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Sample records for deutschoesterreichischen phase ii-studie

  1. Phase II study of lonidamine in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Pronzato, P.; Amoroso, D.; Bertelli, G.; Conte, P. F.; Cusimano, M. P.; Ciottoli, G. B.; Gulisano, M.; Lionetto, R.; Rosso, R.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty patients with previously treated metastatic breast cancer were entered in a phase II study with oral lonidamine. Twenty-eight patients are evaluable for toxicity and 25 for response. A partial remission was obtained in four patients (16%) and disease stability in 11 (44%): 10 patients progressed (40%). Toxicity was acceptable, consisting mainly of myalgias (39% of patients) and asthenia (21.4%). No myelotoxicity was observed. The drug is active in previously treated metastatic breast cancer and, because of its peculiar pattern of action and toxicity, deserves to be evaluated in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:2930690

  2. [Phase I-II study of recombinant interferon gamma].

    PubMed

    Adachi, K; Ogawa, M; Usui, N; Inagaki, J; Horikoshi, N; Inoue, K; Nakada, H; Tada, A; Yamazaki, H; Mukaiyama, T

    1985-06-01

    A phase I-II study of human recombinant interferon gamma (rIFN-gamma) was conducted in patients with various advanced cancer refractory to standard chemotherapies. In the phase I study, seven patients received 14 courses of escalating doses ranging from 2 X 10(6)U/m2 to 64 X 10(6)U/m2 by 1-hour intravenous infusion for 5 consecutive days. The toxicities were high fever with chills, anorexia, occasional nausea and vomiting, elevation of serum GOT, and dose-related leukopenia and neurotoxic symptoms such as heavy fatigue with somnolence or lethargy, both of which were reversible. The pharmacokinetics showed that the peak levels of serum rIFN-gamma activity were dose-related but decreased rapidly to below measurable levels within 6 hours after infusion in patients receiving less than 12 X 10(6)U/m2. Considering these data, the dosage of rIFN-gamma 6 X 10(6) U/m2 by daily intramuscular injection for more than 4 weeks was selected for the early phase II study. There was no partial response out of 11 evaluable patients but a stable condition was observed in 2 cases of renal cell carcinoma and one case each of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. All toxicities seen were similar to those observed in the phase I study, but no tachyphylaxis developed with continued dosage. The antitumor effect of rIFN-gamma remains to be evaluated in a further study employing higher doses. PMID:2988459

  3. A phase II study of axitinib in advanced neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, J R; Cives, M; Hwang, J; Weber, T; Nickerson, M; Atreya, C E; Venook, A; Kelley, R K; Valone, T; Morse, B; Coppola, D; Bergsland, E K

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are highly vascular neoplasms overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as VEGF receptors (VEGFR). Axitinib is a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGFR-1, -2 and -3, currently approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. We performed an open-label, two-stage design, phase II trial of axitinib 5 mg twice daily in patients with progressive unresectable/metastatic low-to-intermediate grade carcinoid tumors. The primary end points were progression-free survival (PFS) and 12-month PFS rate. The secondary end points included time to treatment failure (TTF), overall survival (OS), overall radiographic response rate (ORR), biochemical response rate and safety. A total of 30 patients were enrolled and assessable for toxicity; 22 patients were assessable for response. After a median follow-up of 29 months, we observed a median PFS of 26.7 months (95% CI, 11.4–35.1), with a 12-month PFS rate of 74.5% (±10.2). The median OS was 45.3 months (95% CI, 24.4–45.3), and the median TTF was 9.6 months (95% CI, 5.5–12). The best radiographic response was partial response (PR) in 1/30 (3%) and stable disease (SD) in 21/30 patients (70%); 8/30 patients (27%) were unevaluable due to early withdrawal due to toxicity. Hypertension was the most common toxicity that developed in 27 patients (90%). Grade 3/4 hypertension was recorded in 19 patients (63%), leading to treatment discontinuation in six patients (20%). Although axitinib appears to have an inhibitory effect on tumor growth in patients with advanced, progressive carcinoid tumors, the high rate of grade 3/4 hypertension may represent a potential impediment to its use in unselected patients. PMID:27080472

  4. Quality of outcome reporting in phase II studies in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bonnett, Laura Jayne; Davies, Geraint Rhys

    2015-01-01

    more effective development of new treatment strategies for patients with TB. Pending development of, and agreement on, such a core outcome set, we suggest some interim recommendations for reporting of future phase II studies of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:26566930

  5. A Phase I-II Study of Postoperative Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiotherapy in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Edwin; Crosby, Tom D.L.; Dubbelman, Ria; Bartelink, Harry; Verheij, Marcel

    2007-12-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 randomized study showed that postoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy improved locoregional control and overall survival in patients with gastric cancer. We hypothesized that these results could be improved further by using a more effective, intensified, and convenient chemotherapy schedule. Therefore, this Phase I-II dose-escalation study was performed to determine the maximal tolerated dose and toxicity profile of postoperative radiotherapy combined with concurrent capecitabine. Patients and Methods: After recovery from surgery for adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction or stomach, all patients were treated with capecitabine monotherapy, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily for 2 weeks. After a 1-week treatment-free interval, patients received capecitabine (650-1,000 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily 5 days/week) in a dose-escalation schedule combined with radiotherapy on weekdays for 5 weeks. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the gastric bed, anastomoses, and regional lymph nodes. Results: Sixty-six patients were treated accordingly. Two patients went off study before or shortly after the start of chemoradiotherapy because of progressive disease. Therefore, 64 patients completed treatment as planned. During the chemoradiotherapy phase, 4 patients developed four items of Grade III dose-limiting toxicity (3 patients in Dose Level II and 1 patient in Dose Level IV). The predefined highest dose of capecitabine, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily orally, was tolerated well and, therefore, considered safe for further clinical evaluation. Conclusions: This Phase I-II study shows that intensified chemoradiotherapy with daily capecitabine is feasible in postoperative patients with gastroesophageal junction and gastric cancer.

  6. Results of the phase II study of photodynamic therapy in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konaka, Chimori; Kato, Harubumi; Okunaka, Tetsuya; Hayata, Yoshihiro

    1994-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) utilizing Photofrin has proven to be an effective modality used in the treatment of solid tumors. In particular, it can be applied via endoscopy to lesions developing in luminal organs. A phase II study was conducted for submission to the Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare. In this protocol an excimer dye laser was used to deliver 630 nm light via a quartz fiber passed through an endoscopic working channel two days subsequent to i.v. injection of photosensitizer. In this study, 98 patients with superficial cancer of various organs were treated. Of these, 88 patients could be evaluated, including 33 with roentgenographically occult lung cancer, 10 with esophageal cancer, 24 with gastric cancer, 18 with cervical cancer and three with bladder cancer. Complete remission as evaluated endoscopically, pathologically, and cytologically was obtained in 83 out of 98 (84.7). There was no serious complication except mild skin photosensitivity, which was seen in four patients. It was concluded that PDT can be efficacious in the treatment of superficial cancers and that complete remission can be achieved when suitable photoradiation conditions are met.

  7. Phase II studies of recombinant human interferon gamma in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Quesada, J R; Kurzrock, R; Sherwin, S A; Gutterman, J U

    1987-02-01

    Thirty-three patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma were treated with recombinant human interferon gamma (rIFN gamma) in two sequential, nonrandomized phase II studies. Fifteen patients received rIFN gamma by daily i.m. injection in doses ranging from 0.25 to 1.0 mg/m2, and 18 patients received it by daily continuous i.v. infusion in doses ranging from 0.01 to 0.05 mg/m2. Partial remissions were achieved by one of 14 (7%) evaluable patients in the i.m. study and in one of 16 in the i.v. study (6%). The incidence of clinical toxicity was similar for both studies. Toxicity was severe in patients receiving rIFN gamma by the i.m. route at 1.0 mg/m2 and by the i.v. route at 0.05 mg/m2. Toxicity includes constitutional symptoms (fatigue, anorexia, weight loss), leukopenia, abnormalities in liver function tests, and hypertriglyceridemia. At the doses and schedules used, rIFN gamma had minimal therapeutic activity as a single agent in metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:3104544

  8. [Phase II study of recombinant leukocyte A interferon (Ro 22-8181) in hematological malignancies].

    PubMed

    1985-04-01

    A Phase II study of recombinant leukocyte A interferon (rIFN-alpha A, Ro 22-8181) was performed in 121 patients with hematological malignancies at 33 institutions from July, 1982 to May, 1984. Patients received Ro 22-8181 by intramuscular injection daily for more than 4 weeks. Daily doses were escalated from 3 X 10(6) to 6X, 9X, 18X, 36X and 50X 10(6) units every 3-7 days. Among 70 evaluable cases, complete or partial responses were observed in 15 patients (21.4%). One complete and 10 partial responses (22.4%) were noted in 49 cases of multiple myeloma, 2 partial remissions (18.2%) in 11 cases of malignant lymphoma and 2 partial remissions (25.0%) in 8 cases of leukemia. Side effects included fever (57.0%), anorexia (34.2%), nausea-vomiting (22.8%), malaise (19.0%), leukopenia (44.3%), thrombocytopenia (45.6%) and increase of GOT or GPT (26.6% or 22.8%). They were all not serious and disappeared quickly after the discontinuation of Ro 22-8181. PMID:3885864

  9. [Phase II study of recombinant leukocyte A interferon (Ro 22-8181) in skin malignant tumors].

    PubMed

    1985-04-01

    A clinical phase II study of recombinant human leukocyte interferon A (rIFN-alpha A, Ro 22-8181) for various skin malignant tumors was jointly conducted at nine medical institutes across the country in order to study its clinical effect and side effects. Patients received Ro 22-8181 alone in doses ranging from 3 X 10(6) U/day to 50 X 10(6) U/day either by intramuscular injection or by local injection. Good response was obtained in one (4.8%) of 21 patients treated by intramuscular injection and in 26 (72.2%) of 36 patients treated by local injection. The percentage of good responses achieved by local injection for individual diseases was 55.6% (5/9) for metastatic malignant skin melanoma, 100% (11/11) for cutaneous malignant lymphoma, 100% (5/5) for extramammary Paget's disease, 75% (3/4) for intraepidermal cancer and 50% (2/4) for metastatic skin cancer. Main side effects were fever, anorexia, general fatigue, chills, nausea and vomiting. Abnormal laboratory data included leukopenia, and elevation of GOT and GPT, although their incidence was lower with local injection than with intramuscular injection. Side effects were mostly improved by reduction of the dose or discontinuation of the treatment. PMID:2985007

  10. Multicenter Phase II Study of Sequential Radioembolization-Sorafenib Therapy for Inoperable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Pierce K. H.; Poon, Donald Y. H.; Khin, Maung-Win; Singh, Harjit; Han, Ho-Seong; Goh, Anthony S. W.; Choo, Su-Pin; Lai, Hee-Kit; Lo, Richard H. G.; Tay, Kiang-Hiong; Lim, Teong-Guan; Gandhi, Mihir; Tan, Say-Beng; Soo, Khee-Chee

    2014-01-01

    Background The safety and tolerability of sequential radioembolization-sorafenib therapy is unknown. An open-label, single arm, investigator-initiated Phase II study (NCT0071279) was conducted at four Asia-Pacific centers to evaluate the safety and efficacy of sequential radioembolization-sorafenib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) not amenable to curative therapies. Methods Sorafenib (400 mg twice-daily) was initiated 14 days post-radioembolization with yttrium-90 (90Y) resin microspheres given as a single procedure. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability and best overall response rate (ORR) using RECIST v1.0.Secondary endpoints included: disease control rate (complete [CR] plus partial responses [PR] and stable disease [SD]) and overall survival (OS). Results Twenty-nine patients with Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage B (38%) or C (62%) HCC received a median of 3.0 GBq (interquartile range, 1.0) 90Y-microspheres followed by sorafenib (median dose/day, 600.0 mg; median duration, 4.1 months). Twenty eight patients experienced ≥1 toxicity; 15 (52%) grade ≥3. Best ORR was 25%, including 2 (7%) CR and 5 (18%) PR, and 15 (54%) SD. Disease control was 100% and 65% in BCLC stage B and C, respectively. Two patients (7%) had sufficient response to enable radical therapy. Median survivals for BCLC stage B and C were 20.3 and 8.6 months, respectively. Conclusions This study shows the potential efficacy and manageable toxicity of sequential radioembolization-sorafenib. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00712790. PMID:24614178

  11. Phase I-II Study of Hypofractionated Simultaneous Integrated Boost With Tomotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Di Muzio, Nadia Fiorino, Claudio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Alongi, Filippo; Broggi, Sara; Mangili, Paola; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Valdagni, Riccardo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Fazio, Ferruccio

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To report planning and acute toxicity data of the first 60 patients treated within a Phase I-II study with moderate hypofractionation by image-guided helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Various clinical target volumes (CTVs) were defined: CTV1-pelvic nodes; CTV2-upper portion of seminal vesicles; CTV3-lower portion of SV; CTV4-prostate; overlap between planning target volume (PTV) 4 and rectum. Different doses to each PTV were simultaneously delivered in 28 fractions. For 31 low-risk patients: 56.0, 61.6, and 71.4 Gy for PTV2-4, respectively; for 20 intermediate-risk patients: 51.8, 61.6, 65.5, and 74.2 Gy for PTV1-4, respectively; for 9 high-risk patients: 51.8 and 65.5 Gy for PTV1-2 and 74.2 Gy for PTV3-4. For all patients, the dose to overlap was 65.5 Gy. Results: The mean fraction of rectum receiving more than 65 Gy (V65) and rectal Dmax were 10% and 70.8 Gy respectively. In cases of pelvic node irradiation, the intestinal cavity (outside PTV) receiving > 45 and 50 Gy was 86 and 12 cc, respectively. A homogeneous dose distribution within each PTV was guaranteed. Acute genitourinary toxicity according to RTOG scoring system was as follows: 21/60 (35%) Grade 1, 12/60 (20%) Grade 2, 2/60 (3%) Grade 3. Acute rectal toxicities were: 18/60 (30%) Grade 1. Twelve (20%) patients showed Grade 1 upper intestinal toxicity (uGI). No patients experienced {>=} Grade 2 acute rectal or uGI side effects. Conclusions: This study shows excellent results with regard to acute toxicity. Further research is necessary to assess definitive late toxicity and tumor control outcome.

  12. Phase II Study of Aflibercept in Recurrent Malignant Glioma: A North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, John F.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Chang, Susan M.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Aldape, Kenneth; Yao, Jun; Jackson, Edward F.; Lieberman, Frank; Robins, H. Ian; Mehta, Minesh P.; Lassman, Andrew B.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Chen, Alice; Prados, Michael D.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy is a promising treatment approach for patients with recurrent glioblastoma. This single-arm phase II study evaluated the efficacy of aflibercept (VEGF Trap), a recombinantly produced fusion protein that scavenges both VEGF and placental growth factor in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Patients and Methods Forty-two patients with glioblastoma and 16 patients with anaplastic glioma who had received concurrent radiation and temozolomide and adjuvant temozolomide were enrolled at first relapse. Aflibercept 4 mg/kg was administered intravenously on day 1 of every 2-week cycle. Results The 6-month progression-free survival rate was 7.7% for the glioblastoma cohort and 25% for patients with anaplastic glioma. Overall radiographic response rate was 24% (18% for glioblastoma and 44% for anaplastic glioma). The median progression-free survival was 24 weeks for patients with anaplastic glioma (95% CI, 5 to 31 weeks) and 12 weeks for patients with glioblastoma (95% CI, 8 to 16 weeks). A total of 14 patients (25%) were removed from the study for toxicity, on average less than 2 months from treatment initiation. The main treatment-related National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria grades 3 and 4 adverse events (38 total) included fatigue, hypertension, and lymphopenia. Two grade 4 CNS ischemias and one grade 4 systemic hemorrhage were reported. Aflibercept rapidly decreases permeability on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular analysis of baseline tumor tissue identified tumor-associated markers of response and resistance. Conclusion Aflibercept monotherapy has moderate toxicity and minimal evidence of single-agent activity in unselected patients with recurrent malignant glioma. PMID:21606416

  13. ENGAGE- 501: phase II study of entinostat (SNDX-275) in relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Batlevi, Connie Lee; Kasamon, Yvette; Bociek, R. Gregory; Lee, Peter; Gore, Lia; Copeland, Amanda; Sorensen, Rachel; Ordentlich, Peter; Cruickshank, Scott; Kunkel, Lori; Buglio, Daniela; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco; Younes, Anas

    2016-01-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma treatment is evolving rapidly with high response rates from antibody-drug conjugates targeting CD30 and immune checkpoint antibodies. However, most patients do not achieve a complete response, therefore development of novel therapies is warranted to improve patient outcomes. In this phase II study, patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma were treated with entinostat, an isoform selective histone deacetylase inhibitor. Forty-nine patients were enrolled: 33 patients on Schedule A (10 or 15 mg oral entinostat once every other week); 16 patients on Schedule B (15 mg oral entinostat once weekly in 3 of 4 weeks). Patients received a median of 3 prior treatments (range 1–10), with 80% of the patients receiving a prior stem cell transplant and 8% of patients receiving prior brentuximab vedotin. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the overall response rate was 12% while the disease control rate (complete response, partial response, and stable disease beyond 6 months) was 24%. Seven patients did not complete the first cycle due to progression of disease. Tumor reduction was observed in 24 of 38 (58%) evaluable patients. Median progression-free survival and overall survival was 5.5 and 25.1 months, respectively. The most frequent grade 3 or 4 adverse events were thrombocytopenia (63%), anemia (47%), neutropenia (41%), leukopenia (10%), hypokalemia (8%), and hypophosphatemia (6%). Twenty-five (51%) patients required dose reductions or delays. Pericarditis/pericardial effusion occurred in one patient after 12 cycles of therapy. Future studies are warranted to identify predictive biomarkers for treatment response and to develop mechanism-based combination strategies. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 00866333) PMID:27151994

  14. ENGAGE- 501: phase II study of entinostat (SNDX-275) in relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Batlevi, Connie Lee; Kasamon, Yvette; Bociek, R Gregory; Lee, Peter; Gore, Lia; Copeland, Amanda; Sorensen, Rachel; Ordentlich, Peter; Cruickshank, Scott; Kunkel, Lori; Buglio, Daniela; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco; Younes, Anas

    2016-08-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma treatment is evolving rapidly with high response rates from antibody-drug conjugates targeting CD30 and immune checkpoint antibodies. However, most patients do not achieve a complete response, therefore development of novel therapies is warranted to improve patient outcomes. In this phase II study, patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma were treated with entinostat, an isoform selective histone deacetylase inhibitor. Forty-nine patients were enrolled: 33 patients on Schedule A (10 or 15 mg oral entinostat once every other week); 16 patients on Schedule B (15 mg oral entinostat once weekly in 3 of 4 weeks). Patients received a median of 3 prior treatments (range 1-10), with 80% of the patients receiving a prior stem cell transplant and 8% of patients receiving prior brentuximab vedotin. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the overall response rate was 12% while the disease control rate (complete response, partial response, and stable disease beyond 6 months) was 24%. Seven patients did not complete the first cycle due to progression of disease. Tumor reduction was observed in 24 of 38 (58%) evaluable patients. Median progression-free survival and overall survival was 5.5 and 25.1 months, respectively. The most frequent grade 3 or 4 adverse events were thrombocytopenia (63%), anemia (47%), neutropenia (41%), leukopenia (10%), hypokalemia (8%), and hypophosphatemia (6%). Twenty-five (51%) patients required dose reductions or delays. Pericarditis/pericardial effusion occurred in one patient after 12 cycles of therapy. Future studies are warranted to identify predictive biomarkers for treatment response and to develop mechanism-based combination strategies. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 00866333). PMID:27151994

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of the Eurotest for dementia: a naturalistic, multicenter phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Carnero-Pardo, Cristobal; Gurpegui, Manuel; Sanchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Frank, Ana; Mola, Santiago; Barquero, M Sagrario; Montoro-Rios, M Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Background Available screening tests for dementia are of limited usefulness because they are influenced by the patient's culture and educational level. The Eurotest, an instrument based on the knowledge and handling of money, was designed to overcome these limitations. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the Eurotest in identifying dementia in customary clinical practice. Methods A cross-sectional, multi-center, naturalistic phase II study was conducted. The Eurotest was administered to consecutive patients, older than 60 years, in general neurology clinics. The patients' condition was classified as dementia or no dementia according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. We calculated sensitivity (Sn), specificity (Sp) and area under the ROC curves (aROC) with 95% confidence intervals. The influence of social and educational factors on scores was evaluated with multiple linear regression analysis, and the influence of these factors on diagnostic accuracy was evaluated with logistic regression. Results Sixteen neurologists recruited a total of 516 participants: 101 with dementia, 380 without dementia, and 35 who were excluded. Of the 481 participants who took the Eurotest, 38.7% were totally or functionally illiterate and 45.5% had received no formal education. Mean time needed to administer the test was 8.2+/-2.0 minutes. The best cut-off point was 20/21, with Sn = 0.91 (0.84–0.96), Sp = 0.82 (0.77–0.85), and aROC = 0.93 (0.91–0.95). Neither the scores on the Eurotest nor its diagnostic accuracy were influenced by social or educational factors. Conclusion This naturalistic and pragmatic study shows that the Eurotest is a rapid, simple and useful screening instrument, which is free from educational influences, and has appropriate internal and external validity. PMID:16606455

  16. A multicentre phase II study of cisplatin and gemcitabine for malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, A K; Byrne, M J; Williamson, R; Ryan, G; Segal, A; Fielding, D; Mitchell, P; Musk, A W; Robinson, B W S

    2002-01-01

    Our previous phase II study of cisplatin and gemcitabine in malignant mesothelioma showed a 47.6% (95% CI 26.2–69.0%) response rate with symptom improvement in responding patients. Here we confirm these findings in a multicentre setting, and assess the effect of this treatment on quality of life and pulmonary function. Fifty-three patients with pleural malignant mesothelioma received cisplatin 100 mg m−2 i.v. day 1 and gemcitabine 1000 mg m−2 i.v. days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28 day cycle for a maximum of six cycles. Quality of life and pulmonary function were assessed at each cycle. The best response achieved in 52 assessable patients was: partial response, 17 (33%, 95% CI 20–46%); stable disease, 31 (60%); and progressive disease, four (8%). The median time to disease progression was 6.4 months, median survival from start of treatment 11.2 months, and median survival from diagnosis 17.3 months. Vital capacity and global quality of life remained stable in all patients and improved significantly in responding patients. Major toxicities were haematological, limiting the mean relative dose intensity of gemcitabine to 75%. This schedule of cisplatin and gemcitabine is active in malignant mesothelioma in a multicentre setting. Investigation of alternative scheduling is needed to decrease haematological toxicity and increase the relative dose intensity of gemcitabine whilst maintaining response rate and quality of life. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 491–496. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600505 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12189542

  17. Phase II Study of Nilotinib in Melanoma Harboring KIT Alterations Following Progression to Prior KIT Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Richard D.; Lawrence, Donald P.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Gonzalez, Rene; Lutzky, Jose; O’Day, Steven J.; Hamid, Omid; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Chapman, Paul B.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Teitcher, Jerrold B.; Ramaiya, Nikhil; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Bastian, Boris C.; Corless, Christopher L.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Hodi, F. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although durable responses can be achieved with tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib in melanomas harboring KIT mutations, the efficacy of alternative inhibitors after progression to imatinib and the activity of these agents on brain metastases is unknown. Experimental Design We conducted a phase II study of nilotinib 400 mg BID in two cohorts of patients with melanomas harboring KIT mutations or amplification: A) those refractory or intolerant to a prior KIT inhibitor; and B) those with brain metastases. The primary endpoint was 4-month disease control rate. Secondary endpoints included response rate, time-to-progression and overall survival. A Simon two-stage and a single-stage design was planned to assess for the primary endpoint in Cohorts A and B, respectively. Results Twenty patients were enrolled and 19 treated (11-Cohort A; 8-Cohort B). Three patients on Cohort A (27%; 95% CI, 8% – 56%) and 1 on Cohort B (12.5%; 90% CI, 0.6% – 47%) achieved the primary endpoint. Two partial responses were observed in Cohort A (18.2%, 90% CI, 3% – 47%); none were observed in Cohort B. The median time-to-progression and overall survival was 3·3 (90% CI, 2.1 – 3.9 months) and 9.1 months (90% CI, 4.3 – 14.2 months), respectively, in all treated patients. Conclusion Nilotinib may achieve disease control in patients with melanoma harboring KIT alterations and whose disease progressed after imatinib therapy. The efficacy of this agent in KIT altered melanoma with brain metastasis is limited. PMID:25695690

  18. REFINEMENT OF THE NEPHELINE DISCRIMINATOR: RESULTS OF A PHASE II STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T

    2008-11-21

    Twenty five glass compositions were selected for a Phase II study to assess the potential for reducing the conservatism in the nepheline discriminator. The glass compositions were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the DWPF PCCS models. In addition, the liquidus temperature model was used to restrict the glass compositions so that they could all be melted at the same temperature. The nepheline discriminator was used to force the glass compositions into regions where nepheline formation was predicted to occur. The glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and characterized for crystallization and chemical durability after both quenching and slow cooling. Chemical analysis showed that the fabricated glasses met the target compositions. Nepheline was identified in one of the quenched glasses and several of the CCC glasses. There was no clear relationship between the types of crystallization that occurred in a particular glass and its location on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} ternary diagram. A partitioning algorithm was used to identify trends in crystallization behavior based on glass composition. Generally, for the CCC glasses MnO influenced the crystallization of spinels and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} influenced the crystallization of nepheline. Measured durability responses varied from acceptable to unacceptable depending on the glass composition and type and extent of crystallization that occurred. It was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator at this time. It is recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where acceptable glasses are predicted to be

  19. Phase I/II study of a short course of weekly cisplatin in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Planting, A. S.; van der Burg, M. E.; de Boer-Dennert, M.; Stoter, G.; Verweij, J.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with advanced solid tumours were entered in a phase I/II study of six, weekly cycles of cisplatin. Nineteen patients were chemonaive and six were previously treated. The starting dose was 50 mg m-2 week-1. This dose could be escalated without major toxicity to 70 mg m-2 week-1. At a dose of 80 mg m-2 myelosuppression grade 3 occurred as well as grade 1 nephro- and neurotoxicity. The maximum tolerated dose was 85 mg m-2 with dose limiting thrombocytopenia. Hypertonic saline was effective in preventing nephrotoxicity. Ondansetron was a very effective antiemetic in the first weeks of treatment but its efficacy waned later on. Responses were observed in head and neck cancer, melanoma and mesothelioma. At the dose level of 80 mg m-2 the optimal dose intensity was reached. This schedule will be tested further in phase II studies. PMID:8398709

  20. Phase I/II Study of Nilotinib/Ruxolitinb Therapy for TKI Resistant Ph-Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-04

    Chronic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Philadelphia Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Resistant to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy

  1. A North American brain tumor consortium phase II study of poly-ICLC for adult patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas.

    PubMed

    Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Lee, Bee L; Prados, Michael D; Cloughesy, Timothy; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Abrey, Lauren; Fink, Karen; Lieberman, Frank; Mehta, Minesh; Ian Robins, H; Junck, Larry; Salazar, Andres M; Chang, Susan M

    2009-01-01

    This phase II study was designed to determine the objective response rate and 6-month progression free survival of adult patients with recurrent supratentorial anaplastic glioma when treated with the immune modulator, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid stabilized with polylysine and carboxymethylcellulose (poly-ICLC). This was an open-labeled, single arm phase II study. Patients were treated with poly-ICLC alone. Patients may have had treatment for no more than two prior relapses. Treatment with poly-ICLC continued until tumor progression. Fifty five patients were enrolled in the study. Ten were ineligible after central review of pathology. Eleven percent of patients (5 of 45) had a radiographic response. Time to progression was known for 39 patients and 6 remain on treatment. The estimated 6-month progression free survival was 24%. The median survival time was 43 weeks. Poly-ICLC was well tolerated, but there was no improvement in 6-month progression free survival compared to historical database nor was there an encouraging objective radiographic response rate. Based on this study, poly-ICLC does not improve 6moPFS in patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas but may be worth further study in combination with agents such as temozolomide. PMID:18850068

  2. A North American brain tumor consortium phase II study of Poly-ICLC for adult patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Butowski, Nicholas; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Lee, Bee L; Prados, Michael D.; Cloughesy, Timothy; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Abrey, Lauren; Fink, Karen; Lieberman, Frank; Mehta, Minesh; Robins, H. Ian; Junck, Larry; Salazar, Andres M.; Chang, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This phase II study was designed to determine the objective response rate and 6-month progression free survival of adult patients with recurrent supratentorial anaplastic glioma when treated with the immune modulator, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid stabilized with polylysine and carboxymethylcellulose (poly-ICLC). Methods and Materials This was an open-labeled, single arm phase II study. Patients were treated with poly-ICLC alone. Patients may have had treatment for no more than two prior relapses. Treatment with poly-ICLC continued until tumor progression. Results 55 patients were enrolled in the study. 10 were ineligible after central review of pathology. 11% of patients (5 of 45) had a radiographic response. Time to progression was known for 39 patients and 6 remain on treatment. The estimated 6-month progression free survival was 24%. The median survival time was 43 weeks. Conclusions Poly-ICLC was well tolerated, but there was no improvement in 6-month progression free survival compared to historical database nor was there an encouraging objective radiographic response rate. Based on this study, poly-ICLC does not improve 6moPFS in patients with recurrent anaplastic gliomas but may be worth further study in combination with agents such as temozolomide. PMID:18850068

  3. A phase II study of TRC105 in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who have progressed on sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, AG; Ulahannan, SV; Cao, L; Rahma, OE; Makarova-Rusher, OV; Kleiner, DE; Fioravanti, S; Walker, M; Carey, S; Yu, Y; Venkatesan, AM; Turkbey, B; Choyke, P; Trepel, J; Bollen, KC; Steinberg, SM; Figg, WD

    2015-01-01

    Background Endoglin is an endothelial cell membrane receptor essential for angiogenesis and highly expressed on the vasculature of many tumor types, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). TRC105 is a chimeric IgG1 anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody that inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth by endothelial cell growth inhibition, ADCC and apoptosis, and complements VEGF inhibitors. Objective The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the efficacy of anti-endoglin therapy with TRC105 in patients with advanced HCC, post-sorafenib. Methods Patients with HCC and compensated liver function (Childs-Pugh A/B7), ECOG 0/1, were enrolled to a single-arm, phase II study of TRC105 15 mg/kg IV every two weeks. Patients must have progressed on or been intolerant of prior sorafenib. A Simon optimal two-stage design was employed with a 50% four-month PFS target for progression to the second stage. Correlative biomarkers evaluated included DCE-MRI as well as plasma levels of angiogenic biomarkers and soluble CD105. Results A total accrual of 27 patients was planned. However, because of lack of efficacy and in accordance with the Simon two-stage design, 11 patients were enrolled. There were no grade 3/4 treatment-related toxicities. Most frequent toxicities were headache (G2; N = 3) and epistaxis (G1; N = 4). One patient had a confirmed partial response by standard RECIST criteria and biologic response on DCE-MRI but the four-month PFS was insufficient to proceed to the second stage of the study. Conclusions: TRC105 was well tolerated in this HCC population following sorafenib. Although there was evidence of clinical activity, this did not meet prespecified criteria to proceed to the second stage. TRC105 development in HCC continues as combination therapy with sorafenib. PMID:26535124

  4. Phase II Study of Vorinostat for Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma and Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kirschbaum, Mark; Frankel, Paul; Popplewell, Leslie; Zain, Jasmine; Delioukina, Maria; Pullarkat, Vinod; Matsuoka, Deron; Pulone, Bernadette; Rotter, Arnold J.; Espinoza-Delgado, Igor; Nademanee, Auayporn; Forman, Stephen J.; Gandara, David; Newman, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We performed a phase II study of oral vorinostat, a histone and protein deacetylase inhibitor, to examine its efficacy and tolerability in patients with relapsed/refractory indolent lymphoma. Patients and Methods In this open label phase II study (NCT00253630), patients with relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma (FL), marginal zone lymphoma (MZL), or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), with ≤ 4 prior therapies were eligible. Oral vorinostat was administered at a dose of 200 mg twice daily on days 1 through 14 of a 21-day cycle until progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary end point was objective response rate (ORR), with secondary end points of progression-free survival (PFS), time to progression, duration of response, safety, and tolerability. Results All 35 eligible patients were evaluable for response. The median number of vorinostat cycles received was nine. ORR was 29% (five complete responses [CR] and five partial responses [PR]). For 17 patients with FL, ORR was 47% (four CR, four PR). There were two of nine responders with MZL (one CR, one PR), and no formal responders among the nine patients with MCL, although one patient maintained stable disease for 26 months. Median PFS was 15.6 months for patients with FL, 5.9 months for MCL, and 18.8 months for MZL. The drug was well-tolerated over long periods of treatment, with the most common grade 3 adverse events being thrombocytopenia, anemia, leucopenia, and fatigue. Conclusion Oral vorinostat is a promising agent in FL and MZL, with an acceptable safety profile. Further studies in combination with other active agents in this setting are warranted. PMID:21300924

  5. Intracerebral administration of CpG oligonucleotide for patients with recurrent glioblastoma: a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Alexandre; Metellus, Philippe; Ursu, Renata; Zohar, Sarah; Lafitte, Francois; Barrié, Maryline; Meng, Yuxia; Richard, Margaretha; Parizot, Christophe; Laigle-Donadey, Florence; Gorochov, Guy; Psimaras, Dimitri; Sanson, Marc; Tibi, Annick; Chinot, Olivier; Carpentier, Antoine F

    2010-04-01

    Immunostimulating oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG-ODN) have shown promising efficacy in cancer models when injected locally. In a phase I clinical trial, intratumoral infusions of CpG-ODN in glioblastoma (GBM) patients were well tolerated at doses up to 20 mg. This phase II trial was designed to study the efficacy of a local treatment by CpG-ODN in patients with recurrent GBMs. Patients with recurrent GBM occurring at least 3 months after radiotherapy, and previously treated with 1 or 2 regimens of chemotherapy received 20 mg of CpG-ODN (CpG-28) by convection-enhanced delivery. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients without tumor progression 6 months after inclusion. Secondary endpoints were tolerance, survival, and radiological response. Thirty-four patients were enrolled in two centers between November 2004 and March 2006. Thirty-one patients received CpG-ODN treatment. The progression-free survival (PFS) at 6 months was 19%. One partial response and 3 minor responses were observed. The median overall survival was 28 weeks. Eight patients (24%) were alive 1 year after inclusion and 5 patients (15%) were alive after 2 years. Treatment was usually well tolerated. As reported previously, the most common toxicities were lymphopenia, mild fever, seizures, and transient neurological worsening. Despite a few cases showing a radiological response, CpG-28 showed modest activity on the 6-month PFS in this patient population. The molecular or clinical characteristics of a subgroup of patients that could potentially benefit from such an approach remain to be defined. PMID:20308317

  6. Rituximab for treatment of inhibitors in haemophilia A. A Phase II study.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, C; Josephson, C D; Granger, S; Konkle, B A; Kruse-Jarres, R; Ragni, M V; Journeycake, J M; Valentino, L; Key, N S; Gill, J C; McCrae, K R; Neufeld, E J; Manno, C; Raffini, L; Saxena, K; Torres, M; Marder, V; Bennett, C M; Assmann, S F

    2014-09-01

    The development of antibodies against infused factor VIII (FVIII) in patients with haemophilia A is a serious complication leading to poorly controlled bleeding and increased morbidity. No treatment has been proven to reduce high titre antibodies in patients who fail immune tolerance induction or are not candidates for it. The Rituximab for the Treatment of Inhibitors in Congenital Hemophilia A (RICH) study was a phase II trial to assess whether rituximab can reduce anamnestic FVIII antibody (inhibitor) titres. Male subjects with severe congenital haemophilia A and an inhibitor titre ≥5 Bethesda Units/ml (BU) following a FVIII challenge infusion received rituximab 375 mg/m² weekly for weeks 1 through 4. Post-rituximab inhibitor titres were measured monthly from week 6 through week 22 to assess treatment response. Of 16 subjects who received at least one dose of rituximab, three (18.8%) met the criteria for a major response, defined as a fall in inhibitor titre to <5 BU, persisting after FVIII re-challenge. One subject had a minor response, defined as a fall in inhibitor titre to <5 BU, increasing to 5-10 BU after FVIII re-challenge, but <50% of the original peak inhibitor titre. Rituximab is useful in lowering inhibitor levels in patients, but its effect as a solo treatment strategy is modest. Future studies are indicated to determine the role of rituximab as an adjunctive therapy in immune tolerisation strategies. PMID:24919980

  7. Doxycycline plus tauroursodeoxycholic acid for transthyretin amyloidosis: a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Obici, Laura; Cortese, Andrea; Lozza, Alessandro; Lucchetti, J; Gobbi, Marco; Palladini, Giovanni; Perlini, Stefano; Saraiva, Maria J; Merlini, Giampaolo

    2012-06-01

    We designed a phase II, open-label study to evaluate the efficacy, tolerability, safety, and pharmacokinetics of orally doxycycline (100 mg BID) and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) (250 mg three times/day) administered continuously for 12 months. Primary endpoint is response rate defined as nonprogression of the neuropathy and of the cardiomyopathy. Since July 2010, we enrolled 20 patients. Seventeen patients have hereditary ATTR, two patients have senile systemic amyloidosis, and one is a domino recipient. Seven patients completed 12-month treatment, 10 completed 6-month treatment, two discontinued because of poor tolerability, and one is lost at follow-up. No serious adverse events were registered. No clinical progression of cardiac involvement was observed. The neuropathy (Neuropathy Impairment Score in the Lower Limbs [NIS-LL] and Kumamoto score) remained substantially stable over 1 year. These preliminary data indicate that the combination of Doxy-TUDCA stabilizes the disease for at least 1 year in the majority of patients with an acceptable toxicity profile. PMID:22551192

  8. Metronomic Capecitabine in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients: A Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    de Rosa, Francesco; Agostini, Valentina; di Girolamo, Stefania; Andreone, Pietro; Bolondi, Luigi; Serra, Carla; Sama, Claudia; Golfieri, Rita; Gramenzi, Annagiulia; Cucchetti, Alessandro; Pinna, Antonio Daniele; Trevisani, Franco; Biasco, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Background. Anti-angiogenic treatment with targeted agents is effective in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This trial evaluated the safety and efficacy of metronomic capecitabine in patients with HCC. Methods. This single-institution phase II trial included 59 previously untreated patients with advanced HCC and 31 patients resistant to or intolerant of sorafenib. The treatment schedule was capecitabine 500 mg twice daily until progression of disease, unacceptable toxicity level, or withdrawal of informed consent. Progression-free survival (PFS) was chosen as the primary endpoint. Results. A total of 59 previously untreated and 31 previously treated patients with HCC were enrolled. The first cohort achieved a median PFS of 6.03 months and an overall survival (OS) of 14.47 months. Two patients achieved a complete response, 1 patient achieved partial response, and in 30 patients, stable disease was the best outcome. The second cohort achieved a median PFS of 3.27 months and a median OS of 9.77 months. No complete or partial responses were observed, but 10 patients had stable disease. An unscheduled comparison of the first cohort of patients with 3,027 untreated patients with HCC from the Italian Liver Cancer (ITA.LI.CA) database was performed. One-to-one matching according to demographic/etiologic/oncologic features was possible for 50 patients. The median OS for these 50 capecitabine-treated patients was 15.6 months, compared with a median OS of 8.0 months for the matched untreated patients (p = .043). Conclusion. Metronomic capecitabine is well tolerated by patients with advanced HCC and appears to have activity both in treatment-naive patients and in those previously treated with sorafenib. PMID:24232581

  9. Phase II Study of Temozolomide (TMZ) and Everolimus (RAD001) Therapy for Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Dronca, Roxana S.; Allred, Jacob B.; Perez, Domingo G.; Nevala, Wendy K.; Lieser, Elizabeth A.T.; Thompson, Michael; Maples, William J.; Creagan, Edward T.; Pockaj, Barbara A.; Kaur, Judith S.; Moore, Timothy D.; Marchello, Benjamin T.; Markovic, Svetomir N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is activated in malignant melanoma and in situ lesions as opposed to benign nevi. Inhibition of PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling is implicated in sensitization of melanoma cells to alkylating agents [temozolomide (TMZ)] and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Methods We conducted a single-arm phase II multi-institution cooperative group study to assess the antitumor activity and safety profile of the combination of TMZ and the rapamycin derivative everolimus in patients with metastatic unresectable malignant melanoma. Patients received 10 mg/d of RAD001 for 5 of 7 days (ie, 50 mg/ wk) and 200 mg/m2/d of TMZ for 5 days each cycle. Results Of the first 39 eligible patients, 17 were PFS-9 successes, for a predetermined threshold of 18/39 patients for a positive trial. Overall, 21 of 48 patients were progression free at 9 weeks, for an event-free survival rate of 44% (95% confidence interval, 29%–59%). The median progression-free survival was 2.4 months and the median overall survival was 8.6 months. Four patients achieved a partial response; the median duration of response was 15.1 months. No complete remissions were observed. Treatment was in general well tolerated with only 1 patient discontinuing therapy due to toxicity (hyperlipidemia). Conclusions The combination of TMZ and RAD001 was well tolerated but failed to meet/exceed our study threshold for promising clinical activity in patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:23357973

  10. Phase II study of low-dose recombinant leukocyte A interferon in disseminated malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Creagan, E T; Ahmann, D L; Green, S J; Long, H J; Frytak, S; O'Fallon, J R; Itri, L M

    1984-09-01

    Thirty patients with disseminated malignant melanoma received intramuscular recombinant leukocyte A interferon (rIFN-alpha A), 12 X 10(6) U/m2, three times weekly for a planned treatment duration of three months. This dose was selected in view of our prior phase II data indicating that 50 X 10(6) U/m2 three times weekly produced excessive toxicity. In this current trial we observed three objective partial regressions (20%) among the 15 better-risk patients (performance score 0, 1, and no prior chemotherapy) with times to disease progression of 1.9, 9.6, and 12.9+ months. There were also three regressions (one complete and two partial) among the 15 poor-risk patients (performance score 2, 3, or prior chemotherapy) with progression times of 3, 3.2, and 9.6+ months. For all patients, the median survival time was 4.2 months. One half of the patients were observed to have progressive disease within one month of commencing treatment. Responding metastatic lesions were limited to soft tissue, although one patient also had a partial response of a lung nodule. The most substantial toxicities were moderate-to-severe myalgias (27%), nausea (33%), anorexia (47%), and fatigue (50%). Among the 22 patients with weight loss, the median was 2.3 kg (range, 0.6 to 8.4 kg). Hematologic and hepatic toxicity was transient and of little clinical significance. Our study indicates that rIFN-alpha A in the dose and schedule that we used is clinically tolerable and has antitumor activity in malignant melanoma. The response rate was similar to results observed in our previous study of a higher dose regimen. PMID:6470751

  11. Phase I/II study of 131I-MIBG with vincristine and 5 days of irinotecan for advanced neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, S G; Allen, S; Bent, M; Hilton, J F; Hollinger, F; Hawkins, R; Courtier, J; Mosse, Y P; Matthay, K K

    2015-01-01

    Background: 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is an active radiopharmaceutical in neuroblastoma. A previous study demonstrated that MIBG could be combined with vincristine and prolonged irinotecan, although 25% of first courses had grade 3 diarrhoea. The current phase I/II study evaluated MIBG with vincristine and 5 days of higher-dose irinotecan. Methods: Patients 1–30 years old with advanced neuroblastoma were eligible. Patients received cefixime on days −1 to +6, irinotecan (50 mg m−2 per dose IV) on days 0–4, vincristine (2 mg m−2) on day 0, MIBG (555 or 666 MBq kg−1) on day 1, and peripheral blood stem cells on day 13. UGT1A1 genotyping was performed in consenting patients. Results: Thirty-two patients (12 phase I ; 20 phase II) received 42 courses. No dose-limiting toxicities were seen during dose escalation and the recommended administered activity was 666 MBq kg−1. Myelosuppression and diarrhoea were the most common toxicities, with grade 3 diarrhoea in 6% of first courses. Patients homozygous for UGT1A1*28 had more grade 4 thrombocytopenia (80% vs 37% P=0.14). Responses (five complete and four partial) occurred in 9 out of 32 (28%) patients. Conclusions: MIBG (666 MBq kg−1) with vincristine and this irinotecan schedule is tolerable and active, with less severe diarrhoea compared with a regimen using more protracted irinotecan. PMID:25602966

  12. Phase I/II study of trastuzumab, paclitaxel, cisplatin and radiation for locally advanced, HER2 overexpressing, esophageal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Safran, Howard . E-mail: hsafran@lifespan.org; Di Petrillo, Thomas; Akerman, Paul; Ng, Thomas; Evans, Devon; Steinhoff, Margaret; Benton, David; Purviance, John; Goldstein, Lisa; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Kennedy, Teresa R.N.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the overall survival for patients with locally advanced, HER2 overexpressing, esophageal adenocarcinoma receiving trastuzumab, paclitaxel, cisplatin, and radiation on a Phase I-II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus without distant organ metastases and 2+/3+ HER2 overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) were eligible. All patients received cisplatin 25 mg/m{sup 2} and paclitaxel 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly for 6 weeks with radiation therapy (RT) 50.4 Gy. Patients received trastuzumab at dose levels of 1, 1.5, or 2 mg/kg weekly for 5 weeks after an initial bolus of 2, 3, or 4 mg/kg. Results: Nineteen patients were entered: 7 (37%) had celiac adenopathy, and 7 (37%) had retroperitoneal, portal adenopathy, or scalene adenopathy. Fourteen of 19 patients (74%) had either 3+ HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry, or an increase in HER2 gene copy number by HER2 gene amplification or high polysomy by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The median survival of all patients was 24 months and the 2-year survival was 50%. Conclusions: Assessment of the effect of trastuzumab in the treatment of patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma overexpressing HER2 is limited by the small number of patients in this study. Overall survival, however, was similar to prior studies without an increase in toxicity. Evaluation of HER2 status should be performed in future trials for patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus that investigate therapies targeting the HER family.

  13. Phase II Study of Lenalidomide and Rituximab As Salvage Therapy for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Badoux, Xavier C.; Keating, Michael J.; Wen, Sijin; Wierda, William G.; O'Brien, Susan M.; Faderl, Stefan; Sargent, Rachel; Burger, Jan A.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug active as salvage therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We combined lenalidomide with rituximab to improve response rates in patients with relapsed or refractory CLL. Patients and Methods Fifty-nine adult patients (age 42 to 82 years) with relapsed or refractory CLL were enrolled onto a phase II study of lenalidomide and rituximab. Patients had received prior fludarabine-based therapy or chemoimmunotherapy. Rituximab (375 mg/m2 intravenously) was administered weekly during cycle one and on day 1 of cycles three to 12. Lenalidomide was started on day 9 of cycle one at 10 mg orally and administered daily continuously. Each cycle was 28 days. Rituximab was administered for 12 cycles; lenalidomide could continue indefinitely if patients benefitted clinically. Results The overall response rate was 66%, including 12% complete responses and 12% nodular partial remissions. Time to treatment failure was 17.4 months. Median overall survival has not been reached; estimated survival at 36 months is 71%. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicity was neutropenia (73% of patients). Fourteen patients (24%) experienced a grade 3 to 4 infection or febrile episode. There was one episode of grade 3 tumor lysis; one patient experienced renal failure during the first cycle of therapy, and one venous thromboembolic event occurred during the study. Conclusion The combination of lenalidomide and rituximab is active in patients with recurrent CLL and warrants further investigation. PMID:23270003

  14. Phase II Study to Assess the Efficacy of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Large Cavernous Sinus Hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; Liu Xiaoxia; Mei Guanghai; Dai Jiazhong; Pan Li; Wang Enmin

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Cavernous sinus hemangioma is a rare vascular tumor. The direct microsurgical approach usually results in massive hemorrhage. Although radiosurgery plays an important role in managing cavernous sinus hemangiomas as a treatment alternative to microsurgery, the potential for increased toxicity with single-session treatment of large tumors is a concern. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Methods: Fourteen patients with large (volume >20 cm{sup 3}) cavernous sinus hemangiomas were enrolled in a prospective Phase II study between December 2007 and December 2010. The hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy dose was 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions. Results: After a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 6-36 months), the magnetic resonance images showed a mean of 77% tumor volume reduction (range, 44-99%). Among the 6 patients with cranial nerve impairments before hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, 1 achieved symptomatic complete resolution and 5 had improvement. No radiotherapy-related complications were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: Our current experience, though preliminary, substantiates the role of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Although a longer and more extensive follow-up is needed, hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions is effective in reducing the tumor volume without causing any new deficits and can be considered as a treatment modality for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas.

  15. Phase II study of gemcitabine and bexarotene (GEMBEX) in the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Illidge, T; Chan, C; Counsell, N; Morris, S; Scarisbrick, J; Gilson, D; Popova, B; Patrick, P; Smith, P; Whittaker, S; Cowan, R

    2013-01-01

    Background: Both gemcitabine and bexarotene are established single agents for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). We investigated the feasibility and efficacy of combining these drugs in a single-arm phase II study. Methods: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma patients who had failed standard skin-directed therapy and at least one prior systemic therapy were given four cycles of gemcitabine and concurrent bexarotene for 12 weeks. Responders were continued on bexarotene maintenance until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Results: The median age was 65 years, stage IB (n=5), stage IIA (n=2), stage IIB (n=8), stage III (n=8) and stage IVA (n=12), 17 patients were erythrodermic, 17 patients were B1, and 10 patients were both erythrodermic and B1. Thirty (86%) patients completed four cycles of gemcitabine. In all, 80.0% of patients demonstrated a reduction in modified Severity-Weighted Assessment Tool (mSWAT) score although the objective disease response rate at 12 weeks was 31% (partial response (PR) 31%) and at 24 weeks 14% (PR 14%, stable disease (SD) 23%, progressive disease (PD) 54%, not evaluable 9%). Median progression-free survival was 5.3 months and median overall survival was 21.2 months. Conclusion: The overall response rate of the combination did not reach the specified target to proceed further and is lower than that previously reported for gemcitabine as a single agent. PMID:24136145

  16. Phase II study of HCVIDD/MA in patients with newly diagnosed peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chihara, Dai; Pro, Barbara; Loghavi, Sanam; Miranda, Roberto N; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Fanale, Michelle A; Hagemeister, Fredrick B; Fayad, Luis E; Romaguera, Jorge E; Samaniego, Felipe; Neelapu, Sattva S; Younes, Anas; Fowler, Nathan H; Rodriguez, M Alma; Wang, Michael; Kwak, Larry W; McLaughlin, Peter; Dang, Nam H; Oki, Yasuhiro

    2015-11-01

    A phase II study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of hyper-fractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and dexamethasone alternating with methotrexate/cytarabine (HCVIDD/MA) in patients with newly diagnosed peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), excluding ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Fifty-three patients were enrolled. Treatment was planned for up to 8 cycles but only 9% of patients received more than 6 cycles due primarily to disease progression (n = 13) or prolonged thrombocytopenia (n = 12). The overall response rate was 66% with a complete response rate of 57%. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 7·5 months. With a median follow-up of 7·6 years, 5-year PFS and overall survival (OS) were 21% and 48%, respectively. The patients with extranodal Natural Killer-cell lymphoma had a shorter PFS (median, 2·4 months) than other subtypes. Grade 3/4 anaemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in 66%, 74% and 79% of patients, respectively. Of note, 23% of patients discontinued therapy due to prolonged thrombocytopenia. In conclusion, HCVIDD/MA for the first-line treatment of PTCL patients is associated with significant myelosuppression leading to poor treatment adherence, and the response and survival outcomes with this regimen are similar to standard CHOP. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00290433. PMID:26260306

  17. The immunological phenotype of rituximab-sensitive chronic graft-versus-host disease: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    van Dorp, Suzanne; Resemann, Henrike; te Boome, Liane; Pietersma, Floor; van Baarle, Debbie; Gmelig-Meyling, Frits; de Weger, Roel; Petersen, Eefke; Minnema, Monique; Lokhorst, Henk; Ebeling, Saskia; Beijn, Scott J.P.; Knol, Edward F.; van Dijk, Marijke; Meijer, Ellen; Kuball, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease is the major long-term complication after allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a suboptimal response rate to current treatments. Therefore, clinical efficacy and changes in lymphocyte subsets before and after rituximab treatment were evaluated in a prospective phase II study in patients with steroid-refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease. Overall response rate was 61%. Only responding patients were found to have increased B-cell numbers prior to treatment. B cells had a naïve-antigen-presenting phenotype and were mainly CD5 negative or had a low CD5 expression. Normal B-cell homeostasis was reestablished in responding patients one year after ritxumab treatment and associated with a significant decline in skin-infiltrating CD8+ T cells, suggesting that host B cells play a role in maintaining pathological CD8+ T-cell responses. Imbalances in B-cell homeostasis could be used to identify patients a priori with a higher chance of response to rituximab treatment (Eudra-CT 2008-004125-42). PMID:21546493

  18. Randomized Open-Label Phase II Study of Decitabine in Patients With Low- or Intermediate-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Faderl, Stefan; Estrov, Zeev; Yang, Hui; Maddipoti, Sirisha; Godley, Lucy A.; Gabrail, Nashat; Berdeja, Jesus G.; Nadeem, Ahmed; Kassalow, Laurent; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This open-label, randomized phase II trial assessed efficacy and tolerability of two low-dose regimens of subcutaneous (SC) decitabine in patients with low- or intermediate-1–risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients and Methods Patients received decitabine 20 mg/m2 SC per day for 3 consecutive days on days 1, 2, and 3 every 28 days (schedule A) or 20 mg/m2 SC per day once every 7 days on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days (schedule B) for up to 1 year. Primary efficacy end point was overall improvement rate (OIR: complete remission [CR], partial remission [PR], marrow CR [mCR], or hematologic improvement [HI]). Secondary end points were HI, transfusion independence, cytogenetic response, overall survival (OS), and time to acute myeloid leukemia or death. Results Efficacy and safety populations were identical: schedule A, n = 43; schedule B, n = 22. Median time from MDS diagnosis to treatment was 3.6 months; 89% had de novo MDS. The trial was terminated early on achievement of protocol-defined OIR superiority of schedule A over schedule B; OIR was 23% for schedule A (seven CRs, three HIs) and 23% for schedule B (one mCR, one PR, three HIs). No differences were observed in secondary end points. Median OS was not reached; approximately 70% of patients were alive at 500 days. Patients in schedule A (67%) and schedule B (59%) were RBC/platelet independent on study. The most frequent drug-related adverse events overall were neutropenia (28% v 36%), anemia (23% v 18%), and thrombocytopenia (16% v 32%). Conclusion In this phase II study, low-dose decitabine showed promising results in patients with low- or intermediate-1–risk MDS. PMID:23733767

  19. Phase II study of the GPC3-derived peptide vaccine as an adjuvant therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Yu; Yoshikawa, Toshiaki; Ofuji, Kazuya; Yoshimura, Mayuko; Tsuchiya, Nobuhiro; Takahashi, Mari; Nobuoka, Daisuke; Gotohda, Naoto; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Kato, Yuichiro; Konishi, Masaru; Kinoshita, Taira; Ikeda, Masafumi; Nakachi, Kohei; Yamazaki, Naoya; Mizuno, Shoichi; Takayama, Tadatoshi; Yamao, Kenji; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Furuse, Junji; Endo, Itaru; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The recurrence rates of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are high, necessitating novel and effective adjuvant therapies. Therefore, we conducted a phase II study of glypican-3 (GPC3) peptide vaccine as an adjuvant therapy for HCC patients. Forty-one patients with initial HCC who had undergone surgery or radiofrequency ablation (RFA) were analyzed in this phase II, open-label, single-arm trial. Ten vaccinations were performed for 1 y after curative treatment. We also investigated case-control subjects, where selected patients treated surgically during the same period were analyzed. The expression of GPC3 in the available primary tumors was determined by immunohistochemical analysis. Six patients received RFA therapy while 35 received surgery. The recurrence rate tended to be lower in the 35 patients treated with surgery plus vaccination compared to 33 patients who underwent surgery alone (28.6% vs. 54.3% and 39.4% vs. 54.5% at 1 and 2 y, respectively; p = 0.346, 0.983). Twenty-five patients treated with surgery and vaccination had GPC3-positive tumors; the recurrence rate in this group was significantly lower compared to that in 21 GPC3-positive patients who received surgery only (24% vs. 48% and 52.4% vs. 61.9% at 1 and 2 y, respectively; p = 0.047, 0.387). The GPC3 peptide vaccine improved the 1-y recurrence rate in patients with GPC3-positive tumors. This study demonstrated that GPC3 expression by the primary tumor may be used as a biomarker in a putative larger randomized clinical trial to determine the efficacy of the GPC3-derived peptide vaccine. PMID:27467945

  20. Telomerase peptide vaccination of patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer: a dose escalating phase I/II study

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, S L; Gjertsen, M K; Trachsel, S; Møller, M; Eriksen, J A; Meo, M; Buanes, T; Gaudernack, G

    2006-01-01

    Patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis with a mean life expectancy of 3–6 months. New treatment modalities are thus urgently needed. Telomerase is expressed in 85–90% of pancreas cancer, and immunogenic telomerase peptides have been characterised. A phase I/II study was conducted to investigate the safety, tolerability, and immunogenecity of telomerase peptide vaccination. Survival of the patients was also recorded. Forty-eight patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer received intradermal injections of the telomerase peptide GV1001 at three dose levels, in combination with granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The treatment period was 10 weeks. Monthly booster vaccinations were offered as follow-up treatment. Immune responses were measured as delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reaction and in vitro T-cell proliferation. GV1001 was well tolerated. Immune responses were observed in 24 of 38 evaluable patients, with the highest ratio (75%) in the intermediate dose group. Twenty-seven evaluable patients completed the study. Median survival for the intermediate dose-group was 8.6 months, significantly longer for the low- (P=0.006) and high-dose groups (P=0.05). One-year survival for the evaluable patients in the intermediate dose group was 25%. The results demonstrate that GV1001 is immunogenic and safe to use. The survival data indicate that induction of an immune response is correlated with prolonged survival, and the vaccine may offer a new treatment option for pancreatic cancer patients, encouraging further clinical studies. PMID:17060934

  1. Telomerase peptide vaccination of patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer: A dose escalating phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, S L; Gjertsen, M K; Trachsel, S; Møller, M; Eriksen, J A; Meo, M; Buanes, T; Gaudernack, G

    2006-12-01

    Patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis with a mean life expectancy of 3-6 months. New treatment modalities are thus urgently needed. Telomerase is expressed in 85-90% of pancreas cancer, and immunogenic telomerase peptides have been characterised. A phase I/II study was conducted to investigate the safety, tolerability, and immunogenecity of telomerase peptide vaccination. Survival of the patients was also recorded. Forty-eight patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer received intradermal injections of the telomerase peptide GV1001 at three dose levels, in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The treatment period was 10 weeks. Monthly booster vaccinations were offered as follow-up treatment. Immune responses were measured as delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reaction and in vitro T-cell proliferation. GV1001 was well tolerated. Immune responses were observed in 24 of 38 evaluable patients, with the highest ratio (75%) in the intermediate dose group. Twenty-seven evaluable patients completed the study. Median survival for the intermediate dose-group was 8.6 months, significantly longer for the low- (P = 0.006) and high-dose groups (P = 0.05). One-year survival for the evaluable patients in the intermediate dose group was 25%. The results demonstrate that GV1001 is immunogenic and safe to use. The survival data indicate that induction of an immune response is correlated with prolonged survival, and the vaccine may offer a new treatment option for pancreatic cancer patients, encouraging further clinical studies. PMID:17060934

  2. A phase I/II study of neoadjuvant liposomal doxorubicin, paclitaxel, and hyperthermia in locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Kim, Dong W.; Jones, Ellen; Lan, Lan; McCall, Linda; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Craciunescu, Oana; Stauffer, Paul; Liotcheva, Vlayka; Betof, Allison; Blackwell, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The prognosis for locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients continues to be poor, with an estimated five-year survival of only 50–60%. Preclinical data demonstrates enhanced therapeutic efficacy with liposomal encapsulation of doxorubicin combined with hyperthermia (HT). Therefore this phase I/II study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a novel neoadjuvant combination treatment of paclitaxel, liposomal doxorubicin, and hyperthermia. Materials and methods Eligible patients received four cycles of neoadjuvant liposomal doxorubicin (30–75 mg/m2), paclitaxel (100–175 mg/m2), and hyperthermia. They subsequently underwent either a modified radical mastectomy or lumpectomy with axillary node dissection followed by radiation therapy and then eight cycles of CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy. Results Forty-seven patients with stage IIB-III LABC were enrolled and 43 patients were evaluable. Fourteen patients (33%) had inflammatory breast cancer. Combined (partial + complete) clinical response rate was 72% and combined pathological response rate was 60%. Four patients achieved a pathologically complete response. Sixteen patients were eligible for breast-conserving surgery. The cumulative equivalent minutes (CEM 43) at T90 (tenth percentile of temperature distribution) was significantly greater for those with a pathological response. Four-year disease-free survival was 63% (95% CI, 46%–76%) and the four-year overall survival was 75% (95% CI, 58–86%). Conclusions Neoadjuvant therapy using paclitaxel, liposomal doxorubicin and hyperthermia is a feasible and well tolerated treatment strategy in patients with LABC. The thermal dose parameter CEM 43 T90 was significantly correlated with attaining a pathological response. PMID:20377362

  3. Phase II study of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ) and concomitant boost radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Sunil; Janjan, Nora A.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Wolff, Robert A.; Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Chang, George J.; Hoff, Paulo M.; Eng, Cathy; Brown, Thomas D.; Crane, Christopher H.; Feig, Barry W.; Morris, Jeffrey; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Lin, Edward H. . E-mail: elin@u.washington.edu

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ), an oral fluoropyrimidine, as a radiosensitizer in the neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: We conducted a phase II study of capecitabine (825 mg/m{sup 2} orally, twice daily continuous) with radiotherapy (52.5 Gy/30 fractions to the primary tumor and perirectal nodes) in 54 patients with LARC (node-negative {>=}T3 or any node-positive tumor) staged by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The primary endpoint was pathologic response rate; secondary endpoints included toxicity profiles and survival parameters. Results: Of the 54 patients (median age, 56.7 years; range, 21.3-78.7 years; male:female ratio, 1.7; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1: 100%), 51 patients (94%) had T3N0 or T3N1 disease by EUS. Surgery was not performed in 3 patients; 2 of these patients had metastatic disease, and the third patient refused after a complete clinical response. Of the 51 patients evaluable for pathologic response, 9 patients (18%) achieved complete response, and 12 patients (24%) had microscopic residual disease (<10% viable cells). In addition, 26 patients of all 54 patients (51%) achieved T-downstaging, and 15 patients of 29 patients (52%) achieved N-downstaging. Grade 3/4 toxicities were radiation dermatitis (9%) and diarrhea (2%). Sphincter preservation rate for tumor {<=}5 cm from the anal verge was 67% (18/27). Conclusion: This regimen of radiotherapy plus capecitabine is well tolerated and is more convenient than protracted venous infusion of 5-FU. The pathologic response rate is comparable to our previous experience using protracted venous infusion 5-FU for LARC.

  4. Radiation dose escalation by simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy for esophageal cancer: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Tiantian; Chang, Daniel; Chen, Zhijian; Huang, Ruihong; Zhang, Wuzhe; Lin, Kun; Guo, Longjia; Zhou, Mingzhen; Li, Dongsheng; Li, Derui; Chen, Chuangzhen

    2016-01-01

    The outcomes for patients with esophageal cancer (EC) underwent standard-dose radical radiotherapy were still disappointing. This phase II study investigated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of radiation dose escalation using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) combined with chemotherapy in 60 EC patients. Radiotherapy consisted of 66Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction to the gross tumor and 54Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction to subclinical diseases simultaneously. Chemotherapy including cisplatin and 5fluorouracil were administered to all patients during and after radiotherapy. The data showed that the majority of patients (98.3%) completed the whole course of radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. The most common ≥ grade 3 acute toxicities were neutropenia (16.7%), followed by esophagitis (6.7%) and thrombopenia (5.0%). With a median follow-up of 24 months (5-38) for all patients and 30 months (18-38) for those still alive, 11 patients (18.3%) developed ≥ Grade 3 late toxicities and 2 (3.3%) of them died subsequently due to esophageal hemorrhage. The 1- and 2-year local-regional control, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 87.6% and 78.6%, 86.0% and 80.5%, 75.6% and 64.4%, 86.7% and 72.7%, respectively. SMART combined with concurrent chemotherapy is feasible in EC patients with tolerable acute toxicities. They showed a trend of significant improvements in local-regional control and overall survival. Further follow-up is needed to evaluate the late toxicities. PMID:26992206

  5. Citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor: clinical antidepressive and long-term effect--a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, O L; Kragh-Sørensen, P; Bjerre, M; Overø, K F; Gram, L F

    1982-01-01

    In a phase II study the antidepressive effect of citalopram, a selective and potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was examined in 20 endogenously and three non-endogenously depressed hospitalized patients. Four endogenously depressed patients dropped out due to deterioration early in the treatment period. The remaining 19 patients completed a 4-6 week treatment schedule. Of 16 endogenously depressed patients 11 responded, one was a partial responder and four did not respond. Of three patients with non-endogenous depressions, two responded and one did not respond. No correlation between plasma citalopram concentration and therapeutic outcome was found. Fourteen patients were given maintenance treatment for 8-113 weeks. One patient developed depression when the dose was reduced from 60 to 40 mg and one patient became manic. After discontinuation of treatment seven patients had a depressive relapse and six of these who again were treated with citalopram responded completely. Side effect rating scores of symptoms usually associated with depression or treatment with tricyclic antidepressants declined during treatment. Three patients complained of increased need of sleep for a period after several weeks of treatment. Apart from an unspecific, transient rise in liver enzymes in two patients, detailed biochemical laboratory tests were all normal. There were no effects on blood pressure, pulse rate, orthostatic reaction, or electrocardiogram. One patient took an overdose of citalopram resulting in plasma levels about six times higher than the average therapeutic level, but there were no signs of severe toxicity. In particular no change in consciousness, electrocardiogram or blood pressure occurred. Pharmacokinetic variables such as dose schedule, steady state kinetics, and metabolism are discussed. PMID:6812140

  6. Treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy via helical tomotherapy: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lei; Zhang, Xin Xin; Feng, Lin Chun; Chen, Jing; Yang, Jun; Liu, Hai Xia; Xu, Shou Ping; Xie, Chuan Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to evaluate short-term safety and efficacy of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiation therapy (SMART) delivered via helical tomotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods Between August 2011 and September 2013, 132 newly diagnosed NPC patients were enrolled for a prospective phase II study. The prescription doses delivered to the gross tumor volume (pGTVnx) and positive lymph nodes (pGTVnd), the high risk planning target volume (PTV1), and the low risk planning target volume (PTV2), were 67.5 Gy (2.25 Gy/F), 60 Gy (2.0 Gy/F), and 54 Gy (1.8 Gy/F), in 30 fractions, respectively. Acute toxicities were evaluated according to the established RTOG/EORTC criteria. This group of patients was compared with the 190 patients in the retrospective P70 study, who were treated between September 2004 and August 2009 with helical tomotherapy, with a dose of 70-74 Gy/33F/6.5W delivered to pGTVnx and pGTVnd. Results The median follow-up was 23.7 (12–38) months. Acute radiation related side-effects were mainly problems graded as 1 or 2. Only a small number of patients suffered from grade 4 leucopenia (4.5%) or thrombocytopenia (2.3%). The local relapse-free survival (LRFS), nodal relapse-free survival (NRFS), local-nodal relapse-free survival (LNRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were 96.7%, 95.5%, 92.2%, 92.7% and 93.2%, at 2 years, respectively, with no significant difference compared with the P70 study. Conclusions Smart delivered via the helical tomotherapy technique appears to be associated with an acceptable acute toxicity profile and favorable short-term outcomes for patients with NPC. Long-term toxicities and patient outcomes are under investigation. PMID:27247555

  7. Electrocardiographic Characterization of Ramucirumab on the Corrected QT Interval in a Phase II Study of Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David C.; Camacho, Luis H.; Thompson, John; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Harvey, R. Donald; Campos, Luis; Ferry, David; Tang, Shande; Gao, Ling; Safran, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned Cardiotoxicity can be a serious complication of anticancer therapies. To enable earlier identification of drug-related cardiac effects, the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) adopted the ICH E14 Guidelines for evaluating the potential for QT/corrected QT (QTc) interval prolongation and proarrhythmic potential for nonantiarrhythmic drugs. The results of the evaluation of ramucirumab on the QT/QTc interval show a lack of effect on QTc prolongation in patients with advanced cancer. Background. Ramucirumab is a human immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody that specifically blocks vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and is approved for the treatment of advanced gastric, non-small cell lung, and colorectal cancers. This phase II study was conducted to determine if treatment with ramucirumab causes prolongation of the corrected QT interval using Fridericia’s formula (QTcF) in patients with advanced cancer. Methods. Patients received intravenous ramucirumab (10 mg/kg) every 21 days for 3 cycles. The first 16 patients received moxifloxacin (400 mg orally), an antibiotic associated with mild QT prolongation as a positive control. During cycle 3, determination of QTcF prolongation was made with triplicate electrocardiograms at multiple time points to compare with baseline. Results. Sixty-six patients received therapy; 51 patients completed 9 or more weeks of therapy for the complete QTcF evaluation period. The upper limit of the 90% two-sided confidence intervals for the least square means of change in QTcF from baseline at each time point was less than 10 milliseconds. Concentration-QTcF analysis showed a visible, but not significant, negative association between ramucirumab concentration and QTcF change from baseline. Conclusion. Ramucirumab at a dose of 10 mg/kg administered every 21 days for 3 cycles did not produce a statistically or clinically significant prolongation of QTcF. PMID:26984445

  8. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of sodium pentosanpolysulfate in the treatment of chronic radiation-induced proctitis

    SciTech Connect

    Grigsby, P.W.; Pilepich, M.V.; Parsons, C.L. )

    1990-02-01

    This is a report of a phase I/II study of 13 patients treated with sodium pentosanpolysulfate (PPS) for chronic radiation-induced proctitis. A complete response was obtained in 82%, a partial response occurred in 9%, and 9% failed to respond to therapy. No significant toxicity was observed. It is concluded that PPS is an effective treatment for chronic radiation-induced proctitis and a phase III randomized, double-blind study of PPS versus placebo is planned.

  9. Phase II studies to select the formulation of a multivalent HPV L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Luxembourg, Alain; Brown, Darron; Bouchard, Celine; Giuliano, Anna R; Iversen, Ole-Erik; Joura, Elmar A; Penny, Mary E; Restrepo, Jaime A; Romaguera, Josefina; Maansson, Roger; Moeller, Erin; Ritter, Michael; Chen, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to develop a multivalent prophylactic HPV vaccine that protects against infection and disease caused by HPV16/18 (oncogenic types in existing prophylactic vaccines) plus additional oncogenic types by conducting 3 Phase II studies comparing the immunogenicity (i.e., anti-HPV6/11/16/18 geometric mean titers [GMT]) and safety of 7 vaccine candidates with the licensed quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine (qHPV vaccine) in young women ages 16–26. In the first study (Study 1), subjects received one of 3 dose formulations of an 8-valent HPV6/11/16/18/31/45/52/58 vaccine or qHPV vaccine (control). In Study 2, subjects received one of 3 dose formulations (termed low-, mid-, and high-dose formulations, respectively) of a 9-valent HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine (9vHPV vaccine) or qHPV vaccine (control). In Study 3, subjects concomitantly received qHPV vaccine plus 5-valent HPV31/33/45/52/58 or qHPV vaccine plus placebo (control). All vaccines were administered at day 1/month 2/month 6. In studies 1 and 3, anti-HPV6/11/16/18 GMTs at month 7 were non-inferior in the experimental arms compared with the control arm; however, there was a trend for lower antibody responses for all 4 HPV types. In Study 2, this immune interference was overcome with the mid- and high-dose formulations of the 9vHPV vaccine by increasing antigen and adjuvant doses. In all 3 studies, all vaccine candidates were strongly immunogenic with respect to HPV31/33/45/52/58 and were well tolerated. Based on the totality of the results, the middle dose formulation of the 9vHPV vaccine was selected for Phase III evaluation. Each 0.5mL dose contains 30μg/40μg/60μg/40μg/20μg/20μg/20μg/20μg/20μg of HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 virus-like particles, and 500μg of amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate adjuvant.ClinicalTrials.gov numbers NCT00260039, NCT00543543, and NCT00551187. PMID:25912208

  10. Phase II studies to select the formulation of a multivalent HPV L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Luxembourg, Alain; Brown, Darron; Bouchard, Celine; Giuliano, Anna R; Iversen, Ole-Erik; Joura, Elmar A; Penny, Mary E; Restrepo, Jaime A; Romaguera, Josefina; Maansson, Roger; Moeller, Erin; Ritter, Michael; Chen, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to develop a multivalent prophylactic HPV vaccine that protects against infection and disease caused by HPV16/18 (oncogenic types in existing prophylactic vaccines) plus additional oncogenic types by conducting 3 Phase II studies comparing the immunogenicity (i.e., anti-HPV6/11/16/18 geometric mean titers [GMT]) and safety of 7 vaccine candidates with the licensed quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine (qHPV vaccine) in young women ages 16-26. In the first study (Study 1), subjects received one of 3 dose formulations of an 8-valent HPV6/11/16/18/31/45/52/58 vaccine or qHPV vaccine (control). In Study 2, subjects received one of 3 dose formulations (termed low-, mid-, and high-dose formulations, respectively) of a 9-valent HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine (9vHPV vaccine) or qHPV vaccine (control). In Study 3, subjects concomitantly received qHPV vaccine plus 5-valent HPV31/33/45/52/58 or qHPV vaccine plus placebo (control). All vaccines were administered at day 1/month 2/month 6. In studies 1 and 3, anti-HPV6/11/16/18 GMTs at month 7 were non-inferior in the experimental arms compared with the control arm; however, there was a trend for lower antibody responses for all 4 HPV types. In Study 2, this immune interference was overcome with the mid- and high-dose formulations of the 9vHPV vaccine by increasing antigen and adjuvant doses. In all 3 studies, all vaccine candidates were strongly immunogenic with respect to HPV31/33/45/52/58 and were well tolerated. Based on the totality of the results, the middle dose formulation of the 9vHPV vaccine was selected for Phase III evaluation. Each 0.5mL dose contains 30μg/40μg/60μg/40μg/20μg/20μg/20μg/20μg/20μg of HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 virus-like particles, and 500μg of amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate adjuvant.ClinicalTrials.gov numbers NCT00260039, NCT00543543, and NCT00551187. PMID:25912208

  11. ET-12PHASE II STUDY OF ONARTUZUMAB PLUS BEVACIZUMAB VERSUS PLACEBO PLUS BEVACIZUMAB IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Cloughesy, Tim; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobel; Recht, Lawrence; Brandes, Alba A; Pineda, Estela; Mikkelsen, Tom; Chinot, Olivier; Balana, Carmen; Macdonald, David; Westphal, Manfred; Hopkins, Kirsten; Weller, Michael; Bruey, Jean-Marie; Liu, Bo; Verret, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glioblastomas are highly vascularized with elevated VEGF expression and have been shown to respond to the anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab. High MET expression has been associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) in glioblastomas (Pierscianek, et al. Brain Pathol 2013). This phase II study investigated the monovalent MET inhibitor, onartuzumab, plus bevacizumab (Ona + Bev) versus placebo plus bevacizumab (Pl + Bev) in recurrent glioblastoma. METHODS: Bevacizumab-naïve patients with glioblastoma at first recurrence following chemoradiation were randomized 1:1 to receive Ona (15mg/kg, q3w) + Bev (15mg/kg, q3w) or Pl + Bev until disease progression. Enrollment onto a third arm, Ona + Pl, was put on hold during assessment of safety data and was subsequently closed due to study conduct concerns (data not presented). Primary endpoint: PFS by RANO criteria (ITT and MET biomarker-positive subpopulations). Secondary endpoints: overall survival, objective response rate, duration of response, and safety. RESULTS: In the 129 patients enrolled (Ona + Bev n = 64, Pl + Bev n = 65) baseline characteristics were balanced; median age was 57 years; 43.4% had Karnofsky performance status 90-100%; 87.6% had measurable disease at baseline. Median number of bevacizumab cycles: 5 for Ona + Bev, 6 for Pl + Bev; median onartuzumab cycles, 4; median placebo cycles, 6. Grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs) were reported in 38.5% of Ona + Bev and 35.9% of Pl + Bev patients; serious AEs were reported in 30.8% and 29.7%, respectively. Grade 5 AEs: Ona + Bev n = 2 intestinal perforation; Pl + Bev n = 1 intracranial hemorrhage. AEs leading to study drug withdrawal were seen in 10.8% of Ona + Bev and 6.3% of Pl + Bev patients. AEs (all grades) with a difference in incidence of ≥10% between arms included peripheral edema (44.6% Ona + Bev, 14.1% Pl + Bev), hypertension (12.3% Ona + Bev, 32.8% Pl + Bev) and hypoalbuminemia (12.3% Ona + Bev, 1.6% Pl + Bev). Efficacy data are pending

  12. Phase II study of 6-thioguanine, procarbazine, dibromodulcitol, lomustine, and vincristine chemotherapy with radiotherapy for treating malignant glioma in children.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, V. A.; Lamborn, K.; Wara, W.; Davis, R.; Edwards, M.; Rabbitt, J.; Malec, M.; Prados, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    We conducted a single-arm phase II study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of radiotherapy combined with 6-thioguanine, procarbazine, dibromodulcitol, lomustine, and vincristine (TPDCV) chemotherapy for treating malignant astrocytoma in children and anaplastic ependymoma in patients of all ages. Between 1984 and 1992, 42 patients who had malignant astrocytomas (glioblastomas multiforme, anaplastic astrocytomas, or mixed anaplastic oligoastrocytomas) were treated with TPDCV chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Of these patients, 40 were younger than 18 years, but 2 were older (22 and 23 years) when treated. Cranial radiation averaged 58 Gy. TPDCV chemotherapy was given for 1 year or until progression. Between 1989 and 1991, 17 patients with malignant ependymoma were treated with TPDCV chemotherapy and craniospinal radiation. Radiation was given at an average dose of 54 Gy to the tumor, 28 Gy to the whole brain, and 31 Gy to the spinal axis. TPDCV chemotherapy was given for 1 year or until tumor progressed. Of the patients with glioblastoma multiforme, 13 of 17 died; the median time to progression was 49 weeks, and median survival was 85 weeks. The four patients surviving at this writing were followed a median 537 weeks (range 364-635 weeks). Of the patients with nonglioblastoma malignant astrocytoma, 14 of 25 died; the median time to progression was 224 weeks. Median survival was not reached in this group. The median follow-up for those surviving was 494 weeks. For the patients with ependymoma, 11 of 17 died with a median time to progression of 141 weeks. The median follow-up for the eight who survive was 469 weeks. Nine patients died with a median survival of 183 weeks. The combination of TPDCV and radiotherapy has activity against childhood anaplastic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, and anaplastic ependymoma. The results of this study for children with glioblastoma were comparable to results in the literature, while the results for children with anaplastic

  13. Phase II study of imatinib mesylate for recurrent meningiomas (North American Brain Tumor Consortium study 01–08)

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Patrick Y.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Norden, Andrew D.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Abrey, Lauren E.; Fine, Howard A.; Chang, Susan M.; Robins, H. Ian; Fink, Karen; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Mehta, Minesh; Di Tomaso, Emmanuelle; Drappatz, Jan; Kesari, Santosh; Ligon, Keith L.; Aldape, Ken; Jain, Rakesh K.; Stiles, Charles D.; Egorin, Merrill J.; Prados, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and its receptors (PDGFR) are frequently coexpressed in meningiomas, potentially contributing to their pathogenesis. The North American Brain Tumor Consortium conducted a phase II study to evaluate the therapeutic potential of imatinib mesylate (Gleevec), a PDGFR inhibitor, in patients with recurrent meningiomas. Patients were stratified into benign (WHO grade I) meningiomas or atypical (WHO grade II) and malignant (WHO grade III) meningiomas. The primary end point was 6-month progression-free survival (6M-PFS). Patients requiring enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs were ineligible. Patients received imatinib at a dose of 600 mg/day for the first 4-week cycle and then gradually increased to 800 mg/day for subsequent cycles, if there were no unacceptable toxicities. Plasma concentrations of imatinib and its active metabolite, CGP74588, were assessed. Twenty-three heavily pre-treated patients were enrolled into the study (13 benign, 5 atypical, and 5 malignant meningiomas), of whom 22 were eligible. The study was closed prematurely due to slow accrual. Tissue was available only from a minority of patients, but in these specimens there was uniform distribution of PDGFR, the drug target. Imatinib was generally well tolerated. Of 19 patients evaluable for response, 10 progressed at the first scan, and 9 were stable. There were no complete or partial responses. Overall median PFS was 2 months (range, 0.7–34 months); 6M-PFS was 29.4%. For benign meningiomas, median PFS was 3 months (range, 1.1–34 months); 6M-PFS was 45%. For atypical and malignant meningiomas, median PFS was 2 months (range, 0.7–3.7 months); 6M-PFS was 0%. Cycle 1 trough concentrations of imatinib and CGP74588 were 2,129 ± 1,600 ng/ml and 517 ± 326 ng/ml, respectively. Single-agent imatinib was well tolerated but had no significant activity in recurrent meningiomas. Trough plasma concentrations of imatinib exceeded those associated with imatinib activity in

  14. Phase II study of imatinib mesylate for recurrent meningiomas (North American Brain Tumor Consortium study 01-08).

    PubMed

    Wen, Patrick Y; Yung, W K Alfred; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Norden, Andrew D; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Abrey, Lauren E; Fine, Howard A; Chang, Susan M; Robins, H Ian; Fink, Karen; Deangelis, Lisa M; Mehta, Minesh; Di Tomaso, Emmanuelle; Drappatz, Jan; Kesari, Santosh; Ligon, Keith L; Aldape, Ken; Jain, Rakesh K; Stiles, Charles D; Egorin, Merrill J; Prados, Michael D

    2009-12-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and its receptors (PDGFR) are frequently coexpressed in meningiomas, potentially contributing to their pathogenesis. The North American Brain Tumor Consortium conducted a phase II study to evaluate the therapeutic potential of imatinib mesylate (Gleevec), a PDGFR inhibitor, in patients with recurrent meningiomas. Patients were stratified into benign (WHO grade I) meningiomas or atypical (WHO grade II) and malignant (WHO grade III) meningiomas. The primary end point was 6-month progression-free survival (6M-PFS). Patients requiring enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs were ineligible. Patients received imatinib at a dose of 600 mg/day for the first 4-week cycle and then gradually increased to 800 mg/day for subsequent cycles, if there were no unacceptable toxicities. Plasma concentrations of imatinib and its active metabolite, CGP74588, were assessed. Twenty-three heavily pretreated patients were enrolled into the study (13 benign, 5 atypical, and 5 malignant meningiomas), of whom 22 were eligible. The study was closed prematurely due to slow accrual. Tissue was available only from a minority of patients, but in these specimens there was uniform distribution of PDGFR, the drug target. Imatinib was generally well tolerated. Of 19 patients evaluable for response, 10 progressed at the first scan, and 9 were stable. There were no complete or partial responses. Overall median PFS was 2 months (range, 0.7-34 months); 6M-PFS was 29.4%. For benign meningiomas, median PFS was 3 months (range, 1.1-34 months); 6M-PFS was 45%. For atypical and malignant meningiomas, median PFS was 2 months (range, 0.7-3.7 months); 6M-PFS was 0%. Cycle 1 trough concentrations of imatinib and CGP74588 were 2,129 +/- 1,600 ng/ml and 517 +/- 326 ng/ml, respectively. Single-agent imatinib was well tolerated but had no significant activity in recurrent meningiomas. Trough plasma concentrations of imatinib exceeded those associated with imatinib activity in chronic

  15. Pharmacokinetic Profile of Subcutaneous Testosterone Enanthate Delivered via a Novel, Prefilled Single‐Use Autoinjector: A Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaminetsky, Jed; Swerdloff, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    , Swerdloff RS. Pharmacokinetic profile of subcutaneous testosterone enanthate delivered via a novel, prefilled single‐use autoinjector: A phase II study. Sex Med 2015;3:263–273. PMID:26797061

  16. Population pharmacokinetic analysis from phase I and phase II studies of the humanized monovalent antibody, onartuzumab (MetMAb), in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yan; Jin, Denise; Eppler, Stephen; Damico-Beyer, Lisa A; Joshi, Amita; Davis, John D; Kaur, Surinder; Nijem, Ihsan; Bothos, John; Peterson, Amy; Patel, Premal; Bai, Shuang

    2013-11-01

    Onartuzumab is a unique, humanized, monovalent (one-armed) monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the MET receptor. The intravenous (IV) pharmacokinetics (PK) of onartuzumab were investigated in a phase I study and a phase II study in recurrent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The potential for drug-drug interaction (DDI) was assessed during co-administration of IV onartuzumab with oral erlotinib, by measuring the PK of both drugs. The concentration-time profiles of onartuzumab were adequately described using a two-compartment model with linear clearance (CL) at doses between 4 and 30 mg/kg. The estimates for CL, central compartment volume (V1 ), and median terminal half-life were 0.439 L/day, 2.77 L, and 13.4 days, respectively. Statistically significant covariates included creatinine clearance (CrCL) on clearance, weight and gender on V1 , and weight on peripheral compartment volume (V2 ), but the clinical relevance of these covariates needs to be further evaluated. The current analysis did not indicate obvious DDI between onartuzumab and erlotinib. MET diagnostic status did not impact the exposure of either agent. Despite the slightly faster clearance compared with typical bivalent mAbs, the PK of onartuzumab support dosing regimens of 15 mg/kg every 3 weeks or doses equivalent to achieve the target minimum tumoristatic concentration in patients. PMID:23922054

  17. Preoperative hyperfractionated chemoradiation for locally recurrent rectal cancer in patients previously irradiated to the pelvis: A multicentric phase II study

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Vincenzo . E-mail: vvalentini@rm.unicatt.it; Morganti, Alessio G.; Gambacorta, M. Antonietta; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Doglietto, G. Battista; Coco, Claudio; De Paoli, Antonino; Rossi, Carlo; Di Russo, Annamaria; Valvo, Francesca; Bolzicco, Giampaolo; Dalla Palma, Maurizio

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: The combination of irradiation and total mesorectal excision for rectal carcinoma has significantly lowered the incidence of local recurrence. However, a new problem is represented by the patient with locally recurrent cancer who has received previous irradiation to the pelvis. In these patients, local recurrence is very often not easily resectable and reirradiation is expected to be associated with a high risk of late toxicity. The aim of this multicenter phase II study is to evaluate the response rate, resectability rate, local control, and treatment-related toxicity of preoperative hyperfractionated chemoradiation for locally recurrent rectal cancer in patients previously irradiated to the pelvis. Methods and Materials: Patients with histologically proven pelvic recurrence of rectal carcinoma, with the absence of extrapelvic disease or bony involvement and previous pelvic irradiation with doses {<=}55 Gy; age {>=}18 years; performance status (PS) (Karnofsky) {>=}60, and who gave institutional review board-approved written informed consent were treated by preoperative chemoradiation. Radiotherapy was delivered to a planning target volume (PTV2) including the gross tumor volume (GTV) plus a 4-cm margin, with a dose of 30 Gy (1.2 Gy twice daily with a minimum 6-h interval). A boost was delivered, with the same fractionation schedule, to a PTV1 including the GTV plus a 2-cm margin (10.8 Gy). During the radiation treatment, concurrent chemotherapy was delivered (5-fluorouracil, protracted intravenous infusion, 225 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 7 days per week). Four to 6 weeks after the end of chemoradiation, patients were evaluated for tumor resectability, and, when feasible, surgical resection of recurrence was performed between 6-8 weeks from the end of chemoradiation. Adjuvant chemotherapy was prescribed to all patients, using Raltitrexed, 3 mg/square meter (sm), every 3 weeks, for a total of 5 cycles. Patients were staged using the computed tomography (CT)-based F

  18. Phase I and II studies of the combination of recombinant human interferon-gamma and 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ajani, J A; Rios, A A; Ende, K; Abbruzzese, J L; Edwards, C; Faintuch, J S; Saks, S; Gutterman, J U; Levin, B

    1989-04-01

    Based on the in vitro and in vivo data suggesting synergistic cytolysis by the combination of 5-fluorouracil and interferon-gamma against a variety of malignant cell lines including a human colon carcinoma cell line (HT-29), we initiated studies in patients with advanced colon or rectal carcinoma. Forty-six patients received 5-fluorouracil as an intravenous injection on days 1-5 and recombinant human interferon-gamma as an intramuscular injection on days 1-14, followed by a rest period of 14 days; courses were repeated every 28 days. In the phase I study, cohorts of two patients received a stepwise dose level increase to achieve the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), at which a total of six patients were studied. The dose levels constituting the MTD were as follows: 5-fluorouracil (500 g/m2/day) and recombinant gamma-interferon (0.5 mg/m2/day). Four patients achieved a partial response in the phase I study. In the phase II study, 30 patients received therapy at the MTD. Among 29 evaluable patients in the phase II study, two patients achieved a partial response. Common toxicities included malaise, fever, anorexia, nausea and vomiting, and diarrhea. Transient severe myelosuppression was common but did not result in significant morbidity. Our data suggest that the combination of 5-fluorouracil and recombinant gamma-interferon did not have the same antitumor effect in patients as it had in the preclinical experiments. PMID:2499663

  19. [Phase II study of recombinant human interferon gamma (S-6810) in renal cell carcinoma. Urological Cooperative Study Group of Recombinant Human Interferon Gamma (S-6810)].

