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Sample records for deuterium-tritium dt fueled

  1. Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

    1991-08-27

    Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

  2. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Analysis Of Plastic Capsule Materials Exposed To Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Schoonover, J R; Steckle, Jr., W P; Elliot, N; Ebey, P S; Nobile, A; Nikroo, A; Cook, R C; Letts, S A

    2005-06-16

    Planar samples of varying thicknesses of both CH and CD glow discharge polymer have been measured with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy before and after exposure to deuterium-tritium (DT) gas at elevated temperature and pressure. Planar samples of polyimide films made from both hydrogenated and deuterated precursors have also been examined by FTIR before and after DT exposure. The post-exposure FTIR spectra demonstrated no measurable exchange of hydrogen with deuterium or tritium for either polymer. Evidence for oxidation of the glow discharge polymer due to atmospheric oxygen was the only chemical change indicated by the FTIR data.

  3. Evidence for stratification of deuterium-tritium fuel in inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Manuel, M J-E; Rinderknecht, H G; Sinenian, N; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Delettrez, J A; Glebov, V Yu; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; McNabb, D P; Amendt, P A; Boyd, R N; Rygg, J R; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Bacher, A D

    2012-02-17

    Measurements of the D(d,p)T (dd) and T(t,2n)(4)He (tt) reaction yields have been compared with those of the D(t,n)(4)He (dt) reaction yield, using deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions. In these experiments, carried out on the OMEGA laser, absolute spectral measurements of dd protons and tt neutrons were obtained. From these measurements, it was concluded that the dd yield is anomalously low and the tt yield is anomalously high relative to the dt yield, an observation that we conjecture to be caused by a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. This effect may be present in ignition experiments planned on the National Ignition Facility. PMID:22401216

  4. Cryogenic Implosion Performance Using High-Purity Deuterium-Tritium Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, T. C.; Goncharov, V. N.; Radha, P. B.; Earley, R.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, M. J., III; Michel, D. T.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2014-10-01

    Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence between symmetric implosions on OMEGA and National Ignition Facility ignition designs will require a number of facility enhancements that include dynamic bandwidth reduction, a set of higher-order super-Gaussian phase plates, high-spatial-resolution gated-core imaging, high-bandwidth neutron burnwidth measurements, improved power balance, and contaminant-free deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. The historic DT fuel supply was contaminated with ~6 atm% of 1H, leading to significant fractionation of the fuel during the layering process (the triple points of H:D and H:T are significantly colder than DD, DT, and TT). The fractionation leads to a drop in the potential yield because the D and T number densities are lower in the void than they would be with a pure-DT mixture). An isotope separation system has been developed to remove the 1H from the DT fuel supply. This talk will discuss the first results with the purified fuel, conclusions from recent implosions to test cross-beam energy transfer mitigation, and the status of the remaining facility enhancements. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  5. Measurements of collective fuel velocities in deuterium-tritium exploding pusher and cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C.-K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ashabranner, R.; Bionta, R.; LePape, S.; McKernan, M.; Mackinnon, A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J.; Sangster, T. C.

    2013-04-15

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of collective fuel velocities in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility are reported. Velocities along the line-of-sight (LOS) of the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS), positioned close to the equator (73 Degree-Sign -324 Degree-Sign ), were inferred from the measured mean energy of the deuterium-tritium (DT)-primary neutron peak. Substantial mean energy shifts up to 113 {+-} 16 keV were observed in DT gas-filled exploding-pusher implosions, driven in a polar-direct drive configuration, which corresponds to bulk fuel velocities up to 210 {+-} 30 km/s. In contrast, only marginal bulk fuel velocities along the MRS LOS were observed in cryogenically layered DT implosions. Integrated analysis of data from a large number of cryogenically layered implosions has recently identified a deficit in achieved hot-spot energy of {approx}3 kJ for these implosions [C. Cerjan et al., Phys. Plasmas (2013)]. One hypothesis that could explain this missing energy is a collective, directional fuel velocity of {approx}190 km/s. As only marginal bulk fuel velocities are observed in the MRS data, this might indicate that turbulent or radial flows would be a likely explanation for the missing energy. However, a directional velocity close to perpendicular to the MRS LOS cannot be ruled out.

  6. Fuel provision for nonbreeding deuterium-tritium fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Katsurai, M.

    1980-01-01

    Nonbreeding D-T reactors have decisive advantages in minimum size, unit cost, variety of applications, and ease of heat removal over reactors using any other fusion cycle, and significant advantages in environmental and safety characteristics over breeding D-T reactors. Considerations of relative energy production demonstrate that the most favorable source of tritium for a widely deployed system of nonbreeding D-T reactors is the very large (approx. 10 GW thermal) semi-catalyzed-deuterium (SCD), or sub-SCD reactor, where none of the escaping /sup 3/He (> 95%) or tritium (< 25%) is reinjected for burn-up. Feasibility of the ignited SCD tokamak reactor requires spatially averaged betas of 15 to 20% with a magnetic field at the TF coils of 12 to 13 Tesla.

  7. Diagnosing fuel {rho}R and {rho}R asymmetries in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions using charged-particle spectrometry at OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2009-04-15

    Determining fuel areal density ({rho}R) in moderate-{rho}R (100-200 mg/cm{sup 2}) cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions is challenging as it requires new spectrometry techniques and analysis methods to be developed. In this paper, we describe a new method for analyzing the spectrum of knock-on deuterons (KO-Ds), elastically scattered by primary DT neutrons, from which a fuel {rho}R can be inferred for values up to {approx}200 mg/cm{sup 2}. This new analysis method, which uses Monte Carlo modeling of a cryogenic DT implosion, improves significantly the previous analysis method in two fundamental ways. First, it is not affected by significant spatial-yield variations, which degrade the diagnosis of the fuel {rho}R (spatial yield variations of about {+-}20% are typically observed), and second, it does not break down when the fuel {rho}R exceeds {approx}70 mg/cm{sup 2}.

  8. Fuel ion ratio determination in NBI heated deuterium tritium fusion plasmas at JET using neutron emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellesen, C.; Eriksson, J.; Binda, F.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Skiba, M.; Weiszflog, M.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2015-02-01

    The fuel ion ratio (nt/nd) is of central importance for the performance and control of a future burning fusion plasma, and reliable measurements of this quantity are essential for ITER. This paper demonstrates a method to derive the core fuel ion ratio by comparing the thermonuclear and beam-thermal neutron emission intensities, using a neutron spectrometer. The method is applied to NBI heated deuterium tritium (DT) plasmas at JET, using data from the magnetic proton recoil spectrometer. The trend in the results is consistent with Penning trap measurements of the fuel ion ratio at the edge of the plasma, but there is a discrepancy in the absolute values, possibly owing to the fact that the two measurements are weighted towards different parts of the plasma. It is suggested to further validate this method by comparing it to the traditionally proposed method to estimate nt/nd from the ratio of the thermal DD and DT neutron emission components. The spectrometer requirements for measuring nt/nd at ITER are also briefly discussed.

  9. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Cheng, B.; Glimm, J.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-01

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  10. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    SciTech Connect

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Glimm, J.; Cheng, B.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-15

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  11. First-principles studies on the equation of state, thermal conductivity, and opacity of deuterium-tritium (DT) and polystyrene (CH) for inertial confinement fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kress, J. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2016-05-01

    Using first-principles (FP) methods, we have performed ab initio compute for the equation of state (EOS), thermal conductivity, and opacity of deuterium-tritium (DT) in a wide range of densities and temperatures for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications. These systematic investigations have recently been expanded to accurately compute the plasma properties of CH ablators under extreme conditions. In particular, the first-principles EOS and thermal-conductivity tables of CH are self-consistently built from such FP calculations, which are benchmarked by experimental measurements. When compared with the traditional models used for these plasma properties in hydrocodes, significant differences have been identified in the warm dense plasma regime. When these FP-calculated properties of DT and CH were used in our hydrodynamic simulations of ICF implosions, we found that the target performance in terms of neutron yield and energy gain can vary by a factor of 2 to 3, relative to traditional model simulations.

  12. Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Davis, A. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Janezic, R.; Karasik, M.; Keck, R. L.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Obenschain, S. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, M. J.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.; Woo, K. M.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2016-07-01

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs=56 ±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility, these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ˜60 % of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, LM15119ER (2016)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is approximately 40% lower. Three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.

  13. Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Regan, S P; Goncharov, V N; Igumenshchev, I V; Sangster, T C; Betti, R; Bose, A; Boehly, T R; Bonino, M J; Campbell, E M; Cao, D; Collins, T J B; Craxton, R S; Davis, A K; Delettrez, J A; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Forrest, C J; Frenje, J A; Froula, D H; Gatu Johnson, M; Glebov, V Yu; Harding, D R; Hohenberger, M; Hu, S X; Jacobs-Perkins, D; Janezic, R; Karasik, M; Keck, R L; Kelly, J H; Kessler, T J; Knauer, J P; Kosc, T Z; Loucks, S J; Marozas, J A; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; McKenty, P W; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Obenschain, S P; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Rice, B; Rosenberg, M J; Schmitt, A J; Schmitt, M J; Seka, W; Shmayda, W T; Shoup, M J; Shvydky, A; Skupsky, S; Solodov, A A; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W; Ulreich, J; Wittman, M D; Woo, K M; Yaakobi, B; Zuegel, J D

    2016-07-01

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure P_{hs}=56±7  Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility, these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ∼60% of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 011201(R) (2016)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is approximately 40% lower. Three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance. PMID:27447511

  14. Solid Deuterium-Tritium Surface Roughness In A Beryllium Inertial Confinement Fusion Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Moody, J D; Montgomery, D S; Gautier, C

    2006-04-19

    Solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layers for inertial confinement fusion experiments were formed inside of a 2 mm diameter beryllium shell and were characterized using phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging. The solid D-T surface roughness is found to be 0.4 {micro}m for modes 7-128 at 1.5 K below the melting temperature. The layer roughness is found to increase with decreasing temperature, in agreement with previous visible light characterization studies. However, phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging provides a more robust surface roughness measurement than visible light methods. The new x-ray imaging results demonstrate clearly that the surface roughness decreases with time for solid D-T layers held at 1.5 K below the melting temperature.

  15. Single Crystal Growth and Formation of Defects in Deuterium-Tritium Ice Layers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chernov, A A; Kozioziemski, B J; Koch, J A; Atherton, L J; Johnson, M A; Hamza, A V; Kucheyev, S O; Lugten, J B; Mapoles, E A; Moody, J D; Salmonson, J D; Sater, J D

    2008-09-05

    We identify vapor-etched grain boundary grooves on the solid-vapor interface as the main source of surface roughness in the Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fuel layers which are solidified and then cooled. Current inertial confinement fusion target designs impose stringent limits to the cross sectional area and total volume of these grooves. Formation of these grain boundaries occurs over timescales of hours as the dislocation network anneals, and is inevitable in a plastically deformed material. Therefore, either cooling on a much shorter time scale or a technique that requires no cooling after solidification should be used to minimize the fuel layer surface roughness.

  16. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Leslie D.

    1982-01-01

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  17. Physics of high performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, K.M.; Barnes, C.W.; Batha, S.

    1996-11-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production, isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high-I{sub i}) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF- heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-I{sub i} discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier. It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed.

  18. Measurement of High-Pressure Shock Waves in Cryogenic Deuterium-Tritium Ice Layered Capsule Implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Moody, J. D.; Celliers, P. M.; Ross, J. S.; Ralph, J.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Parham, T.; Sater, J.; Mapoles, E. R.; Holunga, D. M.; Walters, C. F.; Haid, B. J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Krauter, K. G.; Frieders, G.; Ross, G.; Bowers, M. W.; Strozzi, D. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Dzenitis, B.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Young, B.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Atherton, L. J.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; Boehly, T. R.

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  19. Measurement of high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium ice layered capsule implosions on NIF.

    PubMed

    Robey, H F; Moody, J D; Celliers, P M; Ross, J S; Ralph, J; Le Pape, S; Berzak Hopkins, L; Parham, T; Sater, J; Mapoles, E R; Holunga, D M; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Kozioziemski, B J; Dylla-Spears, R J; Krauter, K G; Frieders, G; Ross, G; Bowers, M W; Strozzi, D J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, B; Bhandarkar, S D; Young, B; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. PMID:23971581

  20. Diagnostic study of steady state advanced fuel (deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium) fusion in an IEC device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Krupakar Murali

    The ionized fusion fuels (D-D & D-3He) have been accelerated to fusion velocities using two concentric grids maintained at a high potential difference in an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device. Though the gridded IEC device currently has a low efficiency (Q ≡ fusion power/input power ˜10-5), the energetic protons and neutrons generated within this device can be used for many near-term applications, such as medical isotope production, landmine detection, neutron activation analysis, etc. The present work is centered upon understanding the operation of the device and finding new ways to increase the overall efficiency. The steady state fusion of D-3He fuel in an IEC device was successfully studied. At a pressure of ˜2 mtorr the source of such reactions was identified to be principally beam-target reactions and was theoretically explained using the Monte Carlo - Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code. The first simultaneous measurement of DD and D-3He protons was accomplished during the present thesis work that confirmed that D- 3He fusion reactions indeed occur in an IEC device. A new pressure independent diagnostic was invented to measure the average ion energy. That diagnostic uses the D-D proton energy spectra from a single loop cathode grid and the SRIM code predictions. A second diagnostic called the eclipse disc was co-invented to characterize the various fusion regimes in an IEC device. This diagnostic verified that a converged core fusion source exists for the DD reactions but the D-3He reactions that are principally embedded source reactions. A third diagnostic called the chordwire was invented to study the effects of various sources of electrons---thermionic, photo and field emission electrons, that decrease the efficiency of the device. This diagnostic also helped map the ion flux into the cathode in 2D, besides helping identify the high performance grid materials (W-25%Re and pure Re). Understanding the electron current

  1. Results from deuterium-tritium tokamak confinement experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    Recent scientific and technical progress in magnetic fusion experiments has resulted in the achievement of plasma parameters (density and temperature) which enabled the production of significant bursts of fusion power from deuterium-tritium fuels and the first studies of the physics of burning plasmas. The key scientific issues in the reacting plasma core are plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability, and the confinement and loss of energetic fusion products from the reacting fuel ions. Progress in the development of regimes of operation which have both good confinement and are MHD stable have enabled a broad study of burning plasma physics issues. A review of the technical and scientific results from the deuterium-tritium experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is given with particular emphasis on alpha-particle physics issues.

  2. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, L.D.

    1980-03-13

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator was designed to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  3. A new ion cyclotron range of frequency scenario for bulk ion heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in our favour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Bilato, R.; Dumont, R.; Lerche, E.; Mantsinen, M.; Messiaen, A.

    2015-08-01

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radio frequency (RF) heating of 3He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra 3He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  4. RF physics in Deuterium-Tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C. K.; Bell, M.; Bell, R. E.; Bernabei, S.; Fredrickson, E.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Majeski, R.; Medley, S.; Ono, M.

    1999-09-20

    A wide variety of potential ICRF heating scenarios relevant for the deuterium-tritium plasmas expected in tokamak reactor-class devices were explored in the TFTR and JET programs. Key physics results from the two programs are discussed. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Deuterium-tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.G.; Beer, M.; Batha, S.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high-l{sub i}). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in-situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q{sub a} {approx} 4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l{sub i} plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross-section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D-T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D-T plasmas with q{sub 0} > 1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode-conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions.

  6. Compression of a spherically symmetric deuterium-tritium plasma liner onto a magnetized deuterium-tritium target

    SciTech Connect

    Santarius, J. F.

    2012-07-15

    Converging plasma jets may be able to reach the regime of high energy density plasmas (HEDP). The successful application of plasma jets to magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) would heat the plasma by fusion products and should increase the plasma energy density. This paper reports the results of using the University of Wisconsin's 1-D Lagrangian, radiation-hydrodynamics, fusion code BUCKY to investigate two MIF converging plasma jet test cases originally analyzed by Samulyak et al.[Physics of Plasmas 17, 092702 (2010)]. In these cases, 15 cm or 5 cm radially thick deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma jets merge at 60 cm from the origin and converge radially onto a DT target magnetized to 2 T and of radius 5 cm. The BUCKY calculations reported here model these cases, starting from the time of initial contact of the jets and target. Compared to the one-temperature Samulyak et al. calculations, the one-temperature BUCKY results show similar behavior, except that the plasma radius remains about twice as long near maximum compression. One-temperature and two-temperature BUCKY results differ, reflecting the sensitivity of the calculations to timing and plasma parameter details, with the two-temperature case giving a more sustained compression.

  7. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Haan, S. W.; Kritcher, A. L.; MacPhee, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Church, J.; Dixit, S.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J.; Moore, A. S.; Nikroo, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Streckert, H.; Town, R.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  8. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Döppner, T; Callahan, D A; Hurricane, O A; Hinkel, D E; Ma, T; Park, H-S; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Casey, D T; Celliers, P; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Haan, S W; Kritcher, A L; MacPhee, A; Le Pape, S; Pak, A; Patel, P K; Springer, P T; Salmonson, J D; Tommasini, R; Benedetti, L R; Bond, E; Bradley, D K; Caggiano, J; Church, J; Dixit, S; Edgell, D; Edwards, M J; Fittinghoff, D N; Frenje, J; Gatu Johnson, M; Grim, G; Hatarik, R; Havre, M; Herrmann, H; Izumi, N; Khan, S F; Kline, J L; Knauer, J; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; Merrill, F E; Moody, J; Moore, A S; Nikroo, A; Ralph, J E; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Sayre, D; Schneider, M; Streckert, H; Town, R; Turnbull, D; Volegov, P L; Wan, A; Widmann, K; Wilde, C H; Yeamans, C

    2015-07-31

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 10^{16} neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel. PMID:26274424

  9. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. P.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Haan, S.; Kritcher, A. L.; MacPhee, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Church, J.; Dixit, S.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J.; Moore, A. S.; Nikroo, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Streckert, H.; Town, R.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a “highfoot” laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  10. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. P.; Dewald, E. L.; et al

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a “highfoot” laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shapemore » closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.« less

  11. Optimal conditions for shock ignition of scaled cryogenic deuterium-tritium targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, M.; Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G.

    2013-02-01

    Within the framework of the shock-ignition (SI) scheme, ignition conditions are reached following the separation of the compression and heating phases. First, the shell is compressed at a sub-ignition implosion velocity; then an intense laser spike is launched at the end of the main drive, leading to the propagation of a strong shock through the precompressed fuel. The minimal laser energy required for ignition of scaled deuterium-tritium (DT) targets is assessed by calculations. A semi-empiric model describing the ignitor shock generation and propagation in the fuel assembly is defined. The minimal power needed in the laser spike pulse to achieve ignition is derived from the hydrodynamic model. Optimal conditions for ignition of scaled targets are explored in terms of laser intensity, shell-implosion velocity, and target scale range for the SI process. Curves of minimal laser requirements for ignition are plotted in the energy-power diagram. The most economic and reliable conditions for ignition of a millimeter DT target are observed in the 240- to 320-km/s implosion velocity range and for the peak laser intensity ranging from ˜2 × 1015 W/cm2 up to 5 × 1015 W/cm2. These optimal conditions correspond to shock-ignited targets for a laser energy of ˜250 kJ and a laser power of 100 to 200 TW. Large, self-ignited targets are particularly attractive by offering ignition at a lower implosion velocity and a reduced laser intensity than for conventional ignition. The SI scheme allows for the compression and heating phases of the high power laser energy research facility target to be performed at a peak laser intensity below 1016 W/cm2. A better control of parametric and hydrodynamic instabilities within the SI scheme sets it as an optimal and reliable approach to attain ignition of large targets.

  12. Preparations for deuterium tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, G.

    1994-04-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinet{sup {trademark}} system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium-deuterium (D-D) run to simulate expected deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D-T experiments using D-D have been performed. The physics objectives of D-T operation are production of {approximately} 10 megawatts (MW) of fusion power, evaluation of confinement and heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas, evaluation of {alpha}-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined {alpha}-particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D-T experiments are reviewed.

  13. Preparations for deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. L.; Anderson, J. W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Aschroft, D.; Barnes, C. W.; Barnes, G.; Batchelor, D. B.; Bateman, G.; Batha, S.; Baylor, L. A.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Biglow, T. S.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bonoli, P.; Bretz, N. L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Burgess, T.; Bush, H.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Cheng, C. Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collazo, I.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cowley, S.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Faunce, J.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G. Y.; Furth, H. P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Goldfinger, R. C.; Golian, T.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gouge, M. J.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hermann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hirshman, S.; Hoffman, D. J.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R. A.; Hsuan, H.; Jaeger, E. F.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Kwon, S.; Labik, G.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Laughlin, M. J.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Leonard, M.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F. M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Machuzak, J.; Mansfield, D. E.; Marchlik, M.; Marmar, E. S.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mastrocola, V.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M. P.; Majeski, R.; Mauel, M.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McGuire, K. M.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Milora, S. L.; Monticello, D.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G. A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Nishitani, T.; Norris, M.; O'Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Paul, S. F.; Pavlov, Yu. I.; Pearson, G.; Perkins, F.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Pitcher, S.; Popovichev, S.; Qualls, A. L.; Raftopoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Scharer, J.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S. D.; Senko, T.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C.; Snipes, J.; Snook, P.; Stencel, J.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B. C.; Strachan, J. D.; Stodiek, W.; Swanson, J.; Synakowski, E.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J.; Thompson, M. E.; Timberlake, J. R.; Towner, H. H.; Ulrickson, M.; von Halle, A.; Vannoy, C.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, K.; Wong, D.; Wong, K. L.; Woskov, P.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Yeun, A.; Yoshikawa, S.; Young, K. M.; Zakharov, L.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zweben, S. J.

    1994-05-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a FluorinertTM system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation, and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium-deuterium (D-D) run to simulate expected deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D-T experiments using D-D have been performed. The physics objectives of D-T operation are production of ≊10 MW of fusion power, evaluation of confinement, and heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas, evaluation of α-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined α particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D-T experiments are reviewed.

  14. Applications of deuterium-tritium equation of state based on density functional theory in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cong; He, Xian-Tu; Ye, Wen-Hua; Zhang, Ping; Fan, Zheng-Feng

    2015-06-15

    An accurate equation of state for deuterium-tritium mixture is of crucial importance in inertial confinement fusion. The equation of state can determine the compressibility of the imploding target and the energy deposited into the fusion fuel. In the present work, a new deuterium-tritium equation of state, which is calculated according to quantum molecular dynamic and orbital free molecular dynamic simulations, has been used to study the target implosion hydrodynamics. The results indicate that the peak density predicted by the new equation of state is ∼10% higher than the quotidian equation of state data. During the implosion, the areal density and neutron yield are also discussed.

  15. Demonstration of fuel hot-spot pressure in excess of 50 Gbar for direct-drive, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Cao, D.; et al

    2016-07-07

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs = 56±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium–tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ~60% of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E (in press)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is ~40%more » lower. Furthermore, three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.« less

  16. Stability analysis of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes in TFTR deuterium-tritium experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; Budny, R.; Chang, Z.; Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.

    1995-09-18

    The toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) are found to be stable in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) deuterium-tritium plasmas. The dominant stabilizing mechanisms are beam ion Landau damping and radiative damping. A core localized TAE mode is shown to exist near the center of the plasma at small magnetic shear and finite plasma beta, which can be destabilized by energetic alpha particles in future TFTR DT experiments. With additional instability drive from fast minority ions powered by ion cyclotron radio frequency, both the global and core localized TAE modes can be readily destabilized.

  17. A new ion cyclotron range of frequency scenario for bulk ion heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in our favour

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.; Dumont, R.; Mantsinen, M.

    2015-08-15

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radio frequency (RF) heating of {sup 3}He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra {sup 3}He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  18. Probing high areal-density cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions using downscattered neutron spectra measured by the magnetic recoil spectrometera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Hatchett, S. P.; Haan, S. W.; Cerjan, C. J.; Landen, O. L.; Fletcher, K. A.; Leeper, R. J.

    2010-05-01

    For the first time high areal-density (ρR) cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions have been probed using downscattered neutron spectra measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) [J. A. Frenje et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 10E502 (2008)], recently installed and commissioned on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The ρR data obtained with the MRS have been essential for understanding how the fuel is assembled and for guiding the cryogenic program at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) to ρR values up to ˜300 mg/cm2. The ρR data obtained from well-established charged particle spectrometry techniques [C. K. Li et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 4902 (2001)] were used to authenticate the MRS data for low-ρR plastic capsule implosions, and the ρR values inferred from these techniques are in excellent agreement, indicating that the MRS technique provides high-fidelity data. Recent OMEGA-MRS data and Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the MRS on the NIF [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] will meet most of the absolute and relative requirements for determining ρR, ion temperature (Ti) and neutron yield (Yn) in both low-yield, tritium-rich, deuterium-lean, hydrogen-doped implosions and high-yield DT implosions.

  19. Compact deuterium-tritium neutron generator using a novel field ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, J. L. Falabella, S.; Sanchez, J.; Tang, V.; Wang, H.

    2014-11-21

    Active interrogation using neutrons is an effective method for detecting shielded nuclear material. A lightweight, lunch-box-sized, battery-operated neutron source would enable new concepts of operation in the field. We have developed at-scale components for a highly portable, completely self-contained, pulsed Deuterium-Tritium (DT) neutron source producing 14 MeV neutrons with average yields of 10{sup 7} n/s. A gated, field ionization ion source using etched electrodes has been developed that produces pulsed ion currents up to 500 nA. A compact Cockcroft-Walton high voltage source is used to accelerate deuterons into a metal hydride target for neutron production. The results of full scale DT tests using the field ionization source are presented.

  20. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfu; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xianpeng; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-01

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10(-7) at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons. PMID:26724081

  1. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfu; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xianpeng; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-01

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10-7 at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  2. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianfu Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianpeng; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-15

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10{sup −7} at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  3. Method and system to directly produce electrical power within the lithium blanket region of a magnetically confined, deuterium-tritium (DT) fueled, thermonuclear fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

  4. Method and System to Directly Produce Electrical Power within the Lithium Blanket Region of a Magnetically Confined, Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Fueled, Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1998-09-22

    A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

  5. Cross-calibration of neutron detectors for deuterium-tritium operation in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.C.; Jassby, D.L.; Roquemore, A.L.; Strachan, J.D.; Barnes, C.W.; Duong, H.H.; Heidbrink, W.E.; Ruskov, E.; Loughlin, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    During the initial deuterium-tritium experiments on TFTR, neutron emission was measured with {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U fission chambers, silicon surface barrier diodes, spatially collimated {sup 4}He proportional counters and ZnS scintillators, and a variety of elemental activation foils. The activation foils, {sup 4}He counters and silicon diodes can discriminate between 14 MeV and 2.5 MeV neutrons. The other detectors respond to both DD and DT neutrons but are more sensitive to the latter. The proportional counters, scintillators, and some of the fission chambers were calibrated absolutely, using a 14-MeV neutron generator positioned at numerous locations inside the TFTR vacuum vessel. Although the directly calibrated systems were saturated during the highest power deuterium-tritium operation, they allowed cross-calibration of less sensitive fission chambers and silicon diodes. The estimated absolute accuracy of the uncertainty-weighted mean of these cross-calibrations, combined with an independent calibration derived from activation foil determinations of total neutron yield, is {plus_minus}7%.

  6. Extrusion of tritium and D-T pellets for ITER fueling

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, P.W.; Gouge, M.J.; Denny, B.J.

    1996-07-01

    As part of the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) plasma fueling development program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has fabricated a pellet injection system to test the mechanical and thermal properties of extruded tritium. This repeating, single-stage, pneumatic injector, called the Tritium-Proof-of-Principle Phase II (TPOP-II) Pellet Injector, has a piston-driven mechanical extruder and is designed to extrude and accelerate hydrogenic pellets sized for the ITER device. The TPOP-II program has the following development goals: evaluate the feasibility of extruding tritium and deuterium-tritium (D-T) mixtures for use in future pellet injection systems; determine the mechanical and thermal properties of tritium and D-T extrusions; integrate, test, and evaluate the extruder in a repeating, single-stage light gas gun that is sized for the ITER application (pellet diameter {approximately}7 to 8 mm); evaluate options for recycling propellant and extruder exhaust gas; evaluate operability and reliability of ITER prototypical fueling systems in an environment of significant tritium inventory that requires secondary and room containment systems. In tests with deuterium feed at ORNL, up to 13 pellets have been extruded at rates up to 1 Hz and accelerated to speeds of 1.0 to 1.1 km/s, using hydrogen propellant gas at a supply pressure of 65 bar. Initially, deuterium pellets 7.5 mm in diameter and 11 mm in length were produced--the largest cryogenic pellets produced by the fusion program to date. These pellets represent about a 10% density perturbation to ITER. Subsequently, the extruder nozzle was modified to produce pellets which are nearly 7.5 mm right circular cylinders.

  7. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-02-15

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  8. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  9. Deuterium-tritium TFTR plasmas in the high poloidal beta regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Navratil, G.A.

    1995-03-01

    Deuterium-tritium plasmas with enhanced energy confinement and stability have been produced in the high poloidal beta, advanced tokamak regime in TFTR. Confinement enhancement H {triple_bond} {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub E ITER-89P} > 4 has been obtained in a limiter H-mode configuration at moderate plasma current I{sub p} = 0.85 {minus} 1.46 MA. By peaking the plasma current profile, {beta}{sub N dia} {triple_bond} 10{sup 8} < {beta}{sub t{perpendicular}} > aB{sub 0}/I{sub p} = 3 has been obtained in these plasma,s exceeding the {beta}{sub N} limit for TFTR plasmas with lower internal inductance, l{sub i}. Fusion power exceeding 6.7 MW with a fusion power gain Q{sub DT} = 0.22 has been produced with reduced alpha particle first orbit loss provided by the increased l{sub i}.

  10. Tunable proton stopping power of deuterium-tritium by mixing heavy ion dopants for fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, D. B.; Hu, L. X.; Wang, W. Q.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Zhang, G. B.; Ouyang, J. M.; Shao, F. Q.; Zhuo, H. B.

    2016-03-01

    The theoretical model of charged-particle stopping power for the Coulomb logarithm lnΛb ≥ 2 plasma [Phys. Rev. Lett., 20, 3059 (1993)] is extended to investigate the transport of the energetic protons in a compressed deuterium-tritium (DT) pellet mixed with heavy ion dopants. It shows that an increase of mixed-ion charge state and density ratio results in the substantial enhancement of the proton stopping power, which leads to a shorter penetration distance and an earlier appearance of the Bragg peak with a higher magnitude. The effect of hot-spot mix on the proton-driven fast ignition model is discussed. It is found that ignition time required for a small mixed hot-spot can be significantly reduced with slightly increased beam energy. Nevertheless, the ignition cannot maintain for a long time due to increasing alpha-particle penetration distance and energy loss from mechanical work and thermal conduction at high temperatures.

  11. Deuterium-tritium experiments on TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, N. L.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Barnes, C. W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Evensen, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, R.; Fu, G.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H. P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Giola, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F. M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M. J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marmar, E.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mauel, M.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M. P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McGuire, K. M.; McKee, G.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G. A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; O'Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S. F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A. L.; Raftapoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmunsen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbaugh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.; Sesnic, S.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Snipes, J.; Stencel, J.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stodiek, W.; Strachan, J. D.; Stratton, B. C.; Swanson, J.; Synakowski, E.; Takahashi, H.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J.; Thompson, M. E.; Tighe, W.; Timberlake, J. R.; Tobita, K.; Towner, H. H.; Tuszewski, M.; Von Halle, A.; Vannoy, C.; Viola, M.; Goeler, S. von; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R. T.; Wester, R.; White, R.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Winston, J.; Wright, K.; Wong, K.-L.; Woskov, P.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Yoshikawa, S.; Young, K. M.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zavereev, V.; Zweben, S. J.

    1995-09-01

    A peak fusion power production of 9.3±0.7 MW has been achieved on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in deuterium plasmas heated by co and counter injected deuterium and tritium neutral beams with a total power of 33.7 MW. The ratio of fusion power output to heating power input is 0.27. At the time of the highest neutron flux the plasma conditions are: Te(0)=11.5 keV, Ti(0)=44 keV, ne(0)=8.5×1019 m-3, and =2.2 giving τE=0.24 s. These conditions are similar to those found in the highest confinement deuterium plasmas. The measured D-T neutron yield is within 7% of computer code estimates based on profile measurements and within experimental uncertainties. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha fraction of 0.2% and central fusion power density of 2 MW/m3 similar to that expected in a fusion reactor. Even though the alpha velocity exceeds the Alfven velocity throughout the time of high neutron output in most high power plasmas, MHD activity is not substantially different from that in comparable deuterium plasmas and Alfven wave activity is low. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles is about 3% of the total as expected from alphas which are born on unconfined orbits. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas with similar externally applied conditions, the stored energy in electrons and ions is about 25% higher indicating improvements in confinement associated with D-T plasmas and consistent with modest electron heating expected from alpha particles. ICRF heating of D-T plasmas using up to 5.5 MW has resulted in 10 keV increases in central ion and 2.5 keV increases in central electron temperatures in relatively good agreement with code predictions. In these cases heating on the magnetic axis at 2ΩT gave up to 80% of the ICRF energy to ions.

  12. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 1015 neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  13. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B. Hopkins, L. F. Berzak; Pape, S. Le; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; and others

    2015-06-15

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  14. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating and current drive in deuterium-tritium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bretz, N.; Budny, R. V.; Darrow, D. S.; Grek, B.; Hammett, G.; Hosea, J. C.; Hsuan, H.; Ignat, D.; Majeski, R.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.; Rogers, J. H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J. E.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zweben, S. J.; Bush, C. E.; Goldfinger, R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Murakami, M.; Rasmussen, D.; Bettenhausen, M.; Lam, N. T.; Scharer, J.; Sund, R.; Sauter, O.

    1995-06-01

    The first experiments utilizing high-power radio waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas have been completed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [Fusion Technol. 21, 13 (1992)]. Results from the initial series of experiments have demonstrated efficient core second harmonic tritium (2ΩT) heating in parameter regimes approaching those anticipated for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor [D. E. Post, Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Proceedings of the 13th International Conference, Washington, DC, 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 239]. Observations are consistent with modeling predictions for these plasmas. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves has been observed in D-T, deuterium-deuterium (D-D), and deuterium-helium-4 (D-4He) plasmas with high concentrations of minority helium-3 (3He) (n3He/ne≳10%). Mode conversion current drive in D-T plasmas was simulated with experiments conducted in D-3He-4He plasmas. Results show a directed propagation of the mode converted ion Bernstein waves, in correlation with the antenna phasing.

  15. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-05-01

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ˜16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ˜200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ˜40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  16. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Stoeckl, C; Boni, R; Ehrne, F; Forrest, C J; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Lonobile, D J; Magoon, J; Regan, S P; Shoup, M J; Sorce, A; Sorce, C; Sangster, T C; Weiner, D

    2016-05-01

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments-a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ∼16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ∼200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ∼40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera. PMID:27250417

  17. Effects of non-equilibrium particle distributions in deuterium-tritium burning

    SciTech Connect

    Michta, D; Graziani, F; Pruet, J; Luu, T

    2009-08-18

    We investigate the effects of non-equilibrium particle distributions resulting from rapid deuterium-tritium burning in plasmas using a Fokker-Planck code that incorporates small-angle Coulomb scattering, Brehmsstrahlung, Compton scattering, and thermal-nuclear burning. We find that in inertial confinement fusion environments, deviations away from Maxwellian distributions for either deuterium or tritium ions are small and result in 1% changes in the energy production rates. The deuterium and tritium effective temperatures are not equal, but differ by only about 2.5% near the time of peak burn rate. Simulations with high Z (Xe) dopants show that the dopant temperature closely tracks that of the fuel. On the other hand, fusion product ion distributions are highly non-Maxwellian, and careful treatments of energy-exchange between these ions and other particles is important for determining burn rates.

  18. Theoretical studies on the stopping power of deuterium-tritium mixed with uranium plasmas for α particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhigang; Fu, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Ping

    2014-10-15

    The stopping power of a compressed and highly ionized deuterium-tritium (DT) and uranium (U) plasma for α particles at very high temperatures (T = 5 keV) is examined theoretically with the dimensional continuation method. We show that with increasing density of U, both the magnitude and width of the resonance peak in the stopping power (as a function of the α particle energy), increases because of the ions, while the penetration distance of the α particles decreases. A simple relation of decreasing penetration distance as a function of plasma density is observed, which may be useful for inertial confinement fusion experiments. Moreover, by comparing the results with the case of a DT plasma mixed with beryllium, we find that the effect of a higher Z plasma is stronger, with regard to energy loss as well as the penetration distance of α particles, than that of a lower Z plasma.

  19. Improving cryogenic deuterium tritium implosion performance on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T. C.; Goncharov, V. N.; Betti, R.; Radha, P. B.; Boehly, T. R.; Casey, D. T.; Collins, T. J.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Glebov, Y. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Kingsley, C.; Kosc, T. Z.; Knauer, J. P.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Maximov, A. V.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Petrasso, Richard D.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Short, R. W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Soures, J. M.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Versteeg, V.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2013-01-01

    A flexible direct-drive target platform is used to implode cryogenic deuterium–tritium (DT) capsules on the OMEGA laser [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The goal of these experiments is to demonstrate ignition hydrodynamically equivalent performance where the laser drive intensity, the implosion velocity, the fuel adiabat, and the in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR) are the same as those for a 1.5-MJ target [Goncharov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 165001 (2010)] designed to ignite on the National Ignition Facility [Hogan et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 567 (2001)]. The results from a series of 29 cryogenic DT implosions are presented. The implosions were designed to span a broad region of design space to study target performance as a function of shell stability (adiabat) and implosion velocity. Ablation-front perturbation growth appears to limit target performance at high implosion velocities. Target outer-surface defects associated with contaminant gases in the DT fuel are identified as the dominant perturbation source at the ablation surface; performance degradation is confirmed by 2D hydrodynamic simulations that include these defects. A trend in the value of the Lawson criterion [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] for each of the implosions in adiabat–IFAR space suggests the existence of a stability boundary that leads to ablator mixing into the hot spot for the most ignition-equivalent designs.

  20. First results of radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium implosions with a 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Döppner, T.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jancaitis, K. S.; and others

    2015-08-15

    Radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium plastic capsule implosions were carried out using a new, 3-shock “adiabat-shaped” drive on the National Ignition Facility. The purpose of adiabat shaping is to use a stronger first shock, reducing hydrodynamic instability growth in the ablator. The shock can decay before reaching the deuterium-tritium fuel leaving it on a low adiabat and allowing higher fuel compression. The fuel areal density was improved by ∼25% with this new drive compared to similar “high-foot” implosions, while neutron yield was improved by more than 4 times, compared to “low-foot” implosions driven at the same compression and implosion velocity.

  1. Shock-tuned cryogenic-deuterium-tritium implosion performance on Omegaa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, T. C.; Goncharov, V. N.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Casey, D. T.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K. A.; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, Y. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenschev, I. V.; Knauer, J. P.; Loucks, S. J.; Li, C. K.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nilson, P. M.; Padalino, S. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Seguin, F. H.; Seka, W.; Short, R. W.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Soures, J. M.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Yaakobi, B.

    2010-05-01

    Cryogenic-deuterium-tritium (DT) target compression experiments with low-adiabat (α), multiple-shock drive pulses have been performed on the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to demonstrate hydrodynamic-equivalent ignition performance. The multiple-shock drive pulse facilitates experimental shock tuning using an established cone-in-shell target platform [T. R. Boehly, R. Betti, T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056301 (2009)]. These shock-tuned drive pulses have been used to implode cryogenic-DT targets with peak implosion velocities of 3×107 cm/s at peak drive intensities of 8×1014 W/cm2. During a recent series of α ˜2 implosions, one of the two necessary conditions for initiating a thermonuclear burn wave in a DT plasma was achieved: an areal density of approximately 300 mg/cm2 was inferred using the magnetic recoil spectrometer [J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, F. H. Séguin et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 042704 (2009)]. The other condition—a burn-averaged ion temperature ⟨Ti⟩n of 8-10 keV—cannot be achieved on Omega because of the limited laser energy; the kinetic energy of the imploding shell is insufficient to heat the plasma to these temperatures. A ⟨Ti⟩n of approximately 3.4 keV would be required to demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 058102 (2010)]. The ⟨Ti⟩n reached during the recent series of α ˜2 implosions was approximately 2 keV, limited primarily by laser-drive and target nonuniformities. Work is underway to improve drive and target symmetry for future experiments.

  2. Shock-Tuned Cryogenic-Deuterium-Tritium Implosion Performance on Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster,T.C.; Goncharov, V.N.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Casey, D.T.; Collins, T.J.B.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Harding, D.R.; Hu, S.X.; Igumenschev, I.V.; Knauer, J.P.; Loucks, S.J.; Li, C.K.; Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; McCrory, R.L.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Nilson, P.M.; Padalino, S.P.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, R.B.; Regan, S.P.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Short,R.W.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Yaakobi, B.

    2010-05-04

    Cryogenic-deuterium-tritium (DT) target compression experiments with low-adiabat (alpha), multiple-shock drive pulses have been performed on the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to demonstrate hydrodynamic-equivalent ignition performance. The multiple-shock drive pulse facilitates experimental shock tuning using an established cone-in-shell target platform [T. R. Boehly, R. Betti, T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056301 (2009)]. These shock-tuned drive pulses have been used to implode cryogenic-DT targets with peak implosion velocities of 3 x 10^7 cm/ s at peak drive intensities of 8 x 10^14 W/cm^2. During a recent series of alpha ~ 2 implosions, one of the two necessary conditions for initiating a thermonuclear burn wave in a DT plasma was achieved: an areal density of approximately 300 mg/cm^2 was inferred using the magnetic recoil spectrometer [J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, F. H. Séguin et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 042704 (2009)]. The other condition—a burn-averaged ion temperature n of 8–10 keV—cannot be achieved on Omega because of the limited laser energy; the kinetic energy of the imploding shell is insufficient to heat the plasma to these temperatures. A n of approximately 3.4 keV would be required to demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)]. The n reached during the recent series of alpha ~ 2 implosions was approximately 2 keV, limited primarily by laser-drive and target nonuniformities. Work is underway to improve drive and target symmetry for future experiments.

  3. Shock-tuned cryogenic-deuterium-tritium implosion performance on Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T. C.; Goncharov, V. N.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, Y. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenschev, I. V.; Knauer, J. P.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2010-05-15

    Cryogenic-deuterium-tritium (DT) target compression experiments with low-adiabat (alpha), multiple-shock drive pulses have been performed on the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to demonstrate hydrodynamic-equivalent ignition performance. The multiple-shock drive pulse facilitates experimental shock tuning using an established cone-in-shell target platform [T. R. Boehly, R. Betti, T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056301 (2009)]. These shock-tuned drive pulses have been used to implode cryogenic-DT targets with peak implosion velocities of 3x10{sup 7} cm/s at peak drive intensities of 8x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. During a recent series of alphaapprox2 implosions, one of the two necessary conditions for initiating a thermonuclear burn wave in a DT plasma was achieved: an areal density of approximately 300 mg/cm{sup 2} was inferred using the magnetic recoil spectrometer [J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, F. H. Seguin et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 042704 (2009)]. The other condition--a burn-averaged ion temperature {sub n} of 8-10 keV--cannot be achieved on Omega because of the limited laser energy; the kinetic energy of the imploding shell is insufficient to heat the plasma to these temperatures. A {sub n} of approximately 3.4 keV would be required to demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 058102 (2010)]. The {sub n} reached during the recent series of alphaapprox2 implosions was approximately 2 keV, limited primarily by laser-drive and target nonuniformities. Work is underway to improve drive and target symmetry for future experiments.

  4. Exposure Of NIF Relevant Polymeric Samples To Deuterium-Tritium Gas At Elevated Temperature And Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ebey, P S; Dole, J M; Nobile, A; Schoonover, J R; Burmann, J; Cook, B; Letts, S; Sanchez, J; Nikroo, A

    2005-06-24

    The purpose of the experiments described in this paper was to expose samples of polymeric materials to a mixture of deuterium-tritium (DT) gas at elevated temperature and pressure to investigate the effects (i.e. damage) on the materials. The materials and exposure parameters were chosen with to be relevant to proposed uses of similar materials in inertial fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Two types of samples were exposed and tested. The first type consisted of 10 4-lead ribbon cables of fine manganin wire insulated with polyimide. Wires of this type are proposed for use in thermal shimming of hohlraums and the goal of this experiment was to measure the change in electrical resistance of the insulation due to tritium exposure. The second type of sample consisted of 20 planar polymer samples that may be used as ignition capsule materials. The exposure was at 34.5 GPa (5010 psia) and 70 C for 48 hours. The change in electrical resistance of the wire insulation will be presented. The results for capsule materials will be presented in a separate paper in this issue.

  5. Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes in TFTR Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    G.Y. Fu; H. Berk; R. Nazikian; S.H. Batha; Z. Chang; et al

    1998-01-01

    Purely alpha-particle-driven Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAEs) with toroidal mode numbers n=1-6 have been observed in Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [D.J. Grove and D.M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)]. The appearance of mode activity following termination of neutral beam injection in plasmas with q(0)>1 is generally consistent with theoretical predictions of TAE stability [G.Y. Fu et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 4036 (1996]. Internal reflectometer measurements of TAE activity is compared with theoretical calculations of the radial mode structure. Core localization of the modes to the region of reduced central magnetic shear is confirmed, however the mode structure can deviate significantly from theoretical estimates. The peak measured TAE amplitude of delta n/n~10(superscript -4) at r/a~0.3-0.4 corresponds to delta B/B~10-5, while dB/B~10(superscript -8) is measured at the plasma edge. Enhanced alpha particle loss associated with TAE activity has not been observed.

  6. Viscosity and mutual diffusion of deuterium-tritium mixtures in the warm-dense-matter regime

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, J. D.; Cohen, James S.; Horner, D. A.; Collins, L. A.; Lambert, F.

    2010-09-15

    We have calculated viscosity and mutual diffusion of deuterium-tritium (DT) in the warm, dense matter regime for densities from 5 to 20 g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures from 2 to 10 eV, using both finite-temperature Kohn-Sham density-functional theory molecular dynamics (QMD) and orbital-free molecular dynamics (OFMD). The OFMD simulations are in generally good agreement with the benchmark QMD results, and we conclude that the simpler OFMD method can be used with confidence in this regime. For low temperatures (3 eV and below), one-component plasma (OCP) model simulations for diffusion agree with the QMD and OFMD calculations, but deviate by 30% at 10 eV. In comparison with the QMD and OFMD results, the OCP viscosities are not as good as for diffusion, especially for 5 g/cm{sup 3} where the temperature dependence is significantly different. The QMD and OFMD reduced diffusion and viscosity coefficients are found to depend largely, though not completely, only on the Coulomb coupling parameter {Gamma}, with a minimum in the reduced viscosity at {Gamma}{approx_equal}25, approximately the same position found in the OCP simulations. The QMD and OFMD equations of state (pressure) are also compared with the hydrogen two-component plasma model.

  7. Impact of first-principles properties of deuterium-tritium on inertial confinement fusion target designsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.; Militzer, B.

    2015-05-01

    A comprehensive knowledge of the properties of high-energy-density plasmas is crucial to understanding and designing low-adiabat, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through hydrodynamic simulations. Warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions are routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy often play an important role in determining the properties of warm dense plasmas. The WDM properties of deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures and ablator materials, such as the equation of state, thermal conductivity, opacity, and stopping power, were usually estimated by models in hydro-codes used for ICF simulations. In these models, many-body and quantum effects were only approximately taken into account in the WMD regime. Moreover, the self-consistency among these models was often missing. To examine the accuracy of these models, we have systematically calculated the static, transport, and optical properties of warm dense DT plasmas, using first-principles (FP) methods over a wide range of densities and temperatures that cover the ICF "path" to ignition. These FP methods include the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and quantum-molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, which treat electrons with many-body quantum theory. The first-principles equation-of-state table, thermal conductivities (κQMD), and first principles opacity table of DT have been self-consistently derived from the combined PIMC and QMD calculations. They have been compared with the typical models, and their effects to ICF simulations have been separately examined in previous publications. In this paper, we focus on their combined effects to ICF implosions through hydro-simulations using these FP-based properties of DT in comparison with the usual model simulations. We found that the predictions of ICF neutron yield could change by up to a factor of ˜2.5; the lower the adiabat of DT capsules, the more variations in hydro-simulations. The FP-based properties of DT

  8. Impact of First-Principles Property Calculations of Warm-Dense Deuterium/Tritium on Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.

    2014-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of the properties of warm dense deuterium/tritium (DT) is essential to reliably design inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. In the warm-dense-matter regime, routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, strong-coupling and degeneracy effects play an important role in determining plasma properties. Using first-principles methods of both path-integral Monte Carlo and quantum molecular-dynamics (QMD), we have performed systematic investigation of the equation of state, thermal conductivity, and opacity for DT over a wide range of densities and temperatures. These first-principles properties have been incorporated into our hydrocodes. When compared to hydro simulations using standard plasma models, significant differences in 1-D target performance have been identified for simulations of DT implosions. For low-adiabat (α <= 2) DT plasma conditions, the QMD-predicted opacities are 10 to 100 × higher than predicted by the cold-opacity-patched astrophysical opacity table. The thermal conductivity could be 3 to 10 × larger than the Lee-More model prediction. These enhancements can modify the shell adiabat and shock dynamics in lower- α ICF implosions, which could lead to ~ 40 variations in peak density and neutron yield. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  9. Deuterium-tritium pulse propulsion with hydrogen as propellant and the entire space-craft as a gigavolt capacitor for ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2013-08-01

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclear pulse propulsion concept for fast interplanetary transport is proposed utilizing almost all the energy for thrust and without the need for a large radiator: By letting the thermonuclear micro-explosion take place in the center of a liquid hydrogen sphere with the radius of the sphere large enough to slow down and absorb the neutrons of the DT fusion reaction, heating the hydrogen to a fully ionized plasma at a temperature of ∼105 K. By using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated gigavolt capacitor, igniting the DT micro-explosion with an intense GeV ion beam discharging the gigavolt capacitor, possible if the space craft has the topology of a torus.

  10. A Comparison Between the Burn Condition of Deuterium-Tritium and Deuterium-Helium-3 Reaction and Stability Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Fereshteh

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear reaction of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion by the usual magnetic or inertial confinement suffers from a number of difficulties and problems caused by tritium handling, neutron damage to materials and neutron-induced radioactivity, etc. The study of the nuclear synthesis reaction of deuterium-helium-3 (D-3He) at low collision energies (below 1 keV) is of interest for its applications in nuclear physics and astrophysics. Spherical tokamak (ST) reactors have a low aspect ratio and can confine plasma with β≈1. These capabilities of ST reactors are due to the use of the alternative D-3He reaction. In this work, the burn condition of D-3He reaction was calculated by using zero-dimensional particles and power equations, and, with the use of the parameters of the ST reactor, the stability limit of D-3He reaction was calculated and then the results were compared with those of D-T reaction. The obtained results show that the burn conditions of D-3He reaction required a higher temperature and had a much more limited temperature range in comparison to those of D-T reaction.

  11. ICRF heating of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Murakami, M.; Adler, H.

    1995-03-01

    The first experiments to heat D-T plasmas in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) have been performed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These experiments have two major objectives: to study the RF physics of ICRF-heated D-T plasmas and to enhance the performance of D-T discharges. Experiments have been conducted at 43 MHz with out-of-phase current strap excitation to explore n{sub T}/n{sub e} concentrations up to approximately 40%. In these experiments n{sub T}/n{sub e} was limited by D recycling from the carbon walls. The location of the T resonance was varied by changing the toroidal magnetic field, and the RF power was modulated (f{sub mod}=5-10 Hz) to elucidate competing heating mechanisms. Up to 5.8 MW of ICRF heating has been coupled into D-T plasmas. The addition of 5.5 MW of ICRF heating to a D-T supershot resulted in an increase in central ion temperature from 26 to 36 keV and an increase in central electron temperature from 8 to 10.5 keV. Up to 80% of the absorbed ICRF power was coupled directly to ions, in good agreement with computer code predictions. These results extrapolate to efficient T heating in future devices such as ITER.

  12. Shock propagation in deuterium-tritium-saturated foam

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.J.B.; Poludnenko, A.; Cunningham, A.; Frank, A.

    2005-06-08

    Adaptive-mesh-refinement hydrodynamic simulations have been performed of cross sections of fibrous foams saturated with cryogenic deuterium and tritium (DT). Material tracking indicates that the fibers and DT mix rapidly behind the shock. In addition, fluctuation decay lengths are on the order of a micron even in the absence of radiative and thermal energy transport. Outside the mix region, the Rankine-Hugoniot equations are satisfied to the degree to which the turbulence and transverse motion decay, a few percent or less. Simulations also show that the shock-front perturbations decay rapidly after the shock leaves the foam and enters a layer of DT ice, suggesting that the foam microstructure will not contribute to feedthrough.

  13. High performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Batha, S.H.; Bell, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    Plasmas composed of nominally equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium (DT) have been created in TFTR with the goals of producing significant levels of fusion power and of examining the effects of DT fusion alpha particles. Conditioning of the limiter by the injection of lithium pellets has led to an approximate doubling of the energy confinement time, {tau}{sub E}, in supershot plasmas at high plasma current (I{sub p} {le} 2.5 MA) and high heating power (P{sub b} {le} 33 MW). Operation with DT typically results in an additional 20% increase in {tau}{sub E}. In the high poloidal beta, advanced tokamak regime in TFTR, confinement enhancement H {triple_bond} {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub E ITER-89P} > 4 has been obtained in a limiter H-mode configuration at moderate plasma current I{sub p} = 0.85 {minus} 1.5 MA. By peaking the plasma current profile, {beta}{sub N dia} {triple_bond} 10{sup 8} < {beta}{sub t{perpendicular}} > aB{sub 0}/I{sub p} = 3 has been obtained in these plasmas, exceeding the {beta}{sub N} limit for TFTR plasmas with lower internal inductance, l{sub i}. Confinement of alpha particles appears to be classical and losses due to collective effects have not been observed. While small fluctuations in fusion product loss were observed during ELMs, no large loss was detected in DT plasmas.

  14. Concept of DT fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Anan'ev, S.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Kuteev, B.V.; Cherkez, D.I.; Shirnin, P.N.; Kazakovsky, N.T.

    2015-03-15

    A concept of DT-fusion neutron source (FNS) with the neutron yield higher than 10{sup 18} neutrons per second is under design in Russia. Such a FNS is of interest for many applications: 1) basic and applied research (neutron scattering, etc); 2) testing the structural materials for fusion reactors; 3) control of sub-critical nuclear systems and 4) nuclear waste processing (including transmutation of minor actinides). This paper describes the fuel cycle concept of a compact fusion neutron source based on a small spherical tokamak (FNS-ST) with a MW range of DT fusion power and considers the key physics issues of this device. The major and minor radii are ∼0.5 and ∼0.3 m, magnetic field ∼1.5 T, heating power less than 15 MW and plasma current 1-2 MA. The system provides the fuel mixture with equal fractions of D and T (D:T = 1:1) for all FNS technology systems. (authors)

  15. Numerical study of the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of laser-irradiated deuterium and deuterium-tritium targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocchino, Alberto; Atzeni, Stefano; Schiavi, Angelo

    2010-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) at the ablation front of laser-irradiated planar targets is investigated by two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics simulations. The linear evolution of perturbations seeded either by surface roughness or target inhomogeneity is studied for perturbation wavelengths in the range 10≤λ≤400 μm and laser intensity 4×1012≤I≤4×1014 W/cm2 (with laser wavelength λlaser=0.35 μm). Thin and thick cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium (DT) planar targets are considered. For targets irradiated at constant intensity, it is found that perturbations with wavelength below a given threshold perform damped oscillations, while perturbations above such a threshold are unstable and oscillate with growing amplitude. This is qualitatively in agreement with theoretical predictions by Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)], according to which ablation related processes stabilize perturbations with kDc≫1, where Dc is the distance between the ablation front and critical density for laser propagation. For kDc<1 a weakly growing Landau-Darrieus instability (LDI) is instead excited. The stability threshold increases substantially with laser intensity, given the dependence of Dc on laser intensity I (roughly Dc∝I, according to the present simulations). Direct-drive laser fusion targets are irradiated by time-shaped pulses, with a low intensity initial foot. In this case, perturbations with wavelengths below some threshold (about 10 μm, for typical ignition-class all-DT targets) are damped after an initial growth. In a thin target, initial perturbations, either damped or amplified by RMI and LDI, seed the subsequent Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Finally, it is shown that RMI growth of fusion targets can be reduced by using laser pulses including an initial adiabat-shaping picket (originally proposed to reduce the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instability).

  16. Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Synakowski, E.

    1994-03-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled by deuterium and tritium to nominally equal densities. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by ~20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by α-particles.

  17. Neutronics analysis of deuterium-tritium-driven experimental hybrid blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Sahin, S.; Kumar, A.

    1984-07-01

    At the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, an experimental fusion and fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor facility is near completion. Experiments are scheduled to begin in February 1984. The experimental cavity leads one to plan experiments mostly with blankets in plane geometry. Five different hybrid blanket modules in plane geometry are analyzed with two different left boundary conditions representing varying experimental situations. Numbers I and II represent energy and fissile fuel producing blankets, whereas number III is mainly a fissile fuel producing blanket. Numbers IV and V are actinide burning blankets. It is shown that the overall neutronic performance, such as k /sub eff/ , energy multiplication factor M, fusile and fissile breeding, of a hybrid blanket with transplutonium actinide fuel is already better than that of a UO/sub 2/ or ThO/sub 2/ hybrid blanket. Furthermore, the transplutonium actinide waste is partly converted into precious nuclear fuel of a new type, such as /sup 242m/ Am and /sup 245/Cm. An experimental blanket with a vacuum left boundary has a harder neutron spectrum, and also excessive neutron leakage from the front surface and the lateral surfaces, as compared to that in the blanket in confinement geometry. It leads to the poorer neutronic performance of the former.

  18. Alpha particle losses from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Batha, S.

    1996-01-01

    Because alpha particle losses can have a significant influence on tokamak reactor viability, the loss of deuterium-tritium alpha particles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been measured under a wide range of conditions. In TFTR, first orbit loss and stochastic toroidal field ripple diffusion are always present. Other losses can arise due to magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or due to waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. No alpha particle losses have yet been seen due to collective instabilities driven by alphas. Ion Bernstein waves can drive large losses of fast ions from TFTR, and details of those losses support one element of the alpha energy channeling scenario.

  19. Copper activation deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Cooper, G W; Ruiz, C L; Leeper, R J; Chandler, G A; Hahn, K D; Nelson, A J; Torres, J A; Smelser, R M; McWatters, B R; Bleuel, D L; Yeamans, C B; Knittel, K M; Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Petrasso, R D; Styron, J D

    2012-10-01

    A DT neutron yield diagnostic based on the reactions, (63)Cu(n,2n)(62)Cu(β(+)) and (65)Cu(n,2n)( 64) Cu(β(+)), has been fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The induced copper activity is measured using a NaI γ-γ coincidence system. Uncertainties in the 14-MeV DT yield measurements are on the order of 7% to 8%. In addition to measuring yield, the ratio of activities induced in two, well-separated copper samples are used to measure the relative anisotropy of the fuel ρR to uncertainties as low as 5%. PMID:23126920

  20. Ignition Capsules with Aerogel-Supported Liquid DT Fuel For The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D D; Salmonson, J D; Clark, D S; Lindl, J D; Haan, S W; Amendt, P; Wu, K J

    2011-10-25

    For high repetition-rate fusion power plant applications, capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel can have much reduced fill time compared to {beta}-layering a solid DT fuel layer. The melting point of liquid DT can be lowered once liquid DT is embedded in an aerogel matrix, and the DT vapor density is consequently closer to the desired density for optimal capsule design requirement. We present design for NIF-scale aerogel-filled capsules based on 1-D and 2-D simulations. An optimal configuration is obtained when the outer radius is increased until the clean fuel fraction is within 65-75% at peak velocity. A scan (in ablator and fuel thickness parameter space) is used to optimize the capsule configurations. The optimized aerogel-filled capsule has good low-mode robustness and acceptable high-mode mix.

  1. Determination of deuterium-tritium critical burn-up parameter by four temperature theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazirzadeh, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Khanbabei, B.

