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Sample records for developed parasitic perfusion

  1. Developing a tissue perfusion sensor.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S L R; Parker, K H; O'Hare, D

    2007-01-01

    The development of a electrochemical tissue perfusion sensor is presented. The sensor is a platinum/platinum ring-disc microelectrode that relies on the principle of collector-generator to monitor mass transport within its vicinity. Tissue perfusion is a mass transport mechanism that describes the movement of respiratory gases, nutrients and metabolites in tissue. The sensor's capability of detecting perfusion at the cellular level in a continuous fashion is unique. This sensor will provide insight into the way nutrients and metabolites are transported in tissue especially in cases were perfusion is low such as in wounds or ischemic tissue. We present experimental work for the development and testing of the sensors in vitro. Experimental flow recordings in free steam solutions as well as the flow through tissue-like media are shown. Tests on post operative human tissue are also presented. The sensor's feature such as the continuous recoding capacities, spatial resolution and the measurement range from ml/min to microl/min are highlighted. PMID:18002549

  2. Parasitic diseases and urban development.

    PubMed Central

    Mott, K. E.; Desjeux, P.; Moncayo, A.; Ranque, P.; de Raadt, P.

    1990-01-01

    The distribution and epidemiology of parasitic diseases in both urban and periurban areas of endemic countries have been changing as development progresses. The following different scenarios involving Chagas disease, lymphatic filariasis, leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis are discussed: (1) infected persons entering nonendemic urban areas without vectors; (2) infected persons entering nonendemic urban areas with vectors; (3) infected persons entering endemic urban areas; (4) non-infected persons entering endemic urban areas; (5) urbanization or domestication of natural zoonotic foci; and (6) vectors entering nonendemic urban areas. Cultural and social habits from the rural areas, such as type of house construction and domestic water usage, are adopted by migrants to urban areas and increase the risk of disease transmission which adversely affects employment in urban populations. As the urban health services must deal with the rise in parasitic diseases, appropriate control strategies for the urban setting must be developed and implemented. PMID:2127380

  3. Developing a Benchmarking Process in Perfusion: A Report of the Perfusion Downunder Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Robert A.; Newland, Richard F.; Fenton, Carmel; McDonald, Michael; Willcox, Timothy W.; Merry, Alan F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Improving and understanding clinical practice is an appropriate goal for the perfusion community. The Perfusion Downunder Collaboration has established a multi-center perfusion focused database aimed at achieving these goals through the development of quantitative quality indicators for clinical improvement through benchmarking. Data were collected using the Perfusion Downunder Collaboration database from procedures performed in eight Australian and New Zealand cardiac centers between March 2007 and February 2011. At the Perfusion Downunder Meeting in 2010, it was agreed by consensus, to report quality indicators (QI) for glucose level, arterial outlet temperature, and pCO2 management during cardiopulmonary bypass. The values chosen for each QI were: blood glucose ≥4 mmol/L and ≤10 mmol/L; arterial outlet temperature ≤37°C; and arterial blood gas pCO2 ≥ 35 and ≤45 mmHg. The QI data were used to derive benchmarks using the Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC™) methodology to identify the incidence of QIs at the best performing centers. Five thousand four hundred and sixty-five procedures were evaluated to derive QI and benchmark data. The incidence of the blood glucose QI ranged from 37–96% of procedures, with a benchmark value of 90%. The arterial outlet temperature QI occurred in 16–98% of procedures with the benchmark of 94%; while the arterial pCO2 QI occurred in 21–91%, with the benchmark value of 80%. We have derived QIs and benchmark calculations for the management of several key aspects of cardiopulmonary bypass to provide a platform for improving the quality of perfusion practice. PMID:22730861

  4. Parasitic diarrheal disease: drug development and targets

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Amir; Peerzada, Mudasir N.; Ahmad, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea is the manifestation of gastrointestinal infection and is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity specifically among the children of less than 5 years age worldwide. Moreover, in recent years there has been a rise in the number of reports of intestinal infections continuously in the industrialized world. These are largely related to waterborne and food borne outbreaks. These occur by the pathogenesis of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms like bacteria and parasites. The parasitic intestinal infection has remained mostly unexplored and under assessed in terms of therapeutic development. The lack of new drugs and the risk of resistance have led us to carry out this review on drug development for parasitic diarrheal diseases. The major focus has been depicted on commercially available drugs, currently synthesized active heterocyclic compounds and unique drug targets, that are vital for the existence and growth of the parasites and can be further exploited for the search of therapeutically active anti-parasitic agents. PMID:26617574

  5. [Views for research development of control of parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin-Ping; Dong, Hui-Fen; Jiang, Ming-Sen

    2013-12-01

    With the social and technological development, new understandings have been emerged for the research development of the control of parasitic diseases. The present review argues that: the traditional point of view for the control of parasitic diseases, eliminating parasites/media, should be updated. For the long-term interests of science and human perspective, biological diversity, including the parasite biodiversity, and ecological environment should be paid much more attention during the control of parasitic diseases. The leading role of society, economy and culture should be fully developed in the control of parasitic diseases with the progress of scientific and technology, to find a final way of sustainable development in the control of parasitic diseases. PMID:24490386

  6. Development of an Extracorporeal Perfusion Device for Small Animal Free Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Fichter, Andreas M.; Ritschl, Lucas M.; Borgmann, Anna; Humbs, Martin; Luppa, Peter B.; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mücke, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal perfusion (ECP) might prolong the vital storage capabilities of composite free flaps, potentially opening a wide range of clinical applications. Aim of the study was the development a validated low-cost extracorporeal perfusion model for further research in small animal free flaps. Methods After establishing optimal perfusion settings, a specially designed extracorporeal perfusion system was evaluated during 8-hour perfusion of rat epigastric flaps followed by microvascular free flap transfer. Controls comprised sham-operation, ischemia and in vivo perfusion. Flaps and perfusate (diluted blood) were closely monitored by blood gas analysis, combined laser Doppler flowmetry and remission spectroscopy and Indocyanine-Green angiography. Evaluations were complemented by assessment of necrotic area and light microscopy at day 7. Results ECP was established and maintained for 8 hours with constant potassium and pH levels. Subsequent flap transfer was successful. Notably, the rate of necrosis of extracorporeally perfused flaps (27%) was even lower than after in vivo perfusion (49%), although not statistically significant (P = 0,083). After sham-operation, only 6% of the total flap area became necrotic, while 8-hour ischemia led to total flap loss (98%). Angiographic and histological findings confirmed these observations. Conclusions Vital storage capabilities of microvascular flaps can be prolonged by temporary ECP. Our study provides important insights on the pathophysiological processes during extracorporeal tissue perfusion and provides a validated small animal perfusion model for further studies. PMID:26808996

  7. Recent developments and future prospects of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Maseeh Uz; Hashmi, Ibrahim; Fatima, Nosheen

    2010-10-01

    Myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging is the most commonly performed functional imaging for assessment of coronary artery disease. High diagnostic accuracy and incremental prognostic value are the major benefits while suboptimal spatial resolution and significant radiation exposure are the main limitations. Its ability to detect hemodynamic significance of lesions seen on multidetector CT angiogram (MDCTA) has paved the path for a successful marriage between anatomical and functional imaging modalities in the form of hybrid SPECT/MDCTA system. In recent years, there have been enormous efforts by industry and academia to develop new SPECT imaging systems with better sensitivity, resolution, compact design and new reconstruction algorithms with ability to improve image quality and resolution. Furthermore, expected arrival of Tc-99m-labeled deoxyglucose in next few years would further strengthen the role of SPECT in imaging hibernating myocardium. In view of these developments, it seems that SPECT would enjoy its pivotal role in spite of major threat to be replaced by fluorine-18-labeled positron emission tomography perfusion and glucose metabolism imaging agents. PMID:20652774

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF APTAMERS TO WATERBORNE PARASITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Safe Drinking Water Act Amendment of 1996 mandates that the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluate public health risks associated with drinking water contaminants to include waterborne parasites, such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia. Additionally, the Agency est...

  9. Parasites

    MedlinePlus

    ... CME and CNE for clinicians... Parasitic Disease and Malaria Strategic Priorities: 2015—2020... Cyclosporiasis: Most U.S. cases ... R S T U V W X Y Z Malaria An ancient disease that affects millions of people ...

  10. Leishmania development in sand flies: parasite-vector interactions overview

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniases are vector-borne parasitic diseases with 0.9 – 1.4 million new human cases each year worldwide. In the vectorial part of the life-cycle, Leishmania development is confined to the digestive tract. During the first few days after blood feeding, natural barriers to Leishmania development include secreted proteolytic enzymes, the peritrophic matrix surrounding the ingested blood meal and sand fly immune reactions. As the blood digestion proceeds, parasites need to bind to the midgut epithelium to avoid being excreted with the blood remnant. This binding is strictly stage-dependent as it is a property of nectomonad and leptomonad forms only. While the attachment in specific vectors (P. papatasi, P. duboscqi and P. sergenti) involves lipophosphoglycan (LPG), this Leishmania molecule is not required for parasite attachment in other sand fly species experimentally permissive for various Leishmania. During late-stage infections, large numbers of parasites accumulate in the anterior midgut and produce filamentous proteophosphoglycan creating a gel-like plug physically obstructing the gut. The parasites attached to the stomodeal valve cause damage to the chitin lining and epithelial cells of the valve, interfering with its function and facilitating reflux of parasites from the midgut. Transformation to metacyclic stages highly infective for the vertebrate host is the other prerequisite for effective transmission. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of molecular interactions occurring in all these distinct phases of parasite colonization of the sand fly gut, highlighting recent discoveries in the field. PMID:23206339

  11. The development of malaria parasites in the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Bennink, Sandra; Kiesow, Meike J; Pradel, Gabriele

    2016-07-01

    The mosquito midgut stages of malaria parasites are crucial for establishing an infection in the insect vector and to thus ensure further spread of the pathogen. Parasite development in the midgut starts with the activation of the intraerythrocytic gametocytes immediately after take-up and ends with traversal of the midgut epithelium by the invasive ookinetes less than 24 h later. During this time period, the plasmodia undergo two processes of stage conversion, from gametocytes to gametes and from zygotes to ookinetes, both accompanied by dramatic morphological changes. Further, gamete formation requires parasite egress from the enveloping erythrocytes, rendering them vulnerable to the aggressive factors of the insect gut, like components of the human blood meal. The mosquito midgut stages of malaria parasites are unprecedented objects to study a variety of cell biological aspects, including signal perception, cell conversion, parasite/host co-adaptation and immune evasion. This review highlights recent insights into the molecules involved in gametocyte activation and gamete formation as well as in zygote-to-ookinete conversion and ookinete midgut exit; it further discusses factors that can harm the extracellular midgut stages as well as the measures of the parasites to protect themselves from any damage. PMID:27111866

  12. Development and application of a high-throughput platform for perfusion-based cell culture processes.

    PubMed

    Villiger-Oberbek, Agata; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Weichang; Yang, Jianguo

    2015-10-20

    A high-throughput (HT) cell culture model has been established for the support of perfusion-based cell culture processes operating at high cell densities. To mimic perfusion, the developed platform takes advantage of shake tubes and operates them in a batch-refeed mode with daily medium exchange to supply the cultures with nutrients and remove toxic byproducts. By adjusting the shaking parameters, such as the speed and setting angle, we have adapted the shake tubes to a semi-continuous production of a recombinant enzyme in a perfusion-like mode. We have demonstrated that the developed model can be used to select clones and cell culture media ahead of process optimization studies in bioreactors and confirmed the applicability of shake tubes to a perfusion-like cell culture reaching ∼50E6 viable cells/mL. Furthermore, through regular cell mass removal and periodic medium exchange we have successfully maintained satellite cultures of bench-top perfusion bioreactors, achieving a sustainable cell culture performance at ≥30E6 viable cells/mL and viabilities >80% for over 58 days. The established HT model is a unique and powerful tool that can be used for the development and screening of media formulations, or for testing selected process parameters during both process optimization and manufacturing support campaigns. PMID:26197419

  13. Development and implementation of a perfusion-based high cell density cell banking process.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yiwen; Shih, Jennifer; Sinacore, Marty; Ryll, Thomas; Yusuf-Makagiansar, Helena

    2011-01-01

    A perfusion-based high cell density (HD) cell banking process has been developed that offers substantial advantages in time savings and simplification of upstream unit operations. HD cell banking provides the means to reduce the time required for culture inoculum expansion and scale-up by eliminating the need for multiple small to intermediate scale shake flask-based operations saving up to 9 days of operation during large-scale inoculum expansion. HD perfusion cultures were developed and optimized in a disposable Wave bioreactor system. Through optimization of perfusion rate, rocking speed and aeration rate, the perfusion system supported peak cell densities of >20 × 10(6) cells/mL while maintaining high cell viability (≥ 90%). The cells were frozen at HD (90-100 × 10(6) viable cells/mL) in 5-mL CryoTube vials. HD cell banks were demonstrated to enable direct inoculation of culture into a Wave bioreactor in the inoculum expansion train thus eliminating the need for intermediate shake flask expansion unit operations. The simplicity of the disposable perfusion system and high quality of the cell banks resulted in the successful implementation in a 2000 L scale manufacturing facility. PMID:21538974

  14. Leishmania vaccine development: exploiting the host-vector-parasite interface.

    PubMed

    Reed, S G; Coler, R N; Mondal, D; Kamhawi, S; Valenzuela, J G

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand flies, fatal if untreated, and with no available human vaccine. In rodents, cellular immunity to Leishmania parasite proteins as well as salivary proteins of the sand fly is associated with protection, making them worthy targets for further exploration as vaccines. This review discusses the notion that a combination vaccine including Leishmania and vector salivary antigens may improve vaccine efficacy by targeting the parasite at its most vulnerable stage just after transmission. Furthermore, we put forward the notion that better modeling of natural transmission is needed to test efficacy of vaccines. For example, the fact that individuals living in endemic areas are exposed to sand fly bites and will mount an immune response to salivary proteins should be considered in pre-clinical and clinical evaluation of leishmaniasis vaccines. Nevertheless, despite remaining obstacles there is good reason to be optimistic that safe and effective vaccines against leishmaniasis can be developed. PMID:26595093

  15. Parasites and steroid hormones: corticosteroid and sex steroid synthesis, their role in the parasite physiology and development

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Marta C.; Jiménez, Pedro; Miranda-Brito, Carolina; Valdez, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    In many cases parasites display highly complex life cycles that include the penetration and permanence of the larva or adults within host organs, but even in those that only have one host, reciprocal, intricate interactions occur. Evidence indicates that steroid hormones have an influence on the development and course of parasitic infections. The host gender's susceptibility to infection, and the related differences in the immune response are good examples of the host-parasite interplay. However, the capacity of these organisms to synthesize their own steroidogenic hormones still has more questions than answers. It is now well-known that many parasites synthesize ecdysteroids, but limited information is available on sex steroid and corticosteroid synthesis. This review intends to summarize some of the existing information in the field. In most, but not all parasitosis the host's hormonal environment determines the susceptibility, the course, and severity of parasite infections. In most cases the infection disturbs the host environment, and activates immune responses that end up affecting the endocrine system. Furthermore, sex steroids and corticosteroids may also directly modify the parasite reproduction and molting. Available information indicates that parasites synthesize some steroid hormones, such as ecdysteroids and sex steroids, and the presence and activity of related enzymes have been demonstrated. More recently, the synthesis of corticosteroid-like compounds has been shown in Taenia solium cysticerci and tapeworms, and in Taenia crassiceps WFU cysticerci. In-depth knowledge of the parasite's endocrine properties will contribute to understand their reproduction and reciprocal interactions with the host, and may also help designing tools to combat the infection in some clinical situations. PMID:26175665

  16. Metanephric kidney development in the chicken embryo: Glomerular numbers, characteristics and perfusion.

    PubMed

    Bolin, Greta; Burggren, Warren W

    2013-10-01

    The developing metanephric kidneys and chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) work in unison to ensure ion and water homeostasis in the avian embryo within its egg. This study focused on how avian renal structure and glomerular perfusion change in concert during development, as well as on changes in body fluid compartment osmolalities. White leghorn chicken eggs were incubated at 37.5°C and 55-60% relative humidity and were examined during days (D) 10-18 of development. Alcian blue, a stain that forms solid aggregations in actively perfused glomeruli of the metanephric kidney, was used to identify the proportion of glomeruli actually perfused. Total nephron number increased from 4705±1599 nephrons/kidney on day 12 to 39,825±3051 nephrons/kidney on day 18. Actively perfused nephrons increased ~23-fold from 761±481 nephrons/kidney on day 12 (~16% of total nephrons) to 17,313±2750 nephrons/kidney on 18 (~43% of total nephrons). Glomerular volume increased from days 12 to 14, remaining constant thereafter. Blood and cloacal fluid osmolality ranged from 270 to 280 mOsm/L. Amniotic fluid osmolality changed in a complex fashion during development but was comparable to blood on days 10 and 18. Allantoic fluid had the lowest osmolalities (175-215 mOsm/L) across development. Uric acid increased steadily within the allantoic fluid compartment, from 36±1mmol/L to 63±4mmol/L. The avian metanephric kidney thus shows a dramatic increase in both recruitment of nephrons and potential filtering capacity during the last half of incubation, in preparation for the degeneration of the allantoic membranes prior to internal piping and subsequent hatching. PMID:23850715

  17. Ex vivo lung perfusion: a comprehensive review of the development and exploration of future trends.

    PubMed

    Roman, Marius A; Nair, Sukumaran; Tsui, Steven; Dunning, John; Parmar, Jasvir S

    2013-09-01

    There is a critical mismatch between the number of donor lungs available and the demand for lungs for transplantation. This has created unacceptably high waiting-list mortality for lung transplant recipients. Currently (2012) in the United Kingdom, there are 216 patients on the lung transplant waiting list and 17 on heart and lung transplant list. The waiting times for suitable lungs average 412 days, with an increasing mortality and morbidity among the patients on the lung transplant list. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a technique for the assessment, resuscitation, and potential repair of suboptimal donor lungs. This is a rapidly developing field with significant clinical implications. In this review article, we critically appraise the background developments that have led to our current clinical practice. In particular, we focus on the human and animal experience, the different perfusion-ventilation strategies, and the impact of different perfusates and leukocyte filters. Finally, we examine EVLP as a potential research tool. This will provide insight into EVLP and its future development in the field of clinical lung transplantation. PMID:23694953

  18. Scaffold proteins LACK and TRACK as potential drug targets in kinetoplastid parasites: Development of inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Qvit, Nir; Schechtman, Deborah; Pena, Darlene Aparecida; Berti, Denise Aparecida; Soares, Chrislaine Oliveira; Miao, Qianqian; Liang, Liying (Annie); Baron, Lauren A.; Teh-Poot, Christian; Martínez-Vega, Pedro; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Churchill, Eric; Cunningham, Anna D.; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Federspiel, Nancy A.; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia; Manso Alves, Maria Julia; Jardim, Armando; Momar, Ndao; Dumonteil, Eric; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases cause ∼500,000 deaths annually and remain a major challenge for therapeutic development. Using a rational design based approach, we developed peptide inhibitors with anti-parasitic activity that were derived from the sequences of parasite scaffold proteins LACK (Leishmania's receptor for activated C-kinase) and TRACK (Trypanosomareceptor for activated C-kinase). We hypothesized that sequences in LACK and TRACK that are conserved in the parasites, but not in the mammalian ortholog, RACK (Receptor for activated C-kinase), may be interaction sites for signaling proteins that are critical for the parasites' viability. One of these peptides exhibited leishmanicidal and trypanocidal activity in culture. Moreover, in infected mice, this peptide was also effective in reducing parasitemia and increasing survival without toxic effects. The identified peptide is a promising new anti-parasitic drug lead, as its unique features may limit toxicity and drug-resistance, thus overcoming central limitations of most anti-parasitic drugs. PMID:27054066

  19. [Development of rotating perfusion bioreactor system and application for bone tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Li, Dichen; Wang, Lin; Wang, Zhen; Lu, Bingheng

    2007-02-01

    A rotating perfusion bioreactor system has recently been developed in our laboratory to produce 3D dynamic culture condition, and the critical-sized scaffolds with interconnected microchennels were fabricated. Gas exchange occurs by semipermeable membrane covered on each side of bioreactor and gas-permeable peristaltic pump tube. Rotation and perfusion of culture media through large scaffolds enhance well mixing and mass transport of oxygen and nutrients in the bioreactor. Osteoblastic cells attached to microchennels are exposed to a low fluid flow-induced shear stress level. This bioreactor system overcomes several defects exited in static culture condition, improves the culture environment, facilitates osteoblast proliferation, differntiation, significant matrix production and mineralization, and the controllability of culture process is enhanced. Large scaffolds/osteoblast constructs were cultured in the bioreactor system for 14 days. Osteoblastic cells attached to microchannels of scaffolds were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicated that cells grew extensively in the microchennels of large scaffolds. PMID:17333894

  20. Postembryonic development of the parasitic amphipod Hyperia galba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Birgit

    1987-06-01

    Hyperia galba Montagu is associated with gelatinous zooplankton as are many species of the Hyperiidea. The hosts preferred in the European seas are the large scyphomedusae Aurelia aurita, Chrysaora hysoscella, Rhizostoma pulmo, Cyanea capillata and Cyanea lamarckii, which harbour the first developmental stages. The anamorphic development produces young that are incapable of swimming at the time of hatching. They are characterized by an embryonic abdomen without extremities and external segmentation; the eyes are not completely developed and the mouth is primitive lacking bristles, molar and incisor. The postembryonic development, described in detail, is subdivided into two phases: the pantochelis phase and the protopleon phase; the former comprises only one stage; the latter can be subdivided into four stages. In the course of postnatal development the larval organs are reduced and characters typical of the adult are gradually differentiated. H. galba plays an important role as obligatory endoparasite of scyphomedusae at least during the first stages of development; without a host this amphipod cannot survive, neither benthically nor in the plankton. The transition from life in the female's marsupium to endoparasitism in the jellyfish generally occurs during stage of the postembryonic development which is the first stage of the protopleon phase. The specific adaptations of its reproductive biology to a parasitic mode of life such as moult inhibition under starvation, development of larval organs and the behavioural patterns of the females as well as the young are described. Further, the influence of external factors such as temperature and food supply on the course of development is examined.

  1. Immune modulation by helminth parasites of ruminants: implications for vaccine development and host immune competence

    PubMed Central

    McNeilly, Tom N.; Nisbet, Alasdair J.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic helminths reside in immunologically-exposed extracellular locations within their hosts, yet they are capable of surviving for extended periods. To enable this survival, these parasites have developed complex and multifaceted mechanisms to subvert or suppress host immunity. This review summarises current knowledge of immune modulation by helminth parasites of ruminants and the parasite-derived molecules involved in driving this modulation. Such immunomodulatory molecules have considerable promise as vaccine targets, as neutralisation of their function is predicted to enhance anti-parasite immunity and, as such, current knowledge in this area is presented herein. Furthermore, we summarise current evidence that, as well as affecting parasite-specific immunity, immune modulation by these parasites may also affect the ability of ruminant hosts to control concurrent diseases or mount effective responses to vaccination. PMID:25292481

  2. [Role of twin reversed arterial perfusion syndrome in the development of fetus acardius].