    PubMed

    Machida, T; Koiso, K; Takaku, F; Ogawa, M

    1987-02-01

    A phase II study of recombinant human interferon gamma (rHuIFN-gamma) administered intravenously and intramuscularly was carried out in 84 patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma with the cooperation of 18 institutions throughout Japan. The eligibility of the patients and evaluation of the responses were undertaken according to the general criteria proposed by Drs. Koyama and Saito. Out of 84 cases entered in this phase II study, 62 patients were evaluable for antitumor effects. In the case of continuous administration of 8-12 X 10(6) U/m2/day interferon for 4 weeks, 32 patients were evaluable. The response rate was 6.3%. In the case of intermittent therapy of 40 X 10(6) U/m2/day interferon for 8 weeks, six out of 30 patients (20%) were evaluable as responders. Among them, one patient showed a complete response, all patients tolerated this type of interferon well. Major adverse effects were fever (86.8%), anorexia (67.1%), fatigue (53.9%) and leukopenia (42.1%). No life-threatening toxicities were found. The results of this study showed that rHuIFN-gamma had antitumor activity against renal cell carcinoma. PMID:3101607

  20. Phase I/II study of sorafenib in combination with temsirolimus for recurrent glioblastoma or gliosarcoma: North American Brain Tumor Consortium study 05-02

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eudocia Q.; Kuhn, John; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Abrey, Lauren; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Lieberman, Frank; Robins, H. Ian; Chang, Susan M.; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Drappatz, Jan; Mehta, Minesh P.; Levin, Victor A.; Aldape, Kenneth; Dancey, Janet E.; Wright, John J.; Prados, Michael D.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2012-01-01

    The activity of single-agent targeted molecular therapies in glioblastoma has been limited to date. The North American Brain Tumor Consortium examined the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of combination therapy with sorafenib, a small molecule inhibitor of Raf, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor–β, and temsirolimus (CCI-779), an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin. This was a phase I/II study. The phase I component used a standard 3 × 3 dose escalation scheme to determine the safety and tolerability of this combination therapy. The phase II component used a 2-stage design; the primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) rate. Thirteen patients enrolled in the phase I component. The maximum tolerated dosage (MTD) for combination therapy was sorafenib 800 mg daily and temsirolimus 25 mg once weekly. At the MTD, grade 3 thrombocytopenia was the dose-limiting toxicity. Eighteen patients were treated in the phase II component. At interim analysis, the study was terminated and did not proceed to the second stage. No patients remained progression free at 6 months. Median PFS was 8 weeks. The toxicity of this combination therapy resulted in a maximum tolerated dose of temsirolimus that was only one-tenth of the single-agent dose. Minimal activity in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme was seen at the MTD of the 2 combined agents. PMID:23099651

  1. Phase I/II study of sorafenib in combination with temsirolimus for recurrent glioblastoma or gliosarcoma: North American Brain Tumor Consortium study 05-02.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eudocia Q; Kuhn, John; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Abrey, Lauren; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Lieberman, Frank; Robins, H Ian; Chang, Susan M; Yung, W K Alfred; Drappatz, Jan; Mehta, Minesh P; Levin, Victor A; Aldape, Kenneth; Dancey, Janet E; Wright, John J; Prados, Michael D; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Gilbert, Mark R; Wen, Patrick Y

    2012-12-01

    The activity of single-agent targeted molecular therapies in glioblastoma has been limited to date. The North American Brain Tumor Consortium examined the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of combination therapy with sorafenib, a small molecule inhibitor of Raf, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β, and temsirolimus (CCI-779), an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin. This was a phase I/II study. The phase I component used a standard 3 × 3 dose escalation scheme to determine the safety and tolerability of this combination therapy. The phase II component used a 2-stage design; the primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) rate. Thirteen patients enrolled in the phase I component. The maximum tolerated dosage (MTD) for combination therapy was sorafenib 800 mg daily and temsirolimus 25 mg once weekly. At the MTD, grade 3 thrombocytopenia was the dose-limiting toxicity. Eighteen patients were treated in the phase II component. At interim analysis, the study was terminated and did not proceed to the second stage. No patients remained progression free at 6 months. Median PFS was 8 weeks. The toxicity of this combination therapy resulted in a maximum tolerated dose of temsirolimus that was only one-tenth of the single-agent dose. Minimal activity in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme was seen at the MTD of the 2 combined agents. PMID:23099651

  2. Phase II Study of the Safety and Antitumor Activity of the Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 in Combination With Doxorubicin in Patients With Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Sant P.; Cranmer, Lee D.; Van Tine, Brian A.; Reed, Damon R.; Okuno, Scott H.; Butrynski, James E.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Hendifar, Andrew E.; Kroll, Stew; Ganjoo, Kristen N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose TH-302, a prodrug of the cytotoxic alkylating agent bromo-isophosphoramide mustard, is preferentially activated in hypoxic conditions. This phase II study investigated TH-302 in combination with doxorubicin, followed by single-agent TH-302 maintenance therapy in patients with first-line advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS) to assess progression-free survival (PFS), response rate, overall survival, safety, and tolerability. Patients and Methods In this open-label phase II study, TH-302 300 mg/m2 was administered intravenously on days 1 and 8 with doxorubicin 75 mg/m2 on day 1 of each 21-day cycle. After six cycles, patients with stable and/or responding disease could receive maintenance monotherapy with TH-302. Results Ninety-one patients initiated TH-302 plus doxorubicin induction treatment. The PFS rate at 6 months (primary efficacy measure) was 58% (95% CI, 46% to 68%). Median PFS was 6.5 months (95% CI, 5.8 to 7.7 months); median overall survival was 21.5 months (95% CI, 16.0 to 26.2 months). Best tumor responses were complete response (n = 2 [2%]) and partial response (n = 30 [34%]). During TH-302 maintenance (n = 48), five patients improved from stable disease to partial response, and one patient improved from partial to complete response. The most common adverse events during induction were fatigue, nausea, and skin and/or mucosal toxicities as well as anemia, thrombocytopenia, and neutropenia. These were less severe and less frequent during maintenance. There was no evidence of TH-302–related hepatic, renal, or cardiac toxicity. Conclusion PFS, overall survival, and tumor response compared favorably with historical outcomes achieved with other first-line chemotherapies for advanced STS. A phase III study of TH-302 is ongoing (NCT01440088). PMID:25185097

  3. Combined levamisole with recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma: a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Creagan, E T; Hestorff, R D; Suman, V J; Mailliard, J A; Nair, S; Krook, J E; Kugler, J W; Marschke, R F; Michalak, J C; Tschetter, L K

    1998-04-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy (AI) with interleukin-2 (IL-2) and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells is an antineoplastic modality in which immune-activated cells are administered to a host having cancer in an attempt to mediate tumor regression. Levamisole (LEV), an immune stimulant, has been suggested as having therapeutic effectiveness in a variety of cancers. After a phase I trial of recombinant IL-2 plus LEV, a phase II trial of this combination was conducted in patients who had advanced renal cell carcinoma. The regimen was IL-2 at 3 x 10(6) U/m2 daily x 5 plus LEV at 50 mg/m2 perorally three times a day x 5. Only one of the 22 eligible patients had a regression. It was a partial regression, 85 days in duration. The median time to treatment failure (refusal, progression, or off study because of toxicity) was 36 days. The only grade 4 toxicity reported was lethargy. This regimen is not recommended for further testing in patients who have advanced renal cell carcinoma. PMID:9537198

  4. A phase II study of AZD2171 (cediranib) in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Ryan; Jumonville, Alcee; Flynn, Patrick James; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Erlichman, Charles; Laplant, Betsy; Juckett, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) not fit for intensive treatment need novel therapy options. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor inhibition is one potential mechanism by which AML and MDS could be treated. The receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor AZD2171 (cediranib) has activity against VEGF receptors KDR and FLT-1. This multicenter phase II study was designed to test cediranib's activity in patients with AML or high-risk MDS. The primary endpoint was confirmed disease response defined as a composite of complete remission, partial remission or hematologic improvement. The study enrolled 23 subjects in the AML cohort and 16 subjects in the MDS cohort. There were no confirmed responses in either group. Since the study met the stopping rule after the first stage of enrollment, the trial was closed to further accrual. Common adverse events in both cohorts included thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, anemia, fatigue, dyspnea, diarrhea, nausea and dehydration. PMID:25329007

  5. Phase II study of gemcitabine plus S-1 chemotherapy in recurrent and metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, PeiJian; Ou, XueQing; Liao, Hai; Liu, YuMeng; Wang, SiYang; Cheng, ZhiBin; Lin, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: No standard salvage regimen has been established for patients with recurrent and metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and disease progression after prior platinum-based chemotherapy. This phase II study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine plus S-1 (GS) chemotherapy as a remedial regimen in this setting. Methods: In this multicenter phase II study, 49 patients with recurrent and metastatic NPC who failed previous platinum-based chemotherapy received gemcitabine (1.0 g/m2 on days 1 and 8) plus oral S-1 chemotherapy (twice daily from day 1 to 14). Each cycle was repeated every 3 weeks for two cycles at least. The dose of S-1 was determined according to the body surface area (BSA): 40 mg twice a day for BSA <1.25 m2; 50 mg twice a day for 1.25 m2 ⩽ BSA <1.5 m2; and 60 mg twice a day for BSA ⩾1.5 m2. Results: Treatment was generally well-tolerated. A total of seven patients (14.3%) had grade 3 toxicities and the main toxicity was myelosuppression, whereas the nonhematology adverse events were minimal. There were 3 complete responses (6.4%), 17 partial responses (36.2%), and the overall response rate was 42.6% (95% confidence interval: 27.3–61.2). Median time to progression was 5.8 months and median survival was 14.8 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 64% and 30%, respectively. Conclusions: Gemcitabine plus S-1 offers a satisfactory clinical activity and an acceptable safety profile for recurrent and metastatic NPC patients after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy. PMID:27239233

  6. Phase I/II Study of the Antibody-Drug Conjugate Glembatumumab Vedotin in Patients With Advanced Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Patrick A.; Hamid, Omid; Pavlick, Anna C.; Kluger, Harriet; Kim, Kevin B.; Boasberg, Peter D.; Simantov, Ronit; Crowley, Elizabeth; Green, Jennifer A.; Hawthorne, Thomas; Davis, Thomas A.; Sznol, Mario; Hwu, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The antibody-drug conjugate glembatumumab vedotin links a fully human immunoglobulin G2 monoclonal antibody against the melanoma-related glycoprotein NMB (gpNMB) to the potent cytotoxin monomethyl auristatin E. This study evaluated the safety and activity of glembatumumab vedotin in patients with advanced melanoma. Patients and Methods Patients received glembatumumab vedotin every 3 weeks (schedule 1) in a dose escalation and phase II expansion at the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD). Dosing during 2 of 3 weeks (schedule 2) and weekly (schedule 3) was also assessed. The primary end points were safety and pharmacokinetics. The secondary end points included antitumor activity, gpNMB expression, and immunogenicity. Results One hundred seventeen patients were treated using schedule 1 (n = 79), schedule 2 (n = 15), or schedule 3 (n = 23). The MTDs were 1.88, 1.5, and 1.0 mg/kg for schedules 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Grade 3/4 treatment-related toxicities that occurred in two or more patients included rash, neutropenia, fatigue, neuropathy, arthralgia, myalgia, and diarrhea. Three treatment-related deaths (resulting from pneumococcal sepsis, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and renal failure) occurred at doses exceeding the MTDs. In the schedule 1 phase II expansion cohort (n = 34), five patients (15%) had a partial response and eight patients (24%) had stable disease for ≥ 6 months. The objective response rate (ORR) was 2 of 6 (33%) for the schedule 2 MTD and 3 of 12 (25%) for the schedule 3 MTD. Rash was correlated with a greater ORR and improved progression-free survival. Conclusion Glembatumumab vedotin is active in advanced melanoma. The schedule 1 MTD (1.88 mg/kg once every 3 weeks) was associated with a promising ORR and was generally well tolerated. More frequent dosing was potentially associated with a greater ORR but increased toxicity. PMID:25267741

  7. A phase I/II study of biweekly capecitabine and irinotecan plus bevacizumab as second-line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Shinozaki, Eiji; Ozaka, Masato; Ogura, Mariko; Chin, Keisho; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Background Triweekly capecitabine plus irinotecan (XELIRI) is not completely regarded as a valid substitute for fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) because of the potential for greater toxicity. We conducted a phase I/II study to assess the efficacy and safety of biweekly XELIRI plus bevacizumab (BV) as second-line chemotherapy for mCRC. Methods Patients with mCRC who had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and BV and had a UGT1A1 genotype of wild-type or heterozygous for UGT1A1*6 or *28 were eligible for this study. Treatment comprised capecitabine 1,000 mg/m2 twice daily from the evening of day 1 to the morning of day 8, intravenous irinotecan on day 1, and BV 5 mg/kg on day 1 every 2 weeks. The phase I study consisted of two steps (irinotecan 150 and 180 mg/m2), and dose-limiting toxicity was assessed during the first treatment cycle. The primary endpoint of the phase II study was progression-free survival (PFS). Results The recommended dose of irinotecan was determined to be 180 mg/m2 in the phase I study. Between November 2010 and August 2013, 44 patients were enrolled in phase II. The patients’ characteristics were as follows (N=44): median age, 60 years (range 32–80); male/female, 21/23; and UGT1A1 wild-type/heterozygous, 29/15. The median PFS was 6.8 months (95% confidence interval, 5.3–8.2 months), and the primary endpoint was met. Median overall survival was 18.3 months. The response rate was 22.7%. There was no significant difference in PFS or overall survival according to UGT1A1 status. Grade 3 or higher adverse events were mainly neutropenia in six patients and diarrhea in five patients. There were no other severe adverse events or treatment-related deaths. Conclusion In mCRC patients with wild-type or heterozygous UGT1A1*6 or *28 genotype, biweekly XELIRI + BV is effective and feasible as second-line chemotherapy. Biweekly XELIRI + BV is considered a valid substitute for FOLFIRI

  8. Phase I/II study of vaccination with dendritic-like leukaemia cells for the immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Roddie, H; Klammer, M; Thomas, C; Thomson, R; Atkinson, A; Sproul, A; Waterfall, M; Samuel, K; Yin, J; Johnson, P; Turner, M

    2006-04-01

    Twenty-two patients with acute myeloid leukaemia were recruited into a phase I/II clinical trial investigating the vaccination of patients in complete remission (CR) with autologous dendritic-like leukaemia cells (DLLC). At trial entry, leukaemia cells were harvested and tested for their ability to undergo cytokine-induced dendritic cell differentiation. Patients were then treated with intensive chemotherapy. Five patients achieved both CR and had leukaemia cells that successfully underwent differentiation and therefore proceeded to vaccination. Four escalating doses of DLLC were administered weekly by subcutaneous injection. Vaccination was generally well tolerated although one patient developed extensive eczema and an increased antinuclear factor titre possibly indicating induction of autoimmunity. Development of anti-leukaemic T-cell responses was assessed by enzyme-linked immunospot analysis of gamma-interferon secreting T lymphocytes and by human leucocyte antigen tetramer analysis for WT1-specific T cells. Increases in anti-leukaemic T-cell responses were demonstrated in four patients, but only two of the five remained in remission more than 12 months postvaccination. The study has demonstrated that generation of DLLC is feasible in only a subgroup of patients and is currently neither broadly applicable or clinically effective. PMID:16611305

  9. A phase I–II study of the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid plus chemoimmunotherapy in patients with advanced melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, A; Minucci, S; Tosti, G; Croci, D; Contegno, F; Ballarini, M; Nolè, F; Munzone, E; Salmaggi, A; Goldhirsch, A; Pelicci, P G; Testori, A

    2009-01-01

    We explored in a phase I/II clinical trial the combination of valproic acid (VPA), a clinically available histone deacetylase inhibitor, with standard chemoimmunotherapy in patients with advanced melanoma, to evaluate its clinical activity, to correlate the clinical response with the biological activity of VPA and to assess toxicity. Patients were treated initially with VPA alone for 6 weeks. The inhibition of the target in non-tumour peripheral blood cells (taken as a potential surrogate marker) was measured periodically, and valproate dosing adjusted with the attempt to reach a measurable inhibition. After the treatment with valproate alone, dacarbazine plus interferon-α was started in combination with valproate. Twenty-nine eligible patients started taking valproate and 18 received chemoimmunotherapy and are assessable for response. We observed one complete response, two partial remissions and three disease stabilisations lasting longer than 24 weeks. With the higher valproate dosages needed to reach a measurable inhibition of the target, we observed an increase of side effects in those patients who received chemoimmunotherapy. The combination of VPA and chemoimmunotherapy did not produce results overtly superior to standard therapy in patients with advanced melanoma and toxicity was not negligible, casting some doubts on the clinical use of VPA in this setting (at least in the administration schedule adopted). PMID:19127265

  10. Lenalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone in Japanese patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma: A phase II study.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenshi; Shinagawa, Atsushi; Uchida, Toshiki; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Hirata, Hirokazu; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Matsue, Kosei; Ogawa, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Takayuki; Otsuka, Maki; Matsumoto, Morio; Iida, Shinsuke; Terui, Yasuhito; Matsumura, Itaru; Ikeda, Takashi; Takezako, Naoki; Ogaki, Yumi; Midorikawa, Shuichi; Houck, Vanessa; Ervin-Haynes, Annette; Chou, Takaaki

    2016-05-01

    In the FIRST trial (MM-020), lenalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone (Rd) reduced the risk of disease progression or death compared with combination melphalan-prednisone-thalidomide. As the FIRST trial did not include any Japanese patients, the efficacy and safety of continuous treatment with Rd was evaluated in 26 Japanese patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (NDMM) in a single-arm, multicenter, open-label phase II trial (MM-025). Patients received lenalidomide on days 1-21 of each 28-day cycle, with a starting dose of 25 mg/day (dose adjusted for renal impairment), and 40 mg/day dexamethasone (dose adjusted for age) on days 1, 8, 15 and 22 of each 28-day cycle until disease progression or discontinuation for any reason. In the efficacy evaluable population, overall response rate was 87.5%, including 29.2% of patients who achieved a complete response/very good partial response. Median durations of response, progression-free survival and overall survival have not been reached. The most common grade 3-4 adverse events were neutropenia (23%) and anemia (19%). The efficacy and safety of Rd were consistent with data from larger studies, including the FIRST trial, thereby supporting the use of Rd continuous in Japanese patients with NDMM who are ineligible for stem cell transplantation. PMID:26914369

  11. Phase II study of dasatinib in Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute and chronic myeloid diseases, including systemic mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Verstovsek, Srdan; Tefferi, Ayalew; Cortes, Jorge; O’Brien, Susan; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Pardanani, Animesh; Akin, Cem; Faderl, Stefan; Manshouri, Taghi; Thomas, Deborah; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization of Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph−) chronic myeloproliferative disorders, such as systemic mastocytosis (SM), has provided a clear rationale for investigating novel targeted therapies. The tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitor dasatinib is 325-fold more potent against Bcr-Abl TK than imatinib in vitro, significantly inhibiting wild-type KIT and PDGFR-B TKs, and is active against cells carrying the mutant KIT-D816V gene. In this phase 2, open-label study, the efficacy of dasatinib (140 mg/day) was investigated in 67 patients with various Ph− myeloid disorders, including SM (N=33; 28 KIT-D816V positive). The overall response rate to dasatinib in patients with SM was 33%. Only two patients, one with SM-myelofibrosis and one with SM-chronic eosinophilic leukemia, achieved complete response (elimination of mastocytosis) lasting for 5 and 16 months, respectively. Both patients were negative for KIT-D816V mutation, had low tryptase levels, abnormal WBC counts, and anemia, and had failed prior therapy with erythropoietin. Additional 9 SM patients had symptomatic response, lasting 3 to 18+ months. Complete responses were achieved in two other patients (acute myeloid leukemia, hypereosinophilic syndrome). No responses were observed among patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and primary myelofibrosis. The majority of adverse events were grade 1/2. These data show that dasatinib may benefit a selected group of SM patients, primarily by improving their symptoms. PMID:18559612

  12. Phase I/II study of erlotinib and temsirolimus for patients with recurrent malignant gliomas: North American Brain Tumor Consortium trial 04-02

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Patrick Y.; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Kuhn, John G.; Norden, Andrew D.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Robins, H. Ian; Lieberman, Frank S.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Drappatz, Jan; Groves, Morris D.; Santagata, Sandro; Ligon, Azra H.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Wright, John J.; Dancey, Janet; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Prados, Michael D.; Ligon, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) may have synergistic antitumor effects in high-grade glioma patients. Methods We conducted a phase I/II study of the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib (150 mg/day) and the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus. Patients initially received temsirolimus 50 mg weekly, and the dose adjusted based on toxicities. In the phase II component, the primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) among glioblastoma patients. Results Twenty-two patients enrolled in phase I, 47 in phase II. Twelve phase I patients treated at the maximum tolerated dosage were included in the phase II cohort for analysis. The maximum tolerated dosage was 15 mg temsirolimus weekly with erlotinib 150 mg daily. Dose-limiting toxicities were rash and mucositis. Among 42 evaluable glioblastoma patients, 12 (29%) achieved stable disease, but there were no responses, and PFS6 was 13%. Among 16 anaplastic glioma patients, 1 (6%) achieved complete response, 1 (6%) partial response, and 2 (12.5%) stable disease, with PFS6 of 8%. Tumor levels of both drugs were low, and posttreatment tissue in 3 patients showed no reduction in the mTOR target phosphorylated (phospho-)S6S235/236 but possible compensatory increase in phospho-AktS473. Presence of EGFR variant III, phospho-EGFR, and EGFR amplification did not correlate with survival, but patients with elevated phospho–extracellular signal-regulated kinase or reduced phosphatase and tensin homolog protein expression had decreased progression-free survival at 4 months. Conclusion Because of increased toxicity, the maximum tolerated dosage of temsirolimus in combination with erlotinib proved lower than expected. Insufficient tumor drug levels and redundant signaling pathways may partly explain the minimal antitumor activity noted. PMID:24470557

  13. Tolerance and Acceptance Results of a Palladium-103 Permanent Breast Seed Implant Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe Rakovitch, Eileen; Keller, Brian M.; Sankreacha, Raxa; Chartier, Carole

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To test, in a prospective Phase I/II trial, a partial breast irradiation technique using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) realized in a single 1-h procedure under sedation and local freezing. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had infiltrating ductal carcinoma {<=}3 cm in diameter, surgical margin {>=}2 mm, no extensive intraductal component, no lymphovascular invasion, and negative lymph nodes. Patients received a permanent seed implant, and a minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the clinical target volume, with a margin of 1.5 cm. Results: From May 2004 to April 2007, 67 patients received the PBSI treatment. The procedure was well tolerated, with 17% of patients having significant pain after the procedure. Only 1 patient (1.5%) had an acute skin reaction (Grade 3 according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria). The rates of acute moist desquamation, erythema, and indurations were 10.4%, 42%, and 27%, respectively. At 1 year the rate of Grade 1 telangiectasia was 14%. The rate of skin reaction decreased from 65% to 28% when skin received less than the 85% isodose. According to a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group questionnaire, 80-90% of patients were very satisfied with their treatment, and the remainder were satisfied. One patient (1.5%) developed an abscess, which resolved after the use of antibiotics. There was no recurrence after a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 11-49 months). Conclusions: The feasibility, safety, and tolerability of PBSI compares favorably with that of external beam and other partial breast irradiation techniques.

  14. Phase II Study of Short-Course Radiotherapy Plus Concomitant and Adjuvant Temozolomide in Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Scaringi, Claudia; Caporello, Paola; Salvati, Maurizio; Arcella, Antonella; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Giangaspero, Felice; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy may prolong survival in older patients (age {>=}70 years) with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), although the survival benefits remain poor. This Phase II multicenter study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) in older patients with GBM. Patients and Methods: Seventy-one eligible patients 70 years of age or older with newly diagnosed GBM and a Karnofsky performance status {>=}60 were treated with a short course of RT (40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks) plus TMZ at the dosage of 75 mg/m{sup 2} per day followed by 12 cycles of adjuvant TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2} for 5 days during each 28-day cycle). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival and toxicity. Results: The Median OS was 12.4 months, and the 1-year and 2-year OS rates were 58% and 20%, respectively. The median and 1-year rates of progression-free survival were 6 months and 20%, respectively. All patients completed the planned programme of RT. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred in 16 patients (22%). Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia occurred in 10 patients (15%), leading to the interruption of treatment in 6 patients (8%). Nonhematologic Grade 3 toxicity was rare, and included fatigue in 4 patients and cognitive disability in 1 patient. Conclusions: A combination of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is well tolerated and may prolong survival in elderly patients with GBM. Future randomized studies need to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of different schedules of RT in association with chemotherapy.

  15. Phase II study of accelerated fractionation radiation therapy with carboplatin followed by vincristine chemotherapy for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, V.A.; Yung, W.K.A.; Kyritsis, A.P.

    1995-09-30

    The purpose of this investigation was to conduct a Phase II one-arm study to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of accelerated fractionated radiotherapy combined with intravenous carboplatin for patients with previously untreated glioblastoma multiforme tumors. Between 1988 and 1992, 83 patients received 1.9-2.0 Gy radiation three times a day with 2-h infusions of 33 mg/m{sup 2} carboplatin for two 5-day cycles separated by 2 weeks. Seventy-four of the 83 patients (89%) received one or more courses of PCV; their median survival was 55 weeks. Total resection was performed in 20% (15 of 74), subtotal resection in 69% (51 or 74), and biospy in 11% (8 of 74); reoperation (total or subtotal resection) was performed in 28 patients (37%). Survival was worst for those {ge} 61 year old (median 35 weeks). Fits of the Cox proportional hazards regression model showed covariated individually predictive of improved survival were younger age (p <0.01), smaller log of radiation volume (p = 0.008), total or subtotal resection vs. biopsy (p = 0.056), and higher Karnofsky performance status (p = 0.055). A multivariate analysis showed that age (p = 0.013) and extent of initial surgery (p = 0.003) together were predictive of a better survival with no other variables providing additional significance. Only 8.4% (7 of 83) of patients had clinically documented therapy-associated neurotoxicity ({open_quotes}radiation necrosis{close_quotes}). When comparable selection criteria were applied, the survival in this study is similar to the results currently attainable with other chemoradiation approaches. The relative safety of accelerated fractionated radiotherapy, as used in this study with carboplatin, enables concomitant full-dose administration of chemotherapy or radiosensitizing agents in glioblastoma multiforme patients. 42 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Phase II study of zoledronic acid combined with docetaxel for non-small-cell lung cancer: West Japan Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Haruyasu; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Seto, Takashi; Sugio, Kenji; Okamoto, Isamu; Sawa, Toshiyuki; Hirashima, Tomonori; Takeda, Koji; Atagi, Shinji; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this open-label, multicenter, randomized phase II trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of zoledronic acid in combination with docetaxel in previously treated patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and bone metastases. In this study, patients randomly received docetaxel (60 mg/m2) with (group DZ) or without (group D) zoledronic acid every 21 days. There were 50 patients in each group, and the primary endpoint was progression-free survival. In an efficacy analysis of 94 patients (DZ, 48; D, 46), the median progression-free survival was 2.7 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5–3.5 months) for the DZ group and 2.6 months (95% CI, 1.5–3.4 months) for the D group (stratified log-rank test, P = 0.89). The median overall survival was 10.4 months (95% CI, 7.0–15.8 months) for the DZ group and 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.1–12.5 months) for the D group (stratified log-rank test, P = 0.62). There were no clinically relevant differences in the frequencies of grade 3 or 4 adverse events between the two groups. No treatment-related deaths occurred in the DZ group. Zoledronic acid combined with docetaxel was well tolerated but did not meet the primary endpoint of demonstrating a longer progression-free survival in advanced NSCLC patients with bone metastases compared with docetaxel alone. This trial was registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN000001098). PMID:24837137

  17. A phase II study of bortezomib plus prednisone for initial therapy of chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Alex F; Kim, Haesook T; Bindra, Bhavjot; Jones, Kyle T; Alyea, Edwin P; Armand, Philippe; Cutler, Corey S; Ho, Vincent T; Nikiforow, Sarah; Blazar, Bruce R; Ritz, Jerome; Antin, Joseph H; Soiffer, Robert J; Koreth, John

    2014-11-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) induces significant morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Corticosteroids are standard initial therapy, despite limited efficacy and long-term toxicity. Based on our experience using bortezomib as effective acute GVHD prophylaxis, we hypothesized that proteasome-inhibition would complement the immunomodulatory effects of corticosteroids to improve outcomes in chronic GVHD (cGVHD). We undertook a single-arm phase II trial of bortezomib plus prednisone for initial therapy of cGVHD. Bortezomib was administered at 1.3 mg/m(2) i.v. on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 of each 35-day cycle for 3 cycles (15 weeks). Prednisone was dosed at .5 to 1 mg/kg/day, with a suggested taper after cycle 1. All 22 enrolled participants were evaluable for toxicity; 20 were evaluable for response. Bortezomib plus prednisone therapy was well tolerated, with 1 occurrence of grade 3 sensory peripheral neuropathy possibly related to bortezomib. The overall response rate at week 15 in evaluable participants was 80%, including 2 (10%) complete and 14 (70%) partial responses. The organ-specific complete response rate was 73% for skin, 53% for liver, 75% for gastrointestinal tract, and 33% for joint, muscle, or fascia involvement. The median prednisone dose decreased from 50 mg/day to 20 mg/day at week 15 (P < .001). The combination of bortezomib and prednisone for initial treatment of cGVHD is feasible and well tolerated. We observed a high response rate to combined bortezomib and prednisone therapy; however, in this single-arm study, we could not directly measure the impact of bortezomib. Proteasome inhibition may offer benefit in the treatment of cGVHD and should be further evaluated. PMID:25017765

  18. Phase II Study of High-Dose Photon/Proton Radiotherapy in the Management of Spine Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaney, Thomas F. Liebsch, Norbert J.; Pedlow, Francis X.; Adams, Judith; Dean, Susan; Yeap, Beow Y.; McManus, Patricia; Rosenberg, Andrew E.; Nielsen, G. Petur; Harmon, David C.; Spiro, Ira J.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Suit, Herman D.; Yoon, Sam S.; Hornicek, Francis J.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (XRT) for spine sarcomas is constrained by spinal cord, nerve, and viscera tolerance. Negative surgical margins are uncommon; hence, doses of {>=}66 Gy are recommended. A Phase II clinical trial evaluated high-dose photon/proton XRT for spine sarcomas. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had nonmetastatic, thoracic, lumbar, and/or sacral spine/paraspinal sarcomas. Treatment included pre- and/or postoperative photon/proton XRT with or without radical resection; patients with osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma received chemotherapy. Shrinking fields delivered 50.4 cobalt Gray equivalent (Gy RBE) to subclinical disease, 70.2 Gy RBE to microscopic disease in the tumor bed, and 77.4 Gy RBE to gross disease at 1.8 Gy RBE qd. Doses were reduced for radiosensitive histologies, concurrent chemoradiation, or when diabetes or autoimmune disease present. Spinal cord dose was limited to 63/54 Gy RBE to surface/center. Intraoperative boost doses of 7.5 to 10 Gy could be given by dural plaque. Results: A total of 50 patients (29 chordoma, 14 chondrosarcoma, 7 other) underwent gross total (n = 25) or subtotal (n = 12) resection or biopsy (n = 13). With 48 month median follow-up, 5-year actuarial local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival are: 78%, 63%, and 87% respectively. Two of 36 (5.6%) patients treated for primary versus 7/14 (50%) for recurrent tumor developed local recurrence (p < 0.001). Five patients developed late radiation-associated complications; no myelopathy developed but three sacral neuropathies appeared after 77.12 to 77.4 Gy RBE. Conclusions: Local control with this treatment is high in patients radiated at the time of primary presentation. Spinal cord dose constraints appear to be safe. Sacral nerves receiving 77.12-77.4 Gy RBE are at risk for late toxicity.

  19. Full dose paclitaxel plus vinorelbine as salvage chemotherapy in anthracycline-resistant advanced breast cancer: a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Polyzos, A; Tsavaris, N; Kosmas, C; Gogas, H; Toufexi, H; Kosmidis, C; Markopoulos, C; Giannopoulos, A; Papadopoulos, O; Stamatiadis, D; Kouraklis, G

    2003-12-01

    This phase II trial studied the efficacy and toxicity of full dose paclitaxel plus vinorelbine, as salvage chemotherapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer resistant to anthracyclines. Patients received vinorelbine (30 mg/m2) followed 1 hour later by full dose paclitaxel (175 mg/m2) every 3 weeks for a maximum of 8 cycles or until disease progression. Because of the heavy pretreatment of the patients, prophylactic granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (5 microg/kg) was administered daily for 5-10 days. To minimize potentially cumulative neurotoxicity due to both agents, amifostine was given prior to chemotherapy. Thirty-four patients: 8 with tumors primary resistant and 26 with tumors recurring within 3-6 months after anthracycline treatment, were evaluable for efficacy and toxicity. Objective responses occurred in 11 patients [32%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 16.3-47.7%), all partial responses. Responses were observed in lung and liver. The median response duration was 4 months (range 3-7), median time to progression was 5 months (range 3-9) and median overall survival was 8 months (range 4-24). Neutropenia was dose limiting (35% grade 3-4 toxicity). The left ventricular ejection fraction, measured and followed in 18 patients, fell less than 20% below baseline level in 9 patients (50%), but only one patient developed congestive cardiac failure. The paclitaxel-vinorelbine regimen was moderately tolerated and moderately effective in poor prognosis breast cancer patients with visceral metastases and tumors resistant to anthracyclines. The combination at these doses and schedules should be considered in the design of regimens for advanced breast cancer. PMID:14998089

  20. Multicentric neoadjuvant pilot Phase II study of cetuximab combined with docetaxel in operable triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nabholtz, J M; Chalabi, N; Radosevic-Robin, N; Dauplat, M M; Mouret-Reynier, M A; Van Praagh, I; Servent, V; Jacquin, J P; Benmammar, K E; Kullab, S; Bahadoor, M R K; Kwiatkowski, F; Cayre, A; Abrial, C; Durando, X; Bignon, Y J; Chollet, P; Penault-Llorca, F

    2016-05-01

    Systemic therapy for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is mostly based upon chemotherapy. Epithelial Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in around 50% of TNBC and may play a role in its pathogenesis. Consequently, we performed a multicentric pilot Phase II neoadjuvant trial of cetuximab (anti-EGFR antibody) combined with docetaxel for patients with operable, Stage II-III TNBC. Therapy consisted of weekly cetuximab (first infusion: 400 mg/m(2), then 250 mg/m(2)) combined with six cycles of docetaxel (T: 100 mg/m(2)) q.3 weeks. Subsequently, all patients underwent surgery. The primary endpoint was pathological complete response (pCR) while clinical response, toxicity and ancillary studies were secondary endpoints. Paraffin-embedded and frozen tumor samples were systematically collected in order to identify predictive biomarkers of efficacy and resistance. From a total of 35 accrued patients, 25 were assessable for pathologic response. The pCR rate was 24% [95% CI: 7.3-40.7]. Complete clinical response rate (cCR) was observed in 22% of cases. Conservative surgery was performed in 75% of patients. Toxicity, mostly cutaneous and hematologic, was manageable. The pre-therapy ratio between CD8+ and FOXP3+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes equal or higher than 2.75 was predictive of pCR: 43% versus 0%, p = 0.047. Cetuximab in combination with docetaxel displays a modest activity, but acceptable toxicity as neoadjuvant therapy of operable TNBC. Similarly to previous observations using panitumumab, another anti-EGFR antibody, the immune component of the tumor microenvironment may play an important role in predicting TNBC response to the neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:26649807

  1. A Phase II Study of High-Dose-Rate Afterloading Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Corner, Carie Rojas, Ana Maria; Bryant, Linda; Ostler, Peter; Hoskin, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: A Phase II dose escalation study has been undertaken to evaluate high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) monotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 110 patients have been entered, all with locally advanced cancer. Three dose levels have been used; 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, and 31.5 Gy in three fractions. These equate to 226Gy{sub 1.5}, 252Gy{sub 1.5}, and 252Gy{sub 1.5}, respectively. Thirty patients have received 34 Gy, 25 received 36 Gy, and 55 patients received 31.5 Gy. Acute and late toxicity was analyzed using the International Prostate Symptom Score, and urologic and rectal events were scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/Common Terminology Criteria scoring systems. Results: Seven patients required urethral catheterization at 2 weeks; 3 receiving 34 Gy, 1 receiving 36 Gy, and 3 receiving 31.5 Gy. Only 3 patients remained catheterized at 12 weeks. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 1 and 2 gastrointestinal toxicity at 2 weeks was seen in 61%, 68%, and 77%, respectively. Grade 3 bladder toxicity was seen in 2 patients at 6 months, 1 each from the 36 Gy and 31.5 Gy arms. One patient from the 31.5-Gy cohort reported Grade 2 bowel toxicity at 6 months. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), stratified for androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and no-ADT patients ranged from 16.1-22.9 {mu}g/L and 11.1-12.5 {mu}g/L, respectively. This fell at 12 months to 0.2-0.6 {mu}g/L and 0.5-1.4 {mu}g/L, respectively. No PSA relapses have yet been seen with a median follow-up of 30 months (34 Gy), 18 months (36 Gy), and 11.8 months (31.5 Gy). Conclusions: Early results suggest an excellent biochemical response with no differences seen in acute and late toxicity between doses of 34 Gy/four fractions, 36 Gy/four fractions, or 31.5 Gy/three fractions.

  2. Combined phase I/II study of imexon (AOP99.0001) for treatment of relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Moehler, Thomas M; Feneberg, Reinhard; Ho, Anthony Dick; Golenkov, Anatoly K; Ludwig, Heinz; Kropff, Martin; Khuageva, Nuriet K; Hajda, Jacek; von Broen, Ingo; Goldschmidt, Hartmut

    2010-08-01

    Imexon [AOP99.0001 (4-imino-1,3-diazobicyclo[3. 1. 0]-hexan-2-one)] belongs to a novel class of promising anticancer agents that induce tumor apoptosis through oxidative stress. Clinical experience since the late 1960s has provided initial evidence for a clinical antitumor activity. Our open-label, multicenter phase I clinical trial was designed to further investigate the adverse event (AEs) profile and pharmacokinetics of AOP99.0001 in pretreated myeloma patients and collect initial data on the potential clinical efficacy in this indication. Thirty-six patients with relapsed or refractory myeloma, who had been pretreated with at least two lines of therapy earlier, were included. Imexon was applied intravenously on 5 consecutive days for 2 weeks (d1-5 and d8-12) for a 3-week cycle. The plasma half-life of AOP99.0001 and its active metabolite AOP99.0002 was found to be approximately 1.2 and 2.6 h, respectively. The mean duration of treatment with Imexon was 6.8 weeks in a dose range between 50 and 1000 mg/m without reaching dose-limiting toxicity. Drug-related AEs occurring with a frequency of greater than 10% were fatigue, nausea, constipation, headache, asthenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia and creatinine increase. A total of nine severe adverse events occurred in three patients. No mortality was encountered when patients were on treatment with Imexon. Preliminary antimyeloma efficacy of AOP99.0001 was observed with 1 minimal response, 12 (36%) stable disease responses, and all other evaluable patients had progressive disease. Remarkably, the patient with minimal response also experienced a complete clinical resolution of myeloma-associated polyneuropathy. Overall, Imexon was safe and well tolerated in the dose range investigated. Imexon showed minor clinical activity as a single agent in heavily pretreated myeloma patients. On account of its unique mechanism of action, favorable toxicity profile, initial clinical evidence for antimyeloma activity, and

  3. Concurrent gemcitabine and radiotherapy with and without neoadjuvant gemcitabine for locally advanced unresectable or resected pancreatic cancer: A phase I-II study

    SciTech Connect

    Brade, Anthony . E-mail: anthony.brade@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Brierley, James; Oza, Amit; Gallinger, Steven; Cummings, Bernard; MacLean, Martha; Pond, Gregory R.; Hedley, David; Wong Shun; Townsley, Carol; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Moore, Malcolm

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of biweekly gemcitabine with concurrent radiotherapy (RT) for resected and locally advanced (LA) pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had either LA or resected pancreatic cancer. Between March 1999 and July 2001, 63 patients (31 with LA and 32 with resected disease) were treated. Of the 63 patients, 28 were enrolled in a Phase I study of increasing radiation doses (35 Gy [n = 7], 43.75 Gy [n = 11], and 52.5 Gy [n = 10] given within 4, 5, or 6 weeks, respectively, in 1.75-Gy fractions) concurrently with 40 mg/m{sup 2} gemcitabine biweekly. Subsequently, 35 were enrolled in a Phase II study with the addition of induction gemcitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2} within 7 or 8 weeks to concurrent biweekly gemcitabine (40 mg/m{sup 2}) and 52.5 Gy RT within 6 weeks. Results: In the LA population, the best response observed was a complete response in 1, partial response in 3, stable disease in 10, and progressive disease in 17. In the phase II trial, gemcitabine plus RT was not delivered to 8 patients because of progression with induction gemcitabine alone (n = 5) or by patient request (n = 3). On intent-to-treat analysis, the median survival in the LA patients was 13.9 months and the 2-year survival rate was 16.1%. In the resected population, the median progression-free survival was 8.3 months, the median survival was 18.4 months, and the 2- and 5-year survival rate was 36% and 19.4%, respectively. The treatment was well tolerated; the median gemcitabine dose intensity was 96% of the planned dose in the neoadjuvant and concurrent portions of the Phase II study. No treatment-related deaths occurred. Conclusion: Biweekly gemcitabine (40 mg/m{sup 2}) concurrently with RT (52.5 Gy in 30 fractions of 1.75 Gy) with or without induction gemcitabine is safe and tolerable and shows efficacy in patients with LA and resected pancreatic cancer.

  4. A Multicenter Phase II Study of Local Radiation Therapy for Stage IEA Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphomas: A Preliminary Report From the Japan Radiation Oncology Group (JAROG)

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, Koichi Kagami, Yoshikazu; Higuchi, Keiko; Kodaira, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Shikama, Naoto; Nakazawa, Masanori; Fukuda, Ichiro; Nihei, Keiji; Ito, Kana; Teshima, Teruki; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Oguchi, Masahiko

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of moderate dose radiation therapy (RT) for mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma in a prospective multicenter phase II trial. Methods and Materials: The subjects in this study were 37 patients with MALT lymphoma between April 2002 and November 2004. There were 16 male and 21 female patients, ranging in age from 24 to 82 years, with a median of 56 years. The primary tumor originated in the orbit in 24 patients, in the thyroid and salivary gland in 4 patients each, and 5 in the others. The median tumor dose was 30.6 Gy (range, 30.6-39.6 Gy), depending on the primary site and maximal tumor diameter. The median follow-up was 37.3 months. Results: Complete remission (CR) or CR/unconfirmed was achieved in 34 patients (92%). The 3-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and local control probability were 100%, 91.9%, and 97.3%, respectively. Thirteen patients experienced Grade 1 acute toxicities including dermatitis, mucositis, and conjunctivitis. One patient developed Grade 2 taste loss. Regarding late toxicities, Grade 2 reactions including hypothyroidism, and radiation pneumonitis were observed in three patients, and Grade 3 cataract was seen in three patients. Conclusions: This prospective phase II study demonstrated that moderate dose RT was highly effective in achieving local control with acceptable morbidity in 37 patients with MALT lymphoma.

  5. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with interstitial hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate carcinoma following external beam radiation therapy: a prospective phase II study.

    PubMed

    Kukiełka, Andrzej M; Strnad, Vratislav; Stauffer, Paul; Dąbrowski, Tomasz; Hetnał, Marcin; Nahajowski, Damian; Walasek, Tomasz; Brandys, Piotr; Matys, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Optimal treatment for patients with only local prostate cancer recurrence after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) failure remains unclear. Possible curative treatments are radical prostatectomy, cryosurgery, and brachytherapy. Several single institution series proved that high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) and pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDRBT) are reasonable options for this group of patients with acceptable levels of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A standard dose prescription and scheme have not been established yet, and the literature presents a wide range of fractionation protocols. Furthermore, hyperthermia has shown the potential to enhance the efficacy of re-irradiation. Consequently, a prospective trial is urgently needed to attain clear structured prospective data regarding the efficacy of salvage brachytherapy with adjuvant hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this report is to introduce a new prospective phase II trial that would meet this need. The primary aim of this prospective phase II study combining Iridium-192 brachytherapy with interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) is to analyze toxicity of the combined treatment; a secondary aim is to define the efficacy (bNED, DFS, OS) of salvage brachytherapy. The dose prescribed to PTV will be 30 Gy in 3 fractions for HDRBT, and 60 Gy in 2 fractions for PDRBT. During IHT, the prostate will be heated to the range of 40-47°C for 60 minutes prior to brachytherapy dose delivery. The protocol plans for treatment of 77 patients. PMID:26207116

  6. Phase II Study Proposal Briefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for the Study of Postsecondary Educational Supports, Honolulu, HI.

    This document collects 23 study proposal briefs presented to the National Center for the Study of Postsecondary Educational Supports. The proposals address the following topics concerned with postsecondary services for students with disabilities: cultural empowerment, longitudinal analysis of postsecondary students' experience, effective models of…

  7. B-Lymphocyte Depletion in Myalgic Encephalopathy/ Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. An Open-Label Phase II Study with Rituximab Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fluge, Øystein; Risa, Kristin; Lunde, Sigrid; Alme, Kine; Rekeland, Ingrid Gurvin; Sapkota, Dipak; Kristoffersen, Einar Kleboe; Sørland, Kari; Bruland, Ove; Dahl, Olav; Mella, Olav

    2015-01-01

    Background Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We previously reported a pilot case series followed by a small, randomized, placebo-controlled phase II study, suggesting that B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab can yield clinical benefit in ME/CFS. Methods In this single-center, open-label, one-armed phase II study (NCT01156909), 29 patients were included for treatment with rituximab (500 mg/m2) two infusions two weeks apart, followed by maintenance rituximab infusions after 3, 6, 10 and 15 months, and with follow-up for 36 months. Findings Major or moderate responses, predefined as lasting improvements in self-reported Fatigue score, were detected in 18 out of 29 patients (intention to treat). Clinically significant responses were seen in 18 out of 28 patients (64%) receiving rituximab maintenance treatment. For these 18 patients, the mean response durations within the 156 weeks study period were 105 weeks in 14 major responders, and 69 weeks in four moderate responders. At end of follow-up (36 months), 11 out of 18 responding patients were still in ongoing clinical remission. For major responders, the mean lag time from first rituximab infusion until start of clinical response was 23 weeks (range 8–66). Among the nine patients from the placebo group in the previous randomized study with no significant improvement during 12 months follow-up after saline infusions, six achieved a clinical response before 12 months after rituximab maintenance infusions in the present study. Two patients had an allergic reaction to rituximab and two had an episode of uncomplicated late-onset neutropenia. Eight patients experienced one or more transient symptom flares after rituximab infusions. There was no unexpected toxicity. Conclusion In a subgroup of ME/CFS patients, prolonged B-cell depletion with rituximab maintenance infusions was associated with sustained clinical responses. The observed

  8. A multicenter phase II study of sepantronium bromide (YM155) plus rituximab in patients with relapsed aggressive B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Kyriakos P; Lopez-Jimenez, Javier; Smith, Scott E; Steinberg, Joyce; Keating, Anne; Sasse, Carolyn; Jie, Fei; Thyss, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    This phase II study evaluated YM155, a novel small-molecule survivin suppressant, in combination with rituximab in patients with relapsed aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) who failed or were not candidates for autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). During 14-day cycles, 41 patients received YM155 (5mg/m(2)/d) by continuous intravenous (IV) infusion for 168 hours (day 1-7), and rituximab (375mg/m(2)) IV on days 1 and 8 during cycles 1-4 and repeated for 4 cycles every 10 cycles. Forty patients (97.6%) had prior rituximab and 15 patients (36.6%) prior ASCT. Most frequent grade 3-4 adverse events were neutropenia (19.5%) and thrombocytopenia (12.2%). In the per-protocol set (n = 34), objective response rate was 50% and median progression-free survival 17.9 months. Median overall survival was not reached at study termination (median follow-up, 23 months). YM155 in combination with rituximab was tolerable with encouraging antitumor activity and durable responses in relapsed aggressive B-cell NHL patients. PMID:26857688

  9. A multicentre phase II study of vorinostat in patients with relapsed or refractory indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Michinori; Ando, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Oh, Sung Yong; Itoh, Kuniaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Au, Wing Yan; Tien, Hwei-Fang; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Terauchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Keiko; Mori, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yoshinobu; Shimamoto, Takashi; Tobinai, Kensei; Kim, Won Seog

    2014-01-01

    Although initial rituximab-containing chemotherapies achieve high response rates, indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL), such as follicular lymphoma (FL), is still incurable. Therefore, new effective agents with novel mechanisms are anticipated. In this multicentre phase II study, patients with relapsed/refractory indolent B-NHL and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) received vorinostat 200 mg twice daily for 14 consecutive days in a 21-d cycle until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR) in FL patients and safety and tolerability in all patients. Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS). Fifty-six eligible patients were enrolled; 50 patients (39 with FL, seven with other B-NHL, and four with MCL) were evaluable for ORR, and 40 patients had received rituximab-containing prior chemotherapeutic regimens. For the 39 patients with FL, the ORR was 49% [95% confidence interval (CI): 32·4, 65·2] and the median PFS was 20 months (95% CI: 11·2, 29·7). Major toxicities were manageable grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. Vorinostat offers sustained antitumour activity in patients with relapsed or refractory FL with an acceptable safety profile. Further investigation of vorinostat for clinical efficacy is warranted. PMID:24617454

  10. Clinical Evidence of the Efficacy of a Mouthwash Containing Propolis for the Control of Plaque and Gingivitis: A Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Elizete Maria Rita; da Silva, João Luís Duval Cândido; Silva, Fernando Freitas; De Luca, Mariana Passos; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira e; Lorentz, Telma Campos Medeiros; Santos, Vagner Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evidence the clinical efficacy of an alcohol-free mouthwash containing 5.0% (W/V) Brazilian green propolis (MGP 5%) for the control of plaque and gingivitis. Twenty five subjects, men and women aging between 18 and 60 years old (35 ± 9), were included in a clinical trials phase II study who had a minimum of 20 sound natural teeth, a mean plaque index of at least 1.5 (PI), and a mean gingival index of at least 1.0 (GI). They were instructed to rinse with 10 mL of mouthwash test for 1 minute, immediately after brushing in the morning and at night. After 45 and 90 days using mouthwash, the results showed a significant reduction in plaque and in gingival index when compared to samples obtained in baseline. These reductions were at 24% and 40%, respectively (P < .5). There were no important side effects in soft and hard tissues of the mouth. In this study, the MGP 5% showed evidence of its efficacy in reducing PI and GI. However, it is necessary to perform a clinical trial, double-blind, randomized to validate such effectiveness. PMID:21584253

  11. Detection of BRAF mutations in the tumour and serum of patients enrolled in the AZD6244 (ARRY-142886) advanced melanoma phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Board, R E; Ellison, G; Orr, M C M; Kemsley, K R; McWalter, G; Blockley, L Y; Dearden, S P; Morris, C; Ranson, M; Cantarini, M V; Dive, C; Hughes, A

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the potential clinical utility of circulating free DNA (cfDNA) as a source of BRAF mutation detection in patients enrolled into a phase II study of AZD6244, a specific MEK1/2 inhibitor, in patients with advanced melanoma. Methods: BRAF mutations were detected using Amplification Refractory Mutation System allele-specific PCR. BRAF mutation status was assessed in serum-derived cfDNA from 126 patients enrolled into the study and from 94 matched tumour samples. Results: Of 94 tumour samples, 45 (47.9%) were found to be BRAF mutation positive (BRAF+). Serum-derived cfDNA was BRAF+ in 33 of 126 (26.2%) samples, including in five samples for which tumour data were unavailable. Of BRAF+ tumours, 25 of 45 (55.6%) were BRAF+ in cfDNA. In three cases in which the tumour was negative, cfDNA was BRAF+. Progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with BRAF+ tumour and cfDNA was not significantly different compared with tumour BRAF+ but cfDNA BRAF-negative patients, indicating that cfDNA BRAF detection is not associated with poorer prognosis on PFS in stage III/IV advanced melanoma. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the feasibility of BRAF mutation detection in cfDNA of patients with advanced melanoma. Future studies should aim to incorporate BRAF mutation testing in cfDNA to further validate this biomarker for patient selection. PMID:19861964

  12. Expression of Heat Shock Protein 27 in Melanoma Metastases Is Associated with Overall Response to Bevacizumab Monotherapy: Analyses of Predictive Markers in a Clinical Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Cornelia; Akslen, Lars A.; Straume, Oddbjørn

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential predictive biomarkers in 35 patients with metastatic melanoma treated with anti-angiogenic bevacizumab monotherapy in a clinical phase II study. The immunohistochemical expression of various angiogenic factors in tissues from primary melanomas and metastases as well as their concentration in blood samples were examined. Strong expression of Heat Shock Protein 27 (HSP27) in metastases correlated significantly with complete or partial response to bevacizumab (p = 0.044). Furthermore, clinical benefit, i.e., complete or partial response or stable disease for at least 6 months, was more frequent in patients with strong expression of HSP27 in primary tumors (p = 0.046). Tissue expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), its splicing variant VEGF165b or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) did not correlate with response, and the concentration of HSP27, VEGF-A or bFGF measured in blood samples before treatment did not show predictive value. Further, microvessel density, proliferating microvessel density and presence of glomeruloid microvascular proliferations were assessed in sections of primary tumors and metastases. Microvessel density in primary melanomas was significantly higher in patients with clinical benefit than in non-responders (p = 0.042). In conclusion, our findings suggest that strong HSP27 expression in melanoma metastases predicts response to bevacizumab treatment. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00139360 PMID:27166673

  13. Gemcitabine-oxaliplatin combination for ovarian cancer resistant to taxane-platinum treatment: a phase II study from the GINECO group

    PubMed Central

    Ray-Coquard, I; Weber, B; Cretin, J; Haddad-Guichard, Z; Lévy, E; Hardy-Bessard, A C; Gouttebel, M C; Geay, J-F; Aleba, A; Orfeuvre, H; Agostini, C; Provencal, J; Ferrero, J M; Fric, D; Dohollou, N; Paraiso, D; Salvat, J; Pujade-Lauraine, É

    2009-01-01

    Advanced ovarian carcinoma in early progression (<6 months) (AOCEP) is considered resistant to most cytotoxic drugs. Gemcitabine (GE) and oxaliplatin (OXA) have shown single-agent activity in relapsed ovarian cancer. Their combination was tested in patients with AOCEP in phase II study. Fifty patients pre-treated with platinum–taxane received q3w administration of OXA (100 mg m–2, d1) and GE (1000 mg m–2, d1, d8, 100-min infusion). Patient characteristics were a : median age 64 years (range 46–79),and 1 (84%) or 2 (16%) earlier lines of treatment. Haematological toxicity included grade 3–4 neutropaenia (33%), anaemia (8%), and thrombocytopaenia (19%). Febrile neutropaenia occurred in 3%. Non-haematological toxicity included grade 2–3 nausea or vomiting (34%), grade 3 fatigue (25%),and grade 2 alopecia (24%). Eighteen (37%) patients experienced response. Median progression-free (PF) and overall survivals (OS) were 4.6 and 11.4 months, respectively. The OXA–GE combination has high activity and acceptable toxicity in AOCEP patients. A comparison of the doublet OXA–GE with single-agent treatment is warranted. PMID:19190632

  14. Multicenter Phase II Study of Nedaplatin and Irinotecan for Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung: Thoracic Oncology Research Group 0910.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kouzo; Saito, Haruhiro; Kondo, Tetsuro; Murakami, Shuji; Masuda, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Michiko; Igawa, Satoshi; Katono, Ken; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Iwasawa, Shunichiro; Kurimoto, Ryota; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Shimokawa, Tsuneo; Hosomi, Yukio; Takagi, Yusuke; Kishi, Kazuma; Ohba, Mari; Oshita, Fumihiro; Watanabe, Koshiro

    2015-12-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung is moderately responsive to anticancer drugs, but no specific chemotherapy regimens have yet been established. We conducted a multicenter phase II study of nedaplatin (NP) and irinotecan (CPT) for SCC of the lung. Fifty patients underwent 4 to 6 cycles of chemotherapy comprising of NP at 100 mg/m(2) on day 1 and CPT at 60 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks. Twenty-seven patients received 4 to 6 cycles of chemotherapy (median=4 cycles). Major toxicities included neutropenia (46.0%), grade 3 or 4 anorexia (22.0%), febrile neutropenia (16.0%), diarrhea (12.0%), hyponatremia (12.0%), grade 4 anemia (10.0%), thrombocytopenia (10.0%) and infection (10.0%). There were no treatment-related deaths. One patient achieved a complete response and 16 a partial response, with an overall response rate of 34.0%. The median survival time was 11.8 months (95% CI=8.3-15.8 months) and the 2-year survival rate was 22.0%. In conclusion, the NP and CPT regimen is not recommend for further evaluation for patients with advanced SCC of the lung. PMID:26637886

  15. Tetracaine oral gel in patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: Final results of a phase II study

    SciTech Connect

    Alterio, Daniela . E-mail: daniela.alterio@ieo.it; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Zuccotti, Gabriele Fulvio Phar; Leon, Maria Elena; Omodeo Sale, Emanuela Phar; Pasetti, Marcella; Modena, Tiziana Phar; Perugini, Paola; Mariani, Luigi; Orecchia, Roberto

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: We performed a phase II study to assess feasibility, pain relief, and toxicity of a tetracaine-based oral gel in the treatment of radiotherapy (RT)-induced mucositis. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients treated with RT for head-and-neck cancer with clinical evidence of acute oral mucositis of grade {>=}2 were scheduled to receive the tetracaine gel. A questionnaire evaluating the effect of the gel was given to all subjects. Results: In 38 patients (79.2%), a reduction in oral cavity pain was reported. Thirty-four patients (82.9%) reported no side effect. Seventy-one percent of patients had no difficulties in gel application. Unpleasant taste of the gel and interference with food taste were noticed in 5 (12%) and 16 patients (39%), respectively. Planned RT course was interrupted less frequently in patients who reported benefit from gel application than in patients who did not (p = 0.014). None of the patients who experienced pain relief needed a nasogastric tube, opposite to the patients who did not report any benefit from gel application (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Tetracaine oral gel administration seemed feasible and safe while reducing RT-induced mucositis-related oral pain in a sizeable proportion of treated head-and-neck cancer patients. A trial designed to compare efficacy of this gel vs. standard treatment is warranted.

  16. Fractionated administration of irinotecan and cisplatin for treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase II study of Okayama Lung Cancer Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Ueoka, H; Tanimoto, M; Kiura, K; Tabata, M; Takigawa, N; Segawa, Y; Takata, I; Eguchi, K; Okimoto, N; Harita, S; Kamei, H; Shibayama, T; Watanabe, Y; Hiraki, S; Harada, M

    2001-01-01

    A phase II study of fractionated administration of irinotecan (CPT-11) and cisplatin (CDDP) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was conducted. Between January 1996 and January 1998, 44 previously untreated patients with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC were enrolled. CDDP at a dose of 60 mg m–2was given first and followed by CPT-11 at a dose of 50 mg m–2. Both drugs were given by 1-hour infusion on days 1 and 8, and repeated every 4 weeks up to 4 cycles. 42 patients were evaluated for response and 44 for survival and toxicity. 20 patients (48%: 95% confidence interval 32–63%) achieved an objective response. The median duration of responses was 8 months, and the median survival time and the 1-year survival rate were 12.5 months and 56.8%, respectively. Major toxicities were neutropenia and diarrhoea. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia occurred in 70.5% of the patients and one patient died of sepsis. Grade 3 or 4 diarrhoea was experienced in 25.0%, but manageable by conventional therapy. In conclusion, fractionated administration of CPT-11 and CDDP was highly effective for advanced NSCLC with manageable toxicities. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11437395

  17. A Phase Ib/II Study Evaluating the Combination of Weekly Docetaxel and Cisplatin Together with Capecitabine and Bevacizumab in Patients with Advanced Esophago-Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sarfaty, Michal; Purim, Ofer; Kundel, Yulia; Amit, Limor; Abramovich, Amir; Sadeh Gonik, Udi; Idelevich, Efraim; Gordon, Noa; Medalia, Gal; Sulkes, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Current treatment options for advanced esophagogastric cancer (AEGC) are still unsatisfactory. The aim of this prospective phase Ib/II study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a novel regimen, AVDCX, consisting of weekly docetaxel and cisplatin together with capecitabine and bevacizumab, in AEGC. Methods Patients with AEGC received treatment with different dose levels of AVDCX (cisplatin and docetaxel 25–35 mg/m2, days 1,8, capecitabine 1,600 mg/m2 days 1–14, bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg, day 1, Q:21 days). The study's primary objectives were to establish the recommended phase II doses of docetaxel and cisplatin in AVDCX (phase Ib part) and to determine the tumor response rate (phase II part). Results The study was closed early, after the accrual of 22 patients, due to accumulating toxicity-related deaths. The median age was 59 years and 77% of patients had gastric or gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas. Grade ≥3 adverse events were documented in 18 patients (82%), usually neutropenia (36%), fatigue (54%) or diarrhea (23%). There were three fatal toxicities (14%): mesenteric thromboembolism, gastric perforation and pancytopenic sepsis. The recommended phase II doses of cisplatin and docetaxel were determined to be 25 mg/m2 and 30 mg/m2, respectively. Twenty-one patients were evaluable for response: 12 (54%) had partial response (PR), 4 (18%) had stable disease (SD) and none had complete response (CR). Hence, the objective response rate (CR+PR) was 54% and the disease control rate (CR+PR+SD) was 72%. For the 17 patients treated at the MTD, the objective response rate was 41% and the disease control rate was 88%. The median overall survival (OS) for these patients was 13.9 months (range, 1.5–52.2 months) and the median progression-free survival was 7.6 months (range, 1.3–26.6 months). The 2-year OS rate reached 23.7%. Conclusions AVDCX was associated with a high rate of regimen related fatal adverse events and is not appropriate for further

  18. An open-label, two-stage, phase II study of bevacizumab and lapatinib in children with recurrent or refractory ependymoma: a collaborative ependymoma research network study (CERN)

    PubMed Central

    DeWire, Mariko; Fouladi, Maryam; Turner, David C.; Wetmore, Cynthia; Hawkins, Cynthia; Jacobs, Carmen; Yuan, Ying; Liu, Diane; Goldman, Stewart; Fisher, Paul; Rytting, Michael; Bouffet, Eric; Khakoo, Yasmin; Hwang, Eugene I.; Foreman, Nicholas; Stewart, Clinton F.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Gilbertson, Richard; Gajjar, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Co-expression of ERBB2 and ERBB4, reported in 75 % of pediatric ependymomas, correlates with worse overall survival. Lapatinib, a selective ERBB1 and ERBB2 inhibitor has produced prolonged disease stabilization in patients with ependymoma in a phase I study. Bevacizumab exposure in ependymoma xenografts leads to ablation of tumor self-renewing cells, arresting growth. Thus, we conducted an open-label, phase II study of bevacizumab and lapatinib in children with recurrent ependymomas. Patients ≤21 years of age with recurrent ependymoma received lapatinib orally twice daily (900 mg/m2/dose to the first 10 patients, and then 700 mg/ m2/dose) and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg intravenously on days 1 and 15 of a 28-day course. Lapatinib serum trough levels were analyzed prior to each course. Total and phosphorylated VEGFR2 expression was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) before doses 1 and 2 of bevacizumab and 24–48 h following dose 2 of bevacizumab. Twenty-four patients with a median age of 10 years (range 2–21 years) were enrolled; 22 were eligible and 20 evaluable for response. Thirteen had anaplastic ependymoma. There were no objective responses; 4 patients had stable disease for ≥4 courses (range 4–14). Grade 3 toxicities included rash, elevated ALT, and diarrhea. Grade 4 toxicities included peri-tracheostomy hemorrhage (n = 1) and elevated creatinine phosphokinase (n = 1). The median lapatinib pre-dose trough concentration was 3.72 μM. Although the combination of bevacizumab and lapatinib was well tolerated in children with recurrent ependymoma, it proved ineffective. PMID:25859842

  19. Five-year Local Control in a Phase II Study of Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost for Early Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Gary M.; Anderson, Penny R.; Bleicher, Richard J.; Litwin, Samuel; Li Tianyu; Swaby, Ramona F.; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie; Li Jinsheng; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Morrow, Monica; Goldstein, Lori J.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Conventional radiation fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy per day for early stage breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6-7 weeks. We report the 5-year results of a phase II study of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hypofractionation, and incorporated boost that shortened treatment time to 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: The study design was phase II with a planned accrual of 75 patients. Eligibility included patients aged {>=}18 years, Tis-T2, stage 0-II, and breast conservation. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost was used, and the whole breast received 2.25 Gy per fraction for a total of 45 Gy, and the tumor bed received 2.8 Gy per fraction for a total of 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Patients were followed every 6 months for 5 years. Results: Seventy-five patients were treated from December 2003 to November 2005. The median follow-up was 69 months. Median age was 52 years (range, 31-81). Median tumor size was 1.4 cm (range, 0.1-3.5). Eighty percent of tumors were node negative; 93% of patients had negative margins, and 7% of patients had close (>0 and <2 mm) margins; 76% of cancers were invasive ductal type: 15% were ductal carcinoma in situ, 5% were lobular, and 4% were other histology types. Twenty-nine percent of patients 29% had grade 3 carcinoma, and 20% of patients had extensive in situ carcinoma; 11% of patients received chemotherapy, 36% received endocrine therapy, 33% received both, and 20% received neither. There were 3 instances of local recurrence for a 5-year actuarial rate of 2.7%. Conclusions: This 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation with incorporated boost was associated with excellent local control, comparable to historical results of 6-7 weeks of conventional whole-breast fractionation with sequential boost.

  20. The Value of Botox-A in Acute Radiation Proctitis: Results From a Phase I/II Study Using a Three-Dimensional Scoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Vuong, Te; Waschke, Kevin; Niazi, Tamim; Richard, Carole; Parent, Josee; Liberman, Sender; Mayrand, Serge; Loungnarath, Rasmy; Stein, Barry; Devic, Slobodan

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation proctitis (ARP) is a common side effect of pelvic radiotherapy, and its management is challenging in daily practice. The present phase I/II study evaluates the safety and efficacy of the botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) in ARP treatment for rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant high-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (HDREBT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients, treated with neoadjuvant HDREBT, 26-Gy in 4 fractions, received the study treatment that consisted of a single injection of BTX-A into the rectal wall. The injection was performed post-HDREBT and prior to the development of ARP. The control group, 20 such patients, did not receive the BTX-A injection. Both groups had access to standard treatment with hydrocortisone rectal aerosol foam (Cortifoam) and anti-inflammatory and narcotic medication. The ARP was clinically evaluated by self-administered daily questionnaires using visual analog scores to document frequency and urgency of bowel movements, rectal burning/tenesmus, and pain symptoms before and after HDREBT. Results: At the time of this analysis, there was no observed systemic toxicity. Patient compliance with the self-administered questionnaire was 100% from week 1 to 4, 70% during week 5, and 40% during week 6. The maximum tolerated dose was established at the 100-U dose level, and noticeable mean differences were observed in bowel frequency (p = 0.016), urgency (p = 0.007), and pain (p = 0.078). Conclusions: This study confirms the feasibility and efficacy of BTX-A intervention at 100-U dose level for study patients compared to control patients. A phase III study with this dose level is planned to validate these results.