    2015-12-01

    Conditions for thermonuclear burn-up of an equimolar mixture of deuterium-tritium in non-equilibrium plasma have been investigated by four temperature theory. The photon distribution shape significantly affects the nature of thermonuclear burn. In three temperature model, the photon distribution is Planckian but in four temperature theory the photon distribution has a pure Planck form below a certain cut-off energy and then for photon energy above this cut-off energy makes a transition to Bose-Einstein distribution with a finite chemical potential. The objective was to develop four temperature theory in a plasma to calculate the critical burn up parameter which depends upon initial density, the plasma components initial temperatures, and hot spot size. All the obtained results from four temperature theory model are compared with 3 temperature model. It is shown that the values of critical burn-up parameter calculated by four temperature theory are smaller than those of three temperature model.

  2. Hydrodynamic instability measurements in DT-layered ICF capsules using the layered-HGR platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D.; Bunn, T.; Carlson, L.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Kozioziemski, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; Sater, J.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H.; Smalyuk, V.

    2016-05-01

    The first measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface in an ICF implosion are reported. Previous instability measurements on the National Ignition Facility have used plastic capsules to measure ablation front Rayleigh-Taylor growth with the Hydro.-Growth Radiography (HGR) platform. These capsules substituted an additional thickness of plastic ablator material in place of the cryogenic layer of Deuterium- Tritium (DT) fuel. The present experiments are the first to include a DT ice layer, which enables measurements of the instability growth occurring at the fuel-ablator interface. Instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface is seeded differently in two independent NIF experiments. In the first case, a perturbation on the outside of the capsule feeds through and grows on the interface. Comparisons to an implosion without a fuel layer produce a measure of the fuel's modulation. In the second case, a modulation was directly machined on the inner ablator before the fuel layer was added. The measurement of growth in these two scenarios are compared to 2D rad-hydro modeling.

  3. Copper activation deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Styron, J. D.; Ruiz, C. L.; Leeper, R. J.; Chandler, G. A.; Hahn, K. D.; Torres, J. A.; Smelser, R. M.; McWatters, B. R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Yeamans, C. B.; Knittel, K. M.; Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-10-15

    A DT neutron yield diagnostic based on the reactions, {sup 63}Cu(n,2n){sup 62}Cu({beta}{sup +}) and {sup 65}Cu(n,2n) {sup 64} Cu({beta}{sup +}), has been fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The induced copper activity is measured using a NaI {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence system. Uncertainties in the 14-MeV DT yield measurements are on the order of 7% to 8%. In addition to measuring yield, the ratio of activities induced in two, well-separated copper samples are used to measure the relative anisotropy of the fuel {rho}R to uncertainties as low as 5%.

  4. Development of a laser-produced plasma x-ray source for phase-contrast imaging of DT fuel ice layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Dewald, E.; Kozioziemski, B.; Koch, J. A.

    2007-11-01

    Because beryllium capsules for NIF experiments are not transparent to visible light, optical microscopy is not applicable for metrology of deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layers. X-ray absorption radiography cannot be used either because absorption in DT ice is negligible, so to quantify the quality of the DT ice surface, x-ray phase-contrast imaging is used in order to enhance contrast of surface imperfections. Phase contrast imaging of ice layers typically utilizes micro-focus x-ray tube sources, but available x-ray fluxes are limited, and these sources cannot be used to quantify changes in the ice surface quality over the second timescales appropriate for rapidly-cooled layers. We have therefore explored the use of a laser-produced plasma x-ray source in order to determine if it has sufficient brightness to produce high-quality phase-contrast flash radiographs of DT ice layers. We irradiated Ti, Fe, Cu, and Au targets with 5-ns, 300-J, 527-nm laser light at the Janus laser facility, and measured absolute x-ray conversion efficiency and x-ray spot size. We will discuss this data as well as phase-contrast radiographs we obtained of non-cryogenic shells.

  5. Hot spot conditions achieved in DT implosions on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, P. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Dittrich, T. R.; Doeppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Hurricane, O. A.; Kritcher, A. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H. S.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B.; Springer, P. T.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.

    2014-10-01

    We describe a 1D model that uses experimentally measured data to derive the thermodynamic conditions at stagnation of the hot spot, dense fuel, and ablator, in deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Neutron measurements--spectrally, spatially and temporally resolved--are used to infer the hot spot burn-averaged pressure, density, areal density, ion temperature, volume, and internal energy. X-ray spectral measurements are used to infer electron temperature, radiative energy loss, and the presence of ablator mix in the hot spot. In addition, we can calculate the fraction of alpha-particle energy trapped in the hot spot and, hence, estimate the degree of self-heating. Recent DT layered implosions using the high-foot design [Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)] have achieved areal densities and temperatures in the hot spot whereby a significant fraction of the internal energy at stagnation can be attributed to alpha-particle self-heating. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Ignition of deuterium-trtium fuel targets

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.; Mruzek, Michael T.

    1991-01-01

    A method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom.

  7. Specific features of X-ray generation by plasma focus chambers with deuterium and deuterium-tritium fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulatov, A. K.; Krapiva, P. S.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Moskalenko, I. N.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The process of hard X-ray (HXR) generation in plasma focus (PF) chambers was studied experimentally. The radiation was recorded using scintillation detectors with a high time resolution and thermoluminescent detectors in combination with the method of absorbing filters. Time-resolved analysis of the processes of neutron and X-ray generation in PFs is performed. The spectra of HXR emission from PF chambers with deuterium and deuterium-tritium fillings are determined. In experiments with PF chambers filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture, in addition to the HXR pulse with photon energies of up to 200-300 keV, a γ-ray pulse with photon energies of up to 2.5-3.0 MeV is recorded, and a mechanism of its generation is proposed.

  8. Demonstration of the Highest Deuterium-Tritium Areal Density Using Multiple-Picket Cryogenic Designs on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Boehly, T. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Radha, P. B.; Seka, W.; Skupsky, S.; Stoeckl, C.; Casey, D. T; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2010-04-23

    The performance of triple-picket deuterium-tritium cryogenic target designs on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is reported. These designs facilitate control of shock heating in low-adiabat inertial confinement fusion targets. Areal densities up to 300 mg/cm{sup 2} (the highest ever measured in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions) are inferred in the experiments with an implosion velocity {approx}3x10{sup 7} cm/s driven at peak laser intensities of 8x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Extension of these designs to ignition on the National Ignition Facility [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)] is presented.

  9. Indications of flow near maximum compression in layered deuterium-tritium implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Gatu Johnson, M; Knauer, J P; Cerjan, C J; Eckart, M J; Grim, G P; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Kilkenny, J D; Munro, D H; Sayre, D B; Spears, B K; Bionta, R M; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Callahan, D; Casey, D T; Döppner, T; Frenje, J A; Glebov, V Yu; Hurricane, O; Kritcher, A; LePape, S; Ma, T; Mackinnon, A; Meezan, N; Patel, P; Petrasso, R D; Ralph, J E; Springer, P T; Yeamans, C B

    2016-08-01

    An accurate understanding of burn dynamics in implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium (D) and tritium (T) filled capsules, obtained partly through precision diagnosis of these experiments, is essential for assessing the impediments to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. We present measurements of neutrons from such implosions. The apparent ion temperatures T_{ion} are inferred from the variance of the primary neutron spectrum. Consistently higher DT than DD T_{ion} are observed and the difference is seen to increase with increasing apparent DT T_{ion}. The line-of-sight rms variations of both DD and DT T_{ion} are small, ∼150eV, indicating an isotropic source. The DD neutron yields are consistently high relative to the DT neutron yields given the observed T_{ion}. Spatial and temporal variations of the DT temperature and density, DD-DT differential attenuation in the surrounding DT fuel, and fluid motion variations contribute to a DT T_{ion} greater than the DD T_{ion}, but are in a one-dimensional model insufficient to explain the data. We hypothesize that in a three-dimensional interpretation, these effects combined could explain the results. PMID:27627237

  10. Indications of flow near maximum compression in layered deuterium-tritium implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Knauer, J. P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Sayre, D. B.; et al

    2016-08-15

    Here, an accurate understanding of burn dynamics in implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium (D) and tritium (T) filled capsules, obtained partly through precision diagnosis of these experiments, is essential for assessing the impediments to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. We present measurements of neutrons from such implosions. The apparent ion temperatures Tion are inferred from the variance of the primary neutron spectrum. Consistently higher DT than DD Tion are observed and the difference is seen to increase with increasing apparent DT Tion. The line-of-sight rms variations of both DD and DT Tion are small, ~150eV, indicating an isotropicmore » source. The DD neutron yields are consistently high relative to the DT neutron yields given the observed Tion. Spatial and temporal variations of the DT temperature and density, DD-DT differential attenuation in the surrounding DT fuel, and fluid motion variations contribute to a DT Tion greater than the DD Tion, but are in a one-dimensional model insufficient to explain the data. We hypothesize that in a three-dimensional interpretation, these effects combined could explain the results.« less

  11. Indications of flow near maximum compression in layered deuterium-tritium implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Knauer, J. P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Sayre, D. B.; Spears, B. K.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D.; Casey, D. T.; Döppner, T.; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hurricane, O.; Kritcher, A.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A.; Meezan, N.; Patel, P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Springer, P. T.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-08-01

    An accurate understanding of burn dynamics in implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium (D) and tritium (T) filled capsules, obtained partly through precision diagnosis of these experiments, is essential for assessing the impediments to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. We present measurements of neutrons from such implosions. The apparent ion temperatures Tion are inferred from the variance of the primary neutron spectrum. Consistently higher DT than DD Tion are observed and the difference is seen to increase with increasing apparent DT Tion. The line-of-sight rms variations of both DD and DT Tion are small, ˜150 eV , indicating an isotropic source. The DD neutron yields are consistently high relative to the DT neutron yields given the observed Tion. Spatial and temporal variations of the DT temperature and density, DD-DT differential attenuation in the surrounding DT fuel, and fluid motion variations contribute to a DT Tion greater than the DD Tion, but are in a one-dimensional model insufficient to explain the data. We hypothesize that in a three-dimensional interpretation, these effects combined could explain the results.

  12. Deuterium-Tritium Simulations of the Enhanced Reversed Shear Mode in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Manickam, J.; Scott, S.D.; Zarnstorff

    1997-04-01

    The potential performance, in deuterium-tritium plasmas, of a new enhanced con nement regime with reversed magnetic shear (ERS mode) is assessed. The equilibrium conditions for an ERS mode plasma are estimated by solving the plasma transport equations using the thermal and particle dif- fusivities measured in a short duration ERS mode discharge in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [F. M. Levinton, et al., Phys. Rev. Letters, 75, 4417, (1995)]. The plasma performance depends strongly on Zeff and neutral beam penetration to the core. The steady state projections typically have a central electron density of {approx}2:5x10 20 m{sup -3} and nearly equal central electron and ion temperatures of {approx}10 keV. In time dependent simulations the peak fusion power, {approx} 25 MW, is twice the steady state level. Peak performance occurs during the density rise when the central ion temperature is close to the optimal value of {approx} 15 keV. The simulated pressure profiles can be stable to ideal MHD instabilities with toroidal mode number n = 1, 2, 3, 4 and {infinity} for {beta}{sub norm} up to 2.5; the simulations have {beta}{sub norm} {le} 2.1. The enhanced reversed shear mode may thus provide an opportunity to conduct alpha physics experiments in conditions imilar to those proposed for advanced tokamak reactors.

  13. A diamond based neutron spectrometer for diagnostics of deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, C; Nocente, M; Rebai, M; Tardocchi, M; Calvani, P; Croci, G; Giacomelli, L; Girolami, M; Griesmayer, E; Grosso, G; Pillon, M; Trucchi, D M; Gorini, G

    2014-11-01

    Single crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are being increasingly exploited for neutron diagnostics in high power fusion devices, given their significant radiation hardness and high energy resolution capabilities. The geometrical efficiency of SDDs is limited by the size of commercially available crystals, which is often smaller than the dimension of neutron beams along collimated lines of sight in tokamak devices. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer consisting of 12 diamond pixels arranged in a matrix, so to achieve an improved geometrical efficiency. Each pixel is equipped with an independent high voltage supply and read-out electronics optimized to combine high energy resolution and fast signals (<30 ns), which are essential to enable high counting rate (>1 MHz) spectroscopy. The response function of a prototype SDD to 14 MeV neutrons has been measured at the Frascati Neutron Generator by observation of the 8.3 MeV peak from the (12)C(n, α)(9)Be reaction occurring between neutrons and (12)C nuclei in the detector. The measured energy resolution (2.5% FWHM) meets the requirements for neutron spectroscopy applications in deuterium-tritium plasmas. PMID:25430280

  14. A diamond based neutron spectrometer for diagnostics of deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Calvani, P.; Croci, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Girolami, M.; Griesmayer, E.; Grosso, G.; Pillon, M.; Trucchi, D. M.; Gorini, G.

    2014-11-01

    Single crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are being increasingly exploited for neutron diagnostics in high power fusion devices, given their significant radiation hardness and high energy resolution capabilities. The geometrical efficiency of SDDs is limited by the size of commercially available crystals, which is often smaller than the dimension of neutron beams along collimated lines of sight in tokamak devices. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer consisting of 12 diamond pixels arranged in a matrix, so to achieve an improved geometrical efficiency. Each pixel is equipped with an independent high voltage supply and read-out electronics optimized to combine high energy resolution and fast signals (<30 ns), which are essential to enable high counting rate (>1 MHz) spectroscopy. The response function of a prototype SDD to 14 MeV neutrons has been measured at the Frascati Neutron Generator by observation of the 8.3 MeV peak from the 12C(n, α)9Be reaction occurring between neutrons and 12C nuclei in the detector. The measured energy resolution (2.5% FWHM) meets the requirements for neutron spectroscopy applications in deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  15. A diamond based neutron spectrometer for diagnostics of deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzaniga, C. Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Rebai, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Grosso, G.; Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Trucchi, D. M.; Griesmayer, E.; Pillon, M.

    2014-11-15

    Single crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are being increasingly exploited for neutron diagnostics in high power fusion devices, given their significant radiation hardness and high energy resolution capabilities. The geometrical efficiency of SDDs is limited by the size of commercially available crystals, which is often smaller than the dimension of neutron beams along collimated lines of sight in tokamak devices. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer consisting of 12 diamond pixels arranged in a matrix, so to achieve an improved geometrical efficiency. Each pixel is equipped with an independent high voltage supply and read-out electronics optimized to combine high energy resolution and fast signals (<30 ns), which are essential to enable high counting rate (>1 MHz) spectroscopy. The response function of a prototype SDD to 14 MeV neutrons has been measured at the Frascati Neutron Generator by observation of the 8.3 MeV peak from the {sup 12}C(n, α){sup 9}Be reaction occurring between neutrons and {sup 12}C nuclei in the detector. The measured energy resolution (2.5% FWHM) meets the requirements for neutron spectroscopy applications in deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  16. High pressure deuterium-tritium gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, A.J.; Spaletta, H.W.; Ware, A.G.; Zabriskie, J.M.; Hardwick, D.A.; Maltrud, H.R.; Paciotti, M.A.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    In experimental studies of muon-catalyzed fusion, the density of the hydrogen gas mixture is an important parameter. Catalysis of up to 150 fusions per muon has been observed in deuterium-tritium gas mixtures at liquid hydrogen density; at room temperature, such densities require a target gas pressure of the order of 1000 atmospheres (100 MPa, 15,000 psi). We report here the design considerations for hydrogen gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments that operate at 1000 and 10,000 atmospheres. The 1000 atmosphere high pressure target vessels are fabricated of Type A-286 stainless steel and lined with oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper to provide a barrier to hydrogen permeation of the stainless steel. The 10,000 atmosphere ultrahigh pressure target vessels are made from 18Ni (200 grade) maraging steel and are lined with OFHC copper, again to prevent hydrogen permeation of the steel. In addition to target design features, operating requirements, fabrication procedures, and secondary containment are discussed. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Alternative hot spot formation techniques using liquid deuterium-tritium layer inertial confinement fusion capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.

    2013-09-15

    The baseline DT ice layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition capsule design requires a hot spot convergence ratio of ∼34 with a hot spot that is formed from DT mass originally residing in a very thin layer at the inner DT ice surface. In the present paper, we propose alternative ICF capsule designs in which the hot spot is formed mostly or entirely from mass originating within a spherical volume of DT vapor. Simulations of the implosion and hot spot formation in two DT liquid layer ICF capsule concepts—the DT wetted hydrocarbon (CH) foam concept and the “fast formed liquid” (FFL) concept—are described and compared to simulations of standard DT ice layer capsules. 1D simulations are used to compare the drive requirements, the optimal shock timing, the radial dependence of hot spot specific energy gain, and the hot spot convergence ratio in low vapor pressure (DT ice) and high vapor pressure (DT liquid) capsules. 2D simulations are used to compare the relative sensitivities to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries in the DT ice and DT liquid capsules. It is found that the overall thermonuclear yields predicted for DT liquid layer capsules are less than yields predicted for DT ice layer capsules in simulations using comparable capsule size and absorbed energy. However, the wetted foam and FFL designs allow for flexibility in hot spot convergence ratio through the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density, with a potentially improved robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetry.

  18. Alternative hot spot formation techniques using liquid deuterium-tritium layer inertial confinement fusion capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.

    2013-09-01

    The baseline DT ice layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition capsule design requires a hot spot convergence ratio of ˜34 with a hot spot that is formed from DT mass originally residing in a very thin layer at the inner DT ice surface. In the present paper, we propose alternative ICF capsule designs in which the hot spot is formed mostly or entirely from mass originating within a spherical volume of DT vapor. Simulations of the implosion and hot spot formation in two DT liquid layer ICF capsule concepts—the DT wetted hydrocarbon (CH) foam concept and the "fast formed liquid" (FFL) concept—are described and compared to simulations of standard DT ice layer capsules. 1D simulations are used to compare the drive requirements, the optimal shock timing, the radial dependence of hot spot specific energy gain, and the hot spot convergence ratio in low vapor pressure (DT ice) and high vapor pressure (DT liquid) capsules. 2D simulations are used to compare the relative sensitivities to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries in the DT ice and DT liquid capsules. It is found that the overall thermonuclear yields predicted for DT liquid layer capsules are less than yields predicted for DT ice layer capsules in simulations using comparable capsule size and absorbed energy. However, the wetted foam and FFL designs allow for flexibility in hot spot convergence ratio through the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density, with a potentially improved robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetry.

  19. Shock timing measurements in DT ice layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Ross, J. S.; Lepape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2013-10-01

    Shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are routinely conducted using the keyhole target geometry, in which the strength and timing of multiple shocks are measured in a liquid-deuterium (D2) filled capsule interior. These targets have recently been modified to improve the surrogacy to ignition implosions by replacing the standard, continuous liquid D2 capsule fill with a deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer with a central DT gas fill. These experiments remove any possible material surrogacy difference between D2 and DT as well as incorporating the physics of multiple shock release and recompression events from an ice layer of finite thickness, an effect that is absent in the liquid-filled targets. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Plasma-surface interactions in TFTR D-T experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, D.K.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.

    1995-03-01

    TFTR has begun its campaign to study deuterium-tritium fusion under reactor-like conditions. Variable amounts of deuterium and tritium neutral beam power have been used to maximize fusion power, study alpha heating, investigate alpha particle confinement, and search for alpha driven plasma instabilities. Additional areas of study include energy and particle transport and confinement, ICRF heating schemes for DT plasmas, tritium retention, and fusion in high {beta}{sub p} plasmas. The majority of this work is done in the TFTR supershot confinement regime. To obtain supershots, extensive limiter conditioning using helium fueled ohmic discharges and lithium pellet injection into ohmic and neutral beam heated plasmas is performed, resulting in a low recycling limiter. The relationship between recycling and core plasma confinement has been studied by using helium, deuterium and high-Z gas puffs to simulate high recycling limiter conditions. These studies show that confinement in TFTR supershots is very sensitive to the influx of neutral particles at the plasma edge.

  1. Alpha Particle-Driven Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas: Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.; Chang, Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Nazikian, R.

    1998-07-09

    The toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [K. Young, et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 26, 11 (1984)]deuterium-tritium plasmas are analyzed using the NOVA-K code [C.Z. Cheng, Phys. Reports 211, 1 (1992)]. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental measurements in detail. In most cases, the theory agrees with the observations in terms of mode frequency, mode structure, and mode stability. However, one mode with toroidal mode number n = 2 is observed to be poloidally localized on the high field side of the magnetic axis with a mode frequency substantially below the TAE frequency.

  2. Single crystal diamond detector measurements of deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium neutrons in Joint European Torus fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzaniga, C. Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Binda, F.; Ericsson, G.; Croci, G.; Grosso, G.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Griesmayer, E.; Kaveney, G.; Syme, B.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-04-15

    First simultaneous measurements of deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium neutrons from deuterium plasmas using a Single crystal Diamond Detector are presented in this paper. The measurements were performed at JET with a dedicated electronic chain that combined high count rate capabilities and high energy resolution. The deposited energy spectrum from DD neutrons was successfully reproduced by means of Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response function and simulations of neutron emission from the plasma, including background contributions. The reported results are of relevance for the development of compact neutron detectors with spectroscopy capabilities for installation in camera systems of present and future high power fusion experiments.

  3. Single crystal diamond detector measurements of deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium neutrons in Joint European Torus fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Binda, F.; Croci, G.; Ericsson, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Griesmayer, E.; Grosso, G.; Kaveney, G.; Nocente, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Rebai, M.; Syme, B.; Tardocchi, M.

    2014-04-01

    First simultaneous measurements of deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium neutrons from deuterium plasmas using a Single crystal Diamond Detector are presented in this paper. The measurements were performed at JET with a dedicated electronic chain that combined high count rate capabilities and high energy resolution. The deposited energy spectrum from DD neutrons was successfully reproduced by means of Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response function and simulations of neutron emission from the plasma, including background contributions. The reported results are of relevance for the development of compact neutron detectors with spectroscopy capabilities for installation in camera systems of present and future high power fusion experiments.

  4. Evaluation of DD and DT fusion fuel cycles for different fusion-fission energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.

    1980-01-01

    A study has been carried out in order to investigate the characteristics of an energy system to produce a new source of fissile fuel for existing fission reactors. The denatured fuel cycles were used because it gives additional proliferation resistance compared to other fuel cycles. DT and DD fusion drivers were examined in this study with a thorium or uranium blanket for each fusion driver. Various fuel cycles were studied for light-water and heavy-water reactors. The cost of electricity for each energy system was calculated.

  5. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, C.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Grant, P. M.; Gharibyan, N.; Gostic, J. M.; Wooddy, P. T.; Torretto, P. C.; Bandong, B. B.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C. J.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Herrmann, H. W.; Knauer, J. P.; Sayre, D. B.; Schneider, D. H.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the 198Au/196Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix.

  6. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C. Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Grant, P. M.; Gharibyan, N.; Gostic, J. M.; Wooddy, P. T.; Torretto, P. C.; Bandong, B. B.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C. J.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Schneider, D. H.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J.; Herrmann, H. W.; Knauer, J. P.

    2015-07-15

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the {sup 198}Au/{sup 196}Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix.

  7. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, C; Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Grant, P M; Gharibyan, N; Gostic, J M; Wooddy, P T; Torretto, P C; Bandong, B B; Bionta, R; Cerjan, C J; Bernstein, L A; Caggiano, J A; Herrmann, H W; Knauer, J P; Sayre, D B; Schneider, D H; Henry, E A; Fortner, R J

    2015-07-01

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the (198)Au/(196)Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix. PMID:26233419

  8. Anomalous yield reduction in direct-drive DT implosions due to 3He addition

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W; Langenbrunner, James R; Mack, Joseph M; Cooley, James H; Wilson, Douglas C; Evans, Scott C; Sedillo, Tom J; Kyrala, George A; Caldwell, Stephen E; Young, Carlton A; Nobile, Arthur; Wermer, Joseph R; Paglieri, Stephen N; Mcevoy, Aaron M; Kim, Yong Ho; Batha, Steven H; Horsfield, Colin J; Drew, Dave; Garbett, Warren; Rubery, Michael; Glebov, Vladimir Yu; Roberts, Samuel; Frenje, Johan A

    2008-01-01

    Glass capsules were imploded in direct drive on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et aI., Opt. Commun. 133, 495, 1997] to look for anomalous degradation in deuterium/tritium (DT) yield (i.e., beyond what is predicted) and changes in reaction history with {sup 3}He addition. Such anomalies have previously been reported for D/{sup 3}He plasmas, but had not yet been investigated for DT/{sup 3}He. Anomalies such as these provide fertile ground for furthering our physics understanding of ICF implosions and capsule performance. A relatively short laser pulse (600 ps) was used to provide some degree of temporal separation between shock and compression yield components for analysis. Anomalous degradation in the compression component of yield was observed, consistent with the 'factor of two' degradation previously reported by MIT at a 50% {sup 3}He atom fraction in D{sub 2} using plastic capsules [Rygg et aI., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)]. However, clean calculations (i.e., no fuel-shell mixing) predict the shock component of yield quite well, contrary to the result reported by MIT, but consistent with LANL results in D{sub 2}/{sup 3}He [Wilson, et aI., lml Phys: Conf Series 112, 022015 (2008)]. X-ray imaging suggests less-than-predicted compression ofcapsules containing {sup 3}He. Leading candidate explanations are poorly understood Equation-of-State (EOS) for gas mixtures, and unanticipated particle pressure variation with increasing {sup 3}He addition.

  9. Energy gain of a thin DT shell target in inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshbinfar, Soheil

    2014-11-01

    Estimation of maximum possible energy gain for a given energy of driver has always become a key point in inertial confinement fusion. It has direct impact on the cost of produced electricity. Here, we employ a hydrodynamics model to assess energy gain in the case of a symmetrical hydrodynamics implosion where a narrow fuel shell consisting of deuterium-tritium (DT), can experience an isentropic compression in a self-similar regime. Introducing a set of six state parameters {Hhs, Ths, Uimp, αc, ξhs and μhs}, the final fuel state close to ignition is fully described. It enables us to calculate energy gain curves for specific set of these state variables. The envelope of the energy gain family curves provide a limiting gain curve Gfuel fuel* ∝ Ef0.36. Next, we took into account the inertial of cold surrounding fuel on the ignition process. It changes the limiting gain curve slope to 0.41. Finally, the analytical model results assessed and validated using numerical simulation code.

  10. Distortion of bulk-ion distribution function due to nuclear elastic scattering and its effect on T(d,n){sup 4}He reaction rate coefficient in neutral-beam-injected deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, H.; Nakao, Y.

    2007-05-15

    An effect of nuclear elastic scattering on the rate coefficient of fusion reaction between field deuteron and triton in the presence of neutral beam injection heating is studied. Without assuming a Maxwellian for bulk-ion distribution function, the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck (BFP) equations for field (bulk) deuteron, field (bulk) triton, {alpha}-particle, and beam deuteron are simultaneously solved in an ITER-like deuterium-tritium thermonuclear plasma [R. Aymar, Fusion Eng. Des. 55, 107 (2001)]. The BFP calculation shows that enhancement of the reaction rate coefficient due to knock-on tail formation in fuel-ion distribution functions becomes appreciable, especially in the case of low-density operations.

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of differential die-away instrument for determination of fissile content in spent fuel assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Hoon; Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2011-10-01

    The differential die-away (DDA) technique has been simulated by using the MCNPX code to quantify its capability of measuring the fissile content in spent fuel assemblies. For 64 different spent fuel cases of various initial enrichment, burnup and cooling time, the count rate and signal to background ratios of the DDA system were obtained, where neutron backgrounds are mainly coming from the 244Cm of the spent fuel. To quantify the total fissile mass of spent fuel, a concept of the effective 239Pu mass was introduced by weighing the relative contribution to the signal of 235U and 241Pu compared to 239Pu and the calibration curves of DDA count rate vs. 239Pu eff were obtained by using the MCNPX code. With a deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron generator of 10 9 n/s strength, signal to background ratios of sufficient magnitude are acquired for a DDA system with the spent fuel assembly in water.

  12. Review of deuterium-tritium results from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, K. M.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. L.; Anderson, J. W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, Cris W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N. L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Chang, C. S.; Cheng, C. Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dendy, R.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Evenson, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G. Y.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H. P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F. M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M. J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marmar, E. S.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mazzucato, E.; Mauel, M.; McCarthy, M. P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McKee, G.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G. A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; O'Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S. F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A. L.; Raftopoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.; Sesnic, S.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Snipes, J.; Stencel, J.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B. C.; Strachan, J. D.; Stodiek, W.; Swanson, J.; Synakowski, E.; Takahashi, H.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J.; Thompson, M. E.; Tighe, W.; Timberlake, J. R.; Tobita, K.; Towner, H. H.; Tuszewski, M.; von Halle, A.; Vannoy, C.; Viola, M.; von Goeler, S.; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R. T.; Wester, R.; White, R.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Winston, J.; Wright, K.; Wong, K. L.; Woskov, P.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Yoshikawa, S.; Young, K. M.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zavereev, V.; Zweben, S. J.

    1995-06-01

    After many years of fusion research, the conditions needed for a D-T fusion reactor have been approached on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. For the first time the unique phenomena present in a D-T plasma are now being studied in a laboratory plasma. The first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas using nearly equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium have been carried out on TFTR. At present the maximum fusion power of 10.7 MW, using 39.5 MW of neutral-beam heating, in a supershot discharge and 6.7 MW in a high-βp discharge following a current rampdown. The fusion power density in a core of the plasma is ≊2.8 MW m-3, exceeding that expected in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 239] at 1500 MW total fusion power. The energy confinement time, τE, is observed to increase in D-T, relative to D plasmas, by 20% and the ni(0) Ti(0) τE product by 55%. The improvement in thermal confinement is caused primarily by a decrease in ion heat conductivity in both supershot and limiter-H-mode discharges. Extensive lithium pellet injection increased the confinement time to 0.27 s and enabled higher current operation in both supershot and high-βp discharges. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating of a D-T plasma, using the second harmonic of tritium, has been demonstrated. First measurements of the confined alpha particles have been performed and found to be in good agreement with TRANSP [Nucl. Fusion 34, 1247 (1994)] simulations. Initial measurements of the alpha ash profile have been compared with simulations using particle transport coefficients from He gas puffing experiments. The loss of alpha particles to a detector at the bottom of the vessel is well described by the first-orbit loss mechanism. No loss due to alpha-particle-driven instabilities has yet been observed

  13. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, III, M. J.; et al

    2016-05-10

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic DT implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ~16 m to a streak camera in amore » well-shielded location. An ~200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ~40±10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. Furthermore, the measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.« less

  14. The Development of RF Heating of Magnetically Confined Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. LeBlanc; C.K. Phillips; J.C. Hosea; R. Majeski; S. Bernabei

    1999-06-01

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q = 0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed.

  15. The development of RF heating of magnetically confined deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J. C.; Bemabei, S.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Majeski, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Schilling, G.; Wilson the TFTR Team, J. R.

    1999-09-20

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q=0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Measurements and analyses of decay radioactivity induced in simulated deuterium-tritium neutron environments for fusion reactor structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C.; Kosako, K.; Oyama, Y.; Maekawa, F.; Maekawa, H.; Kumar, A.; Youssef, M.Z.; Abdou, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    To meet urgent requirements for data validation, an experimental analysis has been carried out for isotopic radioactivity induced by deuterium-tritium neutron irradiation in structural materials. The primary objective is to examine the adequacy of the activation cross sections implemented in the current activation calculation codes considered for use in fusion reactor nuclear design. Four activation cross-section libraries, namely, JENDL, LIB90, REAC{sup *}63, and REAC{sup *}175 were investigated in this current analysis. The isotopic induced radioactivity calculations using these four libraries are compared with experimental values obtained in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute/U.S. Department of Energy collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics. The nine materials studied are aluminum, silicon, titanium, vanadium, chromium, MnCu alloy, iron, nickel, niobium, and Type 316 stainless steel. The adequacy of the cross sections is investigated through the calculation to experiment analysis. As a result, most of the discrepancies in the calculations from experiments can be explained by inadequate activation cross sections. In addition, uncertainties due to neutron energy groups and neutron transport calculation are considered. The JENDL library gives the best agreement with experiments, followed by REAC{sup *}175, LIB90, and REAC{sup *}63, in this order. 45 refs., 32 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Two-dimensional simulations of the neutron yield in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R. L.

    2010-10-01

    Maximizing the neutron yield to obtain energy gain is the ultimate goal for inertial confinement fusion. Nonuniformities seeded by target and laser perturbations can disrupt neutron production via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth. To understand the effects of perturbations on the neutron yield of cryogenic DT implosions on the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], two-dimensional DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] simulations have been performed to systematically investigate each perturbation source and their combined effects on the neutron-yield performance. Two sources of nonuniformity accounted for the neutron-yield reduction in DRACO simulations: target offset from the target chamber center and laser imprinting. The integrated simulations for individual shots reproduce the experimental yield-over-clean (YOC) ratio within a factor of 2 or better. The simulated neutron-averaged ion temperatures ⟨Ti⟩ is only about 10%-15% higher than measurements. By defining the temperature-over-clean, its relationship to YOC provides an indication of how much the hot-spot volume and density are perturbed with respect to the uniform situation. Typically, the YOC in OMEGA experiments is of the order of ˜5%. The simulation results suggest that YOC can be increased to the ignition hydroequivalent level of 15%-20% (with ⟨ρR⟩=200-300 mg/cm2) by maintaining a target offset of less than 10 μm and employing beam smoothing by spectral dispersion.

  18. Physics requirements for pellet fueling of mirror reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1983-11-15

    Requirements for pellet fueling of mirror reactors, such as the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS), have been assessed. To avoid perturbing the MARS central-cell plasma density more than 10%, we have determined that the fuel injected per pellet must not exceed 2 x 10/sup 21/ deuterium-tritium (DT) atoms. This implies a maximum radius of 2 mm for each of the frozen DT pellets and a repetition rate of at least 6.2 pellets/s. Furthermore, the required pellet velocity will depend on the plasma density and temperature, including the effects of fusion products such as 3.5-MeV alphas, the shapes of these profiles, and the effectiveness of fueling the center of the plasma by radial diffusion. Under MARS conditions, the velocity requirement for frozen DT pellets will range from 4 to 20 km/s. To minimize this requirement, we will inject the pellets near the end of the central cell where the plasma radius is reduced by the strong magnetic field and where trapped alphas can be avoided by design of the magnetic field. To meet these fueling objectives, we are looking for new technologies for increasing the pellet speeds. One technology under consideration is the railgun for high-speed acceleration.

  19. NIF Target Capsule Wall And Hohlraum Transfer Gas Effects On Deuterium-Tritium Redistribution Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Giedt, W H; Sanchez, J J

    2005-06-27

    The effects of temperature and age on the times required for beta-heating-induced redistribution of a 50-50 mole percent mixture of deuterium and tritium (DT) in a spherical capsule are investigated analytically and numerically. The derivation of an analytical solution for the redistribution time in a one-dimensional binary diffusion model, which includes the capsule thermal resistance, is first described. This result shows that the redistribution time for a high conductivity capsule wall is approximately doubled after 8 days of {sup 3}He formation. In contrast, with a low thermal conductivity capsule wall (e.g., polyimide), the redistribution time would increase by less than 10%. The substantial effect of the capsule wall resistance suggested that the resistance to heat transfer from the capsule through the surrounding transfer gas to the hohlraum wall would also influence the redistribution process. This was investigated with a spherical model, which was based on accounting for energy transfer by diffusion with a conduction heat transfer approximation. This made it possible to solve for the continuous temperature distribution throughout the capsule and surrounding gas. As with the capsule the redistribution times depended on the relative values of the thermal resistances of the vapor, the capsule, and the transfer gas. With increasing thermal resistance of the vapor (increased concentration of {sup 3}He) redistributions times for hydrocarbon capsules were significantly less than predicted by the one-dimensional model, which included the capsule wall resistance. In particular for low {sup 3}He concentrations the time constant was approximately 10% less than the minimum one-dimensional value of 27 minutes. Further analytical and experimental investigation focused on defining the relations between the thermal resistances under which the one-dimensional model analysis applies is recommended.

  20. Two-dimensional simulations of the neutron yield in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R. L.

    2010-10-15

    Maximizing the neutron yield to obtain energy gain is the ultimate goal for inertial confinement fusion. Nonuniformities seeded by target and laser perturbations can disrupt neutron production via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth. To understand the effects of perturbations on the neutron yield of cryogenic DT implosions on the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], two-dimensional DRACO[P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] simulations have been performed to systematically investigate each perturbation source and their combined effects on the neutron-yield performance. Two sources of nonuniformity accounted for the neutron-yield reduction in DRACO simulations: target offset from the target chamber center and laser imprinting. The integrated simulations for individual shots reproduce the experimental yield-over-clean (YOC) ratio within a factor of 2 or better. The simulated neutron-averaged ion temperatures is only about 10%-15% higher than measurements. By defining the temperature-over-clean, its relationship to YOC provides an indication of how much the hot-spot volume and density are perturbed with respect to the uniform situation. Typically, the YOC in OMEGA experiments is of the order of {approx}5%. The simulation results suggest that YOC can be increased to the ignition hydroequivalent level of 15%-20% (with <{rho}R>=200-300 mg/cm{sup 2}) by maintaining a target offset of less than 10 {mu}m and employing beam smoothing by spectral dispersion.

  1. Confined trapped-alpha behavior in TFTR deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Budny, R.V.; Redi, M.H.; Roquemore, A.L.; White, R.B.; Duong, H.H.; Fisher, R.K.; Petrov, M.P.; Gorelenkov, N.N.

    1997-10-01

    Confined trapped-alpha energy spectra and differential radial density profiles in TFTR D-T plasmas are obtained with the Pellet Charge-eXchange (PCX) diagnostic which measures high energy (E{sub {alpha}} = 0.5--3.5 MeV), trapped alphas (v{sub {parallel}}/v = - 0.048) at a single time slice ({Delta}t {approximately} 1 msec) with a spatial resolution of {Delta}r {approximately} 5 cm. Tritons produced in D-D plasmas and RF-driven ion tails (H, {sup 3}He or T) were also observed and energetic tritium ion tail measurements will be discussed. PCX alpha and triton energy spectra extending up to their birth energies were measured in the core of MHD-quiescent discharges where the expected classical slowing down and pitch angle scattering effects are not complicated by stochastic ripple diffusion and sawtooth activity. Both the shape of the measured alpha and triton energy distributions and their density ratios are in good agreement with TRANSP predictions, indicating that the PCX measurements are consistent with classical thermalization of the fusion-generated alphas and tritons. From calculations, these results set an upper limit on possible anomalous radial diffusion for trapped alphas of D{sub {alpha}} {le} 0.01 m{sup 2}s{sup {minus}1}. Outside the core, where the trapped alphas are influenced by stochastic ripple diffusion effects, the PCX measurements are consistent with the functional dependence of the Goldston-White-Boozer stochastic ripple threshold on the alpha energy and the q-profile. In the presence of strong sawtooth activity, the PCX diagnostic observes significant redistribution of the alpha signal radial profile wherein alphas are depleted in the core and redistributed to well outside the q = 1 radius, but apparently not beyond the energy-dependent stochastic ripple loss boundary.

  2. Systematic analysis of advanced fusion fuel in inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, G.; Eliezer, S.; Henis, Z.; Piera, M.; Martinez-Val, J. M.

    1997-04-01

    Aneutronic fusion reactions can be considered as the cleanest way to exploit nuclear energy. However, these reactions present in general two main drawbacks.—very high temperatures are needed to reach relevant values of their cross sections—Moderate (and even low) energy yield per reaction. This value is still lower if measured in relation to the Z number of the reacting particles. It is already known that bremsstrahlung overruns the plasma reheating by fusion born charged-particles in most of the advanced fuels. This is for instance the case for proton-boron-11 fusion in a stoichiometric plasma and is also so in lithium isotopes fusion reactions. In this paper, the use of deuterium-tritium seeding is suggested to allow to reach higher burnup fractions of advanced fuels, starting at a lower ignition temperature. Of course, neutron production increases as DT contents does. Nevertheless, the ratio of neutron production to energy generation is much lower in DT-advanced fuel mixtures than in pure DT plasmas. One of the main findings of this work is that some natural resources (as D and Li-7) can be burned-up in a catalytic regime for tritium. In this case, neither external tritium breeding nor tritium storage are needed, because the tritium inventory after the fusion burst is the same as before it. The fusion reactor can thus operate on a pure recycling of a small tritium inventory.

  3. Prospects for measuring the fuel ion ratio in burning ITER plasmas using a DT neutron emission spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellesen, C.; Skiba, M.; Dzysiuk, N.; Weiszflog, M.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Ericsson, G.; Conroy, S.; Andersson-Sundén, E.; Eriksson, J.; Binda, F.

    2014-11-01

    The fuel ion ratio nt/nd is an essential parameter for plasma control in fusion reactor relevant applications, since maximum fusion power is attained when equal amounts of tritium (T) and deuterium (D) are present in the plasma, i.e., nt/nd = 1.0. For neutral beam heated plasmas, this parameter can be measured using a single neutron spectrometer, as has been shown for tritium concentrations up to 90%, using data obtained with the MPR (Magnetic Proton Recoil) spectrometer during a DT experimental campaign at the Joint European Torus in 1997. In this paper, we evaluate the demands that a DT spectrometer has to fulfill to be able to determine nt/nd with a relative error below 20%, as is required for such measurements at ITER. The assessment shows that a back-scattering time-of-flight design is a promising concept for spectroscopy of 14 MeV DT emission neutrons.

  4. Prospects for measuring the fuel ion ratio in burning ITER plasmas using a DT neutron emission spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hellesen, C; Skiba, M; Dzysiuk, N; Weiszflog, M; Hjalmarsson, A; Ericsson, G; Conroy, S; Andersson-Sundén, E; Eriksson, J; Binda, F

    2014-11-01

    The fuel ion ratio nt/nd is an essential parameter for plasma control in fusion reactor relevant applications, since maximum fusion power is attained when equal amounts of tritium (T) and deuterium (D) are present in the plasma, i.e., nt/nd = 1.0. For neutral beam heated plasmas, this parameter can be measured using a single neutron spectrometer, as has been shown for tritium concentrations up to 90%, using data obtained with the MPR (Magnetic Proton Recoil) spectrometer during a DT experimental campaign at the Joint European Torus in 1997. In this paper, we evaluate the demands that a DT spectrometer has to fulfill to be able to determine nt/nd with a relative error below 20%, as is required for such measurements at ITER. The assessment shows that a back-scattering time-of-flight design is a promising concept for spectroscopy of 14 MeV DT emission neutrons. PMID:25430238

  5. Simulations of DT experiments in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.; Bell, M.G.; Biglari, H.; Bitter, M.; Bush, C.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fredrickson, E.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, D.; Johnson, L.C.; LeBlanc, B.; McCune, D.C.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.T.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Scott, S.; Schivell, J.; Strachan, J.D.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J.

    1991-12-01

    A transport code (TRANSP) is used to simulate future deuterium-tritium experiments (DT) in TFTR. The simulations are derived from 14 TFTR DD discharges, and the modeling of one supershot is discussed in detail to indicate the degree of accuracy of the TRANSP modeling. Fusion energy yields and {alpha}-particle parameters are calculated, including profiles of the {alpha} slowing down time, average energy, and of the Alfven speed and frequency. Two types of simulations are discussed. The main emphasis is on the DT equivalent, where an equal mix of D and T is substituted for the D in the initial target plasma, and for the D{sup O} in the neutral-beam injection, but the other measured beam and plasma parameters are unchanged. This simulation does not assume that {alpha} heating will enhance the plasma parameters, or that confinement will increase with T. The maximum relative fusion yield calculated for these simulations is Q{sub DT} {approx} 0.3, and the maximum {alpha} contribution to the central toroidal {beta} is {beta}{sub {alpha}}(0) {approx} 0.5%. The stability of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) and kinetic ballooning modes (KBM) is discussed. The TAE mode is predicted to become unstable for some of the equivalent simulations, particularly after the termination of neutral beam injection. In the second type of simulation, empirical supershot scaling relations are used to project the performance at the maximum expected beam power. The MHD stability of the simulations is discussed.

  6. Pulsed Laser-Based X-Ray Sources for Rapid-Cool DT Layer Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Dewald, E; Izumi, N; Kozioziemski, B; Landen, O; Siders, C

    2007-08-29

    Ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will contain a cryogenically cooled {approx} 75 {micro}m-thick deuterium/tritium (DT) ice layer surrounded by a {approx} 150 {micro}m-thick beryllium (Be) shell [1]. Ignition target design optimization depends sensitively on the achievable inner surface quality of the ice layer and on the pressure of the DT gas inside the ice, which is determined by the temperature of the ice. The inner ice layer surface is smoothest at temperatures just below the DT ice/liquid/gas triple point (3T), but current ignition target designs require central gas pressures of 0.3 mg/cm3, corresponding to an ice layer temperature 1.5 K below the triple point (3T-1.5). At these lower temperatures, the ice layer quality degrades due to the formation of cracks and other features.

  7. High performance detectors for upgraded gamma ray diagnostics for JET DT campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zychor, I.; Boltruczyk, G.; Burakowska, A.; Craciunescu, T.; Fernandes, A.; Figueiredo, J.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Gierlik, M.; Gosk, M.; Grodzicka, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Kaveney, G.; Kiptily, V.; Korolczuk, S.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Mianowski, S.; Moszynski, M.; Murari, A.; Nocente, M.; Pereira, R. C.; Perseo, V.; Rigamonti, D.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Sibczynski, P.; Santos, B.; Soare, S.; Syntfeld-Kazuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Szawlowski, M.; Szczesniak, T.; Szewinski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Urban, A.; Zoita, V. L.; contributors, JET

    2016-06-01

    In forthcoming deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on JET a significant population of alpha-particles will be produced. For operating alpha-particle diagnostics at high DT neutron fluxes, specific improvements have to be made. Proposed new detectors for gamma-ray measurements will be based on CeBr3 and LaBr3:Ce scintillators. They are characterized by a good energy resolution, a relatively high detection efficiency for a few MeV gamma-rays and a fast response time. An overview of scintillator parameters is presented. A description of the properties of photodetectors is given to indicate optimal setups. Results of measurements, using gamma-ray sources with energies up to a few MeV, are discussed with relation to the DT campaign requirements.

  8. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S; Hartouni, E; Hatchett, S P; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Moses, E; Park, H-S; Ralph, J; Remington, B A; Smalyuk, V; Yeamans, C B; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Chandler, G A; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J; Fletcher, K; Kilkenny, J; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Paguio, R

    2012-10-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF. PMID:23126915

  9. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Doeppner, T.; Glenzer, S.; Hartouni, E.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A.; and others

    2012-10-15

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  10. Prospects for measuring the fuel ion ratio in burning ITER plasmas using a DT neutron emission spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hellesen, C.; Skiba, M. Dzysiuk, N.; Weiszflog, M.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Ericsson, G.; Conroy, S.; Andersson-Sundén, E.; Eriksson, J.; Binda, F.

    2014-11-15

    The fuel ion ratio n{sub t}/n{sub d} is an essential parameter for plasma control in fusion reactor relevant applications, since maximum fusion power is attained when equal amounts of tritium (T) and deuterium (D) are present in the plasma, i.e., n{sub t}/n{sub d} = 1.0. For neutral beam heated plasmas, this parameter can be measured using a single neutron spectrometer, as has been shown for tritium concentrations up to 90%, using data obtained with the MPR (Magnetic Proton Recoil) spectrometer during a DT experimental campaign at the Joint European Torus in 1997. In this paper, we evaluate the demands that a DT spectrometer has to fulfill to be able to determine n{sub t}/n{sub d} with a relative error below 20%, as is required for such measurements at ITER. The assessment shows that a back-scattering time-of-flight design is a promising concept for spectroscopy of 14 MeV DT emission neutrons.

  11. Predicting the Equilibrium Deuterium-Tritium Fuel Layer Thickness Profile in an Indirect-Drive Hohlraum Capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Jorge J.; Giedt, Warren H.

    2004-03-15

    A numerical procedure for calculating the equilibrium thickness distribution of a thin layer of deuterium and tritium on the inner surface of an indirect drive target sphere ({approx}2.0 mm in diameter) is described. Starting with an assumed uniform thickness layer and with specified thermal boundary conditions, the temperature distribution throughout the capsule and hohlraum (including natural convection in the hohlraum gas) is calculated. Results are used to make a first estimate of the final non-uniform thickness distribution of the layer. This thickness distribution is then used to make a second calculation of the temperature distribution with the same boundary conditions. Legendre polynomial coefficients are evaluated for the two temperature distributions and the two thickness profiles. Final equilibrium Legendre coefficients are determined by linear extrapolation. From these coefficients, the equilibrium layer thickness can be computed.

  12. Predicting the Equilibrium Deuterium-Tritium Fuel Layer Thickness Profile in an Indirect-Drive Hohlraum Capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J J; Giedt, W H

    2003-09-02

    A numerical procedure for calculating the equilibrium thickness distribution of a thin layer of deuterium and tritium on the inner surface of an indirect drive target sphere ({approx} 2.0 mm in diameter) is described. Starting with an assumed uniform thickness layer and with specified thermal boundary conditions, the temperature distribution throughout the capsule and hohlraum (including natural convection in the hohlraum gas) is calculated. Results are used to make a first estimate of the final non-uniform thickness distribution of the layer. This thickness distribution is then used to make a second calculation of the temperature distribution with the same boundary conditions. Legendre polynomial coefficients are evaluated for the two temperature distributions and the two thickness profiles. Final equilibrium Legendre coefficients are determined by linear extrapolation. From these coefficients, the equilibrium layer thickness can be computed.

  13. Advanced Fuel Cycles for Fusion Reactors: Passive Safety and Zero-Waste Options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchetti, Massimo; Sugiyama, Linda E.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear fusion is seen as a much ''cleaner'' energy source than fission. Most of the studies and experiments on nuclear fusion are currently devoted to the Deuterium-Tritium (DT) fuel cycle, since it is the easiest way to reach ignition. The recent stress on safety by the world's community has stimulated the research on other fuel cycles than the DT one, based on 'advanced' reactions, such as the Deuterium-Helium-3 (DHe) one. These reactions pose problems, such as the availability of 3He and the attainment of the higher plasma parameters that are required for burning. However, they have many advantages, like for instance the very low neutron activation, while it is unnecessary to breed and fuel tritium. The extrapolation of Ignitor technologies towards a larger and more powerful experiment using advanced fuel cycles (Candor) has been studied. Results show that Candor does reach the passive safety and zero-waste option. A fusion power reactor based on the DHe cycle could be the ultimate response to the environmental requirements for future nuclear power plants.

  14. Compression and combustion of non-cryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2013-04-15

    Variants of a target with a solid thermonuclear fuel in the form of deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals for an inertial fusion have been proposed. The laser-pulse-induced compression of non-cryogenic targets, as well as ignition and combustion of such targets, has been examined. The numerical calculations show that, despite a decrease in the caloric content of the fuel and an increase in the energy losses on intrinsic radiation in the target containing deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals as compared to the target containing deuterium-tritium ice, the non-cryogenic target can ensure the fusion gain sufficient for its use in the energy cycle of a thermonuclear power plant based on the inertial plasma confinement method.

  15. Deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements with the 4.5 m neutron-time-of-flight detectors at NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Clancy, T. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Khater, H. Y.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2012-10-15

    The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator/photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring deuterium-deuterium (DD) and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield (Y{sub n}) measurements from below 10{sup 9} (DD) to nearly 10{sup 15} (DT). The detectors initially demonstrated detector-to-detector Y{sub n} precisions better than 5%, but lacked in situ absolute calibrations. Recent experiments at NIF now have provided in situ DT yield calibration data that establish the absolute sensitivity of the 4.5 m differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) detector with an accuracy of {+-}10% and precision of {+-}1%. The 4.5 m nTOF calibration measurements also have helped to establish improved detector impulse response functions and data analysis methods, which have contributed to improving the accuracy of the Y{sub n} measurements. These advances have also helped to extend the usefulness of nTOF measurements of ion temperature and downscattered neutron ratio (neutron yield 10-12 MeV divided by yield 13-15 MeV) with other nTOF detectors.

  16. Change in inertial confinement fusion implosions upon using an ab initio multiphase DT equation of state.

    PubMed

    Caillabet, L; Canaud, B; Salin, G; Mazevet, S; Loubeyre, P

    2011-09-01

    Improving the description of the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an inertial confinement fusion target [S. X. Hu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235003 (2010)]. Here we use an advanced multiphase EOS, based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over possible uncertainties of the EOS. Two different target designs are discussed, for shock ignition and self-ignition. In the first case, the areal density and thermonuclear energy can be recovered by slightly increasing the laser energy. In the second case, a lower in-flight adiabat is needed, leading to a significant delay (3 ns) in the shock timing of the implosion. PMID:22026681

  17. First observation of alpha particle loss induced by kinetic ballooning modes in TFTR deuterium-tritium experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Z.; Budny, R.V.; Chen, L.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Janos, A.; Mansfield, D.; Mazzucato, E.; McGuire, K.M.; Nazikian, R.; Rewoldt, G.; Strachan, J.D.; Tang, W.M.; Taylor, G.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S. |; TFTR group

    1996-02-01

    A correlation between the measured alpha particle loss and high frequency ({approximately}100{endash}200 kHz) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes has been observed in some high {beta} (= plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) DT plasmas in TFTR. These modes are localized around the peak plasma pressure gradient and have ballooning characteristics. Particle simulation shows that the loss is due to wave-particle resonances. Linear instability analysis indicates that the plasma is unstable to the kinetic MHD ballooning modes driven by strong local pressure gradients. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Thermal oscillation smoothing of DT solid layers for HAPL and NIF scale targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sheliak, John D; Geller, Drew A; Hoffer, James K

    2009-01-01

    Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) solid fuel layers must meet stringent roughness specifications for both the ICF and IFE laser fusion programs and native beta-layering alone is unable to provide sufficient solid layer smoothing to meet these specifications at 18.3 K or below. Consequently, several supplemental smoothing options have been proposed to resolve this issue, including a technique called 'Thermal Breathing'. This technique consists of oscillating the temperature of the solid D-T layer about its equilibration temperature for a period of one to several hours. Recently, thermal oscillations have been used to successfully smooth rough solid D{sub 2} in spherical targets. In order to study this particular smoothing technique, we examined the effects of thermal oscillations on equilibrated D-T solid layers, using both ICF and IFE scale layering cells and layer thicknesses. The D-T solid layers that were Subjected to thermal breathing in these studies were equilibrated at temperatures ranging from 16.0 K to 19.25 K, followed by 1.5 to 2 hours of temperature oscillations. During the HAPL scale experiments the amplitude and period of the oscillations were both varied to examine parametric effects of these variables on final layer roughness. In both sets of experiments, once the oscillations completed we allowed the layers to 'relax' at their initial equilibration temperature for another 1 to 2 hours, to observe any 'rebounding' or re-roughening that might occur. The rCF scale experiments were performed using a 2 mm beryllium torus, for which the layer was free from optical distortions that were observed in our IFE scale cell (a 4 mm dia. sapphire sphere-cylinder). Our results showed a temperature dependent smoothing effect ofthe DT solid layer ranging from 20% to 35% over the temperature range of 17.3 K to 19.0 K for the rCF-scale, 2-mm celL The final RMS roughness for layers grown in this 2-mm Be torus was on average less than 1 /lm for modes 7 and above. Results for the

  19. Ion cyclotron range of frequency heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma via the second-harmonic tritium cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Bush, C.E.; Darrow, D.; Hosea, J.C.; Jaeger, E.F.; Majeski, R.; Murakami, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.E.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.

    1995-07-31

    Experiments have been performed on the TFTR to study rf wave heating of a D-T plasma by way of the second-harmonic tritium cyclotron resonance. The addition of tritium ions to a deuterium plasma allows for absorption of the rf waves at the tritium cyclotron harmonics and by electron damping of a mode converted ion Bernstein wave. Competing mechanisms include direct electron damping and damping at the fundamental cyclotron resonance of deuterium, {alpha} particles, and {sup 3}He ions. The contribution of each is estimated from a series of plasma discharges where various plasma parameters are varied. The majority of the rf power is found to damp on the tritium ions.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of moderator and reflector in coal analyzer based on a D-T neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Shan, Qing; Chu, Shengnan; Jia, Wenbao

    2015-11-01

    Coal is one of the most popular fuels in the world. The use of coal not only produces carbon dioxide, but also contributes to the environmental pollution by heavy metals. In prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA)-based coal analyzer, the characteristic gamma rays of C and O are mainly induced by fast neutrons, whereas thermal neutrons can be used to induce the characteristic gamma rays of H, Si, and heavy metals. Therefore, appropriate thermal and fast neutrons are beneficial in improving the measurement accuracy of heavy metals, and ensure that the measurement accuracy of main elements meets the requirements of the industry. Once the required yield of the deuterium-tritium (d-T) neutron generator is determined, appropriate thermal and fast neutrons can be obtained by optimizing the neutron source term. In this article, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Transport Code and Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) database are used to optimize the neutron source term in PGNAA-based coal analyzer, including the material and shape of the moderator and neutron reflector. The optimized targets include two points: (1) the ratio of the thermal to fast neutron is 1:1 and (2) the total neutron flux from the optimized neutron source in the sample increases at least 100% when compared with the initial one. The simulation results show that, the total neutron flux in the sample increases 102%, 102%, 85%, 72%, and 62% with Pb, Bi, Nb, W, and Be reflectors, respectively. Maximum optimization of the targets is achieved when the moderator is a 3-cm-thick lead layer coupled with a 3-cm-thick high-density polyethylene (HDPE) layer, and the neutron reflector is a 27-cm-thick hemispherical lead layer. PMID:26325583

  1. A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) for ρR_fuel and Ti measurements of warm, fizzle and ignited implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Deciantis, J. L.; Kurebayashi, S.; Rygg, J. R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Soures, J. M.; Hatchett, S. P.; Hann, S. W.; Schmid, G. J.; Landen, O. L.; Izumi, N.

    2003-10-01

    A method for determining ρR_fuel of cryogenic deuterium-tritium plasmas involves measurement of the energy spectrum of elastically-scattered, primary neutrons. A spectrometer has been designed for doing this at OMEGA and the NIF, using scattered neutrons in the energy range 7-10 MeV to determine ρR_fuel and primary neutrons to measure T_i. The instrument utilizes a magnet and a conversion foil for production of charged particles. A large dynamic range (>10^6) will allow operation at yields as low as 10^12. This will allow ρR_fuel and Ti measurements of warm and cryogenic DT targets at OMEGA, and fizzle and ignited cryogenic DT targets at the NIF. This work was supported in part by the US DoE (contract W-7405-ENG-48 with LLNL, grant DE-FG03-99DP00300 and Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-92SF19460), LLE (subcontract P0410025G), and LLNL (subcontract B313975).

  2. Measurements of the Fuel Distribution in Cryogenic D-T Direct-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Chad J.

    In direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, a capsule filled with a mixture of deuterium and tritium ice at cryogenic temperature is irradiated by a symmetric arrangements of laser beams to compress and heat the fuel to conditions required for thermonuclear reactions. The areal density (rhoR) of the compressed fuel assembly in a cryogenic implosion is one of the fundamental parameters required to assess the target performance. The rhoR measurements presented here are achieved by measuring the complex neutron energy spectrum resulting from primary and secondary nuclear reactions within the compressed fuel assembly. Advances in neutron time-of-flight diagnostics have made it possible to infer the neutron fraction that elastically scatters off the tritons in the compressed fuel in the energy range from 3.5 -5.5 MeV which is directly proportional to the areal density. In these OMEGA cryogenic campaigns from January 2013 to August 2014, measured low-mode modulations show good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Deviations up to 40% in the cold-fuel distribution from spherical symmetry have been inferred from the scattered neutron spectrum. Understanding the mechanism for anisotropic areal density measurements is crucial to improve hydrodynamically equivalent ignition-relevant direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA.

  3. Development of a Laser-Produced Plasma X-ray source for Phase-Contrast Radiography of DT Ice layers

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N; Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Landen, O L; Koch, J A

    2008-07-21

    Refraction enhanced x-ray phase contrast imaging is crucial for characterization of deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer roughness in optically opaque inertial confinement fusion capsules. To observe the time development of DT ice roughness over {approx} second timescales, we need a bright x-ray source that can produce an image faster than the evolution of the ice surface roughness. A laser produced plasma x-ray source is one of the candidates that can meet this requirement. We performed experiments at the Janus laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and assessed the characteristics of the laser produced plasma x-ray source as a potential backlight for in situ target characterization.