    PubMed

    Nizyaeva, N V; Kostyukov, K V; Gladkova, K A; Kulikova, G V; Shchegolev, A I

    2016-01-01

    Monochorionic multiple pregnancy has a higher risk for obstetric complications, including those due to the development of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome and reversed arterial perfusion syndrome (TRAP sequence). The latter occurs in 0.1% of all monochorionic pregnancies. The basis for TRAP sequence is a relationship between arterial and venous anastomoses from the appropriate placental areas, causing a recipient fetus to develop at the expense of a donor fetus. The presence of abnormal anastomoses is considered to be a main cause of acardia. The prognosis for a donor fetus is also unfavorable: the mortality rates in the absence of intrauterine correction are as high as 55%. PMID:27600783

  3. Chloroquine neither eliminates liver stage parasites nor delays their development in a murine Chemoprophylaxis Vaccination model.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Tejram; Lambert, Lynn; Herrod, Jessica; Conteh, Solomon; Orr-Gonzalez, Sachy; Carter, Dariyen; Duffy, Patrick E

    2015-01-01

    Chemoprophylaxis Vaccination (CVac) confers long lasting sterile protection against homologous parasite strains in humans, and involves inoculation of infectious sporozoites (SPZ) under drug cover. CVac using the drug chloroquine (CQ) induces pre-erythrocytic immunity in humans that includes antibody to SPZ and T-cell responses to liver stage (LS) parasites. The mechanism by which CVac with CQ induces strong protective immunity is not understood as untreated infections do not confer protection. CQ kills blood stage parasites, but its effect on LS parasites is poorly studied. Here we hypothesized that CQ may prolong or perturb LS development of Plasmodium, as a potential explanation for enhanced pre-erythrocytic immune responses. Balb/c mice with or without CQ prophylaxis were infected with sporozoite forms of a luciferase-expressing rodent parasite, Plasmodium yoelii-Luc (Py-Luc). Mice that received primaquine, a drug that kills LS parasites, served as a positive control of drug effect. Parasite burden in liver was measured both by bioluminescence and by qRT-PCR quantification of parasite transcript. Time to appearance of parasites in the blood was monitored by microscopic analysis of Giemsa-stained thick and thin blood smears. The parasite load in livers of CQ-treated and untreated mice did not significantly differ at any of the time points studied. Parasites appeared in the blood smears of both CQ-treated and untreated mice 3 days after infection. Taken together, our findings confirm that CQ neither eliminates LS parasites nor delays their development. Further investigations into the mechanism of CQ-induced protection after CVac are required, and may give insights relevant to drug and vaccine development. PMID:25914686

  4. Chloroquine neither eliminates liver stage parasites nor delays their development in a murine Chemoprophylaxis Vaccination model

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Tejram; Lambert, Lynn; Herrod, Jessica; Conteh, Solomon; Orr-Gonzalez, Sachy; Carter, Dariyen; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2015-01-01

    Chemoprophylaxis Vaccination (CVac) confers long lasting sterile protection against homologous parasite strains in humans, and involves inoculation of infectious sporozoites (SPZ) under drug cover. CVac using the drug chloroquine (CQ) induces pre-erythrocytic immunity in humans that includes antibody to SPZ and T-cell responses to liver stage (LS) parasites. The mechanism by which CVac with CQ induces strong protective immunity is not understood as untreated infections do not confer protection. CQ kills blood stage parasites, but its effect on LS parasites is poorly studied. Here we hypothesized that CQ may prolong or perturb LS development of Plasmodium, as a potential explanation for enhanced pre-erythrocytic immune responses. Balb/c mice with or without CQ prophylaxis were infected with sporozoite forms of a luciferase-expressing rodent parasite, Plasmodium yoelii-Luc (Py-Luc). Mice that received primaquine, a drug that kills LS parasites, served as a positive control of drug effect. Parasite burden in liver was measured both by bioluminescence and by qRT-PCR quantification of parasite transcript. Time to appearance of parasites in the blood was monitored by microscopic analysis of Giemsa-stained thick and thin blood smears. The parasite load in livers of CQ-treated and untreated mice did not significantly differ at any of the time points studied. Parasites appeared in the blood smears of both CQ-treated and untreated mice 3 days after infection. Taken together, our findings confirm that CQ neither eliminates LS parasites nor delays their development. Further investigations into the mechanism of CQ-induced protection after CVac are required, and may give insights relevant to drug and vaccine development. PMID:25914686

  5. Lipopeptide Nanoparticles: Development of Vaccines against Hookworm Parasite.

    PubMed

    Fuaad, Abdullah A H Ahmad; Pearson, Mark S; Pickering, Darren A; Becker, Luke; Zhao, Guangzu; Loukas, Alex C; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan

    2015-10-01

    Necator americanus (hookworm) infects over half a billion people worldwide. Anthelminthic drugs are commonly used to treat the infection; however, vaccination is a more favorable strategy to combat this parasite. We designed new B-cell peptide epitopes based on the aspartic protease of N. americanus (Na-APR-1). The peptides were conjugated to self-adjuvanting lipid core peptide (LCP) systems via stepwise solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) and copper catalyst azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reactions. The LCP vaccine candidates were able to self-assemble into nanoparticles, were administered to mice without the use of additional adjuvant, and generated antibodies that recognized the parent epitope. However, only one LCP derivative was able to produce a high titer of antibodies specific to Na-APR-1; circular dichroism analyses of this compound showed a β-sheet conformation for the incorporated epitope. This study provides important insight in epitope and delivery system design for the development of a vaccine against hookworm infections. PMID:26269385

  6. A broad analysis of resistance development in the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Corey, Victoria C; Lukens, Amanda K; Istvan, Eva S; Lee, Marcus C S; Franco, Virginia; Magistrado, Pamela; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sakata-Kato, Tomoyo; Fuchs, Olivia; Gnädig, Nina F; Goldgof, Greg; Linares, Maria; Gomez-Lorenzo, Maria G; De Cózar, Cristina; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria Jose; Prats, Sara; Meister, Stephan; Tanaseichuk, Olga; Wree, Melanie; Zhou, Yingyao; Willis, Paul A; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Goldberg, Daniel E; Fidock, David A; Wirth, Dyann F; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Microbial resistance to chemotherapy has caused countless deaths where malaria is endemic. Chemotherapy may fail either due to pre-existing resistance or evolution of drug-resistant parasites. Here we use a diverse set of antimalarial compounds to investigate the acquisition of drug resistance and the degree of cross-resistance against common resistance alleles. We assess cross-resistance using a set of 15 parasite lines carrying resistance-conferring alleles in pfatp4, cytochrome bc1, pfcarl, pfdhod, pfcrt, pfmdr, pfdhfr, cytoplasmic prolyl t-RNA synthetase or hsp90. Subsequently, we assess whether resistant parasites can be obtained after several rounds of drug selection. Twenty-three of the 48 in vitro selections result in resistant parasites, with time to resistance onset ranging from 15 to 300 days. Our data indicate that pre-existing resistance may not be a major hurdle for novel-target antimalarial candidates, and focusing our attention on fast-killing compounds may result in a slower onset of clinical resistance. PMID:27301419

  7. A broad analysis of resistance development in the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Victoria C.; Lukens, Amanda K.; Istvan, Eva S.; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Franco, Virginia; Magistrado, Pamela; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sakata-Kato, Tomoyo; Fuchs, Olivia; Gnädig, Nina F.; Goldgof, Greg; Linares, Maria; Gomez-Lorenzo, Maria G.; De Cózar, Cristina; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria Jose; Prats, Sara; Meister, Stephan; Tanaseichuk, Olga; Wree, Melanie; Zhou, Yingyao; Willis, Paul A.; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Goldberg, Daniel E.; Fidock, David A.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial resistance to chemotherapy has caused countless deaths where malaria is endemic. Chemotherapy may fail either due to pre-existing resistance or evolution of drug-resistant parasites. Here we use a diverse set of antimalarial compounds to investigate the acquisition of drug resistance and the degree of cross-resistance against common resistance alleles. We assess cross-resistance using a set of 15 parasite lines carrying resistance-conferring alleles in pfatp4, cytochrome bc1, pfcarl, pfdhod, pfcrt, pfmdr, pfdhfr, cytoplasmic prolyl t-RNA synthetase or hsp90. Subsequently, we assess whether resistant parasites can be obtained after several rounds of drug selection. Twenty-three of the 48 in vitro selections result in resistant parasites, with time to resistance onset ranging from 15 to 300 days. Our data indicate that pre-existing resistance may not be a major hurdle for novel-target antimalarial candidates, and focusing our attention on fast-killing compounds may result in a slower onset of clinical resistance. PMID:27301419

  8. Development of an Ex Vivo, Beating Heart Model for CT Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Pelgrim, Gert Jan; Das, Marco; Haberland, Ulrike; Slump, Cees; Handayani, Astri; van Tuijl, Sjoerd; Stijnen, Marco; Klotz, Ernst; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the feasibility of a CT-compatible, ex vivo, perfused porcine heart model for myocardial perfusion CT imaging. Methods. One porcine heart was perfused according to Langendorff. Dynamic perfusion scanning was performed with a second-generation dual source CT scanner. Circulatory parameters like blood flow, aortic pressure, and heart rate were monitored throughout the experiment. Stenosis was induced in the circumflex artery, controlled by a fractional flow reserve (FFR) pressure wire. CT-derived myocardial perfusion parameters were analysed at FFR of 1 to 0.10/0.0. Results. CT images did not show major artefacts due to interference of the model setup. The pacemaker-induced heart rhythm was generally stable at 70 beats per minute. During most of the experiment, blood flow was 0.9–1.0 L/min, and arterial pressure varied between 80 and 95 mm/Hg. Blood flow decreased and arterial pressure increased by approximately 10% after inducing a stenosis with FFR ≤ 0.50. Dynamic perfusion scanning was possible across the range of stenosis grades. Perfusion parameters of circumflex-perfused myocardial segments were affected at increasing stenosis grades. Conclusion. An adapted Langendorff porcine heart model is feasible in a CT environment. This model provides control over physiological parameters and may allow in-depth validation of quantitative CT perfusion techniques. PMID:26185756

  9. Brain tumors and synchrotron radiation: Methodological developments in quantitative brain perfusion imaging and radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, Jean-Francois

    2005-04-01

    High-grade gliomas are the most frequent type of primary brain tumors in adults. Unfortunately, the management of glioblastomas is still mainly palliative and remains a difficult challenge, despite advances in brain tumor molecular biology and in some emerging therapies. Synchrotron radiation opens fields for medical imaging and radiation therapy by using monochromatic intense x-ray beams. It is now well known that angiogenesis plays a critical role in the tumor growth process and that brain perfusion is representative of the tumor mitotic activity. Synchrotron radiation quantitative computed tomography (SRCT) is one of the most accurate techniques for measuring in vivo contrast agent concentration and thus computing precise and accurate absolute values of the brain perfusion key parameters. The methodological developments of SRCT absolute brain perfusion measurements as well as their preclinical validation are detailed in this thesis. In particular, absolute cerebral volume and blood brain barrier permeability high-resolution (pixel size <50x50 {mu}m{sup 2}) parametric maps were reported. In conventional radiotherapy, the treatment of these tumors remains a delicate challenge, because the damages to the surrounding normal brain tissue limit the amount of radiation that can be delivered. One strategy to overcome this limitation is to infuse an iodinated contrast agent to the patient during the irradiation. The contrast agent accumulates in the tumor, through the broken blood brain barrier, and the irradiation is performed with kilovoltage x rays, in tomography mode, the tumor being located at the center of rotation and the beam size adjusted to the tumor dimensions. The dose enhancement results from the photoelectric effect on the heavy element and from the irradiation geometry. Synchrotron beams, providing high intensity, tunable monochromatic x rays, are ideal for this treatment. The beam properties allow the selection of monochromatic irradiation, at the optimal

  10. Scaffold proteins LACK and TRACK as potential drug targets in kinetoplastid parasites: Development of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qvit, Nir; Schechtman, Deborah; Pena, Darlene Aparecida; Berti, Denise Aparecida; Soares, Chrislaine Oliveira; Miao, Qianqian; Liang, Liying Annie; Baron, Lauren A; Teh-Poot, Christian; Martínez-Vega, Pedro; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Churchill, Eric; Cunningham, Anna D; Malkovskiy, Andrey V; Federspiel, Nancy A; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia; Manso Alves, Maria Julia; Jardim, Armando; Momar, Ndao; Dumonteil, Eric; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-04-01

    Parasitic diseases cause ∼ 500,000 deaths annually and remain a major challenge for therapeutic development. Using a rational design based approach, we developed peptide inhibitors with anti-parasitic activity that were derived from the sequences of parasite scaffold proteins LACK (Leishmania's receptor for activated C-kinase) and TRACK (Trypanosoma receptor for activated C-kinase). We hypothesized that sequences in LACK and TRACK that are conserved in the parasites, but not in the mammalian ortholog, RACK (Receptor for activated C-kinase), may be interaction sites for signaling proteins that are critical for the parasites' viability. One of these peptides exhibited leishmanicidal and trypanocidal activity in culture. Moreover, in infected mice, this peptide was also effective in reducing parasitemia and increasing survival without toxic effects. The identified peptide is a promising new anti-parasitic drug lead, as its unique features may limit toxicity and drug-resistance, thus overcoming central limitations of most anti-parasitic drugs. PMID:27054066

  11. A Class of Tricyclic Compounds Blocking Malaria Parasite Oocyst Development and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, Richard T.; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Raj, Dipak K.; Dixit, Saurabh; Deng, Bingbing; Miura, Kazutoyo; Yuan, Jing; Tanaka, Takeshi Q.; Johnson, Ronald L.; Jiang, Hongying; Huang, Ruili; Williamson, Kim C.; Lambert, Lynn E.; Long, Carole; Austin, Christopher P.; Wu, Yimin

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is a deadly infectious disease in many tropical and subtropical countries. Previous efforts to eradicate malaria have failed, largely due to the emergence of drug-resistant parasites, insecticide-resistant mosquitoes and, in particular, the lack of drugs or vaccines to block parasite transmission. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are known to play a role in drug transport, metabolism, and resistance in many organisms, including malaria parasites. To investigate whether a Plasmodium falciparum ABC transporter (Pf14_0244 or PfABCG2) modulates parasite susceptibility to chemical compounds or plays a role in drug resistance, we disrupted the gene encoding PfABCG2, screened the recombinant and the wild-type 3D7 parasites against a library containing 2,816 drugs approved for human or animal use, and identified an antihistamine (ketotifen) that became less active against the PfABCG2-disrupted parasite in culture. In addition to some activity against asexual stages and gametocytes, ketotifen was highly potent in blocking oocyst development of P. falciparum and the rodent parasite Plasmodium yoelii in mosquitoes. Tests of structurally related tricyclic compounds identified additional compounds with similar activities in inhibiting transmission. Additionally, ketotifen appeared to have some activity against relapse of Plasmodium cynomolgi infection in rhesus monkeys. Further clinical evaluation of ketotifen and related compounds, including synthetic new derivatives, in blocking malaria transmission may provide new weapons for the current effort of malaria eradication. PMID:23129054

  12. Development and Assessment of Transgenic Rodent Parasites for the Preclinical Evaluation of Malaria Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Diego A; Radtke, Andrea J; Zavala, Fidel

    2016-01-01

    Rodent transgenic parasites are useful tools for the preclinical evaluation of malaria vaccines. Over the last decade, several studies have reported the development of transgenic rodent parasites expressing P. falciparum antigens for the assessment of vaccine-induced immune responses, which traditionally have been limited to in vitro assays. However, the genetic manipulation of rodent Plasmodium species can have detrimental effects on the parasite's infectivity and development. In this chapter, we present a few guidelines for designing transfection plasmids, which should improve transfection efficiency and facilitate the generation of functional transgenic parasite strains. In addition, we provide a transfection protocol for the development of transgenic P. berghei parasites as well as practical methods to assess the viability and infectivity of these newly generated strains throughout different stages of their life cycle. These techniques should allow researchers to develop novel rodent malaria parasites expressing antigens from human malaria species and to determine whether these transgenic strains are fully infectious and thus represent stringent platforms for the in vivo evaluation of malaria vaccine candidates. PMID:27076155

  13. Microsatellite marker development in the protozoan parasite Perkinsus olseni.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Belén G; Cao, Asunción; Vilas, Roman; Abollo, Elvira; Villalba, Antonio; Martínez, Paulino

    2011-04-01

    The analysis of an enriched partial genomic library and of public expressed sequence tag (EST) resources allowed the characterization of the first microsatellite loci in the protozoan parasite Perkinsus olseni. Clonal cultures from laboratory isolates derived from infected clams Ruditapes decussatus (from Spain), R. philippinarum (from Spain and Japan), and Austrovenus stutchburyi (from New Zealand) were used for the characterization of 12 microsatellites. Low variation was detected at most loci, with the number of alleles at polymorphic loci ranging from 2 to 7 (average 3.20 +/- 0.51) and gene diversity from 0.11 to 0.79 (average 0.40 +/- 0.07). Preliminary results show that (1) isolates of P. olseni are diploid cells, and (2) multiple infections can occur within a single host. Eight of the loci analyzed successfully cross-amplified in the congeneric species P. mediterraneus. These microsatellite markers will be useful to analyze in detail the population genetic structure of P. olseni, crucial for the efficient management of this parasitic disease. PMID:21648245

  14. Parasitic colitis.

    PubMed

    Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; McQuade, Jennifer A

    2015-06-01

    Over one billion people worldwide harbor intestinal parasites. Parasitic intestinal infections have a predilection for developing countries due to overcrowding and poor sanitation but are also found in developed nations, such as the United States, particularly in immigrants or in the setting of sporadic outbreaks. Although the majority of people are asymptomatically colonized with parasites, the clinical presentation can range from mild abdominal discomfort or diarrhea to serious complications, such as perforation or bleeding. Protozoa and helminths (worms) are the two major classes of intestinal parasites. Protozoal intestinal infections include cryptosporidiosis, cystoisosporiasis, cyclosporiasis, balantidiasis, giardiasis, amebiasis, and Chagas disease, while helminth infections include ascariasis, trichuriasis, strongyloidiasis, enterobiasis, and schistosomiasis. Intestinal parasites are predominantly small intestine pathogens but the large intestine is also frequently involved. This article highlights important aspects of parasitic infections of the colon including epidemiology, transmission, symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as appropriate medical and surgical treatment. PMID:26034403

  15. Parasitic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M.; McQuade, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Over one billion people worldwide harbor intestinal parasites. Parasitic intestinal infections have a predilection for developing countries due to overcrowding and poor sanitation but are also found in developed nations, such as the United States, particularly in immigrants or in the setting of sporadic outbreaks. Although the majority of people are asymptomatically colonized with parasites, the clinical presentation can range from mild abdominal discomfort or diarrhea to serious complications, such as perforation or bleeding. Protozoa and helminths (worms) are the two major classes of intestinal parasites. Protozoal intestinal infections include cryptosporidiosis, cystoisosporiasis, cyclosporiasis, balantidiasis, giardiasis, amebiasis, and Chagas disease, while helminth infections include ascariasis, trichuriasis, strongyloidiasis, enterobiasis, and schistosomiasis. Intestinal parasites are predominantly small intestine pathogens but the large intestine is also frequently involved. This article highlights important aspects of parasitic infections of the colon including epidemiology, transmission, symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as appropriate medical and surgical treatment. PMID:26034403

  16. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M.; Coolens, C.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  17. MHC, parasites and antler development in red deer: no support for the Hamilton & Zuk hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Buczek, M; Okarma, H; Demiaszkiewicz, A W; Radwan, J

    2016-03-01

    The Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis proposes that the genetic benefits of preferences for elaborated secondary sexual traits have their origins in the arms race between hosts and parasites, which maintains genetic variance in parasite resistance. Infection, in turn, can be reflected in the expression of costly sexual ornaments. However, the link between immune genes, infection and the expression of secondary sexual traits has rarely been investigated. Here, we explored whether the presence and identity of functional variants (supertypes) of the highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC), which is responsible for the recognition of parasites, predict the load of lung and gut parasites and antler development in the red deer (Cervus elaphus). While we found MHC supertypes to be associated with infection by a number of parasite species, including debilitating lung nematodes, we did not find support for the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis. On the contrary, we found that lung nematode load was positively associated with antler development. We also found that the supertypes that were associated with resistance to certain parasites at the same time cause susceptibility to others. Such trade-offs may undermine the potential genetic benefits of mate choice for resistant partners. PMID:26687843

  18. Intracellular protozoan parasites of humans: the role of molecular chaperones in development and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shonhai, Addmore; Maier, Alexander G; Przyborski, Jude M; Blatch, Gregory L

    2011-02-01

    Certain kinetoplastid (Leishmania spp. and Tryapnosoma cruzi) and apicomplexan parasites (Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii) are capable of invading human cells as part of their pathology. These parasites appear to have evolved a relatively expanded or diverse complement of genes encoding molecular chaperones. The gene families encoding heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) chaperones show significant expansion and diversity (especially for Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi), and in particular the Hsp40 family appears to be an extreme example of phylogenetic radiation. In general, Hsp40 proteins act as co-chaperones of Hsp70 chaperones, forming protein folding pathways that integrate with Hsp90 to ensure proteostasis in the cell. It is tempting to speculate that the diverse environmental insults that these parasites endure have resulted in the evolutionary selection of a diverse and expanded chaperone network. Hsp90 is involved in development and growth of all of these intracellular parasites, and so far represents the strongest candidate as a target for chemotherapeutic interventions. While there have been some excellent studies on the molecular and cell biology of Hsp70 proteins, relatively little is known about the biological function of Hsp70-Hsp40 interactions in these intracellular parasites. This review focuses on intracellular protozoan parasites of humans, and provides a critique of the role of heat shock proteins in development and pathogenesis, especially the molecular chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70 and Hsp40. PMID:20955165

  19. Development of a realistic, dynamic digital brain phantom for CT perfusion validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divel, Sarah E.; Segars, W. Paul; Christensen, Soren; Wintermark, Max; Lansberg, Maarten G.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-03-01

    Physicians rely on CT Perfusion (CTP) images and quantitative image data, including cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and bolus arrival delay, to diagnose and treat stroke patients. However, the quantification of these metrics may vary depending on the computational method used. Therefore, we have developed a dynamic and realistic digital brain phantom upon which CTP scans can be simulated based on a set of ground truth scenarios. Building upon the previously developed 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom containing a highly detailed brain model, this work consisted of expanding the intricate vasculature by semi-automatically segmenting existing MRA data and fitting nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces to the new vessels. Using time attenuation curves input by the user as reference, the contrast enhancement in the vessels changes dynamically. At each time point, the iodine concentration in the arteries and veins is calculated from the curves and the material composition of the blood changes to reflect the expected values. CatSim, a CT system simulator, generates simulated data sets of this dynamic digital phantom which can be further analyzed to validate CTP studies and post-processing methods. The development of this dynamic and realistic digital phantom provides a valuable resource with which current uncertainties and controversies surrounding the quantitative computations generated from CTP data can be examined and resolved.

  20. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Gastrointestinal Parasite Infection in a Developing Nation Environment

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Douglas R.; Benshoff, Matthew; Cáceres, Mercedes; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Cortes, Loreto; Martin, Christopher F.; Schmulson, Max; Peña, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    Postinfectious IBS is defined in the industrialized world as IBS onset following a sentinel gastrointestinal infection. In developing nations, where repeated bacterial and parasitic gastrointestinal infections are common, the IBS pathophysiology may be altered. Our aim was to investigate the relationship between intestinal parasite infection and IBS in the “nonsterile” developing world environment. IBS subjects were identified from a population-based sample of 1624 participants using the Rome II Modular Questionnaire. Stool samples from cases and randomly selected controls were examined for ova and parasites. Logistic regression models explored the relationship between IBS and parasite infection. The overall IBS prevalence among participants was 13.2% (9.3% males, 15.9% females). There was no difference in parasite carriage between IBS cases and controls, 16.6% versus 15.4% (P = 0.78), nor among IBS subtypes. The pathophysiology of post-infectious IBS may be altered in the developing world as compared to industrialized nations and warrants investigation. PMID:22474433

  1. Development and Application of a Simple Plaque Assay for the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, James A.; Collins, Christine R.; Das, Sujaan; Hackett, Fiona; Graindorge, Arnault; Bell, Donald; Deu, Edgar; Blackman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is caused by an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that replicates within and destroys erythrocytes. Asexual blood stages of the causative agent of the most virulent form of human malaria, Plasmodium falciparum, can be cultivated indefinitely in vitro in human erythrocytes, facilitating experimental analysis of parasite cell biology, biochemistry and genetics. However, efforts to improve understanding of the basic biology of this important pathogen and to develop urgently required new antimalarial drugs and vaccines, suffer from a paucity of basic research tools. This includes a simple means of quantifying the effects of drugs, antibodies and gene modifications on parasite fitness and replication rates. Here we describe the development and validation of an extremely simple, robust plaque assay that can be used to visualise parasite replication and resulting host erythrocyte destruction at the level of clonal parasite populations. We demonstrate applications of the plaque assay by using it for the phenotypic characterisation of two P. falciparum conditional mutants displaying reduced fitness in vitro. PMID:27332706

  2. Sexual development in Plasmodium parasites: knowing when it's time to commit.

    PubMed

    Josling, Gabrielle A; Llinás, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Malaria is a devastating infectious disease that is caused by blood-borne apicomplexan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. These pathogens have a complex lifecycle, which includes development in the anopheline mosquito vector and in the liver and red blood cells of mammalian hosts, a process which takes days to weeks, depending on the Plasmodium species. Productive transmission between the mammalian host and the mosquito requires transitioning between asexual and sexual forms of the parasite. Blood- stage parasites replicate cyclically and are mostly asexual, although a small fraction of these convert into male and female sexual forms (gametocytes) in each reproductive cycle. Despite many years of investigation, the molecular processes that elicit sexual differentiation have remained largely unknown. In this Review, we highlight several important recent discoveries that have identified epigenetic factors and specific transcriptional regulators of gametocyte commitment and development, providing crucial insights into this obligate cellular differentiation process. PMID:26272409

  3. A transcriptional switch underlies commitment to sexual development in malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Kafsack, Björn F C; Rovira-Graells, Núria; Clark, Taane G; Bancells, Cristina; Crowley, Valerie M; Campino, Susana G; Williams, April E; Drought, Laura G; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Baker, David A; Cortés, Alfred; Llinás, Manuel

    2014-03-13

    The life cycles of many parasites involve transitions between disparate host species, requiring these parasites to go through multiple developmental stages adapted to each of these specialized niches. Transmission of malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) from humans to the mosquito vector requires differentiation from asexual stages replicating within red blood cells into non-dividing male and female gametocytes. Although gametocytes were first described in 1880, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in commitment to gametocyte formation is extremely limited, and disrupting this critical developmental transition remains a long-standing goal. Here we show that expression levels of the DNA-binding protein PfAP2-G correlate strongly with levels of gametocyte formation. Using independent forward and reverse genetics approaches, we demonstrate that PfAP2-G function is essential for parasite sexual differentiation. By combining genome-wide PfAP2-G cognate motif occurrence with global transcriptional changes resulting from PfAP2-G ablation, we identify early gametocyte genes as probable targets of PfAP2-G and show that their regulation by PfAP2-G is critical for their wild-type level expression. In the asexual blood-stage parasites pfap2-g appears to be among a set of epigenetically silenced loci prone to spontaneous activation. Stochastic activation presents a simple mechanism for a low baseline of gametocyte production. Overall, these findings identify PfAP2-G as a master regulator of sexual-stage development in malaria parasites and mark the first discovery of a transcriptional switch controlling a differentiation decision in protozoan parasites. PMID:24572369

  4. A transcriptional switch underlies commitment to sexual development in human malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Kafsack, Björn F.C.; Rovira-Graells, Núria; Clark, Taane G.; Bancells, Cristina; Crowley, Valerie M.; Campino, Susana G.; Williams, April E.; Drought, Laura G.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Baker, David A.; Cortés, Alfred; Llinás, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The life cycles of many parasites involve transitions between disparate host species, requiring these parasites to go through multiple developmental stages adapted to each of these specialized niches. Transmission of malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) from humans to the mosquito vector requires differentiation from asexual stages replicating within red blood cells into non-dividing male and female gametocytes. Although gametocytes were first described in 1880, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in commitment to gametocyte formation is extremely limited and disrupting this critical developmental transition remains a long-standing goal1. We show here that expression levels of the DNA-binding protein PfAP2-G correlate strongly with levels of gametocyte formation. Using independent forward and reverse genetics approaches, we demonstrate that PfAP2-G function is essential for parasite sexual differentiation. By combining genome-wide PfAP2-G cognate motif occurrence with global transcriptional changes resulting from PfAP2-G ablation, we identify early gametocyte genes as likely targets of PfAP2-G and show that their regulation by PfAP2-G is critical for their wild-type level expression. In the asexual blood-stage parasites pfap2-g appears to be among a set of epigenetically silenced loci2,3 prone to spontaneous activation4. Stochastic activation presents a simple mechanism for a low baseline of gametocyte production. Overall, these findings identify PfAP2-G as a master regulator of sexual-stage development in malaria parasites and mark the first identification of a transcriptional switch controlling a differentiation decision in protozoan parasites. PMID:24572369