  1. Phase II Study of Erlotinib Plus Temozolomide During and After Radiation Therapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme or Gliosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Prados, Michael D.; Chang, Susan M.; Butowski, Nicholas; DeBoer, Rebecca; Parvataneni, Rupa; Carliner, Hannah; Kabuubi, Paul; Ayers-Ringler, Jennifer; Rabbitt, Jane; Page, Margaretta; Fedoroff, Anne; Sneed, Penny K.; Berger, Mitchel S.; McDermott, Michael W.; Parsa, Andrew T.; Vandenberg, Scott; James, C. David; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Stokoe, David; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This open-label, prospective, single-arm, phase II study combined erlotinib with radiation therapy (XRT) and temozolomide to treat glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and gliosarcoma. The objectives were to determine efficacy of this treatment as measured by survival and to explore the relationship between molecular markers and treatment response. Patients and Methods Sixty-five eligible adults with newly diagnosed GBM or gliosarcoma were enrolled. We intended to treat patients not currently treated with enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs (EIAEDs) with 100 mg/d of erlotinib during XRT and 150 mg/d after XRT. Patients receiving EIAEDs were to receive 200 mg/d of erlotinib during XRT and 300 mg/d after XRT. After XRT, the erlotinib dose was escalated until patients developed tolerable grade 2 rash or until the maximum allowed dose was reached. All patients received temozolomide during and after XRT. Molecular markers of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), and methylation status of the promotor region of the MGMT gene were analyzed from tumor tissue. Survival was compared with outcomes from two historical phase II trials. Results Median survival was 19.3 months in the current study and 14.1 months in the combined historical control studies, with a hazard ratio for survival (treated/control) of 0.64 (95% CI, 0.45 to 0.91). Treatment was well tolerated. There was a strong positive correlation between MGMT promotor methylation and survival, as well as an association between MGMT promotor-methylated tumors and PTEN positivity shown by immunohistochemistry with improved survival. Conclusion Patients treated with the combination of erlotinib and temozolomide during and following radiotherapy had better survival than historical controls. Additional studies are warranted. PMID:19075262

  2. Prolonged progression-free survival after consolidating second or later remissions of neuroblastoma with Anti-GD2 immunotherapy and isotretinoin: a prospective Phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, Brian H; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Cheung, Irene Y; Kuk, Deborah; Kramer, Kim; Modak, Shakeel; Yataghene, Karima; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2015-01-01

    Relapse of high-risk neuroblastoma (HR-NB) is deemed invariably fatal yet increasing numbers of HR-NB patients achieve a second complete/very good partial remission (CR/VGPR), hence the urgency to find a successful consolidative therapy. Identifying efficacy in patients without assessable disease, however, is problematic. We report the first study providing outcome data for this group of patients with poor prognosis. To prevent another relapse, HR-NB patients in second or later CR/VGPR received the anti-GD2 murine antibody 3F8 plus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor plus isotretinoin in a Phase II trial. Upon meeting the target aim for progression-free survival (PFS) in the initial cohort of 33 patients, the trial was amended to allow patients who developed human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA) to receive rituximab to ablate HAMA with or without low-dose maintenance chemotherapy until immunotherapy could resume. For the total of 101 study patients, 5-year PFS and overall survival (OS) rates were 33% ± 5% and 48% ± 5%, respectively. Among the 33 long-term progression-free survivors, 19 had MYCN amplification, 19 had previously received anti-GD2 immunotherapy plus isotretinoin (as first-line therapy), and 15 never received maintenance chemotherapy. In a multivariate analysis of prognostic factors, only absence of minimal residual disease in bone marrow after 2 cycles of immunotherapy and before initiation of isotretinoin or anti-HAMA therapy was significantly favorable for both PFS and OS. Therefore, long-term PFS is possible for HR-NB patients who achieve at least a second CR/VGPR and receive consolidation that includes anti-GD2 immunotherapy plus isotretinoin, even if the patients received these biological treatments before relapse. Results from this prospective study will aid in the development of future Phase II studies for this growing ultra high-risk patient population. PMID:26140243

  3. Phase II study of lutetium-177 labeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) monoclonal antibody J591 for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Scott T.; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Morris, Michael; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Christos, Paul; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Osborne, Joseph; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Larson, Steve; Taskar, Neeta Pandit; Scher, Howard I.; Bander, Neil H.; Nanus, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the efficacy of a single infusion of radiolabeled anti-prostate specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 (177Lu-J591) by PSA decline, measurable disease response, and survival. Experimental Design In this dual-center phase II study, 2 cohorts with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer received one dose of 177Lu-J591 (15 patients at 65 mCi/m2, 17 at 70 mCi/m2) with radionuclide imaging. Expansion cohort (n=15) received 70 mCi/m2 to verify response rate and examine biomarkers. Results 47 patients who progressed after hormonal therapies (55.3% also received prior chemotherapy) received 177Lu-J591. 10.6% experienced ≥ 50% decline in PSA, 36.2% experienced ≥ 30% decline, and 59.6% experienced any PSA decline following their single treatment. One of 12 with measurable disease experienced a partial radiographic response (8 with stable disease). Sites of prostate cancer metastases were targeted in 44 of 47 (93.6%) as determined by planar imaging. All experienced reversible hematologic toxicity with grade 4 thrombocytopenia occurring in 46.8% (29.8% received platelet transfusions) without significant hemorrhage. 25.5% experienced grade 4 neutropenia with 1 episode of febrile neutropenia. The phase I maximum tolerated dose (70 mCi/m2) resulted in more 30% PSA declines (46.9% vs 13.3%, p=0.048) and longer survival (21.8 vs 11.9 months, p=0.03), but also more grade 4 hematologic toxicity and platelet transfusions. No serious non-hematologic toxicity occurred. Those with poor PSMA imaging were less likely to respond. Conclusion A single dose of 177Lu-J591 was well-tolerated with reversible myelosuppression. Accurate tumor targeting and PSA responses were seen with evidence of dose-response. Imaging biomarkers appear promising. PMID:23714732

  4. A phase II study of dacetuzumab (SGN-40) in patients with relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and correlative analyses of patient-specific factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with DLBCL who are ineligible for or have relapsed after aggressive salvage chemotherapy have a poor prognosis. CD40 is expressed on multiple B-cell neoplasms including DLBCL and is a potential target for immunotherapy. Dacetuzumab (SGN-40), a non-blocking, partial agonist, humanized IgG1, anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody, has previously demonstrated anti-lymphoma activity in a phase I study. Methods A phase II study was undertaken to evaluate the rate and duration of objective responses and safety of single-agent dacetuzumab in relapsed DLBCL. Forty-six adult patients with relapsed/refractory DLBCL received up to 12 cycles of intravenous dacetuzumab using intrapatient dose-escalation to a target dose of 8 mg/kg/week in an initial 5-week cycle, followed by 4-week cycles of 8 mg/kg/week. Study endpoints included rate and duration of objective responses, safety, survival, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and exploratory correlative studies. Results Overall response rate was 9% and disease control rate (complete remission + partial remission + stable disease) was 37%. Common non-hematologic adverse events (AEs) included fatigue, headache, chills, fever, and nausea. The most frequent Grade 3–4 non-hematologic AE was deep venous thrombosis (3 patients). Grade 3–4 lymphopenia (41%), neutropenia (13%), or thrombocytopenia (19%) occurred without associated infection or bleeding. Reversible ocular events, including conjunctivitis and ocular hyperemia, occurred in 8 patients (17%). Patient-specific factors, including Fc-gamma-RIIIa polymorphism, did not appear to correlate with antitumor activity. Conclusions Single-agent dacetuzumab has modest activity and manageable toxicity in unselected patients with relapsed DLBCL. Combination regimens and robust methods of patient selection may be necessary for further development. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00435916. PMID:24919462

  5. Randomized Phase Ib/II Study of Gemcitabine Plus Placebo or Vismodegib, a Hedgehog Pathway Inhibitor, in Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Catenacci, Daniel V.T.; Junttila, Melissa R.; Karrison, Theodore; Bahary, Nathan; Horiba, Margit N.; Nattam, Sreenivasa R.; Marsh, Robert; Wallace, James; Kozloff, Mark; Rajdev, Lakshmi; Cohen, Deirdre; Wade, James; Sleckman, Bethany; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Stiff, Patrick; Kumar, Pankaj; Xu, Peng; Henderson, Les; Takebe, Naoko; Salgia, Ravi; Wang, Xi; Stadler, Walter M.; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Kindler, Hedy L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sonic hedgehog (SHH), an activating ligand of smoothened (SMO), is overexpressed in > 70% of pancreatic cancers (PCs). We investigated the impact of vismodegib, an SHH antagonist, plus gemcitabine (GV) or gemcitabine plus placebo (GP) in a multicenter phase Ib/randomized phase II trial and preclinical PC models. Patients and Methods Patients with PC not amenable to curative therapy who had received no prior therapy for metastatic disease and had Karnofsky performance score ≥ 80 were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned in a one-to-one ratio to GV or GP. The primary end point was progression-free-survival (PFS). Exploratory correlative studies included serial SHH serum levels and contrast perfusion computed tomography imaging. To further investigate putative biologic mechanisms of SMO inhibition, two autochthonous pancreatic cancer models (KrasG12D; p16/p19fl/fl; Pdx1-Cre and KrasG12D; p53R270H/wt; Pdx1-Cre) were studied. Results No safety issues were identified in the phase Ib portion (n = 7), and the phase II study enrolled 106 evaluable patients (n = 53 in each arm). Median PFS was 4.0 and 2.5 months for GV and GP arms, respectively (95% CI, 2.5 to 5.3 and 1.9 to 3.8, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.54 to 1.21; P = .30). Median overall survival (OS) was 6.9 and 6.1 months for GV and GP arms, respectively (95% CI, 5.8 to 8.0 and 5.0 to 8.0, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.69 to 1.58; P = .84). Response rates were not significantly different. There were no significant associations between correlative markers and overall response rate, PFS, or OS. Preclinical trials revealed no significant differences with vismodegib in drug delivery, tumor growth rate, or OS in either model. Conclusion The addition of vismodegib to gemcitabine in an unselected cohort did not improve overall response rate, PFS, or OS in patients with metastatic PC. Our preclinical and clinical results revealed no statistically significant

  6. Rapid induction of single donor chimerism after double umbilical cord blood transplantation preceded by reduced intensity conditioning: results of the HOVON 106 phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Judith A.E.; Braakman, Eric; van der Holt, Bronno; Petersen, Eefke J.; Marijt, Erik W.A.; Huisman, Cynthia; Sintnicolaas, Kees; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Groenendijk-Sijnke, Marlies E.; Brand, Anneke; Cornelissen, Jan J.

    2014-01-01

    Double umbilical cord blood transplantation is increasingly applied in the treatment of adult patients with high-risk hematological malignancies and has been associated with improved engraftment as compared to that provided by single unit cord blood transplantation. The mechanism of improved engraftment is, however, still incompletely understood as only one unit survives. In this multicenter phase II study we evaluated engraftment, early chimerism, recovery of different cell lineages and transplant outcome in 53 patients who underwent double cord blood transplantation preceded by a reduced intensity conditioning regimen. Primary graft failure occurred in one patient. Engraftment was observed in 92% of patients with a median time to neutrophil recovery of 36 days (range, 15–102). Ultimate single donor chimerism was established in 94% of patients. Unit predominance occurred by day 11 after transplantation and early CD4+ T-cell chimerism predicted for unit survival. Total nucleated cell viability was also associated with unit survival. With a median follow up of 35 months (range, 10–51), the cumulative incidence of relapse and non-relapse mortality rate at 2 years were 39% and 19%, respectively. Progressionfree survival and overall survival rates at 2 years were 42% (95% confidence interval, 28–56) and 57% (95% confidence interval, 43–70), respectively. Double umbilical cord blood transplantation preceded by a reduced intensity conditioning regimen using cyclophosphamide/fludarabine/4 Gy total body irradiation results in a high engraftment rate with low non-relapse mortality. Moreover, prediction of unit survival by early CD4+ lymphocyte chimerism might suggest a role for CD4+ lymphocyte mediated unit-versus-unit alloreactivity. www.trialregister.nl NTR1573. PMID:25107890

  7. Continuous 7-Days-A-Week External Beam Irradiation in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Final Results of the Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Serkies, Krystyna; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Jassem, Jacek

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of definitive continuous 7-days-a-week pelvic irradiation without breaks between external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between November 1998 and December 1999, 30 patients with International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology Stage IIB or IIIB cervical cancer were included in a prospective Phase I/II study of continuous 7-days-a-week pelvic irradiation, to the total Manchester point B dose of 40.0-57.6 Gy. The first 13 patients (Group A) were given a daily tumor dose of 1.6 Gy, and the remaining 17 patients (Group B) were given 1.8 Gy. One or two immediate brachytherapy applications (point A dose 10-20 Gy, each) were performed in 28 cases. Results: Two patients did not complete the irradiation because of apparent early progression of disease during the irradiation. Eleven of the 28 evaluable patients (39%; 45% and 35% in Groups A and B, respectively) completed their treatment within the prescribed overall treatment time. Acute toxicity (including severe European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 and 4 effects in 40%) was experienced by 83% of patients and resulted in unplanned treatment interruptions in 40% of all patients (31% and 47% of patients in Groups A and B, respectively). Severe intestinal side effects occurred in 31% and 41% of Patients in Groups A and B, respectively (p = 0.71). The 5-year overall survival probability was 33%. Cancer recurrence occurred in 63% of patients: 20% inside and 57% outside the pelvis. Cumulative incidence of late severe bowel and urinary bladder toxicity at 24 months was 15%. Conclusion: Continuous irradiation in locally advanced cervical cancer is associated with a high incidence of severe acute toxicity, resulting in unplanned treatment interruptions. Late severe effects and survival after continuous radiotherapy do not substantially differ from

  8. Phase II Study of Chemoradiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin for Stage II-III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: JCOG Trial (JCOG 9906)

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Ken; Muro, Kei; Minashi, Keiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Boku, Narikazu; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Komatsu, Yoshito; Miyata, Yoshinori; Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: In this Phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for Stage II-III esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Patients and Methods: Patients with clinical Stage II-III (T1N1M0 or T2-3N0-1M0) thoracic ESCC were enrolled between April 2000 and March 2002. Chemotherapy comprised two courses of protracted infusion of 5-FU (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on Days 1-5 and 8-12, and 2-h infusion of CDDP (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1 and 8; this regimen was repeated every 5 weeks. Concurrent radiotherapy involved 60-Gy irradiation (30 fractions) for 8 weeks with a 2-week break. Responders received two courses of 5-FU (800 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on Days 1-5 and CDDP (80 mg/m{sup 2}) on Day 1. Final analysis was conducted in March 2007. Survival and late toxicities were monitored for 5 years. Results: The characteristics of the 76 patients enrolled were as follows: median age, 61 years; male/female, 68/8; performance status 0/1, 59/17 patients; Stage IIA/IIB/III, 26/12/38 patients. Of the 74 eligible patients, 46 (62.2%) achieved complete response. Median survival time was 29 months, with 3- and 5-year survival rates of 44.7% and 36.8%, respectively. Acute toxicities included Grade 3/4 esophagitis (17%), nausea (17%), hyponatremia (16%), and infection without neutropenia (12%). Late toxicities comprised Grade 3/4 esophagitis (13%), pericardial (16%) and pleural (9%) effusion, and radiation pneumonitis (4%), causing 4 deaths. Conclusions: CRT is effective for Stage II-III ESCC with manageable acute toxicities and can provide a nonsurgical treatment option. However, further improvement is required for reduction in late toxicity.

  9. Adjusting for confounding effects of treatment switching in a randomized phase II study of dabrafenib plus trametinib in BRAF V600+ metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Nicholas R; Amonkar, Mayur M; Stapelkamp, Ceilidh; Sun, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Patients with BRAF V600E mutation-positive melanoma who were assigned to 150 mg dabrafenib twice daily combined with 2 mg trametinib once daily in a phase I/II study showed a median overall survival (OS) of 23.8 months, compared with 20.2 months for patients assigned to dabrafenib alone [hazard ratio (HR)=0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.43-1.24; data cutoff March 2013], on the basis of an intention-to-treat analysis. Because patients assigned to dabrafenib monotherapy were allowed to switch to combination therapy upon disease progression, we attempted to adjust for confounding effects on OS. Randomization-based adjustment methods, Rank Preserving Structural Failure Time Models and the Iterative Parameter Estimation algorithm, were used. Two analyses, 'treatment group' (assumes that treatment effect continues beyond treatment discontinuation) and 'on treatment' (assumes that the treatment effect disappears upon treatment discontinuation), were used to test assumptions on the durability of the treatment effect. A total of 45/54 (83%) patients assigned to dabrafenib monotherapy switched to the trametinib/dabrafenib combination. Adjusted OS HRs ranged from 0.47 to 0.50, depending on the analysis, compared with the unadjusted OS HR of 0.73. CIs continued to cross 1.00; thus, adjusted estimates did not provide statistically significant evidence of a treatment benefit on survival. Reduction of HRs after adjusting for the effect of treatment switching suggests that the intention-to-treat analysis underestimates the effect of dabrafenib plus trametinib on OS, although several factors, such as small trial size and methodological assumptions, affect the certainty of the conclusions. PMID:26340744

  10. Phase II study of necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 as first-line treatment in patients with locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elez, E; Hendlisz, A; Delaunoit, T; Sastre, J; Cervantes, A; Varea, R; Chao, G; Wallin, J; Tabernero, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: This single-arm phase II study investigated the EGFR monoclonal antibody necitumumab plus modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6) in first-line treatment of locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: Patients received 800-mg intravenous necitumumab (day 1; 2-week cycles), followed by oxaliplatin 85 mg m−2, folinic acid 400 mg m−2, and 5-fluorouracil (400 mg m−2 bolus then 2400 mg m−2 over 46 h). Radiographic evaluation was performed every 8 weeks until progression. Primary endpoint was objective response rate. Results: Forty-four patients were enrolled and treated. Objective response rate was 63.6% (95% confidence interval 47.8–77.6); complete response was observed in four patients; median duration of response was 10.0 months (7.0–16.0). Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 22.5 (11.0–30.0) and 10.0 months (7.0–12.0), respectively. Clinical outcome was better in patients with KRAS exon 2 wild type (median OS 30.0 months (23.0–NA); median PFS 12.0 (8.0–20.0)), compared with KRAS exon 2 mutant tumours (median OS 7.0 months (5.0–37.0); median PFS 7.0 (4.0–18.0)). The most common grade ⩾3 adverse events were neutropenia (29.5%), asthenia (27.3%), and rash (20.5%). Conclusion: First-line necitumumab+mFOLFOX6 was active with manageable toxicity in locally advanced or mCRC; additional evaluation of the impact of tumour RAS mutation status is warranted. PMID:26766738

  11. Mitomycin C plus S-1 as second-line therapy in patients with advanced gastric cancer: a noncomparative phase II study.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Hoon; Kim, Young Saing; Hong, Junshik; Park, Jinny; Nam, Eunmi; Cho, Eun Kyung; Shin, Dong Bok; Lee, Jae Hoon; Lee, Woon Kee; Chung, Min

    2008-03-01

    S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine consisting of the 5-fluorouracil prodrug tegafur combined with two modulating substances, gimeracil and potassium oxonate. On the basis of the potential additive effect between mitomycin C (MMC) and 5-fluorouracil as a continuous infusion, we conducted a phase II study to assess the efficacy and tolerability of the combination of S-1 and MMC as second-line chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer (AGC). Patients with measurable AGC, progressive after one prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease, received MMC (7 mg/m2) on day 1 and S-1 (40 mg/m2) twice daily as an intermittent regimen of 4 weeks of treatment followed by a 2-week rest. Treatment was repeated every 6 weeks. The primary objective was the response rate. For 43 patients registered, 42 patients were treated with MMC plus S-1. A total of 121 chemotherapy cycles were delivered (median: 2; range: 1-6). The patients' median age was 53 years (range: 31-75) and nine (21%) had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2. In an intent-to-treat analysis, nine patients (21%) achieved an objective response, which was maintained for 4.1 months. The median progression-free and overall survivals were 3.4 months (95% confidence interval: 2.3-4.5) and 8.0 months (95% confidence interval: 6.1-9.9), respectively. Although fatigue was the most frequently encountered toxicity safety profiles were generally predictable and manageable. One patient developed hemolytic anemia, which was resolved spontaneously. Grade > or = 2 hand-foot syndrome was observed in only three patients. Second-line chemotherapy with MMC and S-1 is an active and tolerable regimen for AGC patients with good performance status. PMID:18510177

  12. Overall survival and final efficacy and safety results from a Japanese phase II study of axitinib in cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eto, Masatoshi; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Tomita, Yoshihiko; Kanayama, Hiroomi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Kamei, Yoichi; Fujii, Yosuke; Umeyama, Yoshiko; Ozono, Seiichiro; Naito, Seiji; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    In an open-label, multicenter phase II study of Japanese patients with cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma, axitinib showed substantial antitumor activity with an acceptable safety profile. Here, we report overall survival and updated efficacy and safety results. Sixty-four Japanese patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma following prior therapy with cytokines were treated with axitinib at a starting dose of 5 mg b.i.d. Following median treatment duration of 14.2 months, median overall survival was 37.3 months (95% CI, 28.6–49.9). The objective response rate, the primary endpoint of the study, was 51.6% (95% CI, 38.7–64.2); the median duration of response, 11.1 months (95% CI, 8.2–13.7); and the median progression-free survival was 11.0 months (95% CI, 9.2–12.0), assessed by the independent review committee. Common treatment-related all-grade adverse events were hypertension (88%), hand-foot syndrome (75%), diarrhea (66%), proteinuria (63%), fatigue (55%) and dysphonia (53%). In an exploratory analysis, median overall survival was found to be significantly longer in patients who had greater decreases in plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 during the first cycle of treatment. In conclusion, the present study showed axitinib to be effective, and toxicities with long-term treatment were generally controllable with axitinib dose modification and/or standard medications in these Japanese patients. Some frequently reported adverse events warrant close monitoring and management. Changes in the plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 may be used as a prognostic factor for overall survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma following axitinib treatment. This study is registered at http://ClinicalTrial.gov (identifier NCT00569946). PMID:25283266

  13. Overall survival and final efficacy and safety results from a Japanese phase II study of axitinib in cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Eto, Masatoshi; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Tomita, Yoshihiko; Kanayama, Hiroomi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Kamei, Yoichi; Fujii, Yosuke; Umeyama, Yoshiko; Ozono, Seiichiro; Naito, Seiji; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-12-01

    In an open-label, multicenter phase II study of Japanese patients with cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma, axitinib showed substantial antitumor activity with an acceptable safety profile. Here, we report overall survival and updated efficacy and safety results. Sixty-four Japanese patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma following prior therapy with cytokines were treated with axitinib at a starting dose of 5 mg b.i.d. Following median treatment duration of 14.2 months, median overall survival was 37.3 months (95% CI, 28.6-49.9). The objective response rate, the primary endpoint of the study, was 51.6% (95% CI, 38.7-64.2); the median duration of response, 11.1 months (95% CI, 8.2-13.7); and the median progression-free survival was 11.0 months (95% CI, 9.2-12.0), assessed by the independent review committee. Common treatment-related all-grade adverse events were hypertension (88%), hand-foot syndrome (75%), diarrhea (66%), proteinuria (63%), fatigue (55%) and dysphonia (53%). In an exploratory analysis, median overall survival was found to be significantly longer in patients who had greater decreases in plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 during the first cycle of treatment. In conclusion, the present study showed axitinib to be effective, and toxicities with long-term treatment were generally controllable with axitinib dose modification and/or standard medications in these Japanese patients. Some frequently reported adverse events warrant close monitoring and management. Changes in the plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 may be used as a prognostic factor for overall survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma following axitinib treatment. This study is registered at ClinicalTrial.gov (identifier NCT00569946). PMID:25283266

  14. Dose-intensified chemotherapy alone or in combination with mogamulizumab in newly diagnosed aggressive adult T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma: a randomized phase II study.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takashi; Jo, Tatsuro; Takemoto, Shigeki; Suzushima, Hitoshi; Uozumi, Kimiharu; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Uike, Naokuni; Saburi, Yoshio; Nosaka, Kisato; Utsunomiya, Atae; Tobinai, Kensei; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Yoshida, Shinichiro; Taira, Naoya; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Imada, Kazunori; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Akinaga, Shiro; Tomonaga, Masao; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2015-06-01

    This multicentre, randomized, phase II study was conducted to examine whether the addition of mogamulizumab, a humanized anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 antibody, to mLSG15, a dose-intensified chemotherapy, further increases efficacy without compromising safety of patients with newly diagnosed aggressive adult T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma (ATL). Patients were assigned 1:1 to receive mLSG15 plus mogamulizumab or mLSG15 alone. The primary endpoint was the complete response rate (%CR); secondary endpoints included the overall response rate (ORR) and safety. The %CR and ORR in the mLSG15-plus-mogamulizumab arm (n = 29) were 52% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33-71%] and 86%, respectively; the corresponding values in the mLSG15 arm (n = 24) were 33% (95% CI, 16-55%) and 75%, respectively. Grade ≥ 3 treatment-emergent adverse events, including anaemia, thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia, leucopenia and decreased appetite, were observed more frequently (≥10% difference) in the mLSG15-plus-mogamulizumab arm. Several adverse events, including skin disorders, cytomegalovirus infection, pyrexia, hyperglycaemia and interstitial lung disease, were observed only in the mLSG15-plus-mogamulizumab arm. Although the combination strategy showed a potentially less favourable safety profile, a higher %CR was achieved, providing the basis for further investigation of this novel treatment for newly diagnosed aggressive ATL. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT01173887. PMID:25733162

  15. Phase II study of central nervous system (CNS)-directed chemotherapy including high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation for CNS relapse of aggressive lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Korfel, Agnieszka; Elter, Thomas; Thiel, Eckhard; Hänel, Matthias; Möhle, Robert; Schroers, Roland; Reiser, Marcel; Dreyling, Martin; Eucker, Jan; Scholz, Christian; Metzner, Bernd; Röth, Alexander; Birkmann, Josef; Schlegel, Uwe; Martus, Peter; Illerhaus, Gerard; Fischer, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with central nervous system relapse of aggressive lymphoma is very poor with no therapy established so far. In a prospective multicenter phase II study, we evaluated a potentially curative chemotherapy-only regimen in these patients. Adult immunocompetent patients 65 years of age or under received induction chemotherapy with MTX/IFO/DEP (methotrexate 4 g/m2 intravenously (i.v.) Day 1, ifosfamide 2 g/m2 i.v. Days 3– 5 and liposomal cytarabine 50 mg intrathecally (i.th) Day 6) and AraC/TT/DEP (cytarabine 3g/m2 i.v. Days 1–2, thiotepa 40 mg/m2 i.v. Day 2 and i.th. liposomal cytarabine 50 mg i.th. Day 3) followed by high-dose chemotherapy with carmustine 400 mg/m2 i.v. Day −5, thiotepa 2×5 mg/kg i.v. Days −4 to −3 and etoposide 150 mg/m2 i.v. Days −5 to −3, and autologous stem cell transplantation Day 0 (HD-ASCT). Thirty eligible patients (median age 58 years) were enrolled. After HD-ASCT (n=24), there was a complete remission in 15 (63%), partial remission in 2 (8%) and progressive disease in 7 (29%) patients. Myelotoxicity was the most adverse event with CTC grade 3/4 infections in 12% of MTX/IFO/DEP courses, 21% of AraC/TT/DEP courses and 46% of HD-ASCT courses. The 2-year time to treatment failure was 49%±19 for all patients and 58%±22 for patients completing HD-ASCT. The protocol assessed proved feasible and highly active with long-lasting remissions in a large proportion of patients. (ClinicalTrials.govIdentifier NCT01148173) PMID:23242601

  16. Phase II study of central nervous system (CNS)-directed chemotherapy including high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation for CNS relapse of aggressive lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Korfel, Agnieszka; Elter, Thomas; Thiel, Eckhard; Hänel, Matthias; Möhle, Robert; Schroers, Roland; Reiser, Marcel; Dreyling, Martin; Eucker, Jan; Scholz, Christian; Metzner, Bernd; Röth, Alexander; Birkmann, Josef; Schlegel, Uwe; Martus, Peter; Illerhaus, Gerard; Fischer, Lars

    2013-03-01

    The prognosis of patients with central nervous system relapse of aggressive lymphoma is very poor with no therapy established so far. In a prospective multicenter phase II study, we evaluated a potentially curative chemotherapy-only regimen in these patients. Adult immunocompetent patients 65 years of age or under received induction chemotherapy with MTX/IFO/DEP (methotrexate 4 g/m(2) intravenously (i.v.) Day 1, ifosfamide 2 g/m(2) i.v. Days 3- 5 and liposomal cytarabine 50 mg intrathecally (i.th) Day 6) and AraC/TT/DEP (cytarabine 3g/m(2) i.v. Days 1-2, thiotepa 40 mg/m(2) i.v. Day 2 and i.th. liposomal cytarabine 50 mg i.th. Day 3) followed by high-dose chemotherapy with carmustine 400 mg/m(2) i.v. Day -5, thiotepa 2×5 mg/kg i.v. Days -4 to -3 and etoposide 150 mg/m(2) i.v. Days -5 to -3, and autologous stem cell transplantation Day 0 (HD-ASCT). Thirty eligible patients (median age 58 years) were enrolled. After HD-ASCT (n=24), there was a complete remission in 15 (63%), partial remission in 2 (8%) and progressive disease in 7 (29%) patients. Myelotoxicity was the most adverse event with CTC grade 3/4 infections in 12% of MTX/IFO/DEP courses, 21% of AraC/TT/DEP courses and 46% of HD-ASCT courses. The 2-year time to treatment failure was 49%±19 for all patients and 58%±22 for patients completing HD-ASCT. The protocol assessed proved feasible and highly active with long-lasting remissions in a large proportion of patients. (ClinicalTrials.govIdentifier NCT01148173). PMID:23242601

  17. Multi-Center Randomized Phase II Study Comparing Cediranib plus Gefitinib with Cediranib plus Placebo in Subjects with Recurrent/Progressive Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Nicholas; McBain, Catherine; Nash, Stephen; Hopkins, Kirsten; Sanghera, Paul; Saran, Frank; Phillips, Mark; Dungey, Fiona; Clifton-Hadley, Laura; Wanek, Katharina; Krell, Daniel; Jeffries, Sarah; Khan, Iftekhar; Smith, Paul; Mulholland, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Cediranib, an oral pan-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, failed to show benefit over lomustine in relapsed glioblastoma. One resistance mechanism for cediranib is up-regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This study aimed to determine if dual therapy with cediranib and the oral EGFR inhibitor gefitinib improved outcome in recurrent glioblastoma. Methods and Findings This was a multi-center randomized, two-armed, double-blinded phase II study comparing cediranib plus gefitinib versus cediranib plus placebo in subjects with first relapse/first progression of glioblastoma following surgery and chemoradiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was progression free survival (PFS). Secondary outcome measures included overall survival (OS) and radiologic response rate. Recruitment was terminated early following suspension of the cediranib program. 38 subjects (112 planned) were enrolled with 19 subjects in each treatment arm. Median PFS with cediranib plus gefitinib was 3.6 months compared to 2.8 months for cediranib plus placebo (HR; 0.72, 90% CI; 0.41 to 1.26). Median OS was 7.2 months with cediranib plus gefitinib and 5.5 months with cediranib plus placebo (HR; 0.68, 90% CI; 0.39 to 1.19). Eight subjects (42%) had a partial response in the cediranib plus gefitinib arm versus five patients (26%) in the cediranib plus placebo arm. Conclusions Cediranib and gefitinib in combination is tolerated in patients with glioblastoma. Incomplete recruitment led to the study being underpowered. However, a trend towards improved survival and response rates with the addition of gefitinib to cediranib was observed. Further studies of the combination incorporating EGFR and VEGF inhibition are warranted. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01310855 PMID:27232884

  18. Phase II Study of the MEK1/MEK2 Inhibitor Trametinib in Patients With Metastatic BRAF-Mutant Cutaneous Melanoma Previously Treated With or Without a BRAF Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kevin B.; Kefford, Richard; Pavlick, Anna C.; Infante, Jeffrey R.; Ribas, Antoni; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Fecher, Leslie A.; Millward, Michael; McArthur, Grant A.; Hwu, Patrick; Gonzalez, Rene; Ott, Patrick A.; Long, Georgina V.; Gardner, Olivia S.; Ouellet, Daniele; Xu, Yanmei; DeMarini, Douglas J.; Le, Ngocdiep T.; Patel, Kiran; Lewis, Karl D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose BRAF mutations promote melanoma cell proliferation and survival primarily through activation of MEK. The purpose of this study was to determine the response rate (RR) for the selective, allosteric MEK1/MEK2 inhibitor trametinib (GSK1120212), in patients with metastatic BRAF-mutant melanoma. Patients and Methods This was an open-label, two-stage, phase II study with two cohorts. Patients with metastatic BRAF-mutant melanoma previously treated with a BRAF inhibitor (cohort A) or treated with chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy (BRAF-inhibitor naive; cohort B) were enrolled. Patients received 2 mg of trametinib orally once daily. Results In cohort A (n = 40), there were no confirmed objective responses and 11 patients (28%) with stable disease (SD); the median progression-free survival (PFS) was 1.8 months. In cohort B (n = 57), there was one (2%) complete response, 13 (23%) partial responses (PRs), and 29 patients (51%) with SD (confirmed RR, 25%); the median PFS was 4.0 months. One patient each with BRAF K601E and BRAF V600R had prolonged PR. The most frequent treatment-related adverse events for all patients were skin-related toxicity, nausea, peripheral edema, diarrhea, pruritis, and fatigue. No cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma was observed. Conclusion Trametinib was well tolerated. Significant clinical activity was observed in BRAF-inhibitor–naive patients previously treated with chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy. Minimal clinical activity was observed as sequential therapy in patients previously treated with a BRAF inhibitor. Together, these data suggest that BRAF-inhibitor resistance mechanisms likely confer resistance to MEK-inhibitor monotherapy. These data support further evaluation of trametinib in BRAF-inhibitor–naive BRAF-mutant melanoma, including rarer forms of BRAF-mutant melanoma. PMID:23248257

  19. Cytoreductive Surgery plus Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Improves Survival for Patients with Peritoneal Carcinomatosis from Colorectal Cancer: A Phase II Study from a Chinese Center

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Wu, Hai-Tao; Liu, Yang; Yonemura, Yutaka; Li, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) is a difficult clinical challenge in colorectal cancer (CRC) because conventional treatment modalities could not produce significant survival benefit, which highlights the acute need for new treatment strategies. Our previous case-control study demonstrated the potential survival advantage of cytoreductive surgery (CRS) plus hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) over CRS alone. This phase II study was to further investigate the efficacy and adverse events of CRS+HIPEC for Chinese patients with CRC PC. Methods A total of 60 consecutive CRC PC patients underwent 63 procedures consisting of CRS+HIPEC and postoperative chemotherapy, all by a designated team focusing on this combined treatment modality. All the clinico-pathological information was systematically integrated into a prospective database. The primary end point was disease-specific overall survival (OS), and the secondary end points were perioperative safety profiles. Results By the most recent database update, the median follow-up was 29.9 (range 3.5–108.9) months. The peritoneal cancer index (PCI) ≤20 was in 47.0% of patients, complete cytoreductive surgery (CC0-1) was performed in 53.0% of patients. The median OS was 16.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.2–19.8) months, and the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 70.5%, 34.2%, 22.0% and 22.0%, respectively. Mortality and grades 3 to 5 morbidity rates in postoperative 30 days were 0.0% and 30.2%, respectively. Univariate analysis identified 3 parameters with significant effects on OS: PCI ≤20, CC0-1 and adjuvant chemotherapy over 6 cycles. On multivariate analysis, however, only CC0-1 and adjuvant chemotherapy ≥6 cycles were found to be independent factors for OS benefit. Discussion CRS+HIPEC at a specialized treatment center could improve OS for selected CRC PC patients from China, with acceptable perioperative safety. PMID:25259574

  20. Prospective phase II study of cisplatin plus pemetrexed with maintenance of pemetrexed for advanced non-squamous cell non-small cell lung cancer in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Asami, Kazuhiro; Kawahara, Masaaki; Hirashima, Tomonori; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Okishio, Kyoichi; Omachi, Naoki; Tamiya, Motohiro; Tamiya, Akihiro; Hirooka, Aya; Nakao, Keiko; Tsuji, Taisuke; Atagi, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Background A previous study showed a survival benefit with maintenance therapy with pemetrexed in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, it remains unclear whether continuation maintenance therapy with pemetrexed is beneficial in Japanese patients. Here, we present our phase II study that assessed the efficacy and safety of cisplatin plus pemetrexed as induction chemotherapy, followed by maintenance therapy with pemetrexed in advanced NSCLC patients in Japan. Methods Chemotherapy-naïve patients received 500 mg/m2 pemetrexed and 75 mg/m2 cisplatin on day one every three weeks for four cycles. In patients who responded to therapy or achieved stable disease, pemetrexed was continued until disease progression. The primary endpoint of this study was the progression-free survival rate at six months (PFS-6). Results Of the 35 patients initially enrolled in the study, 18 (51%) received maintenance chemotherapy with pemetrexed. The median PFS was 6.7 months, and the PFS-6 was 60% (95% confidence interval [CI], 42–76%). Median overall survival (OS) was 15.5 months (95% CI, 8.3–22.7 months). The median PFS and OS in patients who received maintenance chemotherapy with pemetrexed were 9.5 months and 25.3 months, respectively. The most frequently noted severe toxicity during induction chemotherapy was neutropenia, which occurred in seven patients. Two patients discontinued maintenance therapy owing to prolonged grade 2 edema in one patient and grade 3 neutropenia in another. Conclusion Continuation maintenance chemotherapy with pemetrexed is associated with a survival benefit in patients who have completed induction chemotherapy for non-squamous NSCLC. PMID:26767015

  1. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Irinotecan and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Jeong, Jun Yong; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Jae-Gahb; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer has shown benefit over postoperative CRT; however, a standard CRT regimen has yet to be defined. We performed a prospective concurrent CRT Phase II study with irinotecan and capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to investigate the efficacy and safety of this regimen. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid-to-lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8-Gy daily fractions for a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions, followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 40 mg/m{sup 2} of irinotecan per week for 5 consecutive weeks and 1,650 mg/m{sup 2} of capecitabine per day for 5 days per week (weekdays only) from the first day of radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were included for the study endpoints. Results: In total, 48 patients were enrolled; 33 (68.7%) were men and 15 (31.3%) were women, and the median age was 59 years (range, 32-72 years). The pathologic complete response rate was 25.0% (11 of 44; 95% confidence interval, 12.2-37.8) and 8 patients (18.2% [8 of 44]) showed near-total tumor regression. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 75.0% and 93.6%, respectively. Grade 3 toxicities included leukopenia (3 [6.3%]), neutropenia (1 [2.1%]), infection (1 [2.1%]), alanine aminotransferase elevation (1 [2.1%]), and diarrhea (1 [2.1%]). There was no Grade 4 toxicity or treatment-related death. Conclusions: Preoperative CRT with irinotecan and capecitabine with treatment-free weekends showed very mild toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of survival.

  2. Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy Using Carboplatin, Tegafur-Uracil and Leucovorin for Stage III and IV Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of GORTEC Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fesneau, Melanie; Pointreau, Yoann; Chapet, Sophie; Martin, Laurent; Pommier, Pascal; Alfonsi, Marc; Laguerre, Brigitte; Feham, Nasreddine; Berger, Christine; Garaud, Pascal; Calais, Gilles

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy is the standard treatment of locally advanced, nonresectable, head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, the optimal chemotherapy regimen is still controversial. The objective of this Phase II study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a concomitant treatment using tegafur-uracil, leucovorin, carboplatin, and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 77 patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma Stage III and IVA were enrolled between October 2003 and July 2005. Of the 77 patients, 72 were eligible. They were treated with tegafur-uracil (300 mg/m{sup 2}/d) and leucovorin (75 mg/d) from Days 1 to 19 and from Days 29 to 47 and carboplatin (70 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously for 4 consecutive days), in three cycles every 21 days. Conventional radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Results: With a mean follow-up of 22.8 months, the 3-year locoregional control, overall survival and disease-free survival actuarial rate was 33.1%, 41.9%, and 27.2%, respectively. The compliance of the treatment was correct. The main acute toxicity was mucositis, with 62% Grade 3-4. Three patients (4.2%) died of acute toxicity. The incidence and severity of late toxicity was acceptable, with 32% Grade 3 and no Grade 4 toxicity. Conclusion: The protocol of concomitant chemoradiotherapy using tegafur-uracil, leucovorin, and carboplatin for locally advanced unresectable head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma is feasible. The compliance was correct. The incidence and severity of the acute and late toxicities were acceptable, but not improved. The efficacy of this regimen seems equivalent to the main protocols of concurrent chemoradiotherapy. It represents a possible alternative for patients without an intravenous catheter.

  3. A Phase II study of acute toxicity for Celebrex{sup TM} (celecoxib) and chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer: Primary endpoint analysis of RTOG 0128

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, David K. . E-mail: david.gaffney@hci.utah.edu; Winter, Kathryn M.S.; Dicker, Adam P.; Miller, Brigitte; Eifel, Patricia J.; Ryu, Janice; Avizonis, Vilija; Fromm, Mitch; Greven, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine treatment-related acute toxicity rates in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by oral celecoxib, i.v. cisplatin and 5-FU, and concurrent pelvic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients on this RTOG Phase I-II study for advanced cervix cancer included FIGO Stage IIB-IVA or patients with FIGO Stage IB through IIA with biopsy proven pelvic node metastases or tumor size {>=}5 cm. Patients were treated with pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Celecoxib was prescribed at 400 mg twice daily beginning on day 1 for 1 year. Cisplatin (75 mg/m2) and 5-FU (1g/m2 for 4 days) were administered every 3 weeks times 3. The primary end point of the study was treatment related toxicity. Results: Between August 2001 and March 2004, 84 patients were accrued to the study and 77 patients were evaluable for toxicity. Regarding the primary end point, toxicities were observed in the following areas: blood/bone marrow (16), gastrointestinal (14), pain (7), renal/genitourinary (6), cardiovascular (3), hemorrhage (1), and neurologic (1). For the first 75 evaluable patients, a toxicity failure was identified in 36 patients for a rate of 48%. Conclusions: Celecoxib at 400 mg twice daily together with concurrent cisplatin and 5-FU and pelvic radiotherapy has a high incidence of acute toxicities. The most frequent toxicities were hematologic. Albeit, the toxicity was deemed excessive in this trial, the rate of toxicities was not too different compared to other recent experiences with concurrent chemoradiation for advanced cervix cancer.

  4. Phase I/II Study of Sorafenib in Combination with Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Low-Dose Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Ueshima, Kazuomi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Kumada, Takashi; Chung, Hobyung; Hagiwara, Satoru; Inoue, Tatsuo; Yada, Norihisa; Kitai, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a phase I/II study in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to determine the recommended dose, as well as the safety and efficacy, of combination therapy of sorafenib with hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) using low dose cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Cohorts consisting of 3-6 patients with HCC received an escalated dose of CDDP and 5-FU until a maximum-tolerated dose was achieved. The treatment regimen was as follows: oral administration of sorafenib (400 mg twice daily for 28 days) combined with HAIC using CDDP (14-20 mg/m2, on days 1 and 8) and 5-FU (170-330 mg/m2, continuously on days 1-5 and 8-12) via an implanted catheter system). Each treatment cycle consisted of 28 days and three cycles of combination therapy. At the end of the first cycle, adverse events were evaluated and future dose escalation was determined. Eighteen patients with advanced HCC were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in two patients from cohort 1 (erythema multiforme and grade 4 thrombocytopenia) and in one patient from cohort 2 (erythema multiforme). Seven of the 18 patients achieved a partial response, seven showed stable disease, two were diagnosed as progressive disease, and two were not assessable. The response rate was 38.9% and the disease control rate was 77.8%. The time-to-progression was 9.7 months and the 1-year survival rate was 88.2%. Oral administration of 400 mg of sorafenib twice daily, 20 mg/m2 of intra-arterial infusion of CDDP, and 5-FU at 330 mg/m2 are the recommended doses for combination therapy, which was well tolerated and efficacious. This combination therapy may be a promising treatment for patients with advanced HCC. A large prospective randomized multicenter study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01214343) is ongoing. PMID:26734580

  5. A Phase II Study of Sequential Capecitabine Plus Oxaliplatin Followed by Docetaxel Plus Capecitabine in Patients With Unresectable Gastric Adenocarcinoma: The TCOG 3211 Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Huang; Lin, Johnson; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Shan, Yan-Shen; Chen, Yeu-Chin; Chen, Li-Tzong; Liu, Tsang-Wu; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee

    2016-01-01

    Fluorouracil and platinum are considered the standard treatment options for advanced gastric cancer. Docetaxel is also an effective agent and it shows no cross-resistance with fluorouracil and platinum. The combination treatment of docetaxel with fluorouracil and platinum has been explored, but it demonstrated intolerable toxicities. An alternative approach in the first-line treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma may be to use these agents sequentially. We aimed to evaluate the activity and safety profile of sequential chemotherapy with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin, followed by docetaxel plus capecitabine in the first-line treatment of unresectable gastric cancer.We conducted a phase II study of sequential first-line chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer. Treatment consisted of 6 cycles of capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (capecitabine 1000 mg/m bid on days 1-10 and oxaliplatin 85 mg/m on day 1, every 2 weeks), followed by 4 cycles of docetaxel plus capecitabine (docetaxel 30 mg/m on days 1 and 8, capecitabine 825 mg/m bid on days 1-14, every 3 weeks). The primary end-point was the objective response rate.Fifty-one patients were enrolled: median age, 63 years; male/female: 37/14. The main grade 3 to 4 toxicities were a decreased absolute neutrophil count (25.4%), diarrhea (9.8%), and hand-foot syndrome (15.7%). The objective response rate was 61.7%. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 8.6 and 11.0 months, respectively. Six patients (11.8%) received surgery after chemotherapy and 5 are still disease-free.This sequential treatment demonstrated feasibility with a favorable safety profile and produced encouraging results in terms of activity and efficacy. PMID:26817912

  6. A Phase II Study of Submandibular Gland Transfer Prior to Radiation for Prevention of Radiation-induced Xerostomia in Head-and-Neck Cancer (RTOG 0244)

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Naresh; Harris, Jonathan; Seikaly, Hadi; Jacobs, John R.; McEwan, A.J.B.; Robbins, K. Thomas; Grecula, John; Sharma, Anand K.; Ang, K. Kian

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: We report the results of a phase II study to determine the reproducibility of a submandibular salivary gland transfer (SGT) surgical technique for prevention of radiation (XRT)-induced xerostomia in a multi-institutional setting and to assess severity of xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had surgery for primary, neck dissection, and SGT, followed by XRT, during which the transferred salivary gland was shielded. Intensity modulated radiation therapy, amifostine, and pilocarpine were not allowed, but postoperative chemotherapy was allowed. Each operation was reviewed by 2 reviewers and radiation by 1 reviewer. If 13 or more (of 43) were 'not per protocol,' then the technique would be considered not reproducible as per study design. The secondary endpoint was the rate of acute xerostomia, grade 2 or higher, and a rate of {<=}51% was acceptable. Results: Forty-four of the total 49 patients were analyzable: male (81.8%), oropharynx (63.6%), stage IV (61.4%), median age 56.5 years. SGT was 'per protocol' or within acceptable variation in 34 patients (77.3%) and XRT in 79.5%. Nine patients (20.9%) developed grade 2 acute xerostomia; 2 had grade 0-1 xerostomia (4.7%) but started on amifostine/pilocarpine. Treatment for these 11 patients (25.6%) was considered a failure for the xerostomia endpoint. Thirteen patients died; median follow-up for 31 surviving patients was 2.9 years. Two-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 76.4% and 71.7%, respectively. Conclusions: The technique of submandibular SGT is reproducible in a multicenter setting. Seventy-four percent of patients were prevented from XRT-induced acute xerostomia.

  7. Semicontinuous Low-Dose-Rate Teletherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Glial Brain Tumors: Final Report of a Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Siker, Malika L.; Firat, Selim Y.; Mueller, Wade; Krouwer, Hendrikus; Schultz, Christopher J.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Semicontinuous low-dose-rate teletherapy (SLDR) is a novel irradiation strategy that exploits the increased radiosensitivity of glial cells in a narrow range of reduced dose rate. We present the final report of a prospective Phase I/II study testing the feasibility of SLDR for the treatment of recurrent gliomas. Methods and Materials: Patients with previously irradiated recurrent gliomas were enrolled from November 1993 to March 1998. Patients received SLDR, delivered 6 to 8 hours/day at a dose rate of 40 to 50 cGy/hour for a total dose of 30 to 35 Gy given over 12 days using a modified cobalt-60 treatment unit. Acute central nervous system toxicity after SLDR treatment was the primary endpoint. Overall survival was a secondary endpoint. Results: Twenty patients were enrolled (14 World Health Organization Grade 4 glioma, 5 Grade 2 glioma, 1 ependymoma). No patients developed {>=}Grade 3 central nervous system toxicity at 3 months without radiographic evidence of tumor progression. Overall survival after SLDR was 56% at 6 months, 28% at 12 months, and 17% at 24 months. One patient survived >48 months, and 1 patient survived >60 months after SLDR treatment. Re-resection before SLDR treatment significantly improved 1-year overall survival for all patients and patients with Grade 4 glioma. Conclusion: The delivery of SLDR is feasible in patients with recurrent gliomas and resulted in improved outcomes for patients who underwent re-resection. There were 2 long-term survivors (>48 months). This pilot study supports the notion that reduced dose rate influences the efficacy and tolerance of reirradiation in the treatment of recurrent gliomas.

  8. A randomized phase II study of carboplatin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin versus carboplatin plus paclitaxel in platinum sensitive ovarian cancer patients: a Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Platinum-based combinations are the standard second-line treatment for platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer (OC). This randomized phase II study was undertaken in order to compare the combination of carboplatin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (LD) with carboplatin and paclitaxel (CP) in this setting. Methods Patients with histologically confirmed recurrent OC, at the time of or more than 6 months after platinum-based chemotherapy, were randomized to six cycles of CP (carboplatin AUC5 + paclitaxel 175 mg/m2, d1q21) or CLD (carboplatin AUC5 + pegylated LD 45 mg/m2, d1q28). Results A total of 189 eligible patients (CP 96, CLD 93), with a median age of 63 years, median Performance Status (PS) 0 and a median platinum free interval (PFI) of 16.5 months, entered the study. Discontinuation due to toxicity was higher in the CP patients (13.5% versus 3%, P = 0.016). The overall response rate was similar: CP 58% versus CLD 51%, P = 0.309 (Complete Response; CR 34% versus 23%) and there was no statistical difference in time-to-progression (TTP) or overall survival (OS; TTP 10.8 months CP versus 11.8 CLD, P = 0.904; OS 29.4 months CP versus 24.7 CLD, P = 0.454). No toxic deaths were recorded. Neutropenia was the most commonly seen severe toxicity (CP 30% versus CLD 35%). More frequent in CLD were severe thrombocytopenia (11% versus 2%, P = 0.016), skin toxicity and Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE) grade 1-2 (38% versus 9%, P< 0.001), while grade 3 neurotoxicity and alopecia were higher in CP (7% versus 0%, P = 0.029, 20% versus 5%, P = 0.003). PS and PFI were independent prognostic factors for TTP and OS. Conclusions The combination of pegylated LD with carboplatin is effective, showing less neurotoxicity and alopecia than paclitaxel-carboplatin. It thus warrants a further phase III evaluation as an alternative treatment option for platinum-sensitive OC patients. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12609000436279 PMID

  9. Consolidative Involved-Node Proton Therapy for Stage IA-IIIB Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: Preliminary Dosimetric Outcomes From a Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Flampouri, Stella; Su Zhong; Morris, Christopher G.; Latif, Naeem

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose reduction to organs at risk (OARs) with proton therapy (PT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) enrolled on a Phase II study of involved-node radiotherapy (INRT). Methods and Materials: Between June 2009 and October 2010, 10 patients were enrolled on a University of Florida institutional review board-approved protocol for de novo 'classical' Stage IA-IIIB HL with mediastinal (bulky or nonbulky) involvement after chemotherapy. INRT was planned per European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines. Three separate optimized plans were developed for each patient: 3D-CRT, IMRT, and PT. The primary end point was a 50% reduction in the body V4 with PT compared with 3D-CRT or IMRT. Results: The median relative reduction with PT in the primary end point, body V4, was 51% compared with 3D-CRT (p = 0.0098) and 59% compared with IMRT (p = 0.0020), thus all patients were offered treatment with PT. PT provided the lowest mean dose to the heart, lungs, and breasts for all 10 patients compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. The median difference in the OAR mean dose reduction with PT compared with 3D-CRT were 10.4 Gy/CGE for heart; 5.5 Gy/CGE for lung; 0.9 Gy/CGE for breast; 8.3 Gy/CGE for esophagus; and 4.1 Gy/CGE for thyroid. The median differences for mean OAR dose reduction for PT compared with IMRT were 4.3 Gy/CGE for heart, 3.1 Gy/CGE for lung, 1.4 Gy/CGE for breast, 2.8 Gy/CGE for esophagus, and 2.7 Gy/CGE for thyroid. Conclusions: All 10 patients benefitted from dose reductions to OARs with PT compared with either 3D-CRT or IMRT. It is anticipated that these reductions in dose to OAR will translate into lower rates of late complications, but long-term follow-up on this Phase II INRT study is needed.

  10. A randomized phase II study of cediranib alone versus cediranib in combination with dasatinib in docetaxel resistant, castration resistant prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Spreafico, Anna; Chi, Kim N.; Sridhar, Srikala S.; Smith, David C.; Carducci, Michael A.; Kavsak, Peter; Wong, Tracy S.; Wang, Lisa; Ivy, S. Percy; Mukherjee, Som Dave; Kollmannsberger, Christian K.; Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Takebe, Naoko; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Siu, Lillian L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Activation of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the oncogenic Src pathway has been implicated in the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in preclinical models. Cediranib and dasatinib are multi-kinase inhibitors targeting VEGFR and Src respectively. Phase II studies of cediranib and dasatinib in CRPC have shown single agent activity. Methods Docetaxel-pretreated CRPC patients were randomized to arm A: cediranib alone (20 mg/day) versus arm B: cediranib (20 mg/day) plus dasatinib (100 mg/day) given orally on 4-week cycles. Primary endpoint was 12-week progression-free survival (PFS) as per the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Working Group (PCWG2). Patient reported outcomes were evaluated using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy- Prostate (FACT-P) and Present Pain Intensity (PPI) scales. Correlative studies of bone turnover markers (BTM), including bone alkaline phosphate (BAP) and serum beta-C telopeptide (B-CTx) were serially assayed. Results A total of 22 patients, 11 per arm, were enrolled. Baseline demographics were similar in both arms. Median number of cycles =4 in arm A (range 1–12) and 2 in arm B (range 1–9). Twelve-week PFS was 73 % in arm A versus 18 % in arm B (p=0.03). Median PFS in months (arm A versus B) was: 5.2 versus 2.6 (95 % CI: 1.9–6.5 versus 1.4-not reached). Most common grade 3 toxicities were hypertension, anemia and thrombocytopenia in arm A and hypertension, diarrhea and fatigue in arm B. One treatment-related death (retroperitoneal hemorrhage) was seen in arm A. FACT-P and PPI scores did not significantly change in either arm. No correlation between BTM and PFS was seen in either arm. Conclusions Although limited by small numbers, this randomized study showed that the combination of VEGFR and Src targeted therapy did not result in improved efficacy and may be associated with a worse outcome than VEGFR targeted therapy alone in patients with CRPC. PMID:24788563

  11. Phase II study of reintroduction of oxaliplatin for advanced colorectal cancer in patients previously treated with oxaliplatin and irinotecan: RE-OPEN study

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Shinozaki, Eiji; Ozaka, Masato; Ogura, Mariko; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of reintroducing oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer refractory to standard chemotherapy has not been verified. We performed a single-arm, open-label, Phase II study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of reintroducing oxaliplatin. Methods Eligible patients had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and irinotecan that achieved a response or stable disease followed by confirmed disease progression ≥6 months previously during prior oxaliplatin-based therapy. The primary endpoint was the disease control rate (DCR) after 12 weeks of treatment starting. The DCR was defined as the sum of patients with complete response, partial response, and stable disease. Results Thirty-three patients were enrolled. The median age was 62 (range: 35–77) years and the male/female ratio was 19/14. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 0 in 84.8%. Fourteen primary tumors were in the colon and 19 were in the rectum. All patients received modified FOLFOX6 as the protocol treatment. After 12 weeks of treatment starting, the DCR was 39.4% (95% confidence interval 21.8–57.0) and the response rate (complete response and partial response) was 6.1%. The median number of chemotherapy cycles was five and the median total dose of oxaliplatin was 425 mg/m2. Median progression-free survival time was 98 days and median overall survival was 300 days. The incidence of grade ≥1 and grade ≥3 allergic reactions was 28.1% and 3.1%, respectively. The incidence of grade ≥1 and grade ≥3 peripheral sensory neuropathy was 53.1% and 0%, respectively. There were no other severe adverse events and no treatment-related deaths. Conclusion Reintroducing oxaliplatin can be both safe and effective. This may be a salvage option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who achieved a response or stable disease with prior oxaliplatin-based therapy followed by disease progression ≥6 months previously during prior

  12. A Phase II Study of Bevacizumab in Combination With Definitive Radiotherapy and Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Untreated Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Carcinoma: Preliminary Results of RTOG 0417

    SciTech Connect

    Schefter, Tracey E.; Winter, Kathryn; Kwon, Janice S.; Stuhr, Kelly; Balaraj, Khalid; Yaremko, Brian P.; Small, William; Gaffney, David K.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer. RTOG 0417 was a Phase II study exploring the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to standard CRT. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with bulky tumors (Stage IB-IIIB) were treated with once-weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) chemotherapy and standard pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Bevacizumab was administered at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks for three cycles. Treatment-related serious adverse event (SAE) and other adverse event (AE) rates within the first 90 days from treatment start were determined. Treatment-related SAEs were defined as any Grade {>=}4 vaginal bleeding or thrombotic event or Grade {>=}3 arterial event, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, or bowel/bladder perforation, or any Grade 5 treatment-related death. Treatment-related AEs included all SAEs and Grade 3 or 4 GI toxicity persisting for >2 weeks despite medical intervention, Grade 4 neutropenia or leukopenia persisting for >7 days, febrile neutropenia, Grade 3 or 4 other hematologic toxicity, and Grade 3 or 4 GI, renal, cardiac, pulmonary, hepatic, or neurologic AEs. All AEs were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (CTCAE) v 3.0 (MedDRA version 6.0). Results: A total of 60 patients from 28 institutions were enrolled between 2006 and 2009, and of these, 49 patients were evaluable. The median follow-up was 12.4 months (range, 4.6-31.4 months).The median age was 45 years (range, 22-80 years). Most patients had FIGO Stage IIB (63%) and were of Zubrod performance status of 0 (67%). 80% of cases were squamous. There were no treatment-related SAEs. There were 15 (31%) protocol-specified treatment-related AEs within 90 days of treatment start; the most common were hematologic (12/15; 80%). 18 (37%) occurred during treatment or follow-up at any time. 37 of the 49 patients (76%) had cisplatin and bevacizumab

  13. E5501 - Phase II Study of Topotecan Sequenced with Etoposide/Cisplatin, and Irinotecan/Cisplatin Sequenced with Etoposide for Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Aisner, Joseph; Wang, Xin Victoria; Dahlberg, Suzanne E.; Rubin, Eric H.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Gounder, Murugesan; Rausch, Paul Gregory; Axelrod, Rita S.; Schiller, Joan H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sequence dependent improved efficacy of topoisomerase I followed by topoisomerase 2 inhibitors was assessed in a randomized phase II study in extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods Patients with previously untreated extensive stage SCLC with measurable disease, ECOG performance status of 0 to 3 and stable brain metastases were eligible. Arm A consisted of topotecan (0.75 mg/m2) on days 1, 2 and 3, etoposide (70 mg/m2) and cisplatin (20 mg/m2) [PET] on days 8, 9 and 10 in a 3-week cycle. Arm B consisted of irinotecan (50 mg/m2) and cisplatin (20 mg/m2) on days 1 and 8 followed by etoposide (85 mg/m2 PO bid) on days 3 and 10 [PIE] in a 3-week cycle. Results We enrolled 140 patients and randomized 66 eligible patients to each arm. Only 54.5% of all patients completed the planned maximum 6 cycles. There were grade ≥3 treatment-related adverse events in approximately 70% of the patients on both arms including 6 treatment-related grade 5 events. The overall response rates (CR+PR) were 69.7% (90% CI: 59.1–78.9%, 95% CI: 57.1–80.4%) for arm A and 57.6% (90% CI: 46.7–67.9%, 95% CI:44.8–69.7%) for arm B. The median PFS and OS were 6.4 months (95% CI: 5.4–7.5 months) and 11.9 months (95% CI: 9.6–13.7 months) for arm A and 6.0 months (95% CI: 5.4–7.0 months) and 11.0 months (95% CI: 8.6–13.1 months) for arm B. Conclusion Sequential administration of topoisomerase inhibitors did not improve on the historical efficacy of standard platinum-doublet chemotherapy for extensive stage SCLC. PMID:24288121

  14. A phase II study evaluating neo-/adjuvant EIA chemotherapy, surgical resection and radiotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The role of chemotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma is controversial. Though many patients undergo initial curative resection, distant metastasis is a frequent event, resulting in 5-year overall survival rates of only 50-60%. Neo-adjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy (CTX) has been applied to achieve pre-operative cytoreduction, assess chemosensitivity, and to eliminate occult metastasis. Here we report on the results of our non-randomized phase II study on neo-adjuvant treatment for high-risk STS. Method Patients with potentially curative high-risk STS (size ≥ 5 cm, deep/extracompartimental localization, tumor grades II-III [FNCLCC]) were included. The protocol comprised 4 cycles of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (EIA, etoposide 125 mg/m2 iv days 1 and 4, ifosfamide 1500 mg/m2 iv days 1 - 4, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 day 1, pegfilgrastim 6 mg sc day 5), definitive surgery with intra-operative radiotherapy, adjuvant radiotherapy and 4 adjuvant cycles of EIA. Result Between 06/2005 and 03/2010 a total of 50 subjects (male = 33, female = 17, median age 50.1 years) were enrolled. Median follow-up was 30.5 months. The majority of primary tumors were located in the extremities or trunk (92%), 6% originated in the abdomen/retroperitoneum. Response by RECIST criteria to neo-adjuvant CTX was 6% CR (n = 3), 24% PR (n = 12), 62% SD (n = 31) and 8% PD (n = 4). Local recurrence occurred in 3 subjects (6%). Distant metastasis was observed in 12 patients (24%). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) at 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively. Multivariate analysis failed to prove influence of resection status or grade of histological necrosis on OS or DFS. Severe toxicities included neutropenic fever (4/50), cardiac toxicity (2/50), and CNS toxicity (4/50) leading to CTX dose reductions in 4 subjects. No cases of secondary leukemias were observed so far. Conclusion The current protocol is feasible for achieving local control rates, as well as OS and

  15. Efficacy of Pharmacokinetics-Directed Busulfan, Cyclophosphamide, and Etoposide Conditioning and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Lymphoma: Comparison of a Multicenter Phase II Study and CIBMTR Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Christopher R; Costa, Luciano J; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Lill, Michael; Shore, Tsiporah B; Vaughan, William; Craig, Michael; Freytes, Cesar O; Shea, Thomas C; Horwitz, Mitchell E; Fay, Joseph W; Mineishi, Shin; Rondelli, Damiano; Mason, James; Braunschweig, Ira; Ai, Weiyun; Yeh, Rosa F; Rodriguez, Tulio E; Flinn, Ian; Comeau, Terrance; Yeager, Andrew M; Pulsipher, Michael A; Bence-Bruckler, Isabelle; Laneuville, Pierre; Bierman, Philip; Chen, Andy I; Kato, Kazunobu; Wang, Yanlin; Xu, Cong; Smith, Angela J; Waller, Edmund K

    2016-07-01

    Busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide (BuCyE) is a commonly used conditioning regimen for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). This multicenter, phase II study examined the safety and efficacy of BuCyE with individually adjusted busulfan based on preconditioning pharmacokinetics. The study initially enrolled Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients ages 18 to 80 years but was amended due to high early treatment-related mortality (TRM) in patients > 65 years. BuCyE outcomes were compared with contemporaneous recipients of carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan (BEAM) from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. Two hundred seven subjects with HL (n = 66) or NHL (n = 141) were enrolled from 32 centers in North America, and 203 underwent ASCT. Day 100 TRM for all subjects (n = 203), patients > 65 years (n = 17), and patients ≤ 65 years (n = 186) were 4.5%, 23.5%, and 2.7%, respectively. The estimated rates of 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) were 33% for HL and 58%, 77%, and 43% for diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL; n = 63), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL; n = 29), and follicular lymphoma (FL; n = 23), respectively. The estimated rates of 2-year overall survival (OS) were 76% for HL and 65%, 89%, and 89% for DLBCL, MCL, and FL, respectively. In the matched analysis rates of 2-year TRM were 3.3% for BuCyE and 3.9% for BEAM, and there were no differences in outcomes for NHL. Patients with HL had lower rates of 2-year PFS with BuCyE, 33% (95% CI, 21% to 46%), than with BEAM, 59% (95% CI, 52% to 66%), with no differences in TRM or OS. BuCyE provided adequate disease control and safety in B cell NHL patients ≤ 65 years but produced worse PFS in HL patients when compared with BEAM. PMID:27040394

  16. Uracil/ftorafur/leucovorin combined with irinotecan (TEGAFIRI) or oxaliplatin (TEGAFOX) as first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer patients: results of randomised phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Bajetta, E; Di Bartolomeo, M; Buzzoni, R; Mariani, L; Zilembo, N; Ferrario, E; Lo Vullo, S; Aitini, E; Isa, L; Barone, C; Jacobelli, S; Recaldin, E; Pinotti, G; Iop, A

    2007-01-01

    This randomised phase II study evaluates the safety and efficacy profile of uracil/tegafur/leucovorin combined with irinotecan (TEGAFIRI) or with oxaliplatin (TEGAFOX). One hundred and forty-three patients with measurable, non-resectable metastatic colorectal cancer were randomised in a multicentre study to receive TEGAFIRI (UFT 250 mg m−2 day days 1–14, LV 90 mg day days 1–14, irinotecan 240 mg m−2 day 1; q21) or TEGAFOX (UFT 250 mg m−2 day days 1–14, LV 90 mg day days 1–14, oxaliplatin 120 mg m−2 day 1; q21). Among 143 randomised patients, 141 were analysed (68 received TEGAFIRI and 73 TEGAFOX). The main characteristics of the two arms were well balanced. The most common grade 3–4 treatment-related adverse events were neutropenia (13% of cases with TEGAFIRI; 1% in the TEGAFOX group). Diarrhoea was prevalent in the TEGAFIRI arm (16%) vs TEGAFOX (4%). Six complete remission (CR) and 19 partial remission (PR) were recorded in the TEGAFIRI arm (odds ratio (OR): 41.7; 95% confidence limit (CL), 29.1–55.1%), and six CR and 22 PR were recorded in the TEGAFOX group, (OR: 38.9; 95% CL, 27.6–51.1). At a median time follow-up of 17 months (intequartile (IQ) range 12–23), a median survival probability of 20 and 19 months was obtained in the TEGAFIRI and TEGAFOX groups, respectively. Median time to progression was 8 months for both groups. TEGAFIRI and TEGAFOX are both effective and tolerable first-line therapies in MCRC patients. The employment of UFT/LV given in doublet combination is interesting and the presented data appear comparable to equivalent infusion regimens described in the literature. The safety profile of the two combinations also allows an evaluation with other biological agents such as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:17245343

  17. Cannabidiol for the Prevention of Graft-versus-Host-Disease after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Results of a Phase II Study.

    PubMed

    Yeshurun, Moshe; Shpilberg, Ofer; Herscovici, Corina; Shargian, Liat; Dreyer, Juliet; Peck, Anat; Israeli, Moshe; Levy-Assaraf, Maly; Gruenewald, Tsipora; Mechoulam, Raphael; Raanani, Pia; Ram, Ron

    2015-10-01

    Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) is a major obstacle to successful allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychotropic ingredient of Cannabis sativa, possesses potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. We hypothesized that CBD may decrease GVHD incidence and severity after alloHCT. We conducted a phase II study. GVHD prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine and a short course of methotrexate. Patients transplanted from an unrelated donor were given low-dose anti-T cell globulin. CBD 300 mg/day was given orally starting 7 days before transplantation until day 30. Forty-eight consecutive adult patients undergoing alloHCT were enrolled. Thirty-eight patients (79%) had acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome and 35 patients (73%) were given myeloablative conditioning. The donor was either an HLA-identical sibling (n = 28), a 10/10 matched unrelated donor (n = 16), or a 1-antigen-mismatched unrelated donor (n = 4). The median follow-up was 16 months (range, 7 to 23). No grades 3 to 4 toxicities were attributed to CBD. None of the patients developed acute GVHD while consuming CBD. In an intention-to-treat analysis, we found that the cumulative incidence rates of grades II to IV and grades III to IV acute GVHD by day 100 were 12.1% and 5%, respectively. Compared with 101 historical control subjects given standard GVHD prophylaxis, the hazard ratio of developing grades II to IV acute GVHD among subjects treated with CBD plus standard GVHD prophylaxis was .3 (P = .0002). Rates of nonrelapse mortality at 100 days and at 1 year after transplantation were 8.6% and 13.4%, respectively. Among patients surviving more than 100 days, the cumulative incidences of moderate-to-severe chronic GVHD at 12 and 18 months were 20% and 33%, respectively. The combination of CBD with standard GVHD prophylaxis is a safe and promising strategy to reduce the incidence of acute GVHD. A randomized double-blind controlled study is warranted

  18. "Poker" association of weekly alternating 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan, bevacizumab and oxaliplatin (FIr-B/FOx) in first line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This phase II study investigated efficacy and safety of weekly alternating Bevacizumab (BEV)/Irinotecan (CPT-11) or Oxaliplatin (OHP) associated to weekly 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) in first line treatment of metastatic colorectal carcinoma (MCRC). Methods Simon two-step design: delta 20% (p0 50%, p1 70%), power 80%, α 5%, β 20%. Projected objective responses (ORR): I step, 8/15 patients (pts); II step 26/43 pts. Schedule: weekly 12 h-timed-flat-infusion/5-FU 900 mg/m2, days 1-2, 8-9, 15-16, 22-23; CPT-11 160 mg/m2 plus BEV 5 mg/kg, days 1,15; OHP at three dose-levels, 60-70-80 mg/m2, days 8, 22; every 4 weeks. Results Fifty consecutive, unselected pts < 75 years were enrolled: median age 63; young-elderly (yE) 24 (48%); liver metastases (LM) 33 pts, 66% Achieved OHP recommended dose, 80 mg/m2. ORR 82% intent-to-treat and 84% as-treated analysis. Median progression-free survival 12 months. Equivalent efficacy was obtained in yE pts. Liver metastasectomies were performed in 26% of all pts and in 39% of pts with LM. After a median follow-up of 21 months, median overall survival was 28 months. Cumulative G3-4 toxicities per patient: diarrhea 28%, mucositis 6%, neutropenia 10%, hypertension 2%. They were equivalent in yE pts. Limiting toxicity syndromes (LTS), consisting of the dose-limiting toxicity, associated or not to G2 or limiting toxicities: 44% overall, 46% in yE. Multiple versus single site LTS, respectively: overall, 24% versus 20%; yE pts, 37.5% versus 8%. Conclusion Poker combination shows high activity and efficacy in first line treatment of MCRC. It increases liver metastasectomies rate and can be safely administered. Trial registration Osservatorio Nazionale sulla Sperimentazione Clinica dei Medicinali (OsSC) Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco (AIFA) Numero EudraCT 2007-004946-34 PMID:20958992

  19. Randomized Phase II Study of 5-Fluorouracil Hepatic Arterial Infusion with or without Antineoplastons as an Adjuvant Therapy after Hepatectomy for Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Yutaka; Matono, Keiko; Tsuda, Hideaki; Ushijima, Masataka; Uchida, Shinji; Akagi, Yoshito; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Background Antineoplastons are naturally occurring peptides and amino acid derivatives found in human blood and urine. Antineoplaston A10 and AS2-1 reportedly control neoplastic growth and do not significantly inhibit normal cell growth. Antineoplastons contain 3-phenylacetylamino-2, 6-piperidinedione (A10), phenylacetylglutamine plus phenylacetylisoglutamine (A10-I), and phenylacetylglutamine plus phenylacetate (AS2-1). This open label, non- blinded randomized phase II study compared the efficacy of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) with 5-fluorouracil,with or without antineoplastons as a postoperative therapy for colorectal metastasis to the liver. Methods Sixty-five patients with histologically confirmed metastatic colon adenocarcinoma in liver, who had undergone hepatectomy, and/or thermal ablation for liver metastases were enrolled between 1998- 2004 in Kurume University Hospital. Patients were randomly assigned to receive systemic antineoplastons (A10-I infusion followed by per-oral AS2-1) plus HAI (AN arm) or HAI alone (control arm) based on the number of metastases and presence/ absence of extra-hepatic metastasis at the time of surgery. Primary endpoint was cancer-specific survival (CSS); secondary endpoints were relapse-free survival (RFS), status and extent of recurrence, salvage surgery (rate) and toxicity. Findings Overall survival was not statistically improved (p=0.105) in the AN arm (n=32). RFS was not significant (p=0.343). Nevertheless, the CSS rate was significantly higher in the AN arm versus the control arm (n=33) with a median survival time 67 months (95%CI 43-not calculated) versus 39 months (95%CI 28-47) (p=0.037) and 5 year CSS rate 60% versus 32% respectively. Cancer recurred more often in a single organ than in multiple organs in the AN arm versus the control arm. The limited extent of recurrent tumours in the AN arm meant more patients remained eligible for salvage surgery. Major adverse effects of antineoplastons were fullness of the

  20. A randomized phase II study of the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat as maintenance therapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chiappori, A. A.; Kolevska, T.; Spigel, D. R.; Hager, S.; Rarick, M.; Gadgeel, S.; Blais, N.; Von Pawel, J.; Hart, L.; Reck, M.; Bassett, E.; Burington, B.; Schiller, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Continuation or ‘switch’ maintenance therapy is commonly used in patients with advancd non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we evaluated the efficacy of the telomerase inhibitor, imetelstat, as switch maintenance therapy in patients with advanced NSCLC. Patients and methods The primary end point of this open-label, randomized phase II study was progression-free survival (PFS). Patients with non-progressive, advanced NSCLC after platinum-based doublet (first-line) chemotherapy (with or without bevacizumab), any histology, with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0–1 were eligible. Randomization was 2 : 1 in favor of imetelstat, administered at 9.4 mg/kg on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle, or observation. Telomere length (TL) biomarker exploratory analysis was carried out in tumor tissue by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and telomerase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results Of 116 patients enrolled, 114 were evaluable. Grade 3/4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were more frequent with imetelstat. Median PFS was 2.8 and 2.6 months for imetelstat-treated versus control [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.844; 95% CI 0.54–1.31; P = 0.446]. Median survival time favored imetelstat (14.3 versus 11.5 months), although not significantly (HR = 0.68; 95% CI 0.41–1.12; P = 0.129). Exploratory analysis demonstrated a trend toward longer median PFS (HR = 0.43; 95% CI 0.14–1.3; P = 0.124) and overall survival (OS; HR = 0.41; 95% CI 0.11–1.46; P = 0.155) in imetelstat-treated patients with short TL, but no improvement in median PFS and OS in patients with long TL (HR = 0.86; 95% CI 0.39–1.88; and HR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.2–1.28; P = 0.145). Conclusions Maintenance imetelstat failed to improve PFS in advanced NSCLC patients responding to first-line therapy. There was a trend toward a improvement in median PFS and OS in patients with short TL. Short TL as a predictive biomarker will require further investigation for the clinical development of

  1. Capecitabine in patients with breast cancer relapsing after high-dose chemotherapy plus autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation--a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Jakob, A; Bokemeyer, C; Knop, S; Schupp, M; Mayer, F; Kanz, L

    2002-04-01

    Capecitabine, a tumor-selective, oral fluoropyrimidine, has demonstrated significant antitumor activity in patients with metastatic breast cancer. In this open-label monocenter phase II study the efficacy and safety of capecitabine in patients with metastatic breast cancer who relapsed after high-dose chemotherapy was examined. Female patients 18-65 years of age, with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer, who relapsed after high-dose chemotherapy (adjuvant and/or metastatic) followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) and who had been treated in their course of the disease with an anthracycline and/or an anthracycline/taxane containing regimen were included into this clinical study. Capecitabine was applied as the first salvage chemotherapy at relapse after high-dose chemotherapy (1250 mg/m(2) b.i.d. p.o. for 14 days followed by 7 days rest period). Responding patients or those with stable disease after two treatment cycles were offered to continue treatment until tumor progression. Response rate, time to disease progression, survival, toxicity and quality of life were assessed. Fourteen patients between 35 and 60 years (median 45.5 years) entered this study and received a median number of 5 cycles (range 1-19) of capecitabine. All patients were evaluable for response. All patients had been pretreated with 1-2 cycles of high-dose chemotherapy plus PBSCT. Furthermore, 13 patients had additionally received local radiotherapy. On average, the patients showed metastatic disease in two organ sites (range 1-4 sites). One patient obtained a complete response and five patients a partial response, accounting for a response rate of 42.9% [95% confidence interval (17.7%; 71.1%)]. All responses were already achieved at the first observation time point 6 weeks after treatment initiation. Two further patients obtained stable disease for at least 12 weeks. At the time of final analysis all patients have progressed. Median

  2. Methodological Aspects of the Phase II Study AFF006 Evaluating Amyloid-beta -Targeting Vaccine AFFITOPE® AD02 in Early Alzheimer’s Disease – Prospective Use of Novel Composite Scales

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, S.; Ellison, N.; Stanworth, S.; Tierney, L.; Mattner, F.; Schmidt, W.; Dubois, B.; Schneeberger, A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Optimized scales and composite outcomes have been proposed as a way to more accurately measure Alzheimer’s disease related decline. AFFITOPE® AD02, is an amyloid-beta (Aβ)-targeting vaccine to elicit anti-Aβ antibodies. IMM-AD04, commonly known as Alum, originally designated as a control agent, appeared to have disease-modifying activity in a multicenter, parallel group phase II study in early AD patients. OBJECTIVES To develop adapted outcomes for cognition, function and a composite scale with improved sensitivity to decline and treatment effects in early AD (mild plus prodromal AD) based on historical data and to assess these adapted outcomes in this phase II study. DESIGN Data from public datasets was analyzed using a partial least squares model in order to identify an optimally weighted cognitive outcome, Adapted ADAS-cog, and an optimally weighted ADL outcome, Adapted ADCS-ADL which were prospectively defined as co-primary endpoints for the study and were also combined into a composite scale. Data from 162 patients in the placebo groups of ADCS studies and 156 mild patients in the ADNI I study were pooled for this analysis. The Adapted ADAS-cog scale considered 13 ADAS-cog items as well as several Neuropsychological test items and CogState items, the Adapted ADCS-ADL considered all ADCS-ADL items. After the pre-specified analyses were complete, additional adapted and composite scales were investigated in a post-hoc manner. Evaluation of the adapted and composite scales was performed on Phase II trial data for AFFITOPE® AD02 (AFF006, Clinical Trial Identifier: NCT01117818) and historic data in early AD. Least square means, standard deviations, and least squares mean to standard deviation ratios were compared among adapted and composite scales and traditional scales for the 5 treatment groups in the phase II study and overall for the historic data. Treatment effect sizes and p-values were also compared for the phase II study. RESULTS Cognitive

  3. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy With Bi-Weekly Docetaxel and Carboplatin for Stage III Unresectable, Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Application of a Protocol Used in a Previous Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Saito, Yoshihiro; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Kudo, Shigehiro; Yoshida, Daisaku; Ichikawa, Akihiro; Sakai, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Futoshi; Kato, Shingo; Shibuya, Kei

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical applicability of a protocol evaluated in a previously reported phase II study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with bi-weekly docetaxel and carboplatin in patients with stage III, unresectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and March 2006, 116 previously untreated patients with histologically proven, stage III NSCLC were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation therapy was administered in 2-Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 60 Gy in combination with docetaxel, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin at an area under the curve value of 3 every 2 weeks during and after radiation therapy. Results: The median survival time for the entire group was 25.5 months. The actuarial 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 53% and 31%, respectively. The 3-year cause-specific survival rate was 60% in patients with stage IIIA disease, whereas it was 35% in patients with stage IIIB disease (p = 0.007). The actuarial 2-year and 5-year local control rates were 62% and 55%, respectively. Acute hematologic toxicities of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 20.7% of patients, while radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade {>=}3 severity were observed in 2.6% and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The feasibility of the protocol used in the previous phase II study was reconfirmed in this series, and excellent treatment results were achieved.

  4. Phase I/II Study of Erlotinib Combined With Cisplatin and Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Herchenhorn, Daniel; Dias, Fernando L.; Viegas, Celia M.P.; Federico, Miriam H.; Araujo, Carlos Manoel M.; Small, Isabelle; Bezerra, Marcos; Fontao, Karina M.D.; Knust, Renata E.; Ferreira, Carlos G.; Martins, Renato G.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Erlotinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is active against head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and possibly has a synergistic interaction with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We investigated the safety and efficacy of erlotinib added to cisplatin and radiotherapy in locally advanced HNSCC. Methods and Materials: In this Phase I/II trial 100 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin was administered on Days 8, 29, and 50, and radiotherapy at 70 Gy was started on Day 8. During Phase I, the erlotinib dose was escalated (50 mg, 100 mg, and 150 mg) in consecutive cohorts of 3 patients, starting on Day 1 and continuing during radiotherapy. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Grade 4 event requiring radiotherapy interruptions. Phase II was initiated 8 weeks after the last Phase I enrollment. Results: The study accrued 9 patients in Phase I and 28 in Phase II; all were evaluable for efficacy and safety. No dose-limiting toxicity occurred in Phase I, and the recommended Phase II dose was 150 mg. The most frequent nonhematologic toxicities were nausea/vomiting, dysphagia, stomatitis, xerostomia and in-field dermatitis, acneiform rash, and diarrhea. Of the 31 patients receiving a 150-mg daily dose of erlotinib, 23 (74%; 95% confidence interval, 56.8%-86.3%) had a complete response, 3 were disease free after salvage surgery, 4 had inoperable residual disease, and 1 died of sepsis during treatment. With a median 37 months' follow-up, the 3-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 61% and 72%, respectively. Conclusions: This combination appears safe, has encouraging activity, and deserves further studies in locally advanced HNSCC.

  5. Two-Phase Calorimetry. II. Studies on the Thermodynamics of Cesium and Strontium Extraction by Mixtures of H+CCD- and PEG-400 in FS-13

    SciTech Connect

    Zalupski, Peter R.; Herbst, R. S.; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Martin, L. R.; Peterman, D. R.; Nash, Ken L

    2010-01-01

    Thermochemical characterization of the partitioning of cesium and strontium from nitric acid solutions into mixtures of the acid form of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (H+CCD-) and polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) in FS-13 diluent has been completed using isothermal titration microcalorimetry and radiotracer distribution methods. The phase transfer reaction for Cs+ is a straightforward (H+ for Cs+) cation exchange reaction. In contrast, the extraction of Sr2+ does not proceed in the absence of the co-solvent molecule PEG-400. This molecule is believed to facilitate the dehydration of the Sr2+ aquo cation to overcome its resistance to partitioning. The phase transfer reactions for both Cs+ and Sr2+ are enthalpy driven (exothermic), but partially compensated by an unfavorable entropy. The results of the calorimetry studies suggest that the PEG-400 functions as a stoichiometric phase transfer reagent rather than acting simply as a phase transfer catalyst or phase modifier. The calorimetry results also demonstrate that the extraction of Sr2+ is complex, including evidence for both the partitioning of Sr(NO3)+ and endothermic ion pairing interactions in the organic phase that contribute to the net enthalpic effect. The thermodynamics of the liquid-liquid distribution equilibria are discussed mainly considering the basic features of the ion solvation thermochemistry.