  4. Triton memory time in solid DT and its nuclear polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P. C.; Fearon, E. M.; Mapoles, E. R.; Sater, J. D.; Collins, G. W.; Gaines, J. R.; Sherman, R. H.; Bartlit, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    The expected value of nuclear spin polarization to inertial confinement fusion is recapitulated. A comparison of brute force versus dynamic nuclear polarization, as applied to solid deuterium-tritium, is given, and the need for a long triton polarization memory time (longitudinal nuclear relaxation time) is shown. The time constant for 25 mol%T/sub 2/-50 DT-25 D/sub 2/ is a short 0.3 s at 5/degree/K and waiting lowers it to 0.1 s. Use of 90 to 96 mol% molecular DT raises the time constant to 0.9 s and addition of about 20 mol% nH/sub 2/ increases it to 5 to 7 s. The theory shows that the species shortening the triton memory time is the J = 1 T/sub 2/, which can be reduced in our samples only by self-catalysis. The heating in order to mix in nH/sub 2/ increases the percent of J = 1 T/sub 2/ and mixing may not be perfect. The experiments have increased the triton memory time twenty-fold and shown that removal of the J = 1 T/sub 2/ is the key to improved results.

  5. Optimization of Beam-Shaping Assemblies for BNCS Using the High-Energy Neutron Sources D-D and D-T

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, Jerome M.; Chen, Allen S.; Vujic, Jasmina L.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2001-06-15

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy is a novel approach for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The goal of the treatment is the ablation of diseased synovial membranes in articulating joints. The treatment of knee joints is the focus of this work. A method was developed, as discussed previously, to predict the dose distribution in a knee joint from any neutron and photon beam spectra incident on the knee. This method is validated and used to design moderators for the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron sources. Treatment times >2 h were obtained with the D-D reaction. They could potentially be reduced if the {sup 10}B concentration in the synovium was increased. For D-T neutrons, high therapeutic ratios and treatment times <5 min were obtained for neutron yields of 10{sup 14} s{sup -1}. This treatment time makes the D-T reaction attractive for boron neutron capture synovectomy.

  6. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Follett, R. K.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Yu. Glebov, V.; Harding, D. R.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Maximov, A. V.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Nora, R.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Short, R.W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Casey, D. T.

    2014-05-01

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≅ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 10⁷ cm/s, and a laser intensity of ~10¹⁵ W/cm². These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  7. Imaging of High-Energy X-Ray Emission from Cryogenic Thermonuclear Fuel Implosions on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T

    2012-05-01

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide spectrally resolved time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets. Using bremsstrahlung assumptions, the measured absolute x-ray brightness allows for the inference of electron temperature, electron density, hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure. Current inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) seek to indirectly drive a spherical implosion, compressing and igniting a deuterium-tritium fuel. This DT fuel capsule is cryogenically prepared as a solid ice layer surrounded by a low-Z ablator material. Ignition will occur when the hot spot approaches sufficient temperature ({approx}3-4 keV) and {rho}R ({approx}0.3 g/cm{sup 2}) such that alpha deposition can further heat the hot spot and generate a self-sustaining burn wave. During the implosion, the fuel mass becomes hot enough to emit large amounts of x-ray radiation, the spectra and spatial variation of which contains key information that can be used to evaluate the implosion performance. The Ross filter diagnostic employs differential filtering to provide spectrally resolved, time-integrated, absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets.

  8. Interspecies Ion Diffusion Studies using DT, DT(3He), and DT(H) Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Schmitt, M. J.; Kagan, G.; McEvoy, A. M.; Hoffman, N. M.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J.; Glevov, V. Yu; Forrest, C.

    2015-11-01

    Anomalous ICF yield degradation has been observed from gas fills containing mixtures (i.e., D(3He), DT(3He), D(Ar), and even DT). Interspecies ion diffusion theory has been suggested as a possible cause resulting from gradient-driven diffusion (i.e., pressure, electric potential, and temperature) which forces lower mass ions away from core and higher mass ions toward core. The theory predicts hydrogen addition to deuterium or tritium should result in increased yield compared to expected yield, which is opposite to 3He addition. At Omega laser facility, we have tested hydro-equivalent fills of DT, DT(3He), and DT(H) with the assumption that same fuel mass and particle pressure will provide identical convergence. Preliminary results verify a factor of 2 yield reduction relative to scaling when 3He added to DT. At DT(H) case, however, no significant yield degradation or a slight yield enhancement was observed which agrees with the interspecies ion diffusion theory. Detailed experiment results and simulation are needed to confirm the initial observation.

  9. Nuclear imaging of the fuel assembly in ignition experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Danly, C. R.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Clark, D. S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Raman, K. S.; Izumi, N.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Drury, O. B.; Alger, E. T.; Arnold, P. A.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Atherton, L. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Batha, S.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Berzins, L. V.; Betti, R.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Boehly, T. R.; Bond, E. J.; Bowers, M. W.; Bradley, D. K.; Brunton, G. K.; Buckles, R. A.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R. F.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Castro, C.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C. J.; Chandler, G. A.; Choate, C.; Cohen, S. J.; Collins, G. W.; Cooper, G. W.; Cox, J. R.; Cradick, J. R.; Datte, P. S.; Dewald, E. L.; Di Nicola, P.; Di Nicola, J. M.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S. N.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eckart, M. J.; Eder, D. C.; Edgell, D. H.; Edwards, M. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Ehrlich, R. B.; Erbert, G. V.; Fair, J.; Farley, D. R.; Felker, B.; Fortner, R. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Frieders, G.; Friedrich, S.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gibson, C. R.; Giraldez, E.; Glebov, V. Y.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gururangan, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hahn, K. D.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Haynam, C.; Hermann, M. R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Holder, J. P.; Holunga, D. M.; Horner, J. B.; Hsing, W. W.; Huang, H.; Jackson, M. C.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kauffman, R. L.; Kauffman, M. I.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Kirkwood, R.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Knittel, K. M.; Koch, J. A.; Kohut, T. R.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Krauter, K.; Krauter, G. W.; Kritcher, A. L.; Kroll, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Fortune, K. N. La; LaCaille, G.; Lagin, L. J.; Land, T. A.; Landen, O. L.; Larson, D. W.; Latray, D. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, T. L.; LePape, S.; Lindl, J. D.; Lowe-Webb, R. R.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Malone, R. M.; Malsbury, T. N.; Mapoles, E.; Marshall, C. D.; Mathisen, D. G.; McKenty, P.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Moran, M. J.; Moreno, K.; Moses, E. I.; Munro, D. H.; Nathan, B. R.; Nelson, A. J.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Orth, C.; Pak, A. E.; Palma, E. S.; Parham, T. G.; Patel, P. K.; Patterson, R. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prasad, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. P.; Rinderknecht, H.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, G. F.; Ruiz, C. L.; Séguin, F. H.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Sater, J. D.; Saunders, R. L.; Schneider, M. B.; Schneider, D. H.; Shaw, M. J.; Simanovskaia, N.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Stoeckl, C.; Stoeffl, W.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P.; Traille, A. J.; Wonterghem, B. Van; Wallace, R. J.; Weaver, S.; Weber, S. V.; Wegner, P. J.; Whitman, P. K.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C. C.; Wood, R. D.; Young, B. K.; Zacharias, R. A.; Zylstra, A.

    2013-05-01

    First results from the analysis of neutron image data collected on implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium capsules during the 2011-2012 National Ignition Campaign are reported. The data span a variety of experimental designs aimed at increasing the stagnation pressure of the central hotspot and areal density of the surrounding fuel assembly. Images of neutrons produced by deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in the hotspot are presented, as well as images of neutrons that scatter in the surrounding dense fuel assembly. The image data are compared with 1D and 2D model predictions, and consistency checked using other diagnostic data. The results indicate that the size of the fusing hotspot is consistent with the model predictions, as well as other imaging data, while the overall size of the fuel assembly, inferred from the scattered neutron images, is systematically smaller than models' prediction. Preliminary studies indicate these differences are consistent with a significant fraction (20%-25%) of the initial deuterium-tritium fuel mass outside the compact fuel assembly, due either to low mode mass asymmetry or high mode 3D mix effects at the ablator-ice interface.

  10. Study of TFTR D-T neutron spectra using natural diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Roquemore, A.L.; Krasilnikov, A.V., Gorelenkov, N.N.

    1996-12-31

    Three Natural Diamond Detector (NDD) based spectrometers have been used for neutron spectra measurement during Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) experiments using high power Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) and Ton Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in 1996. A 2-3 % energy resolution coupled with the high radiation resistance of NDDs (5 x 10{sup 14}n/cm{sup 2}) makes them ideal for measuring the D-T neutron spectra in the high radiation environment of TFTR tritium experiments. The compact size of the NDD made it possible to insert one of the detectors into one of the center channels of the TFTR multichannel neutron collimator to provide a vertical view perpendicular to the vessel midplane, Two other detectors were placed inside shields in TFTR test cell and provide measurements of the neutrons having angles of emission of 110- 180{degrees} and 60-12-{degrees} with respect to the direction of the plasma current. By using a 0.25 {mu}s shaping time of the Ortec 673 spectroscopy amplifier we were able to accumulate useful spectrometry data at count rates up to 1.5 x 10{sup 3} counts/sec. To model the D- T neutron spectra measured by each of three NDD`s the Neutron Source post TRANSP (NST) code and semi-analytical model were developed. A set of D-T and D-D plasmas is analyzed for the dynamics of D-T neutron spectral broadening for each of three NDD cones of view. The application of three NDD based D-T neutron -spectrometer array demonstrated the anisotropy of the ion distribution function. and provided a mature of the dynamics of the effective ion temperatures for each detector view, and determined the tangential velocity of resonant tritons during ICRH.

  11. Fuel gain exceeding unity in an inertially confined fusion implosion.

    PubMed

    Hurricane, O A; Callahan, D A; Casey, D T; Celliers, P M; Cerjan, C; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Döppner, T; Hinkel, D E; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Kline, J L; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacPhee, A G; Milovich, J L; Pak, A; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Remington, B A; Salmonson, J D; Springer, P T; Tommasini, R

    2014-02-20

    Ignition is needed to make fusion energy a viable alternative energy source, but has yet to be achieved. A key step on the way to ignition is to have the energy generated through fusion reactions in an inertially confined fusion plasma exceed the amount of energy deposited into the deuterium-tritium fusion fuel and hotspot during the implosion process, resulting in a fuel gain greater than unity. Here we report the achievement of fusion fuel gains exceeding unity on the US National Ignition Facility using a 'high-foot' implosion method, which is a manipulation of the laser pulse shape in a way that reduces instability in the implosion. These experiments show an order-of-magnitude improvement in yield performance over past deuterium-tritium implosion experiments. We also see a significant contribution to the yield from α-particle self-heating and evidence for the 'bootstrapping' required to accelerate the deuterium-tritium fusion burn to eventually 'run away' and ignite. PMID:24522535

  12. Tritium projectiles for fueling magnetic fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, P.W.; Gouge, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    As part of the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) plasma fueling development program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has fabricated a pellet (cylindrical projectile of frozen hydrogenic gas at a temperature in the range 6--16 K) injection system to test the mechanical and thermal properties of extruded tritium, a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. This repeating, single-stage, pneumatic injector, called the Tritium-Proof-of-Principle Phase 2 (TPOP-2) Pellet Injector, has a piston-driven mechanical extruder and is designed to extrude and accelerate hydrogenic pellets sized for the ITER device. The TPOP-2 program has the following development goals: evaluate the feasibility of extruding tritium and deuterium-tritium (D-T) mixtures for use in future pellet injection systems; determine the mechanical and thermal properties of tritium and D-T extrusions; integrate, test, and evaluate the extruder in a repeating, single-stage light gas gun that is sized for the ITER application (pellet diameter {approximately} 7 to 8 mm); evaluate options for recycling propellant and extruder exhaust gas; evaluate operability and reliability of ITER prototypical fueling systems in an environment of significant tritium inventory that requires secondary and room containment systems. In initial tests with deuterium feed at ORNL, up to 13 pellets have been extruded at rates up to 1 Hz and accelerated to speeds of 1.0 to 1.1 km/s, using hydrogen propellant gas at a supply pressure of 65 bar. The pellets, typically 7.4 mm in diameter and up to 11 mm in length, are the largest cryogenic pellets produced by the fusion program to date. These pellets represent about a 11% density perturbation to ITER. Hydrogenic pellets will be used in ITER to sustain the fusion power in the plasma core and may be crucial in reducing first-wall tritium inventories by a process called isotopic fueling in which tritium-rich pellets fuel the burning plasma core and deuterium gas fuels the edge.

  13. Comparison of the recently proposed super-Marx generator approach to thermonuclear ignition with the deuterium-tritium laser fusion-fission hybrid concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Winterberg, F.

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed super-Marx generator pure deuterium microdetonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser deuterium-tritium fusion-fission hybrid concept (LIFE). In a super-Marx generator, a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultrahigh voltage Marx generator from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium microexplosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. Typical examples of the LIFE concept are a fusion gain of 30 and a fission gain of 10, making up a total gain of 300, with about ten times more energy released into fissionmore » as compared to fusion. This means the substantial release of fission products, as in fissionless pure fission reactors. In the super-Marx approach for the ignition of pure deuterium microdetonation, a gain of the same magnitude can, in theory, be reached. If feasible, the super-Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions.« less

  14. Comparison of the recently proposed super-Marx generator approach to thermonuclear ignition with the deuterium-tritium laser fusion-fission hybrid concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Winterberg, F.

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed super-Marx generator pure deuterium microdetonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser deuterium-tritium fusion-fission hybrid concept (LIFE). In a super-Marx generator, a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultrahigh voltage Marx generator from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium microexplosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. Typical examples of the LIFE concept are a fusion gain of 30 and a fission gain of 10, making up a total gain of 300, with about ten times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means the substantial release of fission products, as in fissionless pure fission reactors. In the super-Marx approach for the ignition of pure deuterium microdetonation, a gain of the same magnitude can, in theory, be reached. If feasible, the super-Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions.

  15. Polyimide capsules may hold high pressure DT fuel without cryogenic support for the National Ignition Facility indirect-drive targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.J.; Letts, S.A.

    1997-03-26

    New target designs for the Omega upgrade laser and ignition targets in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require thick (80 - 100 {micro}m) cryogenic fuel layers. The Omega upgrade target will require cryogenic handling after initial fill because of the high fill pressures and the thin capsule walls. For the NIF indirectly driven targets, a larger capsule size and new materials offer hope that they can be built, filled and stored in a manner similar to the targets used in the Nova facility without requiring cryogenic handling.

  16. Integrated Two-Dimensional DRACO Simulations of Cryogenic DT Target Performance on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Radha, P. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Betti, R.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.

    2013-10-01

    Integrated simulations of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) target implosions on OMEGA have been performed using the radiation-hydrodynamic code DRACO. Taking into account the known nonuniformities of target and laser irradiation, 2-D simulations examine the target performance of a variety of ignition-relevant implosions. The effects of cross-beam energy transfer and nonlocal heat transport are mimicked by a time-dependent flux limiter. DRACO simulations show good agreement with experiments in ρR , neutron yield, Ti, neutron rate, and x-ray images for the mid-adiabat (α ~ 4 ) implosions. For low-adiabat (α ~ 2) and high in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR > 24) implosions, the integrated simulations with the known nonuniformity sources cannot fully explain the reduction in target performance. Examinations of other possible nonuniformity sources and the thermal conductivity model will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  17. Enhancement of Localized ICRF Heating and Current Drive in TFTR D-T Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    = G Schilling, First Author

    1997-04-15

    Theoretical advantages have led to an increased importance of the modification and sustainment of pressure and magnetic shear profiles in plasmas. We have demonstrated electron heating and current drive in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) plasmas with the existing 43/63.6 MHz ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) system, both via the fast wave and via mode conversion of the fast wave to an ion-Bernstein wave. In order to achieve both on- and off-axis mode conversion in a pure D-T (deuterium-tritium) plasma, we have changed the operating frequency of two of our transmitters and antennas to 30 MHz and improved the launched directional wave spectrum. As a second step, two new four-strap fast-wave antennas have been installed, and a new four-strap direct-launch IBW antenna has been added as well. This reconfiguration and the resulting operating characteristics of the TFTR ICRF system in a variety of discharges will be presented.

  18. Optical and X-ray Characterization of Groove Profiles in DT Ice Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Kozioziemski, B J; Salmonson, J; Chernov, A; Atherton, L J; Dewald, E; Izumi, N; Johnson, M A; Kucheyev, S; Lugten, J; Mapoles, E; Moody, J D; Pipes, J W; Sater, J D; Stefanescu, D

    2008-06-27

    Deuterium-tritium (DT) single-crystal ice layers in spherical shells often form with localized defects that we believe are vapor-etched grain boundary grooves built from dislocations and accommodating slight misorientations between contacting lattice regions. Ignition implosion target requirements limit the cross-sectional areas and total lengths of these grooves, and since they are often the dominant factor in determining layer surface quality, it is important that we be able to characterize their depths, widths and lengths. We present a variety of raytracing and diffraction image modeling results that support our understanding of the profiles of the grooves, which is grounded in x-ray and optical imaging data, and we describe why these data are nevertheless insufficient to adequately determine whether or not a particular layer will meet the groove requirements for ignition. We present accumulated data showing the distribution of groove depths, widths, and lengths from a number of layers, and we discuss how these data motivate the adoption of layer rejection criteria in order to ensure that layers that pass these criteria will almost certainly meet the groove requirements.

  19. Numerical investigations on a compact magnetic fusion device for studying the effect of external applied magnetic field oscillations on the nuclear burning efficiency of D-T and p-11B fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustaizis, S. D.; Lalousis, P.; Hora, H.; Larour, J.; Auvray, P.; Balcou, P.; Ducret, J.-E.; Martin, P.

    2015-05-01

    The burning process of high density (about 1018cm-3), high temperature (tens to hundreds of keV) plasma trapped by a high mirror-like magnetic field in a Compact Magnetic Fusion (CMF) device is numerically investigated.. The initial high density and high temperature plasma in the CMF device is produced by ultrashort high intensity laser beam interaction with clusters or thin foils, and two fuels, D-T and p-11B are studied. The spatio-temporal evolution of D-T and p-11B plasmas, the production of alphas, the generated electric fields and the high external applied magnetic field are described by a 1-D multifluid code. The initial values for the plasma densities, temperatures and external applied magnetic field (about 100 T) correspond to high β plasmas. The main objectives of the numerical simulations are: to study the plasma trapping, the neutron and alpha production for both fuels, and compare the effect of the external applied magnetic field on the nuclear burning efficiency for the two fuels.. The comparisons and the advantages for each fuel will be presented. The proposed CMF device and the potential operation of the device within the ELI-NP pillar will be discussed.

  20. Relativistically correct DD and DT neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, B.; Chittenden, J.

    2014-06-01

    We use relativistic kinematics to derive an expression for the energy spectrum of neutrons produced by fusion reactions in deuterium and deuterium-tritium thermal plasmas. The derivation does not require approximations and the obtained expression gives the exact shape of the spectrum. It is shown that the high-energy tail of the neutron spectrum is highly sensitive to the plasma temperature. Simple expressions for the plasma temperature as a function of the neutron spectrum full width at half maximum (FWHM) are given.

  1. Spherical ion kinetic simulations of DT implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, F.; Matte, J.P.; Casanova, M.; Larroche, O.

    1995-10-01

    The implosion of the DT plasma in an ablatively driven glass microballoon was simulated with a spherical ion kinetic code. The ion velocity distribution functions were strongly non-Maxwellian, and mostly depleted of fast ions. A high viscosity contributed to fuel heating, while large ion heat fluxes towards the pusher strongly cooled the fuel. This latter kinetic effect may explain in part why hydrodynamic simulations usually predict higher neutron yields than are measured.

  2. Pulsed neutron generators based on the sealed chambers of plasma focus design with D and DT fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkov, D. I.; Dulatov, A. K.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Golikov, A. V.; Andreev, D. A.; Mikhailov, Yu V.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Development of neutron generators using plasma focus (PF) chambers is being conducted in the All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA) during more than 25 years. PF is a source of soft and hard x-rays and neutrons 2.5 MeV (D) or 14 MeV (DT). Pulses of x-rays and neutrons have a duration of about several tens of nanoseconds, which defines the scope of such generators—the study of ultrafast processes. VNIIA has developed a series of pulse neutron generators covering the range of outputs 107-1012 n/pulse with resources on the order of 103-104 switches, depending on purposes. Generators have weights in the range of 30-700 kg, which allows referring them to the class of transportable generators. Generators include sealed PF chambers, whose manufacture was mastered by VNIIA vacuum tube production plant. A number of optimized PF chambers, designed for use in generators with a certain yield of neutrons has been developed. The use of gas generator based on gas absorber of hydrogen isotopes, enabled to increase the self-life and resource of PF chambers. Currently, the PF chambers withstand up to 1000 switches and have the safety of not less than 5 years. Using a generator with a gas heater, significantly increased security of PF chambers, because deuterium-tritium mixture is released only during work, other times it is in a bound state in the working element of the gas generator.

  3. Anomalous Loss of DT Alpha Particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W.

    1997-06-01

    Princeton's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is the first experimental fusion device to routinely use tritium to study the deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reaction,allowing the first systematic study of DT alpha particles in tokamak plasmas. A crucial aspect of alpha-particle physics is the fraction of alphas that escape from the plasma, particularly since these energetic particles can do severe damage to the first wall of a reactor. An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR's DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of alpha-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous "delayed" loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on alpha-particle loss has led to a better understanding of alpha-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing alpha-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e. compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90 degree lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an alpha-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized alpha-particles near the

  4. Low Fuel Convergence Path to Direct-Drive Fusion Ignition.

    PubMed

    Molvig, Kim; Schmitt, Mark J; Albright, B J; Dodd, E S; Hoffman, N M; McCall, G H; Ramsey, S D

    2016-06-24

    A new class of inertial fusion capsules is presented that combines multishell targets with laser direct drive at low intensity (2.8×10^{14}  W/cm^{2}) to achieve robust ignition. The targets consist of three concentric, heavy, metal shells, enclosing a volume of tens of μg of liquid deuterium-tritium fuel. Ignition is designed to occur well "upstream" from stagnation, with minimal pusher deceleration to mitigate interface Rayleigh-Taylor growth. Laser intensities below thresholds for laser plasma instability and cross beam energy transfer facilitate high hydrodynamic efficiency (∼10%). PMID:27391731

  5. Low Fuel Convergence Path to Direct-Drive Fusion Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvig, Kim; Schmitt, Mark J.; Albright, B. J.; Dodd, E. S.; Hoffman, N. M.; McCall, G. H.; Ramsey, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    A new class of inertial fusion capsules is presented that combines multishell targets with laser direct drive at low intensity (2.8 ×1014 W /cm2 ) to achieve robust ignition. The targets consist of three concentric, heavy, metal shells, enclosing a volume of tens of μ g of liquid deuterium-tritium fuel. Ignition is designed to occur well "upstream" from stagnation, with minimal pusher deceleration to mitigate interface Rayleigh-Taylor growth. Laser intensities below thresholds for laser plasma instability and cross beam energy transfer facilitate high hydrodynamic efficiency (˜10 %).

  6. Nuclear imaging of the fuel assembly in ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Danly, C. R.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Batha, S.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Clark, D. S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Raman, K. S.; Izumi, N.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Drury, O. B.; Alger, E. T.; and others

    2013-05-15

    First results from the analysis of neutron image data collected on implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium capsules during the 2011-2012 National Ignition Campaign are reported. The data span a variety of experimental designs aimed at increasing the stagnation pressure of the central hotspot and areal density of the surrounding fuel assembly. Images of neutrons produced by deuterium–tritium fusion reactions in the hotspot are presented, as well as images of neutrons that scatter in the surrounding dense fuel assembly. The image data are compared with 1D and 2D model predictions, and consistency checked using other diagnostic data. The results indicate that the size of the fusing hotspot is consistent with the model predictions, as well as other imaging data, while the overall size of the fuel assembly, inferred from the scattered neutron images, is systematically smaller than models' prediction. Preliminary studies indicate these differences are consistent with a significant fraction (20%–25%) of the initial deuterium-tritium fuel mass outside the compact fuel assembly, due either to low mode mass asymmetry or high mode 3D mix effects at the ablator-ice interface.

  7. Thick target D-T neutron yield measurements using metal occluders of scandium, titanium, yttrium, zirconium, gadolinium, erbium, hafnium, and tantalum at energies from 25 to 200 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Malbrough, D.J.; Molloy, J.T. Jr.; Becker, R.H.

    1990-11-19

    Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) neutron yields from thick films of scandium, titanium, yttrium, zirconium, gadolinium, erbium, hafnium, and tantalum were measured by the associated particle technique using the 200-keV accelerator at the Pinellas Plant. The neutron yields were measured for all targets at energies from 25 to 200 keV in 5-keV steps with an average uncertainty of {plus_minus}6.8%. Tabulated results are presented with yield versus energy curves for each target. Yield curves for D-D neutrons from earlier measurements are also presented with the D-T neutron yield curves. Good fits to the data were found for both D-D and D-T with theoretical calculations that were adjusted by smooth functions of the form: A{sub 0} + A{sub 1}E + A{sub 2}E{sup 2}. The results of the fits strongly suggest that disagreement between measurement and theory is due mainly to inaccuracies in currently available stopping power data. Comparisons with earlier theoretical calculations for titanium and erbium are also presented. 27 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Understanding Fuel Magnetization and Mix Using Secondary Nuclear Reactions in Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, P. F.; Knapp, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Lamppa, D. C.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Porter, J. L.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Ruiz, C. L.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.155003] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs.

  9. Understanding fuel magnetization and mix using secondary nuclear reactions in magneto-inertial fusion.

    PubMed

    Schmit, P F; Knapp, P F; Hansen, S B; Gomez, M R; Hahn, K D; Sinars, D B; Peterson, K J; Slutz, S A; Sefkow, A B; Awe, T J; Harding, E; Jennings, C A; Chandler, G A; Cooper, G W; Cuneo, M E; Geissel, M; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Herrmann, M C; Hess, M H; Johns, O; Lamppa, D C; Martin, M R; McBride, R D; Porter, J L; Robertson, G K; Rochau, G A; Rovang, D C; Ruiz, C L; Savage, M E; Smith, I C; Stygar, W A; Vesey, R A

    2014-10-10

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs. PMID:25375715

  10. Fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananyev, S. S.; Spitsyn, A. V.; Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a tokamak-based stationary fusion neutron source (FNS) for scientific research (neutron diffraction, etc.), tests of structural materials for future fusion reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, fission reactor fuel production, and control of subcritical nuclear systems (fusion-fission hybrid reactor) is being developed in Russia. The fuel cycle system is one of the most important systems of FNS that provides circulation and reprocessing of the deuterium-tritium fuel mixture in all fusion reactor systems: the vacuum chamber, neutral injection system, cryogenic pumps, tritium purification system, separation system, storage system, and tritium-breeding blanket. The existing technologies need to be significantly upgraded since the engineering solutions adopted in the ITER project can be only partially used in the FNS (considering the capacity factor higher than 0.3, tritium flow up to 200 m3Pa/s, and temperature of reactor elements up to 650°C). The deuterium-tritium fuel cycle of the stationary FNS is considered. The TC-FNS computer code developed for estimating the tritium distribution in the systems of FNS is described. The code calculates tritium flows and inventory in tokamak systems (vacuum chamber, cryogenic pumps, neutral injection system, fuel mixture purification system, isotope separation system, tritium storage system) and takes into account tritium loss in the fuel cycle due to thermonuclear burnup and β decay. For the two facility versions considered, FNS-ST and DEMO-FNS, the amount of fuel mixture needed for uninterrupted operation of all fuel cycle systems is 0.9 and 1.4 kg, consequently, and the tritium consumption is 0.3 and 1.8 kg per year, including 35 and 55 g/yr, respectively, due to tritium decay.

  11. Performance characteristics of a compact D-T neutron generator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfutzner, H. G.; Groves, J. L.; Mahdavi, M.

    1995-05-01

    A new pulsed neutron generator system has been introduced which uses the deuterium-tritium fusion reaction to produce 14 MeV neutrons. The new system incorporates the latest technology in its electronics, sealed tube neutron head and computer control. The system is extremely flexible and adaptable to a wide range of applications in the field of materials non-destructive analysis.

  12. Optimization of combined delayed neutron and differential die-away prompt neutron signal detection for characterization of spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Pauline; Tobin, Stephen J; Croft, Stephen; Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, M; Lee, T

    2010-12-02

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded multiple laboratories and universities to develop a means to accurately quantify the Plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies and ways to also detect potential diversion of fuel pins. Delayed Neutron (DN) counting provides a signature somewhat more sensitive to {sup 235}U than Pu while Differential Die-Away (DDA) is complementary in that it has greater sensitivity to Pu. The two methods can, with care, be combined into a single instrument which also provides passive neutron information. Individually the techniques cannot robustly quantify the Pu content but coupled together the information content in the signatures enables Pu quantification separate to the total fissile content. The challenge of merging DN and DDA, prompt neutron (PN) signal, capabilities in the same design is the focus of this paper. Other possibilities also suggest themselves, such as a direct measurement of the reactivity (multiplication) by either the boost in signal obtained during the active interrogation itself or by the extension of the die-away profile. In an early study, conceptual designs have been modeled using a neutron detector comprising fission chambers or 3He proportional counters and a {approx}14 MeV neutron Deuterium-Tritium (DT) generator as the interrogation source. Modeling was performed using the radiation transport code Monte Carlo N-Particles eXtended (MCNPX). Building on this foundation, the present paper quantifies the capability of a new design using an array of {sup 3}He detectors together with fission chambers to optimize both DN and PN detections and active characterization, respectively. This new design was created in order to minimize fission in {sup 238}U (a nuisance DN emitter), to use a realistic neutron generator, to reduce the cost and to achieve near spatial interrogation and detection of the DN and PN, important for detection of diversion, all within

  13. D--T and D sub 2 retention in plastic shells

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.W.; Sanchez, J.J.; Fearon, E.M. )

    1992-07-01

    We have measured the D{sub 2} and D--T gas pressure versus time inside multilayer polymer shells (polystyrene, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and plasma polymer CH{sub 1.3}) from which we calculate an effective permeability for the PVA layer. From this data, we have developed a D--T pressurization procedure for current direct drive fusion targets that increases the D--T fuel retention time an order of magnitude over previous pressurization schemes. The D--T fuel retention time will be decreased from the shells original D{sub 2} retention time ({similar to}45 h) by; (1) 50% immediately after D--T pressurization, (2) 60% after D--T pressurization and cryogenic storage for 1 day, and (3) 85% after D--T pressurization and cryogenic storage for 13 days. We have also found that heat treating the polymer shell increases the fuel retention time for D{sub 2} from 10% to 40% and that the D{sub 2} mass transfer through the composite polymer shell does not follow Fick's law. Finally, we describe an efficient target pressurization procedure for D{sub 2} fuel.

  14. Stability analysis of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes in TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; Budny, R.; Chang, Z.; Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.

    1995-05-15

    The toroidicity-induced Alfvin eigenmodes (TAE) with radially extended structure are found to be stable in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Deuterium-Tritium plasmas. A core localized TAE mode is shown to exist near the center of the plasma at small magnetic shear and finite plasma beta, which can be destabilized by energetic alpha particles on TFTR. With additional instability drive from fast minority ions powered by ICRH, both the global and the core localized TAE modes can be readily destabilized.

  15. Energy relaxation of multi-MeV protons traveling in compressed DT+Be plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhigang; He, Bin; Fu, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Ping

    2014-07-15

    We investigate the stopping power of the multi-MeV protons moving in the hot dense deuterium-tritium plasmas mixed with beryllium (Be), which is important in inertial confinement fusion experiments. It is shown that with increasing the density of Be, the stopping power of the proton also increases with the peaks shifting towards higher projectile velocity, which leads to the reduction of both the projectile range and the energy transferred to the electrons.

  16. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Brooks, J.N.; Hogan, J.

    1998-07-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors.

  17. Douglas DT-2 (Naval Aircraft Factory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    Douglas DT-2 (Naval Aircraft Factory): This example of the Douglas DT-2 torpedo plane, which flew as 'NACA 11,' was built in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by the Naval Aircraft Factory. Langley's NACA staff studied the take-off characteristics of a twin-float seaplane with this aircraft.

  18. Kinetic Method for Hydrogen-Deuterium-Tritium Mixture Distillation Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sazonov, A.B.; Kagramanov, Z.G.; Magomedbekov, E.P.

    2005-07-15

    Simulation of hydrogen distillation plants requires mathematical procedures suitable for multicomponent systems. In most of the present-day simulation methods a distillation column is assumed to be composed of theoretical stages, or plates. However, in the case of a multicomponent mixture theoretical plate does not exist.An alternative kinetic method of simulation is depicted in the work. According to this method a system of mass-transfer differential equations is solved numerically. Mass-transfer coefficients are estimated with using experimental results and empirical equations.Developed method allows calculating the steady state of a distillation column as well as its any non-steady state when initial conditions are given. The results for steady states are compared with ones obtained via Thiele-Geddes theoretical stage technique and the necessity of using kinetic method is demonstrated. Examples of a column startup period and periodic distillation simulations are shown as well.

  19. First Measurements of Fuel-Ablator Interface Instability Growth in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Weber, C R; Döppner, T; Casey, D T; Bunn, T L; Carlson, L C; Dylla-Spears, R J; Kozioziemski, B J; MacPhee, A G; Nikroo, A; Robey, H F; Sater, J D; Smalyuk, V A

    2016-08-12

    Direct measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are reported for the first time. These experiments investigate one of the degradation mechanisms behind the lower-than-expected performance of early ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility. Face-on x-ray radiography is used to measure instability growth occurring between the deuterium-tritium fuel and the plastic ablator from well-characterized perturbations. This growth starts in two ways through separate experiments-either from a preimposed interface modulation or from ablation front feedthrough. These experiments are consistent with analytic modeling and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which say that a moderately unstable Atwood number and convergence effects are causing in-flight perturbation growth at the interface. The analysis suggests that feedthrough from outersurface perturbations dominates the interface perturbation growth at mode 60. PMID:27563971

  20. First Measurements of Fuel-Ablator Interface Instability Growth in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. R.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D. T.; Bunn, T. L.; Carlson, L. C.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H. F.; Sater, J. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    Direct measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are reported for the first time. These experiments investigate one of the degradation mechanisms behind the lower-than-expected performance of early ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility. Face-on x-ray radiography is used to measure instability growth occurring between the deuterium-tritium fuel and the plastic ablator from well-characterized perturbations. This growth starts in two ways through separate experiments—either from a preimposed interface modulation or from ablation front feedthrough. These experiments are consistent with analytic modeling and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which say that a moderately unstable Atwood number and convergence effects are causing in-flight perturbation growth at the interface. The analysis suggests that feedthrough from outersurface perturbations dominates the interface perturbation growth at mode 60.

  1. DT-MRI segmentation using graph cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeselassie, Yonas T.; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2007-03-01

    An important problem in medical image analysis is the segmentation of anatomical regions of interest. Once regions of interest are segmented, one can extract shape, appearance, and structural features that can be analyzed for disease diagnosis or treatment evaluation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) is a relatively new medical imaging modality that captures unique water diffusion properties and fiber orientation information of the imaged tissues. In this paper, we extend the interactive multidimensional graph cuts segmentation technique to operate on DT-MRI data by utilizing latest advances in tensor calculus and diffusion tensor dissimilarity metrics. The user interactively selects certain tensors as object ("obj") or background ("bkg") to provide hard constraints for the segmentation. Additional soft constraints incorporate information about both regional tissue diffusion as well as boundaries between tissues of different diffusion properties. Graph cuts are used to find globally optimal segmentation of the underlying 3D DT-MR image among all segmentations satisfying the constraints. We develop a graph structure from the underlying DT-MR image with the tensor voxels corresponding to the graph vertices and with graph edge weights computed using either Log-Euclidean or the J-divergence tensor dissimilarity metric. The topology of our segmentation is unrestricted and both obj and bkg segments may consist of several isolated parts. We test our method on synthetic DT data and apply it to real 2D and 3D MRI, providing segmentations of the corpus callosum in the brain and the ventricles of the heart.

  2. Density dependent stopping power and muon sticking in muon catalyzed D-T fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rafelski, H.E.; Mueller, B.

    1988-12-27

    The origin of the experimentally observed (1) density dependence of the muon alpha sticking fraction ..omega../sub s/ in muon catalyzed deuterium- tritium fusion is investigated. We show that the reactivation probability depends sensitively on the target stopping power at low ion velocities. The density dependence of the stopping power for a singly charged projectile in liquid heavy hydrogen is parametrized to simulate possible screening effects and a density dependent effective ionization potential. We find that, in principle, a description of the measured density dependence is possible, but the required parameters appear too large. Also, the discrepancy with observed (He..mu..) X-ray data widens.

  3. Demonstrating Ignition Hydrodynamic Equivalence in Cryogenic DT Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. N.

    2013-10-01

    Demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence is one of the primary goals of direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA. It requires the shell reaching implosion velocities > 3.5 × 107 cm/s while maintaining the fuel adiabat below 3 and keeping the shell from breaking up as a result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The cryogenic targets used for implosions on OMEGA are 860- μm-outer-diam CD shells filled with DT fuel. The shell thickness varies between 5 and 12 μm, and DT ice thickness between 40 and 65 μm. Experimental results demonstrate, however, that neutron-averaged areal density in excess of 80% and yields above 25% of 1-D predicted values are obtained if the fuel adiabat > 3.5 and shell in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR) is below 22. As the IFAR exceeds this value, the shell breaks up and the areal density and yield are reduced. Identifying the main source of shell nonuniformities that lead to performance degradation in low-adiabat designs is one of the main efforts of OMEGA cryogenic campaign. This talk will summarize progress in cryogenic target implosions over the last year and review the effect of target debris, early-time laser shinethrough, and fuel-pusher roughness on target performance. In addition, the effect of cross-beam energy transfer (a major source of hydroefficiency degradation in a direct-drive implosions) and its mitigation strategies (including high- Z ablator layers, beam zooming, and laser wavelength shifts) will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  4. Tritium processing and management during D-T experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    La Marche, P.H.; Anderson, J.L.; Gentile, C.A.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hosea, J.; Kalish, M.; Kozub, T.; Murray, H.; Nagy, A.; Raftopoulos, S.

    1994-11-01

    TFTR performance has surpassed many of the previous tokamak records. This has been made possible by the use of tritium as fuel for DT plasma discharges. Stable operations of tritium systems provide for safe, routine DT operation of TFTR. In the preparation for DT operation, in the commissioning of the tritium systems and in the operation of the Nuclear Facility several key lessons have been learned. They include: the facility must take the lead in interpreting the applicable regulations and orders and then seek regulator approval; the use of ultra high vacuum technology in tritium system design and construction simplifies and enhances operations and maintenance; and central facility control under a single supervisory position is crucial to safely orchestrate operational and maintenance activities.

  5. Hot spot temperature measurements in DT layered implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Pravesh; Ma, T.; Macphee, A.; Callahan, D.; Chen, H.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D.; Edgell, D.; Hurricane, O.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; Jarrott, L.; Kritcher, A.; Springer, P.

    2015-11-01

    The temperature of the burning DT hot spot in an ICF implosion is a crucial parameter in understanding the thermodynamic conditions of the fuel at stagnation and and the performance of the implosion in terms of alpha-particle self-heating and energy balance. The continuum radiation spectrum emitted from the hot spot provides an accurate measure of the emissivity-weighted electron temperature. Absolute measurements of the emitted radiation are made with several independent instruments including spatially-resolved broadband imagers, and space- and time-integrated monochromatic detectors. We present estimates of the electron temperature in DT layered implosions derived from the radiation spectrum most consistent with the available measurements. The emissivity-weighted electron temperatures are compared to the neutron-averaged apparent ion temperatures inferred from neutron time-of-flight detectors. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Direct-drive DT implosions with Knudsen number variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Schmitt, M. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Gales, S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Leatherland, A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu

    2016-05-01

    Direct-drive implosions of DT-filled plastic-shells have been conducted at the Omega laser facility, measuring nuclear yields while varying Knudsen numbers (i.e., the ratio of mean free path of fusing ions to the length of fuel region) by adjusting both shell thickness (e.g., 7.5, 15, 20, 30 μm) and fill pressure (e.g., 2, 5, 15 atm). The fusion reactivity reduction model showed a stronger effect on yield as the Knudsen number increases (or the shell thickness decreases). The Reduced-Ion-Kinetic (RIK) simulation which includes both fusion reactivity reduction and mix model was necessary to provide a better match between the observed neutron yields and those simulated.

  7. Measurements of Muon Catalyzed dt Fusion in Solid HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcelli, Tracy

    1999-05-01

    The first measurement of muon catalyzed dt fusion (dtμ arrow ^4He + n + μ^-) in solid HD at ~ 3 K has been performed. The theory describing the formation of the [(dtμ)pee)] muonic molecule from the resonant reaction tμ + HD arrow [(dtμ)pee], a key process in the dt fusion cycle, can now be tested against experimental results. Using an experimental technique which employs solid layers of hydrogen isotopes, the energy of molecular formation is determined via time of flight, and dt fusion time spectra in solid HD have been measured. The theory describing the resonant formation of the dtμ muonic molecule is compared to the experimental results through Monte Carlo simulations. The energy dependent molecular formation rates calculated for HD at 3 K have been employed in the Monte Carlo with the resultant fusion time spectra in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Laser-optical path to nuclear energy without radioactivity: Fusion of hydrogen-boron by nonlinear force driven plasma blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Malekynia, B.; Azizi, N.

    2009-10-01

    Anomalous interaction of terawatt-picosecond laser pulses allows side-on ignition of solid state density fusion fuel with the unexpected possibility of igniting uncompressed hydrogen-boron p- 11B. Suppression of relativistic self-focusing by using very clean laser pulses with an extremely high contrast ratio is essential to achieve ignition thresholds only ten times more difficult than fusion of deuterium-tritium (DT). This opens the possibility for laser driven fusion energy without neutrons and less radioactivity than from burning coal. The complex nonlinear optical properties involved are elaborated.

  9. Measurements of escaping alphas in the TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.

    1995-03-01

    Alpha particle loss to the wall of TFTR has been measured during the initial TFTR DT run period. These measurements were made with the same lost alpha scintillator detector system used previously for DD fusion products, except for a switch of the scintillator material from zinc sulfide (P31) to yttrium aluminate (P46) to insure a linear response up to the maximum alpha flux expected in DT. The alpha loss signals in DT are {approx} 100 times larger than the DD fusion product loss signals, as expected from the neutron rates and the relative sensitivity to DT vs. DD fusion products.

  10. Effect of dt{mu} quasinucleus structure on energy levels of the (dt{mu})Xee exotic molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Kartavtsev, O.I.; Malykh, A.V.; Permyakov, V.P.

    2004-08-01

    Precise energies of rovibrational states of the exotic hydrogen-like molecule (dt{mu})Xee are of importance for dt{mu} resonant formation, which is a key process in the muon-catalyzed fusion cycle. The effect of the internal structure and rotation of the dt{mu} quasi-nucleus on energy levels is studied using the three-body description of the (dt{mu})Xee molecule based on the hierarchy of scales and corresponding energies of its constituent subsystems. For a number of rovibrational states of (dt{mu})dee and (dt{mu})tee, the shifts and splittings of energy levels are calculated in the second order of the perturbation theory.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Muon-catalyzed dt Fusion in Wide Ranges of D/T Mixture Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bom, V.R.; Eijk, C.W.E. van; Demin, A.M.; Golubkov, A.N.; Grishechkin, S.K.; Klevtsov, V.G.; Kuryakin, A.V.; Musyaev, R.K.; Perevozchikov, V.V.; Vinogradov, Yu.I.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Zlatoustovskii, S.V.; Demin, D.L.; Filchenkov, V.V.; Grafov, N.N.; Gritsaj, K.I.; Konin, A.D.; Medved', S.V.; Rudenko, A.I.; Yukhimchuk, S.A.

    2005-04-01

    A vast program of the experimental investigation of muon-catalyzed dt fusion was performed on the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research phasotron. Parameters of the dt cycle were obtained in a wide range of the D/T mixture conditions: temperatures of 20-800 K, densities of 0.2-1.2 of the liquid hydrogen density (LHD), and tritium concentrations of 15-86%. In this paper, the results obtained are summarized.

  12. High-Performance Layered DT Capsule Implosions in Depleted Uranium Hohlraums on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doeppner, Tilo; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Benedetti, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Fittinghoff, D.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Izumi, N.; Kritcher, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P.; Robey, H.; Remington, B.; Salmonson, J.; Springer, P.; Widmann, K.; Merrill, F.; Wilde, C.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the first layered DT capsule implosions in depleted uranium (DU) hohlraums driven with a high-foot pulse shape. High-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to hydrodynamic instabilities. [Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. DU hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to 25 TW extra laser power at the peak of the drive compared to Au hohlraums. Additionally, we observe an improved implosion shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. As a result, these first high-foot DU experiments achieved total neutron yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel. This work performed under the auspices of U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Collision of plane thermonuclear detonation waves in a preliminarily compressed DT mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Khishchenko, K. V.; Charakhch’yan, A. A.

    2015-03-15

    The paper deals with a one-dimensional problem on symmetric irradiation of a plane DT fuel layer with a thickness 2H and density ρ{sub 0} ⩽ 100ρ{sub s} (where ρ{sub s} is the density of the DT fuel in the solid state at atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 4 K) by two identical monoenergetic proton beams with a kinetic energy of 1 MeV, an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, and a duration of 50 ps. The problem is solved in the framework of one-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamic model that takes into account the equation of state for hydrogen, electron and ion heat conductivities, kinetics of the DT reaction, plasma self-radiation, and plasma heating by α-particles. The irradiation of the fuel results in the appearance of two counterpropagating detonation waves to the fronts of which rarefaction waves are adjacent. The efficiency of the DT reaction after the collision (reflection from the plane of symmetry) of the detonation waves depends on the spatial homogeneity of thermodynamic functions between the fronts of the reflected detonation waves. At Hρ{sub 0} ≈ 1 g/cm{sup 2}, the gain factor is G ≈ 200, whereas at Hρ{sub 0} ≈ 5 g/cm{sup 2}, it is G > 2000. As applied to a cylindrical target that is ignited from ends and in which the cylinder with the fuel is surrounded by a heavy magnetized shell, the obtained values of the burn-up and gain factors are maximum possible. To estimate the ignition energy E{sub ig} of a cylindrical target by using solutions to the one-dimensional problem, a quasi-one-dimensional model is developed. The model assumes that the main mechanism of target ignition is fuel heating by α-particles. The trajectories of α-particles are limited by a cylindrical surface with a given radius, which is a parameter of the model and is identified with the fuel radius in the target and the radii of the irradiating proton beams. This model reproduces the well-known theoretical dependence E{sub ig} ∼ ρ{sub 0}{sup −2} and yields E

  14. Cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Alger, E. T.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Castro, C.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; DiNicola, J. M.; and others

    2012-05-15

    The first inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments with equimolar deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fuel have been performed on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use 0.17 mg of fuel with the potential for ignition and significant fusion yield conditions. The thermonuclear fuel has been fielded as a cryogenic layer on the inside of a spherical plastic capsule that is mounted in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 192 laser beams for a total laser energy of 1.6 MJ produces a soft x-ray field with 300 eV temperature. The ablation pressure produced by the radiation field compresses the initially 2.2-mm diameter capsule by a factor of 30 to a spherical dense fuel shell that surrounds a central hot-spot plasma of 50 {mu}m diameter. While an extensive set of x-ray and neutron diagnostics has been applied to characterize hot spot formation from the x-ray emission and 14.1 MeV deuterium-tritium primary fusion neutrons, thermonuclear fuel assembly is studied by measuring the down-scattered neutrons with energies in the range of 10 to 12 MeV. X-ray and neutron imaging of the compressed core and fuel indicate a fuel thickness of (14 {+-} 3) {mu}m, which combined with magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements of the fuel areal density of (1 {+-} 0.09) g cm{sup -2} result in fuel densities approaching 600 g cm{sup -3}. The fuel surrounds a hot-spot plasma with average ion temperatures of (3.5 {+-} 0.1) keV that is measured with neutron time of flight spectra. The hot-spot plasma produces a total fusion neutron yield of 10{sup 15} that is measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer and nuclear activation diagnostics that indicate a 14.1 MeV yield of (7.5{+-}0.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} which is 70% to 75% of the total fusion yield due to the high areal density. Gamma ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity of (170 {+-} 30) ps. These indirect-drive implosions result in the highest areal densities

  15. Cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Kline, J. L.; Grim, G.; Alger, E. T.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Betti, R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Castro, C.; Casey, D. T.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; DiNicola, J. M.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Döppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Dzenitis, E.; Eckart, M.; Erbert, G.; Farley, D.; Fair, J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Frank, M.; Frenje, L. J. A.; Friedrich, S.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Gibson, C.; Giraldez, E.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Guler, N.; Haan, S. W.; Haid, B. J.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Haynam, C. A.; Heestand, G. M.; Hermann, M.; Hermann, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Holder, J. P.; Holunda, D. M.; Horner, J. B.; Hsing, W. W.; Huang, H.; Izumi, N.; Jackson, M.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kauffman, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Klingmann, J.; Kohut, T.; Knauer, J. P.; Koch, J. A.; Kozioziemki, B.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kritcher, A. L.; Kroll, J.; La Fortune, K.; Lagin, L.; Landen, O. L.; Larson, D. W.; LaTray, D.; Leeper, R. J.; Le Pape, S.; Lindl, J. D.; Lowe-Webb, R.; Ma, T.; McNaney, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Malsbury, T. N.; Mapoles, E.; Marshall, C. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Moran, M.; Moreno, K. A.; Munro, D. H.; Nathan, B. R.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Orth, C. D.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Parham, T.; Petrasso, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Rinderknecht, H.; Regan, S. P.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Rosen, M. D.; Sacks, R.; Salmonson, J. D.; Saunders, R.; Sater, J.; Sangster, C.; Schneider, M. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Shaw, M. J.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Stoeffl, W.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Walters, C.; Weaver, S.; Weber, S. V.; Wegner, P. J.; Whitman, P. K.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C. C.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Van Wonterghem, B.; MacGowan, B. J.; Atherton, L. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Moses, E. I.

    2012-05-01

    The first inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments with equimolar deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fuel have been performed on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use 0.17 mg of fuel with the potential for ignition and significant fusion yield conditions. The thermonuclear fuel has been fielded as a cryogenic layer on the inside of a spherical plastic capsule that is mounted in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 192 laser beams for a total laser energy of 1.6 MJ produces a soft x-ray field with 300 eV temperature. The ablation pressure produced by the radiation field compresses the initially 2.2-mm diameter capsule by a factor of 30 to a spherical dense fuel shell that surrounds a central hot-spot plasma of 50 μm diameter. While an extensive set of x-ray and neutron diagnostics has been applied to characterize hot spot formation from the x-ray emission and 14.1 MeV deuterium-tritium primary fusion neutrons, thermonuclear fuel assembly is studied by measuring the down-scattered neutrons with energies in the range of 10 to 12 MeV. X-ray and neutron imaging of the compressed core and fuel indicate a fuel thickness of (14 ± 3) μm, which combined with magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements of the fuel areal density of (1 ± 0.09) g cm-2 result in fuel densities approaching 600 g cm-3. The fuel surrounds a hot-spot plasma with average ion temperatures of (3.5 ± 0.1) keV that is measured with neutron time of flight spectra. The hot-spot plasma produces a total fusion neutron yield of 1015 that is measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer and nuclear activation diagnostics that indicate a 14.1 MeV yield of (7.5±0.1)×1014 which is 70% to 75% of the total fusion yield due to the high areal density. Gamma ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity of (170 ± 30) ps. These indirect-drive implosions result in the highest areal densities and neutron yields achieved on laser facilities to date

  16. Active Interrogation for Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Dougan, Arden

    2015-11-05

    The DDA instrument for nuclear safeguards is a fast, non-destructive assay, active neutron interrogation technique using an external 14 MeV DT neutron generator for characterization and verification of spent nuclear fuel assemblies.

  17. Alpha particle loss in the TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    Alpha particle loss was measured during the TFTR DT experiments using a scintillator detector located at the vessel bottom in the ion grad-B drift direction. The DT alpha particle loss to this detector was consistent with the calculated first-orbit loss over the whole range of plasma current I=0.6-2.7 MA. In particular, the alpha particle loss rate per DT neutron did not increase significantly with fusion power up to 10.7 MW, indicating the absence of any new ``collective`` alpha particle loss processes in these experiments.

  18. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Ussery, David W.; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilson, Daniel J.; et al

    2016-03-04

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. In this paper, we used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ~1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934more » to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ~1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ~1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. Finally, the results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections.« less

  19. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Ussery, David W; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W; Wilson, Daniel J; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2016-04-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315S Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ∼1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ∼1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ∼1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonellafrom pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. The results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections. PMID:26944846

  20. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilson, Daniel J.; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ∼1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ∼1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ∼1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. The results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections. PMID:26944846

  1. Development of tritium breeding blankets for DT-burning fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    This study examines the status of understanding of blanket tritium recovery and the performance of potentially viable tritium breeding materials under conditions anticipated in a DT-fueled fusion reactor environment. The existing physicochemical, thermophysical, and ceramographic data for candidate liquid and solid breeders are reviewed and appropriate operating conditions defined. It is shown that selection of a breeding material and an appropriate tritium recovery method can impose significant constraints upon blanket design, particularly when considerations of breeder/coolant/structure compatibility and temperature limitations are taken into account.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Investigations of the Ablator/Fuel Interface during Early Stages of Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Liam; Murillo, Michael; Glosli, James

    2014-10-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, high-powered laser beams are used to compress a small target to generate fusion reactions. A critical issue in achieving this is the understanding of mix at the ablator/fuel interface. Mixing occurs at various length scales, ranging from atomic inter-species diffusion to hydrodynamic instabilities. Because the interface is preheated by energy from the incoming shock, it is important to understand the dynamics before the shock arrives. The interface is in the warm dense matter phase with a deuterium/tritium fuel mixture on one side and a plastic mixture on the other. We would like to understand various aspects of the evolution, including the state of the interface when the main shock arrives, the role of electric field generation at the interface, and the character and time scales for diffusion. We present a molecular dynamics approach to model these processes, in which the ions are treated as classical point particles. Because we must reach extremely large length and time scales, we have also developed a simplified electronic structure model, which includes time- and space-dependent ionization levels, external heating and electron-ion energy exchange. Simulation results are presented and compared with other models and experiments. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. The scientific case for a JET D-T experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Weisen, H.; Sips, A. C. C.; Horton, L. D.; Challis, C. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Batistoni, P. [EURATOM Collaboration: EFDA-JET Contributors

    2014-08-21

    After the first high power D-T experiment in JET in 1997 (DTE1), when JET was equipped with Carbon PFC's, a proposed second high power (up to ∼40MW) D-T campaign (DTE2) in the current Be/W vessel will address essential operational, technical, diagnostics and scientific issues in support of ITER. These experiments are proposed to minimize the risks to ITER by testing strategies for the management of the in-vessel tritium content, by providing the basis for transferring operational scenarios from non-active operation to D-T mixtures and by addressing the issue of the neutron measurement accuracy. Dedicated campaigns with operation in Deuterium, Hydrogen and Tritium before the D-T campaign proper will allow the investigation of isotope scaling of the H-mode transition, pedestal physics, heat, particle, momentum and impurity transport in much greater detail than was possible in DTE1. The D-T campaign proper will include validations of the baseline ELMy H-Mode scenario, of the hybrid H-mode and advanced tokamak scenarios, as well as the investigation of alpha particle physics and the qualification of ICRH scenarios suitable for D-T operation. This paper reviews the scientific goals of DTE2 together with a summary of the results of DTE1.

  4. The scientific case for a JET D-T experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisen, H.; Sips, A. C. C.; Challis, C. D.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Sharapov, S. E.; Batistoni, P.; Horton, L. D.; Zastrow, K.-D.; EFDA-JET Contributors

    2014-08-01

    After the first high power D-T experiment in JET in 1997 (DTE1), when JET was equipped with Carbon PFC's, a proposed second high power (up to ˜40MW) D-T campaign (DTE2) in the current Be/W vessel will address essential operational, technical, diagnostics and scientific issues in support of ITER. These experiments are proposed to minimize the risks to ITER by testing strategies for the management of the in-vessel tritium content, by providing the basis for transferring operational scenarios from non-active operation to D-T mixtures and by addressing the issue of the neutron measurement accuracy. Dedicated campaigns with operation in Deuterium, Hydrogen and Tritium before the D-T campaign proper will allow the investigation of isotope scaling of the H-mode transition, pedestal physics, heat, particle, momentum and impurity transport in much greater detail than was possible in DTE1. The D-T campaign proper will include validations of the baseline ELMy H-Mode scenario, of the hybrid H-mode and advanced tokamak scenarios, as well as the investigation of alpha particle physics and the qualification of ICRH scenarios suitable for D-T operation. This paper reviews the scientific goals of DTE2 together with a summary of the results of DTE1.

  5. Quasispherical fuel compression and fast ignition in a heavy-ion-driven X-target with one-sided illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henestroza, Enrique; Logan, B. Grant; Perkins, L. John

    2011-03-01

    The HYDRA radiation-hydrodynamics code [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)] is used to explore one-sided axial target illumination with annular and solid-profile uranium ion beams at 60 GeV to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium fuel filling the volume of metal cases with cross sections in the shape of an "X" (X-target). Quasi-three-dimensional, spherical fuel compression of the fuel toward the X-vertex on axis is obtained by controlling the geometry of the case, the timing, power, and radii of three annuli of ion beams for compression, and the hydroeffects of those beams heating the case as well as the fuel. Scaling projections suggest that this target may be capable of assembling large fuel masses resulting in high fusion yields at modest drive energies. Initial two-dimensional calculations have achieved fuel compression ratios of up to 150X solid density, with an areal density ρR of about 1 g/cm2. At these currently modest fuel densities, fast ignition pulses of 3 MJ, 60 GeV, 50 ps, and radius of 300 μm are injected through a hole in the X-case on axis to further heat the fuel to propagating burn conditions. The resulting burn waves are observed to propagate throughout the tamped fuel mass, with fusion yields of about 300 MJ. Tamping is found to be important, but radiation drive to be unimportant, to the fuel compression. Rayleigh-Taylor instability mix is found to have a minor impact on ignition and subsequent fuel burn-up.

  6. [Characteristics of tetrahydrofuran degradation by Pseudomonas oleovorans DT4].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Yang; Chen, Dong-Zhi; Jin, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Jian-Meng; He, Jie

    2011-01-01

    A tetrahydrofuran (THF)-degrading strain Pseudomonas oleovorans DT4 was isolated from the activated sludge of a pharmaceutical plant. P. oleovorans DT4 was able to utilize THF as the sole carbon and energy source under aerobic condition. 5 mmol/L of THF could be completely degraded by 3.2 mg/L inoculums of P. oleovorans DT4 in 14 h at pH 7.2 and 30 degrees C, with the cells concentration increasing to 188.6 mg/L. After the complete consumption of THF, no TOC could be detected but IC reached the stable value of about 46 mg/L, with pH decreasing to 6.54, which indicated that the substance was totally mineralized by P. oleovorans DT4. The optimum conditions for THF biodegradation in shaking flasks were pH 7.5 and temperature 37 degrees C, respectively. Results from the oxygen control experiments revealed that the oxygen supply by shaking was the satisfactory growth condition. Additionally, as the important elements for DT4, Mg2+ and Ca2+ at concentrations of 0.80 mmol/L and 0.20 mmol/L, respectively, were suitable for THF degradation. All the results contribute to the efficient bioremediation for the THF contaminated. PMID:21404697

  7. Measurements of muon-catalyzed dt fusion in solid HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcelli, Tracy Ann

    1999-12-01

    The first measurement of muon catalyzed dt fusion ( dtm--> 4He + n + m- ) in solid HD at ~ 3 K has been performed. The theory describing the formation of the [(dtm)pe e] muonic molecule from the resonant reaction tm+HD-->[(dtm) pee] , a key process in the dt fusion cycle, can now be tested against the experimental results. Using an experimental technique which employs solid layers of hydrogen isotopes, the energy of molecular formation is determined via time of flight, and dt fusion time spectra in solid HD have been measured. The theory describing the resonant formation of the dtm muonic molecule is compared to the experimental results through Monte Carlo simulations. The energy dependent molecular formation rates calculated for HD at 3 K have been employed in the Monte Carlo with the resultant simulated fusion time spectra in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Recent results from the TFTR ICRF DT Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.H.; Darrow, D.; Majeski, R.