  5. Developing vaccines to control protozoan parasites in ruminants: dead or alive?

    PubMed

    Innes, Elisabeth A; Bartley, Paul M; Rocchi, Mara; Benavidas-Silvan, Julio; Burrells, Alison; Hotchkiss, Emily; Chianini, Francesca; Canton, German; Katzer, Frank

    2011-08-01

    Protozoan parasites are among some of the most successful organisms worldwide, being able to live and multiply within a very wide range of hosts. The diseases caused by these parasites cause significant production losses in the livestock sector involving reproductive failure, impaired weight gain, contaminated meat, reduced milk yields and in severe cases, loss of the animal. In addition, some protozoan parasites affecting livestock such as Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum may also be transmitted to humans where they can cause serious disease. Data derived from experimental models of infection in ruminant species enables the study of the interactions between parasite and host. How the parasite initiates infection, becomes established and multiplies within the host and the critical pathways that may lead to a disease outcome are all important to enable the rational design of appropriate intervention strategies. Once the parasites invade the hosts they induce both innate and adaptive immune responses and the induction and function of these immune responses are critical in determining the outcome of the infection. Vaccines offer green solutions to control disease as they are sustainable, reducing reliance on pharmacological drugs and pesticides. The use of vaccines has multiple benefits such as improving animal health and welfare by controlling animal infections and infestations; improving public health by controlling zoonoses and food borne pathogens in animals; solving problems associated with resistance to acaricides, antibiotics and anthelmintics; keeping animals and the environment free of chemical residues and maintaining biodiversity. All of these attributes should lead to improved sustainability of animal production and economic benefit. Using different protozoan parasitic diseases as examples this paper will discuss various approaches used to develop vaccines to protect against disease in livestock and discuss the relative merits of using live

  6. Development and validation of a segmentation-free polyenergetic algorithm for dynamic perfusion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic perfusion imaging can provide the morphologic details of the scanned organs as well as the dynamic information of blood perfusion. However, due to the polyenergetic property of the x-ray spectra, beam hardening effect results in undesirable artifacts and inaccurate CT values. To address this problem, this study proposes a segmentation-free polyenergetic dynamic perfusion imaging algorithm (pDP) to provide superior perfusion imaging. Dynamic perfusion usually is composed of two phases, i.e., a precontrast phase and a postcontrast phase. In the precontrast phase, the attenuation properties of diverse base materials (e.g., in a thorax perfusion exam, base materials can include lung, fat, breast, soft tissue, bone, and metal implants) can be incorporated to reconstruct artifact-free precontrast images. If patient motions are negligible or can be corrected by registration, the precontrast images can then be employed as a priori information to derive linearized iodine projections from the postcontrast images. With the linearized iodine projections, iodine perfusion maps can be reconstructed directly without the influence of various influential factors, such as iodine location, patient size, x-ray spectrum, and background tissue type. A series of simulations were conducted on a dynamic iodine calibration phantom and a dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom to validate the proposed algorithm. The simulations with the dynamic iodine calibration phantom showed that the proposed algorithm could effectively eliminate the beam hardening effect and enable quantitative iodine map reconstruction across various influential factors. The error range of the iodine concentration factors ([Formula: see text]) was reduced from [Formula: see text] for filtered back-projection (FBP) to [Formula: see text] for pDP. The quantitative results of the simulations with the dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom indicated that the maximum error of iodine concentrations can be reduced from

  7. The TLR2 is activated by sporozoites and suppresses intrahepatic rodent malaria parasite development

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Tan, Zhangping; Zhou, TaoLi; Zhu, Feng; Ding, Yan; Liu, Taiping; Wu, Yuzhang; Xu, Wenyue

    2015-01-01

    TLRs (Toll-like receptors) play an important role in the initiation of innate immune responses against invading microorganisms. Although several TLRs have been reported to be involved in the innate immune response against the blood-stage of malaria parasites, the role of TLRs in the development of the pre-erythrocytic stage is still largely unknown. Here, we found that sporozoite and its lysate could significantly activate the TLR2, and induce macrophages to release proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-6, MCP-1 and TNF-α, in a TLR2-dependent manner. Further studies showed that sporozoite and its lysate could be recognized by either TLR2 homodimers or TLR2/1 and TLR2/6 heterodimers, implicating the complexity of TLR2 agonist in sporozoite. Interestingly, the TLR2 signaling can significantly suppress the development of the pre-erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium yoelii, as both liver parasite load and subsequent parasitemia were significantly elevated in both TLR2- and MyD88-deficient mice. Additionally, the observed higher level of parasite burden in TLR2−/− mice was found to be closely associated with a reduction in proinflammatory cytokines in the liver. Therefore, we provide the first evidence that sporozoites can activate the TLR2 signaling, which in turn significantly inhibits the intrahepatic parasites. This may provide us with novel clues to design preventive anti-malaria therapies. PMID:26667391

  8. Non-sibling parasites (Strepsiptera) develop together in the same paper wasp.

    PubMed

    Vannini, L; Carapelli, A; Frati, F; Beani, L

    2008-05-01

    Host discrimination by immature host-seeking endoparasites is a complex and somewhat unexplored topic. In the case of multiple infections, conflicts among conspecifics may occur to monopolize space and resources in the same host. Two or more 1st instar larvae of Xenos vesparum (Strepsiptera, Stylopidae) may enter into a Polistes dominulus (Hymenoptera, Vespidae) larva and develop together until the adult stage of both parasite and host. We carried out a screening of mitochondrial haplotypes in X. vesparum individuals extracted from superparasitized wasps taken in 5 naturally infected nests from different areas of Tuscany (Italy), to assess whether non-sibling parasites may infect the same colony and host. In total, we obtained 12 different haplotypes out of 122 genotyped individuals of both sexes: 17 of 34 superparasitized wasps hosted parasites that originated from females differing in their haplotypes. To date, this is the first described case of superparasitism with non-sibling host-seeking larvae infecting a single individual hymenopteran host. In addition, at least in heavily infected colonies, there is evidence of a male-biased sex-ratio and synchronous development of the parasites, regardless of their haplotypes. Finally, the distribution of haplotypes per nest is consistent with either phoretic infection or larvipositing on nests by means of superparasitized wasps. PMID:18501043

  9. Blunting the knife: development of vaccines targeting digestive proteases of blood-feeding helminth parasites.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Mark S; Ranjit, Najju; Loukas, Alex

    2010-08-01

    Proteases are pivotal to parasitism, mediating biological processes crucial to worm survival including larval migration through tissue, immune evasion/modulation and nutrient acquisition by the adult parasite. In haematophagous parasites, many of these proteolytic enzymes are secreted from the intestine (nematodes) or gastrodermis (trematodes) where they act to degrade host haemoglobin and serum proteins as part of the feeding process. These proteases are exposed to components of the immune system of the host when the worms ingest blood, and therefore present targets for the development of anti-helminth vaccines. The protective effects of current vaccine antigens against nematodes that infect humans (hookworm) and livestock (barber's pole worm) are based on haemoglobin-degrading intestinal proteases and act largely as a result of the neutralisation of these proteases by antibodies that are ingested with the blood-meal. In this review, we survey the current status of helminth proteases that show promise as vaccines and describe their vital contribution to a parasitic existence. PMID:20482309

  10. Development of a pneumatically driven active cover lid for multi-well microplates for use in perfusion three-dimensional cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Song-Bin; Chou, Dean; Chang, Yu-Han; Li, Ke-Cing; Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Ventikos, Yiannis; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Before microfluidic-based cell culture models can be practically utilized for bioassays, there is a need for a transitional cell culture technique that can improve conventional cell culture models. To address this, a hybrid cell culture system integrating an active cover lid and a multi-well microplate was proposed to achieve perfusion 3-D cell culture. In this system, a microfluidic-based pneumatically-driven liquid transport mechanism was integrated into the active cover lid to realize 6-unit culture medium perfusion. Experimental results revealed that the flow of culture medium could be pneumatically driven in a flow-rate uniform manner. We used the system to successfully perform a perfusion 3-D cell culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for up to 16 days. Moreover, we investigated the effects of various cell culture models on the physiology of MSCs. The physiological nature of MSCs can vary with respect to the cell culture model used. Using the perfusion 3-D cell culture format might affect the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Overall, we have developed a cell culture system that can achieve multi-well microplate-based perfusion 3-D cell culture in an efficient, cost-effective, and user-friendly manner. These features could facilitate the widespread application of perfusion cell culture models for cell-based assays. PMID:26669749

  11. Development of a pneumatically driven active cover lid for multi-well microplates for use in perfusion three-dimensional cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Song-Bin; Chou, Dean; Chang, Yu-Han; Li, Ke-Cing; Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Ventikos, Yiannis; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    Before microfluidic-based cell culture models can be practically utilized for bioassays, there is a need for a transitional cell culture technique that can improve conventional cell culture models. To address this, a hybrid cell culture system integrating an active cover lid and a multi-well microplate was proposed to achieve perfusion 3-D cell culture. In this system, a microfluidic-based pneumatically-driven liquid transport mechanism was integrated into the active cover lid to realize 6-unit culture medium perfusion. Experimental results revealed that the flow of culture medium could be pneumatically driven in a flow-rate uniform manner. We used the system to successfully perform a perfusion 3-D cell culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for up to 16 days. Moreover, we investigated the effects of various cell culture models on the physiology of MSCs. The physiological nature of MSCs can vary with respect to the cell culture model used. Using the perfusion 3-D cell culture format might affect the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Overall, we have developed a cell culture system that can achieve multi-well microplate-based perfusion 3-D cell culture in an efficient, cost-effective, and user-friendly manner. These features could facilitate the widespread application of perfusion cell culture models for cell-based assays.

  12. Development of a pneumatically driven active cover lid for multi-well microplates for use in perfusion three-dimensional cell culture.

    PubMed

    Huang, Song-Bin; Chou, Dean; Chang, Yu-Han; Li, Ke-Cing; Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Ventikos, Yiannis; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Before microfluidic-based cell culture models can be practically utilized for bioassays, there is a need for a transitional cell culture technique that can improve conventional cell culture models. To address this, a hybrid cell culture system integrating an active cover lid and a multi-well microplate was proposed to achieve perfusion 3-D cell culture. In this system, a microfluidic-based pneumatically-driven liquid transport mechanism was integrated into the active cover lid to realize 6-unit culture medium perfusion. Experimental results revealed that the flow of culture medium could be pneumatically driven in a flow-rate uniform manner. We used the system to successfully perform a perfusion 3-D cell culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for up to 16 days. Moreover, we investigated the effects of various cell culture models on the physiology of MSCs. The physiological nature of MSCs can vary with respect to the cell culture model used. Using the perfusion 3-D cell culture format might affect the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Overall, we have developed a cell culture system that can achieve multi-well microplate-based perfusion 3-D cell culture in an efficient, cost-effective, and user-friendly manner. These features could facilitate the widespread application of perfusion cell culture models for cell-based assays. PMID:26669749

  13. Drug Development Against the Major Diarrhea-Causing Parasites of the Small Intestine, Cryptosporidium and Giardia.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yukiko; Eckmann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Diarrheal diseases are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, particularly among young children. A limited number of infectious agents account for most of these illnesses, raising the hope that advances in the treatment and prevention of these infections can have global health impact. The two most important parasitic causes of diarrheal disease are Cryptosporidium and Giardia. Both parasites infect predominantly the small intestine and colonize the lumen and epithelial surface, but do not invade deeper mucosal layers. This review discusses the therapeutic challenges, current treatment options, and drug development efforts against cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis. The goals of drug development against Cryptosporidium and Giardia are different. For Cryptosporidium, only one moderately effective drug (nitazoxanide) is available, so novel classes of more effective drugs are a high priority. Furthermore, new genetic technology to identify potential drug targets and better assays for functional evaluation of these targets throughout the parasite life cycle are needed for advancing anticryptosporidial drug design. By comparison, for Giardia, several classes of drugs with good efficacy exist, but dosing regimens are suboptimal and emerging resistance begins to threaten clinical utility. Consequently, improvements in potency and dosing, and the ability to overcome existing and prevent new forms of drug resistance are priorities in antigiardial drug development. Current work on new drugs against both infections has revealed promising strategies and new drug leads. However, the primary challenge for further drug development is the underlying economics, as both parasitic infections are considered Neglected Diseases with low funding priority and limited commercial interest. If a new urgency in medical progress against these infections can be raised at national funding agencies or philanthropic organizations, meaningful and timely progress is possible

  14. Drug Development Against the Major Diarrhea-Causing Parasites of the Small Intestine, Cryptosporidium and Giardia

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Yukiko; Eckmann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Diarrheal diseases are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, particularly among young children. A limited number of infectious agents account for most of these illnesses, raising the hope that advances in the treatment and prevention of these infections can have global health impact. The two most important parasitic causes of diarrheal disease are Cryptosporidium and Giardia. Both parasites infect predominantly the small intestine and colonize the lumen and epithelial surface, but do not invade deeper mucosal layers. This review discusses the therapeutic challenges, current treatment options, and drug development efforts against cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis. The goals of drug development against Cryptosporidium and Giardia are different. For Cryptosporidium, only one moderately effective drug (nitazoxanide) is available, so novel classes of more effective drugs are a high priority. Furthermore, new genetic technology to identify potential drug targets and better assays for functional evaluation of these targets throughout the parasite life cycle are needed for advancing anticryptosporidial drug design. By comparison, for Giardia, several classes of drugs with good efficacy exist, but dosing regimens are suboptimal and emerging resistance begins to threaten clinical utility. Consequently, improvements in potency and dosing, and the ability to overcome existing and prevent new forms of drug resistance are priorities in antigiardial drug development. Current work on new drugs against both infections has revealed promising strategies and new drug leads. However, the primary challenge for further drug development is the underlying economics, as both parasitic infections are considered Neglected Diseases with low funding priority and limited commercial interest. If a new urgency in medical progress against these infections can be raised at national funding agencies or philanthropic organizations, meaningful and timely progress is possible

  15. Transcriptome of Small Regulatory RNAs in the Development of the Zoonotic Parasite Trichinella spiralis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bin; Piao, Xianyu; Hou, Nan; Peng, Shuai; Jiang, Ning; Yin, Jigang; Liu, Mingyuan; Chen, Qijun

    2011-01-01

    Background Trichinella spiralis is a parasite with unique features. It is a multicellular organism but with an intracellular parasitization and development stage. T. spiralis is the helminthic pathogen that causes zoonotic trichinellosis and afflicts more than 10 million people worldwide, whereas the parasite's biology, especially the developmental regulation is largely unknown. In other organisms, small non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNA) and small interfering RNAs (siRNA) execute post-transcriptional regulation by translational repression or mRNA degradation, and a large number of miRNAs have been identified in diverse species. In T. spiralis, the profile of small non-coding RNAs and their function remains poorly understood. Methodology and Principal Findings Here, the transcriptional profiles of miRNA and siRNA in three developmental stages of T. spiralis in the rat host were investigated, and compared by high-throughput cDNA sequencing technique (“RNA-seq”). 5,443,641 unique sequence tags were obtained. Of these, 21 represented conserved miRNAs related to 13 previously identified metazoan miRNA families and 213 were novel miRNAs so far unique to T. spiralis. Some of these miRNAs exhibited stage-specific expression. Expression of miRNAs was confirmed in three stages of the life cycle by qRT-PCR and northern blot analysis. In addition, endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) were found mainly derived from natural antisense transcripts (NAT) and transposable elements (TE) in the parasite. Conclusions and Significance We provide evidence for the presence of miRNAs and endo-siRNAs in T. spiralis. The miRNAs accounted for the major proportion of the small regulatory RNA population of T. spiralis, while fewer endogenous siRNAs were found. The finding of stage-specific expression patterns of the miRNAs in different developmental stages of T. spiralis suggests that miRNAs may play important roles in parasite development. Our data provide a basis for further

  16. Development of the isolated perfused porcine skin flap for in vitro studies of percutaneous absorption pharmacokinetics and cutaneous biotransformation

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    The isolated perfused porcine skin flap (IPPSF) has proven to be a valuable in vitro tool for studying the physiology and biochemistry of skin and for identifying biochemical and histological markers of direct cutaneous toxicity. The present experiments were undertaken for two purposes: (1) to develop a pharmacokinetic model, based on dermal penetration in the IPPSF, which is predictive of percutaneous absorption in vivo, and (2) to examine cutaneous biotransformation of the important agricultural poison parathion (P). Dosing solutions of {sup 14}C-radiolabelled compounds representing 3 chemical classes-organic acid/base (benzoic acid (B), caffeine (C)), organophosphate (OP) pesticides, and steroid hormones, were applied topically in ethanol at 40 {mu}m cm{sup {minus}2}, both in vivo and on the IPPSF. A 3-compartment pharmacokinetic model describing mass transfer from the surface (C{sub 1}), diffusion through epidermis and dermis (C{sub 2}), and transfer into the perfusate (C{sub 3}), was developed based on flux through the IPPSF from 0-8 hr. Model simulations were predictive of percutaneous absorption in vivo for the OP's and steroids. Modification of the basic 3-compartment model to account for fast and slow tissue-release processes (B) and for flux-dependent perfusage flow increases (C), provided excellent in vivo-in vitro correlation over all 7 compounds.

  17. Artemisinin-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Parasites Exhibit Altered Patterns of Development in Infected Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hott, Amanda; Casandra, Debora; Sparks, Kansas N.; Morton, Lindsay C.; Castanares, Geocel-Grace; Rutter, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin derivatives are used in combination with other antimalarial drugs for treatment of multidrug-resistant malaria worldwide. Clinical resistance to artemisinin recently emerged in southeast Asia, yet in vitro phenotypes for discerning mechanism(s) of resistance remain elusive. Here, we describe novel phenotypic resistance traits expressed by artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. The resistant parasites exhibit altered patterns of development that result in reduced exposure to drug at the most susceptible stage of development in erythrocytes (trophozoites) and increased exposure in the most resistant stage (rings). In addition, a novel in vitro delayed clearance assay (DCA) that assesses drug effects on asexual stages was found to correlate with parasite clearance half-life in vivo as well as with mutations in the Kelch domain gene associated with resistance (Pf3D7_1343700). Importantly, all of the resistance phenotypes were stable in cloned parasites for more than 2 years without drug pressure. The results demonstrate artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum has evolved a novel mechanism of phenotypic resistance to artemisinin drugs linked to abnormal cell cycle regulation. These results offer insights into a novel mechanism of drug resistance in P. falciparum and new tools for monitoring the spread of artemisinin resistance. PMID:25779582

  18. The Malarial Serine Protease SUB1 Plays an Essential Role in Parasite Liver Stage Development

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Catherine; Volkmann, Katrin; Gomes, Ana Rita; Billker, Oliver; Blackman, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Transmission of the malaria parasite to its vertebrate host involves an obligatory exoerythrocytic stage in which extensive asexual replication of the parasite takes place in infected hepatocytes. The resulting liver schizont undergoes segmentation to produce thousands of daughter merozoites. These are released to initiate the blood stage life cycle, which causes all the pathology associated with the disease. Whilst elements of liver stage merozoite biology are similar to those in the much better-studied blood stage merozoites, little is known of the molecular players involved in liver stage merozoite production. To facilitate the study of liver stage biology we developed a strategy for the rapid production of complex conditional alleles by recombinase mediated engineering in Escherichia coli, which we used in combination with existing Plasmodium berghei deleter lines expressing Flp recombinase to study subtilisin-like protease 1 (SUB1), a conserved Plasmodium serine protease previously implicated in blood stage merozoite maturation and egress. We demonstrate that SUB1 is not required for the early stages of intrahepatic growth, but is essential for complete development of the liver stage schizont and for production of hepatic merozoites. Our results indicate that inhibitors of SUB1 could be used in prophylactic approaches to control or block the clinically silent pre-erythrocytic stage of the malaria parasite life cycle. PMID:24348254

  19. The Redox Biology of Schistosome Parasites and Applications for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsin-Hung; Rigouin, Coraline; Williams, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma spp. is a serious public health concern, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Praziquantel is the only drug currently administrated to treat this disease. However, praziquantel-resistant parasites have been identified in endemic areas and can be generated in the laboratory. Therefore, it is essential to find new therapeutics. Antioxidants are appealing drug targets. In order to survive in their hosts, schistosomes are challenged by reactive oxygen species from intrinsic and extrinsic sources. Schistosome antioxidant enzymes have been identified as essential proteins and novel drug targets and inhibition of the antioxidant response can lead to parasite death. Because the organization of the redox network in schistosomes is significantly different form that in humans, new drugs are being developed targeting schistosome antioxidants. In this paper the redox biology of schistosomes is discussed and their potential use as drug targets is reviewed. It is hoped that compounds targeting parasite antioxidant responses will become clinically relevant drugs in the near future. PMID:22607149

  20. Plasmodium vivax: ookinete destruction and oocyst development arrest are responsible for Anopheles albimanus resistance to circumsporozoite phenotype VK247 parasites.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ceron, L; Rodriguez, M H; Santillan, F; Chavez, B; Nettel, J A; Hernandez-Avila, J E; Kain, K C

    2001-07-01

    Anopheles albimanus and An. pseudopunctipennis differ in their susceptibilities to Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite phenotypes. An. pseudopunctipennis is susceptible to phenotype VK247 but almost refractory to VK210. In contrast, An. albimanus is almost refractory to VK247 but susceptible to VK210. To investigate the site in the mosquito and the parasite stage at which resistance mechanisms affect VK247 development in An. albimanus, parasite development was followed in a series of experiments in which both mosquitoes species were simultaneously infected with blood from patients. Parasite phenotype was determined in mature oocysts and salivary gland sporozoites by use of immunofluorescence and Western blot assays and/or gene identification. Ookinete maturation and their densities within the bloodmeal bolus were similar in both mosquito species. Ookinete densities on the internal midgut surface of An. albimanus were 4.7 times higher than those in An. pseudopunctipennis; however, the densities of developing oocysts on the external midgut surface were 6.12 times higher in the latter species. Electron microscopy observation of ookinetes in An. albimanus midgut epithelium indicated severe parasite damage. These results indicate that P. vivax VK247 parasites are destroyed at different parasite stages during migration in An. albimanus midguts. A portion, accumulated on the internal midgut surface, is probably destroyed by the mosquito's digestive enzymes and another portion is most likely destroyed by mosquito defense molecules within the midgut epithelium. A third group, reaching the external midgut surface, initiates oocyst development, but over 90% of them interrupt their development and die. The identification of mechanisms that participate in parasite destruction could provide new elements to construct transgenic mosquitoes resistant to malaria parasites. PMID:11527438

  1. Ultrastructure, development, and host-parasite relationship of a new species of the genus Pleistophora--a microsporidian parasite of the marine fish Epinephelus chlorostignei.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Bashtar, Abdel-Rahman; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Al-Rasheid, Khaled; Al-Olayan, Ebtsam; Koura, Eglal; Morsy, Kareem

    2009-12-01

    The life cycle of a new microsporidian of the genus Pleistophora is described. This parasite infects the epithelial cells of the gut and the peritoneal cavity of the Red Sea fish, Epinephelus chlorostignei. All stages develop within a special structure, the sporophorocyst, which is covered by a thick dense wall. This wall grows along with the growth of the parasites inside. Meronts are uni- to binucleate, which divide and constantly give rise to sporonts. During transition to sporonts, the cell border of the meronts increases its thickness, temporarily featuring thick irregular projections. Eventually, a uniform thick sporont wall is formed; then, the sporont cells detach themselves from the wall (future wall of the sporophorous vesicle, SPV) and start a series of divisions to produce sporoblasts. The SPV wall is compact, has no pores, and consists of two layers. Mature spores measure about 2.0 x 1.8 microm. They possess a polar filament with 20-28 coils, a posterior vacuole, and a polaroplast made up of an outer part of dense and closely spaced lamellae encircling an inner part of widely spaced lamellae. All morphological and ultrastructural features indicate that the described microsporidian parasite belongs to the genus Pleistophora. PMID:19844744

  2. The control of morph development in the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, S C; Gemmill, A W; Read, A F; Viney, M E

    2000-01-01

    The parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti has a complex life cycle. The progeny of the parasitic females can develop into three distinct morphs, namely directly developing infective third-stage larvae (iL3s), free-living adult males and free-living adult females. We have analysed of the effect of host immune status (an intra-host factor), environmental temperature (an extra-host factor) and their interaction on the proportion of larvae that develop into these three morphs. The results are consistent with the developmental decision of larvae being controlled by at least two discrete developmental switches. One is a sex-determination event that is affected by host immune status and the other is a switch between alternative female morphs that is affected by both host immune status and environmental temperature. These findings clarify the basis of the life cycle of S. ratti and demonstrate how such complex life cycles can result from a combination of simple developmental switches. PMID:11416909

  3. Differential Subcellular Localization of Leishmania Alba-Domain Proteins throughout the Parasite Development

    PubMed Central

    Dupé, Aurélien; Dumas, Carole; Papadopoulou, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alba-domain proteins are RNA-binding proteins found in archaea and eukaryotes and recently studied in protozoan parasites where they play a role in the regulation of virulence factors and stage-specific proteins. This work describes in silico structural characterization, cellular localization and biochemical analyses of Alba-domain proteins in Leishmania infantum. We show that in contrast to other protozoa, Leishmania have two Alba-domain proteins, LiAlba1 and LiAlba3, representative of the Rpp20- and the Rpp25-like eukaryotic subfamilies, respectively, which share several sequence and structural similarities but also important differences with orthologs in other protozoa, especially in sequences targeted for post-translational modifications. LiAlba1 and LiAlba3 proteins form a complex interacting with other RNA-binding proteins, ribosomal subunits, and translation factors as supported by co-immunoprecipitation and sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis. A higher co-sedimentation of Alba proteins with ribosomal subunits was seen upon conditions of decreased translation, suggesting a role of these proteins in translational repression. The Leishmania Alba-domain proteins display differential cellular localization throughout the parasite development. In the insect promastigote stage, Alba proteins co-localize predominantly to the cytoplasm but they translocate to the nucleolus and the flagellum upon amastigote differentiation in the mammalian host and are found back to the cytoplasm once amastigote differentiation is completed. Heat-shock, a major signal of amastigote differentiation, triggers Alba translocation to the nucleolus and the flagellum. Purification of the Leishmania flagellum confirmed LiAlba3 enrichment in this organelle during amastigote differentiation. Moreover, partial characterization of the Leishmania flagellum proteome of promastigotes and differentiating amastigotes revealed the presence of other RNA-binding proteins, as well as differences in

  4. In vitro development of Haemoproteus columbae (Haemosporida: Haemoproteidae), with perspectives for genomic studies of avian haemosporidian parasites.

