferences is presented. The detection system is based on the effect of water on the equilibrium which results from the reaction aryl aldehydes, such as cinnamaldehyde and methanol in the eluent to form cinnamaldehyde dimethylacetal, plus water. This equilibrium is shifted in a catalytic atmosphere of a hydrogen ion form past column reactor. The extent of the shift and the resulting change in absorbance are proportional to the amount of water present.

  10. An evaluation of seepage gains and losses in Indian Creek Reservoir, Ada County, Idaho, April 2010–November 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Marshall L.; Etheridge, Alexandra B.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Water Resources, conducted an investigation on Indian Creek Reservoir, a small impoundment in east Ada County, Idaho, to quantify groundwater seepage into and out of the reservoir. Data from the study will assist the Idaho Water Resources Department’s Comprehensive Aquifer Management Planning effort to estimate available water resources in Ada County. Three independent methods were utilized to estimate groundwater seepage: (1) the water-budget method; (2) the seepage-meter method; and (3) the segmented Darcy method. Reservoir seepage was quantified during the periods of April through August 2010 and February through November 2011. With the water-budget method, all measureable sources of inflow to and outflow from the reservoir were quantified, with the exception of groundwater; the water-budget equation was solved for groundwater inflow to or outflow from the reservoir. The seepage-meter method relies on the placement of seepage meters into the bottom sediments of the reservoir for the direct measurement of water flux across the sediment-water interface. The segmented-Darcy method utilizes a combination of water-level measurements in the reservoir and in adjacent near-shore wells to calculate water-table gradients between the wells and the reservoir within defined segments of the reservoir shoreline. The Darcy equation was used to calculate groundwater inflow to and outflow from the reservoir. Water-budget results provided continuous, daily estimates of seepage over the full period of data collection, while the seepage-meter and segmented Darcy methods provided instantaneous estimates of seepage. As a result of these and other difference in methodologies, comparisons of seepage estimates provided by the three methods are considered semi-quantitative. The results of the water-budget derived estimates of seepage indicate seepage to be seasonally variable in terms of the direction and magnitude

  11. Drift natural convection and seepage at the Yucca Mountain repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halecky, Nicholaus Eugene

    The decay heat from radioactive waste that is to be disposed in the once proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM) will significantly influence the moisture conditions in the fractured rock near emplacement tunnels (drifts). Additionally, large-scale convective cells will form in the open-air drifts and will serve as an important mechanism for the transport of vaporized pore water from the fractured rock, from the hot drift center to the cool drift end. Such convective processes would also impact drift seepage, as evaporation could reduce the build up of liquid water at the tunnel wall. Characterizing and understanding these liquid water and vapor transport processes is critical for evaluating the performance of the repository, in terms of water- induced canister corrosion and subsequent radionuclide containment. To study such processes, we previously developed and applied an enhanced version of TOUGH2 that solves for natural convection in the drift. We then used the results from this previous study as a time-dependent boundary condition in a high-resolution seepage model, allowing for a computationally efficient means for simulating these processes. The results from the seepage model show that cases with strong natural convection effects are expected to improve the performance of the repository, since smaller relative humidity values, with reduced local seepage, form a more desirable waste package environment.

  12. Influence of Seepage Undercutting on the Root Reinforcement of Streambanks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streambank erosion serves as a primary source of sediment loading to streams. Recent research has suggested that undercutting by seepage erosion may play an important role in streambank failure compared to increased soil pore-water pressure. The objective of this research was to utilize the Bank Sta...

  13. Determination of radium in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Franklin Butt; Johnson, J.O.

    1964-01-01

    Radium isotopes are common radioactive constituents of natural waters. The concentration of radium-226 in potable water is of particular significance because this isotope is generally considered the most hazardous of all radionuclides with respect to ingestion. The approximate concentration of radium-226 is determined after coprecipitating radium with barium sulfate. The short-lived daughters of radium are allowed to grow for 10-12 days, then the alpha activity of the precipitate is measured and compared with that of a precipitate containing a known amount of radium-226. Concentrations of the individual alpha-emitting isotopes of radium-223, radium-224, and radium-226, are determined by coprecipitating radium first with lead sulfate, then with barium chloride, and finally with barium sulfate. This final precipitate is initially free of other alpha-emitting nuclides, thus permitting the isotopic composition to be determined by measuring the growth and decay of the alpha activity of the precipitate.

  14. Remote semi-continuous flow rate logging seepage meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reay, William G.; Walthall, Harry G.

    1991-01-01

    The movement of groundwater and its associated solutes from upland regions was implicated in the degradation of receiving surface water bodies. Current efforts to directly measure this influx of water incorporate manually operated seepage meters which are hindered by severe limitations. A prototype seepage meter was developed by NASA Langley Research Center and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University that will allow for the semi-continuous collection and data logging of seepage flux across the sediment water interface. The meter is designed to operate at depths to 40 meters, and alleviate or minimize all disadvantages associated with traditional methods while remaining cost effective. The unit was designed to operate independently for time periods on the order of weeks with adjustable sample sequences depending upon hydrologic conditions. When used in conjunction with commercially available pressure transducers, this seepage meter allows for correlations to be made between groundwater discharge and tidal/sea state conditions in coastal areas. Field data from the Chesapeake Bay and Florida Bay systems are presented.

  15. A characterization study of the new TNX seepage basin at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Two seepage basins have been used to treat waste water generated by the TNX facilities. The old seepage basin was constructed in 1958 for the treatment and disposal of both low-level radioactive wastes and non-radioactive hazardous waste chemicals. The old basin was closed out in 1980 and waste flows were diverted to a new seepage basin. This report describes soil sample acquisition, field laboratory procedures, water sample acquisition, quality assurance and control procedures, and safety and health protection procedures in the pollution monitoring of the new seepage basin. Four appendices contain laboratory data. To date, no significant groundwater contamination has been detected.

  16. Method for estimating spatially variable seepage loss and hydraulic conductivity in intermittent and ephemeral streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niswonger, R.G.; Prudic, D.E.; Fogg, G.E.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Buckland, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating seepage loss and streambed hydraulic conductivity along intermittent and ephemeral streams using streamflow front velocities in initially dry channels. The method uses the kinematic wave equation for routing streamflow in channels coupled to Philip's equation for infiltration. The coupled model considers variations in seepage loss both across and along the channel. Water redistribution in the unsaturated zone is also represented in the model. Sensitivity of the streamflow front velocity to parameters used for calculating seepage loss and for routing streamflow shows that the streambed hydraulic conductivity has the greatest sensitivity for moderate to large seepage loss rates. Channel roughness, geometry, and slope are most important for low seepage loss rates; however, streambed hydraulic conductivity is still important for values greater than 0.008 m/d. Two example applications are presented to demonstrate the utility of the method. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Incorporating seepage losses into the unsteady streamflow equations for simulating intermittent flow along mountain front streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niswonger, R.G.; Prudic, D.E.; Pohll, G.; Constantz, J.

    2005-01-01

    Seepage losses along numerous mountain front streams that discharge intermittently onto alluvial fans and piedmont alluvial plains are an important source of groundwater in the Basin and Range Province of the Western United States. Determining the distribution of seepage loss along mountain front streams is important when assessing groundwater resources of the region. Seepage loss along a mountain front stream in northern Nevada was evaluated using a one-dimensional unsteady streamflow model. Seepage loss was incorporated into the spatial derivatives of the streamflow equations. Because seepage loss from streams is dependent on stream depth, wetted perimeter, and streambed properties, a two-dimensional variably saturated flow model was used to develop a series of relations between seepage loss and stream depth for each reach. This method works when streams are separated from groundwater by variably saturated sediment. Two periods of intermittent flow were simulated to evaluate the modeling approach. The model reproduced measured flow and seepage losses along the channel. Seepage loss in the spring of 2000 was limited to the upper reaches on the alluvial plain and totaled 196,000 m3, whereas 64% of the seepage loss in the spring of 2004 occurred at the base of the alluvial plain and totaled 273,000 m3. A greater seepage loss at the base of the piedmont alluvial plain is attributed to increased streambed hydraulic conductivity caused by less armoring of the channel. The modeling approach provides a method for quantifying and distributing seepage loss along mountain front streams that cross alluvial fans or piedmont alluvial plains. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Seepage investigation of the Rio Grande from below Leasburg Dam, Leasburg, New Mexico, to above American Dam, El Paso, Texas, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briody, Alyse C.; Robertson, Andrew J.; Thomas, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Seepage investigations have been conducted annually by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1988 to 1998 and from 2004 to the present (2014) along a 64-mile reach of the Rio Grande from below Leasburg Dam, Leasburg, New Mexico, to above American Dam, El Paso, Texas, as part of the Mesilla Basin monitoring program. Results of the investigation conducted in 2014 are presented in this report. The 2014 seepage investigation was conducted on February 11, 2014, during the low-flow conditions of the non-irrigation season. During the 2014 investigation, discharge was measured at 23 sites along the main-stem Rio Grande and 19 inflow sites within the study reach. Because of extended drought conditions affecting the basin, many sites along the Rio Grande (17 main-stem and 9 inflow) were observed to be dry in February 2014. Water-quality samples were collected during the seepage investigation at sites with flowing water as part of a long-term monitoring effort in the region.Net seepage gain or loss was computed for each subreach (the interval between two adjacent measurement locations along the river) by subtracting the discharge measured at the upstream location from the discharge measured at the closest downstream location along the river and then subtracting any inflow to the river within the subreach. An estimated gain or loss was determined to be meaningful when it exceeded the cumulative measurement uncertainty associated with the net seepage computation. The cumulative seepage loss in the 64-mile study reach in 2014 was 16.0 plus or minus 2.9 cubic feet per second.

  19. Seepage basin radionuclide transport in sediments and vegetation. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Jerome, K.M.

    1993-12-31

    Radionuclide concentrations were measured in soil and vegetation growing adjacent to and in the Savannah River Laboratory Seepage Basins as part of the plan for closure of the basin system. The results of the measurements provide some information about the mobility of the radionuclides introduced into the basins. {sup 90}Sr is the most mobile of the radionuclides in soil. Its high mobility and high relative uptake by vegetation cause {sup 90}Sr to be distributed throughout the basin system. {sup 137}Cs is not as mobile in the basin soil, limiting its uptake by vegetation growing on the edge of the seepage basins; however, it is readily taken up by the vegetation growing in the basins. Soil mobility and vegetation uptake is relatively low for all of the transuranic radionuclides. For the most part these radionuclides remain near the surface of the basin soils where they were absorbed from the waste-water. The relative role of soil mobility and vegetation uptake on the distribution of radionuclide at the basins was futher evaluated by comparing the vegetation concentration ratio and the half-depth of penetration of the radionuclides in the basin soil. The results suggest that vegetation processes dominate in determining the concentration of {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs in the vegetation. The influences of soil and vegetation are more balanced for {sup 90}Sr. The other radionuclides exhibit both low soil mobility and low vegetation uptake. The lack of soil mobility is seen in the lower concentrations found in vegetation growing on the edge of the basin compared to those growing in the basin.

  20. Geophysical investigation of seepage beneath an earthen dam.

    PubMed

    Ikard, S J; Rittgers, J; Revil, A; Mooney, M A

    2015-01-01

    A hydrogeophysical survey is performed at small earthen dam that overlies a confined aquifer. The structure of the dam has not shown evidence of anomalous seepage internally or through the foundation prior to the survey. However, the surface topography is mounded in a localized zone 150 m downstream, and groundwater discharges from this zone periodically when the reservoir storage is maximum. We use self-potential and electrical resistivity tomography surveys with seismic refraction tomography to (1) determine what underlying hydrogeologic factors, if any, have contributed to the successful long-term operation of the dam without apparent indicators of anomalous seepage through its core and foundation; and (2) investigate the hydraulic connection between the reservoir and the seepage zone to determine whether there exists a potential for this success to be undermined. Geophysical data are informed by hydraulic and geotechnical borehole data. Seismic refraction tomography is performed to determine the geometry of the phreatic surface. The hydro-stratigraphy is mapped with the resistivity data and groundwater flow patterns are determined with self-potential data. A self-potential model is constructed to represent a perpendicular profile extending out from the maximum cross-section of the dam, and self-potential data are inverted to recover the groundwater velocity field. The groundwater flow pattern through the aquifer is controlled by the bedrock topography and a preferential flow pathway exists beneath the dam. It corresponds to a sandy-gravel layer connecting the reservoir to the downstream seepage zone. PMID:24635516

  1. Mine seepage problems in drift mine operations

    SciTech Connect

    DeRossett, C.; Johnson, D.E.; Bradshaw, D.B.

    1996-12-31

    Extensive mining in the Eastern Kentucky Coal Region has occurred in coal deposits located above valley floors. Underground mines present unique stability problems resulting from the creation of mine pools in abandoned works. {open_quotes}Blowouts{close_quotes} occur when hydrostatic pressures result in the cataclysmic failure of an outcrop-barrier. Additionally, seepage from flooded works results in saturation of colluvium, which may ultimately mobilize as landslides. Several case studies of both landslides and blowouts illustrate that considerations should be taken into account to control or prevent these problems. Underground mine maps and seepage conditions at the individual sites were examined to determine the mine layouts, outcrop-barrier widths, and structure of the mine floors. Discharge monitoring points were established in and near the landslides. These studies depict how mine layout, operation, and geology influence drainage conditions. The authors suggest that mine designs should incorporate drainage control to insure long-term stability and limit liability. The goal of the post-mining drainage plan is control of the mine drainage, which will reduce the size of mine pools and lower the hydrostatic pressure. Recommendations are made as to several methods that may be useful in controlling mine drainage.

  2. A seepage erosion sediment transport function and geometric headcut relationships for predicting seepage erosion undercutting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage erosion is an important factor in hillslope instability and failure. However, predicting erosion by subsurface flow or seepage and incorporating its effects into stability models remain a challenge. Limitations exist with all existing seepage erosion sediment transport functions, including n...

  3. Simulating seepage into mine shafts and tunnels with MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Zaidel, Jacob; Markham, Bradley; Bleiker, David

    2010-01-01

    In cases when an equivalent porous medium assumption is suitable for simulating groundwater flow in bedrock aquifers, estimation of seepage into underground mine workings (UMWs) can be achieved by specifying MODFLOW drain nodes at the contact between water bearing rock and dewatered mine openings. However, this approach results in significant numerical problems when applied to simulate seepage into an extensive network of UMWs, which often exist at the mine sites. Numerical simulations conducted for individual UMWs, such as a vertical shaft or a horizontal drift, showed that accurate prediction of seepage rates can be achieved by either applying grid spacing that is much finer than the diameter/width of the simulated openings (explicit modeling) or using coarser grid with cell sizes exceeding the characteristic width of shafts or drifts by a factor of 3. Theoretical insight into this phenomenon is presented, based on the so-called well-index theory. It is demonstrated that applying this theory allows to minimize numerical errors associated with MODFLOW simulation of seepage into UMWs on a relatively coarse Cartesian grid. Presented examples include simulated steady-state groundwater flow from homogeneous, heterogeneous, and/or anisotropic rock into a vertical shaft, a horizontal drift/cross-cut, a ramp, two parallel drifts, and a combined system of a vertical shaft connected to a horizontal drift. PMID:20039952

  4. Evaluation of seepage from Chester Morse Lake and Masonry Pool, King County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hidaka, F.T.; Garrett, Arthur Angus

    1967-01-01

    Hydrologic data collected in the Cedar and Snoqualmie River basins on the west slope of the Cascade Range have been analyzed to determine the amount of water lost by seepage from Chester Morse Lake and Masonry Pool and the. consequent gain by seepage to the Cedar and South Fork Snoqualmie Rivers. For water years 1957-64, average losses were about 220 cfs (cubic feet per second) while average gains were about 180 cfs in the Cedar River and 50 cfs in the South Fork Snoqualmie River. Streamflow and precipitation data for water years 1908-26 and 1930-F2 indicate that a change in runoff regimen occurred in Cedar and South Fork Snoqualmie Rivers after the Boxley Creek washout in December 1918. For water years 1919-26 and 1930-32, the flow of Cedar River near Landsburg averaged about 80 cfs less than it would have if the washout had not occurred. In contrast, the flow of South Fork Snoqualmie River at North Bend averaged about 60 cfs more than it would have.

  5. Utilizing Continuous Resistivity Profiling for Assessment and Characterization of Canal Seepage in El Paso's Lower Valley Irrigation Network System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. A.; Sheng, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Annually, billions of gallons of water are lost through seepage along sections of the irrigation network. To conserve water, El Paso County Water Improvement District has been assessing seepage losses and investigating measures for reducing such losses. Resistivity techniques were used to identify areas of high seepage and provide information on locations along canals that need to be structurally modified in an effort to curb water lost through seepage. Several half mile sections were selected along canals with varying seepage rates to conduct electric resistivity surveys in order generate soil profiles during the non-irrigation and irrigation seasons. Two different multiple channel resistivity meters (The“OhmMapper and the Super Sting R8”) were used, which both allow a vertical resistivity profile to be collected using a single current transmission. The results presented are preliminary and we believe that upon completion findings will serve multiple purposes. Firstly, a better understanding of seepage patterns, seepage rate and its spatial variation can be obtained. Secondly, our findings could be used to produce geological profiles associated with seepage areas which will enable the irrigation district to develop guidelines for improving delivery efficiency, especially during drought. And thirdly, our results will be transferable to other areas of the state and will have a positive impact on the environment and the overall quality of life.

  6. Self-potential investigation of moraine dam seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Boleve, Alexandre; Sanders, Johnny W.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2011-08-01

    Self-potential (SP) and electrical resistivity measurements are used to investigate seepage at a remote moraine dam in the Sierra Nevada of California. The site is a small terminal moraine impounding roughly 300,000 m 3 of water at ~ 3400 m a.s.l. Suspicious fine sediment in a small lake at the dam's downstream toe prompted initial concerns that anomalous seepage may be eroding matrix material from the moraine. 235 individual SP measurements covering the surface of the dam were collected in order to investigate electrokinetic current sources resulting from seepage, while resistivity soundings probed moraine stratigraphy and suggest that the till contains interstitial ice. Contoured SP data reveal a non-uniform voltage distribution over the moraine dam and two distinct negative SP anomalies. The first, located in the central area of the moraine, shows a broad negative SP zone around the crest and increasingly positive SP moving downhill towards both the upstream and downstream toes. This anomaly can be explained by shallow gravitational groundwater flow in the near subsurface combined with upward groundwater flux through evapotranspiration; numerical simulation of the combined effect matches field data well. The second SP anomaly has a tightly localized distribution and can be explained by vertically descending flow into a bedrock fault conduit. Our conceptual seepage model suggests that flow travels from Dana Lake first at the boundary of ice-filled moraine and bedrock before converging on a concentrated channel in the subvertical fault zone. Positive SP near the dam abutments results from groundwater inflow from adjacent hillslopes. Combined analyses suggest that seepage erosion is not currently affecting the moraine dam, and that the sediment observed on the bed of the downstream toe lake is likely a remnant of past outflow events.

  7. Fluid venting and seepage at accretionary ridges: the Four Way Closure Ridge offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaucke, Ingo; Berndt, Christian; Crutchley, Gareth; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lin, Saulwood; Muff, Sina

    2016-06-01

    Within the accretionary prism offshore SW Taiwan, widespread gas hydrate accumulations are postulated to occur based on the presence of a bottom simulating reflection. Methane seepage, however, is also widespread at accretionary ridges offshore SW Taiwan and may indicate a significant loss of methane bypassing the gas hydrate system. Four Way Closure Ridge, located in 1,500 m water depth, is an anticlinal ridge that would constitute an ideal trap for methane and consequently represents a site with good potential for gas hydrate accumulations. The analysis of high-resolution bathymetry, deep-towed sidescan sonar imagery, high-resolution seismic profiling and towed video observations of the seafloor shows that Four Way Closure Ridge is and has been a site of intensive methane seepage. Continuous seepage is mainly evidenced by large accumulations of authigenic carbonate precipitates, which appear to be controlled by the creation of fluid pathways through faulting. Consequently, Four Way Closure Ridge is not a closed system in terms of fluid migration and seepage. A conceptual model of the evolution of gas hydrates and seepage at accretionary ridges suggests that seepage is common and may be a standard feature during the geological development of ridges in accretionary prisms. The observation of seafloor seepage alone is therefore not a reliable indicator of exploitable gas hydrate accumulations at depth.