    1995-03-01

    The first experiments to be performed with ICRF heating of DT plasmas are reported. ICRF heating of minority ions, tritium (second harmonic resonance), as well as direct electron heating are being performed during the DT phase of TFTR. RF power modulation and Fourier transform techniques are used to attempt to elucidate the competition between tritium second harmonic, direct electron, and {sup 3}He fundamental heating in DT plasmas. A significant fraction of the RF power has been found to couple to the tritium ions via second harmonic heating. Relevant RF coupling physics is investigated using {sup 3}He minority heating (43 MHz), H minority heating (64 MHz), and mode conversion (43 MHz, comparable densities of {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He) at a toroidal field of 4.5T.

  9. Coherent fluctuations in the initial TFTR D-T experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.; Chang, Z.Y.; Budny, R.V.

    1995-03-01

    The initial operation of TFTR with approximately equal power in the tritium and deuterium neutral beam injectors has resulted in the production of fusion power in excess of 9MW and central {beta}{sub {alpha}} > 0.25%. This {beta}{sub {alpha}} is within a factor of 2--3 of the {beta}{sub {alpha}} in projections of ITER performance. Effects of this {alpha} population on TAE modes, sawteeth and fishbone activity are being searched for. The D-T plasmas are also being studied for evidence of changes in MHD activity which might be attributed to the fast {alpha} population. This paper reports on the activity in the Alfven range of frequencies in the D-T plasmas and on detailed measurements of the MHD activity preceding major disruptions in D-D and D-T.

  10. Fast ignition of an inertial fusion target with a solid noncryogenic fuel by an ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2015-09-01

    The burning efficiency of a preliminarily compressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target with a solid noncryogenic fuel (deuterium-tritium beryllium hydride) upon fast central ignition by a fast ion beam is studied. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent to which the spatial temperature distribution formed under the heating of an ICF target by ion beams with different particle energy spectra affects the thermonuclear gain. The study is based on a complex numerical modeling including computer simulations of (i) the heating of a compressed target with a spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a fast ion beam and (ii) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum compression of the target and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of heating of the compressed target by the ion beam. The threshold energy of the igniting ion beam and the dependence of the thermonuclear gain on the energy deposited in the target are determined.

  11. Fast ignition of an inertial fusion target with a solid noncryogenic fuel by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2015-09-15

    The burning efficiency of a preliminarily compressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target with a solid noncryogenic fuel (deuterium-tritium beryllium hydride) upon fast central ignition by a fast ion beam is studied. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent to which the spatial temperature distribution formed under the heating of an ICF target by ion beams with different particle energy spectra affects the thermonuclear gain. The study is based on a complex numerical modeling including computer simulations of (i) the heating of a compressed target with a spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a fast ion beam and (ii) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum compression of the target and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of heating of the compressed target by the ion beam. The threshold energy of the igniting ion beam and the dependence of the thermonuclear gain on the energy deposited in the target are determined.

  12. Pressure broadening of the ((dt. mu. )dee)* formation resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.S.; Leon, M.; Padial, N.T.

    1988-12-27

    The treatment of ((dt..mu..)dee)* formation at high densities as a pressure broadening process is discussed. Cross sections for collisions of the complex (dt..mu..)dee, and of the D/sub 2/ molecule from which it is formed, with the bath molecules have been accurately calculated. These cross sections are used to calculate the collisional width in three variations of the impact approximation that have been proposed for this problem. In general, the quasistatic approximation is shown to satisfy the usual conditions of muon-catalyzed fusion better than does the impact approximation. A preliminary rough treatment is presented to illustrate the quasistatic approximation.

  13. One-dimensional particle simulations of Knudsen-layer effects on D-T fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Bruce I.; Dimits, Andris M.; Zimmerman, George B.; Wilks, Scott C.

    2014-12-15

    Particle simulations are used to solve the fully nonlinear, collisional kinetic equation describing the interaction of a high-temperature, high-density, deuterium-tritium plasma with absorbing boundaries, a plasma source, and the influence of kinetic effects on fusion reaction rates. Both hydrodynamic and kinetic effects influence the end losses, and the simulations show departures of the ion velocity distributions from Maxwellian due to the reduction of the population of the highest energy ions (Knudsen-layer effects). The particle simulations show that the interplay between sources, plasma dynamics, and end losses results in temperature anisotropy, plasma cooling, and concomitant reductions in the fusion reaction rates. However, for the model problems and parameters considered, particle simulations show that Knudsen-layer modifications do not significantly affect the velocity distribution function for velocities most important in determining the fusion reaction rates, i.e., the thermal fusion reaction rates using the local densities and bulk temperatures give good estimates of the kinetic fusion reaction rates.

  14. Results from D-T Experiments on TFTR and Implications for Achieving an Ignited Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J. and the TFTR Group

    1998-07-14

    Progress in the performance of tokamak devices has enabled not only the production of significant bursts of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET) but, more importantly, the initial study of the physics of burning magnetically confined plasmas. As a result of the worldwide research on tokamaks, the scientific and technical issues for achieving an ignited plasma are better understood and the remaining questions more clearly defined. The principal research topics which have been studied on TFTR are transport, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and energetic particle confinement. The integration of separate solutions to problems in each of these research areas has also been of major interest. Although significant advances, such as the reduction of turbulent transport by means of internal transport barriers, identification of the theoretically predicted bootstrap current, and the study of the confinement of energetic fusion alpha-particles have been made, interesting and important scientific and technical issues remain for achieving a magnetic fusion energy reactor. In this paper, the implications of the TFTR experiments for overcoming these remaining issues will be discussed.

  15. Results from D-T experiments on TFTR and implications for achieving an ignited plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Blanchard, W.; Batha, S.

    1998-07-01

    Progress in the performance of tokamak devices has enable not only the production of significant bursts of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET) but, more importantly, the initial study of the physics of burning magnetically confined plasmas. As a result of the worldwide research on tokamaks, the scientific and technical issues for achieving an ignited plasma are better understood and the remaining questions more clearly defined. The principal research topics which have been studied on TFTR are transport, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and energetic particle confinement. The integration of separate solutions to problems in each of these research areas has also been of major interest. Although significant advances, such as the reduction of turbulent transport by means of internal transport barriers, identification of the theoretically predicted bootstrap current, and the study of the confinement of energetic fusion alpha-particles have been made, interesting and important scientific and technical issues remain. In this paper, the implications for the TFTR experiments for overcoming these remaining issues will be discussed.

  16. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: the first precision tuning series

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J L; Mackinnon, A J

    2011-10-27

    Ignition implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] are driven with a very carefully tailored sequence of four shock waves that must be timed to very high precision in order to keep the fuel on a low adiabat. The first series of precision tuning experiments on NIF have been performed. These experiments use optical diagnostics to directly measure the strength and timing of all four shocks inside the hohlraum-driven, cryogenic deuterium-filled capsule interior. The results of these experiments are presented demonstrating a significant decrease in the fuel adiabat over previously un-tuned implosions. The impact of the improved adiabat on fuel compression is confirmed in related deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions by measurement of fuel areal density (rR), which show the highest fuel compression (rR {approx} 1.0 g/cm{sup 2}) measured to date.

  17. Inferring Low-Mode Asymmetries from the Elastically Scattered Neutron Spectrum in Layered Cryogenic DT Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution neutron spectroscopy is used to probe the areal density of layered cryogenic DT direct-drive implosions in inertial confinement fusion experiments on OMEGA. Advanced scintillation detectors record the neutron spectrum using time-of-flight techniques. The shape of the energy spectrum is fully determined by the neutron elastic scattering cross-section for spherically symmetric target configurations. Significant differences from the expected shape have been measured for some recent implosions, which indicate a deviation from a spherically symmetric fuel assembly. Neutron scattering with low-mode perturbations in the DT fuel assembly have been simulated in the Monte Carlo n-particle transport code. The experimental data shows good agreement with the model when the mass distribution of the compressed DT shell is highly asymmetric with one side having a factor-of-2 higher areal density. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  18. Production of Medical isotope Technecium-99 from DT Fusion neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguski, John; Gentile, Charles; Ascione, George

    2011-10-01

    High energy neutrons produced in DT fusion reactors have a secondary application for use in the synthesis of valuable man-made isotopes utilized in industry today. One such isotope is metastable Technecium-99 (Tc99m), a low energy gamma emitter used in ~ 85% of all medical imaging diagnostics. Tc99m is created through beta decay of Molybdenum-99 (Mo99), which itself has only a 66 hour half-life and must be created from a neutron capture by the widely available and stable isotope Molydenum-98. Current worldwide production of Tc99m occurs in just five locations and relies on obtaining the fission byproduct Mo99 from highly enriched Uranium reactors. A Tc99m generator using DT fusion neutrons, however, could potentially be operated at individual hospitals and medical facilities without the use of any fissile material. The neutron interaction of the DT neutrons with Molybdenum in a potential device geometry was modeled using Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. Trial experiments were also performed to test the viability of using DT neutrons to create ample quantities of Tc99m. Modeling and test results will follow.

  19. TAE modes and MHD activity in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.; Batha, S.; Bell, M.

    1995-03-01

    The high power deuterium and tritium experiments on TFTR have produced fusion a parameters similar to those expected on ITER. The achieved {beta}{sub {alpha}}/{beta} and the R{triangledown}{beta}{sub {alpha}} in TFRR D-T shots are 1/2 to 1/3 those predicted in the ITER EDA. Studies of the initial TFTR D-T plasmas find no evidence that the presence of the fast fusion {alpha} population has affected the stability of MHD, with the possible exception of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE`s). The initial TFTR DT plasmas had MHD activity similar to that commonly seen in deuterium plasmas. Operation of TFTR at plasma currents of 2.0--2.5 MA has greatly reduced the deleterious effects of MHD commonly observed at lower currents. Even at these higher currents, the performance of TFTR is limited by {beta}-limit disruptions. The effects of MHD on D-T fusion {alpha}`s was similar to effects observed on other fusion products in D only plasmas.

  20. First implosion experiments with cryogenic thermonuclear fuel on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Spears, Brian K.; Edwards, M. John; Alger, Ethan T.; Berger, Richard L.; Bleuel, Darren L.; Bradley, David K.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Callahan, Debra A.; Castro, Carlos; Casey, Daniel T.; Choate, Christine; Clark, Daniel S.; Cerjan, Charles J.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Dewald, Eduard L.; Di Nicola, Jean-Michel G.; Di Nicola, Pascale; Divol, Laurent; Dixit, Shamasundar N.; Döppner, Tilo; Dylla-Spears, Rebecca; Dzenitis, Elizabeth G.; Fair, James E.; Frenje, Lars Johan Anders; Gatu Johnson, M.; Giraldez, E.; Glebov, Vladimir; Glenn, Steven M.; Haan, Steven W.; Hammel, Bruce A.; Hatchett, Stephen P., II; Haynam, Christopher A.; Heeter, Robert F.; Heestand, Glenn M.; Herrmann, Hans W.; Hicks, Damien G.; Holunga, Dean M.; Horner, Jeffrey B.; Huang, Haibo; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Jones, Ogden S.; Kalantar, Daniel H.; Kilkenny, Joseph D.; Kirkwood, Robert K.; Kline, John L.; Knauer, James P.; Kozioziemski, Bernard; Kritcher, Andrea L.; Kroll, Jeremy J.; Kyrala, George A.; LaFortune, Kai N.; Landen, Otto L.; Larson, Douglas W.; Leeper, Ramon J.; Le Pape, Sebastien; Lindl, John D.; Ma, Tammy; Mackinnon, Andrew J.; MacPhee, Andrew G.; Mapoles, Evan; McKenty, Patrick W.; Meezan, Nathan B.; Michel, Pierre; Milovich, Jose L.; Moody, John D.; Moore, Alastair S.; Moran, Mike; Moreno, Kari Ann; Munro, David H.; Nathan, Bryan R.; Nikroo, Abbas; Olson, Richard E.; Orth, Charles D.; Pak, Arthur; Patel, Pravesh K.; Parham, Tom; Petrasso, Richard; Ralph, Joseph E.; Rinderknecht, Hans; Regan, Sean P.; Robey, Harry F.; Ross, J. Steven; Salmonson, Jay D.; Sangster, Craig; Sater, Jim; Schneider, Marilyn B.; Séguin, F. H.; Shaw, Michael J.; Shoup, Milton J.; Springer, Paul T.; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Suter, Larry J.; Avery Thomas, Cliff; Town, Richard P. J.; Walters, Curtis; Weber, Stephen V.; Wegner, Paul J.; Widmayer, Clay; Whitman, Pamela K.; Widmann, Klaus; Wilson, Douglas C.; Van Wonterghem, Bruno M.; MacGowan, Brian J.; Atherton, L. Jeff; Moses, Edward I.

    2012-04-01

    Non-burning thermonuclear fuel implosion experiments have been fielded on the National Ignition Facility to assess progress toward ignition by indirect drive inertial confinement fusion. These experiments use cryogenic fuel ice layers, consisting of mixtures of tritium and deuterium with large amounts of hydrogen to control the neutron yield and to allow fielding of an extensive suite of optical, x-ray and nuclear diagnostics. The thermonuclear fuel layer is contained in a spherical plastic capsule that is fielded in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 1.3 MJ of energy delivered by 192 laser beams produces a soft x-ray drive spectrum with a radiation temperature of 300 eV. The radiation field produces an ablation pressure of 100 Mbar which compresses the capsule to a spherical dense fuel shell that contains a hot plasma core 80 µm in diameter. The implosion core is observed with x-ray imaging diagnostics that provide size, shape, the absolute x-ray emission along with bangtime and hot plasma lifetime. Nuclear measurements provide the 14.1 MeV neutron yield from fusion of deuterium and tritium nuclei along with down-scattered neutrons at energies of 10-12 MeV due to energy loss by scattering in the dense fuel that surrounds the central hot-spot plasma. Neutron time-of-flight spectra allow the inference of the ion temperature while gamma-ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity. The fusion yield from deuterium-tritium reactions scales with ion temperature, which is in agreement with modeling over more than one order of magnitude to a neutron yield in excess of 1014 neutrons, indicating large confinement parameters on these first experiments. Part of the EPS 2011 special issue. Based on the plenary talk by S H Glenzer at the 38th EPS Plasma Physics meeting in Strassbourg, 2011.

  1. Conceptual design of the gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer for the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Barlow, D. B.; Young, C. S.; Stoeffl, W.; Casey, D.; Clancy, T.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Moy, K.; Batha, S. H.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) diagnostic is designed to measure the prompt γ-ray energy spectrum during high yield deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The prompt γ-ray spectrum will provide "burn-averaged" observables, including total DT fusion yield, total areal density (ρR), ablator ρR, and fuel ρR. These burn-averaged observables are unique because they are essentially averaged over 4π, providing a global reference for the line-of-sight-specific measurements typical of x-ray and neutron diagnostics. The GEMS conceptual design meets the physics-based requirements: ΔE/E = 3%-5% can be achieved in the range of 2-25 MeV γ-ray energy. Minimum DT neutron yields required for 15% measurement uncertainty at low-resolution mode are: 5 × 1014 DT-n for ablator ρR (at 0.2 g/cm2); 2 × 1015 DT-n for total DT yield (at 4.2 × 10-5 γ/n); and 1 × 1016 DT-n for fuel ρR (at 1 g/cm2).

  2. Conceptual design of the gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Herrmann, H W; Jorgenson, H J; Barlow, D B; Young, C S; Stoeffl, W; Casey, D; Clancy, T; Lopez, F E; Oertel, J A; Hilsabeck, T; Moy, K; Batha, S H

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) diagnostic is designed to measure the prompt γ-ray energy spectrum during high yield deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The prompt γ-ray spectrum will provide "burn-averaged" observables, including total DT fusion yield, total areal density (ρR), ablator ρR, and fuel ρR. These burn-averaged observables are unique because they are essentially averaged over 4π, providing a global reference for the line-of-sight-specific measurements typical of x-ray and neutron diagnostics. The GEMS conceptual design meets the physics-based requirements: ΔE/E = 3%-5% can be achieved in the range of 2-25 MeV γ-ray energy. Minimum DT neutron yields required for 15% measurement uncertainty at low-resolution mode are: 5 × 10(14) DT-n for ablator ρR (at 0.2 g/cm(2)); 2 × 10(15) DT-n for total DT yield (at 4.2 × 10(-5) γ/n); and 1 × 10(16) DT-n for fuel ρR (at 1 g/cm(2)). PMID:25430301

  3. Conceptual design of the gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. Herrmann, H. W.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Barlow, D. B.; Young, C. S.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Casey, D.; Clancy, T.; Hilsabeck, T.; Moy, K.

    2014-11-15

    The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) diagnostic is designed to measure the prompt γ-ray energy spectrum during high yield deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The prompt γ-ray spectrum will provide “burn-averaged” observables, including total DT fusion yield, total areal density (ρR), ablator ρR, and fuel ρR. These burn-averaged observables are unique because they are essentially averaged over 4π, providing a global reference for the line-of-sight-specific measurements typical of x-ray and neutron diagnostics. The GEMS conceptual design meets the physics-based requirements: ΔE/E = 3%–5% can be achieved in the range of 2–25 MeV γ-ray energy. Minimum DT neutron yields required for 15% measurement uncertainty at low-resolution mode are: 5 × 10{sup 14} DT-n for ablator ρR (at 0.2 g/cm{sup 2}); 2 × 10{sup 15} DT-n for total DT yield (at 4.2 × 10{sup −5} γ/n); and 1 × 10{sup 16} DT-n for fuel ρR (at 1 g/cm{sup 2})

  4. Quantitative Characterization of Inertial Confinement Fusion Capsules Using Phase Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B J; Koch, J A; Barty, A; Martz, H E; Lee, W; Fezzaa, K

    2004-05-07

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium capsule. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) capsule. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam capsules were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately reproduced in phase contrast enhanced x-ray images.

  5. Simultaneous usage of pinhole and penumbral apertures for imaging small scale neutron sources from inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Guler, N; Volegov, P; Danly, C R; Grim, G P; Merrill, F E; Wilde, C H

    2012-10-01

    Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to understand the basic principles of creating self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic capsules. The neutron imaging diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by observing neutron images in two different energy bands for primary (13-17 MeV) and down-scattered (6-12 MeV) neutrons. From this, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. These experiments provide small sources with high yield neutron flux. An aperture design that includes an array of pinholes and penumbral apertures has provided the opportunity to image the same source with two different techniques. This allows for an evaluation of these different aperture designs and reconstruction algorithms. PMID:23126842

  6. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guler, Nevzat; Aragonez, Robert J.; Archuleta, Thomas N.; Batha, Steven H.; Clark, David D.; Clark, Deborah J.; Danly, Chris R.; Day, Robert D.; Fatherley, Valerie E.; Finch, Joshua P.; Gallegos, Robert A.; Garcia, Felix P.; Grim, Gary; Hsu, Albert H.; Jaramillo, Steven A.; Loomis, Eric N.; Mares, Danielle; Martinson, Drew D.; Merrill, Frank E.; Morgan, George L.; Munson, Carter; Murphy, Thomas J.; Oertel, John A.; Polk, Paul J.; Schmidt, Derek W.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Valdez, Adelaida C.; Volegov, Petr L.; Wang, Tai-Sen F.; Wilde, Carl H.; Wilke, Mark D.; Wilson, Douglas C.; Atkinson, Dennis P.; Bower, Dan E.; Drury, Owen B.; Dzenitis, John M.; Felker, Brian; Fittinghoff, David N.; Frank, Matthias; Liddick, Sean N.; Moran, Michael J.; Roberson, George P.; Weiss, Paul; Buckles, Robert A.; Cradick, Jerry R.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Lutz, Steve S.; Malone, Robert M.; Traille, Albert

    2013-11-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic (CH) capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (10-12 MeV) neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  7. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; et al

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightlymore » oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.« less

  8. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  9. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART I.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-07-10

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I will discuss the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  10. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-08-17

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I discussed the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  11. Proton-beam driven fast ignition of inertially confined fuels: Reduction of the ignition energy by the use of two proton beams with radially shaped profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Temporal, M.; Honrubia, J. J.; Atzeni, S.

    2008-05-15

    Fast ignition of a spherical compressed deuterium-tritium assembly induced by the energy deposition of laser-accelerated proton beams is considered. An efficient way to reduce the ignition energy consists of using a two proton beams scheme [M. Temporal, Phys Plasmas 13, 122704 (2006)]. For a uniformly compressed fuel at 500 g/cm{sup 3} irradiated by proton beams with Maxwellian energy distribution with a temperature of 4 MeV, the ignition energy is 10 kJ using only one proton beam and reduces to a total of 8 kJ with the two-beam scheme. Further reduction of the ignition energy is found by using a first beam with annular radial profile and a second beam with the uniform radial profile. It is found that the first beam causes some additional fuel compression and confinement that decrease the total beam energy required for the ignition to 6 kJ, which is 40% smaller than in the case of a single beam with uniform radial profile.

  12. Analysis of integrating sphere performance for IR enhanced DT layering

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.B.,; Collins, G.W.

    1997-06-01

    Absorbed IR energy can supplement the beta decay energy from DT ice to improve the driving force toward uniform layers. A significant problem with this approach has been to deliver the added IR energy with sufficient uniformity to enhance rather than destroy the uniformity of the ice layers. Computer modeling has indicated that one can achieve {approximately}1% uniformity in the angular variation of the absorbed power using an integrating sphere containing holes large enough to allow external inspection of the ice layer uniformity. The power required depends on the integrating sphere size, a 25 mm diameter sphere requires {approximately}35 mW of IR to deposit as much energy in the ice as the 50 mW/cm{sup 3}(35 pW total) received from tritium decay in DT. Power absorbed in the plastic can cause unacceptable ice-layer non-uniformities for the integrating sphere design considered here.

  13. Interpolation of vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.; Zhu, Y. M.; Rapacchi, S.; Luo, J. H.; Robini, M.; Croisille, P.

    2011-03-01

    There has recently been increased interest in developing tensor data processing methods for the new medical imaging modality referred to as diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI). This paper proposes a method for interpolating the primary vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI, with the particularity of achieving interpolation and denoising simultaneously. The method consists of localizing the noise-corrupted vectors using the local statistical properties of vector fields, removing the noise-corrupted vectors and reconstructing them by using the thin plate spline (TPS) model, and finally applying global TPS interpolation to increase the resolution in the spatial domain. Experiments on 17 human hearts show that the proposed method allows us to obtain higher resolution while reducing noise, preserving details and improving direction coherence (DC) of vector fields as well as fiber tracking. Moreover, the proposed method perfectly reconstructs azimuth and elevation angle maps.

  14. TF ripple loss of alpha particles in TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.

    1995-08-01

    Quantitative evaluation of TF ripple loss of DT alpha particles is a central issue for reactor design because of potentially severe first wall heat load problems. DT experiments on TFTR allow experimental measurements to be compared to modeling of the underlying alpha physics, with code validation an important goal. Modeling of TF ripple loss of alphas in TFTR now includes neoclassical calculations of alpha losses arising from first orbit loss, stochastic ripple diffusion, ripple trapping and collisional effects. Recent Hamiltonian coordinate guiding center code (ORBIT) simulations for TFTR have shown that collisions enhance the stochastic TF ripple losses at TFTR. A faster way to simulate experiment has been developed and is discussed here which uses a simple stochastic domain model for TF ripple loss within the TRANSP analysis code.

  15. Uniform DT 3T burn: computations and sensitivities

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, Erik; Hryniw, Natalia; Hansen, Jon A; Kesler, Leigh A; Li, Frank

    2011-01-27

    A numerical model was developed in C to integrate the nonlinear deutrium-tritium (DT) burn equations in a three temperature (3T) approximation for spatially uniform test problems relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Base model results are in excellent agreement with standard 3T results. Data from NDI, SESAME, and TOPS databases is extracted to create fits for the reaction rate parameter, the Planck opacity, and the coupling frequencies of the plasma temperatures. The impact of different fits (e.g., TOPS versus SESAME opacity data, higher order polynomial fits ofNDI data for the reaction rate parameter) were explored, and sensitivity to several model inputs are presented including: opacity data base, Coulomb logarithm, and Bremsstrahlung. Sensitivity to numerical integration time step size, and the relative insensitivity to the discretized numerics and numerical integration method was demonstrated. Variations in the IC for densities and temperatures were explored, showing similar DT burn profiles in most cases once ignition occurs. A coefficient multiplying the Compton coupling term (default, A = 1) can be adjusted to approximate results from more sophisticated models. The coefficient was reset (A = 0.4) to match the maximum temperatures resulting from standard multi-group simulations of the base case test problem. Setting the coefficient to a larger value, (A = 0.6) matches maximum ion temperatures in a kinetic simulation of a high density ICF-like regime. Matching peak temperatures does not match entire temperature-time profiles, indicating the Compton coefficient is density and time dependent as the photon distribution evolves. In the early time burn during the ignition of the DT, the present model with modified Compton coupling provides a very simple method to obtain a much improved match to the more accurate solution from the multi-group radiation model for these DT burn regimes.

  16. D-T Neutron Skyshine Experiments at JAERI/FNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitani, Takeo; Ochiai, Kentaro; Yoshida, Shigeo; Tanaka, Ryohei; Wakisaka, Masashi; Nakao, Makoto; Sato, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Michinori; Hori, Jun-Ichi; Takahashi, Akito; Kaneko, Jun-Ichi; Sawamura, Teruko

    The D-T neutron skyshine experiments have been carried out at the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) of JAERI with the neutron yield of ˜1.7×1011n/s. The concrete thickness of the roof and the wall of a FNS target room are 1.15 and 2 m, respectively. The FNS skyshine port with a size of 0.9 × 0.9 m2 was open during the experimental period.The radiation dose rate outside the target room was measured as far as about 550 m away from the D-T target point with a spherical rem-counter. The highest neutron dose was about 0.5 μSv/hr at a distance of 30 m from the D-T target point and the dose rate was attenuated to 0.002 μSv/hr at a distance of 550 m. The measured neutron dose distribution was analyzed with Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B and a simple line source model. The MCNP calculation overestimates the neutron dose in the distance range larger than 250 m. The neutron spectra were evaluated with a 3He detector with different thickness of polyethylene neutron moderators. Secondary gamma-rays were measured with high purity Ge detectors and NaI scintillation detectors.

  17. TFTR neutral beam control and monitoring for DT operations

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, T.; Kamperschroer, J.; Chu, J.

    1995-12-31

    Record fusion power output has recently been obtained in TFTR with the injection of deuterium and tritium neutral beams. This significant achievement was due in part to the controls, software, and data processing capabilities added to the neutral beam system for DT operations. Chief among these improvements was the addition of SUN workstations and large dynamic data storage to the existing Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition (CICADA) system. Essentially instantaneous look back over the recent shot history has been provided for most beam waveforms and analysis results. Gas regulation controls allowing remote switchover between deuterium and tritium were also added. With these tools, comparison of the waveforms and data of deuterium and tritium for four test conditioning pulses quickly produced reliable tritium setpoints. Thereafter, all beam conditioning was performed with deuterium, thus saving the tritium supply for the important DT injection shots. The lookback capability also led to modifications of the gas system to improve reliability and to control ceramic valve leakage by backbiasing. Other features added to improve the reliability and availability of DT neutral beam operations included master beamline controls and displays, a beamline thermocouple interlock system, a peak thermocouple display, automatic gas inventory and cryo panel gas loading monitoring, beam notching controls, a display of beam/plasma interlocks, and a feedback system to control beam power based on plasma conditions.

  18. DT results of TFTR`s alpha collector

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, H.W.; Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Timberlake, J.R.; Chong, G.P.; Haasz, A.A.; Pitcher, C.S.; Macaulay-Newcombe, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR`s DT phase to complement the results of the lost alpha scintillator detectors which have been operating on TFTR since 1988. Measurements of the energy distribution of escaping alphas have been made by measuring the range of alphas implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Exposed samples have been analyzed for 4 DT plasma discharges at plasma currents of 1.0 and 1.8 MA. The results at 1.0 MA are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss at 3.5 MeV. The 1.8 MA results, however, indicate a large anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas at an energy {approximately}30% below the birth energy and at a total fluence nearly an order of magnitude above expected first orbit loss. This anomalous loss is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. Several potential explanations for this loss process are examined. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations.

  19. Measurements of fusion neutrons from Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion Experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E. C.; Awe, T. J.; Torres, J. A.; Jones, B.; Bur, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Styron, J. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    Strong evidence of thermonuclear neutron production has been observed during Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on the Z accelerator. So far, these experiments have utilized deuterium fuel and produced primary DD fusion neutron yields up to 2e12 with electron and ion stagnation temperatures in the 2-3 keV range. We present MagLIF neutron measurements and compare to other data and implosion simulations. In addition to primary DD and secondary DT yields and ion temperatures, other complex physics regarding the degree of fuel magnetization and liner density are elucidated by the neutron measurements. Neutron diagnostic development for deuterium and future deuterium-tritium fuel experiments are also discussed. Sandia is sponsored by the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. High-speed repetitive pellet injector for plasma fueling of magnetic confinement fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Baylor, L.R.; Foust, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    The projected fueling requirements of future magnetic confinement devices for controlled thermonuclear research [e.g., the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)] indicate that a flexible plasma fueling capability is required. This includes a mix of traditional gas puffing and low- and high-velocity deuterium-tritium pellets. Conventional pellet injectors (based on light gas guns or centrifugal accelerators) can reliably provide frozen hydrogen pellets (1- to 6-mm-diam sizes tested) up to {approximately}1.3-km/s velocity at the appropriate pellet fueling rates (1 to 10 Hz or greater). For long-pulse operation in a higher velocity regime (>2 km/s), an experiment in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ENEA Frascati is under way. This activity will be carried out in the framework of a collaborative agreement between the US Department of Energy and European Atomic Energy Community -- ENEA Association. In this experiment, an existing ORNL hydrogen extruder (equipped with a pellet chambering mechanism/gun barrel assembly) and a Frascati two-stage light gas gun driver have been combined on a test facility at ORNL. Initial testing has been carried out with single deuterium pellets accelerated up to 2.05 km/s with the two-stage driver; in addition, some preliminary repetitive testing (to commission the diagnostics) was performed at reduced speeds, including sequences at 0.5 to 1 Hz and 10 to 30 pellets. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate repetitive operation (up to {approximately}1 Hz) with speeds in the 2- to 3-km/s range. In addition, the strength of extruded hydrogen ice as opposed to that produced in situ by direct condensation in pipe guns can be investigated. The equipment and initial experimental results are described.

  1. Overview of D-T results from TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.G.; McGuire, K.M.; Arunasalam, V.

    1995-10-01

    Experiments with plasmas having nearly equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium have been carried out on TFTR. To date, the maximum fusion power has been 10.7 MW, using 39.5 MW of neutral-beam heating, in a supershot discharge and 6.7 MW in a high-{beta}{sub p} discharge following a current ramp-down. The fusion power density in the core of the plasma has reached 2.8 MWm{sup {minus}3}, exceeding that expected in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITTER). The energy confinement time, {tau}{sub E}, is observed to increase in D-T, relative to D plasmas, by 20% and the n{sub i}(O){center_dot}{tau}{sub E} product by 55%. The improvement in thermal confinement is caused primarily by a decrease in ion heat conductivity in both supershot and limiter-H-mode discharges. Extensive lithium pellet injection increased the confinement time to 0.27 s and enabled higher current operation in both supershot and high-{beta}{sub p} discharges. First measurements of the confined alpha particles have been performed and found to be in good agreement with TRANSP simulations assuming classical confinement. Measurements of the alpha ash profile have been compared with simulations using particle transport coefficients from helium gas puffing experiments. The loss of energetic alpha particles to a detector at the bottom of the vessel is well described by the first-orbit loss mechanism. No loss due to alpha-particle-driven instabilities has yet been observed. ICRF heating of a D-T plasma, using the second harmonic of tritium, has been demonstrated. D-T experiments on TFTR will continue both to explore the physics underlying the ITER design and to examine some of the physics issues associated with an advanced tokamak reactor.

  2. Initial H-mode experiments in DT plasmas on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, C.E.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Bell, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    H-modes have been obtained for the first time in high temperature, high poloidal beta plasmas with significant tritium concentrations in TFTR. Tritium is provided mainly through high power neutral beam injection (NBI) with powers up to 28 MW and beam energies of 90--110 keV. Transition to a circular limiter H-mode has been obtained following a rapid ramp down of the plasma current. Some of the highest values of {tau}{sub E} have been achieved on TFTR during the ELM-free phase of these DT H-mode plasmas. {tau}{sub E} enhancements greater than four times L-mode have been achieved.

  3. Spectroscopic identification of SNe 2004ds and SN 2004dt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2004-08-01

    A. Gal-Yam, D. Fox and S. Kulkarni, California Institute of Technology, report on red spectra (range 550-780 nm) obtained by Kulkarni and Fox on Aug. 13.5 UT at the 10-m Keck I telescope (+ LRIS). The spectrum of of SN 2004ds (IAUC #8386), shows a broad, well-developed P-Cyg H_alpha line and suggests that this is a type II supernova. The spectrum of SN 2004dt (IAUC #8386), shows the distinctive Si II 6100 absorption trough around 6100 Angstrom, indicating this is a young SN Ia.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Ternary Alloys for Fusion Breeding Blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B. William; Chiu, Ing L.

    2015-10-26

    Future fusion power plants based on the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel cycle will be required to breed the T fuel via neutron reactions with lithium, which will be incorporated in a breeding blanket that surrounds the fusion source. Recent work by LLNL proposed the used of liquid Li as the breeder in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. Subsequently, an LDRD was initiated to develop alternatives ternary alloy liquid metal breeders that have reduced chemical reactivity with water and air compared to pure Li. Part of the work plan was to experimentally investigate the phase diagrams of ternary alloys. Of particular interest was measurement of the melt temperature, which must be low enough to be compatible with the temperature limits of the steel used in the construction of the chamber and heat transfer system.

  5. Low-Convergence Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, Stephen; Vesey, Roger; Sinars, Daniel; Sefkow, Adam

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulations indicate that pulsed-power driven liner-implosions could produce substantial fusion yields if the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel is first magnetized and preheated [S.A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. As with all inertial fusion, the implosions could be degraded by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Since highly convergent implosions are more susceptible to this instability, we have explored the necessary conditions to obtain significant fusion yield with low-convergence liner-implosions. Such low-convergence implosions can be obtained if the fuel is sufficiently preheated and magnetized. We present analytic and numerical studies of laser plasma heating, which indicate that low convergence implosions should be possible with sufficient laser energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contra.

  6. Improvements in the CHERS system for DT experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, C.E.; Bell, R.; Synakowski, E.J.

    1995-03-01

    Improvements in the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) system have resulted in accurate measurements of T{sub i} and V{sub {phi}} profiles during DT experiments. These include moving the spectrometer detector array and electronics farther away from the tokamak to a low neutron flux location. This relocation has also improved access to all components of the system. Also, a nonplasma-viewing calibration fiber system was added to monitor the change in fiber transmission due to the high flux DT neutrons. Narrowband filtered light transmitted through the calibration fiber is now used as a reference for the VO measurement. At the highest neutron flux of {approximately} 2.5 {times} 10{sup 18} neutrons/see (fusion power {approximately} 6.2 MW) a modest 5% decrease in fiber transmission was observed. Corrections for transmission loss are made and T{sub i} (r,t) and absolute V{sub phi} (r,t) profiles are automatically calculated within four minutes of every shot.

  7. Isotopic mass and alpha heating effects in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Bell, M.G.; Mansfield, D.K.

    1994-09-01

    Sets of similar TFTR discharges with varying amounts of D and T are compared. The T content is altered by varying the mix of D and T NBI at approximately constant total NBI power. The total plasma current, toroidal field, central Z{sub eff}, and wall conditions are very similar in each set. The electron density profiles are approximately similar. The sets contain pairs of discharges with D-only and DT-NBI. Several sets also contain discharges with T-only NBI. The discharges are analyzed using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Good agreement with measured parameters is achieved. Profiles are computed for the isotopic mass of the hydrogenic thermal species A, and for the hydrogenic thermal plus beam species A{sub tot}. Their volume averages increase approximately linearly as the fraction of T-NBI power increases, and they are slightly peaked for DT and T-only NBI discharges. The total energy and the total energy confinement time increase approximately linearly with A{sub tot} up to 30%. The beam fraction of the total energy at 0.5 sec of NBI remains relatively constant, {approx} 40--50% as A{sub tot} varies. The thermal ion fraction increases slightly, and the electron fraction decreases. The isotopic and alpha heating effects contribute in roughly equal amounts to the increase in central T{sub e}.

  8. eDT and Model-based Configuration of 12GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Dennison L.

    2015-09-01

    This poster will discuss model-driven setup of CEBAF for the 12GeV era, focusing on the elegant Download Tool (eDT). eDT is a new operator tool that generates magnet design setpoints for various machine energies and pass configurations. eDT was developed in the effort towards a process for reducing machine configuration time and reproducibility by way of an accurate accelerator model.

  9. DT-13 attenuates human lung cancer metastasis via regulating NMIIA activity under hypoxia condition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Hui; Lin, Sen-Sen; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Ren-Ping; Khan, Ghulam Jilany; Du, Hong-Zhi; Mao, Ting-Ting; Yu, Bo-Yang; Li, Rui-Ming; Yuan, Sheng-Tao; Sun, Li

    2016-08-01

    Cancer metastasis plays a major role in tumor deterioration. Metastatic processes are known to be regulated by hypoxic microenvironment and non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA). DT-13, a bioactive saponin monomer isolated from Ophiopogon japonicus, has been reported to inhibit various cancer metastasis, but whether NMIIA is involved in the anti-metastatic activity of DT-13 under hypoxia remains to be determined. Thus, this study aims to clarify the role of DT-13 in regulating 95D cell metastasis under hypoxic microenvironment and to further investigate whether NMIIA is involved in the anti-metastatic mechanism of DT-13. We found that DT-13 significantly inhibited 95D cells metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, hypoxia significantly inhibited the expression of NMIIA and redistributed NMIIA to the cell periphery, whereas DT-13 reversed the hypoxic effects by upregulating the expression of NMIIA. Moreover, DT-13 treatment redistributed NMIIA to the nuclear periphery and reduced the formation of F-actin in 95D cells. In addition, we found that the Raf-ERK1/2 signaling pathway is involved in regulation of NMIIA by DT-13. Collectively, these findings support NMIIA as a target of DT-13 to prevent lung cancer metastasis. PMID:27374701

  10. Method and apparatus to produce and maintain a thick, flowing, liquid lithium first wall for toroidal magnetic confinement DT fusion reactors

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.

  11. High-Yield D-T Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Wells, R.P.; Reijonen, J.

    2006-11-15

    A high-yield D-T neutron generator has been developed for neutron interrogation in homeland security applications such as cargo screening. The generator has been designed as a sealed tube with a performance goal of producing 5 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} n/s over a long lifetime. The key generator components developed are a radio-frequency (RF) driven ion source and a beam-loaded neutron production target that can handle a beam power of 10 kW. The ion source can provide a 100 mA D{sup +}/T{sup +} beam current with a high fraction of atomic species and can be pulsed up to frequencies of several kHz for pulsed neutron generator operation. Testing in D-D operation has been started.

  12. Developing a commercial production process for 500,000 targets per day: A key challenge for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Goodin, D.T.; Alexander, N.B.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Bozek, A.S.; Brown, L.C.; Flint, G.W.; Kilkenny, J.D.; McQuillan, B.W.; Nikroo, A.; Paguio, R.R.; Petzoldt, R.W.; Schroen, D.G.; Sheliak, J.D.; Vermillion, B.A.; Carlson, L.C.; Goodman, P.; Maksaereekul, W.; Raffray, R.; Spalding, J.; Tillack, M.S.

    2006-05-15

    As is true for current-day commercial power plants, a reliable and economic fuel supply is essential for the viability of future Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) [Energy From Inertial Fusion, edited by W. J. Hogan (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1995)] power plants. While IFE power plants will utilize deuterium-tritium (DT) bred in-house as the fusion fuel, the 'target' is the vehicle by which the fuel is delivered to the reaction chamber. Thus the cost of the target becomes a critical issue in regard to fuel cost. Typically six targets per second, or about 500 000/day are required for a nominal 1000 MW(e) power plant. The electricity value within a typical target is about $3, allocating 10% for fuel cost gives only 30 cents per target as-delivered to the chamber center. Complicating this economic goal, the target supply has many significant technical challenge - fabricating the precision fuel-containing capsule, filling it with DT, cooling it to cryogenic temperatures, layering the DT into a uniform layer, characterizing the finished product, accelerating it to high velocity for injection into the chamber, and tracking the target to steer the driver beams to meet it with micron-precision at the chamber center.

  13. Design of the NIF Cryogenic Target System

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, C; Baltz, J; Malsbury, T; Atkinson, D; Brugmann, V; Coffield, F; Edwards, O; Haid, B; Locke, S; Shiromizu, S; Skulina, K

    2008-06-10

    The United States Department of Energy has embarked on a campaign to conduct credible fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 2010. The target assembly specified for this campaign requires the formation of a deuterium/tritium (DT) fuel ice layer in a 2 mm diameter capsule at the center of a 9 mm long by 5 mm diameter cylinder, called a hohlraum. The ice layer must be formed and maintained at temperatures below 20 K. At laser shot time, the target is positioned at the center of the NIF target chamber, aligned to the laser beams and held stable to less than 7 {micro}m rms. We have completed the final design of the Cryogenic Target System and are integrating the devices necessary to create, characterize and position the cryogenic target for ignition experiments. These designs, with supporting analysis and prototype test results, will be presented.

  14. Maintenance concept development for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), located at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, will be the next major experimental machine in the US Fusion Program. Its use of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel requires the use of remote handling technology to carry out maintenance operations on the machine. These operations consist of removing and repairing such components as diagnostic equipment modules by using remotely operated maintenance equipment. The major equipment being developed for maintenance external to the vacuum vessel includes both bridge-mounted and floor-mounted manipulator systems. Additionally, decontamination (decon) equipment, hot cell repair facilities, and equipment for handling and packaging solid radioactive waste (rad-waste) are being developed. Recent design activities have focused on establishing maintenance system interfaces with the facility design, developing manipulator system requirements, and using mock-ups to support the tokamak configuration design. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Cryogenic target system for hydrogen layering

    SciTech Connect

    Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Atkinson, D.; Baisden, P.; Bertolini, L.; Boehm, K; Chernov, A.; Coffee, K.; Coffield, F.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edwards, O.; Fair, J.; Fedorov, M.; Fry, J.; Gibson, C.; Haid, B.; Holunga, D.; Kohut, T.; Lewis, T.; Malsbury, T.; Mapoles, E.; Sater, J.; Skulina, K.; Trummer, D.; Walters, C.

    2015-11-24

    Here, a cryogenic target positioning system was designed and installed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber. This instrument incorporates the ability to fill, form, and characterize the NIF targets with hydrogen isotopes needed for ignition experiments inside the NIF target bay then transport and position them in the target chamber. This effort brought to fruition years of research in growing and metrologizing high-quality hydrogen fuel layers and landed it in an especially demanding operations environment in the NIF facility. D-T (deuterium-tritium) layers for NIF ignition experiments have extremely tight specifications and must be grown in a very highly constrained environment: a NIF ignition target inside a cryogenic target positioner inside the NIF target bay. Exquisite control of temperature, pressure, contaminant level, and thermal uniformity are necessary throughout seed formation and layer growth to create an essentially-groove-free single crystal layer.

  16. Onset of hydrodynamic mix in high-velocity, highly compressed inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Ma, T; Patel, P K; Izumi, N; Springer, P T; Key, M H; Atherton, L J; Benedetti, L R; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Celliers, P M; Cerjan, C J; Clark, D S; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Döppner, T; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Glenn, S; Grim, G; Haan, S W; Hammel, B A; Hicks, D; Hsing, W W; Jones, O S; Khan, S F; Kilkenny, J D; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; Le Pape, S; MacGowan, B J; Mackinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; Meezan, N B; Moody, J D; Pak, A; Parham, T; Park, H-S; Ralph, J E; Regan, S P; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Ross, J S; Spears, B K; Smalyuk, V; Suter, L J; Tommasini, R; Town, R P; Weber, S V; Lindl, J D; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Moses, E I

    2013-08-23

    Deuterium-tritium inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility have demonstrated yields ranging from 0.8 to 7×10(14), and record fuel areal densities of 0.7 to 1.3 g/cm2. These implosions use hohlraums irradiated with shaped laser pulses of 1.5-1.9 MJ energy. The laser peak power and duration at peak power were varied, as were the capsule ablator dopant concentrations and shell thicknesses. We quantify the level of hydrodynamic instability mix of the ablator into the hot spot from the measured elevated absolute x-ray emission of the hot spot. We observe that DT neutron yield and ion temperature decrease abruptly as the hot spot mix mass increases above several hundred ng. The comparison with radiation-hydrodynamic modeling indicates that low mode asymmetries and increased ablator surface perturbations may be responsible for the current performance. PMID:24010449

  17. Stack and area tritium monitoring systems for the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR)

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, G.G.; Meixler, L.D.; Sissingh, R.A.P.

    1991-01-01

    TFTR Tritium Stack and Area Monitoring Systems have been developed to provide the required level of reliability in a cost effective manner consistent with the mission of the Tritium Handling System on TFTR. Personnel protection, environmental responsibility, and tritium containing system integrity have been the considerations in system design. During the Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) experiments on TFTR, tritium will be used for the first time as one of the fuels. All of the tritium bearing systems will have potentially releasable inventories. Although the tritium inventories (total on-site inventory is limited to 50,000 Ci) are low, the consequences of a release may still be significant. For that reason, a thorough TFTR tritium monitoring program has been initiated. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Physics data base for the Beam Plasma Neutron Source (BPNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coensgen, F. H.; Casper, T. A.; Correll, D. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Molvik, A. W.

    1990-10-01

    A 14-MeV deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron source for accelerated end-of-life testing of fusion reactor materials has been designed on the basis of a linear two-component collisional plasma system. An intense flux (up to 5 x 10(exp 18)/sq m sec) of 14 MeV neutrons is produced in a fully ionized high-density (n sub e approx. = 3 x 10(exp 21) per cu m) tritium target by transverse injection of 60 MW of neutral beam power. Power deposited in the target is removed by thermal electron conduction to large end chambers, where it is deposited in gaseous plasma collectors. We show in this paper that the major physics issues have now been experimentally demonstrated. These include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and stability, microstability, startup, fueling, Spitzer electron thermal conductivity, and power deposition in a gaseous plasma collector. However, an integrated system was not demonstrated.

  19. Conceptual Design of a Z-Pinch Fusion Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert; Polsgrove, Tara; Fincher, Sharon; Fabinski, Leo; Maples, Charlotte; Miernik, Janie; Stratham, Geoffrey; Cassibry, Jason; Cortez, Ross; Turner, Matthew; Santarius, John; Percy, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a project that aims to develop a conceptual design for a Z-pinch thruster, that could be applied to develop advanced thruster designs which promise high thrust/high specific impulse propulsion. Overviews shows the concept of the design, which use annular nozzles with deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel and a Lithium mixture as a cathode, Charts show the engine performance as a function of linear mass, nozzle performance (i.e., plasma segment trajectories), and mission analysis for possible Mars and Jupiter missions using this concept for propulsion. Slides show views of the concepts for the vehicle configuration, thrust coil configuration, the power management system, the structural analysis of the magnetic nozzle, the thermal management system, and the avionics suite,

  20. Cryogenic target system for hydrogen layering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Atkinson, D.; Baisden, P.; Bertolini, L.; Boehm, K; Chernov, A.; Coffee, K.; Coffield, F.; Dylla-Spears, R.; et al

    2015-11-24

    Here, a cryogenic target positioning system was designed and installed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber. This instrument incorporates the ability to fill, form, and characterize the NIF targets with hydrogen isotopes needed for ignition experiments inside the NIF target bay then transport and position them in the target chamber. This effort brought to fruition years of research in growing and metrologizing high-quality hydrogen fuel layers and landed it in an especially demanding operations environment in the NIF facility. D-T (deuterium-tritium) layers for NIF ignition experiments have extremely tight specifications and must be grown in a very highlymore » constrained environment: a NIF ignition target inside a cryogenic target positioner inside the NIF target bay. Exquisite control of temperature, pressure, contaminant level, and thermal uniformity are necessary throughout seed formation and layer growth to create an essentially-groove-free single crystal layer.« less

  1. Enhanced cytotoxicity of mitomycin C in human tumour cells with inducers of DT-diaphorase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Doherty, G P; Leith, M K; Curphey, T J; Begleiter, A

    1999-01-01

    DT-diaphorase is a two-electron reducing enzyme that activates the bioreductive anti-tumour agent, mitomycin C (MMC). Cell lines having elevated levels of DT-diaphorase are generally more sensitive to MMC. We have shown that DT-diaphorase can be induced in human tumour cells by a number of compounds, including 1,2-dithiole-3-thione. In this study, we investigated whether induction of DT-diaphorase could enhance the cytotoxic activity of MMC in six human tumour cell lines representing four tumour types. DT-diaphorase was induced by many dietary inducers, including propyl gallate, dimethyl maleate, dimethyl fumarate and sulforaphane. The cytotoxicity of MMC was significantly increased in four tumour lines with the increase ranging from 1.4- to threefold. In contrast, MMC activity was not increased in SK-MEL-28 human melanoma cells and AGS human gastric cancer cells, cell lines that have high base levels of DT-diaphorase activity. Toxicity to normal human marrow cells was increased by 50% when MMC was combined with 1,2-dithiole-3-thione, but this increase was small in comparison with the threefold increase in cytotoxicity to tumour cells. This study demonstrates that induction of DT-diaphorase can increase the cytotoxic activity of MMC in human tumour cell lines, and suggests that it may be possible to use non-toxic inducers of DT-diaphorase to enhance the efficacy of bioreductive anti-tumour agents. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10376975

  2. Measurements of DT and DD neutron yields by neutron activation on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Larson, A.R.; LeMunyan, G.; Loughlin, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    A variety of elemental foils have been activated by neutron fluence from TFTR under conditions with the DT neutron yield per shot ranging from 10{sup 12} to over 10{sup 18}, and with the DT/(DD+DT) neutron ratio varying from 0.5% (from triton burnup) to unity. Linear response over this large dynamic range is obtained by reducing the mass of the foils and increasing the cooling time, all while accepting greatly improved counting statistics. Effects on background gamma-ray lines from foil-capsule-material contaminants, and the resulting lower limits on activation foil mass, have been determined. DT neutron yields from dosimetry standard reactions on aluminum, chromium, iron, nickel, zirconium, and indium are in agreement within the {+-}9% (one-sigma) accuracy of the measurements; also agreeing are yields from silicon foils using the ACTL library cross-section, while the ENDF/B-V library has too low a cross-section. Preliminary results from a variety of other threshold reactions are presented. Use of the {sup 115}In(n.n{prime}) {sup 115m}In reaction (0.42 times as sensitive to DT neutrons as DD neutrons) in conjunction with pure-DT reactions allows a determination of the DT/(DD+DT) ratio in trace tritium or low-power tritium beam experiments.

  3. DT-diaphorase induction by lead acetate in the liver of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Arizono, K.; Sugiura, S.; Miyazato, S.; Takiguchi, M.; Ariyoshi, T.

    1996-07-01

    DT-diaphorase(NAD(P)H:(quinone acceptor)oxidoreductase) is a cytosolic enzyme, which is localized mainly in liver, kidney, and gastrointestinal tract suggested that DT-diaphorase has a role as a cellular control devise against radical formation. Moreover it is considered that DT-diaphorase has an important role in the cellular defense mechanism against cytotoxic and mutagenic compounds. This enzyme is induced by aromatic hydrocarbons such as 3-methylcholanthrene and antioxidants, and is an interesting enzyme from drug metabolism and toxicological aspects. Another series of studies first reported that the treatment of organotin compounds induces hepatic DT-diaphorase activity accompanied by thymus atrophy in rats. Second, the induction ability of hepatic DT-diaphorase of rats treated with lead acetate (PbAc) is high among various metals. Although organotin compounds produce both thymus atrophy and increased DT-diaphorase activity similar to 3-MC, PbAc causes no significant change in thymus weight. These findings suggest that there is a different mechanism involved in the induction of DT-diaphorase with PbAc than with organotin compounds. In the present study, the induction mechanism of DT-diaphorase by PbAc in the liver of rats was investigated. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Measurements of DT and DD neutron yields by neutron activation on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Larson, A.R.; LeMunyan, G.; Loughlin, M.J.

    1994-05-05

    A variety of elemental foils have been activated by neutron fluence from TFTR under conditions with the DT neutron yield per shot ranging from 10{sup 12} to over 10{sup 18}, and with the DT/(DD+DT) neutron ratio varying from 0.5% (from triton burnup) to unity. Linear response over this large dynamic range is obtained by reducing the mass of the foils and increasing the cooling time, all while accepting greatly improved counting statistics. Effects on background gamma-ray lines from foil-capsule-material contaminants. and the resulting lower limits on activation foil mass, have been determined. DT neutron yields from dosimetry standard reactions on aluminum, chromium, iron, nickel, zirconium, and indium are in agreement within the {plus_minus}9% (one-sigma,) accuracy of the measurements: also agreeing are yields from silicon foils using the ACTL library cross-section. While the ENDF/B-V library has too low a cross-section. Preliminary results from a variety of other threshold reactions are presented. Use of the {sup 115}In(n,n) {sup 115m}In reaction (0.42 times as sensitive to DT neutrons as DD neutrons) in conjunction with pure-DT reactions allows a determination of the DT/(DD+DT) ratio in trace tritium or low-power tritium beam experiments.

  5. Polarized advanced fuel reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    The d-/sup 3/He reaction has the same spin dependence as the d-t reaction. It produces no neutrons, so that if the d-d reactivity could be reduced, it would lead to a neutron-lean reactor. The current understanding of the possible suppression of the d-d reactivity by spin polarization is discussed. The question as to whether a suppression is possible is still unresolved. Other advanced fuel reactions are briefly discussed. 11 refs.

  6. DT Gem - ein RRab-Stern mit leichtem Blazhko-Effekt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maintz, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    CCD observations of the RRab star DT Gem (RA = 06 06 58.09, DE = +25 24 02.0 (2000)) were obtained at my private observatory. For DT Gem 8 maxima were obtained. The amplitude of the light-curve varies epoch to epoch. So does the stepness of the rising and descending branch also. These variations are due to a small Blazhko effect. The observations will be continued to find the Blazhko period. Elements of DT Gem are revised as: DT Gem: Max = 2456355.4134 + 0.611283 * E, which is shorter than given in GCVS. Phased lightcurves of DT Gem provided by IOMC, SuperWASP, ASAS and NSVS are given.

  7. Intra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumour (DT) with Pelvic Extension-A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sathish Selva; Ramachandran, Padmini; G, Veena; Madhusudhan, Napa; Kumbhar, Uday

    2014-01-01

    Desmoid Tumour (DT) is a rare benign, myofibroblastic tumour originating from muscle fascia with tendency to recur but, it rarely metastasizes. We are reporting here a case of DT that presented as an intra-abdominal mass with pelvic extension in a patient who underwent hysterectomy for fibroid uterus seventeen years ago. A clinical diagnosis of ovarian malignancy was made. Ovarian tumour markers for surface epithelial and germ cell tumours were negative. Imaging studies suggested DT and the same was excised surgically. A histopathological diagnosis of DT was made and confirmed with immunohistochemistry (IHC) markers. DT should always be considered especially in female patients with previous history of surgery. A complete surgical excision is the treatment of choice with recurrent cases requiring radiotherapy. A differential diagnosis like sarcoma and further toxic chemotherapy can be avoided with careful histopathological evaluation and IHC confirmation of DTs. PMID:24596759

  8. Analysis of the dV/dt effect on an IGBT gate circuit in IPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Hua; Zehong, Li; Bo, Zhang; Xiangjun, Huang; Dekai, Cheng

    2013-04-01

    The effect of dV/dt on the IGBT gate circuit in IPM is analyzed both by simulation and experiment. It is shown that a voltage slope applied across the collector-emitter terminals of the IGBT can induce a gate voltage spike through the feedback action of the parasitic capacitances of the IGBT. The dV/dt rate, gate-collector capacitance, gate-emitter capacitance and gate resistance have a direct influence on this voltage spike. The device with a higher dV/dt rate, gate-collector capacitance, gate resistance and lower gate-emitter capacitance is more prone to dV/dt induced self turn-on. By optimizing these parameters, the dV/dt induced voltage spike can be effectively controlled.

  9. Bioactivation of mitomycin antibiotics by aerobic and hypoxic Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing DT-diaphorase.

    PubMed

    Belcourt, M F; Hodnick, W F; Rockwell, S; Sartorelli, A C

    1996-06-28

    DT-Diaphorase catalyzes a two-electron reduction of mitomycin C (MC) and porfiromycin (POR) to reactive species. Many cell lines that overexpress DT-diaphorase and are sensitive to the mitomycins are protected from the aerobic cytotoxicity of these drugs by the DT-diaphorase inhibitor dicumarol. The cytoprotective properties of this relatively non-specific inhibitor, however, vanish under hypoxic conditions. To ascertain the role of DT-diaphorase in mitomycin bioactivation and cytotoxicity in living cells, a rat liver DT-diaphorase cDNA was transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells. MC was equitoxic to the parental cells under oxygenated and hypoxic conditions. In contrast, POR was less toxic than MC to these cells under aerobic conditions, but significantly more toxic than MC under hypoxia. Two DT-diaphorase-transfected clones displayed increases in DT-diaphorase activity of 126- and 133-fold over parental cells. The activities of other oxidoreductases implicated in mitomycin bioreduction were unchanged. MC was more toxic to both DT-diaphorase-transfected lines than to parental cells; the toxicity of MC to the transfected lines was similar in air and hypoxia. POR was also more toxic to the DT-diaphorase-elevated clones than to parental cells under oxygenated conditions. Under hypoxia, however, the toxicity of POR to the transfected clones was unchanged from that of parental cells. The findings implicate DT-diaphorase in mitomycin bioactivation in living cells, but suggest that this enzyme does not contribute to the differential toxicity of MC or POR in air and hypoxia. PMID:8687482

  10. pH-dependent inactivation of DT-diaphorase by mitomycin C and porfiromycin.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D; Beall, H; Kasai, M; Arai, H; Gibson, N W; Ross, D

    1993-12-01

    Mitomycin C and porfiromycin were found to inactivate rat hepatic DT-diaphorase. Inactivation was pH dependent; little inactivation was detected at pH 5.8, but inactivation increased as the pH was raised to 7.8. Inactivation was concentration and time dependent and displayed pseudo-first-order kinetics. Inactivation was NADH dependent, indicating that reductive metabolism was necessary for inhibition. [3H]Mitomycin C was covalently bound to DT-diaphorase during inhibition, and the stoichiometry for inactivation of DT-diaphorase by mitomycin C was approximately 0.8 nmol of mitomycin C bound/nmol of enzyme. A higher molecular mass product (60 kDa) was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis of DT-diaphorase preincubated with NADH and mitomycin C at pH 7.8, suggesting that mitomycin C is capable of cross-linking DT-diaphorase. The kinetics of inhibition, requirement for NADH for inhibition, covalent binding of [3H] mitomycin C to DT-diaphorase, and approximate 1:1 stoichiometry suggest that this inactivation process may be mechanism based. Inhibition of DT-diaphorase by mitomycin C and porfiromycin is not limited to a cell-free system and could also be observed in HT-29 cells in culture at pH 7.2. Bioactivation of mitomycin C or porfiromycin by DT-diaphorase is favored at lower pH, whereas at higher pH values enzyme alkylation and inactivation of DT-diaphorase occur. These data suggest that the success of attempts to exploit the elevated DT-diaphorase content of certain human tumors for improved chemotherapeutic response using mitomycin C or porfiromycin will depend on intracellular pH. PMID:8264549

  11. Technique for Forming Solid D2 and D-T Layers for Shock Timing Experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sater, J. D.; Espinosa-Loza, F.; Kozioziemski, B.; Mapoles, E. R.

