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Sample records for deuterium-tritium dt fueled

  1. Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

    1991-08-27

    Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

  2. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Analysis Of Plastic Capsule Materials Exposed To Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Schoonover, J R; Steckle, Jr., W P; Elliot, N; Ebey, P S; Nobile, A; Nikroo, A; Cook, R C; Letts, S A

    2005-06-16

    Planar samples of varying thicknesses of both CH and CD glow discharge polymer have been measured with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy before and after exposure to deuterium-tritium (DT) gas at elevated temperature and pressure. Planar samples of polyimide films made from both hydrogenated and deuterated precursors have also been examined by FTIR before and after DT exposure. The post-exposure FTIR spectra demonstrated no measurable exchange of hydrogen with deuterium or tritium for either polymer. Evidence for oxidation of the glow discharge polymer due to atmospheric oxygen was the only chemical change indicated by the FTIR data.

  3. Evidence for stratification of deuterium-tritium fuel in inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Manuel, M J-E; Rinderknecht, H G; Sinenian, N; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Delettrez, J A; Glebov, V Yu; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; McNabb, D P; Amendt, P A; Boyd, R N; Rygg, J R; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Bacher, A D

    2012-02-17

    Measurements of the D(d,p)T (dd) and T(t,2n)(4)He (tt) reaction yields have been compared with those of the D(t,n)(4)He (dt) reaction yield, using deuterium-tritium gas-filled inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions. In these experiments, carried out on the OMEGA laser, absolute spectral measurements of dd protons and tt neutrons were obtained. From these measurements, it was concluded that the dd yield is anomalously low and the tt yield is anomalously high relative to the dt yield, an observation that we conjecture to be caused by a stratification of the fuel in the implosion core. This effect may be present in ignition experiments planned on the National Ignition Facility. PMID:22401216

  4. Cryogenic Implosion Performance Using High-Purity Deuterium-Tritium Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, T. C.; Goncharov, V. N.; Radha, P. B.; Earley, R.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, M. J., III; Michel, D. T.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2014-10-01

    Demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence between symmetric implosions on OMEGA and National Ignition Facility ignition designs will require a number of facility enhancements that include dynamic bandwidth reduction, a set of higher-order super-Gaussian phase plates, high-spatial-resolution gated-core imaging, high-bandwidth neutron burnwidth measurements, improved power balance, and contaminant-free deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. The historic DT fuel supply was contaminated with ~6 atm% of 1H, leading to significant fractionation of the fuel during the layering process (the triple points of H:D and H:T are significantly colder than DD, DT, and TT). The fractionation leads to a drop in the potential yield because the D and T number densities are lower in the void than they would be with a pure-DT mixture). An isotope separation system has been developed to remove the 1H from the DT fuel supply. This talk will discuss the first results with the purified fuel, conclusions from recent implosions to test cross-beam energy transfer mitigation, and the status of the remaining facility enhancements. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  5. Measurements of collective fuel velocities in deuterium-tritium exploding pusher and cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C.-K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ashabranner, R.; Bionta, R.; LePape, S.; McKernan, M.; Mackinnon, A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Knauer, J.; Sangster, T. C.

    2013-04-15

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of collective fuel velocities in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility are reported. Velocities along the line-of-sight (LOS) of the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS), positioned close to the equator (73 Degree-Sign -324 Degree-Sign ), were inferred from the measured mean energy of the deuterium-tritium (DT)-primary neutron peak. Substantial mean energy shifts up to 113 {+-} 16 keV were observed in DT gas-filled exploding-pusher implosions, driven in a polar-direct drive configuration, which corresponds to bulk fuel velocities up to 210 {+-} 30 km/s. In contrast, only marginal bulk fuel velocities along the MRS LOS were observed in cryogenically layered DT implosions. Integrated analysis of data from a large number of cryogenically layered implosions has recently identified a deficit in achieved hot-spot energy of {approx}3 kJ for these implosions [C. Cerjan et al., Phys. Plasmas (2013)]. One hypothesis that could explain this missing energy is a collective, directional fuel velocity of {approx}190 km/s. As only marginal bulk fuel velocities are observed in the MRS data, this might indicate that turbulent or radial flows would be a likely explanation for the missing energy. However, a directional velocity close to perpendicular to the MRS LOS cannot be ruled out.

  6. Fuel provision for nonbreeding deuterium-tritium fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Katsurai, M.

    1980-01-01

    Nonbreeding D-T reactors have decisive advantages in minimum size, unit cost, variety of applications, and ease of heat removal over reactors using any other fusion cycle, and significant advantages in environmental and safety characteristics over breeding D-T reactors. Considerations of relative energy production demonstrate that the most favorable source of tritium for a widely deployed system of nonbreeding D-T reactors is the very large (approx. 10 GW thermal) semi-catalyzed-deuterium (SCD), or sub-SCD reactor, where none of the escaping /sup 3/He (> 95%) or tritium (< 25%) is reinjected for burn-up. Feasibility of the ignited SCD tokamak reactor requires spatially averaged betas of 15 to 20% with a magnetic field at the TF coils of 12 to 13 Tesla.

  7. Diagnosing fuel {rho}R and {rho}R asymmetries in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions using charged-particle spectrometry at OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2009-04-15

    Determining fuel areal density ({rho}R) in moderate-{rho}R (100-200 mg/cm{sup 2}) cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions is challenging as it requires new spectrometry techniques and analysis methods to be developed. In this paper, we describe a new method for analyzing the spectrum of knock-on deuterons (KO-Ds), elastically scattered by primary DT neutrons, from which a fuel {rho}R can be inferred for values up to {approx}200 mg/cm{sup 2}. This new analysis method, which uses Monte Carlo modeling of a cryogenic DT implosion, improves significantly the previous analysis method in two fundamental ways. First, it is not affected by significant spatial-yield variations, which degrade the diagnosis of the fuel {rho}R (spatial yield variations of about {+-}20% are typically observed), and second, it does not break down when the fuel {rho}R exceeds {approx}70 mg/cm{sup 2}.

  8. Fuel ion ratio determination in NBI heated deuterium tritium fusion plasmas at JET using neutron emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellesen, C.; Eriksson, J.; Binda, F.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Skiba, M.; Weiszflog, M.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2015-02-01

    The fuel ion ratio (nt/nd) is of central importance for the performance and control of a future burning fusion plasma, and reliable measurements of this quantity are essential for ITER. This paper demonstrates a method to derive the core fuel ion ratio by comparing the thermonuclear and beam-thermal neutron emission intensities, using a neutron spectrometer. The method is applied to NBI heated deuterium tritium (DT) plasmas at JET, using data from the magnetic proton recoil spectrometer. The trend in the results is consistent with Penning trap measurements of the fuel ion ratio at the edge of the plasma, but there is a discrepancy in the absolute values, possibly owing to the fact that the two measurements are weighted towards different parts of the plasma. It is suggested to further validate this method by comparing it to the traditionally proposed method to estimate nt/nd from the ratio of the thermal DD and DT neutron emission components. The spectrometer requirements for measuring nt/nd at ITER are also briefly discussed.

  9. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Cheng, B.; Glimm, J.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-01

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  10. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    SciTech Connect

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Glimm, J.; Cheng, B.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-15

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  11. First-principles studies on the equation of state, thermal conductivity, and opacity of deuterium-tritium (DT) and polystyrene (CH) for inertial confinement fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kress, J. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2016-05-01

    Using first-principles (FP) methods, we have performed ab initio compute for the equation of state (EOS), thermal conductivity, and opacity of deuterium-tritium (DT) in a wide range of densities and temperatures for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) applications. These systematic investigations have recently been expanded to accurately compute the plasma properties of CH ablators under extreme conditions. In particular, the first-principles EOS and thermal-conductivity tables of CH are self-consistently built from such FP calculations, which are benchmarked by experimental measurements. When compared with the traditional models used for these plasma properties in hydrocodes, significant differences have been identified in the warm dense plasma regime. When these FP-calculated properties of DT and CH were used in our hydrodynamic simulations of ICF implosions, we found that the target performance in terms of neutron yield and energy gain can vary by a factor of 2 to 3, relative to traditional model simulations.

  12. Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Cao, D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Davis, A. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Janezic, R.; Karasik, M.; Keck, R. L.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Obenschain, S. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Rice, B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Shoup, M. J.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Ulreich, J.; Wittman, M. D.; Woo, K. M.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2016-07-01

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs=56 ±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility, these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ˜60 % of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, LM15119ER (2016)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is approximately 40% lower. Three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.

  13. Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Regan, S P; Goncharov, V N; Igumenshchev, I V; Sangster, T C; Betti, R; Bose, A; Boehly, T R; Bonino, M J; Campbell, E M; Cao, D; Collins, T J B; Craxton, R S; Davis, A K; Delettrez, J A; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Forrest, C J; Frenje, J A; Froula, D H; Gatu Johnson, M; Glebov, V Yu; Harding, D R; Hohenberger, M; Hu, S X; Jacobs-Perkins, D; Janezic, R; Karasik, M; Keck, R L; Kelly, J H; Kessler, T J; Knauer, J P; Kosc, T Z; Loucks, S J; Marozas, J A; Marshall, F J; McCrory, R L; McKenty, P W; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Obenschain, S P; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Rice, B; Rosenberg, M J; Schmitt, A J; Schmitt, M J; Seka, W; Shmayda, W T; Shoup, M J; Shvydky, A; Skupsky, S; Solodov, A A; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W; Ulreich, J; Wittman, M D; Woo, K M; Yaakobi, B; Zuegel, J D

    2016-07-01

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure P_{hs}=56±7  Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility, these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ∼60% of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 011201(R) (2016)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is approximately 40% lower. Three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance. PMID:27447511

  14. Solid Deuterium-Tritium Surface Roughness In A Beryllium Inertial Confinement Fusion Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Moody, J D; Montgomery, D S; Gautier, C

    2006-04-19

    Solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layers for inertial confinement fusion experiments were formed inside of a 2 mm diameter beryllium shell and were characterized using phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging. The solid D-T surface roughness is found to be 0.4 {micro}m for modes 7-128 at 1.5 K below the melting temperature. The layer roughness is found to increase with decreasing temperature, in agreement with previous visible light characterization studies. However, phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging provides a more robust surface roughness measurement than visible light methods. The new x-ray imaging results demonstrate clearly that the surface roughness decreases with time for solid D-T layers held at 1.5 K below the melting temperature.

  15. Single Crystal Growth and Formation of Defects in Deuterium-Tritium Ice Layers for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chernov, A A; Kozioziemski, B J; Koch, J A; Atherton, L J; Johnson, M A; Hamza, A V; Kucheyev, S O; Lugten, J B; Mapoles, E A; Moody, J D; Salmonson, J D; Sater, J D

    2008-09-05

    We identify vapor-etched grain boundary grooves on the solid-vapor interface as the main source of surface roughness in the Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fuel layers which are solidified and then cooled. Current inertial confinement fusion target designs impose stringent limits to the cross sectional area and total volume of these grooves. Formation of these grain boundaries occurs over timescales of hours as the dislocation network anneals, and is inevitable in a plastically deformed material. Therefore, either cooling on a much shorter time scale or a technique that requires no cooling after solidification should be used to minimize the fuel layer surface roughness.

  16. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Leslie D.

    1982-01-01

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  17. Physics of high performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, K.M.; Barnes, C.W.; Batha, S.

    1996-11-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production, isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high-I{sub i}) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF- heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-I{sub i} discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier. It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed.

  18. Measurement of High-Pressure Shock Waves in Cryogenic Deuterium-Tritium Ice Layered Capsule Implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Moody, J. D.; Celliers, P. M.; Ross, J. S.; Ralph, J.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Parham, T.; Sater, J.; Mapoles, E. R.; Holunga, D. M.; Walters, C. F.; Haid, B. J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Krauter, K. G.; Frieders, G.; Ross, G.; Bowers, M. W.; Strozzi, D. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Dzenitis, B.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Young, B.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Atherton, L. J.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; Boehly, T. R.

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  19. Measurement of high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium ice layered capsule implosions on NIF.

    PubMed

    Robey, H F; Moody, J D; Celliers, P M; Ross, J S; Ralph, J; Le Pape, S; Berzak Hopkins, L; Parham, T; Sater, J; Mapoles, E R; Holunga, D M; Walters, C F; Haid, B J; Kozioziemski, B J; Dylla-Spears, R J; Krauter, K G; Frieders, G; Ross, G; Bowers, M W; Strozzi, D J; Yoxall, B E; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, B; Bhandarkar, S D; Young, B; Van Wonterghem, B M; Atherton, L J; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; Boehly, T R

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of multiple, high-pressure shock waves in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility have been performed. The strength and relative timing of these shocks must be adjusted to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel entropy low and compressibility high. All previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011), H. F. Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] have been performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas regions were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. This report presents the first experimental validation of the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. PMID:23971581

  20. Diagnostic study of steady state advanced fuel (deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium) fusion in an IEC device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Krupakar Murali

    The ionized fusion fuels (D-D & D-3He) have been accelerated to fusion velocities using two concentric grids maintained at a high potential difference in an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device. Though the gridded IEC device currently has a low efficiency (Q ≡ fusion power/input power ˜10-5), the energetic protons and neutrons generated within this device can be used for many near-term applications, such as medical isotope production, landmine detection, neutron activation analysis, etc. The present work is centered upon understanding the operation of the device and finding new ways to increase the overall efficiency. The steady state fusion of D-3He fuel in an IEC device was successfully studied. At a pressure of ˜2 mtorr the source of such reactions was identified to be principally beam-target reactions and was theoretically explained using the Monte Carlo - Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) code. The first simultaneous measurement of DD and D-3He protons was accomplished during the present thesis work that confirmed that D- 3He fusion reactions indeed occur in an IEC device. A new pressure independent diagnostic was invented to measure the average ion energy. That diagnostic uses the D-D proton energy spectra from a single loop cathode grid and the SRIM code predictions. A second diagnostic called the eclipse disc was co-invented to characterize the various fusion regimes in an IEC device. This diagnostic verified that a converged core fusion source exists for the DD reactions but the D-3He reactions that are principally embedded source reactions. A third diagnostic called the chordwire was invented to study the effects of various sources of electrons---thermionic, photo and field emission electrons, that decrease the efficiency of the device. This diagnostic also helped map the ion flux into the cathode in 2D, besides helping identify the high performance grid materials (W-25%Re and pure Re). Understanding the electron current

  1. Results from deuterium-tritium tokamak confinement experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    Recent scientific and technical progress in magnetic fusion experiments has resulted in the achievement of plasma parameters (density and temperature) which enabled the production of significant bursts of fusion power from deuterium-tritium fuels and the first studies of the physics of burning plasmas. The key scientific issues in the reacting plasma core are plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability, and the confinement and loss of energetic fusion products from the reacting fuel ions. Progress in the development of regimes of operation which have both good confinement and are MHD stable have enabled a broad study of burning plasma physics issues. A review of the technical and scientific results from the deuterium-tritium experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is given with particular emphasis on alpha-particle physics issues.

  2. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, L.D.

    1980-03-13

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator was designed to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  3. A new ion cyclotron range of frequency scenario for bulk ion heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in our favour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Bilato, R.; Dumont, R.; Lerche, E.; Mantsinen, M.; Messiaen, A.

    2015-08-01

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radio frequency (RF) heating of 3He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra 3He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  4. RF physics in Deuterium-Tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C. K.; Bell, M.; Bell, R. E.; Bernabei, S.; Fredrickson, E.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Majeski, R.; Medley, S.; Ono, M.

    1999-09-20

    A wide variety of potential ICRF heating scenarios relevant for the deuterium-tritium plasmas expected in tokamak reactor-class devices were explored in the TFTR and JET programs. Key physics results from the two programs are discussed. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Deuterium-tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.G.; Beer, M.; Batha, S.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high-l{sub i}). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in-situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q{sub a} {approx} 4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l{sub i} plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross-section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D-T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D-T plasmas with q{sub 0} > 1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode-conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions.

  6. Compression of a spherically symmetric deuterium-tritium plasma liner onto a magnetized deuterium-tritium target

    SciTech Connect

    Santarius, J. F.

    2012-07-15

    Converging plasma jets may be able to reach the regime of high energy density plasmas (HEDP). The successful application of plasma jets to magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) would heat the plasma by fusion products and should increase the plasma energy density. This paper reports the results of using the University of Wisconsin's 1-D Lagrangian, radiation-hydrodynamics, fusion code BUCKY to investigate two MIF converging plasma jet test cases originally analyzed by Samulyak et al.[Physics of Plasmas 17, 092702 (2010)]. In these cases, 15 cm or 5 cm radially thick deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma jets merge at 60 cm from the origin and converge radially onto a DT target magnetized to 2 T and of radius 5 cm. The BUCKY calculations reported here model these cases, starting from the time of initial contact of the jets and target. Compared to the one-temperature Samulyak et al. calculations, the one-temperature BUCKY results show similar behavior, except that the plasma radius remains about twice as long near maximum compression. One-temperature and two-temperature BUCKY results differ, reflecting the sensitivity of the calculations to timing and plasma parameter details, with the two-temperature case giving a more sustained compression.

  7. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Haan, S. W.; Kritcher, A. L.; MacPhee, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Church, J.; Dixit, S.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J.; Moore, A. S.; Nikroo, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Streckert, H.; Town, R.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  8. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. P.; Dewald, E. L.; et al

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a “highfoot” laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shapemore » closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.« less

  9. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Döppner, T; Callahan, D A; Hurricane, O A; Hinkel, D E; Ma, T; Park, H-S; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Casey, D T; Celliers, P; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Haan, S W; Kritcher, A L; MacPhee, A; Le Pape, S; Pak, A; Patel, P K; Springer, P T; Salmonson, J D; Tommasini, R; Benedetti, L R; Bond, E; Bradley, D K; Caggiano, J; Church, J; Dixit, S; Edgell, D; Edwards, M J; Fittinghoff, D N; Frenje, J; Gatu Johnson, M; Grim, G; Hatarik, R; Havre, M; Herrmann, H; Izumi, N; Khan, S F; Kline, J L; Knauer, J; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; Merrill, F E; Moody, J; Moore, A S; Nikroo, A; Ralph, J E; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Sayre, D; Schneider, M; Streckert, H; Town, R; Turnbull, D; Volegov, P L; Wan, A; Widmann, K; Wilde, C H; Yeamans, C

    2015-07-31

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 10^{16} neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel. PMID:26274424

  10. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. P.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Haan, S.; Kritcher, A. L.; MacPhee, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Church, J.; Dixit, S.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J.; Moore, A. S.; Nikroo, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Streckert, H.; Town, R.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a “highfoot” laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  11. Optimal conditions for shock ignition of scaled cryogenic deuterium-tritium targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, M.; Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G.

    2013-02-01

    Within the framework of the shock-ignition (SI) scheme, ignition conditions are reached following the separation of the compression and heating phases. First, the shell is compressed at a sub-ignition implosion velocity; then an intense laser spike is launched at the end of the main drive, leading to the propagation of a strong shock through the precompressed fuel. The minimal laser energy required for ignition of scaled deuterium-tritium (DT) targets is assessed by calculations. A semi-empiric model describing the ignitor shock generation and propagation in the fuel assembly is defined. The minimal power needed in the laser spike pulse to achieve ignition is derived from the hydrodynamic model. Optimal conditions for ignition of scaled targets are explored in terms of laser intensity, shell-implosion velocity, and target scale range for the SI process. Curves of minimal laser requirements for ignition are plotted in the energy-power diagram. The most economic and reliable conditions for ignition of a millimeter DT target are observed in the 240- to 320-km/s implosion velocity range and for the peak laser intensity ranging from ˜2 × 1015 W/cm2 up to 5 × 1015 W/cm2. These optimal conditions correspond to shock-ignited targets for a laser energy of ˜250 kJ and a laser power of 100 to 200 TW. Large, self-ignited targets are particularly attractive by offering ignition at a lower implosion velocity and a reduced laser intensity than for conventional ignition. The SI scheme allows for the compression and heating phases of the high power laser energy research facility target to be performed at a peak laser intensity below 1016 W/cm2. A better control of parametric and hydrodynamic instabilities within the SI scheme sets it as an optimal and reliable approach to attain ignition of large targets.

  12. Preparations for deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. L.; Anderson, J. W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Aschroft, D.; Barnes, C. W.; Barnes, G.; Batchelor, D. B.; Bateman, G.; Batha, S.; Baylor, L. A.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Biglow, T. S.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bonoli, P.; Bretz, N. L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Burgess, T.; Bush, H.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Cheng, C. Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collazo, I.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cowley, S.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Faunce, J.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G. Y.; Furth, H. P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Goldfinger, R. C.; Golian, T.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gouge, M. J.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hermann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hirshman, S.; Hoffman, D. J.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R. A.; Hsuan, H.; Jaeger, E. F.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Kwon, S.; Labik, G.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Laughlin, M. J.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Leonard, M.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F. M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Machuzak, J.; Mansfield, D. E.; Marchlik, M.; Marmar, E. S.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mastrocola, V.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M. P.; Majeski, R.; Mauel, M.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McGuire, K. M.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Milora, S. L.; Monticello, D.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G. A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Nishitani, T.; Norris, M.; O'Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Paul, S. F.; Pavlov, Yu. I.; Pearson, G.; Perkins, F.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Pitcher, S.; Popovichev, S.; Qualls, A. L.; Raftopoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Scharer, J.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S. D.; Senko, T.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C.; Snipes, J.; Snook, P.; Stencel, J.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B. C.; Strachan, J. D.; Stodiek, W.; Swanson, J.; Synakowski, E.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J.; Thompson, M. E.; Timberlake, J. R.; Towner, H. H.; Ulrickson, M.; von Halle, A.; Vannoy, C.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, K.; Wong, D.; Wong, K. L.; Woskov, P.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Yeun, A.; Yoshikawa, S.; Young, K. M.; Zakharov, L.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zweben, S. J.

    1994-05-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a FluorinertTM system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation, and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium-deuterium (D-D) run to simulate expected deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D-T experiments using D-D have been performed. The physics objectives of D-T operation are production of ≊10 MW of fusion power, evaluation of confinement, and heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas, evaluation of α-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined α particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D-T experiments are reviewed.

  13. Preparations for deuterium tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, G.

    1994-04-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinet{sup {trademark}} system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium-deuterium (D-D) run to simulate expected deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D-T experiments using D-D have been performed. The physics objectives of D-T operation are production of {approximately} 10 megawatts (MW) of fusion power, evaluation of confinement and heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas, evaluation of {alpha}-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined {alpha}-particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D-T experiments are reviewed.

  14. Applications of deuterium-tritium equation of state based on density functional theory in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cong; He, Xian-Tu; Ye, Wen-Hua; Zhang, Ping; Fan, Zheng-Feng

    2015-06-15

    An accurate equation of state for deuterium-tritium mixture is of crucial importance in inertial confinement fusion. The equation of state can determine the compressibility of the imploding target and the energy deposited into the fusion fuel. In the present work, a new deuterium-tritium equation of state, which is calculated according to quantum molecular dynamic and orbital free molecular dynamic simulations, has been used to study the target implosion hydrodynamics. The results indicate that the peak density predicted by the new equation of state is ∼10% higher than the quotidian equation of state data. During the implosion, the areal density and neutron yield are also discussed.

  15. Demonstration of fuel hot-spot pressure in excess of 50 Gbar for direct-drive, layered deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Cao, D.; et al

    2016-07-07

    A record fuel hot-spot pressure Phs = 56±7 Gbar was inferred from x-ray and nuclear diagnostics for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion cryogenic, layered deuterium–tritium implosions on the 60-beam, 30-kJ, 351-nm OMEGA Laser System. When hydrodynamically scaled to the energy of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), these implosions achieved a Lawson parameter ~60% of the value required for ignition [A. Bose et al., Phys. Rev. E (in press)], similar to indirect-drive implosions [R. Betti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 255003 (2015)], and nearly half of the direct-drive ignition-threshold pressure. Relative to symmetric, one-dimensional simulations, the inferred hot-spot pressure is ~40%more » lower. Furthermore, three-dimensional simulations suggest that low-mode distortion of the hot spot seeded by laser-drive nonuniformity and target-positioning error reduces target performance.« less

  16. Stability analysis of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes in TFTR deuterium-tritium experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; Budny, R.; Chang, Z.; Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.

    1995-09-18

    The toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) are found to be stable in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) deuterium-tritium plasmas. The dominant stabilizing mechanisms are beam ion Landau damping and radiative damping. A core localized TAE mode is shown to exist near the center of the plasma at small magnetic shear and finite plasma beta, which can be destabilized by energetic alpha particles in future TFTR DT experiments. With additional instability drive from fast minority ions powered by ion cyclotron radio frequency, both the global and core localized TAE modes can be readily destabilized.

  17. A new ion cyclotron range of frequency scenario for bulk ion heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in our favour

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.; Dumont, R.; Mantsinen, M.

    2015-08-15

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radio frequency (RF) heating of {sup 3}He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra {sup 3}He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  18. Probing high areal-density cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions using downscattered neutron spectra measured by the magnetic recoil spectrometera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Hatchett, S. P.; Haan, S. W.; Cerjan, C. J.; Landen, O. L.; Fletcher, K. A.; Leeper, R. J.

    2010-05-01

    For the first time high areal-density (ρR) cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions have been probed using downscattered neutron spectra measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) [J. A. Frenje et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 10E502 (2008)], recently installed and commissioned on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The ρR data obtained with the MRS have been essential for understanding how the fuel is assembled and for guiding the cryogenic program at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) to ρR values up to ˜300 mg/cm2. The ρR data obtained from well-established charged particle spectrometry techniques [C. K. Li et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 4902 (2001)] were used to authenticate the MRS data for low-ρR plastic capsule implosions, and the ρR values inferred from these techniques are in excellent agreement, indicating that the MRS technique provides high-fidelity data. Recent OMEGA-MRS data and Monte Carlo simulations have shown that the MRS on the NIF [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] will meet most of the absolute and relative requirements for determining ρR, ion temperature (Ti) and neutron yield (Yn) in both low-yield, tritium-rich, deuterium-lean, hydrogen-doped implosions and high-yield DT implosions.

  19. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianfu Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianpeng; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-15

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10{sup −7} at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  20. Compact deuterium-tritium neutron generator using a novel field ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, J. L. Falabella, S.; Sanchez, J.; Tang, V.; Wang, H.

    2014-11-21

    Active interrogation using neutrons is an effective method for detecting shielded nuclear material. A lightweight, lunch-box-sized, battery-operated neutron source would enable new concepts of operation in the field. We have developed at-scale components for a highly portable, completely self-contained, pulsed Deuterium-Tritium (DT) neutron source producing 14 MeV neutrons with average yields of 10{sup 7} n/s. A gated, field ionization ion source using etched electrodes has been developed that produces pulsed ion currents up to 500 nA. A compact Cockcroft-Walton high voltage source is used to accelerate deuterons into a metal hydride target for neutron production. The results of full scale DT tests using the field ionization source are presented.

  1. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfu; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xianpeng; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-01

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10(-7) at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons. PMID:26724081

  2. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfu; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xianpeng; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-01

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10-7 at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  3. Method and System to Directly Produce Electrical Power within the Lithium Blanket Region of a Magnetically Confined, Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Fueled, Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1998-09-22

    A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

  4. Method and system to directly produce electrical power within the lithium blanket region of a magnetically confined, deuterium-tritium (DT) fueled, thermonuclear fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A method for integrating liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power generation with fusion blanket technology to produce electrical power from a thermonuclear fusion reactor located within a confining magnetic field and within a toroidal structure. A hot liquid metal flows from a liquid metal blanket region into a pump duct of an electromagnetic pump which moves the liquid metal to a mixer where a gas of predetermined pressure is mixed with the pressurized liquid metal to form a Froth mixture. Electrical power is generated by flowing the Froth mixture between electrodes in a generator duct. When the Froth mixture exits the generator the gas is separated from the liquid metal and both are recycled.

  5. Cross-calibration of neutron detectors for deuterium-tritium operation in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.C.; Jassby, D.L.; Roquemore, A.L.; Strachan, J.D.; Barnes, C.W.; Duong, H.H.; Heidbrink, W.E.; Ruskov, E.; Loughlin, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    During the initial deuterium-tritium experiments on TFTR, neutron emission was measured with {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U fission chambers, silicon surface barrier diodes, spatially collimated {sup 4}He proportional counters and ZnS scintillators, and a variety of elemental activation foils. The activation foils, {sup 4}He counters and silicon diodes can discriminate between 14 MeV and 2.5 MeV neutrons. The other detectors respond to both DD and DT neutrons but are more sensitive to the latter. The proportional counters, scintillators, and some of the fission chambers were calibrated absolutely, using a 14-MeV neutron generator positioned at numerous locations inside the TFTR vacuum vessel. Although the directly calibrated systems were saturated during the highest power deuterium-tritium operation, they allowed cross-calibration of less sensitive fission chambers and silicon diodes. The estimated absolute accuracy of the uncertainty-weighted mean of these cross-calibrations, combined with an independent calibration derived from activation foil determinations of total neutron yield, is {plus_minus}7%.