  8. Fluid venting and seepage at accretionary ridges: the Four Way Closure Ridge offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaucke, Ingo; Berndt, Christian; Crutchley, Gareth; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lin, Saulwood; Muff, Sina

    2015-12-01

    Within the accretionary prism offshore SW Taiwan, widespread gas hydrate accumulations are postulated to occur based on the presence of a bottom simulating reflection. Methane seepage, however, is also widespread at accretionary ridges offshore SW Taiwan and may indicate a significant loss of methane bypassing the gas hydrate system. Four Way Closure Ridge, located in 1,500 m water depth, is an anticlinal ridge that would constitute an ideal trap for methane and consequently represents a site with good potential for gas hydrate accumulations. The analysis of high-resolution bathymetry, deep-towed sidescan sonar imagery, high-resolution seismic profiling and towed video observations of the seafloor shows that Four Way Closure Ridge is and has been a site of intensive methane seepage. Continuous seepage is mainly evidenced by large accumulations of authigenic carbonate precipitates, which appear to be controlled by the creation of fluid pathways through faulting. Consequently, Four Way Closure Ridge is not a closed system in terms of fluid migration and seepage. A conceptual model of the evolution of gas hydrates and seepage at accretionary ridges suggests that seepage is common and may be a standard feature during the geological development of ridges in accretionary prisms. The observation of seafloor seepage alone is therefore not a reliable indicator of exploitable gas hydrate accumulations at depth.

  9. Heterogeneous seepage at the Nopal I natural analogue site, Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Cook, Paul J.; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Rodriguez, J. Alfredo; Villalba, Lourdes; de la Garza, Rodrigo

    2008-10-25

    An integrated field, laboratory, and modeling study of the Pena Blanca (Chihuahua, Mexico) natural analogue site is being conducted to evaluate processes that control the mobilization and transport of radionuclides from a uranium ore deposit. One component of this study is an evaluation of the potential for radionuclide transport through the unsaturated zone (UZ) via a seepage study in an adit at the Nopal I uranium mine, excavated 10 m below a mined level surface. Seasonal rainfall on the exposed level surface infiltrates into the fractured rhyolitic ash-flow tuff and seeps into the adit. An instrumented seepage collection system and local automated weather station permit direct correlation between local precipitation events and seepage within the Nopal I +00 adit. Monitoring of seepage within the adit between April 2005 and December 2006 indicates that seepage is highly heterogeneous with respect to time, location, and quantity. Within the back adit area, a few zones where large volumes of water have been collected are linked to fast flow path fractures (0-4 h transit times) presumably associated with focused flow. In most locations, however, there is a 1-6 month time lag between major precipitation events and seepage within the adit, with longer residence times observed for the front adit area. Seepage data obtained from this study will be used to provide input to flow and transport models being developed for the Nopal I hydrogeologic system.

  10. The geochemistry characteristic and dating of cold seepage carbonates of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, eastern of South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yunxin; Fu, Shaoying

    2015-04-01

    Cold seepage carbonates are usually formed by the interaction of methane oxidizing archaea, sulfate reducing bacteria and cold seepage which contain abundant venting hydrocarbon gases. The presence of cold seepage carbonates on the seabed is one of the evidences that the area exist venting hydrocarbon gases, which are usually result by the dissociation of gas hydrate. The cold seepage property and fluid flow rate can influence the oxidation-deoxidation environment of the bottom water and sediment. Many previous studies focused on the mineral composition, microstructure, elemental composition, isotope composition of the cold seepage carbonates and isotopic dating for the cold seepage carbonates. The isotopic dating for the cold seepage carbonates can provide the information of the gas hydrate formation and dissociation in some area of the South China Sea. High precision TIMS-U dating and 14C dating are used as routine method for the dating of the Quaternary carbonates and fossils. The cold seepage carbonates in the study include the samples collected by ROV on the seabed and the drilling for gas hydrate in the Pearl River Mouth Basin, eastern of the South China Sea. The authigenic carbonate occurred in different depth in the A, B and C drilling site. They may be represent different events of gas hydrate formation and dissociation in the Quaternary. The dating study for all the cold seepage carbonates can provide the relative accurate eras of the gas hydrate dissociation events in certain area of the South China Sea.

  11. Three-dimensional imaging, change detection, and stability assessment during the centerline trench levee seepage experiment using terrestrial light detection and ranging technology, Twitchell Island, California, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bawden, Gerald W.; Howle, James; Bond, Sandra; Shriro, Michelle; Buck, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A full scale field seepage test was conducted on a north-south trending levee segment of a now bypassed old meander belt on Twitchell Island, California, to understand the effects of live and decaying root systems on levee seepage and slope stability. The field test in May 2012 was centered on a north-south trench with two segments: a shorter control segment and a longer seepage test segment. The complete length of the trench area measured 40.4 meters (m) near the levee centerline with mature trees located on the waterside and landside of the levee flanks. The levee was instrumented with piezometers and tensiometers to measure positive and negative porewater pressures across the levee after the trench was flooded with water and held at a constant hydraulic head during the seepage test—the results from this component of the experiment are not discussed in this report. We collected more than one billion three-dimensional light detection and ranging (lidar) data points before, during, and after the centerline seepage test to assess centimeter-scale stability of the two trees and the levee crown. During the seepage test, the waterside tree toppled (rotated 20.7 degrees) into the water. The landside tree rotated away from the levee by 5 centimeters (cm) at a height of 2 m on the tree. The paved surface of the levee crown had three regions that showed subsidence on the waterside of the trench—discussed as the northern, central, and southern features. The northern feature is an elongate region that subsided 2.1 cm over an area with an average width of 1.35 m that extends 15.8 m parallel to the trench from the northern end of the trench to just north of the trench midpoint, and is associated with a crack 1 cm in height that formed during the seepage test on the trench wall. The central subsidence feature is a semicircular region on the waterside of the trench that subsided by as much as 6.2 cm over an area 3.4 m wide and 11.2 m long. The southern feature is an elongate

  12. Assessing lakebed hydraulic conductivity and seepage flux by potentiomanometer.

    PubMed

    Ong, John B; Zlotnik, Vitaly A

    2011-01-01

    Potentiomanometers (PMs) are commonly used to determine flux directions across interfaces between surface waters and aquifers. We describe a complementary function: estimating small-scale hydraulic conductivity (K) in a lakebed, using the constant-head injection test (CHIT) by Cardenas and Zlotnik (2003) with the PM designed by Winter et al. (1988). A piezometer with a small screen is inserted into the lakebed. Local head potential is obtained by measuring the head difference between the test point and the aquifer interface. The piezometer is then used for water injection. This technique is illustrated by measurements taken from Alkali Lake in the Sand Hills, Nebraska, United States. Lakebed K and seepage fluxes ranged from 0.037 to 0.090 m/d and Darcy velocities ranged from 0.004 to 0.027 m/d. Results were consistent with the supplementary data gathered using a modified CHIT and a cone penetrometer. The compact size of the device and the small volumes used for injection enable this method to estimate lakebed K values as low as 0.01 to 0.1 m/d, a range seldom explored in lake-aquifer interface systems. PMID:20497483

  13. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    During second quarter 1992, tritium, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226), gross alpha, mercury, lead, tetrachloroethylene, arsenic, and cadmium exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) at the Savannah River Plant. This report gives the results of the analyses of groundwater from the H-Area Seepage Basin.

  14. Improving the accuracy of canal seepage detection through geospatial techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Muhammad

    With climatic change, many western states in the United States are experiencing drought conditions. Numerous irrigation districts are losing significant amount of water from their canal systems due to leakage. Every year, on the average 2 million acres of prime cropland in the US is lost to soil erosion, waterlogging and salinity. Lining of canals could save enormous amount of water for irrigating crops but in present time due to soaring costs of construction and environmental mitigation, adopting such program on a large scale would be excessive. Conventional techniques of seepage detection are expensive, time consuming and labor intensive besides being not very accurate. Technological advancements in remote sensing have made it possible to investigate irrigation canals for seepage sites identification. In this research, band-9 in the [NIR] region and band-45 in the [TIR] region of an airborne MASTER data has been utilized to highlight anomalies along irrigation canal at Phoenix, Arizona. High resolution (1 to 4 meter pixels) satellite images provided by private companies for scientific research and made available by Google to the public on Google Earth is then successfully used to separate those anomalies into water activity sites, natural vegetation, and man-made structures and thereby greatly improving the seepage detection ability of airborne remote sensing. This innovative technique is much faster and cost effective as compared to conventional techniques and past airborne remote sensing techniques for verification of anomalies along irrigation canals. This technique also solves one of the long standing problems of discriminating false impression of seepage sites due to dense natural vegetation, terrain relief and low depressions of natural drainages from true water related activity sites.

  15. Impact of Quaternary Climate on Seepage at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Whelan; J.B. Paces; L.A. Neymark; A.K. Schmitt; M. Grove

    2006-03-17

    Uranium-series ages, oxygen-isotopic compositions, and uranium contents were determined in outer growth layers of opal and calcite from 0.5- to 3-centimeter-thick mineral coatings hosted by lithophysal cavities in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the proposed site of a permanent repository for high-level radioactive waste. Micrometer-scale growth layering in the minerals was imaged using a cathodoluminescence detector on a scanning electron microscope. Determinations of the chemistry, ages, and delta oxygen-18 values of the growth layers were conducted by electron microprobe analysis and secondary ion mass spectrometry techniques at spatial resolutions of 1 to about 20 micrometers ({micro}m) and 25 to 40 micrometers, respectively. Growth rates for the last 300 thousand years (k.y.) calculated from about 300 new high-resolution uranium-series ages range from approximately 0.5 to 1.5 {micro}m/k.y. for 1- to 3-centimeter-thick coatings, whereas coatings less than about I-centimeter-thick have growth rates less than 0.5 {micro}m/k.y. At the depth of the proposed repository, correlations of uranium concentration and delta oxygen-18 values with regional climate records indicate that unsaturated zone percolation and seepage water chemistries have responded to changes in climate during the last several hundred thousand years.

  16. Lagoon Seepage Testing Report for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory, Butte County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Bridger Morrison

    2014-09-01

    J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) performed seepage tests on the CFA Wastewater Lagoons 1, 2, and 3 between August 26th and September 22nd, 2014. The lagoons were tested to satisfy the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16) that require all lagoons be tested at a frequency of every 10 years and the Compliance Activity CA-141-03 in the DEQ Wastewater Reuse Permit for the CFA Sewage Treatment Plant (LA-000141-03). The lagoons were tested to determine if the average seepage rates are less than 0.25 in/day, the maximum seepage rate allowed for lagoons built prior to April 15, 2007. The average seepage rates were estimated for each lagoon and are given in Table-ES1. The average seepage rates for Lagoons 1 and 2 are less than the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day. Lagoon 1 and 2 passed the seepage test and will not have to be tested again until the year 20241. However, the average seepage rate for Lagoon 3 appears to exceed the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day which means the potential source for the excessive leakage should be investigated further.

  17. Seepage into drifts with mechanical degradation.

    PubMed

    Li, Guomin; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2003-01-01

    Seepage into drifts in unsaturated tuff is an important issue for the long-term performance of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Drifts in which waste packages will be emplaced are subject to degradation in the form of rockfall from the drift ceiling, induced by stress-relief, seismic, or thermal effects. The objective of this study is to calculate seepage rates, for various drift-degradation scenarios and for different values of percolation flux, in the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and the Topopah Spring lower lithophysal (Tptpll) units at Yucca Mountain. Seepage calculations are conducted by (1) defining a heterogeneous drift-scale permeability model with field data, (2) selecting calibrated parameters associated with the Tptpmn and Tptpll units, and (3) simulating seepage, based on detailed degraded-drift profiles obtained from a separate rock mechanics engineering analysis. The simulation results indicate (1) that the seepage threshold (i.e., the percolation flux at which seepage first occurs) is not significantly changed by drift degradation and (2) the degradation-induced increase in seepage above the threshold is influenced probably more by the shape of the cavity created by rockfall than by rockfall volume. PMID:12714289

  18. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-05

    The purpose of this Model Report (REV02) is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes on UZ flow and transport. This Model Report has been developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2002 [160819]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this Model Report in Section 1.12, Work Package AUZM08, ''Coupled Effects on Flow and Seepage''. The plan for validation of the models documented in this Model Report is given in Attachment I, Model Validation Plans, Section I-3-4, of the TWP. Except for variations in acceptance criteria (Section 4.2), there were no deviations from this TWP. This report was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models''. This Model Report documents the THC Seepage Model and the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model. The THC Seepage Model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC model is a drift-scale process model relying on the same conceptual model and much of the same input data (i.e., physical, hydrological, thermodynamic, and kinetic) as the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model is the primary method for validating the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model compares predicted water and gas compositions, as well as mineral alteration patterns, with observed data from the DST. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal-loading conditions, and predict the evolution of mineral alteration and fluid chemistry around potential waste emplacement drifts. The DST THC Model is used solely for the validation of the THC

  19. Field measurement of seepage and evapotranspiration rate for a soil under plant cover: A comparison of soil water balance and tritium labeling procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzer, K.; Strebel, O.; Renger, M.

    1980-08-01

    Vertical water flux at 90 cm depth and evapotranspiration were measured in a loess Parabraunerde soil profile, under spring wheat and sugar beets, respectively, during a time period of nearly 21 months. Two field methods were compared: the HTO-tracer method (labeling soil water at a depth of 60 cm followed by core sampling) and the soil water balance method (measuring soil water suction and water content as a function of depth and time). Outside the vegetation season the results of the two methods agreed well, but not during the vegetation season. The reason is that the reference soil compartment, with its reference depth of 90 cm, lies within the root zone and the HTO-method does not correctly reflect the water flux through the roots and the water withdrawal by the roots from this reference compartment. It is shown, that after correcting the HTO-values for these root-activity-dependent effects, a good agreement between the two methods was found also during periods with root activity. Investigations with the HTO-method lead to inaccurate results if the reference depth or the median value of the tracer distribution lie within the zone of active roots.

  20. Incorporating seepage processes into a streambank stability model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage processes are usually neglected in bank stability analyses although they can become a prominent failure mechanism under certain field conditions. This study incorporated the effects of seepage (i.e., seepage gradient forces and seepage erosion undercutting) into the Bank Stability and Toe Er...

  1. Preliminary assessment of tree mortality near F- and H-area seepage basins

    SciTech Connect

    Loehle, C; Gladden, J

    1988-01-28

    A preliminary assessment was conducted to evaluate factors that may have been responsible for the vegetation damage that has occurred in groundwater seeps downslope from the F- and H-area seepage basins. The factors that were considered included altered hydrology, toxicity from hazardous chemical constituents associated with seepage basin operation, and toxicity from non-hazardous constituents associated with basin operation. It was concluded that the observed damage was not likely to have resulted from altered hydrologic conditions or hazardous constituents associated with basin operation. Insufficient information is currently available to determine definitively which of the non-hazardous constituents, alone or in concert, were responsible for the observed vegetation damage. The most likely explanation, however, is that elevated Na, pH, and conductivity is outcropping seep water are responsible for tree mortality. All three of these factors will return to ambient levels over a period of several years when basin operation ceases. Faster remediation can be achieved using lime at the seep line.

  2. Seepage erosion mechanisms of bank collapse: three-dimensional seepage particle mobilization and undercutting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage flow initiates undercutting, similar to development and headward migration of internal gullies, by liquefaction of soil particles, followed by mass wasting of the bank. Although seepage erosion has three-dimensional characteristics, two-dimensional lysimeters have been used in previous resea...

  3. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    C. Tsang

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  4. Natural Oil Seepages : Detection, Monitoring and Relationships with Submarine Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhont, D.; Jatiault, R.; Dubucq, D.; Longépé, N.; Nhunfat, B.; Lucas, M.

    2014-12-01

    Detection of hydrocarbon shows in marine areas is of primary importance for oil and gas exploration since they confirm hydrocarbon generation and prove the presence of an active petroleum system. The use of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images serves as an ideal technology for the imaging of hydrocarbon seeps as it is cost effective, provides large ground coverage with continuous acquisitions and operates day and night and in all weather conditions. Here, we present results on the interpretation of radar images for seepage detection on the West African margin. Long-term monitoring of 150 SAR scenes during 20 years allowed the recognition of more than 1400 oil seepages. Seabed morphologies associated to oil leakage correspond to clusters of small sized pockmarks, 50 to 200 m in diameter, and high-reflectivity mounds. The correlation between the location of the impact point of the oil plume at the sea surface with the seabed features reveals that oceanic drift of the oil is less than 1000 m through a water column of 1800 m, with a rising speed of 10 cm/s. In order to address the question of the seeps lifetime, we set up a short-term monitoring through the acquisition of one radar scene every 12 hours during 10 days in a specific area recognized for active oil leaking. Our main observations are: (i) the number of detected seeps varies spatially and temporally, and (ii) oil seep dissipation is effective in less than 12 hours. The variation of the hydrostatic pressure in the water column associated to the oscillation of the tide has been firstly considered as a possible mechanism controlling the expulsion of oil at the seafloor in relation with the number of seeps detected on each image. However, the correlation between the regional mean wind field and the amount of oil seeps strongly suggests that the wind is a primary factor to be considered for seepage detection. In addition, the age of the seepage on the sea surface is undetermined when the SAR imagery

  5. Dense distributed temperature sensing to infer local seepage fluxes in coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgersom, Koen; van de Giesen, Nick

    2014-05-01

    In many deltas, land surfaces are largely below sea level, and consequently suffering from saline groundwater seepage. This phenomenon affects the fresh water supply for, for example, agriculture and drinking water production. In many of those deltas, sea level rise and land subsidence enhance these problems. Depending on the geology, the seepage fluxes can occur both distributed and locally. Local seepage occurs through ancient channels that were filled with higher-conductive material at later times, but also works its way up via small vents through the soil. The latter is called boil seepage and usually is the most saline of the mentioned seepage types. Boils commonly appear in ditches and canals, since the pressure gradient is most of the time larger compared to the surrounding area. Although boils appear only as local point inflows, their high discharge and consequent salt flux can make them contribute for over 70% of the salt flux into lowland water systems (de Louw et al., 2010). Seepage measurement methods include the application of so-called seepage meters and tracers like temperature. Conventional methods using temperature differences between groundwater and surface water require drilling temperature sensors into the soil. Because the locations of boils are sensitive to disturbances of the soil, we measure the seepage flux by measuring a 3D temperature profile in the surface water above the boil instead. The seepage flux is inferred from a numerical surface water model that includes salt and temperature transport. Laboratory and field results show the onset of stratification because of the denser groundwater. In the winter situation, the temperature of the groundwater is relatively high, and double diffusive processes may play a role, mainly because there is negligible lateral flow most of the time, when the downstream pumping station is not active. Therefore, a model is set up that is well able to represent these double diffusive processes. References De

  6. Determination of color of turbid waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamar, W.L.

    1949-01-01

    A convenient procedure for determining the color of turbid waters, using the principle of precipitation of turbidity by the electrolyte calcium chloride, is described. Because the stable turbidity of many surface waters cannot be completely precipitated by conventional centrifuging alone, this procedure presents a means of flocculating the turbidity without affecting the true color of the water. In the determination of true color of turbid samples one of the most prevalent errors is caused by the reading of color on samples not completely free of turbidity. Pertinent data are presented on color and turbidity of waters as related to the principles involved in the determination of color.

  7. Results of a seepage investigation at Bear Creek Valley, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, January through September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.A.; Johnson, G.C.

    1996-12-31

    A seepage investigation was conducted of 4,600 acres of Bear Creek Valley southwest of the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for the period of January through September 1994. The data was collected to help the Y-12 Environmental Restoration Program develop a better understanding of ground-water and surface-water interactions, recharge and discharge relations, and ground-water flow patterns. The project was divided into three phases: a reconnaissance and mapping of seeps, springs, and stream-measurement sites; a high base flow seepage investigation; and a low base flow seepage investigation. This report describes the results of the investigation. It includes a map showing measurement site locations and tables that list the coordinates for each site and measurements of discharge, pH, specific conductance, temperature, and dissolved oxygen.

  8. Characterization of seepage in the exploratory studies facility, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oliver, T.A.; Whelan, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Following a 5-month period of above-average precipitation during the winter of 2004-2005, water was observed seeping into the South Ramp section of the Exploratory Studies Facility of the proposed repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Samples of the seepage were collected and analyzed for major ions, trace metals, and delta deuterium and delta oxygen-18 values in an effort to characterize the water and assess the interaction of seepage with anthropogenic materials used in the construction of the proposed repository. As demonstrated by the changes in the chemistry of water dripping from a rock bolt, interaction of seepage with construction materials can alter solution chemistry and oxidation state.