    PubMed

    Coral, Arelis A; Valkiūnas, Gediminas; González, Angie D; Matta, Nubia E

    2015-10-01

    The evolutionary origin of wildlife and human malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.) has been discussed for several decades. The lack of genomic data about species of wildlife haemosporidian parasites related to Plasmodium limits the number of taxa available for phylogenetic analysis. Genomic data about avian parasites of the genus Haemoproteus parasites, the sister genus to Plasmodium are still not available, mainly due to difficulties in obtaining pure DNA of parasites inhabiting nucleated avian host cells. Recent studies show that microgametes of Haemoproteus (Parahaemoproteus) spp. develop in vitro and can be isolated by simple centrifugation, allowing the isolation of pure parasite DNA for genomic studies. However, in vitro development of Haemoproteus (Haemoproteus) spp. has not been investigated, and it is unclear if microgametes of these parasites also can be obtained under in vitro conditions. Here, we provide the first data about the in vitro development of Haemoproteus (Haemoproteus) columbae, a widespread avian haemosporidian parasite, which is specific to pigeons and doves (Columbiformes) and is transmitted by hippoboscid flies (Diptera, Hippoboscidae). In vitro gametogenesis and ookinete development of H. columbae were studied using a strain isolated from a feral Rock Pigeon (Columba livia) in Bogotá-Colombia. The morphological events leading to exflagellation, fertilization and ookinete formation, as well as the rate of development of these stages were followed in vitro at 40 °C, 19 °C and 15 °C for 48 h. Macrogametes, microgametes, zygotes and initial stages of ookinete development were observed in all temperatures, but mature ookinetes were seen only at 40 °C. The largest diversity of sporogonic stages of H. columbae were present at 40 °C however, exflagellation, fertilization of macrogametes and development of immature ookinetes were also observed at 15 °C and 19 °C. Morphological and morphometric features of these stages in vitro were

  5. Extension materials for meat-borne parasitic diseases in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Rimm, Mogens

    2003-06-01

    In support of a project on porcine cysticercosis in Tanzania, an educational video was prepared to inform the rural communities on the health risks and prevention of the parasitic disease. This paper describes the process involved in making the video, especially the importance of establishing a good understanding between veterinary public health officials and the video producer. Important steps in the process include determining the target audience, the film's core message, the construction of the "story", script development, the filming and editing activities, and, importantly, the development of strategies for production and use of the film as extension material. Suggestions on logistical and technical aspects of filming and viewing are also discussed. The experience gained in Tanzania will be of value to others planning similar projects elsewhere. PMID:12781393

  6. Eimeria tenella: parasite-specific incorporation of /sup 3/H-uracil as a quantitative measure of intracellular development

    SciTech Connect

    Schmatz, D.M.; Crane, M.S.; Murray, P.K.

    1986-02-01

    An assay has been developed using parasite-specific incorporation of /sup 3/H-uracil to assess the intracellular growth of Eimeria tenella in vitro. As shown by both scintillation counts and autoradiography, /sup 3/H-uracil was incorporated specifically into intracellular parasites from the onset of infection and continued throughout development of the first generation schizonts. Mature schizonts and first generation merozoites did not continue to incorporate additional /sup 3/H-uracil, indicating that RNA synthesis had halted in these stages. Based on these findings, a semi-automated microscale uracil incorporation assay was developed to determine parasite viability. This method should be useful for biochemical studies with intracellular parasites and for screening compounds for anticoccidial activity. The ease, rapidity, and quantitative nature of this assay contrasts favorably with standard morphometric approaches of determining parasite development. In addition, parallel studies using host cell incorporation of /sup 3/H-uridine have been introduced as a method of determining whether antiparasitic activity is direct or indirect in relation to effects on the host cell.

  7. Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites ... be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies ...

  8. Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites ... can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies ...

  9. Development and use of a new perfusion technique to study glucose metabolism of the aortic wall in normal and alloxan-diabetic rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.J.M.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigated (1) possible alterations in glucose uptake and utilization in the perfused, normal, and diabetic vascular wall of rabbits and (2) the effects thereon of insulin and exogenous glucose concentration. Part I involved development and characterization of an in vitro perfusion technique that closely reproduced predetermined in vivo conditions of aortic blood flow, arterial blood pressure, heart rate and pulse pressure. The responsiveness of the preparation to vasoactive agents was assessed with concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) from 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -4/ M. In Part II, the effects of NE-induced tension development on glucose metabolism were determined by perfusion with oxygenated physiological salt solution (PSS) containing 7 mM glucose and tracer amounts of uniformly labeled /sup 14/C-glucose. Aortas from 8 week-diabetic rabbits were perfused under similar conditions employing a NE infusion in the presence or absence of insulin (150 uU/ml) and variable levels of glucose. Effects of NE-induced tension development include an apparent increase (39%) in glucose uptake and a twofold increase in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and lactate production. Aortas from diabetic rabbits perfused with PSS containing 7 mM glucose demonstrated marked decreases in glucose uptake (74%), /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ (68%), lactate (30%), total tissue glycogen (75%) and labeled tissue phospholipids (70%). Insulin or elevation of exogenous glucose to 25 mM (diabetic levels) normalized glucose uptake, but had differential effects on the pattern of substrate utilization. The marked alterations of glucose metabolism in the diabetic state may contribute to the functional changes observed in diabetic blood vessels.

  10. Temperature effects on surface pressure-induced changes in rat skin perfusion: implications in pressure ulcer development.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Knapp, C F; Donofrio, J C; Salcido, R

    1999-07-01

    The effect of varying local skin temperature on surface pressure-induced changes in skin perfusion and deformation was determined in hairless fuzzy rats (13.5+/-3 mo, 474+/-25 g). Skin surface pressure was applied by a computer-controlled plunger with corresponding skin deformation measured by a linear variable differential transformer while a laser Doppler flowmeter measured skin perfusion. In Protocol I, skin surface perfusion was measured without heating (control, T=28 degrees C), with heating (T=36 degrees C), for control (probe just touching skin, 3.7 mmHg), and at two different skin surface pressures, 18 mmHg and 73 mmHg. Heating caused perfusion to increase at control and 18 mmHg pressure, but not at 73 mmHg. In Protocol II, skin perfusion was measured with and without heating as in Protocol I, but this time skin surface pressure was increased from 3.7 to 62 mmHg in increments of 3.7 mmHg. For unheated skin, perfusion increased as skin surface pressure increased from 3.7 to 18 mmHg. Further increases in surface pressure caused a decrease in perfusion until zero perfusion was reached for pressures over 55 mmHg. Heating increased skin perfusion for surface pressures from 3.7 to 18 mmHg, but not for pressures greater than 18 mmHg. After the release of surface pressure, the reactive hyperemia peak of perfusion increased with heating. In Protocol III, where skin deformation (creep and relaxation) was measured during the application of 3.7 and 18 mmHg, heating caused the tissue to be stiffer, allowing less deformation. It was found that for surface pressures below 18 mmHg, increasing skin temperature significantly increased skin perfusion and tissue stiffness. The clinical significance of these findings may have relevance in evaluating temperature and pressure effects on skin blood flow and deformation as well as the efficacy of using temperature as a therapeutic modality in the treatment of pressure ulcers. PMID:10659802

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi Immune Response Modulation Decreases Microbiota in Rhodnius prolixus Gut and Is Crucial for Parasite Survival and Development

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Daniele P.; Moraes, Caroline S.; Gonzalez, Marcelo S.; Ratcliffe, Norman A.; Azambuja, Patrícia; Garcia, Eloi S.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi in order to complete its development in the digestive tract of Rhodnius prolixus needs to overcome the immune reactions and microbiota trypanolytic activity of the gut. We demonstrate that in R. prolixus following infection with epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi clone Dm28c and, in comparison with uninfected control insects, the midgut contained (i) fewer bacteria, (ii) higher parasite numbers, and (iii) reduced nitrite and nitrate production and increased phenoloxidase and antibacterial activities. In addition, in insects pre-treated with antibiotic and then infected with Dm28c, there were also reduced bacteria numbers and a higher parasite load compared with insects solely infected with parasites. Furthermore, and in contrast to insects infected with Dm28c, infection with T. cruzi Y strain resulted in a slight decreased numbers of gut bacteria but not sufficient to mediate a successful parasite infection. We conclude that infection of R. prolixus with the T. cruzi Dm28c clone modifies the host gut immune responses to decrease the microbiota population and these changes are crucial for the parasite development in the insect gut. PMID:22574189

  12. Development of 4D mathematical observer models for the task-based evaluation of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Frey, Eric C.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents two 4D mathematical observer models for the detection of motion defects in 4D gated medical images. Their performance was compared with results from human observers in detecting a regional motion abnormality in simulated 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT images. The first 4D mathematical observer model extends the conventional channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) based on a set of 2D spatial channels and the second is a proposed model that uses a set of 4D space-time channels. Simulated projection data were generated using the 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom with 16 gates/cardiac cycle. The activity distribution modelled uptake of 99mTc MIBI with normal perfusion and a regional wall motion defect. An analytical projector was used in the simulation and the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was used in image reconstruction followed by spatial and temporal low-pass filtering with various cut-off frequencies. Then, we extracted 2D image slices from each time frame and reorganized them into a set of cine images. For the first model, we applied 2D spatial channels to the cine images and generated a set of feature vectors that were stacked for the images from different slices of the heart. The process was repeated for each of the 1,024 noise realizations, and CHO and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis methodologies were applied to the ensemble of the feature vectors to compute areas under the ROC curves (AUCs). For the second model, a set of 4D space-time channels was developed and applied to the sets of cine images to produce space-time feature vectors to which the CHO methodology was applied. The AUC values of the second model showed better agreement (Spearman’s rank correlation (SRC) coefficient = 0.8) to human observer results than those from the first model (SRC coefficient = 0.4). The agreement with human observers indicates the proposed 4D mathematical observer model provides a good predictor of the

  13. Development of 4D mathematical observer models for the task-based evaluation of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Frey, Eric C; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents two 4D mathematical observer models for the detection of motion defects in 4D gated medical images. Their performance was compared with results from human observers in detecting a regional motion abnormality in simulated 4D gated myocardial perfusion (MP) SPECT images. The first 4D mathematical observer model extends the conventional channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) based on a set of 2D spatial channels and the second is a proposed model that uses a set of 4D space-time channels. Simulated projection data were generated using the 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom with 16 gates/cardiac cycle. The activity distribution modelled uptake of (99m)Tc MIBI with normal perfusion and a regional wall motion defect. An analytical projector was used in the simulation and the filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was used in image reconstruction followed by spatial and temporal low-pass filtering with various cut-off frequencies. Then, we extracted 2D image slices from each time frame and reorganized them into a set of cine images. For the first model, we applied 2D spatial channels to the cine images and generated a set of feature vectors that were stacked for the images from different slices of the heart. The process was repeated for each of the 1,024 noise realizations, and CHO and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis methodologies were applied to the ensemble of the feature vectors to compute areas under the ROC curves (AUCs). For the second model, a set of 4D space-time channels was developed and applied to the sets of cine images to produce space-time feature vectors to which the CHO methodology was applied. The AUC values of the second model showed better agreement (Spearman's rank correlation (SRC) coefficient = 0.8) to human observer results than those from the first model (SRC coefficient = 0.4). The agreement with human observers indicates the proposed 4D mathematical observer model provides a good predictor of the

  14. Method of Isolated Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion in a Rat Model: Lessons Learned from Developing a Rat EVLP Program

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kevin; Bobba, Christopher; Eren, Emre; Spata, Tyler; Tadres, Malak; Hayes,, Don; Black, Sylvester M.

    2015-01-01

    The number of acceptable donor lungs available for lung transplantation is severely limited due to poor quality. Ex-Vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP) has allowed lung transplantation in humans to become more readily available by enabling the ability to assess organs and expand the donor pool. As this technology expands and improves, the ability to potentially evaluate and improve the quality of substandard lungs prior to transplant is a critical need. In order to more rigorously evaluate these approaches, a reproducible animal model needs to be established that would allow for testing of improved techniques and management of the donated lungs as well as to the lung-transplant recipient. In addition, an EVLP animal model of associated pathologies, e.g., ventilation induced lung injury (VILI), would provide a novel method to evaluate treatments for these pathologies. Here, we describe the development of a rat EVLP lung program and refinements to this method that allow for a reproducible model for future expansion. We also describe the application of this EVLP system to model VILI in rat lungs. The goal is to provide the research community with key information and “pearls of wisdom”/techniques that arose from trial and error and are critical to establishing an EVLP system that is robust and reproducible. PMID:25741794

  15. Method of isolated ex vivo lung perfusion in a rat model: lessons learned from developing a rat EVLP program.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kevin; Bobba, Christopher; Eren, Emre; Spata, Tyler; Tadres, Malak; Hayes, Don; Black, Sylvester M; Ghadiali, Samir; Whitson, Bryan A

    2015-01-01

    The number of acceptable donor lungs available for lung transplantation is severely limited due to poor quality. Ex-Vivo Lung Perfusion (EVLP) has allowed lung transplantation in humans to become more readily available by enabling the ability to assess organs and expand the donor pool. As this technology expands and improves, the ability to potentially evaluate and improve the quality of substandard lungs prior to transplant is a critical need. In order to more rigorously evaluate these approaches, a reproducible animal model needs to be established that would allow for testing of improved techniques and management of the donated lungs as well as to the lung-transplant recipient. In addition, an EVLP animal model of associated pathologies, e.g., ventilation induced lung injury (VILI), would provide a novel method to evaluate treatments for these pathologies. Here, we describe the development of a rat EVLP lung program and refinements to this method that allow for a reproducible model for future expansion. We also describe the application of this EVLP system to model VILI in rat lungs. The goal is to provide the research community with key information and "pearls of wisdom"/techniques that arose from trial and error and are critical to establishing an EVLP system that is robust and reproducible. PMID:25741794

  16. Local Auxin Biosynthesis Mediated by a YUCCA Flavin Monooxygenase Regulates Haustorium Development in the Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Juliane K; Wakatake, Takanori; Yoshida, Satoko; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Wafula, Eric; dePamphilis, Claude W; Namba, Shigetou; Shirasu, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae cause serious agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants develop a multicellular infectious organ called a haustorium after recognition of host-released signals. To understand the molecular events associated with host signal perception and haustorium development, we identified differentially regulated genes expressed during early haustorium development in the facultative parasite Phtheirospermum japonicum using a de novo assembled transcriptome and a customized microarray. Among the genes that were upregulated during early haustorium development, we identified YUC3, which encodes a functional YUCCA (YUC) flavin monooxygenase involved in auxin biosynthesis. YUC3 was specifically expressed in the epidermal cells around the host contact site at an early time point in haustorium formation. The spatio-temporal expression patterns of YUC3 coincided with those of the auxin response marker DR5, suggesting generation of auxin response maxima at the haustorium apex. Roots transformed with YUC3 knockdown constructs formed haustoria less frequently than nontransgenic roots. Moreover, ectopic expression of YUC3 at the root epidermal cells induced the formation of haustorium-like structures in transgenic P. japonicum roots. Our results suggest that expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene YUC3 at the epidermal cells near the contact site plays a pivotal role in haustorium formation in the root parasitic plant P. japonicum. PMID:27385817

  17. Local Auxin Biosynthesis Mediated by a YUCCA Flavin Monooxygenase Regulates Haustorium Development in the Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Wafula, Eric; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae cause serious agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants develop a multicellular infectious organ called a haustorium after recognition of host-released signals. To understand the molecular events associated with host signal perception and haustorium development, we identified differentially regulated genes expressed during early haustorium development in the facultative parasite Phtheirospermum japonicum using a de novo assembled transcriptome and a customized microarray. Among the genes that were upregulated during early haustorium development, we identified YUC3, which encodes a functional YUCCA (YUC) flavin monooxygenase involved in auxin biosynthesis. YUC3 was specifically expressed in the epidermal cells around the host contact site at an early time point in haustorium formation. The spatio-temporal expression patterns of YUC3 coincided with those of the auxin response marker DR5, suggesting generation of auxin response maxima at the haustorium apex. Roots transformed with YUC3 knockdown constructs formed haustoria less frequently than nontransgenic roots. Moreover, ectopic expression of YUC3 at the root epidermal cells induced the formation of haustorium-like structures in transgenic P. japonicum roots. Our results suggest that expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene YUC3 at the epidermal cells near the contact site plays a pivotal role in haustorium formation in the root parasitic plant P. japonicum. PMID:27385817

  18. Expression profile of heat shock response factors during hookworm larval activation and parasitic development.

    PubMed

    Gelmedin, Verena; Delaney, Angela; Jennelle, Lucas; Hawdon, John M

    2015-07-01

    When organisms are exposed to an increase in temperature, they undergo a heat shock response (HSR) regulated by the transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1). The heat shock response includes the rapid changes in gene expression initiated by binding of HSF-1 to response elements in the promoters of heat shock genes. Heat shock proteins function as molecular chaperones to protect proteins during periods of elevated temperature and other stress. During infection, hookworm infective third stage larvae (L3) undergo a temperature shift from ambient to host temperature. This increased temperature is required for the resumption of feeding and activation of L3, but whether this increase initiates a heat shock response is unknown. To investigate the role of the heat shock in hookworm L3 activation and parasitic development, we identified and characterized the expression profile of several components of the heat shock response in the hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. We cloned DNAs encoding an hsp70 family member (Aca-hsp-1) and an hsp90 family member (Aca-daf-21). Exposure to a heat shock of 42°C for one hour caused significant up-regulation of both genes, which slowly returned to near baseline levels following one hour attenuation at 22°C. Neither gene was up-regulated in response to host temperature (37°C). Conversely, levels of hsf-1 remained unchanged during heat shock, but increased in response to incubation at 37°C. During activation, both hsp-1 and daf-21 are down regulated early, although daf-21 levels increase significantly in non-activated control larvae after 12h, and slightly in activated larvae by 24h incubation. The heat shock response modulators celastrol and KNK437 were tested for their effects on gene expression during heat shock and activation. Pre-incubation with celastrol, an HSP90 inhibitor that promotes heat shock gene expression, slightly up-regulated expression of both hsp-1 and daf-21 during heat shock. KNK437, an inhibitor of heat shock

  19. Cultivation of parasites

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nishat Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Parasite cultivation techniques constitute a substantial segment of present-day study of parasites, especially of protozoa. Success in establishing in vitro and in vivo culture of parasites not only allows their physiology, behavior and metabolism to be studied dynamically, but also allows the nature of the antigenic molecules in the excretory and secretory products to be vigorously pursued and analyzed. The complex life-cycles of various parasites having different stages and host species requirements, particularly in the case of parasitic helminths, often make parasite cultivation an uphill assignment. Culturing of parasites depends on the combined expertise of all types of microbiological cultures. Different parasites require different cultivation conditions such as nutrients, temperature and even incubation conditions. Cultivation is an important method for diagnosis of many clinically important parasites, for example, Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis, Leishmania spp., Strongyloides stercoralis and free-living amoebae. Many commercial systems like InPouch TV for T. vaginalis, microaerophilous stationary phase culture for Babesia bovis and Harada-Mori culture technique for larval-stage nematodes have been developed for the rapid diagnosis of the parasitic infections. Cultivation also has immense utility in the production of vaccines, testing vaccine efficacy, and antigen - production for obtaining serological reagents, detection of drug-resistance, screening of potential therapeutic agents and conducting epidemiological studies. Though in vitro cultivation techniques are used more often compared with in vivo techniques, the in vivo techniques are sometimes used for diagnosing some parasitic infections such as trypanosomiasis and toxoplasmosis. Parasite cultivation continues to be a challenging diagnostic option. This review provides an overview of intricacies of parasitic culture and update on popular methods used for cultivating parasites. PMID

  20. House and Stable Fly Seasonal Abundance, Larval Development Substrates, and Natural Parasitism on Small Equine Farms in Florida.

    PubMed

    Machtinger, E T; Leppla, N C; Hogsette, J A

    2016-08-01

    House flies, Musca domestica Linnaeus, and stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), are common pests on horse farms. The successful use of pupal parasitoids for management of these pests requires knowledge of seasonal fluctuations and biology of the flies as well as natural parasitism levels. However, these dynamics have not been investigated on small equine farms. A 1-year field study began in July 2010, in north central Florida, to determine adult fly population levels and breeding areas on four small equine farms. Weekly surveillance showed that pest flies were present year-round, though there were differences in adult population levels among farms and seasons. Fly development was not confirmed on two of the four small farms, suggesting that subtle differences in husbandry may adversely affect the development of immature flies. In six substrates previously identified as the most common among the farms, stable fly puparia were found overwhelmingly in hay mixed with equine manure and house fly puparia were found in fresh pine shavings mixed with equine manure. Natural parasitism was minimal as expected, but greatest numbers of natural parasitoids collected were of the genus Spalangia. Differences in adult and immature fly numbers recovered emphasizes the need for farm owners to confirm on-site fly development prior to purchase and release of biological control agents. Additionally, due to the low natural parasitism levels and domination of parasitism by Spalangia cameroni, augmentative releases using this species may be the most effective. PMID:26902468

  1. Myocardial perfusion imaging using contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Pathan, Faraz; Marwick, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    Microbubbles are an excellent intravascular tracer, and both the rate of myocardial opacification (analogous to coronary microvascular perfusion) and contrast intensity (analogous to myocardial blood volume) provide unique insights into myocardial perfusion. A strong evidence base has been accumulated to show comparability with nuclear perfusion imaging and incremental diagnostic and prognostic value relative to wall motion analysis. This technique also provides the possibility to measure myocardial perfusion at the bedside. Despite all of these advantages, the technique is complicated, technically challenging, and has failed to scale legislative and financial hurdles. The development of targeted imaging and therapeutic interventions will hopefully rekindle interest in this interesting modality. PMID:25817740

  2. Development of in vitro isolated perfused porcine skin flaps for study of percutaneous absorption of xenobiotics. Annual report, 30 September 1985-29 September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Riviere, J.E.; Carver, M.P.; Monteiro-Riviere, N.A.; Bowman, K.F.

    1986-11-01

    Interspecies comparisons of cutaneous anatomy and physiology suggest that the weanling pig is a suitable surrogate for human skin; however, very few investigations of percutaneous absorption phenomena have been conducted in pigs. This study examined the radiolabel excretion patterns after intravenous (IV) and topical administration of six /sup 14/C-labeled compounds in weanling Yorkshire sows. These data were required as a baseline to compare xenobiotic absorption in the isolated perfused procine skin flap (IPPSF) fully described in the first Annual Report (Riviere, J. E., Bowman, K. F., and Monteiro-Riviere, N. A., Development of In Vitro Isolated Perfused Porcine Skin Flaps for Study of Percutaneous Absorption of Xenobiotics, USAMRDC, DAMD17-84-C-4103, November 1, 1986).

  3. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health ...

  4. From commensalism to parasitism in Carapidae (Ophidiiformes): heterochronic modes of development?

    PubMed Central

    Lanterbecq, Déborah; Eeckhaut, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic variations allow a lineage to move into new regions of the adaptive landscape. The purpose of this study is to analyse the life history of the pearlfishes (Carapinae) in a phylogenetic framework and particularly to highlight the evolution of parasite and commensal ways of life. Furthermore, we investigate the skull anatomy of parasites and commensals and discuss the developmental process that would explain the passage from one form to the other. The genus Carapus forms a paraphyletic grouping in contrast to the genus Encheliophis, which forms a monophyletic cluster. The combination of phylogenetic, morphologic and ontogenetic data clearly indicates that parasitic species derive from commensal species and do not constitute an iterative evolution from free-living forms. Although the head morphology of Carapus species differs completely from Encheliophis, C. homei is the sister group of the parasites. Interestingly, morphological characteristics allowing the establishment of the relation between Carapus homei and Encheliophis spp. concern the sound-producing mechanism, which can explain the diversification of the taxon but not the acquisition of the parasite morphotype. Carapus homei already has the sound-producing mechanism typically found in the parasite form but still has a commensal way of life and the corresponding head structure. Moreover, comparisons between the larval and adult Carapini highlight that the adult morphotype “Encheliophis” is obtained by going beyond the adult stage reached by Carapus. The entrance into the new adaptive landscape could have been realised by at least two processes: paedomorphosis and allometric repatterning. PMID:26989623

  5. Inhibition of malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum development by crotamine, a cell penetrating peptide from the snake venom.

    PubMed

    El Chamy Maluf, S; Dal Mas, C; Oliveira, E B; Melo, P M; Carmona, A K; Gazarini, M L; Hayashi, M A F

    2016-04-01

    We show here that crotamine, a polypeptide from the South American rattlesnake venom with cell penetrating and selective anti-fungal and anti-tumoral properties, presents a potent anti-plasmodial activity in culture. Crotamine inhibits the development of the Plasmodium falciparum parasites in a dose-dependent manner [IC50 value of 1.87 μM], and confocal microscopy analysis showed a selective internalization of fluorescent-labeled crotamine into P. falciparum infected erythrocytes, with no detectable fluorescence in uninfected healthy erythrocytes. In addition, similarly to the crotamine cytotoxic effects, the mechanism underlying the anti-plasmodial activity may involve the disruption of parasite acidic compartments H(+) homeostasis. In fact, crotamine promoted a reduction of parasites organelle fluorescence loaded with the lysosomotropic fluorochrome acridine orange, in the same way as previously observed mammalian tumoral cells. Taken together, we show for the first time crotamine not only compromised the metabolism of the P. falciparum, but this toxin also inhibited the parasite growth. Therefore, we suggest this snake polypeptide as a promising lead molecule for the development of potential new molecules, namely peptidomimetics, with selectivity for infected erythrocytes and ability to inhibit the malaria infection by its natural affinity for acid vesicles. PMID:26806200

  6. Interacting parasites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Parasitism is the most popular life-style on Earth, and many vertebrates host more than one kind of parasite at a time. A common assumption is that parasite species rarely interact, because they often exploit different tissues in a host, and this use of discrete resources limits competition (1). On page 243 of this issue, however, Telfer et al. (2) provide a convincing case of a highly interactive parasite community in voles, and show how infection with one parasite can affect susceptibility to others. If some human parasites are equally interactive, our current, disease-by-disease approach to modeling and treating infectious diseases is inadequate (3).