    2016-07-11

    Capsule implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are driven with a carefully tailored laser pulse that delivers a sequence of shocks to the ablator and fuel. In order to ensure the shocks converge at the desired position, the shock strength and velocity are measured in experimental platforms referred to as keyhole targets. We made shock measurements on capsules completely filled with liquid deuterium for the solid deuterium tritide (D-T) layer campaigns. Modeling has been used to extend these results to form an estimate of the shock properties in solid D-T layers. Furthermore, to verify and improve the surrogacymore » of the liquid-filled keyhole measurements, we have developed a technique to form a solid layer inside the keyhole capsule. The layer is typically uniform over a 400-μm-diameter area. This is sufficient to allow direct measurement of the shock velocity. This layering technique has been successfully applied to 13 experiments on the NIF. The technique may also be applicable to fast-igniter experiments since some proposed designs resemble keyhole targets. We discuss our method in detail and give representative results.« less

  12. Using HT and DT gamma rays to diagnose mix in Omega capsule implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, M. J.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A. M.; Zylstra, A.; Hammel, B. A.; Sepke, S. M.; Leatherland, A.; Gales, S.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental evidence [1] indicates that shell material can be driven into the core of Omega capsule implosions on the same time scale as the initial convergent shock. It has been hypothesized that shock-generated temperatures at the fuel/shell interface in thin exploding pusher capsules diffusively drives shell material into the gas core between the time of shock passage and bang time. We propose a method to temporally resolve and observe the evolution of shell material into the capsule core as a function of fuel/shell interface temperature (which can be varied by varying the capsule shell thickness). Our proposed method uses a CD plastic capsule filled with 50/50 HT gas and diagnosed using gas Cherenkov detection (GCD) to temporally resolve both the HT “clean” and DT “mix” gamma ray burn histories. Simulations using Hydra [2] for an Omega CD-lined capsule with a sub-micron layer of the inside surface of the shell pre-mixed into a fraction of the gas region produce gamma reaction history profiles that are sensitive to the depth to which this material is mixed. An experiment to observe these differences as a function of capsule shell thickness is proposed to determine if interface mixing is consistent with thermal diffusion λii∼T2/Z2ρ at the gas/shell interface. Since hydrodynamic mixing from shell perturbations, such as the mounting stalk and glue, could complicate these types of capsule-averaged temporal measurements, simulations including their effects also have been performed showing minimal perturbation of the hot spot geometry.

  13. Assessing Neutron Generator Output Using Delayed Activation of Silicon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron generators are used for elemental composition analysis and medical applications. Often composition is determined by examining elemental ratios in which the knowledge of the neutron flux is unnecessary. However, the absolute value of the neutron flux is required when t...

  14. Reactor for boron fusion with picosecond ultrahigh power laser pulses and ultrahigh magnetic field trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, G. H.; Hora, H.; Kirchhoff, G.

    2016-05-01

    Compared with the deuterium tritium (DT) fusion, the environmentally clean fusion of protons with 11B is extremely difficult. When instead of nanosecond laser pulses for thermal-ablating driven ignition, picosecond pulses are used, a drastic change by nonlinearity results in ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks. This radically changes to economic boron fusion by a measured new avalanche ignition.

  15. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    SciTech Connect

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Meier, W.R.

    1982-08-17

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. Produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithiumceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  16. Catalyzed deuterium fueled tandem mirror reactor assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrott, D.

    1985-01-01

    This study was part of a Department of Energy supported alternate fusion fuels program at Science Applications International Corp. The purpose of this portion of the study is to perform an assessment of a conceptual tandem mirror reactor (TMR) that is fueled by the catalyzed-deuterium (Cat-d) fuel cycle with respect to the physics, technology, safety, and cost. Achievable stable betas and magnet configurations are found to be comparable for the Cat-d and d-t fueled TMR. A comparison with respect to cost, reactor performance, and technology requirements for a Cat-d fueled reactor and a comparable d-t fueled reactor such as MARS is also made.

  17. Asymmetric-shell ignition capsule design to tune the low-mode asymmetry during the peak drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianfa; Dai, Zhensheng; Song, Peng; Zou, Shiyang; Ye, Wenhua; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Shaoping

    2016-08-01

    The low-mode radiation flux asymmetry in the hohlraum is a main source of performance degradation in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosion experiments. To counteract the deleterious effects of the large positive P2 flux asymmetry during the peak drive, this paper develops a new tuning method called asymmetric-shell ignition capsule design which adopts the intentionally asymmetric CH ablator layer or deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. A series of two-dimensional implosion simulations have been performed, and the results show that the intentionally asymmetric DT ice layer can significantly improve the fuel ρR symmetry, hot spot shape, hot spot internal energy, and the final neutron yield compared to the spherical capsule. This indicates that the DT asymmetric-shell capsule design is an effective tuning method, while the CH ablator asymmetric-shell capsule could not correct the fuel ρR asymmetry, and it is not as effective as the DT asymmetric-shell capsule design.

  18. Performance of high-convergence, layered DT implosions with extended-duration pulses at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Smalyuk, V A; Atherton, L J; Benedetti, L R; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Bond, E; Bradley, D K; Caggiano, J; Callahan, D A; Casey, D T; Celliers, P M; Cerjan, C J; Clark, D; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Döppner, T; Edgell, D H; Edwards, M J; Frenje, J; Gatu-Johnson, M; Glebov, V Y; Glenn, S; Glenzer, S H; Grim, G; Haan, S W; Hammel, B A; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hatchett, S; Hicks, D G; Hsing, W W; Izumi, N; Jones, O S; Key, M H; Khan, S F; Kilkenny, J D; Kline, J L; Knauer, J; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; Le Pape, S; Lindl, J D; Ma, T; MacGowan, B J; Mackinnon, A J; MacPhee, A G; McNaney, J; Meezan, N B; Moody, J D; Moore, A; Moran, M; Moses, E I; Pak, A; Parham, T; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Petrasso, R; Ralph, J E; Regan, S P; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Ross, J S; Spears, B K; Springer, P T; Suter, L J; Tommasini, R; Town, R P; Weber, S V; Widmann, K

    2013-11-22

    Radiation-driven, low-adiabat, cryogenic DT layered plastic capsule implosions were carried out on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to study the sensitivity of performance to peak power and drive duration. An implosion with extended drive and at reduced peak power of 350 TW achieved the highest compression with fuel areal density of ~1.3±0.1 g/cm2, representing a significant step from previously measured ~1.0 g/cm2 toward a goal of 1.5 g/cm2. Future experiments will focus on understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and mix, and improving symmetry required to reach the threshold for thermonuclear ignition on NIF. PMID:24313493

  19. Performance of High-Convergence, Layered DT Implosions on Power-Scaling Experiments at National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bleuel, D.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; et al

    2013-10-19

    The radiation-driven, low-adiabat, cryogenic DT layered plastic capsule implosions were carried out on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to study the sensitivity of performance to peak power and drive duration. An implosion with extended drive and at reduced peak power of 350 TW achieved the highest compression with fuel areal density of ~1.3±0.1 g/cm 2, representing a significant step from previously measured ~1.0 g/cm2 toward a goal of 1.5 g/cm 2. Moreover, for future experiments will focus on understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and mix, and improving symmetry required to reach the threshold for thermonuclear ignition on NIF.

  20. Performance of High-Convergence, Layered DT Implosions on Power-Scaling Experiments at National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bleuel, D.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D.; Dewald, E. L.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Edgell, D. H.; Edwards, M. J.; Frenje, J.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Grim, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hartouni, E.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S.; Hicks, D.; Hsing, W. W.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Key, M. H.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Pape, S. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A.; Moran, M.; Moses, E. I.; Pak, A.; Parham, T; Park, H. -S.; Patel, P. K.; Petrasso, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. P.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Suter, L J; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P.; Weber, S. V.; Widmann, K.

    2013-10-19

    The radiation-driven, low-adiabat, cryogenic DT layered plastic capsule implosions were carried out on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to study the sensitivity of performance to peak power and drive duration. An implosion with extended drive and at reduced peak power of 350 TW achieved the highest compression with fuel areal density of ~1.3±0.1 g/cm 2, representing a significant step from previously measured ~1.0 g/cm2 toward a goal of 1.5 g/cm 2. Moreover, for future experiments will focus on understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and mix, and improving symmetry required to reach the threshold for thermonuclear ignition on NIF.

  1. Optimization Of Phase-Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging Of D-T Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B

    2005-06-17

    Phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging has been demonstrated for characterization of D-T layers inside of beryllium shells. These first demonstrations used both scintillator and direct-detection imaging. This memo details tradeoffs between the two methods in order to optimize the imaging. The guiding principle for optimization is to minimize the exposure time while maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio at the D-T solid-vapor interface. Direct-detection and scintillator performance are comparable when imaging the full capsule. However, a scintillator allows for higher-resolution images necessary for studying local defects in the D-T layer.

  2. Branched Lateral Tail Fiber Organization in T5-Like Bacteriophages DT57C and DT571/2 is Revealed by Genetic and Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Golomidova, Alla K; Kulikov, Eugene E; Prokhorov, Nikolai S; Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo С; Knirel, Yuriy A; Kostryukova, Elena S; Tarasyan, Karina K; Letarov, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    The T5-like siphoviruses DT57C and DT571/2, isolated from horse feces, are very closely related to each other, and most of their structural proteins are also nearly identical to T5 phage. Their LTFs (L-shaped tail fibers), however, are composed of two proteins, LtfA and LtfB, instead of the single Ltf of bacteriophage T5. In silico and mutant analysis suggests a possible branched structure of DT57C and DT571/2 LTFs, where the LtfB protein is connected to the phage tail via the LtfA protein and with both proteins carrying receptor recognition domains. Such adhesin arrangement has not been previously recognized in siphoviruses. The LtfA proteins of our phages are found to recognize different host O-antigen types: E. coli O22-like for DT57C phage and E. coli O87 for DT571/2. LtfB proteins are identical in both phages and recognize another host receptor, most probably lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O81 type. In these two bacteriophages, LTF function is essential to penetrate the shield of the host's O-antigens. We also demonstrate that LTF-mediated adsorption becomes superfluous when the non-specific cell protection by O-antigen is missing, allowing the phages to bind directly to their common secondary receptor, the outer membrane protein BtuB. The LTF independent adsorption was also demonstrated on an O22-like host mutant missing O-antigen O-acetylation, thus showing the biological value of this O-antigen modification for cell protection against phages. PMID:26805872

  3. A new noninvasive device for measuring central ejection dP/dt mathematical foundation of cardiac dP/dt measurement using a model for a collapsible artery.

    PubMed

    Gorenberg, Miguel; Rotztein, Hector; Marmor, Alon

    2009-03-01

    We have developed a novel non-invasive device for the measurement of one of the most sensitive indices of myocardial contractility as represented by the rate of increase of intraventricular pressure (left ventricular dP/dt and arterial dP/dt performance index (dP/dt(ejc)). Up till now, these parameters could be obtained only by invasive catheterization methods. The new technique is based on the concept of applying multiple successive occlusive pressures on the brachial artery from peak systole to diastole using a inflatable cuff and plotting the values against time intervals that leads to the reconstruction of the central aortic pressure noninvasively. The following describes the computer simulator developed for providing a mathematical foundation of the new sensor. At the core of the simulator lies a hemodynamic model of the blood flow on an artery under externally applied pressure. The purpose of the model is to reproduce the experimental results obtained in studies on patients (Gorenberg et al. in Cardiovasc Eng: 305-311, 2004; Gorenberg et al. in Emerg med J 22 (7): 486-489, 2005) and a animal model where ischemia resulted from balloon inflation during coronary catheterization (Gorenberg and Marmor in J Med Eng Technol, 2006) and to describe correlations between the dP/dt(ejc) and other hemodynamic variables. The model has successfully reproduced the trends observed experimentally, providing a solid in-depth understanding of the hemodynamics involved in the new measurement. A high correlation between the dP/dt(ejc) and the rate of pressure rise in the aorta during the ejection phase was observed. dP/dt(ejc) dependence on other hemodynamic parameters was also investigated. PMID:19259812

  4. Branched Lateral Tail Fiber Organization in T5-Like Bacteriophages DT57C and DT571/2 is Revealed by Genetic and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Golomidova, Alla K.; Kulikov, Eugene E.; Prokhorov, Nikolai S.; Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo С.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Kostryukova, Elena S.; Tarasyan, Karina K.; Letarov, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    The T5-like siphoviruses DT57C and DT571/2, isolated from horse feces, are very closely related to each other, and most of their structural proteins are also nearly identical to T5 phage. Their LTFs (L-shaped tail fibers), however, are composed of two proteins, LtfA and LtfB, instead of the single Ltf of bacteriophage T5. In silico and mutant analysis suggests a possible branched structure of DT57C and DT571/2 LTFs, where the LtfB protein is connected to the phage tail via the LtfA protein and with both proteins carrying receptor recognition domains. Such adhesin arrangement has not been previously recognized in siphoviruses. The LtfA proteins of our phages are found to recognize different host O-antigen types: E. coli O22-like for DT57C phage and E. coli O87 for DT571/2. LtfB proteins are identical in both phages and recognize another host receptor, most probably lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O81 type. In these two bacteriophages, LTF function is essential to penetrate the shield of the host’s O-antigens. We also demonstrate that LTF-mediated adsorption becomes superfluous when the non-specific cell protection by O-antigen is missing, allowing the phages to bind directly to their common secondary receptor, the outer membrane protein BtuB. The LTF independent adsorption was also demonstrated on an O22-like host mutant missing O-antigen O-acetylation, thus showing the biological value of this O-antigen modification for cell protection against phages. PMID:26805872

  5. Muon catalyzed fusion in plasma state and high intensity DT fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    dt/mu/ molecular formation rates in a plasma state of DT mixture by d and t ions are, respectively, 63 and 77 times higher than the ones by electrons. High plasma oscillation frequency in a high electron density plasma enhances the formation rate in the high temperature dt mixture. The DT muon catalyzed fusion has the ability to produce much higher intensity 14 MeV neutron source (in order of 5 /times/ 10/sup 16/n/cm/sup 2//sec) than other means of stripping and spallation approaches. Such neutrons can be used for testing of first wall material candidates for magnetic fusion reactors, for incinerating fission products (e.g., Cs/sup 137/) and for creating high thermal flux neutron sources, on the order of 10/sup 17/n/cm/sup 2//sec. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Investigation of Celotex trademark charring depths in the DT-18 shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    Celotex {trademark}, the insulating material used between the outer and inner containers of the DT-18 shipping package, undergoes decomposition, combustion, or both when heated to temperatures exceeding 150{degrees}C. Several DT-18 packages that had previously undergone hypothetical thermal accident testing were opened and Celotex {trademark} charring depths ranging from {1/2} to 1 {1/2} in. were recorded. The majority of char depth data taken was between 3/4 and 1 {1/4} in. One-dimensional HEATING 7.1 models of the DT-18 package were developed. HEATING predicts charring depths of 1 to 1 1/8 in., which are in good agreement with measured values. Both experimental and analytical data indicate that charring is fairly uniform over the DT-18 package. 7 refs.

  7. Investigation of Celotex{trademark} charring depths in the DT-18 shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    Celotex {trademark}, the insulating material used between the outer and inner containers of the DT-18 shipping package, undergoes decomposition, combustion, or both when heated to temperatures exceeding 150{degrees}C. Several DT-18 packages that had previously undergone hypothetical thermal accident testing were opened and Celotex {trademark} charring depths ranging from {1/2} to 1 {1/2} in. were recorded. The majority of char depth data taken was between 3/4 and 1 {1/4} in. One-dimensional HEATING 7.1 models of the DT-18 package were developed. HEATING predicts charring depths of 1 to 1 1/8 in., which are in good agreement with measured values. Both experimental and analytical data indicate that charring is fairly uniform over the DT-18 package. 7 refs.

  8. Mass transport properties of Pu/DT mixtures from orbital free molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, Joel David; Ticknor, Christopher; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-09-16

    Mass transport properties (shear viscosity and diffusion coefficients) for Pu/DT mixtures were calculated with Orbital Free Molecular Dynamics (OFMD). The results were fitted to simple functions of mass density (for ρ=10.4 to 62.4 g/cm3) and temperature (for T=100 up to 3,000 eV) for Pu/DT mixtures consisting of 100/0, 25/75, 50/50, and 75/25 by number.

  9. Dynamic recrystallization mechanisms and their transition in the Daling Thrust (DT) zone, Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subhajit; Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir; Dasgupta, Sujoy

    2016-04-01

    The Daling Thrust (DT) delineates a zone of intense shear localization in the Lesser Himalayan Sequence (LHS) of the Darjeeling-Sikkim Himalaya. From microstructural studies of deformed quartzite samples, we show a transition in the dynamic recrystallization mechanism with increasing distance from the DT, dominated by grain boundary bulging (BLG) recrystallization closest to the DT, and progressively replaced by sub-grain rotation (SGR) recrystallization away from the thrust. The transition is marked by a characteristic variation in the fractal dimension (D) of grain boundaries, estimated from the area-perimeter method. For the BLG regime, D ≈ 1.046, which decreases significantly to a value as low as 1.025 for the SGR regime. Using the available thermal data for BLG and SGR recrystallization, we infer increasing deformation temperatures away from the DT in the hanging wall. Based on the quartz piezometer our estimates reveal strong variations in the flow stress (59.00 MPa to 16.00 MPa) over a distance of ~ 1.2 km from the DT. Deformation mechanism maps constructed for different temperatures indicate that the strain rates (10- 12 S- 1 to 10- 14 S- 1) comply with the geologically possible range. Finally, we present a mechanical model to provide a possible explanation for the cause of stress intensification along the DT.

  10. The effect of laser pulse shape variations on the adiabat of NIF capsule implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Landen, O. L.; LaFortune, K. N.; Widmayer, C.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Ross, J. S.; Ralph, J.; LePape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Spears, B. K.; Haan, S. W.; Clark, D.; Lindl, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.

    2013-05-01

    Indirectly driven capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are being performed with the goal of compressing a layer of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel to a sufficiently high areal density (ρR) to sustain the self-propagating burn wave that is required for fusion power gain greater than unity. These implosions are driven with a temporally shaped laser pulse that is carefully tailored to keep the DT fuel on a low adiabat (ratio of fuel pressure to the Fermi degenerate pressure). In this report, the impact of variations in the laser pulse shape (both intentionally and unintentionally imposed) on the in-flight implosion adiabat is examined by comparing the measured shot-to-shot variations in ρR from a large ensemble of DT-layered ignition target implosions on NIF spanning a two-year period. A strong sensitivity to variations in the early-time, low-power foot of the laser pulse is observed. It is shown that very small deviations (˜0.1% of the total pulse energy) in the first 2 ns of the laser pulse can decrease the measured ρR by 50%.

  11. The effect of laser pulse shape variations on the adiabat of NIF capsule implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Landen, O. L.; LaFortune, K. N.; Widmayer, C.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Ross, J. S.; Ralph, J.; LePape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Spears, B. K.; Haan, S. W.; Clark, D.; Lindl, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.

    2013-05-15

    Indirectly driven capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are being performed with the goal of compressing a layer of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel to a sufficiently high areal density (ρR) to sustain the self-propagating burn wave that is required for fusion power gain greater than unity. These implosions are driven with a temporally shaped laser pulse that is carefully tailored to keep the DT fuel on a low adiabat (ratio of fuel pressure to the Fermi degenerate pressure). In this report, the impact of variations in the laser pulse shape (both intentionally and unintentionally imposed) on the in-flight implosion adiabat is examined by comparing the measured shot-to-shot variations in ρR from a large ensemble of DT-layered ignition target implosions on NIF spanning a two-year period. A strong sensitivity to variations in the early-time, low-power foot of the laser pulse is observed. It is shown that very small deviations (∼0.1% of the total pulse energy) in the first 2 ns of the laser pulse can decrease the measured ρR by 50%.

  12. Complete genome sequences of T5-related Escherichia coli bacteriophages DT57C and DT571/2 isolated from horse feces.

    PubMed

    Golomidova, Alla K; Kulikov, Eugene E; Prokhorov, Nikolai S; Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C; Ksenzenko, Vladimir N; Tarasyan, Karina K; Letarov, Andrey V

    2015-12-01

    We report the complete genome sequencing of two Escherichia coli T5-related bacteriophages, DT57C and DT571/2, isolated from the same specimen of horse feces. These two isolates share 96% nucleotide sequence identity and can thus be considered representatives of the same novel species within the genus T5likevirus. The observed variation in the ltfA gene of these phages, resulting from a recent recombination event, may explain the observed host-range differences, suggesting that a modular mechanism makes a significant contribution to the short-term evolution (or adaptation) of T5-like phage genomes in the intestinal ecosystem. Comparison of our isolates to their closest relative, coliphage T5, revealed high overall synteny of the genomes and high conservation of the sequences of almost all structural proteins as well as of the other proteins with identified functions. At the same time, numerous alterations and non-orthologous replacements of non-structural protein genes (mostly of those with unknown functions) as well as substantial differences in tail fiber locus organization support the conclusion that DT57C and DT571/2 form a species-level group clearly distinct from bacteriophage T5. PMID:26350770

  13. Effect of inactive impurities on the burning of ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2011-12-15

    The efficiency of thermonuclear burning of the spherical deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets in the presence of low-Z impurities (such as lithium, carbon, or beryllium) with arbitrary concentrations is investigated. The effect of impurities produced due to the mixing of the thermonuclear fuel with the material of the structural elements of the target during its compression on the process of target burning is studied, and the possibility of using solid noncryogenic thermonuclear fuels in ICF targets is analyzed. Analytical dependences of the ignition energy and target thermonuclear gain on the impurity concentration are obtained. The models are constructed for homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas for the case in which the burning is initiated in the central heated region of the target and then propagates into the surrounding relatively cold fuel. Two possible configurations of an inhomogeneous plasma, namely, an isobaric configuration formed in the case of spark ignition of the target and an isochoric configuration formed in the case of fast ignition, are considered. The results of numerical simulations of the burning of the DT plasma of ICF targets in a wide range of impurity concentrations are presented. The simulations were performed using the TEPA one-dimensional code, in which the thermonuclear burning kinetics is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. It is shown that the strongest negative effect related to the presence of impurities is an increase in the energy of target ignition. It is substantiated that the most promising solid noncryogenic fuel is DT hydride of beryllium (BeDT). The requirements to the plasma parameters at which BeDT can be used as a fuel in noncryogenic ICF targets are determined. Variants of using noncryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel are proposed.

  14. New interpretation of alpha-particle-driven instabilities in deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor.

    PubMed

    Nazikian, R; Kramer, G J; Cheng, C Z; Gorelenkov, N N; Berk, H L; Sharapov, S E

    2003-09-19

    The original description of alpha particle driven instabilities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor in terms of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) remained inconsistent with three fundamental characteristics of the observations: (i) the variation of the mode frequency with toroidal mode number, (ii) the chirping of the mode frequency for a given toroidal mode number, and (iii) the antiballooning density perturbation of the modes. It is now shown that these characteristics can be explained by observing that cylindrical-like modes can exist in the weak magnetic shear region of the plasma that then make a transition to TAEs as the central safety factor decreases in time. PMID:14525368

  15. Transport analysis of measured neutron energy spectra in a graphite stack with a collimated deuterium-tritium neutron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tsechanski, A.; Ofek, R.; Goldfeld, A.; Shani, G.

    1989-02-01

    The Ben-Gurion University measurements of neutron energy spectra in a graphite stack, resulting from the scattering of 14.7-MeV neutrons streaming through a 6-cm-diam collimator in a 121-cm-thick paraffin wall, have been used as a benchmark for the compatability and accuracy of discrete ordinates, P/sub n/, and transport calculations and as a tool for fusion reactor neutronics. The transport analysis has been carried out with the DOT 4.2 discrete ordinates code and with cross sections processed with the NJOY code. Most of the parameters affecting the accuracy of the flux and L system scattering cross sections in the P/sub n/ approximation, the quadrature set employed, and the energy multigroup structure. First, a spectrum calculated with DOT 4.2, with a detector located on the axis of the system, was compared with a spectrum calculated with the MCNP Monte Carlo code, which was a preliminary verification of the DOT 4.2 results. Both calculated spectra were in good agreement. Next, the DOT 4.2 calculations were compared with the measured spectra. The comparison showed that the discrepancies between the measurements and the calculations increase as the distance between the detector and the system axis increases. This trend indicates that when the flux is determined mainly by multiple scatterings, a more divided multigroup structure should be employed.

  16. A New Interpretation of Alpha-particle-driven Instabilities in Deuterium-Tritium Experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    R. Nazikian; G.J. Kramer; C.Z. Cheng; N.N. Gorelenkov; H.L. Berk; S.E. Sharapov

    2003-03-26

    The original description of alpha-particle-driven instabilities in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in terms of Toroidal Alfvin Eigenmodes (TAEs) remained inconsistent with three fundamental characteristics of the observations: (i) the variation of the mode frequency with toroidal mode number, (ii) the chirping of the mode frequency for a given toroidal mode number, and (iii) the anti-ballooning density perturbation of the modes. It is now shown that these characteristics can be explained by observing that cylindrical-like modes can exist in the weak magnetic shear region of the plasma that then make a transition to TAEs as the central safety factor decreases in time.

  17. High-adiabat high-foot inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments on the national ignition facility.

    PubMed

    Park, H-S; Hurricane, O A; Callahan, D A; Casey, D T; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Döppner, T; Hinkel, D E; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; Patel, P K; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Salmonson, J D; Kline, J L

    2014-02-01

    This Letter reports on a series of high-adiabat implosions of cryogenic layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsules indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser drive pulse at the National Ignition Facility. High-foot implosions have high ablation velocities and large density gradient scale lengths and are more resistant to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot. Indeed, the observed hot spot mix in these implosions was low and the measured neutron yields were typically 50% (or higher) of the yields predicted by simulation. On one high performing shot (N130812), 1.7 MJ of laser energy at a peak power of 350 TW was used to obtain a peak hohlraum radiation temperature of ∼300  eV. The resulting experimental neutron yield was (2.4±0.05)×10(15) DT, the fuel ρR was (0.86±0.063)  g/cm2, and the measured Tion was (4.2±0.16)  keV, corresponding to 8 kJ of fusion yield, with ∼1/3 of the yield caused by self-heating of the fuel by α particles emitted in the initial reactions. The generalized Lawson criteria, an ignition metric, was 0.43 and the neutron yield was ∼70% of the value predicted by simulations that include α-particle self-heating. PMID:24580603

  18. A model for degradation of indirectly driven ICF implosions by supra-thermal electron preheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Rosen, M. D.; Clark, D. S.; Dewald, E. L.; Haan, S. W.; Kritcher, A. L.; Kruer, W.; Lindl, J. D.; Marinak, M. M.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, M.; Patel, P. K.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Springer, P. T.; Weber, C. R.; Shvarts, D.; Hohenberger, M.; Afeyan, B.; Montgomery, D. S.

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in the performance of indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental results to date, however, have fallen short of the predicted neutron yield, the expected compression of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel layer, and the pressure and density achieved in the central hot spot. A numerical model is presented for the degradation of implosion performance due to preheat of the DT fuel layer by supra-thermal electrons. The model is benchmarked by comparison with focused experiments, which directly measure the expansion of a DT ice layer caused by preheat from a controlled, well-characterized flux of supra-thermal electrons. The same model applied to ignition implosions shows improved agreement with a wide range of experimental observables, and may help to provide an explanation for many of the features observed in ignition implosions on the NIF. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. (Deuterium-deuterium)-driven experimental hybrid blankets and their neutronic analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Sahin, S.

    1984-09-01

    The impressive progress made so far toward the achievement of the physics goal of ignited fusion fuel of deuterium-tritium (D-T) is stirring the scientific community to look back and work for the earliest possible introduction of advanced fusion fuel based reactors with the ultimate objective of very clean, safe, and limitless fusion power. As the introduction of advanced fuel fusion drivers is expected to be in phases due to energetics considerations, it is quite instructive to examine the neutronic aspects of deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron driven hybrid blankets. The neutronics investigations of some compact hybrid blankets that could be tested experimentally are presented. The blanket designs are selected to conform to a rather small experimental chamber of the LOTUS fusionfission hybrid facility. The parallelepiped-shaped blankets are driven by a (D-D) neutron source from one side. The fertile fuel is either ThO/sub 2/, natural UO/sub 2/, or LOTUS UO/sub 2/. The tritium breeders are chosen from lithium, LiAlO/sub 2/, or Li/sub 2/O. The relative performances of different fertile fuels and tritium breeders are compared. The performance characteristics of ThO/sub 2/ blankets driven by (D-T) and (D-D) neutrons are compared. The improvement in performance characteristics obtained by the introduction of actinides as multipliers with ThO/sub 2/ hybrid blankets is also investigated.

  20. Majority ion heating near the ion-ion hybrid layer in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Hosea, J.C.; Ignat, D.; Majeski, R.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Wilson, J.R.

    1995-08-01

    Efficient direct majority ion heating in a deuterium-tritium (D-T) reactor-grade plasma via absorption of fast magnetosonic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is discussed. Majority ion heating results from resonance overlap between the cyclotron layers and the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer in hot, dense plasmas for fast waves launched with high parallel wavenumbers. Analytic and numerical models are used to explore the regime in ITER plasmas.

  1. Experimental Determination of DT Yield in High Current DD Dense Plasma Focii

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, D. R.; Hagen, E. C.; Meehan, B. T.; Springs, R. K.; O'Brien, R. J.

    2013-06-18

    Dense Plasma Focii (DPF), which utilize deuterium gas to produce 2.45 MeV neutrons, may in fact also produce DT fusion neutrons at 14.1 MeV due to the triton production in the DD reaction. If beam-target fusion is the primary producer of fusion neutrons in DPFs, it is possible that ejected tritons from the first pinch will interact with the second pinch, and so forth. The 2 MJ DPF at National Security Technologies’ Losee Road Facility is able to, and has produced, over 1E12 DD neutrons per pulse, allowing an accurate measurement of the DT/DD ratio. The DT/DD ratio was experimentally verified by using the (n,2n) reaction in a large piece of praseodymium metal, which has a threshold reaction of 8 MeV, and is widely used as a DT yield measurement system1. The DT/DD ratio was experimentally determined for over 100 shots, and then compared to independent variables such as tube pressure, number of pinches per shot, total current, pinch current and charge voltage.

  2. The Genome of the Chicken DT40 Bursal Lymphoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Póti, Ádám; Pipek, Orsolya; Krzystanek, Marcin; Kanu, Nnennaya; Swanton, Charles; Tusnády, Gábor E.; Szallasi, Zoltan; Csabai, István; Szüts, Dávid

    2014-01-01

    The chicken DT40 cell line is a widely used model system in the study of multiple cellular processes due to the efficiency of homologous gene targeting. The cell line was derived from a bursal lymphoma induced by avian leukosis virus infection. In this study we characterized the genome of the cell line using whole genome shotgun sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism array hybridization. The results indicate that wild-type DT40 has a relatively normal karyotype, except for whole chromosome copy number gains, and no karyotype variability within stocks. In a comparison to two domestic chicken genomes and the Gallus gallus reference genome, we found no unique mutational processes shaping the DT40 genome except for a mild increase in insertion and deletion events, particularly deletions at tandem repeats. We mapped coding sequence mutations that are unique to the DT40 genome; mutations inactivating the PIK3R1 and ATRX genes likely contributed to the oncogenic transformation. In addition to a known avian leukosis virus integration in the MYC gene, we detected further integration sites that are likely to de-regulate gene expression. The new findings support the hypothesis that DT40 is a typical transformed cell line with a relatively intact genome; therefore, it is well-suited to the role of a model system for DNA repair and related processes. The sequence data generated by this study, including a searchable de novo genome assembly and annotated lists of mutated genes, will support future research using this cell line. PMID:25227228

  3. Alternate-fuel reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K. Jr.; Ehst, D.A.; Gohar, Y.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.F.; Turner, L.R.

    1983-02-01

    A number of studies related to improvements and/or greater understanding of alternate-fueled reactors is presented. These studies cover the areas of non-Maxwellian distributions, materials and lifetime analysis, a /sup 3/He-breeding blanket, tritium-rich startup effects, high field magnet support, and reactor operation spanning the range from full D-T operation to operation with no tritium breeding.

  4. Correlations of Multiple Ion-Temperature Measurements with Shot Parameters in DT Cryogenic Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2014-10-01

    Several neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors installed at different lines of sight (LOS) are used to measure neutron-averaged ion temperature in direct-drive DT implosions on the OMEGA laser. The measurement precision of the ion temperature in different LOS for ambient targets is less than 4% rms. In DT cryogenic implosions, however, the ratio of the ion temperature measured in different LOS can vary by a factor of 2. Correlations of the ion-temperature difference with parameters such as target offset, beam power balance, and phase plates in DT cryogenic implosions on OMEGA will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  5. The sensitivity of human tumour cells to quinone bioreductive drugs: what role for DT-diaphorase?

    PubMed

    Robertson, N; Stratford, I J; Houlbrook, S; Carmichael, J; Adams, G E

    1992-08-01

    15 human tumour cell lines (lung, breast and colon) have been evaluated for their sensitivity to the quinone based anti-cancer drugs Mitomycin C, Porfiromycin, and EO9 (3-hydroxymethyl-5-aziridinyl-1-methyl-2-(IH-indole-4,7-dione)prop-beta- en-alpha-ol). Sensitivity has been compared with the intra-cellular levels of DT-diaphorase, an enzyme thought to be important in the reductive activation of these quinones. No correlation exists between levels of DT-diaphorase and sensitivity to Mitomycin C or Porfiromycin. However, for EO9 those cell lines showing highest levels of DT-diaphorase activity tend to be the most sensitive. PMID:1510692

  6. Characterizing somatic hypermutation and gene conversion in the chicken DT40 cell system.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Nagarama; Fugmann, Sebastian D

    2011-01-01

    The secondary immunoglobulin gene diversification processes, somatic hypermutation (SHM), immunoglobulin gene conversion (GCV), and class switch recombination, are important for efficient humoral immune responses. They require the action of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, an enzyme that deaminates cytosine in the context of single-stranded DNA. The chicken DT40 B-cell line is an important model system for exploring the mechanisms of SHM and GCV, as both processes occur constitutively without the need for stimulation. In addition, standard gene targeting strategies can be used for defined manipulations of the DT40 genome. Thus, these cells represent an excellent model of choice for genetic studies of SHM and GCV. Problems arising from defects in early B-cell development that are of concern when using genetically engineered mice are avoided in this system. Here, we describe how to perform gene targeting in DT40 cells and how to determine the effects of such modifications on SHM and GCV. PMID:21701980

  7. Thyratron characteristics under high di/dt and high-repetition-rate operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D.; Hill, J.; Kan, T.

    1981-05-11

    Power conditioning systems for high peak and average power, high repetition rate discharge excited lasers involve operation of modulator components in unconventional regimes. Reliable operation of switches and energy storage elements under high voltage and high di/dt conditions is a pacing item for laser development at the present time. To test and evaluate these components a Modulator Component Test Facility (MCTF) was constructed. The MCTF consists of a command charge system, energy storage capacitors, thyratron switch with inverse thyratron protection, and a resistive load. The modulator has initially been operated at voltages up to 60 kV at 600 Hz. Voltage, current, and calorimetric diagnostics are provided for major modulator components. Measurements of thyratron characteristics under high di/dt operation are presented. Commutation energy loss and di/dt have been measured as functions of the tube hydrogen pressure.

  8. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  9. Substrate interactions during the biodegradation of BTEX and THF mixtures by Pseudomonas oleovorans DT4.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Yang; Chen, Dong-Zhi; Zhu, Run-Ye; Chen, Jian-Meng

    2011-06-01

    The efficient tetrahydrofuran (THF)-degrading bacterium, Pseudomonas oleovorans DT4 was used to investigate the substrate interactions during the aerobic biotransformation of THF and BTEX mixtures. Benzene and toluene could be utilized as growth substrates by DT4, whereas cometabolism of m-xylene, p-xylene and ethylbenzene occurred with THF. In binary mixtures, THF degradation was delayed by xylene, ethylbenzene, toluene and benzene in descending order of inhibitory effects. Conversely, benzene (or toluene) degradation was greatly enhanced by THF leading to a higher degradation rate of 39.68 mg/(h g dry weight) and a shorter complete degradation time about 21 h, possibly because THF acted as an "energy generator". Additionally, the induction experiments suggested that BTEX and THF degradation was initiated by independent and inducible enzymes. The transient intermediate hydroquinone was detected in benzene biodegradation with THF while catechol in the process without THF, suggesting that P. oleovorans DT4 possessed two distinguished benzene pathways. PMID:21511464

  10. Radiation shielding design of BNCT treatment room for D-T neutron source.

    PubMed

    Pouryavi, Mehdi; Farhad Masoudi, S; Rahmani, Faezeh

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that D-T neutron generator can be used as a proper neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of deep-seated brain tumors. In this paper, radiation shielding calculations have been conducted based on the computational method for designing a BNCT treatment room for a recent proposed D-T neutron source. By using the MCNP-4C code, the geometry of the treatment room has been designed and optimized in such a way that the equivalent dose rate out of the treatment room to be less than 0.5μSv/h for uncontrolled areas. The treatment room contains walls, monitoring window, maze and entrance door. According to the radiation protection viewpoint, dose rate results of out of the proposed room showed that using D-T neutron source for BNCT is safe. PMID:25732097

  11. Partial Purification and Characterization of a Bacteriocin DT24 Produced by Probiotic Vaginal Lactobacillus brevis DT24 and Determination of its Anti-Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Potential.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Disha; Jena, Prasant Kumar; Patel, Jignesh Kumar; Seshadri, Sriram

    2013-06-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance has increased the interest for finding new antimicrobials in the past decade. Probiotic Lactic acid bacteria producing antimicrobial proteins like bacteriocin can be excellent agents for development as novel therapeutic agents and complement to conventional antibiotic therapy. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli, most causative agent of Urinary tract infection, has developed resistance to various antibiotics. In the present investigation, antibacterial substance like bacteriocin (Bacteriocin DT24) produced by probiotic Lactobacillus brevis DT24 from vaginal sample of healthy Indian woman was partially purified and characterized. It was efficiently working against various pathogens, that is, Uropathogenic E. coli, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. The antimicrobial peptide was relatively heat resistant and also active over a broad range of pH 2-10. It has been partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration chromatography and checked on reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bacteriocin DT24 was approximately 7-kDa protein. The peptide is inactivated by proteolytic enzymes, trypsin and lipase but not when treated with catalase, α-amylase and pepsin. It showed bacteriostatic mode of action against uropathogenic E. coli. Such characteristics indicate that this bacteriocin-producing probiotic may be a potential candidate for alternative agents to control urinary tract infections and other pathogens. PMID:26782739

  12. Fuel ion ratio measurements in reactor relevant neutral beam heated fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Hellesen, C; Eriksson, J; Conroy, S; Ericsson, G; Skiba, M; Weiszflog, M

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we present a method to derive n(t)/n(d) using the ratio of the thermonuclear neutron emission to the beam-target neutron emission. We apply it to neutron spectroscopy data from the magnetic proton recoil spectrometer taken during the deuterium tritium experiment at JET. n(t)/n(d)-values obtained using neutron spectroscopy are in qualitative agreement with those from other diagnostics measuring the isotopic composition of the exhaust in the divertor. PMID:23130799

  13. Measurements of DT alpha particle loss near the outer midplane of TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.; Redi, M.H.; Schivell, J.; White, R.B.

    1995-07-01

    Measurements of DT alpha particle loss to the outer midplane region of TFTR have been made using a radially movable scintillator detector. The conclusion from this data is that mechanisms determining the DT alpha loss to the outer midplane are not substantially different from those for DD fusion products. Some of these results are compared with a simplified theoretical model for TF ripple-induced alpha loss, which is expected to be the dominant classical alpha loss mechanism near the outer midplane. An example of plasma-driven MHD-induced alpha particle loss is shown, but no signs of any ``collective`` alpha instability-induced alpha loss have yet been observed.

  14. Modelling TF ripple loss of alpha particles in TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.

    1995-07-01

    Modelling of TF ripple loss of alphas in DT experiments on TFTR now includes neoclassical calculations of first orbit loss, stochastic ripple diffusion, ripple trapping and collisional effects. A rapid way to simulate experiment has been developed which uses a simple stochastic domain model for TF ripple loss within the TRANSP analysis code, with the ripple diffusion threshold evaluated by comparison with more accurate but computationally expensive Hamiltonian coordinate guiding center code simulations. Typical TF collisional ripple loss predictions are 6-10% loss of alphas for TFTR D-T experiments at I{sub p} = 1.0-2.0 MA and R = 2.52 m.

  15. Applications to engineering design of the general geometry, grid & analysis (GGA) object in DT-NURBES

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, B.; Ferguson, D.

    1996-12-31

    The DT-NURBS spline geometry subroutine library is a Non-Uniform Rational B-spline library developed with the goal of providing a common mathematical base for integrating geometrically dependent analysis tools with design geometry; and as a tool for use in the development of multi-disciplinary applications. In this paper we will describe the approach taken with the DT-NURBS library, the basic library entities themselves and how they can be used to affect the integration of diverse geometries and analyses.

  16. Enhancement of hypermutation frequency in the chicken B cell line DT40 for efficient diversification of the antibody repertoire

    SciTech Connect

    Magari, Masaki; Kanehiro, Yuichi; Todo, Kagefumi; Ikeda, Mika; Kanayama, Naoki Ohmori, Hitoshi

    2010-05-28

    Chicken B cell line DT40 continuously accumulates mutations in the immunoglobulin variable region (IgV) gene by gene conversion and point mutation, both of which are mediated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), thereby producing an antibody (Ab) library that is useful for screening monoclonal Abs (mAbs) in vitro. We previously generated an engineered DT40 line named DT40-SW, whose AID expression can be reversibly switched on or off, and developed an in vitro Ab generation system using DT40-SW cells. To efficiently create an Ab library with sufficient diversity, higher hypermutation frequency is advantageous. To this end, we generated a novel cell line DT40-SW{Delta}C, which conditionally expresses a C-terminus-truncated AID mutant lacking the nuclear export signal. The transcription level of the mutant AID gene in DT40-SW{Delta}C cells was similar to that of the wild-type gene in DT40-SW cells. However, the protein level of the truncated AID mutant was less than that of the wild type. The mutant protein was enriched in the nuclei of DT40-SW{Delta}C cells, although the protein might be highly susceptible to degradation. In DT40-SW{Delta}C cells, both gene conversion and point mutation occurred in the IgV gene with over threefold higher frequency than in DT40-SW cells, suggesting that a lower level of the mutant AID protein was sufficient to increase mutation frequency. Thus, DT40-SW{Delta}C cells may be useful for constructing Ab libraries for efficient screening of mAbs in vitro.

  17. High efficient ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks by PW-ps laser pulses for producing fusion flames in DT and HB11 of solid state density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustaizis, S.; Lalousis, P.; Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks in the range of 1020 cm/s2 has been confirmed experimentally after this was long predicted as a non-thermal direct conversion of optical energy into plasma motion due to dominating nonlinear (ponderomotive) forces [1]. The use of laser pulses of more than PW power and ps or shorter duration can ignite a nuclear fusion flame in solid density deuterium tritium because the necessary energy flux of >108J/cm2 according to the theory of Chu [2] is available [3]. For the studies of the necessary velocities of the generated fusion flames above 1000 km/s the detailed processes can be analyzed by using the advanced genuine two-fluid hydrodynamic model [4] where it was surprising that the ignition of the fusion flame by the picosecond interaction needs a comparably long development in the nanosecond range before the thermal processes result in shock fronts similar to the Rakine-Hugoniot theory. For the evaluation of power generation the problem of lateral energy losses was studied by using very high pulsed magnetic fields. The recently produced 10 Kilotesla magnetic fields [5] are very promising for solutions.

  18. Progress towards a high-gain and robust target design for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henestroza, Enrique; Grant Logan, B.

    2012-07-01

    Recently [E. Henestroza et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)], a new inertial-fusion target configuration, the X-target, using one-sided axial illumination has been explored. This class of target uses annular and solid-profile heavy ion beams to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel that fills the interior of metal cases that have side-view cross sections in the shape of an "X." X-targets using all-DT-filled metal cases imploded by three annular ion beams resulted in fuel densities of ˜50 g/cm3 at peak compression, and fusion gains of ˜50, comparable to heavy ion driven hohlraum targets [D. A. Callahan-Miller and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)]. This paper discusses updated X-target configurations that incorporate inside the case a propellant (plastic) and a pusher (aluminum) surrounding the DT fuel. The updated configurations are capable of assembling higher fuel areal densities ˜2 g/cm2 using two annular beams to implode the target to peak DT densities ˜100 g/cm3, followed by a fast-ignition solid ion beam which heats the high-density fuel to thermonuclear temperatures in ˜200 ps to start the burn propagation, obtaining gains of ˜300. These targets have been modeled using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)] in two- and three- dimensions to study the properties of the implosion as well as the ignition and burn propagation phases. At typical Eulerian mesh resolutions of a few microns, the aluminum-DT interface shows negligible Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth; also, the shear flow of the DT fuel as it slides along the metal X-target walls, which drives the RT and Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities, does not have a major effect on the burning rate. An analytic estimate of the RT instability process at the Al-DT interface shows that the aluminum spikes generated during the pusher deceleration phase would not reach the ignition zone in time to affect the burning

  19. Progress towards a high-gain and robust target design for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, Enrique; Grant Logan, B.

    2012-07-15

    Recently [E. Henestroza et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 032702 (2011)], a new inertial-fusion target configuration, the X-target, using one-sided axial illumination has been explored. This class of target uses annular and solid-profile heavy ion beams to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel that fills the interior of metal cases that have side-view cross sections in the shape of an 'X.' X-targets using all-DT-filled metal cases imploded by three annular ion beams resulted in fuel densities of {approx}50 g/cm{sup 3} at peak compression, and fusion gains of {approx}50, comparable to heavy ion driven hohlraum targets [D. A. Callahan-Miller and M. Tabak, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2083 (2000)]. This paper discusses updated X-target configurations that incorporate inside the case a propellant (plastic) and a pusher (aluminum) surrounding the DT fuel. The updated configurations are capable of assembling higher fuel areal densities {approx}2 g/cm{sup 2} using two annular beams to implode the target to peak DT densities {approx}100 g/cm{sup 3}, followed by a fast-ignition solid ion beam which heats the high-density fuel to thermonuclear temperatures in {approx}200 ps to start the burn propagation, obtaining gains of {approx}300. These targets have been modeled using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)] in two- and three- dimensions to study the properties of the implosion as well as the ignition and burn propagation phases. At typical Eulerian mesh resolutions of a few microns, the aluminum-DT interface shows negligible Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth; also, the shear flow of the DT fuel as it slides along the metal X-target walls, which drives the RT and Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities, does not have a major effect on the burning rate. An analytic estimate of the RT instability process at the Al-DT interface shows that the aluminum spikes generated during the pusher deceleration phase would not

  20. The National Ignition Facility neutron time-of-flight system and its initial performance (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Knauer, J. P.; Theobald, W.; Marshall, K. L.; Shoup, M. J.; Buczek, T.; Cruz, M.; Duffy, T.; Romanofsky, M.; Fox, M.; Pruyne, A.; Moran, M. J.; Lerche, R. A.; McNaney, J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Eckart, M. J.; Schneider, D.; Munro, D.; Stoeffl, W.; Zacharias, R.; Haslam, J. J.; Clancy, T.; Yeoman, M.; Warwas, D.; Horsfield, C. J.; Bourgade, J.-L.; Landoas, O.; Disdier, L.; Chandler, G. A.; Leeper, R. J.

    2010-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) successfully completed its first inertial confinement fusion (ICF) campaign in 2009. A neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) system was part of the nuclear diagnostics used in this campaign. The nTOF technique has been used for decades on ICF facilities to infer the ion temperature of hot deuterium (D2) and deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas based on the temporal Doppler broadening of the primary neutron peak. Once calibrated for absolute neutron sensitivity, the nTOF detectors can be used to measure the yield with high accuracy. The NIF nTOF system is designed to measure neutron yield and ion temperature over 11 orders of magnitude (from 108 to 1019), neutron bang time in DT implosions between 1012 and 1016, and to infer areal density for DT yields above 1012. During the 2009 campaign, the three most sensitive neutron time-of-flight detectors were installed and used to measure the primary neutron yield and ion temperature from 25 high-convergence implosions using D2 fuel. The OMEGA yield calibration of these detectors was successfully transferred to the NIF.

  1. Experimental investigation of bright spots in broadband, gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barrios, M. A.; Suter, L. J.; Glenn, S.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Scott, H.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Kyrala, G. A.

    2013-07-15

    Bright spots in the hot spot intensity profile of gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, (2004)] are observed. X-ray images of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium (DT) and tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) ice capsules, and gas filled plastic shell capsules (Symcap) were recorded along the hohlraum symmetry axis. Heterogeneous mixing of ablator material and fuel into the hot spot (i.e., hot-spot mix) by hydrodynamic instabilities causes the bright spots. Hot-spot mix increases the radiative cooling of the hot spot. Fourier analysis of the x-ray images is used to quantify the evolution of bright spots in both x- and k-space. Bright spot images were azimuthally binned to characterize bright spot location relative to known isolated defects on the capsule surface. A strong correlation is observed between bright spot location and the fill tube for both Symcap and cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets, indicating the fill tube is a significant seed for the ablation front instability causing hot-spot mix. The fill tube is the predominant seed for Symcaps, while other capsule non-uniformities are dominant seeds for the cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets. A comparison of the bright spot power observed for Si- and Ge-doped ablator targets shows heterogeneous mix in Symcap targets is mostly material from the doped ablator layer.

  2. Experimental investigation of bright spots in broadband, gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, M. A.; Regan, S. P.; Suter, L. J.; Glenn, S.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.; Epstein, R.; Hammel, B. A.; Kyrala, G. A.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Scott, H.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2013-07-01

    Bright spots in the hot spot intensity profile of gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, (2004)] are observed. X-ray images of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium (DT) and tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) ice capsules, and gas filled plastic shell capsules (Symcap) were recorded along the hohlraum symmetry axis. Heterogeneous mixing of ablator material and fuel into the hot spot (i.e., hot-spot mix) by hydrodynamic instabilities causes the bright spots. Hot-spot mix increases the radiative cooling of the hot spot. Fourier analysis of the x-ray images is used to quantify the evolution of bright spots in both x- and k-space. Bright spot images were azimuthally binned to characterize bright spot location relative to known isolated defects on the capsule surface. A strong correlation is observed between bright spot location and the fill tube for both Symcap and cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets, indicating the fill tube is a significant seed for the ablation front instability causing hot-spot mix. The fill tube is the predominant seed for Symcaps, while other capsule non-uniformities are dominant seeds for the cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets. A comparison of the bright spot power observed for Si- and Ge-doped ablator targets shows heterogeneous mix in Symcap targets is mostly material from the doped ablator layer.

  3. Signatures of asymmetry in neutron spectra and images predicted by three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of indirect drive implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chittenden, J. P.; Appelbe, B. D.; Manke, F.; McGlinchey, K.; Niasse, N. P. L.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of 3D simulations of indirect drive inertial confinement fusion capsules driven by the "high-foot" radiation pulse on the National Ignition Facility. The results are post-processed using a semi-deterministic ray tracing model to generate synthetic deuterium-tritium (DT) and deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron spectra as well as primary and down scattered neutron images. Results with low-mode asymmetries are used to estimate the magnitude of anisotropy in the neutron spectra shift, width, and shape. Comparisons of primary and down scattered images highlight the lack of alignment between the neutron sources, scatter sites, and detector plane, which limits the ability to infer the ρr of the fuel from a down scattered ratio. Further calculations use high bandwidth multi-mode perturbations to induce multiple short scale length flows in the hotspot. The results indicate that the effect of fluid velocity is to produce a DT neutron spectrum with an apparently higher temperature than that inferred from the DD spectrum and which is also higher than the temperature implied by the DT to DD yield ratio.

  4. A scintillating-fiber 14-MeV neutron detector on TFTR during DT operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A.; Chrien, R.E.; Barnes, C.W.; Sailor, W.C.; Roquemore, A.L.; Lavelle, M.J.; O`Gara, P.M.; Jordan, R.J.

    1994-07-01

    A compact 14-MeV neutron detector using an array of scintillating fibers has been tested on the TFTR tokamak under conditions of a high gamma background. This detector uses a fiber-matrix geometry, a magnetic field-insensitive phototube with an active HV base and pulse-height discrimination to reject low-level pulses from 2.5 MeV neutron and intense gammas. Laboratory calibrations have been performed at EG&G Las Vegas using a pulsed DT neutron generator and a 30 kCi {sup 60}Co source as background, at PPPL using DT neutron sources, and at LANL using an energetic deuterium beam and target at a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. During the first high power DT shots on TFTR in December 1993, the detector was 15.5 meters from the torus in a large collimator. For a rate of 1 {times} 10{sup 18} n/sec from the tokamak, it operated in an equivalent background of 1 {times} 10{sup 10} gammas/cm{sup 2}/sec ({approximately}4 mA current drain) at a DT count rate of 200 kHz.

  5. Emergence of Multidrug-resistant Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, David; Cloeckaert, Axel; Ahmed, Rafiq; Ng, Lai-King

    2004-01-01

    We document an increase in the number of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi B dT+ identified in Canada. Most of these strains harbor Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). Further studies are needed to determine factors contributing to the observed emergence of this multidrug-resistant strain. PMID:15324556

  6. Surface studies and implanted helium measurements following NOVA high-yield DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, M.A.; Hudson, G.B.

    1997-02-18

    This paper presents the results of three March 6, 1996 direct-drive high-yield DT NOVA experiments and provides `proof-of-principal` results for the quantitative measurement of energetic He ions. Semiconductor quality Si wafers and an amorphous carbon wafer were exposed to NOVA high-yield implosions. Surface damage was sub-micron in general, although the surface ablation was slightly greater for the carbon wafer than for the Si wafers. Melting of a thin ({approx} 0.1{mu}) layer of Si was evident from microscopic investigation. Electron microscopy indicated melted blobs of many different metals (e.g. Al, Au, Ta, Fe alloys, Cu and even Cd) on the surfaces. The yield measured by determining the numbers of atoms of implanted {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He indicate the number of DT fusions to be 9.1({plus_minus}2.3) X 10{sup 12} and DD fusions to be 4.8({plus_minus}1.0) x 10{sup 10}, respectively. The helium DT fusion yield is slightly lower than that of the Cu activation measurement, which was 1.3({plus_minus}0.l) x 10{sup 13} DT fusions.

  7. Dt2 is a gain-of-function MADS-Domain factor gene that controls semi-determinacy in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Similar to Arabidopsis, the wild soybean (Glycine soja) and many soybean (Glycine max) cultivars exhibit indeterminate stem growth controlled by a gene Dt1 – the functional counterpart of the Arabidopsis TFL1. Mutations in TFL1 and Dt1 both result in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) switching from ve...

  8. Radionuclide left ventricular dV/dt for the assessment of cardiac function in patients with coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Bianco, J A; Makey, D G; Laskey, W K; Shafer, R B

    1979-01-01

    To investigate potential uses of left-ventricular (LV) systolic ejection rate (LV dV/dt) in the evaluation of LV function, we examined the effect of exercise, angiotensin, and leg raising on LV ejection fraction and LV dV/dt in patients with coronary-artery disease. The following observations were made: a) LV ejection fraction and dV/dt changed proportionately, but in opposite directions, during supine exercise; b) LV ejection fraction and dV/dt decreased to a similar extent during angiotensin infusions; and c) LV ejection fraction and dV/dt were unchanged by leg raising. The changes in peak and mean LV dV/dt were similar. Regardless of the physiologic state, peak LV dV/dt occurred during the first third of systole. These data imply that in this population there were no specific advantages of LV dV/dt over LV ejection fraction in the evaluation of LV performance. PMID:430171

  9. DT-13, a saponin monomer of dwarf lilyturf tuber, induces autophagy and potentiates anti-cancer effect of nutrient deprivation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyang; Sun, Li; de Carvalho, Evandro Lopes; Li, Xinxin; Lv, Xiaodan; Khan, Ghulam Jilany; Semukunzi, Herve; Yuan, Shengtao; Lin, Sensen

    2016-06-15

    Metabolic stress induces autophagy as a protective mechanism in tumorigenesis and development. Conversely, excessive autophagy in nutrient-deprived cancer cells would be beneficial for cancer therapy. DT-13, the saponin monomer 13 of the Dwarf lilyturf tuber, inhibited tumor metastasis and angiogenesis in previous studies. However, there is scarcity of data regarding the effect of DT-13 on autophagy process. Here, we demonstrated that DT-13 induced autophagy in human cancer cell lines and caused significant cell apoptosis under nutrient starvation. We firstly showed that DT-13 increased the accumulation of GFP-LC3 puncta and induced the expression of LC3-II in a dose- and time-dependent manner. DT-13 also upregulated the expression of Beclin-1, Atg-3 and Atg-7, and induced autophagic flux in human gastric cancer BGC-823 cells. We next found that low-toxic concentrations of DT-13 significantly induced apoptosis under nutrient deprivation. We finally demonstrated that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway was involved in the cytotoxic effect of DT-13. Our data indicated that DT-13 was a novel autophagy inducer and might be considered in future treatment of cancer. PMID:27079642

  10. ON THE PROGENITOR SYSTEM OF THE TYPE Iax SUPERNOVA 2014dt IN M61

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Ryan J.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Mauerhan, Jon C.; Miller, Adam A.; Smith, Nathan

    2015-01-10

    We present pre-explosion and post-explosion Hubble Space Telescope images of the Type Iax supernova (SN Iax) 2014dt in M61. After astrometrically aligning these images, we do not detect any stellar sources at the position of the SN in the pre-explosion images to relatively deep limits (3σ limits of M {sub F438W} > –5.0 mag and M {sub F814W} > –5.9 mag). These limits are similar to the luminosity of SN 2012Z's progenitor system (M {sub F435W} = –5.43 ± 0.15 and M {sub F814W} = –5.24 ± 0.16 mag), the only probable detected progenitor system in pre-explosion images of a SN Iax, and indeed, of any white-dwarf supernova. SN 2014dt is consistent with having a C/O white-dwarf primary/helium-star companion progenitor system, as was suggested for SN 2012Z, although perhaps with a slightly smaller or hotter donor. The data are also consistent with SN 2014dt having a low-mass red giant or main-sequence star companion. The data rule out main-sequence stars with M {sub init} ≳ 16 M {sub ☉} and most evolved stars with M {sub init} ≳ 8 M {sub ☉} as being the progenitor of SN 2014dt. Hot Wolf-Rayet stars are also allowed, but the lack of nearby bright sources makes this scenario unlikely. Because of its proximity (D = 12 Mpc), SN 2014dt is ideal for long-term monitoring, where images in ∼2 yr may detect the companion star or the luminous bound remnant of the progenitor white dwarf.

  11. Development of a targeted flip-in system in avian DT40 cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kaori; Fujii, Toshihiko; Asada, Ryuta; Ooka, Masato; Hirota, Kouji

    2015-01-01

    Gene-targeting to create null mutants or designed-point mutants is a powerful tool for the molecular dissection of complex phenotypes involving DNA repair, signal transduction, and metabolism. Because gene-targeting is critically impaired in mutants exhibiting attenuated homologous recombination (HR), it is believed that gene-targeting is mediated via homologous recombination, though the precise mechanism remains unknown. We explored gene-targeting in yeast and avian DT40 cells. In animal cells, gene-targeting is activated by DNA double strand breaks introduced into the genomic region where gene-targeting occurs. This is evidenced by the fact that introducing double strand breaks at targeted genome sequences via artificial endonucleases such as TALEN and CRISPR facilitates gene-targeting. We found that in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, gene-targeting was initiated from double strand breaks on both edges of the homologous arms in the targeting construct. Strikingly, we also found efficient gene-targeting initiated on the edges of homologous arms in avian DT40 cells, a unique animal cell line in which efficient gene-targeting has been demonstrated. It may be that yeast and DT40 cells share some mechanism in which unknown factors detect and recombine broken DNA ends at homologous arms accompanied by crossover. We found efficient targeted integration of gapped plasmids accompanied by crossover in the DT40 cells. To take advantage of this finding, we developed a targeted flip-in system for avian DT40 cells. This flip-in system enables the rapid generation of cells expressing tag-fused proteins and the stable expression of transgenes from OVA loci. PMID:25799417

  12. Tritium Breeding Blanket for a Commercial Fusion Power Plant - A System Engineering Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Wayne R.

    2014-04-14

    The goal of developing a new source of electric power based on fusion has been pursued for decades. If successful, future fusion power plants will help meet growing world-wide demand for electric power. A key feature and selling point for fusion is that its fuel supply is widely distributed globally and virtually inexhaustible. Current world-wide research on fusion energy is focused on the deuterium-tritium (DT for short) fusion reaction since it will be the easiest to achieve in terms of the conditions (e.g., temperature, density and confinement time of the DT fuel) required to produce net energy. Over the past decades countless studies have examined various concepts for TBBs for both magnetic fusion energy (MFE) and inertial fusion energy (IFE). At this time, the key organizations involved are government sponsored research organizations world-wide. The near-term focus of the MFE community is on the development of TBB mock-ups to be tested on the ITER tokamak currently under construction in Caderache France. TBB concepts for IFE tend to be different from MFE primarily due to significantly different operating conditions and constraints. This report focuses on longer-term commercial power plants where the key stakeholders include: electric utilities, plant owner and operator, manufacturer, regulators, utility customers, and in-plant subsystems including the heat transfer and conversion systems, fuel processing system, plant safety systems, and the monitoring control systems.