  9. A seepage investigation of an area at and near Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, March through August 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, G.C.

    1996-01-01

    A seepage investigation was conducted of an area surrounding the Oak Ridge National Laboratory from March through August 1993. The project was divided into three phases: a reconnaissance to inventory and map seeps, springs, and stream-measurement sites; a high base flow seepage investigation; and a low base flow seepage investigation. The reconnaissance consisted of following each tributary to its source to inventory each site where water was issuing from the ground. Stream- measurement sites were also located along stream reaches at 500-foot intervals. A total of 822 sites were identified. A global positioning system was used to locate 483 sites to within 3- to 5-meter accuracy. The high base flow seepage investigation was conducted from April 29 through May 3, 1993, and from May 7 through May 10, 1993. During the high base flow seepage investigation, sites identified during the reconnaissance were revisited. At almost all sites with flowing water, discharge, pH, specific conductance, and temperature were recorded. Two hundred and fourteen sites were dry. The low base flow seepage investigation was conducted from August 8 through August 10, 1993, and consisted of revisiting the seeps and springs that were flowing during the high base flow seepage investigation. Stream- measurement sites were not revisited. One hundred and forty-one sites were dry.

  10. Statistical analysis of interaction between lake seepage rates and groundwater and lake levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-aho, P.; Rossi, P. M.; Klöve, B.

    2012-04-01

    In Finland, the main sources of groundwater are the esker deposits from the last ice age. Small lakes imbedded in the aquifer with no outlets or inlets are typically found in eskers. Some lakes at Rokua esker, in Northern Finland, have been suffering from changes in water stage and quality. A possible permanent decline of water level has raised considerable concern as the area is also used for recreation and tourism. Rare biotypes supported by the oligotrophic lakes can also be endangered by the level decline. Drainage of peatlands located in the discharge zone of the aquifer is a possible threat for the lakes and the whole aquifer. Drainage can potentially lower the aquifer water table which can have an effect on the groundwater-lake interaction. The aim of this study was to understand in more detail the interaction of the aquifer and the lake systems so potential causes for the lake level variations could be better understood and managed. In-depth understanding of hydrogeological system provides foundation to study the nutrient input to lakes affecting lake ecosystems. A small lake imbedded the Rokua esker aquifer was studied in detail. Direct measurements of seepage rate between the lake and the aquifer were carried out using seepage meters. Seepage was measured from six locations for eight times during May 2010 - November 2010. Precipitation was recorded with a tipping bucket rain gauge adjacent to the lake. Lake stage and groundwater levels from three piezometers were registered on an hourly interval using pressure probes. Statistical methods were applied to examine relationship between seepage measurements and levels of lake and groundwater and amount of precipitation. Distinct areas of inseepage and outseepage of the lake were distinguished with seepage meter measurements. Seepage rates showed only little variation within individual measurement locations. Nevertheless analysis revealed statistically significant correlation of seepage rate variation in four

  11. A Tube Seepage Meter for In Situ Measurement of Seepage Rate and Groundwater Sampling.

    PubMed

    Solder, John E; Gilmore, Troy E; Genereux, David P; Solomon, D Kip

    2016-07-01

    We designed and evaluated a "tube seepage meter" for point measurements of vertical seepage rates (q), collecting groundwater samples, and estimating vertical hydraulic conductivity (K) in streambeds. Laboratory testing in artificial streambeds show that seepage rates from the tube seepage meter agreed well with expected values. Results of field testing of the tube seepage meter in a sandy-bottom stream with a mean seepage rate of about 0.5 m/day agreed well with Darcian estimates (vertical hydraulic conductivity times head gradient) when averaged over multiple measurements. The uncertainties in q and K were evaluated with a Monte Carlo method and are typically 20% and 60%, respectively, for field data, and depend on the magnitude of the hydraulic gradient and the uncertainty in head measurements. The primary advantages of the tube seepage meter are its small footprint, concurrent and colocated assessments of q and K, and that it can also be configured as a self-purging groundwater-sampling device. PMID:26683886

  12. Estimation of past seepage volumes from calcite distribution in the Topopah Spring Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Brian D; Neymark, Leonid A; Peterman, Zell E

    2003-01-01

    Low-temperature calcite and opal record the past seepage of water into open fractures and lithophysal cavities in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site of a proposed high-level radioactive waste repository. Systematic measurements of calcite and opal coatings in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel at the proposed repository horizon are used to estimate the volume of calcite at each site of calcite and/or opal deposition. By estimating the volume of water required to precipitate the measured volumes of calcite in the unsaturated zone, seepage rates of 0.005 to 5 liters/year (l/year) are calculated at the median and 95th percentile of the measured volumes, respectively. These seepage rates are at the low end of the range of seepage rates from recent performance assessment (PA) calculations, confirming the conservative nature of the performance assessment. However, the distribution of the calcite and opal coatings indicate that a much larger fraction of the potential waste packages would be contacted by this seepage than is calculated in the performance assessment. PMID:12714293

  13. Estimation of past seepage volumes from calcite distribution in the Topopah Spring Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshall, B.D.; Neymark, L.A.; Peterman, Z.E.

    2003-01-01

    Low-temperature calcite and opal record the past seepage of water into open fractures and lithophysal cavities in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site of a proposed high-level radioactive waste repository. Systematic measurements of calcite and opal coatings in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel at the proposed repository horizon are used to estimate the volume of calcite at each site of calcite and/or opal deposition. By estimating the volume of water required to precipitate the measured volumes of calcite in the unsaturated zone, seepage rates of 0.005 to 5 liters/year (l/year) are calculated at the median and 95th percentile of the measured volumes, respectively. These seepage rates are at the low end of the range of seepage rates from recent performance assessment (PA) calculations, confirming the conservative nature of the performance assessment. However, the distribution of the calcite and opal coatings indicate that a much larger fraction of the potential waste packages would be contacted by this seepage than is calculated in the performance assessment.

  14. Using wavelet analysis to derive seepage rates from thermal records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banzhaf, S.; Onderka, M.; Krein, A.; Scheytt, T.

    2012-04-01

    The use of thermal records to detect loosing and gaining reaches of streams and also to determine water fluxes between surface water and groundwater has attracted researchers in hydrological sciences worldwide. This method is attractive due to the high resolution and quality of the temperature data and the relatively low costs of the equipment needed to collect the data in the streambed and therefore is widely applied. Stream water temperature fluctuates on different time scales, with strong diurnal and seasonal fluctuations. When the temperature signal propagates into the aquifer, it is attenuated and shifted in time, where the degree of signal attenuation and its shift are determined by the fluid flow velocity, thermal properties of the sediment matrix, and the frequency of the temperature signal. High-frequency signals (diurnal or smaller) are damped more than low-frequency signals (seasonal or annual). Vertical fluxes can be estimated from the amplitude ratios of temperature oscillations measured between two depths in the stream bed by using the one-dimensional heat transport equation by STALLMAN (1965) when the sediment properties between this two depths are assumed to be homogeneous. However, before this calculations can be performed a time-frequency analysis has to be performed. In contrast to the Fourier transform, which is most common, the use of wavelets allows also to capture non steady-state frequency responses. This, of course, is a huge advantage of the wavelet analysis for hydrological applications as most environmental signals are non steady-state. Wavelet transform decomposes a signal into a time-frequency space and therefore localized intermittent periodicities in the signal can be detected. The wavelet power spectrum that is yielded then allows to separate these different periods, e.g. daily cycles and seasonal signals. To test this method, temperature data that was recorded for a period of 2 years in a stream and its riverbank at a field site in

  15. Turbulent flow statistics of vegetative channel with seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Thokchom Bebina; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2015-12-01

    The present study is carried out for studying the impact of submerged, flexible vegetation in a channel where downward seepage occurs. Laboratory experiments on artificial vegetation of two different heights, 8 cm and 6 cm, were conducted for no-seepage, 10% seepage and 15% seepage cases. Vegetation height is an important parameter in influencing the flow characteristics in a vegetated channel, where velocity is reduced near the top of the vegetation. Results show that velocity measured at upstream vegetation section is always higher than the downstream section even with the application of downward seepage. The maximum value of Reynolds stress occurs near the top of the vegetation. When the flow enters the vegetation section, the local effect of the presence of vegetation on sediment transport is more at the upstream vegetation section and then decreases which is shown by higher Reynolds stress at the upstream as compared to downstream vegetation section highlighting the importance of vegetation in providing as an erosion control. The maximum Reynolds stress at no seepage is increased by a percentage of 17% for 10% seepage and average of 30.5% for 15% seepage. The turbulence intensities at no seepage are increased by an average value of 15% for 10% seepage and 25% for 15% seepage. The reduction of Reynolds stress and turbulent intensities along the longitudinal direction implies the importance of using vegetation as a river restoration measure providing considerable stability to channels. Third order moments highlight that downward seepage increases the streamwise flux and decreases the upward flux.

  16. Water determination in drugs containing thiols.

    PubMed

    Sherman, F; Kuselman, I

    1999-11-15

    A new rapid analytical method is applied for water determination in alpha-Mono-thioglycerol and Captopril tablets containing thiols, and therefore, not amenable for direct Karl Fischer titration. The method is based on the consecutive titration first of thiol by a novel reagent, and then of water by a conventional K. Fischer reagent in the same sample and cell with the electrometric 'dead-stop' location of the end point in both titrations. The new reagent consists of iodine, potassium iodide and sodium acetate in non-aqueous medium. Estimated repeatability and accuracy of both water and thiol determinations are satisfactory. PMID:10547459

  17. Modeling streambank instability by seepage undercutting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predicting bank collapse due to undercutting brought about by seepage erosion has not been fully studied or modeled, albeit its role in streambank erosion may be important. The limitation originates from the limited field measurements or laboratory experiments that successfully measure or simulate s...

  18. A new device for collecting time-integrated water samples from springs and surface water bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panno, S.V.; Krapac, I.G.; Keefer, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    A new device termed the 'seepage sampler' was developed to collect representative water samples from springs, streams, and other surface-water bodies. The sampler collects composite, time-integrated water samples over short (hours) or extended (weeks) periods without causing significant changes to the chemical composition of the samples. The water sample within the sampler remains at the ambient temperature of the water body and does not need to be cooled. Seepage samplers are inexpensive to construct and easy to use. A sampling program of numerous springs and/or streams can be designed at a relatively low cost through the use of these samplers. Transient solutes migrating through such flow systems, potentially unnoticed by periodic sampling, may be detected. In addition, the mass loading of solutes (e.g., agrichemicals) may be determined when seepage samplers are used in conjunction with discharge measurements.

  19. DRIFT-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (DST AND TH SEEPAGE) MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer; S. Mukhopadhyay

    2005-01-13

    The purpose of this report is to document drift-scale modeling work performed to evaluate the thermal-hydrological (TH) behavior in Yucca Mountain fractured rock close to waste emplacement drifts. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in rock temperatures elevated from ambient for thousands of years after emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, giving rise to water redistribution and altered flow paths. The predictive simulations described in this report are intended to investigate fluid flow in the vicinity of an emplacement drift for a range of thermal loads. Understanding the TH coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally driven water saturation changes affect the potential seepage of water into waste emplacement drifts. Seepage of water is important because if enough water gets into the emplacement drifts and comes into contact with any exposed radionuclides, it may then be possible for the radionuclides to be transported out of the drifts and to the groundwater below the drifts. For above-boiling rock temperatures, vaporization of percolating water in the fractured rock overlying the repository can provide an important barrier capability that greatly reduces (and possibly eliminates) the potential of water seeping into the emplacement drifts. In addition to this thermal process, water is inhibited from entering the drift opening by capillary forces, which occur under both ambient and thermal conditions (capillary barrier). The combined barrier capability of vaporization processes and capillary forces in the near-field rock during the thermal period of the repository is analyzed and discussed in this report.

  20. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    J. Birkholzer; S. Mukhopadhyay

    2004-09-29

    The purpose of this report is to document drift-scale modeling work performed to evaluate the thermal-hydrological (TH) behavior in Yucca Mountain fractured rock close to waste emplacement drifts. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in rock temperatures elevated from ambient for thousands of years after emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, giving rise to water redistribution and altered flow paths. The predictive simulations described in this report are intended to investigate fluid flow in the vicinity of an emplacement drift for a range of thermal loads. Understanding the TH coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally driven water saturation changes affect the potential seepage of water into waste emplacement drifts. Seepage of water is important because if enough water gets into the emplacement drifts and comes into contact with any exposed radionuclides, it may then be possible for the radionuclides to be transported out of the drifts and to the groundwater below the drifts. For above-boiling rock temperatures, vaporization of percolating water in the fractured rock overlying the repository can provide an important barrier capability that greatly reduces (and possibly eliminates) the potential of water seeping into the emplacement drifts. In addition to this thermal process, water is inhibited from entering the drift opening by capillary forces, which occur under both ambient and thermal conditions (capillary barrier). The combined barrier capability of vaporization processes and capillary forces in the near-field rock during the thermal period of the repository is analyzed and discussed in this report.

  1. Influence of riparian seepage zones on nitrate variability in two agricultural headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian seepage zones are one of the primary pathways of groundwater transport to headwater streams. While seeps have been recognized for their contributions to streamflow, there is little information on how seeps affect stream water quality. The objective of this study was to examine the influence...

  2. A novel selenocystine-accumulating plant in selenium-mine seepage area of Yutangba, China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yutangba, located in the northwestern Hubei province, China, is the only selenium (Se) mine in the world with Se content as high as 8500 mg/kg. High Se concentrations in water and soil can be collected from certain restricted areas near abandoned stone coal spoils. In the seepage areas of Se mines, ...

  3. A Field Exercise on Groundwater Flow Using Seepage Meters and Mini-Piezometers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, David R.; Cherry, John A.

    1979-01-01

    Basic principles of physical hydrogeology and the nature of hydrologic interactions between groundwater and surface water can be demonstrated using two devices, the miniature piezometer and the seepage meter which can be cheaply constructed by the teacher and students. Use of the devices and learning activities are presented. (RE)

  4. Natural convection in tunnels at Yucca Mountain and impact on drift seepage

    SciTech Connect

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Peterson, P.

    2010-04-15

    The decay heat from radioactive waste that is to be disposed in the once proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM) will significantly influence the moisture conditions in the fractured rock near emplacement tunnels (drifts). Additionally, large-scale convective cells will form in the open-air drifts and will serve as an important mechanism for the transport of vaporized pore water from the fractured rock in the drift center to the drift end. Such convective processes would also impact drift seepage, as evaporation could reduce the build up of liquid water at the tunnel wall. Characterizing and understanding these liquid water and vapor transport processes is critical for evaluating the performance of the repository, in terms of water-induced canister corrosion and subsequent radionuclide containment. To study such processes, we previously developed and applied an enhanced version of TOUGH2 that solves for natural convection in the drift. We then used the results from this previous study as a time-dependent boundary condition in a high-resolution seepage model, allowing for a computationally efficient means for simulating these processes. The results from the seepage model show that cases with strong natural convection effects are expected to improve the performance of the repository, since smaller relative humidity values, with reduced local seepage, form a more desirable waste package environment.

  5. Determination of uranium in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, L.L.; Barker, F.B.

    1957-01-01

    The fluorophotometric determination of uranium was studied to develop a procedure applicable to the routine analysis of waters. Three grams of the high carbonate flux are used in a dilution procedure with spiking. Because of the comparatively high reflectivity of this large disk and the low uranium concentration, a correction for nonquenched light is required. A formula is developed to compensate for the effect, an electrical fusion device is described, and the problem of fixing uranium in waters is discussed.

  6. On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

    2002-07-18

    Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy for reducing the rate of increase of global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2} ) concentrations (IEA, 1997; Reichle, 2000). As used here, the term geologic carbon sequestration refers to the direct injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} deep into subsurface target formations. These target formations will typically be either depleted oil and gas reservoirs, or brine-filled permeable formations referred to here as brine formations. Injected CO{sub 2} will tend to be trapped by one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) permeability trapping, for example when buoyant supercritical CO{sub 2} rises until trapped by a confining caprock; (2) solubility trapping, for example when CO{sub 2} dissolves into the aqueous phase in water-saturated formations, or (3) mineralogic trapping, such as occurs when CO{sub 2} reacts to produce stable carbonate minerals. When CO{sub 2} is trapped in the subsurface by any of these mechanisms, it is effectively sequestered away from the atmosphere where it would otherwise act as a greenhouse gas. The purpose of this report is to summarize our work aimed at quantifying potential CO{sub 2} seepage due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites. The approach we take is to present first the relevant properties of CO{sub 2} over the range of conditions from the deep subsurface to the vadose zone (Section 2), and then discuss conceptual models for how leakage might occur (Section 3). The discussion includes consideration of gas reservoir and natural gas storage analogs, along with some simple estimates of seepage based on assumed leakage rates. The conceptual model discussion provides the background for the modeling approach wherein we focus on simulating transport in the vadose zone, the last potential barrier to CO{sub 2} seepage (Section 4). Because of the potentially wide range of possible properties of actual future geologic sequestration sites, we carry out sensitivity analyses by

  7. GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

    2012-05-08

    From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin

  8. A steady state solution for ditch drainage problem with special reference to seepage face and unsaturated zone flow contribution: Derivation of a new drainage spacing eqaution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousfi, Ammar; Mechergui, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    al. (2001). In this work, a novel solution based on theoretical approach will be adapted to incorporate both the seepage face and the unsaturated zone flow contribution for solving ditch drained aquifers problems. This problem will be tackled on the basis of the approximate 2D solution given by Castro-Orgaz et al. (2012). This given solution yields the generalized water table profile function with a suitable boundary condition to be determined and provides a modified DF theory which permits as an outcome the analytical determination of the seepage face. To assess the ability of the developed equation for water-table estimations, the obtained results were compared with numerical solutions to the 2-D problem under different conditions. It is shown that results are in fair agreement and thus the resulting model can be used for designing ditch drainage systems. With respect to drainage design, the spacings calculated with the newly derived equation are compared with those computed from the DF theory. It is shown that the effect of the unsaturated zone flow contribution is limited to sandy soils and The calculated maximum increase in drain spacing is about 30%. Keywords: subsurface ditch drainage; unsaturated zone; seepage face; water-table, ditch spacing equation

  9. H-Area Seepage Basins. Third quarter 1990 groundwater quality assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, G.

    1990-12-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium.

  10. H-Area Seepage Basin (H-HWMF): Fourth quarterly 1989, groundwater quality assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    During the fourth quarter of 1989 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF){sup 1} monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, and total radium.