  6. Extrusion of tritium and D-T pellets for ITER fueling

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, P.W.; Gouge, M.J.; Denny, B.J.

    1996-07-01

    As part of the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) plasma fueling development program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has fabricated a pellet injection system to test the mechanical and thermal properties of extruded tritium. This repeating, single-stage, pneumatic injector, called the Tritium-Proof-of-Principle Phase II (TPOP-II) Pellet Injector, has a piston-driven mechanical extruder and is designed to extrude and accelerate hydrogenic pellets sized for the ITER device. The TPOP-II program has the following development goals: evaluate the feasibility of extruding tritium and deuterium-tritium (D-T) mixtures for use in future pellet injection systems; determine the mechanical and thermal properties of tritium and D-T extrusions; integrate, test, and evaluate the extruder in a repeating, single-stage light gas gun that is sized for the ITER application (pellet diameter {approximately}7 to 8 mm); evaluate options for recycling propellant and extruder exhaust gas; evaluate operability and reliability of ITER prototypical fueling systems in an environment of significant tritium inventory that requires secondary and room containment systems. In tests with deuterium feed at ORNL, up to 13 pellets have been extruded at rates up to 1 Hz and accelerated to speeds of 1.0 to 1.1 km/s, using hydrogen propellant gas at a supply pressure of 65 bar. Initially, deuterium pellets 7.5 mm in diameter and 11 mm in length were produced--the largest cryogenic pellets produced by the fusion program to date. These pellets represent about a 10% density perturbation to ITER. Subsequently, the extruder nozzle was modified to produce pellets which are nearly 7.5 mm right circular cylinders.

  7. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  8. Shock timing measurements and analysis in deuterium-tritium-ice layered capsule implosions on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-02-15

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion implosions [Boehly et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 195005 (2011); Robey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215004 (2012)] were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique. Comparison of the data with simulation shows good agreement for the timing of the first three shocks, but reveals a considerable discrepancy in the timing of the 4th shock in DT ice layered implosions. Electron preheat is examined as a potential cause of the observed discrepancy in the 4th shock timing.

  9. Deuterium-tritium TFTR plasmas in the high poloidal beta regime

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Navratil, G.A.

    1995-03-01

    Deuterium-tritium plasmas with enhanced energy confinement and stability have been produced in the high poloidal beta, advanced tokamak regime in TFTR. Confinement enhancement H {triple_bond} {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub E ITER-89P} > 4 has been obtained in a limiter H-mode configuration at moderate plasma current I{sub p} = 0.85 {minus} 1.46 MA. By peaking the plasma current profile, {beta}{sub N dia} {triple_bond} 10{sup 8} < {beta}{sub t{perpendicular}} > aB{sub 0}/I{sub p} = 3 has been obtained in these plasma,s exceeding the {beta}{sub N} limit for TFTR plasmas with lower internal inductance, l{sub i}. Fusion power exceeding 6.7 MW with a fusion power gain Q{sub DT} = 0.22 has been produced with reduced alpha particle first orbit loss provided by the increased l{sub i}.

  10. Tunable proton stopping power of deuterium-tritium by mixing heavy ion dopants for fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, D. B.; Hu, L. X.; Wang, W. Q.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Zhang, G. B.; Ouyang, J. M.; Shao, F. Q.; Zhuo, H. B.

    2016-03-01

    The theoretical model of charged-particle stopping power for the Coulomb logarithm lnΛb ≥ 2 plasma [Phys. Rev. Lett., 20, 3059 (1993)] is extended to investigate the transport of the energetic protons in a compressed deuterium-tritium (DT) pellet mixed with heavy ion dopants. It shows that an increase of mixed-ion charge state and density ratio results in the substantial enhancement of the proton stopping power, which leads to a shorter penetration distance and an earlier appearance of the Bragg peak with a higher magnitude. The effect of hot-spot mix on the proton-driven fast ignition model is discussed. It is found that ignition time required for a small mixed hot-spot can be significantly reduced with slightly increased beam energy. Nevertheless, the ignition cannot maintain for a long time due to increasing alpha-particle penetration distance and energy loss from mechanical work and thermal conduction at high temperatures.

  11. Deuterium-tritium experiments on TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, N. L.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Barnes, C. W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Evensen, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, R.; Fu, G.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H. P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Giola, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F. M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M. J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marmar, E.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mauel, M.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M. P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McGuire, K. M.; McKee, G.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G. A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; O'Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S. F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A. L.; Raftapoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmunsen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbaugh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.; Sesnic, S.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Snipes, J.; Stencel, J.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stodiek, W.; Strachan, J. D.; Stratton, B. C.; Swanson, J.; Synakowski, E.; Takahashi, H.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J.; Thompson, M. E.; Tighe, W.; Timberlake, J. R.; Tobita, K.; Towner, H. H.; Tuszewski, M.; Von Halle, A.; Vannoy, C.; Viola, M.; Goeler, S. von; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R. T.; Wester, R.; White, R.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Winston, J.; Wright, K.; Wong, K.-L.; Woskov, P.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Yoshikawa, S.; Young, K. M.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zavereev, V.; Zweben, S. J.

    1995-09-01

    A peak fusion power production of 9.3±0.7 MW has been achieved on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in deuterium plasmas heated by co and counter injected deuterium and tritium neutral beams with a total power of 33.7 MW. The ratio of fusion power output to heating power input is 0.27. At the time of the highest neutron flux the plasma conditions are: Te(0)=11.5 keV, Ti(0)=44 keV, ne(0)=8.5×1019 m-3, and =2.2 giving τE=0.24 s. These conditions are similar to those found in the highest confinement deuterium plasmas. The measured D-T neutron yield is within 7% of computer code estimates based on profile measurements and within experimental uncertainties. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha fraction of 0.2% and central fusion power density of 2 MW/m3 similar to that expected in a fusion reactor. Even though the alpha velocity exceeds the Alfven velocity throughout the time of high neutron output in most high power plasmas, MHD activity is not substantially different from that in comparable deuterium plasmas and Alfven wave activity is low. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles is about 3% of the total as expected from alphas which are born on unconfined orbits. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas with similar externally applied conditions, the stored energy in electrons and ions is about 25% higher indicating improvements in confinement associated with D-T plasmas and consistent with modest electron heating expected from alpha particles. ICRF heating of D-T plasmas using up to 5.5 MW has resulted in 10 keV increases in central ion and 2.5 keV increases in central electron temperatures in relatively good agreement with code predictions. In these cases heating on the magnetic axis at 2ΩT gave up to 80% of the ICRF energy to ions.

  12. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B. Hopkins, L. F. Berzak; Pape, S. Le; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; and others

    2015-06-15

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  13. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 1015 neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  14. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating and current drive in deuterium-tritium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bretz, N.; Budny, R. V.; Darrow, D. S.; Grek, B.; Hammett, G.; Hosea, J. C.; Hsuan, H.; Ignat, D.; Majeski, R.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.; Rogers, J. H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J. E.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zweben, S. J.; Bush, C. E.; Goldfinger, R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Murakami, M.; Rasmussen, D.; Bettenhausen, M.; Lam, N. T.; Scharer, J.; Sund, R.; Sauter, O.

    1995-06-01

    The first experiments utilizing high-power radio waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas have been completed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [Fusion Technol. 21, 13 (1992)]. Results from the initial series of experiments have demonstrated efficient core second harmonic tritium (2ΩT) heating in parameter regimes approaching those anticipated for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor [D. E. Post, Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Proceedings of the 13th International Conference, Washington, DC, 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 239]. Observations are consistent with modeling predictions for these plasmas. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves has been observed in D-T, deuterium-deuterium (D-D), and deuterium-helium-4 (D-4He) plasmas with high concentrations of minority helium-3 (3He) (n3He/ne≳10%). Mode conversion current drive in D-T plasmas was simulated with experiments conducted in D-3He-4He plasmas. Results show a directed propagation of the mode converted ion Bernstein waves, in correlation with the antenna phasing.

  15. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, M. J.; Sorce, A.; Sorce, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Weiner, D.

    2016-05-01

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ˜16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ˜200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ˜40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.

  16. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Stoeckl, C; Boni, R; Ehrne, F; Forrest, C J; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Lonobile, D J; Magoon, J; Regan, S P; Shoup, M J; Sorce, A; Sorce, C; Sangster, T C; Weiner, D

    2016-05-01

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments-a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ∼16 m to a streak camera in a well-shielded location. An ∼200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ∼40 ± 10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x-rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. The measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera. PMID:27250417

  17. Theoretical studies on the stopping power of deuterium-tritium mixed with uranium plasmas for α particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhigang; Fu, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Ping

    2014-10-15

    The stopping power of a compressed and highly ionized deuterium-tritium (DT) and uranium (U) plasma for α particles at very high temperatures (T = 5 keV) is examined theoretically with the dimensional continuation method. We show that with increasing density of U, both the magnitude and width of the resonance peak in the stopping power (as a function of the α particle energy), increases because of the ions, while the penetration distance of the α particles decreases. A simple relation of decreasing penetration distance as a function of plasma density is observed, which may be useful for inertial confinement fusion experiments. Moreover, by comparing the results with the case of a DT plasma mixed with beryllium, we find that the effect of a higher Z plasma is stronger, with regard to energy loss as well as the penetration distance of α particles, than that of a lower Z plasma.

  18. Effects of non-equilibrium particle distributions in deuterium-tritium burning

    SciTech Connect

    Michta, D; Graziani, F; Pruet, J; Luu, T

    2009-08-18

    We investigate the effects of non-equilibrium particle distributions resulting from rapid deuterium-tritium burning in plasmas using a Fokker-Planck code that incorporates small-angle Coulomb scattering, Brehmsstrahlung, Compton scattering, and thermal-nuclear burning. We find that in inertial confinement fusion environments, deviations away from Maxwellian distributions for either deuterium or tritium ions are small and result in 1% changes in the energy production rates. The deuterium and tritium effective temperatures are not equal, but differ by only about 2.5% near the time of peak burn rate. Simulations with high Z (Xe) dopants show that the dopant temperature closely tracks that of the fuel. On the other hand, fusion product ion distributions are highly non-Maxwellian, and careful treatments of energy-exchange between these ions and other particles is important for determining burn rates.

  19. Improving cryogenic deuterium tritium implosion performance on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T. C.; Goncharov, V. N.; Betti, R.; Radha, P. B.; Boehly, T. R.; Casey, D. T.; Collins, T. J.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Glebov, Y. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Kingsley, C.; Kosc, T. Z.; Knauer, J. P.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Maximov, A. V.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Petrasso, Richard D.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Short, R. W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Soures, J. M.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Versteeg, V.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2013-01-01

    A flexible direct-drive target platform is used to implode cryogenic deuterium–tritium (DT) capsules on the OMEGA laser [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The goal of these experiments is to demonstrate ignition hydrodynamically equivalent performance where the laser drive intensity, the implosion velocity, the fuel adiabat, and the in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR) are the same as those for a 1.5-MJ target [Goncharov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 165001 (2010)] designed to ignite on the National Ignition Facility [Hogan et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 567 (2001)]. The results from a series of 29 cryogenic DT implosions are presented. The implosions were designed to span a broad region of design space to study target performance as a function of shell stability (adiabat) and implosion velocity. Ablation-front perturbation growth appears to limit target performance at high implosion velocities. Target outer-surface defects associated with contaminant gases in the DT fuel are identified as the dominant perturbation source at the ablation surface; performance degradation is confirmed by 2D hydrodynamic simulations that include these defects. A trend in the value of the Lawson criterion [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] for each of the implosions in adiabat–IFAR space suggests the existence of a stability boundary that leads to ablator mixing into the hot spot for the most ignition-equivalent designs.

  20. First results of radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium implosions with a 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Döppner, T.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jancaitis, K. S.; and others

    2015-08-15

    Radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium plastic capsule implosions were carried out using a new, 3-shock “adiabat-shaped” drive on the National Ignition Facility. The purpose of adiabat shaping is to use a stronger first shock, reducing hydrodynamic instability growth in the ablator. The shock can decay before reaching the deuterium-tritium fuel leaving it on a low adiabat and allowing higher fuel compression. The fuel areal density was improved by ∼25% with this new drive compared to similar “high-foot” implosions, while neutron yield was improved by more than 4 times, compared to “low-foot” implosions driven at the same compression and implosion velocity.

  1. Shock-Tuned Cryogenic-Deuterium-Tritium Implosion Performance on Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster,T.C.; Goncharov, V.N.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Casey, D.T.; Collins, T.J.B.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Harding, D.R.; Hu, S.X.; Igumenschev, I.V.; Knauer, J.P.; Loucks, S.J.; Li, C.K.; Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; McCrory, R.L.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Nilson, P.M.; Padalino, S.P.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, R.B.; Regan, S.P.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Short,R.W.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Yaakobi, B.

    2010-05-04

    Cryogenic-deuterium-tritium (DT) target compression experiments with low-adiabat (alpha), multiple-shock drive pulses have been performed on the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to demonstrate hydrodynamic-equivalent ignition performance. The multiple-shock drive pulse facilitates experimental shock tuning using an established cone-in-shell target platform [T. R. Boehly, R. Betti, T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056301 (2009)]. These shock-tuned drive pulses have been used to implode cryogenic-DT targets with peak implosion velocities of 3 x 10^7 cm/ s at peak drive intensities of 8 x 10^14 W/cm^2. During a recent series of alpha ~ 2 implosions, one of the two necessary conditions for initiating a thermonuclear burn wave in a DT plasma was achieved: an areal density of approximately 300 mg/cm^2 was inferred using the magnetic recoil spectrometer [J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, F. H. Séguin et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 042704 (2009)]. The other condition—a burn-averaged ion temperature n of 8–10 keV—cannot be achieved on Omega because of the limited laser energy; the kinetic energy of the imploding shell is insufficient to heat the plasma to these temperatures. A n of approximately 3.4 keV would be required to demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)]. The n reached during the recent series of alpha ~ 2 implosions was approximately 2 keV, limited primarily by laser-drive and target nonuniformities. Work is underway to improve drive and target symmetry for future experiments.

  2. Shock-tuned cryogenic-deuterium-tritium implosion performance on Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Sangster, T. C.; Goncharov, V. N.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, Y. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenschev, I. V.; Knauer, J. P.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2010-05-15

    Cryogenic-deuterium-tritium (DT) target compression experiments with low-adiabat (alpha), multiple-shock drive pulses have been performed on the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to demonstrate hydrodynamic-equivalent ignition performance. The multiple-shock drive pulse facilitates experimental shock tuning using an established cone-in-shell target platform [T. R. Boehly, R. Betti, T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056301 (2009)]. These shock-tuned drive pulses have been used to implode cryogenic-DT targets with peak implosion velocities of 3x10{sup 7} cm/s at peak drive intensities of 8x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. During a recent series of alphaapprox2 implosions, one of the two necessary conditions for initiating a thermonuclear burn wave in a DT plasma was achieved: an areal density of approximately 300 mg/cm{sup 2} was inferred using the magnetic recoil spectrometer [J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, F. H. Seguin et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 042704 (2009)]. The other condition--a burn-averaged ion temperature {sub n} of 8-10 keV--cannot be achieved on Omega because of the limited laser energy; the kinetic energy of the imploding shell is insufficient to heat the plasma to these temperatures. A {sub n} of approximately 3.4 keV would be required to demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 058102 (2010)]. The {sub n} reached during the recent series of alphaapprox2 implosions was approximately 2 keV, limited primarily by laser-drive and target nonuniformities. Work is underway to improve drive and target symmetry for future experiments.

  3. Shock-tuned cryogenic-deuterium-tritium implosion performance on Omegaa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangster, T. C.; Goncharov, V. N.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Casey, D. T.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K. A.; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, Y. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenschev, I. V.; Knauer, J. P.; Loucks, S. J.; Li, C. K.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nilson, P. M.; Padalino, S. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Seguin, F. H.; Seka, W.; Short, R. W.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Soures, J. M.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Yaakobi, B.

    2010-05-01

    Cryogenic-deuterium-tritium (DT) target compression experiments with low-adiabat (α), multiple-shock drive pulses have been performed on the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to demonstrate hydrodynamic-equivalent ignition performance. The multiple-shock drive pulse facilitates experimental shock tuning using an established cone-in-shell target platform [T. R. Boehly, R. Betti, T. R. Boehly et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056301 (2009)]. These shock-tuned drive pulses have been used to implode cryogenic-DT targets with peak implosion velocities of 3×107 cm/s at peak drive intensities of 8×1014 W/cm2. During a recent series of α ˜2 implosions, one of the two necessary conditions for initiating a thermonuclear burn wave in a DT plasma was achieved: an areal density of approximately 300 mg/cm2 was inferred using the magnetic recoil spectrometer [J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, F. H. Séguin et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 042704 (2009)]. The other condition—a burn-averaged ion temperature ⟨Ti⟩n of 8-10 keV—cannot be achieved on Omega because of the limited laser energy; the kinetic energy of the imploding shell is insufficient to heat the plasma to these temperatures. A ⟨Ti⟩n of approximately 3.4 keV would be required to demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas17, 058102 (2010)]. The ⟨Ti⟩n reached during the recent series of α ˜2 implosions was approximately 2 keV, limited primarily by laser-drive and target nonuniformities. Work is underway to improve drive and target symmetry for future experiments.

  4. Viscosity and mutual diffusion of deuterium-tritium mixtures in the warm-dense-matter regime

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, J. D.; Cohen, James S.; Horner, D. A.; Collins, L. A.; Lambert, F.

    2010-09-15

    We have calculated viscosity and mutual diffusion of deuterium-tritium (DT) in the warm, dense matter regime for densities from 5 to 20 g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures from 2 to 10 eV, using both finite-temperature Kohn-Sham density-functional theory molecular dynamics (QMD) and orbital-free molecular dynamics (OFMD). The OFMD simulations are in generally good agreement with the benchmark QMD results, and we conclude that the simpler OFMD method can be used with confidence in this regime. For low temperatures (3 eV and below), one-component plasma (OCP) model simulations for diffusion agree with the QMD and OFMD calculations, but deviate by 30% at 10 eV. In comparison with the QMD and OFMD results, the OCP viscosities are not as good as for diffusion, especially for 5 g/cm{sup 3} where the temperature dependence is significantly different. The QMD and OFMD reduced diffusion and viscosity coefficients are found to depend largely, though not completely, only on the Coulomb coupling parameter {Gamma}, with a minimum in the reduced viscosity at {Gamma}{approx_equal}25, approximately the same position found in the OCP simulations. The QMD and OFMD equations of state (pressure) are also compared with the hydrogen two-component plasma model.

  5. Exposure Of NIF Relevant Polymeric Samples To Deuterium-Tritium Gas At Elevated Temperature And Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ebey, P S; Dole, J M; Nobile, A; Schoonover, J R; Burmann, J; Cook, B; Letts, S; Sanchez, J; Nikroo, A

    2005-06-24

    The purpose of the experiments described in this paper was to expose samples of polymeric materials to a mixture of deuterium-tritium (DT) gas at elevated temperature and pressure to investigate the effects (i.e. damage) on the materials. The materials and exposure parameters were chosen with to be relevant to proposed uses of similar materials in inertial fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Two types of samples were exposed and tested. The first type consisted of 10 4-lead ribbon cables of fine manganin wire insulated with polyimide. Wires of this type are proposed for use in thermal shimming of hohlraums and the goal of this experiment was to measure the change in electrical resistance of the insulation due to tritium exposure. The second type of sample consisted of 20 planar polymer samples that may be used as ignition capsule materials. The exposure was at 34.5 GPa (5010 psia) and 70 C for 48 hours. The change in electrical resistance of the wire insulation will be presented. The results for capsule materials will be presented in a separate paper in this issue.

  6. Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes in TFTR Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    G.Y. Fu; H. Berk; R. Nazikian; S.H. Batha; Z. Chang; et al

    1998-01-01

    Purely alpha-particle-driven Toroidal Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAEs) with toroidal mode numbers n=1-6 have been observed in Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [D.J. Grove and D.M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)]. The appearance of mode activity following termination of neutral beam injection in plasmas with q(0)>1 is generally consistent with theoretical predictions of TAE stability [G.Y. Fu et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 4036 (1996]. Internal reflectometer measurements of TAE activity is compared with theoretical calculations of the radial mode structure. Core localization of the modes to the region of reduced central magnetic shear is confirmed, however the mode structure can deviate significantly from theoretical estimates. The peak measured TAE amplitude of delta n/n~10(superscript -4) at r/a~0.3-0.4 corresponds to delta B/B~10-5, while dB/B~10(superscript -8) is measured at the plasma edge. Enhanced alpha particle loss associated with TAE activity has not been observed.

  7. Impact of first-principles properties of deuterium-tritium on inertial confinement fusion target designsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.; Militzer, B.

    2015-05-01

    A comprehensive knowledge of the properties of high-energy-density plasmas is crucial to understanding and designing low-adiabat, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through hydrodynamic simulations. Warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions are routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy often play an important role in determining the properties of warm dense plasmas. The WDM properties of deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures and ablator materials, such as the equation of state, thermal conductivity, opacity, and stopping power, were usually estimated by models in hydro-codes used for ICF simulations. In these models, many-body and quantum effects were only approximately taken into account in the WMD regime. Moreover, the self-consistency among these models was often missing. To examine the accuracy of these models, we have systematically calculated the static, transport, and optical properties of warm dense DT plasmas, using first-principles (FP) methods over a wide range of densities and temperatures that cover the ICF "path" to ignition. These FP methods include the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and quantum-molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, which treat electrons with many-body quantum theory. The first-principles equation-of-state table, thermal conductivities (κQMD), and first principles opacity table of DT have been self-consistently derived from the combined PIMC and QMD calculations. They have been compared with the typical models, and their effects to ICF simulations have been separately examined in previous publications. In this paper, we focus on their combined effects to ICF implosions through hydro-simulations using these FP-based properties of DT in comparison with the usual model simulations. We found that the predictions of ICF neutron yield could change by up to a factor of ˜2.5; the lower the adiabat of DT capsules, the more variations in hydro-simulations. The FP-based properties of DT

  8. Impact of First-Principles Property Calculations of Warm-Dense Deuterium/Tritium on Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.

    2014-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of the properties of warm dense deuterium/tritium (DT) is essential to reliably design inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. In the warm-dense-matter regime, routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, strong-coupling and degeneracy effects play an important role in determining plasma properties. Using first-principles methods of both path-integral Monte Carlo and quantum molecular-dynamics (QMD), we have performed systematic investigation of the equation of state, thermal conductivity, and opacity for DT over a wide range of densities and temperatures. These first-principles properties have been incorporated into our hydrocodes. When compared to hydro simulations using standard plasma models, significant differences in 1-D target performance have been identified for simulations of DT implosions. For low-adiabat (α <= 2) DT plasma conditions, the QMD-predicted opacities are 10 to 100 × higher than predicted by the cold-opacity-patched astrophysical opacity table. The thermal conductivity could be 3 to 10 × larger than the Lee-More model prediction. These enhancements can modify the shell adiabat and shock dynamics in lower- α ICF implosions, which could lead to ~ 40 variations in peak density and neutron yield. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  9. Deuterium-tritium pulse propulsion with hydrogen as propellant and the entire space-craft as a gigavolt capacitor for ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    2013-08-01

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclear pulse propulsion concept for fast interplanetary transport is proposed utilizing almost all the energy for thrust and without the need for a large radiator: By letting the thermonuclear micro-explosion take place in the center of a liquid hydrogen sphere with the radius of the sphere large enough to slow down and absorb the neutrons of the DT fusion reaction, heating the hydrogen to a fully ionized plasma at a temperature of ∼105 K. By using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated gigavolt capacitor, igniting the DT micro-explosion with an intense GeV ion beam discharging the gigavolt capacitor, possible if the space craft has the topology of a torus.

  10. A Comparison Between the Burn Condition of Deuterium-Tritium and Deuterium-Helium-3 Reaction and Stability Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Fereshteh

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear reaction of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion by the usual magnetic or inertial confinement suffers from a number of difficulties and problems caused by tritium handling, neutron damage to materials and neutron-induced radioactivity, etc. The study of the nuclear synthesis reaction of deuterium-helium-3 (D-3He) at low collision energies (below 1 keV) is of interest for its applications in nuclear physics and astrophysics. Spherical tokamak (ST) reactors have a low aspect ratio and can confine plasma with β≈1. These capabilities of ST reactors are due to the use of the alternative D-3He reaction. In this work, the burn condition of D-3He reaction was calculated by using zero-dimensional particles and power equations, and, with the use of the parameters of the ST reactor, the stability limit of D-3He reaction was calculated and then the results were compared with those of D-T reaction. The obtained results show that the burn conditions of D-3He reaction required a higher temperature and had a much more limited temperature range in comparison to those of D-T reaction.

  11. ICRF heating of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Murakami, M.; Adler, H.

    1995-03-01

    The first experiments to heat D-T plasmas in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) have been performed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These experiments have two major objectives: to study the RF physics of ICRF-heated D-T plasmas and to enhance the performance of D-T discharges. Experiments have been conducted at 43 MHz with out-of-phase current strap excitation to explore n{sub T}/n{sub e} concentrations up to approximately 40%. In these experiments n{sub T}/n{sub e} was limited by D recycling from the carbon walls. The location of the T resonance was varied by changing the toroidal magnetic field, and the RF power was modulated (f{sub mod}=5-10 Hz) to elucidate competing heating mechanisms. Up to 5.8 MW of ICRF heating has been coupled into D-T plasmas. The addition of 5.5 MW of ICRF heating to a D-T supershot resulted in an increase in central ion temperature from 26 to 36 keV and an increase in central electron temperature from 8 to 10.5 keV. Up to 80% of the absorbed ICRF power was coupled directly to ions, in good agreement with computer code predictions. These results extrapolate to efficient T heating in future devices such as ITER.

  12. Shock propagation in deuterium-tritium-saturated foam

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.J.B.; Poludnenko, A.; Cunningham, A.; Frank, A.

    2005-06-08

    Adaptive-mesh-refinement hydrodynamic simulations have been performed of cross sections of fibrous foams saturated with cryogenic deuterium and tritium (DT). Material tracking indicates that the fibers and DT mix rapidly behind the shock. In addition, fluctuation decay lengths are on the order of a micron even in the absence of radiative and thermal energy transport. Outside the mix region, the Rankine-Hugoniot equations are satisfied to the degree to which the turbulence and transverse motion decay, a few percent or less. Simulations also show that the shock-front perturbations decay rapidly after the shock leaves the foam and enters a layer of DT ice, suggesting that the foam microstructure will not contribute to feedthrough.

  13. High performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, S.A.; Batha, S.H.; Bell, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    Plasmas composed of nominally equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium (DT) have been created in TFTR with the goals of producing significant levels of fusion power and of examining the effects of DT fusion alpha particles. Conditioning of the limiter by the injection of lithium pellets has led to an approximate doubling of the energy confinement time, {tau}{sub E}, in supershot plasmas at high plasma current (I{sub p} {le} 2.5 MA) and high heating power (P{sub b} {le} 33 MW). Operation with DT typically results in an additional 20% increase in {tau}{sub E}. In the high poloidal beta, advanced tokamak regime in TFTR, confinement enhancement H {triple_bond} {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub E ITER-89P} > 4 has been obtained in a limiter H-mode configuration at moderate plasma current I{sub p} = 0.85 {minus} 1.5 MA. By peaking the plasma current profile, {beta}{sub N dia} {triple_bond} 10{sup 8} < {beta}{sub t{perpendicular}} > aB{sub 0}/I{sub p} = 3 has been obtained in these plasmas, exceeding the {beta}{sub N} limit for TFTR plasmas with lower internal inductance, l{sub i}. Confinement of alpha particles appears to be classical and losses due to collective effects have not been observed. While small fluctuations in fusion product loss were observed during ELMs, no large loss was detected in DT plasmas.

  14. Concept of DT fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Anan'ev, S.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Kuteev, B.V.; Cherkez, D.I.; Shirnin, P.N.; Kazakovsky, N.T.