  13. Analytical Dependence of the Ignition Dynamics Parameters on the Low-Z Impurity Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Mohammad; Abedi, Sayed Ebrahim

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, thermonuclear burning of the deuterium-tritium (D/T) plasma of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target is studied in the presence of low-Z impurities (lithium, beryllium, and carbon) with arbitrary concentrations. The effect of impurities produced due to the mixing of the thermonuclear fuel with the material of the structural elements of the target during its compression on the process of target burning is studied. Also, the effect of impurity concentration on the plasma ignition parameters such as ignition temperature, confinement parameter ρR, and ignition energy are discussed. The models are constructed for an isobaric and an isochoric plasma for the case in which the burning is initiated in the central heated region of the target and then propagated into the surrounding relatively cold fuel. In ICF spherical implosions of the D/T fuel, the ignition parameters as ignition temperature and parameter ρR in the hot spot are approximately 7 - 10 keV and 0.2 - 0.4 g cm-2 respectively, and these values are increased by the presence of impurities.

  14. Implosion of reactor-size, gas-filled spherical shell targets driven by shaped pressure pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Piriz, A.R.; Atzeni, S. )

    1993-05-01

    The implosion of a family of reactor-size targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is studied analytically and numerically. The targets consist of a deuterium--tritium (D--T) shell filled with D--T vapor and they are imploded by a multistep pressure pulse designed in such a way that the final hot spot is formed mainly from the initially gaseous fuel. The formation of the hot spot is described by means of a relatively simple model, and scaling laws for the quantities that characterize the state of the initially gaseous part of the fuel prior to ignition are derived. The results of the model are compared with one-dimensional fluid simulations, and good agreement is found. A parametric study of the fuel energy gain is then presented; the dependence of the gain and of the hot spot convergence ratio on the pulse parameters and on the filling gas density is analyzed. It is also shown that a substantial increase in the gain (for a given target and pulse energy) can be achieved by replacing the last step of the pulse with an exponential ramp.

  15. Effect of varying differentiator frequency response on recorded peak dP/dt. [for left ventricular contractile state index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, W. H.; Marlon, A. M.; Adams, M.; Harrison, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    Dogs were used to study the effects of varying the differentiator cutoff frequency on the recorded peak first derivative of left ventricular pressure with respect to time (dP/dt), using high-precision solid-state pressure transducers and recording equipment. In canine hearts with a basic periodicity of 1 to 3 Hz, the differentiator frequency response required to record an accurate peak dP/dt is found to be influenced by the value of peak dP/dt. At peak dP/dt ranging from 1500 to 9000 mm Hg/sec (200 and 1200 kPa/sec), a differentiator cutoff frequency of at least 90 Hz was required to record accurately peak dP/dt.

  16. Interaction of a self-focused laser beam with a DT fusion target in a plasma-loaded cone-guided ICF scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saedjalil, N.; Mehrangiz, M.; Jafari, S.; Ghasemizad, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the interaction of a self-focused laser beam with a DT fusion target in a plasma-loaded cone-guided ICF scheme has been presented. We propose here to merge a plasma-loaded cone with the precompressed DT target in order to strongly focus the incident laser beam on the core to improve the fusion gain. The WKB approximation is used to derive a differential equation that governs the evolution of beamwidth of the incident laser beam with the distance of propagation in the plasma medium. The effects of initial plasma and laser parameters, such as initial plasma electron temperature, initial radius of the laser beam, initial laser beam intensity and plasma density, on self-focusing and defocusing of the Gaussian laser beam have been studied. Numerical results indicate that with increasing the plasma frequency (or plasma density) in the cone, the laser beam will be self-focused noticeably, while for a thinner laser beam (with small radius), it will diverge as propagate in the cone. By evaluating the energy deposition of the relativistic electron ignitors in the fuel, the importance of electron transportation in the cone-attached shell was demonstrated. Moreover, by lessening the least energy needed for ignition, the electrons coupling with the pellet enhances. Therefore, it increases the fusion efficiency. In this scheme, with employing a plasma-loaded cone, the fusion process improves without needing an ultrahigh-intensity laser beam in a conventional ICF.

  17. Performance of Indirectly-Driven Capsule Implosions on NIF Using Adiabat-Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, Harry

    2015-11-01

    Indirectly-driven capsule implosions are being conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Early experiments conducted during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) were driven by a laser pulse with a relatively low-power initial foot (``low-foot''), which was designed to keep the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel on a low adiabat to achieve a high fuel areal density (ρR). These implosions were successful in achieving high ρR, but fell significantly short of the predicted neutron yield. A leading candidate to explain this degraded performance was ablation front instability growth, which can lead to the mixing of ablator material with the DT fuel layer and in extreme cases into the central DT hot spot. A subsequent campaign employing a modified laser pulse with increased power in the foot (``high-foot'') was designed to reduce the adverse effects of ablation front instability growth. These implosions have been very successful, increasing neutron yields by more than an order of magnitude, but at the expense of reduced fuel compression. To bridge these two regimes, a series of implosions have been designed to simultaneously achieve both high stability and high ρR. These implosions employ adiabat-shaping, where the driving laser pulse is high in the initial picket similar to the high-foot to retain the favorable stability properties at the ablation front. The remainder of the foot is similar to that of the low-foot, driving a lower velocity shock into the DT fuel to keep the adiabat low and compression high. This talk will present results and analysis of these implosions and will discuss implications for improved implosion performance. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Demonstration of 55 +/- 7-Gbar Hot-Spot Pressure in Direct-Drive Layered DT Cryogenic Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    Direct-drive ignition target designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require hot-spot pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. Only one-third of the required pressure was inferred in earlier experimental campaigns conducted on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA laser with direct-drive implosions of layered DT cryogenic targets. Laser and target improvements were implemented on OMEGA to increase the stagnation pressure, including a set of phase plates to increase the laser irradiation uniformity on target and a purified fuel with isotope composition reaching a 50:50 DT ratio. Diagnostic improvements were made for a neutron burnwidth measurement with a 40-ps impulse response and a 16-channel Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope to measure gated (30-ps) x-ray images of the core near peak compression with 6- μm resolution. The inferred volume-averaged, peak pressure in the current campaign almost doubled to 55 +/- 7 Gbar with a neutron yield approaching 5 ×1013 . Further target performance improvements to reach hydrodynamic equivalence to ignition on OMEGA require mitigation of cross-beam energy transfer (CBET), which reduces the laser coupling. A proposed technique to reduce CBET by driving the spherical target with overlapping laser beams having individual focal spots smaller than the outside diameter of the target was investigated. The diameter of the target was discretely varied from 800 to 1000 μm, while the laser focal spot size was kept constant at 820 μm. The larger targets driven with up to 30 kJ of laser energy used dynamic bandwidth reduction, where the smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) is only applied to the pickets. The smaller targets driven with 26 kJ of laser energy had SSD on the entire pulse. This talk will summarize the results of this CBET mitigation campaign and describe a path forward to achieve ignition hydro-equivalence on OMEGA. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under

  19. Rate modulated pacing based on right ventricular dP/dt: quantitative analysis of chronotropic response.

    PubMed

    Kay, G N; Philippon, F; Bubien, R S; Plumb, V J

    1994-08-01

    Right ventricular contractility increases in response to catecholamine stimulation and greater ventricular preload, factors that increase with exercise workload. Thus, the maximum systolic dP/dt may be a potentially useful sensor to control the pacing rate of a permanent pacing system. The present study was designed to test the long-term performance of a permanent pacemaker that modulates pacing rate based on right ventricular dP/dt and to quantitatively analyze the chronotropic response characteristics of this sensor in a group of patients with widely varying structural heart diseases and degrees of hemodynamic impairment. A permanent pacing system incorporating a high fidelity pressure sensor in the lead for measurement of right ventricular dP/dt was implanted in 13 patients with atrial arrhythmias and AV block, including individuals with coronary artery disease, hypertension, severe obstructive pulmonary disease with prior pneumonectomy, atrial septal defect, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and mitral stenosis. Patients underwent paired treadmill exercise testing in the VVI and VVIR pacing modes with measurement of expired gas exchange and quantitative analysis of chronotropic response using the concept of metabolic reserve. The peak right ventricular dP/dt ranged from 238-891 mmHg/sec with a pulse pressure that ranged from 19-41 mmHg. There was a positive correlation between the right ventricular dP/dt and pulse pressure (r = 0.70, P = 0.012). The maximum pacing rate and VO2max were 72 +/- 6 beats/min and 12.61 +/- 4.0 cc O2/kg per minute during VVI pacing and increased to 124 +/- 18 beats/min and 15.89 +/- 5.9 cc O2/kg per minute in the VVIR pacing mode (P < 0.0003 and P < 0.002, respectively). The integrated area under the normalized rate response curve was 96.7 +/- 45.7% of expected during exercise and 100.1 +/- 43.4% of expected during recovery. One patient demonstrated an anomalous increase in pacing rate in response to a change in

  20. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    SciTech Connect

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  1. Spatio-temporal interpolation of soil moisture in 3D+T using automated sensor network data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasch, C.; Hengl, T.; Magney, T. S.; Brown, D. J.; Gräler, B.

    2014-12-01

    Soil sensor networks provide frequent in situ measurements of dynamic soil properties at fixed locations, producing data in 2- or 3-dimensions and through time (2D+T and 3D+T). Spatio-temporal interpolation of 3D+T point data produces continuous estimates that can then be used for prediction at unsampled times and locations, as input for process models, and can simply aid in visualization of properties through space and time. Regression-kriging with 3D and 2D+T data has successfully been implemented, but currently the field of geostatistics lacks an analytical framework for modeling 3D+T data. Our objective is to develop robust 3D+T models for mapping dynamic soil data that has been collected with high spatial and temporal resolution. For this analysis, we use data collected from a sensor network installed on the R.J. Cook Agronomy Farm (CAF), a 37-ha Long-Term Agro-Ecosystem Research (LTAR) site in Pullman, WA. For five years, the sensors have collected hourly measurements of soil volumetric water content at 42 locations and five depths. The CAF dataset also includes a digital elevation model and derivatives, a soil unit description map, crop rotations, electromagnetic induction surveys, daily meteorological data, and seasonal satellite imagery. The soil-water sensor data, combined with the spatial and temporal covariates, provide an ideal dataset for developing 3D+T models. The presentation will include preliminary results and address main implementation strategies.

  2. Plasma wall interaction and tritium retention in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C. H.; Amarescu, E.; Ascione, G.; Synakowski, E.

    1996-05-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been operating safely and routinely with deuterium-tritium fuel for more than two years. In this time, TFTR has produced an impressive number of record breaking results including core fusion power, ~ 2 MW/m³, comparable to that expected for ITER. Advances in wall conditioning via lithium pellet injection have played an essential role in achieving these results. Deuterium-tritium operation has also provided a special opportunity to address the issues of tritium recycling and retention. Tritium retention over two years of operation was approximately 40%. Recently, the in-torus tritium inventory was reduced by half through a combination of glow discharge cleaning, moist-air soaks, and plasma discharge cleaning. The tritium inventory is not a constraint in continued operations. The authors present recent results from TFTR in the context of plasma wall interactions and deuterium-tritium issues.

  3. Targeting distinct tautomerase sites of D-DT and MIF with a single molecule for inhibition of neutrophil lung recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Deepa; Zierow, Swen; Syed, Mansoor; Bucala, Richard; Bhandari, Vineet; Lolis, Elias J.

    2014-01-01

    We report a new inflammatory activity for extracellular d-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT), the recruitment of neutrophils to the lung on D-DT intratracheal installation of C57BL/6J mice with an EC50 of 5.6 μg. We also find that D-DT and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) have additive effects in neutrophil recruitment. Although the tautomerase site of D-DT and its homologue MIF are biophysically very different, 4-iodo-6-phenylpyrimidine (4-IPP) forms a covalent bond with Pro-1 of both proteins, resulting in a 6-phenylpyrimidine (6-PP) adduct. Recruitment of neutrophils to the lung for the 6-PP adducts of D-DT and MIF are reduced by ∼50% relative to the apo proteins, demonstrating that an unmodified Pro-1 is important for this activity, but there is no cooperativity in inhibition of the proteins together. The differences in the binding mode of the 6-PP adduct for D-DT was determined by crystallographic studies at 1.13 Å resolution and compared to the structure of the MIF–6-PP complex. There are major differences in the location of the 6-PP adduct to the D-DT and MIF active sites that provide insight into the lack of cooperativity by 4-IPP and into tuning the properties of the covalent inhibitors of D-DT and MIF that are necessary for the development of therapeutic small molecules against neutrophil damage from lung infections such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients.—Rajasekaran, D., Zierow, S., Syed, M., Bucala, R., Bhandari, V., Lolis, E. J. Targeting distinct tautomerase sites of D-DT and MIF with a single molecule for inhibition of neutrophil lung recruitment. PMID:25016026

  4. Reaction-in-flight neutrons as a signature for shell mixing in National Ignition Facility capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, A. C.; Bradley, P. A.; Grim, G. P.; Jungman, Gerard; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    Analytic calculations and results from computational simulations are presented that suggest that reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons can be used to diagnose mixing of the ablator shell material into the fuel in deuterium-tritium (DT) capsules designed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner, J. D. Boyes, S. A. Kumpan, W. H. Lowdermilk, and M. S. Sorem, Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. Such mixing processes in NIF capsules are of fundamental physical interest and can have important effects on capsule performance, quenching the total thermonuclear yield. The sensitivity of RIF neutrons to hydrodynamical mixing arises through the dependence of RIF production on charged-particle stopping lengths in the mixture of DT fuel and ablator material. Since the stopping power in the plasma is a sensitive function of the electron temperature and density, it is also sensitive to mix. RIF production scales approximately inversely with the degree of mixing taking place, and the ratio of RIF to down-scattered neutrons provides a measure of the mix fraction and/or the mixing length. For sufficiently high-yield capsules, where spatially resolved RIF images may be possible, neutron imaging could be used to map RIF images into detailed mix images.

  5. A tritium vessel cleanup experiment in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Caorlin, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Owens, D.K.; Voorhees, D.; Mueller, D.; Ramsey, A.T.; La Marche, P.H.; Barnes, C.W.; Loughlin, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    A simple tritium cleanup experiment was carried out in TFTR following the initial high power deuterium-tritium discharges in December 1993. A series of 34 ohmic and deuterium neutral beam fueled shots was used to study the removal of tritium implanted into the wall and limiters. A very large plasma was created in each discharge to ``scrub`` an area as large as possible. Beam-fueled shots at 2.5 to 7.5 MW of injected power were used to monitor tritium concentration levels in the plasma by detection of DT-neutrons. The neutron signal decreased by a factor of 4 during the experiment, remaining well above the expected T-burnup level. The amount of tritium recovered at the end of the cleanup was about 8% of the amount previously injected with high power DT discharges. The experience gained suggests that measurements of tritium inventory in the torus are very difficult to execute and require dedicated systems with overall accuracy of 1%.

  6. Neutron spectroscopy results of JET high-performance plasmas and extrapolations to DT performance.

    PubMed

    Hellesen, C; Andersson Sundén, E; Conroy, S; Ericsson, G; Eriksson, J; Gatu Johnson, M; Weiszflog, M

    2010-10-01

    In a fusion reactor with high energy gain, the fusion power will be mainly thermonuclear (THN). Measurements of the THN neutron rate are a good performance indicator of a fusion plasma, requiring neutron emission spectroscopy (NES) measurements to distinguish thermal and nonthermal contributions. We report here on recent NES results from JET high-performance plasmas with high fractions (about 65%) of THN emission. The analysis is made with a framework for analyzing NES data, taking into account THN reactions and beam-target reactions. The results are used to extrapolate to the equivalent DT rates. Finally, we discuss the applicability of using NES in the deuterium phase of ITER, both for the extrapolations to ITER’s future DT performance as well as for the measurements of confined energetic ions. PMID:21058461

  7. A new strategy for gene targeting and functional proteomics using the DT40 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Orlowska, Kinga P.; Klosowska, Kamila; Szczesny, Roman J.; Cysewski, Dominik; Krawczyk, Pawel S.; Dziembowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    DT40 cells derived from chicken B lymphocytes exhibit exceptionally high homologous recombination rates. Therefore, they can be used as a convenient tool and model for gene targeting experiments. However, lack of efficient cloning strategies, protein purification protocols and a well annotated protein database limits the utility of these cells for proteomic studies. Here we describe a fast and inexpensive experimental pipeline for protein localization, quantification and mass spectrometry–based interaction studies using DT40 cells. Our newly designed set of pQuant vectors and a sequence- and ligation-independent cloning (SLIC) strategy allow for simple and efficient generation of gene targeting constructs, facilitating homologous-recombination–based protein tagging on a multi-gene scale. We also report proof of principle results using the key proteins involved in RNA decay, namely EXOSC8, EXOSC9, CNOT7 and UPF1. PMID:23892402

  8. High Resolution Mapping of the Final Stepped leader Phase from dE/dt TOA Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. S.; Uman, M. A.; Hill, J. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Jerauld, J. E.; Dwyer, J. R.; Saleh, Z.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2008-12-01

    A time of arrival network composed of eight wideband (DC-20 MHz) electric field derivative (dE/dt) antennas and eight co-located NaI(T1) scintillation detectors is deployed at the UF-FIT ICLRT to study the final part of the leader phase in cloud-to-ground lightning. It can resolve lightning processes within several hundred meters of ground with 2-3 m of horizontal uncertainty and typically less than 10 m of altitude uncertainty for sources 50 m or higher above ground. We discuss here the locations of dE/dt stepped-leader and other pulses from a negative first stoke that occurred on 2 June 2006 . A dominant region of stepped-leader activity (dE/dt pulses) was identified 500 us prior to the return-stroke about 350 m above ground. The leader descended toward ground, exhibiting extensive branching. Ninety dE/dt pulses were located during this period. At 70 us before the return stroke, the downward leader had descended to an altitude of roughly 120 m. After this time, the leader descended as four distinct channels to an altitude between 50 and 75 m. Approximately 40 pulses were located . The final dE/dt pulse of the stepped-leader phase corresponded to the final step in the leader branch nearest a tree line. Several us later, a "burst" of four dE/dt pulses, termed here a "leader burst" to distinguish it from the characteristic leader step dE/dt pulses, was observed at all stations, corresponding to the rapid advancement of the downward leader from near the main leader towards the tree line. During the leader burst, the leader channel descended over 30 m in altitude and propagated a horizontal distance of about 60 m in less than a microsecond. The termination of this burst, at an altitude about 10 m, coincided with the start of the initial rising portion of the dE/dt (and E-field) waveform, the so called "slow front" of the return stroke. Two pulses occurring during the slow front were located very near the termination of the leader burst. The locations determined for

  9. Implementation of the {alpha}-CHERS diagnostic for D-T operation of TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, G.R.; Fonck, R.J.; Stratton, F.K.

    1995-03-01

    The {alpha}-CHERS diagnostic is a high throughput charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic designed to measure the density profile and time evolution of 0-500 keV alpha particles during D-T operation of TFTR. Following successful tests with a prototype ({alpha}-CHERS system, an improved, multi-channel system has been installed for D-T Operation. Three spatial channels may be observed simultaneously, and the spectral resolution of 0.5 nm permits increased alpha energy resolution and improved impurity line identification. More efficient coupling optics between the spectrometer and CCD detectors have increased the light throughput, and radiation shielding has been installed around the detectors and spectrometers to eliminate the neutron/gamma ray noise observed in high power D-D plasmas.

  10. The AGHS at JET and preparations for a future DT campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.

    2015-03-15

    The Active Gas Handling System (AGHS) at JET is a unique facility enabling JET to perform reactor like, DT operations. As a future DT experimental campaign (DTE2) is scheduled for 2017 this paper provides a brief overview of the AGHS and a summary of ongoing work supporting the currently JET experimental campaign. In order to improve tritium accountancy a solid state based detector for tritium is being developed. Another important upgrade concerns tritium injection, 4 existing GIMs (Tritium Gas Introduction Module) will inject a mix of D and T rather than T{sub 2} in the divertor region rather than in the torus mid plane enabling a far better control and variability of the introduction of tritium into the plasma. An overview of the scale of DTE2 is included as well as an example of some of the upgrades currently being undertaken to fully exploit the learning opportunities for ITER and DEMO DTE2 provides. (authors)

  11. Fusion alpha-particle diagnostics for DT experiments on the joint European torus

    SciTech Connect

    Kiptily, V. G.; Beaumont, P.; Syme, D. B.; Cecil, F. E.; Riva, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Craciunescu, T.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Curuia, M.; Soare, S.; Darrow, D.; Fernandes, A. M.; Pereira, R. C.; Sousa, J.; Gorini,; Nocente, M.; and others

    2014-08-21

    JET equipped with ITER-like wall (a beryllium wall and a tungsten divertor) can provide auxiliary heating with power up to 35MW, producing a significant population of α-particles in DT operation. The direct measurements of alphas are very difficult and α-particle studies require a significant development of dedicated diagnostics. JET now has an excellent set of confined and lost fast particle diagnostics for measuring the α-particle source and its evolution in space and time, α-particle energy distribution, and α-particle losses. This paper describes how the above mentioned JET diagnostic systems could be used for α-particle measurements, and what options exist for keeping the essential α-particle diagnostics functioning well in the presence of intense DT neutron flux. Also, α-particle diagnostics for ITER are discussed.

  12. Neutron spectroscopy results of JET high-performance plasmas and extrapolations to DT performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hellesen, C.; Andersson Sunden, E.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Eriksson, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Weiszflog, M.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    In a fusion reactor with high energy gain, the fusion power will be mainly thermonuclear (THN). Measurements of the THN neutron rate are a good performance indicator of a fusion plasma, requiring neutron emission spectroscopy (NES) measurements to distinguish thermal and nonthermal contributions. We report here on recent NES results from JET high-performance plasmas with high fractions (about 65%) of THN emission. The analysis is made with a framework for analyzing NES data, taking into account THN reactions and beam-target reactions. The results are used to extrapolate to the equivalent DT rates. Finally, we discuss the applicability of using NES in the deuterium phase of ITER, both for the extrapolations to ITER's future DT performance as well as for the measurements of confined energetic ions.

  13. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by D-T neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, D.C.; Edwards, A.A.; Prosser, J.S.; Bolton, D.; Sherwin, A.G.

    1984-06-01

    Unstable chromosome aberrations induced by in vitro irradiation with D-T neutrons have been analyzed in human blood lymphocytes. With respect to 250 kVp X rays a maximum limiting RBE at low doses of 4.1 was obtained for dicentric aberrations. Using aberrations as markers in mixed cultures of irradiated and unirradiated cells permits an assessment of interphase death plus mitotic delay. The low-dose RBE for this effect is 2.5. Assuming all unstable aberrations observed at metaphase would lead to cell death by nondisjunction allows an assessment of mitotic death. The low-dose RBE for this effect is 4.5. The data are compared with similar work obtained earlier with /sup 242/Cm ..cap alpha.. particles. The application of the present work to cytogenetic assessment of dose after accidental exposure to D-T neutrons is discussed.

  14. Benchmark testing and independent verification of the VS2DT computer code

    SciTech Connect

    McCord, J.T.; Goodrich, M.T.

    1994-11-01

    The finite difference flow and transport simulator VS2DT was benchmark tested against several other codes which solve the same equations (Richards equation for flow and the Advection-Dispersion equation for transport). The benchmark problems investigated transient two-dimensional flow in a heterogeneous soil profile with a localized water source at the ground surface. The VS2DT code performed as well as or better than all other codes when considering mass balance characteristics and computational speed. It was also rated highly relative to the other codes with regard to ease-of-use. Following the benchmark study, the code was verified against two analytical solutions, one for two-dimensional flow and one for two-dimensional transport. These independent verifications show reasonable agreement with the analytical solutions, and complement the one-dimensional verification problems published in the code`s original documentation.

  15. Radioactivity measurements of ITER materials using the TFTR D-T neutron field

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A.; Barnes, C.W.; Kugel, H.W.; Loughlin, M.J.

    1994-08-01

    The availability of high D-T fusion neutron yields at TFTR has provided a useful opportunity to directly measure D-T neutron-induced radioactivity in a realistic tokamak fusion reactor environment for materials of vital interest to ITER. These measurements are valuable for characterizing radioactivity in various ITER candidate materials. for validating complex neutron transport calculations, and for meeting fusion reactor licensing requirements. The radioactivity measurements at TFTR involve potential ITER materials including stainless steel 316, vanadium, titanium, chromium, silicon, iron, cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, aluminum, copper, zinc. zirconium, niobium, and tungsten. Small samples of these materials were irradiated close to the plasma and just outside the vacuum vessel wall of TFTR, locations of different neutron energy spectra. Saturation activities for both threshold and capture reactions were measured. Data from dosimetric reactions have been used to obtain preliminary neutron energy spectra. Spectra from the first wall were compared to calculations from ITER and to measurements from accelerator-based tests.

  16. DT-13 inhibits cancer cell migration by regulating NMIIA indirectly in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongzhi; Huang, Yue; Hou, Xiaoyin; Yu, Xiaowen; Lin, Sensen; Wei, Xiaohui; Li, Ruiming; Khan, Ghulam Jilany; Yuan, Shengtao; Sun, Li

    2016-08-01

    Tumor metastasis is one of the main causes of mortality among patients with malignant tumors. Previous studies concerning tumor metastasis have merely focused on the cancer cells in the tumor. However, an increasing number of studies show that the tumor microenvironment plays a vital role in the progression of cancer, particularly in tumor metastasis. Since fibroblasts and adipocytes are two of the most representative mesenchymal cells in the tumor microenvironment, we established a hypoxia-induced cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) model and a chemically induced adipocyte model to reveal the effect of the microenvironment on cancer development. In these models, the conditioned medium from the tumor microenvironment was found to significantly promote the migration of human lung cancer cell line 95D and regulate the expression of non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA), which is consistent with results in the published literature. Then, we confirmed the hypothesis that the tumor microenvironment can regulate NMIIA in cancer cells and facilitate migration by using the non-muscle myosin II inhibitor, blebbistatin. Thus, this is the first report that the tumor microenvironment can promote cancer cell migration by regulating the expression of NMIIA. Our present data also indicated that DT-13, the saponin monomer 13 of dwarf lilyturf tuber, inhibited cancer cell migration in the tumor microenvironment model. Further results showed that DT-13 exhibited anti-migratory effects by inhibiting the c-raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Consequently, our research confirmed that DT-13 significantly inhibited 95D cell migration in vitro, indicating the potential anti-metastatic effect of DT-13 on lung cancer and the scientific basis for drug development. PMID:27350172

  17. Surface characterization of TFTR first wall graphite tiles used during DT operations

    SciTech Connect

    Paffett, M. T.; Willms, R. S.; Gentile, C.; Skinner, C.

    2001-01-01

    Surface characterization studies were performed on graphite tiles used as first wall materials during DT operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. These ex situ analysis studies revealed a number of interesting and unexpected features. In this work we examined the spatial and (where possible) the depth distribution of impurity species deposited onto the plasma facing surfaces using Xray Photo-electron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS).

  18. Bcl6 Is Required for Somatic Hypermutation and Gene Conversion in Chicken DT40 Cells.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alan M; Maman, Yaakov; Alinikula, Jukka; Schatz, David G

    2016-01-01

    The activation induced cytosine deaminase (AID) mediates diversification of B cell immunoglobulin genes by the three distinct yet related processes of somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch recombination (CSR), and gene conversion (GCV). SHM occurs in germinal center B cells, and the transcription factor Bcl6 is a key regulator of the germinal center B cell gene expression program, including expression of AID. To test the hypothesis that Bcl6 function is important for the process of SHM, we compared WT chicken DT40 B cells, which constitutively perform SHM/GCV, to their Bcl6-deficient counterparts. We found that Bcl6-deficient DT40 cells were unable to perform SHM and GCV despite enforced high level expression of AID and substantial levels of AID in the nucleus of the cells. To gain mechanistic insight into the GCV/SHM dependency on Bcl6, transcriptional features of a highly expressed SHM target gene were analyzed in Bcl6-sufficient and -deficient DT40 cells. No defect was observed in the accumulation of single stranded DNA in the target gene as a result of Bcl6 deficiency. In contrast, association of Spt5, an RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and AID binding factor, was strongly reduced at the target gene body relative to the transcription start site in Bcl6-deficient cells as compared to WT cells. However, partial reconstitution of Bcl6 function substantially reconstituted Spt5 association with the target gene body but did not restore detectable SHM. Our observations suggest that in the absence of Bcl6, Spt5 fails to associate efficiently with Pol II at SHM targets, perhaps precluding robust AID action on the SHM target DNA. Our data also suggest, however, that Spt5 binding is not sufficient for SHM of a target gene even in DT40 cells with strong expression of AID. PMID:26900682

  19. Degradation pathway and field-scale DT50 determination of Boscalid in a sandy Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Anneli S.; Weihermüller, Lutz; Tappe, Wolfgang; Mukherjee, Santanu; Spielvogel, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    The research on environmental fate of pesticides has received increasing attention within the last decades and the persistence of several compounds in soil matrices is well documented. However, the fate of the new fungicide Boscalid (introduced in 2003) is not yet completely investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze the environmental fate of Boscalid in a sandy soil. Three years after the second application on a cropland site in Kaldenkirchen, Germany, 65 undisturbed soil samples from the plough layer were derived. Boscalid residues were extracted using Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) and measured with UPLC-MS/MS. The Boscalid residues ranged between 0.12 and 0.53 μg kg‑1with a field mean of 0.20 ± 0.09 μg kg‑1. These results differed considerably from the predicted field concentration of 16.89 μg kg‑1 (calculated from the application rate) and half-lives (DT50) of 104-182 days compared to 345 days reported in literature. Adjusting the extraction efficiency to 20% could not explain the large difference. Therefore, an incubation study with 14C-labeled Boscalid was conducted to measure the DT50 under controlled conditions. Here, the DT50 values were in the range of values stated in literature (297-337 days compared to 345 days) but still much larger than the DT50 based on the field-study values (104-182 days). Our results indicate that Boscalid dissipation under field conditions is much faster at agricultural sites with sandy soil type as expected from laboratory incubation experiments. Future experiments with Boscalid will be conducted in two different soils with different particle size. A laboratory experiment with uniformly 13C-labeled Boscalid will provide insight into the uptake and incorporation in microbial biomass.

  20. Growth and survival of antibiotic-resistant Salmonella typhimurium DT104 in liquid egg products.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, Michael T; Mcquestin, Olivia J; Tamplin, Mark; Kelley, Lynda C

    2009-09-01

    Since 11 September 2001, quality and food safety are no longer the concerns of only consumers, industry, regulatory agencies, or other government officials. Liquid foods that are prepared or stored in bulk, including liquid egg products, are considered to be at potential risk for sabotage. Because of their versatility, low price, and functional properties, many of these products are being marketed. Four of the most common products of this type are whole egg, egg albumen, 10% sugared yolk, and 10% salted yolk. Although all of the serotypes of Salmonella enterica may cause illness, multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 has become widespread and can cause severe illness that is difficult to treat. Studies were conducted to determine growth patterns of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in four commercial liquid egg products held at 4, 10, 20, 30, 37, and 42 degrees C for 0 to 384 h. All experiments were performed in duplicate and repeated twice. Standard methods were used to estimate cell numbers, and log CFU per gram of egg product was plotted against time. The number of cells of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 increased to 8 to 9 log CFU/g in whole egg and 10% sugared yolk, increased by 1 log CFU/g in liquid albumen, but decreased by 3 log CFU/g in 10% salted yolk. Data from this study have been archived in the ComBase database to further assist policy makers or other scientists interested in Salmonella growth characteristics in liquid eggs. However, based on data generated in this study, Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 probably does not constitute a food threat agent in liquid eggs. PMID:19777905

  1. Bcl6 Is Required for Somatic Hypermutation and Gene Conversion in Chicken DT40 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Alan M.; Maman, Yaakov; Alinikula, Jukka; Schatz, David G.

    2016-01-01

    The activation induced cytosine deaminase (AID) mediates diversification of B cell immunoglobulin genes by the three distinct yet related processes of somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch recombination (CSR), and gene conversion (GCV). SHM occurs in germinal center B cells, and the transcription factor Bcl6 is a key regulator of the germinal center B cell gene expression program, including expression of AID. To test the hypothesis that Bcl6 function is important for the process of SHM, we compared WT chicken DT40 B cells, which constitutively perform SHM/GCV, to their Bcl6-deficient counterparts. We found that Bcl6-deficient DT40 cells were unable to perform SHM and GCV despite enforced high level expression of AID and substantial levels of AID in the nucleus of the cells. To gain mechanistic insight into the GCV/SHM dependency on Bcl6, transcriptional features of a highly expressed SHM target gene were analyzed in Bcl6-sufficient and -deficient DT40 cells. No defect was observed in the accumulation of single stranded DNA in the target gene as a result of Bcl6 deficiency. In contrast, association of Spt5, an RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and AID binding factor, was strongly reduced at the target gene body relative to the transcription start site in Bcl6-deficient cells as compared to WT cells. However, partial reconstitution of Bcl6 function substantially reconstituted Spt5 association with the target gene body but did not restore detectable SHM. Our observations suggest that in the absence of Bcl6, Spt5 fails to associate efficiently with Pol II at SHM targets, perhaps precluding robust AID action on the SHM target DNA. Our data also suggest, however, that Spt5 binding is not sufficient for SHM of a target gene even in DT40 cells with strong expression of AID. PMID:26900682

  2. THEHYCO-3DT: Thermal hydrodynamic code for the 3 dimensional transient calculation of advanced LMFBR core

    SciTech Connect

    Vitruk, S.G.; Korsun, A.S.; Ushakov, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    The multilevel mathematical model of neutron thermal hydrodynamic processes in a passive safety core without assemblies duct walls and appropriate computer code SKETCH, consisted of thermal hydrodynamic module THEHYCO-3DT and neutron one, are described. A new effective discretization technique for energy, momentum and mass conservation equations is applied in hexagonal - z geometry. The model adequacy and applicability are presented. The results of the calculations show that the model and the computer code could be used in conceptual design of advanced reactors.

  3. Development and evaluation of systems for controlling parallel high di/dt thyratrons

    SciTech Connect

    Litton. A.; McDuff, G.

    1982-01-01

    Increasing numbers of high power, high repetition rate applications dictate the use or thyratrons in multiple of hard parallel configurations to achieve the required rate of current rise, di/dt. This in turn demands the development of systems to control parallel thyratron commutation with nanosecond accuracy. Such systems must be capable of real-time, fully-automated control in multi-kilohertz applications while still remaining cost effective. This paper describes the evolution of such a control methodology and system.

  4. Pressure broadening of the ((dt. mu. )dee)/sup */ formation resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.S.; Leon, M.; Padial, N.T.

    1988-01-01

    The treatment of ((dt..mu..)dee)/sup */ formation at high densities as a pressure broadening process is discussed. The quasistatic approximation is shown to satisfy the usual conditions of muon-catalyzed fusion better than does the impact approximation. Complete accurate results are shown for the impact approximation, and a preliminary rough treatment is presented to illustrate the quasistatic approximation. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Fixed and free line ratio DT2 PIXE fitting and simulation package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, M. A.; Chaves, P. C.; Taborda, A.; Marques, J. P.; Barradas, N. P.

    2014-01-01

    The DATTPIXE software package, which full extent version become operational in 1992, has been largely used both in academic research and for standard analysis. Developments of a new PIXE setup, having an X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS) EDS high resolution detection system and a CdTe detector, raised the need for a deep revision of the software used to fit PIXE spectra and interpret data. First steps taken in 2007 essentially comprised a new fitting code based on a proven Bayesian inference routine. Meanwhile, fundamental processes associated to PIXE spectra, which became more evident in X-ray Microcalorimeter spectrometer (XMS) high resolution EDS spectra, made clear the need for a full new code. Using some of the routines developed in DATTPIXE, the new DT2 package is written in Fortran 2003 and includes both the fitting and data handling codes. DT2 is now designed to include in the fitting model and deal with diagram lines as well as with satellite lines (Radiative Auger Emission (RAE), multi-ionization satellites and even chemically shifted lines) or even lines having other origins such as low energy γ-rays. In this communication we present the new DT2 package and discuss its new features, such as the possibility of fixing or leave free the relative intensity of spectra lines, even if they belong to transitions to the same shell.

  6. Directed evolution of human scFvs in DT40 cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Alfred W Y; Williams, Gareth T; Rada, Cristina; Sale, Julian E

    2016-02-01

    Cells that constitutively diversify their immunoglobulin genes can be used for selection of novel antibodies and for refining existing affinities and specificities. Here, we report an adaptation of the chicken DT40 system wherein its capacity for somatic hypermutation is harnessed to evolve human antibodies expressed as single-chain variable fragments (scFvs). Expression of membrane-anchored scFvs from within the rearranged Igλ locus created self-diversifying scFv libraries from which we could both select scFvs of a desired specificity and evolve both the specificity and affinity of existing scFvs by iterative expansion and selection. From these scFvs, we were able to create fully human IgG antibodies with nanomolar affinities. We further enhanced the functionality of the system by creating a pool of DT40 scFv lines with high levels of mutation driven by the overexpression of a hyperactive variant of activation-induced deaminase. From this library, we successfully isolated scFvs that bound the spliceosome factor CWC15 and the cytokine human IFNγ. Our results demonstrate the flexibility and utility of DT40 for rapid generation of scFv repertoires and efficient selection, evolution and affinity maturation of scFv specificities. PMID:26519451

  7. Tensor dissimilarity based adaptive seeding algorithm for DT-MRI visualization with streamtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeselassie, Yonas T.; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we propose an adaptive seeding strategy for visualization of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) data using streamtubes. DT-MRI is a medical imaging modality that captures unique water diffusion properties and fiber orientation information of the imaged tissues. Visualizing DT-MRI data using streamtubes has the advantage that not only the anisotropic nature of the diffusion is visualized but also the underlying anatomy of biological structures is revealed. This makes streamtubes significant for the analysis of fibrous tissues in medical images. In order to avoid rendering multiple similar streamtubes, an adaptive seeding strategy is employed which takes into account similarity of tensors in a given region. The goal is to automate the process of generating seed points such that regions with dissimilar tensors are assigned more seed points compared to regions with similar tensors. The algorithm is based on tensor dissimilarity metrics that take into account both diffusion magnitudes and directions to optimize the seeding positions and density of streamtubes in order to reduce the visual clutter. Two recent advances in tensor calculus and tensor dissimilarity metrics are utilized: the Log-Euclidean and the J-divergence. Results show that adaptive seeding not only helps to cull unnecessary streamtubes that would obscure visualization but also do so without having to compute the culled streamtubes, which makes the visualization process faster.

  8. E and DE/DT waveshapes for narrow bipolar pulses in intracloud lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Thomson, Ewen M.; Pierce, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    Wideband electric field and dE/dt waveforms were recorded and digitized at a 100 MS/s rate at KSC during the summer and fall of 1989. These waveforms were combined to produce composite electric fields with an effective bandwidth of 3 to 50 MHz. Bipolar electric field pulses are characterized in terms of their E and dE/dt waveshapes. Half width mean durations were found to be 1.83 and 3.64 microseconds for negative and positive bipolar pulses respectively. Twenty of thirty of these pulses were found to occur independently of any other lightning activity. Analysis of the frequency content of these pulses as a function of time shows that radiation at different frequencies peak at different times. In addition to the initial peak and subsequent overshoot in the composite E waveshape, secondary humps following the initial peak are characterized according to their time of occurrence within the pulse. THe 156 narrow negative bipolar pulses and 10 positive narrow bipolar pulses are analyzed. The dE/dt signatures range from impulsive variations lasting several microseconds both before and after the initial peak of the electric field pulse, to smoother variations closely associated with peak.

  9. Directed evolution of human scFvs in DT40 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Alfred W.Y.; Williams, Gareth T.; Rada, Cristina; Sale, Julian E.

    2016-01-01

    Cells that constitutively diversify their immunoglobulin genes can be used for selection of novel antibodies and for refining existing affinities and specificities. Here, we report an adaptation of the chicken DT40 system wherein its capacity for somatic hypermutation is harnessed to evolve human antibodies expressed as single-chain variable fragments (scFvs). Expression of membrane-anchored scFvs from within the rearranged Igλ locus created self-diversifying scFv libraries from which we could both select scFvs of a desired specificity and evolve both the specificity and affinity of existing scFvs by iterative expansion and selection. From these scFvs, we were able to create fully human IgG antibodies with nanomolar affinities. We further enhanced the functionality of the system by creating a pool of DT40 scFv lines with high levels of mutation driven by the overexpression of a hyperactive variant of activation-induced deaminase. From this library, we successfully isolated scFvs that bound the spliceosome factor CWC15 and the cytokine human IFNγ. Our results demonstrate the flexibility and utility of DT40 for rapid generation of scFv repertoires and efficient selection, evolution and affinity maturation of scFv specificities. PMID:26519451

  10. Measurement of loss of DT fusion products using scintillator detectors in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Marsala, R.J.; Palladino, R.W.; Zweben, S.J.; Tuszewski, M.

    1995-03-01

    A poloidal array of MeV ion loss probes previously used to measure DD fusion product loss has been upgraded to measure the loss of alpha particles from DT plasmas in TFTR. The following improvements to the system have been made in preparation for the use of tritium in TFTR: (1) relocation of detectors to a neutronshielded enclosure in the basement to reduce neutron-induced background signals; (2) replacement of ZnS:Cu (P31) scintillators in the probes with the Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}0{sub 12}:Ce(P46) variety to minimize damage and assure linearity at the fluxes anticipated from DT plasmas; and (3) shielding of the fiber optic bundles which carry the fight from the probes to the detectors to reduce neutron- and gamma-induced light within them. In addition to the above preparations, the probes have been absolutely calibrated for alpha particles by using the Van de Graaf accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Alpha particle losses from DT plasmas have been observed, and losses at the detector 901 below the midplane are consistent with first orbit loss.

  11. Benchmarking the x-ray phase contrast imaging for ICF DT ice characterization using roughened surrogates

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Moody, J; Koch, J; Mapoles, E; Montesanti, R; Youngblood, K; Letts, S; Nikroo, A; Sater, J; Atherton, J

    2008-06-26

    We use x-ray phase contrast imaging to characterize the inner surface roughness of DT ice layers in capsules planned for future ignition experiments. It is therefore important to quantify how well the x-ray data correlates with the actual ice roughness. We benchmarked the accuracy of our system using surrogates with fabricated roughness characterized with high precision standard techniques. Cylindrical artifacts with azimuthally uniform sinusoidal perturbations with 100 um period and 1 um amplitude demonstrated 0.02 um accuracy limited by the resolution of the imager and the source size of our phase contrast system. Spherical surrogates with random roughness close to that required for the DT ice for a successful ignition experiment were used to correlate the actual surface roughness to that obtained from the x-ray measurements. When comparing average power spectra of individual measurements, the accuracy mode number limits of the x-ray phase contrast system benchmarked against surface characterization performed by Atomic Force Microscopy are 60 and 90 for surrogates smoother and rougher than the required roughness for the ice. These agreement mode number limits are >100 when comparing matching individual measurements. We will discuss the implications for interpreting DT ice roughness data derived from phase-contrast x-ray imaging.

  12. Feature-based interpolation of diffusion tensor fields and application to human cardiac DT-MRI.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Zhu, Yue-Min; Magnin, Isabelle E; Luo, Jian-Hua; Croisille, Pierre; Kingsley, Peter B

    2012-02-01

    Diffusion tensor interpolation is an important issue in the application of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) to the human heart, all the more as the points representing the myocardium of the heart are often sparse. We propose a feature-based interpolation framework for the tensor fields from cardiac DT-MRI, by taking into account inherent relationships between tensor components. In this framework, the interpolation consists in representing a diffusion tensor in terms of two tensor features, eigenvalues and orientation, interpolating the Euler angles or the quaternion relative to tensor orientation and the logarithmically transformed eigenvalues, and reconstructing the tensor to be interpolated from the interpolated eigenvalues and tensor orientations. The results obtained with the aid of both synthetic and real cardiac DT-MRI data demonstrate that the feature-based schemes based on Euler angles or quaternions not only maintain the advantages of Log-Euclidean and Riemannian interpolation as for preserving the tensor's symmetric positive-definiteness and the monotonic determinant variation, but also preserve, at the same time, the monotonicity of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values, which is not the case with Euclidean, Cholesky and Log-Euclidean methods. As a result, both interpolation schemes remove the phenomenon of FA collapse, and consequently avoid introducing artificial fiber crossing, with the difference that the quaternion is independent of coordinate system while Euler angles have the property of being more suitable for sophisticated interpolations. PMID:22154961

  13. Achromatic and isochronous lattice design of P2DT bending section in RAON accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jang, Hyojae; Hong, In-Seok; Jeon, Dong-O.

    2015-09-01

    In RAON heavy ion accelerator, generally, the In-flight Fragmentation (IF) and Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) systems are employed in order to produce various isotope beams. Out of the isotope beams, the beams generated by the ISOL system are transported from the low energy linac SCL3 to the high energy driver linac SCL2. The post-accelerator to the driver linac transport (P2DT) section that consists of the charge stripper section, the 180° bending section, and the SCL2 matching section is placed between the SCL3 and the SCL2. In this P2DT section, however, the transverse and longitudinal emittance growth can aggravate the beam acceptance of the SCL2. Besides, the growth at the P2DT 180° bending section is considered a significant issue because of the unexpected achromatic effect. Therefore an achromatic and isochronous lattice design should be devised to prevent the transverse and longitudinal emittance from increasing while the multi-charge beams flow through the bending section. This study reports an improved design for the achromatic and isochronous lattice up to the second-order. After satisfying the first-order achromatic and isochronous condition by adjusting the field strength of quadrupoles with this design, the simple and efficient method will be utilized with the aim of getting the minimum number of sextupoles. The research on the collimator for the charge selection at the bending section will be also represented by using the designed lattice.

  14. Microbiological study of biofilm formation in isolates of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104 and DT104b cultured from the modern pork chain.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Denis; Cabe, Evonne M Mc; McCusker, Matthew P; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2013-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to characterise 172 Salmonella Typhimurium isolates taken from the pork chain for their biofilm forming abilities and to analyse their potential to survive on food processing surfaces. Many Salmonella have the ability to form biofilms. These natural structures, elaborated by bacteria are important in food production because their formation contributes to bacterial survival. Adherent bacterial cells are more resilient to displacement strategies including physical and chemical procedures as a consequence of their altered more resistant phenotype. By improving our understanding of the nature of biofilms, this data could positively contribute to the development and implementation of eradication strategies. In this study, Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 and DT104b were investigated for their ability to form biofilms on a range of different surfaces under defined environmental growth conditions. Phenotypic characterisation involved examining colony morphology on indicator agars, assessing their ability to survive chlorine-based challenges and investigating their ability to attach to stainless steel and to plastic surfaces. All bacterial isolates were investigated for the presence of Salmonella genomic island I (SGI1) which is thought to enhance efficient biofilm formation. It was found that the majority of strains possess biofilm forming capabilities but successful attachment is highly dependent on the surface on which the biofilm is forming. The strains readily attached to stainless steel and plastic surfaces and survived high chlorine concentrations. Molecular and phenotypic comparisons of strong and weak biofilm forming strains indicate that biofilm development is not solely dependent on the acquirement of SGI1. PMID:23266499

  15. The X-Target: A novel high gain target with single-sided heavy-ion beam illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henestroza, Enrique

    2012-10-01

    A new inertial-fusion target configuration, the X-target, using one-sided heavy ion axial illumination has been explored [1]. It takes advantage of the unique energy deposition properties of heavy ion beams that have a classical, long penetration range. This class of target uses heavy ion beams to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel that fills the interior of metal cases that have side-view cross sections in the shape of an ``X''. X-targets that incorporate inside the case a propellant (plastic) and a pusher (aluminum) surrounding the DT are capable of assembling fuel areal densities ˜2 g/cm^2 using two MJ-scale annular beams to implode quasi-spherically the target to peak DT densities ˜100 g/cm^3. A 3MJ fast-ignition solid ion beam heats the fuel to thermonuclear temperatures in ˜200 ps to start the burn propagation, obtaining gains of ˜300. The main concern for the X-target is the amount of high-Z atomic mixing at the ignition zone produced by hydro-instabilities, which, if large enough, could cool the fuel during the ignition process and prevent the propagation of the fusion burn. Analytic estimates and implosion calculations using the radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA in 2D (RZ), at typical Eulerian mesh resolutions of a few microns, have shown that for the relatively low implosion velocities, low stagnation fuel densities, and low quasi-spherical fuel convergence ratios of the X-target, these hydro-instabilities do not have a large effect on the burning process. These preliminary studies need to be extended by further hydrodynamic calculations using finer resolution, complemented with turbulent mix modeling and validated by experiments, to ascertain the stability of the X-target design. We will present the current status of the X-target. [4pt] [1] E. Henestroza and B. G. Logan, Phys. Plasmas 19, 072706 (2012)

  16. Anti-tumor properties of the cGMP/protein kinase G inhibitor DT3 in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Soltek, Sabine; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Golovastova, Marina; D'Haese, Jan G; Serba, Susanne; Nachtigall, Ines; Philippov, Pavel P; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the deadliest cancers in the world. Therefore, new therapeutic options are urgently needed to improve the survival of PDAC patients. Protein kinase G (PKG) conducts the interlude of cGMP signaling which is important for healthy as well as for cancer cells. DT3 is a specific inhibitor of PKG, and it has been shown to possess an anti-tumor cytotoxic activity in vitro. The main aim of this work was to investigate anti-tumor effects of DT3 upon PDAC in vivo.Expression of PKG was assessed with real-time PCR analysis in the normal and tumor pancreatic cells. In vitro cell viability, proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, migration, and invasion of the murine PDAC cell line Panc02 were assessed after DT3 treatment. In vivo anti-tumor effects of DT3 were investigated in the murine Panc02 orthotopic model of PDAC. Western blot analysis was used to determine the phosphorylation state of the proteins of interest.Functional PKGI is preferentially expressed in PDAC cells. DT3 was capable to reduce viability, proliferation, and migration of murine PDAC cells in vitro. At the same time, DT3 treatment did not change the viability of normal epithelial cells of murine liver. In vivo, DT3 treatment reduced the tumor volume and metastases in PDAC-bearing mice, but it was ineffective to prolong the survival of the tumor-bearing animals. In addition, DT3 treatment decreased phosphorylation of GSK-3, P38, and CREB in murine PDAC.Inhibition of PKG could be a potential therapeutic strategy for PDAC treatment which should be carefully validated in future pre-clinical studies. PMID:26105003

  17. Neutron Spectroscopy on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.

    2012-10-01

    The performance of cryogenic fuel implosion experiments in progress at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is measured by an experimental threshold factorfootnotetextM. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051003 (2011). (ITFX) and a generalized Lawson Criterion.footnotetextC. D. Zhou and R. Betti, Phys. Plasmas 15, 102707 (2008); P. Y. Chang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 135002 (2010); and R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010). The ITFX metric is determined by the fusion yield and the areal density of an assembled deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel mass. Typical neutron yields from NIF implosions are greater than 10^14 allowing the neutron energy spectrum to be measured with unprecedented precision. A NIF spectrum is composed of neutrons created by fusion (DT, DD, and TT reactions) and neutrons scattered by the dense, cold fuel layer. Neutron scattering is used to determine the areal density of a NIF implosion and is measured along four lines of sight by two neutron time-of-flight detectors, a neutron imaging system, and the magnetic recoil spectrometer. An accurate measurement of the instrument response function for these detectors allows for the routine production of neutron spectra showing DT fuel areal densities up to 1.3 g/cm^2. Spectra over neutron energies of 10 to 17 MeV show areal-density asymmetries of 20% that are inconsistent with simulations. New calibrations and analyses have expended the spectral coverage down to energies less than the deuterium backscatter edge (1.5 MeV for 14 MeV neutrons). These data and analyses are presented along with a compilation of other nuclear diagnostic data that show a larger-than-expected variation in the areal density over the cold fuel mass. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No DE-FC52-08NA28302. In collaboration with NIC.

  18. Transport and performance in DIII-D discharges with weak or negative central magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, C.M.; Schissel, D.P.; Stallard, B.W.

    1996-12-01

    Discharges exhibiting the highest plasma energy and fusion reactivity yet realized in the DIII-D tokamak have been produced by combining the benefits of a hollow or weakly sheared central current profile with a high confinement (H-mode) edge. In these discharges, low power neutral beam injection heats the electrons during the initial current ramp, and {open_quotes}freezes in{close_quotes} a hollow or flat central current profile. When the neutral beam power is increased, formation of a region of reduced transport and highly peaked profiles in the core often results. Shortly before these plasmas would otherwise disrupt, a transition is triggered from the low (L-mode) to high (H-mode) confinement regimes, thereby broadening the pressure profile and avoiding the disruption. These plasmas continue to evolve until the high performance phase is terminated nondisruptively at much higher {beta}{sub T} (ratio of plasma pressure to toroidal magnetic field pressure) than would be attainable with peaked profiles and an L-mode edge. Transport analysis indicates that in this phase, the ion diffusivity is equivalent to that predicted by Chang-Hinton neoclassical theory over the entire plasma volume. This result is consistent with suppression of turbulence by locally enhanced E x B flow shear, and is supported by observations of reduced fluctuations in the plasma. Calculations of performance in these discharges extrapolated to a deuterium-tritium fuel mixture indicates that such plasmas could produce a DT fusion gain Q{sub DT} = 0.32.

  19. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-04-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant.

  20. The Ignition Target for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, L J; Moses, E I; Carlisle, K; Kilkenny, J

    2007-03-12

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for performing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. When completed in 2009, NIF will be able to produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light for target experiments that will create conditions of extreme temperatures (>10{sup 8} K), pressures (10-GBar) and matter densities (> 100 g/cm{sup 3}). A detailed program called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to enable ignition experiments in 2010, with the goal of producing fusion ignition and burn of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel mixture in millimeter-scale target capsules. The first of the target experiments leading up to these ignition shots will begin in 2008. Targets for the National Ignition Campaign are both complex and precise, and are extraordinarily demanding in materials fabrication, machining, assembly, cryogenics and characterization. An overview of the campaign for ignition will be presented, along with technologies for target fabrication, assembly and metrology and advances in growth and x-ray imaging of DT ice layers. The sum of these efforts represents a quantum leap in target precision, characterization, manufacturing rate and flexibility over current state-of-the-art.

  1. Propulsion of space ships by nuclear explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhart, J. G.; Kravárik, J.

    2005-01-01

    Recent progress in the research on deuterium-tritium (D-T) inertially confined microexplosions encourages one to reconsider the nuclear propulsion of spaceships based on the concept originally proposed in the Orion project. We discuss first the acceleration of medium-sized spaceships by D-T explosions whose output is in the range of 0.1 10 t of TNT. The launching of such a ship into an Earth orbit or beyond by a large nuclear explosion in an underground cavity is sketched out in the second section of the paper, and finally we consider a hypothetical Mars mission based on these concepts. In the conclusion it is argued that propulsion based on the Orion concept only is not the best method for interplanetary travel owing to the very large number of nuclear explosion required. A combination of a super gun and subsequent rocket propulsion using advanced chemical fuels appears to be the best solution for space flights of the near future.

  2. High-Yield Magnetized Liner Fusion Explosions and Blast Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, Stephen; Vesey, Roger; Cuneo, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Cylindrical liner implosions with preheated and magnetized deuterium-tritium (DT) are predicted to reach fusion conditions on present pulsed power machines [S.A. Slutz et al Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. We present simulations indicating that high yields (1-10 GJ) and gains (100-1000) may be possible at currents of about 60-70 MA if a cryogenic layer of solid DT is provided on the inside surface of the metal liner. A hot spot is formed from the central preheated magnetized low-density gas and a burn wave propagates radially into the surrounding cold dense fuel. These yields and gains are more than adequate for inertial fusion energy. However, the pulsed-power driver must be protected from the blast of these high-yield explosions. Numerical simulations are presented which show that the blast can be deflected and the fusion neutrons absorbed by a blanket that partially surrounds the liner. Thus a modest length transmission line can be used to deliver power to the liner. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Noninvasive assessment of left atrial maximum dP/dt by a combination of transmitral and pulmonary venous flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakatani, S.; Garcia, M. J.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Rodriguez, L.; Grimm, R. A.; Greenberg, N. L.; McCarthy, P. M.; Vandervoort, P. M.; Thomas, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study assessed whether hemodynamic parameters of left atrial (LA) systolic function could be estimated noninvasively using Doppler echocardiography. BACKGROUND: Left atrial systolic function is an important aspect of cardiac function. Doppler echocardiography can measure changes in LA volume, but has not been shown to relate to hemodynamic parameters such as the maximal value of the first derivative of the pressure (LA dP/dt(max)). METHODS: Eighteen patients in sinus rhythm were studied immediately before and after open heart surgery using simultaneous LA pressure measurements and intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Left atrial pressure was measured with a micromanometer catheter, and LA dP/dt(max) during atrial contraction was obtained. Transmitral and pulmonary venous flow were recorded by pulsed Doppler echocardiography. Peak velocity, and mean acceleration and deceleration, and the time-velocity integral of each flow during atrial contraction was measured. The initial eight patients served as the study group to derive a multilinear regression equation to estimate LA dP/dt(max) from Doppler parameters, and the latter 10 patients served as the test group to validate the equation. A previously validated numeric model was used to confirm these results. RESULTS: In the study group, LA dP/dt(max) showed a linear relation with LA pressure before atrial contraction (r = 0.80, p < 0.005), confirming the presence of the Frank-Starling mechanism in the LA. Among transmitral flow parameters, mean acceleration showed the strongest correlation with LA dP/dt(max) (r = 0.78, p < 0.001). Among pulmonary venous flow parameters, no single parameter was sufficient to estimate LA dP/dt(max) with an r2 > 0.30. By stepwise and multiple linear regression analysis, LA dP/dt(max) was best described as follows: LA dP/dt(max) = 0.1 M-AC +/- 1.8 P-V - 4.1; r = 0.88, p < 0.0001, where M-AC is the mean acceleration of transmitral flow and P-V is the peak velocity

  4. Strategy for D/He-3 fusion development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santarius, John F.

    1988-01-01

    It is concluded that Deuterium/Helium-3 fusion faces a more difficult physics development path but an easier technology development path than does Deuterium/Tritium. Early D/He-3 tests in next generation D/T fusion experiments might provide a valuable D/He-3 proof-of-principle at modest cost. At least one high leverage alternate concept should be vigorously pursued. Space applications of D/He-3 fusion are critically important to large scale development.

  5. Final report for the field-reversed configuration power plant critical-issue scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Santarius, John F.; Mogahed, Elsayed A.; Emmert, Gilbert A.; Khater, Hesham Y.; Nguyen, Canh N.; Ryzhkov, Sergei V.; Stubna, Michael D.; Steinhauer, Loren C.; Miley, George H.

    2001-03-01

    This report describes research in which a team from the Universities of Wisconsin, Washington, and Illinois performed a scoping study of critical issues for field-reversed configuration (FRC) power plants. The key tasks for this research were (1) systems analysis of deuterium-tritium (D-T) FRC fusion power plants, and (2) conceptual design of the blanket and shield module for an FRC fusion core.

  6. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    SciTech Connect

    Maniscalco, James A.; Meier, Wayne R.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  7. Comparison of subtracted venography and phase contrast in cerebral regions by utilizing 3DT1TFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Yeong-Cheol; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Jang, Hyon-Chol; Lee, Chang-Hee; Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Hae-Kag

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we evaluated the 3D venography images and the phase contrast images that were subtracted by using the images that had been obtained before and after utilizing the contrast medium with a 3D, segmented, T1-weighted gradient echo sequence (3DT1TFE) when performing a cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination with contrast medium. The study was carried out in 10 patients who under went a brain examination with a contrast medium by using the 3.0T MR System and 8-channel sensitivity encoding (SENSE) head coil. The 3DT1TFE images after the contrast medium had been used was subtracted from the 3DT1TFE images before the utilization. The subtracted images were re-formed to venography images by using maximum intensity projection (MIP) techniques; then, the re-formed images and 3D phase contrast (PC) venography were evaluated qualitative analysis. The qualitative analysis was done to confirm the reliability of the ratings of the observers via the ICC (intraclass correlation coefficient) and then to evaluate of the statistical significance via an independent T-test. The ICC test showed that 3D PC venography images and subtracted venography images had reliabilities of 0.677 and 0.734 on average, respectively, indicating good reliability of the ratings by the observers. Because the proximal superior sagittal sinus (SSS), the middle SSS, the confluence SSS, the vein of labbe, the internal cerebral vein, and the Vein of Galen represented p > 0.05 a the independent T-test, no statistically significant difference was observed between the two images. However, a significant difference was observed between the images regarding the straight sinus (p < 0.05). As such, the venography images subtracted from the straight sinus would be better, because the average of the straight sinus was higher in subtracted venography.