  11. Seepage patterns of Diuron in a ditch bed during a sequence of flood events.

    PubMed

    Dages, C; Samouëlian, A; Negro, S; Storck, V; Huttel, O; Voltz, M

    2015-12-15

    Although ditches limit surface water contamination, groundwater recharge through ditches in Mediterranean catchments may result in groundwater contamination. We analysed the dynamics of pesticide percolation in ditches by conducting an original lab experiment that mimicked the successive percolation processes that occur during a flood season. Nine successive percolation events were operated on an undisturbed soil column collected from a ditch bed. The infiltrating water was doped with (14)C-Diuron at concentrations that were chosen to decrease between the events so as to correspond to values observed during actual flood events. The water and solute fluxes were monitored during each event, and the final extractable and non-extractable Diuron residues in the column were determined. Two main observations were made. First, a high leaching potential was observed through the ditch bed over a succession of infiltrating flood events, with 58.9% of the infiltrated Diuron and its metabolites leaching. Second, compared with the contamination of surface water circulating in the ditches, the contamination of seepage water exhibited smaller peak values and persisted much longer because of the desorption of Diuron residues stored in the ditch bed. Thus, ditches serve as buffering zones between surface and groundwater. However, compared with field plots, ditches appear to be a preferential location for the percolation of pesticides into groundwater at the catchment scale. PMID:26282746

  12. Microbial community changes along the active seepage site of one cold seep in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huiluo; Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The active seepage of the marine cold seeps could be a critical process for the exchange of energy between the submerged geosphere and the sea floor environment through organic-rich fluids, potentially even affecting surrounding microbial habitats. However, few studies have investigated the associated microbial community changes. In the present study, 16S rRNA genes were pyrosequenced to decipher changes in the microbial communities from the Thuwal seepage point in the Red Sea to nearby marine sediments in the brine pool, normal marine sediments and water, and benthic microbial mats. An unexpected number of reads from unclassified groups were detected in these habitats; however, the ecological functions of these groups remain unresolved. Furthermore, ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community structures were investigated using the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene. Analysis of amoA showed that planktonic marine habitats, including seeps and marine water, hosted archaeal ammonia oxidizers that differed from those in microbial mats and marine sediments, suggesting modifications of the ammonia oxidizing archaeal (AOA) communities along the environmental gradient from active seepage sites to peripheral areas. Changes in the microbial community structure of AOA in different habitats (water vs. sediment) potentially correlated with changes in salinity and oxygen concentrations. Overall, the present results revealed for the first time unanticipated novel microbial groups and changes in the ammonia-oxidizing archaea in response to environmental gradients near the active seepages of a cold seep. PMID:26284035

  13. Microbial community changes along the active seepage site of one cold seep in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huiluo; Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The active seepage of the marine cold seeps could be a critical process for the exchange of energy between the submerged geosphere and the sea floor environment through organic-rich fluids, potentially even affecting surrounding microbial habitats. However, few studies have investigated the associated microbial community changes. In the present study, 16S rRNA genes were pyrosequenced to decipher changes in the microbial communities from the Thuwal seepage point in the Red Sea to nearby marine sediments in the brine pool, normal marine sediments and water, and benthic microbial mats. An unexpected number of reads from unclassified groups were detected in these habitats; however, the ecological functions of these groups remain unresolved. Furthermore, ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community structures were investigated using the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene. Analysis of amoA showed that planktonic marine habitats, including seeps and marine water, hosted archaeal ammonia oxidizers that differed from those in microbial mats and marine sediments, suggesting modifications of the ammonia oxidizing archaeal (AOA) communities along the environmental gradient from active seepage sites to peripheral areas. Changes in the microbial community structure of AOA in different habitats (water vs. sediment) potentially correlated with changes in salinity and oxygen concentrations. Overall, the present results revealed for the first time unanticipated novel microbial groups and changes in the ammonia-oxidizing archaea in response to environmental gradients near the active seepages of a cold seep. PMID:26284035

  14. Seismic Stability of Subsea Tunnels Subjected to Seepage

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xuansheng; Ren, Yi; Du, Xiuli

    2014-01-01

    Strength reduction method and ADINA software are adopted to study the stability of submarine tunnel structures subjected to seepage and earthquake under different seawater depths and overlying rock strata thicknesses. First, the excess pore water pressure in the rock mass is eliminated through consolidation calculation. Second, dynamic time-history analysis is performed by inputting the seismic wave to obtain the maximum horizontal displacement at the model top. Finally, static analysis is conducted by inputting the gravity and the lateral border node horizontal displacement when the horizontal displacement is the largest on the top border. The safety factor of a subsea tunnel structure subjected to seepage and earthquake is obtained by continuously reducing the shear strength parameters until the calculation is not convergent. The results show that the plastic zone initially appears at a small scope on the arch feet close to the lining structure and at both sides of the vault. Moreover, the safety factor decreases with increasing seawater depth and overlying rock strata thickness. With increasing seawater depth and overlying rock strata thickness, maximum main stress, effective stress, and maximum displacement increase, whereas displacement amplitude slightly decreases. PMID:24778591

  15. Seismic stability of subsea tunnels subjected to seepage.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuansheng; Ren, Yi; Du, Xiuli; Zhang, Yida

    2014-01-01

    Strength reduction method and ADINA software are adopted to study the stability of submarine tunnel structures subjected to seepage and earthquake under different seawater depths and overlying rock strata thicknesses. First, the excess pore water pressure in the rock mass is eliminated through consolidation calculation. Second, dynamic time-history analysis is performed by inputting the seismic wave to obtain the maximum horizontal displacement at the model top. Finally, static analysis is conducted by inputting the gravity and the lateral border node horizontal displacement when the horizontal displacement is the largest on the top border. The safety factor of a subsea tunnel structure subjected to seepage and earthquake is obtained by continuously reducing the shear strength parameters until the calculation is not convergent. The results show that the plastic zone initially appears at a small scope on the arch feet close to the lining structure and at both sides of the vault. Moreover, the safety factor decreases with increasing seawater depth and overlying rock strata thickness. With increasing seawater depth and overlying rock strata thickness, maximum main stress, effective stress, and maximum displacement increase, whereas displacement amplitude slightly decreases. PMID:24778591

  16. Quantitative determination of engine water ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P.; Hernan, M.; Sarohia, V.

    1986-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique is described for determination of liquid mass flux in a droplet laden airstream. The techniques were developed for quantitative determination of engine water ingestion resulting from heavy rain or wheel spray. Independent measurements of the liquid water content (LWC) of the droplet laden airstream and of the droplet velocities were made at the stimulated nacelle inlet plane for the liquid mass flux determination. The LWC was measured by illuminating and photographing the droplets contained within a thin slice of the flow field by means of a sheet of light from a pulsed laser. A fluorescent dye introduced in the water enchanced the droplet image definition. The droplet velocities were determined from double exposed photographs of the moving droplet field. The technique was initially applied to a steady spray generated in a wind tunnel. It was found that although the spray was initially steady, the aerodynamic breakup process was inherently unsteady. This resulted in a wide variation of the instantaneous LWC of the droplet laden airstream. The standard deviation of ten separate LWC measurements was 31% of the average. However, the liquid mass flux calculated from the average LWC and droplet velocities came within 10% of the known water ingestion rate.

  17. Inertial (non-Darcian) channeled seepage flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foda, Mostafa A.

    1994-10-01

    A slow wave solution is identified for an infinite elastic medium intersected by a two-dimensional fluid channel. Because the wave speed is much slower than the medium's elastic shear wave, the response in the elastic medium is governed by elastostatics. The inertia of the wave is essentially focused in the fluid channel. Furthermore, wave damping is caused by fluid viscous friction on the channel in an elastic solid. It is proposed that these solutions may also be used in the case of a granular porous medium. The seepage channels would then represent a network of preferential flow paths. Therefore we would allow, in this case, the channel porosity to be different from the average granular porosity. For a strongly channel seepage flow or for a low channel porosity the solution is shown to approach that of a single-channel solution, giving rise to a slow propagating wave mode. On the other hand, for weak channeling or nearly `homogeneous' seepage flow the solution is shown to reproduce Biot's (1956) critically damped wave of the second kind. It is proposed that the resonance observed by Foda and Tzang (1994) are in the form of these strongly channeled wave modes.

  18. The impact of oil seepages and municipal wastewaters on Tembi River sediments, Masjedsoleyman (SW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavarsad, Zeynab; Moore, Farid; Modaberi, Soroush; Hessam, Alireza

    2010-05-01

    Oil seepage in Masjedsoleyman oil-producing region and urban and industrial effluents discharge into the main stream of Masjedsoleyman and eventually into Tembi River has polluted this river. The water of Masjedsoleyman main stream is used for livestock drinking and Tembi River is famous as a tourist site and camping. In this study, ten sampling stations were chosen along the main stream of Masjed¬soleyman and Tembi River. Heavy metal concentrations (Zn, Ni, Cu, Cd, Co, Cr, Pb, Fe), carbonate content, texture, pH, total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), total organic carbon (TOC) and free hydrocarbon(S1) in sediments samples were analyzed using ICP-MS, GC-MS and Rockeval 6. In order to determine the most important transporting phase in the sediment, Tessier sequential extraction is used. Correlation between metals and petroleum hydrocarbon and physical properties of sediment, probable source and spread of pollution are discussed. The concentration of contaminants is compared with threshold effect concentration (TEC) and probable effect concentration (PEC). Contamination factor (CF) has been calculated to assess the degree of pollution in sediments. Enrichment factors illustrate maximum enrichment of metals in sediments of Dare Khersan of Masjedsoleyman stream. Sequential extraction analysis shows iron, chrome, copper and zinc accumulate mainly in residual phase. In the majority of sediment Pb occurs in the organic fraction. Cd in sediments appears mainly in the exchangeable fraction, followed by the Fe-Mn oxides and residual fractions. The bioavailability of heavy metals decrease as Cd> Ni> Co> Pb> Cr> Zn> Cu> Fe. This study shows that the major source of heavy metals is the discharge of municipal sewage but the source of Ni is the oil seepages. Comparing the heavy metal concentrations with the consensus-based TEC and PEC values revealed that some metals such as Cd, Cr, Ni and Zn in some sediment samples are higher than both TEC and PEC, values

  19. Evaluation of seepage and discharge uncertainty in the middle Snake River, southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Williams, Marshall L.; Evetts, David M.; Vidmar, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the State of Idaho, Idaho Power Company, and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, evaluated seasonal seepage gains and losses in selected reaches of the middle Snake River, Idaho, during November 2012 and July 2013, and uncertainty in measured and computed discharge at four Idaho Power Company streamgages. Results from this investigation will be used by resource managers in developing a protocol to calculate and report Adjusted Average Daily Flow at the Idaho Power Company streamgage on the Snake River below Swan Falls Dam, near Murphy, Idaho, which is the measurement point for distributing water to owners of hydropower and minimum flow water rights in the middle Snake River. The evaluated reaches of the Snake River were from King Hill to Murphy, Idaho, for the seepage studies and downstream of Lower Salmon Falls Dam to Murphy, Idaho, for evaluations of discharge uncertainty. Computed seepage was greater than cumulative measurement uncertainty for subreaches along the middle Snake River during November 2012, the non-irrigation season, but not during July 2013, the irrigation season. During the November 2012 seepage study, the subreach between King Hill and C J Strike Dam had a meaningful (greater than cumulative measurement uncertainty) seepage gain of 415 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), and the subreach between Loveridge Bridge and C J Strike Dam had a meaningful seepage gain of 217 ft3/s. The meaningful seepage gain measured in the November 2012 seepage study was expected on the basis of several small seeps and springs present along the subreach, regional groundwater table contour maps, and results of regional groundwater flow model simulations. Computed seepage along the subreach from C J Strike Dam to Murphy was less than cumulative measurement uncertainty during November 2012 and July 2013; therefore, seepage cannot be quantified with certainty along this subreach. For the uncertainty evaluation, average

  20. An analytical solution for predicting the transient seepage from a subsurface drainage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Pei; Dan, Han-Cheng; Zhou, Tingzhang; Lu, Chunhui; Kong, Jun; Li, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Subsurface drainage systems have been widely used to deal with soil salinization and waterlogging problems around the world. In this paper, a mathematical model was introduced to quantify the transient behavior of the groundwater table and the seepage from a subsurface drainage system. Based on the assumption of a hydrostatic pressure distribution, the model considered the pore-water flow in both the phreatic and vadose soil zones. An approximate analytical solution for the model was derived to quantify the drainage of soils which were initially water-saturated. The analytical solution was validated against laboratory experiments and a 2-D Richards equation-based model, and found to predict well the transient water seepage from the subsurface drainage system. A saturated flow-based model was also tested and found to over-predict the time required for drainage and the total water seepage by nearly one order of magnitude, in comparison with the experimental results and the present analytical solution. During drainage, a vadose zone with a significant water storage capacity developed above the phreatic surface. A considerable amount of water still remained in the vadose zone at the steady state with the water table situated at the drain bottom. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated that effects of the vadose zone were intensified with an increased thickness of capillary fringe, capillary rise and/or burying depth of drains, in terms of the required drainage time and total water seepage. The analytical solution provides guidance for assessing the capillary effects on the effectiveness and efficiency of subsurface drainage systems for combating soil salinization and waterlogging problems.

  1. A method for estimating spatially variable seepage and hydrualic conductivity in channels with very mild slopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanafield, Margaret; Niswonger, Richard G.; Prudic, David E.; Pohll, Greg; Susfalk, Richard; Panday, Sorab

    2014-01-01

    Infiltration along ephemeral channels plays an important role in groundwater recharge in arid regions. A model is presented for estimating spatial variability of seepage due to streambed heterogeneity along channels based on measurements of streamflow-front velocities in initially dry channels. The diffusion-wave approximation to the Saint-Venant equations, coupled with Philip's equation for infiltration, is connected to the groundwater model MODFLOW and is calibrated by adjusting the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the channel bed. The model is applied to portions of two large water delivery canals, which serve as proxies for natural ephemeral streams. Estimated seepage rates compare well with previously published values. Possible sources of error stem from uncertainty in Manning's roughness coefficients, soil hydraulic properties and channel geometry. Model performance would be most improved through more frequent longitudinal estimates of channel geometry and thalweg elevation, and with measurements of stream stage over time to constrain wave timing and shape. This model is a potentially valuable tool for estimating spatial variability in longitudinal seepage along intermittent and ephemeral channels over a wide range of bed slopes and the influence of seepage rates on groundwater levels.

  2. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    E. Gonnenthal; N. Spyoher

    2001-02-05

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000 [153447]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: (1) Performance Assessment (PA); (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); (3) UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR); and (4) Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR. The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in

  3. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    E. Sonnenthale

    2001-04-16

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) 2000 [1534471]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: Performance Assessment (PA); Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR; Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); and UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: Continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in this AMR are required

  4. Determination of beta activity in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, F.B.; Robinson, B.P.

    1963-01-01

    Many elements have one or more naturally radioactive isotopes, and several hundred other radionuclides have been produced artificially. Radioactive substances may be present in natural water as a result of geochemical processes or the release of radioactive waste and other nuclear debris to the environment. The Geological Survey has developed methods for measuring certain of these .radioactive substances in water. Radioactive substances often are present in water samples in microgram quantities or less. Therefore, precautions must be taken to prevent loss of material and to assure that the sample truly represents its source at the time of collection. Addition of acids, complexing agents, or stable isotopes often aids in preventing loss of radioactivity on container walls, on sediment, or on other solid materials in contact with the sample. The disintegration of radioactive atoms is a random process subject to established methods of statistical analysis. Because many water samples contain small amounts of radioactivity, low-level counting techniques must be used. The usual assumption that counting data follow a Gaussian distribution is invalid under these conditions, and statistical analyses must be based on the Poisson distribution. The gross beta activity in water samples is determined from the residue left after evaporation of the sample to dryness. Evaporation is accomplished first in a teflon dish, then the residue is transferred with distilled water to a counting planchet and again is reduced to dryness. The radioactivity on the planchet is measured with an anticoincidence-shielded, low-background, beta counter and is compared with measurements of a strontium-90-yttrium-90 standard prepared and measured in the same manner. Control charts are used to assure consistent operation of the counting instrument.

  5. Determination of uranium in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Franklin Butt; Johnson, J.O.; Edwards, K.W.; Robinson, B.P.

    1965-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of very low concentrations of uranium in water. The method is based on the fluorescence of uranium in a pad prepared by fusion of the dried solids from the water sample with a flux of 10 percent NaF 45.5 percent Na2CO3 , and 45.5 percent K2CO3 . This flux permits use of a low fusion temperature and yields pads which are easily removed from the platinum fusion dishes for fluorescence measurements. Uranium concentrations of less than 1 microgram per liter can be determined on a sample of 10 milliliters, or less. The sensitivity and accuracy of the method are dependent primarily on the purity of reagents used, the stability and linearity of the fluorimeter, and the concentration of quenching elements in the water residue. A purification step is recommended when the fluorescence is quenched by more than 30 percent. Equations are given for the calculation of standard deviations of analyses by this method. Graphs of error functions and representative data are also included.

  6. Combined use of thermal methods and seepage meters to efficiently locate, quantify, and monitor focused groundwater discharge to a sand-bed stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberry, Donald O.; Briggs, Martin A.; Delin, Geoffrey; Hare, Danielle K.

    2016-06-01

    Quantifying flow of groundwater through streambeds often is difficult due to the complexity of aquifer-scale heterogeneity combined with local-scale hyporheic exchange. We used fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS), seepage meters, and vertical temperature profiling to locate, quantify, and monitor areas of focused groundwater discharge in a geomorphically simple sand-bed stream. This combined approach allowed us to rapidly focus efforts at locations where prodigious amounts of groundwater discharged to the Quashnet River on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, northeastern USA. FO-DTS detected numerous anomalously cold reaches one to several m long that persisted over two summers. Seepage meters positioned upstream, within, and downstream of 7 anomalously cold reaches indicated that rapid groundwater discharge occurred precisely where the bed was cold; median upward seepage was nearly 5 times faster than seepage measured in streambed areas not identified as cold. Vertical temperature profilers deployed next to 8 seepage meters provided diurnal-signal-based seepage estimates that compared remarkably well with seepage-meter values. Regression slope and R2 values both were near 1 for seepage ranging from 0.05 to 3.0 m d-1. Temperature-based seepage model accuracy was improved with thermal diffusivity determined locally from diurnal signals. Similar calculations provided values for streambed sediment scour and deposition at subdaily resolution. Seepage was strongly heterogeneous even along a sand-bed river that flows over a relatively uniform sand and fine-gravel aquifer. FO-DTS was an efficient method for detecting areas of rapid groundwater discharge, even in a strongly gaining river, that can then be quantified over time with inexpensive streambed thermal methods.

  7. Empirical sediment transport function predicting seepage erosion undercutting for cohesive bank failure prediction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage erosion is an important factor in hillslope instability and failure. However, predicting erosion by subsurface flow or seepage and incorporating its effects into stability models remains a challenge. Limitations exist with all existing seepage erosion sediment transport functions, including ...

  8. Catalytic determination of vanadium in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, M. J.; Skougstad, M.W.

    1964-01-01

    A rapid, accurate, and sensitive spectrophotometric method for the quantitative determination of trace amounts of vanadium in water is based on the catalytic effect of vanadium on the rate of oxidation of gallic acid by persulfate in acid solution. Under given conditions of concentrations of reactants, temperature, and reaction time, the extent of oxidation of gallic acid is proportional to the concentration of vanadium present. Vanadium is determined by measuring the absorbance of the sample at 415 m?? and comparison with standard solutions treated in an identical manner. Concentrations in the range of from 0.1 to 8.0 ??g. per liter may be determined with a standard deviation of 0.2 or less. By reducing the reaction time, the method may be extended to cover the range from 1 to 100 ??g. with a standard deviation of 0.8 or less. Several substances interfere, including chloride above 100 p.p.m., and bromide and iodide in much lower concentrations. Interference from the halides is eliminated or minimized by the addition of mercuric nitrate solution. Most other substances do not interfere at the concentration levels at which they commonly occur in natural waters.

  9. Sources, extent and history of methane seepage on the continental shelf off northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Simone; Lepland, Aivo; Chand, Shyam; Schubert, Carsten J.; Eichinger, Florian; Knies, Jochen

    2014-05-01

    Active natural hydrocarbon gas seepage was recently discovered in the Hola area on the continental shelf off Vesterålen, northern Norway. We conducted acoustic and geochemical investigations to assess the modern and past extent, source and pathways of the gas seepage . Water column echosounder surveys showed bubble plumes up to several tens of metres above the seafloor. Analyses of dissolved methane in the water column indicated slightly elevated concentrations (50 nM) close to the seafloor. To identify fluxes and origin of methane in the sediments we analysed sediment pore water chemistry, the isotopic composition of methane and of dissolved inorganic carbon (d13CCH4, d2HCH4, d13CDIC) in three closely spaced (

  10. Biosensor systems for pesticide determination in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilitewski, Ursula; Bier, Frank F.; Beyersdorf-Radeck, Baerbel; Rueger, Petra; Zischkale, Frank; Schmid, Rolf D.

    1993-03-01

    Different biosensor systems suitable for the determination of pesticides in water are described. They are based on immobilized biological components, which are sensitive to compounds commonly used as pesticides. The biological components in the work described here were microorganisms capable of degrading chlorinated aromatic compounds, cholinesterases which are inhibited by carbamates and organophosphates, and antibodies specific to triazines. They were immobilized on various carriers and were either integrated in automated flow-through systems or developed as disposable electrodes. In this contribution, characteristics features of the different formats are given, e.g., the dependence of the specificity and sensitivity of the system on the biological component.

  11. Calibration and use of continuous heat-type automated seepage meters for submarine groundwater discharge measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mwashote, B.M.; Burnett, W.C.; Chanton, J.; Santos, I.R.; Dimova, N.; Swarzenski, P.W.