  7. Effects of legume forages on ovine gastrointestinal parasite development, migration and survival.

    PubMed

    Marley, C L; Fraser, M D; Roberts, J E; Fychan, R; Jones, R

    2006-06-15

    Lambs grazing certain legumes have reduced parasite intensities compared to lambs grazing ryegrass swards. Eighteen replicates of white clover (cv. AberHerald), lucerne (cv. Luzelle), red clover (cv. Merviot) and perennial ryegrass (cv. Abersilo) were sown at equivalent field rates in 25 cm diameter PVC pots and maintained outside for 6 months. On day 0, forage in each pot was cut to 50 mm from soil level and the pots were placed in a glasshouse (at 19-25 degrees C and 70% humidity) in a randomised block design. Ten grams sheep faeces containing 2,133 Haemonchus contortus eggs per gram were placed on the soil in each pot. Six replicates of each forage were destructively sampled on days 14, 21 and 29. Forage samples were cut at 50 mm from the soil surface and at the soil surface to give two samples per pot. The number of nematodes was determined by a modification of the Whitehead tray method. The ratio of free-living to infective-stage larvae was determined from at least 10% of the larvae. The number of H. contortus larvae kgdrymatter(-1) (DM) forage was calculated and the data rank transformed prior to analysis by ANOVA. There were fewer larvae on legumes compared with ryegrass on samples from forage above 50 mm (P<0.001) but there was no forage effect on larvae below this height. The sum of larvae present on all forage per kilogram DM showed fewer larvae on red clover compared with ryegrass on day 21 (P<0.05). There was an effect of day on the total number of larvae on forage (P<0.001) but there were no foragexday interactions. Analysis of the data according to the leaf area above 50 mm from the soil surface confirmed these results, that there were fewer larvae on legume forages than ryegrass above this height (P<0.01). Overall, red clover affected the development of H. contortus and all legumes affected larval migration above 50 mm compared with ryegrass but survival of larvae was similar on all forages. Further work is needed to determine if these effects of

  8. Development of a gel formulation of formic acid for control of parasitic mites of honey bees.

    PubMed

    Kochansky, J; Shimanuki, H

    1999-09-01

    Formic acid has been used in various countries for the control of parasitic mites of honey bees (Apis mellifera), particularly the Varroa mite (Varroa jacobsoni) and the tracheal mite (Acarapis woodi). Its corrosivity and consequent fear of liability have precluded commercial interest in the United States, and its rapid vaporization requires frequent reapplication. We have developed a gel formulation of formic acid which provides controlled release over 2-3 weeks and improves the convenience and safety of handling of formic acid. The strong acidity of formic acid restricts the choice of gelling agents; vegetable gellants such as agar are destroyed, and bentonite clay derivatives do not gel, even with high-shear mixing. Polyacrylamides lead to viscous liquids lacking thixotropic properties. High-molecular-weight poly(acrylic acids) and fumed silicas provided gels with suitable physical characteristics. The poly(acrylic acid) gels were difficult to mix and gave slower and nonlinear release behavior, while the fumed silica gels were easy to prepare and linear in formic acid vaporization. PMID:10552733

  9. Parasitism by the protozoan Perkinsus atlanticus favours the development of opportunistic infections.

    PubMed

    Montes, J F; Durfort, M; García-Valero, J

    2001-08-22

    It has been suggested that opportunistic pathogens could contribute to the mortality of Perkinsus atlanticus-infected clams. Examination of Tapes semidecussatus clams from the northern Mediterranean coast of Spain revealed that while 86% of the clams heavily infected with P. atlanticus were co-infected by bacteria and/or viruses, neither non-infected nor lightly P. atlanticus-infected specimens had bacterial or viral infections. The bacteria, which had a Gram-negative cell wall, were always located in the apical pole of gill epithelial cells and enclosed within membranous compartments. Bacteria-containing cells were hypertrophied and showed dysplasia with loss of cilia and microvilli. The viruses shared ultrastructural, morphologic and cytopathic characteristics of a polyomavirus. Viral particles with icosahedral symmetry were found in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus of numerous cell types. Virus-infected cells showed severe alterations, including hypertrophy, reduction of the intracellular compartments and extrusion of the nuclear envelope. Moreover, gill epithelial cells showed disorganization and swelling of the apical region, which affected the ciliary structure. Our findings show that P. atlanticus parasitism favours the development of opportunistic infections which have detrimental effects in this clam population. PMID:11592703

  10. Arrested development of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis, in certain populations of mitochondrial 16S lineage III Tubifex tubifex.

    PubMed

    Baxa, D V; Kelley, G O; Mukkatira, K S; Beauchamp, K A; Rasmussen, C; Hedrick, R P

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory populations of Tubifex tubifex from mitochondrial (mt)16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) lineage III were generated from single cocoons of adult worms releasing the triactinomyxon stages (TAMs) of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis. Subsequent worm populations from these cocoons, referred to as clonal lines, were tested for susceptibility to infection with the myxospore stages of M. cerebralis. Development and release of TAMs occurred in five clonal lines, while four clonal lines showed immature parasitic forms that were not expelled from the worm (non-TAM producers). Oligochaetes from TAM- and non-TAM-producing clonal lines were confirmed as lineage III based on mt16S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) sequences, but these genes did not differentiate these phenotypes. In contrast, random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses of genomic DNA demonstrated unique banding patterns that distinguished the phenotypes. Cohabitation of parasite-exposed TAM- and non-TAM-producing phenotypes showed an overall decrease in expected TAM production compared to the same exposure dose of the TAM-producing phenotype without cohabitation. These studies suggest that differences in susceptibility to parasite infection can occur in genetically similar T. tubifex populations, and their coexistence may affect overall M. cerebralis production, a factor that may influence the severity of whirling disease in wild trout populations. PMID:17891544

  11. Trickle and single infection with Discocotyle sagittata (Monogenea: Polyopisthocotylea): effect of exposure mode on parasite abundance and development.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Godoy, Miguel; Tinsley, Richard C

    2002-01-01

    Experimental infection of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum) with the monogenean Discocotyle sagittata (Leuckart, 1842) allowed comparison between trickle and single exposure, two infection modes demonstrated to occur in the wild. Both types of infection resulted in mean larval attachment success around 50%, which was significantly dependent on dose of infective larvae used (P < 0.0001), but was not affected by mode of infection (P = 0.244). Worms recovered from fish exposed to the same number of oncomiracidia but different mode of infection differed in their rate of development. The developmental stage attained by parasites was significantly affected by number of infective larvae used (P = 0.005), and by the interaction between dose and mode of infection (P = 0.026), suggesting competition among attached larvae. Statistical analysis demonstrated that in the early stages of infestation, worm distribution over the gill arches can be explained by the relative amount of water flowing over them. One, two and three months post-infection parasite numbers were comparable (P = 0.805), but their observed distribution gradually decreased in gill arches III and IV and increased in gill arch I, suggesting that parasites migrate after initial attachment. These results reproduce phenomena observed in the field, indicating that the experimental infection system could be employed to study infection dynamics and host-parasite interactions under controlled conditions. PMID:12641200

  12. Arrested development of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis, in certain populations of mitochondrial 16S lineage III Tubifex tubifex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baxa, D.V.; Kelley, G.O.; Mukkatira, K.S.; Beauchamp, K.A.; Rasmussen, C.; Hedrick, R.P.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory populations of Tubifex tubifex from mitochondrial (mt)16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) lineage III were generated from single cocoons of adult worms releasing the triactinomyxon stages (TAMs) of the myxozoan parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis. Subsequent worm populations from these cocoons, referred to as clonal lines, were tested for susceptibility to infection with the myxospore stages of M. cerebralis. Development and release of TAMs occurred in five clonal lines, while four clonal lines showed immature parasitic forms that were not expelled from the worm (non-TAM producers). Oligochaetes from TAM- and non-TAM-producing clonal lines were confirmed as lineage III based on mt16S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) sequences, but these genes did not differentiate these phenotypes. In contrast, random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses of genomic DNA demonstrated unique banding patterns that distinguished the phenotypes. Cohabitation of parasite-exposed TAM- and non-TAM-producing phenotypes showed an overall decrease in expected TAM production compared to the same exposure dose of the TAM-producing phenotype without cohabitation. These studies suggest that differences in susceptibility to parasite infection can occur in genetically similar T. tubifex populations, and their coexistence may affect overall M. cerebralis production, a factor that may influence the severity of whirling disease in wild trout populations. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Pigeonpea genotypes influence parasitization preference and survival and development of the Helicoverpa armigera larval parasitoid, Campoletis chlorideae.

    PubMed

    Hugar, Shiddalingappa V; Sharma, Hari C; Basavan Goud, Kondikallu

    2014-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to identify pigeonpea, Cajanus cajan (L.) Millspaugh and the wild relative of pigeonpea, Cajanus scarabaeoides (L.) (accession ICPW 125,) genotypes that are hospitable to the pod borer, Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larval parasitoid, Campoletis chlorideae Uchida (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) for the management of this pest in pigeonpea based cropping systems. Percentage parasitization of the H. armigera larvae by the C. chlorideae females was greater under no-choice conditions than under multi-choice conditions because of forced parasitization under no-choice conditions. Lowest parasitization was recorded on the wild relative, ICPW 125, which may be due to long nonglandular hairs and low survival of H. armigera larvae. Parasitization of H. armigera larvae was greater under no-choice, dual-choice and/or multi-choice conditions on ICPL 87, ICPL 87119 and ICPL 87091, which are susceptible to H. armigera, than on the pod borer-resistant genotypes ICPL 332WR, ICPL 84060 and ICPB 2042; while survival and development of the parasitoid was better on H. armigera larvae fed on ICPL 87, ICPL 87119, LRG 41, ICP 7035 and ICPL 87091 than on ICPL 332WR, ICPL 84060, ICPB 2042 and ICPW 125. The genotypes ICPL 87, ICPL 87119, LRG 42 and ICPL 87091 that are hospitable to C. chloridae, are better suited for use in integrated pest management to minimize the losses due to H. armigera in pigeonpea. PMID:25110629

  14. Parasites: Water

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Water Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Parasites can live in natural water sources. When outdoors, treat your water before drinking ...

  15. Development of a polymerase chain reaction diagnostic assay for Ceratomyxa shasta, a myxosporean parasite of salmonid fish.

    PubMed

    Palenzuela, O; Trobridge, G; Bartholomew, J L

    1999-04-15

    A diagnostic procedure based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the myxosporean parasite Ceratomyxa shasta. Three sets of oligonucleotide primers were designed to specifically amplify C. shasta ribosomal RNA genes and several parameters of the assay were tested and optimised. A simple protocol for the processing of fish tissue samples was also developed. In a single round, 20 microliters volume reaction the optimised procedure allows the detection of 50 fg of purified C. shasta genomic DNA, or 0.01 spore from a seeded fish intestine sample. This protocol is considerably faster, cheaper and more reliable than any previous diagnostic procedure for a myxosporean parasite, and can be an invaluable tool for the monitoring of early and/or subclinical C. shasta infections in wild and cultured salmon populations. PMID:10349552

  16. History and development of research on wildlife parasites in southern Africa, with emphasis on terrestrial mammals, especially ungulates

    PubMed Central

    Junker, Kerstin; Horak, Ivan G.; Penzhorn, Banie

    2014-01-01

    The history of wildlife parasitology in South Africa, and to some extent southern Africa, is reviewed, giving a brief overview of the early years and following its development from the founding of the Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute in 1908 until the turn of the century. An emphasis is placed on game species. The main findings on protozoan parasites, including those of carnivores, are presented, starting in the 1890s and leading up to the first decade of the 21st century. Important developments with regard to the studies of arthropod and helminth parasites took place during a period of three decades, starting from the 1970s. Because of the sheer volume of work done by parasitologists during this time, this particular part of the overview concentrates on South African authors or authors working in South Africa at the time, and is limited to hosts that are members of the order Perissodactyla and the superorder Cetartiodactyla. PMID:25830101

  17. Development of a normothermic extracorporeal liver perfusion system toward improving viability and function of human extended criteria donor livers.

    PubMed

    Banan, Babak; Watson, Rao; Xu, Min; Lin, Yiing; Chapman, William

    2016-07-01

    Donor organ shortages have led to an increased interest in finding new approaches to recover organs from extended criteria donors (ECD). Normothermic extracorporeal liver perfusion (NELP) has been proposed as a superior preservation method to reduce ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), precondition suboptimal grafts, and treat ECD livers so that they can be successfully used for transplantation. The aim of this study was to investigate the beneficial effects of a modified NELP circuit on discarded human livers. Seven human livers that were rejected for transplantation were placed on a modified NELP circuit for 8 hours. Perfusate samples and needle core biopsies were obtained at hourly intervals. A defatting solution that contained exendin-4 (50 nM) and L-carnitine (10 mM) was added to the perfusate for 2 steatotic livers. NELP provided normal temperature, electrolytes, and pH and glucose levels in the perfusate along with physiological vascular flows and pressures. Functional, biochemical, and microscopic evaluation revealed no additional injuries to the grafts during NELP with an improved oxygen extraction ratio (>0.5) and stabilized markers of hepatic injury. All livers synthesized adequate amounts of bile and coagulation factors. We also demonstrated a mild reduction (10%) of macroglobular steatosis with the use of the defatting solution. Histology demonstrated normal parenchymal architecture and a minimal to complete lack of IRI at the end of NELP. In conclusion, a modified NELP circuit preserved hepatocyte architecture, recovered synthetic functions, and hepatobiliary parameters of ECD livers without additional injuries to the grafts. This approach has the potential to increase the donor pool for clinical transplantation. Liver Transplantation 22 979-993 2016 AASLD. PMID:27027254

  18. Development of an Integrated Microfluidic Perfusion Cell Culture System for Real-Time Microscopic Observation of Biological Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lung; Wang, Shih-Siou; Wu, Min-Hsien; Oh-Yang, Chih-Chin

    2011-01-01

    This study reports an integrated microfluidic perfusion cell culture system consisting of a microfluidic cell culture chip, and an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass-based microheater chip for micro-scale perfusion cell culture, and its real-time microscopic observation. The system features in maintaining both uniform, and stable chemical or thermal environments, and providing a backflow-free medium pumping, and a precise thermal control functions. In this work, the performance of the medium pumping scheme, and the ITO glass microheater were experimentally evaluated. Results show that the medium delivery mechanism was able to provide pumping rates ranging from 15.4 to 120.0 μL·min−1. In addition, numerical simulation and experimental evaluation were conducted to verify that the ITO glass microheater was capable of providing a spatially uniform thermal environment, and precise temperature control with a mild variation of ±0.3 °C. Furthermore, a perfusion cell culture was successfully demonstrated, showing the cultured cells were kept at high cell viability of 95 ± 2%. In the process, the cultured chondrocytes can be clearly visualized microscopically. As a whole, the proposed cell culture system has paved an alternative route to carry out real-time microscopic observation of biological cells in a simple, user-friendly, and low cost manner. PMID:22164082

  19. AIDS: caused by development of resistance to drugs in a non-target intracellular parasite.

    PubMed

    Parris, George E

    2007-01-01

    The origin of acquired immune disorder syndrome (AIDS) has been the subject of substantial controversy both in the scientific community and in the popular press. The debate involves the mode of transmission of a simian virus (SIV) to humans. Both major camps in the argument presume that humans are normally free of such viruses and assume that once the simian virus was transmitted, it immediately infected some T-cells and caused the release of toxic agents that killed off bystander (uninfected) T-cells resulting in AIDS. The evolution of the Simian virus (SIV) into a human virus (HIV) is regarded as an artifact. In contrast, a fundamentally different hypothesis has been proposed [Parris GE. Med Hypotheses 2004;62(3):354-7] in which it is presumed that in hyper-endemic areas of malaria (central Africa), all primates (humans and non-human primates) have shared a retrovirus that augments their T-cell response to the malaria parasite. The virus can be called "primate T-cell retrovirus" (PTRV). Over thousands of years the virus has crossed species lines many times (with little effect) and typically adapts to the host quickly. In this model, AIDS is seen to be the result of the development of resistance of the virus (PTRV) to continuous exposure to pro-apoptotic (schizonticidal) aminoquinoline drugs used to prevent malaria. The hypothesis was originally proposed based on biochemical activities of the aminoquinolines (e.g., pamaquine (plasmoquine(TM)), primaquine and chloroquine), but recent publications demonstrated that some of these drugs definitely adversely affect HIV and other viruses and logically would cause them to evolve resistance. Review of the timeline that has been created for the evolution of HIV in humans is also shown to be qualitatively and quantitatively consistent with this hypothesis (and not with either version of the conventional hypothesis). SARS and Ebola also fit this pattern. PMID:16893612

  20. The Cytoplasmic Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase of the Malaria Parasite is a Dual-Stage Target for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Jonathan D.; Pepper, Lauren R.; Cortese, Joseph F.; Estiu, Guillermina; Galinsky, Kevin; Zuzarte-Luis, Vanessa; Derbyshire, Emily R.; Ribacke, Ulf; Lukens, Amanda K.; Santos, Sofia A.; Patel, Vishal; Clish, Clary B.; Sullivan, William J.; Zhou, Huihao; Bopp, Selina E.; Schimmel, Paul; Lindquist, Susan; Clardy, Jon; Mota, Maria M.; Keller, Tracy L.; Whitman, Malcolm; Wiest, Olaf; Wirth, Dyann F.; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance is a major limitation of current antimalarials. The discovery of new druggable targets and pathways including those that are critical for multiple life cycle stages of the malaria parasite is a major goal for the development of the next-generation of antimalarial drugs. Using an integrated chemogenomics approach that combined drug-resistance selection, whole genome sequencing and an orthogonal yeast model, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic prolyl-tRNA synthetase (PfcPRS) of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is a biochemical and functional target of febrifugine and its synthetic derivatives such as halofuginone. Febrifugine is the active principle of a traditional Chinese herbal remedy for malaria. We show that treatment with febrifugine derivatives activated the amino acid starvation response in both P. falciparum and a transgenic yeast strain expressing PfcPRS. We further demonstrate in the P. berghei mouse model of malaria that halofuginol, a new halofuginone analog that we developed, is highly active against both liver and asexual blood stages of the malaria parasite. Halofuginol, unlike halofuginone and febrifugine, is well tolerated at efficacious doses, and represents a promising lead for the development of dual-stage next generation antimalarials. PMID:25995223

  1. Hemolytic C-type lectin CEL-III from sea cucumber expressed in transgenic mosquitoes impairs malaria parasite development.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shigeto; Shimada, Yohei; Kondoh, Daisuke; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Ghosh, Anil K; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Sinden, Robert E

    2007-12-01

    The midgut environment of anopheline mosquitoes plays an important role in the development of the malaria parasite. Using genetic manipulation of anopheline mosquitoes to change the environment in the mosquito midgut may inhibit development of the malaria parasite, thus blocking malaria transmission. Here we generate transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes that express the C-type lectin CEL-III from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, in a midgut-specific manner. CEL-III has strong and rapid hemolytic activity toward human and rat erythrocytes in the presence of serum. Importantly, CEL-III binds to ookinetes, leading to strong inhibition of ookinete formation in vitro with an IC(50) of 15 nM. Thus, CEL-III exhibits not only hemolytic activity but also cytotoxicity toward ookinetes. In these transgenic mosquitoes, sporogonic development of Plasmodium berghei is severely impaired. Moderate, but significant inhibition was found against Plasmodium falciparum. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of stably engineered anophelines that affect the Plasmodium transmission dynamics of human malaria. Although our laboratory-based research does not have immediate applications to block natural malaria transmission, these findings have significant implications for the generation of refractory mosquitoes to all species of human Plasmodium and elucidation of mosquito-parasite interactions. PMID:18159942

  2. Purine import into malaria parasites as a target for antimalarial drug development

    PubMed Central

    Frame, I.J.; Deniskin, Roman; Arora, Avish; Akabas, Myles H.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Plasmodium species parasites causes malaria. Plasmodium parasites are purine auxotrophs. In all life cycle stages, they require purines for RNA and DNA synthesis and other cellular metabolic processes. Purines are imported from the host erythrocyte by equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). They are processed via purine salvage–pathway enzymes to form the required purine nucleotides. The P. falciparum genome encodes four putative ENTs (PfENT1–4). Genetic, biochemical, and physiologic evidence suggest that PfENT1 is the primary purine transporter supplying the purine-salvage pathway. Protein mass spectrometry shows that PfENT1 is expressed in all parasite stages. PfENT1 knockout parasites are not viable in culture at purine concentrations found in human blood (< 10 µM). Thus, PfENT1 is a potential target for novel antimalarial drugs, but no PfENT1 inhibitors have been identified to test the hypothesis. Identifying inhibitors of PfENT1 is an essential step to validate PfENT1 as a potential antimalarial drug target. PMID:25424653

  3. Purine import into malaria parasites as a target for antimalarial drug development.

    PubMed

    Frame, I J; Deniskin, Roman; Arora, Avish; Akabas, Myles H

    2015-04-01

    Infection with Plasmodium species parasites causes malaria. Plasmodium parasites are purine auxotrophs. In all life cycle stages, they require purines for RNA and DNA synthesis and other cellular metabolic processes. Purines are imported from the host erythrocyte by equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). They are processed via purine salvage pathway enzymes to form the required purine nucleotides. The Plasmodium falciparum genome encodes four putative ENTs (PfENT1-4). Genetic, biochemical, and physiologic evidence suggest that PfENT1 is the primary purine transporter supplying the purine salvage pathway. Protein mass spectrometry shows that PfENT1 is expressed in all parasite stages. PfENT1 knockout parasites are not viable in culture at purine concentrations found in human blood (<10 μM). Thus, PfENT1 is a potential target for novel antimalarial drugs, but no PfENT1 inhibitors have been identified to test the hypothesis. Identifying inhibitors of PfENT1 is an essential step to validate PfENT1 as a potential antimalarial drug target. PMID:25424653

  4. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D.; Raja, Waseem K.; Wang, Rebecca Y.; Stinson, Jordan A.; Glettig, Dean L.; Burke, Kelly A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogensis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  5. Neospora caninum-infected cattle develop parasite-specific CD4+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Staska, Lauren M; McGuire, Travis C; Davies, Christopher J; Lewin, Harris A; Baszler, Timothy V

    2003-06-01

    Cattle infected with Neospora caninum readily experience transplacental parasite transmission, presumably after maternal parasitemia, leading to abortion or birth of congenitally infected calves. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are important mediators of protective immunity against Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular apicomplexan protozoan closely related to N. caninum. In this study, N. caninum-specific CTL expanded from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of two major histocompatibility complex-mismatched, experimentally infected cattle were identified by using a (51)Cr release cytotoxicity assay. Enrichment and blocking of CD4(+)- and CD8(+)-T-lymphocyte effector subsets indicated that CD4(+) CTL killed N. caninum-infected, autologous target cells and that killing was mediated through a perforin/granzyme pathway. Detection and characterization of CTL responses to N. caninum in the natural, outbred, bovine host will facilitate identification of immunogens and design of immunization strategies to induce parasite-specific CTL against transplacental N. caninum transmission in cattle. PMID:12761108

  6. Neospora caninum-Infected Cattle Develop Parasite-Specific CD4+ Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Staska, Lauren M.; McGuire, Travis C.; Davies, Christopher J.; Lewin, Harris A.; Baszler, Timothy V.

    2003-01-01

    Cattle infected with Neospora caninum readily experience transplacental parasite transmission, presumably after maternal parasitemia, leading to abortion or birth of congenitally infected calves. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are important mediators of protective immunity against Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular apicomplexan protozoan closely related to N. caninum. In this study, N. caninum-specific CTL expanded from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of two major histocompatibility complex-mismatched, experimentally infected cattle were identified by using a 51Cr release cytotoxicity assay. Enrichment and blocking of CD4+- and CD8+-T-lymphocyte effector subsets indicated that CD4+ CTL killed N. caninum-infected, autologous target cells and that killing was mediated through a perforin/granzyme pathway. Detection and characterization of CTL responses to N. caninum in the natural, outbred, bovine host will facilitate identification of immunogens and design of immunization strategies to induce parasite-specific CTL against transplacental N. caninum transmission in cattle. PMID:12761108

  7. Field-cage evaluation of parasitism, development, and overwintering of two recently introduced biological control agents of the emerald ash borer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field-cages were used to evaluate the abilities of Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) and Spathius agrili Yang (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), biocontrol agents of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), to parasitize, develop and overwinter following three late-sea...