  8. Spatially resolved D-T(2) correlation NMR of porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Within the past decade, 2D Laplace nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been developed to analyze pore geometry and diffusion of fluids in porous media on the micrometer scale. Many objects like rocks and concrete are heterogeneous on the macroscopic scale, and an integral analysis of microscopic properties provides volume-averaged information. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolves this spatial average on the contrast scale set by the particular MRI technique. Desirable contrast parameters for studies of fluid transport in porous media derive from the pore-size distribution and the pore connectivity. These microscopic parameters are accessed by 1D and 2D Laplace NMR techniques. It is therefore desirable to combine MRI and 2D Laplace NMR to image functional information on fluid transport in porous media. Because 2D Laplace resolved MRI demands excessive measuring time, this study investigates the possibility to restrict the 2D Laplace analysis to the sum signals from low-resolution pixels, which correspond to pixels of similar amplitude in high-resolution images. In this exploratory study spatially resolved D-T2 correlation maps from glass beads and mortar are analyzed. Regions of similar contrast are first identified in high-resolution images to locate corresponding pixels in low-resolution images generated with D-T2 resolved MRI for subsequent pixel summation to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of contrast-specific D-T2 maps. This method is expected to contribute valuable information on correlated sample heterogeneity from the macroscopic and the microscopic scales in various types of porous materials including building materials and rock. PMID:24607821

  9. Alpha-Driven MHD and MHD-Induced Alpha Loss in TFTR DT Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zuoyang

    1996-11-01

    Theoretical calculation and numerical simulation indicate that there can be interesting interactions between alpha particles and MHD activity which can adversely affect the performance of a tokamak reactor (e.g., ITER). These interactions include alpha-driven MHD, like the toroidicity-induced-Alfven-eigenmode (TAE) and MHD induced alpha particle losses or redistribution. Both phenomena have been observed in recent TFTR DT experiments. Weak alpha-driven TAE activity was observed in a NBI-heated DT experiment characterized by high q0 ( >= 2) and low core magnetic shear. The TAE mode appears at ~30-100 ms after the neutral beam turning off approximately as predicted by theory. The mode has an amplitude measured by magnetic coils at the edge tildeB_p ~1 mG, frequency ~150-190 kHz and toroidal mode number ~2-3. It lasts only ~ 30-70 ms and has been seen only in DT discharges with fusion power level about 1.5-2.0 MW. Numerical calculation using NOVA-K code shows that this type of plasma has a big TAE gap. The calculated TAE frequency and mode number are close to the observation. (2) KBM-induced alpha particle loss^1. In some high-β, high fusion power DT experiments, enhanced alpha particle losses were observed to be correlated to the high frequency MHD modes with f ~100-200 kHz (the TAE frequency would be two-times higher) and n ~5-10. These modes are localized around the peak plasma pressure gradient and have ballooning characteristics. Alpha loss increases by 30-100% during the modes. Particle orbit simulations show the added loss results from wave-particle resonance. Linear instability analysis indicates that the plasma is unstable to the kinetic MHD ballooning modes (KBM) driven primarily by strong local pressure gradients. ----------------- ^1Z. Chang, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 (1996) 1071. In collaberation with R. Nazikian, G.-Y. Fu, S. Batha, R. Budny, L. Chen, D. Darrow, E. Fredrickson, R. Majeski, D. Mansfield, K. McGuire, G. Rewoldt, G. Taylor, R. White, K

  10. Flight Deck Display Technologies for 4DT and Surface Equivalent Visual Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Jones, Denis R.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Allamandola, Angela S.; Foyle, David C.; Hooey, Becky L.

    2009-01-01

    NASA research is focused on flight deck display technologies that may significantly enhance situation awareness, enable new operating concepts, and reduce the potential for incidents/accidents for terminal area and surface operations. The display technologies include surface map, head-up, and head-worn displays; 4DT guidance algorithms; synthetic and enhanced vision technologies; and terminal maneuvering area traffic conflict detection and alerting systems. This work is critical to ensure that the flight deck interface technologies and the role of the human participants can support the full realization of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) and its novel operating concepts.

  11. Monitoring of D-T accelerator neutron output in a PGNAA system using silicon carbide detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulloo, Abdul R.; Ruddy, Frank H.; Seidel, John G.; Petrović, Bojan

    2001-07-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) detectors are being employed to monitor the neutron output of the D-T accelerator in a pulsed Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system. Detection of the source neutrons relies on energetic neutron reactions in the detector material. Experimental testing has been performed to confirm that the detector response is caused by fast neutrons from the accelerator source. Modeling calculations have also been carried out to provide additional verification. Use of the SiC detectors in the PGNAA system is expected to assist in evaluating system performance as well as ensuring accurate data interpretation and analysis.

  12. Measurement and analysis of radioactivity induced in CuCrZr by D?T neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichin, R.; Adelhelm, C.; Blokhin, A. I.; Forrest, R. A.; Freiesleben, H.; Kovalchuk, V. D.; Markovskij, D. V.; Seidel, K.; Unholzer, S.

    2004-08-01

    CuCrZr is used in high heat flux components of ITER and other fusion reactor designs. A CuCrZr alloy of the European Fusion Technology Programme was irradiated with D-T neutrons, and the γ-activities of all nuclides which are relevant up to the recycling limit of the material were measured. The results were analysed with the European Activation System (versions EASY-2001 and EASY-2003). The calculated total activation property of the material was validated within 10%. The long-term radioactivity was estimated to be well below the hands-on limit with an uncertainty of 19%.

  13. Fusion gamma diagnostics for D-T and D-/sup 3/He plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Hendel, H.

    1982-11-01

    Nuclear reactions of interest in controlled thermonuclear fusion research often possess a branch yielding prompt emission of gamma radiation. In principle, the gamma emission can be exploited to provide a new fusion diagnostic offering measurements comparable to those obtained by the well established neutron diagnostics methods. The conceptual aspects for a fusion gamma diagnostic are discussed in this paper and the feasibility for application to the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor during deuterium neutral beam heating of a D-T plasma and minority ion cyclotron resonance heating of a D-/sup 3/He plasma is examined.

  14. Determination of Histone H2AX Phosphorylation in DT40 Cells.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Kana; Shahane, Sampada A; Xia, Menghang

    2016-01-01

    Visualization of DNA damage response protein recruitment to DNA damage sites enables measurement of the DNA damage. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and blocked replication forks induce the phosphorylation of H2AX at serine 139 (γH2AX), and accumulate γH2AX which can then be detected as foci. The detection of γH2AX foci by immunostaining with antibodies that recognize γH2AX is an indicator of DSBs presence. This chapter describes the measurement of γH2AX immunostaining using a high-content imaging platform in chicken DT40 B-lymphocyte cell lines. PMID:27518625

  15. Observation of sawtooth redistribution of nonthermal, confined alpha particles in TFTR D-T discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.; Budny, R.; Chang, Z.; Fonck, R.; Wising, F.; Odblom, A.

    1996-05-01

    Radial profiles of the density of confined alpha particles with energies in the 0.15-0.6 MeV range are spectroscopically observed before and after a sawtooth crash in a TFTR D-T plasma. A large drop in the core alpha density is seen indicating expulsion of alphas from the core to the plasma periphery. The measured changes in the alpha density profiles are consistent with predictions based on the Kolesnichenko sawtooth model, indicating that it may be used to reliably predict the effect of sawteeth on fusion-produced alphas.

  16. An Easter outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104A associated with traditional pork salami in Italy.

    PubMed

    Luzzi, I; Galetta, P; Massari, M; Rizzo, C; Dionisi, A M; Filetici, E; Cawthorne, A; Tozzi, A; Argentieri, M; Bilei, S; Busani, L; Gnesivo, C; Pendenza, A; Piccoli, A; Napoli, P; Loffredo, L; Trinito, M O; Santarelli, E; Ciofi degli Atti, M L

    2007-04-01

    Salmonella enterica is a common cause of gastrointestinal illness in Italy. S. Typhimurium accounts for approximately 40% of isolates, and most of these strains belong to the phage type DT104. We describe the investigation of an outbreak of S. Typhimurium DT104A, a subtype never observed before in Italy, which occurred in Rome during spring 2004.We conducted a matched case control study between 24 July and 9 September 2004. Controls were matched for age and area of residence. Each case had between one and four controls. Odds of exposure to potential risk factors and vehicles for the outbreak were compared between cases and controls. A multivariate analysis was conducted to estimate adjusted Odds Ratios.Sixty-three cases of S. Typhimurium DT 104A infection with onset between 1 April and 5 May 2004 were identified. Sixty-one were residents of Rome and two were residents of a neighbouring region. Twenty-six cases (43%) were enrolled in the study. Their median age was 7.5 years. Fourteen of 26 cases and 16 of 62 controls had eaten pork salami (OR= 25.5; 95% CI 1.6- 416.8). No food samples were available for testing. In northern Italy, two months prior to the outbreak, the veterinary surveillance system identified the first isolation of S. Typhimurium DT104A in a pig isolate. Both human and pig isolates showed indistinguishable PFGE patterns. It was not possible to trace the pig after the sample was taken at slaughter. The epidemiological evidence on the implication of pork salami in this outbreak suggests that pork products can also be a vehicle for salmonella in Italy and underlines the importance of good manufacturing practices for ready-to-eat foods. This investigation highlights the value of laboratory-based surveillance in identifying community-wide outbreaks of uncommon pathogens. It also underlines the need to improve surveillance timeliness, for promptly detecting outbreaks, undergoing field investigation, and implementing control measures. Moreover, our study

  17. Reducing disk storage of full-3D seismic waveform tomography (F3DT) through lossy online compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, Peter; Chen, Po; Lee, En-Jui

    2016-08-01

    Full-3D seismic waveform tomography (F3DT) is the latest seismic tomography technique that can assimilate broadband, multi-component seismic waveform observations into high-resolution 3D subsurface seismic structure models. The main drawback in the current F3DT implementation, in particular the scattering-integral implementation (F3DT-SI), is the high disk storage cost and the associated I/O overhead of archiving the 4D space-time wavefields of the receiver- or source-side strain tensors. The strain tensor fields are needed for computing the data sensitivity kernels, which are used for constructing the Jacobian matrix in the Gauss-Newton optimization algorithm. In this study, we have successfully integrated a lossy compression algorithm into our F3DT-SI workflow to significantly reduce the disk space for storing the strain tensor fields. The compressor supports a user-specified tolerance for bounding the error, and can be integrated into our finite-difference wave-propagation simulation code used for computing the strain fields. The decompressor can be integrated into the kernel calculation code that reads the strain fields from the disk and compute the data sensitivity kernels. During the wave-propagation simulations, we compress the strain fields before writing them to the disk. To compute the data sensitivity kernels, we read the compressed strain fields from the disk and decompress them before using them in kernel calculations. Experiments using a realistic dataset in our California statewide F3DT project have shown that we can reduce the strain-field disk storage by at least an order of magnitude with acceptable loss, and also improve the overall I/O performance of the entire F3DT-SI workflow significantly. The integration of the lossy online compressor may potentially open up the possibilities of the wide adoption of F3DT-SI in routine seismic tomography practices in the near future.

  18. Molecular characterization of Mycobacterium avium complex isolates giving discordant results in AccuProbe tests by PCR-restriction enzyme analysis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and DT1-DT6 PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Devallois, A; Picardeau, M; Paramasivan, C N; Vincent, V; Rastogi, N

    1997-01-01

    Based on cultural and biochemical tests, a total of 84 strains (72 clinical and 12 environmental isolates from the Caribbean Isles, Europe, and the Indian subcontinent) were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). They were further characterized with MAC, M. avium, and M. intracellulare probes of the AccuProbe system, and this was followed by selective amplification of DT6 and DT1 sequences. Seventy isolates gave concordant results; 63 were identified as M. avium, 5 were identified as M. intracellulare, and 24 remained untypeable by both methods. Fourteen isolates gave discrepant results, as they were DT1 positive but gave negative results by the M. intracellulare AccuProbe test. Consequently, a detailed molecular analysis of all DT1-positive isolates (14 discrepant strains plus 5 M. intracellulare strains) was performed by PCR-restriction analysis (PRA) of the hsp65 gene and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The results confirmed the reported heterogeneity of M. intracellulare, as only 6 of 19 isolates (32%) gave PRA results compatible with published M. intracellulare profiles while the rest of the isolates were grouped in four previously unpublished profiles. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that only 8 of 19 isolates (42%) were related to M. intracellulare IWGMT 90247 (EMBL accession no. X88917), the rest being related to MCRO19 (EMBL accession no. X93030) and MIWGTMR10 (EMBL accession no. X88915). In conclusion, we have characterized a significant number of MAC isolates which were not identified by the AccuProbe test, PRA, or 16S rRNA sequencing. However, all of them were identifiable by DT1-DT6 PCR (they were DT6 negative and DT1 positive) and could be tentatively identified as M. intracellulare based on previously published observations. It is noteworthy that the majority of such isolates (14 of 19) were from the Indian subcontinent, with 12 of 14 being environmental isolates. Our study confirms the marked heterogeneity of M. intracellulare

  19. D-T neutron generator development for cancer therapy. 1980 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, F.M.; Walko, R.J.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Cowgill, D.F.; Riedel, A.A.; O'Hagan, J.B.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during the first year of a two-year grant by NCI/HEW to investigate the feasibility of developing a D-T neutron generator for use in cancer therapy. Experiments have continued on the Target Test Facility (TTF) developed during a previous grant to investigate high-temperature metal hydrides for use as target materials. The high voltage reliability of the TTF has been improved so that 200 kV, 200 mA operation is now routine. In recent target tests, the D-D neutron production rate was measured to be > 1 x 10/sup 11//s, a rate that corresponds to a D-T neutron production rate of > 1 x 10/sup 13//s - the desired rate for use in cancer therapy. Deuterium concentration depth profiles in the target, measured during intense ion beam bombardment, show that deuterium is depleted near the surface of the target due to impurities implanted by the ion beam. Recent modifications of the duopigatron ion source to reduce secondary electron damage to the electrodes also improved the ion source efficiency by about 40%. An ultra high vacuum version of the TTF is now being constructed to determine if improved vacuum conditions will reduce ion source impurities to a sufficiently low level that the deuterium near the surface of the target is not depleted. Testing will begin in June 1980.

  20. Behavior of Salmonella typhimurium DT104 during the manufacture and storage of pepperoni.

    PubMed

    Ihnot, A M; Roering, A M; Wierzba, R K; Faith, N G; Luchansky, J B

    1998-03-01

    Pepperoni batter (ca. 70% pork:30% beef) was prepared and subsequently inoculated with a six-strain cocktail (ca. 4.4 x 10(7) per gram batter) of Salmonella typhimurium DT104. After fermentation at 36 degrees C and 92% relative humidity (RH) to < or = pH 4.8, counts of the pathogen decreased by about 1.3 log10 units. An additional 1.6 log10 unit decrease was observed following drying at 13 degrees C and 65% RH to a moisture protein ratio (M/Pr) of 1.6:1. After storage of pepperoni sticks for 56 days under vacuum at 4 or 21 degrees C, counts of the pathogen were about 4.6 and 6.6 log10 units lower, respectively, compared with starting levels in the batter. These data establish that fermentation and drying result in about a 3.0 log10 reduction in numbers of S typhimurium DT104 in pepperoni sticks and that storage of pepperoni sticks under vacuum at ambient temperature is more severe on the pathogen than refrigerated storage. PMID:9600617

  1. Biotransformation of tetracycline by a novel bacterial strain Stenotrophomonas maltophilia DT1.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yifei; Bao, Jianguo; Chang, Gaofeng; Zheng, Han; Li, Xingxing; Du, Jiangkun; Snow, Daniel; Li, Xu

    2016-11-15

    Although several abiotic processes have been reported that can transform antibiotics, little is known about whether and how microbiological processes may degrade antibiotics in the environment. This work isolated one tetracycline degrading bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain DT1, and characterized the biotransformation of tetracycline by DT1 under various environmental conditions. The biotransformation rate was the highest when the initial pH was 9 and the reaction temperature was at 30°C, and can be described using the Michaelis-Menten model under different initial tetracycline concentrations. When additional substrate was present, the substrate that caused increased biomass resulted in a decreased biotransformation rate of tetracycline. According to disk diffusion tests, the biotransformation products of tetracycline had lower antibiotic potency than the parent compound. Six possible biotransformation products were identified, and a potential biotransformation pathway was proposed that included sequential removal of N-methyl, carbonyl, and amine function groups. Results from this study can lead to better estimation of the fate and transport of antibiotics in the environment and has the potential to be utilized in designing engineering processes to remove tetracycline from water and soil. PMID:27420384

  2. An outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium DT170 associated with kebab meat and yogurt relish.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M. R.; Salmon, R. L.; Nehaul, L.; Mably, S.; Wafford, L.; Nolan-Farrell, M. Z.; Gardner, D.; Ribeiro, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    During July 1995, an outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium definitive type (DT) 170, an unusual strain, occurred in South Wales. A case-control study found that illness was associated with eating kebabs (odds ratio undefined, P = 0.002), doner kebabs (odds ratio 7.9, 95 % confidence interval 1.5-20.5, P = 0.02) and kebabs with yoghurt based relish (odds ratio undefined, P = 0.009) but not with eating kebabs with mayonnaise-based relish (odds ratio 2.4, 95 % confidence interval 0.4-13.9, P = 0.53). Environmental investigations discovered a complex web of producers and wholesale suppliers. Kebab meat and yoghurt had been supplied to the two main implicated outlets by a single wholesaler. Samples of raw minced lamb and several environmental swabs taken at the wholesaler were positive for S. typhimurium DT170. Blood-stained, unsealed yoghurt pots were observed to be stored under a rack of raw lamb. Investigators of food poisoning outbreaks linked to takeaway food should consider cross-contaminated relishes and dressings as well as undercooked meat as potential vehicles of infection. PMID:10459639

  3. Experimental Studies of Alfven Eigenmode Stability in JET D-T Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasoli, A.; Heeter, R.; Borba, D.; Gormezano, C.; Sharapov, S.; Jaun, A.

    1997-11-01

    Systematic studies of Alfven Eigenmodes (AE) are performed at JET, based on the excitation via resonant interaction with fast particles generated by additional heating and by fusion reactions, and via external antennas, providing a direct measurement of the mode damping rate. Similar damping rates are observed in D-D and D-T plasmas with similar configurations. In both cases the formation of an X-point provides a strong stabilising effect on low-n TAE. The fast particle drive is detected as a reduction in the measured damping rate as the fast particle pressure is increased. For ICRH power levels above the experimentally established marginal stability limit, 3 MW < P_thres < 6 MW, the magnetic fluctuation spectra indicate the destabilisation of different families of AE (TAE, EAE, kTAE, NAE). In 50:50 D-T plasmas characterised by moderate fusion power (P_fusion< 2 MW), alpha particle pressure is observed to destabilise TAE in the afterglow of the NBI and ICRH heating phase. The diagnostic potential of AE will be discussed along with the implications for the AE stability in ignited plasmas.

  4. Measuring Mix in Direct-Drive Cryogenic DT Implosions Using Soft X-Ray Narrowband Backlighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Jungquist, R. K.; Mileham, C.; Nilson, P. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Theobald, W.

    2014-10-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor mix is widely seen as the major source of perturbations, which limit the performance of low-adiabat cryogenic implosions in both direct- and indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments. Backlit images of cryogenic direct-drive implosions recorded with a narrowband x-ray imager using an aspherically bent quartz crystal for the Si Heα line at ~ 1.86 keV show a clear signature of carbon from the CD outer shell of the cryogenic target mixing into the DT layer at the end of the acceleration phase. These implosions are driven on a low adiabat with a high in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR). Comparison with post-processed 1-D hydrodynamic simulations show that the absorption seen in the backlit images is ~ 5 × larger than expected, consistent with mixing ~ 0.2% of carbon into the DT shell. Experiments with a slightly higher adiabat and lower IFAR match the predictions of clean 1-D simulations showing no signature of carbon mix. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  5. Evaluation of the US Army DT-236 battlefield personnel dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Oyan, R.; Sims, C.S.; Dooley, M.A.

    1986-06-01

    Performance characteristics of the US Army DT-236 battlefield personnel dosimetry system were evaluated using the Health Physics Research Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The DT-236 dosimeter is designed to measure total (neutron plus gamma) radiation dose using a radiophotoluminescent (RPL) detector for gamma rays and a silicon diode for fast neutrons. Areas considered in this evaluation included preirradiation dose indication; accuracy and precision of total, gamma, and neutron dose measurements; fading; angular response; temperature dependence; and relative dosimeter response in air and on various body locations. Experimental results for a variety of radiation fields and dose levels indicate that the existing system overestimates total, neutron, and gamma radiation doses in air by about 20 to 60% relative to reference values. Associated measurement precisions were about +-5% of the means for doses above approximately 0.5 Gy. Fading characteristics, angular dependence, and temperature dependence of the RPL and diode systems were consistent with results expected based on detector characteristics and previous performance studies. Recommendations to improve existing reader performance and measurement accuracy are also presented.

  6. Salmonella typhimurium DT104: a virulent and drug-resistant pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C; Smart, N; Khakhria, R; Johnson, W; Spika, J; Prescott, J

    1998-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium phage type (PT) or definitive type (DT) 104 is a virulent pathogen for humans and animals, particularly cattle. It has been isolated increasingly from humans and animals in the United Kingdom and several other European countries and, more recently, in the United States and Canada. Humans may acquire the infection from foods of animal origin contaminated with the infective organism. Farm families are particularly at risk of acquiring the infection by contact with infected animals or by drinking unpasteurized milk. The symptoms in cattle are watery to bloody diarrhea, a drop in milk production, pyrexia, anorexia, dehydration and depression. Infection may result in septicemic salmonellosis and, upon necropsy, a fibrinonecrotic enterocolitis may be observed. The infection occurs more commonly in the calving season than at other times. Feedlot cattle and pigs may also be affected. Prolonged carriage and shedding of the pathogen may occur. Symptoms in humans consist of diarrhea, fever, headache, nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, and, less frequently, blood in the stool. Salmonella typhimurium DT104 strains are commonly resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides, and tetracycline. PMID:9752592

  7. An Excess of Mid-infrared Emission from the Type Iax SN 2014dt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Ori D.; Johansson, Joel; Kasliwal, Mansi; Andrews, Jennifer; Bally, John; Bond, Howard E.; Boyer, Martha L.; Gehrz, R. D.; Helou, George; Hsiao, E. Y.; Masci, Frank J.; Parthasarathy, M.; Smith, Nathan; Tinyanont, Samaporn; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2016-01-01

    Supernovae Type Iax (SNe Iax) are less energetic and less luminous than typical thermonuclear explosions. A suggested explanation for the observed characteristics of this subclass is a binary progenitor system consisting of a CO white dwarf primary accreting from a helium star companion. A single-degenerate explosion channel might be expected to result in a dense circumstellar medium (CSM), although no evidence for such a CSM has yet been observed for this subclass. Here we present recent Spitzer observations of the SN Iax 2014dt obtained by the SPIRITS program nearly one year post-explosion that reveal a strong mid-IR excess over the expected fluxes of more normal SNe Ia. This excess is consistent with 10-5{M}⊙ of newly formed dust, which would be the first time that newly formed dust has been observed to form in a Type Ia. The excess, however, is also consistent with a dusty CSM that was likely formed in pre-explosion mass-loss, thereby suggesting a single degenerate progenitor system. Compared to other SNe Ia that show significant shock interaction (SNe Ia-CSM) and interacting core-collapse events (SNe IIn), this dust shell in SN 2014dt is less massive. We consider the implications that such a pre-existing dust shell has for the progenitor system, including a binary system with a mass donor that is a red giant, a red supergiant, or an asymptotic giant branch star.

  8. Correlation Between Tensile Strength and Hardness of Electron Beam Welded TC4-DT Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Shi, Yaowu; Li, Xiaoyan; Lei, Yongping

    2013-06-01

    Correlation between tensile strength and hardness for damage-tolerant Ti-6Al-4V (TC4-DT) alloy and its electron beam welded joints was investigated. Yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and strain hardening coefficient of base metal and weld metal were obtained using uniaxial tensile tests. Microhardness of the base metal, heat affected zone, and weld metal was measured. Then, the linear correlations among the yield strength, tensile strength, and hardness were proposed. Moreover, correlation between strain hardening coefficient and the ratio of YS to UTS (YS/UTS) was established. The results indicate that microhardness can be used to predict the YS and UTS of the TC4-DT welded joint successfully. In addition, the strain hardening coefficient can be predicted by the YS/UTS. The prediction of strength and strain hardening coefficient is in agreement with the experiments. The correlations are applicable and valuable for the strength prediction of narrow welded fusion zone and heat affected zone based on the microhardness measurement.

  9. Induction of DT-diaphorase by 1,2-dithiole-3-thione and increase of antitumour activity of bioreductive agents.

    PubMed Central

    Begleiter, A.; Leith, M. K.; Curphey, T. J.

    1996-01-01

    Bioreductive antitumour agents are an important new class of anticancer drugs that require activation by reduction. The two-electron reducing enzyme, DT-diaphorase, has been shown to be an important activating enzyme for the bioreductive agents, mitomycin C (MMC) and EO9. Incubation of L5178Y murine lymphoma cells in vitro with 1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T) increased the level of DT-diaphorase activity in these cells 22-fold. In contrast, D3T had no effect on the DT-diaphorase level in normal mouse bone marrow cells. Combination therapy with D3T and MMC or EO9, produced a 2- or 7-fold enhancement, respectively, of the cytotoxic activity of these antitumour agents in L5178Y cells. By comparison, D3T did not enhance the activity of MMC in marrow cells and produced only a small increase in EO9 cytotoxicity in these cells. The DT-diaphorase inhibitor, dicoumarol, inhibited the effect of D3T on the antitumour activity of the bioreductive agents, supporting the proposal that the enhanced anticancer activity was due to the elevated enzyme level. These findings suggest that D3T, or other inducers of DT-diaphorase, could be used to enhance the antitumour efficacy of bioreductive antitumour agents. PMID:8763837

  10. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Bionta, R M; Casey, D T; Caggiano, J A; Hatarik, R; Khater, H Y; Sayre, D B; Knauer, J P; Sangster, T C; Herrmann, H W; Kilkenny, J D

    2014-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4-20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80-140 mg/cm(2) and CH-ablator ρR's of 400-680 mg/cm(2) are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions. PMID:25430283

  11. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Caggiano, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Khater, H. Y.; Sayre, D. B.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4-20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80-140 mg/cm2 and CH-ablator ρR's of 400-680 mg/cm2 are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions.

  12. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gatu Johnson, M. Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Caggiano, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Khater, H. Y.; Sayre, D. B.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-11-15

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4–20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80–140 mg/cm{sup 2} and CH-ablator ρR's of 400–680 mg/cm{sup 2} are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions.

  13. Ultra-dense SNP genetic map construction and identification of SiDt gene controlling the determinate growth habit in Sesamum indicum L.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyang; Miao, Hongmei; Li, Chun; Wei, Libin; Duan, Yinghui; Ma, Qin; Kong, Jingjing; Xu, Fangfang; Chang, Shuxian

    2016-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an important oilseed crop and has an indeterminate growth habit. Here we resequenced the genomes of the parents and 120 progeny of an F2 population derived from crossing Yuzhi 11 (indeterminate, Dt) and Yuzhi DS899 (determinate, dt1), and constructed an ultra-dense SNP map for sesame comprised of 3,041 bins including 30,193 SNPs in 13 linkage groups (LGs) with an average marker density of 0.10 cM. Results indicated that the same recessive gene controls the determinacy trait in dt1 and a second determinate line, dt2 (08TP092). The QDt1 locus for the determinacy trait was located in the 18.0 cM–19.2 cM interval of LG8. The target SNP, SiDt27-1, and the determinacy gene, DS899s00170.023 (named here as SiDt), were identified in Scaffold 00170 of the Yuzhi 11 reference genome, based on genetic mapping and genomic association analysis. Unlike the G397A SNP change in the dt1 genotype, the SiDt allele in dt2 line was lost from the genome. This example of map-based gene cloning in sesame provides proof-of-concept of the utility of ultra-dense SNP maps for accurate genome research in sesame. PMID:27527492

  14. Ultra-dense SNP genetic map construction and identification of SiDt gene controlling the determinate growth habit in Sesamum indicum L.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Miao, Hongmei; Li, Chun; Wei, Libin; Duan, Yinghui; Ma, Qin; Kong, Jingjing; Xu, Fangfang; Chang, Shuxian

    2016-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an important oilseed crop and has an indeterminate growth habit. Here we resequenced the genomes of the parents and 120 progeny of an F2 population derived from crossing Yuzhi 11 (indeterminate, Dt) and Yuzhi DS899 (determinate, dt1), and constructed an ultra-dense SNP map for sesame comprised of 3,041 bins including 30,193 SNPs in 13 linkage groups (LGs) with an average marker density of 0.10 cM. Results indicated that the same recessive gene controls the determinacy trait in dt1 and a second determinate line, dt2 (08TP092). The QDt1 locus for the determinacy trait was located in the 18.0 cM-19.2 cM interval of LG8. The target SNP, SiDt27-1, and the determinacy gene, DS899s00170.023 (named here as SiDt), were identified in Scaffold 00170 of the Yuzhi 11 reference genome, based on genetic mapping and genomic association analysis. Unlike the G397A SNP change in the dt1 genotype, the SiDt allele in dt2 line was lost from the genome. This example of map-based gene cloning in sesame provides proof-of-concept of the utility of ultra-dense SNP maps for accurate genome research in sesame. PMID:27527492

  15. Dt2 Is a Gain-of-Function MADS-Domain Factor Gene That Specifies Semideterminacy in Soybean[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jieqing; Liu, Yunfeng; Sun, Lianjun; Zhao, Meixia; Li, Yinghui; She, Maoyun; Sui, Yi; Lin, Feng; Liu, Xiaodong; Tang, Zongxiang; Nguyen, Hanh; Tian, Zhixi; Qiu, Lijuan; Nelson, Randall L.; Clemente, Thomas E.; Specht, James E.; Ma, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Similar to Arabidopsis thaliana, the wild soybeans (Glycine soja) and many cultivars exhibit indeterminate stem growth specified by the shoot identity gene Dt1, the functional counterpart of Arabidopsis TERMINAL FLOWER1 (TFL1). Mutations in TFL1 and Dt1 both result in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) switching from vegetative to reproductive state to initiate terminal flowering and thus produce determinate stems. A second soybean gene (Dt2) regulating stem growth was identified, which, in the presence of Dt1, produces semideterminate plants with terminal racemes similar to those observed in determinate plants. Here, we report positional cloning and characterization of Dt2, a dominant MADS domain factor gene classified into the APETALA1/SQUAMOSA (AP1/SQUA) subfamily that includes floral meristem (FM) identity genes AP1, FUL, and CAL in Arabidopsis. Unlike AP1, whose expression is limited to FMs in which the expression of TFL1 is repressed, Dt2 appears to repress the expression of Dt1 in the SAMs to promote early conversion of the SAMs into reproductive inflorescences. Given that Dt2 is not the gene most closely related to AP1 and that semideterminacy is rarely seen in wild soybeans, Dt2 appears to be a recent gain-of-function mutation, which has modified the genetic pathways determining the stem growth habit in soybean. PMID:25005919

  16. Towards in vitro DT/DNT testing: Assaying chemical susceptibility in early differentiating NT2 cells.

    PubMed

    Menzner, Ann-Katrin; Abolpour Mofrad, Sepideh; Friedrich, Oliver; Gilbert, Daniel F

    2015-12-01

    Human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma (NT2) cells are increasingly considered as a suitable model for in vitro toxicity testing, e.g. developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity (DT/DNT) studies, as they undergo neuronal differentiation upon stimulation with retinoic acid (RA) and permit toxicity testing at different stages of maturation. NT2 cells have recently been reported to show specific changes in dielectric resistance profiles during differentiation which can be observed as early as 24h upon RA-stimulation. These observations suggest altered susceptibility to chemicals at an early stage of differentiation. However, chemical susceptibility of early differentiating NT cells has not yet been studied. To address this question, we have established a cell fitness screening assay based on the analysis of intracellular ATP levels and we applied the assay in a large-scale drug screening experiment in NT2 stem cells and early differentiating NT2 cells. Subsequent analysis of ranked fitness phenotypes revealed 19 chemicals with differential toxicity profile in early differentiating NT2 cells. To evaluate whether any of the identified drugs have previously been associated with DT/DNT, we conducted a literature search on the identified molecules and quantified the fraction of chemicals assigned to the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) pregnancy risk categories (PRC) N, A, B, C, D, and X in the hit list and the small molecule library. While the fractions of the categories N and B were decreased (0.81 and 0.35-fold), the classes C, D and X were increased (1.35, 1.47 and 3.27-fold) in the hit list compared to the chemical library. From these data as well as from the literature review, identifying large fractions of chemicals being directly (∼42%) and indirectly associated with DT/DNT (∼32%), we conclude that our method may be beneficial to systematic in vitro-based primary screening for developmental toxicants and neurotoxicants and we propose cell fitness screening in

  17. Effect of Microstructure on the Fatigue Crack Propagation Behavior of TC4-DT Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ping; Zhao, Yongqing; Zeng, Weidong; Liu, Jianglin

    2015-05-01

    This paper focused on the fatigue crack growth behavior of TC4-DT titanium alloy with different microstructures. Heat treatments were performed to produce different microstructures, which varied in α lamella width and cluster size. The fatigue crack propagation route was observed for different microstructures. The deformation characteristic of the crack tip plastic zone was analyzed. The results demonstrated that, for adequate mechanical properties of the alloy, the microstructure formed after performing two treatments (first, air cooling from the β-phase field, and then annealing at 550 °C for 4 h) exhibited a better fatigue anti-crack propagation ability. This result was related to the existing higher plastic deformation field in the crack tip. Wide α lamellae and coarse α colonies were found to contribute to the improvement of the fracture toughness.

  18. Detection of glucose via enzyme-coupling reaction based on a DT-diaphorase fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xinghui; Li, Xiaohua; Wan, Qiongqiong; Li, Zhao; Ma, Huimin

    2014-03-01

    Enzyme-coupling reactions play an important role in the assay of analytes. In this manuscript, we developed a new fluorescent probe for the detection of glucose through the enzyme-coupling reaction of DT-diaphorase (DTD). The probe was synthesized through a mild and simple synthetic procedure, and showed good fluorescence response to DTD. The reactions for the detection of glucose proceed as follows: glucose dehydrogenase oxidizes glucose to gluconolactone with NAD(+) as the electron acceptor to yield NADH, and NADH can be utilized by DTD to further react with the probe releasing resorufin. As a result of these tandem reactions, fluorescence off-on response will occur. The method showed high selectivity for glucose with a detection limit of 0.2 µM, which may provide a potential way for fluorescence detection of glucose through enzyme-coupling reactions. Furthermore, the applicability of the method has been demonstrated by detecting glucose in human urine samples. PMID:24468396

  19. 3D+t brain MRI segmentation using robust 4D Hidden Markov Chain.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, François; Collet, Christophe; Armspach, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    In recent years many automatic methods have been developed to help physicians diagnose brain disorders, but the problem remains complex. In this paper we propose a method to segment brain structures on two 3D multi-modal MR images taken at different times (longitudinal acquisition). A bias field correction is performed with an adaptation of the Hidden Markov Chain (HMC) allowing us to take into account the temporal correlation in addition to spatial neighbourhood information. To improve the robustness of the segmentation of the principal brain structures and to detect Multiple Sclerosis Lesions as outliers the Trimmed Likelihood Estimator (TLE) is used during the process. The method is validated on 3D+t brain MR images. PMID:25571045

  20. [Biodegradation of tetrahydrofuran by combined immobilized of Pseudomonas oleovorans DT4].

    PubMed

    Shao, Qian; Ye, Jie-Xu; Ouyang, Du-Juan; Chen, Jian-Meng; Chen, Dong-Zhi

    2013-08-01

    A new composite matrix, calcium alginate (CA) coupled with activated carbon fiber (ACF) was designed to immobilize the cells of Pseudomonas oleovorans DT4 for tetrahydrofuran (THF) degradation. The average removal rate of the CA-ACF immobilized cells reached 24.0 mg x (L x h)(-1) with an initial THF concentration of 360 mg x L(-1) when the concentration of CA and ACF was 3% and 1.5% respectively. The mechanical strength of the mobilized cells was also significantly improved with the addition of ACF. Compared to the free suspended cells, higher stable removal efficiency (more than 80%) of CA-ACF cells was detected under different conditions of temperature and pH. The feasibility of the newly designed matrix was also reflected by the repeated batch degradation which showed that the removal activity decreased insignificantly after 80 cycles with the modified reaction system (PNS). PMID:24191576

  1. Crystal plasticity finite element analysis for René88DT statistical volume element generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Joseph C.; Cerrone, Albert R., III; Ingraffea, Anthony R.; Rollett, Anthony D.

    2015-04-01

    This work focuses on the major cause of life limiting behavior in Ni-based superalloys for high pressure and temperature turbine disks applications in low cycle fatigue. Specific ideas of local microstructure features, such as the role of as large as (ALA) grains, in promoting slip localization in directly measured 3D microstructures were tested with finite element method (FEM) simulations with crystal plasticity. Synthetic microstructures with experimentally determined microstructurally small fatigue crack weakest link features of ALA grains comprise the test cases. A René88 damage tolerant (R88DT) dataset, from electron backscatter diffraction, was used to instantiate approximately 1.5 million elements and 200 grains from FEM sensitivity studies. Changing mesh resolution minimally impacted global damage response, but local convergence required the maximum resolution. The present results help to quantify the deleterious impact of ALA grains in Ni-based superalloys to extend service life.

  2. Approximations used in calculating many-body effects in resonant ((dt. mu. )dee) formation

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.S.; Leon, M.

    1989-02-01

    The approximations needed to treat the resonant formation of the compound molecule ((dt..mu..)dee)/sup */ as a line-broadening process are examined. The necessary criteria for applying the impact (Lorentzian) approximation are shown to be seriously violated under the usual conditions of muon-catalyzed fusion. Neither the condition for binary collisions nor the requirement that the detuning not be too large holds. A much more appropriate description is the many-body quasistatic approximation, which is valid for large detunings at any density and for practically the whole profile at high densities. The convenient factorization of the three-body rate into a convolution of a two-body rate with a broadening factor is shown to hold within some approximations, but the broadening factor itself depends on the transition being considered.

  3. Antimicrobial effect of Thai spices against Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    Thongson, Chitsiri; Davidson, P Michael; Mahakarnchanakul, Warapa; Vibulsresth, Preeya

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the potential antimicrobial activity of extracts and essential oils of spices from Thailand against foodborne pathogenic bacteria. The antimicrobial efficacy of ginger (Zingiber officinale), fingerroot (Boesenbergia pandurata), and turmeric (Curcuma longa) was evaluated against five strains of Listeria monocytogenes and four strains of Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104. Antimicrobial activity was investigated in microbiological media by using an agar dilution assay and enumeration over time and a model food system, apple juice, by monitoring growth over time. In the agar dilution assay, water extracts of the three spices had no effect on L. monocytogenes. Similarly, 50% ethanol extracts of ginger or turmeric had no effect. In contrast, ethanolic fingerroot extracts at 5 to 10% (vol/ vol) inhibited most L. monocytogenes strains for 24 h in the agar dilution assay. Commercial essential oils (EO) of ginger or turmeric inhibited all L. monocytogenes at < or = 0.6 or < or = 10%, respectively. Fingerroot EO inhibited all strains at < or = 0.4%. In the enumeration-over-time assay, a 5% fingerroot ethanol extract reduced ca. 4 log CFU/ml Listeria by around 2 log in 24 h while 10% inactivated the microorganism in 9 h. Fingerroot EO at 0.2% inactivated 4 log CFU/ml L. monocytogenes in 6 to 9 h. Neither extracts nor commercial EO had any effect on Salmonella Typhimurium DT 104 with the exception of fingerroot EO, which inhibited all strains at < or = 0.7%. Addition of 0.2% fingerroot EO to apple juice reduced 4 log of L. monocytogenes Scott A and both strains of Salmonella Typhimurium to an undetectable level within 1 to 2 days. It was concluded that fingerroot EO and extract have potential for inhibiting pathogens in food systems. PMID:16245707

  4. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  5. Acid environments affect biofilm formation and gene expression in isolates of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Denis; McCabe, Evonne M; McCusker, Matthew P; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the survival and potential virulence of biofilm-forming Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 under mild acid conditions. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 employs an acid tolerance response (ATR) allowing it to adapt to acidic environments. The threat that these acid adapted cells pose to food safety could be enhanced if they also produce biofilms in acidic conditions. The cells were acid-adapted by culturing them in 1% glucose and their ability to form biofilms on stainless steel and on the surface of Luria Bertani (LB) broth at pH7 and pH5 was examined. Plate counts were performed to examine cell survival. RNA was isolated from cells to examine changes in the expression of genes associated with virulence, invasion, biofilm formation and global gene regulation in response to acid stress. Of the 4 isolates that were examined only one (1481) that produced a rigid biofilm in LB broth at pH7 also formed this same structure at pH5. This indicated that the lactic acid severely impeded the biofilm producing capabilities of the other isolates examined under these conditions. Isolate 1481 also had higher expression of genes associated with virulence (hilA) and invasion (invA) with a 24.34-fold and 13.68-fold increase in relative gene expression respectively at pH5 compared to pH7. Although genes associated with biofilm formation had increased expression in response to acid stress for all the isolates this only resulted in the formation of a biofilm by isolate 1481. This suggests that in addition to the range of genes associated with biofilm production at neutral pH, there are genes whose protein products specifically aid in biofilm production in acidic environments. Furthermore, it highlights the potential for the use of lactic acid for the inhibition of Salmonella biofilms. PMID:25912312

  6. Anomalous loss of DT alpha particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, H.W.

    1997-09-01

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR`s DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of {alpha}-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on {alpha}-particle loss has led to a better understanding of {alpha}-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing {alpha}-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e., compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90{degree} lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an {alpha}-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized {alpha}-particles near the passing/trapped boundary was observed to occur between inward and outward shifts at an intermediate value of plasma current (1.4 MA). This anomalous loss feature is not yet understood.

  7. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT(2) measurements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature. PMID:26340435

  8. Sawtooth mixing of alpha particles in TFTR D-T plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, M.P.; Budny, R.V.; Chang, Z.

    1996-12-31

    Radially resolved confined alpha particle energy and density distributions are routinely measured on TFTR using two diagnostics: PCX and {alpha}-CHERS. The Pellet Charge-eXchange (PCX) diagnostic uses the ablation cloud formed by an impurity pellet (Li or B) for neutralization of the alphas followed by analysis of the escaping helium neutrals. PCX detects deeply trapped alpha particles in the energy range 0.5 - 3.8 MeV. The {alpha}-CHERS technique, were the alpha signal is excited by charge-exchange between alphas and the deuterium atoms of one of the heating beams and appears as a wing on the He{sup +} 468.6 nm line, detects mainly passing alphas in the range of 0.15 - 0.7 MeV. Studies of alpha losses during DT experiments on TFTR have also been conducted using lost alpha detectors located on the walls of the plasma chamber. All of these diagnostics were used for investigating the influence of sawtooth crashes on alphas in high power D-T discharges in TFTR. Both PCX and {alpha}-CHERS measurements show a strong depletion of the alpha core density and transport of trapped alphas radially outwards well beyond q = 1 surface after a sawtooth crash. Lost alpha detectors measure bursts of alpha loss of the previously confined alphas (<1%). Thus, a sawtooth crash leads mainly to radial redistribution of the alphas rather than losses. For modeling of alpha sawtooth mixing, a code is used which is based on the conventional model of magnetic reconnection and the conservation of particles, energy and magnetic flux. The effect of the particle orbit averaged toroidal drift in a perturbed helical electric field generated by the crash has also been included in the code. It is shown that mixing of the passing alphas is dominated by the magnetic reconnection whereas trapped alphas are affected mainly by ExB drift.

  9. Radiological analysis of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.S.

    1993-10-26

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be capable of providing a laser output pulse at 0.35 {mu}m wavelength with an energy of 1.8 MJ and a power of 500 TW. The NIF will house a multi-beamline, Nd-doped-glass laser capable of delivering such pulses into a target chamber. In the target chamber, a positioner will center a target containing fusion fuel (a deuterium-tritium mixture) for each ignition shot. Diagnostics in the chamber will provide the test data (e.g., neutron and x-ray yields). The NIF baseline case would result in deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron yields of about 10{sup 16} to 10{sup 19} per fusion shot. The baseline fusion shots would use 2 Ci of tritium per capsule, with an annual input of about 600 Ci (60 mg). The resulting anticipated annual airborne emissions would consist of approximately 10 Ci of tritium and small amounts of activated air species. The NEF shielding configuration would limit the direct and skyshine radiation intensities around the facility to less than 0.1 rem/y on site and to less than 0.001 rem/y off site. This report presents the results of atmospheric transport calculations for tritium and activated air emissions; neutron and secondary gamma-ray shielding calculations; and results of benchmark studies for validating the EPA CAP88-PC code (for the transport of tritium) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory neutron-photon transport code TART. All calculations were normalized to the annual baseline case of 1.4 {times} 10{sup 20} DT-fusion neutrons. Tritium emissions were normalized to 10 Ci/y. Radiological analyses show that normal NIF operations would result in off-site radiation intensities that would represent insignificant increases over the natural background radiation intensity. The NIF is a national facility, and the DOE has not completed the site evaluation process. Although the results presented in this report are for LLNL, the analytical approach is applicable to any site.

  10. Fuel ion ratio measurements in reactor relevant neutral beam heated fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hellesen, C.; Eriksson, J.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Skiba, M.; Weiszflog, M.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-15

    In this paper, we present a method to derive n{sub t}/n{sub d} using the ratio of the thermonuclear neutron emission to the beam-target neutron emission. We apply it to neutron spectroscopy data from the magnetic proton recoil spectrometer taken during the deuterium tritium experiment at JET. n{sub t}/n{sub d}-values obtained using neutron spectroscopy are in qualitative agreement with those from other diagnostics measuring the isotopic composition of the exhaust in the divertor.

  11. Optimal Scaling of Filtered GRACE dS/dt Anomalies over Sacramento and San Joaquin River Basins, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukasha, M.; Ramirez, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Signals from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiments (GRACE) twin satellites mission mapping the time invariant earth's gravity field are degraded due to measurement and leakage errors. Dampening of these errors using different filters results in a modification of the true geophysical signals. Therefore, use of a scale factor is suggested to recover the modified signals. For basin averaged dS/dt anomalies computed from data available at University of Colorado GRACE data analysis website - http://geoid.colorado.edu/grace/, optimal time invariant and time variant scale factors for Sacramento and San Joaquin river basins, California, are derived using observed precipitation (P), runoff (Q) and evapotranspiration (ET). Using the derived optimal scaling factor for GRACE data filtered using a 300 km- wide gaussian filter resulted in scaled GRACE dS/dt anomalies that match better with observed dS/dt anomalies (P-ET-Q) as compared to the GRACE dS/dt anomalies computed from scaled GRACE product at University of Colorado GRACE data analysis website. This paper will present the procedure, the optimal values, and the statistical analysis of the results.

  12. Collaborative Learning in Technology Education: D&T Unit on Puppetry in Different Indian Socio-Cultural Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrotra, Swati; Khunyakari, Ritesh; Natarajan, Chitra; Chunawala, Sugra

    2009-01-01

    The paper reports on the trials of a Design and Technology (D&T) unit carried out in three different Indian contexts with a focus on collaborative learning. Both collaboration and technology education are not common to the Indian school system. As part of a larger project to introduce technology education, suitable for middle school girls and boys…

  13. Registration of DT99-16864 soybean germplasm line with moderate resistance to charcoal rot [Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Charcoal rot, caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goidanich, is a disease that is a world-wide problem in soybean production for which no highly resistant cultivars are currently available. Soybean germplasm line DT99-16864, a maturity group V line, was developed by the U.S. Department of Ag...

  14. A New Neutron Time-of-Flight Detector for DT Yield and Ion-Temperature Measurements on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-11-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector for DT yield and ion-temperature measurements in DT implosions on the OMEGA Laser System was designed, fabricated, tested, and calibrated. The goal of this detector is to provide a second line of sight for DT yield and ion-temperature measurements in the 1 ×1012 to 1014 yield range. The nTOF detector consists of a 40-mm-diam, 20-mm-thick BC-422Q(1%) scintillator coupled with a one-stage Photek PMT-140 photomultiplier tube. To avoid PMT saturation at high yields a neutral density filter ND1 is inserted between the scintillator and PMT. Both the scintillator and PMT are shielded from hard x rays by 5 mm of lead on all sides and 10 mm in the direction of the target. The nTOF detector is located at 15.8 m from target chamber center in the OMEGA Target Bay. The design details and calibration results of this nTOF detector in DT implosions on OMEGA will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  15. PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR SURVIVAL AND GROWTH OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM DT104 ON CHICKEN SKIN DURING TEMPERATURE ABUSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better predict risk of Salmonella infection from chicken subjected to temperature abuse, a study was undertaken to develop a predictive model for survival and growth of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 on chicken skin with native micro flora. For model development, chicken skin portions were inocula...

  16. Registration of TARS-MST1 and SB-DT1 multiple-stress tolerant black bean germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-ambient-temperature stress, drought stress, root rot disease, and common bacterial blight [CBB; caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Smith) Dye] cause widespread yield reductions in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) worldwide. TARS-MST1 (Reg. No. GP-284, PI 661512) and SB-DT1 (Reg. ...

  17. The agricultural antibiotic carbadox induces generalized transducing phage in multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella, a leading cause of U.S. foodborne disease and food-related deaths, often asymptomatically colonizes food-producing animals. In fact, >50% of U.S. swine production facilities test positive for Salmonella. The multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 NCTC13348 c...

  18. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, M.

    1996-05-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``Onsite Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the OMEGA Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel. The authors are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program to create and demonstrate viable ways to generate and characterize cryogenic layers. Progress has been made on ways to both create viable layers and to characterize them. They continued engineering, assembly and testing of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  19. Analysis of Time-Dependent Tritium Breeding Capability of Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket for CFETR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fangfang; Zhang, Xiaokang; Pu, Yong; Zhu, Qingjun; Liu, Songlin

    2016-08-01

    Attaining tritium self-sufficiency is an important mission for the Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor (CFETR) operating on a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fuel cycle. It is necessary to study the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and breeding tritium inventory variation with operation time so as to provide an accurate data for dynamic modeling and analysis of the tritium fuel cycle. A water cooled ceramic breeder (WCCB) blanket is one candidate of blanket concepts for the CFETR. Based on the detailed 3D neutronics model of CFETR with the WCCB blanket, the time-dependent TBR and tritium surplus were evaluated by a coupling calculation of the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) and the fusion activation code FISPACT-2007. The results indicated that the TBR and tritium surplus of the WCCB blanket were a function of operation time and fusion power due to the Li consumption in breeder and material activation. In addition, by comparison with the results calculated by using the 3D neutronics model and employing the transfer factor constant from 1D to 3D, it is noted that 1D analysis leads to an over-estimation for the time-dependent tritium breeding capability when fusion power is larger than 1000 MW. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2015GB108002, and 2014GB119000), and by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  20. Reducing Disk Storage of Full-3D Seismic Waveform Tomography (F3DT) Through Lossy Online Compression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lindstrom, Peter; Chen, Po; Lee, En-Jui

    2016-05-05

    Full-3D seismic waveform tomography (F3DT) is the latest seismic tomography technique that can assimilate broadband, multi-component seismic waveform observations into high-resolution 3D subsurface seismic structure models. The main drawback in the current F3DT implementation, in particular the scattering-integral implementation (F3DT-SI), is the high disk storage cost and the associated I/O overhead of archiving the 4D space-time wavefields of the receiver- or source-side strain tensors. The strain tensor fields are needed for computing the data sensitivity kernels, which are used for constructing the Jacobian matrix in the Gauss-Newton optimization algorithm. In this study, we have successfully integrated a lossy compression algorithmmore » into our F3DT SI workflow to significantly reduce the disk space for storing the strain tensor fields. The compressor supports a user-specified tolerance for bounding the error, and can be integrated into our finite-difference wave-propagation simulation code used for computing the strain fields. The decompressor can be integrated into the kernel calculation code that reads the strain fields from the disk and compute the data sensitivity kernels. During the wave-propagation simulations, we compress the strain fields before writing them to the disk. To compute the data sensitivity kernels, we read the compressed strain fields from the disk and decompress them before using them in kernel calculations. Experiments using a realistic dataset in our California statewide F3DT project have shown that we can reduce the strain-field disk storage by at least an order of magnitude with acceptable loss, and also improve the overall I/O performance of the entire F3DT-SI workflow significantly. The integration of the lossy online compressor may potentially open up the possibilities of the wide adoption of F3DT-SI in routine seismic tomography practices in the near future.« less

  1. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  2. Left ventricular pressure, contractility and dP/dt(max) in nonclinical drug safety assessment studies.

    PubMed

    Sarazan, R Dustan; Kroehle, John P; Main, Bradley W

    2012-09-01

    Increasing or decreasing cardiac contractility is an undesirable property of drugs being developed for noncardiovascular indications. The International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) Topic S7A and S7B guidelines only require the assessment of heart rate, blood pressure and the electrocardiogram in nonclinical in vivo safety pharmacology studies. Assessment of drug effects on contractility is only suggested as an optional follow-up study. However, these nonclinical safety assessment studies can detect these effects if properly designed and conducted using appropriate instrumentation. Left ventricular dP/dt is the first derivative of left ventricular pressure, which is computed by software algorithms by using calculus. Its peak value, dP/dt(max), is a common, robust and sensitive indicator of changes in cardiac contractility if experimental parameters such as preload, afterload and heart rate are well controlled. In order to ensure accuracy and avoid errors in the measurement of contractility in experimental animals, the frequency response of the pressure sensing system and the sample rate of the data acquisition system must be optimized for the signal. For dogs, nonhuman primates, and normotensive rats, all important information in a left ventricular pressure signal can be captured with a system with a frequency response of 100 Hz. Although systems with much higher frequency response can be used to measure left ventricular pressure, the output of these devices must be filtered to allow no frequencies to be acquired that are higher than one-half the sample rate of the acquisition system. Stated conversely, the sample rate of the acquisition system must be at least 2× the highest frequency contained in the signal. Failure to follow these principals can lead to incorrect results due to measurement artifacts from high frequency noise, which could be present but not detectable by the investigator. This manuscript has been written for biologists who do not have

  3. Opportunity fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Lutwen, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    Opportunity fuels - fuels that can be converted to other forms of energy at lower cost than standard fossil fuels - are discussed in outline form. The type and source of fuels, types of fuels, combustability, methods of combustion, refinery wastes, petroleum coke, garbage fuels, wood wastes, tires, and economics are discussed.

  4. Integrated modeling of cryogenic layered highfoot experiments at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritcher, A. L.; Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Clark, D.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Haan, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Landen, O.; Ma, T.; Meezan, N.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S.; Spears, B.; Springer, P. T.; Thomas, C. A.; Town, R.; Celliers, P. M.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Integrated radiation hydrodynamic modeling in two dimensions, including the hohlraum and capsule, of layered cryogenic HighFoot Deuterium-Tritium (DT) implosions on the NIF successfully predicts important data trends. The model consists of a semi-empirical fit to low mode asymmetries and radiation drive multipliers to match shock trajectories, one dimensional inflight radiography, and time of peak neutron production. Application of the model across the HighFoot shot series, over a range of powers, laser energies, laser wavelengths, and target thicknesses predicts the neutron yield to within a factor of two for most shots. The Deuterium-Deuterium ion temperatures and the DT down scattered ratios, ratio of (10-12)/(13-15) MeV neutrons, roughly agree with data at peak fuel velocities <340 km/s and deviate at higher peak velocities, potentially due to flows and neutron scattering differences stemming from 3D or capsule support tent effects. These calculations show a significant amount alpha heating, 1-2.5× for shots where the experimental yield is within a factor of two, which has been achieved by increasing the fuel kinetic energy. This level of alpha heating is consistent with a dynamic hot spot model that is matched to experimental data and as determined from scaling of the yield with peak fuel velocity. These calculations also show that low mode asymmetries become more important as the fuel velocity is increased, and that improving these low mode asymmetries can result in an increase in the yield by a factor of several.

  5. The high dose response and functional capability of the DT-702/Pd lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Tyler M; Talmadge, Molly D; Murray, Mark M; Nelson, Martin E; Mueller, Andrew C; Romanyukha, Alexander A; Fairchild, Gregory R; Grypp, Matthew D; Williams, Anthony S

    2015-05-01

    The United States Navy monitors the dose its radiation workers receive using the DT-702/PD thermoluminescent dosimeter, which consists of the Harshaw 8840 holder and the four-element Harshaw 8841 card. There were two main objectives of this research. In the first objective, the dosimeters were exposed to 100 Gy using electron and x-ray beams and found to respond approximately 30-40% lower than the delivered dose. No significant effect on the under-response was found when dose rate, radiation type, dosimeter position on the phantom, and dosimeter material were varied or when the card was irradiated while enclosed in its holder. Since the current naval policy is to remove from occupational use any thermoluminescent dosimeter with an accumulated deep dose equivalent of 0.05 Sv or greater, the functionality of the dosimeter was also investigated at deep dose equivalents of 0.05, 0.15, and 0.25 Sv using 60Co and 137Cs sources as the second main objective. All dosimeters were annealed following exposure and then exposed to 5.0 mSv from a 90Sr source. In all cases, the dosimeters responded within 3% of the delivered dose, indicating that the dosimeters remained functional as defined by naval dosimetry requirements. However, the anneal time required to clear the thermoluminescent dosimeter's reading was found to increase approximately as the cube root with the delivered dose. PMID:25811149

  6. The influence of stress on the /d/-/t/ distinction in French

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelli-Beruh, Nassima; Aravamudhan, Radhika Aravamudhan

    2005-09-01

    This study examined how monolingual French speakers produced the /d/-/t/ distinction in stressed and unstressed syllable-initial stops preceded by a voiceless phone (/s/). Syllables were embedded in sentences. Sentence durations and voicing-related differences in durations of preceding vowel, /s/, stop closure, and VOT were calculated and analyzed as a function of the stress condition separately for each speaker (stressed syllables spoken at normal speaking rate, unstressed syllables produced at normal speaking rate). Preliminary analyses reveal that the vowel and the voiceless fricative preceding the unstressed target syllables were longer than the vowel and the fricative preceding the stressed target syllables. Closure durations were also longer in the unstressed condition than in the stressed condition. However, voicing-related duration differences were not systematically affected by stress. Finally, the voicing of /s/ (/s/ before /d/) and of /d/ closures, which occurred frequently in the stress condition, occurred less frequently in the unstressed condition for most of the speakers. The perceptual consequences of such results remain to be investigated.

  7. Multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) locus in Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    Randall, L P; Woodward, M J

    2001-03-01

    In order to understand the role of the mar locus in Salmonella with regard to multiple antibiotic resistance, cyclohexane resistance, and outer membrane protein F (OmpF) regulation, a marA::gfp reporter mutant was constructed in an antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 background. Salicylate induced marA, whereas a number of antibiotics, disinfectants, and various growth conditions did not. Increased antibiotic resistance was observed upon salicylate induction, although this was shown to be by both mar-dependent and mar-independent pathways. Cyclohexane resistance, however, was induced by salicylate by a mar-dependent pathway. Complementation studies with a plasmid that constitutively expressed marA confirmed the involvement of mar in Salmonella with low-level antibiotic resistance and cyclohexane resistance, although the involvement of mar in down regulation of OmpF was unclear. However, marA overexpression did increase the expression of a ca. 50-kDa protein, but its identity remains to be elucidated. Passage of the marA::gfp reporter mutant with increasing levels of tetracycline, a method reported to select for mar mutants in Escherichia coli, led to both multiple-antibiotic and cyclohexane resistance. Collectively, these data indicate that low-level antibiotic resistance, cyclohexane resistance, and modulation of OMPs in Salmonella, as in E. coli, can occur in both a mar-dependent and mar-independent manner. PMID:11229910

  8. Modelling of LHCD profile control for high performance DT experiments on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Tala, T. J. J.; Heikkinen, J. A.; Karttunen, S. J.; Paettikangas, T. J. H.; Soeldner, F. X.; Parail, V. V.; Baranov, Yu. F.; Taroni, A.