    2010-01-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) assessments were conducted both in the laboratory and at a field site in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, using a continuous heat-type automated seepage meter (seepmeter). The functioning of the seepmeter is based on measurements of a temperature gradient in the water between downstream and upstream positions in its flow pipe. The device has the potential of providing long-term, high-resolution measurements of SGD. Using a simple inexpensive laboratory set-up, we have shown that connecting an extension cable to the seepmeter has a negligible effect on its measuring capability. Similarly, the observed influence of very low temperature (???3 ??C) on seepmeter measurements can be accounted for by conducting calibrations at such temperatures prior to field deployments. Compared to manual volumetric measurements, calibration experiments showed that at higher water flow rates (>28 cm day-1 or cm3 cm-2 day-1) an analog flowmeter overestimated flow rates by ???7%. This was apparently due to flow resistance, turbulence and formation of air bubbles in the seepmeter water flow tubes. Salinity had no significant effect on the performance of the seepmeter. Calibration results from fresh water and sea water showed close agreement at a 95% confidence level significance between the data sets from the two media (R2 = 0.98). Comparatively, the seepmeter SGD measurements provided data that are comparable to manually-operated seepage meters, the radon geochemical tracer approach, and an electromagnetic (EM) seepage meter. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Calibration and use of continuous heat-type automated seepage meters for submarine groundwater discharge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwashote, B. M.; Burnett, W. C.; Chanton, J.; Santos, I. R.; Dimova, N.; Swarzenski, P. W.

    2010-03-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) assessments were conducted both in the laboratory and at a field site in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, using a continuous heat-type automated seepage meter (seepmeter). The functioning of the seepmeter is based on measurements of a temperature gradient in the water between downstream and upstream positions in its flow pipe. The device has the potential of providing long-term, high-resolution measurements of SGD. Using a simple inexpensive laboratory set-up, we have shown that connecting an extension cable to the seepmeter has a negligible effect on its measuring capability. Similarly, the observed influence of very low temperature (≤3 °C) on seepmeter measurements can be accounted for by conducting calibrations at such temperatures prior to field deployments. Compared to manual volumetric measurements, calibration experiments showed that at higher water flow rates (>28 cm day -1 or cm 3 cm -2 day -1) an analog flowmeter overestimated flow rates by ≥7%. This was apparently due to flow resistance, turbulence and formation of air bubbles in the seepmeter water flow tubes. Salinity had no significant effect on the performance of the seepmeter. Calibration results from fresh water and sea water showed close agreement at a 95% confidence level significance between the data sets from the two media ( R2 = 0.98). Comparatively, the seepmeter SGD measurements provided data that are comparable to manually-operated seepage meters, the radon geochemical tracer approach, and an electromagnetic (EM) seepage meter.

  13. Seepage study of Mapleton Lateral Canal near Mapleton, Utah, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkowske, Chris D.; Phillips, Jeff V.

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted during the summer of 2003 on Mapleton Lateral Canal near Mapleton, Utah, to determine gain or loss of flow in the canal from seepage. Measurements were made in May, June, July, and September of 2003. The uppermost reach of the canal had an apparent average loss of 2.6 cubic feet per second. The next reach downstream showed an apparent average gain of 1.4 cubic feet per second. The next three downstream reaches had apparent average losses of 2.4, 2.5, and 2.7 cubic feet per second. The apparent average net loss from the canal was 8.8 cubic feet per second, or a loss of 30 percent of the total discharge measured at the head of the canal.

  14. Groundwater seepage mechanisms of streambank erosion and failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of groundwater seepage and pipeflow is unknown with respect to other fundamental processes of streambank erosion and failure, although seepage and pipeflow features are observed on streambanks throughout the world that span a range of geomorphologic conditions. Previous field and labo...

  15. Differential gauging and tracer tests resolve seepage fluxes in a strongly-losing stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehl, C.; Fisher, A. T.; Hatch, C.; Huertos, M. Los; Stemler, G.; Shennan, C.

    2006-10-01

    SummaryThe Pajaro River, central coastal California, consistently loses 0.2-0.4 m 3/s of discharge along an 11.42-km experimental reach late in the water year, when discharge is ⩽4.5 m 3/s. Channel loss occurs throughout this reach, but is greatest in magnitude near the bottom of the reach. Water isotopic data and other observations suggest that channel loss results mainly from streambed seepage, as opposed to evapotranspiration. If it occurs throughout the year, the channel loss along this short stream reach could contribute 6-13 × 10 6 m 3 of annual aquifer recharge, or ˜20-40% of current sustainable basin yield. We performed a series of tracer injections along this reach to determine if hydrologic exchange occurs within this strongly-losing stream. We found that during periods of high channel loss, there were also comparable storage exchange fluxes and lateral inflow of tracer-free water. Within upper and lower parts of the experimental reach, storage exchange fluxes are about 10 times greater than lateral inflow. The former are associated with the movement of water between the main channel and surface or subsurface storage zones. In this system, it is likely that the latter are primarily associated with spatially- or temporally-long subsurface flow paths within the shallow streambed, as opposed to inflow of ground water from deeper in the basin. Along both upper and lower parts of the experimental reach, lateral inflow tends to increase as channel discharge decreases. In contrast, storage exchange fluxes increase with decreasing discharge along the upper parts of the reach, but decrease with decreasing discharge along the lower parts. Gauging and tracer test results suggest that subsurface storage exchange and loss may occur simultaneously, and that the lateral inflow of tracer-free water can be caused by long-scale subsurface flow as well as ground water making its first appearance in the channel.

  16. Flame photometric determination of strontium in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skougstad, Marvin W.

    1957-01-01

    Preliminary search of reported methods of Sr analysis revealed several investigations which have been made for the determination of Sr with the flame photometer, both at relatively low concentrations (0 to 50 ppm Sr) and at higher concentrations. Generally the procedures described involved measurement of Sr emission at either 460.7 mu or at 681 mu. There is disagreement among those reporting methods for Sr as to the preference of the one wavelength over the other. The 681 line (or band) seems to be preferred because of its greater reproducibility and relative freedom from interference. The 460.7 mu line, however, lies in the region of greater sensitivity of the photomultiplier tube, and hence for this reason is preferred by some. This is an advantage, of course, when determining Sr at very low concentrations. This investigation is concerned with determining the optimum conditions for the determination of Sr at low concentration levels in water samples. Early experimental work indicated a greater sensitivity for the 460.7 mu (hereafter designated as 461 mu) Sr line. Therefore, most of the subsequent work was based on a study of the effects of various other materials and conditions on the emission of Sr at this wavelength.

  17. Ecohydrology of seepage springs in an urban National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knee, K.; Melone, J.; Friedel, B.; Fong, D.

    2014-12-01

    Shallow groundwater-fed seepage springs, also known as hypotelminorheic habitats, are found around the Washington, DC area, including in the George Washington Parkway, a National Park unit in northern Virginia. These springs differ from better-known vernal pools both in their hydrology and their ecology: because they are groundwater-fed, they are more resistant to drying out than vernal pools, and they harbor cave-adapted arthropod species including amphipods of the genus Stygobroumus. This project seeks to understand the ecohydrology of the hypotelminorheic habitats that support these species, some of which are endangered, and which comprise an important but underappreciated component of biodiversity in DC-area National Parks. Our study focuses on two hypotelminorheic habitats in the GW Parkway area and consists of three main components: (1) a weekly population census of Stygobroumus using multiple mark-recapture methodology, (2) weekly monitoring of dissolved radon, a tracer of groundwater discharge, as well as conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and pH, and (3) continuous logging of spring water temperature. This poster presents preliminary data from the Stygobroumus population census and explores how these animals may be affected by spring hydrology. Specifically, we use temperature, conductivity, radon activity and precipitation data from a nearby weather station to understand how the springs respond to episodic and seasonal variation in temperature, precipitation and groundwater seepage and how this affects Stygobromus populations. We also explore whether variations in Stygobromus counts reflect (1) active migration between the surficial spring and the larger subterranean habitat, or (2) passive flushing driven by groundwater discharge. Our results provide basic hydrologic data about a little-understood habitat type and will help managers protect Stygobromus in the urban park environment.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Seepage Properties of Fractured Rocks Under Different Confining Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, D.; Miao, X. X.; Chen, Z. Q.; Mao, X. B.

    2013-09-01

    The effectiveness of transmitting underground water in rock fractures is strongly influenced by the widths of the fractures and their interconnections. However, the geometries needed for water flow in fractured rock are also heavily controlled by the confining pressure conditions. This paper is intended to study the seepage properties of fractured rocks under different confining pressures. In order to do this, we designed and manufactured a water flow apparatus that can be connected to the electro-hydraulic servo-controlled test system MTS815.02, which provides loading and exhibits external pressures in the test. Using this apparatus, we tested fractured mudstone, limestone and sandstone specimens and obtained the relationship between seepage properties and variations in confining pressure. The calculation of the seepage properties based on the collection of water flow and confining pressure differences is specifically influenced by non-Darcy flow. The results show that: (1) The seepage properties of fractured rocks are related to confining pressure, i.e. with the increase of confining pressure, the permeability decreases and the absolute value of non-Darcy flow coefficient increases. (2) The sandstone coefficients and range from to m2 and to m-1, respectively, and exhibit a greater change compared to coefficients of mudstone and limestone. (3) From the regression analysis of experimental data, it is concluded that the polynomial function is a better fit than the power and logarithmic functions. The results obtained can provide an important reference for understanding the stability of rock surrounding roadways toward prevention of underground water gushing-out, and for developing underground resources (e.g. coal).

  19. Water balance approach to determine upward water movement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shallow water tables can contribute water moving up into the root zone. The purpose of this study was to quantify upward moving water. Automated sensors were used to monitor soil water content and water table depth on sites in Central Iowa, which had varying shallow water tables. Tipping bucket rain...

  20. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, tritium, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226), gross alpha, antimony, mercury, lead, tetrachloroethylene, arsenic, and cadmium exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) at the Savannah River Site. This report presents and discusses the groundwater monitoring results in the H-Area for first quarter 1992.

  1. Groundwater quality assessment/corrective action feasibility plan. Savannah River Laboratory Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, G.F.

    1989-11-15

    The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) Seepage Basins are located in the northeastern section of the 700 Area at the Savannah River Site. Currently the four basins are out of service and are awaiting closure in accordance with the Consent Decree settled under Civil Act No. 1:85-2583. Groundwater monitoring data from the detection monitoring network around the SRL Basins was recently analyzed using South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations R.61-79.264.92 methods to determine if groundwater in the immediate vicinity of the SRL Basins had been impacted. Results from the data analysis indicate that the groundwater has been impacted by both volatile organic constituents (VOCs) and inorganic constituents. The VOCs, specifically trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene, are currently being addressed under the auspices of the SRS Hazardous Waste Permit Application (Volume III, Section J.6.3). The impacts resulting from elevated levels of inorganic constituent, such as barium, calcium, and zinc in the water table, do not pose a threat to human health and the environment. In order to determine if vertical migration of the inorganic constituents has occurred three detection monitoring wells are proposed for installation in the upper portion of the Congaree Aquifer.

  2. Utilizing geophysical methods for asessment and characterization of canal seepage in El Paso's lower valley irrigation delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegon, Amanda Brooke

    El Paso County Water Improvement District No. 1 (EPCWID No.1) delivers the Rio Grande water for agricultural production and urban uses through numerous networked irrigation canals. Of the nearly 86 billion gallons of water released annually for irrigation uses in Texas, billions are lost due to evaporation and seepage in unlined canals with 56 million gallons of the billions are lost in Franklin Canal annually due to improper lining and sediment variation of the canals. To characterize seepage patterns and identify areas of high seepage, Electrical Resistivity, Ground Truthing via soil sample analysis were used along three, half-mile long sectioned canals during irrigation and non-irrigation seasons. The data lines acquired were processed in EARTHIMAGER 2D to create 2D vertical resistivity inversion profiles to locate potential areas of high seepage/high resistivity. The research results will help El Paso County Water Improvement District No. 1 to develop management strategies to conserve water and improve the delivery efficiency systems which leads to economic growth in the Rio Grande Basin.

  3. Infinite slope stability under steady unsaturated seepage conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Godt, J.

    2008-01-01

    [1] We present a generalized framework for the stability of infinite slopes under steady unsaturated seepage conditions. The analytical framework allows the water table to be located at any depth below the ground surface and variation of soil suction and moisture content above the water table under steady infiltration conditions. The framework also explicitly considers the effect of weathering and porosity increase near the ground surface on changes in the friction angle of the soil. The factor of safety is conceptualized as a function of the depth within the vadose zone and can be reduced to the classical analytical solution for subaerial infinite slopes in the saturated zone. Slope stability analyses with hypothetical sandy and silty soils are conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the framework. These analyses indicate that for hillslopes of both sandy and silty soils, failure can occur above the water table under steady infiltration conditions, which is consistent with some field observations that cannot be predicted by the classical infinite slope theory. A case study of shallow slope failures of sandy colluvium on steep coastal hillslopes near Seattle, Washington, is presented to examine the predictive utility of the proposed framework. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Prediction of NO3-N losses in surface runoff from a field with seepage zones using GLEAMS and RZWQM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Groundwater Loading Effects of Agricultural Management Systems (GLEAMS) model and the Root Zone Water Quality Model (RZWQM) were used to predict daily and monthly nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations and losses in surface runoff from an agricultural field with seepage zones. Three statistic...

  5. Preliminary Evaluation of Drift Seepage Model Using SeepageInformation from the ESF South Ramp at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, Stefan; Seol, Yongkoo

    2005-09-30

    The overall objective of this study is to examine whether the modeling approach employed to estimate seepage into waste emplacement drifts yields results that are consistent with the observed seepage in the ESF South Ramp. It is important to realize that the modeling study reported here is not an attempt to predict, reproduce, or analyze the South Ramp seepage data. Such an effort would require the development of a specific model and a specific characterization and analysis approach best suited for capturing the hydrogeologic conditions in the South Ramp as they prevailed before and during the period of the seepage observations. Instead, the conceptual framework and analysis approach developed for the estimation of long-term seepage into waste emplacement drifts in the Topopah Spring unit is used with minimal adjustments to examine whether the results of the probabilistic approach employed in the TSPA-LA (which considers uncertainty and spatial variability in fracture permeability, capillary strength, and local percolation flux) would provide reasonable seepage estimates, even if applied to the conditions in the South Ramp. If so, confidence can be gained that the TSPA-LA approach captures the processes relevant for the prediction of natural seepage into large underground openings.

  6. Prototype development of an apparatus to locate and map sea floor petroleum seepages. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.F.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of the grant was to design, build, and test two autonomous instruments to measure vertical profiles of electrical potential in sea floor sediments. The objectives were fully met when the instruments were successfully deployed in 1,800 feet of water at known petroleum seepage sites in the Gulf of Mexico. The instruments were proven to be able to measure and record signals known to be appropriate to sediments altered by seepage. Two known seepage sites were visited on September 18th and 20th, 1996. At the first, a small-scale instrument capable of measuring 60 cm into the sediment was repeatedly emplaced by the manipulator arm of a research submarine, along a sea floor traverse. Further, the large-scale instrument, having a probe 3.3 m in length, was deployed by steel cable from the ship and emplaced in the sediment under gravity. Both successfully recorded data from multiple electrodes, revealing the expected negative potentials (Eh values as low as {minus}230 mV) at, and close to, the sediment-water interface, instead of at the normal depths of 3 to 4 m.

  7. Prototype development of an apparatus to locate and map sea floor petroleum seepages. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The objective of the grant was to design, build, and test two autonomous instruments to measure vertical profiles of electrical potential in sea floor sediments. The objectives were fully met when the instruments were successfully deployed in 1,800 feet of water at known petroleum seepage sites in the Gulf of Mexico. The instruments were proven to be able to measure and record signals known to be appropriate to sediments altered by seepage. Two known seepage sites were visited on September 18th and 20th, 1996. At the first, a small-scale instrument capable of measuring 60 cm into the sediment was repeatedly emplaced by the manipulator arm of a research submarine, along a sea floor traverse. Further, the large-scale instrument, having a probe 3.3 m in length, was deployed by steel cable from the ship and emplaced in the sediment under gravity. Both successfully recorded data from multiple electrodes, revealing the expected negative potentials (Eh values at low at {minus}230 mV) at, and close to, the sediment-water interface, instead of at the normal depths of 3 to 4 m.

  8. Determination of water content using mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, G. M.; Upchurch, B. T.; Hughes, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    Mass spectrometer is used to measure small quantities of water present in different materials. System has been applied in measuring water and gases desorbed from microcircuitry insulation, can also be used with foods, polymeric materials, and organic solvents.

  9. Determination of dissolved aluminum in water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Afifi, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    A technique has been modified for determination of a wide range of concentrations of dissolved aluminum (Al) in water and has been tested. In this technique, aluminum is complexed with 8-hydroxyquinoline at pH 8.3 to minimize interferences, then extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The extract is analyzed colorimetrically at 395 nm. This technique is used to analyze two forms of monomeric Al, nonlabile (organic complexes) and labile (free, Al, Al sulfate, fluoride and hydroxide complexes). A detection limit 2 ug/L is possible with 25-ml samples and 10-ml extracts. The detection limit can be decreased by increasing the volume of the sample and (or) decreasing the volume of the methyl isobutyl ketone extract. The analytical uncertainty of this method is approximately + or - 5 percent. The standard addition technique provides a recovery test for this technique and ensures precision in samples of low Al concentrations. The average percentage recovery of the added Al plus the amount originally present was 99 percent. Data obtained from analyses of filtered standard solutions indicated that Al is adsorbed on various types of filters. However, the relationship between Al concentrations and adsorption remains linear. A test on standard solutions also indicated that Al is not adsorbed on nitric acid-washed polyethylene and polypropylene bottle wells. (USGS)

  10. Coulomb stress variation produced by reservoir loading and seepage: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Tao, K.; Ning, J.

    2010-12-01

    Reservoir loading and seepage can lead to change of Coulomb stress on nearby fault planes. Sometimes it may trigger big earthquakes. For quantitatively revealing the correlation between reservoir impoundment and seismicity, we conduct numerical simulation of faults’ Coulomb stress change under the reservoir. We compute the Coulomb stress change on faults introduced by the reservoir loading and fluid pressure seepage separately for both simplicity and distinguishing the roles of different mechanisms. The effects of reservoir loading and seepage to faults’ Coulomb stress are mainly related to the locations of faults as well as their geometrical and mechanical properties. The solution of Bousinesq’s problem is for the stress distribution at any point under the reservoir. Based on the elastic theoretical solution for half-infinite space, we calculated shear and normal stress changes on faults by convolution. However the Coulomb stress is fault related. A thrust fault may decrease the Coulomb stress when a reservoir above releasing water, but the effect of a reservoir on a normal fault is opposite. So we did a lot of computations with different computational conditions to get better conclusions. At the same time, we follow Biot’s theory and Rice’s theory and calculate the temporal and spatial pore pressure change as results of reservoir seepage along faults using FEPG finite element method software. After a couple of computations with different coefficient of diffusion, we find that the pore pressure variation strongly depends on the coefficient of water diffusion. When taking both the role of reservoir loading on the pore pressure and the seepage into consideration of pore pressure computation, we find that the pore pressure variation with time is totally different with former understandings. According to the Coulomb failure criterion, we calculated the final Coulomb stress change of a specific fault, in which the shear stress and effective normal stress

  11. Computation on free gas seepage and associated seabed pockmark formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Cathles, Lawrence M.; Chen, D. F.; Wu, N. Y.

    2010-03-01

    Seabed pockmarks formed by seepage of subsurface fluids are very commonly located in areas where gas is present in near-surface sediments. Especially, they are widely observed on the seafloor at hydrate regions around the world. In this paper we consider that capillary sealing is the crucial mechanism for gas entrapment, gas escape, and pockmark formation. In the hydrate system, free gas is trapped beneath the hydrate layer. The gas overpressure increases as the gas accumulates beneath the hydrate. the hydrate layer is a capillary seal. Capillary seals have the property that they fail completely when the gas pressure reaches the point that they are invaded by gas. The release of gas is thus episodic and sudden. We imagine in our model that when it occurs the venting gas will push the overlying water upward at increasingly higher velocities as the gas pipe approaches the seafloor. As the water velocity increases, the near surface sediments will become quick at a depth that is a function of the thickness of free gas column under the hydrate seal and the depth of hydrate seal, leaving a pockmark on the seafloor. The model shows that at least a 22-m-thick free gas layer beneath the hydrate at Blake Ridge is needed to form the 4-m-deep pockmark at the seabed.