    2015-03-15

    A concept of DT-fusion neutron source (FNS) with the neutron yield higher than 10{sup 18} neutrons per second is under design in Russia. Such a FNS is of interest for many applications: 1) basic and applied research (neutron scattering, etc); 2) testing the structural materials for fusion reactors; 3) control of sub-critical nuclear systems and 4) nuclear waste processing (including transmutation of minor actinides). This paper describes the fuel cycle concept of a compact fusion neutron source based on a small spherical tokamak (FNS-ST) with a MW range of DT fusion power and considers the key physics issues of this device. The major and minor radii are ∼0.5 and ∼0.3 m, magnetic field ∼1.5 T, heating power less than 15 MW and plasma current 1-2 MA. The system provides the fuel mixture with equal fractions of D and T (D:T = 1:1) for all FNS technology systems. (authors)

  15. Numerical study of the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of laser-irradiated deuterium and deuterium-tritium targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocchino, Alberto; Atzeni, Stefano; Schiavi, Angelo

    2010-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) at the ablation front of laser-irradiated planar targets is investigated by two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics simulations. The linear evolution of perturbations seeded either by surface roughness or target inhomogeneity is studied for perturbation wavelengths in the range 10≤λ≤400 μm and laser intensity 4×1012≤I≤4×1014 W/cm2 (with laser wavelength λlaser=0.35 μm). Thin and thick cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium (DT) planar targets are considered. For targets irradiated at constant intensity, it is found that perturbations with wavelength below a given threshold perform damped oscillations, while perturbations above such a threshold are unstable and oscillate with growing amplitude. This is qualitatively in agreement with theoretical predictions by Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)], according to which ablation related processes stabilize perturbations with kDc≫1, where Dc is the distance between the ablation front and critical density for laser propagation. For kDc<1 a weakly growing Landau-Darrieus instability (LDI) is instead excited. The stability threshold increases substantially with laser intensity, given the dependence of Dc on laser intensity I (roughly Dc∝I, according to the present simulations). Direct-drive laser fusion targets are irradiated by time-shaped pulses, with a low intensity initial foot. In this case, perturbations with wavelengths below some threshold (about 10 μm, for typical ignition-class all-DT targets) are damped after an initial growth. In a thin target, initial perturbations, either damped or amplified by RMI and LDI, seed the subsequent Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Finally, it is shown that RMI growth of fusion targets can be reduced by using laser pulses including an initial adiabat-shaping picket (originally proposed to reduce the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instability).

  16. Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Synakowski, E.

    1994-03-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled by deuterium and tritium to nominally equal densities. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by ~20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by α-particles.

  17. Neutronics analysis of deuterium-tritium-driven experimental hybrid blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Sahin, S.; Kumar, A.

    1984-07-01

    At the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, an experimental fusion and fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor facility is near completion. Experiments are scheduled to begin in February 1984. The experimental cavity leads one to plan experiments mostly with blankets in plane geometry. Five different hybrid blanket modules in plane geometry are analyzed with two different left boundary conditions representing varying experimental situations. Numbers I and II represent energy and fissile fuel producing blankets, whereas number III is mainly a fissile fuel producing blanket. Numbers IV and V are actinide burning blankets. It is shown that the overall neutronic performance, such as k /sub eff/ , energy multiplication factor M, fusile and fissile breeding, of a hybrid blanket with transplutonium actinide fuel is already better than that of a UO/sub 2/ or ThO/sub 2/ hybrid blanket. Furthermore, the transplutonium actinide waste is partly converted into precious nuclear fuel of a new type, such as /sup 242m/ Am and /sup 245/Cm. An experimental blanket with a vacuum left boundary has a harder neutron spectrum, and also excessive neutron leakage from the front surface and the lateral surfaces, as compared to that in the blanket in confinement geometry. It leads to the poorer neutronic performance of the former.

  18. Alpha particle losses from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Batha, S.

    1996-01-01

    Because alpha particle losses can have a significant influence on tokamak reactor viability, the loss of deuterium-tritium alpha particles from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been measured under a wide range of conditions. In TFTR, first orbit loss and stochastic toroidal field ripple diffusion are always present. Other losses can arise due to magnetohydrodynamic instabilities or due to waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. No alpha particle losses have yet been seen due to collective instabilities driven by alphas. Ion Bernstein waves can drive large losses of fast ions from TFTR, and details of those losses support one element of the alpha energy channeling scenario.

  19. Copper activation deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Cooper, G W; Ruiz, C L; Leeper, R J; Chandler, G A; Hahn, K D; Nelson, A J; Torres, J A; Smelser, R M; McWatters, B R; Bleuel, D L; Yeamans, C B; Knittel, K M; Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Petrasso, R D; Styron, J D

    2012-10-01

    A DT neutron yield diagnostic based on the reactions, (63)Cu(n,2n)(62)Cu(β(+)) and (65)Cu(n,2n)( 64) Cu(β(+)), has been fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The induced copper activity is measured using a NaI γ-γ coincidence system. Uncertainties in the 14-MeV DT yield measurements are on the order of 7% to 8%. In addition to measuring yield, the ratio of activities induced in two, well-separated copper samples are used to measure the relative anisotropy of the fuel ρR to uncertainties as low as 5%. PMID:23126920

  20. Ignition Capsules with Aerogel-Supported Liquid DT Fuel For The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, D D; Salmonson, J D; Clark, D S; Lindl, J D; Haan, S W; Amendt, P; Wu, K J

    2011-10-25

    For high repetition-rate fusion power plant applications, capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel can have much reduced fill time compared to {beta}-layering a solid DT fuel layer. The melting point of liquid DT can be lowered once liquid DT is embedded in an aerogel matrix, and the DT vapor density is consequently closer to the desired density for optimal capsule design requirement. We present design for NIF-scale aerogel-filled capsules based on 1-D and 2-D simulations. An optimal configuration is obtained when the outer radius is increased until the clean fuel fraction is within 65-75% at peak velocity. A scan (in ablator and fuel thickness parameter space) is used to optimize the capsule configurations. The optimized aerogel-filled capsule has good low-mode robustness and acceptable high-mode mix.

  1. Determination of deuterium-tritium critical burn-up parameter by four temperature theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazirzadeh, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Khanbabei, B.

    2015-12-01

    Conditions for thermonuclear burn-up of an equimolar mixture of deuterium-tritium in non-equilibrium plasma have been investigated by four temperature theory. The photon distribution shape significantly affects the nature of thermonuclear burn. In three temperature model, the photon distribution is Planckian but in four temperature theory the photon distribution has a pure Planck form below a certain cut-off energy and then for photon energy above this cut-off energy makes a transition to Bose-Einstein distribution with a finite chemical potential. The objective was to develop four temperature theory in a plasma to calculate the critical burn up parameter which depends upon initial density, the plasma components initial temperatures, and hot spot size. All the obtained results from four temperature theory model are compared with 3 temperature model. It is shown that the values of critical burn-up parameter calculated by four temperature theory are smaller than those of three temperature model.

  2. Hydrodynamic instability measurements in DT-layered ICF capsules using the layered-HGR platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D.; Bunn, T.; Carlson, L.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Kozioziemski, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; Sater, J.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H.; Smalyuk, V.

    2016-05-01

    The first measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface in an ICF implosion are reported. Previous instability measurements on the National Ignition Facility have used plastic capsules to measure ablation front Rayleigh-Taylor growth with the Hydro.-Growth Radiography (HGR) platform. These capsules substituted an additional thickness of plastic ablator material in place of the cryogenic layer of Deuterium- Tritium (DT) fuel. The present experiments are the first to include a DT ice layer, which enables measurements of the instability growth occurring at the fuel-ablator interface. Instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface is seeded differently in two independent NIF experiments. In the first case, a perturbation on the outside of the capsule feeds through and grows on the interface. Comparisons to an implosion without a fuel layer produce a measure of the fuel's modulation. In the second case, a modulation was directly machined on the inner ablator before the fuel layer was added. The measurement of growth in these two scenarios are compared to 2D rad-hydro modeling.

  3. Copper activation deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Styron, J. D.; Ruiz, C. L.; Leeper, R. J.; Chandler, G. A.; Hahn, K. D.; Torres, J. A.; Smelser, R. M.; McWatters, B. R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Yeamans, C. B.; Knittel, K. M.; Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-10-15

    A DT neutron yield diagnostic based on the reactions, {sup 63}Cu(n,2n){sup 62}Cu({beta}{sup +}) and {sup 65}Cu(n,2n) {sup 64} Cu({beta}{sup +}), has been fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The induced copper activity is measured using a NaI {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence system. Uncertainties in the 14-MeV DT yield measurements are on the order of 7% to 8%. In addition to measuring yield, the ratio of activities induced in two, well-separated copper samples are used to measure the relative anisotropy of the fuel {rho}R to uncertainties as low as 5%.

  4. Development of a laser-produced plasma x-ray source for phase-contrast imaging of DT fuel ice layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Dewald, E.; Kozioziemski, B.; Koch, J. A.

    2007-11-01

    Because beryllium capsules for NIF experiments are not transparent to visible light, optical microscopy is not applicable for metrology of deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layers. X-ray absorption radiography cannot be used either because absorption in DT ice is negligible, so to quantify the quality of the DT ice surface, x-ray phase-contrast imaging is used in order to enhance contrast of surface imperfections. Phase contrast imaging of ice layers typically utilizes micro-focus x-ray tube sources, but available x-ray fluxes are limited, and these sources cannot be used to quantify changes in the ice surface quality over the second timescales appropriate for rapidly-cooled layers. We have therefore explored the use of a laser-produced plasma x-ray source in order to determine if it has sufficient brightness to produce high-quality phase-contrast flash radiographs of DT ice layers. We irradiated Ti, Fe, Cu, and Au targets with 5-ns, 300-J, 527-nm laser light at the Janus laser facility, and measured absolute x-ray conversion efficiency and x-ray spot size. We will discuss this data as well as phase-contrast radiographs we obtained of non-cryogenic shells.

  5. Hot spot conditions achieved in DT implosions on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, P. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Dittrich, T. R.; Doeppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Hurricane, O. A.; Kritcher, A. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H. S.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B.; Springer, P. T.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.

    2014-10-01

    We describe a 1D model that uses experimentally measured data to derive the thermodynamic conditions at stagnation of the hot spot, dense fuel, and ablator, in deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Neutron measurements--spectrally, spatially and temporally resolved--are used to infer the hot spot burn-averaged pressure, density, areal density, ion temperature, volume, and internal energy. X-ray spectral measurements are used to infer electron temperature, radiative energy loss, and the presence of ablator mix in the hot spot. In addition, we can calculate the fraction of alpha-particle energy trapped in the hot spot and, hence, estimate the degree of self-heating. Recent DT layered implosions using the high-foot design [Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)] have achieved areal densities and temperatures in the hot spot whereby a significant fraction of the internal energy at stagnation can be attributed to alpha-particle self-heating. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Ignition of deuterium-trtium fuel targets

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.; Mruzek, Michael T.

    1991-01-01

    A method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom.

  7. Demonstration of the Highest Deuterium-Tritium Areal Density Using Multiple-Picket Cryogenic Designs on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Boehly, T. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Radha, P. B.; Seka, W.; Skupsky, S.; Stoeckl, C.; Casey, D. T; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2010-04-23

    The performance of triple-picket deuterium-tritium cryogenic target designs on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is reported. These designs facilitate control of shock heating in low-adiabat inertial confinement fusion targets. Areal densities up to 300 mg/cm{sup 2} (the highest ever measured in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions) are inferred in the experiments with an implosion velocity {approx}3x10{sup 7} cm/s driven at peak laser intensities of 8x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Extension of these designs to ignition on the National Ignition Facility [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)] is presented.

  8. Specific features of X-ray generation by plasma focus chambers with deuterium and deuterium-tritium fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulatov, A. K.; Krapiva, P. S.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Moskalenko, I. N.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The process of hard X-ray (HXR) generation in plasma focus (PF) chambers was studied experimentally. The radiation was recorded using scintillation detectors with a high time resolution and thermoluminescent detectors in combination with the method of absorbing filters. Time-resolved analysis of the processes of neutron and X-ray generation in PFs is performed. The spectra of HXR emission from PF chambers with deuterium and deuterium-tritium fillings are determined. In experiments with PF chambers filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture, in addition to the HXR pulse with photon energies of up to 200-300 keV, a γ-ray pulse with photon energies of up to 2.5-3.0 MeV is recorded, and a mechanism of its generation is proposed.

  9. Indications of flow near maximum compression in layered deuterium-tritium implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Knauer, J. P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Sayre, D. B.; Spears, B. K.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D.; Casey, D. T.; Döppner, T.; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Hurricane, O.; Kritcher, A.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Mackinnon, A.; Meezan, N.; Patel, P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Springer, P. T.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-08-01

    An accurate understanding of burn dynamics in implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium (D) and tritium (T) filled capsules, obtained partly through precision diagnosis of these experiments, is essential for assessing the impediments to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. We present measurements of neutrons from such implosions. The apparent ion temperatures Tion are inferred from the variance of the primary neutron spectrum. Consistently higher DT than DD Tion are observed and the difference is seen to increase with increasing apparent DT Tion. The line-of-sight rms variations of both DD and DT Tion are small, ˜150 eV , indicating an isotropic source. The DD neutron yields are consistently high relative to the DT neutron yields given the observed Tion. Spatial and temporal variations of the DT temperature and density, DD-DT differential attenuation in the surrounding DT fuel, and fluid motion variations contribute to a DT Tion greater than the DD Tion, but are in a one-dimensional model insufficient to explain the data. We hypothesize that in a three-dimensional interpretation, these effects combined could explain the results.

  10. Indications of flow near maximum compression in layered deuterium-tritium implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Gatu Johnson, M; Knauer, J P; Cerjan, C J; Eckart, M J; Grim, G P; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Kilkenny, J D; Munro, D H; Sayre, D B; Spears, B K; Bionta, R M; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Callahan, D; Casey, D T; Döppner, T; Frenje, J A; Glebov, V Yu; Hurricane, O; Kritcher, A; LePape, S; Ma, T; Mackinnon, A; Meezan, N; Patel, P; Petrasso, R D; Ralph, J E; Springer, P T; Yeamans, C B

    2016-08-01

    An accurate understanding of burn dynamics in implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium (D) and tritium (T) filled capsules, obtained partly through precision diagnosis of these experiments, is essential for assessing the impediments to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. We present measurements of neutrons from such implosions. The apparent ion temperatures T_{ion} are inferred from the variance of the primary neutron spectrum. Consistently higher DT than DD T_{ion} are observed and the difference is seen to increase with increasing apparent DT T_{ion}. The line-of-sight rms variations of both DD and DT T_{ion} are small, ∼150eV, indicating an isotropic source. The DD neutron yields are consistently high relative to the DT neutron yields given the observed T_{ion}. Spatial and temporal variations of the DT temperature and density, DD-DT differential attenuation in the surrounding DT fuel, and fluid motion variations contribute to a DT T_{ion} greater than the DD T_{ion}, but are in a one-dimensional model insufficient to explain the data. We hypothesize that in a three-dimensional interpretation, these effects combined could explain the results. PMID:27627237

  11. Indications of flow near maximum compression in layered deuterium-tritium implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Knauer, J. P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Sayre, D. B.; et al

    2016-08-15

    Here, an accurate understanding of burn dynamics in implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium (D) and tritium (T) filled capsules, obtained partly through precision diagnosis of these experiments, is essential for assessing the impediments to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. We present measurements of neutrons from such implosions. The apparent ion temperatures Tion are inferred from the variance of the primary neutron spectrum. Consistently higher DT than DD Tion are observed and the difference is seen to increase with increasing apparent DT Tion. The line-of-sight rms variations of both DD and DT Tion are small, ~150eV, indicating an isotropicmore » source. The DD neutron yields are consistently high relative to the DT neutron yields given the observed Tion. Spatial and temporal variations of the DT temperature and density, DD-DT differential attenuation in the surrounding DT fuel, and fluid motion variations contribute to a DT Tion greater than the DD Tion, but are in a one-dimensional model insufficient to explain the data. We hypothesize that in a three-dimensional interpretation, these effects combined could explain the results.« less

  12. High pressure deuterium-tritium gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, A.J.; Spaletta, H.W.; Ware, A.G.; Zabriskie, J.M.; Hardwick, D.A.; Maltrud, H.R.; Paciotti, M.A.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    In experimental studies of muon-catalyzed fusion, the density of the hydrogen gas mixture is an important parameter. Catalysis of up to 150 fusions per muon has been observed in deuterium-tritium gas mixtures at liquid hydrogen density; at room temperature, such densities require a target gas pressure of the order of 1000 atmospheres (100 MPa, 15,000 psi). We report here the design considerations for hydrogen gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments that operate at 1000 and 10,000 atmospheres. The 1000 atmosphere high pressure target vessels are fabricated of Type A-286 stainless steel and lined with oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper to provide a barrier to hydrogen permeation of the stainless steel. The 10,000 atmosphere ultrahigh pressure target vessels are made from 18Ni (200 grade) maraging steel and are lined with OFHC copper, again to prevent hydrogen permeation of the steel. In addition to target design features, operating requirements, fabrication procedures, and secondary containment are discussed. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Deuterium-Tritium Simulations of the Enhanced Reversed Shear Mode in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Manickam, J.; Scott, S.D.; Zarnstorff

    1997-04-01

    The potential performance, in deuterium-tritium plasmas, of a new enhanced con nement regime with reversed magnetic shear (ERS mode) is assessed. The equilibrium conditions for an ERS mode plasma are estimated by solving the plasma transport equations using the thermal and particle dif- fusivities measured in a short duration ERS mode discharge in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [F. M. Levinton, et al., Phys. Rev. Letters, 75, 4417, (1995)]. The plasma performance depends strongly on Zeff and neutral beam penetration to the core. The steady state projections typically have a central electron density of {approx}2:5x10 20 m{sup -3} and nearly equal central electron and ion temperatures of {approx}10 keV. In time dependent simulations the peak fusion power, {approx} 25 MW, is twice the steady state level. Peak performance occurs during the density rise when the central ion temperature is close to the optimal value of {approx} 15 keV. The simulated pressure profiles can be stable to ideal MHD instabilities with toroidal mode number n = 1, 2, 3, 4 and {infinity} for {beta}{sub norm} up to 2.5; the simulations have {beta}{sub norm} {le} 2.1. The enhanced reversed shear mode may thus provide an opportunity to conduct alpha physics experiments in conditions imilar to those proposed for advanced tokamak reactors.

  14. A diamond based neutron spectrometer for diagnostics of deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, C; Nocente, M; Rebai, M; Tardocchi, M; Calvani, P; Croci, G; Giacomelli, L; Girolami, M; Griesmayer, E; Grosso, G; Pillon, M; Trucchi, D M; Gorini, G

    2014-11-01

    Single crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are being increasingly exploited for neutron diagnostics in high power fusion devices, given their significant radiation hardness and high energy resolution capabilities. The geometrical efficiency of SDDs is limited by the size of commercially available crystals, which is often smaller than the dimension of neutron beams along collimated lines of sight in tokamak devices. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer consisting of 12 diamond pixels arranged in a matrix, so to achieve an improved geometrical efficiency. Each pixel is equipped with an independent high voltage supply and read-out electronics optimized to combine high energy resolution and fast signals (<30 ns), which are essential to enable high counting rate (>1 MHz) spectroscopy. The response function of a prototype SDD to 14 MeV neutrons has been measured at the Frascati Neutron Generator by observation of the 8.3 MeV peak from the (12)C(n, α)(9)Be reaction occurring between neutrons and (12)C nuclei in the detector. The measured energy resolution (2.5% FWHM) meets the requirements for neutron spectroscopy applications in deuterium-tritium plasmas. PMID:25430280

  15. A diamond based neutron spectrometer for diagnostics of deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzaniga, C. Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Rebai, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Grosso, G.; Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Trucchi, D. M.; Griesmayer, E.; Pillon, M.

    2014-11-15

    Single crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are being increasingly exploited for neutron diagnostics in high power fusion devices, given their significant radiation hardness and high energy resolution capabilities. The geometrical efficiency of SDDs is limited by the size of commercially available crystals, which is often smaller than the dimension of neutron beams along collimated lines of sight in tokamak devices. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer consisting of 12 diamond pixels arranged in a matrix, so to achieve an improved geometrical efficiency. Each pixel is equipped with an independent high voltage supply and read-out electronics optimized to combine high energy resolution and fast signals (<30 ns), which are essential to enable high counting rate (>1 MHz) spectroscopy. The response function of a prototype SDD to 14 MeV neutrons has been measured at the Frascati Neutron Generator by observation of the 8.3 MeV peak from the {sup 12}C(n, α){sup 9}Be reaction occurring between neutrons and {sup 12}C nuclei in the detector. The measured energy resolution (2.5% FWHM) meets the requirements for neutron spectroscopy applications in deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  16. A diamond based neutron spectrometer for diagnostics of deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Nocente, M.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Calvani, P.; Croci, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Girolami, M.; Griesmayer, E.; Grosso, G.; Pillon, M.; Trucchi, D. M.; Gorini, G.

    2014-11-01

    Single crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are being increasingly exploited for neutron diagnostics in high power fusion devices, given their significant radiation hardness and high energy resolution capabilities. The geometrical efficiency of SDDs is limited by the size of commercially available crystals, which is often smaller than the dimension of neutron beams along collimated lines of sight in tokamak devices. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer consisting of 12 diamond pixels arranged in a matrix, so to achieve an improved geometrical efficiency. Each pixel is equipped with an independent high voltage supply and read-out electronics optimized to combine high energy resolution and fast signals (<30 ns), which are essential to enable high counting rate (>1 MHz) spectroscopy. The response function of a prototype SDD to 14 MeV neutrons has been measured at the Frascati Neutron Generator by observation of the 8.3 MeV peak from the 12C(n, α)9Be reaction occurring between neutrons and 12C nuclei in the detector. The measured energy resolution (2.5% FWHM) meets the requirements for neutron spectroscopy applications in deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  17. Alternative hot spot formation techniques using liquid deuterium-tritium layer inertial confinement fusion capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.

    2013-09-15

    The baseline DT ice layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition capsule design requires a hot spot convergence ratio of ∼34 with a hot spot that is formed from DT mass originally residing in a very thin layer at the inner DT ice surface. In the present paper, we propose alternative ICF capsule designs in which the hot spot is formed mostly or entirely from mass originating within a spherical volume of DT vapor. Simulations of the implosion and hot spot formation in two DT liquid layer ICF capsule concepts—the DT wetted hydrocarbon (CH) foam concept and the “fast formed liquid” (FFL) concept—are described and compared to simulations of standard DT ice layer capsules. 1D simulations are used to compare the drive requirements, the optimal shock timing, the radial dependence of hot spot specific energy gain, and the hot spot convergence ratio in low vapor pressure (DT ice) and high vapor pressure (DT liquid) capsules. 2D simulations are used to compare the relative sensitivities to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries in the DT ice and DT liquid capsules. It is found that the overall thermonuclear yields predicted for DT liquid layer capsules are less than yields predicted for DT ice layer capsules in simulations using comparable capsule size and absorbed energy. However, the wetted foam and FFL designs allow for flexibility in hot spot convergence ratio through the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density, with a potentially improved robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetry.

  18. Alternative hot spot formation techniques using liquid deuterium-tritium layer inertial confinement fusion capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.

    2013-09-01

    The baseline DT ice layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition capsule design requires a hot spot convergence ratio of ˜34 with a hot spot that is formed from DT mass originally residing in a very thin layer at the inner DT ice surface. In the present paper, we propose alternative ICF capsule designs in which the hot spot is formed mostly or entirely from mass originating within a spherical volume of DT vapor. Simulations of the implosion and hot spot formation in two DT liquid layer ICF capsule concepts—the DT wetted hydrocarbon (CH) foam concept and the "fast formed liquid" (FFL) concept—are described and compared to simulations of standard DT ice layer capsules. 1D simulations are used to compare the drive requirements, the optimal shock timing, the radial dependence of hot spot specific energy gain, and the hot spot convergence ratio in low vapor pressure (DT ice) and high vapor pressure (DT liquid) capsules. 2D simulations are used to compare the relative sensitivities to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries in the DT ice and DT liquid capsules. It is found that the overall thermonuclear yields predicted for DT liquid layer capsules are less than yields predicted for DT ice layer capsules in simulations using comparable capsule size and absorbed energy. However, the wetted foam and FFL designs allow for flexibility in hot spot convergence ratio through the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density, with a potentially improved robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetry.

  19. Shock timing measurements in DT ice layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Ross, J. S.; Lepape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2013-10-01

    Shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are routinely conducted using the keyhole target geometry, in which the strength and timing of multiple shocks are measured in a liquid-deuterium (D2) filled capsule interior. These targets have recently been modified to improve the surrogacy to ignition implosions by replacing the standard, continuous liquid D2 capsule fill with a deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer with a central DT gas fill. These experiments remove any possible material surrogacy difference between D2 and DT as well as incorporating the physics of multiple shock release and recompression events from an ice layer of finite thickness, an effect that is absent in the liquid-filled targets. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Plasma-surface interactions in TFTR D-T experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, D.K.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.

    1995-03-01

    TFTR has begun its campaign to study deuterium-tritium fusion under reactor-like conditions. Variable amounts of deuterium and tritium neutral beam power have been used to maximize fusion power, study alpha heating, investigate alpha particle confinement, and search for alpha driven plasma instabilities. Additional areas of study include energy and particle transport and confinement, ICRF heating schemes for DT plasmas, tritium retention, and fusion in high {beta}{sub p} plasmas. The majority of this work is done in the TFTR supershot confinement regime. To obtain supershots, extensive limiter conditioning using helium fueled ohmic discharges and lithium pellet injection into ohmic and neutral beam heated plasmas is performed, resulting in a low recycling limiter. The relationship between recycling and core plasma confinement has been studied by using helium, deuterium and high-Z gas puffs to simulate high recycling limiter conditions. These studies show that confinement in TFTR supershots is very sensitive to the influx of neutral particles at the plasma edge.

  1. Alpha Particle-Driven Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas: Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.; Chang, Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Nazikian, R.

    1998-07-09

    The toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [K. Young, et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 26, 11 (1984)]deuterium-tritium plasmas are analyzed using the NOVA-K code [C.Z. Cheng, Phys. Reports 211, 1 (1992)]. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental measurements in detail. In most cases, the theory agrees with the observations in terms of mode frequency, mode structure, and mode stability. However, one mode with toroidal mode number n = 2 is observed to be poloidally localized on the high field side of the magnetic axis with a mode frequency substantially below the TAE frequency.

  2. Single crystal diamond detector measurements of deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium neutrons in Joint European Torus fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzaniga, C. Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Binda, F.; Ericsson, G.; Croci, G.; Grosso, G.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Griesmayer, E.; Kaveney, G.; Syme, B.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-04-15

    First simultaneous measurements of deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium neutrons from deuterium plasmas using a Single crystal Diamond Detector are presented in this paper. The measurements were performed at JET with a dedicated electronic chain that combined high count rate capabilities and high energy resolution. The deposited energy spectrum from DD neutrons was successfully reproduced by means of Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response function and simulations of neutron emission from the plasma, including background contributions. The reported results are of relevance for the development of compact neutron detectors with spectroscopy capabilities for installation in camera systems of present and future high power fusion experiments.

  3. Single crystal diamond detector measurements of deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium neutrons in Joint European Torus fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Binda, F.; Croci, G.; Ericsson, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Griesmayer, E.; Grosso, G.; Kaveney, G.; Nocente, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Rebai, M.; Syme, B.; Tardocchi, M.

    2014-04-01

    First simultaneous measurements of deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium neutrons from deuterium plasmas using a Single crystal Diamond Detector are presented in this paper. The measurements were performed at JET with a dedicated electronic chain that combined high count rate capabilities and high energy resolution. The deposited energy spectrum from DD neutrons was successfully reproduced by means of Monte Carlo calculations of the detector response function and simulations of neutron emission from the plasma, including background contributions. The reported results are of relevance for the development of compact neutron detectors with spectroscopy capabilities for installation in camera systems of present and future high power fusion experiments.

  4. Evaluation of DD and DT fusion fuel cycles for different fusion-fission energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.

    1980-01-01

    A study has been carried out in order to investigate the characteristics of an energy system to produce a new source of fissile fuel for existing fission reactors. The denatured fuel cycles were used because it gives additional proliferation resistance compared to other fuel cycles. DT and DD fusion drivers were examined in this study with a thorium or uranium blanket for each fusion driver. Various fuel cycles were studied for light-water and heavy-water reactors. The cost of electricity for each energy system was calculated.

  5. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, C.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Grant, P. M.; Gharibyan, N.; Gostic, J. M.; Wooddy, P. T.; Torretto, P. C.; Bandong, B. B.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C. J.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Herrmann, H. W.; Knauer, J. P.; Sayre, D. B.; Schneider, D. H.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the 198Au/196Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix.

  6. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C. Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Grant, P. M.; Gharibyan, N.; Gostic, J. M.; Wooddy, P. T.; Torretto, P. C.; Bandong, B. B.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C. J.; Bernstein, L. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Schneider, D. H.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J.; Herrmann, H. W.; Knauer, J. P.

    2015-07-15

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the {sup 198}Au/{sup 196}Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix.