  6. Treatment of relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma with everolimus (RAD001) and alemtuzumab: a Phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Zent, Clive S; Bowen, Deborah A; Conte, Michael J; LaPlant, Betsy R; Call, Timothy G

    2016-07-01

    Patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL), and especially those with purine analogue refractory disease or TP53 deletion/mutation, had a poor prognosis prior to the introduction of therapy targeting B cell receptor signaling. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus has biological activity in CLL and can mobilize CLL cells from the lymphoid tissues into the circulation. In this clinical trial we determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of everolimus together with eight weeks of standard dose subcutaneous alemtuzumab (Phase I) and then evaluated the tolerability and efficacy of therapy of relapsed/refractory CLL with the combination of everolimus and alemtuzumab (Phase II). The maximum tolerated dose of oral everolimus was 2.5 mg three times/week. Therapy with everolimus and alemtuzumab was tolerable, but not sufficiently efficacious (33% partial responses, no complete responses) to recommend further development of the regimen. PMID:26699397

  7. Phase I/II study of sagopilone (ZK-EPO) plus carboplatin in women with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    McMeekin, S; Patel, R; Verschraegen, C; Celano, P; Burke, J; Plaxe, S; Ghatage, P; Giurescu, M; Stredder, C; Wang, Y; Schmelter, T

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sagopilone is the first fully synthetic epothilone in clinical development and has demonstrated promising preclinical activity. This phase I/II, prospective, open-label trial investigated the efficacy and safety of sagopilone plus carboplatin in patients with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer (OC). Methods: In phase I (dose-escalation stage), patients with OC recurring at least 6 months after platinum-containing chemotherapy received 3-h infusions of sagopilone (initial dose of 12 mg m−2) followed by carboplatin every 3 weeks, for 2–6 treatment courses. Patients enrolled in phase II received 3-h infusions of 16 mg m−2 sagopilone. Efficacy was assessed using modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (modRECIST) and Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup CA125 criteria. The safety and tolerability of sagopilone were also evaluated. Results: In all, 45 patients received sagopilone at 12 mg m−2 or 16 mg m−2. There were 29 confirmed tumour responses (21 modRECIST and 8 CA125) across both treatment groups, indicating that the primary objective of the study was reached. The main adverse events (AEs) reported were peripheral neuropathy (75.6%), fatigue (71.1%) and nausea (64.4%). Grade ⩾3 AEs occurred in 35 patients (77.8%). No deaths related to the study drug were reported. Conclusion: Sagopilone in combination with carboplatin was effective and toxicities were manageable in patients with recurrent platinum-sensitive OC. PMID:22108514

  8. A phase II study of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, adriamycin, and cisplatin (FLAP) for metastatic gastric and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. A Penn Cancer Clinical Trial Group and Roswell Park Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program Trial.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, D J; Meropol, N J; Holroyde, C; Mintzer, D; Nuamah, I; Armstead, B; Douglass, H O; Haller, D G

    1997-06-01

    A Phase II study was performed to evaluate the activity and toxicity of 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, Adriamycin, and cisplatin combination chemotherapy (FLAP) in patients with previously untreated advanced gastric and gastroesophageal (GE) junction adenocarcinoma. Forty-two consecutive patients were enrolled to received FLAP in this multi-institutional trial. Response, toxicity, and survival data were noted. Fifteen of 42 (36%) patients demonstrated objective responses, with two complete responses (5%) and 13 partial responses (31%). The median time to disease progression was 17 weeks, and the overall survival duration was 30 weeks. Myelosuppression was significant, requiring dose modifications, but there were no treatment-related deaths. FLAP is an active regimen in the treatment of advanced gastric and GE junction adenocarcinoma. We are presently using this regimen in the neoadjuvant setting in patients with gastric and GE junction cancers. PMID:9167745

  9. A Phase II study of a histamine H₃ receptor antagonist GSK239512 for cognitive impairment in stable schizophrenia subjects on antipsychotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Jarskog, L Fredrik; Lowy, Martin T; Grove, Richard A; Keefe, Richard S E; Horrigan, Joseph P; Ball, M Patricia; Breier, Alan; Buchanan, Robert W; Carter, Cameron S; Csernansky, John G; Goff, Donald C; Green, Michael F; Kantrowitz, Joshua T; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Laurelle, Marc; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Marder, Stephen R; Maruff, Paul; McMahon, Robert P; Seidman, Larry J; Peykamian, Margaret A

    2015-05-01

    This Phase II exploratory study assessed GSK239512, a brain penetrant histamine H₃ receptor antagonist, versus placebo on cognitive impairment in 50 stable outpatients with schizophrenia. Subjects were randomized to placebo or GSK239512 for 7 weeks (4 weeks titration). GSK239512 was associated with a small positive effect size (ES) on the CogState Schizophrenia Battery (CSSB) Composite Score (ES=0.29, CI=-0.40, 0.99) relative to placebo (primary endpoint). GSK239512's ES on CSSB domains were generally positive or neutral except Processing Speed, which favored placebo (ES=-0.46). Effects on the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery were mostly neutral or favored placebo. GSK239512 was generally well tolerated with an adverse event profile consistent with the known class pharmacology. There was no evidence of overall beneficial effects of GSK239512 for CIAS in this population. PMID:25728831

  10. A randomized, double-blind, dose-finding Phase II study to evaluate immunogenicity and safety of the third generation smallpox vaccine candidate IMVAMUNE®

    PubMed Central

    von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Vollmar, Jens; Pokorny, Rolf; Rapp, Petra; Wulff, Niels; Petzold, Barbara; Handley, Amanda; Mateo, Lyn; Siersbol, Henriette; Kollaritsch, Herwig; Chaplin, Paul

    2009-01-01

    IMVAMUNE® is a Modified Vaccinia Ankara-based virus that is being developed as a safer 3rd generation smallpox vaccine. In order to determine the optimal dose for further development, a double-blind, randomized Phase II trial was performed testing three different doses of IMVAMUNE® in 164 healthy volunteers. All three IMVAMUNE® doses displayed a favourable safety profile, with local reactions as the most frequent observation. The 1×108 TCID50 IMVAMUNE® dose induced a total antibody response in 94% of the subjects following the first vaccination and the highest peak seroconversion rates by ELISA (100%) and PRNT (71%). This IMVAMUNE® dose was considered to be optimal for the further clinical development of this highly attenuated poxvirus as a safer smallpox vaccine. PMID:19944151

  11. Prospective Evaluation of First-Line Erlotinib in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Carrying an Activating EGFR Mutation: A Multicenter Academic Phase II Study in Caucasian Patients (FIELT)

    PubMed Central

    De Grève, Jacques; Van Meerbeeck, Jan; Vansteenkiste, Johan F.; Decoster, Lore; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Vuylsteke, Peter; Focan, Christian; Canon, Jean-Luc; Humblet, Yves; Berchem, Guy; Colinet, Benoit; Galdermans, Danny; Bosquée, Lionel; Vermeij, Joanna; Dewaele, Alex; Geers, Caroline; Schallier, Denis; Teugels, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibition is the preferred first-line treatment of advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung that harbors EGFR activating tyrosine kinase domain mutations. Most data available pertain to Asian populations in which such mutations are more prevalent. We report on the long-term results of first-line treatment with erlotinib in Caucasian patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung that have a somatic EGFR mutation in their tumor. Methods Multicenter academic prospective phase II study with erlotinib in patients with an activating EGFR tyrosine kinase (TK) domain somatic mutation (any exon encoding the kinase domain) in the tumor and no prior treatment for their advanced disease. Results Phenotypic preselecting of 229 patients led to a high EGFR mutation detection rate of 24% of which 46 patients were included in the phase II study. With a progression free survival (PFS) of 81% at three months the study met its primary endpoint for presumed superiority over chemotherapy. With an overall median PFS of 11 months and a median overall survival (OS) of 23 months, the results compare favorably with results obtained in randomized studies using TKI in first line in EGFR mutation positive adenocarcinoma of the lung. Conclusion The present study reinforces the use of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibition (TKI) as a first line treatment of choice for advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung carrying an activating EGFR mutation. The mutation rate in preselected Caucasian patients is higher than previously reported. Issues relevant for clinical practice are discussed. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00339586 PMID:27032107

  12. Biomarker Analyses from a Placebo-Controlled Phase II Study Evaluating Erlotinib ± Onartuzumab in Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer: MET Expression Levels Are Predictive of Patient Benefit

    PubMed Central

    Koeppen, Hartmut; Yu, Wei; Zha, Jiping; Pandita, Ajay; Penuel, Elicia; Rangell, Linda; Raja, Rajiv; Mohan, Sankar; Patel, Rajesh; Desai, Rupal; Fu, Ling; Do, An; Parab, Vaishali; Xia, Xiaoling; Januario, Tom; Louie, Sharianne G.; Filvaroff, Ellen; Shames, David S.; Wistuba, Ignacio; Lipkind, Marina; Huang, Jenny; Lazarov, Mirella; Ramakrishnan, Vanitha; Amler, Lukas; Phan, See-Chun; Patel, Premal; Peterson, Amy; Yauch, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In a recent phase II study of onartuzumab (MetMAb), patients whose non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissue scored as positive for MET protein by immunohistochemistry (IHC) experienced a significant benefit with onartuzumab plus erlotinib (O+E) versus erlotinib. We describe development and validation of a standardized MET IHC assay and, retrospectively, evaluate multiple biomarkers as predictors of patient benefit. Experimental Design Biomarkers related to MET and/or EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling were measured by IHC, FISH, quantitative reverse transcription PCR, mutation detection techniques, and ELISA. Results A positive correlation between IHC, Western blotting, and MET mRNA expression was observed in NSCLC cell lines/tissues. An IHC scoring system of MET expression taking proportional and intensity-based thresholds into consideration was applied in an analysis of the phase II study and resulted in the best differentiation of outcomes. Further analyses revealed a nonsignificant overall survival (OS) improvement with O+E in patients with high MET copy number (mean ≥5 copies/cell by FISH); however, benefit was maintained in “MET IHC-positive”/MET FISH-negative patients (HR, 0.37; P = 0.01). MET, EGFR, amphiregulin, epiregulin, or HGF mRNA expression did not predict a significant benefit with onartuzumab; a nonsignificant OS improvement was observed in patients with high tumor MET mRNA levels (HR, 0.59; P = 0.23). Patients with low baseline plasma hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) exhibited an HR for OS of 0.519 (P = 0.09) in favor of onartuzumab treatment. Conclusions MET IHC remains the most robust predictor of OS and progression-free survival benefit from O+E relative to all examined exploratory markers. PMID:24687921

  13. Phase II Study of Single-Agent Navitoclax (ABT-263) and Biomarker Correlates in Patients with Relapsed Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, Charles M.; Hann, Christine L.; Garon, Edward B.; Ribeiro de Oliveira, Moacyr; Bonomi, Philip D.; Camidge, D. Ross; Chu, Quincy; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Khaira, Divis; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Ranson, Malcolm R.; Dive, Caroline; McKeegan, Evelyn M.; Chyla, Brenda J.; Dowell, Barry L.; Chakravartty, Arunava; Nolan, Cathy E.; Rudersdorf, Niki; Busman, Todd A.; Mabry, Mack H.; Krivoshik, Andrew P.; Humerickhouse, Rod A.; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.; Gandhi, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Bcl-2 is a critical regulator of apoptosis that is overexpressed in the majority of small cell lung cancers (SCLC). Nativoclax (ABT-263) is a potent and selective inhibitor of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. The primary objectives of this phase IIa study included safety at the recommended phase II dose and preliminary, exploratory efficacy assessment in patients with recurrent and progressive SCLC after at least one prior therapy. Experimental Design Thirty-nine patients received navitoclax 325 mg daily, following an initial lead-in of 150 mg daily for 7 days. Study endpoints included safety and toxicity assessment, response rate, progression-free and overall survival (PFS and OS), as well as exploratory pharmacodynamic correlates. Results The most common toxicity associated with navitoclax was thrombocytopenia, which reached grade III–IV in 41% of patients. Partial response was observed in one (2.6%) patient and stable disease in 9 (23%) patients. Median PFS was 1.5 months and median OS was 3.2 months. A strong association between plasma pro–gastrin-releasing peptide (pro-GRP) level and tumor Bcl-2 copy number (R = 0.93) was confirmed. Exploratory analyses revealed baseline levels of cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen 21-1, neuron-specific enolase, pro-GRP, and circulating tumor cell number as correlates of clinical benefit. Conclusion Bcl-2 targeting by navitoclax shows limited single-agent activity against advanced and recurrent SCLC. Correlative analyses suggest several putative biomarkers of clinical benefit. Preclinical models support that navitoclax may enhance sensitivity of SCLC and other solid tumors to standard cytotoxics. Future studies will focus on combination therapies. PMID:22496272

  14. EXTRA-A Multicenter Phase II Study of Chemoradiation Using a 5 Day per Week Oral Regimen of Capecitabine and Intravenous Mitomycin C in Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob Meadows, Helen; Wan, Susan; Gollins, Simon; Leslie, Martin; Levine, Ed; McDonald, Alec C.; Myint, Sun; Samuel, Les; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) + mitomycin C (MMC)-based chemoradiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with epidermoid anal carcinoma. Clinical trials in other cancers have confirmed 5-FU can successfully be replaced by the oral fluoropyrimidine capecitabine. This phase II trial aimed to determine the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of capecitabine, MMC and radiotherapy (RT) in anal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy comprised the schedule of the UK Anal Cancer Trial (ACT) II trial (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy). With MMC (12 mg/m{sup 2}) on Day 1 and capecitabine on each RT treatment day in two divided doses (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d). The endpoints were complete response at 4 weeks, local control at 6 months and toxicity. Results: Thirty-one patients entered the trial. The median age was 61 years (range 45-86) with 14 males and 17 females. Compliance with chemotherapy with no dose interruptions or delays was 68%, and with RT was 81%. Eighteen (58%) patients completed both modalities of treatment as planned. Dose-limiting Grade 3 or 4 diarrhea was seen in 1 of 31 patients. Three patients experienced Grade 3 neutropenia. There were no treatment-related deaths. Four weeks following completion of chemoradiation, 24 patients (77%) had a complete clinical response, and 4 (16%) a partial response. With a median follow-up of 14 months, three locoregional relapses occurred. Conclusions: Capecitabine with MMC and RT in with patients anal carcinoma is well tolerated, with minimal toxicity and acceptable compliance. We recommend testing this schedule in future national Phase III studies in anal cancer.

  15. A PHASE II STUDY OF A PACLITAXEL-BASED CHEMORADIATION REGIMEN WITH SELECTIVE SURGICAL SALVAGE FOR RESECTABLE LOCOREGIONALLY ADVANCED ESOPHAGEAL CANCER: INITIAL REPORTING OF RTOG 0246

    PubMed Central

    Swisher, Stephen G.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Wu, Tsung T.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Konski, Andre A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The strategy of definitive chemoradiation with selective surgical salvage in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer was evaluated in a Phase II trial in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-affiliated sites. Methods and Materials The study was designed to detect an improvement in 1-year survival from 60% to 77.5% (α= 0.05; power = 80%). Definitive chemoradiation involved induction chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (650 mg/mg2/day), cisplatin (15 mg/mg2/day), and paclitaxel (200 mg/mg2/day) for two cycles, followed by concurrent chemoradiation with 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and daily 5-FU (300 mg/mg2/day) with cisplatin (15 mg/mg2/day) over the first 5 days. Salvage surgical resection was considered for patients with residual or recurrent esophageal cancer who did not have systemic disease. Results Forty-three patients with nonmetastatic resectable esophageal cancer were entered from Sept 2003 to March 2006. Forty-one patients were eligible for analysis. Clinical stage was ≥T3 in 31 patients (76%) and N1 in 29 patients (71%), with adenocarcinoma histology in 30 patients (73%). Thirty-seven patients (90%) completed induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation. Twenty-eight patients (68%) experienced Grade 3+ nonhematologic toxicity. Four treatment-related deaths were noted. Twenty-one patients underwent surgery following definitive chemoradiation because of residual (17 patients) or recurrent (3 patients) esophageal cancer,and 1 patient because of choice. Median follow-up of live patients was 22 months, with an estimated 1-year survival of 71%. Conclusions In this Phase II trial (RTOG 0246) evaluating selective surgical salvage after definitive chemoradiation in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer, the hypothesized 1-year RTOG survival rate (77.5%) was not achieved (1 year, 71%; 95% confidence interval< 54%–82%). PMID:21507583

  16. A phase II study in patients with Alzheimer's disease to assess the preliminary efficacy and maximum tolerated dose of rivastigmine (Exelon).

    PubMed

    Forette, F; Anand, R; Gharabawi, G

    1999-07-01

    Rivastigmine is a carbamate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor with central selectivity. Early studies showed that daily doses up to 6 mg/day have some efficacy in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT). The present study was designed to assess the safety, tolerability and efficacy of rivastigmine at doses up to 12 mg/day. A total of 114 patients with mild-moderate DAT were randomly assigned to either rivastigmine (b.i.d. (twice daily) or t.i.d. (three times daily)) or placebo in a double-blind fashion titrated to their maximum tolerated dose over 10 weeks followed by an eight-week maintenance phase. The mean maximum tolerated dose was approximately 10 mg/day (b.i.d. or t.i.d.). Gastrointestinal complaints, the majority of which were mild to moderate, were the most frequently reported adverse events. No clinically relevant changes in vital signs, haematology or organ function were detected. Significantly more patients taking rivastigmine b.i.d. were considered improved according to the Clinicians' Interview-Based Impression of Change-Plus (CIBIC-Plus) vs. placebo (57% vs. 16%, respectively; P = 0.027). The Nurses' Observation Scale for Geriatric Patients (NOSGER) (memory component) and the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) also improved in the rivastigmine b.i.d. group vs. placebo (mean change from baseline on NOSGER = -0.7 vs. +1.3, respectively; P = 0.037: mean change from baseline on ADAS-cog = -2.7 vs. +0.2, respectively; P = 0.054). Despite the relatively small size and limited duration of the study, the finding that rivastigmine induced changes in the same (positive) direction in all three dimensions measured suggests that rivastigmine at doses of up to 12 mg/day has useful efficacy in patients with mild-moderate DAT. Reports from larger phase III studies confirm this finding. The results of this study also suggest that b.i.d. is the more efficacious regimen and has comparable tolerability to the t.i.d. regimen

  17. A Phase II Study of Modulated-Capecitabine and Docetaxel in Chemonaive Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    PubMed Central

    Bertino, Erin M.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Fernandez, Soledad; Diasio, Robert B.; Karim, Nagla A.; Otterson, Gregory A.; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This phase II single-arm trial of docetaxel and capecitabine in previously untreated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients was designed to evaluate response rate of this regimen based on promising efficacy data from phase II testing in pre-treated NSCLC patients. The trial also evaluated the correlation between peripheral blood dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) expression and efficacy/toxicity. Methods Patients with advanced NSCLC (metastatic, including malignant pleural effusion) without prior chemotherapy were enrolled. Baseline DPD screening was performed; patients with baseline DPD level < 0.07 nmol/min/mg protein were considered ineligible for the study. Treatment included a 28-day cycle of docetaxel 36 mg/m2 days 1, 8, 15 and capecitabine 1250 mg/m2/day in divided doses on days 5–18. Overall response rate (RR) was the primary endpoint with a target RR of 50%. Correlative studies included evaluation of DPD activity levels in peripheral blood and correlation with clinical responses. Results Twenty-eight patients received 86 cycles of treatment (median 3 cycles) and were evaluable for response. The RR was 18% (5 patients); RR did not meet the pre-specified efficacy endpoint and the trial was stopped. 14 patients had stable disease (SD - 50%) and 4 pts had SD > 12 weeks. Median time to progression was 3.3 months (95% CI 1.5 – 4.6 months). Median overall survival was 10.5 months (95% CI: 3.2 – 15 months). Main toxicities included fatigue, stomatitis and leukopenia. DPD levels ranged from 0.06 to 0.26 nmol/min/mg. The majority of responders (4/5) had DPD levels ≤ 0.1 nmol/min/mg. Most of the responders (4/5) experienced grade 3 toxicities including leukopenia, dehydration, fatigue, and diarrhea. None of the patients (0/4) with higher DPD levels (>0.2 nmol/min/mg) had a response. Conclusion The response rate for the regimen did not demonstrate sufficient activity and further study of this regimen in this setting is not indicated

  18. A randomized, phase II study of afatinib versus cetuximab in metastatic or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck†

    PubMed Central

    Seiwert, T. Y.; Fayette, J.; Cupissol, D.; del Campo, J. M.; Clement, P. M.; Hitt, R.; Degardin, M.; Zhang, W.; Blackman, A.; Ehrnrooth, E.; Cohen, E. E. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Afatinib is an oral, irreversible ErbB family blocker that has shown activity in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated lung cancer. We hypothesized that the agent would have greater antitumor activity compared with cetuximab in recurrent or metastatic (R/M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients, whose disease has progressed after platinum-containing therapy. Patients and methods An open-label, randomized, phase II trial was conducted in 43 centers; 124 patients were randomized (1 : 1) to either afatinib (50 mg/day) or cetuximab (250 mg/m2/week) until disease progression or intolerable adverse events (AEs) (stage I), with optional crossover (stage II). The primary end point was tumor shrinkage before crossover assessed by investigator (IR) and independent central review (ICR). Results A total of 121 patients were treated (61 afatinib, 60 cetuximab) and 68 crossed over to stage II (32 and 36 respectively). In stage I, mean tumor shrinkage by IR/ICR was 10.4%/16.6% with afatinib and 5.4%/10.1% with cetuximab (P = 0.46/0.30). Objective response rate was 16.1%/8.1% with afatinib and 6.5%/9.7% with cetuximab (IR/ICR). Comparable disease control rates were observed with afatinib (50%) and cetuximab (56.5%) by IR; similar results were seen by ICR. Most common grade ≥3 drug-related AEs (DRAEs) were rash/acne (18% versus 8.3%), diarrhea (14.8% versus 0%), and stomatitis/mucositis (11.5% versus 0%) with afatinib and cetuximab, respectively. Patients with DRAEs leading to treatment discontinuation were 23% with afatinib and 5% with cetuximab. In stage II, disease control rate (IR/ICR) was 38.9%/33.3% with afatinib and 18.8%/18.8% with cetuximab. Conclusion Afatinib showed antitumor activity comparable to cetuximab in R/M HNSCC in this exploratory phase II trial, although more patients on afatinib discontinued treatment due to AEs. Sequential EGFR/ErbB treatment with afatinib and cetuximab provided sustained clinical benefit in patients

  19. Superior efficacy of calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate aerosol foam versus ointment in patients with psoriasis vulgaris – A randomized phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Koo, John; Tyring, Stephen; Werschler, William P.; Bruce, Suzanne; Olesen, Martin; Villumsen, John; Bagel, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: An aerosol foam formulation of fixed combination calcipotriene 0.005% (as hydrate; Cal) plus betamethasone dipropionate 0.064% (BD) was developed to improve psoriasis treatment. Objectives: To compare the efficacy and safety of Cal/BD aerosol foam with Cal/BD ointment after 4 weeks. Methods: In this Phase II, multicenter, investigator-blind, 4-week trial, adult patients with psoriasis vulgaris were randomized to Cal/BD aerosol foam, Cal/BD ointment, aerosol foam vehicle or ointment vehicle (3:3:1:1). The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of patients at week 4 who achieved treatment success (clear or almost clear with at least a two-step improvement) according to the physician’s global assessment of disease severity. Results: In total, 376 patients were randomized. At week 4, significantly more patients using Cal/BD aerosol foam achieved treatment success (54.6% versus 43.0% [ointment]; p = 0.025); mean modified (excluding the head, which was not treated) psoriasis area and severity index score was significantly different between Cal/BD aerosol foam and Cal/BD ointment (mean difference –0.6; p = 0.005). Rapid, continuous itch relief occurred with both active treatments. One adverse drug reaction was reported with Cal/BD aerosol foam (application site itch). Conclusions: Cal/BD aerosol foam demonstrates significantly greater efficacy and similar tolerability compared with Cal/BD ointment for psoriasis treatment. PMID:26444907

  20. A phase II study of oxaliplatin and prednisone for patients with relapsed or refractory marginal zone lymphoma: Consortium for Improving Survival of Lymphoma trial.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sung Yong; Kim, Won Seog; Kim, Jin Seok; Chae, Yee Soo; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Eom, Hyeon Seok; Ryoo, Hun Mo; Lee, Suee; Kim, Seok Jin; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Won, Jong Ho; Hong, Junshik; Park, Jinny; Lee, Sang-Min; Hong, Jung Yong; Park, Eunkyung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Suh, Cheolwon

    2016-06-01

    Overall, more than 50% of marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) patients experience a relapse within 10 years. This phase II trial was conductedto assess the efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin-prednisone (Ox-P) chemotherapy for patients with relapsed or refractory MZL. Patients received oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2) on day 1 and prednisone 100 mg/day on days 1-5 of each cycle. A total of 38 patients were enrolled. The median age of the 34 (16 males, 18 females) evaluated patients was 53 (range = 27-74) years. There were seven complete responses (20.6%) and 15 partial responses (44.1%) (Overall response rate = 64.7%). No treatment-related deaths occurred. The median progression-free survival was 14.2 months (95% CI = 2.1-26.3 months); 3-year overall survival rate was 77.7%. Thus, salvage Ox-P chemotherapy for patients with relapsed or refractory MZL at the stated dosage and schedule showed moderate clinical activity and was considerable in very few selected patients (NCT01068392). PMID:26413982

  1. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by L-asparaginase-containing chemotherapy, VIDL, for localized nasal extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma: CISL08-01 phase II study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok Jin; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Kim, Jin Seok; Kwak, Jae-Yong; Eom, Hyeon-Seok; Hong, Dae Sik; Won, Jong Ho; Lee, Jae Hoon; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Cho, Jaeho; Nam, Taek-Keun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Ahn, Yong Chan; Suh, Cheolwon; Kim, Won Seog

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a phase II trial of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by 2 cycles of L-asparaginase-containing chemotherapy for patients who were newly diagnosed with stages IE and IIE nasal extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma (ENKTL). CCRT consisted of 40-44 Gy of radiotherapy with weekly administration of 30 mg/m(2) of cisplatin for 4 weeks. Two cycles of VIDL (etoposide (100 mg/m(2)), ifosfamide (1,200 mg/m(2)), and dexamethasone (40 mg) from days 1 to 3, and L-asparaginase (4,000 IU/m(2)) every other day from days 8 to 20) were administered sequentially. CCRT yielded a 90 % overall response rate without significant side effects in 30 patients, including 20 patients with complete response (CR); however, two patients showed distant disease progression. After CCRT, VIDL chemotherapy showed an 87 % final CR rate (26/30). Although grade III or IV hematologic toxicity was frequent during VIDL chemotherapy, no treatment-related mortality was observed, and L-asparaginase-associated toxicity was manageable. With a median follow-up of 44 months, 11 patients showed local (n = 4) and distant (n = 7) relapse or progression. The estimated 5-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 73 and 60 %, respectively. In conclusion, CCRT followed by L-asparaginase-containing chemotherapy is a feasible treatment for newly diagnosed stages IE/IIE nasal ENKTL. PMID:24947798

  2. Immunogenicity and safety of tetravalent dengue vaccine in 2-11 year-olds previously vaccinated against yellow fever: randomized, controlled, phase II study in Piura, Peru.

    PubMed

    Lanata, Claudio F; Andrade, Teresa; Gil, Ana I; Terrones, Cynthia; Valladolid, Omar; Zambrano, Betzana; Saville, Melanie; Crevat, Denis

    2012-09-01

    In a randomized, placebo-controlled, monocenter, observer blinded study conducted in an area where dengue is endemic, we assessed the safety and immunogenicity of a recombinant, live, attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (CYD-TDV) in 2-11 year-olds with varying levels of pre-existing yellow-fever immunity due to vaccination 1-7 years previously. 199 children received 3 injections of CYD-TDV (months 0, 6 and 12) and 99 received placebo (months 0 and 6) or pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (month 12). One month after the third dengue vaccination, serotype specific neutralizing antibody GMTs were in the range of 178-190 (1/dil) (versus 16.7-38.1 in the control group), a 10-20 fold-increase from baseline, and 94% of vaccines were seropositive to all four serotypes (versus 39% in the control group). There were no vaccine-related SAEs. The observed reactogenicity profile was consistent with phase I studies, with severity grade 1-2 injection site pain, headache, malaise and fever most frequently reported and no increase after subsequent vaccinations. Virologically confirmed dengue cases were seen after completion of the 3 doses: 1 in the CYD-TDV group (N=199), and 3 in the control group (N=99). A 3-dose regimen of CYD-TDV had a good safety profile in 2-11 year olds with a history of YF vaccination and elicited robust antibody responses that were balanced against the four serotypes. PMID:22863660

  3. Phase I/II Study of HSP90 Inhibitor AUY922 and Erlotinib for EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer With Acquired Resistance to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Melissa L.; Yu, Helena A.; Hart, Eric M.; Weitner, Bing Bing; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Patel, Jyoti D.; Kris, Mark G.; Riely, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose AUY922 is an HSP90 inhibitor that causes degradation of HSP chaperones and their client proteins, including epidermal growth factor receptor. We conducted a phase I/II trial to evaluate AUY922 and erlotinib for patients with EGFR-mutant lung cancer and disease progression during erlotinib treatment. Patients and Methods All patients had developed acquired resistance after treatment with erlotinib and underwent repeat tumor biopsies before study entry to assess for EGFR T790M. In phase I, 18 patients were treated with AUY922 intravenously once per week and erlotinib once per day in 28-day cycles using a 3 + 3 dose-escalation design. In phase II, 19 additional patients were treated at the maximum-tolerated dose. The primary end point of the phase II trial was complete plus partial response rate. Results In phase I (n = 18), three patients were treated in each cohort, except the highest-dose cohort (AUY922 70 mg and erlotinib 150 mg), which expanded to six patients because of a dose-limiting toxicity (ie, junctional cardiac rhythm). Common drug-related adverse events were diarrhea, skin rash, hyperglycemia, and night blindness. All patients treated at maximum-tolerated dose (n = 25) were evaluable for response. The partial response rate was 16% (four of 25 patients; 95% CI, 5% to 36%) and was independent of tumor T790M status. Conclusion Partial responses were observed, but the duration of treatment with AUY922 and erlotinib was limited by toxicities, especially night blindness. This phase II study of AUY922 and erlotinib did not meet its primary end point. PMID:25870087

  4. Randomized multicenter phase II study of flavopiridol (alvocidib), cytarabine, and mitoxantrone (FLAM) versus cytarabine/daunorubicin (7+3) in newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zeidner, Joshua F.; Foster, Matthew C.; Blackford, Amanda L.; Litzow, Mark R.; Morris, Lawrence E.; Strickland, Stephen A.; Lancet, Jeffrey E.; Bose, Prithviraj; Levy, M. Yair; Tibes, Raoul; Gojo, Ivana; Gocke, Christopher D.; Rosner, Gary L.; Little, Richard F.; Wright, John J.; Doyle, L. Austin; Smith, B. Douglas; Karp, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    Serial studies have demonstrated that induction therapy with FLAM [flavopiridol (alvocidib) 50 mg/m2 days 1–3, cytarabine 667 mg/m2/day continuous infusion days 6–8, and mitoxantrone (FLAM) 40 mg/m2 day 9] yields complete remission rates of nearly 70% in newly diagnosed poor-risk acute myeloid leukemia. Between May 2011–July 2013, 165 newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients (age 18–70 years) with intermediate/adverse-risk cytogenetics were randomized 2:1 to receive FLAM or 7+3 (cytarabine 100 mg/m2/day continuous infusion days 1–7 and daunorubicin 90 mg/m2 days 1–3), across 10 institutions. Some patients on 7+3 with residual leukemia on day 14 received 5+2 (cytarabine 100 mg/m2/day continuous infusion days 1–5 and daunorubicin 45 mg/m2 days 1–2), whereas patients on FLAM were not re-treated based on day 14 bone marrow findings. The primary objective was to compare complete remission rates between one cycle of FLAM and one cycle of 7+3. Secondary end points included safety, overall survival and event-free survival. FLAM led to higher complete remission rates than 7+3 alone (70% vs. 46%; P=0.003) without an increase in toxicity, and this improvement persisted after 7+3+/−5+2 (70% vs. 57%; P=0.08). There were no significant differences in overall survival and event-free survival in both arms but post-induction strategies were not standardized. These results substantiate the efficacy of FLAM induction in newly diagnosed AML. A phase III study is currently in development. This study is registered with clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 01349972. PMID:26022709

  5. Antiproliferative effects of lanreotide autogel in patients with progressive, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours: a Spanish, multicentre, open-label, single arm phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) are indicated to relieve carcinoid syndrome but seem to have antiproliferative effects on neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). This is the first prospective study investigating tumour stabilisation with the long-acting SSA lanreotide Autogel in patients with progressive NETs. Methods This was a multicentre, open-label, phase II trial conducted in 17 Spanish specialist centres. Patients with well-differentiated NETs and radiologically confirmed progression within the previous 6 months received lanreotide Autogel, 120 mg every 28 days over ≤92 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were response rate, tumour biomarkers, symptom control, quality of life (QoL), and safety. Radiographic imaging was assessed by a blinded central radiologist. Results Of 30 patients included in the efficacy and safety analyses, 40% had midgut tumours and 27% pancreatic tumours; 63% of tumours were functioning. Median PFS time was 12.9 (95% CI: 7.9, 16.5) months, and most patients achieved disease stabilisation (89%) or partial response (4%). No deterioration in QoL was observed. Nineteen patients (63%) experienced treatment-related adverse events, most frequently diarrhoea and asthenia; only one treatment-related adverse event (aerophagia) was severe. Conclusion Lanreotide Autogel provided effective tumour stabilisation and PFS >12 months in patients with progressive NETs ineligible for surgery or chemotherapy, with a safety profile consistent with the pharmacology of the class. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00326469; EU Clinical Trial Register EudraCT no 2004-002871-18. PMID:24053191

  6. A randomized phase II study of S-1 plus oral leucovorin versus S-1 monotherapy in patients with gemcitabine-refractory advanced pancreatic cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, M.; Okusaka, T.; Omuro, Y.; Isayama, H.; Fukutomi, A.; Ikeda, M.; Mizuno, N.; Fukuzawa, K.; Furukawa, M.; Iguchi, H.; Sugimori, K.; Furuse, J.; Shimada, K.; Ioka, T.; Nakamori, S.; Baba, H.; Komatsu, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Hyodo, I.; Boku, N.

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of adding oral leucovorin (LV) to S-1 when compared with S-1 monotherapy in patients with gemcitabine-refractory pancreatic cancer (PC). Patients and methods Gemcitabine-refractory PC patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive S-1 at 40, 50, or 60 mg according to body surface area plus LV 25 mg, both given orally twice daily for 1 week, repeated every 2 weeks (SL group), or S-1 monotherapy at the same dose as the SL group for 4 weeks, repeated every 6 weeks (S-1 group). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Results Among 142 patients enrolled, 140 were eligible for efficacy assessment (SL: n = 69 and S-1: n = 71). PFS was significantly longer in the SL group than in the S-1 group [median PFS, 3.8 versus 2.7 months; hazard ratio (HR), 0.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.37–0.85; P = 0.003]). The disease control rate was significantly higher in the SL group than in the S-1 group (91% versus 72%; P = 0.004). Overall survival (OS) was similar in both groups (median OS, 6.3 versus 6.1 months; HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.54–1.22; P = 0.463). After adjusting for patient background factors in a multivariate analysis, OS tended to be better in the SL group (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.47–1.07; P = 0.099). Both treatments were well tolerated, although gastrointestinal toxicities were slightly more severe in the SL group. Conclusion The addition of LV to S-1 significantly improved PFS in patients with gemcitabine-refractory advanced PC, and a phase III trial has been initiated in a similar setting. Clinical trials number Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center: JapicCTI-111554. PMID:26681680

  7. A Phase II Study of Fixed-Dose Rate Gemcitabine Plus Low-Dose Cisplatin Followed by Consolidative Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Andrew H.; Venook, Alan P.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The optimal strategy for treating locally advanced pancreatic cancer remains controversial, including the respective roles and timing of chemotherapy and radiation. We conducted a Phase II nonrandomized trial to evaluate sequential chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Chemotherapy naive patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} at 10 mg/m{sup 2}/min) plus cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Those without evidence of extrapancreatic metastases after six cycles of chemotherapy received radiation (5,040 cGy over 28 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (800 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the day of radiation) as a radiosensitizer. Results: A total of 25 patients were enrolled with a median follow-up time of 656 days. Twelve patients (48%) successfully received all six cycles of chemotherapy plus chemoradiation. Eight patients (32%) progressed during chemotherapy, including 7 with extrapancreatic metastases. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities were uncommon. Two patients sustained myocardial infarctions during chemotherapy, and 4 were hospitalized for infectious complications, although none in the setting of neutropenia. Median time to progression was 10.5 months and median survival was 13.5 months, with an estimated 1-year survival rate of 62%. Patients receiving all components of therapy had a median survival of 17.0 months. Conclusions: A strategy of initial fixed-dose rate gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, followed by chemoradiation, shows promising efficacy for treatment of locally advanced disease. A substantial proportion of patients will be identified early on as having extrapancreatic disease and spared the potential toxicities associated with radiation.

  8. Phase II Study of Chemoembolization With Drug-Eluting Beads in Patients With Hepatic Neuroendocrine Metastases: High Incidence of Biliary Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagat, Nikhil Reyes, Diane K.; Lin, Mingde; Kamel, Ihab; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Frangakis, Constantine; Geschwind, J. F.

    2013-04-15

    To evaluate safety in an interim analysis of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with doxorubicin-eluting beads (DEB) in 13 patients with hepatic metastases from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) as part of a phase II trial. Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent were obtained. Thirteen patients completed preliminary safety analysis. Their mean age was 65 years, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status was 0/1, tumor burden range was 4-75 %, and mean targeted tumor size was 5.9 cm. Up to four DEB-TACE sessions (100-300 {mu}m beads loaded with {<=}100 mg doxorubicin) within 6 months were allowed. Tumor response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging 1 month after treatment using contrast-enhancement [European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) and size Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST)] criteria. Safety was assessed by National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria. DEB-TACE was successfully performed in all 13 patients. At 1 month follow-up, there was a mean 12 % decrease in tumor size (p < 0.0003) and a 56 % decrease in tumor enhancement (p < 0.0001). By EASL criteria, the targeted lesion objective response rate was 78 %. Grade 3 to 4 toxicities were fatigue (23 %), increased alanine amino transferase (15 %), hyperglycemia (15 %), and abdominal pain (8 %). Seven patients developed bilomas (54 %); all of these patients had multiple small (<4 cm) lesions. Subsequently, four underwent percutaneous drainage, three for abscess formation and one for symptoms related to mass effect. Although biloma and liver abscess are known risks after TACE, the high incidence in our study population was unexpected and forced interruption of the trial. Although this occurred in a small group of patients, we have changed our technique and patient selection as a result of these findings, thus allowing resumption of the trial.

  9. Phase II study of tosedostat with cytarabine or decitabine in newly diagnosed older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia or high-risk MDS.

    PubMed

    Mawad, Raya; Becker, Pamela S; Hendrie, Paul; Scott, Bart; Wood, Brent L; Dean, Carol; Sandhu, Vicky; Deeg, Hans Joachim; Walter, Roland; Wang, Lixia; Myint, Han; Singer, Jack W; Estey, Elihu; Pagel, John M

    2016-01-01

    Tosedostat, an oral aminopeptidase inhibitor, has synergy with cytarabine and hypomethylating agents. We performed a Phase II trial to determine rates of complete remission (CR) and survival using tosedostat with cytarabine or decitabine in older patients with untreated acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Thirty-four patients ≥60 years old (median age 70 years; range, 60-83) were randomized to receive tosedostat (120 mg on days 1-21 or 180 mg continuously) with 5 d of either cytarabine (1 g/m2 /d) or decitabine (20 mg/m2 /d) every 35 d. Twenty-nine patients (85%) had AML, including 15 (44%) with secondary AML/MDS, and 5 (15%) had MDS-refractory anaemia with excess blasts type 2. The CR/CR with incomplete count recovery (CRi) rate was 53% [9 in each arm; 14 CR (41%) and 4 CRi (12%)], attained in 6 of 14 patients with adverse cytogenetics and 4 of 7 with FLT3-internal tandem duplication mutations. Median follow-up was 11.2 months (range, 0.5-22.3), and median survival was 11.5 months (95% confidence interval, 5.2-16.7). Twenty-three patients (67.6%) were treated as outpatients and 10 of these patients required hospitalization for febrile neutropenia. No Grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicities required withdrawal from study. Tosedostat with cytarabine or decitabine is tolerated in older patients with untreated AML/MDS, results in a CR/CRi rate of >50%, and warrants further study in larger trials. PMID:26568032

  10. Multicenter phase II study of everolimus in patients with metastatic or recurrent bone and soft-tissue sarcomas after failure of anthracycline and ifosfamide.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Changhoon; Lee, Jeeyun; Rha, Sun Young; Park, Kyong Hwa; Kim, Tae Min; Kim, Yu Jung; Lee, Hyo Jin; Lee, Kyung Hee; Ahn, Jin-Hee

    2013-12-01

    This multicenter, phase II trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, in patients with metastatic or recurrent bone and soft-tissue sarcoma after the failure of anthracycline- and ifosfamide-containing regimens. Everolimus was administered orally as 10 mg once daily. The primary endpoint was the progression-free rate (PFR) at 16 weeks, assessed by computed tomography scan according to RECIST v1.0. Between July 2010 and May 2011, 41 patients were enrolled in this study. Among them, 83% received two or more regimens of chemotherapy prior to study entry. In 38 patients who the primary endpoint was evaluable, 11 patients reached 16 weeks progression-free (one with partial response and 10 with stable disease), indicating a PFR at 16 weeks of 27% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16-42%). The PFR at 16 weeks was highest in patients with angiosarcoma (2 of 3, 67%). With a median follow-up of 10.9 months (range, 2.3-23.9 months) in living patients, the median progression-free survival was 1.9 months (95% CI, 1.3-2.4 months) and the median overall survival was 5.8 months (95% CI, 3.6-8.0 months). Most adverse events were generally mild and tolerable. Grade 3/4 toxicities included hyperglycemia (15%), stomatitis (7%), pain (5%), and asthenia (5%). Everolimus shows modest antitumor activity with manageable toxicities in heavily pretreated patients with bone and soft-tissue sarcoma. PMID:24037083

  11. A phase II study of nab-paclitaxel plus carboplatin in combination with thoracic radiation in patients with locally advanced non–small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Takaaki; Futamura, Yohei; Horiba, Akane; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Toshitaka; Kato, Tatsuo; Kaito, Daizo; Ohno, Yasuhi; Iida, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Shinya; Sawa, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-PTX) and carboplatin (CBDCA) with concurrent radiotherapy for unresectable locally advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with Stage III NSCLC and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1 were eligible. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy consisted of weekly administration of nab-PTX (40 mg/m2) plus CBDCA (area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC) 2) and thoracic radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions) for a total of 6 weeks. After concurrent chemoradiotherapy, patients received an additional two cycles of consolidation phase chemotherapy that consisted of 4-week cycles of nab-PTX (100 mg/m2 on Days 1, 8 and 15)/CBDCA (AUC 5 mg/ml/min on Day 1). Response was evaluated in accordance with the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Progression-free survival and overall survival were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Toxicity was graded using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. A total of 10 patients were enrolled in this trial between September 2013 and January 2014 from three institutes. The overall response rate was 40.0% and the median progression-free survival was 6.7 months. Treatment-related death occurred in two patients. Grade 2 or worse severe radiation pneumonitis was observed in all three patients that had the volume of lung receiving at least 20 Gy (V20) >30%. The results of this study indicate that no further investigation is warranted into nab-PTX and CBDCA with concurrent thoracic radiation for Stage III NSCLC with V20 > 30% due to severe toxicity. PMID:26442970

  12. Double-Blinded, Randomized Phase II Study Using Embolization with or without Granulocyte–Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor in Uveal Melanoma with Hepatic Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Valsecchi, Matias E.; Terai, Mizue; Eschelman, David J.; Gonsalves, Carin F.; Chervoneva, Inna; Shields, Jerry A.; Shields, Carol L.; Yamamoto, Akira; Sullivan, Kevin L.; Laudadio, MaryAnn; Berd, David; Mastrangelo, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of immunoembolization with granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with uveal melanoma (UM) with liver-only metastasis. Materials and Methods In this double-blind phase II clinical trial, patients were randomized to undergo immunoembolization or bland embolization (BE). Lobar treatment was performed with GM-CSF or normal saline solution mixed with ethiodized oil followed by embolization with gelatin sponge emulsified with iodinated contrast medium. Fifty-two patients (immunoembolization, n = 25; BE, n = 27) were enrolled. Response was assessed after every two treatments. The primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR) of liver metastases. Progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and immunologic responses were secondary endpoints. Results There were five partial responses in the immunoembolization group (ORR, 21.2%; 90% confidence interval [CI], 10.3%–30.5%) and three in the BE group (ORR, 16.7%; 90% CI, 6.3%–26.9%). Stable disease was seen in 12 patients in the immunoembolization group and 19 in the BE group. OS times were 21.5 months (95% CI, 18.5–24.8 mo) with immunoembolization and 17.2 months (95% CI, 11.9–22.4 mo) with BE. The degree of proinflammatory cytokine production was more robust after immunoembolization and correlated with time to “systemic” extrahepatic progression. In the immunoembolization group, interleukin (IL)-6 levels at 1 hour (P = .001) and IL-8 levels at 18 hours after the procedure (P < .001) were significant predictors of longer systemic PFS. Moreover, a dose–response pattern was evident between posttreatment serum cytokine concentrations and systemic PFS. Conclusions Immunoembolization induced more robust inflammatory responses, which correlated with the delayed progression of extrahepatic systemic metastases. PMID:25678394

  13. Final results of a phase II study of nab-paclitaxel, bevacizumab, and gemcitabine as first-line therapy for patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Christopher; Lopes, Gilberto; Baez, Odalys; Castrellon, Aurelio; Ferrell, Annapoorna; Higgins, Connie; Hurley, Erin; Hurley, Judith; Reis, Isildinha; Richman, Stephen; Seo, Pearl; Silva, Orlando; Slingerland, Joyce; Tukia, Keleni; Welsh, Catherine; Glück, Stefan

    2010-09-01

    In order to examine the efficacy and safety of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-P) in combination with bevacizumab (B) and gemcitabine (G) for the first-line treatment of patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer (MBC). In this single-center, open-label phase II trial, patients with HER2-negative MBC received gemcitabine 1500 mg/m(2), nab-paclitaxel 150 mg/m(2), and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg (each administered intravenously) on days 1 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. The primary end point was progression free survival (PFS); secondary end points were overall response rate (ORR), complete (CR) and partial (PR) response rates, clinical benefit (ORR + stable disease), overall survival (OS), and safety. Thirty patients were enrolled. One patient was ineligible and was not included in analysis. Median PFS was 10.4 months (95% CI: 5.6-15.2 months). ORR was 75.9%, comprising eight (27.6%) CRs and 14 (48.3%) PRs; five patients had stable disease (SD) and two patients (6.9%) had progressive disease (PD) as their best response. The clinical benefit rate was 93.1% (27/29) in the overall group and 84.6% in the triple-negative cohort (11/13). The 18-month survival rate was 77.2% (95% CI: 51.1-90.5%). Eight (27.6%) patients experienced grade 3 or 4 toxicity: grade 4 neutropenic fever (n = 1) and grade 3 infection (n = 6), leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, peripheral neuropathy, seizure, shortness of breath, hematuria, and cardiac tamponade (one each). First-line therapy with nab-P, B, and G demonstrated a median PFS of 10.4 months and a 75.9% ORR with acceptable toxicity; this novel combination warrants investigation in a randomized study. PMID:20585851

  14. CPG 7909, an immunostimulatory TLR9 agonist oligodeoxynucleotide, as adjuvant to Engerix-B HBV vaccine in healthy adults: a double-blind phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Cooper, C L; Davis, H L; Morris, M L; Efler, S M; Adhami, M Al; Krieg, A M; Cameron, D W; Heathcote, J

    2004-11-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides containing immunostimulatory CpG motifs (CpG ODN) act as potent Th1-like immune enhancers with many antigens in animal models. We have extended these observations to the first clinical evaluation of the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of CPG 7909 when added to a commercial HBV vaccine. In a randomized, double-blind phase I dose escalation study, healthy volunteers aged 18-35 years were vaccinated at 0, 4 and 24 weeks by intramuscular injection with Engerix-B (GlaxoSmithKline). The regular adult dose of 20 microg recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) adsorbed to alum was administered mixed with saline (control) or with CPG 7909 at one of three doses (0.125, 0.5 or 1.0 mg). HBsAg-specific antibody responses (anti-HBs) appeared significantly sooner and were significantly higher at all timepoints up to and including 24 weeks in CPG 7909 recipients compared to control subjects (p< or = 0.001). Strikingly, most CpG 7909-vaccinated subjects developed protective levels of anti-HBs IgG within just two weeks of the priming vaccine dose. A trend towards higher rates of positive cytotoxic T cell lymphocyte responses was noted in the two higher dose groups of CPG 7909 compared to controls. The most frequently reported adverse events were injection site reactions, flu-like symptoms and headache. While these were more frequent in CPG 7909 groups than in the control group (p<0.0001), most were reported to be of mild to moderate intensity regardless of group. In summary, CPG 7909 as an adjuvant to Engerix-B was well-tolerated and enhanced vaccine immunogenicity. CPG 7909 may allow the development of a two-dose prophylactic HBV vaccine. PMID:15622454

  15. Prospective and clinical validation of ALK immunohistochemistry: results from the phase I/II study of alectinib for ALK-positive lung cancer (AF-001JP study)

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, K.; Togashi, Y.; Kamihara, Y.; Fukuyama, T.; Yoshioka, H.; Inoue, A.; Katsuki, H.; Kiura, K.; Nakagawa, K.; Seto, T.; Maemondo, M.; Hida, T.; Harada, M.; Ohe, Y.; Nogami, N.; Yamamoto, N.; Nishio, M.; Tamura, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusions need to be accurately and efficiently detected for ALK inhibitor therapy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) remains the reference test. Although increasing data are supporting that ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) is highly concordant with FISH, IHC screening needed to be clinically and prospectively validated. Patients and methods In the AF-001JP trial for alectinib, 436 patients were screened for ALK fusions through IHC (n = 384) confirmed with FISH (n = 181), multiplex RT-PCR (n = 68), or both (n = 16). IHC results were scored with iScore. Result ALK fusion was positive in 137 patients and negative in 250 patients. Since the presence of cancer cells in the samples for RT-PCR was not confirmed, ALK fusion negativity could not be ascertained in 49 patients. IHC interpreted with iScore showed a 99.4% (173/174) concordance with FISH. All 41 patients who had iScore 3 and were enrolled in phase II showed at least 30% tumor reduction with 92.7% overall response rate. Two IHC-positive patients with an atypical FISH pattern responded to ALK inhibitor therapy. The reduction rate was not correlated with IHC staining intensity. Conclusions Our study showed (i) that when sufficiently sensitive and appropriately interpreted, IHC can be a stand-alone diagnostic for ALK inhibitor therapies; (ii) that when atypical FISH patterns are accompanied by IHC positivity, the patients should be considered as candidates for ALK inhibitor therapies, and (iii) that the expression level of ALK fusion is not related to the level of response to ALK inhibitors and is thus not required for patient selection. Registration number JapicCTI-101264 (This study is registered with the Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center). PMID:26487585

  16. A multicenter phase II study incorporating high-dose rituximab and liposomal doxorubicin into the CODOX-M/IVAC regimen for untreated Burkitt's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Evens, A. M.; Carson, K. R.; Kolesar, J.; Nabhan, C.; Helenowski, I.; Islam, N.; Jovanovic, B.; Barr, P. M.; Caimi, P. F.; Gregory, S. A.; Gordon, L. I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite improvement with intensive multi-agent chemotherapy, 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates for adults with high-risk Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) remains <55%. Patients and methods We conducted a phase II trial for newly diagnosed classic BL utilizing liposomal doxorubicin (Adriamycin) in lieu of doxorubicin and incorporating intravenous rituximab (at 500 mg/m2 twice/cycle) into the CODOX-M/IVAC regimen. Correlative analyses included paired serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rituximab levels and close examination of cardiac function. Results Among 25 BL patients, the median age was 44 years (23–70) and 4 patients were HIV positive. There were 20 high-risk and 5 low-risk patients. At baseline, 40% of high-risk patients had bone marrow involvement, 35% had bulky disease and 15% had central nervous system involvement. The overall response rate was 100% (complete remission 92%). At 34-month median follow-up, the 2-year PFS and overall survival (OS) rates for all patients were 80% and 84%, respectively (low-risk: both 100%; high-risk: 76% and 81%, respectively). Furthermore, the 2-year PFS, OS, and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates for high-risk, HIV-negative patients were 84%, 89% and 100%, respectively. Adverse events (AEs) appeared to be consistent with prior CODOX-M/IVAC data, although there were several grade 3 cardiac events noted (all declined ejection fraction without clinical symptoms). The mean serum rituximab levels at 24 h after cycles 1 and 3 for patients without relapse were 258 and 306 μg/ml, respectively, versus 131 and 193 μg/ml, respectively, for patients with early progression (P = 0.002 and 0.002, respectively). The mean CSF rituximab levels for all patients were 0.11 and 0.24 μg/ml, respectively, at cycle 1 (24/72 h), which equated to serum:CSF ratios of 0.05% and 0.20%, respectively. Conclusions The integration of rituximab into CODOX-M/IVAC for adult BL was feasible and tolerable, while changes in cardiac function

  17. A 6-week, double-blind, placebo- and haloperidol-controlled, phase II study of lurasidone in patients with acute schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Potkin, Steven G.; Kimura, Tatsuya; Guarino, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the short-term efficacy and safety of the atypical antipsychotic agent lurasidone in the treatment of schizophrenia. Methods: In this phase II, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, hospitalized adult patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and experiencing an acute exacerbation of psychotic symptoms were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of fixed-dose lurasidone 20 mg/day (n = 71), lurasidone 40 mg/day (n = 67), lurasidone 80 mg/day (n = 71), haloperidol 10 mg/day (n = 72, included to test for assay sensitivity), or placebo (n = 72). Efficacy was assessed using the brief psychiatric rating scale, positive and negative syndrome scale, and clinical global impression-severity. Safety assessments included incidence of adverse events and clinical laboratory measures. Results: Numerical improvement was observed from baseline to week 6 (last observation carried forward) on all efficacy measures in all treatment groups; however, no statistically significant differences were noted between any lurasidone group and placebo, or between haloperidol and placebo. The most common adverse events in lurasidone-treated patients, with an incidence of at least 10% (dose groups combined) and greater than placebo, were sedation (15.3%), dyspepsia (13.4%), nausea (13.4%), akathisia (12.4%), and vomiting (10.5%); for haloperidol, the most common adverse events (incidence ⩾ 10% and greater than placebo) were extrapyramidal disorder (20.8%), sedation (19.4%), akathisia (19.4%), dystonia (15.3%), insomnia (13.9%), and somnolence (12.5%). Lurasidone was associated with minimal changes in weight, metabolic parameters, and prolactin levels. Conclusions: None of the lurasidone groups separated from placebo in this clinical study of patients with acute schizophrenia. In addition, haloperidol, which was included for assay sensitivity, did not separate from placebo, resulting in a failed study. Possible reasons for the lack of assay

  18. A phase I/II study examining pentostatin, chlorambucil, and theophylline in patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Willis, Carl R; Goodrich, Amy; Park, Kathy; Waselenko, Jamie K; Lucas, Margaret; Reese, Amy; Diehl, Louis F; Grever, Michael R; Byrd, John C; Flinn, Ian W

    2006-05-01

    In an attempt to exploit bcl-2 overexpression and aberrant p53 function, two frequently encountered aberrations that predict marked treatment resistance and worse prognosis in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), we combined theophylline, pentostatin, and chlorambucil at two dose levels (cohort I: 30 mg/m(2); cohort II: 20 mg/m(2)) on a 21-day cycle for up to six courses. We employed a phase I/II design to determine feasibility, define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and explore the impact of biologic modulation on response and time to progression (TTP) in 20 patients with relapsed or refractory CLL and NHL. Eight patients were enrolled in cohort I. They demonstrated a response rate (RR) of 28% and a 16.5-month TTP after receiving a median of two cycles. A 50% RR was observed in this cohort when patients with adverse histologies were excluded. Because of myelotoxicity, this dose level defined the MTD, and de-escalation occurred. All 12 patients in cohort II received 20 mg/m(2) chlorambucil. A 50% RR and an 18-month TTP were observed after a median of 5.5 cycles. An RR of 47% and a complete remission (CR) of 5% were observed for the entire group, although responses and TTP varied greatly by histology. Significant activity was observed in patients with B-cell CLL and follicular lymphoma (FL). RR and TTP for fludarabine-sensitive/naïve and fludarabine-refractory (FR) B-cell CLL patients were 66 vs 25% and 20 vs 8.5 months, respectively. Both FL patients responded (one with partial remission and one with CR), with a 22.5-monthly median TTP. For responding patients, median TTP and overall survival (OS) was 21 and 69 months, respectively, compared to a median TTP of 2 months and an OS of 13.5 months for nonresponders. The combination of pentostatin, chlorambucil, and theophylline is the active regimen in patients with FL and B-cell CLL. PMID:16518606

  19. Phase II Study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Mannose-Sensitive Hemagglutinin in Combination with Capecitabine for Her-2–Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer Pretreated with Anthracycline and Taxane

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Fangfang; Cao, Jun; Liu, Zhebin; Wang, Zhonghua; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Leiping; Zhao, Xinmin; Shao, Zhimin; Wang, Biyun; Hu, Xichun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) remains an incurable disease despite major therapeutic advances. Pseudomonas aeruginosa–mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (PA-MSHA) has been established to have anti-proliferative effects against breast cancer cells in preclinical experiments, and is indicated for treatment of cancer in China. We performed a phase II trial combining PA-MSHA with capecitabine in patients with heavily pretreated MBC. Methods Eligibility criteria included human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–negative MBC, prior therapy with anthracyclines and taxanes, at least one prior chemotherapy regimen for metastatic disease or early relapse after a taxane plus anthracycline adjuvant regimen, and adequate organ function and performance status. PA-MSHA 1 mg was administered subcutaneously every other day and capecitabine 1000 mg/m2 orally twice a day for 2 weeks on, 1 week off. The primary end point was progression-free survival. Results A total of 97 patients were enrolled. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 4.0 months [95 % confidence interval (CI) 3.0–4.9], which was not significantly different from that in historical controls. However, median PFS was significantly longer (8.2 months; 95 % CI 6.7–9.7) in 24 patients with moderate immune-related adverse events (irAEs) such as fever or skin induration at the injection site than in those with no or mild irAEs (3.1 months, 95 % CI 2.5–3.6; p = 0.003). Overall survival was also improved in these patients (25.4 vs. 16.4 months; p = 0.044). PA-MSHA has a good safety profile, with only 6 patients (6.2 %) discontinuing treatment. PA-MSHA did not increase capecitabine-related toxicities such as hand-foot syndrome, nausea, and vomiting. Conclusion Adding PA-MSHA to capecitabine has a good safety profile in patients with heavily pre-treated MBC, although benefit from this regimen might occur only in patients with moderate PA-MSHA–related adverse events. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  20. Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Suppression With Bevacizumab and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vuky, Jacqueline; Badiozamani, Kasra; Song Guobin

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We report a Phase II trial assessing the acute and late toxicities of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), long-term androgen suppression (LTAS), and bevacizumab in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We treated 18 patients with LTAS with bicalutamide and goserelin in combination with bevacizumab and IMRT. Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) was administered for the first 16 weeks, and 15 mg/kg was then given every 3 weeks for 12 additional weeks, with an IMRT dose of 77.9 Gy to the prostate, 64.6 Gy to the seminal vesicles, and 57 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes. Patients were eligible if they had clinical stage T2b to T4, a Gleason sum score of 8 to 10, or a prostate- specific antigen level of 20ng/mL or greater. The primary endpoint of the study was evaluation of acute and late toxicities. Results: The median age was 69 years, with a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 12.5 ng/mL and Gleason score of 8. The pretreatment clinical stage was T1c in 4 patients, T2 in 11, and T3 in 3. All patients completed IMRT with median follow-up of 34 months (range, 28-40 months) The most common Grade 2 or higher toxicities were hypertension (61% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), proteinuria (28% with Grade 2 and 6% with Grade 3), and leucopenia (28% with Grade 2). No Grade 4 or higher acute toxicities were reported. Late toxicities included proctitis (6% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), rectal bleeding (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), hematuria (6% with Grade 2), proteinuria (17% with Grade 2), hyponatremia (6% with Grade 3), cystitis (6% with Grade 3), and urinary retention (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3). Grade 4 prostatitis occurred in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions: Bevacizumab does not appear to exacerbate the acute effects of IMRT. Late toxicities may have been worsened with this regimen. Further investigations of bevacizumab with LTAS and IMRT should be

  1. 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine with intensive chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for high-risk neuroblastoma. A new approaches to neuroblastoma therapy (NANT) phase II study.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Gregory A; Villablanca, Judith G; Maris, John M; Weiss, Brian; Groshen, Susan; Marachelian, Araz; Park, Julie R; Tsao-Wei, Denice; Hawkins, Randall; Shulkin, Barry L; Jackson, Hollie; Goodarzian, Fariba; Shimada, Hiro; Courtier, Jesse; Hutchinson, Raymond; Haas-Koga, Daphne; Hasenauer, C Beth; Czarnecki, Scarlett; Katzenstein, Howard M; Matthay, Katherine K

    2015-04-01

    (131)I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine ((131)I-MIBG) has been used as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy for the treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma. The activity and toxicity of (131)I-MIBG when combined with carboplatin, etoposide, and melphalan (CEM) and autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) are now investigated in a phase II multicenter study. Fifty patients with MIBG-avid disease were enrolled into 2 cohorts, stratified by response to induction therapy. The primary study endpoint was response of patients with refractory (n = 27) or progressive disease (n = 15). A second cohort of patients (n = 8) with a partial response (PR) to induction therapy was included to obtain preliminary response data. (131)I-MIBG was administered on day -21 to all patients, with CEM given days -7 to -4, and SCT given on day 0. (131)I-MIBG dosing was determined by pre-therapy glomerular filtration rate (GFR), with 8 mCi/kg given if GFR was 60 to 99 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) (n = 13) and 12 mCi/kg if GFR ≥ 100 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) (n = 37). External beam radiotherapy was delivered to the primary and metastatic sites, beginning approximately 6 weeks after SCT. Responses (complete response + PR) were seen in 4 of 41 (10%) evaluable patients with primary refractory or progressive disease. At 3 years after SCT, the event-free survival (EFS) was 20% ± 7%, with overall survival (OS) 62% ± 8% for this cohort of patients. Responses were noted in 3 of 8 (38%) of patients with a PR to induction, with 3-year EFS 38% ± 17% and OS 75% ± 15%. No statistically significant difference was found comparing EFS or OS based upon pre-therapy GFR or disease cohort. Six of 50 patients had nonhematologic dose-limiting toxicity (DLT); 1 of 13 in the low GFR and 5 of 37 in the normal GFR cohorts. Hepatic sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) was seen in 6 patients (12%), with 5 events defined as dose-limiting SOS. The median times to neutrophil and platelet engraftment were 10 and 15 days

  2. A phase II study of capecitabine and irinotecan in combination with concurrent pelvic radiotherapy (CapIri-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Willeke, F; Horisberger, K; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, U; Wenz, F; Leitner, A; Hochhaus, A; Grobholz, R; Willer, A; Kähler, G; Post, S; Hofheinz, R-D

    2007-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety data of a combination regimen using weekly irinotecan in combination with capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy (CapIri-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer in a phase-II trial. Patients with rectal cancer clinical stages T3/4 Nx or N+ were recruited to receive irinotecan (50 mg m−2 weekly) and capecitabine (500 mg m−2 bid days 1–38) with a concurrent RT dose of 50.4 Gy. Surgery was scheduled 4–6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. A total of 36 patients (median age 62 years; m/f: 27:9) including three patients with local recurrence were enclosed onto the trial. The median distance of the tumour from the anal verge was 5 cm. The main toxicity observed was (NCI-CTC grades 1/2/3/4 (n)): Anaemia 23/9/−/−; leucocytopenia 12/7/7/2, diarrhoea 13/15/4/−, nausea/vomiting 9/10/2/−, and increased activity of transaminases 3/3/1/−. One patient had a reversible episode of ventricular fibrillation during chemoradiation, most probably caused by capecitabine. The relative dose intensity was (median/mean (%)): irinotecan 95/91, capecitabine 100/92). Thirty-four patients underwent surgery (anterior resection n=25; abdomino-perineal resection n=6; Hartmann's procedure n=3). R0-resection was accomplished in all patients. Two patients died in the postoperative course from septic complications. Pathological complete remission was observed in five out of 34 resected patients (15%), and nine patients showed microfoci of residual tumour (26%). After a median follow-up of 28 months one patient had developed a local recurrence, and five patients distant metastases. Three-year overall survival for all patients with surgery (excluding three patients treated for local relapse or with primary metastatic disease) was 80%. In summary, preoperative chemoradiation with CapIri-RT exhibits promising efficacy whereas showing managable toxicity. The local recurrence and distant failure rates observed after

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma: Four-Year Results of a Prospective Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fakiris, Achilles J.; McGarry, Ronald C.; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Papiez, Lech; Williams, Mark; Henderson, Mark A.; Timmerman, Robert

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: The 50-month results of a prospective Phase II trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in medically inoperable patients are reported. Methods and Materials: A total of 70 medically inoperable patients had clinically staged T1 (34 patients) or T2 (36 patients) (<=7 cm), N0, M0, biopsy-confirmed non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and received SBRT as per our previously published reports. The SBRT treatment dose of 60-66 Gy was prescribed to the 80% isodose volume in three fractions. Results: Median follow-up was 50.2 months (range, 1.4-64.8 months). Kaplan-Meier local control at 3 years was 88.1%. Regional (nodal) and distant recurrence occurred in 6 (8.6%) and 9 (12.9%) patients, respectively. Median survival (MS) was 32.4 months and 3-year overall survival (OS) was 42.7% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 31.1-54.3%). Cancer-specific survival at 3 years was 81.7% (95% CI, 70.0-93.4%). For patients with T1 tumors, MS was 38.7 months (95% CI, 25.3-50.2) and for T2 tumors MS was 24.5 months (95% CI, 18.5-37.4) (p = 0.194). Tumor volume (<=5 cc, 5-10 cc, 10-20 cc, >20 cc) did not significantly impact survival: MS was 36.9 months (95% CI, 18.1-42.9), 34.0 (95% CI, 16.9-57.1), 32.8 (95% CI, 21.3-57.8), and 21.4 months (95% CI, 17.8-41.6), respectively (p = 0.712). There was no significant survival difference between patients with peripheral vs. central tumors (MS 33.2 vs. 24.4 months, p = 0.697). Grade 3 to 5 toxicity occurred in 5 of 48 patients with peripheral lung tumors (10.4%) and in 6 of 22 patients (27.3%) with central tumors (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.088). Conclusion: Based on our study results, use of SBRT results in high rates of local control in medically inoperable patients with Stage I NSCLC.

  4. The validity and responsiveness of three quality of life measures in the assessment of psoriasis patients: results of a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Shikiar, Richard; Willian, Mary Kaye; Okun, Martin M; Thompson, Christine S; Revicki, Dennis A

    2006-01-01

    Background Patient-reported outcome (PROs) measures are being used more frequently in investigational studies of treatments for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. The objective of this study was to examine the relationships among the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), the Short Form 36 (SF-36), and the EuroQOL 5D (EQ-5D) and to assess their validity, responsiveness, and estimates of minimum important differences. Methods A Phase II, randomized, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled, multi-center clinical trial assessed the clinical efficacy and safety of two doses of subcutaneously administered adalimumab vs. placebo for 12 weeks in the treatment of 147 patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. This study provided the opportunity to evaluate the validity and responsiveness to change in clinical status of PROs instruments. Patients completed the DLQI, SF-36, and EQ-5D questionnaires at baseline and at 12 weeks. Blinded investigators assessed the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) scores and the Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) scores of enrolled patients. The responsiveness of the measures to changes in the clinical endpoints from baseline to Week 12 was assessed. Estimates of minimum important differences (MID) were derived. All analyses were performed with blinded data; findings and conclusions were not biased based on treatment condition. Results The dermatology-specific DLQI was highly correlated to clinical endpoints at baseline and at Week 12, and was the most responsive PRO to changes in endpoints. Compared with the SF-36, the EQ-5D index score and VAS scores were generally more highly correlated with clinical endpoints, but displayed about the same degree of responsiveness. The most responsive SF-36 scales were the Bodily Pain and Social Functioning scales. Estimates of the MID for the DLQI ranged from 2.3–5.7 and for the SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS) score ranged from 2.5–3.9. Conclusion This study provides

  5. Phase II Study of Haploidentical Natural Killer Cell Infusion for Treatment of Relapsed or Persistent Myeloid Malignancies Following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Brian C; Le Luduec, Jean-Benoit; Forlenza, Christopher; Jakubowski, Ann A; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Young, James W; Hsu, Katharine C

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a phase 2 study to determine the efficacy of HLA-haploidentical related donor natural killer (NK) cells after cyclophosphamide-based lymphodepletion in patients with relapsed or progressive acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Eight patients (2 with MDS and 6 with AML) were treated with cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg on day -3 and day -2 before infusion of NK cells isolated from a haploidentical related donor. One patient also received fludarabine 25 mg/m(2)/day for 4 days. Six doses of 1 million units of interleukin-2 (IL-2) were administered on alternating days beginning on day -1. The median number of NK cells infused was 10.6 × 10(6)/kg (range, 4.3 to 22.4 × 10(6)/kg), and the median number of CD3 cells infused was 2.1 × 10(3)/kg (range, 1.9 to 40 × 10(3)/kg). NK infusions were well tolerated, with a median time to neutrophil recovery of 19 days (range, 7 days to not achieved) and no incidence of graft-versus-host disease after NK infusion. One patient with AML and 1 patient with MDS achieved a complete response, but relapsed at 1.7 and 1.8 months, respectively. One patient with MDS experienced resolution of dysplastic features but persistence of clonal karyotype abnormalities; this patient was stable at 65 months after NK cell therapy. The median duration of survival was 12.9 months (range, 0.8 to 65.3 months). Chimerism analysis of CD3(-)/CD56(+) peripheral blood cells did not detect any circulating haploidentical NK cells after infusion. NK phenotyping was performed in 7 patients during and after IL-2 infusion. We found a slight trend toward greater expression of KIR2DL2/2DL3/2DS2 (5% versus 28%; P = .03) at 14 days in patients who survived longer than 6 months from NK cell infusion (n = 4) compared with those who died within 6 months of NK cell therapy (n = 3). In summary, our data support the safety of haploidentical NK cell

  6. QuickSilver: A Phase II Study Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Criteria to Identify “Good Prognosis” Rectal Cancer Patients Eligible for Primary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently, two nonrandomized, prospective cohort studies used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess the circumferential resection margin to identify “good prognosis” rectal tumors eligible for primary surgery and have reported favorable outcomes. Objective The objective of this project was to conduct a Phase II trial to assess the safety and feasibility of MRI criteria to identify “good prognosis” rectal tumors eligible for primary surgery in the North American setting. Methods Patients with newly diagnosed primary rectal cancer attending surgical clinics at participating centers will be invited to participate in the study. The inclusion criteria for the study are: (1) diagnosis of rectal cancer (0-15 cm) from the anal verge on endoscopy and proximal extent of tumor at or below the sacral promontory on computed tomography (CT) or MRI; (2) meets all MRI criteria for “good prognosis” rectal tumor as defined by the study protocol; (3) 18 years or older; and (4) able to provide written consent. The initial assessment will include: (1) clinical and endoscopic examination of the primary tumor; (2) CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis; and (3) pelvic MRI. All potentially eligible cases will be presented at a multidisciplinary cancer conference to assess for eligibility based on the MRI criteria for “good prognosis” tumor which include: (1) predicted circumferential resection margin (CRM) > 1 mm; (2) definite T2, T2/early T3, or definite T3 tumor with < 5 mm of extramural depth of invasion (EMD); (3) any N0, N1, or N2; and (4) absence of extramural venous invasion (EMVI). All patients fulfilling the MRI criteria for “good prognosis” rectal cancer and the inclusion and exclusion criteria will be invited to participate in the study and proceed to primary surgery. The safety of the MRI criteria will be evaluated by assessing the positive CRM rate and is the primary outcome for the study. Results We expect to have a minimum of 300 potentially

  7. Phase II Study of Everolimus Beyond Progression

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  8. Vinflunine – an active chemotherapy for treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer previously treated with a platinum-based regimen: results of a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Bennouna, J; Breton, J-L; Tourani, J-M; Ottensmeier, C; O'Brien, M; Kosmidis, P; Huat, T E; Pinel, M-C; Colin, C; Douillard, J-Y

    2006-01-01

    A multicentre, single-arm, phase II trial designed to determine the efficacy of single-agent vinflunine in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) previously treated with a platinum-based regimen. The objectives were to assess efficacy in terms of tumour response rate (primary end point), duration of response, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), and to evaluate the toxicity associated with this treatment. Patients with advanced NSCLC with progressive disease having failed prior platinum-based first-line treatment for advanced disease. Five responses out of the 63 treated patients were documented by WHO criteria and validated by an independent panel review (IRP), yielding a response rate of 7.9% (95% CI: 2.6–17.6) in the intent-to-treat analysis and 8.3% (95% CI: 2.8–18.4) in the evaluable population. Disease control was achieved in 35 out of 60 evaluable patients (58.3%). The median duration of response (complete response+partial response), according to modified WHO criteria was 7.8 months (95% CI: 4.6–NR). Median PFS was 2.6 months (95% CI: 1.4–3.8), and the median survival was 7.0 months (95% CI: 5.8–9.2). Grades 3–4 neutropenia was reported in 50% of patients; febrile neutropenia was observed in two patients (3.2%); grades 3–4 myalgia and grade 3 constipation were experienced by 10 (15.9%) and six (9.5%) of patients, respectively. Constipation was manageable, noncumulative and could be prevented with laxative prophylaxis. The encouraging results from this phase II study with vinflunine warrant further investigations in phase III trials as second- or first-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma, as a single agent or in combination with other active drugs. PMID:16641911

  9. A Multicenter, Open-Label, Controlled Phase II Study to Evaluate Safety and Immunogenicity of MVA Smallpox Vaccine (IMVAMUNE) in 18–40 Year Old Subjects with Diagnosed Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Richard N; Hurley, Yadira; Dinh, Dinh V.; Mraz, Serena; Vera, Javier Gomez; von Bredow, Dorothea; von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Roesch, Siegfried; Virgin, Garth; Arndtz-Wiedemann, Nathaly; Meyer, Thomas Peter; Schmidt, Darja; Nichols, Richard; Young, Philip; Chaplin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Replicating smallpox vaccines can cause severe complications in individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD). Prior studies evaluating Modified Vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA), a non-replicating vaccine in humans, showed a favorable safety and immunogenicity profile in healthy volunteers. Objective This Phase II study compared the safety and immunogenicity of MVA enrolling groups of 350 subjects with AD (SCORAD ≤ 30) and 282 healthy subjects. Methods Subjects were vaccinated twice with MVA, each dose given subcutaneously 4 weeks apart. Adverse events, cardiac parameters, and the development of vaccinia virus humoral immune responses were monitored. Results The overall safety of the vaccine was similar in both groups. Adverse events affecting skin were experienced significantly more often in subjects with AD, but the majority of these events were mild to moderate in intensity. Seroconversion rates and geometric mean titers for total and neutralizing vaccinia-specific antibodies in the AD group were non-inferior compared to the healthy subjects. Limitations The size of the study population limited the detection of serious adverse events occurring at a frequency less than 1%. Conclusion MVA has a favorable safety profile and the ability to elicit vaccinia-specific immune responses in subjects with AD. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00316602 PMID:26439129

  10. PEPCOL: a GERCOR randomized phase II study of nanoliposomal irinotecan PEP02 (MM-398) or irinotecan with leucovorin/5-fluorouracil as second-line therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chibaudel, Benoist; Maindrault-Gœbel, Frédérique; Bachet, Jean-Baptiste; Louvet, Christophe; Khalil, Ahmed; Dupuis, Olivier; Hammel, Pascal; Garcia, Marie-Line; Bennamoun, Mostefa; Brusquant, David; Tournigand, Christophe; André, Thierry; Arbaud, Claire; Larsen, Annette K; Wang, Yi-Wen; Yeh, C Grace; Bonnetain, Franck; de Gramont, Aimery

    2016-04-01

    A multicenter, open-label, noncomparative, randomized phase II study (PEPCOL) was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the irinotecan or PEP02 (MM-398, nanoliposomal irinotecan) with leucovorin (LV)/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combination as second-line treatment in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients with unresectable mCRC who had failed one prior oxaliplatin-based first-line therapy were randomized toirinotecan with LV/5-FU (FOLFIRI) or PEP02 with LV/5-FU (FUPEP; PEP02 80 mg/m(2) with LV 400 mg/m(2) on day 1 and 5-FU 2400 mg/m(2) on days 1-2). Bevacizumab (5 mg/kg, biweekly) was allowed in both arms. The primary endpoint was 2-month response rate (RR). Fifty-five patients were randomized (FOLFIRI, n = 27; FUPEP, n = 28). In the intent-to-treat population (n = 55), 2-month RR response rate was observed in two (7.4%) and three (10.7%) patients in the FOLFIRI and FUPEP arms, respectively. The most common grade 3-4 adverse events reported in the respective FOLFIRI and FUPEP arms were diarrhea (33% vs. 21%), neutropenia (30% vs. 11%), mucositis (11% vs. 11%), and grade 2 alopecia (26% vs. 25%). FUPEP has activity and acceptable safety profile in oxaliplatin-pretreated mCRC patients. PMID:26806397

  11. A randomised pilot Phase II study of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (AC) or epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC) given 2 weekly with pegfilgrastim (accelerated) vs 3 weekly (standard) for women with early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R L; Walsh, G; Ashley, S; Chua, S; Agarwal, R; O'Brien, M; Johnston, S; Smith, I E

    2009-01-01

    Accelerated (dose-dense) chemotherapy, in which the frequency of administration is increased without changing total dose or duration, may increase the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. We performed a randomised Phase II study to assess the safety and relative toxicity of AC (doxorubicin; cyclophosphamide) vs E(epirubicin)C given by conventional or accelerated schedules as neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer. Furthermore, the relative toxicity of doxorubicin and epirubicin remains uncertain. Patients were randomised to one of four arms; four courses of standard 3 weekly cyclophosphamide 600 mg m−2 in combination with doxorubicin 60 mg m−2 (AC) vs epirubicin 90 mg m−2 (EC) 3 weekly vs the same regimens administered every 2 weeks with pegfilgrastim (G-CSF). A total of 126 patients were treated, 42 with standard AC, 42 with accelerated AC, 19 with standard EC and 23 with accelerated EC. Significantly more grade 3/4 day one neutropenia was seen with standard (6/61, 10%) compared to accelerated (0/65,) regimens (P=0.01). A trend towards more neutropenic sepsis was seen in the combined standard and accelerated AC arms (12/84, 14%) compared to the combined EC arms (1/42, 2%), P=0.06. Falls in left ventricular ejection fraction were not increased with accelerated treatment. Accelerated AC and EC with pegfilgrastim are safe and feasible regimens in the treatment of early breast cancer with less neutropenia than conventional 3 weekly schedules. PMID:19165198

  12. A phase II study of elacytarabine in combination with idarubicin and of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and persistent blasts after the first induction course.