  12. On the physics of unstable infiltration, seepage, and gravity drainage in partially saturated tuffs.

    PubMed

    Faybishenko, B; Bodvarsson, G S; Salve, R

    2003-01-01

    To improve understanding of the physics of dynamic instabilities in unsaturated flow processes within the Paintbrush nonwelded unit (PTn) and the middle nonlithophysal portion of the Topopah Spring welded tuff unit (TSw) of Yucca Mountain, we analyzed data from a series of infiltration tests carried out at two sites (Alcove 4 and Alcove 6) in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), using analytical and empirical functions. The analysis of infiltration rates measured at both sites showed three temporal scales of infiltration rate: (1) a macro-scale trend of overall decreasing flow, (2) a meso-scale trend of fast and slow motion exhibiting three-stage variations of the flow rate (decreasing, increasing, and [again] decreasing flow rate, as observed in soils in the presence of entrapped air), and (3) micro-scale (high frequency) fluctuations. Infiltration tests in the nonwelded unit at Alcove 4 indicate that this unit may effectively dampen episodic fast infiltration events; however, well-known Kostyakov, Horton, and Philip equations do not satisfactorily describe the observed trends of the infiltration rate. Instead, a Weibull distribution model can most accurately describe experimentally determined time trends of the infiltration rate. Infiltration tests in highly permeable, fractured, welded tuff at Alcove 6 indicate that the infiltration rate exhibits pulsation, which may have been caused by multiple threshold effects and water-air redistribution between fractures and matrix. The empirical relationships between the extrinsic seepage from fractures, matrix imbibition, and gravity drainage versus the infiltration rate, as well as scaling and self-similarity for the leading edge of the water front are the hallmark of the nonlinear dynamic processes in water flow under episodic infiltration through fractured tuff. Based on the analysis of experimental data, we propose a conceptual model of a dynamic fracture flow and fracture-matrix interaction in fractured tuff

  13. On the physics of unstable infiltration, seepage, and gravity drainage in partially saturated tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, B.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Salve, R.

    2002-04-01

    To improve understanding of the physics of dynamic instabilities in unsaturated flow processes within the Paintbrush nonwelded unit (PTn) and the middle nonlithophysal portion of the Tonopah Spring welded tuff unit (TSw) of Yucca Mountain, we analyzed data from a series of infiltration tests carried out at two sites (Alcove 4 and Alcove 6) in the Exploratory Studies Facility, using analytical and empirical functions. The analysis of infiltration rates measured at both sites showed three temporal scales of infiltration rate: (1) a macro-scale trend of overall decreasing flow, (2) a meso-scale trend of fast and slow motion exhibiting three-stage variations of the flow rate (decreasing, increasing, and [again] decreasing flow rate, as observed in soils in the presence of entrapped air), and (3) micro-scale (high frequency) fluctuations. Infiltration tests in the nonwelded unit at Alcove 4 indicate that this unit may effectively dampen episodic fast infiltration events; however, well-known Kostyakov, Horton, and Philip equations do not satisfactorily describe the observed trends of the infiltration rate. Instead, a Weibull distribution model can most accurately describe experimentally determined time trends of the infiltration rate. Infiltration tests in highly permeable, fractured, welded tuff at Alcove 6 indicate that the infiltration rate exhibits pulsation, which may have been caused by multiple threshold effects and water-air redistribution between fractures and matrix. The empirical relationships between the extrinsic seepage from fractures, matrix imbibition, and gravity drainage versus the infiltration rate, as well as scaling and self-similarity for the leading edge of the water front are the hallmark of the nonlinear dynamic processes in water flow under episodic infiltration through fractured tuff. Based on the analysis of experimental data, we propose a conceptual model of a dynamic fracture flow and fracture-matrix interaction in fractured tuff

  14. On the physics of unstable infiltration, seepage, and gravity drainage in partially saturated tuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faybishenko, B.; Bodvarsson, G. S.; Salve, R.

    2003-05-01

    To improve understanding of the physics of dynamic instabilities in unsaturated flow processes within the Paintbrush nonwelded unit (PTn) and the middle nonlithophysal portion of the Topopah Spring welded tuff unit (TSw) of Yucca Mountain, we analyzed data from a series of infiltration tests carried out at two sites (Alcove 4 and Alcove 6) in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), using analytical and empirical functions. The analysis of infiltration rates measured at both sites showed three temporal scales of infiltration rate: (1) a macro-scale trend of overall decreasing flow, (2) a meso-scale trend of fast and slow motion exhibiting three-stage variations of the flow rate (decreasing, increasing, and [again] decreasing flow rate, as observed in soils in the presence of entrapped air), and (3) micro-scale (high frequency) fluctuations. Infiltration tests in the nonwelded unit at Alcove 4 indicate that this unit may effectively dampen episodic fast infiltration events; however, well-known Kostyakov, Horton, and Philip equations do not satisfactorily describe the observed trends of the infiltration rate. Instead, a Weibull distribution model can most accurately describe experimentally determined time trends of the infiltration rate. Infiltration tests in highly permeable, fractured, welded tuff at Alcove 6 indicate that the infiltration rate exhibits pulsation, which may have been caused by multiple threshold effects and water-air redistribution between fractures and matrix. The empirical relationships between the extrinsic seepage from fractures, matrix imbibition, and gravity drainage versus the infiltration rate, as well as scaling and self-similarity for the leading edge of the water front are the hallmark of the nonlinear dynamic processes in water flow under episodic infiltration through fractured tuff. Based on the analysis of experimental data, we propose a conceptual model of a dynamic fracture flow and fracture-matrix interaction in fractured tuff

  15. Interrelationships among hydrologic-budget components of a northern Wisconsin seepage lake and implications for acid-deposition modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wentz, D.A.; Rose, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Components of the hydrologic budget for a northern Wisconsin seepage lake were analyzed by applying correlation and regression techniques to monthly data. Analyses for the 1981-83 water years revealed a statistically significant, direct relationship between storage change and precipitation-evaporation balance. Ground-water outflow was negatively correlated with ground-water inflow, and this relationship was influenced by similar relationships for both hydraulic gradients and cross-sectional areas in outflow versus inflow regions of the lake. Neither ground-water outflow nor inflow was significantly related to precipitation, evaporation, storage change, or lake stage; this may reflect a lag in response time of the ground-water system compared to the lake. The results (1) emphasize the complexity of factors that influence ground-water interactions with seepage lakes and (2) suggest the importance of completing detailed hydrologic studies of these systems before mechanistic models, such as those developed to predict effects of acid deposition, are applied.

  16. Controlling seepage in discrete particle simulations of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Joldes, Grand R; Wong, Kelvin K L; Tan, Chin Wee; Smith, David W

    2016-08-01

    It is now commonplace to represent materials in a simulation using assemblies of discrete particles. Sometimes, one wishes to maintain the integrity of boundaries between particle types, for example, when modelling multiple tissue layers. However, as the particle assembly evolves during a simulation, particles may pass across interfaces. This behaviour is referred to as 'seepage'. The aims of this study were (i) to examine the conditions for seepage through a confining particle membrane and (ii) to define some simple rules that can be employed to control seepage. Based on the force-deformation response of spheres with various sizes and stiffness, we develop analytic expressions for the force required to move a 'probe particle' between confining 'membrane particles'. We analyse the influence that particle's size and stiffness have on the maximum force that can act on the probe particle before the onset of seepage. The theoretical results are applied in the simulation of a biological cell under unconfined compression. PMID:26629728

  17. Seepage investigation of the Rio Grande from below Leasburg Dam, Leasburg, New Mexico, to above American Dam, El Paso, Texas, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briody, Alyse C.; Robertson, Andrew J.; Thomas, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Net seepage gain or loss was computed for each subreach (the interval between two adjacent measurement locations along the river) by subtracting the discharge measured at the upstream location from the discharge measured at the closest downstream location along the river and then subtracting any inflow to the river within the subreach. An estimated gain or loss was determined to be meaningful when it exceeded the cumulative measurement uncertainty associated with the net seepage computation. The cumulative seepage loss in the 64-mile study reach in 2015 was 17.3 plus or minus 2.6 cubic feet per second. Gaining and losing reaches identified in this investigation generally correspond to seepage patterns observed in previous investigations conducted during dry years, with the gaining reaches occurring primarily at the southern (downstream) end of the basin.

  18. Modelling groundwater seepage zones in an unconfined aquifer with MODFLOW: different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leterme, Bertrand; Gedeon, Matej

    2014-05-01

    In areas where groundwater level occurs close to surface topography, the discharge of groundwater flow to the ground surface (or seepage) can be an important aspect of catchment hydrological cycle. It is also associated with valuable zones from an ecological point of view, often having a permanent shallow water table and constant lithotrophic water quality (Batelaan et al., 2003). In the present study, we try to implement a correct representation of this seepage process in a MODFLOW-HYDRUS coupled model for a small catchment (18.6 km²) of north-east Belgium. We started from an exisiting transient groundwater model of the unconfined aquifer in the study area (Gedeon and Mallants, 2009) discretized in 50x50 m cells. As the model did not account for seepage, hydraulic heads were simulated above the surface topography in certain zones. In the coupled MODFLOW-HYDRUS setup, transient boundary conditions (potential evapotranspiration and precipitation) are used to calculate the recharge with the HYDRUS package (Seo et al., 2007) for MODFLOW-2000 (Harbaugh et al., 2000). Coupling HYDRUS to MODFLOW involves the definition of a number of zones based on similarity in estimated groundwater depth, soil type and land cover. Concerning simulation of seepage, several existing packages are tested, including the DRAIN package (as in Reeve et al., 2006), the SPF package (from VSF Process; Thoms et al., 2006) and the PBC package (Post, 2011). Alternatively to the HYDRUS package for MODFLOW, the UZF package (Niswonger et al., 2006) for the simulation of recharge (and seepage) is also tested. When applicable, the parameterization of drain conductance in the top layer is critical and is investigated in relation to the soil hydraulic conductivity values used for the unsaturated zone (HYDRUS). Furthermore, stability issues are discussed, and where successful model runs are obtained, simulation results are compared with observed groundwater levels from a piezometric network. Spatial and

  19. Statistical analysis of liquid seepage in partially saturated heterogeneous fracture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, T.S.

    1999-12-01

    Field evidence suggests that water flow in unsaturated fracture systems may occur along fast preferential flow paths. However, conventional macroscale continuum approaches generally predict the downward migration of water as a spatially uniform wetting front subjected to strong inhibition into the partially saturated rock matrix. One possible cause of this discrepancy may be the spatially random geometry of the fracture surfaces, and hence, the irregular fracture aperture. Therefore, a numerical model was developed in this study to investigate the effects of geometric features of natural rock fractures on liquid seepage and solute transport in 2-D planar fractures under isothermal, partially saturated conditions. The fractures were conceptualized as 2-D heterogeneous porous media that are characterized by their spatially correlated permeability fields. A statistical simulator, which uses a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, was employed to generate synthetic permeability fields. Hypothesized geometric features that are expected to be relevant for seepage behavior, such as spatially correlated asperity contacts, were considered in the SA algorithm. Most importantly, a new perturbation mechanism for SA was developed in order to consider specifically the spatial correlation near conditioning asperity contacts. Numerical simulations of fluid flow and solute transport were then performed in these synthetic fractures by the flow simulator TOUGH2, assuming that the effects of matrix permeability, gas phase pressure, capillary/permeability hysteresis, and molecular diffusion can be neglected. Results of flow simulation showed that liquid seepage in partially saturated fractures is characterized by localized preferential flow, along with bypassing, funneling, and localized ponding. Seepage pattern is dominated by the fraction of asperity contracts, and their shape, size, and spatial correlation. However, the correlation structure of permeability field is less important

  20. DETERMINING THE NUTRIENT STATUS OF DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of biodegradable organic matter in drinking water can result in biologically unstable water that has been linked to various taste, odor and color problems. hen the implicated bacteria are members of the total coliform group, those occurrences can result if major comp...

  1. F-Area seepage basins, groundwater quality assessment report, first quarter 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    During the first quarter of 1990, wells which make up the F-Area Seepage Basins (F-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, gross alpha, and nonvolatile beta. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the F-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, cadmium, lead, total radium, gross alpha, and nonvolatile beta. Concentrations of at least one of the following constituents: tritium, nitrate, total radium, gross alpha, cadmium, lead, tetrachloroethylene, nonvolatile beta, endrin, lindane, barium, fluoride, mercury, and trichlorethylene in excess of the primary drinking water standard (PDWS) were observed in at least one well monitoring the F-Area Seepage Basins. Tritium concentrations above the PDWS occur in forty-four of the fifty-nine (75%) groundwater monitoring wells. Nitrate concentrations above the PDWS occur in thirty-four of the fifty-nine (59%) groundwater wells. The radionuclides, total radium, gross alpha, and nonvolatile beta, exceed the PDWS is over twenty-five percent of the groundwater wells. Heavy metals, cadmium and lead in particular, exceed the PDWS in over twelve percent of the wells. Since 1987, tritium and nitrate concentrations have been steadily declining in a majority of the wells. However, tritium concentrations, from fourth quarter 1989 to first quarter 1990, have increased.

  2. Measurement of seepage losses and chemical export from waste lagoons at animal feeding operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, J. M.; DeSutter, T. M.

    2001-05-01

    Whole-lagoon seepage rates were measured from 20 lagoons in Kansas using water balance techniques. Study sites included cattle feedlots, swine facilities, and one dairy. Seepage rates ranged from 0.2 mm/day to 2.4 mm/day with and overall average of 1.2 mm/day. Analysis of lagoon effluent (58 samples from 38 sites) indicated large differences in lagoon chemistry between locations. Ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N), which accounted for over 99 percent of the soluble nitrogen, ranged from 10 ppm to 3500 ppm. On average, nitrogen concentrations in swine lagoons were about five times higher than those at cattle feedlots. The chemical flux density (flux boundary condition) was estimated from the seepage rate and the corresponding waste chemistry data from each lagoon. Results showed that ammonium-N export was between 0.02 and 1.06 kg NH4-N m-2 yr^{-1} with an overall average of about 0.3 kg NH4-N m^{-2} yr^{-1}$ . Similar data are available for other soluble compounds. Soil cores were collected beneath eight lagoons that had been operated from 12 to 25 years. Results showed that NH4-N was strongly adsorbed by the soil clay particles and that nitrogen concentrations often decreased to background levels at 3 m beneath the lagoon. Other ions, such as chloride, penetrated to much lower depths at all locations. The 'reservoir' of NH4-N that exists beneath older lagoons could convert to nitrate and move to lower depths after lagoon closure. Data suggest that the properties if the soil beneath lagoons, the concentration of the waste, the seepage rate, and the depth to groundwater are the crucial factors that affect the risk of groundwater contamination.

  3. Groundwater seepage landscapes from distant and local sources in experiments and on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, W. A.; McLelland, S. J.; Parsons, D. R.; Murphy, B. J.; Hauber, E.; Kleinhans, M. G.

    2015-08-01

    Valleys with theater-shaped heads can form due to the seepage of groundwater and as a result of knickpoint (waterfall) erosion generated by overland flow. This ambiguity in the mechanism of formation hampers the interpretation of such valleys on Mars, particularly since there is limited knowledge of material properties. Moreover, the hydrological implications of a groundwater or surface water origin are important for our understanding of the evolution of surface features on Mars, and a quantification of valley morphologies at the landscape scale may provide diagnostic insights on the formative hydrological conditions. However, flow patterns and the resulting landscapes produced by different sources of groundwater are poorly understood. We aim to improve the understanding of the formation of entire valley landscapes through seepage processes from different groundwater sources that will provide a framework of landscape metrics for the interpretation of such systems. We study groundwater seepage from a distant source of groundwater and from infiltration of local precipitation in a series of sandbox experiments and combine our results with previous experiments and observations of the Martian surface. Key results are that groundwater flow piracy acts on valleys fed by a distant groundwater source and results in a sparsely dissected landscape of many small and a few large valleys. In contrast, valleys fed by a local groundwater source, i.e., nearby infiltration, result in a densely dissected landscape. In addition, valleys fed by a distant groundwater source grow towards that source, while valleys with a local source grow in a broad range of directions and have a strong tendency to bifurcate, particularly on flatter surfaces. We consider these results with respect to two Martian cases: Louros Valles shows properties of seepage by a local source of groundwater and Nirgal Vallis shows evidence of a distant source, which we interpret as groundwater flow from Tharsis.

  4. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, the groundwater at the F-Area Seepage Basins (FASB) was monitored in compliance with South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, R61-79.265, Subpart F. Eighty-five wells provided samples from the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the FASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Post-Closure Care Permit Application for the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control in December 1990. Historically, as well as currently, tritium, nitrate, gross alpha, total alpha-emitting radium, cadmium, and lead are the primary constituents observed above final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater at the FASB. Nonvolatile beta has consistently exceeded its drinking water screening level. Other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also have exceeded the final PDWS in the groundwater at the FASB. The elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB[sub 2] (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB[sub 1], (Barnwell/McBean) wells. However, several Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells also contain elevated levels of constituents, primarily tritium. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/ activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units for first and fourth quarters 1992. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the FASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  5. Seepage investigations of the Rio Grande from below Leasburg Dam, Leasburg, New Mexico, to above American Dam, El Paso, Texas, 2006-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crilley, D.M.; Matherne, A.M.; Thomas, Nicole; Falk, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Seepage investigations were conducted annually by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1988 to 1998 and from 2004 to 2013 along a 64-mile reach of the Rio Grande from below Leasburg Dam, Leasburg, New Mexico, to above American Dam, El Paso, Texas, as part of the Mesilla Basin monitoring program. Results of studies conducted from 2006 to 2013 are presented in this report. Seepage investigations were conducted over a period of 1–2 days in February of each year, during low-flow conditions in the non-irrigation season. During the seepage investigations, discharge was measured at as many as 24 sites along the Rio Grande and as many as 20 inflow sites within the study reach. Net seepage gain or loss was computed for each subreach by subtracting the discharge measured at the upstream location from the discharge measured at the closest downstream location along the river and then subtracting any inflow to the river within the subreach. An estimated gain or loss was determined to be significant when it exceeded the cumulative measurement uncertainty associated with the net seepage computation. Study reaches during 2006 to 2013 ranged from 20.2 to 64 miles in length, and seepage losses ranged from 8.2 ± 3.1 to 47.9 ± 8.2 cubic feet per second.

  6. Quantifying spatial and temporal variability of groundwater-surface-water exchange in fluvial settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberry, Donald

    2010-05-01

    Substantial spatial variability in flow across the sediment-water interface is now generally accepted as ubiquitous in hyporheic settings. A growing body of evidence indicates exchange also varies temporally, including frequent reversals in flow direction, on scales of minutes to hours to days. The extent of this dynamism, and the significance with regard to water chemistry and ecosystem viability and stability, have yet to be determined for many hyporheic settings. Anthropogenic influences create even greater variability through bed disturbance, and manipulation of stream and river flow, sediment supply, and surface-water and groundwater quality. In-situ measurements of seepage rate and direction were made along two river reaches, one located well downstream of any control structures and where bed mobility was common, and the other located several kilometers downstream of a dam where the bed was immobile nearly all of the time. Seepage meters modified for use in flowing water were used to measure rates of exchange between surface and sub-surface water in a sand-and-gravel-bed river in Colorado, USA (South Platte River, mean annual river discharge = 9.7 m3/s), and in a cobble-bed river in western Pennsylvania, USA (Allegheny River, mean annual river discharge = 188 m3/s). The median value of all seepage measurements at the South Platte River was 0.24 m/day, indicating a small to moderate rate of groundwater discharge to the river. However, substantial local-scale bed topography as well as mobile bedforms in the river resulted in spatial and temporal variability an order of magnitude larger than the median groundwater discharge rate. Both upward and downward seepage were recorded along every transect across the river with rates ranging from +2.37 (upward) to -3.40 (downward) m/day. At the Allegheny River site, moss and algae covered much of the bed and river grass was common, indicating greater bed stability than at the South Platte River site. Median seepage was +0

  7. Modeling seepage into heated waste emplacement tunnels in unsaturated fractured rock

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, Jens T.; Mukhopihadhyay, Sumit; Tsang, Yvonne W.

    2003-10-01

    Predicting the amount of water that may seep into waste emplacement tunnels (drifts) is important for assessing the performance of the proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The repository will be located in thick, partially saturated fractured tuff that-for the first several hundred years after emplacement-will be heated to above-boiling temperatures as a result of heat generation from the decay of radioactive waste. Heating of rock water to above-boiling conditions induces water saturation changes and perturbs water fluxes that affect the potential for water seepage into drifts. In this paper, we describe numerical analyses of the coupled thermal-hydrological (TH) processes in the vicinity of waste emplacement drifts, evaluate the potential of seepage during the heating phase of the repository, and discuss the implications for the performance of the site. In addition to the capillary barrier at the rock-drift interface-independent of the thermal conditions-a second barrier exists to downward percolation at above-boiling conditions. This barrier is caused by vaporization of water in the fractured rock overlying the repository. A TOUGH2 dual-permeability simulation model was developed to analyze the combined effect of these two barriers; it accounts for all relevant TH processes in response to heating, while incorporating the capillary barrier condition at the drift wall. Model results are presented for a variety of simulation cases that cover the expected variability and uncertainty of relevant rock properties and boundary conditions.