  8. Experimental ovine toxoplasmosis: influence of the gestational stage on the clinical course, lesion development and parasite distribution.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Pablo; Fuertes, Miguel; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Ferre, Ignacio; Fernández, Miguel; Ferreras, M Carmen; Moreno-Gonzalo, Javier; González-Lanza, Camino; Pereira-Bueno, Juana; Katzer, Frank; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel; Pérez, Valentín; Benavides, Julio

    2016-01-01

    The relation between gestational age and foetal death risk in ovine toxoplasmosis is already known, but the mechanisms involved are not yet clear. In order to study how the stage of gestation influences these mechanisms, pregnant sheep of the same age and genetic background were orally dosed with 50 oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii (M4 isolate) at days 40 (G1), 90 (G2) and 120 (G3) of gestation. In each group, four animals were culled on the second, third and fourth week post infection (pi) in order to evaluate parasite load and distribution, and lesions in target organs. Ewes from G1 showed a longer period of hyperthermia than the other groups. Abortions occurred in all groups. While in G2 they were more frequent during the acute phase of the disease, in G3 they mainly occurred after day 20 pi. After challenge, parasite and lesions in the placentas and foetuses were detected from day 19 pi in G3 while in G2 or G1 they were only detected at day 26 pi. However, after initial detection at day 19 pi, parasite burden, measured through RT-PCR, in placenta or foetus of G3 did not increase significantly and, at in the third week pi it was lower than that measured in foetal liver or placenta from G1 to G3 respectively. These results show that the period of gestation clearly influences the parasite multiplication and development of lesions in the placenta and foetus and, as a consequence, the clinical course in ovine toxoplasmosis. PMID:26983883

  9. Systematic errors in temperature estimates from MODIS data covering the western Palearctic and their impact on a parasite development model.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Carné, Jorge; García-Martín, Alberto; Estrada-Peña, Agustin

    2013-11-01

    The modelling of habitat suitability for parasites is a growing area of research due to its association with climate change and ensuing shifts in the distribution of infectious diseases. Such models depend on remote sensing data and require accurate, high-resolution temperature measurements. The temperature is critical for accurate estimation of development rates and potential habitat ranges for a given parasite. The MODIS sensors aboard the Aqua and Terra satellites provide high-resolution temperature data for remote sensing applications. This paper describes comparative analysis of MODIS-derived temperatures relative to ground records of surface temperature in the western Palaearctic. The results show that MODIS overestimated maximum temperature values and underestimated minimum temperatures by up to 5-6 °C. The combined use of both Aqua and Terra datasets provided the most accurate temperature estimates around latitude 35-44° N, with an overestimation during spring-summer months and an underestimation in autumn-winter. Errors in temperature estimation were associated with specific ecological regions within the target area as well as technical limitations in the temporal and orbital coverage of the satellites (e.g. sensor limitations and satellite transit times). We estimated error propagation of temperature uncertainties in parasite habitat suitability models by comparing outcomes of published models. Error estimates reached 36% of annual respective measurements depending on the model used. Our analysis demonstrates the importance of adequate image processing and points out the limitations of MODIS temperature data as inputs into predictive models concerning parasite lifecycles. PMID:24258878

  10. A perfusion chamber developed to investigate platelet interaction in flowing blood with human vessel wall cells, their extracellular matrix, and purified components.

    PubMed

    Sakariassen, K S; Aarts, P A; de Groot, P G; Houdijk, W P; Sixma, J J

    1983-10-01

    A flat perfusion chamber was developed to study the interaction of blood platelets in flowing blood with cultured human vessel wall cells, their connective tissue matrix, and isolated connective tissue components at defined shear rate conditions. A cover slip covered with endothelial cells or extracellular matrix components was introduced into the chamber. Laser-Doppler velocimetry showed a symmetrical flow profile at flow rates between 50 and 150 ml/min (wall shear rate 300 to 1100 sec-1). Platelet deposition was estimated by using blood platelets labeled with indium-111 or by a morphometric method. Blood platelets did not adhere to endothelial cells at wall shear rates of 765 sec-1 and the endothelial cells remained attached for at least 10 min of perfusion. In preconfluent cultures of endothelial cells, blood platelets adhered to extracellular material in areas between the cells. Removal of endothelial cells by treatment with 0.5% Triton X-100 induced increased platelet adherence with a preference for certain, as yet unidentified, fibrillar structures of the extracellular matrix. Platelet adherence to equine collagen was also studied after coating the cover slips by spraying of small collagen droplets followed by air drying. Platelet adherence and the subsequent platelet aggregate formation occurred predominantly along visible collagen fibers. These studies showed that this perfusion chamber has a laminar and symmetrical flow allowing qualitative and quantitative investigation of platelet interaction with endothelial cells, their extracellular matrix, and pure connective tissue components. A variety of wall shear rates and exposure times can be applied at controlled conditions without removing cells or extracellular material. PMID:6619647

  11. Development of a dynamic model for real-time determination of membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase activity upon perfusion with inhibitors and reactivators.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Saskia; Eyer, Peter; Mückter, Harald; Worek, Franz

    2006-07-28

    Quantitative predictions of the course of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, following interference of inhibitors and reactivators, are usually obscured by the time-dependent changes of all reaction partners. To mimic these dynamics we developed an in vitro model. Immobilized human erythrocyte ghosts in a bioreactor were continuously perfused while AChE activity was monitored by a modified Ellman method. The perfusion system consisted of two HPLC pumps with integrated quaternary low-pressure gradient formers that were programmed by a computer using commercial HPLC software. The combined eluates passed a particle filter (Millex-GS, 0.22 microm) containing a thin layer of erythrocytes that was immersed in a temperature-controlled water bath. The effluent passed a flow cell in a UV-vis detector, the signal of which was digitized, written to disc and calculated with curve fitting programs. AChE activity decreased by 3.4% within 2.5 h. The day-to-day variation of the freshly prepared bioreactor using the same enzyme source was +/-3.3%. Residual activity of 0.2% marked the limit of quantification. Following perfusion with paraoxon, pseudo first-order rate constants of inhibition were established that did not differ from results obtained in conventional assays. The same holds true for reactivation with obidoxime. The set-up presented allows freely programmable time-dependent changes of up to eight solvents to mimic pharmacokinetic profiles without accumulation of products. Due to some hysteresis in the system, reaction half-lives should be >3 min and concentration changes in critical compounds should exceed half-lives of 5 min. Otherwise, the system offers much flexibility and operates with high precision. PMID:16725113

  12. Transfection of Eimeria mitis with Yellow Fluorescent Protein as Reporter and the Endogenous Development of the Transgenic Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Mei; Liu, Xian Yong; Tang, Xin Ming; Suo, Jing Xia; Tao, Ge Ru; Suo, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Background Advancements have been made in the genetic manipulation of apicomplexan parasites. Both the in vitro transient and in vivo stable transfection of Eimeria tenella have been developed successfully. Herein, we report the transient and stable transfection of Eimeria mitis. Methods and Findings Sporozoites of E. mitis transfected with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) expression plasmid were inoculated into chickens via the cloacal route. The recovered fluorescent oocysts were sorted by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and then passaged 6 generations successively in chickens. The resulting population was analyzed by genome walking and Western blot. The endogenous development of the transgenic E. mitis was observed and its reproduction potential was tested. The stable transfection of E. mitis was developed. Genome walking confirmed the random integration of plasmid DNA into the genome; while Western blot analysis demonstrated the expression of foreign proteins. Constitutive expression of EYFP was observed in all stages of merogony, gametogony and sporogony. The peak of the transgenic oocyst output was delayed by 24 h and the total oocyst reproduction was reduced by 7-fold when compared to the parental strain. Conclusion Stable transfection of E. mitis was successfully developed. The expression of foreign antigens in the transgenic parasites will facilitate the development of transgenic E. mitis as a vaccine vector. PMID:25490541

  13. Development of abamectin loaded plant virus nanoparticles for efficacious plant parasitic nematode control.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jing; Guenther, Richard H; Sit, Tim L; Lommel, Steven A; Opperman, Charles H; Willoughby, Julie A

    2015-05-13

    Plant parasitic nematodes are one of the world's major agricultural pests, causing in excess of $157 billion in worldwide crop damage annually. Abamectin (Abm) is a biological pesticide with a strong activity against a wide variety of plant parasitic nematodes. However, Abm's poor mobility in the soil compromises its nematicide performance because of the limited zone of protection surrounding the growing root system of the plant. In this study, we manipulated Abm's soil physical chemistry by encapsulating Abm within the Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) to produce a plant virus nanoparticle (PVN) delivery system for Abm. The transmission electron microscopic and dynamic light scattering characterization of Abm-loaded PVN (PVN(Abm)) indicated the resultant viral capsid integrity and morphology comparable to native RCNMV. In addition, the PVN(Abm) significantly increased Abm's soil mobility while enabling a controlled release strategy for Abm's bioavailability to nematodes. As a result, PVN(Abm) enlarged the zone of protection from Meloidogyne hapla root knot nematodes in the soil as compared to treating with free Abm molecules. Tomato seedlings treated with PVN(Abm) had healthier root growth and a reduction in root galling demonstrating the success of this delivery system for the increased efficacy of Abm to control nematode damage in crops. PMID:25906360

  14. Cathepsin B Cysteine Proteinase is Essential for the Development and Pathogenesis of the Plant Parasitic Nematode Radopholus similis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Wang, Ke; Xie, Hui; Wang, Dong-Wei; Xu, Chun-Ling; Huang, Xin; Wu, Wen-Jia; Li, Dan-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Radopholus similis is an important plant parasitic nematode which severely harms many crops. Cathepsin B is present in a wide variety of organisms, and plays an important role in many parasites. Understanding cathepsin B of R. similis would allow us to find new targets and approaches for its control. In this study, we found that Rs-cb-1 mRNA was expressed in esophageal glands, intestines and gonads of females, testes of males, juveniles and eggs in R. similis. Rs-cb-1 expression was the highest in females, followed by juveniles and eggs, and was the lowest in males. The maximal enzyme activity of Rs-CB-1 was detected at pH 6.0 and 40 °C. Silencing of Rs-cb-1 using in vitro RNAi (Soaking with dsRNA in vitro) not only significantly inhibited the development and hatching of R. similis, but also greatly reduced its pathogenicity. Using in planta RNAi, we confirmed that Rs-cb-1 expression in nematodes were significantly suppressed and the resistance to R. similis was significantly improved in T2 generation transgenic tobacco plants expressing Rs-cb-1 dsRNA. The genetic effects of in planta RNAi-induced gene silencing could be maintained in the absence of dsRNA for at least two generations before being lost, which was not the case for the effects induced by in vitro RNAi. Overall, our results first indicate that Rs-cb-1 plays key roles in the development, hatching and pathogenesis of R. similis, and that in planta RNAi is an effective tool in studying gene function and genetic engineering of plant resistance to migratory plant parasitic nematodes. PMID:26221074

  15. Development and application of a duplex QPCR for river water samples to monitor the myxozoan parasite Parvicapsula minibicornis.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Sascha L; Bartholomew, Jerri L

    2009-09-01

    A duplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) assay was developed to simultaneously quantify the myxozoan parasite Parvicapsula minibicornis in river water samples and detect inhibition, which may compromise recognition of the target organism. The assay combines a TaqMan MGB probe specific to the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene of P. minibicornis and a commercial TaqMan Exogenous Internal Positive Control. P. minibicornis is endemic to freshwaters of the Pacific Northwest of North America and contributes to reduced fish health in Klamath River (Oregon/California) salmonids. The prevalence of P. minibicornis in these fish can reach 100%, and infection can result in glomerulonephritis and impaired kidney function. To better understand the temporal and spatial occurrence of this parasite in the Klamath River basin, water samples were taken from 7 mainstem sites and 5 tributaries along the 400 km river from March through September 2006. The samples were filtered, and the captured DNA was extracted and tested for the presence of P. minibicornis with the duplex QPCR assay. The parasite was present throughout the river over the entire sampling period, but its distribution and abundance varied spatially and temporally by over 2 orders of magnitude. Spore densities were lowest in March (spring) and peaked in June/July (summer) when site variance was also greatest. Inhibition levels also varied. The assay is able to detect 1 actinospore (the life cycle stage infective to fish) in 1 l of water and offers an alternative to sampling fish to monitor this pathogen and develop management options. PMID:19899348

  16. Clinical Neuroimaging Using Arterial Spin-Labeled Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Ronald L.; Detre, John A.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY The two most common methods for measuring perfusion with MRI are based on dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL). Although clinical experience to date is much more extensive with DSC perfusion MRI, ASL methods offer several advantages. The primary advantages are that completely noninvasive absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements are possible with relative insensitivity to permeability, and that multiple repeated measurements can be obtained to evaluate one or more interventions or to perform perfusion-based functional MRI. ASL perfusion and perfusion-based fMRI methods have been applied in many clinical settings, including acute and chronic cerebrovascular disease, CNS neoplasms, epilepsy, aging and development, neurodegenerative disorders, and neuropsychiatric diseases. Recent technical advances have improved the sensitivity of ASL perfusion MRI, and increasing use is expected in the coming years. This review focuses on ASL perfusion MRI and applications in clinical neuroimaging. PMID:17599701

  17. Aminopeptidase N1 (EtAPN1), an M1 Metalloprotease of the Apicomplexan Parasite Eimeria tenella, Participates in Parasite Development

    PubMed Central

    Gras, Simon; Byzia, Anna; Gilbert, Florence B.; McGowan, Sheena; Drag, Marcin; Niepceron, Alisson; Lecaille, Fabien; Lalmanach, Gilles; Brossier, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Aminopeptidases N are metalloproteases of the M1 family that have been reported in numerous apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, and Eimeria. While investigating the potency of aminopeptidases as therapeutic targets against coccidiosis, one of the most important avian diseases caused by the genus Eimeria, we identified and characterized Eimeria tenella aminopeptidase N1 (EtAPN1). Its inhibition by bestatin and amastatin, as well as its reactivation by divalent ions, is typical of zinc-dependent metalloproteases. EtAPN1 shared a similar sequence, three-dimensional structure, and substrate specificity and similar kinetic parameters with A-M1 from Plasmodium falciparum (PfA-M1), a validated target in the treatment of malaria. EtAPN1 is synthesized as a 120-kDa precursor and cleaved into 96-, 68-, and 38-kDa forms during sporulation. Further, immunolocalization assays revealed that, similar to PfA-M1, EtAPN1 is present during the intracellular life cycle stages in both the parasite cytoplasm and the parasite nucleus. The present results support the hypothesis of a conserved role between the two aminopeptidases, and we suggest that EtAPN1 might be a valuable target for anticoccidiosis drugs. PMID:24839124

  18. Peroxiredoxins in Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Gretes, Michael C.; Poole, Leslie B.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Parasite survival and virulence relies on effective defenses against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species produced by the host immune system. Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are ubiquitous enzymes now thought to be central to such defenses and, as such, have potential value as drug targets and vaccine antigens. Recent Advances: Plasmodial and kinetoplastid Prx systems are the most extensively studied, yet remain inadequately understood. For many other parasites our knowledge is even less well developed. Through parasite genome sequencing efforts, however, the key players are being discovered and characterized. Here we describe what is known about the biochemistry, regulation, and cell biology of Prxs in parasitic protozoa, helminths, and fungi. At least one Prx is found in each parasite with a sequenced genome, and a notable theme is the common patterns of expression, localization, and functionality among sequence-similar Prxs in related species. Critical Issues: The nomenclature of Prxs from parasites is in a state of disarray, causing confusion and making comparative inferences difficult. Here we introduce a systematic Prx naming convention that is consistent between organisms and informative about structural and evolutionary relationships. Future Directions: The new nomenclature should stimulate the crossfertilization of ideas among parasitologists and with the broader redox research community. The diverse parasite developmental stages and host environments present complex systems in which to explore the variety of roles played by Prxs, with a view toward parlaying what is learned into novel therapies and vaccines that are urgently needed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 608–633. PMID:22098136

  19. Reduction of parasitic lasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, Mark E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A technique was developed which carefully retro-reflects precisely controlled amounts of light back into a laser system thereby intentionally forcing the laser system components to oscillate in a new resonator called the parasitic oscillator. The parasitic oscillator uses the laser system to provide the gain and an external mirror is used to provide the output coupling of the new resonator. Any change of gain or loss inside the new resonator will directly change the lasing threshold of the parasitic oscillator. This change in threshold can be experimentally measured as a change in the absolute value of reflectivity, provided by the external mirror, necessary to achieve lasing in the parasitic oscillator. Discrepancies between experimental data and a parasitic oscillator model are direct evidence of optical misalignment or component performance problems. Any changes in the optical system can instantly be measured as a change in threshold for the parasitic oscillator. This technique also enables aligning the system for maximum parasitic suppression with the system fully operational.

  20. Immunoglobulin-binding proteins in ticks: new target for vaccine development against a blood-feeding parasite.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Nuttall, P A

    1999-10-15

    Humans have a long history of trying to control ticks. At first, attempts focused on modifying the habitat, whereas later efforts relied heavily on the use of chemicals. Current research is directed at finding a vaccine against ticks. A strategy of targeting 'concealed antigens' succeeded with the first commercialised vaccine against the cattle tick Boophilus microplus. However, vaccine development against other tick species appears unsatisfactory to date. Vaccination depends on a specific antibody-mediated immunoreaction that damages the parasite. Immunoglobulin molecules of vertebrate hosts can pass through gut barriers into the haemolymph of ectoparasites while retaining antibody activity. Research on the ixodid tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus revealed that host immunoglobulin-G in the parasite was excreted via salivation, during feeding. Immunoglobulin-binding proteins in tick haemolymph and salivary glands are thought to be responsible for such excretion. The discovery of an immunoglobulin excretion system in ticks indicates that they have a highly developed mechanism to protect themselves from their host's antibody attack. Such a mechanism questions whether immunization strategies will be effective against ticks, unless they circumvent or disable the ticks' immunoglobulin excretion system. PMID:11212356

  1. Structural analysis of malaria-parasite lysyl-tRNA synthetase provides a platform for drug development.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sameena; Garg, Ankur; Camacho, Noelia; Van Rooyen, Jason; Kumar Pole, Anil; Belrhali, Hassan; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluis; Sharma, Vinay; Sharma, Amit

    2013-05-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are essential enzymes that transmit information from the genetic code to proteins in cells and are targets for antipathogen drug development. Elucidation of the crystal structure of cytoplasmic lysyl-tRNA synthetase from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfLysRS) has allowed direct comparison with human LysRS. The authors' data suggest that PfLysRS is dimeric in solution, whereas the human counterpart can also adopt tetrameric forms. It is shown for the first time that PfLysRS is capable of synthesizing the signalling molecule Ap4a (diadenosine tetraphosphate) using ATP as a substrate. The PfLysRS crystal structure is in the apo form, such that binding to ATP will require rotameric changes in four conserved residues. Differences in the active-site regions of parasite and human LysRSs suggest the possibility of exploiting PfLysRS for selective inhibition. These investigations on PfLysRS further validate malarial LysRSs as attractive antimalarial targets and provide new structural space for the development of inhibitors that target pathogen LysRSs selectively. PMID:23633587

  2. Parasitism, Emergence, and Development of Spalangia endius (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) in Pupae of Different Ages of Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Liang-De; Ji, Xun-Cong; Han, Yun; Fu, Bu-Li; Liu, Kui

    2015-01-01

    The wasp Spalangia endius Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) is a major parasitoid of the pupae of fruit flies, which are a common agricultural pest. An understanding of this intricate host–parasitoid interaction could provide basic information necessary for the sustainable integrated biological control of fruit flies. In this study, we investigated the effect of S. endius on different-aged pupae of the melon fly Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillett by using choice and nonchoice tests under laboratory conditions. We showed that S. endius females oviposited, and their progeny successfully developed, in different-aged pupae of B. cucurbitae regardless of the method of exposure. There was an oviposition preference for 3–5-d-old pupa. The highest mean percentage parasitism occurred on 4- and 5-d-old hosts, followed by 2- and 3-d-old hosts. The average development time for both males and females was significantly longer in 6–7-d-old hosts than in the younger host stages. Adult females that developed from younger host pupae (2–5-d old) were significantly heavier than those from older host pupae (6–7-d old), and they also lived longer. The sex ratio (proportion of females) of the parasite progeny decreased with an increase in host age. Host mortality also decreased gradually as the pupal age increased. The differences in development time, body weight, and longevity between females and males were significant. These results suggest that S. endius is a good candidate for the biological control of B. cucurbitae. PMID:25700538

  3. Ex vivo lung graft perfusion.

    PubMed

    Briot, Raphaël; Gennai, Stéphane; Maignan, Maxime; Souilamas, Redha; Pison, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    This review proposes an update of the state of the art and the ongoing clinical trials of ex vivo lung perfusion for lung transplantation in patients. Ex vivo lung perfusion techniques (EVLP) can be used to evaluate a lung graft outside of the body. The goal of EVLP is to study the functional status of lung grafts that were first rejected for transplantation because they did not match all criteria for a conventional transplantation. After an EVLP evaluation, some of these lungs may be requalified for a possible transplantation in patients. This article proposes an overview of the developments of EVLP techniques. During EVLP, the perfusion and ventilation of the isolated lung preparation are very progressive in order to avoid oedema due to ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. Lung evaluation is mainly based on gasometric (PaO2/FiO2) and rheological criteria (low pulmonary arterial resistance). Several series of patients transplanted with EVLP evaluated lungs have been recently published with promising results. EVLP preparations also allow a better understanding of the physiopathology and treatments of ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. Organ procurements from "non-heart-beating" donors will probably require a wider application of these ex vivo techniques. The development of semi-automated systems might facilitate the clinical use of EVLP techniques. PMID:26746565

  4. Effects of temperature on hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) immunity and QPX (Quahog Parasite Unknown) disease development: II. Defense parameters.

    PubMed

    Perrigault, Mickael; Dahl, Soren F; Espinosa, Emmanuelle Pales; Gambino, Laura; Allam, Bassem

    2011-02-01

    Quahog Parasite Unknown (QPX) is a protistan parasite affecting hard clams Mercenaria mercenaria along the Northeastern coast of the United States. The geographic distribution and occurrence of disease epizootics suggests a primary role of temperature in disease development. This study was designed to investigate the effect of temperature on constitutive and QPX-induced defense factors in M. mercenaria. Control and QPX-challenged (both experimentally and naturally) clams were maintained at 13, 21 and 27°C for 4 months. Control and experimentally-infected clams originated from a southern broodstock (Florida, no prior reports of disease outbreak) while naturally-infected clams originated from a northern broodstock (Massachusetts, enzootic area). Standard and QPX-specific cellular and humoral defense parameters were assessed after 2 and 4 months. Measured parameters included total and differential hemocyte counts, reactive oxygen species production, phagocytic activity of hemocytes, lysozyme concentration in plasma, anti-QPX activity in plasma and resistance of hemocytes to cytotoxic QPX extracellular products. Results demonstrated a strong influence of temperature on constitutive clam defense factors with significant modulation of cellular and humoral parameters of control clams maintained at 13°C compared to 21 and 27°C. Similarly, clam response to QPX challenge was also affected by temperature. Challenged clams exhibited no difference from controls at 27°C whereas different responses were observed at 21°C and 13°C compared to controls. Despite differences in infection mode (experimentally or naturally infected) and clam origin (northern and southern broodstocks), similarities were observed at 13°C and 21°C between QPX infected clams from Florida and Massachusetts. Clam response to temperature and to QPX exhibited interesting relationship with QPX disease development highlighting major influence of temperature on disease development. PMID:21115017

  5. The Development and Evaluation of a Teleprocessed Computer-Assisted Instruction Course in the Recognition of Malarial Parasites. Final Report; May 1, 1967 - June 30, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitzel, Harold E.

    A computer-assisted instruction course in the recognition of malarial parasites was developed and evaluated. The course includes stage discrimination, species discrimination, and case histories. Segments developed use COURSEWRITER as an author language and are presented via a display terminal that permits two-way communication with an IBM computer…

  6. A method of thymic perfusion and its evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ekwueme, O.

    1973-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a method of isolated ex vivo perfusion of the rabbit thymus using diluted autologous blood is described. The data indicate that the viability of the preparation is maintained at a satisfactory level during the period of perfusion. These results suggest that the isolated perfused thymus would be a useful new approach to studies of thymus function. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4747584

  7. Establishment and development of Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes in the common vole (Microtus arvalis) after oral inoculation with parasite eggs.

    PubMed

    Woolsey, Ian David; Jensen, Per Moestrup; Deplazes, Peter; Kapel, Christian Moliin Outzen

    2015-12-01

    Transmission of the zoonotic tapeworm, Echinococcus multilocularis mainly occurs between the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and various species of vole. Microtus arvalis is considered one of the key intermediate hosts in Europe. We infected 21 M. arvalis aged 35 days (n=2), 56 days (n=6), 84 days (n=4) and 263 days (n=9) with 100 E. multilocularis eggs. Four voles aged 263 days were euthanized at 6 weeks post inoculation (wpi) with the remainder euthanized 10 wpi for analysis of metacestode growth and protoscolex development. Eight C57BL/6j mice (age 35-231 days) were included as controls for egg viability (they have been shown to exhibit visible infection after 4 wpi) and dissected at 6 (n=2) and 10 (n=6) wpi. M. arvalis had significantly higher metacestode establishment (p=0.008) 6 wpi with 27.5±6.63S.D. compared to C57BL/6j with 15.5±0.71S.D. Multivesiculation precluded enumeration at 10 wpi in M. arvalis. No protoscolices were found in metacestodes in M. arvalis 6 wpi or C57BL/6j at any time point but were found in all infected voles 10 wpi (48,056±52,574 S.D.). It has been reported that glucocorticoid (GC) profile can affect E. multilocularis establishment. This was assessed by measuring corticosterone in rodent hair to determine if parasite establishment or fertility was related to this stress hormone. No significant differences were found. Data presented here provides, for the first time, a protoscolex development window in this species that has the potential to shed light on the epizootiology of this parasite. PMID:26279253

  8. CAD of myocardial perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Corstiaan J.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2007-03-01

    Our purpose is in the automated evaluation of the physiological relevance of lesions in coronary angiograms. We aim to extract as much as possible quantitative information about the physiological condition of the heart from standard angiographic image sequences. Coronary angiography is still the gold standard for evaluating and diagnosing coronary abnormalities as it is able to locate precisely the coronary artery lesions. The dimensions of the stenosis can be assessed nowadays successfully with image processing based Quantitative Coronary Angiography (QCA) techniques. Our purpose is to assess the clinical relevance of the pertinent stenosis. We therefore analyze the myocardial perfusion as revealed in standard angiographic image sequences. In a Region-of-Interest (ROI) on the angiogram (without an overlaying major blood vessel) the contrast is measured as a function of time (the so-called time-density curve). The required hyperemic state of exercise is induced artificially by the injection of a vasodilator drug e.g. papaverine. In order to minimize motion artifacts we select based on the recorded ECG signal end-diastolic images in both a basal and a hyperemic run in the same projection to position the ROI. We present the development of the algorithms together with results of a small study of 20 patients which have been catheterized following the standard protocol.