    PubMed

    Rizzieri, David; Vey, Norbert; Thomas, Xavier; Huguet-Rigal, Françoise; Schlenk, Richard F; Krauter, Jürgen; Kindler, Thomas; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Blau, Igor Wolfgang; Jacobsen, Tove Flem; Johansen, Malin; Bergeland, Trygve; Gianella-Borradori, Athos; Krug, Utz

    2014-09-01

    Unlike cytarabine, cellular entry of Elacytarabine, the elaidic acid ester derivative of cytarabine, is independent of the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1). This phase II study tested whether the hENT1 blast expression level can be used as a predictive marker for cytarabine response and if the efficacy of elacytarabine is independent of hENT1 expression. A total of 51 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) induction failure were given elacytarabine-idarubicin as a second induction course. The hENT1 expression level was analyzed prior to first induction and/or prior to treatment with elacytarabine. The overall response rate (ORR) was 41% and the safety profile was manageable. There is a trend suggesting that hENT1 expression influences response to cytarabine, but not sufficient to support it as a biomarker for guiding treatment. Further, we conclude that the activity of elacytarabine is not significantly predicted by the hENT1 expression level. PMID:24255981

  13. Randomized phase II study of two schedules of flavopiridol given as timed sequential therapy with cytosine arabinoside and mitoxantrone for adults with newly diagnosed, poor-risk acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Judith E.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Estey, Elihu H.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Smith, B. Douglas; Greer, Jacqueline M.; Drye, D. Michelle; Mackey, Karen; Dorcy, Kathleen Shannon; Gore, Steven D.; Levis, Mark J.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Carraway, Hetty E.; Pratz, Keith W.; Gladstone, Douglas E.; Showel, Margaret M.; Othus, Megan; Doyle, L. Austin; Wright, John J.; Pagel, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Flavopiridol is a protein-bound, cytotoxic, cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor. A phase II trial of flavopiridol followed by ara-C and mitoxantrone with flavopiridol given by 1-h bolus for adults with newly-diagnosed, poor-risk acute myelogenous leukemia yielded 67% complete remission with median disease-free survival of 13.6 months. Design and Methods We compared bolus flavopiridol (50 mg/m2/day, Arm A) versus 'hybrid' flavopiridol (30 mg/m2 over 30 min followed by 40 mg/m2 over 4 h, Arm B) followed by ara-C and mitoxantrone in 78 patients (39 per arm) with newly diagnosed, poor-risk acute myelogenous leukemia. To mitigate imbalance, patients were stratified by presence or absence of secondary leukemia and therapy for antecedent disorder. Results Death at or before Day 60 occurred in 8% of patients per arm. Complete remission plus complete remission with incomplete recovery was 68% (Arm A, 62%; Arm B, 74%) overall, and 65% or over in both arms for patients with secondary leukemia and leukemia with adverse genetics. In Arm A 91% and in Arm B 86% of patients received chemotherapy and/or allogeneic transplantation in complete remission. Median overall survival for all remission patients has not been reached for either arm, with median disease free survival of 13.6 months for Arm A and of 12.0 months for Arm B. Conclusions Both flavopiridol schedules produce comparably encouraging results in adults with poor-risk acute myelogenous leukemia. Given the greater ease of bolus administration, we are conducting a randomized phase II study of bolus flavopiridol followed by ara-c and mitoxantrone versus conventional induction therapy for patients aged 70 years and under with intermediate or poor-risk acute myelogenous leukemia. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT 00407966. PMID:22733022

  14. Phase II-I-II Study of Two Different Doses and Schedules of Pralatrexate, a High-Affinity Substrate for the Reduced Folate Carrier, in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma Reveals Marked Activity in T-Cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Owen A.; Horwitz, Steven; Hamlin, Paul; Portlock, Carol; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Sarasohn, Debra; Neylon, Ellen; Mastrella, Jill; Hamelers, Rachel; MacGregor-Cortelli, Barbara; Patterson, Molly; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Sirotnak, Frank; Fleisher, Martin; Mould, Diane R.; Saunders, Mike; Zelenetz, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of pralatrexate in patients with lymphoma. Patients and Methods Pralatrexate, initially given at a dose of 135 mg/m2 on an every-other-week basis, was associated with stomatitis. A redesigned, weekly phase I/II study established an MTD of 30 mg/m2 weekly for six weeks every 7 weeks. Patients were required to have relapsed/refractory disease, an absolute neutrophil greater than 1,000/μL, and a platelet count greater than 50,000/μL for the first dose of any cycle. Results The every-other-week, phase II experience was associated with an increased risk of stomatitis and hematologic toxicity. On a weekly schedule, the MTD was 30 mg/m2 weekly for 6 weeks every 7 weeks. This schedule modification resulted in a 50% reduction in the major hematologic toxicities and abrogation of the grades 3 to 4 stomatitis. Stomatitis was associated with elevated homocysteine and methylmalonic acid, which were reduced by folate and vitamin B12 supplementation. Of 48 assessable patients, the overall response rate was 31% (26% by intention to treat), including 17% who experienced complete remission (CR). When analyzed by lineage, the overall response rates were 10% and 54% in patients with B- and T-cell lymphomas, respectively. All eight patients who experienced CR had T-cell lymphoma, and four of the six patients with a partial remission were positron emission tomography negative. The duration of responses ranged from 3 to 26 months. Conclusion Pralatrexate has significant single-agent activity in patients with relapsed/refractory T-cell lymphoma. PMID:19652067

  15. Safety and Clinical Activity of a Combination Therapy Comprising Two Antibody-Based Targeting Agents for the Treatment of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Results of a Phase I/II Study Evaluating the Immunoconjugate Inotuzumab Ozogamicin With Rituximab

    PubMed Central

    Fayad, Luis; Offner, Fritz; Smith, Mitchell R.; Verhoef, Gregor; Johnson, Peter; Kaufman, Jonathan L.; Rohatiner, Ama; Advani, Anjali; Foran, James; Hess, Georg; Coiffier, Bertrand; Czuczman, Myron; Giné, Eva; Durrant, Simon; Kneissl, Michelle; Luu, Kenneth T.; Hua, Steven Y.; Boni, Joseph; Vandendries, Erik; Dang, Nam H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Inotuzumab ozogamicin (INO) is an antibody-targeted chemotherapy agent composed of a humanized anti-CD22 antibody conjugated to calicheamicin, a potent cytotoxic agent. We performed a phase I/II study to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of INO plus rituximab (R-INO) for treatment of relapsed/refractory CD20+/CD22+ B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patients and Methods A dose-escalation phase to determine the MTD of R-INO was followed by an expanded cohort to further evaluate the efficacy and safety at the MTD. Patients with relapsed follicular lymphoma (FL), relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), or refractory aggressive NHL received R-INO every 4 weeks for up to eight cycles. Results In all, 118 patients received one or more cycles of R-INO (median, four cycles). Most common grade 3 to 4 adverse events were thrombocytopenia (31%) and neutropenia (22%). Common low-grade toxicities included hyperbilirubinemia (25%) and increased AST (36%). The MTD of INO in combination with rituximab (375 mg/m2) was confirmed to be the same as that for single-agent INO (1.8 mg/m2). Treatment at the MTD yielded objective response rates of 87%, 74%, and 20% for relapsed FL (n = 39), relapsed DLBCL (n = 42), and refractory aggressive NHL (n = 30), respectively. The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate was 68% (median, not reached) for FL and 42% (median, 17.1 months) for relapsed DLBCL. Conclusion R-INO demonstrated high response rates and long PFS in patients with relapsed FL or DLBCL. This and the manageable toxicity profile suggest that R-INO may be a promising option for CD20+/CD22+ B-cell NHL. PMID:23295790

  16. A Phase II Study of Preradiotherapy Chemotherapy Followed by Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Medulloblastoma/Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group (CCG 9931)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Jeffrey Donahue, Bernadine; Mehta, Minesh; Miller, Douglas C.; Rorke, Lucy B.; Jakacki, Regina; Robertson, Patricia; Sposto, Richard; Holmes, Emi; Vezina, Gilbert; Muraszko, Karin; Puccetti, Diane; Prados, Michael; Chan, K.-W.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To verify feasibility and monitor progression-free survival and overall survival in children with high-risk medulloblastoma and noncerebellar primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) treated in a Phase II study with preradiotherapy chemotherapy (CHT) followed by high-dose, hyperfractionated craniospinal radiotherapy (CSRT). Methods and Materials: Eligibility criteria included age >3 years at diagnosis, medulloblastoma with either high M stage and/or >1.5 cm{sup 2} postoperative residual disease, and all patients with noncerebellar PNET. Treatment was initiated with five alternating monthly cycles of CHT (A [cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and vincristine], B [carboplatin and etoposide], A, B, and A) followed by hyperfractionated CSRT (40 Gy) with a boost to the primary tumor (72 Gy) given in twice-daily 1-Gy fractions. Results: The valid study group consisted of 124 patients whose median age at diagnosis was 7.8 years. Eighty-four patients (68%) completed the entire protocol according to study guidelines (within 9 months), and the median time to complete CSRT was 1.6 months. Major reasons for failure to complete CHT included progressive disease (17%) and toxic death (2.4%). The 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 43% {+-} 5% and 52% {+-} 5%, respectively. No significant differences were detected in subset analysis related to response to CHT, site of primary tumor, postoperative residual disease, or M stage. Conclusions: The feasibility of this intensive multimodality protocol was confirmed, and response to pre-RT CHT did not impact on survival. Survival data from this protocol can not be compared with data from other studies, given the protocol design.

  17. A phase II study of GM-CSF and rIFN-γ1b plus carboplatin for the treatment of recurrent, platinum-sensitive ovarian, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Apte, Sachin M.; Cohen, Lorenzo; Bassett, Roland L.; Iyer, Revathy B.; Wolf, Judith K.; Levenback, Charles L.; Gershenson, David M.; Freedman, Ralph S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of carboplatin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and recombinant interferon gamma 1b (rIFN-γ1b) in women with recurrent, platinum-sensitive ovarian, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal cancer. Methods In this phase II study, patients with recurrent, platinum-sensitive ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer were treated with subcutaneous GM-CSF and rIFN-γ1b before and after intravenous carboplatin until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. All patients had measurable disease and a chemotherapy-free interval ≥6 months. Response was determined using RECIST criteria and CA 125 levels. Results Between 2003 and 2007, 59 patients received a median of 6 cycles of therapy (range, 1 to 13 cycles). Median age at enrollment was 61 years (range, 35 to 79 years). Median time to progression prior to enrollment was 11 months (range, 6 to 58 months). Of 54 patients evaluable for response, 9 (17%) had a complete response, 21 (39%) had a partial response, and 24 (44%) had progressive disease. The overall response rate was 56% (95% CI: 41% to 69%). With a median follow-up of 6.4 months, median time to progression was 6 months. Myeloid derived cells and platelets increased on day 9 of each chemotherapy cycle. The most common adverse effects were bone marrow suppression, carboplatin hypersensitivity, and fatigue. Responders reported improved quality of life. Conclusion This pre and post-carboplatin cytokine regimen resulted in a reasonable response and a hematologic profile that could invite further evaluation of its components in the treatment of patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:19264351

  18. Long-Term Follow-Up of Preoperative Pelvic Radiation Therapy and Concomitant Boost Irradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Multi-Institutional Phase II Study (KROG 04-01)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Nam, Taek-Keun; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Lee, Doo Seok; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Chang, Hee Jin; Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Jang, Hong Seok

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To perform a prospective phase II study to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative pelvic radiation therapy and concomitant small-field boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, mid-to-lower rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled. They had received preoperative chemoradiation therapy and total mesorectal excision. Pelvic radiation therapy of 43.2 Gy in 24 fractions plus concomitant boost radiation therapy of 7.2 Gy in 12 fractions was delivered to the pelvis and tumor bed for 5 weeks. Two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin were administered for 3 days in the first and fifth week of radiation therapy. The pathologic response, survival outcome, and treatment toxicity were evaluated for the study endpoints. Results: Of 69 patients, 8 (11.6%) had a pathologically complete response. Downstaging rates were 40.5% for T classification and 68.1% for N classification. At the median follow-up of 69 months, 36 patients have been followed up for more than 5 years. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival rates were 66.0% and 75.3%, respectively. Higher pathologic T (P = .045) and N (P = .032) classification were significant adverse prognostic factors for DFS, and high-grade histology was an adverse prognostic factor for both DFS (P = .025) and overall survival (P = .031) on the multivariate analysis. Fifteen patients (21.7%) experienced grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity, and 7 patients (10.1%) had long-term toxicity. Conclusion: Preoperative pelvic radiation therapy with concomitant boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks showed acceptable acute and long-term toxicities. However, the benefit of concomitant small-field boost irradiation for 5 weeks in rectal cancer patients was not demonstrated beyond conventional irradiation for 6 weeks in terms of tumor response and

  19. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0247: A Randomized Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Concurrent Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stuart J.; Winter, Kathryn; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, Robert Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) and the toxicity of two neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT) regimens for Stage T3-T4 rectal cancer in a randomized Phase II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer of <12 cm from the anal verge were randomized to preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (1,200 mg/m{sup 2}/d Mondays through Friday) and irinotecan (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly in four doses) (Arm 1) or concurrent capecitabine (1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday through Friday) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly in five doses) (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks after chemoRT, and adjuvant chemotherapy 4-6 weeks after surgery. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate, requiring 48 evaluable patients per arm. Results: A total of 146 patients were enrolled. The protocol chemotherapy was modified because of excessive gastrointestinal toxicity after treatment of 35 patients; 96 were assessed for the primary endpoint-the final regimen described above. The patient characteristics were similar for both arms. After chemoRT, the rate of tumor downstaging was 52% and 60% and the rate of nodal downstaging (excluding N0 patients) was 46% and 40%, for Arms 1 and 2, respectively. The pCR rate for Arm 1 was 10% and for Arm 2 was 21%. For Arm 1 and 2, the preoperative chemoRT rate of Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was 9% and 4% and the rate of Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity was 26% and 27%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoRT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin for distal rectal cancer has significant clinical activity (10 of 48 pCRs) and acceptable toxicity. This regimen is currently being evaluated in a Phase III randomized trial (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project R04).

  20. Sirukumab, a human anti-interleukin-6 monoclonal antibody: a randomised, 2-part (proof-of-concept and dose-finding), phase II study in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis despite methotrexate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Josef S; Weinblatt, Michael E; Sheng, Shihong; Zhuang, Yanli; Hsu, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The safety and efficacy of sirukumab, an anti-interleukin-6 (IL-6) monoclonal antibody, were evaluated in a 2-part, placebo-controlled phase II study of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite methotrexate therapy. Methods In Part A (proof-of-concept), 36 patients were randomised to placebo or sirukumab 100 mg every 2 weeks (q2w) through week 10, with crossover treatment during weeks 12–22. In Part B (dose finding), 151 patients were randomised to sirukumab (100 mg q2w, 100 mg q4w, 50 mg q4w, or 25 mg q4w) through week 24, or placebo through week 10 with crossover to sirukumab 100 mg q2w (weeks 12–24). The proportion of patients with an American College of Rheumatology 50 (ACR50) response and the change from baseline in the 28-joint count disease activity score using C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) were determined. Safety was evaluated through week 38 in both parts. Results The primary endpoint (ACR50 at week 12 in Part B) was achieved only with sirukumab 100 mg q2w versus placebo (26.7% vs 3.3%; p=0.026). Greater improvements in mean DAS28-CRP at week 12 were observed with sirukumab 100 mg q2w versus placebo in Parts A (2.1 vs 0.6, p<0.001) and B (2.2 vs 1.1; p<0.001). The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was similar for sirukumab-treated and placebo-treated patients through week 12 in Part A (70.6% and 63.2%, respectively) and B (67.8% and 66.7%, respectively). Infections were the most common type of AE; one death occurred (Part B, sirukumab 100 mg q2w, brain aneurysm). Conclusions Sirukumab-treated patients experienced improvements in the signs/symptoms of RA. Safety results through 38 weeks were consistent with other IL-6 inhibitors. Trial registration number NCT00718718. PMID:24699939

  1. Phase II Study of Gemcitabine, Carboplatin, and Iniparib As Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-Negative and BRCA1/2 Mutation–Associated Breast Cancer With Assessment of a Tumor-Based Measure of Genomic Instability: PrECOG 0105

    PubMed Central

    Telli, Melinda L.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Vinayak, Shaveta; Kurian, Allison W.; Lipson, Jafi A.; Flaherty, Patrick J.; Timms, Kirsten; Abkevich, Victor; Schackmann, Elizabeth A.; Wapnir, Irene L.; Carlson, Robert W.; Chang, Pei-Jen; Sparano, Joseph A.; Head, Bobbie; Goldstein, Lori J.; Haley, Barbara; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Reid, Julia E.; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Manola, Judith; Ford, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to assess efficacy, safety, and predictors of response to iniparib in combination with gemcitabine and carboplatin in early-stage triple-negative and BRCA1/2 mutation–associated breast cancer. Patients and Methods This single-arm phase II study enrolled patients with stage I to IIIA (T ≥ 1 cm) estrogen receptor–negative (≤ 5%), progesterone receptor–negative (≤ 5%), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–negative or BRCA1/2 mutation–associated breast cancer. Neoadjuvant gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 intravenously [IV] on days 1 and 8), carboplatin (area under curve of 2 IV on days 1 and 8), and iniparib (5.6 mg/kg IV on days 1, 4, 8, and 11) were administered every 21 days for four cycles, until the protocol was amended to six cycles. The primary end point was pathologic complete response (no invasive carcinoma in breast or axilla). All patients underwent comprehensive BRCA1/2 genotyping, and homologous recombination deficiency was assessed by loss of heterozygosity (HRD-LOH) in pretreatment core breast biopsies. Results Among 80 patients, median age was 48 years; 19 patients (24%) had germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations; clinical stage was I (13%), IIA (36%), IIB (36%), and IIIA (15%). Overall pathologic complete response rate in the intent-to-treat population (n = 80) was 36% (90% CI, 27 to 46). Mean HRD-LOH scores were higher in responders compared with nonresponders (P = .02) and remained significant when BRCA1/2 germline mutations carriers were excluded (P = .021). Conclusion Preoperative combination of gemcitabine, carboplatin, and iniparib is active in the treatment of early-stage triple-negative and BRCA1/2 mutation–associated breast cancer. The HRD-LOH assay was able to identify patients with sporadic triple-negative breast cancer lacking a BRCA1/2 mutation, but with an elevated HRD-LOH score, who achieved a favorable pathologic response. Confirmatory controlled trials are warranted. PMID:25847929

  2. Long-Term Results of a Prospective, Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Ablation, Pelvic Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy Boost, and Adjuvant Docetaxel in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiBiase, Steven J.; Hussain, Arif; Kataria, Ritesh; Amin, Pradip; Bassi, Sunakshi; Dawson, Nancy; Kwok, Young

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We report the long-term results of a prospective, Phase II study of long-term androgen deprivation (AD), pelvic radiotherapy (EBRT), permanent transperineal prostate brachytherapy boost (PB), and adjuvant docetaxel in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included biopsy-proven prostate adenocarcinoma with the following: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) > 20 ng/ml; or Gleason score of 7 and a PSA >10 ng/ml; or any Gleason score of 8 to 10; or stage T2b to T3 irrespective of Gleason score or PSA. Treatment consisted of 45 Gy of pelvic EBRT, followed 1 month later by PB with either iodine-125 or Pd-103. One month after PB, patients received three cycles of docetaxel chemotherapy (35 mg/m{sup 2} per week, Days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days). All patients received 2 years of AD. Biochemical failure was defined as per the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir + 2). Results: From August 2000 to March 2004, 42 patients were enrolled. The median overall and active follow-ups were 5.6 years (range, 0.9-7.8 years) and 6.3 years (range, 4-7.8 years), respectively. Grade 2 and 3 acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were 50.0% and 14.2%, respectively, with no Grade 4 toxicities noted. Grade 3 and 4 acute hematologic toxicities were 19% and 2.4%, respectively. Of the patients, 85.7% were able to complete the planned multimodality treatment. The 5- and 7-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failures rates were 89.6% and 86.5%, and corresponding rates for disease-free survival were 76.2% and 70.4%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial overall survival rates were 83.3% and 80.1%, respectively. The 5- and 7-year actuarial rates of late Grade 2 GI/GU toxicity (no Grade 3-5) was 7.7%. Conclusions: The trimodality approach of using 2 years of AD, external radiation, brachytherapy, and upfront docetaxel in high-risk prostate cancer is well tolerated, produces encouraging long-term results, and should be validated in a

  3. Epigenetic Therapy Using Belinostat for Patients With Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Multicenter Phase I/II Study With Biomarker and Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Tumors From Patients in the Mayo Phase II Consortium and the Cancer Therapeutics Research Group

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Winnie; Chung, Hyun C.; Chan, Stephen L.; Wang, Ling Z.; Lim, Robert; Picus, Joel; Boyer, Michael; Mo, Frankie K.F.; Koh, Jane; Rha, Sun Y.; Hui, Edwin P.; Jeung, Hei C.; Roh, Jae K.; Yu, Simon C.H.; To, Ka F.; Tao, Qian; Ma, Brigette B.; Chan, Anthony W.H.; Tong, Joanna H.M.; Erlichman, Charles; Chan, Anthony T.C.; Goh, Boon C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Epigenetic aberrations have been reported in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study of patients with unresectable HCC and chronic liver disease, epigenetic therapy with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat was assessed. The objectives were to determine dose-limiting toxicity and maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), to assess pharmacokinetics in phase I, and to assess activity of and explore potential biomarkers for response in phase II. Patients and Methods Major eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed unresectable HCC, European Cooperative Oncology Group performance score ≤ 2, and adequate organ function. Phase I consisted of 18 patients; belinostat was given intravenously once per day on days 1 to 5 every 3 weeks; dose levels were 600 mg/m2 per day (level 1), 900 mg/m2 per day (level 2), 1,200 mg/m2 per day (level 3), and 1,400 mg/m2 per day (level 4). Phase II consisted of 42 patients. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS), and the main secondary end points were response according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and overall survival (OS). Exploratory analysis was conducted on pretreatment tumor tissues to determine whether HR23B expression is a potential biomarker for response. Results Belinostat pharmacokinetics were linear from 600 to 1,400 mg/m2 without significant accumulation. The MTD was not reached at the maximum dose administered. Dose level 4 was used in phase II. The median number of cycles was two (range, one to 12). The partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD) rates were 2.4% and 45.2%, respectively. The median PFS and OS were 2.64 and 6.60 months, respectively. Exploratory analysis revealed that disease stabilization rate (complete response plus PR plus SD) in tumors having high and low HR23B histoscores were 58% and 14%, respectively (P = .036). Conclusion Epigenetic therapy with belinostat demonstrates tumor stabilization and is generally well-tolerated. HR23B

  4. A Phase II Study of 3′-Deoxy-3′-18F-Fluorothymidine PET in the Assessment of Early Response of Breast Cancer to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy: Results from ACRIN 6688

    PubMed Central

    Kostakoglu, Lale; Duan, Fenghai; Idowu, Michael O.; Jolles, Paul R.; Bear, Harry D.; Muzi, Mark; Cormack, Jean; Muzi, John P.; Pryma, Daniel A.; Specht, Jennifer M.; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Miliziano, John; Mallett, Sharon; Shields, Anthony F.; Mankoff, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether early change in standardized uptake values (SUVs) of 3′deoxy-3′-18F-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT) using PET with CT could predict pathologic complete response (pCR) of primary breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). The key secondary objective was to correlate SUV with the proliferation marker Ki-67 at baseline and after NAC. Methods This prospective, multicenter phase II study did not specify the therapeutic regimen, thus, NAC varied among centers. All evaluable patients underwent 18F-FLT PET/CT at baseline (FLT1) and after 1 cycle of NAC (FLT2); 43 patients were imaged at FLT1, FLT2, and after NAC completion (FLT3). The percentage change in maximum SUV (%ΔSUVmax) between FLT1 and FLT2 and FLT3 was calculated for the primary tumors. The predictive value of ΔSUVmax for pCR was determined using receiver-operating-characteristic curve analysis. The correlation between SUVmax and Ki-67 was also assessed. Results Fifty-one of 90 recruited patients (median age, 54 y; stage IIA–IIIC) met the eligibility criteria for the primary objective analysis, with an additional 22 patients totaling 73 patients for secondary analyses. A pCR in the primary breast cancer was achieved in 9 of 51 patients. NAC resulted in a significant reduction in %SUVmax (mean Δ, 39%; 95% confidence interval, 31–46). There was a marginal difference in %ΔSUVmax_FLT1-FLT2 between pCR and no-pCR patient groups (Wilcoxon 1-sided P = 0.050). The area under the curve for ΔSUVmax in the prediction of pCR was 0.68 (90% confidence interval, 0.50–0.83; Delong 1-sided P = 0.05), with slightly better predictive value for percentage mean SUV (P = 0.02) and similar prediction for peak SUV (P = 0.04). There was a weak correlation with pretherapy SUVmax and Ki-67 (r = 0.29, P = 0.04), but the correlation between SUVmax and Ki-67 after completion of NAC was stronger (r = 0.68, P < 0.0001). Conclusion 18F-FLT PET imaging of breast cancer after 1 cycle of NAC

  5. A Phase I/II Study of Cyclophosphamide and Topotecan in Patients with High-Risk Malignancies Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: The St. Jude Long-term Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kasow, Kimberly A.; Stewart, Clinton F.; Barfield, Raymond C.; Wright, Nancy L.; Li, Chenghong; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Leung, Wing; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Bowman, Laura C.; Handgretinger, Rupert; Hale, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-eight consecutive children with high-risk malignancies were treated with cyclophosphamide and targeted topotecan followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) in a phase I/II IRB-approved study. Twelve participants enrolled in phase I; 5 received dose level 1 of topotecan 3mg/m2/day with subsequent doses targeted to total systemic exposure of 100 ± 20 ng°hr/ml and cyclophosphamide 750mg/m2/day. Seven participants received dose level 2. Cyclophosphamide dose escalation to 1g/m2/day was considered excessively toxic; 1 died from irreversible veno-occlusive disease and 2 experienced reversible hepatotoxicity. These adverse events halted further dose escalation. Forty-six participants were enrolled in phase II; results are on the 51 participants who received therapy at dose level 1, the maximum tolerated dose. Diagnoses included neuroblastoma (26), sarcoma (9), lymphoma (8), brain tumors (5), Wilms (2) and retinoblastoma (1). Twenty participants (39.3%) were in ≥ CR1 at enrollment; median age was 5.1 years. Most common non-hematologic grade 3/4 toxicity was gastrointestinal (n=37). Neutrophil and platelet engraftment occurred at a median of 15 and 24 days, respectively. Twenty-six (51%) remain alive at a median of 6.4 years after AHCT. Cyclophosphamide 3.75g/m2 and targeted topotecan followed by AHCT is feasible and produces acceptable toxicity in children with high-risk malignancies. PMID:22426752

  6. North Central Cancer Treatment Group Phase II study of 5-fluorouracil and high-dose levamisole for gastric and gastroesophageal cancer using survival as the primary endpoint of efficacy.

    PubMed

    Burch, P A; Keppen, M D; Schroeder, G; Rubin, J; Krook, J E; Dalton, R J; Gerstner, J B; Jancewicz, M T; Ebbert, L P

    1999-10-01

    At present there is no established standard chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer. Combination regimens have yielded response rates at times exceeding 50% but with no improvement in survival compared to single agents. This study examined the role of 5-fluorouracil and high-dose levamisole in a phase II setting using survival as the main endpoint. Patients with advanced carcinomas of the stomach or gastroesophageal junction were treated with 5-fluorouracil, 450 mg/m2 IV days 1 to 5, and levamisole, 100 mg/m2 orally three times daily on days 1 to 3, and 50 mg/m2 tid days 4 to 5 every 5 weeks. To allow more rapid accrual and to study a population that more accurately reflects the makeup of patients treated in clinical practice, patients with both measurable and nonmeasurable disease were entered in this study. Two of fifteen (13%) patients with measurable disease experienced a partial response to treatment. The adjusted 1-year survival rate for the 44 patients entered was 29.6%, which is similar to the historical 1-year survival of 30% observed in a group of nearly 400 patients treated in prior North Central Cancer Treatment Group studies. This regimen offers no improvement in therapeutic activity for advanced gastric cancer. This study design, however, allows rapid screening of phase II regimens in patients who would usually be candidates for phase III trials. PMID:10521068

  7. Vaccination with autologous dendritic cells loaded with autologous tumor lysate or homogenate combined with immunomodulating radiotherapy and/or preleukapheresis IFN-α in patients with metastatic melanoma: a randomised “proof-of-principle” phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccination with dendritic cells (DC) loaded with tumor antigens elicits tumor-specific immune responses capable of killing cancer cells without inducing meaningful side-effects. Patients with advanced melanoma enrolled onto our phase II clinical studies have been treated with autologous DC loaded with autologous tumor lysate/homogenate matured with a cytokine cocktail, showing a clinical benefit (PR + SD) in 55.5% of evaluable cases to date. The beneficial effects of the vaccine were mainly restricted to patients who developed vaccine-specific immune response after treatment. However, immunological responses were only induced in about two-thirds of patients, and treatments aimed at improving immunological responsiveness to the vaccine are needed. Methods/Design This is a phase II, “proof-of-principle”, randomized, open-label trial of vaccination with autologous DC loaded with tumor lysate or homogenate in metastatic melanoma patients combined with immunomodulating RT and/or preleukapheresis IFN-α. All patients will receive four bi-weekly doses of the vaccine during the induction phase and monthly doses thereafter for up to a maximum of 14 vaccinations or until confirmed progression. Patients will be randomized to receive: (1.) three daily doses of 8 Gy up to 12 Gy radiotherapy delivered to one non-index metastatic field between vaccine doses 1 and 2 and, optionally, between doses 7 and 8, using IMRT-IMAT techniques; (2.) daily 3 MU subcutaneous IFN-α for 7 days before leukapheresis; (3.) both 1 and 2; (4.) neither 1 nor 2. At least six patients eligible for treatment will be enrolled per arm. Daily 3 MU IL-2 will be administered subcutaneously for 5 days starting from the second day after each vaccine dose. Serial DTH testing and blood sampling to evaluate treatment-induced immune response will be performed. Objective response will be evaluated according to immune-related response criteria (irRC). Discussion Based upon the emerging role of

  8. A phase I/II study of oral clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine in previously treated acute myeloid leukaemia and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients at least 60 years of age.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Sarah A; Mawad, Raya; Gooley, Ted A; Becker, Pamela S; Sandhu, Vicky; Hendrie, Paul; Scott, Bart L; Wood, Brent L; Walter, Roland B; Smith, Kelly; Dean, Carol; Estey, Elihu H; Pagel, John M

    2015-08-01

    Outcomes for older adults with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are generally poor, and new effective therapies are needed. We investigated oral clofarabine combined with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in patients aged 60 years and above with relapsed or refractory AML or high-risk MDS in a phase I/II trial. A 3 + 3 dose escalation of oral clofarabine was followed by a phase II expansion with the aim of obtaining a complete response (CR) rate ≥30%. We identified 20 mg/d for 5 d as the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of oral clofarabine. A total of 35 patients, with a median age of 72 years, were treated. Of 26 patients enrolled at the MTD, 4 had treatment-related grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicities, but none died within 28 d. The observed CR rate and median survival were 34% [95% confidence interval (CI), 18-50%] and 6.8 months overall and 38% [95% CI, 19-57%] and 7.2 months at the MTD. The median disease-free survival was 7.4 months. Fifty-two percent (23/44) of cycles administered at the MTD were done without hospital admission. This combination of oral clofarabine and LDAC demonstrated efficacy with a CR rate of >30% and acceptable toxicity in older patients. PMID:25854284

  9. Phase II Study of Thalidomide Plus Dexamethasone Induction Followed by Tandem Melphalan-Based Autotransplantation and Thalidomide-Plus-Prednisone Maintenance for Untreated Multiple Myeloma: A Southwest Oncology Group Trial (S0204)

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Mohamad A.; Bolejack, Vanessa; Zonder, Jeffrey A.; Durie, Brian G.M.; Jakubowiak, Andrzej J.; Crowley, John J.; Barlogie, Bart

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Thalidomide-dexamethasone (THAL-DEX) is standard induction therapy for multiple myeloma (MM). Tandem melphalan-based transplantations have yielded superior results to single transplantations. Phase II trial S0204 was designed to improve survival results reported for the predecessor, phase III trial S9321 by 50%. Patients and Methods Newly diagnosed patients with MM were eligible for S0204 with THAL-DEX induction, tandem melphalan-based tandem transplantation, and THAL-prednisone maintenance. Results Of 143 eligible patients, 142 started induction, 73% completed first transplantation, 58% completed second transplantation, and 56% started maintenance. The quantity of stem cells required for two transplantations was reached in 88% of 111 patients undergoing collection, 74% of whom completed both transplantations. Partial response, very good partial remission, and complete response were documented after 12 months of maintenance therapy in 87%, 72%, and 22% of patients, respectively. During a median follow-up time of 37 months, 4-year estimates of event-free and overall survival were 50% and 64%, respectively. Survival outcomes were superior for International Staging System (ISS) stage 1 disease, when lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were normal and a second transplantation was applied in a timely fashion. Conclusion Both overall survival (P = .0002) and event-free survival (P < .0001) were significantly improved with S0204 compared with S9321 when 121 and 363 patients, respectively, were matched on ISS stage and LDH. PMID:19546405

  10. Erlotinib plus capecitabine as first-line treatment for older Chinese patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the lung (C-TONG0807): an open-label, single arm, multicenter phase II study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Yun; Chen, Gong-Yan; Huang, Yan; Li, Xiao-li; Feng, Ji-Feng; Shi, Mei-Qi; Cheng, Ying; Ma, Li-Xia; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Gu, Cui-Ping; Song, Xiang-Qun; Zhou, Da; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies have shown synergism between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors and antifolates in solid tumors. This study is to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of erlotinib plus capecitabine as first-line treatment in older Chinese patients (≥ 65 years) with lung adenocarcinoma. This is an open-label, single arm, multicenter phase II clinical trial. Sixty- two patients with previously untreated stage IIIB/IV adenocarcinoma and age 65 years or above were enrolled at four tertiary teaching hospitals and 2 provincial hospitals in China; 58 patients fulfilled the study requirements. Erlotinib (150 mg/day) and capecitabine (1000 mg/m2 twice daily on days 1-14) were administered during every 21-day cycle. The primary endpoint was the non-progression rate at 12 weeks. EGFR and K-ras mutation rates were determined using PCR. Tumor expression of different biomarkers was assessed using immunohistochemistry. In a cohort of 58 patients, 34 patients had no disease progression at 12 weeks following treatment. The objective response rate was 29.3%, and the disease control rate was 75.9%. The objective response rate was significantly higher in patients with EGFR mutations than in those with wild-type EGFR. Patients with thymidine phosphorylase-negative tumors had significantly longer overall survival after one year than patients with thymidine phosphorylase-positive tumors. Forty-four patients had at least one primary adverse events (AEs), including skin rash (n = 30), grade 3 AEs (n = 17), and grade 4 AEs (n = 7). This is the first phase II clinical trial to assess erlotinib plus capecitabine combination therapy as first-line treatment in older patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Erlotinib/capecitabine chemotherapy was significantly better in patients with EGFR mutations and in those with thymidine phosphorylase-negative tumors. The use of fluorouracil derivatives for the treatment of lung adenocarcinoma warrants further study

  11. Phase I/II Study Evaluating Early Tolerance in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Treated With the MammoSite Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Using a 2-Day Dose Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro; Mitchell, Christina; Chen, Peter Y.; Ghilezan, Mihai; Benitez, Pamela; Brown, Eric; Vicini, Frank

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Initial Phase I/II results using balloon brachytherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in 2 days in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Materials and Methods: Between March 2004 and August 2007, 45 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy after lumpectomy with balloon brachytherapy in a Phase I/II trial delivering 2800 cGy in four fractions of 700 cGy. Toxicities were evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 scale and cosmesis was documented at >=6 months. Results: The median age was 66 years (range, 48-83) and median skin spacing was 12 mm (range, 8-24). The median follow-up was 11.4 months (5.4-48 months) with 21 patients (47%) followed >=1 year, 11 (24%) >=2 years, and 7 (16%) >=3 years. At <6 months (n = 45), Grade II toxicity rates were 9% radiation dermatitis, 13% breast pain, 2% edema, and 2% hyperpigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 13% (n = 6). At >=6 months (n = 43), Grade II toxicity rates were: 2% radiation dermatitis, 2% induration, and 2% hypopigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 2%. Infection was 13% (n = 6) at <6 months and 5% (n = 2) at >=6 months. Persistent seroma >=6 months was 30% (n = 13). Fat necrosis developed in 4 cases (2 symptomatic). Rib fractures were seen in 4% (n = 2). Cosmesis was good/excellent in 96% of cases. Conclusions: Treatment with balloon brachytherapy using a 2-day dose schedule resulted acceptable rates of Grade II/III chronic toxicity rates and similar cosmetic results observed with a standard 5-day accelerated partial breast irradiation schedule.

  12. A phase II study of the efficacy of diamminedichloroplatinum (cisplatin) for the control of locally recurrent and intransit malignant melanoma of the extremities using tourniquet outflow-occlusion techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Bland, K I; Kimura, A K; Brenner, D E; Basinger, M A; Hirsch, M; Hawkins, I F; Pierson, K K; Copeland, E M

    1989-01-01

    A phase II trial was conducted with 15 patients (mean age of 65.7 years) with locally recurrent or intransit melanoma of the extremities. After total outflow occlusion with pneumatic tourniquet, the cell-cycle nonspecific anti-neoplastic agent cis-diamminedicholoroplatinum (CDDP) was infused intra-arterially in a mean dose of 26.7 mg/m2 per infusion (2.6 infusions per patient). The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of CDDP infusion for control of intransit and recurrent melanoma of the extremities. Three to four weeks postinfusion, all visible residual disease was resected. Partial remissions were observed in ten patients (67%); five patients achieved stable disease status. No patient had complete regression of disease. At an average follow-up interval of 18.3 months (range 4-44 months), the mean local/regional disease-free survival was 14.8 months. Eighty per cent of patients (twelve of 15) had local/regional control of disease at an average follow-up of 14.8 months after CDDP infusion and surgical resection. Of five melanoma-related deaths, three patients had had no local/regional recurrence at the time of their demise. Three compartment syndromes resulted as a complication of the infusional therapy and occurred within 1-3 days of the treatment. In vitro growth of melanoma from lymph nodes draining the infused area was seen in all subjects studied. Outgrowth from tumor within the tourniquet infusion area was observed in two patients, both of whom experienced recurrences clinically at 24-months' postinfusion. Pharmacokinetic data of total CDDP concentrations from tissue and blood (n = 4) were available from pretreatment to 1 hour post-therapy. Biopsy data from patients pre- and post-treatment suggest substantial tumor uptake of CDDP as compared to local or distal normal skin, with minimal CDDP loss to the systemic circulation. Pharmacologic and clinical data of this phase II trial suggest that intraarterial infusion with tourniquet outflow

  13. A phase II study of pemetrexed plus carboplatin followed by maintenance pemetrexed as first-line chemotherapy for elderly patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tamiya, Motohiro; Tamiya, Akihiro; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Goto, Koichi; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Shimokawa, Tsuneo; Abe, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Daga, Haruko; Takeda, Koji; Hirashima, Tomonori; Atagi, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    A phase I study recommended carboplatin (CBDCA, area under the curve = 5) plus pemetrexed (PEM, 500 mg/m(2)) for elderly patients (≥75-years old) with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PEM maintenance therapy was well tolerated. We conducted a multicenter phase II trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this regimen in elderly patients with NSCLC. Four courses of CBDCA plus PEM, followed by PEM, were administered. The primary endpoint was the 1-year overall survival (OS) rate, and the secondary endpoints were OS, progression-free survival (PFS), response rate (RR), and safety. Thirty-four patients (median age, 77 years) were enrolled between June 2012 and May 2013. The median observation time was 22.7 months. The primary endpoint of the 1-year OS rate was 58.0 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 42.9-78.4 %), and RR and disease control rate were 41.2 and 85.3 %, respectively. Fourteen patients had partial responses, 15 had stable disease, 4 had disease progression, and 1 was not evaluated. The maintenance therapy rate was 58.8 %. The median PFS was 5.7 months (95 % CI 3.9-8.9 months), and median OS was 20.5 months (95 % CI 10.0-infinity months). Grade ≥3 hematological adverse events included leucopenia (23.5 % of patients), neutropenia (55.9 %), anemia (35.3 %), and thrombocytopenia (20.6 %). Grade ≥3 non-hematological adverse events included febrile neutropenia (8.8 %), elevated aminotransferases (5.9 %), infection (23.5 %), and anorexia/fatigue (5.9 %). Four patients had interstitial lung diseases (ILD) and one died due to ILD. CBDCA plus PEM, followed by PEM, was effective and reasonably tolerated in chemotherapy-naïve elderly patients with non-squamous NSCLC. Clinical Trial Registration This trial is registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (Trial Number UMIN 000004810). PMID:26603297

  14. A clinical phase II study with sorafenib in patients with progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer: a study of the CESAR Central European Society for Anticancer Drug Research-EWIV

    PubMed Central

    Steinbild, S; Mross, K; Frost, A; Morant, R; Gillessen, S; Dittrich, C; Strumberg, D; Hochhaus, A; Hanauske, A-R; Edler, L; Burkholder, I; Scheulen, M

    2007-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor with antiangiogenic and antiproliferative activity. The activity of sorafenib in progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) patients was investigated in a phase II clinical study. Progressive HRPC patients received sorafenib 400 mg bid p.o. continuously. Only patients with no prior chemotherapy, and either one-unidimensional measurable lesion according to RECIST-criteria or increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values reflecting a hormone-refractory situation, were eligible for study entry. The primary study objective was the rate of progression-free survival of ⩾12 weeks (PFS12). Secondary end points were overall response, overall survival, and toxicity. Fifty-seven patients with PC were enrolled. Two patients had to be withdrawn from the set of eligible patients. According to RECIST criteria, 4 patients out of 55 evaluable patients showed stable disease (SD). According to PSA–response, we saw 11 patients with SD PSA and 2 patients were responders at 12 weeks (PFS12=17/55=31%). Among the 257 adverse events, 15 were considered drug related of maximum CTC-grade 3. Twenty-four serious adverse events occurred in 14 patients (14/55=26%). Seven of them were determined to be drug related. No treatment-related death was observed. Sorafenib has antitumour activity in HRPCP when evaluated for RECIST- and PSA-based response. Further investigation as a component of combination regimens is necessary to evaluate its definite or overall clinical benefit for HRPCP. PMID:18040273

  15. A phase II study of cyclophosphamide, etoposide, vincristine and prednisone (CEOP) Alternating with Pralatrexate (P) as front line therapy for patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL): final results from the T- cell consortium trial.

    PubMed

    Advani, Ranjana H; Ansell, Stephen M; Lechowicz, Mary J; Beaven, Anne W; Loberiza, Fausto; Carson, Kenneth R; Evens, Andrew M; Foss, Francine; Horwitz, Steven; Pro, Barbara; Pinter-Brown, Lauren C; Smith, Sonali M; Shustov, Andrei R; Savage, Kerry J; Vose, Julie M

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) have suboptimal outcomes using conventional CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) chemotherapy. The anti-folate pralatrexate, the first drug approved for patients with relapsed/refractory PTCL, provided a rationale to incorporate it into the front-line setting. This phase 2 study evaluated a novel front-line combination whereby cyclophosphamide, etoposide, vincristine and prednisone (CEOP) alternated with pralatrexate (CEOP-P) in PTCL. Patients achieving a complete or partial remission (CR/PR) were eligible for consolidative stem cell transplantation (SCT) after 4 cycles. Thirty-three stage II-IV PTCL patients were treated: 21 PTCL-not otherwise specified (64%), 8 angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (24%) and 4 anaplastic large cell lymphoma (12%). The majority (61%) had stage IV disease and 46% were International Prognostic Index high/intermediate or high risk. Grade 3-4 toxicities included anaemia (27%), thrombocytopenia (12%), febrile neutropenia (18%), mucositis (18%), sepsis (15%), increased creatinine (12%) and liver transaminases (12%). Seventeen patients (52%) achieved a CR. The 2-year progression-free survival and overall survival, were 39% (95% confidence interval 21-57) and 60% (95% confidence interval 39-76), respectively. Fifteen patients (45%) (12 CR) received SCT and all remained in CR at a median follow-up of 21·5 months. CEOP-P did not improve outcomes compared to historical data using CHOP. Defining optimal front line therapy in PTCL continues to be a challenge and an unmet need. PMID:26627450

  16. Phase II Study Evaluating the Addition of Cetuximab to the Concurrent Delivery of Weekly Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, and Daily Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Suntharalingam, Mohan; Kwok, Young; Goloubeva, Olga; Parekh, Arti; Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey; Zimrin, Ann; Strome, Scott; Ord, Robert; Cullen, Kevin J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report the mature data of a prospective Phase II trial designed to evaluate the efficacy of an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor cetuximab (CTX) added to the concurrent therapy of weekly paclitaxel/carboplatin (PC) and daily radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2009, a total of 43 patients were enrolled in the study. The median follow-up was 31 months (range, 9-59 months). All patients had Stage III/IV disease at presentation, and 67% had oropharyngeal primaries. The weekly IV dose schedules were CTX 250 mg/m{sup 2} (400 mg/m{sup 2} IV loading dose 1 week before RT), paclitaxel 40 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin AUC 2. RT was given at 1.8 Gy per day to 70.2 Gy. Intensity-modulated RTwas used in 70% of cases. Results: All patients completed the planned RT dose, 74% without any treatment breaks. The planned CTX and PC cycles were completed in 70% (91% with at least seven of planned nine cycles) and 56% (93% with at least seven of planned eight cycles) of patients, respectively. Toxicity included Grade 3 mucositis (79%), rash (9%), leucopenia (19%), neutropenia (19%), and RT dermatitis (16%). The complete response (CR) rate at the completion of therapy was 84%. The estimated 3-year local regional control rate was 72%. Six patients with an initial CR subsequently experienced a local recurrence, 10 patients experienced distant progression. The median overall survival and disease-free survivals have not been reached. The 3-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival were 59% and 58%, respectively. Conclusions: The addition of CTX to weekly PC and daily RT was well tolerated and resulted in encouraging local control and survival rates.

  17. Effect of CYP3A-inducing anti-epileptics on sorafenib exposure: results of a phase II study of sorafenib plus daily temozolomide in adults with recurrent glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Vredenburgh, James J.; Desjardins, Annick; Peters, Katherine; Gururangan, Sridharan; Sampson, John H.; Marcello, Jennifer; Herndon, James E.; McLendon, Roger E.; Janney, Dorothea; Friedman, Allan H.; Bigner, Darell D.; Friedman, Henry S.

    2011-01-01

    Sorafenib, an oral VEGFR-2, Raf, PDGFR, c-KIT and Flt-3 inhibitor, is active against renal cell and hepatocellular carcinomas, and has recently demonstrated promising activity for lung and breast cancers. In addition, various protracted temozolomide dosing schedules have been evaluated as a strategy to further enhance its anti-tumor activity. We reasoned that sorafenib and protracted, daily temozolomide may provide complementary therapeutic benefit, and therefore performed a phase 2 trial among recurrent glioblastoma patients. Adult glioblastoma patients at any recurrence after standard temozolomide chemoradiotherapy received sorafenib (400 mg twice daily) and continuous daily temozolomide (50 mg/m2/day). Assessments were performed every eight weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6) and secondary end points were radiographic response, overall survival (OS), safety and sorafenib pharmacokinetics. Of 32 enrolled patients, 12 (38%) were on CYP3-A inducing anti-epileptics (EIAEDs), 17 (53%) had 2 or more prior progressions, 15 had progressed while receiving 5-day temozolomide, and 12 (38%) had failed either prior bevacizumab or VEGFR inhibitor therapy. The most common grade ≥ 3 toxicities were palmer-planter erythrodysesthesia (19%) and elevated amylase/lipase (13%). Sorafenib pharmacokinetic exposures were comparable on day 1 regardless of EIAED status, but significantly lower on day 28 for patients on EIAEDs (P = 0.0431). With a median follow-up of 93 weeks, PFS-6 was 9.4%. Only one patient (3%) achieved a partial response. In conclusion, sorafenib can be safely administered with daily temozolomide, but this regimen has limited activity for recurrent GBM. Co-administration of EIAEDs can lower sorafenib exposures in this population. PMID:20443129

  18. OCTET-CY: a phase II study to investigate the efficacy of post-transplant cyclophosphamide as sole graft-versus-host prophylaxis after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Holtick, Udo; Chemnitz, Jens-Markus; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Theurich, Sebastian; Chakupurakal, Geothy; Krause, Anke; Fiedler, Anne; Luznik, Leo; Hellmich, Martin; Wolf, Dominik; Hallek, Michael; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Scheid, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Objective Post-transplant cyclophosphamide is increasingly used as graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) prophylaxis in the setting of bone marrow transplantation. No data have been published on the use of single-agent GvHD prophylaxis with post-transplant cyclophosphamide in the setting of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). Methods In a phase II trial, 11 patients with myeloma or lymphoma underwent conditioning with fludarabine and busulfan followed by T-replete PBSCT and application of 50 mg/kg/d of cyclophosphamide on day+3 and +4 without other concurrent immunosuppression (IS). Results Median time to leukocyte, neutrophil, and platelet engraftment was 18, 21, and 18 d. The incidence of grade II–IV and grade III–IV GvHD was 45% and 27%, with a non-relapse mortality (NRM) of 36% at one and 2 yr. After median follow-up of 927 d, overall and relapse-free survival was 64% and 34%. Three patients did not require any further systemic IS until day+100 and thereafter. Analysis of immune reconstitution demonstrated rapid T- and NK-cell recovery. B- and CD3+/CD161+NK/T-cell recovery was superior in patients not receiving additional IS. Conclusion Post-transplant cyclophosphamide as sole IS in PBSCT is feasible and allows rapid immune recovery. Increased rates of severe acute GvHD explain the observed NRM and may advise a temporary combination partner such as mTor-inhibitors in the PBSCT setting. PMID:25703164

  19. Successful change of treatment strategy in elderly patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma by de-escalating induction and introducing temozolomide maintenance: results from a phase II study by the Nordic Lymphoma Group.

    PubMed

    Pulczynski, Elisa J; Kuittinen, Outi; Erlanson, Martin; Hagberg, Hans; Fosså, Alexander; Eriksson, Mikael; Nordstrøm, Marie; Østenstad, Bjørn; Fluge, Øystein; Leppä, Sirpa; Fiirgaard, Bente; Bersvendsen, Hanne; Fagerli, Unn-Merete

    2015-04-01

    The Nordic Lymphoma Group has conducted a phase ll trial in newly diagnosed primary central nervous system lymphoma patients applying an age-adjusted multi-agent immunochemotherapy regimen, which in elderly patients included temozolomide maintenance treatment. Patients aged 18-75 years were eligible. Thirty-nine patients aged 18-65 years and 27 patients aged 66-75 years were enrolled. The median age of the two age groups was 55 and 70 years, respectively. The overall response rate was 73.8% for the entire cohort: 69.9% in the younger and 80.8% in the elderly subgroup. With a median follow up of 22 months, the 2-year overall survival probability was 60.7% in patients aged 65 years or under and 55.6% in patients aged over 65 years (P=0.40). The estimated progression-free survival at two years was 33.1% (95%CI: 19.1%-47.9%) in patients aged under 65 years and 44.4% (95%CI: 25.6%-61.8%) in the elderly subgroup (P=0.74). Median duration of response was ten months in the younger subgroup, and not reached in the elderly patient subgroup (P=0.33). Four patients aged 64-75 years (6%) died from treatment-related complications. Survival in the two age groups was similar despite a de-escalation of induction treatment in patients aged over 65 years. Duration of response in elderly patients receiving maintenance temozolomide was longer than in the younger age subgroup. While toxicity during induction is still of concern, especially in the elderly patients, we conclude from these data that de-escalation of induction therapy in elderly primary central nervous system lymphoma patients followed by maintenance treatment seems to be a promising treatment strategy. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier:01458730). PMID:25480497

  20. NeoFLOT: Multicenter phase II study of perioperative chemotherapy in resectable adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction or gastric adenocarcinoma-Very good response predominantly in patients with intestinal type tumors.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Christoph; Kullmann, Frank; Kunzmann, Volker; Fuchs, Martin; Geissler, Michael; Vehling-Kaiser, Ursula; Stauder, Heribert; Wein, Axel; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Kubin, Thomas; Schäfer, Claus; Stintzing, Sebastian; Giessen, Clemens; Modest, Dominik Paul; Ridwelski, Karsten; Heinemann, Volker

    2015-08-01

    Perioperative treatment is a standard of care in locally advanced gastroesophageal cancer (GEC) (gastric adenocarcinoma and gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma). While preoperative treatment can be applied to the majority of patients, postoperative chemotherapy can be given only to a fraction. The NeoFLOT-study therefore investigates the application of prolonged neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). Patients with T3, T4, and/or node-positive adenocarcinoma (GEC) were eligible for this multicenter phase II trial. NACT consisted of 6 cycles of oxaliplatin 85 mg/m(2) , leucovorin 200 mg/m(2) , 5-fluorouracil 2600 mg/m(2) and docetaxel 50 mg/m(2) (FLOT) applied q 2 wks. Application of adjuvant chemotherapy was explicitly not part of the protocol. R0-resection rate was evaluated as a primary endpoint. Of 59 enrolled patients, 50 patients underwent surgery and were assessable for the primary endpoint. R0-resection rate was 86.0% (43/50). Pathologic complete response (pCR) was 20.0% (10/50) and a further 20% (10/50) of patients achieved near complete histological remission (<10% residual tumor). Among these very good responders, 85% (17/20) had intestinal type tumors, 10% (2/20) had diffuse and 5% (1/20) had mixed type tumors. After 3 cycles of NACT, 6.9% (4/58) of patients developed progressive disease. Median disease-free survival was 32.9 months. The 1-year survival-rate was 79.3%. Grade 3-4 toxicities included neutropenia 29.3%, febrile neutropenia 1.7%, diarrhea 12.1% and mucositis 6.9%. This study indicates that intensified NACT with 6 cycles of FLOT is highly effective and tolerable in resectable GEC. Very good response (pCR and <10% residual tumor) was predominantly observed in patients with intestinal type tumors. PMID:25530271

  1. A Phase II Study of Synchronous Three-Dimensional Conformal Boost to the Gross Tumor Volume for Patients With Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Results of Korean Radiation Oncology Group 0301 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kwan Ho Ahn, Sung Ja; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Kim, Kyu-Sik; Kim, Young-Chul; Moon, Sung Ho; Han, Ji-Youn; Kim, Heung Tae; Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Jin Soo

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the efficacy of synchronous three-dimensional (3D) conformal boost to the gross tumor volume (GTV) in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included unresectable Stage III NSCLC with no pleural effusion, no supraclavicular nodal metastases, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score of 0-1. Forty-nine patients with pathologically proven NSCLC were enrolled. Eighteen patients had Stage IIIA and 31 had Stage IIIB. By using 3D conformal radiotherapy (RT) techniques, a dose of 1.8 Gy was delivered to the planning target volume with a synchronous boost of 0.6 Gy to the GTV, with a total dose of 60 Gy to the GTV and 45 Gy to the planning target volume in 25 fractions during 5 weeks. All patients received weekly chemotherapy consisting of paclitaxel and carboplatin during RT. Results: With a median follow-up of 36.8 months (range, 29.0-45.5 months) for surviving patients, median survival was 28.1 months. One-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 77%, 56.4%, and 43.8%, respectively. Corresponding local progression-free survival rates were 71.2%, 53.7%, and 53.7%. Compliance was 90% for RT and 88% for chemotherapy. Acute esophagitis of Grade 2 or higher occurred in 29 patients. Two patients with T4 lesions died of massive bleeding and hemoptysis during treatment (Grade 5). Overall late toxicity was acceptable. Conclusions: Based on the favorable outcome with acceptable toxicity, the acceleration scheme using 3D conformal GTV boost in this trial is warranted to compare with conventional fractionation in a Phase III trial.

  2. Randomized Phase II Study of Pemetrexed, Carboplatin, and Thoracic Radiation With or Without Cetuximab in Patients With Locally Advanced Unresectable Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Cancer and Leukemia Group B Trial 30407

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, Ramaswamy; Bogart, Jeffrey; Stinchcombe, Thomas; Wang, Xiaofei; Hodgson, Lydia; Kratzke, Robert; Garst, Jennifer; Brotherton, Timothy; Vokes, Everett E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cancer and Leukemia Group B conducted a randomized phase II trial to investigate two novel chemotherapy regimens in combination with concurrent thoracic radiation therapy (TRT). Patients and Methods Patients with unresectable stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were randomly assigned to carboplatin (area under the curve, 5) and pemetrexed (500 mg/m2) every 21 days for four cycles and TRT (70 Gy; arm A) or the same treatment with cetuximab administered concurrent only with TRT (arm B). Patients in both arms received up to four cycles of pemetrexed as consolidation therapy. The primary end point was the 18-month overall survival (OS) rate; if the 18-month OS rate was ≥ 55%, the regimen(s) would be considered for further study. Results Of the 101 eligible patients enrolled (48 in arm A and 53 in arm B), 60% were male; the median age was 66 years (range, 32 to 81 years); 44% and 35% had adenocarcinoma and squamous carcinoma, respectively; and more patients enrolled onto arm A compared with arm B had a performance status of 0 (58% v 34%, respectively; P = .04). The 18-month OS rate was 58% (95% CI, 46% to 74%) in arm A and 54% (95% CI, 42% to 70%) in arm B. No significant difference in OS between patients with squamous and nonsquamous NSCLC was observed (P = .667). The toxicities observed were consistent with toxicities associated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Conclusion The combination of pemetrexed, carboplatin, and TRT met the prespecified criteria for further evaluation. This regimen should be studied further in patients with locally advanced unresectable nonsquamous NSCLC. PMID:21747084

  3. NRG ONCOLOGY/RTOG 0921: A PHASE II STUDY OF POSTOPERATIVE INTENSITY MODULATED RADIATION THERAPY (IMRT) WITH CONCURRENT CISPLATIN AND BEVACIZUMAB FOLLOWED BY CARBOPLATIN AND PACLITAXEL FOR PATIENTS WITH ENDOMETRIAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Moughan, Jennifer; Miller, Brigitte E.; Xiao, Ying; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Bosch, Walter; Matulonis, Ursula; Horowitz, Neil; Mannel, Robert S.; Souhami, Luis; Erickson, Beth; Winter, Kathryn; Small, William; Gaffney, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess acute and late adverse events (AEs), overall survival (OS), pelvic failure (PF), regional failure, distant failure, and disease-free survival (DFS) in a prospective phase II clinical trial of bevacizumab (Bev) and pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with chemotherapy in high-risk endometrial-cancer patients. Materials/Methods Patients had a hysterectomy, lymph node removal, and ≥1 of the following high-risk factors: grade 3 carcinoma with >50% myometrial invasion; grade 2 or 3 disease with any cervical stromal invasion; or known extrauterine extension confined to the pelvis. Treatment included pelvic IMRT and concurrent cisplatin on days 1 and 29 of radiation and Bev (5 mg/kg on days 1, 15 and 29 of radiation) followed by adjuvant carboplatin and paclitaxel for 4 cycles. The primary endpoint was grade ≥3 AEs in the first 90 days. Results Thirty-four patients were accrued from November 2009 through December 2011, 30 of whom were eligible and received study treatment. Seven out of 30 patients (23.3%, 90% CI: 10.6%-36.0%) had grade ≥3 treatment-related non-hematologic toxicities within 90 days; an additional 6 patients had grade ≥3 toxicities between 90 and 365 days after treatment. Two-year OS was 96.7% and DFS was 79.1%. No patient developed a within-field PF and no patients with stage I-IIIA disease relapsed after a median follow-up of 26 months. Conclusion Postoperative Bev added to chemotherapy and pelvic IMRT is well tolerated and results in high overall survival rates at 2 years for patients with high-risk endometrial carcinoma. PMID:25847373

  4. Concomitant intraarterial cisplatin, intravenous 5-flourouracil, and split-course radiation therapy for locally advanced unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a phase II study of the Puget Sound Oncology Consortium (PSOC-703).

    PubMed

    Thomas, C R; Weiden, P L; Traverso, L W; Thompson, T

    1997-04-01

    A Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group (GITSG) protocol showed a survival benefit for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma when treated with split-course radiation therapy and bolus intravenous (i.v.) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as compared with survival achieved with radiation alone. In an attempt to improve these results, a phase II trial using intraarterial (i.a.) cisplatin, systemic-infusional 5-FU, and concomitant split-course radiation therapy was conducted. Sixteen previously untreated patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma (5 with American Joint Committee on Cancer [AJCC] stage I-II, 11 with stage III) disease were treated with i.a. cisplatin 100 mg/m2 by selective celiac arteriography followed by i.v. infusional 5-FU 1,000 mg/m2/day for 4 days, and concomitant split-course external beam photon radiation therapy at 2.0 Gy for 10 days in a 12-day period. After a planned 14-day interval, the identical chemoradiation treatment was repeated; finally, after a second 2-week interval, a third cycle of chemotherapy with a final 10 Gy radiation was administered. All 16 patients were evaluable for response; there were two partial responses (PR: 12%) and five minor responses (31%). Median follow-up period was 77 months. Median time to progression was 6 months (range 1-12 months), and median survival was 9 months (range 4-94 months). Nausea/vomiting was the major toxicity. There were no treatment-related fatalities. This regimen of concomitant i.a. cisplatin, i.v. infusional 5-FU, and split-course external beam photon radiation is well tolerated but has minimal activity in the treatment of locally advanced unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Future combined-modality protocols for this disease should explore alternative chemoradiation schemes. PMID:9124192

  5. Weekly paclitaxel with trastuzumab and pertuzumab in patients with HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer: overall survival and updated progression-free survival results from a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Smyth, L M; Iyengar, N M; Chen, M F; Popper, S M; Patil, S; Wasserheit-Lieblich, C; Argolo, D F; Singh, J C; Chandarlapaty, S; Sugarman, S M; Comen, E A; Drullinsky, P R; Traina, T A; Troso-Sandoval, T; Baselga, J; Norton, L; Hudis, C A; Dang, C T

    2016-07-01

    We previously reported progression-free survival (PFS) results on a phase II trial of weekly paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2(HER2)-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) treated in the first- and second-line setting. Here, we report results for overall survival (OS) and updated PFS after an additional year of follow-up. Patients with HER2-positive MBC with 0-1 prior treatment were eligible. Treatment consisted of paclitaxel (80 mg/m(2)) weekly, and trastuzumab (loading dose 8 mg/kg → 6 mg/kg) and pertuzumab (loading dose 840 mg → 420 mg) every 3 weeks, all given intravenously. Primary endpoint was 6-month PFS. Secondary endpoints included median PFS, 6-month and median OS. Evaluable patients received at least one full dose of treatment. From January 2011 to December 2013, 69 patients were enrolled: 51 (74 %) and 18 (26 %) treated in first- and second-line metastatic settings, respectively. As of July 1, 2015, the median follow-up was 33 months (range 3-49 months; 67 patients were evaluable for efficacy). The median OS was 44 months (95 % CI 37.5-NR) overall and 44 months (95 % CI 38.3-NR) and 37.5 months (95 % CI 30.3-NR) for patients with 0 and 1 prior metastatic treatment, respectively; 6-month OS was 98 % (95 % CI 90-1). The 6-month PFS was 86 % (95 % CI 75-93) overall and 89 % (95 % CI 76-95) and 78 % (95 % CI 51-91) for patients with 0 and 1 prior therapy, respectively; and median PFS was 21.4 months (95 % CI 14.1-NR) overall and 25.7 months (95 % CI 14.1-NR) and 16.9 months (95 % CI 8.5-NR) for patients with 0-1 prior treatment, respectively. Treatment was well tolerated. Updated analysis demonstrates that weekly paclitaxel, when added to trastuzumab and pertuzumab, is associated with a favorable OS and PFS and offers an alternative to docetaxel-based therapy. http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT0127604. PMID:27306421

  6. Efficacy Endpoints of RTOG 0247: A Randomized Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Plus Concurrent Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Stuart J.; Moughan, J.; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith P.; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Primary endpoint analysis of RTOG 0247 demonstrated preoperative RT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin achieved a pCR pre-specified threshold (21%) to merit further study, whereas the RT with capecitabine plus irinotecan arm did not (10%). Secondary efficacy endpoints are reported here. Methods and Materials A randomized phase II trial evaluated preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions) with two concurrent chemotherapy regimens: 1—capecitabine (1200 mg/m2/d M-F) plus irinotecan (50 mg/m2 /week × 4); and 2—capecitabine (1650 mg/m2/d M-F) plus oxaliplatin (50 mg/m2 /week × 5) for clinical T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks following chemoradiation, then 4-6 weeks later, adjuvant chemotherapy (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m2; leucovorin 400 mg/m2; 5FU 400 mg/m2; 5FU 2400 mg/m2) every 2 weeks × 9. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated univariately by the Kaplan-Meier method. Local-regional failure (LRF), distant failure (DF), and second primary failure (SP) were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. No statistical comparisons were made between arms as each was evaluated individually. Results 104 patients (median age 57) were treated; characteristics were similar for both arms. Median follow-up for RT with capecitabine/irinotecan arm was 3.77 years and for RT with capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm was 3.97 years. Four-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP estimates for capecitabine/irinotecan arm are 68%, 85%, 16%, 24%, and 2%, respectively. The 4-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP failure estimates for capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm are 62%, 75%, 18%, 30%, and 6%, respectively. Conclusions Efficacy results for both arms are similar to other reported studies but suggest that pCR is an unsuitable surrogate for traditional survival metrics of clinical outcome. While it remains uncertain if the addition of a second cytotoxic agent enhances the effectiveness of fluorouracil plus RT, these results suggest further

  7. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine and vinorelbine followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy with oral etoposide and cisplatin in patients with inoperable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dae Ho; Han, Ji-Youn; Cho, Kwan Ho; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Kim, Hyae Young; Yoon, Sung Jin B.S.; Lee, Jin Soo . E-mail: jslee@ncc.re.kr

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: For locoregionally advanced inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), concurrent chemoradiotherapy has become a standard therapy. We conducted a Phase II trial to examine the efficacy and toxicity of adding gemcitabine and vinorelbine induction chemotherapy to concurrent chemoradiotherapy with oral etoposide and cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included inoperable clinical Stage III NSCLC without pleural effusion, ECOG performance status 0-1, and weight loss {<=}5%. Induction chemotherapy consisted of three cycles of gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} and vinorelbine 30 mg/m{sup 2}, each given i.v. on Days 1 and 8, every 3 weeks. During once-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.8 Gy/day, total 63 Gy), two cycles of oral etoposide (100 mg on Days 1-5 and 8-12) plus cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 8) were given concurrently 4 weeks apart. Results: Between April 2002 and November 2003, 42 patients were enrolled and 40 were included in response and toxicity evaluation. The median age was 59 years and 13 patients had IIIA and 27 had IIIB; 24 had squamous ca, 12 had adenocarcinoma, and 4 had others. Objective tumor responses were obtained in 29 patients (72.5%), including 18 (45.0%) after induction chemotherapy. After a median follow-up of 23.8 months, the median survival time and progression-free survival was 23.2 months and 10.9 months, respectively, with 2-year survival rate of 43.9%. For the patients with supraclavicular nodal involvement, the median survival time was 11.8 months with 2-year survival rate of 16.7%, whereas the corresponding figures were 27.8 months and 52.0%, respectively, for those without supraclavicular nodal involvement. Toxicity of induction chemotherapy was mild and well tolerated. However, concurrent chemoradiotherapy was associated with G3/4 hematologic toxicity in 75.7%, G3 esophagitis in 24.2%, and two treatment-related deaths. There were nonlife-threatening late toxicities in additional 6 patients. Conclusions

  8. Phase II single arm open label multicentre clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and side effects of a combination of gefitinib and methotrexate to treat tubal ectopic pregnancies (GEM II): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Andrew W; Skubisz, Monika M; Doust, Ann; Duncan, W Colin; Wallace, Euan; Critchley, Hilary O D; Johns, Terrance G; Norman, Jane E; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Mollison, Jill; Rassmusen, Michael; Tong, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tubal ectopic pregnancy (tEP) is the most common life-threatening condition in gynaecology. tEPs with pretreatment serum human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) levels <1000 IU/L respond well to outpatient medical treatment with intramuscular methotrexate (MTX). TEPs with hCG >1000 IU/L take a significant time to resolve with MTX and require multiple outpatient monitoring visits. Gefitinib is an orally active epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antagonist. In preclinical studies, we found that EP implantation sites express high levels of EGFR and that gefitinib augments MTX-induced regression of pregnancy-like tissue. We performed a phase I toxicity study administering oral gefitinib and intramuscular MTX to 12 women with tEPs. The combination therapy did not cause significant toxicities and was well tolerated. We noted that combination therapy resolved the tEPs faster than MTX alone. We now describe the protocol of a larger single arm trial to estimate the efficacy and side effects of combination gefitinib and MTX to treat stable tEPs with hCG 1000–10 000 IU/L Methods and analysis We propose to undertake a single-arm multicentre open label trial (in Edinburgh and Melbourne) and recruit 28 women with tEPs (pretreatment serum hCG 1000–10 000 IU/L). We intend to give a single dose of intramuscular MTX (50 mg/m2) and oral gefitinib (250 mg) daily for 7 days. Our primary outcome is the resolution of EP to non-pregnant hCG levels <15 IU/L without requirement of surgery. Our secondary outcomes are comparison of time to resolution against historical controls given MTX only, and safety and tolerability as determined by clinical/biochemical assessment. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from Scotland A Research Ethics Committee (MREC 11/AL/0350), Southern Health Human Research Ethics Committee B (HREC 11180B) and the Mercy Health Human Research Ethics Committee (R12/25). Data will be presented at international

  9. A Phase II Study of a Dose-Density Regimen With Fluorouracil, Epirubicin, and Cyclophosphamide on Days 1 and 4 Every 14 Days With Filgrastim Support Followed by Weekly Paclitaxel in Women With Primary Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pietri, Elisabetta; Andreis, Daniele; Fabbri, Francesca; Menna, Cecilia; Schirone, Alessio; Kopf, Barbara; Rocca, Andrea; Amadori, Dino

    2015-01-01

    Background. Recent evidence shows that use of anthracycline and taxane adjuvant chemotherapy and dose-dense regimens, consisting of more frequent administration of the drugs, have improved outcomes for breast cancer patients. In this study, we evaluated administration of an epirubicin-based regimen with paclitaxel in a sequential, dose-dense schedule as adjuvant treatment for patients with high-risk primary breast cancer. Methods. In a phase II Simon two-stage design study, we evaluated the feasibility of a modified fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC) regimen at high dose intensity (fluorouracil 500 mg/m2 i.v. on days 1 and 4, epirubicin 60 mg/m2 i.v. on days 1 and 4, and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 i.v. on days 1 and 4; all drugs were administered every 14 days for 3 cycles) with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support followed by dose-intense weekly paclitaxel 100 mg/m2 for 8 cycles. In 11 patients with breast cancer following quadrantectomy (n = 8) or modified radical mastectomy (n = 3), any grade 3 (G3) or higher nonhematologic toxicity (excluding alopecia, nausea or vomiting, and bone pain, which might be a consequence of the administration of filgrastim) and adherence to the scheduled dose-dense treatment (deliverability) were monitored with the purpose of enrolling an additional 27 patients in the case of a satisfying toxicity profile and deliverability of the planned treatment (at least 7 patients completing the treatment). Results. Five of 11 patients experienced G3 or higher nonhematologic toxicity during the FEC regimen. We did not observe G3 or higher nonhematologic toxicity related to paclitaxel treatment. In particular, three patients experienced G3 fatigue, one patient had G3 oral mucositis, three patients had G3 hypokalemia, one patient had G3 syncope, one patient had G3 transaminitis (alanine aminotransferase), one patient experienced G4 pulmonary thromboembolism, and 1 patient had a G3 breast infection. Four of 11 patients

  10. Idarubicin and cytarabine in combination with gemtuzumab ozogamicin (IAGO) for untreated patients with high-risk MDS or AML evolved from MDS: a phase II study from the EORTC and GIMEMA Leukemia Groups (protocol 06013).

    PubMed

    de Witte, Theo; Suciu, Stefan; Meert, Liv; Halkes, Constantijn; Selleslag, Dominik; Bron, Dominique; Amadori, Sergio; Willemze, Roel; Muus, Petra; Baron, Frédéric

    2015-12-01

    The primary objective of this trial was to assess the feasibility, toxicity profile, and antitumor activity of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) combined with a chemotherapy remission-induction regimen in adults with untreated high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (HR-MDS) or secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). In this phase II trial, 30 patients with median age of 58 years received 1 day of GO as a 1-h infusion at the dose level of 5 mg/m(2) on day 7 of the remission-induction course further consisting of a continuous infusion of cytarabine 100 mg/m(2)/day for 10 days and idarubicin 12 mg/m(2)/day on days 1, 3, and 5. A consolidation course, consisting of intermediate-dose cytarabine (A) and idarubicin (I) followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was planned for patients in complete remission (CR). The primary endpoints were response rate (CR/CRi) and severe toxicity rate. The secondary endpoint(s) were survival and progression-free survival (PFS) from start of treatment. Thirteen patients (43 %) achieved CR (eight patients) or CR with incomplete hematopoietic recovery (CRi) (five patients). In patients who achieved CR or CRi, the median time to recovery of neutrophils to 0.5 × 10(9)/l and of platelets to >50 × 10(9)/l was 29 and 30 days, respectively. Grade 3 to 4 severe toxicities occurred in nine patients. The most prominent was liver toxicity, as shown by elevated bilirubin levels in 16 patients and one case of nonfatal veno-occlusive disease (VOD). All 13 patients with CR/CRi received consolidation therapy, which was followed by allogeneic HSCT in five patients and autologous HSCT in three patients. According to the statistical design of the study, the idarubicin and cytarabine in combination with gemtuzumab ozogamicin (IAGO) regimen did not show sufficient activity to warrant further exploration of this regimen in adult patients with HR-MDS or sAML. PMID:26410352

  11. Comparison of neurological and functional outcomes after administration of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor in motor-complete versus motor-incomplete postrehabilitated, chronic spinal cord injuries: a phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Hooshang; Derakhshanrad, Nazi; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a major growth factor in the activation and differentiation of granulocytes. This cytokine has been widely and safely employed in different disease conditions over many years. The administration of the growth factors in spinal cord injury (SCI) has been reported elsewhere; here we have tried to see the effect of SCI severity on the neurological outcomes after neuroprotective treatment for SCI with G-CSF. Seventy-four consecutive patients with SCI of at least 6 months' duration, with stable neurological status in the last 3 months, having informed consent for the treatment were included in the study. All the patients had undergone at least 3 months of standard rehabilitation. Patients were assessed by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale, Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) III, and International Association of Neurorestoratology-Spinal Cord Injury Functional Rating Scale (IANR-SCIFRS) just before intervention and periodically until 6 months after subcutaneous administration of 5 µg/kg per day of G-CSF for 7 consecutive days. Multiple linear regression models were performed for statistical evaluation of lesion completeness and level of injury on changes in ASIA motor, light touch, pinprick, IANR-SCIFRS, and SCIM III scores, as a phase I/II comparative study. The study consisted of 52 motor-complete and 22 motor-incomplete SCI patients. There was no significant difference regarding age and sex, chronicity, and level of SCI between the two groups. Motor-incomplete patients had significantly more improvement in ASIA motor score compared to the motor-complete patients (7.68 scores, p < 0.001); also they had significant improvement in light touch (6.42 scores, p = 0.003) and pinprick sensory scores (4.89 scores, p = 0.011). Therefore, G-CSF administration in motor-incomplete SCIs is associated with significantly higher motor improvement, and also the higher the initial ASIA Impairment Scale

  12. Phase I-II study of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost using volumetric modulated arc therapy for adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer patients: a report of feasibility and early toxicity results in the first 50 treatments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To report results in terms of feasibility and early toxicity of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) as adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery. Methods Between September 2010 and May 2011, 50 consecutive patients presenting early-stage breast cancer were submitted to adjuvant radiotherapy with SIB-VMAT approach using RapidArc in our Institution (Istituto Clinico Humanitas ICH). Three out of 50 patients were irradiated bilaterally (53 tumours in 50 patients). All patients were enrolled in a phase I-II trial approved by the ICH ethical committee. All 50 patients enrolled in the study underwent VMAT-SIB technique to irradiate the whole breast with concomitant boost irradiation of the tumor bed. Doses to whole breast and surgical bed were 40.5 Gy and 48 Gy respectively, delivered in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Skin toxicities were recorded during and after treatment according to RTOG acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria with a median follow-up of 12 months (range 8–16). Cosmetic outcomes were assessed as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results The median age of the population was 68 years (range 36–88). According to AJCC staging system, 38 breast lesions were classified as pT1, and 15 as pT2; 49 cases were assessed as N0 and 4 as N1. The maximum acute skin toxicity by the end of treatment was Grade 0 in 20/50 patients, Grade 1 in 32/50, Grade 2 in 0 and Grade 3 in 1/50 (one of the 3 cases of bilateral breast irradiation). No Grade 4 toxicities were observed. All Grade 1 toxicities had resolved within 3 weeks. No significant differences in cosmetic scores on baseline assessment vs. 3 months and 6 months after the treatment were observed: all patients were scored as excellent/good (50/50) compared with baseline; no fair/poor judgment was recorded. No other toxicities or local failures were recorded during follow-up. Conclusions The 3-week course of

  13. A Phase II Study of Doxycycline in Relapsed NHL

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-23

    Adult Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma Recurrent; Lymphoma, Follicular; Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma; Malignant Lymphoma - Lymphoplasmacytic; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); T-Cell Lymphoma

  14. Correlation of bevacizumab-induced hypertension and outcome in the BOXER study, a phase II study of capecitabine, oxaliplatin (CAPOX) plus bevacizumab as peri-operative treatment in 45 patients with poor-risk colorectal liver-only metastases unsuitable for upfront resection

    PubMed Central

    Dewdney, A; Cunningham, D; Barbachano, Y; Chau, I

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bevacizumab is commonly used in combination with chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer, but to date, despite extensive research, no predictive or prognostic biomarkers for bevacizumab have been identified. The development of bevacizumab-induced arterial hypertension has recently been suggested as a potential predictive biomarker. Methods: Blood pressure was recorded during the BOXER study, a phase II study of capecitabine, oxaliplatin (CAPOX) plus bevacizumab as peri-operative treatment in 45 patients with poor-risk colorectal liver-only metastases unsuitable for upfront resection. In this analysis, the development of bevacizumab-induced hypertension was correlated with clinical outcomes. Results: Fifteen percent of patients developed ⩾grade 1 hypertension while receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and 4% developed grade 3 hypertension. There was no correlation between the development of hypertension and radiological response rate (P=0.642), progression-free survival (P=0.644) or overall survival (P=0.480) in those who developed hypertension compared with those who did not. Conclusion: Bevacizumab-induced hypertension did not predict radiological response or survival in our study. The results highlight a number of important issues regarding the use of hypertension as a biomarker. PMID:22531628

  15. Clofarabine in combination with a standard remission induction regimen (cytosine arabinoside and idarubicin) in patients with previously untreated intermediate and bad-risk acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (HR-MDS): phase I results of an ongoing phase I/II study of the leukemia groups of EORTC and GIMEMA (EORTC GIMEMA 06061/AML-14A trial).

    PubMed

    Willemze, R; Suciu, S; Muus, P; Halkes, C J M; Meloni, G; Meert, L; Karrasch, M; Rapion, J; Vignetti, M; Amadori, S; de Witte, T; Marie, J P

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of clofarabine combined with the EORTC-GIMEMA 3 + 10 induction regimen (idarubicin + cytosine arabinoside) in adults with untreated acute myelogenous leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. In this phase I trial, 25 patients (median age 56 years) received 5 days of clofarabine as 1-h infusion (arm A) or push injection (arm B) at the dose level of 5 × 10 or 5 × 15 mg/m(2)/day in an algorithmic dose escalation 3 + 3 design. A consolidation course (intermediate dose cytosine arabinoside, idarubicin) was planned for patients in complete remission (CR). Primary endpoint was safety and tolerance as measured by dose limiting toxicity (DLT); secondary endpoints were response rate, other grade III/IV toxicities, and hematological recovery after induction and consolidation. Five DLTs were observed (in arm A: one DLT at 10 mg/m(2)/day, three at 15 mg/m(2)/day; in arm B: one DLT at 15 mg/m(2)/day). Three patients receiving 15 mg/m(2)/day were withdrawn due to adverse events not classified as DLT. Prolonged hypoplasia was observed in five patients. CR + complete remission with incomplete recovery were achieved in 21 patients (11/12 (92 %) receiving clofarabine 10 mg/m(2)/day; 10/13 (77 %) receiving clofarabine 15 mg/m(2)/day). Clofarabine, 5 × 10 mg/m(2)/day, resulted in one DLT and no early treatment withdrawals. MTD of clofarabine combined with cytosine arabinoside and idarubicin is 5 × 10 mg/m(2)/day. PMID:24682421

  16. Organisationalbis justice and cognitive function in middle-aged employees: the Whitehall II study

    PubMed Central

    Elovainio, Marko; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Ferrie, Jane E; Shipley, Martin; Gimeno, David; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Marianna; Jokela, Markus; Marmot, Michael G; Kivimäki, Mika; De Vogli, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the role work-related factors play in the decline cognitive function. We examined the association between perceived organizational justice and cognitive function among middle-aged men and women. Methods Perceived organizational justice was measured at Phases 1 (1985–1988) and 2 (1989–1990) of the Whitehall II study when the participants were 35–55 years old. Assessment of cognitive function at the screening clinic at Phases 5 (1997–1999) and 7 (2003–2004) included the following tests in screening clinic: memory, inductive reasoning (Alice Heim 4), vocabulary (Mill Hill), and verbal fluency (phonemic and semantic). Mean exposure to lower organizational justice at Phases 1 and 2 in relation to cognitive function at Phases 5 and 7 were analysed using linear regression analyses. The final sample included 4531 men and women. Results Lower mean levels of justice at Phases 1 and 2 were associated with worse cognitive function in terms of memory, inductive reasoning, vocabulary and verbal fluency at both Phases 5 and 7. These associations were independent of covariates, such as age, occupational grade, behavioural risks, depression, hypertension and job strain. Conclusions This study suggests an association between perceived organizational justice and cognitive function. Further studies are needed to examine whether interventions designed to improve organizational justice would affect employees’ cognition function favourably. PMID:21084589

  17. Injustice at work and incidence of psychiatric morbidity: the Whitehall II study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrie, J E; Head, J; Shipley, M J; Vahtera, J; Marmot, M G; Kivimäki, M

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous studies of organisational justice and mental health have mostly examined women and have not examined the effect of change in justice. Aim To examine effects of change in the treatment of employees by supervisors (the relational component of organisational justice) on minor psychiatric morbidity, using a cohort with a large proportion of men. Methods Data are from the Whitehall II study, a prospective cohort of 10 308 white‐collar British civil servants (3143 women and 6895 men, aged 35–55 at baseline) (Phase 1, 1985–88). Employment grade, relational justice, job demands, job control, social support at work, effort–reward imbalance, physical illness, and psychiatric morbidity were measured at baseline. Relational justice was assessed again at Phase 2 (1989–90). The outcome was cases of psychiatric morbidity by Phases 2 and 3 (1991–93) among participants case‐free at baseline. Results In analyses adjusted for age, grade, and baseline physical illness, women and men exposed to low relational justice at Phase 1 were at higher risk of psychiatric morbidity by Phases 2 and 3. Adjustment for other psychosocial work characteristics, particularly social support and effort–reward imbalance, partially attenuated these associations. A favourable change in justice between Phase 1 and Phase 2 reduced the immediate risk (Phase 2) of psychiatric morbidity, while an adverse change increased the immediate and longer term risk (Phase 3). Conclusion This study shows that unfair treatment by supervisors increases risk of poor mental health. It appears that the employers' duty to ensure that employees are treated fairly at work also has benefits for health. PMID:16698805

  18. Efficacy of upfront high-dose chemotherapy plus rituximab followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for untreated high-intermediate-, and high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a multicenter prospective phase II study (JSCT-NHL04).