  8. Determining Atmospheric Pressure Using a Water Barometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohrengel, C. Frederick; Larson, Paul R.

    2012-12-01

    The atmosphere is an envelope of compressible gases that surrounds Earth. Because of its compressibility and nonuniform heating by the Sun, it is in constant motion. The atmosphere exerts pressure on Earth's surface, but that pressure is in constant flux. This experiment allows students to directly measure atmospheric pressure by measuring the mass of the water that is used as the fluid medium in the barometer. Simple calculations based upon the mass of water collected from the barometer yield the mass of the atmosphere per square unit of area at the site where the experiment is conducted.

  9. D-area oil seepage basin bioventing optimization test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, C.J.; Radway, J.C.; Alman, D.; Hazen, T.C.

    1998-12-31

    The D Area Oil Seepage Basin (DOSB) was used from 1952 to 1975 for disposal of petroleum-based products (waste oils), general office and cafeteria waste, and apparently some solvents [trichloroethylene (TCE)/tetrachloroethylene (PCE)]. Numerous analytical results have indicated the presence of TCE and its degradation product vinyl chloride in groundwater in and around the unit, and of petroleum hydrocarbons in soils within the unit. The DOSB is slated for additional assessment and perhaps for environmental remediation. In situ bioremediation represents a technology of demonstrated effectiveness in the reclamation of sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents, and has been retained as an alternative for the cleanup of the DOSB. The Savannah River Site is therefore proposing to conduct a field treatability study designed to demonstrate and optimize the effectiveness of in situ microbiological biodegradative processes at the DOSB. The introduction of air and gaseous nutrients via two horizontal injection wells (bioventing) is expected to enhance biodegradation rates of petroleum components and stimulate microbial degradation of chlorinated solvents. The data gathered in this test will allow a determination of the biodegradation rates of contaminants of concern in the soil and groundwater, allow an evaluation of the feasibility of in situ bioremediation of soil and groundwater at the DOSB, and provide data necessary for the functional design criteria for the final remediation system.

  10. INTERIM METHOD FOR DETERMINING ASBESTOS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual describes an interim electron microscope (EM) procedure for measuring the concentration of asbestos in water samples. The main features of the method include filtering the sample through a sub-micron polycarbonate membrane filter, examining an EM specimen grid in a tr...

  11. Infiltration, seepage and slope instability mechanisms during the 20-21 November 2000 rainstorm in Tuscany, central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofani, V.; Dapporto, S.; Vannocci, P.; Casagli, N.

    2006-12-01

    On 20-21 November 2000, a storm of high intensity, with a estimated return period of more than 100 years, triggered over 50 landslides within the province of Pistoia in Tuscany (Italy). These failures can be defined as complex earth slides- earth flows. One of the documented landslides has been investigated by modelling the ground water infiltration process, the positive and negative pore water pressure variations and the effects of these variations on slope stability during the rainfall event. Morphometric and geotechnical analyses were carried out through a series of in-situ and laboratory tests, the results of which were used as input for the modelling process. The surface infiltration rate was initially simulated using the rainfall recorded at the nearest raingauge station. Finite element seepage analysis for transient conditions were then employed to model the changes in pore water pressure during the storm event, using the computed infiltration rate as the ground surface boundary condition. Finally, the limit equilibrium slope stability method was applied to calculate the variations in the factor of safety during the event and thereby determine the critical time of instability. For the investigated site the trend of the factor of safety indicates that the critical time for failure occurs about 18 h after the storm commences, and highlights the key role played by the soil permeability and thickness in controlling the response in terms of slope instability.

  12. EVALUATION OF INSTRUMENT FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PHENOL IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Spectra Product's pH-2 Phenol Instrument was evaluated to determine its applicability to water and wastewaters. The results show that the determinations of phenol in water and wastewaters can be obtained with an accuracy of + or - 5% in the range of 0.05 to 50.0 ppm and with ...

  13. The determination of water in biomass-derived liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, C.; De Caumia, B.

    1986-01-01

    The Dean and Stark distillation is an appropriate method for the determination of water in coal tar, bitumen and petroleum-like products. This article shows, however, that a direct application of the Dean and Stark method for the determination of water in biomass-derived liquid fuels results in incorrect estimates. Inaccuracies are due to the presence of soluble organics in the aqueous phase, which apparently form azeotropic mixtures with water and xylene and which condense and are trapped as distillate in the graduated cylinder. Instead, a Karl Fischer determination of water is recommended in the case of biomass-derived liquid fuels.

  14. Modified determination of radium in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, F.B.; Thatcher, L.L.

    1957-01-01

    The proposed method embodies a barium sulfate carrier precipitation, filtration through molecular filter membranes, and collection of activity after prescribed aging period. The method is sufficiently accurate and precise to indicate the potability of water and for use in general studies of radium in chemical hydrology. Amounts of radium as low as 0.1 ????c. can be detected by using 1 -hour counting times. Radium-226 is used as the standard and the results indicate about 100 to 110 % of the activity of the alpha-emitting radium isotopes as radium-223, radium-224, and radium-226.

  15. Seepage from canals having variable shape and partial lining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnateghi, A.; Bruch, J. C.

    1983-07-01

    The numerical models presented here are solutions to the steady two-dimensional flow through a porous medium from canals of variable shape with partial lining. Two main cases are studied. The first case is the seepage flow from canals with impervious lining on their sloping sides. The second case is for seepage from canals in which the impervious lining is located on the base of the canal and the sides are unlined. The Baiocchi transformation and method is used to develop a boundary value problem which is then solved by the finite-difference successive over-relaxation method with projection. A sample problem of each case is presented. The discharge rates and free surfaces of the seepage flows are obtained through the numerical scheme, and are compared with available analytical results.

  16. Snow water equivalent determination by microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Foster, J. L.; Hall, D. K.; Rango, A.; Hartline, B. K.

    1981-01-01

    One of the most important parameters for accurate snowmelt runoff prediction is snow water equivalent (SWE) which is contentionally monitored using observations made at widely scattered points in or around specific watersheds. Remote sensors which provide data with better spatial and temporal coverage can be used to improve the SWE estimates. Microwave radiation, which can penetrate through a snowpack, may be used to infer the SWE. Calculations made from a microscopic scattering model were used to simulate the effect of varying SWE on the microwave brightness temperature. Data obtained from truck mounted, airborne and spaceborne systems from various test sites were studied. The simulated SWE compares favorable with the measured SWE. In addition, whether the underlying soil is frozen or thawed can be discriminated successfully on the basis of the polarization of the microwave radiation.

  17. Albedo and land surface temperature shift in hydrocarbon seepage potential area, case study in Miri Sarawak Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suherman, A.; Rahman, M. Z. A.; Busu, I.

    2014-02-01

    The presence of hydrocarbon seepage is generally associated with rock or mineral alteration product exposures, and changes of soil properties which manifest with bare development and stress vegetation. This alters the surface thermodynamic properties, changes the energy balance related to the surface reflection, absorption and emission, and leads to shift in albedo and LST. Those phenomena may provide a guide for seepage detection which can be recognized inexpensively by remote sensing method. District of Miri is used for study area. Available topographic maps of Miri and LANDSAT ETM+ were used for boundary construction and determination albedo and LST. Three land use classification methods, namely fixed, supervised and NDVI base classifications were employed for this study. By the intensive land use classification and corresponding statistical comparison was found a clearly shift on albedo and land surface temperature between internal and external seepage potential area. The shift shows a regular pattern related to vegetation density or NDVI value. In the low vegetation density or low NDVI value, albedo of internal area turned to lower value than external area. Conversely in the high vegetation density or high NDVI value, albedo of internal area turned to higher value than external area. Land surface temperature of internal seepage potential was generally shifted to higher value than external area in all of land use classes. In dense vegetation area tend to shift the temperature more than poor vegetation area.

  18. H-Area Seepage Basins Groundwater Monitoring Report: Volume 1, Third and Fourth quarters 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.A.

    1994-03-01

    Isoconcentration/isocactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1994. Geologic cross sections indicate both the extent and depth of contamination of the primary contaminants in all of the hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1994. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the H-Area Seepage Basins have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  19. F-Area Seepage Basins Groundwater Monitoring Report: Volume 1, Third and fourth quarters 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.A.

    1994-03-01

    Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units. Geologic cross sections indicate both the extent and depth of contamination of the primary contaminants in all of the hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1994. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the F-Area Seepage Basins have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  20. Estimating Vadose Zone Drainage From a Capped Seepage Basin, F Area, Savannah River Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Denham, M.

    2011-12-01

    Large volumes of waste solutions were commonly discharged into unlined seepage basins at many different facilities in the past. Plutonium was extracted from depleted uranium from 1955 to 1988 at the F-Area within the Savannah River Site, with contaminated process waters disposed of in permeable seepage basins. The primarily acidic solutions contained radioactive components (including tritium, 129I, and multiple isotopes of U, Pu, Sr, and Cs), elevated nitrate, and some metals (Hg, Pb, Cd). Basin 3 was the largest F-Area seepage basin, covering 2.0 hectare, with the water table typically at about 20 m below the soil surface. The local groundwater flows at an average velocity of 200 m/y in the approximately 10 m thick shallow aquifer, and is underlain by the low permeability Tan Clay. We used nearly 20 years of groundwater quality data from a monitoring well immediately downstream of Basin 3 to estimate the post-closure drainage of waste solutions through its underlying vadose zone, into the shallow aquifer. The measurements of tritium, nitrate, and specific conductance, were used as plume tracers in our estimates of vadose zone drainage. These calculations indicate that early stages of post-closure waste drainage occurred with high fluxes (≈ 1 m/y), and quickly declined. However, even after 20 years, drainage continues at a low but significant rate of several cm/y. These estimated drainage fluxes can help constrain predictions on the waste plume behavior, especially with respect to its emerging trailing gradient and anticipated time scales suitable for monitored natural attenuation.

  1. Fiber Bragg grating-based performance monitoring of a slope model subjected to seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hong-Hu; Shi, Bin; Yan, Jun-Fan; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Cheng-Cheng; Wang, Bao-Jun

    2014-09-01

    In the past few years, fiber optic sensing technologies have played an increasingly important role in the health monitoring of civil infrastructures. These innovative sensing technologies have recently been successfully applied to the performance monitoring of a series of geotechnical structures. Fiber optic sensors have shown many unique advantages in comparison with conventional sensors, including immunity to electrical noise, higher precision and improved durability and embedding capabilities; fiber optic sensors are also smaller in size and lighter in weight. In order to explore the mechanism of seepage-induced slope instability, a small-scale 1 g model test of the soil slope has been performed in the laboratory. During the model’s construction, specially fabricated sensing fibers containing nine fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensors connected in a series were horizontally and vertically embedded into the soil mass. The surcharge load was applied on the slope crest, and the groundwater level inside of the slope was subsequently varied using two water chambers installed besides the slope model. The fiber optic sensing data of the vertical and horizontal strains within the slope model were automatically recorded by an FBG interrogator and a computer during the test. The test results are presented and interpreted in detail. It is found that the gradually accumulated deformation of the slope model subjected to seepage can be accurately captured by the quasi-distributed FBG strain sensors. The test results also demonstrate that the slope stability is significantly affected by ground water seepage, which fits well with the results that were calculated using finite element and limit equilibrium methods. The relationship between the strain measurements and the safety factors is further analyzed, together with a discussion on the residual strains. The performance evaluation of a soil slope using fiber optic strain sensors is proved to be a potentially effective

  2. Heterogeneous seepage at the Nopal I natural analogue site, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Cook, Paul J.; Rodríguez-Pineda, J. Alfredo; Villalba, Lourdes; de La Garza, Rodrigo

    2012-02-01

    A study of seepage occurring in an adit at the Nopal I uranium mine in Chihuahua, Mexico, was conducted as part of an integrated natural analogue study to evaluate the effects of infiltration and seepage on the mobilization and transport of radionuclides. An instrumented seepage collection system and local automated weather station permit direct correlation between local precipitation events and seepage. Field observations recorded between April 2005 and December 2006 indicate that seepage is highly heterogeneous with respect to time, location, and quantity. Seepage, precipitation, and fracture data were used to test two hypotheses: (1) that fast flow seepage is triggered by large precipitation events, and (2) that an increased abundance of fractures and/or fracture intersections leads to higher seepage volumes. A few zones in the back adit recorded elevated seepage volumes immediately following large (>20 mm/day) precipitation events, with transit times of less than 4 h through the 8-m thick rock mass. In most locations, there is a 1-6 month time lag between the onset of the rainy season and seepage, with longer times observed for the front adit. There is a less clear-cut relation between fracture abundance and seepage volume; processes such as evaporation and surface flow along the ceiling may also influence seepage.

  3. Groundwater model recalibration and remediation well network design at the F-Area Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, W.R.

    1995-04-01

    On September 30, 1992, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Part B Permit prescribing remediation of contaminated groundwater beneath and downgradient of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site. The remediation outlined in the Part B Permit calls for a three phase approach. For the F-Area Seepage Basins, the first phase requires the ``installation of an adequate number of pumping and injection wells or trenches, as appropriate, to capture and remediate those portions of-the contaminant plume delineated by the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour.`` Geochemical results from 1992 groundwater monitoring were used to delineate this isoconcentration contour in the Corrective Action Program (CAP) (WSRC, 1992a). The 1992 results were used based on SCDHEC written requirement to use the most recent data available at the time the CAP was formulated. The rationale used by SCDHEC in selecting the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour was that it also encompassed most of the other contaminants listed in the Groundwater Protection Standards. After extraction and treatment, the water is required to be reinjected into the aquifer due to the high levels of tritium still present in the treated water. The conceptual plan is to have recirculation of the tritium (as much as can practically be accomplished) to allow more time for radioactive decay before natural discharge to surface water.

  4. Seepage investigations of Noyes Canal, Menard County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yost, Ivan Dale

    1953-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, and the Menard Irrigation Company, a seepage investigation was made on Noyes Canal (Menard Irrigation Company Canal) in Menard County, Texas, from the headgates of the canal to where the canal empties back into the San Saba River.

  5. Seepage caused tension failures and erosion undercutting of hillslopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract Although seepage erosion has three-dimensional characteristics, two-dimensional lysimeters have been used in previous research to analyze for the hydraulic and geotechnical controls on this mechanism of hillslope, gully, and bank instability. A 50 cm cubic soil block with a focused inflow r...

  6. Geologic seepage of methane and light alkanes in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doezema, L. A.; Chang, K.; Baril, R.; Nwachuku, I.; Contreras, P.; Marquez, A.; Howard, D.

    2013-12-01

    Natural geologic seepage of methane from underground oil and natural gas reservoirs has been suggested to be an underreported part of the global methane budget. Other light alkanes are also given off in combination with the methane seepage, making it possible that geologic seepage is also a potentially significant global source of these light alkanes. This study reports C1-C5 findings from geologic seepage made in the Los Angeles region. Microseepage, invisible escape of gases, was measured primarily at Kenneth Hahn Regional Park, while macroseepage, the visible release of gases, was measured at the La Brea Tar Pits. Samples were collected using stainless steel canisters and flux chambers and were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID). Average microseepage flux rates of 0.95 μg m-2 h-1 for ethane and 0.51 μg m-2 h-1 were found for propane, while average macroseepage rates for methane, ethane, and propane were 664, 19.8, and 18.1 mg m-2 h-1 respectively. Relationships between microseepage flux rate and location of underground oil and natural deposit and earthquake fault lines are presented. Additionally, the relative importance of findings in context with global budgets and local air quality is discussed.

  7. Determinants of virtual water flows in the Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Fracasso, Andrea; Sartori, Martina; Schiavo, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the paper is to investigate the main determinants of the bilateral virtual water (water used in the production of a commodity or service) flows associated with international trade in agricultural goods across the Mediterranean basin. We consider the bilateral gross flows of virtual water in the area and study what export-specific and import-specific factors are significantly associated with virtual water flows. We follow a sequential approach. Through a gravity model of trade, we obtain a "refined" version of the variable we aim to explain, one that is free of the amount of flows due to pair-specific factors affecting bilateral trade flows and that fully reflects the impact of country-specific determinants of virtual water trade. A number of country-specific potential explanatory variables, ranging from water endowments to trade barriers, from per capita GDP to irrigation prices, is presented and tested. To identify the variables that help to explain the bilateral flows of virtual water, we adopt a model selection procedure based on model averaging. Our findings confirm one of the main controversial results in the literature: larger water endowments do not necessarily lead to a larger 'export' of virtual water, as one could expect. We also find some evidence that higher water irrigation prices reduce (increase) virtual water 'exports' ('imports'). PMID:25708715

  8. Determination of total dissolved solids in water analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, C.S.

    1933-01-01

    The figure for total dissolved solids, based on the weight of the residue on evaporation after heating for 1 hour at 180??C., is reasonably close to the sum of the determined constituents for most natural waters. Waters of the carbonate type that are high in magnesium may give residues that weigh less than the sum. Natural waters of the sulfate type usually give residues that are too high on account of incomplete drying.

  9. Quantifying Seepage Flux using Sediment Temperatures

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report provides a demonstration of different modeling approaches that use sediment temperatures to estimate the magnitude and direction of water flux across the groundwater-surface water transition zone. Analytical models based on steady-state or transient temperature solut...

  10. Effects of outcropping groundwater from the F- and H-Area seepage basins on the distribution of fish in Four Mile Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.H.; Storey, C.

    1990-10-01

    Four Mile Creek was electrofished during June 26--July 2, 1990 to assess the impacts of outcropping ground water form the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins on fish abundance and distribution. Number of fish species and total catch were comparable at sample stations upstream from and downstream from the outcropping zone in Four Mile Creek. Species number and composition downstream from the outcropping zone in Four Mile Creek were similar to species number and composition in unimpacted portions of Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Meyers Branch. These findings indicate that seepage basin outcropping was not adversely affecting the Four Mile Creek fish community. 5 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Rapid determination of filterable residue in natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Herbert E.; Bacon, Charles W.

    1969-01-01

    The most widely used procedures for determining filterable residue (total dissolved solids) in water are macromethods given in Standard Methods. Although macromethods give good results, they require large amounts of water and long drying times. This report describes a microtechnique for determining filterable residue that requires only 0.05 ml of water and 15 min/sample drying time. The sensitivity of the method is within the range (4 mg/l or 5 per cent) given in Standard Methods and that reported by Sokoloff.

  12. Trace water determination in gases by infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stallard, B.R.; Espinoza, L.H.; Niemczyk, T.M.

    1995-05-01

    Water determination in semiconductor process gases is desirable in order to extend the life of gas delivery systems and improve wafer yields. The authors review their work in applying Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to this problem, where a 10 ppb detection limit has been demonstrated for water in N{sub 2}, HCl, and HBr. The potential for optical determination of other contaminants in these gases is discussed. Also, alternative optical spectroscopic approaches are briefly described. Finally, they discuss methods for dealing with interference arising from water in the instrument beam path, yet outside the sample cell.

  13. Quantity and quality of seepage from two earthen basins used to store livestock waste in southern Minnesota during the first year of operation, 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhl, James F.

    1999-01-01

    Seepage from the site B basin (based on 10 samples each from the bottom and sidewall) had chloride concentrations of 11 to 100 mg/L; ammonium-N concentrations of 2.58 mg/L or less; nitrate-N concentrations of 25.7 mg/L or less (except for one concentration of 146 mg/L); and organic-N concentrations of 0.92 mg/L or less. Nitrate-N concentrations in the seepage exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (1996). MCL (maximum contaminant level) of 10 mg/L in 17 of 22 samples. Background ground-water quality, however, indicated that nitrate-N concentrations were greater than the MCL prior to operation of the basin. Fecal Coliform bacteria, as at the site A basin, were abundant in the basin wastewater, but not in the seepage.