  9. A Putative Homologue of CDC20/CDH1 in the Malaria Parasite Is Essential for Male Gamete Development

    PubMed Central

    Guttery, David S.; Ferguson, David J. P.; Poulin, Benoit; Xu, Zhengyao; Straschil, Ursula; Klop, Onny; Solyakov, Lev; Sandrini, Sara M.; Brady, Declan; Nieduszynski, Conrad A.; Janse, Chris J.; Holder, Anthony A.; Tobin, Andrew B.; Tewari, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Cell-cycle progression is governed by a series of essential regulatory proteins. Two major regulators are cell-division cycle protein 20 (CDC20) and its homologue, CDC20 homologue 1 (CDH1), which activate the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) in mitosis, and facilitate degradation of mitotic APC/C substrates. The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, is a haploid organism which, during its life-cycle undergoes two stages of mitosis; one associated with asexual multiplication and the other with male gametogenesis. Cell-cycle regulation and DNA replication in Plasmodium was recently shown to be dependent on the activity of a number of protein kinases. However, the function of cell division cycle proteins that are also involved in this process, such as CDC20 and CDH1 is totally unknown. Here we examine the role of a putative CDC20/CDH1 in the rodent malaria Plasmodium berghei (Pb) using reverse genetics. Phylogenetic analysis identified a single putative Plasmodium CDC20/CDH1 homologue (termed CDC20 for simplicity) suggesting that Plasmodium APC/C has only one regulator. In our genetic approach to delete the endogenous cdc20 gene of P. berghei, we demonstrate that PbCDC20 plays a vital role in male gametogenesis, but is not essential for mitosis in the asexual blood stage. Furthermore, qRT-PCR analysis in parasite lines with deletions of two kinase genes involved in male sexual development (map2 and cdpk4), showed a significant increase in cdc20 transcription in activated gametocytes. DNA replication and ultra structural analyses of cdc20 and map2 mutants showed similar blockage of nuclear division at the nuclear spindle/kinetochore stage. CDC20 was phosphorylated in asexual and sexual stages, but the level of modification was higher in activated gametocytes and ookinetes. Changes in global protein phosphorylation patterns in the Δcdc20 mutant parasites were largely different from those observed in the Δmap2 mutant. This suggests that CDC20 and MAP2 are both

  10. A putative homologue of CDC20/CDH1 in the malaria parasite is essential for male gamete development.

    PubMed

    Guttery, David S; Ferguson, David J P; Poulin, Benoit; Xu, Zhengyao; Straschil, Ursula; Klop, Onny; Solyakov, Lev; Sandrini, Sara M; Brady, Declan; Nieduszynski, Conrad A; Janse, Chris J; Holder, Anthony A; Tobin, Andrew B; Tewari, Rita

    2012-02-01

    Cell-cycle progression is governed by a series of essential regulatory proteins. Two major regulators are cell-division cycle protein 20 (CDC20) and its homologue, CDC20 homologue 1 (CDH1), which activate the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) in mitosis, and facilitate degradation of mitotic APC/C substrates. The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, is a haploid organism which, during its life-cycle undergoes two stages of mitosis; one associated with asexual multiplication and the other with male gametogenesis. Cell-cycle regulation and DNA replication in Plasmodium was recently shown to be dependent on the activity of a number of protein kinases. However, the function of cell division cycle proteins that are also involved in this process, such as CDC20 and CDH1 is totally unknown. Here we examine the role of a putative CDC20/CDH1 in the rodent malaria Plasmodium berghei (Pb) using reverse genetics. Phylogenetic analysis identified a single putative Plasmodium CDC20/CDH1 homologue (termed CDC20 for simplicity) suggesting that Plasmodium APC/C has only one regulator. In our genetic approach to delete the endogenous cdc20 gene of P. berghei, we demonstrate that PbCDC20 plays a vital role in male gametogenesis, but is not essential for mitosis in the asexual blood stage. Furthermore, qRT-PCR analysis in parasite lines with deletions of two kinase genes involved in male sexual development (map2 and cdpk4), showed a significant increase in cdc20 transcription in activated gametocytes. DNA replication and ultra structural analyses of cdc20 and map2 mutants showed similar blockage of nuclear division at the nuclear spindle/kinetochore stage. CDC20 was phosphorylated in asexual and sexual stages, but the level of modification was higher in activated gametocytes and ookinetes. Changes in global protein phosphorylation patterns in the Δcdc20 mutant parasites were largely different from those observed in the Δmap2 mutant. This suggests that CDC20 and MAP2 are both

  11. A Phantom Tissue System for the Calibration of Perfusion Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mudaliar, Ashvinikumar V.; Ellis, Brent E.; Ricketts, Patricia L.; Lanz, Otto I.; Scott, Elaine P.; Diller, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    A convenient method for testing and calibrating surface perfusion sensors has been developed. A phantom tissue model is used to simulate the nondirectional blood flow of tissue perfusion. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was constructed in Fluent® to design the phantom tissue and validate the experimental results. The phantom perfusion system was used with a perfusion sensor based on clearance of thermal energy. A heat flux gage measures the heat flux response of tissue when a thermal event (convective cooling) is applied. The blood perfusion and contact resistance are estimated by a parameter estimation code. From the experimental and analytical results, it was concluded that the probe displayed good measurement repeatability and sensitivity. The experimental perfusion measurements in the tissue were in good agreement with those of the CFD models and demonstrated the value of the phantom tissue system. PMID:19045509

  12. Parasitic Apologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galatolo, Renata; Ursi, Biagio; Bongelli, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    The action of apologizing can be accomplished as the main business of the interaction or incidentally while participants are doing something else. We refer to these apologies as "parasitic apologies," because they are produced "en passant" (Schegloff, 2007), and focus our analysis on this type of apology occurring at the…

  13. Foodborne Parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and foodborne parasitic diseases, though not as widespread as bacterial and viral infections, are common on all continents and in most ecosystems, including arctic, temperate, and tropical regions. Certain foodborne ...

  14. The languages of parasite communication.

    PubMed

    Roditi, Isabel

    2016-07-01

    Although it is regarded as self-evident that parasites interact with their hosts, with the primary aim of enhancing their own survival and transmission, the extent to which unicellular parasites communicate with each has been severely underestimated. Recent publications show that information is commonly exchanged between parasites of the same species and that this can govern their decisions to divide, to differentiate or to migrate as a group. Communication can take the form of soluble secreted factors, extracellular vesicles or contact between cells. Extracellular parasites can do this directly, while intracellular parasites use the infected host cell - or components derived from it - as an intermediary. By emitting signals that can be dispersed within the host, parasites can also have long-distance effects on the course of an infection and its pathology. This article presents an overview of recent developments in this field and draws attention to some older work that merits re-examination. PMID:27211242

  15. Biliverdin targets enolase and eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) to reduce the growth of intraerythrocytic development of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Eduardo; Maluf, Fernando V.; Bueno, Vânia B.; Guido, Rafael V. C.; Oliva, Glaucius; Singh, Maneesh; Scarpelli, Pedro; Costa, Fahyme; Sartorello, Robson; Catalani, Luiz H.; Brady, Declan; Tewari, Rita; Garcia, Celia R. S.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, haem degradation to biliverdin (BV) through the action of haem oxygenase (HO) is a critical step in haem metabolism. The malaria parasite converts haem into the chemically inert haemozoin to avoid toxicity. We discovered that the knock-out of HO in P. berghei is lethal; therefore, we investigated the function of biliverdin (BV) and haem in the parasite. Addition of external BV and haem to P. falciparum-infected red blood cell (RBC) cultures delays the progression of parasite development. The search for a BV molecular target within the parasites identified P. falciparum enolase (Pf enolase) as the strongest candidate. Isothermal titration calorimetry using recombinant full-length Plasmodium enolase suggested one binding site for BV. Kinetic assays revealed that BV is a non-competitive inhibitor. We employed molecular modelling studies to predict the new binding site as well as the binding mode of BV to P. falciparum enolase. Furthermore, addition of BV and haem targets the phosphorylation of Plasmodium falciparum eIF2α factor, an eukaryotic initiation factor phosphorylated by eIF2α kinases under stress conditions. We propose that BV targets enolase to reduce parasite glycolysis rates and changes the eIF2α phosphorylation pattern as a molecular mechanism for its action. PMID:26915471

  16. Emerging importance of mismatch repair components including UvrD helicase and their cross-talk with the development of drug resistance in malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Moaz; Tuteja, Renu

    2014-12-01

    Human malaria is an important parasitic infection responsible for a significant number of deaths worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions. The recent scenario has worsened mainly because of the emergence of drug-resistant malaria parasites having the potential to spread across the world. Drug-resistant parasites possess a defective mismatch repair (MMR); therefore, it is essential to explore its mechanism in detail to determine the underlying cause. Recently, artemisinin-resistant parasites have been reported to exhibit nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in MMR pathways such as MutL homolog (MLH) and UvrD. Plasmodium falciparum MLH is an endonuclease required to restore the defective MMR in drug-resistant W2 strain of P. falciparum. Although the role of helicases in eukaryotic MMR has been questioned, the identification and characterization of the UvrD helicase and their cross-talk with MLH in P. falciparum suggests the possible involvement of UvrD in MMR. A comparative genome-wide analysis revealed the presence of the UvrD helicase in Plasmodium species, while it is absent in human host. Therefore, PfUvrD may emerge as a suitable drug target to control malaria. This review study is focused on recent developments in MMR biochemistry, emerging importance of the UvrD helicase, possibility of its involvement in MMR and the emerging cross-talk between MMR components and drug resistance in malaria parasite. PMID:25771870

  17. Gastrointestinal Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Embil, Juan A.; Embil, John M.

    1988-01-01

    This article surveys the most important gastrointestinal parasites that affect humans. The modes of acquisition, pathology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment are all briefly examined. Gastrointestinal parasites have become increasingly important in the differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease, as a result of a number of circumstances. These circumstances include: increasing travel to developing countries; increased numbers, for one reason or another, of immunocompromised individuals; increased consumption of raw or partially cooked ethnic delicacies; more crowding in day-care centres; increased immigration from developing countries; and an endemic pocket of individuals with certain unhygienic or unsanitary practices. PMID:21253148

  18. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation. PMID:26700566

  19. Gene silencing of CCD7 and CCD8 in Phelipanche aegyptiaca by tobacco rattle virus system retarded the parasite development on the host.

    PubMed

    Aly, Radi; Dubey, Neeraj Kumar; Yahyaa, Mosaab; Abu-Nassar, Jackline; Ibdah, Mwafaq

    2014-01-01

    Strigolactones are phytohormones that stimulate seed germination of parasitic plants including Phelipanche aegyptiaca. Strigolactones are derived from carotenoids via a pathway involving the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases CCD7 and CCD8. We report here identification of PaCCD7 and PaCCD8 orthologous genes from P. aegyptiaca. Expression analysis of PaCCD7 and PaCCD8 genes showed significant variation in their transcript levels in seeds and tubercles of P. aegyptiaca at different developmental stages. These two parasitic PaCCD7 and PaCCD8 genes were silenced in P. aegyptiaca using a trans-silencing approach in Nicotiana benthamiana. The transient knock-down of PaCCD7 and PaCCD8 inhibited tubercle development and the infestation process in host plants. Our results suggest an important role of the strigolactone associated genes (PaCCD7 and PaCCD8) in the parasite life cycle. PMID:25763619

  20. Transcriptome analyses reveal protein and domain families that delineate stage-related development in the economically important parasitic nematodes, Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi are among the most important gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle worldwide. The economic losses caused by these parasites are on the order of hundreds of millions of dollars per year. Conventional treatment of these parasites is through anthelmintic drugs; however, as resistance to anthelmintics increases, overall effectiveness has begun decreasing. New methods of control and alternative drug targets are necessary. In-depth analysis of transcriptomic data can help provide these targets. Results The assembly of 8.7 million and 11 million sequences from C. oncophora and O. ostertagi, respectively, resulted in 29,900 and 34,792 transcripts. Among these, 69% and 73% of the predicted peptides encoded by C. oncophora and O. ostertagi had homologues in other nematodes. Approximately 21% and 24% were constitutively expressed in both species, respectively; however, the numbers of transcripts that were stage specific were much smaller (~1% of the transcripts expressed in a stage). Approximately 21% of the transcripts in C. oncophora and 22% in O. ostertagi were up-regulated in a particular stage. Functional molecular signatures were detected for 46% and 35% of the transcripts in C. oncophora and O. ostertagi, respectively. More in-depth examinations of the most prevalent domains led to knowledge of gene expression changes between the free-living (egg, L1, L2 and L3 sheathed) and parasitic (L3 exsheathed, L4, and adult) stages. Domains previously implicated in growth and development such as chromo domains and the MADF domain tended to dominate in the free-living stages. In contrast, domains potentially involved in feeding such as the zinc finger and CAP domains dominated in the parasitic stages. Pathway analyses showed significant associations between life-cycle stages and peptides involved in energy metabolism in O. ostertagi whereas metabolism of cofactors and vitamins were specifically up-regulated in the parasitic

  1. THE ROLE OF OX40L INTERACTION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE PRIMARY AND MEMORY TH2 RESPONSE TO THE GASTROINTESTINAL NEMATODE PARASITE HELIGMOSOMOIDES POLYGYRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In these studies, we examined the effects of OX40L deficiency on the development of Th2 cells during the primary and memory immune responses to the intestinal nematode parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus. Elevations in IL-4 production and total and Ag-specific serum IgE levels were inhibited during ...

  2. [The nature of changes of some immunophysiological characteristics in bream (Abramis brama) infected with plerocercoids (Ligula intestinalis) at various stages of parasite development].

    PubMed

    Silkina, N I; Mikriakov, V R; Mikriakov, D V

    2012-01-01

    The data from studies of the antimicrobial properties of blood serum, the content of total lipids, and antioxidant activity of immunocompetent tissues and organs of breams Abramis brama infected with plerocercoids Ligula intestinalis depending on the phase of development of the parasite are presented. The quantitative characteristics of the studied parameters are determined. PMID:23136746

  3. GPU-accelerated voxelwise hepatic perfusion quantification.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Cao, Y

    2012-09-01

    Voxelwise quantification of hepatic perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging greatly contributes to assessment of liver function in response to radiation therapy. However, the efficiency of the estimation of hepatic perfusion parameters voxel-by-voxel in the whole liver using a dual-input single-compartment model requires substantial improvement for routine clinical applications. In this paper, we utilize the parallel computation power of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computation, while maintaining the same accuracy as the conventional method. Using compute unified device architecture-GPU, the hepatic perfusion computations over multiple voxels are run across the GPU blocks concurrently but independently. At each voxel, nonlinear least-squares fitting the time series of the liver DCE data to the compartmental model is distributed to multiple threads in a block, and the computations of different time points are performed simultaneously and synchronically. An efficient fast Fourier transform in a block is also developed for the convolution computation in the model. The GPU computations of the voxel-by-voxel hepatic perfusion images are compared with ones by the CPU using the simulated DCE data and the experimental DCE MR images from patients. The computation speed is improved by 30 times using a NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU compared to a 2.67 GHz Intel Xeon CPU processor. To obtain liver perfusion maps with 626 400 voxels in a patient's liver, it takes 0.9 min with the GPU-accelerated voxelwise computation, compared to 110 min with the CPU, while both methods result in perfusion parameters differences less than 10(-6). The method will be useful for generating liver perfusion images in clinical settings. PMID:22892645

  4. Parasites alter community structure.

    PubMed

    Wood, Chelsea L; Byers, James E; Cottingham, Kathryn L; Altman, Irit; Donahue, Megan J; Blakeslee, April M H

    2007-05-29

    Parasites often play an important role in modifying the physiology and behavior of their hosts and may, consequently, mediate the influence hosts have on other components of an ecological community. Along the northern Atlantic coast of North America, the dominant herbivorous snail Littorina littorea structures rocky intertidal communities through strong grazing pressure and is frequently parasitized by the digenean trematode Cryptocotyle lingua. We hypothesized that the effects of parasitism on host physiology would induce behavioral changes in L. littorea, which in turn would modulate L. littorea's influence on intertidal community composition. Specifically, we hypothesized that C. lingua infection would alter the grazing rate of L. littorea and, consequently, macroalgal communities would develop differently in the presence of infected versus uninfected snails. Our results show that uninfected snails consumed 40% more ephemeral macroalgal biomass than infected snails in the laboratory, probably because the digestive system of infected snails is compromised by C. lingua infection. In the field, this weaker grazing by infected snails resulted in significantly greater expansion of ephemeral macroalgal cover relative to grazing by uninfected snails. By decreasing the per-capita grazing rate of the dominant herbivore, C. lingua indirectly affects the composition of the macroalgal community and may in turn affect other species that depend on macroalgae for resources or habitat structure. In light of the abundance of parasites across systems, we suggest that, through trait-mediated indirect effects, parasites may be a common determinant of structure in ecological communities. PMID:17517667

  5. Development of the microsporidian parasite, Loma salmonae, in a rainbow trout gill epithelial cell line (RTG-1): evidence of xenoma development in vitro.

    PubMed

    McConnachie, S H; Sheppard, J; Wright, G M; Speare, D J

    2015-02-01

    Growth and propagation of fish-infecting microsporidians within cell culture has been more difficult to achieve than for insect- and human-infecting microsporidians. Fish microsporidia tend to elicit xenoma development rather than diffuse growth in vivo, and this process likely increases host specificity. We present evidence that the fish microsporidian, Loma salmonae, has the capacity to develop xenomas within a rainbow trout gill epithelial cell line (RTG-1). Spore numbers increased over a 4 weeks period within cell culture flasks. Xenoma-like structures were observed using phase contrast microscopy, and then confirmed using transmission electron microscopy. Optimization of the L. salmonae-RTG-1 cell model has important implications in elucidating the process of xenoma development induced by microsporidian parasites. PMID:25434457

  6. Experimental glomerulonephritis in the isolated perfused rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Couser, W G; Steinmuller, D R; Stilmant, M M; Salant, D J; Lowenstein, L M

    1978-01-01

    The development of immune deposits on the subepithelial surface of the glomerular capillary wall was studied in isolated rat kidneys perfused at controlled perfusion pressure, pH, temperature, and flow rates with recirculating oxygenated perfusate containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) in buffer and sheep antibody to rat proximal tubular epithelial cell brush border antigen (Fx1A). Control kidney were perfused with equal concentrations of non-antibody immunoglobulin (Ig)G. Renal function was monitored by measuring inulin clearance, sodium reabsorption, and urine flow as well as BSA excretion and fractional clearance. Perfused kidneys were studied by light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy. All kidneys perfused with anti-Fx1A developed diffuse, finely granular deposits of IgG along the glomerular capillary wall by immunofluorescence. Electron microscopy revealed these deposits to be localized exclusively in the subepithelial space and slit pores. Similar deposits were produced in a nonrecirculating perfusion system, thereby excluding the formation of immune complexes in the perfusate caused by renal release of tubular antigen. Control kidneys perfused with nonantibody IgG did not develop glomerular immune deposits. Renal function and BSA excretion were the same in experimental and control kidneys. Glomerular deposits in antibody perfused kidneys were indistinguishable from deposits in rats injected with anti-Fx1A or immunized with Fx1A to produce autologous immune complex nephropathy. These studies demonstrate that subepithelial immune deposits can be produced in the isolated rat kidney by perfusion with specific antibody to Fx1A in the absence of circulating immune complexes. In this model deposits result from in situ complex formation rather than circulating immune complex deposition. Images PMID:372233

  7. Distribution of perfusion.

    PubMed

    Glenny, Robb; Robertson, H Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Local driving pressures and resistances within the pulmonary vascular tree determine the distribution of perfusion in the lung. Unlike other organs, these local determinants are significantly influenced by regional hydrostatic and alveolar pressures. Those effects on blood flow distribution are further magnified by the large vertical height of the human lung and the relatively low intravascular pressures in the pulmonary circulation. While the distribution of perfusion is largely due to passive determinants such as vascular geometry and hydrostatic pressures, active mechanisms such as vasoconstriction induced by local hypoxia can also redistribute blood flow. This chapter reviews the determinants of regional lung perfusion with a focus on vascular tree geometry, vertical gradients induced by gravity, the interactions between vascular and surrounding alveolar pressures, and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. While each of these determinants of perfusion distribution can be examined in isolation, the distribution of blood flow is dynamically determined and each component interacts with the others so that a change in one region of the lung influences the distribution of blood flow in other lung regions. PMID:23737171

  8. Importance of capillary perfusion.

    PubMed

    Hardaway, R M

    1979-11-01

    Perfusion is more critical than oxygen in the maintenance of cell viability. A high hematocrit or high fibrinogen level increases blood viscosity and predisposes to disseminated intravascular coagulation. It is recommended that a hematocrit of about 30 be maintained in periods of circulatory stress such as shock or extracorporeal circulation. PMID:495856

  9. Parasite-related diarrhoeas*

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    This article reviews available knowledge on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, immunology, diagnosis, and therapy of parasite-related diarrhoeas of public health importance, primarily amoebiasis, giardiasis, trichuriasis, strongyloidiasis, balantidiasis, coccidioses, schistosomiasis, and capillariasis. Research priorities are recommended in each of these fields with the aim of developing better means of prevention and treatment. PMID:6971185

  10. The physiology of infection with nematodes: the role of intracellular pH in the development of the early parasitic stage.

    PubMed

    Petronijevic, T; Rogers, W P

    1987-01-01

    1. H2CO3, the host's signal which induced (less than 25 min) the Ca2+-dependent development of the first parasitic stage of Haemonchus contortus, produced a diphasic change in the pHi (less than 30 min), measured with 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolidinedione, in the infective stage. The intensity of the diphasic change was related to the [H2CO3] and so to the efficiency of the stimulus for development. 2. MES and HEPES buffers induced a rapid rise in pHi of infective stages in step with pHo. Ortho-and pyrophosphate induced greater changes in pHi. Such buffers did not initiate development. 3. These and other results suggest that the stimulus for development, H2CO3, induced an energy-dependent Ca2+/H+ exchange mediated by mitochondria of the infective stage, which initiated development of the parasitic stage. PMID:2890466

  11. Development of Anti-Infectives Using Phage Display: Biological Agents against Bacteria, Viruses, and Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Johnny X.; Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of anti-infective therapeutics on the market or in development are small molecules; however, there is now a nascent pipeline of biological agents in development. Until recently, phage display technologies were used mainly to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) targeted against cancer or inflammatory disease targets. Patent disputes impeded broad use of these methods and contributed to the dearth of candidates in the clinic during the 1990s. Today, however, phage display is recognized as a powerful tool for selecting novel peptides and antibodies that can bind to a wide range of antigens, ranging from whole cells to proteins and lipid targets. In this review, we highlight research that exploits phage display technology as a means of discovering novel therapeutics against infectious diseases, with a focus on antimicrobial peptides and antibodies in clinical or preclinical development. We discuss the different strategies and methods used to derive, select, and develop anti-infectives from phage display libraries and then highlight case studies of drug candidates in the process of development and commercialization. Advances in screening, manufacturing, and humanization technologies now mean that phage display can make a significant contribution in the fight against clinically important pathogens. PMID:22664969

  12. Serine proteases of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-02-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  13. Serine Proteases of Parasitic Helminths

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  14. The omic approach to parasitic trematode research-a review of techniques and developments within the past 5 years.

    PubMed

    Haçarız, Orçun; Sayers, Gearóid P

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of technologies to explore parasite biology at a detailed level has made significant advances in recent years, particularly with the development of omic-based strategies. Whilst extensive efforts have been made in the past to develop therapeutic and prophylactic control strategies for trematode parasites, only the therapeutic anthelmintic approach can be regarded as usable in clinical practice. Currently, there is no commercialised prophylactic strategy (such as vaccination) for protection of the definitive host against any trematode parasite. Since 2010 in particular, the integration of omic technologies, including liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and next-generation sequencing (NGS), has been increasingly reported in trematode-related studies. Both LC-MS and NGS facilitate a better understanding of the biology of trematodes and provide a promising route to identifying clinically important biological characteristics of parasitic trematodes. In this review, we focus on the application, advantages, and disadvantages of omic technologies (LC-MS and NGS) in trematode research within the past 5 years and explore the use and translation of the omic-based research results into practical tools to deal with infection. PMID:27126082

  15. Plants that attack plants: molecular elucidation of plant parasitism.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Satoko; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-12-01

    Obligate parasitic plants in the family Orobanchaceae, such as Striga and Orobanche (including Phelipanche) spp., parasitize important crops and cause severe agricultural damage. Recent molecular studies have begun to reveal how these parasites have adapted to hosts in a parasitic lifecycle. The parasites detect nearby host roots and germinate by a mechanism that seems to have evolved from a conserved germination system found in non-parasites. The development of a specialized infecting organ called a haustorium is a unique feature of plant parasites and is triggered by host compounds and redox signals. Newly developed genomic and genetic resources will facilitate more rapid progress toward a molecular understanding of plant parasitism. PMID:22898297

  16. RNA interference in adult Ascaris suum – an opportunity for the development of a functional genomics platform that supports organism-, tissue- and cell-based biology in a nematode parasite

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Ciaran J.; Warnock, Neil D.; Atkinson, Louise E.; Atcheson, Erwan; Martin, Richard J.; Robertson, Alan P.; Maule, Aaron G.; Marks, Nikki J.; Mousley, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The sustainable control of animal parasitic nematodes requires the development of efficient functional genomics platforms to facilitate target validation and enhance anthelmintic discovery. Unfortunately, the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) for the validation of novel drug targets in nematode parasites remains problematic. Ascaris suum is an important veterinary parasite and a zoonotic pathogen. Here we show that adult A. suum is RNAi competent, and highlight the induction, spread and consistency of RNAi across multiple tissue types. This platform provides a new opportunity to undertake whole organism-, tissue- and cell-level gene function studies to enhance target validation processes for nematode parasites of veterinary/medical significance. PMID:26149642

  17. Attenuation of a drug-sensitive strain of a turkey protozoan parasite Eimeria meleagrimitis by selection for precocious development.

    PubMed

    Rathinam, T; Gadde, U; Chapman, H D

    2016-01-30

    An attenuated line of Eimeria meleagrimitis was established by repeated propagation of the parasite in 9-day old turkey poults and subsequent selection for precocious development. Following 20 passages, the prepatent period decreased from 120 to 104h. A series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the pathogenicity, immunogenicity and fecundity of the newly selected line. Judged by body weight gain, feed consumption and feed efficiency following infection, the attenuated line had appreciably reduced pathogenicity. Immunogenicity of the attenuated line was examined by infecting poults successively with incremental doses of 10(2), 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts at 0, 7, and 14 days of age respectively. No oocysts were detected following challenge with 5×10(2) oocysts, indicating that the attenuated line had retained immunogenicity. Fecundity was assessed by infecting two-week old birds with 5×10(2) oocysts of either parent or attenuated line. Oocyst production from 96 to 240h post-infection showed that the patent period of the attenuated line commenced earlier and was of shorter duration than the parent line. PMID:26801586

  18. Evolutionary consequence of a change in life cycle complexity: A link between precocious development and evolution toward female-biased sex allocation in a hermaphroditic parasite.