    PubMed

    Murayama, Tohru; Fukuda, Takahiro; Okumura, Hirokazu; Sunami, Kazutaka; Sawazaki, Aiko; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Uike, Naokuni; Hidaka, Tomonori; Takatsuka, Yoshifusa; Eto, Tetsuya; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Fujisaki, Tomoaki; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Tsuneyoshi, Naoko; Iyama, Satoshi; Nagafuji, Koji; Harada, Mine

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of upfront high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and rituximab (R) followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (auto-PBSCT) in patients with newly diagnosed high-intermediate(HI)-, and high(H)-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), we conducted a multicenter prospective phase II trial. In 15-60-year-old patients with H- or HI-risk DLBCL, after three courses of (R-)CHOP14, high-dose etoposide was given prior to peripheral blood stem cell harvesting. After an additional three courses of (R-)CHOP14, auto-PBSCT was performed following HDCT. The primary endpoint of the study is progression-free survival (PFS) at 2 years after registration in eligible patients. The expected PFS and the threshold PFS were estimated to be 70 and 50 %, respectively. Among 40 eligible patients registered, 30 patients completed treatment. With a median observation period in surviving eligible patients of 63 months, the 2- and 4-year PFS after registration were 79.9 and 72.0 %, respectively. The 2- and 4-year overall survival (OS) were 92.5 and 84.6 %, respectively. In 30 patients who completed treatment, the 4-year PFS and OS after auto-PBSCT were 79.2 and 85.9 %, respectively. In conclusion, the results of our study suggest that upfront HDCT and auto-PBSCT combined with rituximab is highly effective as an initial treatment for HI-, and H-risk DLBCL. PMID:27084252

  19. Phase II Study of Concomitant Thalidomide During Radiotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ang, Hui-Ju; Hsu, Chiun; Chen, Chien-Hung; Chang, Ya-Hui; Chang, Jeffrey S.; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Thalidomide has been demonstrated to possess antitumor activity in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The objective of the present study was to determine whether the combined treatment of thalidomide with radiotherapy (RT) is associated with acceptable toxicity and an improved clinical outcome in HCC patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled to receive RT combined with thalidomide. A total dose of 50 Gy was delivered in 2-Gy fractions within 5 weeks. Thalidomide was administered 100 mg twice daily starting 3 days before RT until the development of unacceptable toxicity or disease progression. Blood samples were collected before, during, and after treatment to measure the levels of angiogenic factors and cytokines. The results of patients receiving the combined therapy were compared with those from 18 HCC patients receiving RT only. Results: No significant difference in the clinical parameters was noted between the two groups, except for the baseline interleukin-6 level, which was greater in the concomitant group (p = .05). The most common toxicities related to thalidomide use were skin rash (54.2%), somnolence (37.5%), and constipation (33.3%). No significant differences were seen in the response rate (55.6% vs. 58.3%, p = .48), median progression-free survival (182 {+-} 48.9 vs. 148 {+-} 6.2 days, p = .15), or median overall survival (258 {+-} 45.6 vs. 241 {+-} 38.6, p = .16) between those who received concomitant therapy and those who received RT alone. Thalidomide suppressed the serum basic fibroblast growth factor level significantly during RT (p = .03) and, to a lesser extent, the interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} levels. After adjusting for other potential prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis, only the baseline interleukin-6 level and stem cell-derived factor-1 during RT independently predicted the progression-free survival. A decreased serum stem cell-derived factor-1 level 1 month after RT completion was a significant predictor of the overall survival of HCC patients receiving RT. Conclusions: Despite the acceptable toxicity, thalidomide provided no additional benefit for HCC patients undergoing RT.

  20. Phase II Study of Oxaliplatin, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Advanced Gastric/Gastroesophageal Junction Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  1. Phase I-II Study of Fluorouracil in Combination With Phenylbutyrate in Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-31

    Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  2. Porfiromycin in the management of epidermoid and transitional cell cancer: a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Panettiere, F J; Talley, R W; Torres, J; Lane, M

    1976-07-01

    Porifiromycin has been tested in many groups of patients over the past several years (1-7). This report is an analysis of greater than 100 patients with epidermoid and urinary tract transitional cell carcinomas treated with this agent. A review of these data and the available literature on this agent shows that porfiromycin offers definite usefulness in disseminated squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix, and definite but lesser effectiveness in epidermoid carcinomas of the lung, the head and neck region, and other sites. Responsiveness was also demonstrated in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary tract. Toxicity was tolerable and consisted primarily of myelosuppression and local skin necrosis in sites where extravasation had occurred. PMID:795539

  3. Phase II study of profiromycin vs mitomycin-C utilizing acute intermittent schedules.

    PubMed

    Baker, L H; Izbicki, R M; Vaitkevicius, V K

    1976-01-01

    A randomized prosective study of Mitomycin-C and its N-methyl derivative, Porfiromycin, was conducted. Thirty-two patients with disseminated gastrointestinal cancer or other disseminated abdominal adenocarcinoma were treated with Mitomycin-C; 31 patients received Porfiromycin. Both drugs were given by acute intermittent bolus schedule (Mitomucin-C , 22.5 mg/M2 or Porfiromycin, 75 mg/M2 every 6--8 weeks as a single bolus i.v. injection). Eleven patients (34%) who received Mitomycin-C entered into partial remission. In 10 of the 31 patients (32%) receiving Porfiromycin, partial remission occured. Analysis by tumor type demonstrated that in the Mitomycin-C treated group responses occured in 4 of 12 patients with colorectal carcinoma, in 4 of 9 with upper GI cancers, and in 3 of 11 with ovarian cancer. Correspondingly in Porfiromycin group responses occured in 2 of 12 colorectal carcinoma patients, in 3 of 7 upper GI cancer patients, and in 5 of 12 ovarian cancer patients. Both drugs produced significant myelosuppression; however, Porfiromycin toxicity appeared more cumulative. Further clinical trial of Mitomycin in an acute intermittent bolus schedule appears justified. PMID:958162

  4. Phase II study of concomitant chemoradiotherapy in bulky refractory or chemoresistant relapsed lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Girinsky, Theodore . E-mail: girinsky@igr.fr; Lapusan, Simona; Ribrag, Vincent; Koscielny, Serge; Ferme, Christophe; Carde, Patrice

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local efficacy of concomitant chemoradiotherapy in patients with mostly refractory lymphoma. Methods and materials: Patients with refractory or chemoresistant-relapsed lymphoma and bulky life-threatening masses were included in this study. A split course of concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy (mostly cisplatin and etoposide) was delivered during a 6-week period. Weekly blood tests and a clinical examination using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group guidelines were performed to assess acute toxicity. The tumor response was evaluated 1-3 months after treatment and at regular follow-up visits. Results: We enrolled 21 patients in the study between January 1998 and April 2003. Of the 21 patients, 60% had disseminated disease with bulky tumor masses and 85% had refractory lymphoma, of which most had been treated with at least two different chemotherapy regimens before concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Seventy-five percent received regimens containing cisplatinum and etoposide. The median radiation dose was 40 Gy (range, 12-62.5 Gy). Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity and mucositis was observed in 70% and 30% of cases respectively, without any deaths. The overall response and complete remission rate was 70% and 20%, respectively. The 1-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rate was 20.4% and 54%, respectively. Three patients with localized disease were still alive 16, 33, and 48 months after treatment. Conclusion: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy for refractory or chemoresistant-relapsed lymphoma induced high hematologic toxicity, but seemed adequate for controlling local bulky tumor masses. No toxicity-related death was observed.

  5. Phase II Study of Intraventricular Methotrexate in Children With Recurrent or Progressive Malignant Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Embryonal Tumor With Abundant Neuropil and True Rosettes; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm to the Leptomeninges

  6. Phase II Study of Alemtuzumab in Combination With Pentostatin in Patients With T-Cell Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Ravandi, Farhad; Aribi, Ahmed; O'Brien, Susan; Faderl, Stefan; Jones, Dan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Huang, Xuelin; York, Sergernne; Pierce, Sherry; Wierda, William; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios; Verstovsek, Srdan; Pro, Barbara; Fayad, Luis; Keating, Michael; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To examine the efficacy and safety of the combination of alemtuzumab and pentostatin in patients with T-cell neoplasms. Patients and Methods We treated 24 patients with a variety of T-cell leukemias and lymphomas with a combination of alemtuzumab 30 mg intravenously (IV) three times weekly for up to 3 months and pentostatin 4 mg/m2 IV weekly for 4 weeks followed by alternate weekly administration for up to 6 months. Prophylactic antibiotics including antiviral, antifungal, and antibacterial agents were administered during the treatment and for 2 months after its completion. Results The median age of patients was 57 years (range, 21 to 79 years). Eight patients were previously untreated, and 16 had a median of two prior therapies (range, one to six regimens). Thirteen patients responded to treatment (11 complete responses [CRs] and two partial responses), for an overall response rate of 54%. The median response duration was 19.5 months. Monoclonal T-cell receptor chain gene rearrangements were detected by polymerase chain reaction in bone marrow of 20 of 22 evaluable patients and became negative in five of seven evaluable patients in CR. Opportunistic infections caused by pathogens associated with severe T-cell dysfunction were common. Conclusion The combination of alemtuzumab and pentostatin is feasible and effective in T-cell neoplasms. Although infections, including cytomegalovirus reactivation, are a concern, they may be minimized with adequate prophylactic antibiotic therapy. PMID:19805674

  7. Pilot Phase II study of mazindol in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Konofal, Eric; Zhao, Wei; Laouénan, Cédric; Lecendreux, Michel; Kaguelidou, Florentia; Benadjaoud, Lila; Mentré, France; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mazindol has been proposed as a potential treatment of children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this pilot study was to assess its pharmacokinetics, short-term efficacy, and safety. Subjects and methods A total of 24 children (aged 9–12 years) with ADHD (according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, text-revision criteria) received a daily dose of 1 mg for 7 days and were followed for 3 additional weeks. Pharmacokinetic samples were collected after the first administration. ADHD symptoms were assessed using the ADHD Rating Scale (RS)-IV, Conners’ Parent Rating Scale – Revised: Long (CPRS-R:L) at screening, baseline, and the end of the study. The Clinical Global Impression – Severity (CGI-S) scale was assessed at baseline, and the CGI – Improvement (CGI-I) scale was assessed at subsequent visits. Results Twenty-one subjects (aged 10±1 years) were analyzed. Pharmacokinetic data were described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption, elimination, and lag time. The typical apparent clearance and apparent volume of distribution were 27.9 L/h and 234 L, and increased with fat-free mass and age, respectively. The mean change in score in ADHD RS-IV after 1 week of mazindol was −24.1 (P<0.0001), greater than a 90% improvement from baseline. Reduction of CPRS-R:L and CGI-S scores were −52.1 (P<0.0001) and −2.5 (P<0.01), respectively. Adverse events were mild to moderate, decreased appetite and upper abdominal pain being the most common. Conclusion This preliminary study shows that mazindol might be an effective, well-tolerated, and long-acting (more than 8 hours) agent for the treatment of ADHD in children. PMID:25525331

  8. Phase II study of preoperative paclitaxel/cisplatin with radiotherapy in locally advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong W.; Blanke, Charles D.; Wu, Huiyun; Shyr, Yu; Berlin, Jordan; Beauchamp, R. Daniel; Chakravarthy, Bapsi . E-mail: bapsi.chak@vanderbilt.edu

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Preoperative paclitaxel-based chemoradiotherapy may improve the response rates and survival in patients with localized esophageal cancer. We evaluated paclitaxel-based induction chemoradiotherapy in patients with localized esophageal cancer to determine its feasibility, clinical response, pathologic response, and overall survival. Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 1998, 50 patients were enrolled in this study. At study entry, patients were categorized as either resectable or unresectable according to evaluation by an experienced thoracic surgeon. All patients were treated with paclitaxel 175 mg/m{sup 2} and cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1, 29 with radiotherapy to 3,000 cGy in 15 fractions. Resectable patients underwent esophagectomy 4 weeks later. Postoperatively, patients received two cycles of paclitaxel 175 mg/m{sup 2} on Day 1 and 5-fluorouracil 350 mg/m{sup 2} and leucovorin 300 mg on Days 1-3, given every 28 days. Patients who were deemed unsuitable for resection from the outset continued radiotherapy to a total dose of 6,000 cGy. Results: Of the 50 patients, all began neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, 40 patients underwent surgery, and 25 patients completed postoperative chemotherapy. A pathologic complete response was seen in 7 patients (17.5%). Patients with a pathologic response had a median survival of 32.4 months vs. 14.4 months for nonresponders (p <0.001). Patients with a clinical response had a median survival of 25.2 months compared with 15.6 months for nonresponders (p = 0.002). At a median follow up of 19.8 months (range 2.4-100.8), the median survival was 20.4 months and the 3-year overall survival rate was 23.2%. Conclusion: Although preoperative cisplatin/paclitaxel with 3,000 cGy was tolerable, this multimodality regimen did not appear to be superior to standard cisplatin/5-fluorouracil-containing regimens and its use is not recommended.

  9. Phase I-II Study of Intraoperative Radiation Therapy (IORT) After Radical Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Saracino, Biancamaria Gallucci, Michele; De Carli, Piero; Soriani, Antonella; Papalia, Rocco; Marzi, Simona; Landoni, Valeria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Arcangeli, Stefano; Forastiere, Ester; Sentinelli, Steno; Arcangeli, Giorgio

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: Recent studies have suggested an {alpha}/{beta} ratio in prostate cancer of 1.5-3 Gy, which is lower than that assumed for late-responsive normal tissues. Therefore the administration of a single, intraoperative dose of irradiation should represent a convenient irradiation modality in prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Between February 2002 and June 2004, 34 patients with localized prostate cancer with only one risk factor (Gleason score {>=}7, Clinical Stage [cT] {>=}2c, or prostate-specific antigen [PSA] of 11-20 ng/mL) and without clinical evidence of lymph node metastases were treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) and intraoperative radiotherapy on the tumor bed. A dose-finding procedure based on the Fibonacci method was employed. Dose levels of 16, 18, and 20 Gy were selected, which are biologically equivalent to total doses of about 60-80 Gy administered with conventional fractionation, using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio value of 3. Results: At a median follow-up of 41 months, 24 (71%) patients were alive with an undetectable PSA value. No patients died from disease, whereas 2 patients died from other malignancies. Locoregional failures were detected in 3 (9%) patients, 2 in the prostate bed and 1 in the common iliac node chain outside the radiation field. A PSA rise without local or distant disease was observed in 7 (21%) cases. The overall 3-year biochemical progression-free survival rate was 77.3%. Conclusions: Our dose-finding study demonstrated the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy in prostate cancer also at the highest administered dose.

  10. Phase II Study of Preoperative Helical Tomotherapy With a Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, Benedikt; Tournel, Koen; Everaert, Hendrik; Hoorens, Anne; Sermeus, Alexandra; Christian, Nicolas; Storme, Guy; Verellen, Dirk; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The addition of concomitant chemotherapy to preoperative radiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. The combined treatment modality increases the complete response rate and local control (LC), but has no impact on survival or the incidence of distant metastases. In addition, it is associated with considerable toxicity. As an alternative strategy, we explored prospectively, preoperative helical tomotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Methods and Materials: A total of 108 patients were treated with intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art II system. A dose of 46 Gy, in daily fractions of 2 Gy, was delivered to the mesorectum and draining lymph nodes, without concomitant chemotherapy. Patients with an anticipated circumferential resection margin (CRM) of less than 2 mm, based on magnetic resonance imaging, received a SIB to the tumor up to a total dose of 55.2 Gy. Acute and late side effects were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: A total of 102 patients presented with cT3-4 tumors; 57 patients entered the boost group and 51 the no-boost group. One patient in the no-boost group developed a radio-hypersensitivity reaction, resulting in a complete tumor remission, a Grade 3 acute and Grade 5 late enteritis. No other Grade {>=}3 acute toxicities occurred. With a median follow-up of 32 months, Grade {>=}3 late gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity were observed in 6% and 4% of the patients, respectively. The actuarial 2-year LC, progression-free survival and overall survival were 98%, 79%, and 93%. Conclusions: Preoperative helical tomotherapy displays a favorable acute toxicity profile in patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer. A SIB can be safely administered in patients with a narrow CRM and resulted in a promising LC.

  11. Phase I/II Study of IMMU-132 in Patients With Epithelial Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-29

    Colorectal Cancer; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Esophageal Cancer; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Small Cell Lung Cancer; Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Carcinoma Breast Stage IV; Hormone-refractory Prostate Cancer; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Head and Neck Cancers- Squamous Cell; Renal Cell Cancer; Urinary Bladder Neoplasms; Cervical Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Glioblastoma Multiforme

  12. Phase II Study of Consolidation Chemotherapy After Concurrent Chemoradiation in Cervical Cancer: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joong; Kim, Woo Young; Nam, Hee Rim; Kim, Byoung-Gie . E-mail: huna0@naver.com; Huh, Seung Jae; Lee, Je-Ho; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to determine the efficacy of consolidation chemotherapy after concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) using high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with cervical carcinoma (FIGO stage IB2-IVA) were treated with external beam radiation therapy to the whole pelvis (50.4 Gy) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (24 Gy to point A). Cisplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2} (Day 1) and 5-fluorouracil 1000 mg/m{sup 2} (Days 1-5) were given every 3 weeks starting concurrently with the radiation and followed by 3 more cycles of consolidation for a total of 6 cycles. Results: Thirty patients (94%) received 3 more cycles of post-CCRT consolidation chemotherapy and were evaluable for the toxicity and efficacy of consolidation. The most common toxicities of Grade 2 or higher were nausea or vomiting (47%) and anemia (33%). Late complications of the rectum and bladder occurred in 13% and 6% of the patients, respectively. The clinical complete response rate was 87% (95% CI, 75%-99%). During a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 6-58 months), 5 patients (17%) had recurrence; the sites of failure were 3 (10%) inside the radiation field and 2 (7%) outside the radiation field. The estimated 3-year progression-free survival rate was 83% (95% CI, 67%-99%) and overall survival rate was 91% (95% CI, 79%-100%). Conclusions: Consolidation chemotherapy after CCRT is well tolerated and effective in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. A prospective randomized trial to compare this treatment strategy with standard CCRT seems to be worthwhile.

  13. Phase II studies of nebulised Arikace in CF patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, J P; Dupont, L; Konstan, M W; Billings, J; Fustik, S; Goss, C H; Lymp, J; Minic, P; Quittner, A L; Rubenstein, R C; Young, K R; Saiman, L; Burns, J L; Govan, J R W; Ramsey, B; Gupta, R

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Arikace is a liposomal amikacin preparation for aerosol delivery with potent Pseudomonas aeruginosa killing and prolonged lung deposition. Objectives To examine the safety and efficacy of 28 days of once-daily Arikace in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients chronically infected with P aeruginosa. Methods 105 subjects were evaluated in double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. Subjects were randomised to once-daily Arikace (70, 140, 280 and 560 mg; n=7, 5, 21 and 36 subjects) or placebo (n=36) for 28 days. Primary outcomes included safety and tolerability. Secondary outcomes included lung function (forced expiratory volume at one second (FEV1)), P aeruginosa density in sputum, and the Cystic Fibrosis Quality of Life Questionnaire—Revised (CFQ-R). Results The adverse event profile was similar among Arikace and placebo subjects. The relative change in FEV1 was higher in the 560 mg dose group at day 28 (p=0.033) and at day 56 (28 days post-treatment, 0.093L±0.203 vs −0.032L±0.119; p=0.003) versus placebo. Sputum P aeruginosa density decreased >1 log in the 560 mg group versus placebo (days 14, 28 and 35; p=0.021). The Respiratory Domain of the CFQ-R increased by the Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID) in 67% of Arikace subjects (560 mg) versus 36% of placebo (p=0.006), and correlated with FEV1 improvements at days 14, 28 and 42 (p<0.05). An open-label extension (560 mg Arikace) for 28 days followed by 56 days off over six cycles confirmed durable improvements in lung function and sputum P aeruginosa density (n=49). Conclusions Once-daily Arikace demonstrated acute tolerability, safety, biologic activity and efficacy in patients with CF with P aeruginosa infection. PMID:23749840

  14. Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab and Radiotherapy for Resectable Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sam S.; Duda, Dan G.; Karl, Daniel L.; Kim, Tae-Min; Kambadakone, Avinash R.; Chen, Yen-Lin; Rothrock, Courtney; Rosenberg, Andrew E.; Nielsen, G. Petur; Kirsch, David G.; Choy, Edwin; Harmon, David C.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Dreyfuss, Jonathan; Ancukiewicz, Marek; and others

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Numerous preclinical studies have demonstrated that angiogenesis inhibitors can increase the efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). We sought to examine the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab (BV) and RT in soft tissue sarcomas and explore biomarkers to help determine the treatment response. Methods and Materials: Patients with {>=}5 cm, intermediate- or high-grade soft tissue sarcomas at significant risk of local recurrence received neoadjuvant BV alone followed by BV plus RT before surgical resection. Correlative science studies included analysis of the serial blood and tumor samples and serial perfusion computed tomography scans. Results: The 20 patients had a median tumor size of 8.25 cm, with 13 extremity, 1 trunk, and 6 retroperitoneal/pelvis tumors. The neoadjuvant treatment was well tolerated, with only 4 patients having Grade 3 toxicities (hypertension, liver function test elevation). BV plus RT resulted in {>=}80% pathologic necrosis in 9 (45%) of 20 tumors, more than double the historical rate seen with RT alone. Three patients had a complete pathologic response. The median microvessel density decreased 53% after BV alone (p <.05). After combination therapy, the median tumor cell proliferation decreased by 73%, apoptosis increased 10.4-fold, and the blood flow, blood volume, and permeability surface area decreased by 62-72% (p <.05). Analysis of gene expression microarrays of untreated tumors identified a 24-gene signature for treatment response. The microvessel density and circulating progenitor cells at baseline and the reduction in microvessel density and plasma soluble c-KIT with BV therapy also correlated with a good pathologic response (p <.05). After a median follow-up of 20 months, only 1 patient had developed local recurrence. Conclusions: The results from the present exploratory study indicated that BV increases the efficacy of RT against soft tissue sarcomas and might reduce the incidence of local recurrence. Thus, this regimen warrants additional investigation. Gene expression profiles and other tissue and circulating biomarkers showed promising correlations with treatment response.

  15. Lenalidomide and dexamethasone for acute light chain-induced renal failure: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Heinz; Rauch, Elisabeth; Kuehr, Thomas; Adam, Zdeněk; Weißmann, Adalbert; Kasparu, Hedwig; Autzinger, Eva-Maria; Heintel, Daniel; Greil, Richard; Poenisch, Wolfram; Müldür, Ercan; Zojer, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the activity and tolerance of lenalidomide-dexamethasone in 35 patients with acute light chain-induced renal failure. The lenalidomide dose was adapted to the estimated glomerular filtration rate and dexamethasone was given at high dose in cycle one and at low dose thereafter. Four patients died within the first two cycles, and five discontinued therapy leaving 26 patients for the per-protocol analysis. Responses were observed in 24/35 (68.6%) patients of the intent-to-treat population. Complete response was noted in seven patients (20%), very good partial response in three patients (8.6%), partial response in 14 patients (40%), and minimal response in one patient (2.9%). Renal response was observed in 16 (45.7%) patients: five (14.2%) achieved complete, four (11.4%) partial and seven (20%) minor renal responses. Five of 13 patients who were dialysis dependent at baseline became dialysis independent. The median time to myeloma and to renal response was 28 days for both parameters, while the median time to best myeloma and best renal response was 92 and 157 days, respectively. The median estimated glomerular filtration rate increased significantly in patients with partial response or better from 17.1 mL/min at baseline to 39.1 mL/min at best response (P=0.001). The median progression-free and overall survival was 5.5 and 21.8 months, respectively, in the intent-to-treat population and 12.1 and 31.4 months, respectively, in the per-protocol group. Infections, cardiotoxicity, anemia and thrombocytopenia were the most frequent toxicities. In conclusion, the lenalidomide-dexamethasone regimen achieved rapid and substantial myeloma and renal responses. The trial was registered under EUDRACT number 2008-006497-15. PMID:25398836

  16. THERMAL CONVERSION OF MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER SLUDGE, PHASE II: STUDY OF HEAVY METAL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The object of this work was to compare and analyze heavy metal emissions associated with the thermal conversion (incineration) processes which can be conducted in a multiple-hearth furnace to dry municipal wastewater (sewage) sludge and reduce its volume by forming an ash or char...

  17. Phase II Study of Dutasteride for Recurrent Prostate Cancer During Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Satyan K.; Trump, Donald L.; Sartor, Oliver; Tan, Wei; Wilding, Gregory E.; Mohler, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We determined the response rate to and safety of a dual 5α-reductase inhibitor, dutasteride, in men with castration recurrent prostate cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 28 men with asymptomatic castration recurrent prostate cancer were treated with 3.5 mg dutasteride daily (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone treatment continued), and evaluated monthly for response and toxicity. Eligibility included appropriate duration antiandrogen withdrawal, baseline prostate specific antigen 2.0 ng/ml or greater and a new lesion on bone scan, increase in measurable disease using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, or 2 or more consecutive prostate specific antigen measurements increased over baseline. Outcomes were progression, stable disease, partial response (prostate specific antigen less than 50% of enrollment for 4 or more weeks) or complete response. Results There were 25 evaluable men with a mean age of 70 years (range 57 to 88), a mean prostate specific antigen of 61.9 ng/ml (range 5.0 to 488.9) and mean Gleason score 8 (range 6 to 10), 15 of whom had bone metastases. Eight men had 10 grade 3 or higher adverse events using National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria, all of which were judged to be unrelated to treatment. Of the 25 men 14 had disease progression by 2 months, 9 had stable (2.5, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 5, 8.5, 9 months) disease, 2 had a partial response and none had a complete response. Overall median time to progression was 1.87 months (range 1 to 10, 95% CI 1.15–3.91). Conclusions Dutasteride rarely produces biochemical responses in men with castration recurrent prostate cancer. However, further study is warranted given its favorable safety profile. PMID:19091347

  18. Phase II study of trastuzumab plus gemcitabine in chemotherapy-pretreated patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Vukelja, Sasha; Marsland, Thomas; Kimmel, Gary; Ratnam, Suresh; Pippen, John E

    2004-06-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of trastuzumab plus gemcitabine in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Sixty-four patients were enrolled, the majority of whom (95%) had been treated with an anthracycline and a taxane before study enrollment. Eligible women were treated with gemcitabine (1200 mg/m(2) weekly for 2 weeks with the third week off on a 21-day cycle) plus weekly doses of trastuzumab (4-mg/kg loading dose; 2 mg/kg thereafter) until disease progression. The median patient age was 55 years, and the median number of previously administered (including adjuvant) chemotherapy regimens was 3. Twenty-two patients were scored as 2+ for HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry; 39 patients scored 3+. Three patients were assessed as HER2-negative on central pathology review and were ineligible for evaluation. Fifty-nine of the 61 patients remained evaluable for response. The objective response rates were 38% in the intent-to-treat population (23 of 61) and 44% among the 39 patients with HER2 3+ expression. The median response duration was 5.8 months, median overall survival was 14.7 months, and median time to disease progression was 5.8 months. Trastuzumab plus gemcitabine was well tolerated. No cases of clinical congestive heart failure occurred. Grade 3/4 toxicities included asthenia in 4 patients, fever in 4, neutropenia in 18, dyspnea in 6, abdominal or back pain in 3, and edema and nausea in 1 patient each. The combination of trastuzumab plus gemcitabine appears to be well tolerated and effective for patients with HER2-positive MBC previously treated with chemotherapy. PMID:15245619

  19. A Phase II Study Evaluating the Safety and Efficacy of Subcutaneous Plerixafor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-26

    For Donors:; Related Donors Donating PBSC to a Family Member; For Recipients:; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Hodgkin's Disease; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  20. [Phase II study of CIS-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) by collaborative study].

    PubMed

    Kato, T

    1982-04-01

    Since the discovery of platinum compounds by Rosenberg, et al. in 1965 on the mitosis inhibitory action against Escherichia coli, the anticancer action of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin) one of the platinum compounds, has called attention, and recently clinical trials of this compounds have been actively performed in the treatment of testicular and ovarian malignancies not only in the U.S.A. but also in Japan. We carried out a joint controlled trial of cisplatin (NK-801, Nippon Kayaku Co.) in the treatment of ovarian malignancies. The eligibility of the patients and evaluation of response were assessed according to the general response criteria proposed by Drs. Koyama and Saito. Fifty-seven patients were evaluable for the tumor response. Complete response were 11%, partial response 47%, and overall response rates 58% in ovarian malignancies, respectively. Toxicities were noted in the gastro-intestinal tract. Myelosupression and renal dysfunction were other prominent adverse effects. PMID:6892198

  1. [Phase II studies of interferon alpha-2 Sch 30500 in advanced gastrointestinal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Furue, H

    1985-08-01

    Eighteen patients with advanced metastatic gastrointestinal cancer (stomach cancer 7, liver cancer 9, pancreas cancer 2) were treated with human recombinant interferon alpha-2 at doses of 3.0 X 10(6)-10.0 X 10(6) IU/body i.m. daily or every second day, 30 X 10(6) IU/body for five consecutive days every four weeks, or 30 X 10(6) IU/body once weekly. No tumor response was demonstrated in any of our cases. Among fifteen evaluable cases, nine had stabilization of evaluable disease at four weeks, but six showed progressive disease. On the other hand, fever, chills, fatigue, anorexia, nausea and vomiting were pronounced. In two cases, CNS toxicities developed. In some instances, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, decrease of hemoglobin content and elevation of transaminase were observed. According to these findings, single use of recombinant interferon alpha-2 at the dose schedule outlined above does not seem to be of use for the treatment of advanced gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:3896154

  2. Phase II Study of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Advanced Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lemma, Girum L.; Lee, Ju-Whei; Aisner, Seena C.; Langer, Corey J.; Tester, William J.; Johnson, David H.; Loehrer, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with advanced previously untreated thymoma and thymic carcinoma. Patients and Methods We conducted a prospective multicenter study in patients with unresectable thymoma (n = 21) or thymic carcinoma (n = 23). Patients were treated with carboplatin (area under the curve, 6) plus paclitaxel (225 mg/m2) every 3 weeks for a maximum of six cycles. The primary end point of this trial was to evaluate the objective response rate. Results From February 2001 through January 2008, 46 patients were enrolled. Thirteen patients had grade 4 or greater toxicity, mostly neutropenia. Using RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) 1.0 criteria, three complete responses (CRs) and six partial responses (PRs; objective response rate [ORR], 42.9%; 90% CI, 24.5% to 62.8%) were observed in the thymoma cohort; 10 patients had stable disease. For patients with thymic carcinoma, no CRs and five PRs (ORR, 21.7%; 90% CI, 9.0% to 40.4%) were observed; 12 patients had stable disease. Progression-free survival (PFS) was 16.7 (95% CI, 7.2 to 19.8) and 5.0 (95% CI, 3.0 to 8.3) months for thymoma and thymic carcinoma cohorts, respectively. To date, only seven patients (33.3%) with thymoma have died, compared with 16 patients (69.6%) with thymic carcinoma. Median survival time was 20.0 months (95% CI, 5.0 to 43.6 months) for patients with thymic carcinoma, but it has not been reached for patients with thymoma. Conclusion Carboplatin plus paclitaxel has moderate clinical activity for patients with thymic malignancies, but this seems less than expected with anthracycline-based therapy. Patients with thymic carcinoma have poorer PFS and overall survival than patients with thymoma. PMID:21502559

  3. Phase II study of lonidamine in non-small cell lung cancer: final report.

    PubMed

    Kokron, O; Maca, S; De Gregorio, M; Ciottoli, G B

    1990-02-01

    Lonidamine (LND) is a new anti-cancer drug which interferes with the energy-yielding processes of tumour cells without affecting DNA replication. A total of 69 previously untreated patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) entered this study. LND was given orally as a single agent at doses ranging from 450 to 900 mg day-1 until tumour progression (2 to greater than or equal to 1,402 days). Partial responses (PR) occurred in 7/69 patients (10.1%); 4/25, 1/27 and 2/9 for epidermoid, adenocarcinoma and large cell cancer respectively. PR by stage was 4/10, 1/3, 1/20 and 1/28 for stages I, II, III and IV, respectively. The median duration of response was 303 days (greater than or equal to 61 to greater than or equal to 338 days). The median survival for the whole group was 261 days. Toxicity was assessed in all patients. No myelosuppression occurred. The main side-effects were myalgia (68%), loss of appetite (23%), asthenia (20%) and testicular pain (13%). Doses above 450 mg day-1 produced more severe side-effects without any improvement in therapeutic activity. PMID:2155644

  4. Cognition and Incident Coronary Heart Disease in Late Midlife: The Whitehall II Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh-Manoux, Archana; Sabia, Severine; Kivimaki, Mika; Shipley, Martin J.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Marmot, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cognitive function in midlife predicts incident coronary heart disease (CHD), followed up over 6 years. Data on 5292 (28% women, mean age 55) individuals free from CHD at baseline were drawn from the British Whitehall II study. We used Cox regression to model the association between cognition…

  5. A Phase II study of external-beam radiotherapy and endovascular brachytherapy with PTA and stenting for femoropopliteal artery restenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Kailash . E-mail: kailash.narayan@petermac.org; Denton, Michael; Das, Ram; Bernshaw, David; Rolfo, Aldo; Dyk, Sylvia van; Mirakian, Alex

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and seek evidence of efficacy of combined external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and endovascular brachytherapy in the treatment of stenotic vascular lesions. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with high risk for restenosis of femoropopliteal arteries were enrolled in this study from February 2000 to August 2002. The external beam radiotherapy regimen consisted of 10 Gy in 5 fractions of 2 Gy, starting on Day 0. This was followed on Day 6 by angiography, stent placement, and intraluminal brachytherapy to a dose of 10 Gy at 1.2 mm from stent surface. The EBRT was continued from the same day to another 10 Gy in 2 Gy daily fractions for 5 days. Results: The follow up ranged from 33 months to 60 months. At the time of analysis 15 of 17 patients were alive with patent stents. Of these, 10 were symptom-free. Two patients died of unrelated causes. Conclusions: The combination of EBRT and endovascular brachytherapy provided adequate dose distribution without any geographical miss or 'candy wrapper' restenosis. No incidence of aneurysmal dilation of radiated vascular segment was observed. The treatment was feasible, well tolerated, and achieved 88% stenosis free survival.

  6. Phase II Study of Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy With S-1 in Patients With T4 Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Tomoko; Murakami, Ryuji; Toya, Ryo; Teshima, Keiko; Nakahara, Aya; Hirai, Toshinori; Hiraki, Akimitsu; Nakayama, Hideki; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Ota, Kazutoshi; Obayashi, Takehisa; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Oya, Natsuo; Shinohara, Masanori

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, in patients with T4 oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: Only patients with histologically proven T4 oral SCC were included. Radiotherapy (total dose, 30 Gy) was delivered in 2-Gy daily fractions over a period of 3 weeks. Concurrently, S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was administered orally twice daily for 14 consecutive days. Results: We enrolled 46 patients. All underwent radiotherapy as planned; however, oral S-1 was discontinued in 3 patients who manifested acute toxicity. Grade 3 toxicities were mucositis (20%), anorexia (9%), and neutropenia (4%). We encountered no Grade 4 adverse events or serious postoperative morbidity requiring surgical intervention. After CCRT, 32 of the 46 patients underwent radical resection; in 17 (53%) of the operated patients, the pathologic response was complete. During follow-up ranging from 7 to 58 months (median, 22 months), tumor control failed in 5 (16%) of the 32 operated patients; there were 3 local and 2 regional failures. Of the 14 non-operated patients, 8 (57%) manifested local (n = 7) or regional failure (n = 1). The 3-year overall survival rate for all 46 patients was 69%; it was significantly higher for operated than for non-operated patients (82% vs. 48%; p = 0.0288). Conclusion: Preoperative CCRT with S-1 is feasible and effective in patients with T4 oral SCC. Even in inoperable cases, CCRT with S-1 provides adequate tumor control.

  7. A Phase I/II Study of Oblimersen Plus Cisplatin and Fluorouracil in Gastric & Esophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  8. Phase II study of (90)Y Ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) in patients with previously untreated marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lossos, Izidore S; Fabregas, Jesus C; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Miao, Feng; Goodman, Deborah; Serafini, Aldo N; Hosein, Peter J; Stefanovic, Alexandra; Rosenblatt, Joseph D; Hoffman, James E

    2015-06-01

    The best upfront therapy for patients with non-gastric extranodal marginal zone lymphomas (MZLs) is not defined. We assessed the safety and efficacy of radioimmunotherapy with (90)yttrium ((90)Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan as upfront therapy in MZL (NCT00453102). A total of 16 patients were enrolled, 81% with advanced-stage disease and 44% with bulky disease. The overall response rate (ORR) at 12 weeks post-therapy was 87.5% (90% confidence interval [CI]: 65.6-97.7%), including a complete response in eight (50%), complete response unconfirmed in one (6%) and partial response in five (31%) patients. With a median follow-up of 65.6 months (range 4.0-96.5), the median progression-free survival (PFS) was 47.6 months (range 4.0-93.3) and median overall survival (OS) was not reached. The 5-year PFS was 40% (90% CI: 19.9-59.5%) and 5-year OS was 71.8% (90% CI: 46.8-86.5%). Overall, (90)Y ibritumomab tiuxetan was well tolerated and led to long-term responses and PFS rates. PMID:25315074

  9. Sirolimus for progressive neurofibromatosis type 1–associated plexiform neurofibromas: a Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Brian; Widemann, Brigitte C.; Wolters, Pamela; Dombi, Eva; Vinks, Alexander; Cantor, Alan; Perentesis, John; Schorry, Elizabeth; Ullrich, Nicole; Gutmann, David H.; Tonsgard, James; Viskochil, David; Korf, Bruce; Packer, Roger J.; Fisher, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plexiform neurofibromas (PNs) are benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors that arise in one-third of individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). They may cause significant disfigurement, compression of vital structures, neurologic dysfunction, and/or pain. Currently, the only effective management strategy is surgical resection. Converging evidence has demonstrated that the NF1 tumor suppressor protein, neurofibromin, negatively regulates activity in the mammalian Target of Rapamycin pathway. Methods We employed a 2-strata clinical trial design. Stratum 1 included subjects with inoperable, NF1-associated progressive PN and sought to determine whether sirolimus safely and tolerably increases time to progression (TTP). Volumetric MRI analysis conducted at regular intervals was used to determine TTP relative to baseline imaging. Results The estimated median TTP of subjects receiving sirolimus was 15.4 months (95% CI: 14.3–23.7 mo), which was significantly longer than 11.9 months (P < .001), the median TTP of the placebo arm of a previous PN clinical trial with similar eligibility criteria. Conclusions This study demonstrated that sirolimus prolongs TTP by almost 4 months in patients with NF1-associated progressive PN. Although the improvement in TTP is modest, given the lack of significant or frequent toxicity and the availability of few other treatment options, the use of sirolimus to slow the growth of progressive PN could be considered in select patients. PMID:25314964

  10. Phase II Study of Chemoradiotherapy With S-1 and Low-Dose Cisplatin for Inoperable Advanced Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Saikawa, Yoshiro Kubota, Tetsuro; Kumagai, Koshi; Nakamura, Rieko; Kumai, Koichiro; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi; Kitajima, Masaki; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: The results of a pilot study using S-1/low-dose cisplatin/radiotherapy led us to hypothesize that the initial chemoradiotherapy regimen would induce a 70% efficacy rate with a 10% pathologic complete response rate. Patients and Methods: Only patients with unresectable or incurable advanced gastric cancer were eligible. The patients received induction S-1 and cisplatin therapy with radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy alone. Results: Of the 30 patients recruited and assessed, 29 were eligible for clinical evaluation of measurable lesions. The response rate was 65.5%, with 19 with a partial response, 8 with no change, and 2 with progressive disease of 29 patients. Of the 30 patients recruited, 10 (33.3%) underwent stomach resection and D2 LN dissections. The pathologic complete response rate was 13.3% (4 patients), and the R0 resection rate was 100% (10 patients). The survival analysis showed a median survival time of 25 months. Grade 3 toxicity occurred in 66.7% for leukocytopenia, 33.3% for thrombocytopenia, 23.3% for nausea and appetite loss, and 6.7% for anemia, diarrhea, and renal dysfunction. Although all the patients had been hospitalized with a poor performance status with a giant tumor, 97% (29 of 30) could be discharged after the first cycle, resulting in an improvement in quality of life. Conclusion: Chemoradiotherapy could be a powerful regimen for controlling tumor progression in advanced gastric cancer, improving patients' quality of life with tolerable toxicity. A complete histologic response rate of >10% would be expected, even for large tumors with metastatic lesions.

  11. A phase II study of belinostat (PXD101) in relapsed and refractory aggressive B-cell lymphomas: SWOG S0520.

    PubMed

    Puvvada, Soham D; Li, Hongli; Rimsza, Lisa M; Bernstein, Steven H; Fisher, Richard I; LeBlanc, Michael; Schmelz, Monika; Glinsmann-Gibson, Betty; Miller, Thomas P; Maddox, Anne-Marie; Friedberg, Jonathan W; Smith, Sonali M; Persky, Daniel O

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) have underscored the importance of tumor microenvironment in escaping host anti-tumor responses. One mechanism is loss of major histocompatibility Class II antigens (MHCII) associated with decreased tumor infiltrating T lymphocytes (TIL) and poor survival. Transcription of MHCII is controlled by CIITA which in turn is regulated by histone acetylation. In this study, we hypothesized that HDAC inhibition with belinostat increases MHCII, CIITA expression, TIL and improves patient outcomes. Primary objective was evaluation of toxicity and response. Twenty-two patients were enrolled for the study. Belinostat was well tolerated with mild toxicity. Two partial responses were observed at 5, 13 months after registration for an overall response rate (ORR) (95% CI) of 10.5% (1.3-33.1%), and three patients had stable disease for 4.7, 42.3+, and 68.4 + months with minimum 3-year follow-up. Included correlative studies support the hypothesis and serve as the basis for SWOG S0806 combining vorinostat with R-CHOP. PMID:26758422

  12. A phase II study of bevacizumab and erlotinib after radiation and temozolomide in MGMT unmethylated GBM patients

    PubMed Central

    Raizer, J. J.; Giglio, P.; Hu, J.; Groves, M.; Merrell, R.; Conrad, C.; Phuphanich, S.; Puduvalli, V. K.; Loghin, M.; Paleologos, N.; Yuan, Y.; Liu, D.; Rademaker, A.; Yung, W. K.; Vaillant, B.; Rudnick, J.; Chamberlain, M.; Vick, N.; Grimm, S.; Tremont-Lukats, I. W.; De Groot, J.; Aldape, K.; Gilbert, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Survival for glioblastoma (GBM) patients with an unmethyated MGMT promoter in their tumor is generally worse than methylated MGMT tumors, as temozolomide (TMZ) response is limited. How to better treat patients with unmethylated MGMT is unknown. We performed a trial combining erlotinib and bevacizumab in unmethylated GBM patients after completion of radiation (RT) and TMZ. GBM patients with an unmethylated MGMT promoter were trial eligible. Patient received standard RT (60 Gy) and TMZ (75 mg/m2 × 6 weeks) after surgical resection of their tumor. After completion of RT they started erlotinib 150 mg daily and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks until progression. Imaging evaluations occurred every 8 weeks. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Of the 48 unmethylated patients enrolled, 46 were evaluable (29 men and 17 women); median age was 55.5 years (29–75) and median KPS was 90 (70–100). All patients completed RT with TMZ. The median number of cycles (1 cycle was 4 weeks) was 8 (2–47). Forty-one patients either progressed or died with a median progression free survival of 9.2 months. At a follow up of 33 months the median overall survival was 13.2 months. There were no unexpected toxicities and most observed toxicities were categorized as CTC grade 1 or 2. The combination of erlotinib and bevacizumab is tolerable but did not meet our primary endpoint of increasing survival. Importantly, more trials are needed to find better therapies for GBM patients with an unmethylated MGMT promoter. PMID:26476729

  13. Phase II Study of Erlotinib in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Papillary Histology Renal Cell Cancer: SWOG S0317

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Michael S.; Hussey, Michael; Nagle, Raymond B.; Lara, Primo N.; Mack, Philip C.; Dutcher, Janice; Samlowski, Wolfram; Clark, Joseph I.; Quinn, David I.; Pan, Chong-Xian; Crawford, David

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Patients with advanced papillary renal cell cancer (pRCC) have poor survival after systemic therapy; the reported median survival time is 7 to 17 months. In this trial, we evaluated the efficacy of erlotinib, an oral epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor in patients with advanced pRCC, a tumor type associated with wild-type von Hippel Lindau gene. Patients and Methods Patients with histologically confirmed, advanced, or metastatic pRCC were treated with erlotinib 150 mg orally once daily. A RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) response rate (RR) of ≥ 20% was considered a promising outcome. Secondary end points included overall survival and 6-month probability of treatment failure. Results Of 52 patients registered, 45 were evaluable. The overall RR was 11% (five of 45 patients; 95% CI, 3% to 24%), and the disease control rate was 64% (ie five partial response and 24 stable disease). The median overall survival time was 27 months (95% CI, 13 to 36 months). Probability of freedom from treatment failure at 6 months was 29% (95% CI, 17% to 42%). There was one grade 5 adverse event (AE) of pneumonitis, one grade 4 thrombosis, and nine other grade 3 AEs. Conclusion Although the RECIST RR of 11% did not exceed prespecified estimates for additional study, single-agent erlotinib yielded disease control and survival outcomes of interest with an expected toxicity profile. The design of future trials of the EGFR axis in pRCC should be based on preclinical or molecular data that define appropriate patient subgroups, new drug combinations, or potentially more active alternative schedules. PMID:19884559

  14. A phase II study of bevacizumab and erlotinib after radiation and temozolomide in MGMT unmethylated GBM patients.

    PubMed

    Raizer, J J; Giglio, P; Hu, J; Groves, M; Merrell, R; Conrad, C; Phuphanich, S; Puduvalli, V K; Loghin, M; Paleologos, N; Yuan, Y; Liu, D; Rademaker, A; Yung, W K; Vaillant, B; Rudnick, J; Chamberlain, M; Vick, N; Grimm, S; Tremont-Lukats, I W; De Groot, J; Aldape, K; Gilbert, M R

    2016-01-01

    Survival for glioblastoma (GBM) patients with an unmethyated MGMT promoter in their tumor is generally worse than methylated MGMT tumors, as temozolomide (TMZ) response is limited. How to better treat patients with unmethylated MGMT is unknown. We performed a trial combining erlotinib and bevacizumab in unmethylated GBM patients after completion of radiation (RT) and TMZ. GBM patients with an unmethylated MGMT promoter were trial eligible. Patient received standard RT (60 Gy) and TMZ (75 mg/m2 × 6 weeks) after surgical resection of their tumor. After completion of RT they started erlotinib 150 mg daily and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks until progression. Imaging evaluations occurred every 8 weeks. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Of the 48 unmethylated patients enrolled, 46 were evaluable (29 men and 17 women); median age was 55.5 years (29-75) and median KPS was 90 (70-100). All patients completed RT with TMZ. The median number of cycles (1 cycle was 4 weeks) was 8 (2-47). Forty-one patients either progressed or died with a median progression free survival of 9.2 months. At a follow up of 33 months the median overall survival was 13.2 months. There were no unexpected toxicities and most observed toxicities were categorized as CTC grade 1 or 2. The combination of erlotinib and bevacizumab is tolerable but did not meet our primary endpoint of increasing survival. Importantly, more trials are needed to find better therapies for GBM patients with an unmethylated MGMT promoter. PMID:26476729

  15. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seok Ah; Lee, Keun Seok; Yun, Tak; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Choi, Hyo Seong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Chang, Hee Jin; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid- to lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of an initial dose of cetuximab of 400 mg/m{sup 2} 1 week before radiotherapy, and then cetuximab 250 mg/m{sup 2}/week, irinotecan 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 5 consecutive weeks and capecitabine 1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days a week (weekdays only) from the first day during radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were evaluated as study endpoints, and an additional KRAS mutation analysis was performed. Results: In total, 39 patients completed their planned preoperative chemoradiation and underwent R0 resection. The pathologic complete response rate was 23.1% (9/39), and 3 patients (7.7%) showed near total regression of tumor. The 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 80.0% and 94.7%, respectively. Grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia (4, 10.3%), neutropenia (2, 5.1%), anemia (1, 2.6%), diarrhea (2, 5.1%), fatigue (1, 2.6%), skin rash (1, 2.6%), and ileus (1, 2.6%). KRAS mutations were found in 5 (13.2%) of 38 patients who had available tissue for testing. Clinical outcomes were not significantly correlated with KRAS mutation status. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine was active and well tolerated. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor for pathologic response in this study.

  16. Gemcitabine and cisplatin as neo-adjuvant chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Aydiner, Adnan; Kiyik, Murat; Cikrikcioglu, Saadettin; Kosar, Filiz; Gurses, Atilla; Turna, Akif; Yazar, Aziz; Dilege, Sukru; Goksel, Tuncay; Cakan, Alpaslan

    2007-11-01

    The combination of gemcitabine and cisplatin is one of the most active chemotherapy regimens against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine combined with cisplatin in a 3-week cycle regimen for patients with operable, early stage NSCLC. Gemcitabine at a dose of 1000 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 of each 21-day cycle for 3 cycles, followed by cisplatin at a dose of 75 mg/m(2) on day 1 was administered to patients with previously untreated, operable, early stage (IB-IIIA) NSCLC. A total of 47 patients (46 male, mean age 56.0+/-8.0 years) who met the eligibility criteria were enrolled. The pathological complete response rate was 5.3% of operated patients and 4.3% of total patients. At visit 4, 57.1% of the patients had partial response, 38.1%, stable disease and 4.8%, progressive disease. The main toxicities - leukopenia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia - were usually clinically asymptomatic and did not require hospitalization. Non-hematological toxicities were minimal and manageable. Disease free and 12-month overall survival rates were over 70% and 80%, respectively. This study demonstrates that the administration of gemcitabine and cisplatin combination for 3 cycles is effective and tolerable for patients with operable, early stage NSCLC. Low toxicity profile and promising survival outcome suggest that this regimen has an encouraging activity in this subset of patients. PMID:17683827

  17. Phase II Study of Vinorelbine and Estramustine in Combination With Conformational Radiotherapy for Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carles, Joan; Nogue, Miguel; Sole, Josep M.; Foro, Palmira; Domenech, Montserrat; Suarez, Marta; Gallardo, Enrique; Garcia, Dario; Ferrer, Ferran; Gelabert-Mas, Antoni; Gayo, Javier; Fabregat, Xavier

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of vinorelbine and estramustine in combination with three-dimensional conformational radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients received estramustine, 600 mg/m{sup 2} daily, and vinorelbine, 25 mg/m{sup 2}, on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle for three cycles in combination with 8 weeks of 3D-CRT (total dose of 70.2 gray [Gy] at 1.8-Gy fractions or 70 Gy at 2.0-Gy fractions). Additionally, patients received luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs for 3 years. Results: All patients were evaluated for response and toxicity. Progression-free survival at 5 years was 72% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52-86). All patients who relapsed had only biochemical relapse. The most frequent severe toxicities were cystitis (16% of patients), leucopenia (10% of patients), diarrhea (10% of patients), neutropenia (8% of patients), and proctitis (8% of patients). Six patients (12%) did not complete study treatment due to the patient's decision (n = 1) and to adverse events such as hepatotoxicity, proctitis, paralytic ileus, and acute myocardial infarction. Conclusions: Vinorelbine and estramustine in combination with 3D-CRT is a safe and effective regimen for patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. A randomized trial is needed to determine whether the results of this regimen are an improvement over the results obtained with radiotherapy and androgen ablation.

  18. Bevacizumab, Capecitabine, Amifostine, and Preoperative Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (HypoArc) for Rectal Cancer: A Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.; Tsoutsou, Pelagia; Chloropoulou, Pelagia A.; Manolas, Kostantinos; Sivridis, Efthimios

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Bevacizumab has established therapeutic activity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy enhances the activity of radiotherapy in experimental models. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiochemotherapy combined with bevacizumab in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with radiologic T3 and/or N+ rectal carcinoma were treated with preoperative conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy (3.4 Gy in 10 consecutive fractions) supported with amifostine (500-1,000 mg daily), capecitabine (600 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily, 5 days per week), and bevacizumab (5 mg/kg every 2 weeks for 2 cycles). Surgery followed 6 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. A cohort of 14 sequential patients treated with the same regimen without bevacizumab was available for comparison. Results: Grade 2 or 3 diarrhea was noted in 7 of 19 patients (36.8%), which was statistically worse than patients receiving the same regimen without bevacizumab (p = 0.01). A higher incidence of Grade 2 or 3 proctalgia was also noted (21.1%) (p = 0.03). Bladder and skin toxicity was negligible. All toxicities regressed completely within 2 weeks after the end of therapy. Pathologic complete and partial response was noted in 7 of 19 cases (36.8%) and 8 of 19 cases (42.1%). Within a median follow-up of 21 months, none of the patients has had late complications develop and only 1 of 18 evaluable cases (5.5%) has had locoregional relapse. Conclusions: Bevacizumab can be safely combined with hypofractionated radiotherapy and capecitabine as a preoperative radiochemotherapy regimen for patients with rectal cancer. The high pathologic complete response rates urges the testing of bevacizumab in randomized studies.

  19. A phase II study of sulforaphane-rich broccoli sprout extracts in men with recurrent prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alumkal, Joshi J.; Slottke, Rachel; Schwartzman, Jacob; Cherala, Ganesh; Munar, Myrna; Graff, Julie N.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Ryan, Christopher W.; Koop, Dennis R.; Gibbs, Angela; Gao, Lina; Flamiatos, Jason F.; Tucker, Erin; Kleinschmidt, Richard; Mori, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Diets high in cruciferous vegetables are associated with lower risk of incidence of prostate cancer, including aggressive forms of this disease. Human intervention studies with cruciferous vegetable-rich diets also demonstrate modulation of gene expression in important pathways in prostate cells. Sulforaphane is a constituent of these foods postulated to harbor the anti-neoplastic activity based on multiple tumor models. Our own work demonstrates that sulforaphane inhibits AR signaling in prostate cancer cells. Here, we report results from the first clinical trial of sulforaphane-rich extracts in men with prostate cancer. We treated 20 patients who had recurrent prostate cancer with 200μmoles/day of sulforaphane-rich extracts for a maximum period of 20 weeks and determined the proportion of patients with ≥50% PSA declines, the primary endpoint. Only one subject experienced a ≥50% PSA decline. Thus, the primary endpoint was not achieved. Seven patients experienced smaller PSA declines (<50%). There was also a significant lengthening of the on-treatment PSA doubling time (PSADT) compared with the pre-treatment PSADT [6.1 months pre-treatment vs. 9.6 months on-treatment (p=0.044)]. Finally, treatment with sulforaphane-rich extracts was safe with no Grade 3 adverse events. Treatment with 200μmoles/day of sulforaphane-rich extracts did not lead to ≥50% PSA declines in the majority of patients. However, because of the safety of treatment and the effects on PSADT modulation, further studies, including those with higher doses, may be warranted to clarify the role of sulforaphane as a prevention agent or treatment agent. PMID:25431127

  20. Therapeutic use of /sup 131/I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) in neuroblastoma: a phase II study in nine patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, O.; Lumbroso, J.; Lemerle, J.; Schlumberger, M.; Ricard, M.; Aubert, B.; Coonaert, S.; Merline, L.; Olive, D.; De Lumley, L.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of high activities of I 131 meta-iodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) were evaluated in nine children with advanced neuroblastoma. All patients had been previously heavily treated and had either primarily refractory disease or resistant relapse. Twenty-two doses of mIBG labeled with 1.3 to 4 GBq (35-108 mCi) of iodine 131 were administered. Three subjective effects, especially relief of pain, and two objective effects were observed. Transient blood pressure increase was observed once and did not recur after prolongation of the infusion time to 6 hours. A major side effect was bone marrow toxicity, essentially marked by thrombopenia, particularly severe in previously bone-marrow-transplanted patients.

  1. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy for nondisseminated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-wook . E-mail: lsw@amc.seoul.kr; Back, Geum Mun; Yi, Byong Yong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Shin, Seong Soo; Kim, Jung-hun; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Bong-Jae; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Seung-Bae; Park, Jin-hong; Lee, Kang Kyoo; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To present preliminary results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with the simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients who underwent IMRT for nondisseminated NPC at the Asan Medical Center between September 2001 and December 2003 were prospectively evaluated. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was delivered with the 'step and shoot' SMART technique at prescribed doses of 72 Gy (2.4 Gy/day) to the gross tumor volume, 60 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinical target volume and metastatic nodal station, and 46 Gy (2 Gy/day) to the clinically negative neck region. Eighteen patients also received cisplatin once per week. Results: The median follow-up period was 27 months. Nineteen patients completed the treatment without interruption; the remaining patient interrupted treatment for 2 weeks owing to severe pharyngitis and malnutrition. Five patients (25%) had Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 mucositis, whereas 9 (45%) had Grade 3 pharyngitis. Seven patients (35%) lost more than 10% of their pretreatment weight, whereas 11 (55%) required intravenous fluids and/or tube feeding. There was no Grade 3 or 4 xerostomia. All patients showed complete response. Two patients had distant metastases and locoregional recurrence, respectively. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with the SMART boost technique allows parotid sparing, as shown clinically and by dosimetry, and might also be more effective biologically. A larger population of patients and a longer follow-up period are needed to evaluate ultimate tumor control and late toxicity.

  2. The long-term outcomes of alternating chemoradiotherapy for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a multiinstitutional phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Fuwa, Nobukazu; Kodaira, Takeshi; Daimon, Takashi; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    To examine the long-term outcomes of alternating chemoradiotherapy (ALCRT) for patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and to assess the efficacy of ALCRT for NPC. Patients with stage IIB to IVB, ECOG PS 0–2, 18–70 years-old, and sufficient organ function were eligible for this study. First, chemotherapy, consisting of 5-fluorouracil (800 mg/m2 per 24 h on days 1–5) and cisplatin (100 mg/m2 per 24 h on day 6), was administered, then a wide field of radiotherapy (36 Gy/20 fraction), chemotherapy, a shrinking field of radiotherapy (34 Gy/17 fraction), and chemotherapy were performed alternately. Between December 2003 and March 2006, 90 patients in 25 facilities were enrolled in this study, 87 patients were finally evaluated. A total of 67 patients (76.1%) completed the course of treatment. The overall survival and the progression-free survival rates at 5 years were 78.04% (95% CI: 69.1∼87.0%), and 68.74% (95% CI: 58.8∼78.7%), respectively. The long-term outcomes of ALCRT for NPC were thought to be promising. ALCRT will be considered to be a controlled trial to compare therapeutic results with those of concurrent chemoradiotherapy for NPC. PMID:25991077

  3. Phase II study of recombinant leukocyte A interferon (IFN-rA) plus cimetidine in disseminated malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Creagan, E T; Ahmann, D L; Green, S J; Long, H J; Frytak, S; Itri, L M

    1985-07-01

    Thirty-five eligible patients with disseminated malignant melanoma received intramuscular recombinant leukocyte interferon (IFN-rA), 50 X 10(6) U/m2 three times weekly (TIW) for an intended duration of 12 weeks concomitant with daily oral cimetidine, 1,200 mg/d in four divided doses. For all study participants, the median survival time was six months. Among 21 "good risk" patients (performance score [PS] 0, 1 and no prior chemotherapy), we observed seven partial regressions (33%). Six patients had stability of disease (29%), seven had immediate disease progression, and one discontinued treatment after two doses without tumor evaluation due to side effects. Times to disease progression of five patients with regressions of soft-tissue disease were 2.1, 3.3, 3.5, 3.7, and 4.3 months. Two patients had partial regressions of lung nodules for 2.0 and 3.8 months. We observed one regression among 14 "poor risk" patients (PS 2, 3, or prior chemotherapy). A 46-year-old woman with prior treatment had a partial regression of soft-tissue disease for 4.1 months. Four "poor risk" patients achieved disease stability, and nine progressed immediately. Leukopenia (WBC count less than 4,100/microL) affected 21 (66%) of 32 patients with WBC count data. The median count was 3,100/microL; range, 1,300 to 8,400/microL. We detected two cases of mild thrombocytopenia (100,000 and 120,000/microL). Other noteworthy toxicities included moderate-to-severe nausea (34%), anorexia (63%), and fatigue (80%). All patients experienced myalgias. Twenty patients had dosage decreases during the first cycle, and 14 of the 16 patients remaining on study after the first cycle required dosage reductions. The overall response rate is similar to our prior studies with IFN-rA as a single agent using TIW doses of 50 X 10(6) U/m2 and 12 X 10(6) U/m2 among 31 and 30 patients, respectively. PMID:4020408

  4. Phase II study of recombinant leukocyte A interferon (rIFN-alpha A) in disseminated malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Creagan, E T; Ahmann, D L; Green, S J; Long, H J; Rubin, J; Schutt, A J; Dziewanowski, Z E

    1984-12-15

    Thirty-one patients with disseminated malignant melanoma received intramuscular recombinant leukocyte A interferon (rIFN-alpha A), 50 X 10(6) units/m2 three times weekly for a planned treatment duration of 3 months. Seven objective regressions (23%), which ranged in duration from 3 to 11.2+ months, were observed. Forty-two percent of 12 patients who were fully active (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group [ECOG] performance score, 0) responded compared to 11% of 19 patients with impairment of performance status (ECOG, 1-3). Prior chemotherapy did not influence response rate. For all patients the median time to progression and of survival was 2 months and 6 months, respectively. Four patients had partial regressions in soft tissue (3, 4.6 months), pulmonary (7 months), and prostatic lesions (3 months). The latter was biopsy-proven and assessed by serial computerized tomography (CT) scans. Three had complete regressions of soft tissue disease (2 patients, 6.4 and 10+ months each), and liver involvement (11.2+ months). The major toxicities were moderate to severe fatigue (87%), anorexia (58%), and confusion (23%). Performance score deteriorated in 84% of patients during the time they were receiving rIFN-alpha A. Among the 13 patients whose tumors did not progress for at least 12 weeks, 7 required dose reductions or termination of treatment due to toxicities. Hematologic and hepatic toxicity was transient and of little clinical significance. The study indicates that rIFN-alpha A has some antitumor activity accompanied by difficult side effects in patients with disseminated malignant melanoma. PMID:6498762

  5. Phase II study assessing the feasibility of using elemental supplements to reduce acute enteritis in patients receiving radical pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Craighead, P S; Young, S

    1998-12-01

    From June 1994 through September 1995, 17 patients with gynecologic cancer were entered into a feasibility study using elemental supplements (ES) during the course of pelvic radiotherapy. The level of compliance with the ES regimen was evaluated by assessing sachet counts and patients' weekly diaries. Diaries were also used to assess compliance with a modified diet program. Bowel function in 45 patients receiving radiotherapy outside this study was assessed concurrently. All patients were reviewed weekly to record bowel function, which was also recorded 1 year after radiotherapy. After treatment of all patients the grade, duration of enteritis, need for antidiarrheal agents, and the likelihood of resolution at 1 year after radiotherapy were analyzed. The study used compliance with the ES regimen as its primary endpoint. Compliance with the ES regimen was achieved in 76.5% of patients, and compliance with the modified diet was achieved regardless of whether the ES was tolerated. Patients not complying with the ES, or who did not receive ES, had higher grade diarrhea, which was longer in duration and was less likely to have resolved than patients in the compliant group. Elemental supplements are well tolerated when taken during a course of pelvic radiotherapy and cause a mild diarrhea, which resolves after treatment has been discontinued. The lack of enteritis 1 year later in patients who complied with ES suggests that reducing the grade of acute enteritis might influence the appearance of later bowel effects. PMID:9856658

  6. A pilot phase II Study of digoxin in patients with recurrent prostate cancer as evident by a rising PSA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jianqing; Zhan, Tingting; Duffy, Danielle; Hoffman-Censits, Jean; Kilpatrick, Deborah; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Chervoneva, Inna; Limentani, Kimberly; Kennedy, Brooke; Kessler, Sarah; Gomella, Leonard; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Carducci, Michael A.; Force, Thomas; Kelly, Wm. Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Background Digoxin was found to inhibit prostate cancer (PCa) growth via the inhibition of HIF-1α synthesis in a mouse model. We hypothesized that a therapeutic dose of digoxin could inhibit human PCa growth and disease progression. Methods An open label, single arm pilot study was performed. Patients (pts) with non-metastatic, biochemically relapsed PCa with prostate specific antigen doubling time (PSADT) of 3–24 months and no hormonal therapy within the past 6 months were enrolled. All pts had testosterone > 50 ng/dL at baseline. Digoxin was taken daily with dose titration to achieve a target therapeutic level (0.8 – 2 ng/ml); patients had routine follow-up including cardiac monitoring with 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) and digoxin levels. The primary endpoint was the proportion of pts at 6 months post-treatment with a PSADT ≥ 200% from the baseline. HIF-1α downstream molecule vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was measured in plasma. Results Sixteen pts were enrolled and 14 pts finished the planned 6 months of treatment. Twenty percent (3/15) of the pts had PSA decrease >25% from baseline with a medium duration of 14 months. At 6 months, 5 of 13 (38%) pts had PSADT ≥ 200% of the baseline PSADT and were continued on study for an additional 24 weeks of treatment. Two patients had durable PSA response for more than 1 year. Digoxin was well tolerated with possible relation of one grade 3 back pain. No patients had evidence of digoxin toxicity. The digoxin dose was lowered in 2 patients for significant ECGs changes (sinus bradycardia and QT prolongation), and there were probable digoxin-related ECG changes in 3 patients. Plasma VEGF was detected in 4 (25%) patients. Conclusions Digoxin was well tolerated and showed a prolongation of PSDAT in 38% of the patients. However, there was no significant difference comparing that of similar patients on placebo from historical data. Digoxin at the dose used in this study may have limited benefit for patients with biochemically relapsed prostate cancer. PMID:25580468

  7. Arandomized multicenter Phase II study of perioperative tiotropium intervention in gastric cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fushida, Sachio; Oyama, Katsunobu; Kaji, Masahide; Hirono, Yasuo; Kinoshita, Jun; Tsukada, Tomoya; Nezuka, Hideaki; Nakano, Tatsuo; Noto, Masahiro; Nishijima, Koji; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Background Tiotropium, a long-acting inhaled anticholinergic drug, has been widely used in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the issue of whether perioperative tiotropium improves postoperative outcomes for gastric cancer patients with COPD remains unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of perioperative tiotropium intervention for gastric cancer patients with COPD. Patients and methods Eighty-four gastric cancer patients with mild-to-moderate COPD were randomly assigned to receive perioperative pulmonary rehabilitation alone (control group) or pulmonary rehabilitation with 18 µg of tiotropium once daily (tiotropium group). The patients in the tiotropium group received tiotropium for more than 1 week before surgery and for 2 weeks after surgery. Spirometry was performed prior to group assignment and at 2 weeks after surgery. Postoperative complications, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced vital capacity, and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in second to forced vital capacity (%) were compared between the two groups. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of age, body mass index, smoking, gastrectomy incision, operation time, and bleeding volume (all P>0.05). Postoperative complications and pulmonary functions did not differ significantly between the control and tiotropium groups. A subgroup analysis of gastric cancer patients with moderate COPD showed that perioperative tiotropium intervention significantly decreased the rate of postoperative complications compared with the control group (P=0.046). However, even after gastrectomy, many patients with mild COPD in both the control and tiotropium groups showed improved pulmonary function. Conclusion Although perioperative tiotropium intervention had no significant effects in gastric cancer patients with mild COPD, it may be beneficial in those with moderate COPD. Therefore, the next prospective study should further evaluate perioperative tiotropium intervention for gastric cancer patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. PMID:26491284

  8. Phase II Study of Oral S-1 and Concurrent Radiotherapy in Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Ishihara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Hara, Taro; Denda, Tadamichi; Tawada, Katsunobu; Imagumbai, Toshiyuki; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro; Hatano, Kazuo; Kawakami, Hiroyuki; Uno, Takashi; Ito, Hisao; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative that has demonstrated favorable antitumor activity in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day from day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35. Two weeks after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, maintenance chemotherapy with S-1 was administered for 28 days every 6 weeks until progression. Results: Thirty-four patients were enrolled in this study. The most common Grade 3 toxicities during chemoradiotherapy were anorexia (24%) and nausea (12%). The overall response rate was 41% (95% confidence interval, 25%-58%) and overall disease control rate (partial response plus stable disease) was 97%. More than 50% decrease in serum CA 19-9 was seen in 27 of 29 evaluable patients (93%). The median progression-free survival was 8.7 months. The median overall survival and 1-year survival rate were 16.8 months and 70.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy exerted a promising antitumor activity with acceptable toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This combination therapy seems to be an attractive alternative to conventional chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil infusion.

  9. A phase II study of adjuvant gemcitabine plus docetaxel followed by concurrent chemoradation in resected pancreaticobiliary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cho, May; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Myerson, Robert; Gao, Feng; Strasberg, Steven; Picus, Joel; Sorscher, Steven; Fournier, Chloe; Nagaraj, Gayathri; Parikh, Parag; Suresh, Rama; Linehan, David; Tan, Benjamin R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Adjuvant gemcitabine with or without chemoradiation is a standard therapeutic option for patients with resected pancreatic cancer. The feasibility and toxicity of gemcitabine with docetaxel before and after 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-based chemoradiation in the adjuvant pancreatic and biliary cancer setting were investigated. Methods After a curative-intent resection, eligible patients with pancreaticobiliary cancers were treated with two cycles of gemcitabine and docetaxel followed by 5FU-based chemoradiation. Four weeks after completing chemoradiation, two cycles of gemcitabine and docetaxel were administered. The primary endpoint was the incidence of severe toxicities. Secondary endpoints included disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Fifty patients with pancreaticobiliary cancers were enrolled. Twenty-nine patients had pancreatic cancer whereas 21 patients had biliary tract or ampullary cancers. There was one death as a result of pneumonia, and 15% of patients experienced grade 3 or greater non-haematological toxicities. The median DFS and OS for patients with pancreatic cancer were 9.6 and 17 months, respectively, and for those with resected biliary tract cancer were 12 and 23 months, respectively. Conclusions This combination of gemcitabine and docetaxel with chemoradiation is feasible and tolerable in the adjuvant setting. Future studies utilizing a different gemcitabine/taxane combination and schedule may be appropriate in the adjuvant treatment of both pancreatic cancer and biliary tumours. PMID:25800066

  10. Studying a disease with no home - lessons in trial recruitment from the PATCH II study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cellulitis is a very common condition that often recurs. The PATCH II study was designed to explore the possibility of preventing future episodes of cellulitis, with resultant cost savings for the NHS. This was the first trial to be undertaken by the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network. As such, it was the first to test a recruitment model that involved many busy clinicians each contributing just a few patients. Methods A double-blind randomised controlled trial comparing prophylactic antibiotics (penicillin V) with placebo tablets, for the prevention of repeat episodes of cellulitis of the leg. Primary outcome was time to subsequent recurrence of cellulitis. Results The PATCH II study was closed to recruitment having enrolled 123 participants from a target of 400. Whilst the recruitment period was extended by 12 months, it was not possible to continue beyond this point without additional funds. Many factors contributed to poor recruitment: (i) changes in hospital policy and the introduction of community-based intravenous teams resulted in fewer cellulitis patients being admitted to hospital; ii) those who were admitted were seen by many different specialties, making it difficult for a network of dermatology clinicians to identify suitable participants; and iii) funding for research staff was limited to a trial manager and a trial administrator at the co-ordinating centre. With no dedicated research nurses at the recruiting centres, it was extremely difficult to maintain momentum and interest in the study. Attempts to boost recruitment by providing some financial support for principal investigators to employ local research staff was of limited success. Discussion The model of a network of busy NHS clinicians all recruiting a few patients into large clinical studies requires further testing. It did not work very well for PATCH II, but this was probably because patients were not routinely seen by dermatologists, and recruitment took place prior to

  11. Does High C-reactive Protein Concentration Increase Atherosclerosis? The Whitehall II Study

    PubMed Central

    Kivimäki, Mika; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Davey Smith, George; Kumari, Meena; Donald, Ann; Britton, Annie; Casas, Juan P.; Shah, Tina; Brunner, Eric; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Halcox, Julian P. J.; Miller, Michelle A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Deanfield, John; Marmot, Michael G.; Hingorani, Aroon D.

    2008-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation, is associated with risk of coronary events and sub-clinical measures of atherosclerosis. Evidence in support of this link being causal would include an association robust to adjustments for confounders (multivariable standard regression analysis) and the association of CRP gene polymorphisms with atherosclerosis (Mendelian randomization analysis). Methodology/Principal Findings We genotyped 3 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) [+1444T>C (rs1130864); +2303G>A (rs1205) and +4899T>G (rs 3093077)] in the CRP gene and assessed CRP and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), a structural marker of atherosclerosis, in 4941 men and women aged 50–74 (mean 61) years (the Whitehall II Study). The 4 major haplotypes from the SNPs were consistently associated with CRP level, but not with other risk factors that might confound the association between CRP and CIMT. CRP, assessed both at mean age 49 and at mean age 61, was associated both with CIMT in age and sex adjusted standard regression analyses and with potential confounding factors. However, the association of CRP with CIMT attenuated to the null with adjustment for confounding factors in both prospective and cross-sectional analyses. When examined using genetic variants as the instrument for serum CRP, there was no inferred association between CRP and CIMT. Conclusions/Significance Both multivariable standard regression analysis and Mendelian randomization analysis suggest that the association of CRP with carotid atheroma indexed by CIMT may not be causal. PMID:18714381

  12. Contribution of the physical environment to socioeconomic gradients in walking in the Whitehall II study.

    PubMed

    Pliakas, Triantafyllos; Wilkinson, Paul; Tonne, Cathryn

    2014-05-01

    Socioeconomic gradients in walking are well documented but the underlying reasons remain unclear. We examined the contribution of objective measures of the physical environment at residence to socioeconomic gradients in walking in 3363 participants (50-74years) from the Whitehall II study (2002-2004). Individual-level socioeconomic position was measured as most recent employment grade. The contribution of multiple measures of the physical environment to socioeconomic position gradients in self-reported log transformed minutes walking/week was examined by linear regression. Objective measures of the physical environment contributed only to a small extent to socioeconomic gradients in walking in middle-aged and older adults living in Greater London, UK. Of these, only the number of killed and seriously injured road traffic casualties per km of road was predictive of walking. More walking in areas with high rates of road traffic casualties per km of road may signal an effect not of injury risk but of more central locations with multiple destinations within short distances ('compact neighbourhoods'). This has potential implications for urban planning to promote physical activity. PMID:24637091

  13. The Long Reach of Childhood Health and Circumstance: Evidence from the Whitehall II Study. NBER Working Paper No. 15640

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Anne; Paxson, Christina

    2010-01-01

    We use data from the Whitehall II study to examine the potential role played by early-life health and circumstances in determining health and employment status in middle and older ages. The population from which the Whitehall II cohort was drawn consisted almost exclusively of white collar civil servants. We demonstrate that estimates of the…

  14. Inflammatory markers and cognitive function in middle-aged adults: the Whitehall II study

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, David; Marmot, Michael G.; Singh-Manoux, Archana

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are associated with low cognitive performance and decline in middle-aged adults. Design/Setting The Whitehall II study; an ongoing large-scale, prospective occupational cohort study of employees from 20 London-based white-collar Civil Service departments. Participants Data from over 3000 males and 1200 female employees. Measures Inflammatory makers measured in 1991-93 and five cognitive tests (short-term verbal memory, inductive reasoning (AH4-I), vocabulary (Mill Hill), and phonemic and semantic fluency) performed in 1997-99 and 2002-04. Performance in the lowest sex-specific quintile indicated low cognitive performance or decline. Covariates included sociodemographics, health behaviours and health conditions. Results In age-adjusted analyses both CRP and IL-6 were associated with all cognitive measures in 1997-99, even though the association with memory was not consistent. After extensive adjustment raised CRP levels were only associated with poor cognitive performance on the AH4-I (OR=1.38; 95% CI: 1.05-1.82) and Mill Hill (OR=1.52; 95% CI: 1.14-2.03) and IL-6 on semantic fluency (OR=1.27; 95%CI: 1.14-2.03). Associations were more evident in men than in women. No clear relationship was observed for decline. Conclusions Our results suggest that raised levels of inflammatory markers in midlife are moderately associated with lower cognitive status, but little with cognitive decline. PMID:18774232

  15. Comparison of food and nutrient intakes between cohorts of the HAPIEE and Whitehall II studies

    PubMed Central

    Pajak, Andrzej; Malyutina, Sofia; Kubinova, Ruzena; Bobak, Martin; Brunner, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Differences in dietary habits have been suggested as an important reason for the large health gap between Eastern and Western European populations. Few studies have compared individual-level nutritional data directly between the two regions. This study addresses this hypothesis by comparing food, drink and nutrient intakes in four large population samples. Methods: Czech, Polish and Russian participants of the Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial Factors in Eastern Europe (HAPIEE) study, and British participants in the Whitehall II study, altogether 29 972 individuals aged 45–73 years, were surveyed in 2002–2005. Dietary data were collected by customised food frequency questionnaires. Reported food, drink and nutrient intake data were harmonised and compared between cohorts using multivariable adjusted quantile regression models. Results: Median fruit and vegetable intakes were lower in the pooled Eastern European sample, but not in all country cohorts, compared with British subjects. Median daily consumption of fruits were 275, 213, 130 and 256 g in the Czech, Polish, Russian and Whitehall II cohort, respectively. The respective median daily intakes of vegetables were 185, 197, 292 and 246 g. Median intakes of animal fat foods and saturated fat, total fat and cholesterol nutrients were significantly higher in the Czech, Polish and Russian cohorts compared with the British; for example, median daily intakes of saturated fatty acids were 31.3, 32.5, 29.2 and 25.4 g, respectively. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that there are important differences in dietary habits between and within Eastern and Western European populations which may have contributed to the health gap between the two regions. PMID:26637342

  16. Food patterns associated with blood lipids are predictive of coronary heart disease: the Whitehall II study.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, Sarah A; Mishra, Gita D; Brunner, Eric J

    2009-08-01

    Analysis of the epidemiological effects of overall dietary patterns offers an alternative approach to the investigation of the role of diet in CHD. We analysed the role of blood lipid-related dietary patterns using a two-step method to confirm the prospective association of dietary pattern with incident CHD. Analysis is based on 7314 participants of the Whitehall II study. Dietary intake was measured using a 127-item FFQ. Reduced rank regression (RRR) was used to derive dietary pattern scores using baseline serum total and HDL-cholesterol, and TAG levels as dependent variables. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to confirm the association between dietary patterns and incident CHD (n 243) over 15 years of follow-up. Increased CHD risk (hazard ratio (HR) for top quartile: 2.01 (95% CI 1.41, 2.85) adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity and energy misreporting) was observed with a diet characterised by high consumption of white bread, fried potatoes, sugar in tea and coffee, burgers and sausages, soft drinks, and low consumption of French dressing and vegetables. The diet-CHD relationship was attenuated after adjustment for employment grade and health behaviours (HR for top quartile: 1.81; 95% CI 1.26, 2.62), and further adjustment for blood pressure and BMI (HR for top quartile: 1.57; 95% CI 1.08, 2.27). Dietary patterns are associated with serum lipids and predict CHD risk after adjustment for confounders. RRR identifies dietary patterns using prior knowledge and focuses on the pathways through which diet may influence disease. The present study adds to the evidence that diet is an important risk factor for CHD. PMID:19327192

  17. COMPILATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DATA, FEBRUARY 1978-MARCH 1979. VOLUME II. STUDIES 8 AND 9

    EPA Science Inventory

    The three-volume report compiles all data from EPA/IERL-RTP's phased environmental assessment program for the period 2/78-3/79. It includes data from 14 environmental assessment studies, compiled in standard format. The formatted Level 1 data are organized within each study by th...