  14. Gas Evidence and Seepage: Implications and Subsidence in the Elkhorn Slough, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Garcia, A.; King, N.; Sims, H.; Lopez, M.; Levey, M. D.; Shipton, G.; Watson, E. B.; Eby, R.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of gas pockets underneath the sediments of the Elkhorn Slough, a 10-km long, 1200-hectare tidal estuary located in Monterey Bay, has been imaged for the first time. Seismic surveys were run in 2011-2012 with an EdgeTech SB-424 full-spectrum sub-bottom CHIRP profiler, used with a default pulse which generates a sweep frequency of 4 kHz - 24 kHz for 10 ms, and a vertical resolution of 0.4 m. This system performed ideally in this shallow environment. Preliminary interpretation of the data shows multiple and widespread evidence of gas as acoustic blanking, acoustic turbidity, and acoustic plumes. The interpreted gas affects the sedimentary column from 5 m below the present channel all the way up to the surface. The gas front of these pockets is buried under the last two seismic units below the channel floor, and in some cases, reaches the surface of the sedimentary column. There are also indications of seepage from these pockets towards the water column, suggesting the seal is no longer effective. Multiples cores were taken between 2008 and 2011 and they confirm the presence of methane (as well as gas cracking evidence in XRays). The areas with unstable methane gas affect this delicate environment, which is currently under a watch for subsidence and strong erosion. The gas seepage can be triggering further collapse of sediments and enhancing the subsidence. In the present work we discuss these factors as well as aim to quantify how much gas the Slough sediments hold and how much is escaping at present. Acknowledgments: CSUMB (chirp), ESNEER staff for their support. The ';Dr. Douglas Garrison Fund' for Educational Excellence (MPC) and ONR supported this research. Figure 1. Chirp examples showing interpreted gas seepage (above) and gas pockets within the sediments (below).

  15. Effect of anisotropy and groundwater system geometry on seepage through lakebeds. 2. Numerical simulation analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.; Pfannkuch, H.O.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of lakes and groundwater is controlled partly by the geologic framework through which the water flows. Two interrelated geometric factors of the groundwater system that affect flow are overall geometry of the system, and anisotropy of the porous media within the system. Numerical simulation analysis was made for variations in the coefficient of anisotropy for each of several lake and groundwater settings having different geometric configurations. These analyses indicate that, for a given geometric setting, as the anisotropy of geologic materials decreases seepage from a lake decreases and depth of the local groundwater flow system associated with the lake increases. Transformation of scale of groundwater systems that have anisotropic media to isotropic equivalents results in a change in the overall geometry. Because of the different slopes of the water table and lakebed resulting from the scale transformations, a series of numerical experiments were made for various geometric configurations for a given anisotropy. These analyses indicate that as thickness of the groundwater system decreases, relative depth of the local flow system increases and seepage from the lake decreases. ?? 1984.

  16. Migration of acidic groundwater seepage from uranium-tailings impoundments, 1. Field study and conceptual hydrogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Kevin A.; Cherry, John A.; Dave, Nand K.; Lim, Tjoe P.; Vivyurka, Al J.

    1988-08-01

    In this first paper of a series, the results of a study at a non-operational tailings site are presented and are used to construct a general conceptual model for seepage migration from uranium-tailings impoundments. Many parts of the model are applicable to other types of tailings and to acid drainage in general. At the field site, the impoundment lies over a portion of a glaciofluvial sand aquifer. Tailings seepage drains downward into the aquifer and then migrates laterally away. Results of the field study indicate the seepage can be divided into three geochemical zones: (1) the inner core, which is essentially unaltered, acidic seepage from the tailings; (2) the neutralization zone, in which inner-core water is neutralized and aqueous concentrations decrease significantly; and (3) the outer zone, which contains both neutralized water from the neutralization zone and pH-neutral process water from the uranium milling operation. Yearly comparisons from 1979 to 1984 indicate the neutralization zone and inner core are migrating downgradient at a rate of about 1 meter/year, which is about 1/440 of the groundwater velocity. The mechanisms that produce the retardation and the decreases in aqueous concentrations are part of the conceptual model. The main features of the conceptual model are solid-liquid interactions, particularly mineral precipitation-dissolution, and buffering effects of dominant aqueous species. The important minerals undergoing precipitation-dissolution are the calcite-siderite solid solution, gypsum, Al-OH minerals, and Fe-OH minerals. "Cell and streamtube" calculations are used to evaluate the general trends in aqueous concentrations and to assist in explaining observed migration rates. Co-precipitation with the above minerals apparently accounts for decreases in other major, minor, and metal solutes. Because of the large amount of mineral precipitation and co-precipitation, variations in 2H and 18O were observed over a flow distance of several

  17. Determination of malachite green and its leuco form in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.L.; Meinertz, J.R.; Gofus, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid chromatographic (lc) analysis can detect malachite green residues in water at less than 10 mu-g/l. Water samples were concentrated on disposable diol columns, eluted with 0.05m P-toluene-sulfonic acid in methanol, and determined by reversed-phase lc. When combined with a lead oxide postcolumn reactor, the lc method can simultaneously determine both leuco and chromatic forms of malachite green. Recoveries averaged 95.4% For the chromatic form and 57.3% For the leuco form of malachite green oxalate and leuco malachite green in spiked pond water samples. Recoveries of the carbinol form of malachite green (an equilibrium product of the dye in water) from spiked tap water samples averaged 98.6%. Recoveries of leuco malachite green were low and ph-dependent.

  18. Methane Seepage at Hyperalkaline Springs in the Ronda Peridotite Massif (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etiope, G.; Vadillo, I.; Whiticar, M. J.; Marques, J. M.; Carreira, P. M.; Tiago, I.; Benavente, J.; Jimenez, P.; Urresti, B.

    2014-12-01

    Methane-rich, hyperalkaline spring waters and bubbling pools have been sampled in the Ronda peridotite massif in southern Spain. Water chemistry (T: 17.1-21.5 ºC; pH: 10.7-11.7; DO: <2 mg/L; Ca-OH facies) is characteristic of present-day serpentinization. Dissolved CH4 concentrations range from 0.1 to 3.2 mg/L. CH4 stable C and H isotope ratios suggest a dominant abiotic origin in two natural spring sites (delta13C: -13 to -29 ‰ VPDB; delta2H: -309 to -333 ‰ VSMOW) and a mixed biotic-abiotic origin in springs with artificial water delivery systems (i.e., pipes or fountains; delta13C: -44 to -69 ‰; delta2H: -180 to -319 ‰). At the natural springs, gas is mainly released through bubbles close to the water outlet (CH4 flux ~1 kg/day by individual bubble trains), and subordinately by microseepage from the ground, even at distances of ~100 m from the bubble-spring site (flux of 10's, up to 97, mg CH4 m-2day-1). Gas seepage is strictly controlled by faults. Under-saturation of CH4 in water, bubbling and seepage location suggest that CH4 is not exclusively transported to the surface by hyperalkaline water, but it follows autonomous migration pathways along faults. Similar 'dry' seepage of abiotic gas was observed in the Philippines, New Zealand, Turkey and Italy. Like other land-based serpentinization systems, the Ronda peridotite massif is characterized by low heat flow (<40 mW/m2), with temperatures <60°C at depths of 1.5 km. At these low T and high pH conditions, CO32- is the only available carbon source dissolved in the water, and unlikely contributes to catalysed Fischer-Tropsch Type reactions. Methane production from CO2 hydrogenation in a gas phase system (unsaturated fractured rocks) cannot be excluded. The presence of ruthenium-enriched chromitites in the Ronda peridotites may support the hypothesis that CH4 is produced by CO2 hydrogenation catalyzed by Ru minerals, even at temperatures below 100°C, as demonstrated in recent laboratory experiments

  19. Coupling Seepage and Radionuclide Transport in and Around Emplacement Drifts at Yucca Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.; Steefel, C.

    2007-12-01

    The proposed nuclear waste repository of the United States is located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Waste packages will be placed in deep (~350 m) underground drifts in volcanic tuff. Seepage may potentially occur at the repository drifts when the drifts get rewetted after a dryout period. The potential seepage water will be quickly evaporated or boiled to near dryness as long as it falls on the top of the hot waste package leading to formation of brine, precipitation of salts and volatilization of gases. These processes may potentially impact the long-term safety of waste packages in the drift. The objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a quantitative model of coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes potentially leading to brine formation, salt precipitation and gas volatilization on top of waste packages and/or a drip shield and (2) dynamically integrate such a model into the larger-scale models of processes within and around waste emplacement drifts, as well as into the smaller-scale waste-package corrosion models. Process models were implemented into an existing reactive transport numerical simulator, TOUGHREACT, to allow modeling of (1) evaporative concentration to very high ionic strength (up to 40 molal), (2) boiling point elevation due to dissolved salts, (3) boiling/evaporation to dryness, and (4) salt deliquescence. An integrated near-field and in-drift THC simulation was run using a vertical 2-D grid extending from near the ground surface to the groundwater table, and covering a width equal to half the design drift spacing of 81 m. The integrated model was then used to simulate a discrete dripping event within the drift. The model considered the release of radionuclides into seepage water as this water contacts the waste package and flows through the invert. The precipitation of uranophane and Np-uranophane was also considered. These minerals form in the invert from the neutralization of mildly acidic seepage water by clay minerals

  20. Elemental chemistry of sand-boil discharge used to trace variable pathways of seepage beneath levees during the 2011 Mississippi River flood

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water samples were collected from the Mississippi River, from sand boils near the toe of the levee on the Mississippi side of the river, and from actively flowing relief wells shortly after peak stage of the 2011 Mississippi River flood. Two distinct pathways for seepage under the levee were identif...

  1. Seepage phenomena on Mars at subzero temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereszturi, Akos; Möhlmann, Diedrich; Berczi, Szaniszlo; Ganti, Tibor; Horvath, Andras; Kuti, Adrienn; Pocs, Tamas; Sik, Andras; Szathmary, Eors

    At the southern hemisphere of Mars seasonal slope structures emanating from Dark Dune Spots are visible on MGS MOC, and MRO HiRISE images. Based on their analysis two groups of streaks could be identified: diffuse and fan shaped ones forming in an earlier phase of local spring, probably by CO2 gas jets, and confined streaks forming only on steep slopes during a later seasonal phase. The dark color of the streaks may arise from the dark color of the dune grains where surface frost disappeared above them, or caused by the phase change of the water ice to liquid-like water, or even it may be influenced by the solutes of salts in the undercooled interfacial water The second group's morphology (meandering style, ponds at their end), morphometry, and related theoretical modelling suggest they may form by undercooled water that remains in liquid phase in a thin layer around solid grains. We analyzed sequence of images, temperature and topographic data of Russel (54S 12E), Richardson (72S 180E) and an unnamed crater (68S 2E) during southern spring. The dark streaks here show slow motion, with an average speed of meter/day, when the maximal daytime temperature is between 190 and 220 K. Based on thermophysical considerations a thin layer of interfacial water is inevitable on mineral surfaces under the present conditions of Mars. With 10 precipitable micrometer of atmospheric water vapor, liquid phase can be present down about 190 K. Under such conditions dark streaks may form by the movement of grains lubricatred by interfacial water. This possibility have various consequences on chemical, mechanical or even possible astrobiological processes on Mars. Acknowledgment: This work was supported by the ESA ECS-project No. 98004 and the Pro Renovanda Cultura Hungariae Foundation.

  2. ASSESSMENT OF HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE DETECTION METHODS ON THE FORT PECK RESERVATION, NORTHEAST MONTANA

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence M. Monson

    2003-06-30

    Surface exploration techniques have been employed in separate study areas on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana. Anomalies associated with hydrocarbon seepage are documented in all three areas and a variety of surface exploration techniques can be compared. In a small area with established production, Head Gas and Thermal Desorption methods best match production; other methods also map depletion. In a moderate-size area that has prospects defined by 3D seismic data, Head Gas along with Microbial, Iodine, and Eh soil anomalies are all associated with the best hydrocarbon prospect. In a large area that contains many curvilinear patterns observed on Landsat images, that could represent micro-seepage chimneys, results are inconclusive. Reconnaissance mapping using Magnetic Susceptibility has identified a potential prospect; subsequent Soil Gas and Head Gas surveys suggest hydrocarbon potential. In the final year of this project the principle contractor, the Fort Peck Tribes, completed a second survey in the Wicape 3D Seismic Prospect Area (also known as Area 6 in Phase I of the project) and sampled several Landsat image features contained in the Smoke Creek Aeromag Anomaly Area (also known as Area 1 in Phase II of the project). Methods determined to be most useful in Phases I and II, were employed in this final Phase III of the study. The Southwest Wicape seismic anomaly was only partially confirmed. The abundant curvilinears proposed to be possible hydrocarbon micro-seepage chimneys in the Smoke Creek Area were not conclusively verified as such. Insufficient sampling of background data precludes affirmative identification of these mostly topographic Landsat features as gas induced soil and vegetation anomalies. However relatively higher light gas concentrations were found associated with some of the curvilinears. Based on the findings of this work the Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation intend to utilize surface hydrocarbon

  3. The role of optimality in characterizing CO2 seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cortis, Andrea; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Benson, Sally M.

    2008-09-15

    Storage of large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep geological formations for greenhouse gas mitigation is gaining momentum and moving from its conceptual and testing stages towards widespread application. In this work we explore various optimization strategies for characterizing surface leakage (seepage) using near-surface measurement approaches such as accumulation chambers and eddy covariance towers. Seepage characterization objectives and limitations need to be defined carefully from the outset especially in light of large natural background variations that can mask seepage. The cost and sensitivity of seepage detection are related to four critical length scales pertaining to the size of the: (1) region that needs to be monitored; (2) footprint of the measurement approach, and (3) main seepage zone; and (4) region in which concentrations or fluxes are influenced by seepage. Seepage characterization objectives may include one or all of the tasks of detecting, locating, and quantifying seepage. Each of these tasks has its own optimal strategy. Detecting and locating seepage in a region in which there is no expected or preferred location for seepage nor existing evidence for seepage requires monitoring on a fixed grid, e.g., using eddy covariance towers. The fixed-grid approaches needed to detect seepage are expected to require large numbers of eddy covariance towers for large-scale geologic CO{sub 2} storage. Once seepage has been detected and roughly located, seepage zones and features can be optimally pinpointed through a dynamic search strategy, e.g., employing accumulation chambers and/or soil-gas sampling. Quantification of seepage rates can be done through measurements on a localized fixed grid once the seepage is pinpointed. Background measurements are essential for seepage detection in natural ecosystems. Artificial neural networks are considered as regression models useful for distinguishing natural system behavior from anomalous behavior

  4. Portable field kit for determining uranium in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, John B.

    1979-01-01

    The pressing need for on-site field analyses of the uranium content of surface and ground waters has promoted the development of a simple, light-weight, relatively cheap, portable kit to make such determinations in the field. Forty to sixty water samples per day can be analyzed for uranium to less than 0.2 parts per billion. The kit was tested in the field with excellent results.

  5. Methane seepage intensities traced by biomarker patterns in authigenic carbonates from the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, H.; Feng, D.

    2015-12-01

    Authigenic carbonate rocks from an active seep (Site F) at 1120 m water depth of the South China Sea (SCS) were studied using mineralogical and lipid biomarker analyses. Carbonate mineral compositions, in specific samples, were predominantly aragonite, high-Mg calcite (HMC), or a mixture of both. Abundant 13C-depleted lipid biomarkers (various isoprenoids) diagnostic for archaea provide evidence that anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) mediated by anaerobic methane oxidizing archaea (ANME) and their bacterial partners is the major process leading to formation of the carbonates. Nearly a pure suite of AOM biomarkers was preserved in aragonitic carbonate in which predominant consortia were most likely ANME-2/Desulfosarcina & Desulfococcus (DSS) assemblages and a mixture of ANME-2/DSS and ANME-1/DSS consortia in the mixed mineral sample, the predominant consortia are in good accordance with the point that the relative higher methane seepage intensity favors the precipitation of aragonite over HMC. In contrast, the completely different biomarker patterns in HMC sample were mainly composed terrestrial organic matter and marine Thaumarchaea, which most likely originally within sediments accompanied with high organic matter input and low methane supply. This environment is known to be favored for archaea of ANME-1 and precipitation of HMC. High concentrations of 13C-depleted hopanoids, including diplopterol, hopanoic acids and hopanols were observed in the aragonite sample that may be sourced by the intermittent presence of oxic conditions in an overall anoxic condition, which was possibly induced by changing seepage intensities.

  6. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report: First and second quarters 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    During the first half of 1993, the groundwater at the F-Area Seepage Basins (FASB) was monitored in compliance with South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, R61-79.265, Subpart F. Eighty-seven wells provided samples from the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the FASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Post-Closure Care Permit Application for the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning in the first quarter of 1993, the standard for comparison is the SCDHEC Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS) specified in the approved F-Area Seepage Basins Part B Permit (November 1992). Currently and historically, gross alpha, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium are among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Numerous other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the FASB during the first half of 1993, notably aluminum, iodine-129, technetium-99, and zinc. The elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells. However, several Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells also contain elevated levels of constituents.

  7. Determination of phosphorus in natural waters: A historical review.

    PubMed

    Worsfold, Paul; McKelvie, Ian; Monbet, Phil

    2016-04-28

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a virtual special issue that reviews the development of analytical approaches to the determination of phosphorus species in natural waters. The focus is on sampling and sample treatment, analytical methods and quality assurance of the data. The export of phosphorus from anthropogenic activities (from diffuse and point sources) can result in increased primary production and eutrophication, and potentially the seasonal development of toxic algal blooms, which can significantly impact on water quality. Therefore the quantification of phosphorus species in natural waters provides important baseline data for studying aquatic phosphorus biogeochemistry, assessing ecosystem health and monitoring compliance with legislation. PMID:27046205

  8. Determination of fixed water in rocks by infrared absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breger, I.A.; Chandler, J.C.

    1969-01-01

    An infrared absorption technique has been developed for the quantitative determination of "fixed water" (H2O+) in rocks. Potassium bromide disks containing 2-mg samples are scanned in the 3-??m spectral region and absorption at 2.96 ??m is determined. Although the exact nature of this peak is not known, other than that it is caused by an interaction between the potassium bromide and hydroxyl groups and water, it can be used for quantitative analysis. Rock samples, other than those containing significant percentages of clay minerals, can be analyzed with a standard deviation of 0.26%.

  9. Determining gold in water by anion-exchange batch extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHugh, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a batch procedure for determining gold in natural waters. It is completely adaptable to field operations. The water samples are filtered and acidified before they are equilibrated with an anion-exchange resin by shaking. The gold is then eluted with acetone-nitric acid solution, and the eluate evaporated to dryness. The residue is taken up in hydrobromic acid-bromine solution and the gold is extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone. The extract is electrothermally atomized in an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer. The limit of determination is 1 ng 1. ?? 1986.

  10. Geological settings and seafloor morphodynamic evolution linked to methane seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Landeghem, Katrien J. J.; Niemann, Helge; Steinle, Lea I.; O'Reilly, Shane S.; Huws, Dei G.; Croker, Peter F.

    2015-08-01

    Methane seeps have been shown to be a powerful agent in modifying seabed morphology, amongst others by cementation processes such as the formation of methane-derived authigenic carbonates (MDACs). The cements stabilise mobile sediment particles and thereby promote the formation of edifices such as mounds on various scales. The release of methane from shallow subsurface sources, when concentrated in seeps, has proven hazardous to offshore construction activities. In this paper, methane cycling and MDAC precipitation is explored as a potential "finger on the pulse" for the recognition of shallow gas pockets and active gas seepage. This would provide a valuable planning tool for seabed engineering developments in areas of potential gas seepage. Measurements of methane concentrations in the Irish Sea are correlated with a unique record of longer-term morphological evolution (up to 11 years) of MDAC structures and subsurface geological settings which would favour the build-up of shallow gas. It was found that gas seepage activity associated with fault zones correlates with carbonate mound steepness. Cessation of gas seepage results in a relatively slow process of erosion and burial of the mounds, eventually producing a subdued carbonate mound morphology after several decades. The Quaternary glacial legacy equally seems to define the distribution and geometry of the MDAC structures. In this case, methane gas locally concentrated in sands and gravels capped by clayey glacial sediments may percolate upwards to the seafloor. A link between methane seeps and the formation of unusually large, trochoidally shaped sediment waves observed on continental shelves worldwide is deemed unlikely. However, the observations suggest that gas percolating through sediment waves may be capped by muddy sediments which have deposited on the sediment waves due to anoxic conditions or eroded from a neighbouring cliff. Other sediment waves in the Irish Sea were found to have a step