  7. Note: Radiochemical measurement of fuel and ablator areal densities in cryogenic implosions at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, C; Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Grant, P M; Gharibyan, N; Gostic, J M; Wooddy, P T; Torretto, P C; Bandong, B B; Bionta, R; Cerjan, C J; Bernstein, L A; Caggiano, J A; Herrmann, H W; Knauer, J P; Sayre, D B; Schneider, D H; Henry, E A; Fortner, R J

    2015-07-01

    A new radiochemical method for determining deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel and plastic ablator (CH) areal densities (ρR) in high-convergence, cryogenic inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility is described. It is based on measuring the (198)Au/(196)Au activation ratio using the collected post-shot debris of the Au hohlraum. The Au ratio combined with the independently measured neutron down scatter ratio uniquely determines the areal densities ρR(DT) and ρR(CH) during burn in the context of a simple 1-dimensional capsule model. The results show larger than expected ρR(CH) values, hinting at the presence of cold fuel-ablator mix. PMID:26233419

  8. Anomalous yield reduction in direct-drive DT implosions due to 3He addition

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W; Langenbrunner, James R; Mack, Joseph M; Cooley, James H; Wilson, Douglas C; Evans, Scott C; Sedillo, Tom J; Kyrala, George A; Caldwell, Stephen E; Young, Carlton A; Nobile, Arthur; Wermer, Joseph R; Paglieri, Stephen N; Mcevoy, Aaron M; Kim, Yong Ho; Batha, Steven H; Horsfield, Colin J; Drew, Dave; Garbett, Warren; Rubery, Michael; Glebov, Vladimir Yu; Roberts, Samuel; Frenje, Johan A

    2008-01-01

    Glass capsules were imploded in direct drive on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et aI., Opt. Commun. 133, 495, 1997] to look for anomalous degradation in deuterium/tritium (DT) yield (i.e., beyond what is predicted) and changes in reaction history with {sup 3}He addition. Such anomalies have previously been reported for D/{sup 3}He plasmas, but had not yet been investigated for DT/{sup 3}He. Anomalies such as these provide fertile ground for furthering our physics understanding of ICF implosions and capsule performance. A relatively short laser pulse (600 ps) was used to provide some degree of temporal separation between shock and compression yield components for analysis. Anomalous degradation in the compression component of yield was observed, consistent with the 'factor of two' degradation previously reported by MIT at a 50% {sup 3}He atom fraction in D{sub 2} using plastic capsules [Rygg et aI., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)]. However, clean calculations (i.e., no fuel-shell mixing) predict the shock component of yield quite well, contrary to the result reported by MIT, but consistent with LANL results in D{sub 2}/{sup 3}He [Wilson, et aI., lml Phys: Conf Series 112, 022015 (2008)]. X-ray imaging suggests less-than-predicted compression ofcapsules containing {sup 3}He. Leading candidate explanations are poorly understood Equation-of-State (EOS) for gas mixtures, and unanticipated particle pressure variation with increasing {sup 3}He addition.

  9. Energy gain of a thin DT shell target in inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshbinfar, Soheil

    2014-11-01

    Estimation of maximum possible energy gain for a given energy of driver has always become a key point in inertial confinement fusion. It has direct impact on the cost of produced electricity. Here, we employ a hydrodynamics model to assess energy gain in the case of a symmetrical hydrodynamics implosion where a narrow fuel shell consisting of deuterium-tritium (DT), can experience an isentropic compression in a self-similar regime. Introducing a set of six state parameters {Hhs, Ths, Uimp, αc, ξhs and μhs}, the final fuel state close to ignition is fully described. It enables us to calculate energy gain curves for specific set of these state variables. The envelope of the energy gain family curves provide a limiting gain curve Gfuel fuel* ∝ Ef0.36. Next, we took into account the inertial of cold surrounding fuel on the ignition process. It changes the limiting gain curve slope to 0.41. Finally, the analytical model results assessed and validated using numerical simulation code.

  10. Distortion of bulk-ion distribution function due to nuclear elastic scattering and its effect on T(d,n){sup 4}He reaction rate coefficient in neutral-beam-injected deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, H.; Nakao, Y.

    2007-05-15

    An effect of nuclear elastic scattering on the rate coefficient of fusion reaction between field deuteron and triton in the presence of neutral beam injection heating is studied. Without assuming a Maxwellian for bulk-ion distribution function, the Boltzmann-Fokker-Planck (BFP) equations for field (bulk) deuteron, field (bulk) triton, {alpha}-particle, and beam deuteron are simultaneously solved in an ITER-like deuterium-tritium thermonuclear plasma [R. Aymar, Fusion Eng. Des. 55, 107 (2001)]. The BFP calculation shows that enhancement of the reaction rate coefficient due to knock-on tail formation in fuel-ion distribution functions becomes appreciable, especially in the case of low-density operations.

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of differential die-away instrument for determination of fissile content in spent fuel assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Hoon; Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2011-10-01

    The differential die-away (DDA) technique has been simulated by using the MCNPX code to quantify its capability of measuring the fissile content in spent fuel assemblies. For 64 different spent fuel cases of various initial enrichment, burnup and cooling time, the count rate and signal to background ratios of the DDA system were obtained, where neutron backgrounds are mainly coming from the 244Cm of the spent fuel. To quantify the total fissile mass of spent fuel, a concept of the effective 239Pu mass was introduced by weighing the relative contribution to the signal of 235U and 241Pu compared to 239Pu and the calibration curves of DDA count rate vs. 239Pu eff were obtained by using the MCNPX code. With a deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron generator of 10 9 n/s strength, signal to background ratios of sufficient magnitude are acquired for a DDA system with the spent fuel assembly in water.

  12. Review of deuterium-tritium results from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, K. M.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J. L.; Anderson, J. W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, Cris W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N. L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Chang, C. S.; Cheng, C. Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dendy, R.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P. C.; Ernst, D.; Evenson, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R. J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G. Y.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H. P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G. R.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hill, K. W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D. L.; Jobes, F. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Johnson, L. C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N. T.; LaMarche, P. H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F. M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M. J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Marmar, E. S.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mazzucato, E.; Mauel, M.; McCarthy, M. P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D. C.; McKee, G.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J. A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G. A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; O'Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D. K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S. F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A. L.; Raftopoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Redi, M. H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.; Sesnic, S.; Sissingh, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Snipes, J.; Stencel, J.; Stevens, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B. C.; Strachan, J. D.; Stodiek, W.; Swanson, J.; Synakowski, E.; Takahashi, H.; Tang, W.; Taylor, G.; Terry, J.; Thompson, M. E.; Tighe, W.; Timberlake, J. R.; Tobita, K.; Towner, H. H.; Tuszewski, M.; von Halle, A.; Vannoy, C.; Viola, M.; von Goeler, S.; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R. T.; Wester, R.; White, R.; Wieland, R.; Wilgen, J. B.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Winston, J.; Wright, K.; Wong, K. L.; Woskov, P.; Wurden, G. A.; Yamada, M.; Yoshikawa, S.; Young, K. M.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zavereev, V.; Zweben, S. J.

    1995-06-01

    After many years of fusion research, the conditions needed for a D-T fusion reactor have been approached on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. For the first time the unique phenomena present in a D-T plasma are now being studied in a laboratory plasma. The first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas using nearly equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium have been carried out on TFTR. At present the maximum fusion power of 10.7 MW, using 39.5 MW of neutral-beam heating, in a supershot discharge and 6.7 MW in a high-βp discharge following a current rampdown. The fusion power density in a core of the plasma is ≊2.8 MW m-3, exceeding that expected in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 239] at 1500 MW total fusion power. The energy confinement time, τE, is observed to increase in D-T, relative to D plasmas, by 20% and the ni(0) Ti(0) τE product by 55%. The improvement in thermal confinement is caused primarily by a decrease in ion heat conductivity in both supershot and limiter-H-mode discharges. Extensive lithium pellet injection increased the confinement time to 0.27 s and enabled higher current operation in both supershot and high-βp discharges. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating of a D-T plasma, using the second harmonic of tritium, has been demonstrated. First measurements of the confined alpha particles have been performed and found to be in good agreement with TRANSP [Nucl. Fusion 34, 1247 (1994)] simulations. Initial measurements of the alpha ash profile have been compared with simulations using particle transport coefficients from He gas puffing experiments. The loss of alpha particles to a detector at the bottom of the vessel is well described by the first-orbit loss mechanism. No loss due to alpha-particle-driven instabilities has yet been observed

  13. Neutron temporal diagnostic for high-yield deuterium-tritium cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stoeckl, C.; Boni, R.; Ehrne, F.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Lonobile, D. J.; Magoon, J.; Regan, S. P.; Shoup, III, M. J.; et al

    2016-05-10

    A next-generation neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) capable of recording high-quality data for the highest anticipated yield cryogenic DT implosion experiments was recently installed at the Omega Laser Facility. A high-quality measurement of the neutron production width is required to determine the hot-spot pressure achieved in inertial confinement fusion experiments—a key metric in assessing the quality of these implosions. The design of this NTD is based on a fast-rise-time plastic scintillator, which converts the neutron kinetic energy to 350- to 450-nm-wavelength light. The light from the scintillator inside the nose-cone assembly is relayed ~16 m to a streak camera in amore » well-shielded location. An ~200× reduction in neutron background was observed during the first high-yield DT cryogenic implosions compared to the current NTD installation on OMEGA. An impulse response of ~40±10 ps was measured in a dedicated experiment using hard x rays from a planar target irradiated with a 10-ps short pulse from the OMEGA EP laser. Furthermore, the measured instrument response includes contributions from the scintillator rise time, optical relay, and streak camera.« less

  14. The Development of RF Heating of Magnetically Confined Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. LeBlanc; C.K. Phillips; J.C. Hosea; R. Majeski; S. Bernabei

    1999-06-01

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q = 0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed.

  15. The development of RF heating of magnetically confined deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J. C.; Bemabei, S.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Majeski, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Schilling, G.; Wilson the TFTR Team, J. R.

    1999-09-20

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q=0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Measurements and analyses of decay radioactivity induced in simulated deuterium-tritium neutron environments for fusion reactor structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C.; Kosako, K.; Oyama, Y.; Maekawa, F.; Maekawa, H.; Kumar, A.; Youssef, M.Z.; Abdou, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    To meet urgent requirements for data validation, an experimental analysis has been carried out for isotopic radioactivity induced by deuterium-tritium neutron irradiation in structural materials. The primary objective is to examine the adequacy of the activation cross sections implemented in the current activation calculation codes considered for use in fusion reactor nuclear design. Four activation cross-section libraries, namely, JENDL, LIB90, REAC{sup *}63, and REAC{sup *}175 were investigated in this current analysis. The isotopic induced radioactivity calculations using these four libraries are compared with experimental values obtained in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute/U.S. Department of Energy collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics. The nine materials studied are aluminum, silicon, titanium, vanadium, chromium, MnCu alloy, iron, nickel, niobium, and Type 316 stainless steel. The adequacy of the cross sections is investigated through the calculation to experiment analysis. As a result, most of the discrepancies in the calculations from experiments can be explained by inadequate activation cross sections. In addition, uncertainties due to neutron energy groups and neutron transport calculation are considered. The JENDL library gives the best agreement with experiments, followed by REAC{sup *}175, LIB90, and REAC{sup *}63, in this order. 45 refs., 32 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Two-dimensional simulations of the neutron yield in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R. L.

    2010-10-01

    Maximizing the neutron yield to obtain energy gain is the ultimate goal for inertial confinement fusion. Nonuniformities seeded by target and laser perturbations can disrupt neutron production via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth. To understand the effects of perturbations on the neutron yield of cryogenic DT implosions on the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], two-dimensional DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] simulations have been performed to systematically investigate each perturbation source and their combined effects on the neutron-yield performance. Two sources of nonuniformity accounted for the neutron-yield reduction in DRACO simulations: target offset from the target chamber center and laser imprinting. The integrated simulations for individual shots reproduce the experimental yield-over-clean (YOC) ratio within a factor of 2 or better. The simulated neutron-averaged ion temperatures ⟨Ti⟩ is only about 10%-15% higher than measurements. By defining the temperature-over-clean, its relationship to YOC provides an indication of how much the hot-spot volume and density are perturbed with respect to the uniform situation. Typically, the YOC in OMEGA experiments is of the order of ˜5%. The simulation results suggest that YOC can be increased to the ignition hydroequivalent level of 15%-20% (with ⟨ρR⟩=200-300 mg/cm2) by maintaining a target offset of less than 10 μm and employing beam smoothing by spectral dispersion.

  18. Physics requirements for pellet fueling of mirror reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1983-11-15

    Requirements for pellet fueling of mirror reactors, such as the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS), have been assessed. To avoid perturbing the MARS central-cell plasma density more than 10%, we have determined that the fuel injected per pellet must not exceed 2 x 10/sup 21/ deuterium-tritium (DT) atoms. This implies a maximum radius of 2 mm for each of the frozen DT pellets and a repetition rate of at least 6.2 pellets/s. Furthermore, the required pellet velocity will depend on the plasma density and temperature, including the effects of fusion products such as 3.5-MeV alphas, the shapes of these profiles, and the effectiveness of fueling the center of the plasma by radial diffusion. Under MARS conditions, the velocity requirement for frozen DT pellets will range from 4 to 20 km/s. To minimize this requirement, we will inject the pellets near the end of the central cell where the plasma radius is reduced by the strong magnetic field and where trapped alphas can be avoided by design of the magnetic field. To meet these fueling objectives, we are looking for new technologies for increasing the pellet speeds. One technology under consideration is the railgun for high-speed acceleration.

  19. Two-dimensional simulations of the neutron yield in cryogenic deuterium-tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Radha, P. B.; Marozas, J. A.; Skupsky, S.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R. L.

    2010-10-15

    Maximizing the neutron yield to obtain energy gain is the ultimate goal for inertial confinement fusion. Nonuniformities seeded by target and laser perturbations can disrupt neutron production via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth. To understand the effects of perturbations on the neutron yield of cryogenic DT implosions on the Omega Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], two-dimensional DRACO[P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056307 (2005)] simulations have been performed to systematically investigate each perturbation source and their combined effects on the neutron-yield performance. Two sources of nonuniformity accounted for the neutron-yield reduction in DRACO simulations: target offset from the target chamber center and laser imprinting. The integrated simulations for individual shots reproduce the experimental yield-over-clean (YOC) ratio within a factor of 2 or better. The simulated neutron-averaged ion temperatures is only about 10%-15% higher than measurements. By defining the temperature-over-clean, its relationship to YOC provides an indication of how much the hot-spot volume and density are perturbed with respect to the uniform situation. Typically, the YOC in OMEGA experiments is of the order of {approx}5%. The simulation results suggest that YOC can be increased to the ignition hydroequivalent level of 15%-20% (with <{rho}R>=200-300 mg/cm{sup 2}) by maintaining a target offset of less than 10 {mu}m and employing beam smoothing by spectral dispersion.

  20. NIF Target Capsule Wall And Hohlraum Transfer Gas Effects On Deuterium-Tritium Redistribution Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Giedt, W H; Sanchez, J J

    2005-06-27

    The effects of temperature and age on the times required for beta-heating-induced redistribution of a 50-50 mole percent mixture of deuterium and tritium (DT) in a spherical capsule are investigated analytically and numerically. The derivation of an analytical solution for the redistribution time in a one-dimensional binary diffusion model, which includes the capsule thermal resistance, is first described. This result shows that the redistribution time for a high conductivity capsule wall is approximately doubled after 8 days of {sup 3}He formation. In contrast, with a low thermal conductivity capsule wall (e.g., polyimide), the redistribution time would increase by less than 10%. The substantial effect of the capsule wall resistance suggested that the resistance to heat transfer from the capsule through the surrounding transfer gas to the hohlraum wall would also influence the redistribution process. This was investigated with a spherical model, which was based on accounting for energy transfer by diffusion with a conduction heat transfer approximation. This made it possible to solve for the continuous temperature distribution throughout the capsule and surrounding gas. As with the capsule the redistribution times depended on the relative values of the thermal resistances of the vapor, the capsule, and the transfer gas. With increasing thermal resistance of the vapor (increased concentration of {sup 3}He) redistributions times for hydrocarbon capsules were significantly less than predicted by the one-dimensional model, which included the capsule wall resistance. In particular for low {sup 3}He concentrations the time constant was approximately 10% less than the minimum one-dimensional value of 27 minutes. Further analytical and experimental investigation focused on defining the relations between the thermal resistances under which the one-dimensional model analysis applies is recommended.

  1. Confined trapped-alpha behavior in TFTR deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Budny, R.V.; Redi, M.H.; Roquemore, A.L.; White, R.B.; Duong, H.H.; Fisher, R.K.; Petrov, M.P.; Gorelenkov, N.N.

    1997-10-01

    Confined trapped-alpha energy spectra and differential radial density profiles in TFTR D-T plasmas are obtained with the Pellet Charge-eXchange (PCX) diagnostic which measures high energy (E{sub {alpha}} = 0.5--3.5 MeV), trapped alphas (v{sub {parallel}}/v = - 0.048) at a single time slice ({Delta}t {approximately} 1 msec) with a spatial resolution of {Delta}r {approximately} 5 cm. Tritons produced in D-D plasmas and RF-driven ion tails (H, {sup 3}He or T) were also observed and energetic tritium ion tail measurements will be discussed. PCX alpha and triton energy spectra extending up to their birth energies were measured in the core of MHD-quiescent discharges where the expected classical slowing down and pitch angle scattering effects are not complicated by stochastic ripple diffusion and sawtooth activity. Both the shape of the measured alpha and triton energy distributions and their density ratios are in good agreement with TRANSP predictions, indicating that the PCX measurements are consistent with classical thermalization of the fusion-generated alphas and tritons. From calculations, these results set an upper limit on possible anomalous radial diffusion for trapped alphas of D{sub {alpha}} {le} 0.01 m{sup 2}s{sup {minus}1}. Outside the core, where the trapped alphas are influenced by stochastic ripple diffusion effects, the PCX measurements are consistent with the functional dependence of the Goldston-White-Boozer stochastic ripple threshold on the alpha energy and the q-profile. In the presence of strong sawtooth activity, the PCX diagnostic observes significant redistribution of the alpha signal radial profile wherein alphas are depleted in the core and redistributed to well outside the q = 1 radius, but apparently not beyond the energy-dependent stochastic ripple loss boundary.

  2. Systematic analysis of advanced fusion fuel in inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde, G.; Eliezer, S.; Henis, Z.; Piera, M.; Martinez-Val, J. M.

    1997-04-01

    Aneutronic fusion reactions can be considered as the cleanest way to exploit nuclear energy. However, these reactions present in general two main drawbacks.—very high temperatures are needed to reach relevant values of their cross sections—Moderate (and even low) energy yield per reaction. This value is still lower if measured in relation to the Z number of the reacting particles. It is already known that bremsstrahlung overruns the plasma reheating by fusion born charged-particles in most of the advanced fuels. This is for instance the case for proton-boron-11 fusion in a stoichiometric plasma and is also so in lithium isotopes fusion reactions. In this paper, the use of deuterium-tritium seeding is suggested to allow to reach higher burnup fractions of advanced fuels, starting at a lower ignition temperature. Of course, neutron production increases as DT contents does. Nevertheless, the ratio of neutron production to energy generation is much lower in DT-advanced fuel mixtures than in pure DT plasmas. One of the main findings of this work is that some natural resources (as D and Li-7) can be burned-up in a catalytic regime for tritium. In this case, neither external tritium breeding nor tritium storage are needed, because the tritium inventory after the fusion burst is the same as before it. The fusion reactor can thus operate on a pure recycling of a small tritium inventory.

  3. Prospects for measuring the fuel ion ratio in burning ITER plasmas using a DT neutron emission spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hellesen, C; Skiba, M; Dzysiuk, N; Weiszflog, M; Hjalmarsson, A; Ericsson, G; Conroy, S; Andersson-Sundén, E; Eriksson, J; Binda, F

    2014-11-01

    The fuel ion ratio nt/nd is an essential parameter for plasma control in fusion reactor relevant applications, since maximum fusion power is attained when equal amounts of tritium (T) and deuterium (D) are present in the plasma, i.e., nt/nd = 1.0. For neutral beam heated plasmas, this parameter can be measured using a single neutron spectrometer, as has been shown for tritium concentrations up to 90%, using data obtained with the MPR (Magnetic Proton Recoil) spectrometer during a DT experimental campaign at the Joint European Torus in 1997. In this paper, we evaluate the demands that a DT spectrometer has to fulfill to be able to determine nt/nd with a relative error below 20%, as is required for such measurements at ITER. The assessment shows that a back-scattering time-of-flight design is a promising concept for spectroscopy of 14 MeV DT emission neutrons. PMID:25430238

  4. Prospects for measuring the fuel ion ratio in burning ITER plasmas using a DT neutron emission spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellesen, C.; Skiba, M.; Dzysiuk, N.; Weiszflog, M.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Ericsson, G.; Conroy, S.; Andersson-Sundén, E.; Eriksson, J.; Binda, F.

    2014-11-01

    The fuel ion ratio nt/nd is an essential parameter for plasma control in fusion reactor relevant applications, since maximum fusion power is attained when equal amounts of tritium (T) and deuterium (D) are present in the plasma, i.e., nt/nd = 1.0. For neutral beam heated plasmas, this parameter can be measured using a single neutron spectrometer, as has been shown for tritium concentrations up to 90%, using data obtained with the MPR (Magnetic Proton Recoil) spectrometer during a DT experimental campaign at the Joint European Torus in 1997. In this paper, we evaluate the demands that a DT spectrometer has to fulfill to be able to determine nt/nd with a relative error below 20%, as is required for such measurements at ITER. The assessment shows that a back-scattering time-of-flight design is a promising concept for spectroscopy of 14 MeV DT emission neutrons.

  5. Simulations of DT experiments in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.; Bell, M.G.; Biglari, H.; Bitter, M.; Bush, C.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fredrickson, E.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, D.; Johnson, L.C.; LeBlanc, B.; McCune, D.C.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.T.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Scott, S.; Schivell, J.; Strachan, J.D.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J.

    1991-12-01

    A transport code (TRANSP) is used to simulate future deuterium-tritium experiments (DT) in TFTR. The simulations are derived from 14 TFTR DD discharges, and the modeling of one supershot is discussed in detail to indicate the degree of accuracy of the TRANSP modeling. Fusion energy yields and {alpha}-particle parameters are calculated, including profiles of the {alpha} slowing down time, average energy, and of the Alfven speed and frequency. Two types of simulations are discussed. The main emphasis is on the DT equivalent, where an equal mix of D and T is substituted for the D in the initial target plasma, and for the D{sup O} in the neutral-beam injection, but the other measured beam and plasma parameters are unchanged. This simulation does not assume that {alpha} heating will enhance the plasma parameters, or that confinement will increase with T. The maximum relative fusion yield calculated for these simulations is Q{sub DT} {approx} 0.3, and the maximum {alpha} contribution to the central toroidal {beta} is {beta}{sub {alpha}}(0) {approx} 0.5%. The stability of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) and kinetic ballooning modes (KBM) is discussed. The TAE mode is predicted to become unstable for some of the equivalent simulations, particularly after the termination of neutral beam injection. In the second type of simulation, empirical supershot scaling relations are used to project the performance at the maximum expected beam power. The MHD stability of the simulations is discussed.

  6. Pulsed Laser-Based X-Ray Sources for Rapid-Cool DT Layer Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Dewald, E; Izumi, N; Kozioziemski, B; Landen, O; Siders, C

    2007-08-29

    Ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will contain a cryogenically cooled {approx} 75 {micro}m-thick deuterium/tritium (DT) ice layer surrounded by a {approx} 150 {micro}m-thick beryllium (Be) shell [1]. Ignition target design optimization depends sensitively on the achievable inner surface quality of the ice layer and on the pressure of the DT gas inside the ice, which is determined by the temperature of the ice. The inner ice layer surface is smoothest at temperatures just below the DT ice/liquid/gas triple point (3T), but current ignition target designs require central gas pressures of 0.3 mg/cm3, corresponding to an ice layer temperature 1.5 K below the triple point (3T-1.5). At these lower temperatures, the ice layer quality degrades due to the formation of cracks and other features.

  7. High performance detectors for upgraded gamma ray diagnostics for JET DT campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zychor, I.; Boltruczyk, G.; Burakowska, A.; Craciunescu, T.; Fernandes, A.; Figueiredo, J.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Gierlik, M.; Gosk, M.; Grodzicka, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Kaveney, G.; Kiptily, V.; Korolczuk, S.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Mianowski, S.; Moszynski, M.; Murari, A.; Nocente, M.; Pereira, R. C.; Perseo, V.; Rigamonti, D.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Sibczynski, P.; Santos, B.; Soare, S.; Syntfeld-Kazuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Szawlowski, M.; Szczesniak, T.; Szewinski, J.; Szydlowski, A.; Tardocchi, M.; Urban, A.; Zoita, V. L.; contributors, JET

    2016-06-01

    In forthcoming deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on JET a significant population of alpha-particles will be produced. For operating alpha-particle diagnostics at high DT neutron fluxes, specific improvements have to be made. Proposed new detectors for gamma-ray measurements will be based on CeBr3 and LaBr3:Ce scintillators. They are characterized by a good energy resolution, a relatively high detection efficiency for a few MeV gamma-rays and a fast response time. An overview of scintillator parameters is presented. A description of the properties of photodetectors is given to indicate optimal setups. Results of measurements, using gamma-ray sources with energies up to a few MeV, are discussed with relation to the DT campaign requirements.

  8. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S; Hartouni, E; Hatchett, S P; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Moses, E; Park, H-S; Ralph, J; Remington, B A; Smalyuk, V; Yeamans, C B; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Chandler, G A; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J; Fletcher, K; Kilkenny, J; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Paguio, R

    2012-10-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF. PMID:23126915

  9. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Doeppner, T.; Glenzer, S.; Hartouni, E.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A.; and others

    2012-10-15

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  10. Prospects for measuring the fuel ion ratio in burning ITER plasmas using a DT neutron emission spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hellesen, C.; Skiba, M. Dzysiuk, N.; Weiszflog, M.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Ericsson, G.; Conroy, S.; Andersson-Sundén, E.; Eriksson, J.; Binda, F.

    2014-11-15

    The fuel ion ratio n{sub t}/n{sub d} is an essential parameter for plasma control in fusion reactor relevant applications, since maximum fusion power is attained when equal amounts of tritium (T) and deuterium (D) are present in the plasma, i.e., n{sub t}/n{sub d} = 1.0. For neutral beam heated plasmas, this parameter can be measured using a single neutron spectrometer, as has been shown for tritium concentrations up to 90%, using data obtained with the MPR (Magnetic Proton Recoil) spectrometer during a DT experimental campaign at the Joint European Torus in 1997. In this paper, we evaluate the demands that a DT spectrometer has to fulfill to be able to determine n{sub t}/n{sub d} with a relative error below 20%, as is required for such measurements at ITER. The assessment shows that a back-scattering time-of-flight design is a promising concept for spectroscopy of 14 MeV DT emission neutrons.

  11. Predicting the Equilibrium Deuterium-Tritium Fuel Layer Thickness Profile in an Indirect-Drive Hohlraum Capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Jorge J.; Giedt, Warren H.

    2004-03-15

    A numerical procedure for calculating the equilibrium thickness distribution of a thin layer of deuterium and tritium on the inner surface of an indirect drive target sphere ({approx}2.0 mm in diameter) is described. Starting with an assumed uniform thickness layer and with specified thermal boundary conditions, the temperature distribution throughout the capsule and hohlraum (including natural convection in the hohlraum gas) is calculated. Results are used to make a first estimate of the final non-uniform thickness distribution of the layer. This thickness distribution is then used to make a second calculation of the temperature distribution with the same boundary conditions. Legendre polynomial coefficients are evaluated for the two temperature distributions and the two thickness profiles. Final equilibrium Legendre coefficients are determined by linear extrapolation. From these coefficients, the equilibrium layer thickness can be computed.

  12. Predicting the Equilibrium Deuterium-Tritium Fuel Layer Thickness Profile in an Indirect-Drive Hohlraum Capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J J; Giedt, W H

    2003-09-02

    A numerical procedure for calculating the equilibrium thickness distribution of a thin layer of deuterium and tritium on the inner surface of an indirect drive target sphere ({approx} 2.0 mm in diameter) is described. Starting with an assumed uniform thickness layer and with specified thermal boundary conditions, the temperature distribution throughout the capsule and hohlraum (including natural convection in the hohlraum gas) is calculated. Results are used to make a first estimate of the final non-uniform thickness distribution of the layer. This thickness distribution is then used to make a second calculation of the temperature distribution with the same boundary conditions. Legendre polynomial coefficients are evaluated for the two temperature distributions and the two thickness profiles. Final equilibrium Legendre coefficients are determined by linear extrapolation. From these coefficients, the equilibrium layer thickness can be computed.

  13. Advanced Fuel Cycles for Fusion Reactors: Passive Safety and Zero-Waste Options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchetti, Massimo; Sugiyama, Linda E.