  18. Novel Design for Centrifugal Countercurrent Chromatography: II. Studies on Novel Geometries of Zigzag Toroidal Tubing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Aisa, Haji Akber; Ito, Yoichiro

    2010-01-01

    The toroidal column using a zigzag pattern has been improved in both retention of the stationary phase and peak resolution. To further improve the retention of stationary phase and peak resolution, a series of novel geometric designs of tubing (plain, mid-clamping, flattened and flat-twisted tubing) was evaluated their performance in CCC. The results showed that the tubing which was flattened vertically against centrifugal force (vert-flattened tubing) produced the best peak resolution among them. Using vert-flattened tubing a series of experiments was performed to study the effects of column capacity and sample size. The results indicated that a 0.25 ml capacity column is ideal for analysis of small amount samples. PMID:20454530

  19. Phase I and Phase II Objective Response Rates are Correlated in Pediatric Cancer Trials: An Argument for Better Clinical Trial Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jonathan C; Huang, Peng; Cohen, Kenneth J

    2016-07-01

    Although many phase I trials report tumor response, formal analysis of efficacy is deferred to phase II. We reviewed paired phase I and II pediatric oncology trials to ascertain the relationship between phase I and II objective response rate (OR%). Single-agent phase I trials were paired with corresponding phase II trials (comparable study drug, dosing schedule, and population). Phase I trials without efficacy data or a matching phase II trial were excluded. OR% was tabulated for all trials, and phase II authors' subjective conclusions regarding efficacy were documented; 35 pairs of trials were analyzed. The correlation between phase I and II OR% was 0.93. Between phase II studies with a "positive" conclusion versus a "negative" one, there was a statistically significant difference in mean phase I OR% (32.0% vs. 4.5%, P<0.001). Thirteen phase II studies were undertaken despite phase I OR% of 0%; only 1 had a "positive" conclusion, and none exceeded OR% of 15%. OR% are highly correlated between phase I and II pediatric oncology trials. Although not a formal measure of drug efficacy, phase I OR% may provide an estimate of phase II response, inform phase II study design, and should be given greater consideration. PMID:27164535

  20. Combined Analysis of Phase I and Phase II Data to Enhance the Power of Pharmacogenetic Tests

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, J; Chenel, M; Comets, E

    2016-01-01

    We show through a simulation study how the joint analysis of data from phase I and phase II studies enhances the power of pharmacogenetic tests in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies. PK profiles were simulated under different designs along with 176 genetic markers. The null scenarios assumed no genetic effect, while under the alternative scenarios, drug clearance was associated with six genetic markers randomly sampled in each simulated dataset. We compared penalized regression Lasso and stepwise procedures to detect the associations between empirical Bayes estimates of clearance, estimated by nonlinear mixed effects models, and genetic variants. Combining data from phase I and phase II studies, even if sparse, increases the power to identify the associations between genetics and PK due to the larger sample size. Design optimization brings a further improvement, and we highlight a direct relationship between η‐shrinkage and loss of genetic signal. PMID:27069775

  1. Combined Analysis of Phase I and Phase II Data to Enhance the Power of Pharmacogenetic Tests.

    PubMed

    Tessier, A; Bertrand, J; Chenel, M; Comets, E

    2016-03-01

    We show through a simulation study how the joint analysis of data from phase I and phase II studies enhances the power of pharmacogenetic tests in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies. PK profiles were simulated under different designs along with 176 genetic markers. The null scenarios assumed no genetic effect, while under the alternative scenarios, drug clearance was associated with six genetic markers randomly sampled in each simulated dataset. We compared penalized regression Lasso and stepwise procedures to detect the associations between empirical Bayes estimates of clearance, estimated by nonlinear mixed effects models, and genetic variants. Combining data from phase I and phase II studies, even if sparse, increases the power to identify the associations between genetics and PK due to the larger sample size. Design optimization brings a further improvement, and we highlight a direct relationship between η-shrinkage and loss of genetic signal. PMID:27069775

  2. Maintaining Exercise and Healthful Eating in Older Adults: The SENIOR Project II: Study Design and Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Phillip G.; Blissmer, Bryan J.; Greene, Geoffrey W.; Lees, Faith D.; Riebe, Deborah A.; Stamm, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    The Study of Exercise and Nutrition in Older Rhode Islanders (SENIOR) Project II is an intervention study to promote the maintenance of both exercise and healthful eating in older adults. It is the second phase of an earlier study, SENIOR Project I, that originally recruited 1,277 community-dwelling older adults to participate in behavior-specific interventions designed to increase exercise and/or fruit and vegetable consumption. The general theoretical framework for this research is the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of Health Behavior Change. The current intervention occurs over a 48-month period, using a manual, newsletters, and phone coaching calls. Annual assessments collect standardized data on behavioral outcomes (exercise and diet), TTM variables (stage of change and self-efficacy), psychosocial variables (social support, depression, resilience, and life satisfaction), physical activity and functioning (SF-36, Up and Go, Senior Fitness Test, and disability assessment), cognitive functioning (Trail Making Test and Forward and Backward Digit Span), physical measures (height, weight, and waist circumference), and demographics. The SENIOR Project II is designed to answer the following question as its primary objective: (1) Does an individualized active-maintenance intervention with older adults maintain greater levels of healthful exercise and dietary behaviors for four years, compared to a control condition? In addition, there are two secondary objectives: (2) What are the psychosocial factors associated with the maintenance of health-promoting behaviors in the very old? and (3) What are the effects of the maintenance of health-promoting behaviors on reported health outcomes, psychosocial measures, anthropometrics, and cognitive status? PMID:20955821

  3. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Fibroid Ablation: Phase II and Phase III Results

    PubMed Central

    Pemueller, Rodolfo Robles; Garza Leal, José Gerardo; Abbott, Karen R.; Falls, Janice L.; Macer, James

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To review phase II and phase III treatments of symptomatic uterine fibroids (myomas) using laparoscopic radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation (RFVTA). Methods: We performed a retrospective, multicenter clinical analysis of 206 consecutive cases of ultrasound-guided laparoscopic RFVTA of symptomatic myomas conducted on an outpatient basis under two phase II studies at 2 sites (n = 69) and one phase III study at 11 sites (n = 137). Descriptive and exploratory, general trend, and matched-pair analyses were applied. Results: From baseline to 12 months in the phase II study, the mean transformed symptom severity scores improved from 53.9 to 8.8 (P < .001) (n = 57), health-related quality-of-life scores improved from 48.5 to 92.0 (P < .001) (n = 57), and mean uterine volume decreased from 204.4 cm3 to 151.4 cm3 (P = .008) (n = 58). Patients missed a median of 4 days of work (range, 2–10 days). The rate of possible device-related adverse events was 1.4% (1 of 69). In the phase III study, approximately 98% of patients were assessed at 12 months, and their transformed symptom severity scores, health-related quality-of-life scores, mean decrease in uterine volume, and mean menstrual bleeding reduction were also significant. Patients in phase III missed a median of 5 days of work (range, 1–29 days). The rate of periprocedural device-related adverse events was 3.5% (5 of 137). Despite the enrollment requirement for patients in both phases to have completed childbearing, 4 pregnancies occurred within the first year after treatment. Conclusions: RFVTA does not require any uterine incisions and provides a uterine-sparing procedure with rapid recovery, significant reduction in uterine size, significant reduction or elimination of myoma symptoms, and significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24960480

  4. Lunar Precursor Missions for Human Exploration of Mars - II. Studies of Mission Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendell, W. W.; Griffith, A. D.

    necessary precursor to human missions to Mars. He observed that mission parameters for Mars expeditions far exceed current and projected near-term space operations experience in categories such as duration, scale, logistics, required system reliability, time delay for communications, crew exposure to the space environment (particularly reduced gravity), lack of abort-to-Earth options, degree of crew isolation, and long-term political commitment. He demonstrated how a program of lunar exploration could be structured to expand the experience base, test operations approaches, and validate proposed technologies. In this paper, we plan to expand the discussion on the topic of mission operations, including flight and trajectory design, crew activity planning, procedure development and validation, and initialization load development. contemplating the nature of the challenges posed by a mission with a single crew lasting 3 years with no possibility of abort to Earth and at a distance where the light-time precludes conversation between with the astronauts. The brief durations of Apollo or Space Shuttle missions mandates strict scheduling of in-space tasks to maximize the productivity. On a mission to Mars, the opposite obtains. Transit times are long (~160 days), and crew time may be principally devoted to physical conditioning and repeated simulations of the landing sequence. While the physical exercise parallels the experience on the International Space Station (ISS), the remote refresher training is new. The extensive surface stay time (~500 days) implies that later phases of the surface missions will have to be planned in consultation with the crew to a large extent than is currently the case. resolve concerns over the form of new methodologies and philosophies needed. Recent proposed reductions in scope and crew size for ISS exacerbate this problem. One unknown aspect is whether any sociological pathologies will develop in the relationship of the crew to Mission

  5. Gender Differences in the Cross-Sectional Relationships Between Sleep Duration and Markers of Inflammation: Whitehall II Study

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michelle A.; Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Brunner, Eric J.; Lowe, Gordon D.O.; Marmot, Michael G.; Cappuccio, Francesco P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationships between sleep and inflammatory markers because these may be important in the development of cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results: The relationship between self-reported sleep duration and interleukin-6 (IL-6) (n = 4642) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (n = 4677) was examined in individuals from the Whitehall II study. Following multiple adjustments, there were no overall linear or nonlinear trends between sleep duration and IL-6. However, in women but not men (interaction P < 0.05), levels of IL-6 tended to be lower in individuals who slept 8 hours (11% [95% confidence interval 4 to 17]) as compared to 7 hours. With hs-CRP, in the adjusted model, there was no association between hs-CRP and sleep duration in men. However, there was a significant nonlinear association in women, the level of hs-CRP being significantly higher in women short sleepers (5 hours or less) after multiple adjustments (P = 0.04) (interaction P < 0.05). Conclusions: No significant variation in inflammatory markers with sleep duration was observed in men. By contrast, both IL-6 and hs-CRP levels varied with sleep duration in women. The observed pattern of variation was different according to the inflammatory marker observed. Further longitudinal studies are required to fully investigate possible temporal relationships between short sleep and markers of inflammation. Citation: Miller MA; Kandala NB; Kivimaki M; Kumari M; Brunner EJ; Lowe GDO; Marmot MG; Cappuccio FP. Gender differences in the cross-sectional relationships between sleep duration and markers of inflammation: Whitehall II study. SLEEP 2009;32(7):857-864. PMID:19639748

  6. Phases and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Moshe

    2014-09-01

    In discussing phase transitions, the first thing that we have to do is to define a phase. This is a concept from thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, where a phase is defined as a homogeneous system. As a simple example, let us consider instant coffee. This consists of coffee powder dissolved in water, and after stirring it we have a homogeneous mixture, i.e., a single phase. If we add to a cup of coffee a spoonful of sugar and stir it well, we still have a single phase -- sweet coffee. However, if we add ten spoonfuls of sugar, then the contents of the cup will no longer be homogeneous, but rather a mixture of two homogeneous systems or phases, sweet liquid coffee on top and coffee-flavored wet sugar at the bottom...

  7. Stroke prevention and atrial fibrillation: reasons leading to an inappropriate management. Main results of the SAFE II study

    PubMed Central

    Deplanque, Dominique; Leys, Didier; Parnetti, Lucilla; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferro, Jose; De Reuck, Jacques; Mas, Jean-Louis; Gallai, Virgilio

    2004-01-01

    Aims The aim of the Stroke and Atrial Fibrillation Ensemble (SAFE) II study was to identify the reasons underlying the under-utilization of oral anticoagulation (OAC) in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Methods We investigated from all available sources the reasons why patients hospitalized for a stroke, who had a previously known NVAF, were not receiving OAC beforehand. We interviewed general practitioners (GPs) and cardiologists with a structured questionnaire, to identify the reasons for their therapeutic choice. Results Of 370 patients, 257 were theoretically eligible for OAC according to guidelines and the presence of contra-indications, but only 82 (22.2%) of them had actually received OAC before. We found that factors independently associated with the prescription of OAC were being followed-up by a cardiologist and having a younger GP. The leading reason evoked by GPs or cardiologists to explain why patients were not treated with OAC was the presence of a ‘potential contra-indication’, which was often inappropriate, followed by ‘there was no indication’, ‘low compliance’ and ‘fear of bleeding’. Conclusions An important reason for not prescribing OAC was the lack of knowledge about trials and guidelines. Medical education about OAC in NVAF should therefore be improved. PMID:15151526

  8. Phase I/II Study of Postoperative Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Advanced-Stage Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck (cSCCHN)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-17

    Recurrent Skin Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity

  9. A Phase II Study of Radiotherapy and Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast-Conserving Treatment for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, William C.; Kim, Janice; Kim, Edward; Silverman, Paula; Overmoyer, Beth; Cooper, Brenda W.; Anthony, Sue; Shenk, Robert; Leeming, Rosemary; Hanks, Shelli H.; Lyons, Janice A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Administering adjuvant chemotherapy before breast radiotherapy decreases the risk of systemic recurrence, but delays in radiotherapy could yield higher local failure. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of placing radiotherapy earlier in the breast-conserving treatment course for lymph node-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2004, 44 women with node-positive Stage II and III breast cancer were entered into this trial. Breast-conserving surgery and 4 cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2})/cyclophosphamide (600 mg/m{sup 2}) were followed by 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) delivered every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was concurrent with the first 2 cycles of paclitaxel. The breast received 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions with a tumor bed boost of 14 Gy in 7 fractions. Regional lymphatics were included when indicated. Functional lung volume was assessed by use of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide as a proxy. Breast cosmesis was evaluated with the Harvard criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival is 88%, and overall survival is 93%. There have been no local failures. Median follow-up is 75 months. No cases of radiation pneumonitis developed. There was no significant change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide either immediately after radiotherapy (p = 0.51) or with extended follow-up (p = 0.63). Volume of irradiated breast tissue correlated with acute cosmesis, and acute Grade 3 skin toxicity developed in 2 patients. Late cosmesis was not adversely affected. Conclusions: Concurrent paclitaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery shortened total treatment time, provided excellent local control, and was well tolerated.

  10. A Phase Ib/II Study of BYL719 and Cetuximab in Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (RM HNSCC) Patients Who Are Resistant or Ineligible/Intolerant to Platinum-based Chemotherapy.; Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  11. Neoadjuvant Treatment With Single-Agent Cetuximab Followed by 5-FU, Cetuximab, and Pelvic Radiotherapy: A Phase II Study in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, Federica Chiara, Silvana; Bengala, Carmelo; Antognoni, Paolo; Dealis, Cristina; Zironi, Sandra; Malavasi, Norma; Scolaro, Tindaro; Depenni, Roberta; Jovic, Gordana; Sonaglio, Claudia; Rossi, Aldo; Luppi, Gabriele; Conte, Pier Franco

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery represents the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Cetuximab has proved activity in advanced colorectal cancer, and its incorporation in preoperative treatment may increase tumor downstaging. Methods and Materials: After biopsy and staging, uT3/uT4 N0/+ LARC received single-agent cetuximab in three doses, followed by weekly cetuximab plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), concomitantly with RT. Sample size was calculated according to Bryant and Day test, a two-stage design with at least 10 pathologic complete remissions observed in 60 patients (pts) able to complete the treatment plan. Results: Forty pts with LARC were entered: male/female = 34/6; median age: 61 (range, 28-77); 12 uT3N0 Ed(30%); 25 uT3N1 (62%); 3 uT4N1 (8%); all Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group = 0. Thirty-five pts completed neoadjuvant treatment; 5 (12%) withdrew therapy after one cetuximab administration: three for hypersensitivity reactions, one for rapid progression, and one for purulent arthritis. They continued 5-FU in continuous infusion in association with RT. Thirty-one pts (77%) presented with acnelike rash; dose reduction/interruption of treatment was necessary in six pts (15%): two for Grade 3 acnelike rash, two for Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity, and two for refusal. Thirty-eight pts were evaluable for pathological response (one patient refused surgery, and one was progressed during neoadjuvant treatment). Pathological staging was: pT0N0 three pts (8%), pT1N0 1 pt (3%); pT2N0 13 pts (34%), and pT3 19 pts (50%) (N0:9, N1:5; N2:5); pT4 2 pts (5%). Conclusions: Preoperative treatment with 5-FU, cetuximab, and pelvic RT is feasible with acceptable toxicities; however, the rate of pathologic responses is disappointingly low.

  12. A double blind randomized placebo controlled phase I/II study assessing the safety and efficacy of allogeneic bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell in critical limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Peripheral vascular disease of the lower extremities comprises a clinical spectrum that extends from no symptoms to presentation with critical limb ischemia (CLI). Bone marrow derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (BM- MSCs) may ameliorate the consequences of CLI due to their combinatorial potential for inducing angiogenesis and immunomodulatory environment in situ. The primary objective was to determine the safety of BM- MSCs in patients with CLI. Methods Prospective, double blind randomized placebo controlled multi-center study was conducted in patients with established CLI as per Rutherford classification in category II-4, III-5, or III-6 with infra-inguinal arterial occlusive disease and were not suitable for or had failed revascularization treatment. The primary end point was incidence of treatment – related adverse events (AE). Exploratory efficacy end points were improvement in rest pain, increase in Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI), ankle pressure, healing of ulcers, and amputation rates. Twenty patients (BM-MSC: Placebo = 1:1) were administered with allogeneic BM-MSCs at a dose of 2 million cells/kg or placebo (PlasmaLyte A) at the gastrocnemius muscle of the ischemic limb. Results Improvement was observed in the rest pain scores in both the arms. Significant increase in ABPI and ankle pressure was seen in BM-MSC arm compared to the placebo group. Incidence of AEs in the BM-MSC arm was 13 vs. 45 in the placebo arm where as serious adverse events (SAE) were similar in both the arms (5 in BM-MSC and 4 in the placebo group). SAEs resulted in death, infected gangrene, amputations in these patients. It was observed that the SAEs were related to disease progression and not related to stem cells. Conclusion BM-MSCs are safe when injected IM at a dose of 2 million cells/kg body weight. Few efficacy parameters such as ABPI and ankle pressure showed positive trend warranting further studies. Trial registration NIH website (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00883870) PMID:23758736

  13. Phase II study of methotrexate, vincristine, pegylated-asparaginase, and dexamethasone (MOpAD) in patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kadia, Tapan M.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Thomas, Deborah A.; O’Brien, Susan; Estrov, Zeev; Ravandi, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Daver, Naval; Wang, Xuemei; Jain, Preetesh; Pierce, Sherry; Brandt, Mark; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge; Borthakur, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Newer approaches are needed for the treatment of relapsed and refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Asparaginase-based regimens are active in the treatment of pediatric ALL and may be important in salvage therapy for adult patients. We conducted a pilot trial combining methotrexate, vincristine, PEGylated-asparaginase, and dexamethasone (MOpAD) in adults with relapsed or refractory ALL. We added tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) ALL and rituximab in patients with CD20 positive B-cell ALL. Among 37 patients treated (median age 42 years; median 2 prior therapies), the complete remission (CR) rate was 28% and an overall response rate (ORR) was 39%. The median CR duration was 4.3 months. Patients with Ph+ ALL had CR and ORR of 50% and 67%, respectively and the CR and ORR in patients with T-cell leukemia were 45% and 56%, respectively. The median survival in patients with CR/CRp was 10.4 versus 3.4 months in nonresponders (P =0.02). The most common grade 3 or 4 nonhematologic toxicities were elevations in bilirubin and transaminases, nausea, peripheral neuropathy, and hyperglycemia, which were managed with supportive care, dose adjustments, and interruptions. PMID:25368968

  14. Phase II Study of Gemcitabine and Docetaxel Combination in Patients with Previously Treated Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Kafri, Zyad; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Sukari, Ammar; Yoo, George; Jacobs, John; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Mulrenan, Heather; Smith, Daryn; Kucuk, Omer

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the safety and efficacy of gemcitabine and docetaxel (GEMDOC) in previously treated patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods. Patients with advanced SCCHN previously pretreated with one or two lines of palliative chemotherapy were treated with gemcitabine and docetaxel until disease progression. Results. Thirty-six patients were enrolled, and 29 were response evaluable. 16 (55%) experienced clinical benefit (response or stable disease). Six (21%) patients achieved partial response (PR), none achieved complete response (CR), and the overall response rate (ORR) was 21% (95% CI: 0.10–0.38). Ten (28%) patients had stable disease. The median response duration (RD) for the 6 PR patients was 3.2 months (80% CI: 2.0–6.1 months). Median overall survival was 4.2 months (95% CI: 2.4–7.0 months). Among the 33 treated patients: 13 (39%) patients had grade 3-4 anemia, 10 (30%) had grade 3-4 neutropenia. Conclusion. The study drugs were relatively safe, and the clinical benefit (PR + SD) rate was 55%. However, the efficacy objective for this regimen was not met. Given the good safety profile, further investigation of this regimen with the addition of a targeted agent may lead to better efficacy. PMID:22655205

  15. Phase II Study of Gemcitabine and Docetaxel Combination in Patients with Previously Treated Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Kafri, Zyad; Heilbrun, Lance K; Sukari, Ammar; Yoo, George; Jacobs, John; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Mulrenan, Heather; Smith, Daryn; Kucuk, Omer

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the safety and efficacy of gemcitabine and docetaxel (GEMDOC) in previously treated patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods. Patients with advanced SCCHN previously pretreated with one or two lines of palliative chemotherapy were treated with gemcitabine and docetaxel until disease progression. Results. Thirty-six patients were enrolled, and 29 were response evaluable. 16 (55%) experienced clinical benefit (response or stable disease). Six (21%) patients achieved partial response (PR), none achieved complete response (CR), and the overall response rate (ORR) was 21% (95% CI: 0.10-0.38). Ten (28%) patients had stable disease. The median response duration (RD) for the 6 PR patients was 3.2 months (80% CI: 2.0-6.1 months). Median overall survival was 4.2 months (95% CI: 2.4-7.0 months). Among the 33 treated patients: 13 (39%) patients had grade 3-4 anemia, 10 (30%) had grade 3-4 neutropenia. Conclusion. The study drugs were relatively safe, and the clinical benefit (PR + SD) rate was 55%. However, the efficacy objective for this regimen was not met. Given the good safety profile, further investigation of this regimen with the addition of a targeted agent may lead to better efficacy. PMID:22655205

  16. Open Label, Phase II Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Oral Nilotinib in Philadelphia Positive (Ph+) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Pediatric Patients.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-05

    Leukemia; Leukemia,Pediatric; Leukemia, Myleiod; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Chronic; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Accelerated; BCR-ABL Positive; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Bone Marrow Disease; Hematologic Diseases; Neoplastic Processes; Imatinib; Dasatinib; Enzyme Inhibitor; Protein Kinase Inhibitor

  17. A phase II Study of Decitabine and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Newly Diagnosed and Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and High-risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Daver, Naval; Kantarjian, Hagop; Ravandi, Farhad; Estey, Elihu; Wang, Xuemei; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Jabbour, Elias; Konopleva, Marina; O’Brien, Susan; Verstovsek, Srdan; Kadia, Tapan; Dinardo, Courtney; Pierce, Sherry; Huang, Xuelin; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Diaz-Pines-Mateo, Maria; Cortes, Jorge; Borthakur, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    Background Decitabine may open the chromatin structure of leukemia cells making them accessible to the calicheamicin epitope of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO). Methods 110 patients (median age 70 years; range 27–89 years) were treated with decitabine and GO in a trial designed on model based futility to accommodate subject heterogeneity: Group 1: relapsed/refractory AML with complete remission duration (CRD) < 1 year (N=28, 25%); Group 2: relapsed/refractory AML with CRD ≥1 year (N=5, 5%); Group 3: untreated AML unfit for intensive chemotherapy or untreated MDS or untreated MF (N=57, 52%); and Group 4: AML evolving from MDS or relapsed/refractory MDS or MF (N=20, 18%). Treatment consisted of decitabine 20mg/m2 daily for 5 days and GO 3 mg/m2 on day 5. Post-induction therapy included 5 cycles of decitabine+GO followed by decitabine alone. Results CR/CRi was achieved in 39 (35%) patients; Group 1= 5/28 (17%), Group 2 = 3/5 (60%), Group 3 = 24/57 (42%), and Group 4 = 7/20 (35%). The 8-week mortality in Groups 3 and 4 was 16% and 10%, respectively. Common drug-related adverse events included nausea, mucositis and hemorrhage. Conclusion Decitabine and GO improved the response rate but not OS compared to historical outcomes in untreated AML ≥60 years. PMID:26365212

  18. Concurrent Liposomal Cisplatin (Lipoplatin), 5-Fluorouracil and Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Liposomal drugs have a better tolerance profile and are highly accumulated in the tumor environment, properties that promise an optimal radiosensitization. We investigated the feasibility of the combination of 5-fluorouracil/lecovorin-based radio-chemotherapy with the administration of high weekly dose of a liposomal platinum formulation (Lipoplatin{sup TM}). Methods and Materials: Lipoplatin was given at a dose of 120mg/m{sup 2}/week, 5-fluorouracil at 400mg/m{sup 2}/week (Day 1), whereas radiotherapy was given through 3.5-Gy fractions on Days 2, 3, and 4. Two groups of 6 patients received four and five consecutive cycles, respectively. Results: Minimal nephrotoxicity (18.2% Grade 1) and neutropenia (9% Grade 3) was noted. Fatigue Grade 2 appeared in 25% of cases. Abdominal discomfort was reported by 18% of patients. No liver, kidney, gastric, or intestinal severe acute or late sequellae were documented, although the median follow-up of 9 months is certainly too low to allow safe conclusions. A net improvement in the performance status (from a median of 1 to 0) was recorded 2 months after the end of therapy. The response rates assessed with computed tomography, endoscopy, and biopsies confirmed 33% (2 of 6) tumor disappearance in patients treated with four cycles, which reached 80% (4 of 5) in patients receiving five cycles. Conclusions: Lipoplatin radio-chemotherapy is feasible, with minor hematological and nonhematological toxicity. The high complete response rates obtained support the testing of Lipoplatin in the adjuvant postoperative or preoperative radio-chemotherapy setting for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  19. Six fractions per week of external beam radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix: A phase I/II study

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sang Min; Huh, Seung Jae . E-mail: sjhuh@smc.samsung.co.kr; Park, Won; Lee, Jeung Eun; Park, Young Je; Nam, Hee Rim; Lim, Do Hoon; Ahn, Yong Chan

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the treatment results of external beam radiotherapy administered in six fractions per week and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From July 2000 to July 2003, 43 patients were enrolled in this study. The patients received 45 Gy from a 10-MV photon beam using four-field box or anterior-posterior beams. Parametrial regions and the pelvic side walls were boosted with up to 50.4 Gy using a midline block. The daily fraction dose was 1.8 Gy administered in six-weekly fractions, from Monday to Saturday. HDR brachytherapy was also delivered at doses of 24 Gy to point A in six fractions twice a week. The median follow-up time was 37 months (range, 9-60 months). Results: The median overall treatment time was 51 days for all patients (range, 44-62 days). Thirty-four patients (79.1%) achieved complete remission and 8 (18.6%) achieved partial remission after radiotherapy. Locoregional recurrence occurred in 5 patients (11.6%), and a distant metastasis was encountered in 6 patients (13.9%). The 3-year overall survival, locoregional, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 74.7%, 87.8%, and 84.7%, respectively. Grade 2 and 3 late rectal complications were encountered in 3 (6.5%) and 1 (2.2%), respectively. There were no Grade 3 late bladder complications. Conclusions: Six fractions per week of external beam radiotherapy and HDR brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with a carcinoma of the uterine cervix and can be used as a possible alternative to concomitant chemoradiotherapy in elderly patients or in patients with co-morbidity.

  20. Phase II study of pemetrexed and carboplatin plus bevacizumab, followed by maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab in Japanese patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Takashi; Torii, Yoshitaro; Katashiba, Yuichi; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Tanijiri, Tsutomu; Ogata, Makoto; Inagaki, Noriko; Kibata, Kayoko; Hayashi, Mina; Niki, Maiko; Shimizu, Toshiki; Miyara, Takayuki; Kurata, Takayasu; Nomura, Shosaku

    2014-12-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy and safety of pemetrexed, carboplatin and bevacizumab, followed by maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab, in chemotherapy-naïve patients with stage IIIB/IV non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The patients were administered pemetrexed (500 mg/m(2)), carboplatin (area under the concentration-time curve, 6.0 mg/ml × min) and bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) intravenously every three weeks for up to six cycles. Patients who did not experience tumor progression remained on maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The primary endpoint was the overall response rate. Of the 26 patients enrolled between March 2010 and April 2011, three were excluded due to brain metastases, therefore the intention-to-treat (ITT) population consisted of 23 patients. The median age was 64 years (range, 40-74 years) and 15 patients were male. In total, six patients had a performance status of 0, and 20 had stage IV tumors. The response rate was 69.6% [95% confidence interval (CI), 47.1-86.8], the disease control rate was 100% and the time to response was 1.2 months (95% CI, 0.72-1.93). The median progression-free survival time was 8.6 months (95% CI, 5.9-10.9) and the median overall survival time was 18.6 months (95% CI, 12.9-24.8). There were no grade 3 or worse hemorrhagic events and the feasibility was modest. Overall, pemetrexed and carboplatin plus bevacizumab, followed by maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab, was effective and tolerable in the patients with non-squamous NSCLC, and the time to response was relatively short. PMID:25364406

  1. Phase II study of pemetrexed and carboplatin plus bevacizumab, followed by maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab in Japanese patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    YOKOI, TAKASHI; TORII, YOSHITARO; KATASHIBA, YUICHI; SUGIMOTO, HIROYUKI; TANIJIRI, TSUTOMU; OGATA, MAKOTO; INAGAKI, NORIKO; KIBATA, KAYOKO; HAYASHI, MINA; NIKI, MAIKO; SHIMIZU, TOSHIKI; MIYARA, TAKAYUKI; KURATA, TAKAYASU; NOMURA, SHOSAKU

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy and safety of pemetrexed, carboplatin and bevacizumab, followed by maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab, in chemotherapy-naïve patients with stage IIIB/IV non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The patients were administered pemetrexed (500 mg/m2), carboplatin (area under the concentration-time curve, 6.0 mg/ml × min) and bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) intravenously every three weeks for up to six cycles. Patients who did not experience tumor progression remained on maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The primary endpoint was the overall response rate. Of the 26 patients enrolled between March 2010 and April 2011, three were excluded due to brain metastases, therefore the intention-to-treat (ITT) population consisted of 23 patients. The median age was 64 years (range, 40–74 years) and 15 patients were male. In total, six patients had a performance status of 0, and 20 had stage IV tumors. The response rate was 69.6% [95% confidence interval (CI), 47.1–86.8], the disease control rate was 100% and the time to response was 1.2 months (95% CI, 0.72–1.93). The median progression-free survival time was 8.6 months (95% CI, 5.9–10.9) and the median overall survival time was 18.6 months (95% CI, 12.9–24.8). There were no grade 3 or worse hemorrhagic events and the feasibility was modest. Overall, pemetrexed and carboplatin plus bevacizumab, followed by maintenance pemetrexed and bevacizumab, was effective and tolerable in the patients with non-squamous NSCLC, and the time to response was relatively short. PMID:25364406

  2. Phase II study of gemcitabine, doxorubicin and paclitaxel (GAT) as first-line chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer: a translational research experience

    PubMed Central

    Passardi, Alessandro; Massa, Ilaria; Zoli, Wainer; Gianni, Lorenzo; Milandri, Carlo; Zumaglini, Federica; Nanni, Oriana; Maltoni, Roberta; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca; Amadori, Dino

    2006-01-01

    Background Patients with metastatic breast cancer are frequently treated with anthracyclines and taxanes, which are among the most active agents in this disease. Gemcitabine is an interesting candidate for a three-drug combination because of its different mechanism of action and non-overlapping toxicity with respect to the other two drugs. We aimed to evaluate the activity and toxicity of the GAT (gemcitabine, doxorubicin and paclitaxel) regimen, derived from experimental preclinical studies, as first-line chemotherapy in patients with stage IIIB-IV breast cancer. Methods Patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer and at least one bidimensionally measurable lesion were included in the present study. Adequate bone marrow reserve, normal cardiac, hepatic and renal function, and an ECOG performance status of 0 to 2 were required. Only prior adjuvant non anthracycline-based chemotherapy was permitted. Treatment consisted of doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 on day 1, paclitaxel 160 mg/m2 on day 2 and gemcitabine 800 mg/m2 on day 6, repeated every 21–28 days. Results Thirty-three consecutive breast cancer patients were enrolled onto the trial (7 stage IIIB and 26 stage IV). All patients were evaluable for toxicity and 29 were assessable for response. A total of 169 cycles were administered, with a median of 6 cycles per patient (range 1–8 cycles). Complete and partial responses were observed in 6.9% and 48.3% of patients, respectively, for an overall response rate of 55.2%. A response was reported in all metastatic sites, with a median duration of 16.4 months. Median time to progression and overall survival were 10.2 and 36.4 months, respectively. The most important toxicity was hematological, with grade III-IV neutropenia observed in 69% of patients, sometimes requiring the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (27%). Non hematological toxicity was rare and mild. One patient died from sepsis during the first treatment cycle before the administration of gemcitabine. Conclusion The strong synergism among the three drugs found in the preclinical setting was confirmed in terms of both clinical activity and hematological toxicity. Our results seem to indicate that the GAT regimen is effective in anthracycline-naïve metastatic breast cancer and provides a feasible chemotherapeutic option in this clinical setting. PMID:16551351

  3. External Beam Radiotherapy Plus 24-Hour Continuous Infusion of Gemcitabine in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mattiucci, Gian C.; Morganti, Alessio G.; Valentini, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Edy; Alfieri, Sergio; Antinori, Armando; Crucitti, Antonio; D'Agostino, Giuseppe R.; Di Lullo, Liberato; Luzi, Stefano; Mantini, Giovanna; Smaniotto, Daniela; Doglietto, Gian B.; Cellini, Numa

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of gemcitabine-based chemoradiation (CT-RT) in treating patients (pts) affected by locally advanced pancreatic cancers (LAPC). Methods and Materials: Weekly gemcitabine (100 mg/m{sup 2}) was given as a 24-hour infusion during the course of three-dimensional radiotherapy (50.4 Gy to the tumor, 39.6 Gy to the nodes). After CT-RT, pts received five cycles of sequential chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2}; 1, 8, q21). Response rate was assessed according to World Health Organization criteria 6 weeks after the end of CT-RT. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), metastases-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the Kaplan Meier method. Results: Forty pts (male/female 22/18; median age 62 years, range, 36-76) were treated from 2000 to 2005. The majority had T4 tumour (n = 34, 85%), six pts (15%) had T3 tumour. Sixteen pts (40%) were node positive at diagnosis. Grade 3-4 acute toxicity was observed in 21 pts (52.5%). Thirty pts (75%) completed the treatment schedule. A clinical response was achieved in 12 pts (30%). With a median follow-up of 76 months (range, 32-98), 2-year LC was 39.6% (median, 12 months), 2-year TTP was 18.4% (median, 10 months), and 2-year MFS was 29.7% (median, 10 months). Two-year OS (25%; median, 15.5 months) compared with our previous study on 5-fluorouracil-based CT-RT (2.8%) was significantly improved (p <0.001). Conclusions: Gemcitabine CT-RT seems correlated with improved outcomes. Healthier patients who are likely to complete the treatment schedule may benefit most from this therapy.

  4. Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin as third-line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of urothelial tract: results of a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Rozzi, Antonio; Santini, Daniele; Salerno, Margherita; Bordin, Francesca; Mancuso, Andrea; Minniti, Giuseppe; Nardoni, Chiara; Corona, Michela; Falbo, Pina Tiziana; Recine, Federica; Lanzetta, Gaetano

    2013-03-01

    Until the recent approval of vinflunine, no standard second-line chemotherapy existed for advanced transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Few data exist about third-line chemotherapy for metastatic disease. Although administered in up-front regimens, anthracyclines were never evaluated beyond second-line treatment. This study assessed the activity of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) in patients with advanced TCC previously treated with two chemotherapy regimens. From May 2005 to June 2009, 23 patients with metastatic TCC were recruited: median age was 62 years (49-76 years) with a median ECOG PS of 1. Patients received PLD 35 mg/m(2) every 21 days. All patients were evaluable for efficacy and toxicity. No patient showed complete response. Three patients (13 %) had partial response; seven patients (30 %) showed stable disease for a disease control rate of 43 %. The median time to progression (TTP) was 4.1 months with a median survival time (MST) of 6.3 months. Treatment was well tolerated: no patient developed grade 4 toxicities. This is the first study which evaluated the role of anthracyclines as third-line chemotherapy in metastatic TCC. Despite its manageable profile of toxicity, PLD showed modest activity. Beyond second-line chemotherapy, supportive care still represents the best therapeutic option for patients with metastatic TCC. PMID:23307245

  5. A Phase II Study of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis for Postoperative Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 0418

    SciTech Connect

    Jhingran, Anuja; Winter, Kathryn; Portelance, Lorraine; Miller, Brigitte; Salehpour, Mohammad; Gaur, Rakesh; Souhami, Luis; Small, William; Berk, Lawrence; Gaffney, David

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with endometrial cancer in a multi-institutional setting and to determine whether this treatment is associated with fewer short-term bowel adverse events than standard radiation therapy. Methods: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium treated with pelvic radiation therapy alone were eligible. Guidelines for target definition and delineation, dose prescription, and dose-volume constraints for the targets and critical normal structures were detailed in the study protocol and a web-based atlas. Results: Fifty-eight patients were accrued by 25 institutions; 43 were eligible for analysis. Forty-two patients (98%) had an acceptable IMRT plan; 1 had an unacceptable variation from the prescribed dose to the nodal planning target volume. The proportions of cases in which doses to critical normal structures exceeded protocol criteria were as follows: bladder, 67%; rectum, 76%; bowel, 17%; and femoral heads, 33%. Twelve patients (28%) developed grade {>=}2 short-term bowel adverse events. Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT for endometrial cancer is feasible across multiple institutions with use of a detailed protocol and centralized quality assurance (QA). For future trials, contouring of vaginal and nodal tissue will need continued monitoring with good QA and better definitions will be needed for organs at risk.

  6. Efficacy and Safety of AM-101 in the Treatment of Acute Inner Ear Tinnitus—A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    van de Heyning, Paul; Muehlmeier, Guido; Cox, Tony; Lisowska, Grazyna; Maier, Heinz; Morawski, Krzysztof; Meyer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intratympanic AM-101 in patients with persistent acute inner ear tinnitus after acute acoustic trauma, idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL), or acute otitis media. Study Design Prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study with follow-up visits on Days 7, 30, and 90. Setting Twenty-eight European sites (academic tertiary referral centers and private ENT practices). Patients 248 patients aged 16 to 65 years. Interventions Three intratympanic injections of AM-101 (0.27 or 0.81 mg/ml) or placebo over 3 consecutive days. Main Outcome Measures Efficacy was assessed by changes in minimum masking level (MML; primary end point), loudness match, tinnitus loudness, tinnitus annoyance, and sleep difficulties on a 0 to 100 numerical rating scale, THI-12 questionnaire, and patient global impression of change. Safety was evaluated using the frequency of clinically relevant hearing deterioration and adverse events. Results The study overall failed to demonstrate a treatment benefit based on the change in MML. However, AM-101 0.81 mg/ml showed statistically significantly better improvement for tinnitus loudness, annoyance, sleep difficulties, and tinnitus impact in patients with tinnitus after noise trauma or otitis media. The subgroup of ISSNHL-related tinnitus patients did not show conclusive results. The study drug and I.T. injections were well tolerated. Conclusion The study established proof of concept for AM-101 in the treatment of tinnitus arising from cochlear glutamate excitotoxicity. Patient-reported outcomes seem to be more relevant and reliable efficacy measures for assessing treatment-related changes in tinnitus than psychoacoustic tests. PMID:24603353

  7. A phase I/II study of leucovorin, carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil (LCF) in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site or advanced oesophagogastric/pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Rigg, A.; Cunningham, D.; Gore, M.; Hill, M.; O'Brien, M.; Nicolson, M.; Chang, J.; Watson, M.; Norman, A.; Hill, A.; Oates, J.; Moore, H.; Ross, P.

    1997-01-01

    Carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUPS) accounts for 5-10% of all malignancies. Forty patients with metastatic CUPS or advanced oesophagogastric/pancreatic adenocarcinomas were recruited. Eligibility included ECOG performance status 0-2, minimum life expectancy of 3 months and measurable disease. The regimen consisted of bolus intravenous 5 fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (20 mg m-2) days 1-5 and carboplatin (AUC5) on day 3. The leucovorin/carboplatin/5-FU (LCF) was repeated every 4 weeks. The starting dose of 5-FU was 350 mg m-2 day-1 with escalation to 370 and then 400 mg m-2 day -1 after the toxicity at the previous level had been assessed. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as the dosage of 5-FU that achieved 60% grade 3/4 toxicity. In addition, objective and symptomatic responses, quality of life and survival were assessed. The MTD of 5-FU in the LCF regimen was 370 mg m-2. The predominant toxicity was asymptomatic marrow toxicity. The 350 mg m-2 level was then expanded. There were two toxic deaths due to neutropenic sepsis, one at 370 mg m-2 after one course and one at 350 mg m-2 after four courses. The objective response rate was 25% with one complete response (CR) and nine partial responses (PRs). The median duration of response was 3.4 months (range 1-10). The CR and eight of the nine PRs were in CUPS patients. Twelve patients developed progressive disease on LCF. Median survival for all 40 patients was 7.8 months (10 months median survival for those treated at 350 mg m-2). The majority of patients described a symptomatic improvement with LCF chemotherapy. The recommended dose of 5-FU for future studies is 350 mg m-2 combined with leucovorin 20 mg m-2 and carboplatin (AUC5). PMID:9000605

  8. Phase II Study of Cetuximab in Combination with Cisplatin and Radiation in Unresectable, Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Trial E3303

    PubMed Central

    Egloff, Ann Marie; Lee, Ju-Whei; Langer, Corey J.; Quon, Harry; Vaezi, Alec; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Seethala, Raja R.; Wang, Lin; Shin, Dong M.; Argiris, Athanassios; Yang, Donghua; Mehra, Ranee; Ridge, John Andrew; Patel, Urjeet A.; Burtness, Barbara A.; Forastiere, Arlene A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Cisplatin or cetuximab combined with radiotherapy (RT) each yield superior survival in locally advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer (LA-SCCHN) compared to RT alone. E3303 evaluated the triple combination. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Patients with stage IV unresectable LA-SCCHN received a loading dose of cetuximab (400mg/m2) followed by 250mg/m2/week and cisplatin 75mg/m2 q 3 weeks x3 cycles concurrent with standard fractionated RT. In the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, patients continued maintenance cetuximab for 6–12 months. Primary endpoint was 2-year progression-free survival (PFS). Patient tumor and blood correlates, including tumor human papillomavirus (HPV) status, were evaluated for association with survival. RESULTS Sixty-nine patients were enrolled; 60 proved eligible and received protocol treatment. Oropharyngeal (OP) primaries constituted the majority (66.7%), stage T4 48.3% and N2–3 91.7%. Median RT dose delivered was 70 Gy, 71.6% received all 3 cycles of cisplatin and 74.6% received maintenance cetuximab. Median PFS was 19.4 months, 2-year PFS 47% (95%CI: 33–61%). 2-year overall survival (OS) was 66% (95%CI: 53–77%); median OS was not reached. Response rate was 66.7%. Most common grade ≥3 toxicities included mucositis (55%), dysphagia (46%) and neutropenia (26%); one attributable grade 5 toxicity occurred. Only tumor HPV status was significantly associated with survival. HPV was evaluable in 29 tumors; 10 (all OP) were HPV+. HPV+ patients had significantly longer OS and PFS (p=0.004 and p=0.036, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Concurrent cetuximab, cisplatin and RT were well-tolerated and yielded promising 2-year PFS and OS in LA-SCCHN with improved survival for patients with HPV+ tumors. PMID:25107914

  9. Rituximab Plus Chlorambucil As First-Line Treatment for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Final Analysis of an Open-Label Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    Hillmen, Peter; Gribben, John G.; Follows, George A.; Milligan, Donald; Sayala, Hazem A.; Moreton, Paul; Oscier, David G.; Dearden, Claire E.; Kennedy, Daniel B.; Pettitt, Andrew R.; Nathwani, Amit; Varghese, Abraham; Cohen, Dena; Rawstron, Andy; Oertel, Stephan; Pocock, Christopher F.E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Most patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are elderly and/or have comorbidities that may make them ineligible for fludarabine-based treatment. For this population, chlorambucil monotherapy is an appropriate therapeutic option; however, response rates with chlorambucil are low, and more effective treatments are needed. This trial was designed to assess how the addition of rituximab to chlorambucil (R-chlorambucil) would affect safety and efficacy in patients with CLL. Patients and Methods Patients with first-line CLL were treated with rituximab (375 mg/m2 on day 1, cycle one, and 500 mg/m2 thereafter) plus chlorambucil (10 mg/m2/d all cycles; day 1 through 7) for six 28-day cycles. For patients not achieving complete response (CR), six additional cycles of chlorambucil alone could be administered. The primary end point of the study was safety. Results A total of 100 patients were treated with R-chlorambucil, with a median follow-up of 30 months. Median age of patients was 70 years (range, 43 to 86 years), with patients having a median of seven comorbidities. Hematologic toxicities accounted for most grade 3/4 adverse events reported, with neutropenia and lymphopenia both occurring in 41% of patients and leukopenia in 23%. Overall response rates were 84%, with CR achieved in 10% of patients. Median progression-free survival was 23.5 months; median overall survival was not reached. Conclusion These results compare favorably with previously published results for chlorambucil monotherapy, suggesting that the addition of rituximab to chlorambucil may improve efficacy with no unexpected adverse events. R-chlorambucil may improve outcome for patients who are ineligible for fludarabine-based treatments. PMID:24638012

  10. A randomised, phase II study of nintedanib or sunitinib in previously untreated patients with advanced renal cell cancer: 3-year results

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, T; Loembé, A-B; Shparyk, Y; MacLeod, N; Jones, R J; Mazurkiewicz, M; Temple, G; Dressler, H; Bondarenko, I

    2015-01-01

    Background: This exploratory study evaluated the safety/efficacy of nintedanib or sunitinib as first-line therapy in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Methods: Ninety-six patients were randomised (2:1) to either nintedanib (200 mg twice daily) or sunitinib (50 mg kg−1 once daily (4 weeks on treatment; 2 weeks off)). Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) at 9 months. P-values reported are descriptive only; the study was not powered for such comparisons. Results: Progression-free survival at 9 months was comparable between nintedanib and sunitinib (43.1% vs 45.2%, respectively; P=0.85). Median PFS was 8.4 months in each group (hazard ratio (HR), 1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.70–1.80; P=0.64). Median overall survival was 20.4 and 21.2 months for nintedanib and sunitinib, respectively (HR, 0.92; 95% CI: 0.54–1.56; P=0.76). Overall incidence of any grade adverse events (AEs) was comparable (90.6% vs 93.8%); AEs grade ⩾3 were lower with nintedanib than sunitinib (48.4% vs 59.4%). Nintedanib was associated with lower incidences of some AEs typical of antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs): hypertension, hypothyroidism, hand–foot syndrome, cardiac disorders and haematological abnormalities. Conclusions: In patients with advanced RCC, nintedanib has promising efficacy and similar tolerability to sunitinib, and a manageable safety profile with fewer TKI-associated AEs. PMID:26448178

  11. A multicentre phase II study of carboplatin and prolonged oral etoposide in the treatment of cancer of unknown primary site (CUPS).

    PubMed Central

    Warner, E.; Goel, R.; Chang, J.; Chow, W.; Verma, S.; Dancey, J.; Franssen, E.; Dulude, H.; Girouard, M.; Correia, J.; Gallant, G.

    1998-01-01

    Cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is frequently used to treat patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUPS). Response rates in the literature range from 12% to 26% and median survival from 5 to 7 months. The goal of this study was to evaluate the combination of carboplatin and prolonged oral etoposide in patients with CUPS, with the hope of minimizing toxicity but improving efficacy and convenience. Treatment consisted of carboplatin, 300 mg m(-2) on day 1, and oral etoposide 50 mg on days 1-20, every 4 weeks for up to nine cycles. A total of 33 patients were treated and all were evaluable for toxicity. Non-haematological toxicity was mild to moderate, with the exception of one case of grade 4 stomatitis. Grade 4 leucopenia was observed in eight (24%) patients and sepsis in four (12%), with two and possibly three treatment-related deaths. For the 26 patients evaluable for response, the response rate was 23% with responses lasting a median of 11 months (range 7-13 months), with one patient still responding at 12 months. An additional nine patients (35%) had stable disease. Median survival for all patients was 5.6 months (range 2 weeks to 33 months). The combination of carboplatin with prolonged oral etoposide has moderate activity similar to that of other platinum-based regimens and is a well tolerated, convenient, outpatient regimen. Dosing according to estimated creatinine clearance to achieve a carboplatin AUC of 6.0 mg ml(-1) min might have decreased the incidence of severe myelotoxicity without compromising the regimen's efficacy. PMID:9649162

  12. Phase I/II study of neoadjuvant bevacizumab, erlotinib and 5-fluorouracil with concurrent external beam radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blaszkowsky, L. S.; Ryan, D. P.; Szymonifka, J.; Borger, D. R.; Zhu, A. X.; Clark, J. W.; Kwak, E. L.; Mamon, H. J.; Allen, J. N.; Vasudev, E.; Shellito, P. C.; Cusack, J. C.; Berger, D. L.; Hong, T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the maximal tolerated dose of erlotinib when added to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemoradiation and bevacizumab and safety and efficacy of this combination in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients and methods Patients with Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound defined T3 or T4 adenocarcinoma of the rectum and without evidence of metastatic disease were enrolled. Patients received infusional 5-FU 225 mg/M2/day continuously, along with bevacizumab 5 mg/kg days 14, 1, 15 and 29. Standard radiotherapy was administered to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Erlotinib started at a dose of 50 mg orally daily and advanced by 50 mg increments in the subsequent cohort. Open total mesorectal excision was carried out 6–9 weeks following the completion of chemoradiation. Results Thirty-two patients received one of three dose levels of erlotinib. Erlotinib dose level of 100 mg was determined to be the maximally tolerated dose. Thirty-one patients underwent resection of the primary tumor, one refused resection. Twenty-seven patients completed study therapy, all of whom underwent resection. At least one grade 3–4 toxicity occurred in 46.9% of patients. Grade 3–4 diarrhea occurred in 18.8%. The pathologic complete response (pCR) for all patients completing study therapy was 33%. With a median follow-up of 2.9 years, there are no documented local recurrences. Disease-free survival at 3 years is 75.5% (confidence interval: 55.1–87.6%). Conclusions Erlotinib added to infusional 5-FU, bevacizumab and radiation in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is relatively well tolerated and associated with an encouraging pCR. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00307736. PMID:24356623

  13. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous Zanamivir Treatment in Hospitalized Adults With Influenza: An Open-label, Multicenter, Single-Arm, Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Francisco M.; Man, Choy Y.; van der Horst, Charles; Francois, Bruno; Garot, Denis; Máňez, Rafael; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Lorente, José A.; Álvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Brealey, David; Zhao, Henry H.; Weller, Steve; Yates, Phillip J.; Peppercorn, Amanda F.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Intravenous zanamivir is a neuraminidase inhibitor suitable for treatment of hospitalized patients with severe influenza. Methods. Patients were treated with intravenous zanamivir 600 mg twice daily, adjusted for renal impairment, for up to 10 days. Primary outcomes included adverse events (AEs), and clinical/laboratory parameters. Pharmacokinetics, viral load, and disease course were also assessed. Results. One hundred thirty patients received intravenous zanamivir (median, 5 days; range, 1–11) a median of 4.5 days (range, 1–7) after onset of influenza; 83% required intensive care. The most common influenza type/subtype was A/H1N1pdm09 (71%). AEs and serious AEs were reported in 85% and 34% of patients, respectively; serious AEs included bacterial pulmonary infections (8%), respiratory failure (7%), sepsis or septic shock (5%), and cardiogenic shock (5%). No drug-related trends in safety parameters were identified. Protocol-defined liver events were observed in 13% of patients. The 14- and 28-day all-cause mortality rates were 13% and 17%. No fatalities were considered zanamivir related. Pharmacokinetic data showed dose adjustments for renal impairment yielded similar zanamivir exposures. Ninety-three patients, positive at baseline for influenza by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, showed a median decrease in viral load of 1.42 log10 copies/mL after 2 days of treatment. Conclusions. Safety, pharmacokinetic and clinical outcome data support further investigation of intravenous zanamivir. Clinical Trials Registration NCT01014988. PMID:23983212

  14. A Phase II study of preoperative radiotherapy and concomitant weekly irinotecan in combination with protracted venous infusion 5-fluorouracil, for resectable locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, Matilde . E-mail: mnavarrogarcia@ico.scs.es; Dotor, Emma; Rivera, Fernando; Sanchez-Rovira, Pedro; Vega-Villegas, Maria Eugenia; Cervantes, Andres; Garcia, Jose Luis; Gallen, Manel; Aranda, Enrique

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with irinotecan (CPT-11) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with resectable rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with resectable T3-T4 rectal cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <2 were included. CPT-11 (50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly) and 5-FU (225 mg/m{sup 2}/day continuous infusion, 5 days/week) were concurrently administered with radiation therapy (RT) (45 Gy, 1.8 Gy/day, 5 days/week), during 5 weeks. Results: A total of 74 patients were enrolled: mean age, 59 years (20-74 years; SD, 11.7). Planned treatment was delivered to most patients (median relative dose intensity for both drugs was 100%). Grade 3/4 lymphocytopenia occurred in 35 patients (47%), neutropenia in 5 (7%), and anemia in 2 (3%). Main Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities were diarrhea (14%), asthenia (9%), rectal mucositis (8%), and abdominal pain (8%). Of the 73 resected specimens, 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.8-23.7) had a pathologic complete response and 49.3% (95% CI, 37.4-61.3) were downstaged. Additionally, 66.7% (95% CI, 51.1-80.0) of patients with ultrasound staged N1/N2 disease had no pathologic evidence of nodal involvement after CRT. Conclusions: This preoperative CRT schedule has been shown to be effective and feasible in a large population of patients with resectable rectal cancer.

  15. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy With Paclitaxel and Nedaplatin Followed by Consolidation Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Preliminary Results of a Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Meiqin; Liu Suping; Wang, Xiang-E.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicities of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and consolidation chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced squamous cell cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with LASCC (FIGO Stage IIB-IIIB) were treated with pelvic external beam radiotherapy (45 Gy for Stage IIB and 50 Gy for Stage III) and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (50 Gy for Stage IIB and 35 Gy for Stage III). The cumulative dose at point A was 50 Gy for Stage IIB and 65 Gy for Stage III. Concurrent chemotherapy with paclitaxel (35 mg/m{sup 2}) and nedaplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}) was given every week for 6 weeks. Consolidation chemotherapy with paclitaxel (135 mg/m{sup 2}) and nedaplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered every 3 weeks for 4 cycles. Results: All patients completed CCRT, and 28 of 34 patients completed consolidation chemotherapy. The complete response rate was 88% (95% CI, 73-96%). The most common Grade 3 or higher toxicities were leukopenia/neutropenia (10.9% of the cycles). During a median follow up of 23 months (range, 14-30 months), 5 patients had locoregional failure and 1 patient had distant metastasis. The estimated 2-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 82% (95% CI, 68-95%) and 93% (95% CI, 83-100%), respectively. Grade 3 late complications occurred in 3 patients (9%). Conclusions: CCRT with paclitaxel and nedaplatin followed by consolidation chemotherapy is well tolerated and effective in patients with locally advanced squamous cell cervical carcinoma. Further randomized trials of comparing this regimen with the standard treatment are worth while.

  16. A Phase II Study of Weekly Paclitaxel Plus Gemcitabine as a Second-Line Therapy in Patients with Metastatic or Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Tak; Kim, Heung Tae; Han, Ji-Youn; Yoon, Sung Jin; Kim, Hyae Young; Nam, Byung-Ho; Lee, Jin Soo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Paclitaxel (P) and gemcitabine (G) are clinically synergistic in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). We evaluated the efficacy of PG as a salvage treatment for SCLC patients whose disease progressed after a platinum-containing regimen. Materials and Methods Eligibility included histologically confirmed SCLC, one dimensionally measurable disease, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-2, and progressive disease after platinum-based chemotherapy. Treatment consisted of P (80 mg/m2) and G (1,000 mg/m2) on days 1 and 8 of each cycle of 21 days until disease progression. Results Thirty-three patients seen between December 2005 and February 2009 were selected into this study. Thirty patients (91%) had received irinotecan-platinum, and three had received etoposide-platinum. Sixteen patients (49%) had a treatment-free interval of less than 3 months. The overall response rate was 30.3% (29.4% in sensitive relapse and 31.3% in refractory relapse). The median time to progression was 12.0 weeks and median overall survival (OS) 31.0 weeks, with a 1-year OS rate of 30.3%. Toxicities were moderate and manageable with 18.2% grade (G) 4 neutropenia, 24.2% G3 thrombocytopenia, 6.1% G3 sensory neuropathy, and 3% G3 asthenia. One patient developed febrile neutropenia. Conclusion Second-line paclitaxel and gemcitabine were well-tolerated and moderately active in SCLC patients previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. PMID:26044164

  17. Lansoprazole as a rescue agent in chemoresistant tumors: a phase I/II study in companion animals with spontaneously occurring tumors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The treatment of human cancer has been seriously hampered for decades by resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. Mechanisms underlying this resistance are far from being entirely known. A very efficient mechanism of tumor resistance to drugs is related to the modification of tumour microenvironment through changes in the extracellular and intracellular pH. The acidification of tumor microenvironment depends on proton pumps that actively pump protons outside the cells, mostly to avoid intracellular acidification. In fact, we have shown in pre-clinical settings as pre-treatment with proton-pumps inhibitors (PPI) increase tumor cell and tumor responsiveness to chemotherapeutics. In this study pet with spontaneously occurring cancer proven refractory to conventional chemotherapy have been recruited in a compassionate study. Methods Thirty-four companion animals (27 dogs and 7 cats) were treated adding to their chemotherapy protocols the pump inhibitor lansoprazole at high dose, as suggested by pre-clinical experiments. Their responses have been compared to those of seventeen pets (10 dogs and 7 cats) whose owners did not pursue any other therapy than continuing the currently ongoing chemotherapy protocols. Results The drug was overall well tolerated, with only four dogs experiencing side effects due to gastric hypochlorhydria consisting with vomiting and or diarrhea. In terms of overall response twenty-three pets out of 34 had partial or complete responses (67.6%) the remaining patients experienced no response or progressive disease however most owners reported improved quality of life in most of the non responders. On the other hand, only three animals in the control group (17%) experienced short lived partial responses (1-3 months duration) while all the others died of progressive disease within two months. Conclusions high dose proton pump inhibitors have been shown to induce reversal of tumor chemoresistance as well as improvement of the quality of life in pets with down staged cancer and in the majority of the treated animals PPI were well tolerated. Further studies are warranted to assess the efficacy of this strategy in patients with advanced cancers in companion animals as well as in humans. PMID:22204495

  18. Safety and efficacy of hCDR1 (Edratide) in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus: results of phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Urowitz, Murray B; Isenberg, David A; Wallace, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of hCDR1 (Edratide) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Patients (n=340) with SLE ≥4 ACR criteria (4–11, mean 7) with active disease (SLEDAI-2K of 6–12). Patients were on average 7.1 years post-diagnosis and their organ involvement was mainly musculoskeletal, mucocutaneous and haematologic. Placebo or Edratide was administered subcutaneously weekly at doses of 0.5, 1.0 or 2.5 mg. The co-primary endpoints were SLEDAI-2K SLE Disease Activity and Adjusted Mean SLEDAI (AMS) reduction in patients compared with controls using a landmark analysis. Secondary outcomes were improvement in British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) Responder Index and medicinal flare analysis. Results Edratide was safe and well tolerated. The primary endpoints based solely on SLEDAI-2K and AMS were not met. The secondary predefined endpoint, BILAG, was met for the 0.5 mg Edratide arm in the intention to treat (ITT) cohort (N=316) (OR=2.09, p=0.03) with trends in the 1.0 and 2.5 mg doses. There was also a positive trend in the Composite SLE Responder Index of the ITT cohort. Post hoc analysis showed that the BILAG secondary endpoint was also met for the 0.5 mg Edratide for a number of subgroup dose levels, including low or no steroids, seropositivity and patients with 2 grade BILAG improvement. Conclusions The favourable safety profile and encouraging clinically significant effects noted in some of the endpoints support the need for additional longer term Edratide studies that incorporate recent advances in the understanding and treatment of SLE, including steroid treatment algorithms, and using a composite primary endpoint which is likely to include BILAG. Trial registration number NCT00203151. PMID:26301100

  19. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation of the Quadriceps in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Receiving Palliative Chemotherapy: A Randomized Phase II Study

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Matthew; Halliday, Vanessa; Chauhan, Alpna; Taylor, Victoria; Nelson, Annmarie; Sampson, Cathy; Byrne, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Background A reduced exercise capacity is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therapeutic exercise can be beneficial and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of the quadriceps muscles may represent a practical approach. The primary aim of this study was to determine the acceptability of NMES of the quadriceps to patients with NSCLC used alongside palliative chemotherapy. Secondary aims explored aspects of safety and efficacy of NMES in this setting. Methods Patients with advanced NSCLC due to receive first-line palliative chemotherapy were randomized to usual care with or without NMES. They were asked to undertake 30 minute sessions of NMES, ideally daily, but as a minimum, three times weekly. For NMES to be considered acceptable, it was predetermined that ≥80% of patients should achieve this minimum level of adherence. Qualitative interviews were held with a subset of patients to explore factors influencing adherence. Safety was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Quadriceps muscle strength, thigh lean mass, and physical activity level were assessed at baseline and after three cycles of chemotherapy. Results 49 patients (28 male, median (IQR) age 69 (64−75) years) participated. Of 30 randomized to NMES, 18 were eligible for the primary endpoint, of whom 9 (50% [90% CI, 29 to 71]) met the minimum level of adherence. Adherence was enhanced by incorporating sessions into a daily routine and hindered by undesirable effects of chemotherapy. There were no serious adverse events related to NMES, nor significant differences in quadriceps muscle strength, thigh lean mass or physical activity level between groups. Conclusions NMES is not acceptable in this setting, nor was there a suggestion of benefit. The need remains to explore NMES in patients with cancer in other settings. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 42944026 www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN42944026 PMID:24386491

  20. Multi-Institutional Phase II Study of Proton Beam Therapy for Organ-Confined Prostate Cancer Focusing on the Incidence of Late Rectal Toxicities

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, Keiji; Ogino, Takashi; Onozawa, Masakatsu; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Fuji, Hiroshi; Murakami, Masao; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) is theoretically an excellent modality for external beam radiotherapy, providing an ideal dose distribution. However, it is not clear whether PBT for prostate cancer can clinically control toxicities. The purpose of the present study was to estimate prospectively the incidence of late rectal toxicities after PBT for organ-confined prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: The major eligibility criteria included clinical Stage T1-T2N0M0; initial prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}20 ng/mL and Gleason score {<=}7; no hormonal therapy or hormonal therapy within 12 months before registration; and written informed consent. The primary endpoint was the incidence of late Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity at 2 years. Three institutions in Japan participated in the present study after institutional review board approval from each. PBT was delivered to a total dose of 74 GyE in 37 fractions. The patients were prospectively followed up to collect the data on toxicities using the National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0. Results: Between 2004 and 2007, 151 patients were enrolled in the present study. Of the 151 patients, 75, 49, 9, 17, and 1 had Stage T1c, T2a, T2b, T2c, and T3a, respectively. The Gleason score was 4, 5, 6, and 7 in 5, 15, 80 and 51 patients, respectively. The initial prostate-specific antigen level was <10 or 10-20 ng/mL in 102 and 49 patients, respectively, and 42 patients had received hormonal therapy and 109 had not. The median follow-up period was 43.4 months. Acute Grade 2 rectal and bladder toxicity temporarily developed in 0.7% and 12%, respectively. Of the 147 patients who had been followed up for >2 years, the incidence of late Grade 2 or greater rectal and bladder toxicity was 2.0% (95% confidence interval, 0-4.3%) and 4.1% (95% confidence interval, 0.9-7.3%) at 2 years, respectively. Conclusion: The results of the present prospective study have revealed a valuable piece of evidence that PBT for localized prostate cancer can achieve a low incidence of late Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicities.

  1. Phase II Study of Weekly Intravenous Oxaliplatin Combined With Oral Daily Capecitabine and Radiotherapy With Biologic Correlates in Neoadjuvant Treatment of Rectal Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fakih, Marwan G. BullardDunn, Kelli; Yang, Gary Y.; Pendyala, Lakshmi; Toth, Karoly; Andrews, Chris; Rustum, Youcef M.; Ross, Mary Ellen; LeVea, Charles; Puthillath, Ajithkumar; Park, Young-Mee; Rajput, Ashwani

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of a combination of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and radiotherapy (RT) in the neoadjuvant treatment of Stage II and III rectal cancers. Methods: Capecitabine was given at 725 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily Monday through Friday concurrently with RT. Oxaliplatin was given intravenously at 50 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly five times starting the first day of RT. The radiation dose was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (1.8 Gy/fraction), five fractions weekly. Endorectal tumor biopsies were obtained before treatment and on the third day of treatment to explore the effects of treatment on thymidine phosphorylase, thymidylate synthase, excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair deficiency complementation group 1 (ERCC1), and apoptosis. Results: A total of 25 patients were enrolled in this study; 6 patients (24%) had a complete pathologic response. T-downstaging occurred in 52% of patients, and N-downstaging occurred in 53%. Grade 3 diarrhea was the most common Grade 3-4 toxicity, occurring in 20% of patients. Only 2 patients experienced disease recurrence, with a median of 20 months of follow-up. Thymidylate synthase, thymidine phosphorylase, ERCC1, and apoptosis did not vary significantly between the pretreatment and Day 3 tumor biopsies, nor did they predict for T-downstaging or a complete pathologic response. Conclusion: Capecitabine at 725 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily, oxaliplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, and RT at 50.4 Gy is an effective neoadjuvant combination for Stage II and III rectal cancer and results in a greater rate of complete pathologic responses than historically shown in fluoropyrimidine plus RT controls.

  2. Phase II Study of Accelerated High-Dose Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Limited Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0239

    SciTech Connect

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Paulus, Rebecca; Ettinger, David S.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.; Choy, Hak

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose thoracic radiation given twice daily during cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy for limited small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC) improves survival, acute esophagitis, and local control rates relative to findings from Intergroup trial 0096 (47%, 27%, and 64%). Patients and Methods: Patients were accrued over a 3-year period from 22 US and Canadian institutions. Patients with LSCLC and good performance status were given thoracic radiation to 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks (daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 1-22, then twice-daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 23-33). Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} IV) was given on day 1 and etoposide (120 mg/m{sup 2} IV) on days 1-3 and days 22-24, followed by 2 cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide alone. Patients who achieved complete response were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. Endpoints included overall and progression-free survival; severe esophagitis (Common Toxicity Criteria v 2.0) and treatment-related fatalities; response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors); and local control. Results: Seventy-two patients were accrued from June 2003 through May 2006; 71 were evaluable (median age 63 years; 52% female; 58% Zubrod 0). Median survival time was 19 months; at 2 years, the overall survival rate was 36.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.6%-47.7%), and progression-free survival 19.7% (95% CI 11.4%-29.6%). Thirteen patients (18%) experienced severe acute esophagitis, and 2 (3%) died of treatment-related causes; 41% achieved complete response, 39% partial response, 10% stable disease, and 6% progressive disease. The local control rate was 73%. Forty-three patients (61%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusions: The overall survival rate did not reach the projected goal; however, rates of esophagitis were lower, and local control higher, than projected. This treatment strategy is now one of three arms of a prospective trial of chemoradiation for LSCLC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0538/Cancer and Leukemia Group B 30610).

  3. A phase II study of paclitaxel, weekly, 24-hour continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and cisplatin in patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kollmannsberger, C; Quietzsch, D; Haag, C; Lingenfelser, T; Schroeder, M; Hartmann, J T; Baronius, W; Hempel, V; Clemens, M; Kanz, L; Bokemeyer, C

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of combination chemotherapy with paclitaxel, cisplatin and 24 h continuous infusion of 5-FU/folinic acid in patients (pts) with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma. Forty-five chemotherapy-naive pts (28 male and 17 female) with a median age of 60 years (range 35–74) were enrolled. 5-FU 2 g/m2was given weekly over 24 h i.v. preceded by folinic acid 500 mg/m2as a 2 h infusion. Paclitaxel 175 mg/m2was administered as a 3 h-infusion on days 1 and 22 and cisplatin 50 mg/m2as 1 h infusion on days 8 and 29. Six weeks of therapy (days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36) followed by 2 weeks rest were considered one cycle. A median of 3 cycles (range 1–4) were administered to 45 pts assessable for response, survival and toxicity. Five pts (11%) obtained a CR and 18 pts (40%) a PR (ORR 51%; 95% Cl: 35.8–66.3%). Responses were achieved in the liver, lymph nodes, lungs and at the site of the primary tumour. Nine pts (20%) had stable disease. Thirteen pts (29%) were considered to have failed treatment, 8 pts (18%) due to progressive disease and 5 pts (11%) who did not receive one complete cycle of therapy due to acute non-haematologic toxicity. The median progression-free and overall survival times were 9 months (range 1–36+) and 14 months (range 2–36+), respectively. Neutropenia WHO III°/IV° occurred in 7 pts (15%) with only 1 pt having grade IV. Additional non-haematologic WHO III°/IV° toxicities included nausea/vomiting in 5 (11%), alopecia in 22 (49%), and diarrhoea in 1 patient each (2%). Dose reductions or treatment delays were necessary in 8 pts (17%), mainly due to neutropenia. All pts were treated on an outpatient basis. The combination of paclitaxel, cisplatin and continuously infused 5-FU/folinic acid appears to be a highly active regimen for the treatment of pts with advanced gastric cancer. While the overall acceptable toxicity allows its use in the palliative setting, it may also be an attractive option to be tested for neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10945491

  4. LH-RH analogues in the treatment of young women with early breast cancer: long-term follow-up of a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Francesco; Necozione, Stefano; Bratta, Massimo; Rosselli, Michele; Guerriero, Gabriele; Rea, Silvio

    2015-03-01

    To prevent premature ovarian failure (POF), high-risk, premenopausal women with early breast cancer were given a luteinizing-hormone releasing hormone (LH-RH) analogue during adjuvant chemotherapy. After an adriamycin-based regimen, patients received radiation therapy concomitant with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil. An aromatase inhibitor was given to patients positive for the estrogen receptor (ER+). The median age was 43 years (range, 26-45). Among 200 consecutive patients, 46% had no axillary node, and 54% had a mean of 5.4 positive nodes (range, 1-25); 56% were ER+, 44% were estrogen receptor negative (ER-), 13% were triple negative, and 20 had tumors positive for the oncogene, c-erb-B2 (identified with fluorescent in situ hybridization). After a median follow-up of 105 months (range, 65-180), no patient under 40 years old exhibited POF, while 44% of patients over 40 years old exhibited POF. Eight pregnancies were recorded: 7 at term and 1 voluntary interruption. The 10-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 85 and 91%, respectively. These data showed that, in premenopausal patients with early breast cancer, the addition of an LH-RH analogue to adjuvant chemotherapy was well tolerated, prevented POF, and was associated with excellent disease-free survival and overall survival rates. PMID:25572674

  5. Randomized phase II study of pemetrexed/cisplatin with or without axitinib for non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The efficacy and safety of axitinib, a potent and selective second-generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3 in combination with pemetrexed and cisplatin was evaluated in patients with advanced non-squamous non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Overall, 170 patients were randomly assigned to receive axitinib at a starting dose of 5-mg twice daily continuously plus pemetrexed 500 mg/m2 and cisplatin 75 mg/m2 on day 1 of up to six 21-day cycles (arm I); axitinib on days 2 through 19 of each cycle plus pemetrexed/cisplatin (arm II); or pemetrexed/cisplatin alone (arm III). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Results Median PFS was 8.0, 7.9, and 7.1 months in arms I, II, and III, respectively (hazard ratio: arms I vs. III, 0.89 [P = 0.36] and arms II vs. III, 1.02 [P = 0.54]). Median overall survival was 17.0 months (arm I), 14.7 months (arm II), and 15.9 months (arm III). Objective response rates (ORRs) for axitinib-containing arms were 45.5% (arm I) and 39.7% (arm II) compared with 26.3% for pemetrexed/cisplatin alone (arm III). Gastrointestinal disorders and fatigue were frequently reported across all treatment arms. The most common all-causality grade ≥3 adverse events were hypertension in axitinib-containing arms (20% and 17%, arms I and II, respectively) and fatigue with pemetrexed/cisplatin alone (16%). Conclusion Axitinib in combination with pemetrexed/cisplatin was generally well tolerated. Axitinib combinations resulted in non-significant differences in PFS and numerically higher ORR compared with chemotherapy alone in advanced NSCLC. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00768755 (October 7, 2008). PMID:24766732

  6. Evaluation of intraoperative fluorescence imaging-guided surgery in cancer-bearing dogs: a prospective proof-of-concept phase II study in 9 cases.

    PubMed

    Cabon, Quentin; Sayag, David; Texier, Isabelle; Navarro, Fabrice; Boisgard, Raphaël; Virieux-Watrelot, Dorothée; Ponce, Frédérique; Carozzo, Claude

    2016-04-01

    The objective was to prospectively evaluate the application of intraoperative fluorescence imaging (IOFI) in the surgical excision of malignant masses in dogs, using a novel lipid nanoparticle contrast agent. Dogs presenting with spontaneous soft-tissue sarcoma or subcutaneous tumors were prospectively enrolled. Clinical staging and whole-body computed tomography (CT) were performed. All the dogs received an intravenous injection of dye-loaded lipid nanoparticles, LipImage 815. Wide or radical resection was realized after CT examination. Real-time IOFI was performed before skin incision and after tumor excision. In cases of radical resection, the lymph nodes (LNs) were imaged. The margin/healthy tissues fluorescence ratio or LN/healthy tissues fluorescence ratio was measured and compared with the histologic margins or LN status. Nine dogs were included. Limb amputation was performed in 3 dogs, and wide resection in 6. No adverse effect was noted. Fluorescence was observed in all 9 of the tumors. The margins were clean in 5 of 6 dogs after wide surgical resection, and the margin/healthy tissues fluorescence ratio was close to 1.0 in all these dogs. Infiltrated margins were observed in 1 case, with a margin/healthy tissues fluorescence ratio of 3.2. Metastasis was confirmed in 2 of 3 LNs, associated with LN/healthy tissues fluorescence ratios of 2.1 and 4.2, whereas nonmetastatic LN was associated with a ratio of 1.0. LipImage 815 used as a contrast agent during IOFI seemed to allow for good discrimination between tumoral and healthy tissues. Future studies are scheduled to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of IOFI using LipImage 815 as a tracer. PMID:26746803

  7. A Phase II Study of Single Agent Brentuximab Vedotin in Relapsed/Refractory CD30 Low (<10%) Mature T Cell Lymphoma (TCL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepato-splenic T-cell Lymphoma; Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T-cell Lymphoma; NK T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Mycosis Fungoides

  8. Intra- and postoperative catumaxomab in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer: safety and two-year efficacy results from a multicentre, single-arm, phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Sehouli, J; Reinthaller, A; Marth, C; Reimer, D; Reimer, T; Stummvoll, W; Angleitner-Boubenizek, L; Brandt, B; Chekerov, R

    2014-01-01

    Background: This is the first study investigating the safety and efficacy of the trifunctional antibody catumaxomab administered i.p. at the end of cytoreductive surgery and postoperatively prior to standard chemotherapy in patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods: Patients received i.p. catumaxomab 10 μg intraoperatively and 10, 20, 50 and 150 μg on days 7, 10, 13 and 16, respectively, postoperatively. After the study, patients received standard chemotherapy and were followed for 23 months. The primary endpoint was the rate of postoperative complications. Results: Forty-one patients entered the study and were evaluable for safety and 34 were alive at 24 months. Complete tumour resection rate was 68%. Postoperative complications were observed in 51%, the most common anastomotic leakage (7%) and wound infections (5%). The most common catumaxomab-related adverse events were abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and pyrexia. Thirty-nine percent discontinued catumaxomab therapy, and 98% received chemotherapy post study. Kaplan–Meier estimates of disease-free and overall survival after 24 months were 56% and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Intra- and close postoperative catumaxomab seems feasible, but efficacy and safety were limited by postsurgical complications. In the future prospective trials are needed to investigate the best schedule of integration of catumaxomab into current treatment strategies for EOC. PMID:25225907

  9. A multicentre Phase II study of non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel as first-line therapy in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Venturini, M; Bighin, C; Puglisi, F; Olmeo, N; Aitini, E; Colucci, G; Garrone, O; Paccagnella, A; Marini, G; Crinò, L; Mansutti, M; Baconnet, B; Barbato, A; Del Mastro, L

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the cardiotoxicity, general toxicity, and activity of non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, in combination with docetaxel and trastuzumab, as first-line therapy in metastatic breast cancer. Thirty-one patients with metastatic human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-overexpressing breast cancer, who had not previously received chemotherapy for metastatic disease, received non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (50 mg/m(2)), docetaxel (75 mg/m(2)) and trastuzumab (2 mg/kg/week) for up to eight cycles, followed by trastuzumab alone for up to 52 weeks. Cardiotoxicity was defined as a decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) to below 45%, or a decrease in LVEF of at least 20% from baseline. Mean LVEF was maintained at baseline level also in the subset of patients who had received anthracycline previously. Cardiotoxicity developed in three patients during the treatment cycles, and in two further patients after the end of the study. The most common adverse events were haematological toxicity, alopecia, asthenia and fever. The best overall response rate was 65.5%. Median time to progression was 13.0 months. The combination of non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, docetaxel and trastuzumab combines acceptable cardiac and general toxicity and promising activity as first-line therapy in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:20185313

  10. Concomitant boost IMRT-based neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for clinical stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma: results of a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aim This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicities of concomitant boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) along with capecitabine and oxaliplatin, followed by a cycle of Xelox, in neoadjuvant course for locally advanced rectal cancer. Materials and methods Patients with histologically confirmed, newly diagnosed, locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma (cT3-T4 and/or cN+) located within 12 cm of the anal verge were included in this study. Patients received IMRT to the pelvis of 50 Gy and a concomitant boost of 5 Gy to the primary tumor in 25 fractions, and concurrent with oxaliplatin (50 mg/m2 d1 weekly) and capecitabine (625 mg/m2 bid d1–5 weekly). One cycle of Xelox (oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 on d1 and capecitabine 1000 mg/m2 twice daily d1–14) was given two weeks after the completion of chemoradiation, and radical surgery was scheduled eight weeks after chemoradiation. Tumor response was evaluated by tumor regression grade (TRG) system and acute toxicities were evaluated by NCI-CTC 3.0 criteria. Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with Log-rank test. Results A total of 78 patients were included between March 2009 and May 2011 (median age 54 years; 62 male). Seventy-six patients underwent surgical resection. Twenty-eight patients underwent sphincter-sparing lower anterior resection and 18 patients (23.7%) were evaluated as pathological complete response (pCR). The incidences of grade 3 hematologic toxicity, diarrhea, and radiation dermatitis were 3.8%, 10.3%, and 17.9%, respectively. The three-year LR (local recurrence), DFS (disease-free survival) and OS (overall survival) rates were 14.6%, 63.8% and 77.4%, respectively. Initial clinical T stage and tumor regression were independent prognostic factors to DFS. Conclusion An intensified regimen of concomitant boost radiotherapy plus concurrent capecitabine and oxaliplatin, followed by one cycle of Xelox, can be safely administered in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, and produces a high rate of pCR. A prognostic score model is helpful to distinguish different long-term prognosis groups in early stage. PMID:24606870

  11. Phase II study of weekly vinorelbine and 24-h infusion of high-dose 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin as first-line treatment of advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, K H; Lu, Y S; Hsu, C H; Lin, J F; Chao, H J; Huang, T C; Chung, C Y; Chang, C S; Yang, C H; Cheng, A L

    2005-01-01

    We prospectively investigated the efficacy and safety of combining weekly vinorelbine (VNB) with weekly 24-h infusion of high-dose 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (LV) in the treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer (ABC). Vinorelbine 25 mg m−2 30-min intravenous infusion, and high-dose 5-FU 2600 mg m−2 plus LV 300 mg m−2 24-h intravenous infusion (HDFL regimen) were given on days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks. Between June 1999 and April 2003, 40 patients with histologically confirmed recurrent or metastatic breast cancer were enrolled with a median age of 49 years (range: 36–68). A total of 25 patients had recurrent ABC, and 15 patients had primary metastatic diseases. The overall response rate for the intent-to-treat group was 70.0% (95% CI: 54–84%) with eight complete responses and 20 partial responses. All 40 patients were evaluated for survival and toxicities. Among a total of 316 cycles of VNB–HDFL given (average: 7.9: range: 4–14 cycles per patient), the main toxicity was Gr3/4 leucopenia and Gr3/4 neutropenia in 57 (18.0%) and 120 (38.0%) cycles, respectively. Gr1/2 infection and Gr1/2 stomatitis were noted in five (1.6%) and 59 (18.7%) cycles, respectively. None of the patients developed Gr3/4 stomatitis or Gr3/4 infection. Gr2/3 and Gr1 hand–foot syndrome was noted in two (5.0%) and 23 (57.5%) patients, respectively. Gr1 sensory neuropathy developed in three patients. The median time to progression was 8.0 months (range: 3–25.5 months), and the median overall survival was 25.0 months with a follow-up of 5.5 to 45+ months. This VNB–HDFL regimen is a highly active yet well-tolerated first-line treatment for ABC. PMID:15770209

  12. Phase II Study of the Addition of Bevacizumab to Standard Chemoradiation for Loco-regionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Trial 0615

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy Y.; Zhang, Ed; Pfister, David. G.; Kim, John; Garden, Adam. S.; Mechalakos, James; Hu, Kenneth; Le, Quynh T.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Chan, Anthony T.C.; Ang, K. Kian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to improve the outcomes for loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by testing the feasibility/safety of adding bevacizumab to chemoradiation. Patients/Methods Eligible patients with ≥T2b and/or positive node(s) were prescribed 3 cycles of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) and cisplatin (100 mg/m2) both given on days 1, 22, and 43 of radiation (70 Gy) using IMRT delivered over 33 days on a daily basis, Monday through Friday. This is followed by 3 cycles of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg), cisplatin (80 mg/m2) both were given on days 64, 85, and 106 and fluorouracil (1000 mg/m2/d) on days 64–67, 85–88, 106–109 after radiation. The primary endpoint was to evaluate the safety of the addition of bevacizumab to chemoradiation, specifically looking at treatment-related Grade 4 hemorrhage and/or any Grade 5 adverse event in the first year. Toxicity during and after treatment were collected along with tumor control endpoints. The analysis was done per protocol. This protocol has completed its target accrual. Results There were a total of 46 patients enrolled in this study of whom 44 patients were eligible for analysis. No grade 3–4 hemorrhage or grade 5 adverse events were observed; 9 patients (20.5%) experienced grade 1–2 hemorrhage. Grade 4 adverse events were experienced by the following numbers of patients: leukopenia NOS – 6; lymphopenia – 5; neutrophil count – 5; pharyngolaryngeal pain – 2; hemoglobin – 1; infection with grade 3–4 neutrophils (blood) – 1; infection with grade 3–4 neutrophils [skin (cellulitis)] – 1; tinnitus – 1; thrombosis – 1; radiation mucositis – 1. The most common grade 3 adverse events were radiation mucositis – 33; dysphagia – 25; and mucositis/stomatitis (clinical exam) (pharynx) – 15. Two patients experienced late grade 3 xerostomia. Other late grade 3 adverse events were: dysphagia – 5; hearing impaired – 3; neuralgia NOS – 2; constitutional symptoms (other) – 1; dehydration – 1; fatigue – 1; hearing disability – 1; infection (other) – 1; muscle weakness NOS – 1; peripheral motor neuropathy – 1; peripheral sensory neuropathy – 1; radiation mucositis – 1.. With a median follow-up of 2.5 years, the estimated 2-year loco-regional progression-free, distant metastasis-free, progression-free and overall survival (OS) rates were 83.7%(95% confidence interval 72.6–94.9), 90.8% (82.2–99.5), 74.7% (61.8–87.6), and 90.9% (82.3–99.4),, respectively. Conclusion It was feasible to add bevacizumab to chemoradiation for NPC treatment. The favorable 2-year OS of 90.9% suggests that bevacizumab might delay progression of subclinical disease. PMID:22178121

  13. A prospective phase II study of chemoradiation followed by adjuvant chemotherapy for FIGO stage I-IIIa (1988) uterine papillary serous carcinoma of the endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Jhingran, Anuja; Ramondetta, Lois M.; Bodurka, Diane C.; Slomovitz, Brian M.; Brown, Jubilee; Levy, Lawrence B.; Garcia, Michael E.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Lu, Karen H.; Burke, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To prospectively evaluate tumor control, survival, and toxic effects in patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (1988) stage I-IIIA papillary serous carcinoma of the endometrium treated with concurrent chemoradiation and adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Thirty-two patients were enrolled from October 2001 through July 2009. Patients underwent full surgical disease staging and postoperative concurrent weekly paclitaxel (50 mg/m2) and pelvic RT to 45 Gy plus a vaginal cuff boost followed by 4 cycles of adjuvant paclitaxel (135 mg/m2). Results Thirty patients (94%) were evaluable (3 with stage IA disease, 11 IB, 3 IC, 1 IIB, and 12 IIIA). Eighteen patients (60%) received all 5 planned courses of concurrent chemotherapy, 10 (33%) received 4 courses, and 2 (7%) received 3 courses. All 30 patients received RT; 27 (90%) received the full dose, 2 received 43.2 Gy, and 1 received 39.6 Gy owing to toxic effects. Twenty-three patients (77%) completed all 4 cycles of adjuvant paclitaxel, 3 (10%) completed 3 cycles, 2 (7%) completed 2 cycles, and 2 received no adjuvant therapy. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates for all patients were 93%, 87%, and 87%, respectively, at 2 years and 85%, 83%, and 87%, respectively, at 5 years. Six patients developed (20%) grade 3/4 toxcities from the treatment. Four patients (13%) had grade 3 or more severe bowel complications and two patients developed symptomatic pelvic fractures. Conclusions Treatment with concurrent paclitaxel and pelvic RT followed by 4 courses of systemic paclitaxel produced favorable results in patients with surgically staged I-III UPSC. PMID:23385150

  14. Genomic markers of panitumumab resistance including ERBB2/HER2 in a phase II study of KRAS wild-type (wt) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC)

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Garrett S.; Cheang, Maggie C.; Chang, Hector Li; Kennecke, Hagen F.