    1999-09-20

    Transport calculations with relevant lower hybrid current drive control have been performed with the JETTO transport code. The heat transport model and various particle transport models reproducing the experimental JET data have been used in JETTO for predictive high performance modelling. Application of 3.5 MW LHCD power provides a slightly inverted or flat q-profile across 70% of the plasma radius whereas, without LHCD the q-profile is monotonic during the flat-top phase. The results predict a fusion power up to 30 MW for the high performance DT plasmas in the optimised shear scenario at B{sub t}=3.4 T and I{sub p}=3.9 MA. Large uncertainties, however, still persist in particular on the particle transport which strongly influences on the modelling calculations. The presence of not well understood MHD instabilities is also likely to reduce the performance. The most optimistic model, still consistent with experimental results, predicts a fusion gain approaching Q=1.

  9. Absolute calibration of TFTR neutron detectors for D-T plasma operation

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Roquemore, A.L.; Strachan, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.; Medley, S.S.; Young, K.M.; Barnes, C.W.

    1995-03-01

    The two most sensitive TFTR fission-chamber detectors were absolutely calibrated in situ by a D-T neutron generator ({approximately}5 {times} 10{sup 7} n/s) rotated once around the torus in each direction, with data taken at about 45 positions. The combined uncertainty for determining fusion neutron rates, including the uncertainty in the total neutron generator output ({plus_minus}9%), counting statistics, the effect of coil coolant, detector stability, cross-calibration to the current mode or log Campbell mode and to other fission chambers, and plasma position variation, is about {plus_minus}13%. The NE-451 (ZnS) scintillators and {sup 4}He proportional counters that view the plasma in up to 10 collimated sightlines were calibrated by scanning. the neutron generator radially and toroidally in the horizontal midplane across the flight tubes of 7 cm diameter. Spatial integration of the detector responses using the calibrated signal per unit chord-integrated neutron emission gives the global neutron source strength with an overall uncertainty of {plus_minus}14% for the scintillators and {plus_minus}15% for the {sup 4}He counters.

  10. Emulation of petroleum well-logging D-T2 correlations on a standard benchtop spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Fordham, E J

    2011-10-01

    An experimental protocol is described that allows two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) correlations of apparent diffusion coefficient D(app) and effective transverse relaxation time T(2,eff) to be acquired on a bench-top spectrometer using pulsed field gradients (PFG) in such a manner as to emulate D(app)-T(2,eff) correlations acquired using a well-logging tool with a fixed field gradient (FFG). This technique allows laboratory-scale NMR measurements of liquid-saturated cored rock to be compared directly to logging data obtained from the well by virtue of providing a comparable acquisition protocol and data format, and hence consistent data processing. This direct comparison supports the interpretation of the well-logging data, including a quantitative determination of the oil/brine saturation. The D-T(2) pulse sequence described here uses two spin echoes (2SE) with a variable echo time to encode for diffusion. The diffusion and relaxation contributions to the signal decay are then deconvolved using a 2D numerical inversion. This measurement allows shorter relaxation time components to be probed than in conventional diffusion measurements. A brief discussion of the numerical inversion algorithms available for inverting these non-rectangular data is included. The PFG-2SE sequence described is well suited to laboratory-scale studies of porous media and short T(2) samples in general. PMID:21875819

  11. System for locating the sources of wideband dE/dt from lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, E. M.; Medelius, P. J.; Davis, S.

    1994-01-01

    A system has been developed to measure wideband electic field derivatives (dE/dt) at five ground stations in a 15 km x 15 km network at Kennedy Space Center. Individual station responses are normalized using digital filters. Pulse-timing resolution is improved to much less than 50-ns sample interval by interpolation using packing in the frequency domain. A time tag for each pulse is defined as the mean of the times of the rising-edge half peak, peak, and falling-edge half peak. The standard deviation in these times defines the timing error and is shown to be a function of noise and bandwidth rather than digitization rate. Each of the four unknowns for a pulse source location (x,y,z) and time of occurrence (t) is found from the five time-tag measurements using different weightings for all five combinations of the four-station hyperbolic equations. Weighting factors and errors in x,y,z and t are estimated using error propagation techniques.

  12. Microfluidic laminate-based phantom for diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, R; Sant, H J; Jiao, F; Johnson, C R; Gale, B K

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports fabrication of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phantom created by stacking of multiple thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers. PDMS is spin coated on SU-8 molds to obtain the desired layer thickness and imprints of the microchannel patterns that define the phantom geometry. This paper also identifies the unique challenges related to the fabrication and assembly of multiple thin layers and reports for the first time assembly of a large number of thin laminates of this nature. Use of photolithography techniques allows us to create a wide range of phantom geometries. The target dimensions of the phantoms reported here are (i) a stack of 30 thin PDMS layers of 10 µm thickness (ii) curved 5 µm × 5 µm microchannels with 8.7 µm spacing, and (iii) straight 5 µm × 5 µm microchannels with 3.6 µm spacing. SEM scans of the assembled phantoms show open microchannels and a monolithic cross-section with no visible interface between PDMS layers. Based on the results of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) scan, the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules due to the physical restriction of the microchannels was detected, which means that the phantom can be used to calibrate and optimize MRI instrumentation. PMID:22865956

  13. Gint2D-T2 correlation NMR of porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    The internal magnetic field gradient induced in porous media by magnetic susceptibility differences at material interfaces impacts diffusion measurements in particular at high magnetic field and can be used to probe the pore structure. Insight about the relationship between pore space and internal gradient Gint can be obtained from 2D Laplace NMR experiments. When measuring distributions of transverse relaxation times T2 in fluid filled porous media, relaxation and diffusion in internal gradients arise simultaneously and data are often interpreted with the assumption that one or the other parameter be constant throughout the sample. To examine this assumption we measure correlations of the distributions of Gint2D and T2 by 2D Laplace NMR for three different kinds of samples, glass beads with different bead diameters saturated with water, glass beads filled with oil and water, and a wet mortar sample. For the first two samples the cases where either the internal gradient or diffusion dominates were examined separately in order to better understand the relationship between Gint and D. These results are useful for assessing the impact of internal gradients and diffusion in unknown samples, such as the mortar sample. The experiments were performed at different magnetic field strengths corresponding to 300 MHz and 700 MHz 1H Larmor frequency to identify the impact of the magnetic field on the internal gradient. Subsequently, spatially resolved Gint2D-T2 maps were obtained to study the sample heterogeneity.

  14. Gint2D-T2 correlation NMR of porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Blümich, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    The internal magnetic field gradient induced in porous media by magnetic susceptibility differences at material interfaces impacts diffusion measurements in particular at high magnetic field and can be used to probe the pore structure. Insight about the relationship between pore space and internal gradient G(int) can be obtained from 2D Laplace NMR experiments. When measuring distributions of transverse relaxation times T(2) in fluid filled porous media, relaxation and diffusion in internal gradients arise simultaneously and data are often interpreted with the assumption that one or the other parameter be constant throughout the sample. To examine this assumption we measure correlations of the distributions of G(int)(2)D and T(2) by 2D Laplace NMR for three different kinds of samples, glass beads with different bead diameters saturated with water, glass beads filled with oil and water, and a wet mortar sample. For the first two samples the cases where either the internal gradient or diffusion dominates were examined separately in order to better understand the relationship between G(int) and D. These results are useful for assessing the impact of internal gradients and diffusion in unknown samples, such as the mortar sample. The experiments were performed at different magnetic field strengths corresponding to 300 MHz and 700 MHz (1)H Larmor frequency to identify the impact of the magnetic field on the internal gradient. Subsequently, spatially resolved Gint(2)D-T(2) maps were obtained to study the sample heterogeneity. PMID:25723135

  15. Microfluidic laminate-based phantom for diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI).

    PubMed

    Samuel, R; Sant, H J; Jiao, F; Johnson, C R; Gale, B K

    2011-09-01

    This paper reports fabrication of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phantom created by stacking of multiple thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers. PDMS is spin coated on SU-8 molds to obtain the desired layer thickness and imprints of the microchannel patterns that define the phantom geometry. This paper also identifies the unique challenges related to the fabrication and assembly of multiple thin layers and reports for the first time assembly of a large number of thin laminates of this nature. Use of photolithography techniques allows us to create a wide range of phantom geometries. The target dimensions of the phantoms reported here are (i) a stack of 30 thin PDMS layers of 10 µm thickness (ii) curved 5 µm × 5 µm microchannels with 8.7 µm spacing, and (iii) straight 5 µm × 5 µm microchannels with 3.6 µm spacing. SEM scans of the assembled phantoms show open microchannels and a monolithic cross-section with no visible interface between PDMS layers. Based on the results of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) scan, the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules due to the physical restriction of the microchannels was detected, which means that the phantom can be used to calibrate and optimize MRI instrumentation. PMID:22865956

  16. Results of d+T fast neutron irradiation on advanced tumors of bladder and rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Battermann, J.J.

    1982-12-01

    From November, 1975 to November, 1981, around 400 patients were irradiated with 14 MeV d+T fast neutrons at the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in Amsterdam. Special interest was focused on inoperable tumors of bladder and rectum. During the pilot phase of the study 47 patients were treated, mostly via two parallel opposed ports with dosages that ranged from 18 to more than 22 Gy. Although persistent local control was achieved in 23 patients (48%), 14 patients (29%) died of severe complications. By the introduction of a six field technique, the fatal complication rate could be reduced significantly. Since May 1978 patients were randomized in a three arm trial, using two dose levels on the neutron site. The preliminary results of a group of 91 patients show a similar survival in the three treatment arms with a somewhat better local control rate for high dose neutrons. An attempt was made to estimate RBE values for tumor control and normal tissue reactions by comparing the data for neutron irradiation with the data obtained with photons on a similar group of patients. From the values derived it must be concluded that the gain for neutron irradiation on these tumors in the pelvis will be negligible.

  17. Results of d+T fast neutron irradiation on advanced tumors of bladder and rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Battermann, J.J.

    1982-12-01

    From November, 1975 to November, 1981, around 400 patients were irradiated with 14 MeV d+T fast neutrons at the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in Amsterdam. Special interest was focused on inoperable tumors of bladder and rectum. During the pilot phase of the study 47 patients were treated, mostly via two parallel opposed ports with dosages that ranged from 18 to more than 22 Gy. Although persistent local control was achieved in 23 patients (48%), 14 patients (29%) died of severe complications. By the introduction of a six field technique, the fatal complication rate could be reduced significantly. Since May 1978 patients were randomized in a three arm trial, using two dose levels on the neutron site. The preliminary results of a group of 91 patients show a similar survival in the three treatment arms with a somewhat better local control rate for high dose neutrons. An attempt was made to estimate RBE values for tumor control and normal tissue reaction by comparing the data for neutron irradiation with the data obtained with photons on a similar group of patients. From the values derived it must be concluded that the gain for neutron irradiation on these tumors in the pelvis will be negligible.

  18. Efficient Energy Conversion of the 14 MeV Neutrons in DT Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2013-02-01

    In DT fusion 80 % of the energy released goes into 14 MeV neutrons, and only the remaining 20 % into charged particles. Unlike the charged particles, the uncharged neutrons cannot be confined by a magnetic field, and for this reason cannot be used for a direct conversion into electric energy. Instead, the neutrons have to be slowed down in some medium, heating this medium to a temperature of less than 103 K, with the heat removed from this medium to drive a turbo-generator. This conversion of nuclear into electric energy has a Carnot efficiency of about 30 %. For the 80 % of the energy released into neutrons, the efficiency is therefore no more than 24 %. While this low conversion efficiency cannot be overcome in magnetic confinement concepts, it can be overcome in inertial confinement concepts, by surrounding the inertial confinement fusion target with a sufficiently thick layer of liquid hydrogen and a thin outer layer of boron, to create a hot plasma fire ball. The hydrogen layer must be chosen just thick and dense enough to be heated by the neutrons to 100,000 K. The thusly generated, fully ionized, and rapidly expanding fire ball can drive a pulsed magnetohydrodynamic generator at an almost 100 % Carnot efficiency, or possibly be used to generate hydrocarbons.

  19. DT-REFinD: Diffusion Tensor Registration With Exact Finite-Strain Differential

    PubMed Central

    Vercauteren, Tom; Fillard, Pierre; Peyrat, Jean-Marc; Pennec, Xavier; Golland, Polina; Ayache, Nicholas; Clatz, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the DT-REFinD algorithm for the diffeomorphic nonlinear registration of diffusion tensor images. Unlike scalar images, deforming tensor images requires choosing both a reorientation strategy and an interpolation scheme. Current diffusion tensor registration algorithms that use full tensor information face difficulties in computing the differential of the tensor reorientation strategy and consequently, these methods often approximate the gradient of the objective function. In the case of the finite-strain (FS) reorientation strategy, we borrow results from the pose estimation literature in computer vision to derive an analytical gradient of the registration objective function. By utilizing the closed-form gradient and the velocity field representation of one parameter subgroups of diffeomorphisms, the resulting registration algorithm is diffeomorphic and fast. We contrast the algorithm with a traditional FS alternative that ignores the reorientation in the gradient computation. We show that the exact gradient leads to significantly better registration at the cost of computation time. Independently of the choice of Euclidean or Log-Euclidean interpolation and sum of squared differences dissimilarity measure, the exact gradient achieves better alignment over an entire spectrum of deformation penalties. Alignment quality is assessed with a battery of metrics including tensor overlap, fractional anisotropy, inverse consistency and closeness to synthetic warps. The improvements persist even when a different reorientation scheme, preservation of principal directions, is used to apply the final deformations. PMID:19556193

  20. Mix Degradation in DT Filled Capsules When Shock and Compression Yields are Resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Cooley, J. H.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; Horsfield, C. J.; Drew, D. W.; Miller, E. K.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2007-11-01

    1100μm dia. DT(5atm) + 3He (0,1,or 5 atm) filled glass capsules were directly driven on the Omega laser to measure yield, X-ray images, and especially the burn time history. The 600ps square pulse increases time separation between the ``shock'' yield (before the reflected shock reaches the incoming shell) and later ``compression'' yield. Matching the timing and amount of this early ``shock'' yield in the implosions fixes the electron conduction flux limiter. The Scannapieco and Cheng mix model results are compared with measured yield, burn temperatures and histories, and gated X-ray images. The experiment shows degradation of both the shock and compression yield, but relatively more degradation of the compression yield than explained by the model. The first gated images, which occur when the reflected shock reaches the incoming shell, show significant mixing has already occurred. But the lack of X-ray emission 60ps earlier suggests no mixing then. Work supported by US DOE/NNSA, performed by LANL, operated by LANS LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-07-4929.

  1. Simulation Study of Ignition and Burn Characteristics of Fast Ignition DT Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Mima, Kunioki; Nakao, Yasuyuki

    The ignition and burn properties of fast ignition DT targets are evaluated for various-sized core (ignition experiment ˜ high gain) on the basis of two-dimensional (2D) burn simulations. A core size of ρR 2.0 g/cm2 is required to achieve explosive burning and then high gain. When the core size is smaller, the target gain drops sharply as core size decreases. Assuming the energy coupling efficiencies from laser to core of 5 % for implosion and 30 % for heating, a target gain of ˜170 is obtained with a 1 MJ implosion laser and a 70 kJ heating laser, under optimum heating conditions (10 ps duration, 15 μm spot radius, and 1.0 g/cm2 heating depth). This requires a very high intensity heating laser (˜ 1 × 1021 W/cm2). In accordance with a scaling for temperature of fast electrons generated by long-duration intense lasers, such a intense laser will generate fast electrons having suitable stopping range for efficient core heating. The sensitivities of ignition condition and gain performance to heating conditions, and the influence of high-Z ions contained in a foam layer on ignition and gain performance are also discussed.

  2. LET spectrometry of 14 MeV (D-T) neutrons using CR-39 track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, G. S.; Tripathy, S. P.; Sunil, C.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2013-04-01

    Linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum in water in the range of 12 keV/μm to 382 keV/μm due to 14 MeV (D-T) neutrons is estimated using the track size parameters in two different types of CR-39 track detectors, viz. Intercast (1.5 mm) and Pershore (0.5 mm). Another set of CR-39s (Intercast) combined with 1 mm polyethylene (PE) radiators is exposed to study the effect of enhanced recoils on the LET spectrum. The detection efficiencies for all these cases and the enhancement ratio due to PE radiator are determined. Using this LET spectrum, the microdosimetric spectra of absorbed doses and dose equivalents are estimated based on the Q-L conversion factors as given in ICRP 60. The shape of the LET spectra are found to be similar in all the cases, however, the dose equivalents obtained with the CR-39+PE radiator is about 20% more than the other detectors without PE. The ratios of dose equivalents obtained from LET spectra (HLET) and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) obtained from fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors (ICRP 74) for 14 MeV neutrons are used to estimate the dose response of the detectors. H*(10) is also measured using a neutron rem meter, the response of which is found to be about 23% less than the actual dose.

  3. New Insights into the DT40 B Cell Receptor Cluster Using a Proteomic Proximity Labeling Assay*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Wen; Rees, Johanna S.; Xue, Peng; Zhang, Hong; Hamaia, Samir W.; Sanderson, Bailey; Funk, Phillip E.; Farndale, Richard W.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Perrett, Sarah; Jackson, Antony P.

    2014-01-01

    In the vertebrate immune system, each B-lymphocyte expresses a surface IgM-class B cell receptor (BCR). When cross-linked by antigen or anti-IgM antibody, the BCR accumulates with other proteins into distinct surface clusters that activate cell signaling, division, or apoptosis. However, the molecular composition of these clusters is not well defined. Here we describe a quantitative assay we call selective proteomic proximity labeling using tyramide (SPPLAT). It allows proteins in the immediate vicinity of a target to be selectively biotinylated, and hence isolated for mass spectrometry analysis. Using the chicken B cell line DT40 as a model, we use SPPLAT to provide the first proteomic analysis of any BCR cluster using proximity labeling. We detect known components of the BCR cluster, including integrins, together with proteins not previously thought to be BCR-associated. In particular, we identify the chicken B-lymphocyte allotypic marker chB6. We show that chB6 moves to within about 30–40 nm of the BCR following BCR cross-linking, and we show that cross-linking chB6 activates cell binding to integrin substrates laminin and gelatin. Our work provides new insights into the nature and composition of the BCR cluster, and confirms SPPLAT as a useful research tool in molecular and cellular proteomics. PMID:24706754

  4. Study on the impact of pair production interaction on D-T controllable neutron density logging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huawei; Zhang, Li; Hou, Boran

    2016-05-01

    This paper considers the effect of pair production on the precision of D-T controllable neutron source density logging. Firstly, the principle of the traditional density logging and pulsed neutron density logging are analyzed and then gamma ray cross sections as a function of energy for various minerals are compared. In addition, the advantageous areas of Compton scattering and pair production interactions on high-energy gamma ray pulse height spectrum and the errors of a controllable source density measurement are studied using a Monte Carlo simulation method. The results indicate that density logging mainly utilizes the Compton scattering of gamma rays, while the attenuation of neutron induced gamma rays and the precision of neutron gamma density measurements are affected by pair production interactions, particularly in the gamma rays with energy higher than 2MeV. By selecting 0.2-2MeV energy range and performing proper lithology correction, the effect of pair production can be eliminated effectively and the density measurement error can be rendered close to the precision of chemical source density logging. PMID:26945102

  5. Relating Field Observed Changes in the Active Stream Channel Network to Features of dQ/dt-Q Recession Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, S. B.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrologists have long plotted the rate of recession (dQ/dt) versus the absolute discharge (Q) to infer aquifer hydraulic properties. In recent years, these dQ/dt-Q plots have been examined in new ways, in particular, looking at individual event curves within the full dQ/dt-Q plot. When examining individual curves (in log-log space), in many cases one observes relatively constant slopes (usually near two) but finds that intercept values shift seasonally. Some have hypothesized that these two features of the dQ/dt-Q plots can be explained by the nature of the contraction of the stream channel network as flow diminishes (e.g. Biswal and Marani, 2010, GRL). To investigate this hypothesis, I have been mapping changes in the active channel network in a 250 ha catchment nested within the larger 69,000 ha Six Mile Creek watershed in central NY. Direct observations of the active channel network have been supplemented with streamflow measurements at 1st and 2nd order channels and the main channel. The larger Six Mile Creek watershed exhibits the expected constant dQ/dt-Q slopes and varying intercepts. However, the 250 ha catchment (assumed to be representative of the upland areas in the larger watershed) maintains a relatively constant active channel network, even during dry periods, and exhibits no systematic contraction of channel lengths. Most 1st order channels appear to be at least in part spring fed from their upper most point of origin. These field observations suggest that at least in this basin, the slope of two in log(dQ/dt) vs log(Q) plots is not directly related to contraction of the channel network. The fractional contribution of subbasins to total basin flow does indicate that these small upland basins contribute a decreased portion of total watershed flow during drier periods, supporting the notion that shifts in intercept may occur because of spatial changes in dominant contributing zones.

  6. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  7. Majority ion heating near the ion-ion hybrid layer in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Hosea, J.C.; Ignat, D.; Majeski, R.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Wilson, J.R.

    1996-02-01

    Efficient direct majority ion heating in a deuterium-tritium (D-T) reactor-grade plasma via absorption of fast magnetosonic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is discussed. Majority ion heating results from resonance overlap between the cyclotron layers and the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer in hot, dense plasmas for fast waves launched with high parallel wavenumbers. Analytic and numerical models are used to explore the regime in ITER plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. High-performance inertial confinement fusion target implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R L; Betti, R; Boehly, T R; Casey, D T; Collins, T.J.B.; Craxton, R S; Delettrez, J A; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Fletcher, K A; Frenje, J A; Glebov, Y Yu; Goncharov, V N; Harding, D R; Hu, S X; Igumenshchev, I V; Knauer, J P; Li, C K; Marozas, J A; Marshall, F J; McKenty, P W; Nilson, P M; Padalino, S P; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Regan, S P; Sangster, T C; Seguin, F H; Seka, W; Short, R W; Shvarts, D; Skupsky, S; Soures, J M; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W; Yaakobi, B

    2011-04-18

    The Omega Laser Facility is used to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) concepts. This paper describes progress in direct-drive central hot-spot (CHS) ICF, shock ignition (SI) and fast ignition (FI) since the 2008 IAEA FEC conference. CHS cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) target implosions on OMEGA have produced the highest DT areal densities yet measured in ICF implosions (~300 mg cm{sup -2}). Integrated FI experiments have shown a significant increase in neutron yield caused by an appropriately timed high-intensity, high-energy laser pulse.

  9. Understanding the stagnation and burn of implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilkenny, J. D.; Caggiano, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Knauer, J. P.; Sayre, D. B.; Spears, B. K.; Weber, S. V.; Yeamans, C. B.; Cerjan, C. J.; Divol, L.; Eckart, M. J.; Glebov, V. Yu; Herrmann, H. W.; Le Pape, S.; Munro, D. H.; Grim, G. P.; Jones, O. S.; Berzak-Hopkins, L.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Mcnaney, J. M.; Petrasso, R.; Rinderknecht, H.; Stoeffl, W.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2016-03-01

    An improved the set of nuclear diagnostics on NIF measures the properties of the stagnation plasma of implosions, including the drift velocity, areal density (ρr) anisotropy and carbon ρr of the compressed core. Two types of deuterium-tritium (DT) gas filled targets are imploded by shaped x-ray pulses, producing stagnated and burning DT cores of radial convergence (Cr) ∼ 5 or ∼20. Comparison with two-dimensional modeling with inner and outer surface mix shows good agreement with nuclear measurements.

  10. Purified rat liver DT-diaphorase potentiates the mutagenicity of 1,3-, 1,6- and 1,8-dinitropyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Hajos, A.K.D.; Winston, G.W. )

    1991-03-11

    The effect of highly purified rat liver cytosolic DT-diaphorase on the mutagenicity of 1,3-, 1,6- and 1,8-dinitropyrene (DNP) was studied in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay. DT-diaphorase over the range of 0 - 0.78 {mu}g/plate increased the mutagenicity of all three DNP in S. typhimurium TA 98 to a maximum of 3-fold. In the nitroreductase-deficient strain, TA98NR, 1,6- and 1,8-DNP were activated to a lesser extent in the presence of equal amounts of DT-diaphorase as compared to TA98. The mutagenicity of 1,3-DNP was markedly lowered in TA98NR and DT-diaphorase did not increase the mutagenicity of this toxicant except at the highest level utilized. DT-diaphorase was found to activate 1,6-, but not 1,3-DNP to mutagenic intermediates in TA98 18DNP{sub 6}, a strain deficient in O-acetyltransferase activity. The results suggest that DT-diaphorase not only catalyzes reduction of the parent DNP but also that of partially reduced metabolites generated from that DNP. This may result in increased formation of the penultimate mutagenic species. Thus, while DT-diaphorase is commonly viewed as having antimutagenic properties with certain compounds the opposite appears to be true for DNP.

  11. Detection of PIGO-Deficient Cells Using Proaerolysin: A Valuable Tool to Investigate Mechanisms of Mutagenesis in the DT40 Cell System

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Jun; Gul, Husamettin; Tian, Xu; Bultman, Scott J.; Swenberg, James A.

    2012-01-01

    While isogenic DT40 cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways are a great tool to understand the DNA damage response to genotoxic agents by a comparison of cell toxicity in mutants and parental DT40 cells, no convenient mutation assay for mutagens currently exists for this reverse-genetic system. Here we establish a proaerolysin (PA) selection-based mutation assay in DT40 cells to identify glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor deficient cells. Using PA, we detected an increase in the number of PA-resistant DT40 cells exposed to MMS for 24 hours followed by a 5-day period of phenotype expression. GPI anchor synthesis is catalyzed by a series of phosphatidylinositol glycan complementation groups (PIGs). The PIG-O gene is on the sex chromosome (Chromosome Z) in chicken cells and is critical for GPI anchor synthesis at the intermediate step. Among all the mutations detected in the sequence levels observed in DT40 cells exposed to MMS at 100 µM, we identified that ∼55% of the mutations are located at A:T sites with a high frequency of A to T transversion mutations. In contrast, we observed no transition mutations out of 18 mutations. This novel assay for DT40 cells provides a valuable tool to investigate the mode of action of mutations caused by reactive agents using a series of isogenic mutant DT40 cells. PMID:22428069

  12. Qualitative and quantitative risk assessment for human salmonellosis due to multi-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 from consumption of Danish dry-cured pork sausages.

    PubMed

    Alban, Lis; Olsen, Anne Mette; Nielsen, Bent; Sørensen, Rie; Jessen, Birthe

    2002-01-22

    Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 (DT104) is unwanted in products for human consumption due to its antibiotic resistance and ability to cause disease. We intended to set up an improved monitoring and management program to aid in deciding when to use pork contaminated with DT104 for production of sausages without jeopardizing consumer safety. We started by carrying out two assessments of the risk for human health associated with consumption of sausages produced by: (1) Danish pork from average slaughter days; (2) imported pork (IMP) with average prevalence of DT104. The assessments showed that, if Salmonella is present, it is usually in lower numbers (< or =50 per 400 cm(2) surface). Additionally, during processing, the numbers will be reduced by at least 2 log-units. In Danish (DK) pork, DT104 constitutes 0.2-1.0% of the Salmonella isolates reported, while in imported pork (IMP), 18%. We estimated that out of one million, 25 g servings of DK dry-cured sausages, up to two DT104 bacteria could be found in each of 245 servings. Out of one million servings of 25 g IMP dry-cured sausages, up to two DT104 bacteria would occur in each of 19,260 servings. PMID:11849720

  13. Physics of High Performance Dueterium-Tritium Plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, K. M.; White, R.; Wieland, R. M.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Wong, K. L.; Wurden, G. A.; Batha, S.; Lamarche, P.; LeBlanc, B.; Levinton, F. M.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Belov, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Fu, G. Y.; Furth, H. P.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Krasilnikov, A. V.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mika, R.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Berk, H.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Breizman, B.; Dorland, W.; Phillips, P.; Bretz, N. L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G. W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Herrmann, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hogan, G. R.; Hosea, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production,isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high -li) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF-heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-li discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier.It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed.

  14. Fielding the NIF Cryogenic Ignition Target

    SciTech Connect

    Malsbury, T; Haid, B; Gibson, C; Atkinson, D; Skulina, K; Klingmann, J; Atherton, J; Mapoles, E; Kozioziemski, B; Dzenitis, E

    2008-02-28

    The United States Department of Energy has embarked on a campaign to conduct credible fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 2010. The target assembly specified for this campaign requires the formation of a deuterium/tritium (DT) fuel ice layer on the inside of a 2 millimeter diameter capsule positioned at the center of a 9 millimeter long by 5 millimeter diameter cylinder, called a hohlraum. The ice layer requires micrometer level accuracy and must be formed and maintained at temperatures below 19 K. At NIF shot time, the target must be positioned at the center of the NIF 10 meter diameter target chamber, aligned to the laser beam lines and held stable to less than 7 micrometers rms. We have completed the final design and are integrating the systems necessary to create, characterize and field the cryogenic target for ignition experiments. These designs, with emphasis on the challenges of fielding a precision cryogenic positioning system will be presented.

  15. Utilization of Heavy Metal Molten Salts in the ARIES-RS Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übeyli, Mustafa; Yapıcı, Hüseyin

    2008-09-01

    ARIES-RS is one of the major magnetic fusion energy reactor designs that uses a blanket having vanadium alloy structure cooled by lithium [1, 2]. It is a deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion driven reactor, having a fusion power of 2170 MW [1, 2]. This study presents the neutronic analysis of the ARIES-RS fusion reactor using heavy metal molten salts in which Li2BeF4 as the main constituent was mixed with increased mole fractions of heavy metal salt (ThF4 or UF4) starting by 2 mol.% up to 12 mol.%. Neutron transport calculations were carried out with the help of the SCALE 4.3 system by solving the Boltzmann transport equation with the XSDRNPM code in 238 neutron groups and a S 8- P 3 approximation. According to the numerical results, tritium self-sufficiency was attained for the coolants, Flibe with 2% UF4 or ThF4 and 4% UF4. In addition, higher energy multiplication values were found for the salt with UF4 compared to that with ThF4. Furthermore, significant amount of high quality nuclear fuel was produced to be used in external reactors.

  16. Alpha-driven mironoinstability in tandem mirror plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.K.; Miley, G.H.; Smith, G.R.; Nevins, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Alpha particles born at deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion are mirror confined in the tandem mirror with a loss-cone-type distribution in the velocity space. The anisotropy created is susceptible to microinstabilities and the objective of this work is to study possible instabilities that can be driven by the alpha loss-cone. The low-frequency (at the order of the ion cyclotron frequency) wave spectrum is examined to seek the waves that can be destabilized by the alphas. A marginal stability boundary in ion density-temperature space is found. The central cell of the tandem mirror is modeled by an infinite, long plasm cylinder with azimuthal symmetry. The plasma consists of both deuteron and triton as fuel ions and is assumed to be cold since the ion velocity is much smaller than that of the alpha. This model also considers a sharp boundary plasma, with a vacuum region separating it from the conducting wall. To examine reactor implication, the authors have calculated the stability boundary for the cases of the MARS and MINIMARS parameters. The operating regime for both cases is found to be unstable. this could be a key problem for reactor operation and deserves more study. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  17. In-Situ Imaging and Quantification of Tritium Surface Contamination via Coherent Fiber Bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Charles A. Gentile; John J. Parker; Stewart J. Zweben

    2001-11-12

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has developed a method of imaging tritium on in-situ surfaces for the purpose of real-time data collection. This method expands upon a previous tritium imaging concept, also developed at PPPL. Enhancements include an objective lens coupled to the entry aperture of a coherent fiber optic (CFO) bundle, and a relay lens connecting the exit aperture of the fiber bundle to an intensifier tube and a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The system has been specifically fabricated for use in determining tritium concentrations on first wall materials. One potential complication associated with the development of D-T [deuterium-tritium] fueled fusion reactors is the deposition of tritium (i.e., co-deposited layer) on the surface of the primary wall of the vacuum vessel. It would be advantageous to implement a process to accurately determine tritium distribution on these inner surfaces. This fiber optic imaging device provides a highly practical method for determining the location, concentration, and activity of surface tritium deposition. In addition, it can be employed for detection of tritium ''hot-spots'' and ''hide-out'' regions present on the surfaces being imaged.

  18. Overview of Progress and Future Prospects in Indirect Drive Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; ">ICF Program, deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reaction products depositing their kinetic energy locally within the fusion reaction region and thus increasing the temperature in the reacting region with a concomitant exponential increase in the fusion reaction-rate, is the essential process needed for a fusion plasma to ignite. For the first time in the laboratory, significant alpha-heating in a fusion plasma was inferred in experiments and fusion fuel gain was demonstrated on the U.S. National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experiments on the NIF have achieved the highest yet recorded stagnation pressures (Pstagnation > 150-230 Gigabar) of any facility based inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, albeit they are still short of the pressures required for ignition on the NIF (i.e. ∼ 300 - 400 Gbar), and have exhibited undesirable shape distortions that waste kinetic energy. We review the issues that have been uncovered and discuss the program strategy and plan that we are following to systematically address the known issues as we press on.

  19. Research on stellarator-mirror fission-fusion hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Kotenko, V. G.; Chernitskiy, S. V.; Nemov, V. V.; Ågren, O.; Noack, K.; Kalyuzhnyi, V. N.; Hagnestål, A.; Källne, J.; Voitsenya, V. S.; Garkusha, I. E.

    2014-09-01

    The development of a stellarator-mirror fission-fusion hybrid concept is reviewed. The hybrid comprises of a fusion neutron source and a powerful sub-critical fast fission reactor core. The aim is the transmutation of spent nuclear fuel and safe fission energy production. In its fusion part, neutrons are generated in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma, confined magnetically in a stellarator-type system with an embedded magnetic mirror. Based on kinetic calculations, the energy balance for such a system is analyzed. Neutron calculations have been performed with the MCNPX code, and the principal design of the reactor part is developed. Neutron outflux at different outer parts of the reactor is calculated. Numerical simulations have been performed on the structure of a magnetic field in a model of the stellarator-mirror device, and that is achieved by switching off one or two coils of toroidal field in the Uragan-2M torsatron. The calculations predict the existence of closed magnetic surfaces under certain conditions. The confinement of fast particles in such a magnetic trap is analyzed.

  20. The experimental plan for cryogenic layered target implosions on the National Ignition Facility - The inertial confinement approach to fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M. J.; Lindl, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Weber, S. V.; Atherton, L. J.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D; Collins, G. W.; Fair, J. E.; Fortner, R. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hatchett, S. P.; Izumi, N.; Jacoby, B.

    2011-05-15

    Ignition requires precisely controlled, high convergence implosions to assemble a dense shell of deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel with {rho}R>{approx}1 g/cm{sup 2} surrounding a 10 keV hot spot with {rho}R {approx} 0.3 g/cm{sup 2}. A working definition of ignition has been a yield of {approx}1 MJ. At this yield the {alpha}-particle energy deposited in the fuel would have been {approx}200 kJ, which is already {approx}10 x more than the kinetic energy of a typical implosion. The National Ignition Campaign includes low yield implosions with dudded fuel layers to study and optimize the hydrodynamic assembly of the fuel in a diagnostics rich environment. The fuel is a mixture of tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) with a density equivalent to DT. The fraction of D can be adjusted to control the neutron yield. Yields of {approx}10{sup 14-15} 14 MeV (primary) neutrons are adequate to diagnose the hot spot as well as the dense fuel properties via down scattering of the primary neutrons. X-ray imaging diagnostics can function in this low yield environment providing additional information about the assembled fuel either by imaging the photons emitted by the hot central plasma, or by active probing of the dense shell by a separate high energy short pulse flash. The planned use of these targets and diagnostics to assess and optimize the assembly of the fuel and how this relates to the predicted performance of DT targets is described. It is found that a good predictor of DT target performance is the THD measurable parameter, Experimental Ignition Threshold Factor, ITFX {approx} Y x dsf {sup 2.3}, where Y is the measured neutron yield between 13 and 15 MeV, and dsf is the down scattered neutron fraction defined as the ratio of neutrons between 10 and 12 MeV and those between 13 and 15 MeV.

  1. First evidence of collective alpha particle effect on toroidal Alfv{acute e}n eigenmodes in the TFTR D-T experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.L.; Schmidt, G.L.; Batha, S.H.; Bell, R.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Darrow, D.S.; Duong, H.H.; Fu, G.Y.; Hammett, G.W.; Levinton, F.; Majeski, R.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Owens, D.K.; Petrov, M.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Wilson, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    The alpha particle effect on the excitation of toroidal Alfv{acute e}n eigenmodes (TAE) was investigated in deuterium-titrium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. rf power was used to position the plasma near the instability threshold, and the alpha particle effect was inferred from the reduction of rf power threshold for TAE instability in D-T plasmas. Initial calculations indicate that the alpha particles contribute 10{percent}{endash}30{percent} of the total drive in a D-T plasma with 3 MW of peak fusion power. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Response of the first wetted wall of an IFE reactor chamber to the energy release from a direct-drive DT capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Stanislav A.; Basko, Mikhail M.; Orlov, Yurii N.; Suslin, Victor M.

    2012-07-11

    Radiation hydrodynamics 1D simulations were performed with two concurrent codes, DEIRA and RAMPHY. The DEIRA code was used for DT capsule implosion and burn, and the RAMPHY code was used for computation of X-ray and fast ions deposition in the first wall liquid film of the reactor chamber. The simulations were run for 740 MJ direct drive DT capsule and Pb thin liquid wall reactor chamber of 10 m diameter. Temporal profiles for DT capsule leaking power of X-rays, neutrons and fast {sup 4}He ions were obtained and spatial profiles of the liquid film flow parameter were computed and analyzed.

  3. Long-term fade study of the DT-702 LiF: Mg,Cu,P TLD.

    PubMed

    Delzer, J A; Hawley, J R; Romanyukha, A; Nemmers, S; Selwyn, R; Benevides, L A

    2008-01-01

    LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) are used by the US Navy to record radiation exposure of personnel. The Model DT-648 LiF:Mg,Ti TLD has been replaced by a new Model DT-702 LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLD. The DT-648 was used for many years and has undergone extensive testing to identify its pre- and post-irradiation fade operating characteristics. Studies have shown that the addition of copper increases the thermoluminesence sensitivity of the TLD for improved low-level radiation monitoring. This study evaluates various fading characteristics of the new copper-doped dosemeter using current equipment for processing of TLDs and calibrating to a National Institute of Standards and Technology standard source. The 57-week study took place at the Naval Dosimetry Center, Bethesda, MD, USA. TLDs were stored for various lengths of time before and after being exposed to a National Institute of Standards and Technology calibrated radiation sources. TLDs were then processed using current US Navy instructions and the resulting dose compared with the calibrated exposure. Both loss of signal and loss of sensitivity were evaluated. The results of this study have shown that the DT-702 TLD has no statistically significant change in sensitivity or change in signal with up to 57 weeks of pre- or post-irradiation time. The results of this study will increase the accuracy of exposure record keeping for the Navy and will allow longer issue periods. This will increase flexibility with international and domestic shipping procedures, as well as reduce workload requirements for dosimetry processing. PMID:18621919

  4. Investigation and management of an outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium DT8 associated with duck eggs, Ireland 2009 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Garvey, P; McKeown, P; Kelly, P; Cormican, M; Anderson, W; Flack, A; Barron, S; De Lappe, N; Buckley, J; Cosgrove, C; Molloy, D; O' Connor, J; O' Sullivan, P; Matthews, J; Ward, M; Breslin, A; O' Sullivan, M B; Kelleher, K; McNamara, A; Foley-Nolan, C; Pelly, H; Cloak, F

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium DT8 was a very rare cause of human illness in Ireland between 2000 and 2008, with only four human isolates from three patients being identified. Over a 19-month period between August 2009 and February 2011, 34 confirmed cases and one probable case of Salmonella Typhimurium DT8 were detected, all of which had an MLVA pattern 2-10-NA-12-212 or a closely related pattern. The epidemiological investigations strongly supported a linkbetween illness and exposure to duck eggs. Moreover, S. Typhimurium with an MLVA pattern indistinguishable (or closely related) to the isolates from human cases, was identified in 22 commercial and backyard duck flocks, twelve of which were linked with known human cases. A range of control measures were taken at farm level, and advice was provided to consumers on the hygienic handling and cooking of duck eggs. Although no definitive link was established with a concurrent duck egg-related outbreak of S. Typhimurium DT8 in the United Kingdom, it seems likely that the two events were related. It may be appropriate for other countries with a tradition of consuming duck eggs to consider the need for measures to reduce the risk of similar outbreaks. PMID:23611032

  5. BNCT dose distribution in liver with epithermal D-D and D-T fusion-based neutron beams.

    PubMed

    Koivunoro, H; Bleuel, D L; Nastasi, U; Lou, T P; Reijonen, J; Leung, K-N

    2004-11-01

    Recently, a new application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatment has been introduced. Results have indicated that liver tumors can be treated by BNCT after removal of the liver from the body. At Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, compact neutron generators based on (2)H(d,n)(3)He (D-D) or (3)H(t,n)(4)He (D-T) fusion reactions are being developed. Preliminary simulations of the applicability of 2.45 MeV D-D fusion and 14.1 MeV D-T fusion neutrons for in vivo liver tumor BNCT, without removing the liver from the body, have been carried out. MCNP simulations were performed in order to find a moderator configuration for creating a neutron beam of optimal neutron energy and to create a source model for dose calculations with the simulation environment for radiotherapy applications (SERA) treatment planning program. SERA dose calculations were performed in a patient model based on CT scans of the body. The BNCT dose distribution in liver and surrounding healthy organs was calculated with rectangular beam aperture sizes of 20 cm x 20 cm and 25 cm x 25 cm. Collimator thicknesses of 10 and 15 cm were used. The beam strength to obtain a practical treatment time was studied. In this paper, the beam shaping assemblies for D-D and D-T neutron generators and dose calculation results are presented. PMID:15308157

  6. Preliminary Evaluation of the Adequacy of Lithium Resources of the World and China for D-T Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongliang; Ni, Muyi; Jiang, Jieqiong; Wu, Yican; FDS-Team

    2012-07-01

    This paper studied the adequacy of the World and China lithium resources, considering the most promising uses in the future, involving nuclear fusion and electric-vehicles. The lithium recycle model for D-T fusion power plant and electric-vehicles, and the logistic growth prediction model of the primary energy for the World and China were constructed. Based on these models, preliminary evaluation of lithium resources adequacy of the World and China for D-T fusion reactors was presented under certain assumptions. Results show that: a. The world terrestrial reserves of lithium seems too limited to support a significant D-T power program, but the lithium reserves of China are relatively abundant, compared with the world case. b. The lithium resources contained in the oceans can be called the “permanent" energy. c. The change in 6Li enrichment has no obvious effect on the availability period of the lithium resources using FDS-II (Liquid Pb-17Li breeder blanket) type of reactors, but it has a stronger effect when PPCS-B (Solid Li4 SiO4 ceramics breeder blanket) is used.

  7. Protease and phospholipase inhibition protect Veneza zonata (Hemiptera Coreidae) against septicemia caused by parasite trypanosomatid 563DT.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Daniele; de Souza, Tatiana de Arruda Campos Brasil; Murate, Letícia Sayuri; Jankevicius, José Vitor; Gaziri, Luiz Carlos Jabur; Jankevicius, Shiduca Itow

    2004-01-01

    Veneza zonata (Hemiptera Coreidae) is an insect which causes losses in several crops, and it is also an important vector of lower trypanosomatids. V. zonata specimens were collected on rural properties in Londrina, state of Paraná, Southern Brazil. Inoculation of Leptomonas 563DT into V. zonata hemocoel caused insect death within approximately 24 h, with large bacterial proliferation into their hemocoels. Some bacteria which were found in the digestive tract of those insects, such as Escherichia coli, Providencia rettgeri, and Kluyveria ascorbata, were also found in their hemolymph, which suggests that trypanosomatid crossing into hemocoel caused mechanical lesions in the digestive tract that allowed intestinal bacteria to infect the hemolymph, thereby leading to lethal septicemia. In this study we analysed proteolytic activities from the 563DT Leptomonas strain, which is pathogenic for V. zonata, aiming at evaluating the potential use of this Leptomonas strain for the biocontrol of the insect. The proteolytic action was evaluated on cells and on culture supernatants of trypanosomatids. We also evaluated the gelatinolytic activities, the action over natural and synthetic substrates for aminopeptidases, and the action of protease inhibitors during all trypanosomatid growth stages. A significant reduction in the number of insect deaths was observed when Leptomonas 563DT were incubated with inhibitors of proteases and phospholipases before being inoculated into the insects, which suggests that those enzymes are involved in the pathogenic mechanism. PMID:14992855

  8. Bead milling for lipid recovery from thraustochytrid cells and selective hydrolysis of Schizochytrium DT3 oil using lipase.

    PubMed

    Byreddy, Avinesh R; Barrow, Colin J; Puri, Munish

    2016-01-01

    Marine microalgae present a renewable alternative source for sustainable production of omega-3 fatty acids, as compared to conventional sources such as krill oil and fish oil. In this study, we optimised a method for lipid extraction from marine thraustochytrids using a bead mill and enzymatic concentration of omega-3 fatty acids from the thraustochytrid oil. The optimised lipid extraction conditions were, bead size 0.4-0.6μm, 4500rpm, 4min of processing time at 5g biomass concentration. The maximum lipid yield (% dry weight basis) achieved at optimum conditions were 40.5% for Schizochytrium sp. S31 (ATCC) and 49.4% for Schizochytrium sp. DT3 (in-house isolate). DT3 oil contained 39.8% docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a percentage of lipid, a higher DHA percentage than S31. Partial hydrolysis of DT3 oil using Candida rugosa lipase was performed to enrich omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the glyceride portion. Total omega-3 fatty acid content was increased to 88.7%. PMID:26519698

  9. DT-diaphorase and cytochrome B5 reductase in human lung and breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Marín, A.; López de Cerain, A.; Hamilton, E.; Lewis, A. D.; Martinez-Peñuela, J. M.; Idoate, M. A.; Bello, J.

    1997-01-01

    The level of expression of enzymes that can activate or detoxify bioreductive agents within tumours has emerged as an important feature in the development of these anti-tumour compounds. The levels of two such reductase enzymes have been determined in 19 human non-small-cell lung tumours and 20 human breast tumours, together with the corresponding normal tissue. DT-diaphorase (DTD) enzyme levels (both expression and activity) were determined in these samples. Cytochrome b5 reductase (Cytb5R) activity was also assessed. With the exception of six patients, the levels of DTD activity were below 45 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) in the normal tissues assayed. DTD tumour activity was extremely variable, distinguishing two different groups of patients, one with DTD activity above 79 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) and the other with levels that were in the same range as found for the normal tissues. In 53% of the lung tumour samples, DTD activity was increased with respect to the normal tissue by a factor of 2.4-90.3 (range 79-965 nmol min[-1] mg[-1]). In 70% of the breast tumour samples, DTD activity was over 80 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) (range 83-267 nmol min[-1] mg[-1]). DTD expression measured by Western blot correlated well with the enzyme activity measured in both tumour and normal tissues. The levels of the other reductase enzyme, Cytb5R, were not as variable as those for DTD, being in the same range in both tumour and normal tissue or slightly higher in the normal tissues. The heterogeneous nature of DTD activity and expression reinforces the need to measure enzyme levels in individual patients before therapy with DTD-activated bioreductive drugs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9328153

  10. DT-Diaphorase Prevents Aminochrome-Induced Alpha-Synuclein Oligomer Formation and Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Patricia; Cardenas, Sergio; Huenchuguala, Sandro; Briceño, Andrea; Couve, Eduardo; Paris, Irmgard; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2015-01-01

    It was reported that aminochrome induces the formation of alpha synuclein (SNCA) oligomers during dopamine oxidation. We found that DT-diaphorase (NQO1) prevents the formation of SNCA oligomers in the presence of aminochrome determined by Western blot, transmission electron microscopy, circular dichroism, and thioflavin T fluorescence, suggesting a protective role of NQO1 by preventing the formation of SNCA oligomers in dopaminergic neurons. In order to test NQO1 protective role in SNCA neurotoxicity in cellular model, we overexpressed SNCA in both RCSN-3 cells (wild-type) and RCSN-3Nq7 cells, which have constitutive expression of a siRNA against NQO1. The expression of SNCA in RCSN-3SNCA and RCSN-3Nq7SNCA cells increased 4.2- and 4.4-fold, respectively. The overexpression of SNCA in RCSN-3Nq7SNCA cells induces a significant increase in cell death of 2.8- and 3.2-fold when they were incubated with 50 and 70 µM aminochrome, respectively. The cell death was found to be of apoptotic character determined by annexin/propidium iodide technique with flow cytometry and DNA laddering. A Western blot demonstrated that SNCA in RCSN-3SNCA is only found in monomer form both in the presence of 20 µM aminochrome or cell culture medium contrasting with RCSN-3Nq7SNCA cells where the majority SNCA is found as oligomer. The antioligomer compound scyllo-inositol induced a significant decrease in aminochrome-induced cell death in RCSN-3Nq7SNCA cells in comparison to cells incubated in the absence of scyllo-inositol. Our results suggest that NQO1 seems to play an important role in the prevention of aminochrome-induced SNCA oligomer formation and SNCA oligomers neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25634539

  11. Laser fusion experiments, facilities, and diagnostics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Ahlstrom, H G

    1981-06-01

    The progress of the LLNL Laser Fusion Program in our work to achieve high gain thermonuclear microex-plosions is discussed. Many experiments have been successfully performed and diagnosed using the large complex twenty-beam 30-TW Shiva laser system. A 400-kJ design of the twenty-beam Nova laser has been completed. The construction of the first phase of this facility has begun. The first phase of this Nd-doped low nonlinear index glass laser will consist of ten beams producing 100 kJ in 1-nsec pulses. One beam of the Argus laser has been converted to operation at 532 nm with 10-cm aperture. It will soon operate at 355 nm, also at 10-cm aperture. Frequency conversion crystals are being procured for full aperture operation at either 532 or 355 nm for both Argus beams. We also discuss new diagnostic instruments which provide us with new and improved resolution, information on laser absorption and scattering, thermal energy flow, supra-thermal electrons and their effects, and final fuel conditions. We have made measurements on the absorption and Brillouin scattering for target irradiations at both 1.064 microm and 532 nm. These measurements confirm the expected increased absorption and reduced scattering at the shorter wavelength. Additional data have been obtained on the angular distribution of suprathermal x rays, which further confirms our observation of its nonisotropy. However, we do not yet have an explanation of the phenomena. Implosion experiments have been performed which have produced final fuel densities over the 10-100x range liquid deuterium-tritium (DT) density. The 100x achievement is the highest yet achieved in laser fusion DT fuel targets. PMID:20332859

  12. First-principles opacity table of warm dense deuterium for inertial-confinement-fusion applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, S X; Collins, L A; Goncharov, V N; Boehly, T R; Epstein, R; McCrory, R L; Skupsky, S

    2014-09-01

    Accurate knowledge of the optical properties of a warm dense deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture is important for reliable design of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The opacity of a warm dense DT shell essentially determines how much radiation from hot coronal plasmas can be deposited in the DT fuel of an imploding capsule. Even for the simplest species of hydrogen, the accurate calculation of their opacities remains a challenge in the warm-dense matter regime because strong-coupling and quantum effects play an important role in such plasmas. With quantum-molecular-dynamics (QMD) simulations, we have derived a first-principles opacity table (FPOT) of deuterium (and the DT mixture by mass scaling) for a wide range of densities from ρ(D)=0.5 to 673.518g/cm(3) and temperatures from T=5000K up to the Fermi temperature T(F) for each density. Compared with results from the astrophysics opacity table (AOT) currently used in our hydrocodes, the FPOT of deuterium from our QMD calculations has shown a significant increase in opacity for strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions by a factor of 3-100 in the ICF-relevant photon-energy range. As conditions approach those of classical plasma, the opacity from the FPOT converges to the corresponding values of the AOT. By implementing the FPOT of deuterium and the DT mixture into our hydrocodes, we have performed radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for low-adiabat cryogenic DT implosions on the OMEGA laser and for direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility. The simulation results using the FPOT show that the target performance (in terms of neutron yield and energy gain) could vary from ∼10% up to a factor of ∼2 depending on the adiabat of the imploding DT capsule; the lower the adiabat, the more variation is seen in the prediction of target performance when compared to the AOT modeling. PMID:25314551

  13. Differential Die-Away Instrument: Report on Fuel Assembly Mock-up Measurements with Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Goodsell, Alison Victoria; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Henzl, Vladimir; Rael, Carlos D.; Desimone, David J.

    2014-09-18

    Fresh fuel experiments for the differential die-away (DDA) project were performed using a DT neutron generator, a 15x15 PWR fuel assembly, and nine 3He detectors in a water tank inside of a shielded cell at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Eight different fuel enrichments were created using low enriched (LEU) and depleted uranium (DU) dioxide fuel rods. A list-mode data acquisition system recorded the time-dependent signal and analysis of the DDA signal die-away time was performed. The die-away time depended on the amount of fissile material in the fuel assembly and the position of the detector. These experiments were performed in support of the spent nuclear fuel Next Generation Safeguards Initiative DDA project. Lessons learned from the fresh fuel DDA instrument experiments and simulations will provide useful information to the spent fuel project.

  14. Molecular characterization of Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+ and Salmonella Heidelberg from poultry and retail chicken meat in Colombia by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Paratyphi B dT+ variant (also termed Salmonella Java) and Salmonella Heidelberg are human pathogens frequently isolated from poultry. As a step towards implementing the Colombian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistant Surveillance (COIPARS), this study characterized molecular patt...

  15. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  16. Induction of DT-diaphorase by 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones in human tumour and normal cells and effect on anti-tumour activity of bioreductive agents.

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, G. P.; Leith, M. K.; Wang, X.; Curphey, T. J.; Begleiter, A.

    1998-01-01

    DT-diaphorase is a two-electron-reducing enzyme that is an important activator of bioreductive anti-tumour agents, such as mitomycin C (MMC) and EO9, and is inducible by many compounds, including 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones (D3Ts). We showed previously that D3T selectively increased DT-diaphorase activity in mouse lymphoma cells compared with normal mouse marrow cells, and also increased MMC or EO9 cytotoxic activity in the lymphoma cells with only minor effects in the marrow cells. In this study, we found that D3T significantly increased DT-diaphorase activity in 28 of 38 human tumour cell lines representing ten tissue types with no obvious relationships between the tumour type, or the base level of DT-diaphorase activity, and the ability of D3T to increase the enzyme activity. Induction of DT-diaphorase activity in human tumour cell lines by 12 D3T analogues varied markedly with the D3T structure. D3T also increased DT-diaphorase activity in normal human bone marrow and kidney cells but the increases were small in these cells. In addition, D3T increased the level of enzyme activity in normal human lung cells. Pretreatment of human tumour cells with D3T analogues significantly increased the cytotoxic activity of MMC or EO9 in these cells, and the level of enhancement of anti-tumour activity paralleled the level of DT-diaphorase induction. In contrast, D3T did not effect the toxicity of EO9 in normal kidney cells. These results demonstrate that D3T analogues can increase DT-diaphorase activity in a wide variety of human tumour cells and that this effect can enhance the anti-tumour activity of the bioreductive agents MMC and EO9. PMID:9579829

  17. Competing fatigue mechanisms in Nickel-base superalloy Rene 88DT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Paul N.

    Nickel base superalloys exhibit superior high temperature mechanical properties required for aircraft engine components. It has been known that the processing of these alloys by the powder metallurgy route introduces inclusions inside the material. The presence of such inclusions often leads to competing failure modes in fatigue that is described by a step-wise or two distinct S-N curves involving both the surface and internally-initiated cracks, resulting in large uncertainties of fatigue life. A clear understanding of such behavior is yet to be established. The principal objective of this research is to examine the effect of inclusions on the extent of fatigue failure competition from surface and internal initiators at two different specimen test volumes. Experimental fatigue testing has been performed to explore how the presence of inclusions affects the competing fatigue failure modes. In addition, how the competing failure modes will behave with changes in the specimen size was also studied. Two groups of material each with two different specimen sizes were used in this study. It has been shown that the two crack initiation mechanisms occurred in the small unseeded Rene 88DT specimens tested at 650ºC over the stress range tested. Additionally, the fatigue lives were reduced with increase in specimen volume. All fatigue failures in seeded material occurred due to crack initiations from the seeded inclusions. In the fatigue life of seeded material, two competing and separate S-N curves were found in small test volume, whereas, in the large test volume, the regions were separated by a "step" in S-N curve. It has been found that the largest inclusion size observed in metallographic surfaces was smaller than the size determined from the fatigue failure origin. An analysis method based on extreme value statistics developed by Murakami was used to predict the largest size of inclusion in the test volume. The results of this study clearly show that competition for

  18. Solid polystyrene and deuterated polystyrene light output response to fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R; Danly, C; Glebov, V Yu; Hurlbut, C; Merrill, F E; Volegov, P L; Wilde, C

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Imaging System has proven to be an important diagnostic in studying DT implosion characteristics at the National Ignition Facility. The current system depends on a polystyrene scintillating fiber array, which detects fusion neutrons born in the DT hotspot as well as neutrons that have scattered to lower energies in the surrounding cold fuel. Increasing neutron yields at NIF, as well as a desire to resolve three-dimensional information about the fuel assembly, have provided the impetus to build and install two additional next-generation neutron imaging systems. We are currently investigating a novel neutron imaging system that will utilize a deuterated polystyrene (CD) fiber array instead of standard hydrogen-based polystyrene (CH). Studies of deuterated xylene or deuterated benzene liquid scintillator show an improvement in imaging resolution by a factor of two [L. Disdier et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 2134 (2004)], but also a reduction in light output [V. Bildstein et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 729, 188 (2013); M. I. Ojaruega, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2009; M. T. Febbraro, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2014] as compared to standard plastic. Tests of the relative light output of deuterated polystyrene and standard polystyrene were completed using 14 MeV fusion neutrons generated through implosions of deuterium-tritium filled capsules at the OMEGA laser facility. In addition, we collected data of the relative response of these two scintillators to a wide energy range of neutrons (1-800 MeV) at the Weapons Neutrons Research Facility. Results of these measurements are presented. PMID:27131680

  19. Solid polystyrene and deuterated polystyrene light output response to fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, R.; Danly, C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hurlbut, C.; Merrill, F. E.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C.

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Imaging System has proven to be an important diagnostic in studying DT implosion characteristics at the National Ignition Facility. The current system depends on a polystyrene scintillating fiber array, which detects fusion neutrons born in the DT hotspot as well as neutrons that have scattered to lower energies in the surrounding cold fuel. Increasing neutron yields at NIF, as well as a desire to resolve three-dimensional information about the fuel assembly, have provided the impetus to build and install two additional next-generation neutron imaging systems. We are currently investigating a novel neutron imaging system that will utilize a deuterated polystyrene (CD) fiber array instead of standard hydrogen-based polystyrene (CH). Studies of deuterated xylene or deuterated benzene liquid scintillator show an improvement in imaging resolution by a factor of two [L. Disdier et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 2134 (2004)], but also a reduction in light output [V. Bildstein et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 729, 188 (2013); M. I. Ojaruega, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2009; M. T. Febbraro, Ph.D. thesis, University of Michigan, 2014] as compared to standard plastic. Tests of the relative light output of deuterated polystyrene and standard polystyrene were completed using 14 MeV fusion neutrons generated through implosions of deuterium-tritium filled capsules at the OMEGA laser facility. In addition, we collected data of the relative response of these two scintillators to a wide energy range of neutrons (1-800 MeV) at the Weapons Neutrons Research Facility. Results of these measurements are presented.

  20. Enhanced D-T supershot performance at high current using extensive lithium conditioning in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.K.; Strachan, J.D.; Bell, M.G.; Scott, S.D.; Budny, R.; Bell, R.E.; Bitter, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.; Grek, B.

    1995-05-01

    A substantial improvement in supershot fusion plasma performance has been realized by combining the enhanced confinement due to tritium fueling with the enhanced confinement due to extensive Li conditioning of the TFTR limiter. This combination has resulted in not only significantly higher global energy confinement times than had previously been obtained in high current supershots, but also the highest ratio of central fusion output power to input power observed to date.