    2006-05-01

    Nuclear fusion is seen as a much ''cleaner'' energy source than fission. Most of the studies and experiments on nuclear fusion are currently devoted to the Deuterium-Tritium (DT) fuel cycle, since it is the easiest way to reach ignition. The recent stress on safety by the world's community has stimulated the research on other fuel cycles than the DT one, based on 'advanced' reactions, such as the Deuterium-Helium-3 (DHe) one. These reactions pose problems, such as the availability of 3He and the attainment of the higher plasma parameters that are required for burning. However, they have many advantages, like for instance the very low neutron activation, while it is unnecessary to breed and fuel tritium. The extrapolation of Ignitor technologies towards a larger and more powerful experiment using advanced fuel cycles (Candor) has been studied. Results show that Candor does reach the passive safety and zero-waste option. A fusion power reactor based on the DHe cycle could be the ultimate response to the environmental requirements for future nuclear power plants.

  14. Compression and combustion of non-cryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2013-04-15

    Variants of a target with a solid thermonuclear fuel in the form of deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals for an inertial fusion have been proposed. The laser-pulse-induced compression of non-cryogenic targets, as well as ignition and combustion of such targets, has been examined. The numerical calculations show that, despite a decrease in the caloric content of the fuel and an increase in the energy losses on intrinsic radiation in the target containing deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals as compared to the target containing deuterium-tritium ice, the non-cryogenic target can ensure the fusion gain sufficient for its use in the energy cycle of a thermonuclear power plant based on the inertial plasma confinement method.

  15. Deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements with the 4.5 m neutron-time-of-flight detectors at NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Clancy, T. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Khater, H. Y.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2012-10-15

    The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator/photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring deuterium-deuterium (DD) and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield (Y{sub n}) measurements from below 10{sup 9} (DD) to nearly 10{sup 15} (DT). The detectors initially demonstrated detector-to-detector Y{sub n} precisions better than 5%, but lacked in situ absolute calibrations. Recent experiments at NIF now have provided in situ DT yield calibration data that establish the absolute sensitivity of the 4.5 m differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) detector with an accuracy of {+-}10% and precision of {+-}1%. The 4.5 m nTOF calibration measurements also have helped to establish improved detector impulse response functions and data analysis methods, which have contributed to improving the accuracy of the Y{sub n} measurements. These advances have also helped to extend the usefulness of nTOF measurements of ion temperature and downscattered neutron ratio (neutron yield 10-12 MeV divided by yield 13-15 MeV) with other nTOF detectors.

  16. Change in inertial confinement fusion implosions upon using an ab initio multiphase DT equation of state.

    PubMed

    Caillabet, L; Canaud, B; Salin, G; Mazevet, S; Loubeyre, P

    2011-09-01

    Improving the description of the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium-tritium (DT) has recently been shown to change significantly the gain of an inertial confinement fusion target [S. X. Hu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235003 (2010)]. Here we use an advanced multiphase EOS, based on ab initio calculations, to perform a full optimization of the laser pulse shape with hydrodynamic simulations starting from 19 K in DT ice. The thermonuclear gain is shown to be a robust estimate over possible uncertainties of the EOS. Two different target designs are discussed, for shock ignition and self-ignition. In the first case, the areal density and thermonuclear energy can be recovered by slightly increasing the laser energy. In the second case, a lower in-flight adiabat is needed, leading to a significant delay (3 ns) in the shock timing of the implosion. PMID:22026681

  17. First observation of alpha particle loss induced by kinetic ballooning modes in TFTR deuterium-tritium experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Z.; Budny, R.V.; Chen, L.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Janos, A.; Mansfield, D.; Mazzucato, E.; McGuire, K.M.; Nazikian, R.; Rewoldt, G.; Strachan, J.D.; Tang, W.M.; Taylor, G.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S. |; TFTR group

    1996-02-01

    A correlation between the measured alpha particle loss and high frequency ({approximately}100{endash}200 kHz) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes has been observed in some high {beta} (= plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) DT plasmas in TFTR. These modes are localized around the peak plasma pressure gradient and have ballooning characteristics. Particle simulation shows that the loss is due to wave-particle resonances. Linear instability analysis indicates that the plasma is unstable to the kinetic MHD ballooning modes driven by strong local pressure gradients. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Thermal oscillation smoothing of DT solid layers for HAPL and NIF scale targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sheliak, John D; Geller, Drew A; Hoffer, James K

    2009-01-01

    Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) solid fuel layers must meet stringent roughness specifications for both the ICF and IFE laser fusion programs and native beta-layering alone is unable to provide sufficient solid layer smoothing to meet these specifications at 18.3 K or below. Consequently, several supplemental smoothing options have been proposed to resolve this issue, including a technique called 'Thermal Breathing'. This technique consists of oscillating the temperature of the solid D-T layer about its equilibration temperature for a period of one to several hours. Recently, thermal oscillations have been used to successfully smooth rough solid D{sub 2} in spherical targets. In order to study this particular smoothing technique, we examined the effects of thermal oscillations on equilibrated D-T solid layers, using both ICF and IFE scale layering cells and layer thicknesses. The D-T solid layers that were Subjected to thermal breathing in these studies were equilibrated at temperatures ranging from 16.0 K to 19.25 K, followed by 1.5 to 2 hours of temperature oscillations. During the HAPL scale experiments the amplitude and period of the oscillations were both varied to examine parametric effects of these variables on final layer roughness. In both sets of experiments, once the oscillations completed we allowed the layers to 'relax' at their initial equilibration temperature for another 1 to 2 hours, to observe any 'rebounding' or re-roughening that might occur. The rCF scale experiments were performed using a 2 mm beryllium torus, for which the layer was free from optical distortions that were observed in our IFE scale cell (a 4 mm dia. sapphire sphere-cylinder). Our results showed a temperature dependent smoothing effect ofthe DT solid layer ranging from 20% to 35% over the temperature range of 17.3 K to 19.0 K for the rCF-scale, 2-mm celL The final RMS roughness for layers grown in this 2-mm Be torus was on average less than 1 /lm for modes 7 and above. Results for the

  19. Ion cyclotron range of frequency heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma via the second-harmonic tritium cyclotron resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Bush, C.E.; Darrow, D.; Hosea, J.C.; Jaeger, E.F.; Majeski, R.; Murakami, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J.E.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.

    1995-07-31

    Experiments have been performed on the TFTR to study rf wave heating of a D-T plasma by way of the second-harmonic tritium cyclotron resonance. The addition of tritium ions to a deuterium plasma allows for absorption of the rf waves at the tritium cyclotron harmonics and by electron damping of a mode converted ion Bernstein wave. Competing mechanisms include direct electron damping and damping at the fundamental cyclotron resonance of deuterium, {alpha} particles, and {sup 3}He ions. The contribution of each is estimated from a series of plasma discharges where various plasma parameters are varied. The majority of the rf power is found to damp on the tritium ions.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of moderator and reflector in coal analyzer based on a D-T neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Shan, Qing; Chu, Shengnan; Jia, Wenbao

    2015-11-01

    Coal is one of the most popular fuels in the world. The use of coal not only produces carbon dioxide, but also contributes to the environmental pollution by heavy metals. In prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA)-based coal analyzer, the characteristic gamma rays of C and O are mainly induced by fast neutrons, whereas thermal neutrons can be used to induce the characteristic gamma rays of H, Si, and heavy metals. Therefore, appropriate thermal and fast neutrons are beneficial in improving the measurement accuracy of heavy metals, and ensure that the measurement accuracy of main elements meets the requirements of the industry. Once the required yield of the deuterium-tritium (d-T) neutron generator is determined, appropriate thermal and fast neutrons can be obtained by optimizing the neutron source term. In this article, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Transport Code and Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) database are used to optimize the neutron source term in PGNAA-based coal analyzer, including the material and shape of the moderator and neutron reflector. The optimized targets include two points: (1) the ratio of the thermal to fast neutron is 1:1 and (2) the total neutron flux from the optimized neutron source in the sample increases at least 100% when compared with the initial one. The simulation results show that, the total neutron flux in the sample increases 102%, 102%, 85%, 72%, and 62% with Pb, Bi, Nb, W, and Be reflectors, respectively. Maximum optimization of the targets is achieved when the moderator is a 3-cm-thick lead layer coupled with a 3-cm-thick high-density polyethylene (HDPE) layer, and the neutron reflector is a 27-cm-thick hemispherical lead layer. PMID:26325583

  1. A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) for ρR_fuel and Ti measurements of warm, fizzle and ignited implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Deciantis, J. L.; Kurebayashi, S.; Rygg, J. R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Soures, J. M.; Hatchett, S. P.; Hann, S. W.; Schmid, G. J.; Landen, O. L.; Izumi, N.

    2003-10-01

    A method for determining ρR_fuel of cryogenic deuterium-tritium plasmas involves measurement of the energy spectrum of elastically-scattered, primary neutrons. A spectrometer has been designed for doing this at OMEGA and the NIF, using scattered neutrons in the energy range 7-10 MeV to determine ρR_fuel and primary neutrons to measure T_i. The instrument utilizes a magnet and a conversion foil for production of charged particles. A large dynamic range (>10^6) will allow operation at yields as low as 10^12. This will allow ρR_fuel and Ti measurements of warm and cryogenic DT targets at OMEGA, and fizzle and ignited cryogenic DT targets at the NIF. This work was supported in part by the US DoE (contract W-7405-ENG-48 with LLNL, grant DE-FG03-99DP00300 and Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-92SF19460), LLE (subcontract P0410025G), and LLNL (subcontract B313975).

  2. Measurements of the Fuel Distribution in Cryogenic D-T Direct-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Chad J.

    In direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, a capsule filled with a mixture of deuterium and tritium ice at cryogenic temperature is irradiated by a symmetric arrangements of laser beams to compress and heat the fuel to conditions required for thermonuclear reactions. The areal density (rhoR) of the compressed fuel assembly in a cryogenic implosion is one of the fundamental parameters required to assess the target performance. The rhoR measurements presented here are achieved by measuring the complex neutron energy spectrum resulting from primary and secondary nuclear reactions within the compressed fuel assembly. Advances in neutron time-of-flight diagnostics have made it possible to infer the neutron fraction that elastically scatters off the tritons in the compressed fuel in the energy range from 3.5 -5.5 MeV which is directly proportional to the areal density. In these OMEGA cryogenic campaigns from January 2013 to August 2014, measured low-mode modulations show good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Deviations up to 40% in the cold-fuel distribution from spherical symmetry have been inferred from the scattered neutron spectrum. Understanding the mechanism for anisotropic areal density measurements is crucial to improve hydrodynamically equivalent ignition-relevant direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA.

  3. Development of a Laser-Produced Plasma X-ray source for Phase-Contrast Radiography of DT Ice layers

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N; Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Landen, O L; Koch, J A

    2008-07-21

    Refraction enhanced x-ray phase contrast imaging is crucial for characterization of deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer roughness in optically opaque inertial confinement fusion capsules. To observe the time development of DT ice roughness over {approx} second timescales, we need a bright x-ray source that can produce an image faster than the evolution of the ice surface roughness. A laser produced plasma x-ray source is one of the candidates that can meet this requirement. We performed experiments at the Janus laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and assessed the characteristics of the laser produced plasma x-ray source as a potential backlight for in situ target characterization.

  4. Triton memory time in solid DT and its nuclear polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P. C.; Fearon, E. M.; Mapoles, E. R.; Sater, J. D.; Collins, G. W.; Gaines, J. R.; Sherman, R. H.; Bartlit, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    The expected value of nuclear spin polarization to inertial confinement fusion is recapitulated. A comparison of brute force versus dynamic nuclear polarization, as applied to solid deuterium-tritium, is given, and the need for a long triton polarization memory time (longitudinal nuclear relaxation time) is shown. The time constant for 25 mol%T/sub 2/-50 DT-25 D/sub 2/ is a short 0.3 s at 5/degree/K and waiting lowers it to 0.1 s. Use of 90 to 96 mol% molecular DT raises the time constant to 0.9 s and addition of about 20 mol% nH/sub 2/ increases it to 5 to 7 s. The theory shows that the species shortening the triton memory time is the J = 1 T/sub 2/, which can be reduced in our samples only by self-catalysis. The heating in order to mix in nH/sub 2/ increases the percent of J = 1 T/sub 2/ and mixing may not be perfect. The experiments have increased the triton memory time twenty-fold and shown that removal of the J = 1 T/sub 2/ is the key to improved results.

  5. Optimization of Beam-Shaping Assemblies for BNCS Using the High-Energy Neutron Sources D-D and D-T

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, Jerome M.; Chen, Allen S.; Vujic, Jasmina L.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2001-06-15

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy is a novel approach for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The goal of the treatment is the ablation of diseased synovial membranes in articulating joints. The treatment of knee joints is the focus of this work. A method was developed, as discussed previously, to predict the dose distribution in a knee joint from any neutron and photon beam spectra incident on the knee. This method is validated and used to design moderators for the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron sources. Treatment times >2 h were obtained with the D-D reaction. They could potentially be reduced if the {sup 10}B concentration in the synovium was increased. For D-T neutrons, high therapeutic ratios and treatment times <5 min were obtained for neutron yields of 10{sup 14} s{sup -1}. This treatment time makes the D-T reaction attractive for boron neutron capture synovectomy.

  6. Improving the hot-spot pressure and demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic deuterium tritium implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Follett, R. K.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Yu. Glebov, V.; Harding, D. R.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Janezic, R.; Kelly, J. H.; Kessler, T. J.; Kosc, T. Z.; Loucks, S. J.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Maximov, A. V.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Nora, R.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shmayda, W. T.; Short, R.W.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Casey, D. T.

    2014-05-01

    Reaching ignition in direct-drive (DD) inertial confinement fusion implosions requires achieving central pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is used to study the physics of implosions that are hydrodynamically equivalent to the ignition designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. It is shown that the highest hot-spot pressures (up to 40 Gbar) are achieved in target designs with a fuel adiabat of α ≅ 4, an implosion velocity of 3.8 × 10⁷ cm/s, and a laser intensity of ~10¹⁵ W/cm². These moderate-adiabat implosions are well understood using two-dimensional hydrocode simulations. The performance of lower-adiabat implosions is significantly degraded relative to code predictions, a common feature between DD implosions on OMEGA and indirect-drive cryogenic implosions on the NIF. Simplified theoretical models are developed to gain physical understanding of the implosion dynamics that dictate the target performance. These models indicate that degradations in the shell density and integrity (caused by hydrodynamic instabilities during the target acceleration) coupled with hydrodynamics at stagnation are the main failure mechanisms in low-adiabat designs. To demonstrate ignition hydrodynamic equivalence in cryogenic implosions on OMEGA, the target-design robustness to hydrodynamic instability growth must be improved by reducing laser-coupling losses caused by cross beam energy transfer.

  7. Imaging of High-Energy X-Ray Emission from Cryogenic Thermonuclear Fuel Implosions on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T

    2012-05-01

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide spectrally resolved time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets. Using bremsstrahlung assumptions, the measured absolute x-ray brightness allows for the inference of electron temperature, electron density, hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure. Current inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) seek to indirectly drive a spherical implosion, compressing and igniting a deuterium-tritium fuel. This DT fuel capsule is cryogenically prepared as a solid ice layer surrounded by a low-Z ablator material. Ignition will occur when the hot spot approaches sufficient temperature ({approx}3-4 keV) and {rho}R ({approx}0.3 g/cm{sup 2}) such that alpha deposition can further heat the hot spot and generate a self-sustaining burn wave. During the implosion, the fuel mass becomes hot enough to emit large amounts of x-ray radiation, the spectra and spatial variation of which contains key information that can be used to evaluate the implosion performance. The Ross filter diagnostic employs differential filtering to provide spectrally resolved, time-integrated, absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets.

  8. Interspecies Ion Diffusion Studies using DT, DT(3He), and DT(H) Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Schmitt, M. J.; Kagan, G.; McEvoy, A. M.; Hoffman, N. M.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J.; Glevov, V. Yu; Forrest, C.

    2015-11-01

    Anomalous ICF yield degradation has been observed from gas fills containing mixtures (i.e., D(3He), DT(3He), D(Ar), and even DT). Interspecies ion diffusion theory has been suggested as a possible cause resulting from gradient-driven diffusion (i.e., pressure, electric potential, and temperature) which forces lower mass ions away from core and higher mass ions toward core. The theory predicts hydrogen addition to deuterium or tritium should result in increased yield compared to expected yield, which is opposite to 3He addition. At Omega laser facility, we have tested hydro-equivalent fills of DT, DT(3He), and DT(H) with the assumption that same fuel mass and particle pressure will provide identical convergence. Preliminary results verify a factor of 2 yield reduction relative to scaling when 3He added to DT. At DT(H) case, however, no significant yield degradation or a slight yield enhancement was observed which agrees with the interspecies ion diffusion theory. Detailed experiment results and simulation are needed to confirm the initial observation.

  9. Nuclear imaging of the fuel assembly in ignition experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Danly, C. R.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Clark, D. S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Raman, K. S.; Izumi, N.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Drury, O. B.; Alger, E. T.; Arnold, P. A.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Atherton, L. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Batha, S.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Berzins, L. V.; Betti, R.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Boehly, T. R.; Bond, E. J.; Bowers, M. W.; Bradley, D. K.; Brunton, G. K.; Buckles, R. A.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R. F.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Castro, C.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C. J.; Chandler, G. A.; Choate, C.; Cohen, S. J.; Collins, G. W.; Cooper, G. W.; Cox, J. R.; Cradick, J. R.; Datte, P. S.; Dewald, E. L.; Di Nicola, P.; Di Nicola, J. M.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S. N.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eckart, M. J.; Eder, D. C.; Edgell, D. H.; Edwards, M. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Ehrlich, R. B.; Erbert, G. V.; Fair, J.; Farley, D. R.; Felker, B.; Fortner, R. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Frieders, G.; Friedrich, S.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gibson, C. R.; Giraldez, E.; Glebov, V. Y.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gururangan, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hahn, K. D.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Haynam, C.; Hermann, M. R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Holder, J. P.; Holunga, D. M.; Horner, J. B.; Hsing, W. W.; Huang, H.; Jackson, M. C.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kauffman, R. L.; Kauffman, M. I.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Kirkwood, R.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Knittel, K. M.; Koch, J. A.; Kohut, T. R.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Krauter, K.; Krauter, G. W.; Kritcher, A. L.; Kroll, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Fortune, K. N. La; LaCaille, G.; Lagin, L. J.; Land, T. A.; Landen, O. L.; Larson, D. W.; Latray, D. A.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, T. L.; LePape, S.; Lindl, J. D.; Lowe-Webb, R. R.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Malone, R. M.; Malsbury, T. N.; Mapoles, E.; Marshall, C. D.; Mathisen, D. G.; McKenty, P.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Moran, M. J.; Moreno, K.; Moses, E. I.; Munro, D. H.; Nathan, B. R.; Nelson, A. J.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Orth, C.; Pak, A. E.; Palma, E. S.; Parham, T. G.; Patel, P. K.; Patterson, R. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prasad, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. P.; Rinderknecht, H.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, G. F.; Ruiz, C. L.; Séguin, F. H.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Sater, J. D.; Saunders, R. L.; Schneider, M. B.; Schneider, D. H.; Shaw, M. J.; Simanovskaia, N.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Stoeckl, C.; Stoeffl, W.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P.; Traille, A. J.; Wonterghem, B. Van; Wallace, R. J.; Weaver, S.; Weber, S. V.; Wegner, P. J.; Whitman, P. K.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C. C.; Wood, R. D.; Young, B. K.; Zacharias, R. A.; Zylstra, A.

    2013-05-01

    First results from the analysis of neutron image data collected on implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium capsules during the 2011-2012 National Ignition Campaign are reported. The data span a variety of experimental designs aimed at increasing the stagnation pressure of the central hotspot and areal density of the surrounding fuel assembly. Images of neutrons produced by deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in the hotspot are presented, as well as images of neutrons that scatter in the surrounding dense fuel assembly. The image data are compared with 1D and 2D model predictions, and consistency checked using other diagnostic data. The results indicate that the size of the fusing hotspot is consistent with the model predictions, as well as other imaging data, while the overall size of the fuel assembly, inferred from the scattered neutron images, is systematically smaller than models' prediction. Preliminary studies indicate these differences are consistent with a significant fraction (20%-25%) of the initial deuterium-tritium fuel mass outside the compact fuel assembly, due either to low mode mass asymmetry or high mode 3D mix effects at the ablator-ice interface.

  10. Study of TFTR D-T neutron spectra using natural diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Roquemore, A.L.; Krasilnikov, A.V., Gorelenkov, N.N.

    1996-12-31

    Three Natural Diamond Detector (NDD) based spectrometers have been used for neutron spectra measurement during Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) experiments using high power Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) and Ton Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in 1996. A 2-3 % energy resolution coupled with the high radiation resistance of NDDs (5 x 10{sup 14}n/cm{sup 2}) makes them ideal for measuring the D-T neutron spectra in the high radiation environment of TFTR tritium experiments. The compact size of the NDD made it possible to insert one of the detectors into one of the center channels of the TFTR multichannel neutron collimator to provide a vertical view perpendicular to the vessel midplane, Two other detectors were placed inside shields in TFTR test cell and provide measurements of the neutrons having angles of emission of 110- 180{degrees} and 60-12-{degrees} with respect to the direction of the plasma current. By using a 0.25 {mu}s shaping time of the Ortec 673 spectroscopy amplifier we were able to accumulate useful spectrometry data at count rates up to 1.5 x 10{sup 3} counts/sec. To model the D- T neutron spectra measured by each of three NDD`s the Neutron Source post TRANSP (NST) code and semi-analytical model were developed. A set of D-T and D-D plasmas is analyzed for the dynamics of D-T neutron spectral broadening for each of three NDD cones of view. The application of three NDD based D-T neutron -spectrometer array demonstrated the anisotropy of the ion distribution function. and provided a mature of the dynamics of the effective ion temperatures for each detector view, and determined the tangential velocity of resonant tritons during ICRH.

  11. Fuel gain exceeding unity in an inertially confined fusion implosion.

    PubMed

    Hurricane, O A; Callahan, D A; Casey, D T; Celliers, P M; Cerjan, C; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Döppner, T; Hinkel, D E; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Kline, J L; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacPhee, A G; Milovich, J L; Pak, A; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Remington, B A; Salmonson, J D; Springer, P T; Tommasini, R

    2014-02-20

    Ignition is needed to make fusion energy a viable alternative energy source, but has yet to be achieved. A key step on the way to ignition is to have the energy generated through fusion reactions in an inertially confined fusion plasma exceed the amount of energy deposited into the deuterium-tritium fusion fuel and hotspot during the implosion process, resulting in a fuel gain greater than unity. Here we report the achievement of fusion fuel gains exceeding unity on the US National Ignition Facility using a 'high-foot' implosion method, which is a manipulation of the laser pulse shape in a way that reduces instability in the implosion. These experiments show an order-of-magnitude improvement in yield performance over past deuterium-tritium implosion experiments. We also see a significant contribution to the yield from α-particle self-heating and evidence for the 'bootstrapping' required to accelerate the deuterium-tritium fusion burn to eventually 'run away' and ignite. PMID:24522535

  12. Tritium projectiles for fueling magnetic fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, P.W.; Gouge, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    As part of the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) plasma fueling development program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has fabricated a pellet (cylindrical projectile of frozen hydrogenic gas at a temperature in the range 6--16 K) injection system to test the mechanical and thermal properties of extruded tritium, a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. This repeating, single-stage, pneumatic injector, called the Tritium-Proof-of-Principle Phase 2 (TPOP-2) Pellet Injector, has a piston-driven mechanical extruder and is designed to extrude and accelerate hydrogenic pellets sized for the ITER device. The TPOP-2 program has the following development goals: evaluate the feasibility of extruding tritium and deuterium-tritium (D-T) mixtures for use in future pellet injection systems; determine the mechanical and thermal properties of tritium and D-T extrusions; integrate, test, and evaluate the extruder in a repeating, single-stage light gas gun that is sized for the ITER application (pellet diameter {approximately} 7 to 8 mm); evaluate options for recycling propellant and extruder exhaust gas; evaluate operability and reliability of ITER prototypical fueling systems in an environment of significant tritium inventory that requires secondary and room containment systems. In initial tests with deuterium feed at ORNL, up to 13 pellets have been extruded at rates up to 1 Hz and accelerated to speeds of 1.0 to 1.1 km/s, using hydrogen propellant gas at a supply pressure of 65 bar. The pellets, typically 7.4 mm in diameter and up to 11 mm in length, are the largest cryogenic pellets produced by the fusion program to date. These pellets represent about a 11% density perturbation to ITER. Hydrogenic pellets will be used in ITER to sustain the fusion power in the plasma core and may be crucial in reducing first-wall tritium inventories by a process called isotopic fueling in which tritium-rich pellets fuel the burning plasma core and deuterium gas fuels the edge.

  13. Comparison of the recently proposed super-Marx generator approach to thermonuclear ignition with the deuterium-tritium laser fusion-fission hybrid concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Winterberg, F.

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed super-Marx generator pure deuterium microdetonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser deuterium-tritium fusion-fission hybrid concept (LIFE). In a super-Marx generator, a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultrahigh voltage Marx generator from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium microexplosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. Typical examples of the LIFE concept are a fusion gain of 30 and a fission gain of 10, making up a total gain of 300, with about ten times more energy released into fissionmore » as compared to fusion. This means the substantial release of fission products, as in fissionless pure fission reactors. In the super-Marx approach for the ignition of pure deuterium microdetonation, a gain of the same magnitude can, in theory, be reached. If feasible, the super-Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions.« less

  14. Comparison of the recently proposed super-Marx generator approach to thermonuclear ignition with the deuterium-tritium laser fusion-fission hybrid concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Winterberg, F.

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed super-Marx generator pure deuterium microdetonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser deuterium-tritium fusion-fission hybrid concept (LIFE). In a super-Marx generator, a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultrahigh voltage Marx generator from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium microexplosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. Typical examples of the LIFE concept are a fusion gain of 30 and a fission gain of 10, making up a total gain of 300, with about ten times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means the substantial release of fission products, as in fissionless pure fission reactors. In the super-Marx approach for the ignition of pure deuterium microdetonation, a gain of the same magnitude can, in theory, be reached. If feasible, the super-Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions.

  15. Polyimide capsules may hold high pressure DT fuel without cryogenic support for the National Ignition Facility indirect-drive targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.J.; Letts, S.A.

    1997-03-26

    New target designs for the Omega upgrade laser and ignition targets in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require thick (80 - 100 {micro}m) cryogenic fuel layers. The Omega upgrade target will require cryogenic handling after initial fill because of the high fill pressures and the thin capsule walls. For the NIF indirectly driven targets, a larger capsule size and new materials offer hope that they can be built, filled and stored in a manner similar to the targets used in the Nova facility without requiring cryogenic handling.

  16. Integrated Two-Dimensional DRACO Simulations of Cryogenic DT Target Performance on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Radha, P. B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Betti, R.; Epstein, R.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Skupsky, S.

    2013-10-01

    Integrated simulations of cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) target implosions on OMEGA have been performed using the radiation-hydrodynamic code DRACO. Taking into account the known nonuniformities of target and laser irradiation, 2-D simulations examine the target performance of a variety of ignition-relevant implosions. The effects of cross-beam energy transfer and nonlocal heat transport are mimicked by a time-dependent flux limiter. DRACO simulations show good agreement with experiments in ρR , neutron yield, Ti, neutron rate, and x-ray images for the mid-adiabat (α ~ 4 ) implosions. For low-adiabat (α ~ 2) and high in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR > 24) implosions, the integrated simulations with the known nonuniformity sources cannot fully explain the reduction in target performance. Examinations of other possible nonuniformity sources and the thermal conductivity model will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  17. Enhancement of Localized ICRF Heating and Current Drive in TFTR D-T Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    = G Schilling, First Author

    1997-04-15

    Theoretical advantages have led to an increased importance of the modification and sustainment of pressure and magnetic shear profiles in plasmas. We have demonstrated electron heating and current drive in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) plasmas with the existing 43/63.6 MHz ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) system, both via the fast wave and via mode conversion of the fast wave to an ion-Bernstein wave. In order to achieve both on- and off-axis mode conversion in a pure D-T (deuterium-tritium) plasma, we have changed the operating frequency of two of our transmitters and antennas to 30 MHz and improved the launched directional wave spectrum. As a second step, two new four-strap fast-wave antennas have been installed, and a new four-strap direct-launch IBW antenna has been added as well. This reconfiguration and the resulting operating characteristics of the TFTR ICRF system in a variety of discharges will be presented.