    2016-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted to identify biomarkers associated with resistance to panitumumab monotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients with previously treated, codon 12/13 KRAS wt, mCRC were prospectively administered panitumumab 6 mg/kg IV q2weeks. Of 34 panitumumab-treated patients, 11 (32%) had progressive disease at 8 weeks and were classified as non-responders. A Nanostring nCounter-based assay identified a 5-gene expression signature (ERBB2, MLPH, IRX3, MYRF, and KLK6) associated with panitumumab resistance (P = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization determined that the HER2 (ERBB2) protein was overexpressed in 4/11 non-responding and 0/21 responding cases (P = 0.035). Two non-responding tumors had ERBB2 gene amplification only, and one demonstrated both ERBB2 amplification and mutation. A non-codon 12/13 KRAS mutation occurred in one panitumumab-resistant patient and was mutually exclusive with ERBB2/HER2 abnormalities. This study identifies a 5-gene signature associated with non-response to single agent panitumumab, including a subgroup of non-responders with evidence of aberrant ERBB2/HER2 signaling. KRAS wt tumors resistant to EGFRi may be identified by gene signature analysis, and the HER2 pathway plays an important role in resistance to therapy. PMID:26980732

  15. Phase I/II study of Holmium-166-DOTMP for bone marrow ablation in multiple myeloma prior to bone marrow transplantation (BMT)

    SciTech Connect

    Podoloff, D.A.; Bhadkamkar, V.H.; Kasi, L.P.

    1994-05-01

    We evaluated a bone seeking radionuclide, Ho-166 DOTMP (which has both beta and gamma energies) as an agent for bone marrow ablation prior to bone marrow transplant. Six men and 1 woman in the age range 42-59 yrs. who had previously failed conventional chemotherapy using VAD (Vincristine, Adriamycin, Dexamethasone) were treated. Each patient received a diagnostic dose (Dx) of 30 mCi of Ho-166 DOTMP and underwent serial total body images using photopeak and scatter windows. Transmission images were obtained on day O. Transmission, scatter and photopeak images were used to calculate marrow dose and skeletal uptake. Therapy dose (Tx) was established to deliver a prescribed absorbed dose to the marrow. Bone marrow biopsy samples from lilac crest were obtained to determine activity concentration and to calculate marrow dose. The Dx was followed by a Tx of 25 Gy (3 pts.), 40 Gy (3 pts.) and 50 Gy (1 pt.). Additional total body imaging was accomplished prior to each Tx and SPECT after the final Tx. Bone retention varied from 26-33%. The calculated red marrow dose varied from 11 to 48 Gy. Toxicity was minimal and included: myalgia (1), nausea (2), increased BUN (1), sore throat (1), fever (1x1 day). Bone marrow ablation was achieved in 3/7 pts. The last pt. treated at the highest dose level had greater than 75% reduction in myeloma protein. We conclude that at doses as high as 31.8 mCi/Kg no significant toxicity has been observed. Diagnostic pretherapy imaging and derived dosimetry is helpful in prescribing a red marrow dose prior to radionuclide therapy. The MTD has not yet been reached. However, thus far Ho-166 DOTMP has safely ablated bone marrow prior to BMT.

  16. Randomized phase II study of lapatinib plus capecitabine or lapatinib plus topotecan for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nancy U; Eierman, Wolfgang; Greil, Richard; Campone, Mario; Kaufman, Bella; Steplewski, Klaudia; Lane, Stephen R; Zembryki, Denise; Rubin, Stephen D; Winer, Eric P

    2011-12-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with advanced, HER2-positive breast cancer develop brain metastases. A significant proportion of women experience central nervous system (CNS) progression after standard radiation therapy. The optimal treatment in the refractory setting is undefined. This study evaluated the toxicity and efficacy of lapatinib in combination with chemotherapy among patients with HER2-positive, progressive brain metastases. Patients with HER2-positive breast cancer with progressive brain metastases after trastuzumab and cranial radiotherapy were included. The primary endpoint was CNS objective response, defined as a ≥ 50% volumetric reduction of CNS lesion(s) in the absence of new or progressive CNS or non-CNS lesions, or increasing steroid requirements. The study was closed early after 22 of a planned 110 patients were enrolled due to excess toxicity and lack of efficacy in the lapatinib plus topotecan arm. The objective response rate (ORR) in the lapatinib plus capecitabine arm was 38% (exact 95% confidence interval [CI] 13.9-68.4). No responses were observed in the lapatinib plus topotecan arm. Although the study was stopped prior to full enrollment, some promising indications of CNS activity were noted for lapatinib plus capecitabine. The combination of lapatinib plus topotecan was not active and was associated with excess toxicity. PMID:21706359

  17. Eribulin mesylate (halichondrin B Analog E7389) in platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer: a two-cohort, phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Martee L.; Kravetz, Sara; Jia, Xiaoyu; Iasonos, Alexia; Tew, William; Pereira, Lauren; Sabbatini, Paul; Whalen, Christin; Aghajanian, Carol A.; Zarwan, Corinne; Berlin, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Background Eribulin mesylate is a tubulin inhibitor with activity superior to paclitaxel in NIH:OVCAR-3 human epithelial ovarian cancer xenograft models. We sought to assess the efficacy of eribulin in platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer. Methods Patients with recurrent measurable epithelial ovarian cancer, ≤2 prior cytotoxic regimens, and adequate organ function were enrolled into two separate cohorts: 1) Platinum resistant (progression-free interval from last platinum-based therapy <6 months); and 2) Platinum sensitive (progression-free interval from last platinum-based therapy ≥6 months). Treatment: Eribulin 1.4 mg/m2 over 15 minutes by vein on days 1 and 8, every 21 days. Efficacy was determined by objective response by computed tomography. Results Platinum-resistant cohort: Thirty-seven patients enrolled. Thirty-six patients were evaluable for response and toxicity. Two patients achieved partial response (PR, 5.5%). Sixteen (44%) had a best response of stable disease. Median progression-free survival was 1.8 months (95% confidence interval, 1.4–2.8 months). Platinum-sensitive cohort: Thirty-seven patients enrolled, and all were evaluable for response. Seven patients achieved partial response (PR, 19%). Median progression-free survival was 4.1 months (95% confidence interval, 2.8–5.8 months). The major toxicity was grade 3 or 4 neutropenia (42% in platinum-resistant patients; 54% in platinum-sensitive patients). Conclusions Eribulin achieved objective response in 5.5% of women with platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer and in 19% of women with platinum-sensitive disease. Median progression-free survival was 1.8 months in the platinum-resistant group and 4.1 months in the platinum-sensitive group. PMID:21935916

  18. Phase II Study of Intraperitoneal Paclitaxel Plus Cisplatin and Intravenous Paclitaxel Plus Bevacizumab As Adjuvant Treatment of Optimal Stage II/III Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Konner, Jason A.; Grabon, Diana M.; Gerst, Scott R.; Iasonos, Alexia; Thaler, Howard; Pezzulli, Sandra D.; Sabbatini, Paul J.; Bell-McGuinn, Katherine M.; Tew, William P.; Hensley, Martee L.; Spriggs, David R.; Aghajanian, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Intraperitoneal (IP) cisplatin and intravenous (IV) or IP paclitaxel constitute a standard therapy for optimally debulked ovarian cancer. Bevacizumab prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) when included in first-line IV chemotherapy. In this study, the safety and feasibility of adding bevacizumab to a first-line IP regimen were assessed. Patients and Methods Treatment was as follows: paclitaxel 135 mg/m2 IV over 3 hours day 1, cisplatin 75 mg/m2 IP day 2, and paclitaxel 60 mg/m2 IP day 8. Bevacizumab 15 mg/kg IV was given after paclitaxel on day 1 beginning in cycle 2. After six cycles of chemotherapy, bevacizumab was given every 3 weeks for 17 additional treatments. The primary end point was safety and tolerability determined by whether 60% of patients completed six cycles of IV/IP chemotherapy. Results Of 41 treated patients, 30 (73%) received six cycles of IV/IP chemotherapy and 35 (85%) received at least four cycles. Three (27%) of those who discontinued chemotherapy did so because of complications related to bevacizumab (hypertension, n = 2; perforation, n = 1). Grades 3 to 4 toxicities included neutropenia (34%), vasovagal syncope (10%), hypertension (7%), nausea/vomiting (7%), hypomagnesemia (7%), and abdominal pain (7%). There were three grade 3 small bowel obstructions (7%) during cycles 3, 9, and 15. One patient died following rectosigmoid anastomotic dehiscence during cycle 4. Estimated median PFS is 28.6 months (95% CI, 19.1 to 38.9 months). Three patients (7%) had IP port malfunction. Conclusion The addition of bevacizumab to this IP regimen is feasible; however, bevacizumab may increase the risk of bowel obstruction/perforation. The observed median PFS is similar to that seen with IP/IV chemotherapy alone. PMID:22067389

  19. Randomized Phase II Study of Gefitinib Compared With Placebo in Chemotherapy-Naive Patients With Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Poor Performance Status

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Glenwood; Ferry, David; Wierzbicki, Rafal; Laurie, Scott A.; Thompson, Joyce; Biesma, Bonne; Hirsch, Fred R.; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Duffield, Emma; Ataman, Ozlem U.; Zarenda, Marc; Armour, Alison A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare gefitinib with placebo in chemotherapy naïve patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and poor performance status. Patients and Methods NSCLC patients (chemotherapy naïve, WHO performance status 2 or 3; unfit for chemotherapy; stage IIIB/IV) were randomly assigned to gefitinib (250 mg/d) plus best supportive care (BSC; n = 100) or placebo plus BSC (n = 101). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), quality of life (QOL), pulmonary symptom improvement (PSI), and safety. Correlation of gefitinib efficacy with EGFR gene copy number (fluorescent in situ hybridization [FISH]) was explored. Results Hazard ratios (HRs; gefitinib:placebo) were 0.82 (95% CI, 0.60 to 1.12; P = .217) for PFS and 0.84 (95% CI, 0.62 to 1.15; P = .272) for OS. As expected for this patient population, OS for both arms was poor, at about 3 months. ORRs were 6.0% (gefitinib) and 1.0% (placebo). QOL and PSI rates were 21.1% and 28.3% (gefitinib) and 20.0% and 28.3% (placebo), respectively. In EGFR FISH-positive patients (n = 32), HRs were 0.29 (95% CI, 0.11 to 0.73) for PFS and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.17 to 1.12) for OS. No unexpected adverse events occurred. Conclusion There was no statistically significant difference in PFS, OS, and ORRs after treatment with gefitinib or placebo, in the overall population; improvements in QOL and symptoms were similar in both groups. Tolerability profile of gefitinib was consistent with previous studies. PFS was statistically significantly improved for gefitinib-treated patients with EGFR FISH-positive tumors. PMID:19289623

  20. Vertical aerosol structure and aerosol mixed layer heights determined with scanning shipborne lidars during the TexAQS II study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, B. J.; Senff, C. J.; Tucker, S. C.; Eberhard, W. L.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Machol, J.; Brewer, W. A.

    2007-12-01

    The NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory (ESRL) deployed the Ozone Profiling Atmospheric LIDAR (OPAL) on the R/V Ronald H. Brown during the summer of 2006 for the Texas Air Quality Study (TEXAQS II). Calibrated aerosol backscatter profiles were determined from data collected at the 355 nm wavelength using a modified Klett retrieval method. OPAL employs a unique scan sequence that consists of staring at multiple elevation angles between 2 and 90 degrees, which is repeated approx. every 90 sec. Blending the data from the various elevation angles allows to extend the aerosol backscatter profiles down to near the surface (approximately 10 meters ASL), while maintaining a high spatial resolution (5 meters). Successful application of this technique requires the aerosol distribution to be sufficiently horizontally homogeneous over several kilometers. Estimates of aerosol mixed layer height were determined by applying a Haar wavelet transform method to detect the gradient that is often present at the top of the boundary layer. Co-located on the R/V Ronald H. Brown, was NOAA/ESRL's High Resolution Doppler LIDAR (HRDL). Aerosol mixed layer heights were also estimated using the data from the 2 micron Doppler LIDAR. A comparison of the mixed layer heights as determined from each LIDAR's observations was used to choose the height of the layer likely connected with the surface. The vertical structure of aerosols in the lower troposphere, in particular the presence of aerosol layers above the boundary layer, is important in understanding radiative effects of aerosols. We will present aerosol backscatter structure in the lower troposphere encountered during the TexAQS II study as well as a comparison of relative aerosol content in the free troposphere compared to that within the boundary layer.

  1. Moon Phases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2010-01-01

    When teaching Moon phases, the focus seems to be on the sequence of Moon phases and, in some grade levels, how Moon phases occur. Either focus can sometimes be a challenge, especially without the use of models and observations of the Moon. In this month's column, the author describes some of the lessons that he uses to teach the phases of the Moon…

  2. Synthetic hydroxyapatites doped with Zn(II) studied by X-ray diffraction, infrared, Raman and thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra-López, José R.; Echeverría, Gustavo A.; Güida, Jorge A.; Viña, Raúl; Punte, Graciela

    2015-06-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHap) formation when different amounts of Zn(II) are present in the mother solution has been investigated by atomic absorption, infrared and Raman spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis (DTA and TG). The studied samples have been synthesized at T=95 °C and pH 9 in air. The analysis of the results have shown that the pure CaHap sample crystallizes in the monoclinic form P21/b. Concentrations up to 20% of Zn(II) in the mother solution, equivalent to smaller concentrations in solid (up to 9.1% in wt), favor the formation of the hexagonal apatite, P63/m, while Zn(II) concentrations higher than 20% in solution help an amorphous phase development where vibrational spectra indicated coexistence of two phases: an apatite and ZnNH4PO4·H2O. Infrared data of thermal treated samples endorse that HPO42- ion had not been incorporated in Zn(II) doped samples during the synthesis process. Present results also allow to conclude that Zn(II) cation exhibits a preference to occupy the Ca2 site of the apatite structure and induces water adsorption and a small quantity of CO32- cation incorporation, leading to formation of a less crystalline Ca deficient apatite.

  3. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE II) 2003 ANNUAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 6th annual meeting of the NATO CCMS Pilot Study, Clean Products and Processes, was held in Cetraro, Italy, from May 11 to 15, 2003. This was also the first meeting of its Phase II study. 24 country representatives attended this meeting. This meeting was very ably run by th...

  4. Metabolism of methandrostenolone in the horse: a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric investigation of phase I and phase II metabolism.

    PubMed

    McKinney, A R; Ridley, D D; Suann, C J

    2001-12-01

    The phase I and phase II metabolism of the anabolic steroid methandrostenolone was investigated following oral administration to a standardbred gelding. In the phase I study, metabolites were isolated from the urine by solid-phase extraction, deconjugated by acid catalysed methanolysis and converted to their O-methyloxime trimethylsilyl derivatives. GC-MS analysis indicated the major metabolic processes to be sequential reduction of the A-ring and hydroxylation at C6 and C16. In the phase II study, unconjugated, beta-glucuronidated and sulfated metabolites were fractionated and deconjugated using a combination of liquid-liquid extraction, enzyme hydrolysis, solid-phase extraction and acid catalysed methanolysis. Derivatization followed by GC-MS analysis revealed extensive conjugation to both glucuronic and sulfuric acids, with only a small proportion of metabolites occurring in unconjugated form. PMID:11817312

  5. Degradation of cellulose at the wet-dry interface. II. Study of oxidation reactions and effect of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Myung-Joon; Dupont, Anne-Laurence; de la Rie, E René

    2014-01-30

    To better understand the degradation of cellulose upon the formation of a tideline at the wet-dry interface when paper is suspended in water, the production of chemical species involved in oxidation reactions was studied. The quantitation of hydroperoxides and hydroxyl radicals was carried out in reverse phase chromatography using triphenylphosphine and terephthalic acid, respectively, as chemical probes. Both reactive oxygen species were found in the tideline immediately after its formation, in the range of micromoles and nanomoles per gram of paper, respectively. The results indicate that hydroxyl radicals form for the most part in paper before the tideline experiment, whereas hydroperoxides appear to be produced primarily during tideline formation. Iron sulfate impregnation of the paper raised the production of hydroperoxides. After hygrothermal aging in sealed vials the hydroxyl radical content in paper increased significantly. When aged together in the same vial, tideline samples strongly influenced the degradation of samples from other areas of the paper (multi-sample aging). Different types of antioxidants were added to the paper before the tideline experiment to investigate their effect on the oxidation reactions taking place. In samples treated with iron sulfate or artificially aged, the addition of Irgafos 168 (tris(2,4-ditert-butylphenyl) phosphate) and Tinuvin 292 (bis(1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidyl) sebacate and methyl 1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidyl sebacate) reduced the concentration of hydroperoxides and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. Tinuvin 292 was also found to considerably lower the rate of cellulose chain scission reactions during hygrothermal aging of the paper. PMID:24299825

  6. PHASE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kippenhan, D.O.

    1959-09-01

    A phase detector circuit is described for use at very high frequencies of the order of 50 megacycles. The detector circuit includes a pair of rectifiers inverted relative to each other. One voltage to be compared is applied to the two rectifiers in phase opposition and the other voltage to be compared is commonly applied to the two rectifiers. The two result:ng d-c voltages derived from the rectifiers are combined in phase opposition to produce a single d-c voltage having amplitude and polarity characteristics dependent upon the phase relation between the signals to be compared. Principal novelty resides in the employment of a half-wave transmission line to derive the phase opposing signals from the first voltage to be compared for application to the two rectifiers in place of the transformer commonly utilized for such purpose in phase detector circuits for operation at lower frequency.

  7. Venus Phasing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    1997-01-01

    Presents a science activity designed to introduce students to the geocentric and heliocentric models of the universe. Helps students discover why phase changes on Venus knocked Earth out of the center of the universe. (DKM)

  8. Migrant Children in Florida. The Phase II Report of the Florida Migratory Child Survey Project, 1968-1969, Vol. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinert, E. John; And Others

    The Phase II study of the Florida Migratory Child Survey Project had as its primary focus the data obtained directly from migratory workers and public schools. Major objectives of the 12-month study were (1) to obtain an accurate count of migratory workers and children in each Florida county, (2) to determine movement patterns of migratory…

  9. Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase II. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Wartman, B.L.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

    1981-06-01

    This evaluation of the hydrothermal resources of North Dakota is based on existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies, and field and laboratory studies conducted. The principal sources of data used during the Phase II study were WELLFILE, the computer library of oil and gas well data developed during the Phase I study, and WATERCAT, a computer library system of water well data assembled during the Phase II study. A field survey of the shallow geothermal gradients present in selected groundwater observation holes was conducted. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of core samples is being done to facilitate heat-flow calculations on those hole-of-convenience cased.

  10. Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies: Phase III--Center-Taxiway Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Phase III of the Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies was conducted, under an agreement with HNTB Corporation, at the NASA Ames FutureFlight Central (FFC) facility in June 2003. The objective of the study was the evaluation of a new center-taxiway concept at LAX. This study is an extension of the Phase I and Phase II studies previously conducted at FFC. This report presents results from Phase III of the study, in which a center-taxiway concept between runways 25L and 25R was simulated and evaluated. Phase III data were compared objectively against the Baseline data. Subjective evaluations by participating LAX controllers were obtained with regard to workload, efficiency, and safety criteria. To facilitate a valid comparison between Baseline and Phase III data, the same scenarios were used for Phase III that were tested during Phases I and II. This required briefing participating controllers on differences in airport and airline operations between 2001 and today.

  11. Phase Won.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocher, Erik

    2003-01-01

    Describes ten steps involved in successful renovation of a college recreation center. They are as follows: hire the right architect, be realistic about costs, devise a plan, do a mental walk through, approach the renovation in phases, communicate to users, expect lost revenue and displacement issues, continue to communicate with architects and…

  12. Transition of Bery Phase and Pancharatnam Phase and Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guolan; Pan, Hui; Wang, Zisheng

    2016-07-01

    Berry Phase and time-dependent Pancharatnam phase are investigated for nuclear spin polarization in a liquid by a rotation magnetic field, where two-state mixture effect is exactly included in the geometric phases. We find that when the system of nuclear spin polarization is in the unpolarized state, the transitive phenomena of both Berry phase and Pancharatnam phase are taken place. For the polarized system, in contrast, such a transition is not taken place. It is obvious that the transitions of geometric phase correspond to the phase change of physical system.

  13. Cardiovascular risk factor levels and their relationships with overweight and fat distribution in children: the Fleurbaix Laventie Ville Santé II study

    PubMed Central

    Botton, Jérémie; Heude, Barbara; Kettaneh, Adrien; Borys, Jean-Michel; Lommez, Agnès; Bresson, Jean-Louis; Ducimetière, Pierre; Charles, Marie-Aline

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To document for the first time in a general population of French children, the prevalence and levels of cardiovascular risk factors, and to assess, separately in boys and girls, whether these risk factors were associated with fat mass distribution independently of subcutaneous overall adiposity. Subjects and design A cross sectional analysis of baseline data from 452 children (235 boys and 217 girls) aged 8–17 years included in 1999 in a population-based epidemiologic study, the Fleurbaix Laventie Ville Santé II (FLVS II) study. Methods Overweight was defined according to the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) references and to the 90th percentiles of the French BMI curves. The thresholds of parameters defining cardiovascular and metabolic risk were the 95th percentile of the Task Force Report on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents for blood pressure, and those of the American Academy of Pediatrics for lipids. Anthropometric and biologic parameters were described by gender and according to overweight. Partial correlations between cardiovascular risk factors and anthropometric measures of adiposity (BMI, sum of four skinfold thicknesses, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio) were calculated. In a second step, these correlations were additionally adjusted for the sum of four skinfold thicknesses. Results High plasma triglycerides, high insulin concentration and low plasma HDL cholesterol were associated with all measures of adiposity (|r|≥0.20; p<0.002). When obese children were excluded, overweight children already had high triglycerides and low HDL cholesterol levels respectively 2 and 20 times more frequently than normal weight children. Among overweight children, 7.7% had at least two risk factors among high blood pressure, high plasma triglycerides or glucose, and low HDL concentrations, versus 0.25% among normal weight children (p=0.002). After adjusting for the sum of skinfolds, an independent association between the risk

  14. Confirmation of model-based dose selection for a Japanese phase III study of rivaroxaban in non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masato; Tanigawa, Takahiko; Hashizume, Kensei; Kajikawa, Mariko; Tajiri, Masahiro; Mueck, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to confirm the appropriateness of the dose setting for a Japanese phase III study of rivaroxaban in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), which had been based on model simulation employing phase II study data. The previously developed mixed-effects pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model, which consisted of an oral one-compartment model parameterized in terms of clearance, volume and a first-order absorption rate, was rebuilt and optimized using the data for 597 subjects from the Japanese phase III study, J-ROCKET AF. A mixed-effects modeling technique in NONMEM was used to quantify both unexplained inter-individual variability and inter-occasion variability, which are random effect parameters. The final PK and PK-PD models were evaluated to identify influential covariates. The empirical Bayes estimates of AUC and C(max) from the final PK model were consistent with the simulated results from the Japanese phase II study. There was no clear relationship between individual estimated exposures and safety-related events, and the estimated exposure levels were consistent with the global phase III data. Therefore, it was concluded that the dose selected for the phase III study with Japanese NVAF patients by means of model simulation employing phase II study data had been appropriate from the PK-PD perspective. PMID:23337693

  15. Unfolding wrapped phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treviño-Palacios, Carlos Gerardo

    2015-11-01

    Phase unwrapping is the final step in phase extraction methods, which consists of recovering the correct phase from the wrapped phase by removing 2π discontinuities. The difference between the correct phase and the wrapped phase is the phase wrapping map. A new method for phase unwrapping is presented by identifying the phase wrapping map as a sequence of binary valued intermediate wrapping maps and iteratively removing them producing the correct phase by phase-wrapped unfolding. A path-following algorithm is presented to exemplify the phase wrapped unfolding method.

  16. The MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC)-II study of common practices for the development and validation of microarray-based predictive models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The second phase of the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC-II) project evaluated common practices for developing and validating microarray-based models aimed at predicting toxicological and clinical endpoints. Thirty-six teams developed classifiers for 13 endpoints - some easy, som...

  17. Four-phase differential phase shift resolver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, P. M.; Wallingford, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Two systems have been developed to resolve phase uncertainty without transmitting reference signals. In both methods signal is impressed on carrier as differential, rather than absolute, phase shift. At the receiver four-phase demodulation and logic process unambiguously resolves differential phase shift of input carrier.

  18. A phase II study of induction chemotherapy followed by thoracic radiotherapy and erlotinib in poor risk stage III non-small cell lung cancer: Results of CALGB 30605 (Alliance)/RTOG 0972 (NRG)

    PubMed Central

    Lilenbaum, Rogerio; Samuels, Michael; Wang, Xiaofei; Kong, Feng Ming; Jänne, Pasi A.; Masters, Gregory; Katragadda, Sreedhar; Hodgson, Lydia; Bogart, Jeffrey; Bradley, Jeffrey; Vokes, Everett

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and poor performance status (PS) and/or weight loss (WL) do not seem to benefit from standard therapy. Based on the pre-clinical interaction between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors and radiation, we designed a trial of induction chemotherapy followed by thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) and concurrent erlotinib. Methods Patients with poor risk unresectable stage III NSCLC received 2 cycles of carboplatin at an AUC of 5 and nab-paclitaxel at 100 mg/m2 on days 1 and 8 every 21 days, followed by erlotinib administered concurrently with TRT. Maintenance was not permitted. Molecular analysis was performed in available specimens. Seventy-two eligible patients were required to test whether the 1-year survival rate was <50% or ≥65% with approximately 90% power at a significance level of 0.10. Results From March 2008 to October 2011, 78patients were enrolled, 3 of which were ineligible. The median age was 68 (range, 39 to 88) and 32% were ≥75 years of age. Patients were evenly distributed between stage IIIA and IIIB and the majority had PS 2. The overall response rate was 67% and the disease control rate was 93%. Treatment was well tolerated. The median PFS and OS were 11 and 17 months, respectively. The overall 12-month OS was 57%, which narrowly missed the pre-specified target for significance. Conclusions Patients with poor risk stage III NSCLC had better than expected outcomes with a regimen of induction carboplatin/nab-paclitaxel followed by TRT and erlotinib. However, as per the statistical design, the 12-month OS was not sufficiently high to warrant further studies. PMID:25384173

  19. Randomized Phase II Study of Docetaxel plus Personalized Peptide Vaccination versus Docetaxel plus Placebo for Patients with Previously Treated Advanced Wild Type EGFR Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Koichi; Sugawara, Shunichi; Saijo, Yasuo; Maemondo, Makoto; Sato, Atsushi; Takamori, Shinzo; Harada, Taishi; Sasada, Tetsuro; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Kishimoto, Junji; Yamada, Akira; Noguchi, Masanori; Itoh, Kyogo; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of personalized peptide vaccination (PPV) combined with chemotherapy for patients with previously treated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods. Previously treated PS0-1 patients with IIIB/IV EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) wild genotype NSCLC were randomly assigned to docetaxel (60 mg/m2 on Day 1) plus PPV based on preexisting host immunity or docetaxel plus placebo. Docetaxel administration was repeated every 3 weeks until disease progression. Personalized peptides or placebo was injected subcutaneously weekly in the first 8 weeks and biweekly in subsequent 16 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Results. PPV related toxicity was grade 2 or less skin reaction. The median PFS for placebo arm and PPV arm was 52 days and 59 days, respectively. There was no significant difference between two arms by log-rank test (p = 0.42). Interestingly, PFS and overall survival (OS) in humoral immunological responder were significantly longer than those in nonresponder. Conclusion. PPV did not improve the survival in combination with docetaxel for previously treated advanced NSCLC. However, PPV may be efficacious for the humoral immunological responders and a further clinical investigation is needed. PMID:27274999

  20. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Phase II Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Apricoxib in Combination With Either Docetaxel or Pemetrexed in Patients With Biomarker-Selected Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Martin J.; Tan, Ming T.; Fidler, Mary J.; Sanborn, Rachel E.; Otterson, Greg; Sequist, Lecia V.; Evans, Tracey L.; Schneider, Bryan J.; Keresztes, Roger; Rogers, John S.; de Mayolo, Jorge Antunez; Feliciano, Josephine; Yang, Yang; Medeiros, Michelle; Zaknoen, Sara L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Overexpression of COX-2 correlates with advanced stage and worse outcomes in non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), possibly as a result of elevated levels of COX-2–dependent prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Exploratory analyses of studies that used COX-2 inhibitors have demonstrated potentially superior outcome in patients in whom the urinary metabolite of PGE2 (PGE-M) is suppressed. We hypothesized that patients with disease defined by PGE-M suppression would benefit from the addition of apricoxib to second-line docetaxel or pemetrexed. Patients and Methods Patients with NSCLC who had disease progression after one line of platinum-based therapy, performance status of 0 to 2, and normal organ function were potentially eligible. Only patients with a ≥ 50% decrease in urinary PGE-M after 5 days of treatment with apricoxib could enroll. Docetaxel 75 mg/m2 or pemetrexed 500 mg/m2 once every 21 days per the investigator was administered with apricoxib or placebo 400 mg once per day. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Exploratory analysis was performed regarding baseline urinary PGE-M and outcomes. Results In all, 101 patients completed screening, and 72 of the 80 who demonstrated ≥ 50% suppression were randomly assigned to apricoxib or placebo. Toxicity was similar between the arms. No improvement in PFS was seen with apricoxib versus placebo. The median PFS for the control arm was 97 days (95% CI, 52 to 193 days) versus 85 days (95% CI, 67 to 142 days) for the experimental arm (P = .91). Conclusion Apricoxib did not improve PFS, despite biomarker-driven patient selection. PMID:25452446

  1. A randomized trial to compare the safety of rivaroxaban vs aspirin in addition to either clopidogrel or ticagrelor in acute coronary syndrome: The design of the GEMINI-ACS-1 phase II study.

    PubMed

    Povsic, Thomas J; Roe, Matthew T; Ohman, Erik Magnus; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; James, Stefan; Plotnikov, Alexei; Mundl, Hardi; Welsh, Robert; Bode, Christoph; Gibson, Charles Michael

    2016-04-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), the combination of aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor, given for 12 months remains the standard of care after presentation with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) because it has been shown to be associated with a significant reduction in ischemic events compared with aspirin monotherapy. The factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban was shown to be associated with a significant reduction in the composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, and stroke, and resulted in a nominal reduction in cardiovascular death, when added to background DAPT in the ATLAS ACS 2-TIMI 51 trial; however, there was excessive bleeding with this "triple-therapy" approach. The combination of rivaroxaban with P2Y12 inhibition in a "dual-pathway" approach may be an effective therapeutic regimen for the treatment of ACS, given the known importance of P2Y12 inhibition after stenting and intriguing data that the combination of an anticoagulant with clopidogrel after stenting in patients with atrial fibrillation appears an attractive option to this patient population. GEMINI-ACS-1 is a prospective, randomized, double-dummy, double-blind, active-controlled trial that will assess the safety of dual antithrombotic therapy (rivaroxaban [2.5 mg twice daily] + P2Y12 inhibitor) as compared with DAPT (aspirin [100 mg] + P2Y12 inhibitor) within 10 days of an ACS event in 3,000 patients. Patients will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio stratified by intended P2Y12 inhibitor use (clopidogrel 75 mg daily or ticagrelor 90 mg twice daily), with 1500 patients expected in each P2Y12 inhibitor strata. The primary end point is Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction clinically significant bleeding (major, minor, or requiring medical attention). The exploratory efficacy determination will be a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and stent thrombosis. GEMINI-ACS-1 will assess the safety and feasibility of dual antithrombotic therapy with rivaroxaban and a P2Y12 inhibitor compared with conventional DAPT for the treatment for patients with recent ACS. PMID:26995378

  2. Canadian Cancer Trials Group IND197: a phase II study of foretinib in patients with estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative recurrent or metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rayson, Daniel; Lupichuk, Sasha; Potvin, Kylea; Dent, Susan; Shenkier, Tamara; Dhesy-Thind, Sukhbinder; Ellard, Susan L; Prady, Catherine; Salim, Muhammad; Farmer, Patricia; Allo, Ghasson; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Allan, Alison; Ludkovski, Olga; Bonomi, Maria; Tu, Dongsheng; Hagerman, Linda; Goodwin, Rachel; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth; Bradbury, Penelope

    2016-05-01

    In murine models, overexpression of the MET receptor transgene induces tumors with human basal gene expression characteristics supporting MET inhibition as a treatment strategy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Foretinib is an oral multi-kinase inhibitor of MET, RON, AXL, TIE-2, and VEGF receptors with anti-tumor activity in advanced HCC and papillary renal cell cancer. Patients with centrally reviewed primary TNBC and 0-1 prior regimens for metastatic disease received daily foretinib 60 mg po in a 2-stage single-arm trial. Primary endpoints were objective response and early progression rates per RECIST 1.1. In stage 2, correlative studies of MET, PTEN, EGFR, and p53 on archival and fresh tumor specimens were performed along with enumeration of CTCs. 45 patients were enrolled with 37 patients having response evaluable and centrally confirmed primary TNBC (cTNBC). There were 2 partial responses (ITT 4.7 % response evaluable cTNBC 5.4 %) with a median duration of 4.4 months (range 3.7-5 m) and 15 patients had stable disease (ITT 33 %, response evaluable cTNBC 40.5 %) with a median duration of 5.4 months (range 2.3-9.7 m). The most common toxicities (all grades/grade 3) were nausea (64/4 %), fatigue (60/4 %), hypertension (58/49 %), and diarrhea (40/7 %). Six serious adverse events were considered possibly related to foretinib and 4 patients went off study due to adverse events. There was no correlation between MET positivity and response nor between response and PTEN, EGFR, p53, or MET expression in CTCs. Although CCTG IND 197 did not meet its primary endpoint, the observation of a clinical benefit rate of 46 % in this cTNBC population suggests that foretinib may have clinical activity as a single, non-cytotoxic agent in TNBC (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01147484). PMID:27116183

  3. Protracted results of dose-intensive therapy using cyclophosphamide, carmustine, and continuous infusion etoposide with autologous stem cell support in patients with relapse or refractory Hodgkin's disease: a phase II study from the North American Marrow Transplant Group.

    PubMed

    Fleming, D R; Wolff, S N; Fay, J W; Brown, R A; Lynch, J P; Bolwell, B J; Stevens, D A; Goodman, S A; Greer, J P; Stein, R S; Pineiro, L A; Collins, R H; Goldsmith, L J; Herzig, G P; Herzig, R H

    1999-09-01

    To determine the long-term results of high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell support in relapsed or primary refractory Hodgkin disease patients. One hundred and thirty-one patients with relapsed or primary refractory Hodgkin's disease were treated with a dose-intensive therapy protocol consisting of etoposide (2400 mg/m2 continuous intravenous infusion) cyclophosphamide (7200 mg/m2 intravenously), and carmustine (300-600 mg/m2 intravenously) CBVi. All patients had previously failed conventional chemoradiotherapy. Severe toxicities were related to infectious, hepatic, and pulmonary complications. Fatal, regimen-related toxicity was 19%; liver and lung dysfunction, as well as infection, were the most frequent problems. Ninety-one (69%) of the patients achieved a complete response (CR) (95% CI = 59% to 75%) after CBVi and autologous stem cell infusion. With a median follow-up of 5.1 years (range 3.0 to 9.5 years), overall and event-free survival are 44% (95% CI = 33% to 47%) and 38% (95% CI = 28% to 46%) respectively. While univariate analysis did not reveal a statistically significant variable to predict a better response, responsiveness to therapy demonstrated a trend. We conclude that CBVi is an effective therapy for relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's disease, producing long-term, durable remissions. PMID:10512166

  4. Induction Chemotherapy With Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil/Leucovorin Followed by Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Taiwan Cooperative Oncology Group Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ang, Hui-Ju; Lin, Yu-Lin; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Chiu, Yen-Feng; Chang, Ming-Chu; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Chen, Jen-Shi; Hsieh, Ruey-Kuen; Lin, Pin-Wen; Shan, Yan-Shen; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Chang, Jang-Yang; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Hwang, Tsann-Long; and others

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of 3-month triplet induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Patients and Methods: Chemonaieve patients with measurable, histologically confirmed LAPC were eligible. The ICT consisted of biweekly gemcitabine (800 mg/m{sup 2}) infusion at a fixed dose rate (10 mg/m{sup 2}/min), followed by 85 mg/m{sup 2} oxaliplatin and 48-h infusion of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (3000/150 mg/m{sup 2}) for 6 cycles. Patients without disease progression 4 weeks after ICT would receive weekly 400 mg/m{sup 2} gemcitabine and 5040 cGy radiation in 28 fractions. After CCRT, patients were subjected for surgical intervention and/or maintenance chemotherapy until progression or intolerable toxicity. Results: Between December 2004 and August 2008, 50 patients were enrolled. The best responses after ICT were partial response (PR) in 9, stable disease in 26, and progressive disease or not evaluable in 15. Among the former 35 patients, 2 had disease progression before CCRT, and 3 declined to have CCRT. Of the 30 patients receiving CCRT, an additional 4 and 1 patient(s) achieved PR at the end of CCRT and during maintenance chemotherapy, respectively. On intent-to-treat analysis, the overall best response was PR in 14 patients and stable disease in 21. The overall response rate and disease control rate were 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16.2-42.5%) and 70% (95% CI, 44.4-99.2%), respectively. The median time to progression and overall survival of the intent-to-treat population was 9.3 (95% CI, 5.8-12.8) months and 14.5 (95% CI, 11.9-17.1) months, respectively. One- and two-year survival rates were 68% (95% CI, 55.1-80.9%) and 20.6% (95% CI, 8.7-32.5%), respectively. Neutropenia was the most common Grade 3-4 toxicity of both ICT and CCRT, with a frequency of 28% and 26.7%, respectively. Significant sensory neuropathy occurred in 9 patients (18%). Conclusion: Three months of triplet ICT followed by gemcitabine-based CCRT is feasible, moderately active, and associated with encouraging survival in patients with LAPC.

  5. Relationship between HER2 expression and efficacy with first-line trastuzumab emtansine compared with trastuzumab plus docetaxel in TDM4450g: a randomized phase II study of patients with previously untreated HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to retrospectively explore the relationship between human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and efficacy in patients receiving trastuzumab plus docetaxel (HT) or trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1). Methods Patients with HER2-positive, locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) were randomly assigned to HT (n = 70) or T-DM1 (n = 67). HER2 status was assessed locally using immunohistochemistry or fluorescence in situ hybridization and confirmed retrospectively by central testing. HER2 mRNA expression was assessed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results HER2 mRNA levels were obtained for 116/137 patients (HT = 61; T-DM1 = 55). Median pretreatment HER2 mRNA was 8.9. The risk of disease progression in the overall population was lower with T-DM1 than with HT (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.59; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.36 to 0.97). This effect was more pronounced in patients with HER2 mRNA ≥ median (HR = 0.39; 95% CI 0.18 to 0.85) versus < median (HR = 0.85; 95% CI 0.44 to 1.67). In the T-DM1 arm, median progression-free survival (PFS) was not reached in patients with HER2 mRNA ≥ median and was 10.6 months in patients with HER2 mRNA < median. In the HT arm, PFS was 8.8 versus 9.8 months in patients with HER2 mRNA ≥ median versus < median, respectively. The effect of HER2 mRNA expression on objective response rates was less pronounced. Conclusions This exploratory analysis suggests that while overall, patients with HER2-positive MBC show improved PFS with T-DM1 relative to HT, the effect is enhanced in patients with tumor HER2 mRNA ≥ median. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00679341 PMID:24887458

  6. A Phase II Study of Additional Four-Week Chemotherapy With Capecitabine During the Resting Periods After Six-Week Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Ha; Song, Min Sang; Park, Jun Boem; Kim, Jin Soo; Kang, Dae Young

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of additional 4-week chemotherapy with capecitabine during the resting periods after a 6-week neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods Radiotherapy was delivered to the whole pelvis at a total dose of 50.4 Gy for 6 weeks. Oral capecitabine was administered at a dose of 825 mg/m2 twice daily for 10 weeks. Surgery was performed 2-4 weeks following the completion of chemotherapy. Results Between January 2010 and September 2011, 44 patients were enrolled. Forty-three patients underwent surgery, and 41 patients completed the scheduled treatment. Pathologic complete remission (pCR) was noted in 9 patients (20.9%). T down-staging and N down-staging were observed in 32 patients (74.4%) and 33 patients (76.7%), respectively. Grade 3 to 5 toxicity was noted in 5 patients (11.4%). The pCR rate was similar with the pCR rates obtained after conventional NCRT at our institute and at other institutes. Conclusion This study showed that additional 4-week chemotherapy with capecitabine during the resting periods after 6-week NCRT was safe, but it was no more effective than conventional NCRT. PMID:24278857

  7. A non-comparative phase II study of dose intensive chemotherapy with doxorubicin and ifosfamide followed by high dose ICE consolidation with PBSCT in non-resectable, high grade, adult type soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jörg Thomas; Horger, M; Kluba, T; Königsrainer, A; de Zwart, P; von Weyhern, C Hann; Eckert, F; Budach, W; Bokemeyer, C

    2013-12-01

    The objective was to determine the role of dose intensive induction chemotherapy in patients with soft tissue sarcomas (STS) that were considered unresectable. Treatment consisted of 2-3 cycles of doxorubicin (Dox) and ifosfamide (Ifo) followed by high dose chemotherapy with ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide (HD-ICE) plus peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). 30 out of 631 consecutive patients, median age 46 years (21-62), with high grade STS were included. 29 patients completed at least 2 cycles of Dox/Ifo. HD-ICE was withheld because of progressive disease (PD) in 5 patients, neurotoxicity in 6 cases, insufficient peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization, complete remission (CR) and refusal in 1 patient each. HD-ICE was associated with non-haematological grade III toxicity including emesis, mucositis, fever, neurotoxicity, and transaminase level elevation. Two additional patients attained a partial response after HD-ICE. Overall, 24 of 30 (80%) patients underwent surgery, with complete tumor resections in 19 patients (63% of all patients, 79% of the operated subgroup); however, 2 of these required amputation. After a median follow up period of 50 months in surviving patients (range, 26-120), 5-year PFS and OS rates were 39% and 48%, respectively. Induction chemotherapy plus consolidation HD-ICE is generally feasible, but is associated with significant neurotoxicity. The advantage of HD-ICE over conventional dose chemotherapy plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in non-resectable disease remains unproven. PMID:24091981

  8. Primary resection versus neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by resection for locally resectable or potentially resectable pancreatic carcinoma without distant metastasis. A multi-centre prospectively randomised phase II-study of the Interdisciplinary Working Group Gastrointestinal Tumours (AIO, ARO, and CAO)

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Thomas B; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G; Meyer, Thomas; Golcher, Henriette; Sauer, Rolf; Hohenberger, Werner

    2007-01-01

    Background The disappointing results of surgical therapy alone of ductal pancreatic cancer can only be improved using multimodal approaches. In contrast to adjuvant therapy, neoadjuvant chemoradiation is able to facilitate resectability with free margins and to lower lymphatic spread. Another advantage is better tolerability which consecutively allows applying multimodal treatment in a higher number of patients. Furthermore, the synopsis of the overall survival results of neoadjuvant trials suggests a higher rate compared to adjuvant trials. Methods/Design As there are no prospectively randomised studies for neoadjuvant therapy, the Interdisciplinary Study Group of Gastrointestinal Tumours of the German Cancer Aid has started such a trial. The study investigates the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally resectable or probably resectable cancer of the pancreatic head without distant metastasis on median overall survival time compared to primary surgery. Adjuvant chemotherapy is integrated into both arms. Discussion The protocol of the study is presented in condensed form after an introducing survey on adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:17338829

  9. Laevofolinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, cyclophosphamide and escalating doses of epirubicin with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support in locally advanced and/or metastatic breast carcinoma: a phase I-II study of the Southern Italy Oncology Group (GOIM).

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, G.; Romito, S.; Gebbia, V.; Pacilio, G.; Giotta, F.; Testa, A.; Pezzella, G.; Durini, E.; Agostara, B.; Cariello, S.

    1995-01-01

    Sixty-four consecutive patients with locally advanced (n = 7) or metastatic breast cancer (n = 57), were treated with a combination of laevofolinic acid 100 mg m-2 plus 5-fluorouracil 340 mg m-2 i.v. on days 1-3, cyclophosphamide 600 mg m-2 i.v. on day 1 and epirubicin 90 mg m-2 i.v. on day 1. Epirubicin dose was progressively escalated by 10 mg m-2 per cycle up to 120 mg m-2 in the absence of dose-limiting toxicities. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was given subcutaneously in order to prevent neutropenia. Epirubicin dosage could be increased to 100 mg m-2 in 53 patients (87%), to 110 mg m-2 in 31 patients (51%) and to 120 mg m-2 in 18 cases (30%). In most patients the dose-limiting toxicity was represented by myelosuppression. A statistically significant correlation was found between median white blood count (WBC) or absolute neutrophil count (ANC) nadir and epirubicin dose level (P = 0.009; P = 0.008). Moreover, a statistically significant correlation was observed between the number of chemotherapeutic cycles, nadir ANC and WBC and the occurrence of anaemia and thrombocytopenia of increasing severity. These data suggest the occurrence of progressive cumulative bone marrow toxicity. Although patients who reached different epirubicin levels showed differences in mean dose intensity, such differences were not statistically significant. No correlation was found between the increase in dose intensity and type, rate or duration of objective responses. In patients with metastatic breast cancer the overall response rate was 72% (95% CL 66-78%) with a 25% complete response rate. Median duration of response was 10 and 13 months respectively for complete and partial responses. All patients with locally advanced breast cancer had an objective response and underwent radical mastectomy. Projected median survival of the whole series of patients with metastatic breast cancer was 20 + months. These data demonstrate that the combination of 5-fluorouracil with laevofolinic acid, cyclophosphamide and epirubicin is very active against metastatic breast cancer. Use of G-CSF allows epirubicin dosage to be increased up to 120 mg m-2 cycle-1, but its use may be linked to the occurrence of sometimes severe cumulative haematological toxicity. PMID:7577476

  10. FINAL RESULTS OF A PROSPECTIVE MULTI-INSTITUTIONAL PHASE II STUDY OF EVEROLIMUS (RAD001), AN MTOR INHIBITOR, IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT OR PROGRESSIVE LOW-GRADE GLIOMA. A POETIC CONSORTIUM TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Kieran, Mark W.; Yao, X.; Macy, M.; Leary, S.; Cohen, K.; MacDonald, T.; Allen, J.; Boklan, J.; Smith, A.; Nazemi, K.; Gore, L.; Trippett, T.; DiRenzo, J.; Narendran, A.; Perentesis, J.; Prabhu, S.; Pinches, N.; Robison, N.; Manley, P.; Chi, S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Purpose: The ras/raf signaling pathway is crucial in the development of pediatric low-grade gliomas (LGGs). Aberrant ras/raf signaling is involved in tumorigenesis through promotion of cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in sporadic LGG. Everolimus (RAD001) is a potent and selective inhibitor of mTOR, a downstream element of the ras/raf pathway. The activity, safety and pharmacokinetics of everolimus in pediatric patients with radiographic recurrent/progressive LGG are presented. METHODS: Pediatric patients with radiographic progressive or recurrent LGGs without neurofibromatosis type I were treated with oral everolimus 5mg/m2/dose once daily. Therapy was provided for 28 days (one cycle) and could be repeated for a total of 12 cycles. Response, as determined by standard 2-D MRI criteria, was assessed for all patients. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenetics, pharmacodynamic parameters including inhibition of p70s6 kinase activity, 4E-BP1 phosphorylation inhibition and suppression of cMyc expression, as well as the toxicity profile of everolimus were evaluated. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients with a median age of 9 years (range, 3–17 years) were enrolled, all of whom had received prior chemotherapy (average # regimens = 2.7) including progression after a carboplatin-containing regimen. Median number of cycles of therapy was 10 (range, 1-12). Responses were determined by blinded central review and included 4 patients with PR (>50% decrease) and 13 with stable disease. Six patients had progressive disease by one year. Overall therapy was well tolerated; two patients discontinued therapy due to mouth sores (n = 1) and withdrawal of consent (n = 1). Everolimus PK parameters were similar to those previously reported in both adult and pediatric patients and drug trough levels were maintained above 5ng/ml. Pharmacodynamic analysis demonstrated inhibition of downstream targets of mTOR including phospho-S6 kinase, 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and cMyc expression within 14 days of initiation of everolimus therapy and this inhibition was maintained throughout the treatment period. CONCLUSIONS: Everolimus was well tolerated in pediatric patients with progressive or recurrent LGGs and demonstrated activity in this multiply recurrent/progressive patient population. Incorporation of everolimus into frontline LGG therapy is being proposed. SECONDARY CATEGORY: Clinical Neuro-Oncology.

  11. Efficacy and safety of cord blood-derived dendritic cells plus cytokine-induced killer cells combined with chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with advanced gastric cancer: a randomized Phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Ying; Wang, Wei-hua; Xie, Jia-ping; Zhang, Ying-xin; Yang, Ya-pei; Zhou, Chang-hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Cellular immunotherapy has been widely used in the treatment of solid tumors. However, the clinical application of cord blood-derived dendritic cells and cytokine-induced killer cells (CB-DC-CIK) for the treatment of gastric cancer has not been frequently reported. In this study, the efficacy and safety of CB-DC-CIK for the treatment of gastric cancer were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Methods The phenotypes, cytokines, and cytotoxicity of CB-DC-CIK were detected in vitro. Patients with advanced gastric cancer were divided into the following two groups: the experimental group (CB-DC-CIK combined with chemotherapy) and the control group (chemotherapy alone). The curative effects and immune function were compared between the two groups. Results First, the results showed that combination therapy significantly increased the overall disease-free survival rate (P=0.0448) compared with chemotherapy alone. The overall survival rate (P=0.0646), overall response rate (P=0.410), and disease control rate (P=0.396) were improved in the experimental group, but these changes did not reach statistical significance. Second, the percentage of T-cell subsets (CD4+, CD3−CD56+, and CD3+CD56+) and the levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, which reflect immune function, were significantly increased (P<0.05) after immunotherapy. Finally, no serious side effects appeared in patients with gastric cancer after the application of cellular immunotherapy based on CB-DC-CIK. Conclusion CB-DC-CIK combined with chemotherapy is effective and safe for the treatment of patients with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:27524915

  12. [177Lu-DOTA]0-D-Phe1-Tyr3-Octreotide (177Lu-DOTATOC) For Peptide Receptor Radiotherapy in Patients with Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumours: A Phase-II Study

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Richard P.; Kluge, Andreas W.; Kulkarni, Harshad; Schorr-Neufing, Ulrike; Niepsch, Karin; Bitterlich, Norman; van Echteld, Cees J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To characterise efficacy and safety of 177Lu-DOTATOC as agent for peptide receptor radiotherapy (PRRT) of advanced neuroendocrine tumours (NET). Patients and methods: Fifty-six subjects with metastasized and progressive NET (50% gastroenteral, 26.8% pancreatic, 23.2% other primary sites) treated consecutively with 177Lu-DOTATOC were analysed retrospectively. Subjects were administered 177Lu-DOTATOC (mean 2.1 cycles; range 1-4) as 7.0GBq (median) doses at three-monthly intervals. Efficacy was analysed using CT and/or MRI according to RECIST 1.1 criteria and results were stratified for the number of administered cycles and the primary tumour origin. Results: In the total NET population (A), median progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 17.4 and 34.2 months, respectively, assessed in a follow-up time (mean ± SD) of 16.1 ± 12.4 months. In patients receiving more than one cycle, mean follow-up time was 22.4 ± 11.0 months for all NETs (B) and PFS was 32.0 months for all NETs (B), 34.5 months for GEP-NET (C), and 11.9 months for other NETs (D). Objective response rates (Complete/Partial Responses) were 33.9%, 40.6%, 54.2%, and 0% for A, B, C, and D groups, respectively, while disease control rates in the same were 66.1%, 93.8%, 100%, and 75%. Complete responses (16.1%, 18.8% and 25.0% for groups A, B and C) were high, 78% of which were maintained throughout the follow up. There were no serious adverse events. One case of self-limiting grade 3 myelotoxicity was reported. Although 20% of patients had mild renal insufficiency at baseline, there was no evidence of exacerbated or de novo renal toxicity after treatment. Conclusion: 177Lu-DOTATOC is a novel agent for PRRT with major potential to induce objective tumour responses and sustained disease control in progressive neuroendocrine tumours, even when administered in moderate activities. The observed safety profile suggests a particularly favourable therapeutic index, including in patients with impaired bone marrow or renal function, which reflects a uniquely low uptake of 177Lu-DOTATOC by normal organs. PMID:26941843

  13. Paclitaxel/carboplatin with or without sorafenib in the first-line treatment of patients with stage III/IV epithelial ovarian cancer: a randomized phase II study of the Sarah Cannon Research Institute

    PubMed Central

    Hainsworth, John D; Thompson, Dana S; Bismayer, John A; Gian, Victor G; Merritt, William M; Whorf, Robert C; Finney, Lindsey H; Dudley, B Stephens

    2015-01-01

    This trial compared the efficacy and toxicity of standard first-line treatment with paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/carboplatin plus sorafenib in patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma. Patients with stage 3 or 4 epithelial ovarian cancer with residual measurable disease or elevated CA-125 levels after maximal surgical cytoreduction were randomized (1:1) to receive treatment with paclitaxel (175 mg/m2, 3 h infusion, day 1) and carboplatin (AUC 6.0, IV, day 1) with or without sorafenib 400 mg orally twice daily (PO BID). Patients were reevaluated for response after completing 6 weeks of treatment (two cycles); responding or stable patients received six cycles of paclitaxel/carboplatin. Patients receiving the sorafenib-containing regimen continued sorafenib (400 PO BID) for a total of 52 weeks. Eighty-five patients were randomized and received treatment.Efficacy was similar for patients receiving paclitaxel/carboplatin/sorafenib versus paclitaxel/carboplatin: overall response rates 69% versus 74%; median progression-free survival 15.4 versus 16.3 months; 2 year survival 76% versus 81%. The addition of sorafenib added substantially to the toxicity of the regimen; rash, hand–foot syndrome, mucositis, and hypertension were significantly more common in patients treated with sorafenib. The addition of sorafenib to standard paclitaxel/carboplatin did not improve efficacy and substantially increased toxicity in the first-line treatment of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. Based on evidence from this study and other completed trials, sorafenib is unlikely to have a role in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25556916

  14. VEGF remains an interesting target in advanced pancreas cancer (APCA): results of a multi-institutional phase II study of bevacizumab, gemcitabine, and infusional 5-fluorouracil in patients with APCA

    PubMed Central

    Martin, L. K.; Li, X.; Kleiber, B.; Ellison, E. C.; Bloomston, M.; Zalupski, M.; Bekaii-Saab, T. S.

    2012-01-01

    Background We investigated the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab combined with gemcitabine followed by infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with advanced pancreas cancer (APCA). Design Patients with untreated APCA received bevacizumab 10 mg/kg, gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 over 100 min, and 5-FU 2400 mg/m2 over 48 h on days 1 and 15 of each 28-day cycle. The primary end point was the proportion of patients with progression-free survival (PFS) at 6 months from initiation of therapy. If PFS at 6 months was ≥41%, the regimen would be considered promising. Results Forty-two patients were enrolled in the study; of which, 39 were evaluable for primary end point. PFS at 6 months was 49% (95% CI 34% to 64%). Median PFS was 5.9 months (95% CI 3.5 to 8.1) and median overall survival (OS) was 7.4 months (95% CI 4.7 to 11.2). Partial response and stable disease occurred in 30% and 45% of patients, respectively. Treatment-related hypertension and normal baseline albumin correlated with an improved response rate, PFS and OS. Grade 3 to 4 toxicities included fatigue (14%), hypertension (5%), and venous thrombosis (5%). Conclusions The study met its primary end point. Further investigation of anti-VEGF therapy in combination with fluoropyrimidine-based therapy is warranted in APCA. Treatment-related hypertension and normal baseline albumin may predict for the efficacy of bevacizumab and should be investigated in prospective studies. PMID:22767582

  15. Clinical and genomic analysis of a randomised phase II study evaluating anastrozole and fulvestrant in postmenopausal patients treated for large operable or locally advanced hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Quenel-Tueux, Nathalie; Debled, Marc; Rudewicz, Justine; MacGrogan, Gaetan; Pulido, Marina; Mauriac, Louis; Dalenc, Florence; Bachelot, Thomas; Lortal, Barbara; Breton-Callu, Christelle; Madranges, Nicolas; de Lara, Christine Tunon; Fournier, Marion; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Soueidan, Hayssam; Nikolski, Macha; Gros, Audrey; Daly, Catherine; Wood, Henry; Rabbitts, Pamela; Iggo, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of neoadjuvant anastrozole and fulvestrant treatment of large operable or locally advanced hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer not eligible for initial breast-conserving surgery, and to identify genomic changes occurring after treatment. Methods: One hundred and twenty post-menopausal patients were randomised to receive 1 mg anastrozole (61 patients) or 500 mg fulvestrant (59 patients) for 6 months. Genomic DNA copy number profiles were generated for a subgroup of 20 patients before and after treatment. Results: A total of 108 patients were evaluable for efficacy and 118 for toxicity. The objective response rate determined by clinical palpation was 58.9% (95% CI=45.0–71.9) in the anastrozole arm and 53.8% (95% CI=39.5–67.8) in the fulvestrant arm. The breast-conserving surgery rate was 58.9% (95% CI=45.0–71.9) in the anastrozole arm and 50.0% (95% CI=35.8–64.2) in the fulvestrant arm. Pathological responses >50% occurred in 24 patients (42.9%) in the anastrozole arm and 13 (25.0%) in the fulvestrant arm. The Ki-67 score fell after treatment but there was no significant difference between the reduction in the two arms (anastrozole 16.7% (95% CI=13.3–21.0) before, 3.2% (95% CI=1.9–5.5) after, n=43; fulvestrant 17.1% (95%CI=13.1–22.5) before, 3.2% (95% CI=1.8–5.7) after, n=38) or between the reduction in Ki-67 in clinical responders and non-responders. Genomic analysis appeared to show a reduction of clonal diversity following treatment with selection of some clones with simpler copy number profiles. Conclusions: Both anastrozole and fulvestrant were effective and well-tolerated, enabling breast-conserving surgery in over 50% of patients. Clonal changes consistent with clonal selection by the treatment were seen in a subgroup of patients. PMID:26171933

  16. Is It Important to Adapt Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy to the Visible Clinical Response? An Open Randomized Phase II Study Comparing Response-Guided and Standard Treatments in HER2-Negative Operable Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mouret-Reynier, Marie-Ange; Savoye, Aude-Marie; Abrial, Catherine; Kwiatkowski, Fabrice; Garbar, Christian; DuBray-Longeras, Pascale; Eymard, Jean-Christophe; Lebouedec, Guillaume; Vanpraagh, Isabelle; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Chollet, Philippe; Cure, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Background. Neoadjuvant treatment provides a unique opportunity to evaluate individual tumor sensitivity. This study evaluated whether a response-guided strategy could improve clinical outcome compared with a standard treatment. Methods. Overall, 264 previously untreated stage II–III operable breast cancer patients were randomized to receive either standard treatment (arm A, n = 131), consisting of fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC100: 500, 100, and 500 mg/m2, respectively, for 3 cycles) followed by docetaxel (100 mg/m2 for 3 cycles), or adapted treatment (arm B, n = 133), beginning with 2 cycles of FEC100 and switching to docetaxel if tumor size decreased by <30% after 2 cycles or <50% after 4 cycles of FEC100 (ultrasound assessments according to World Health Organization criteria). Otherwise, FEC100 was given for six cycles before surgery. Intent-to-treat analysis was performed. Results. Similar results were observed for clinical response (objective response was 54% vs 56%, p = .18), breast conservation surgery (BCS; 67% vs 68%, p = .97), and pathological complete response rate (Chevallier classification: 14% vs 11%, p = .68; Statloff classification: 16% vs 13%, p = .82) between arms A and B. Similar toxicities were observed, even with unbalanced numbers of FEC100 and docetaxel courses. Conclusion. Adapted and standard treatments had similar results in terms of tumor response, BCS rate, and tolerability. Further survival outcome data are expected. PMID:25637380

  17. Safety and Tolerability of Everolimus as Second-line Treatment in Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma / Neuroendocrine Carcinoma G3 (WHO 2010) and Neuroendocrine Tumor G3 - an Investigator Initiated Phase II Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-18

    Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma,; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 3; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 1 [Well-differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma] That Switched to G3; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 2 [Moderately Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma] That Switched to G3; Neuroendocrine Tumor, Grade 3 and Disease Progression as Measured by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST 1.1.)

  18. Phase Coexistence in a Dynamic Phase Diagram.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Luigi; Coppola, Luigi; Balog, Sandor; Mortensen, Kell; Ranieri, Giuseppe A; Olsson, Ulf

    2015-08-01

    Metastability and phase coexistence are important concepts in colloidal science. Typically, the phase diagram of colloidal systems is considered at the equilibrium without the presence of an external field. However, several studies have reported phase transition under mechanical deformation. The reason behind phase coexistence under shear flow is not fully understood. Here, multilamellar vesicle (MLV)-to-sponge (L3 ) and MLV-to-Lα transitions upon increasing temperature are detected using flow small-angle neutron scattering techniques. Coexistence of Lα and MLV phases at 40 °C under shear flow is detected by using flow NMR spectroscopy. The unusual rheological behavior observed by studying the lamellar phase of a non-ionic surfactant is explained using (2) H NMR and diffusion flow NMR spectroscopy with the coexistence of planar lamellar-multilamellar vesicles. Moreover, a dynamic phase diagram over a wide range of temperatures is proposed. PMID:26083451

  19. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem

    SciTech Connect

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-06-01

    The idea of attacking the phase problem by crowdsourcing is introduced. Using an interactive, multi-player, web-based system, participants work simultaneously to select phase sets that correspond to better electron-density maps in order to solve low-resolution phasing problems. The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as ‘crowdsourcing’. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of ‘individuals’, each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it

  20. Non-equilibrium phases and phase diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Massalski, T.B.; Rizzo, H.F.

    1988-03-01

    In this paper we consider the degree of usefulness of the phase diagram and the related thermodynamics in predicting and understanding the formation of metastable phases during quenching, or during low-temperature solid-state interdiffusion, or during co-deposition. Recent research has demonstrated that many of such metastable phases are formed because the more stable intermediate phases that are favored thermodynamically are nevertheless bypassed kinetically. The kinetic elimination of intermediate phases provides conditions where a metastable equilibrium can be established at low temperatures between the supercooled liquid and the terminal solid solutions, leading to metastable partitioned two-phase regions. Alternatively, the range of the metastable phases may be governed by the T/sub 0/ principle related to the crossover of the respective free energy curves, or may be controlled mainly by kinetic considerations. Which particular thermodynamic conditions apply appears to depend on the initial form of the phase diagram and the specific technique used. The occurrence of massive transformations also is discussed. 34 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Map-likelihood phasing

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2001-01-01

    The recently developed technique of maximum-likelihood density modification [Terwilliger (2000 ▶), Acta Cryst. D56, 965–972] allows a calculation of phase probabilities based on the likelihood of the electron-density map to be carried out separately from the calculation of any prior phase probabilities. Here, it is shown that phase-probability distributions calculated from the map-likelihood function alone can be highly accurate and that they show minimal bias towards the phases used to initiate the calculation. Map-likelihood phase probabilities depend upon expected characteristics of the electron-density map, such as a defined solvent region and expected electron-density distributions within the solvent region and the region occupied by a macromolecule. In the simplest case, map-likelihood phase-probability distributions are largely based on the flatness of the solvent region. Though map-likelihood phases can be calculated without prior phase information, they are greatly enhanced by high-quality starting phases. This leads to the technique of prime-and-switch phasing for removing model bias. In prime-and-switch phasing, biased phases such as those from a model are used to prime or initiate map-likelihood phasing, then final phases are obtained from map-likelihood phasing alone. Map-likelihood phasing can be applied in cases with solvent content as low as 30%. Potential applications of map-likelihood phasing include unbiased phase calculation from molecular-replacement models, iterative model building, unbiased electron-density maps for cases where 2Fo − Fc or σA-weighted maps would currently be used, structure validation and ab initio phase determination from solvent masks, non-crystallographic symmetry or other knowledge about expected electron density. PMID:11717488

  2. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem.

    PubMed

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R; Yeates, Todd O

    2014-06-01

    The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as `crowdsourcing'. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of `individuals', each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it possible to extract meaningful information in cases where limited resolution might otherwise prevent initial phasing. PMID:24914965

  3. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem

    PubMed Central

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-01-01

    The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as ‘crowdsourcing’. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of ‘individuals’, each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it possible to extract meaningful information in cases where limited resolution might otherwise prevent initial phasing. PMID:24914965

  4. Ripeness sensor development. Final report of a Phase 2 study

    SciTech Connect

    Stroshine, R.

    1995-08-01

    This is a final report for the Phase II study entitled ``Ripeness Sensor Development.`` The overall objective of the study was the development of a prototype device capable of testing whole fruits for sugar content. Although ripeness and sugar content are not synonymous, they are closely related. Furthermore, the consumer`s acceptance of or preference for fruits is strongly influenced by sugar content. Therefore, the device was called a ripeness sensor. The principle behind the measurement is proton magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-MR). For several decades, chemists, pharmacists and other scientists have been using {sup 1}H-MR to investigate chemical structure and composition. More recently, the technique has been used in laboratories of the food industry for quality control. This effort represents one of the first attempts to adapt {sup 1}H-MR to use in a commercial facility. 28 refs., 36 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Propagating phase interface with intermediate interfacial phase: Phase field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Kasra; Levitas, Valery I.

    2014-05-01

    An advanced three-phase phase field approach (PFA) is suggested for a nonequilibrium phase interface that contains an intermediate phase, in particular, a solid-solid interface with a nanometer-sized intermediate melt (IM). A thermodynamic potential in the polar order parameters is developed that satisfies all thermodynamic equilibrium and stability conditions. The special form of the gradient energy allowed us to include the interaction of two solid-melt interfaces via an intermediate melt and obtain a well-posed problem and mesh-independent solutions. It is proved that for stationary 1D solutions to two Ginzburg-Landau equations for three phases, the local energy at each point is equal to the gradient energy. Simulations are performed for β ↔δ phase transformations (PTs) via IM in an HMX energetic material. The obtained energy IM width dependence is described by generalized force-balance models for short- and long-range interaction forces between interfaces but not far from the melting temperature. A force-balance model is developed that describes phase field results even 100 K below the melting temperature. The effects of the ratios of width and energies of solid-solid and solid-melt interfaces, temperature, and the parameter characterizing interaction of two solid-melt interfaces, on the structure, width, energy of the IM and interface velocity are determined by finite element method. Depending on parameters, the IM may appear by continuous or discontinuous barrierless disordering or via critical nucleus due to thermal fluctuations. The IM may appear during heating and persist during cooling at temperatures well below than it follows from sharp-interface approach. On the other hand, for some parameters when IM is expected, it does not form, producing an IM-free gap. The developed PFA represents a quite general three-phase model and can be extended to other physical phenomena, such as martensitic PTs, surface-induced premelting and PTs, premelting

  6. Early Investigational Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders: From Animal Studies to Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The most common gastrointestinal disorders which include evidence of dysmotility include: gastroparesis, the lower functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with altered bowel function [such as chronic (functional) diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC)], and opioid induced constipation (OIC). These conditions, which are grouped as gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders, are characterized by abnormal motor, sensory, or secretory functions that alter bowel function and result in a significant disease burden, since currently available treatments do not completely alleviate symptoms. New drugs are being developed for these disorders, targeting mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases, specifically, motor function, intestinal secretion and bile acid modulation. Areas Covered The article provides a brief overview of motility disorders and the drugs approved and currently available for these indications. It also provides an evaluation of the efficacy, safety and possible mechanisms of the drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, CIC and OIC, based on animal to phase II studies. Medications with complete phase III trials are excluded from this discussion. Expert opinion Treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders requires the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, biomarkers to identify subgroups of these disorders, and robust pharmacological studies from animal to phase II studies. These are prerequisites for the development of efficacious medications and individualizing therapy in order to enhance the treatment of these patients. PMID:25971881

  7. Simplified phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershey, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    Tanlick sine-wave phase detector gives dc output voltage nearly proportional to phase difference between oscillator signal and reference signal. Device may be used for systems in which signal-to-noise ratio is high.

  8. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.A.; Johnson, J.A.

    1992-05-26

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency or phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2[pi] when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention. 6 figs.

  9. Digital quadrature phase detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James A.; Johnson, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A system for detecting the phase of a frequency of phase modulated signal that includes digital quadrature sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal at two times that are one quarter of a cycle of a reference signal apart, determination of the arctangent of the ratio of a first sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal to the second sampling of the frequency or phase modulated signal, and a determination of quadrant in which the phase determination is increased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the first quadrant to the fourth quadrant and decreased by 2.pi. when the quadrant changes from the fourth quadrant to the first quadrant whereby the absolute phase of the frequency or phase modulated signal can be determined using an arbitrary reference convention.

  10. Phase jitter in a differential phase experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanenbaum, B. S.; Connolly, D. J.; Austin, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    Austin (1971) had concluded that, because of the 'phase jitter,' the differential phase experiment is useful over a more limited height range than the differential absorption experiment. Several observations are presented to show that this conclusion is premature. It is pointed out that the logical basis of the differential absorption experiment also requires that the O- and X-mode echoes, at a given time, come from the same irregularities. Austin's calculations are believed to contain a systematic error above 80 km.

  11. Perceptions about Moon Phases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rider, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Presents research on different techniques to determine the level of understanding among middle school students regarding the phases of the moon. Quotes student responses to provide some insight into students' level of understanding of general knowledge about the moon, moon phases, and modeling the phases. Presents implications for teachers. (KHR)

  12. Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes, negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants, they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached. Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need; and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations. PMID:16252337

  13. Phase microscope imaging in phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Mehta, Shalin B.

    2016-03-01

    Imaging in a bright field or phase contrast microscope is partially coherent. We have found that the image can be conveniently considered and modeled in terms of the Wigner distribution function (WDF) of the object transmission. The WDF of the object has a simple physical interpretation for the case of a slowly varying object. Basically, the image intensity is the spatial marginal of the spatial convolution of the object WDF with the phase space imager kernel (PSIkernel), a rotated version of the transmission cross-coefficient. The PSI-kernel can be regarded as a partially-coherent generalization of the point spread function. This approach can be extended to consider the partial coherence of the image itself. In particular, we can consider the mutual intensity, WDF or ambiguity function of the image. It is important to note that the spatial convolution of the object WDF with the PSI-kernel is not a WDF, and not the WDF of the image. The phase space representations of the image have relevance to phase reconstruction methods such as phase space tomography, or the transport of intensity equation approach, and to the three-dimensional image properties.

  14. High-Lift Flight Tunnel - Phase II Report. Phase 2 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofftus, David; Lund, Thomas; Rote, Donald; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The High-Lift Flight Tunnel (HiLiFT) concept is a revolutionary approach to aerodynamic ground testing. This concept utilizes magnetic levitation and linear motors to propel an aerodynamic model through a tube containing a quiescent test medium. This medium (nitrogen) is cryogenic and pressurized to achieve full flight Reynolds numbers higher than any existing ground test facility world-wide for the range of 0.05 to 0.50 Mach. The results of the Phase II study provide excellent assurance that the HiLiFT concept will provide a valuable low-speed, high Reynolds number ground test facility. The design studies concluded that the HiLiFT facility is feasible to build and operate and the analytical studies revealed no insurmountable difficulties to realizing a practical high Reynolds number ground test facility. It was determined that a national HiLiFT facility, including development, would cost approximately $400M and could be operational by 2013 if fully funded. Study participants included National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center as the Program Manager and MSE Technology Applications, Inc., (MSE) of Butte, Montana as the prime contractor and study integrator. MSE#s subcontractors included the University of Texas at Arlington for aerodynamic analyses and the Argonne National Laboratory for magnetic levitation and linear motor technology support.

  15. PHASE DIFFERENTIAL INDICATING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Kirsten, F.A.

    1962-01-01

    An electronic circuit for totalizing the net phase difference between two alternating current signals is designed which responds to both increasing and decreasing phase changes. A phase comparator provldes an output pulse for each 360 deg of phase difference occurring, there being a negative pulse for phase shtft in one direction and a positive pulse for a phase shift in the opposite direction. A counting circuit utilizing glow discharge tubes receives the negative and positive pulses at a single input terminal and provides a running net total, pulses of one polarity dded and pulses of the opposite polarity being subtracted. The glow discharge tubes may be decaded to increase the total count capacity. (AEC)

  16. Gymnastics in Phase Space

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander Wu; /SLAC

    2012-03-01

    As accelerator technology advances, the requirements on accelerator beam quality become increasingly demanding. Facing these new demands, the topic of phase space gymnastics is becoming a new focus of accelerator physics R&D. In a phase space gymnastics, the beam's phase space distribution is manipulated and precision tailored to meet the required beam qualities. On the other hand, all realization of such gymnastics will have to obey accelerator physics principles as well as technological limitations. Recent examples of phase space gymnastics include Emittance exchanges, Phase space exchanges, Emittance partitioning, Seeded FELs and Microbunched beams. The emittance related topics of this list are reviewed in this report. The accelerator physics basis, the optics design principles that provide these phase space manipulations, and the possible applications of these gymnastics, are discussed. This fascinating new field promises to be a powerful tool of the future.

  17. Noncommutative Anandan quantum phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passos, E.; Ribeiro, L. R.; Furtado, C.; Nascimento, J. R.

    2007-07-01

    In this work, we study the noncommutative nonrelativistic quantum dynamics of a neutral particle, which possesses permanent magnetic and electric dipole moments, in the presence of external electric and magnetic fields. We use the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation of the Dirac spinor with a nonminimal coupling to obtain the nonrelativistic limit. In this limit, we study the noncommutative quantum dynamics and obtain the noncommutative Anandan geometric phase. We analyze the situation where the magnetic dipole moment of the particle is zero, and we obtain the noncommutative version of the He-McKellar-Wilkens effect. We demonstrate that this phase in the noncommutative case is a geometric dispersive phase. We also investigate this geometric phase by considering the noncommutativity in the phase space, and the Anandan phase is obtained.

  18. Crystal phase identification

    DOEpatents

    Michael, Joseph R.; Goehner, Raymond P.; Schlienger, Max E.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample. This invention provides a method and apparatus for unambiguously identifying and determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample by using an electron beam generator, such as a scanning electron microscope, to obtain a backscattered electron Kikuchi pattern of a sample, and extracting crystallographic and composition data that is matched to database information to provide a quick and automatic method to identify crystalline phases.

  19. Phase Holograms In PMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maker, Paul D.; Muller, Richard E.

    1994-01-01

    Complex, computer-generated phase holograms written in thin films of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by process of electron-beam exposure followed by chemical development. Spatial variations of phase delay in holograms quasi-continuous, as distinquished from stepwise as in binary phase holograms made by integrated-circuit fabrication. Holograms more precise than binary holograms. Greater continuity and precision results in decreased scattering loss and increased imaging efficiency.

  20. Novel therapies for resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FONT) phase II clinical trial: study design

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The lack of adequate randomized clinical trials (RCT) has hindered identification of new therapies that are safe and effective for patients with primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), especially in patients who fail to respond to corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapies. Recent basic science advances have led to development of alternative treatments that specifically target aberrant pathways of fibrosis which are relevant to disease progression in FSGS. There is a need for a flexible Phase II study design which will test such novel antifibrotic strategies in order to identify agents suitable for phase III testing. Methods/Design The Novel Therapies for Resistant Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FONT) project is a multicenter Phase I/II RCT designed to investigate the potential efficacy of novel therapies for resistant FSGS. Adalimumab and galactose will be evaluated against conservative therapy consisting of the combination of lisinopril, losartan and atorvastatin. The sample size is defined to assure that if one of the treatments has a superior response rate compared to that of the other treatments, it will be selected with high probability for further evaluation. Comparison of primary and secondary endpoints in each study arm will enable a choice to be made of which treatments are worthy of further study in future Phase III RCT. Discussion This report highlights the key features of the FONT II RCT including the two-step outcome analysis that will expedite achievement of the study objectives. The proposed phase II study design will help to identify promising agents for further testing while excluding ineffective agents. This staged approach can help to prevent large expenditures on unworthy therapeutic agents in the management of serious but rare kidney diseases Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00814255 PMID:21310077

  1. Holographic magnetic phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lifschytz, Gilad; Lippert, Matthew

    2009-09-15

    We study four-dimensional interacting fermions in a strong magnetic field, using the holographic Sakai-Sugimoto model of intersecting D4- and D8-branes in the deconfined, chiral-symmetric parallel phase. We find that as the magnetic field is varied, while staying in the parallel phase, the fermions exhibit a first-order phase transition in which their magnetization jumps discontinuously. Properties of this transition are consistent with a picture in which some of the fermions jump to the lowest Landau level. Similarities to known magnetic phase transitions are discussed.