  18. Optical and X-ray Characterization of Groove Profiles in DT Ice Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Kozioziemski, B J; Salmonson, J; Chernov, A; Atherton, L J; Dewald, E; Izumi, N; Johnson, M A; Kucheyev, S; Lugten, J; Mapoles, E; Moody, J D; Pipes, J W; Sater, J D; Stefanescu, D

    2008-06-27

    Deuterium-tritium (DT) single-crystal ice layers in spherical shells often form with localized defects that we believe are vapor-etched grain boundary grooves built from dislocations and accommodating slight misorientations between contacting lattice regions. Ignition implosion target requirements limit the cross-sectional areas and total lengths of these grooves, and since they are often the dominant factor in determining layer surface quality, it is important that we be able to characterize their depths, widths and lengths. We present a variety of raytracing and diffraction image modeling results that support our understanding of the profiles of the grooves, which is grounded in x-ray and optical imaging data, and we describe why these data are nevertheless insufficient to adequately determine whether or not a particular layer will meet the groove requirements for ignition. We present accumulated data showing the distribution of groove depths, widths, and lengths from a number of layers, and we discuss how these data motivate the adoption of layer rejection criteria in order to ensure that layers that pass these criteria will almost certainly meet the groove requirements.

  19. Relativistically correct DD and DT neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, B.; Chittenden, J.

    2014-06-01

    We use relativistic kinematics to derive an expression for the energy spectrum of neutrons produced by fusion reactions in deuterium and deuterium-tritium thermal plasmas. The derivation does not require approximations and the obtained expression gives the exact shape of the spectrum. It is shown that the high-energy tail of the neutron spectrum is highly sensitive to the plasma temperature. Simple expressions for the plasma temperature as a function of the neutron spectrum full width at half maximum (FWHM) are given.

  20. Numerical investigations on a compact magnetic fusion device for studying the effect of external applied magnetic field oscillations on the nuclear burning efficiency of D-T and p-11B fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustaizis, S. D.; Lalousis, P.; Hora, H.; Larour, J.; Auvray, P.; Balcou, P.; Ducret, J.-E.; Martin, P.

    2015-05-01

    The burning process of high density (about 1018cm-3), high temperature (tens to hundreds of keV) plasma trapped by a high mirror-like magnetic field in a Compact Magnetic Fusion (CMF) device is numerically investigated.. The initial high density and high temperature plasma in the CMF device is produced by ultrashort high intensity laser beam interaction with clusters or thin foils, and two fuels, D-T and p-11B are studied. The spatio-temporal evolution of D-T and p-11B plasmas, the production of alphas, the generated electric fields and the high external applied magnetic field are described by a 1-D multifluid code. The initial values for the plasma densities, temperatures and external applied magnetic field (about 100 T) correspond to high β plasmas. The main objectives of the numerical simulations are: to study the plasma trapping, the neutron and alpha production for both fuels, and compare the effect of the external applied magnetic field on the nuclear burning efficiency for the two fuels.. The comparisons and the advantages for each fuel will be presented. The proposed CMF device and the potential operation of the device within the ELI-NP pillar will be discussed.

  1. Spherical ion kinetic simulations of DT implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, F.; Matte, J.P.; Casanova, M.; Larroche, O.

    1995-10-01

    The implosion of the DT plasma in an ablatively driven glass microballoon was simulated with a spherical ion kinetic code. The ion velocity distribution functions were strongly non-Maxwellian, and mostly depleted of fast ions. A high viscosity contributed to fuel heating, while large ion heat fluxes towards the pusher strongly cooled the fuel. This latter kinetic effect may explain in part why hydrodynamic simulations usually predict higher neutron yields than are measured.

  2. Pulsed neutron generators based on the sealed chambers of plasma focus design with D and DT fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkov, D. I.; Dulatov, A. K.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Golikov, A. V.; Andreev, D. A.; Mikhailov, Yu V.; Prokuratov, I. A.; Selifanov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Development of neutron generators using plasma focus (PF) chambers is being conducted in the All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA) during more than 25 years. PF is a source of soft and hard x-rays and neutrons 2.5 MeV (D) or 14 MeV (DT). Pulses of x-rays and neutrons have a duration of about several tens of nanoseconds, which defines the scope of such generators—the study of ultrafast processes. VNIIA has developed a series of pulse neutron generators covering the range of outputs 107-1012 n/pulse with resources on the order of 103-104 switches, depending on purposes. Generators have weights in the range of 30-700 kg, which allows referring them to the class of transportable generators. Generators include sealed PF chambers, whose manufacture was mastered by VNIIA vacuum tube production plant. A number of optimized PF chambers, designed for use in generators with a certain yield of neutrons has been developed. The use of gas generator based on gas absorber of hydrogen isotopes, enabled to increase the self-life and resource of PF chambers. Currently, the PF chambers withstand up to 1000 switches and have the safety of not less than 5 years. Using a generator with a gas heater, significantly increased security of PF chambers, because deuterium-tritium mixture is released only during work, other times it is in a bound state in the working element of the gas generator.

  3. Anomalous Loss of DT Alpha Particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Hans W.

    1997-06-01

    Princeton's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is the first experimental fusion device to routinely use tritium to study the deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion reaction,allowing the first systematic study of DT alpha particles in tokamak plasmas. A crucial aspect of alpha-particle physics is the fraction of alphas that escape from the plasma, particularly since these energetic particles can do severe damage to the first wall of a reactor. An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR's DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of alpha-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous "delayed" loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on alpha-particle loss has led to a better understanding of alpha-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing alpha-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e. compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90 degree lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an alpha-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized alpha-particles near the

  4. Low Fuel Convergence Path to Direct-Drive Fusion Ignition.

    PubMed

    Molvig, Kim; Schmitt, Mark J; Albright, B J; Dodd, E S; Hoffman, N M; McCall, G H; Ramsey, S D

    2016-06-24

    A new class of inertial fusion capsules is presented that combines multishell targets with laser direct drive at low intensity (2.8×10^{14}  W/cm^{2}) to achieve robust ignition. The targets consist of three concentric, heavy, metal shells, enclosing a volume of tens of μg of liquid deuterium-tritium fuel. Ignition is designed to occur well "upstream" from stagnation, with minimal pusher deceleration to mitigate interface Rayleigh-Taylor growth. Laser intensities below thresholds for laser plasma instability and cross beam energy transfer facilitate high hydrodynamic efficiency (∼10%). PMID:27391731

  5. Low Fuel Convergence Path to Direct-Drive Fusion Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvig, Kim; Schmitt, Mark J.; Albright, B. J.; Dodd, E. S.; Hoffman, N. M.; McCall, G. H.; Ramsey, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    A new class of inertial fusion capsules is presented that combines multishell targets with laser direct drive at low intensity (2.8 ×1014 W /cm2 ) to achieve robust ignition. The targets consist of three concentric, heavy, metal shells, enclosing a volume of tens of μ g of liquid deuterium-tritium fuel. Ignition is designed to occur well "upstream" from stagnation, with minimal pusher deceleration to mitigate interface Rayleigh-Taylor growth. Laser intensities below thresholds for laser plasma instability and cross beam energy transfer facilitate high hydrodynamic efficiency (˜10 %).

  6. Nuclear imaging of the fuel assembly in ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Danly, C. R.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Batha, S.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Clark, D. S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Raman, K. S.; Izumi, N.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Drury, O. B.; Alger, E. T.; and others

    2013-05-15

    First results from the analysis of neutron image data collected on implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium capsules during the 2011-2012 National Ignition Campaign are reported. The data span a variety of experimental designs aimed at increasing the stagnation pressure of the central hotspot and areal density of the surrounding fuel assembly. Images of neutrons produced by deuterium–tritium fusion reactions in the hotspot are presented, as well as images of neutrons that scatter in the surrounding dense fuel assembly. The image data are compared with 1D and 2D model predictions, and consistency checked using other diagnostic data. The results indicate that the size of the fusing hotspot is consistent with the model predictions, as well as other imaging data, while the overall size of the fuel assembly, inferred from the scattered neutron images, is systematically smaller than models' prediction. Preliminary studies indicate these differences are consistent with a significant fraction (20%–25%) of the initial deuterium-tritium fuel mass outside the compact fuel assembly, due either to low mode mass asymmetry or high mode 3D mix effects at the ablator-ice interface.

  7. Thick target D-T neutron yield measurements using metal occluders of scandium, titanium, yttrium, zirconium, gadolinium, erbium, hafnium, and tantalum at energies from 25 to 200 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Malbrough, D.J.; Molloy, J.T. Jr.; Becker, R.H.

    1990-11-19

    Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) neutron yields from thick films of scandium, titanium, yttrium, zirconium, gadolinium, erbium, hafnium, and tantalum were measured by the associated particle technique using the 200-keV accelerator at the Pinellas Plant. The neutron yields were measured for all targets at energies from 25 to 200 keV in 5-keV steps with an average uncertainty of {plus_minus}6.8%. Tabulated results are presented with yield versus energy curves for each target. Yield curves for D-D neutrons from earlier measurements are also presented with the D-T neutron yield curves. Good fits to the data were found for both D-D and D-T with theoretical calculations that were adjusted by smooth functions of the form: A{sub 0} + A{sub 1}E + A{sub 2}E{sup 2}. The results of the fits strongly suggest that disagreement between measurement and theory is due mainly to inaccuracies in currently available stopping power data. Comparisons with earlier theoretical calculations for titanium and erbium are also presented. 27 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Understanding fuel magnetization and mix using secondary nuclear reactions in magneto-inertial fusion.

    PubMed

    Schmit, P F; Knapp, P F; Hansen, S B; Gomez, M R; Hahn, K D; Sinars, D B; Peterson, K J; Slutz, S A; Sefkow, A B; Awe, T J; Harding, E; Jennings, C A; Chandler, G A; Cooper, G W; Cuneo, M E; Geissel, M; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Herrmann, M C; Hess, M H; Johns, O; Lamppa, D C; Martin, M R; McBride, R D; Porter, J L; Robertson, G K; Rochau, G A; Rovang, D C; Ruiz, C L; Savage, M E; Smith, I C; Stygar, W A; Vesey, R A

    2014-10-10

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs. PMID:25375715

  9. Understanding Fuel Magnetization and Mix Using Secondary Nuclear Reactions in Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, P. F.; Knapp, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Lamppa, D. C.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Porter, J. L.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Ruiz, C. L.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetizing the fuel in inertial confinement fusion relaxes ignition requirements by reducing thermal conductivity and changing the physics of burn product confinement. Diagnosing the level of fuel magnetization during burn is critical to understanding target performance in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) implosions. In pure deuterium fusion plasma, 1.01 MeV tritons are emitted during deuterium-deuterium fusion and can undergo secondary deuterium-tritium reactions before exiting the fuel. Increasing the fuel magnetization elongates the path lengths through the fuel of some of the tritons, enhancing their probability of reaction. Based on this feature, a method to diagnose fuel magnetization using the ratio of overall deuterium-tritium to deuterium-deuterium neutron yields is developed. Analysis of anisotropies in the secondary neutron energy spectra further constrain the measurement. Secondary reactions also are shown to provide an upper bound for the volumetric fuel-pusher mix in MIF. The analysis is applied to recent MIF experiments [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.155003] on the Z Pulsed Power Facility, indicating that significant magnetic confinement of charged burn products was achieved and suggesting a relatively low-mix environment. Both of these are essential features of future ignition-scale MIF designs.

  10. Fuel cycle for a fusion neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananyev, S. S.; Spitsyn, A. V.; Kuteev, B. V.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a tokamak-based stationary fusion neutron source (FNS) for scientific research (neutron diffraction, etc.), tests of structural materials for future fusion reactors, nuclear waste transmutation, fission reactor fuel production, and control of subcritical nuclear systems (fusion-fission hybrid reactor) is being developed in Russia. The fuel cycle system is one of the most important systems of FNS that provides circulation and reprocessing of the deuterium-tritium fuel mixture in all fusion reactor systems: the vacuum chamber, neutral injection system, cryogenic pumps, tritium purification system, separation system, storage system, and tritium-breeding blanket. The existing technologies need to be significantly upgraded since the engineering solutions adopted in the ITER project can be only partially used in the FNS (considering the capacity factor higher than 0.3, tritium flow up to 200 m3Pa/s, and temperature of reactor elements up to 650°C). The deuterium-tritium fuel cycle of the stationary FNS is considered. The TC-FNS computer code developed for estimating the tritium distribution in the systems of FNS is described. The code calculates tritium flows and inventory in tokamak systems (vacuum chamber, cryogenic pumps, neutral injection system, fuel mixture purification system, isotope separation system, tritium storage system) and takes into account tritium loss in the fuel cycle due to thermonuclear burnup and β decay. For the two facility versions considered, FNS-ST and DEMO-FNS, the amount of fuel mixture needed for uninterrupted operation of all fuel cycle systems is 0.9 and 1.4 kg, consequently, and the tritium consumption is 0.3 and 1.8 kg per year, including 35 and 55 g/yr, respectively, due to tritium decay.

  11. Performance characteristics of a compact D-T neutron generator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfutzner, H. G.; Groves, J. L.; Mahdavi, M.

    1995-05-01

    A new pulsed neutron generator system has been introduced which uses the deuterium-tritium fusion reaction to produce 14 MeV neutrons. The new system incorporates the latest technology in its electronics, sealed tube neutron head and computer control. The system is extremely flexible and adaptable to a wide range of applications in the field of materials non-destructive analysis.

  12. Optimization of combined delayed neutron and differential die-away prompt neutron signal detection for characterization of spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Pauline; Tobin, Stephen J; Croft, Stephen; Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, M; Lee, T

    2010-12-02

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded multiple laboratories and universities to develop a means to accurately quantify the Plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies and ways to also detect potential diversion of fuel pins. Delayed Neutron (DN) counting provides a signature somewhat more sensitive to {sup 235}U than Pu while Differential Die-Away (DDA) is complementary in that it has greater sensitivity to Pu. The two methods can, with care, be combined into a single instrument which also provides passive neutron information. Individually the techniques cannot robustly quantify the Pu content but coupled together the information content in the signatures enables Pu quantification separate to the total fissile content. The challenge of merging DN and DDA, prompt neutron (PN) signal, capabilities in the same design is the focus of this paper. Other possibilities also suggest themselves, such as a direct measurement of the reactivity (multiplication) by either the boost in signal obtained during the active interrogation itself or by the extension of the die-away profile. In an early study, conceptual designs have been modeled using a neutron detector comprising fission chambers or 3He proportional counters and a {approx}14 MeV neutron Deuterium-Tritium (DT) generator as the interrogation source. Modeling was performed using the radiation transport code Monte Carlo N-Particles eXtended (MCNPX). Building on this foundation, the present paper quantifies the capability of a new design using an array of {sup 3}He detectors together with fission chambers to optimize both DN and PN detections and active characterization, respectively. This new design was created in order to minimize fission in {sup 238}U (a nuisance DN emitter), to use a realistic neutron generator, to reduce the cost and to achieve near spatial interrogation and detection of the DN and PN, important for detection of diversion, all within

  13. D--T and D sub 2 retention in plastic shells

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.W.; Sanchez, J.J.; Fearon, E.M. )

    1992-07-01

    We have measured the D{sub 2} and D--T gas pressure versus time inside multilayer polymer shells (polystyrene, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and plasma polymer CH{sub 1.3}) from which we calculate an effective permeability for the PVA layer. From this data, we have developed a D--T pressurization procedure for current direct drive fusion targets that increases the D--T fuel retention time an order of magnitude over previous pressurization schemes. The D--T fuel retention time will be decreased from the shells original D{sub 2} retention time ({similar to}45 h) by; (1) 50% immediately after D--T pressurization, (2) 60% after D--T pressurization and cryogenic storage for 1 day, and (3) 85% after D--T pressurization and cryogenic storage for 13 days. We have also found that heat treating the polymer shell increases the fuel retention time for D{sub 2} from 10% to 40% and that the D{sub 2} mass transfer through the composite polymer shell does not follow Fick's law. Finally, we describe an efficient target pressurization procedure for D{sub 2} fuel.

  14. Energy relaxation of multi-MeV protons traveling in compressed DT+Be plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhigang; He, Bin; Fu, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Ping

    2014-07-15

    We investigate the stopping power of the multi-MeV protons moving in the hot dense deuterium-tritium plasmas mixed with beryllium (Be), which is important in inertial confinement fusion experiments. It is shown that with increasing the density of Be, the stopping power of the proton also increases with the peaks shifting towards higher projectile velocity, which leads to the reduction of both the projectile range and the energy transferred to the electrons.

  15. Stability analysis of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes in TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; Budny, R.; Chang, Z.; Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.

    1995-05-15

    The toroidicity-induced Alfvin eigenmodes (TAE) with radially extended structure are found to be stable in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Deuterium-Tritium plasmas. A core localized TAE mode is shown to exist near the center of the plasma at small magnetic shear and finite plasma beta, which can be destabilized by energetic alpha particles on TFTR. With additional instability drive from fast minority ions powered by ICRH, both the global and the core localized TAE modes can be readily destabilized.

  16. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Brooks, J.N.; Hogan, J.

    1998-07-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors.

  17. Douglas DT-2 (Naval Aircraft Factory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1923-01-01

    Douglas DT-2 (Naval Aircraft Factory): This example of the Douglas DT-2 torpedo plane, which flew as 'NACA 11,' was built in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by the Naval Aircraft Factory. Langley's NACA staff studied the take-off characteristics of a twin-float seaplane with this aircraft.

  18. Kinetic Method for Hydrogen-Deuterium-Tritium Mixture Distillation Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sazonov, A.B.; Kagramanov, Z.G.; Magomedbekov, E.P.

    2005-07-15

    Simulation of hydrogen distillation plants requires mathematical procedures suitable for multicomponent systems. In most of the present-day simulation methods a distillation column is assumed to be composed of theoretical stages, or plates. However, in the case of a multicomponent mixture theoretical plate does not exist.An alternative kinetic method of simulation is depicted in the work. According to this method a system of mass-transfer differential equations is solved numerically. Mass-transfer coefficients are estimated with using experimental results and empirical equations.Developed method allows calculating the steady state of a distillation column as well as its any non-steady state when initial conditions are given. The results for steady states are compared with ones obtained via Thiele-Geddes theoretical stage technique and the necessity of using kinetic method is demonstrated. Examples of a column startup period and periodic distillation simulations are shown as well.

  19. First Measurements of Fuel-Ablator Interface Instability Growth in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Weber, C R; Döppner, T; Casey, D T; Bunn, T L; Carlson, L C; Dylla-Spears, R J; Kozioziemski, B J; MacPhee, A G; Nikroo, A; Robey, H F; Sater, J D; Smalyuk, V A

    2016-08-12

    Direct measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are reported for the first time. These experiments investigate one of the degradation mechanisms behind the lower-than-expected performance of early ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility. Face-on x-ray radiography is used to measure instability growth occurring between the deuterium-tritium fuel and the plastic ablator from well-characterized perturbations. This growth starts in two ways through separate experiments-either from a preimposed interface modulation or from ablation front feedthrough. These experiments are consistent with analytic modeling and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which say that a moderately unstable Atwood number and convergence effects are causing in-flight perturbation growth at the interface. The analysis suggests that feedthrough from outersurface perturbations dominates the interface perturbation growth at mode 60. PMID:27563971

  20. First Measurements of Fuel-Ablator Interface Instability Growth in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. R.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D. T.; Bunn, T. L.; Carlson, L. C.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H. F.; Sater, J. D.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    Direct measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are reported for the first time. These experiments investigate one of the degradation mechanisms behind the lower-than-expected performance of early ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility. Face-on x-ray radiography is used to measure instability growth occurring between the deuterium-tritium fuel and the plastic ablator from well-characterized perturbations. This growth starts in two ways through separate experiments—either from a preimposed interface modulation or from ablation front feedthrough. These experiments are consistent with analytic modeling and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which say that a moderately unstable Atwood number and convergence effects are causing in-flight perturbation growth at the interface. The analysis suggests that feedthrough from outersurface perturbations dominates the interface perturbation growth at mode 60.

  1. DT-MRI segmentation using graph cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeselassie, Yonas T.; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2007-03-01

    An important problem in medical image analysis is the segmentation of anatomical regions of interest. Once regions of interest are segmented, one can extract shape, appearance, and structural features that can be analyzed for disease diagnosis or treatment evaluation. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) is a relatively new medical imaging modality that captures unique water diffusion properties and fiber orientation information of the imaged tissues. In this paper, we extend the interactive multidimensional graph cuts segmentation technique to operate on DT-MRI data by utilizing latest advances in tensor calculus and diffusion tensor dissimilarity metrics. The user interactively selects certain tensors as object ("obj") or background ("bkg") to provide hard constraints for the segmentation. Additional soft constraints incorporate information about both regional tissue diffusion as well as boundaries between tissues of different diffusion properties. Graph cuts are used to find globally optimal segmentation of the underlying 3D DT-MR image among all segmentations satisfying the constraints. We develop a graph structure from the underlying DT-MR image with the tensor voxels corresponding to the graph vertices and with graph edge weights computed using either Log-Euclidean or the J-divergence tensor dissimilarity metric. The topology of our segmentation is unrestricted and both obj and bkg segments may consist of several isolated parts. We test our method on synthetic DT data and apply it to real 2D and 3D MRI, providing segmentations of the corpus callosum in the brain and the ventricles of the heart.

  2. Density dependent stopping power and muon sticking in muon catalyzed D-T fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rafelski, H.E.; Mueller, B.

    1988-12-27

    The origin of the experimentally observed (1) density dependence of the muon alpha sticking fraction ..omega../sub s/ in muon catalyzed deuterium- tritium fusion is investigated. We show that the reactivation probability depends sensitively on the target stopping power at low ion velocities. The density dependence of the stopping power for a singly charged projectile in liquid heavy hydrogen is parametrized to simulate possible screening effects and a density dependent effective ionization potential. We find that, in principle, a description of the measured density dependence is possible, but the required parameters appear too large. Also, the discrepancy with observed (He..mu..) X-ray data widens.

  3. Demonstrating Ignition Hydrodynamic Equivalence in Cryogenic DT Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. N.

    2013-10-01

    Demonstrating ignition hydrodynamic equivalence is one of the primary goals of direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA. It requires the shell reaching implosion velocities > 3.5 × 107 cm/s while maintaining the fuel adiabat below 3 and keeping the shell from breaking up as a result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The cryogenic targets used for implosions on OMEGA are 860- μm-outer-diam CD shells filled with DT fuel. The shell thickness varies between 5 and 12 μm, and DT ice thickness between 40 and 65 μm. Experimental results demonstrate, however, that neutron-averaged areal density in excess of 80% and yields above 25% of 1-D predicted values are obtained if the fuel adiabat > 3.5 and shell in-flight aspect ratio (IFAR) is below 22. As the IFAR exceeds this value, the shell breaks up and the areal density and yield are reduced. Identifying the main source of shell nonuniformities that lead to performance degradation in low-adiabat designs is one of the main efforts of OMEGA cryogenic campaign. This talk will summarize progress in cryogenic target implosions over the last year and review the effect of target debris, early-time laser shinethrough, and fuel-pusher roughness on target performance. In addition, the effect of cross-beam energy transfer (a major source of hydroefficiency degradation in a direct-drive implosions) and its mitigation strategies (including high- Z ablator layers, beam zooming, and laser wavelength shifts) will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  4. Tritium processing and management during D-T experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    La Marche, P.H.; Anderson, J.L.; Gentile, C.A.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hosea, J.; Kalish, M.; Kozub, T.; Murray, H.; Nagy, A.; Raftopoulos, S.

    1994-11-01

    TFTR performance has surpassed many of the previous tokamak records. This has been made possible by the use of tritium as fuel for DT plasma discharges. Stable operations of tritium systems provide for safe, routine DT operation of TFTR. In the preparation for DT operation, in the commissioning of the tritium systems and in the operation of the Nuclear Facility several key lessons have been learned. They include: the facility must take the lead in interpreting the applicable regulations and orders and then seek regulator approval; the use of ultra high vacuum technology in tritium system design and construction simplifies and enhances operations and maintenance; and central facility control under a single supervisory position is crucial to safely orchestrate operational and maintenance activities.

  5. Hot spot temperature measurements in DT layered implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Pravesh; Ma, T.; Macphee, A.; Callahan, D.; Chen, H.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D.; Edgell, D.; Hurricane, O.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; Jarrott, L.; Kritcher, A.; Springer, P.

    2015-11-01

    The temperature of the burning DT hot spot in an ICF implosion is a crucial parameter in understanding the thermodynamic conditions of the fuel at stagnation and and the performance of the implosion in terms of alpha-particle self-heating and energy balance. The continuum radiation spectrum emitted from the hot spot provides an accurate measure of the emissivity-weighted electron temperature. Absolute measurements of the emitted radiation are made with several independent instruments including spatially-resolved broadband imagers, and space- and time-integrated monochromatic detectors. We present estimates of the electron temperature in DT layered implosions derived from the radiation spectrum most consistent with the available measurements. The emissivity-weighted electron temperatures are compared to the neutron-averaged apparent ion temperatures inferred from neutron time-of-flight detectors. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Direct-drive DT implosions with Knudsen number variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Schmitt, M. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Gales, S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Leatherland, A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu

    2016-05-01

    Direct-drive implosions of DT-filled plastic-shells have been conducted at the Omega laser facility, measuring nuclear yields while varying Knudsen numbers (i.e., the ratio of mean free path of fusing ions to the length of fuel region) by adjusting both shell thickness (e.g., 7.5, 15, 20, 30 μm) and fill pressure (e.g., 2, 5, 15 atm). The fusion reactivity reduction model showed a stronger effect on yield as the Knudsen number increases (or the shell thickness decreases). The Reduced-Ion-Kinetic (RIK) simulation which includes both fusion reactivity reduction and mix model was necessary to provide a better match between the observed neutron yields and those simulated.

  7. Measurements of Muon Catalyzed dt Fusion in Solid HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcelli, Tracy

    1999-05-01

    The first measurement of muon catalyzed dt fusion (dtμ arrow ^4He + n + μ^-) in solid HD at ~ 3 K has been performed. The theory describing the formation of the [(dtμ)pee)] muonic molecule from the resonant reaction tμ + HD arrow [(dtμ)pee], a key process in the dt fusion cycle, can now be tested against experimental results. Using an experimental technique which employs solid layers of hydrogen isotopes, the energy of molecular formation is determined via time of flight, and dt fusion time spectra in solid HD have been measured. The theory describing the resonant formation of the dtμ muonic molecule is compared to the experimental results through Monte Carlo simulations. The energy dependent molecular formation rates calculated for HD at 3 K have been employed in the Monte Carlo with the resultant fusion time spectra in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Laser-optical path to nuclear energy without radioactivity: Fusion of hydrogen-boron by nonlinear force driven plasma blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Malekynia, B.; Azizi, N.

    2009-10-01

    Anomalous interaction of terawatt-picosecond laser pulses allows side-on ignition of solid state density fusion fuel with the unexpected possibility of igniting uncompressed hydrogen-boron p- 11B. Suppression of relativistic self-focusing by using very clean laser pulses with an extremely high contrast ratio is essential to achieve ignition thresholds only ten times more difficult than fusion of deuterium-tritium (DT). This opens the possibility for laser driven fusion energy without neutrons and less radioactivity than from burning coal. The complex nonlinear optical properties involved are elaborated.

  9. Measurements of escaping alphas in the TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.

    1995-03-01

    Alpha particle loss to the wall of TFTR has been measured during the initial TFTR DT run period. These measurements were made with the same lost alpha scintillator detector system used previously for DD fusion products, except for a switch of the scintillator material from zinc sulfide (P31) to yttrium aluminate (P46) to insure a linear response up to the maximum alpha flux expected in DT. The alpha loss signals in DT are {approx} 100 times larger than the DD fusion product loss signals, as expected from the neutron rates and the relative sensitivity to DT vs. DD fusion products.

  10. Effect of dt{mu} quasinucleus structure on energy levels of the (dt{mu})Xee exotic molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Kartavtsev, O.I.; Malykh, A.V.; Permyakov, V.P.

    2004-08-01

    Precise energies of rovibrational states of the exotic hydrogen-like molecule (dt{mu})Xee are of importance for dt{mu} resonant formation, which is a key process in the muon-catalyzed fusion cycle. The effect of the internal structure and rotation of the dt{mu} quasi-nucleus on energy levels is studied using the three-body description of the (dt{mu})Xee molecule based on the hierarchy of scales and corresponding energies of its constituent subsystems. For a number of rovibrational states of (dt{mu})dee and (dt{mu})tee, the shifts and splittings of energy levels are calculated in the second order of the perturbation theory.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Muon-catalyzed dt Fusion in Wide Ranges of D/T Mixture Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bom, V.R.; Eijk, C.W.E. van; Demin, A.M.; Golubkov, A.N.; Grishechkin, S.K.; Klevtsov, V.G.; Kuryakin, A.V.; Musyaev, R.K.; Perevozchikov, V.V.; Vinogradov, Yu.I.; Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Zlatoustovskii, S.V.; Demin, D.L.; Filchenkov, V.V.; Grafov, N.N.; Gritsaj, K.I.; Konin, A.D.; Medved', S.V.; Rudenko, A.I.; Yukhimchuk, S.A.

    2005-04-01

    A vast program of the experimental investigation of muon-catalyzed dt fusion was performed on the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research phasotron. Parameters of the dt cycle were obtained in a wide range of the D/T mixture conditions: temperatures of 20-800 K, densities of 0.2-1.2 of the liquid hydrogen density (LHD), and tritium concentrations of 15-86%. In this paper, the results obtained are summarized.

  12. High-Performance Layered DT Capsule Implosions in Depleted Uranium Hohlraums on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doeppner, Tilo; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Benedetti, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Fittinghoff, D.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Izumi, N.; Kritcher, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P.; Robey, H.; Remington, B.; Salmonson, J.; Springer, P.; Widmann, K.; Merrill, F.; Wilde, C.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the first layered DT capsule implosions in depleted uranium (DU) hohlraums driven with a high-foot pulse shape. High-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to hydrodynamic instabilities. [Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. DU hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to 25 TW extra laser power at the peak of the drive compared to Au hohlraums. Additionally, we observe an improved implosion shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. As a result, these first high-foot DU experiments achieved total neutron yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel. This work performed under the auspices of U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Collision of plane thermonuclear detonation waves in a preliminarily compressed DT mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Khishchenko, K. V.; Charakhch’yan, A. A.

    2015-03-15

    The paper deals with a one-dimensional problem on symmetric irradiation of a plane DT fuel layer with a thickness 2H and density ρ{sub 0} ⩽ 100ρ{sub s} (where ρ{sub s} is the density of the DT fuel in the solid state at atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 4 K) by two identical monoenergetic proton beams with a kinetic energy of 1 MeV, an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, and a duration of 50 ps. The problem is solved in the framework of one-fluid two-temperature hydrodynamic model that takes into account the equation of state for hydrogen, electron and ion heat conductivities, kinetics of the DT reaction, plasma self-radiation, and plasma heating by α-particles. The irradiation of the fuel results in the appearance of two counterpropagating detonation waves to the fronts of which rarefaction waves are adjacent. The efficiency of the DT reaction after the collision (reflection from the plane of symmetry) of the detonation waves depends on the spatial homogeneity of thermodynamic functions between the fronts of the reflected detonation waves. At Hρ{sub 0} ≈ 1 g/cm{sup 2}, the gain factor is G ≈ 200, whereas at Hρ{sub 0} ≈ 5 g/cm{sup 2}, it is G > 2000. As applied to a cylindrical target that is ignited from ends and in which the cylinder with the fuel is surrounded by a heavy magnetized shell, the obtained values of the burn-up and gain factors are maximum possible. To estimate the ignition energy E{sub ig} of a cylindrical target by using solutions to the one-dimensional problem, a quasi-one-dimensional model is developed. The model assumes that the main mechanism of target ignition is fuel heating by α-particles. The trajectories of α-particles are limited by a cylindrical surface with a given radius, which is a parameter of the model and is identified with the fuel radius in the target and the radii of the irradiating proton beams. This model reproduces the well-known theoretical dependence E{sub ig} ∼ ρ{sub 0}{sup −2} and yields E

  14. Alpha particle loss in the TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    Alpha particle loss was measured during the TFTR DT experiments using a scintillator detector located at the vessel bottom in the ion grad-B drift direction. The DT alpha particle loss to this detector was consistent with the calculated first-orbit loss over the whole range of plasma current I=0.6-2.7 MA. In particular, the alpha particle loss rate per DT neutron did not increase significantly with fusion power up to 10.7 MW, indicating the absence of any new ``collective`` alpha particle loss processes in these experiments.

  15. Cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Kline, J. L.; Grim, G.; Alger, E. T.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Betti, R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Castro, C.; Casey, D. T.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; DiNicola, J. M.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Döppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Dzenitis, E.; Eckart, M.; Erbert, G.; Farley, D.; Fair, J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Frank, M.; Frenje, L. J. A.; Friedrich, S.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Gibson, C.; Giraldez, E.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Guler, N.; Haan, S. W.; Haid, B. J.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Haynam, C. A.; Heestand, G. M.; Hermann, M.; Hermann, H. W.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Holder, J. P.; Holunda, D. M.; Horner, J. B.; Hsing, W. W.; Huang, H.; Izumi, N.; Jackson, M.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kauffman, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Klingmann, J.; Kohut, T.; Knauer, J. P.; Koch, J. A.; Kozioziemki, B.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kritcher, A. L.; Kroll, J.; La Fortune, K.; Lagin, L.; Landen, O. L.; Larson, D. W.; LaTray, D.; Leeper, R. J.; Le Pape, S.; Lindl, J. D.; Lowe-Webb, R.; Ma, T.; McNaney, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Malsbury, T. N.; Mapoles, E.; Marshall, C. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Merrill, F.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Moran, M.; Moreno, K. A.; Munro, D. H.; Nathan, B. R.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Orth, C. D.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Parham, T.; Petrasso, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Rinderknecht, H.; Regan, S. P.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Rosen, M. D.; Sacks, R.; Salmonson, J. D.; Saunders, R.; Sater, J.; Sangster, C.; Schneider, M. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Shaw, M. J.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Stoeffl, W.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Walters, C.; Weaver, S.; Weber, S. V.; Wegner, P. J.; Whitman, P. K.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C. C.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Van Wonterghem, B.; MacGowan, B. J.; Atherton, L. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Moses, E. I.

    2012-05-01

    The first inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments with equimolar deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fuel have been performed on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use 0.17 mg of fuel with the potential for ignition and significant fusion yield conditions. The thermonuclear fuel has been fielded as a cryogenic layer on the inside of a spherical plastic capsule that is mounted in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 192 laser beams for a total laser energy of 1.6 MJ produces a soft x-ray field with 300 eV temperature. The ablation pressure produced by the radiation field compresses the initially 2.2-mm diameter capsule by a factor of 30 to a spherical dense fuel shell that surrounds a central hot-spot plasma of 50 μm diameter. While an extensive set of x-ray and neutron diagnostics has been applied to characterize hot spot formation from the x-ray emission and 14.1 MeV deuterium-tritium primary fusion neutrons, thermonuclear fuel assembly is studied by measuring the down-scattered neutrons with energies in the range of 10 to 12 MeV. X-ray and neutron imaging of the compressed core and fuel indicate a fuel thickness of (14 ± 3) μm, which combined with magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements of the fuel areal density of (1 ± 0.09) g cm-2 result in fuel densities approaching 600 g cm-3. The fuel surrounds a hot-spot plasma with average ion temperatures of (3.5 ± 0.1) keV that is measured with neutron time of flight spectra. The hot-spot plasma produces a total fusion neutron yield of 1015 that is measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer and nuclear activation diagnostics that indicate a 14.1 MeV yield of (7.5±0.1)×1014 which is 70% to 75% of the total fusion yield due to the high areal density. Gamma ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity of (170 ± 30) ps. These indirect-drive implosions result in the highest areal densities and neutron yields achieved on laser facilities to date

  16. Cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Alger, E. T.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Castro, C.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; DiNicola, J. M.; and others

    2012-05-15

    The first inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments with equimolar deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fuel have been performed on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use 0.17 mg of fuel with the potential for ignition and significant fusion yield conditions. The thermonuclear fuel has been fielded as a cryogenic layer on the inside of a spherical plastic capsule that is mounted in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 192 laser beams for a total laser energy of 1.6 MJ produces a soft x-ray field with 300 eV temperature. The ablation pressure produced by the radiation field compresses the initially 2.2-mm diameter capsule by a factor of 30 to a spherical dense fuel shell that surrounds a central hot-spot plasma of 50 {mu}m diameter. While an extensive set of x-ray and neutron diagnostics has been applied to characterize hot spot formation from the x-ray emission and 14.1 MeV deuterium-tritium primary fusion neutrons, thermonuclear fuel assembly is studied by measuring the down-scattered neutrons with energies in the range of 10 to 12 MeV. X-ray and neutron imaging of the compressed core and fuel indicate a fuel thickness of (14 {+-} 3) {mu}m, which combined with magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements of the fuel areal density of (1 {+-} 0.09) g cm{sup -2} result in fuel densities approaching 600 g cm{sup -3}. The fuel surrounds a hot-spot plasma with average ion temperatures of (3.5 {+-} 0.1) keV that is measured with neutron time of flight spectra. The hot-spot plasma produces a total fusion neutron yield of 10{sup 15} that is measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer and nuclear activation diagnostics that indicate a 14.1 MeV yield of (7.5{+-}0.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} which is 70% to 75% of the total fusion yield due to the high areal density. Gamma ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity of (170 {+-} 30) ps. These indirect-drive implosions result in the highest areal densities

  17. Active Interrogation for Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Dougan, Arden

    2015-11-05

    The DDA instrument for nuclear safeguards is a fast, non-destructive assay, active neutron interrogation technique using an external 14 MeV DT neutron generator for characterization and verification of spent nuclear fuel assemblies.

  18. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Ussery, David W.; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilson, Daniel J.; et al

    2016-03-04

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. In this paper, we used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ~1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934more » to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ~1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ~1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. Finally, the results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections.« less

  19. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Hendriksen, Rene S; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Ussery, David W; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W; Wilson, Daniel J; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2016-04-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315S Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ∼1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ∼1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ∼1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonellafrom pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. The results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections. PMID:26944846

  20. Global Genomic Epidemiology of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium DT104

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Jun, Se-Ran; Lund, Ole; Crook, Derrick W.; Wilson, Daniel J.; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    It has been 30 years since the initial emergence and subsequent rapid global spread of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 (MDR DT104). Nonetheless, its origin and transmission route have never been revealed. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and temporally structured sequence analysis within a Bayesian framework to reconstruct temporal and spatial phylogenetic trees and estimate the rates of mutation and divergence times of 315 S. Typhimurium DT104 isolates sampled from 1969 to 2012 from 21 countries on six continents. DT104 was estimated to have emerged initially as antimicrobial susceptible in ∼1948 (95% credible interval [CI], 1934 to 1962) and later became MDR DT104 in ∼1972 (95% CI, 1972 to 1988) through horizontal transfer of the 13-kb Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) MDR region into susceptible strains already containing SGI1. This was followed by multiple transmission events, initially from central Europe and later between several European countries. An independent transmission to the United States and another to Japan occurred, and from there MDR DT104 was probably transmitted to Taiwan and Canada. An independent acquisition of resistance genes took place in Thailand in ∼1975 (95% CI, 1975 to 1990). In Denmark, WGS analysis provided evidence for transmission of the organism between herds of animals. Interestingly, the demographic history of Danish MDR DT104 provided evidence for the success of the program to eradicate Salmonella from pig herds in Denmark from 1996 to 2000. The results from this study refute several hypotheses on the evolution of DT104 and suggest that WGS may be useful in monitoring emerging clones and devising strategies for prevention of Salmonella infections. PMID:26944846

  1. Development of tritium breeding blankets for DT-burning fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Clemmer, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    This study examines the status of understanding of blanket tritium recovery and the performance of potentially viable tritium breeding materials under conditions anticipated in a DT-fueled fusion reactor environment. The existing physicochemical, thermophysical, and ceramographic data for candidate liquid and solid breeders are reviewed and appropriate operating conditions defined. It is shown that selection of a breeding material and an appropriate tritium recovery method can impose significant constraints upon blanket design, particularly when considerations of breeder/coolant/structure compatibility and temperature limitations are taken into account.

  2. The scientific case for a JET D-T experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Weisen, H.; Sips, A. C. C.; Horton, L. D.; Challis, C. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Batistoni, P. [EURATOM Collaboration: EFDA-JET Contributors

    2014-08-21

    After the first high power D-T experiment in JET in 1997 (DTE1), when JET was equipped with Carbon PFC's, a proposed second high power (up to ∼40MW) D-T campaign (DTE2) in the current Be/W vessel will address essential operational, technical, diagnostics and scientific issues in support of ITER. These experiments are proposed to minimize the risks to ITER by testing strategies for the management of the in-vessel tritium content, by providing the basis for transferring operational scenarios from non-active operation to D-T mixtures and by addressing the issue of the neutron measurement accuracy. Dedicated campaigns with operation in Deuterium, Hydrogen and Tritium before the D-T campaign proper will allow the investigation of isotope scaling of the H-mode transition, pedestal physics, heat, particle, momentum and impurity transport in much greater detail than was possible in DTE1. The D-T campaign proper will include validations of the baseline ELMy H-Mode scenario, of the hybrid H-mode and advanced tokamak scenarios, as well as the investigation of alpha particle physics and the qualification of ICRH scenarios suitable for D-T operation. This paper reviews the scientific goals of DTE2 together with a summary of the results of DTE1.

  3. The scientific case for a JET D-T experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisen, H.; Sips, A. C. C.; Challis, C. D.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Sharapov, S. E.; Batistoni, P.; Horton, L. D.; Zastrow, K.-D.; EFDA-JET Contributors

    2014-08-01

    After the first high power D-T experiment in JET in 1997 (DTE1), when JET was equipped with Carbon PFC's, a proposed second high power (up to ˜40MW) D-T campaign (DTE2) in the current Be/W vessel will address essential operational, technical, diagnostics and scientific issues in support of ITER. These experiments are proposed to minimize the risks to ITER by testing strategies for the management of the in-vessel tritium content, by providing the basis for transferring operational scenarios from non-active operation to D-T mixtures and by addressing the issue of the neutron measurement accuracy. Dedicated campaigns with operation in Deuterium, Hydrogen and Tritium before the D-T campaign proper will allow the investigation of isotope scaling of the H-mode transition, pedestal physics, heat, particle, momentum and impurity transport in much greater detail than was possible in DTE1. The D-T campaign proper will include validations of the baseline ELMy H-Mode scenario, of the hybrid H-mode and advanced tokamak scenarios, as well as the investigation of alpha particle physics and the qualification of ICRH scenarios suitable for D-T operation. This paper reviews the scientific goals of DTE2 together with a summary of the results of DTE1.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Investigations of the Ablator/Fuel Interface during Early Stages of Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Liam; Murillo, Michael; Glosli, James

    2014-10-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, high-powered laser beams are used to compress a small target to generate fusion reactions. A critical issue in achieving this is the understanding of mix at the ablator/fuel interface. Mixing occurs at various length scales, ranging from atomic inter-species diffusion to hydrodynamic instabilities. Because the interface is preheated by energy from the incoming shock, it is important to understand the dynamics before the shock arrives. The interface is in the warm dense matter phase with a deuterium/tritium fuel mixture on one side and a plastic mixture on the other. We would like to understand various aspects of the evolution, including the state of the interface when the main shock arrives, the role of electric field generation at the interface, and the character and time scales for diffusion. We present a molecular dynamics approach to model these processes, in which the ions are treated as classical point particles. Because we must reach extremely large length and time scales, we have also developed a simplified electronic structure model, which includes time- and space-dependent ionization levels, external heating and electron-ion energy exchange. Simulation results are presented and compared with other models and experiments. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Quasispherical fuel compression and fast ignition in a heavy-ion-driven X-target with one-sided illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henestroza, Enrique; Logan, B. Grant; Perkins, L. John

    2011-03-01

    The HYDRA radiation-hydrodynamics code [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001)] is used to explore one-sided axial target illumination with annular and solid-profile uranium ion beams at 60 GeV to compress and ignite deuterium-tritium fuel filling the volume of metal cases with cross sections in the shape of an "X" (X-target). Quasi-three-dimensional, spherical fuel compression of the fuel toward the X-vertex on axis is obtained by controlling the geometry of the case, the timing, power, and radii of three annuli of ion beams for compression, and the hydroeffects of those beams heating the case as well as the fuel. Scaling projections suggest that this target may be capable of assembling large fuel masses resulting in high fusion yields at modest drive energies. Initial two-dimensional calculations have achieved fuel compression ratios of up to 150X solid density, with an areal density ρR of about 1 g/cm2. At these currently modest fuel densities, fast ignition pulses of 3 MJ, 60 GeV, 50 ps, and radius of 300 μm are injected through a hole in the X-case on axis to further heat the fuel to propagating burn conditions. The resulting burn waves are observed to propagate throughout the tamped fuel mass, with fusion yields of about 300 MJ. Tamping is found to be important, but radiation drive to be unimportant, to the fuel compression. Rayleigh-Taylor instability mix is found to have a minor impact on ignition and subsequent fuel burn-up.

  6. [Characteristics of tetrahydrofuran degradation by Pseudomonas oleovorans DT4].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Yang; Chen, Dong-Zhi; Jin, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Jian-Meng; He, Jie

    2011-01-01

    A tetrahydrofuran (THF)-degrading strain Pseudomonas oleovorans DT4 was isolated from the activated sludge of a pharmaceutical plant. P. oleovorans DT4 was able to utilize THF as the sole carbon and energy source under aerobic condition. 5 mmol/L of THF could be completely degraded by 3.2 mg/L inoculums of P. oleovorans DT4 in 14 h at pH 7.2 and 30 degrees C, with the cells concentration increasing to 188.6 mg/L. After the complete consumption of THF, no TOC could be detected but IC reached the stable value of about 46 mg/L, with pH decreasing to 6.54, which indicated that the substance was totally mineralized by P. oleovorans DT4. The optimum conditions for THF biodegradation in shaking flasks were pH 7.5 and temperature 37 degrees C, respectively. Results from the oxygen control experiments revealed that the oxygen supply by shaking was the satisfactory growth condition. Additionally, as the important elements for DT4, Mg2+ and Ca2+ at concentrations of 0.80 mmol/L and 0.20 mmol/L, respectively, were suitable for THF degradation. All the results contribute to the efficient bioremediation for the THF contaminated. PMID:21404697

  7. Measurements of muon-catalyzed dt fusion in solid HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcelli, Tracy Ann

    1999-12-01

    The first measurement of muon catalyzed dt fusion ( dtm--> 4He + n + m- ) in solid HD at ~ 3 K has been performed. The theory describing the formation of the [(dtm)pe e] muonic molecule from the resonant reaction tm+HD-->[(dtm) pee] , a key process in the dt fusion cycle, can now be tested against the experimental results. Using an experimental technique which employs solid layers of hydrogen isotopes, the energy of molecular formation is determined via time of flight, and dt fusion time spectra in solid HD have been measured. The theory describing the resonant formation of the dtm muonic molecule is compared to the experimental results through Monte Carlo simulations. The energy dependent molecular formation rates calculated for HD at 3 K have been employed in the Monte Carlo with the resultant simulated fusion time spectra in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Recent results from the TFTR ICRF DT Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.H.; Darrow, D.; Majeski, R.

    1995-03-01

    The first experiments to be performed with ICRF heating of DT plasmas are reported. ICRF heating of minority ions, tritium (second harmonic resonance), as well as direct electron heating are being performed during the DT phase of TFTR. RF power modulation and Fourier transform techniques are used to attempt to elucidate the competition between tritium second harmonic, direct electron, and {sup 3}He fundamental heating in DT plasmas. A significant fraction of the RF power has been found to couple to the tritium ions via second harmonic heating. Relevant RF coupling physics is investigated using {sup 3}He minority heating (43 MHz), H minority heating (64 MHz), and mode conversion (43 MHz, comparable densities of {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He) at a toroidal field of 4.5T.

  9. Coherent fluctuations in the initial TFTR D-T experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.; Chang, Z.Y.; Budny, R.V.

    1995-03-01

    The initial operation of TFTR with approximately equal power in the tritium and deuterium neutral beam injectors has resulted in the production of fusion power in excess of 9MW and central {beta}{sub {alpha}} > 0.25%. This {beta}{sub {alpha}} is within a factor of 2--3 of the {beta}{sub {alpha}} in projections of ITER performance. Effects of this {alpha} population on TAE modes, sawteeth and fishbone activity are being searched for. The D-T plasmas are also being studied for evidence of changes in MHD activity which might be attributed to the fast {alpha} population. This paper reports on the activity in the Alfven range of frequencies in the D-T plasmas and on detailed measurements of the MHD activity preceding major disruptions in D-D and D-T.

  10. Pressure broadening of the ((dt. mu. )dee)* formation resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.S.; Leon, M.; Padial, N.T.

    1988-12-27

    The treatment of ((dt..mu..)dee)* formation at high densities as a pressure broadening process is discussed. Cross sections for collisions of the complex (dt..mu..)dee, and of the D/sub 2/ molecule from which it is formed, with the bath molecules have been accurately calculated. These cross sections are used to calculate the collisional width in three variations of the impact approximation that have been proposed for this problem. In general, the quasistatic approximation is shown to satisfy the usual conditions of muon-catalyzed fusion better than does the impact approximation. A preliminary rough treatment is presented to illustrate the quasistatic approximation.

  11. Fast ignition of an inertial fusion target with a solid noncryogenic fuel by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2015-09-15

    The burning efficiency of a preliminarily compressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target with a solid noncryogenic fuel (deuterium-tritium beryllium hydride) upon fast central ignition by a fast ion beam is studied. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent to which the spatial temperature distribution formed under the heating of an ICF target by ion beams with different particle energy spectra affects the thermonuclear gain. The study is based on a complex numerical modeling including computer simulations of (i) the heating of a compressed target with a spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a fast ion beam and (ii) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum compression of the target and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of heating of the compressed target by the ion beam. The threshold energy of the igniting ion beam and the dependence of the thermonuclear gain on the energy deposited in the target are determined.

  12. Fast ignition of an inertial fusion target with a solid noncryogenic fuel by an ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2015-09-01

    The burning efficiency of a preliminarily compressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target with a solid noncryogenic fuel (deuterium-tritium beryllium hydride) upon fast central ignition by a fast ion beam is studied. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent to which the spatial temperature distribution formed under the heating of an ICF target by ion beams with different particle energy spectra affects the thermonuclear gain. The study is based on a complex numerical modeling including computer simulations of (i) the heating of a compressed target with a spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a fast ion beam and (ii) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum compression of the target and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of heating of the compressed target by the ion beam. The threshold energy of the igniting ion beam and the dependence of the thermonuclear gain on the energy deposited in the target are determined.

  13. Results from D-T Experiments on TFTR and Implications for Achieving an Ignited Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J. and the TFTR Group

    1998-07-14

    Progress in the performance of tokamak devices has enabled not only the production of significant bursts of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET) but, more importantly, the initial study of the physics of burning magnetically confined plasmas. As a result of the worldwide research on tokamaks, the scientific and technical issues for achieving an ignited plasma are better understood and the remaining questions more clearly defined. The principal research topics which have been studied on TFTR are transport, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and energetic particle confinement. The integration of separate solutions to problems in each of these research areas has also been of major interest. Although significant advances, such as the reduction of turbulent transport by means of internal transport barriers, identification of the theoretically predicted bootstrap current, and the study of the confinement of energetic fusion alpha-particles have been made, interesting and important scientific and technical issues remain for achieving a magnetic fusion energy reactor. In this paper, the implications of the TFTR experiments for overcoming these remaining issues will be discussed.

  14. Results from D-T experiments on TFTR and implications for achieving an ignited plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Blanchard, W.; Batha, S.

    1998-07-01

    Progress in the performance of tokamak devices has enable not only the production of significant bursts of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET) but, more importantly, the initial study of the physics of burning magnetically confined plasmas. As a result of the worldwide research on tokamaks, the scientific and technical issues for achieving an ignited plasma are better understood and the remaining questions more clearly defined. The principal research topics which have been studied on TFTR are transport, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and energetic particle confinement. The integration of separate solutions to problems in each of these research areas has also been of major interest. Although significant advances, such as the reduction of turbulent transport by means of internal transport barriers, identification of the theoretically predicted bootstrap current, and the study of the confinement of energetic fusion alpha-particles have been made, interesting and important scientific and technical issues remain. In this paper, the implications for the TFTR experiments for overcoming these remaining issues will be discussed.

  15. One-dimensional particle simulations of Knudsen-layer effects on D-T fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Bruce I.; Dimits, Andris M.; Zimmerman, George B.; Wilks, Scott C.

    2014-12-15

    Particle simulations are used to solve the fully nonlinear, collisional kinetic equation describing the interaction of a high-temperature, high-density, deuterium-tritium plasma with absorbing boundaries, a plasma source, and the influence of kinetic effects on fusion reaction rates. Both hydrodynamic and kinetic effects influence the end losses, and the simulations show departures of the ion velocity distributions from Maxwellian due to the reduction of the population of the highest energy ions (Knudsen-layer effects). The particle simulations show that the interplay between sources, plasma dynamics, and end losses results in temperature anisotropy, plasma cooling, and concomitant reductions in the fusion reaction rates. However, for the model problems and parameters considered, particle simulations show that Knudsen-layer modifications do not significantly affect the velocity distribution function for velocities most important in determining the fusion reaction rates, i.e., the thermal fusion reaction rates using the local densities and bulk temperatures give good estimates of the kinetic fusion reaction rates.

  16. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: the first precision tuning series

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J L; Mackinnon, A J

    2011-10-27

    Ignition implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] are driven with a very carefully tailored sequence of four shock waves that must be timed to very high precision in order to keep the fuel on a low adiabat. The first series of precision tuning experiments on NIF have been performed. These experiments use optical diagnostics to directly measure the strength and timing of all four shocks inside the hohlraum-driven, cryogenic deuterium-filled capsule interior. The results of these experiments are presented demonstrating a significant decrease in the fuel adiabat over previously un-tuned implosions. The impact of the improved adiabat on fuel compression is confirmed in related deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions by measurement of fuel areal density (rR), which show the highest fuel compression (rR {approx} 1.0 g/cm{sup 2}) measured to date.

  17. Inferring Low-Mode Asymmetries from the Elastically Scattered Neutron Spectrum in Layered Cryogenic DT Implosions on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution neutron spectroscopy is used to probe the areal density of layered cryogenic DT direct-drive implosions in inertial confinement fusion experiments on OMEGA. Advanced scintillation detectors record the neutron spectrum using time-of-flight techniques. The shape of the energy spectrum is fully determined by the neutron elastic scattering cross-section for spherically symmetric target configurations. Significant differences from the expected shape have been measured for some recent implosions, which indicate a deviation from a spherically symmetric fuel assembly. Neutron scattering with low-mode perturbations in the DT fuel assembly have been simulated in the Monte Carlo n-particle transport code. The experimental data shows good agreement with the model when the mass distribution of the compressed DT shell is highly asymmetric with one side having a factor-of-2 higher areal density. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  18. TAE modes and MHD activity in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.; Batha, S.; Bell, M.

    1995-03-01

    The high power deuterium and tritium experiments on TFTR have produced fusion a parameters similar to those expected on ITER. The achieved {beta}{sub {alpha}}/{beta} and the R{triangledown}{beta}{sub {alpha}} in TFRR D-T shots are 1/2 to 1/3 those predicted in the ITER EDA. Studies of the initial TFTR D-T plasmas find no evidence that the presence of the fast fusion {alpha} population has affected the stability of MHD, with the possible exception of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE`s). The initial TFTR DT plasmas had MHD activity similar to that commonly seen in deuterium plasmas. Operation of TFTR at plasma currents of 2.0--2.5 MA has greatly reduced the deleterious effects of MHD commonly observed at lower currents. Even at these higher currents, the performance of TFTR is limited by {beta}-limit disruptions. The effects of MHD on D-T fusion {alpha}`s was similar to effects observed on other fusion products in D only plasmas.

  19. Production of Medical isotope Technecium-99 from DT Fusion neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguski, John; Gentile, Charles; Ascione, George

    2011-10-01

    High energy neutrons produced in DT fusion reactors have a secondary application for use in the synthesis of valuable man-made isotopes utilized in industry today. One such isotope is metastable Technecium-99 (Tc99m), a low energy gamma emitter used in ~ 85% of all medical imaging diagnostics. Tc99m is created through beta decay of Molybdenum-99 (Mo99), which itself has only a 66 hour half-life and must be created from a neutron capture by the widely available and stable isotope Molydenum-98. Current worldwide production of Tc99m occurs in just five locations and relies on obtaining the fission byproduct Mo99 from highly enriched Uranium reactors. A Tc99m generator using DT fusion neutrons, however, could potentially be operated at individual hospitals and medical facilities without the use of any fissile material. The neutron interaction of the DT neutrons with Molybdenum in a potential device geometry was modeled using Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. Trial experiments were also performed to test the viability of using DT neutrons to create ample quantities of Tc99m. Modeling and test results will follow.

  20. Conceptual design of the gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. Herrmann, H. W.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Barlow, D. B.; Young, C. S.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Casey, D.; Clancy, T.; Hilsabeck, T.; Moy, K.

    2014-11-15

    The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) diagnostic is designed to measure the prompt γ-ray energy spectrum during high yield deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The prompt γ-ray spectrum will provide “burn-averaged” observables, including total DT fusion yield, total areal density (ρR), ablator ρR, and fuel ρR. These burn-averaged observables are unique because they are essentially averaged over 4π, providing a global reference for the line-of-sight-specific measurements typical of x-ray and neutron diagnostics. The GEMS conceptual design meets the physics-based requirements: ΔE/E = 3%–5% can be achieved in the range of 2–25 MeV γ-ray energy. Minimum DT neutron yields required for 15% measurement uncertainty at low-resolution mode are: 5 × 10{sup 14} DT-n for ablator ρR (at 0.2 g/cm{sup 2}); 2 × 10{sup 15} DT-n for total DT yield (at 4.2 × 10{sup −5} γ/n); and 1 × 10{sup 16} DT-n for fuel ρR (at 1 g/cm{sup 2})

  1. Conceptual design of the gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Herrmann, H W; Jorgenson, H J; Barlow, D B; Young, C S; Stoeffl, W; Casey, D; Clancy, T; Lopez, F E; Oertel, J A; Hilsabeck, T; Moy, K; Batha, S H

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) diagnostic is designed to measure the prompt γ-ray energy spectrum during high yield deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The prompt γ-ray spectrum will provide "burn-averaged" observables, including total DT fusion yield, total areal density (ρR), ablator ρR, and fuel ρR. These burn-averaged observables are unique because they are essentially averaged over 4π, providing a global reference for the line-of-sight-specific measurements typical of x-ray and neutron diagnostics. The GEMS conceptual design meets the physics-based requirements: ΔE/E = 3%-5% can be achieved in the range of 2-25 MeV γ-ray energy. Minimum DT neutron yields required for 15% measurement uncertainty at low-resolution mode are: 5 × 10(14) DT-n for ablator ρR (at 0.2 g/cm(2)); 2 × 10(15) DT-n for total DT yield (at 4.2 × 10(-5) γ/n); and 1 × 10(16) DT-n for fuel ρR (at 1 g/cm(2)). PMID:25430301

  2. Conceptual design of the gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer for the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Barlow, D. B.; Young, C. S.; Stoeffl, W.; Casey, D.; Clancy, T.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Moy, K.; Batha, S. H.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) diagnostic is designed to measure the prompt γ-ray energy spectrum during high yield deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The prompt γ-ray spectrum will provide "burn-averaged" observables, including total DT fusion yield, total areal density (ρR), ablator ρR, and fuel ρR. These burn-averaged observables are unique because they are essentially averaged over 4π, providing a global reference for the line-of-sight-specific measurements typical of x-ray and neutron diagnostics. The GEMS conceptual design meets the physics-based requirements: ΔE/E = 3%-5% can be achieved in the range of 2-25 MeV γ-ray energy. Minimum DT neutron yields required for 15% measurement uncertainty at low-resolution mode are: 5 × 1014 DT-n for ablator ρR (at 0.2 g/cm2); 2 × 1015 DT-n for total DT yield (at 4.2 × 10-5 γ/n); and 1 × 1016 DT-n for fuel ρR (at 1 g/cm2).

  3. Quantitative Characterization of Inertial Confinement Fusion Capsules Using Phase Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B J; Koch, J A; Barty, A; Martz, H E; Lee, W; Fezzaa, K

    2004-05-07

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium capsule. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) capsule. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam capsules were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately reproduced in phase contrast enhanced x-ray images.

  4. Simultaneous usage of pinhole and penumbral apertures for imaging small scale neutron sources from inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Guler, N; Volegov, P; Danly, C R; Grim, G P; Merrill, F E; Wilde, C H

    2012-10-01

    Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to understand the basic principles of creating self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic capsules. The neutron imaging diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by observing neutron images in two different energy bands for primary (13-17 MeV) and down-scattered (6-12 MeV) neutrons. From this, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. These experiments provide small sources with high yield neutron flux. An aperture design that includes an array of pinholes and penumbral apertures has provided the opportunity to image the same source with two different techniques. This allows for an evaluation of these different aperture designs and reconstruction algorithms. PMID:23126842

  5. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guler, Nevzat; Aragonez, Robert J.; Archuleta, Thomas N.; Batha, Steven H.; Clark, David D.; Clark, Deborah J.; Danly, Chris R.; Day, Robert D.; Fatherley, Valerie E.; Finch, Joshua P.; Gallegos, Robert A.; Garcia, Felix P.; Grim, Gary; Hsu, Albert H.; Jaramillo, Steven A.; Loomis, Eric N.; Mares, Danielle; Martinson, Drew D.; Merrill, Frank E.; Morgan, George L.; Munson, Carter; Murphy, Thomas J.; Oertel, John A.; Polk, Paul J.; Schmidt, Derek W.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Valdez, Adelaida C.; Volegov, Petr L.; Wang, Tai-Sen F.; Wilde, Carl H.; Wilke, Mark D.; Wilson, Douglas C.; Atkinson, Dennis P.; Bower, Dan E.; Drury, Owen B.; Dzenitis, John M.; Felker, Brian; Fittinghoff, David N.; Frank, Matthias; Liddick, Sean N.; Moran, Michael J.; Roberson, George P.; Weiss, Paul; Buckles, Robert A.; Cradick, Jerry R.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Lutz, Steve S.; Malone, Robert M.; Traille, Albert

    2013-11-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic (CH) capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (10-12 MeV) neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  6. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; et al

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightlymore » oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.« less

  7. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  8. First implosion experiments with cryogenic thermonuclear fuel on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Spears, Brian K.; Edwards, M. John; Alger, Ethan T.; Berger, Richard L.; Bleuel, Darren L.; Bradley, David K.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Callahan, Debra A.; Castro, Carlos; Casey, Daniel T.; Choate, Christine; Clark, Daniel S.; Cerjan, Charles J.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Dewald, Eduard L.; Di Nicola, Jean-Michel G.; Di Nicola, Pascale; Divol, Laurent; Dixit, Shamasundar N.; Döppner, Tilo; Dylla-Spears, Rebecca; Dzenitis, Elizabeth G.; Fair, James E.; Frenje, Lars Johan Anders; Gatu Johnson, M.; Giraldez, E.; Glebov, Vladimir; Glenn, Steven M.; Haan, Steven W.; Hammel, Bruce A.; Hatchett, Stephen P., II; Haynam, Christopher A.; Heeter, Robert F.; Heestand, Glenn M.; Herrmann, Hans W.; Hicks, Damien G.; Holunga, Dean M.; Horner, Jeffrey B.; Huang, Haibo; Izumi, Nobuhiko; Jones, Ogden S.; Kalantar, Daniel H.; Kilkenny, Joseph D.; Kirkwood, Robert K.; Kline, John L.; Knauer, James P.; Kozioziemski, Bernard; Kritcher, Andrea L.; Kroll, Jeremy J.; Kyrala, George A.; LaFortune, Kai N.; Landen, Otto L.; Larson, Douglas W.; Leeper, Ramon J.; Le Pape, Sebastien; Lindl, John D.; Ma, Tammy; Mackinnon, Andrew J.; MacPhee, Andrew G.; Mapoles, Evan; McKenty, Patrick W.; Meezan, Nathan B.; Michel, Pierre; Milovich, Jose L.; Moody, John D.; Moore, Alastair S.; Moran, Mike; Moreno, Kari Ann; Munro, David H.; Nathan, Bryan R.; Nikroo, Abbas; Olson, Richard E.; Orth, Charles D.; Pak, Arthur; Patel, Pravesh K.; Parham, Tom; Petrasso, Richard; Ralph, Joseph E.; Rinderknecht, Hans; Regan, Sean P.; Robey, Harry F.; Ross, J. Steven; Salmonson, Jay D.; Sangster, Craig; Sater, Jim; Schneider, Marilyn B.; Séguin, F. H.; Shaw, Michael J.; Shoup, Milton J.; Springer, Paul T.; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Suter, Larry J.; Avery Thomas, Cliff; Town, Richard P. J.; Walters, Curtis; Weber, Stephen V.; Wegner, Paul J.; Widmayer, Clay; Whitman, Pamela K.; Widmann, Klaus; Wilson, Douglas C.; Van Wonterghem, Bruno M.; MacGowan, Brian J.; Atherton, L. Jeff; Moses, Edward I.

    2012-04-01

    Non-burning thermonuclear fuel implosion experiments have been fielded on the National Ignition Facility to assess progress toward ignition by indirect drive inertial confinement fusion. These experiments use cryogenic fuel ice layers, consisting of mixtures of tritium and deuterium with large amounts of hydrogen to control the neutron yield and to allow fielding of an extensive suite of optical, x-ray and nuclear diagnostics. The thermonuclear fuel layer is contained in a spherical plastic capsule that is fielded in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 1.3 MJ of energy delivered by 192 laser beams produces a soft x-ray drive spectrum with a radiation temperature of 300 eV. The radiation field produces an ablation pressure of 100 Mbar which compresses the capsule to a spherical dense fuel shell that contains a hot plasma core 80 µm in diameter. The implosion core is observed with x-ray imaging diagnostics that provide size, shape, the absolute x-ray emission along with bangtime and hot plasma lifetime. Nuclear measurements provide the 14.1 MeV neutron yield from fusion of deuterium and tritium nuclei along with down-scattered neutrons at energies of 10-12 MeV due to energy loss by scattering in the dense fuel that surrounds the central hot-spot plasma. Neutron time-of-flight spectra allow the inference of the ion temperature while gamma-ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity. The fusion yield from deuterium-tritium reactions scales with ion temperature, which is in agreement with modeling over more than one order of magnitude to a neutron yield in excess of 1014 neutrons, indicating large confinement parameters on these first experiments. Part of the EPS 2011 special issue. Based on the plenary talk by S H Glenzer at the 38th EPS Plasma Physics meeting in Strassbourg, 2011.

  9. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART I.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-07-10

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I will discuss the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  10. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-08-17

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I discussed the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  11. Proton-beam driven fast ignition of inertially confined fuels: Reduction of the ignition energy by the use of two proton beams with radially shaped profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Temporal, M.; Honrubia, J. J.; Atzeni, S.

    2008-05-15

    Fast ignition of a spherical compressed deuterium-tritium assembly induced by the energy deposition of laser-accelerated proton beams is considered. An efficient way to reduce the ignition energy consists of using a two proton beams scheme [M. Temporal, Phys Plasmas 13, 122704 (2006)]. For a uniformly compressed fuel at 500 g/cm{sup 3} irradiated by proton beams with Maxwellian energy distribution with a temperature of 4 MeV, the ignition energy is 10 kJ using only one proton beam and reduces to a total of 8 kJ with the two-beam scheme. Further reduction of the ignition energy is found by using a first beam with annular radial profile and a second beam with the uniform radial profile. It is found that the first beam causes some additional fuel compression and confinement that decrease the total beam energy required for the ignition to 6 kJ, which is 40% smaller than in the case of a single beam with uniform radial profile.

  12. Interpolation of vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.; Zhu, Y. M.; Rapacchi, S.; Luo, J. H.; Robini, M.; Croisille, P.

    2011-03-01

    There has recently been increased interest in developing tensor data processing methods for the new medical imaging modality referred to as diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI). This paper proposes a method for interpolating the primary vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI, with the particularity of achieving interpolation and denoising simultaneously. The method consists of localizing the noise-corrupted vectors using the local statistical properties of vector fields, removing the noise-corrupted vectors and reconstructing them by using the thin plate spline (TPS) model, and finally applying global TPS interpolation to increase the resolution in the spatial domain. Experiments on 17 human hearts show that the proposed method allows us to obtain higher resolution while reducing noise, preserving details and improving direction coherence (DC) of vector fields as well as fiber tracking. Moreover, the proposed method perfectly reconstructs azimuth and elevation angle maps.

  13. TF ripple loss of alpha particles in TFTR DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.

    1995-08-01

    Quantitative evaluation of TF ripple loss of DT alpha particles is a central issue for reactor design because of potentially severe first wall heat load problems. DT experiments on TFTR allow experimental measurements to be compared to modeling of the underlying alpha physics, with code validation an important goal. Modeling of TF ripple loss of alphas in TFTR now includes neoclassical calculations of alpha losses arising from first orbit loss, stochastic ripple diffusion, ripple trapping and collisional effects. Recent Hamiltonian coordinate guiding center code (ORBIT) simulations for TFTR have shown that collisions enhance the stochastic TF ripple losses at TFTR. A faster way to simulate experiment has been developed and is discussed here which uses a simple stochastic domain model for TF ripple loss within the TRANSP analysis code.

  14. Analysis of integrating sphere performance for IR enhanced DT layering

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.B.,; Collins, G.W.

    1997-06-01

    Absorbed IR energy can supplement the beta decay energy from DT ice to improve the driving force toward uniform layers. A significant problem with this approach has been to deliver the added IR energy with sufficient uniformity to enhance rather than destroy the uniformity of the ice layers. Computer modeling has indicated that one can achieve {approximately}1% uniformity in the angular variation of the absorbed power using an integrating sphere containing holes large enough to allow external inspection of the ice layer uniformity. The power required depends on the integrating sphere size, a 25 mm diameter sphere requires {approximately}35 mW of IR to deposit as much energy in the ice as the 50 mW/cm{sup 3}(35 pW total) received from tritium decay in DT. Power absorbed in the plastic can cause unacceptable ice-layer non-uniformities for the integrating sphere design considered here.

  15. Uniform DT 3T burn: computations and sensitivities

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, Erik; Hryniw, Natalia; Hansen, Jon A; Kesler, Leigh A; Li, Frank

    2011-01-27

    A numerical model was developed in C to integrate the nonlinear deutrium-tritium (DT) burn equations in a three temperature (3T) approximation for spatially uniform test problems relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Base model results are in excellent agreement with standard 3T results. Data from NDI, SESAME, and TOPS databases is extracted to create fits for the reaction rate parameter, the Planck opacity, and the coupling frequencies of the plasma temperatures. The impact of different fits (e.g., TOPS versus SESAME opacity data, higher order polynomial fits ofNDI data for the reaction rate parameter) were explored, and sensitivity to several model inputs are presented including: opacity data base, Coulomb logarithm, and Bremsstrahlung. Sensitivity to numerical integration time step size, and the relative insensitivity to the discretized numerics and numerical integration method was demonstrated. Variations in the IC for densities and temperatures were explored, showing similar DT burn profiles in most cases once ignition occurs. A coefficient multiplying the Compton coupling term (default, A = 1) can be adjusted to approximate results from more sophisticated models. The coefficient was reset (A = 0.4) to match the maximum temperatures resulting from standard multi-group simulations of the base case test problem. Setting the coefficient to a larger value, (A = 0.6) matches maximum ion temperatures in a kinetic simulation of a high density ICF-like regime. Matching peak temperatures does not match entire temperature-time profiles, indicating the Compton coefficient is density and time dependent as the photon distribution evolves. In the early time burn during the ignition of the DT, the present model with modified Compton coupling provides a very simple method to obtain a much improved match to the more accurate solution from the multi-group radiation model for these DT burn regimes.

  16. TFTR neutral beam control and monitoring for DT operations

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, T.; Kamperschroer, J.; Chu, J.

    1995-12-31

    Record fusion power output has recently been obtained in TFTR with the injection of deuterium and tritium neutral beams. This significant achievement was due in part to the controls, software, and data processing capabilities added to the neutral beam system for DT operations. Chief among these improvements was the addition of SUN workstations and large dynamic data storage to the existing Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition (CICADA) system. Essentially instantaneous look back over the recent shot history has been provided for most beam waveforms and analysis results. Gas regulation controls allowing remote switchover between deuterium and tritium were also added. With these tools, comparison of the waveforms and data of deuterium and tritium for four test conditioning pulses quickly produced reliable tritium setpoints. Thereafter, all beam conditioning was performed with deuterium, thus saving the tritium supply for the important DT injection shots. The lookback capability also led to modifications of the gas system to improve reliability and to control ceramic valve leakage by backbiasing. Other features added to improve the reliability and availability of DT neutral beam operations included master beamline controls and displays, a beamline thermocouple interlock system, a peak thermocouple display, automatic gas inventory and cryo panel gas loading monitoring, beam notching controls, a display of beam/plasma interlocks, and a feedback system to control beam power based on plasma conditions.

  17. D-T Neutron Skyshine Experiments at JAERI/FNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitani, Takeo; Ochiai, Kentaro; Yoshida, Shigeo; Tanaka, Ryohei; Wakisaka, Masashi; Nakao, Makoto; Sato, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Michinori; Hori, Jun-Ichi; Takahashi, Akito; Kaneko, Jun-Ichi; Sawamura, Teruko

    The D-T neutron skyshine experiments have been carried out at the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) of JAERI with the neutron yield of ˜1.7×1011n/s. The concrete thickness of the roof and the wall of a FNS target room are 1.15 and 2 m, respectively. The FNS skyshine port with a size of 0.9 × 0.9 m2 was open during the experimental period.The radiation dose rate outside the target room was measured as far as about 550 m away from the D-T target point with a spherical rem-counter. The highest neutron dose was about 0.5 μSv/hr at a distance of 30 m from the D-T target point and the dose rate was attenuated to 0.002 μSv/hr at a distance of 550 m. The measured neutron dose distribution was analyzed with Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B and a simple line source model. The MCNP calculation overestimates the neutron dose in the distance range larger than 250 m. The neutron spectra were evaluated with a 3He detector with different thickness of polyethylene neutron moderators. Secondary gamma-rays were measured with high purity Ge detectors and NaI scintillation detectors.

  18. DT results of TFTR`s alpha collector

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, H.W.; Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Timberlake, J.R.; Chong, G.P.; Haasz, A.A.; Pitcher, C.S.; Macaulay-Newcombe, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR`s DT phase to complement the results of the lost alpha scintillator detectors which have been operating on TFTR since 1988. Measurements of the energy distribution of escaping alphas have been made by measuring the range of alphas implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Exposed samples have been analyzed for 4 DT plasma discharges at plasma currents of 1.0 and 1.8 MA. The results at 1.0 MA are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss at 3.5 MeV. The 1.8 MA results, however, indicate a large anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas at an energy {approximately}30% below the birth energy and at a total fluence nearly an order of magnitude above expected first orbit loss. This anomalous loss is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. Several potential explanations for this loss process are examined. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations.

  19. Measurements of fusion neutrons from Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion Experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E. C.; Awe, T. J.; Torres, J. A.; Jones, B.; Bur, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Styron, J. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    Strong evidence of thermonuclear neutron production has been observed during Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on the Z accelerator. So far, these experiments have utilized deuterium fuel and produced primary DD fusion neutron yields up to 2e12 with electron and ion stagnation temperatures in the 2-3 keV range. We present MagLIF neutron measurements and compare to other data and implosion simulations. In addition to primary DD and secondary DT yields and ion temperatures, other complex physics regarding the degree of fuel magnetization and liner density are elucidated by the neutron measurements. Neutron diagnostic development for deuterium and future deuterium-tritium fuel experiments are also discussed. Sandia is sponsored by the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. High-speed repetitive pellet injector for plasma fueling of magnetic confinement fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Baylor, L.R.; Foust, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    The projected fueling requirements of future magnetic confinement devices for controlled thermonuclear research [e.g., the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)] indicate that a flexible plasma fueling capability is required. This includes a mix of traditional gas puffing and low- and high-velocity deuterium-tritium pellets. Conventional pellet injectors (based on light gas guns or centrifugal accelerators) can reliably provide frozen hydrogen pellets (1- to 6-mm-diam sizes tested) up to {approximately}1.3-km/s velocity at the appropriate pellet fueling rates (1 to 10 Hz or greater). For long-pulse operation in a higher velocity regime (>2 km/s), an experiment in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ENEA Frascati is under way. This activity will be carried out in the framework of a collaborative agreement between the US Department of Energy and European Atomic Energy Community -- ENEA Association. In this experiment, an existing ORNL hydrogen extruder (equipped with a pellet chambering mechanism/gun barrel assembly) and a Frascati two-stage light gas gun driver have been combined on a test facility at ORNL. Initial testing has been carried out with single deuterium pellets accelerated up to 2.05 km/s with the two-stage driver; in addition, some preliminary repetitive testing (to commission the diagnostics) was performed at reduced speeds, including sequences at 0.5 to 1 Hz and 10 to 30 pellets. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate repetitive operation (up to {approximately}1 Hz) with speeds in the 2- to 3-km/s range. In addition, the strength of extruded hydrogen ice as opposed to that produced in situ by direct condensation in pipe guns can be investigated. The equipment and initial experimental results are described.

  1. Overview of D-T results from TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.G.; McGuire, K.M.; Arunasalam, V.

    1995-10-01

    Experiments with plasmas having nearly equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium have been carried out on TFTR. To date, the maximum fusion power has been 10.7 MW, using 39.5 MW of neutral-beam heating, in a supershot discharge and 6.7 MW in a high-{beta}{sub p} discharge following a current ramp-down. The fusion power density in the core of the plasma has reached 2.8 MWm{sup {minus}3}, exceeding that expected in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITTER). The energy confinement time, {tau}{sub E}, is observed to increase in D-T, relative to D plasmas, by 20% and the n{sub i}(O){center_dot}{tau}{sub E} product by 55%. The improvement in thermal confinement is caused primarily by a decrease in ion heat conductivity in both supershot and limiter-H-mode discharges. Extensive lithium pellet injection increased the confinement time to 0.27 s and enabled higher current operation in both supershot and high-{beta}{sub p} discharges. First measurements of the confined alpha particles have been performed and found to be in good agreement with TRANSP simulations assuming classical confinement. Measurements of the alpha ash profile have been compared with simulations using particle transport coefficients from helium gas puffing experiments. The loss of energetic alpha particles to a detector at the bottom of the vessel is well described by the first-orbit loss mechanism. No loss due to alpha-particle-driven instabilities has yet been observed. ICRF heating of a D-T plasma, using the second harmonic of tritium, has been demonstrated. D-T experiments on TFTR will continue both to explore the physics underlying the ITER design and to examine some of the physics issues associated with an advanced tokamak reactor.

  2. Initial H-mode experiments in DT plasmas on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, C.E.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Bell, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    H-modes have been obtained for the first time in high temperature, high poloidal beta plasmas with significant tritium concentrations in TFTR. Tritium is provided mainly through high power neutral beam injection (NBI) with powers up to 28 MW and beam energies of 90--110 keV. Transition to a circular limiter H-mode has been obtained following a rapid ramp down of the plasma current. Some of the highest values of {tau}{sub E} have been achieved on TFTR during the ELM-free phase of these DT H-mode plasmas. {tau}{sub E} enhancements greater than four times L-mode have been achieved.

  3. Spectroscopic identification of SNe 2004ds and SN 2004dt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2004-08-01

    A. Gal-Yam, D. Fox and S. Kulkarni, California Institute of Technology, report on red spectra (range 550-780 nm) obtained by Kulkarni and Fox on Aug. 13.5 UT at the 10-m Keck I telescope (+ LRIS). The spectrum of of SN 2004ds (IAUC #8386), shows a broad, well-developed P-Cyg H_alpha line and suggests that this is a type II supernova. The spectrum of SN 2004dt (IAUC #8386), shows the distinctive Si II 6100 absorption trough around 6100 Angstrom, indicating this is a young SN Ia.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Ternary Alloys for Fusion Breeding Blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, B. William; Chiu, Ing L.

    2015-10-26

    Future fusion power plants based on the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel cycle will be required to breed the T fuel via neutron reactions with lithium, which will be incorporated in a breeding blanket that surrounds the fusion source. Recent work by LLNL proposed the used of liquid Li as the breeder in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. Subsequently, an LDRD was initiated to develop alternatives ternary alloy liquid metal breeders that have reduced chemical reactivity with water and air compared to pure Li. Part of the work plan was to experimentally investigate the phase diagrams of ternary alloys. Of particular interest was measurement of the melt temperature, which must be low enough to be compatible with the temperature limits of the steel used in the construction of the chamber and heat transfer system.

  5. Low-Convergence Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutz, Stephen; Vesey, Roger; Sinars, Daniel; Sefkow, Adam

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulations indicate that pulsed-power driven liner-implosions could produce substantial fusion yields if the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel is first magnetized and preheated [S.A. Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)]. As with all inertial fusion, the implosions could be degraded by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Since highly convergent implosions are more susceptible to this instability, we have explored the necessary conditions to obtain significant fusion yield with low-convergence liner-implosions. Such low-convergence implosions can be obtained if the fuel is sufficiently preheated and magnetized. We present analytic and numerical studies of laser plasma heating, which indicate that low convergence implosions should be possible with sufficient laser energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contra.

  6. Improvements in the CHERS system for DT experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, C.E.; Bell, R.; Synakowski, E.J.

    1995-03-01

    Improvements in the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) system have resulted in accurate measurements of T{sub i} and V{sub {phi}} profiles during DT experiments. These include moving the spectrometer detector array and electronics farther away from the tokamak to a low neutron flux location. This relocation has also improved access to all components of the system. Also, a nonplasma-viewing calibration fiber system was added to monitor the change in fiber transmission due to the high flux DT neutrons. Narrowband filtered light transmitted through the calibration fiber is now used as a reference for the VO measurement. At the highest neutron flux of {approximately} 2.5 {times} 10{sup 18} neutrons/see (fusion power {approximately} 6.2 MW) a modest 5% decrease in fiber transmission was observed. Corrections for transmission loss are made and T{sub i} (r,t) and absolute V{sub phi} (r,t) profiles are automatically calculated within four minutes of every shot.

  7. Isotopic mass and alpha heating effects in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Bell, M.G.; Mansfield, D.K.

    1994-09-01

    Sets of similar TFTR discharges with varying amounts of D and T are compared. The T content is altered by varying the mix of D and T NBI at approximately constant total NBI power. The total plasma current, toroidal field, central Z{sub eff}, and wall conditions are very similar in each set. The electron density profiles are approximately similar. The sets contain pairs of discharges with D-only and DT-NBI. Several sets also contain discharges with T-only NBI. The discharges are analyzed using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Good agreement with measured parameters is achieved. Profiles are computed for the isotopic mass of the hydrogenic thermal species A, and for the hydrogenic thermal plus beam species A{sub tot}. Their volume averages increase approximately linearly as the fraction of T-NBI power increases, and they are slightly peaked for DT and T-only NBI discharges. The total energy and the total energy confinement time increase approximately linearly with A{sub tot} up to 30%. The beam fraction of the total energy at 0.5 sec of NBI remains relatively constant, {approx} 40--50% as A{sub tot} varies. The thermal ion fraction increases slightly, and the electron fraction decreases. The isotopic and alpha heating effects contribute in roughly equal amounts to the increase in central T{sub e}.

  8. eDT and Model-based Configuration of 12GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Dennison L.

    2015-09-01

    This poster will discuss model-driven setup of CEBAF for the 12GeV era, focusing on the elegant Download Tool (eDT). eDT is a new operator tool that generates magnet design setpoints for various machine energies and pass configurations. eDT was developed in the effort towards a process for reducing machine configuration time and reproducibility by way of an accurate accelerator model.

  9. DT-13 attenuates human lung cancer metastasis via regulating NMIIA activity under hypoxia condition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Hui; Lin, Sen-Sen; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Ren-Ping; Khan, Ghulam Jilany; Du, Hong-Zhi; Mao, Ting-Ting; Yu, Bo-Yang; Li, Rui-Ming; Yuan, Sheng-Tao; Sun, Li

    2016-08-01

    Cancer metastasis plays a major role in tumor deterioration. Metastatic processes are known to be regulated by hypoxic microenvironment and non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA). DT-13, a bioactive saponin monomer isolated from Ophiopogon japonicus, has been reported to inhibit various cancer metastasis, but whether NMIIA is involved in the anti-metastatic activity of DT-13 under hypoxia remains to be determined. Thus, this study aims to clarify the role of DT-13 in regulating 95D cell metastasis under hypoxic microenvironment and to further investigate whether NMIIA is involved in the anti-metastatic mechanism of DT-13. We found that DT-13 significantly inhibited 95D cells metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, hypoxia significantly inhibited the expression of NMIIA and redistributed NMIIA to the cell periphery, whereas DT-13 reversed the hypoxic effects by upregulating the expression of NMIIA. Moreover, DT-13 treatment redistributed NMIIA to the nuclear periphery and reduced the formation of F-actin in 95D cells. In addition, we found that the Raf-ERK1/2 signaling pathway is involved in regulation of NMIIA by DT-13. Collectively, these findings support NMIIA as a target of DT-13 to prevent lung cancer metastasis. PMID:27374701

  10. Method and apparatus to produce and maintain a thick, flowing, liquid lithium first wall for toroidal magnetic confinement DT fusion reactors

    DOEpatents

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    A system for forming a thick flowing liquid metal, in this case lithium, layer on the inside wall of a toroid containing the plasma of a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor. The presence of the liquid metal layer or first wall serves to prevent neutron damage to the walls of the toroid. A poloidal current in the liquid metal layer is oriented so that it flows in the same direction as the current in a series of external magnets used to confine the plasma. This current alignment results in the liquid metal being forced against the wall of the toroid. After the liquid metal exits the toroid it is pumped to a heat extraction and power conversion device prior to being reentering the toroid.