    PubMed

    Kasl, Emily L; McAllister, Chris T; Robison, Henry W; Connior, Matthew B; Font, William F; Criscione, Charles D

    2015-12-01

    The evolutionary consequences of changes in the complex life cycles of parasites are not limited to the traits that directly affect transmission. For instance, mating systems that are altered due to precocious sexual maturation in what is typically regarded as an intermediate host may impact opportunities for outcrossing. In turn, reproductive traits may evolve to optimize sex allocation. Here, we test the hypothesis that sex allocation evolved toward a more female-biased function in populations of the hermaphroditic digenean trematode Alloglossidium progeneticum that can precociously reproduce in their second hosts. In these precocious populations, parasites are forced to self-fertilize as they remain encysted in their second hosts. In contrast, parasites in obligate three-host populations have more opportunities to outcross in their third host. We found strong support that in populations with precocious development, allocation to male resources was greatly reduced. We also identified a potential phenotypically plastic response in a body size sex allocation relationship that may be driven by the competition for mates. These results emphasize how changes in life cycle patterns that alter mating systems can impact the evolution of reproductive traits in parasites. PMID:26508113

  19. The Effect of Temperature on Synchronization of Brood Development of the Bopyrid Isopod Parasite Probopyrus pandalicola with Molting of Its Host, the Daggerblade Grass Shrimp Palaemonetes pugio.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Brigette A; Curran, Mary Carla

    2015-08-01

    The bopyrid isopod Probopyrus pandalicola is a hematophagous ectoparasite that sexually sterilizes some palaemonid shrimps, including female daggerblade grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio. The reproduction of parasitic isopods is thought to occur synchronously with host molting because the brood would be unsuccessful if molting occurred before the larvae were free swimming. Temperature affects the length of the molting cycle of shrimp, and therefore may also affect the incubation time of isopod broods. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of temperature on brood development of the parasite and on the degree of synchronization with the molting of its host. Parasitized P. pugio were monitored daily at 2 experimental temperatures, 23 and 15 C, in temperature-controlled chambers for the duration of a full parasite reproductive cycle. Developmental stage was determined by the visible coloration of the brood through the exoskeleton of the host, and was designated as egg, embryo I, embryo II, or epicaridium larvae. Temperature significantly affected median brood incubation time, which was only 11 days at 23 C, as compared to 35 days at 15 C. The final developmental stage (epicaridium larvae) was 3 times shorter at 23 C (median 3 days; n = 45) than at 15 C (median 9 days; n = 15). Temperature significantly affected the intermolt period of parasitized shrimp, which was shorter at 23 C (median 12 days) than at 15 C (median 37 days). A smaller percentage of the intermolt period elapsed between larval release and shrimp molting at 23 C (0.0%) than at 15 C (3.1%), indicating closer synchronization between host molting and parasite reproduction at the warmer temperature. At 15 C, the isopods utilized a smaller proportion of the time that was available for brood incubation during the intermolt period of their host. Brood size ranged from 391 to 4,596 young and was positively correlated with parasite and host size. Because development progressed more rapidly

  20. Myocardial perfusion as an indicator of graft patency after coronary artery bypass surgery. [Thallium 201

    SciTech Connect

    Kolibash, A.J.; Call, T.D.; Bush, C.A.; Tetalman, M.R.; Lewis, R.P.

    1980-05-01

    Stress and resting myocardial perfusion were assessed in 38 patients who received 96 grafts. Stress perfusion was evaluated with thallium-201 and resting myocardial blood flow distribution with radiolabeled particles. When both stress and rest perfusion were normal, graft patency was 82% (51 of 62 grafts). Graft patency was also high (81%, 13 of 16) in areas where stress perfusion abnormalities resolved or become less apparent at rest. However, when stress perfusion defects remained unchanged at rest, the graf was likely to be occuluded (73%, 11 of 15). Maintenance of normal rest perfusion or improvement of rest perfusion postoperatively was also associated with a high graft patency rate (80%, 35 of 44), whereas the development of new rest perfusion defects postoperatively implied graft occlusion (86%, six of seven).

  1. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF AN eDNA METHOD TO DETECT AND QUANTIFY A PATHOGENIC PARASITE IN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Huver, J. R.; Koprivnikar, J.; Johnson, P. T. J.; Whyard, S.

    2015-01-01

    Approaches based on organismal DNA found in the environment (eDNA) have become increasingly utilized for ecological studies and biodiversity inventories as an alternative to traditional field survey methods. Such DNA-based techniques have been largely used to establish the presence of free-living organisms, but have much potential for detecting and quantifying infectious agents in the environment, which are necessary to evaluate disease risk. We developed an eDNA method to examine the distribution and abundance of the trematode Ribeiroia ondatrae, a pathogenic parasite known to cause malformations in North American amphibians. In addition to comparing this eDNA approach to classical host necropsy, we examined the detectability of R. ondatrae in water samples subject to different degradation conditions (time and temperature). Our test exhibited high specificity and sensitivity to R. ondatrae, capable of detecting as little as 14 fg of this parasite’s DNA (1/2500th of a single infectious stage) from field water samples. Compared to our results from amphibian host necropsy, quantitative PCR was ∼ 90% concordant with respect to R. ondatrae detection from 15 field sites and was also a significant predictor of host infection abundance. DNA was still detectable in lab samples after 21 days at 25 °C, indicating that our method is robust to field conditions. By comparing the advantages and disadvantages of eDNA versus traditional survey methods for determining pathogen presence and abundance in the field, we found that the lower costs and effort associated with eDNA approaches provide many advantages. The development of alternative tools is critical for disease ecology as wildlife management and conservation efforts require reliable establishment and monitoring of pathogens. PMID:26380540

  2. Hookworm SCP/TAPS protein structure--A key to understanding host-parasite interactions and developing new interventions.

    PubMed

    Osman, Asiah; Wang, Conan K; Winter, Anja; Loukas, Alex; Tribolet, Leon; Gasser, Robin B; Hofmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    SCP/TAPS proteins are a diverse family of molecules in eukaryotes, including parasites. Despite their abundant occurrence in parasite secretomes, very little is known about their functions in parasitic nematodes, including blood-feeding hookworms. Current information indicates that SCP/TAPS proteins (called Ancylostoma-secreted proteins, ASPs) of the canine hookworm, Ancylostoma caninum, represent at least three distinct groups of proteins. This information, combined with comparative modelling, indicates that all known ASPs have an equatorial groove that binds extended structures, such as peptides or glycans. To elucidate structure-function relationships, we explored the three-dimensional crystal structure of an ASP (called Ac-ASP-7), which is highly up-regulated in expression in the transition of A. caninum larvae from a free-living to a parasitic stage. The topology of the N-terminal domain is consistent with pathogenesis-related proteins, and the C-terminal extension that resembles the fold of the Hinge domain. By anomalous diffraction, we identified a new metal binding site in the C-terminal extension of the protein. Ac-ASP-7 is in a monomer-dimer equilibrium, and crystal-packing analysis identified a dimeric structure which might resemble the homo-dimer in solution. The dimer interaction interface includes a novel binding site for divalent metal ions, and is proposed to serve as a binding site for proteins involved in the parasite-host interplay at the molecular level. Understanding this interplay and the integration of structural and functional data could lead to the design of new approaches for the control of parasitic diseases, with biotechnological outcomes. PMID:22120067

  3. Induction of Haustorium Development by Sphaeropsidones in Radicles of the Parasitic Weeds Striga and Orobanche. A Structure-Activity Relationship Study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Masi, Marco; Maddau, Lucia; Cimmino, Alessio; Evidente, Marco; Rubiales, Diego; Evidente, Antonio

    2016-06-29

    Crop attack by parasitic weeds such as Striga and Orobanche occurs through developmental processes triggered by host chemodetection. Seeds of those weed species remain dormant in the soil until germination is triggered by host root exudates. The development of haustorium, a parasitic plant organ that invades the host to withdraw its nutrients, is also initiated in Orobanchaceae by host molecular cues. The induction of haustorium development by exogenous signals has previously been reported for Striga but not for Orobanche species. In this work, we demonstrate that sphaeropsidone and epi-sphaeropsidone, two phytotoxic cyclohexene oxides isolated from the fungus Diplodia cupressi, a causal agent of cypress canker, induce haustorium development in radicles of the parasitic weeds Striga hermonthica, Orobanche crenata, and Orobanche cumana. This is the first report of chemical stimulation of haustorium development in radicles of Orobanche in the absence of host. In addition, SAR studies were carried out by testing the haustorium-inducing activity of the natural cyclohexene oxides, seven already known and four new hemisynthetic derivatives, in O. cumana, O. crenata, and S. hermonthica, to find a molecular specificity model required for haustorium induction. The results suggested that the haustorium-inducing activity is due to the possibility to convert the natural sphaeropsidone and natural and hemisynthetic derivatives in the corresponding 3-methoxyquinone and that the stereochemistry at C-5 also seems to affect this activity. PMID:27267731

  4. The life cycle of Gregarina cuneata in the midgut of Tribolium castaneum and the effects of parasitism on the development of insects.

    PubMed

    Gigliolli, A A S; Julio, A H F; Conte, H

    2016-04-01

    Tribolium castaneum Herbst 1797 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), an important pest of stored grains and byproducts, is naturally infected by Gregarina cuneata Stein 1848 (Apicomplexa: Gregarinidae). Changes in the life cycle of insects caused by the parasite development in the midgut were studied. Trophozoites, gamonts (solitary and associated), and gametocysts were present in the midgut of the insects. In young trophozoites, the apical region differentiated into an epimerite that firmly attached the parasite to the host epithelial cells. With maturation, trophozoites developed in gamonts that were associated with the initiation of sexual reproduction in the cell cycle, culminating in the formation of the spherical gametocyst. Morpho-functional analyses indicated that gregarines absorb nutrients from infected cells and can occlude the midgut as they develop. Consequently, nutritional depletion may interfere with the host's physiology, causing decreased growth, delayed development, and high mortality rates of the parasitized insects. These results suggest G. cuneata could be an important biological agent for controlling T. castaneum in integrated pest management programs. PMID:26781173

  5. Development of kit formulations for (99m) TcN-MPO: a cationic radiotracer for myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yumin; Ji, Shundong; Tomaselli, Elena; Liu, Shuang

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a kit formulation for [(99m) TcN(mpo)(PNP5)](+) (MPO = 2-mercaptopyridine oxide), ((99m) TcN-MPO) to support its clinical evaluations as a SPECT radiotracer. Radiolabeling studies were performed using three different formulations (two-vial formulation and single-vial formulations with/without SnCl2 ) to explore the factors influencing radiochemical purity (RCP) of (99m) TcN-MPO. We found that the most important factor affecting the RCP of (99m) TcN-MPO was the purity of PNP5. (99m) TcN-MPO was prepared >98% RCP (n = 20) using the two-vial formulation. For single-vial formulations with/without SnCl2 , β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) is particularly useful as a stabilizer for PNP5. The RCP of (99m) TcN-MPO was 95-98% using β-CD, but its RCP was only 90-93% with γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD). It seems that PNP5 fits better into the inner cavity of β-CD, which forms more stable inclusion complex than γ-CD in the single-vial formulations. The results from biodistribution and imaging studies in Sprague-Dawley rats clearly demonstrated biological equivalence of three different formulations. Single photon-emission computed tomography data suggested that high quality images could be obtained at 0-30-min post-injection without significant interference from the liver radioactivity. Considering the ease for (99m) Tc-labeling and high RCP of (99m) TcN-MPO, the non-SnCl2 single-vial formulation is an attractive choice for future clinical studies. PMID:25070025

  6. Cardiac Involvement with Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hidron, Alicia; Vogenthaler, Nicholas; Santos-Preciado, José I.; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J.; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Rassi, Anis

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Parasitic infections previously seen only in developing tropical settings can be currently diagnosed worldwide due to travel and population migration. Some parasites may directly or indirectly affect various anatomical structures of the heart, with infections manifested as myocarditis, pericarditis, pancarditis, or pulmonary hypertension. Thus, it has become quite relevant for clinicians in developed settings to consider parasitic infections in the differential diagnosis of myocardial and pericardial disease anywhere around the globe. Chagas' disease is by far the most important parasitic infection of the heart and one that it is currently considered a global parasitic infection due to the growing migration of populations from areas where these infections are highly endemic to settings where they are not endemic. Current advances in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis offer hope to prevent not only the neurological complications but also the frequently identified cardiac manifestations of this life-threatening parasitic infection. The lack of effective vaccines, optimal chemoprophylaxis, or evidence-based pharmacological therapies to control many of the parasitic diseases of the heart, in particular Chagas' disease, makes this disease one of the most important public health challenges of our time. PMID:20375355

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A SAMPLING PLAN IN WINTER WHEAT THAT ESTIMATES CEREAL APHID PARASITISM LEVELS AND PREDICTS POPULATION SUPPRESSION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From 1998 to 2001, the relationship between the proportion of cereal aphids parasitized (Pp) and the proportion of tillers with > 0 mummified aphids (Ptm) was estimated on 57 occasions in fields of hard red winter wheat located in central and western Oklahoma. Both original (57 fields) and validati...

  8. Neutrophils clear bacteria associated with parasitic nematodes augmenting the development of an effective Th2-type response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection with the parasitic nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis induces a potent Th2 response; however little is known about early stages of the innate response that may contribute to protective immunity. To examine early events in this response, chemokine expression in the draining lymph node w...

  9. Development and Validation of a Biodynamic Model for Mechanistically Predicting Metal Accumulation in Fish-Parasite Systems.

    PubMed

    Le, T T Yen; Nachev, Milen; Grabner, Daniel; Hendriks, A Jan; Sures, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Because of different reported effects of parasitism on the accumulation of metals in fish, it is important to consider parasites while interpreting bioaccumulation data from biomonitoring programmes. Accordingly, the first step is to take parasitism into consideration when simulating metal bioaccumulation in the fish host under laboratory conditions. In the present study, the accumulation of metals in fish-parasite systems was simulated by a one-compartment toxicokinetic model and compared to uninfected conspecifics. As such, metal accumulation in fish was assumed to result from a balance of different uptake and loss processes depending on the infection status. The uptake by parasites was considered an efflux from the fish host, similar to elimination. Physiological rate constants for the uninfected fish were parameterised based on the covalent index and the species weight while the parameterisation for the infected fish was carried out based on the reported effects of parasites on the uptake kinetics of the fish host. The model was then validated for the system of the chub Squalius cephalus and the acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus tereticollis following 36-day exposure to waterborne Pb. The dissolved concentration of Pb in the exposure tank water fluctuated during the exposure, ranging from 40 to 120 μg/L. Generally, the present study shows that the one-compartment model can be an effective method for simulating the accumulation of metals in fish, taking into account effects of parasitism. In particular, the predicted concentrations of Cu, Fe, Zn, and Pb in the uninfected chub as well as in the infected chub and the acanthocephalans were within one order of magnitude of the measurements. The variation in the absorption efficiency and the elimination rate constant of the uninfected chub resulted in variations of about one order of magnitude in the predicted concentrations of Pb. Inclusion of further assumptions for simulating metal accumulation in the infected chub

  10. Development and Validation of a Biodynamic Model for Mechanistically Predicting Metal Accumulation in Fish-Parasite Systems

    PubMed Central

    Le, T. T. Yen; Nachev, Milen; Grabner, Daniel; Hendriks, A. Jan; Sures, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Because of different reported effects of parasitism on the accumulation of metals in fish, it is important to consider parasites while interpreting bioaccumulation data from biomonitoring programmes. Accordingly, the first step is to take parasitism into consideration when simulating metal bioaccumulation in the fish host under laboratory conditions. In the present study, the accumulation of metals in fish-parasite systems was simulated by a one-compartment toxicokinetic model and compared to uninfected conspecifics. As such, metal accumulation in fish was assumed to result from a balance of different uptake and loss processes depending on the infection status. The uptake by parasites was considered an efflux from the fish host, similar to elimination. Physiological rate constants for the uninfected fish were parameterised based on the covalent index and the species weight while the parameterisation for the infected fish was carried out based on the reported effects of parasites on the uptake kinetics of the fish host. The model was then validated for the system of the chub Squalius cephalus and the acanthocephalan Pomphorhynchus tereticollis following 36-day exposure to waterborne Pb. The dissolved concentration of Pb in the exposure tank water fluctuated during the exposure, ranging from 40 to 120 μg/L. Generally, the present study shows that the one-compartment model can be an effective method for simulating the accumulation of metals in fish, taking into account effects of parasitism. In particular, the predicted concentrations of Cu, Fe, Zn, and Pb in the uninfected chub as well as in the infected chub and the acanthocephalans were within one order of magnitude of the measurements. The variation in the absorption efficiency and the elimination rate constant of the uninfected chub resulted in variations of about one order of magnitude in the predicted concentrations of Pb. Inclusion of further assumptions for simulating metal accumulation in the infected chub

  11. Glomerulopathy Associated with Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    van Velthuysen, M.-L. F.; Florquin, S.

    2000-01-01

    Although parasitic infections do not usually present with disturbance in renal function, glomerular lesions can be seen in most of these infections. The glomerular lesions observed in parasitic infections cover the whole range of glomerular lesions known, but most of them are proliferative. Little is known of the exact pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we try to explain the glomerular lesions associated with parasitic infections in terms of the specific immunologic events observed during these diseases against the background of recent developments in the general knowledge of the pathogenesis of glomerular disease. PMID:10627491

  12. Diversity of parasite complex II.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shigeharu; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Ohmori, Junko; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Parasites have developed a variety of physiological functions necessary for completing at least part of their life cycles in the specialized environments of surrounding the parasites in the host. Regarding energy metabolism, which is essential for survival, parasites adapt to the low oxygen environment in mammalian hosts by using metabolic systems that are very different from those of the hosts. In many cases, the parasite employs aerobic metabolism during the free-living stage outside the host but undergoes major changes in developmental control and environmental adaptation to switch to anaerobic energy metabolism. Parasite mitochondria play diverse roles in their energy metabolism, and in recent studies of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, the mitochondrial complex II plays an important role in anaerobic energy metabolism of parasites inhabiting hosts by acting as a quinol-fumarate reductase. In Trypanosomes, parasite complex II has been found to have a novel function and structure. Complex II of Trypanosoma cruzi is an unusual supramolecular complex with a heterodimeric iron-sulfur subunit and seven additional non-catalytic subunits. The enzyme shows reduced binding affinities for both substrates and inhibitors. Interestingly, this structural organization is conserved in all trypanosomatids. Since the properties of complex II differ across a wide range of parasites, this complex is a potential target for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. In this regard, structural information on the target enzyme is essential for the molecular design of drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Respiratory complex II: Role in cellular physiology and disease. PMID:23333273

  13. Parasites in algae mass culture

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Laura T.; Lane, Todd W.

    2014-01-01

    Parasites are now known to be ubiquitous across biological systems and can play an important role in modulating algal populations. However, there is a lack of extensive information on their role in artificial ecosystems such as algal production ponds and photobioreactors. Parasites have been implicated in the demise of algal blooms. Because individual mass culture systems often tend to be unialgal and a select few algal species are in wide scale application, there is an increased potential for parasites to have a devastating effect on commercial scale monoculture. As commercial algal production continues to expand with a widening variety of applications, including biofuel, food and pharmaceuticals, the parasites associated with algae will become of greater interest and potential economic impact. A number of important algal parasites have been identified in algal mass culture systems in the last few years and this number is sure to grow as the number of commercial algae ventures increases. Here, we review the research that has identified and characterized parasites infecting mass cultivated algae, the techniques being proposed and or developed to control them, and the potential impact of parasites on the future of the algal biomass industry. PMID:24936200

  14. Protozoan Parasites.

    PubMed

    Custodio, Haidee

    2016-02-01

    • Stool antigen detection for Cryptosporidium sp, Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica are now commercially available, have better sensitivity and specificity than the traditional stool microscopy, and are less dependent on personnel skill. Tests employing newer techniques with faster turnaround time are also available for diagnosing trichomoniasis.• Nitazoxanide, the only U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved medication for therapy of cryptosporidiosis, is effective among immunocompetent patients. However, on the basis of strong evidence from multiple clinical trials, nitazoxanide is considered ineffective among immunocompromised patients. (14) • Giardiasis can be asymptomatic or have a chronic course leading to malabsorption and failure to thrive. It can be treated with metronidazole, tinidazole, or nitazoxanide. On the basis of growing observational studies, postinfectious and extraintestinal manifestations of giardiasis occur, but the mechanisms are unclear. Given the high prevalence of giardiasis, public health implications need to be defined. (16) • Eradicating E histolytica from the gastrointestinal tract requires only intraluminal agent therapy. Therapy for invasive illnesses requires use of imidazole followed by intraluminal agents to eliminate persistent intraluminal parasites. • Malaria is considered the most lethal parasitic infection, with Plasmodium falciparum as the predominant cause of mortality. P vivax and P ovale can be dormant in the liver, and primaquine is necessary to resolve infection by P vivax and P ovale. • Among immunocompetent patients, infection with Toxoplasma gondii may be asymptomatic, involve localized lymphadenopathy, or cause ocular infection. In immunocompromised patients, reactivation or severe infection is not uncommon. On the basis of limited observational studies (there are no well-controlled randomized trials), therapy is recommended for acute infection during pregnancy to prevent transmission to the

  15. Climate change and Arctic parasites.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Andy; Molnár, Péter K; Kutz, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Climate is changing rapidly in the Arctic. This has important implications for parasites of Arctic ungulates, and hence for the welfare of Arctic peoples who depend on caribou, reindeer, and muskoxen for food, income, and a focus for cultural activities. In this Opinion article we briefly review recent work on the development of predictive models for the impacts of climate change on helminth parasites and other pathogens of Arctic wildlife, in the hope that such models may eventually allow proactive mitigation and conservation strategies. We describe models that have been developed using the metabolic theory of ecology. The main strength of these models is that they can be easily parameterized using basic information about the physical size of the parasite. Initial results suggest they provide important new insights that are likely to generalize to a range of host-parasite systems. PMID:25900882

  16. Interleukin 3 perfusion in W/Wv mice allows the development of macroscopic hematopoietic spleen colonies and restores cutaneous mast cell number

    SciTech Connect

    Ody, C.; Kindler, V.; Vassalli, P. )

    1990-07-01

    The genetically anemic W/Wv mice are characterized by the inability of their bone marrow cells to form macroscopic pluripotent hematopoietic colonies in the spleen of irradiated recipients upon transfer (colony-forming units). Furthermore, they almost totally lack mast cells, notably in the skin. In the present study, we have tested the effect of recombinant murine interleukin 3 (rmIL-3) on W/Wv mice hematopoiesis. Transfer of W/Wv bone marrow cells into lethally irradiated recipients perfused with rmIL-3 is followed by the appearance of macroscopic spleen colonies. Moreover, perfusion of rmIL-3 in W/Wv mice: (a) restores almost normal total numbers of hematopoietic precursors (colony-forming cells), but without modification of anemia; and (b) leads to the appearance of a normal number of mastocytes in the skin.

  17. Asynchronicity of Facial Blood Perfusion in Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Zaproudina, Nina; Teplov, Victor; Nippolainen, Ervin; Lipponen, Jukka A.; Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Närhi, Matti; Karjalainen, Pasi A.; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical changes in blood perfusion and asynchronous blood supply to head tissues likely contribute to migraine pathophysiology. Imaging was widely used in order to understand hemodynamic variations in migraine. However, mapping of blood pulsations in the face of migraineurs has not been performed so far. We used the Blood Pulsation Imaging (BPI) technique, which was recently developed in our group, to establish whether 2D-imaging of blood pulsations parameters can reveal new biomarkers of migraine. BPI characteristics were measured in migraineurs during the attack-free interval and compared to healthy subjects with and without a family history of migraine. We found a novel phenomenon of transverse waves of facial blood perfusion in migraineurs in contrast to healthy subjects who showed synchronous blood delivery to both sides of the face. Moreover, the amplitude of blood pulsations was symmetrically distributed over the face of healthy subjects, but asymmetrically in migraineurs and subjects with a family history of migraine. In the migraine patients we found a remarkable correlation between the side of unilateral headache and the direction of the blood perfusion wave. Our data suggest that migraine is associated with lateralization of blood perfusion and asynchronous blood pulsations in the facial area, which could be due to essential dysfunction of the autonomic vascular control in the face. These findings may further enhance our understanding of migraine pathophysiology and suggest new easily available biomarkers of this pathology. PMID:24324592

  18. Molecular diagnostics and parasitic disease.

    PubMed

    Vasoo, Shawn; Pritt, Bobbi S

    2013-09-01

    Molecular parasitology represents an emerging field in microbiology diagnostics. Although most assays use nonstandardized, laboratory-developed methods, a few commercial systems have recently become available and are slowly being introduced into larger laboratories. In addition, a few methodologies show promise for use in field settings in which parasitic infections are endemic. This article reviews the available techniques and their applications to major parasitic diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, and trichomoniasis. PMID:23931835

  19. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan? A lung ventilation/perfusion scan, or VQ scan, is a ... that measures air and blood flow in your lungs. A VQ scan most often is used to ...

  20. Development of a New Antileishmanial Aziridine-2,3-Dicarboxylate-Based Inhibitor with High Selectivity for Parasite Cysteine Proteases.

    PubMed

    Schad, Caroline; Baum, Ulrike; Frank, Benjamin; Dietzel, Uwe; Mattern, Felix; Gomes, Carlos; Ponte-Sucre, Alicia; Moll, Heidrun; Schurigt, Uta; Schirmeister, Tanja

    2016-02-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the major neglected tropical diseases of the world. Druggable targets are the parasite cysteine proteases (CPs) of clan CA, family C1 (CAC1). In previous studies, we identified two peptidomimetic compounds, the aziridine-2,3-dicarboxylate compounds 13b and 13e, in a series of inhibitors of the cathepsin L (CL) subfamily of the papain clan CAC1. Both displayed antileishmanial activity in vitro while not showing cytotoxicity against host cells. In further investigations, the mode of action was characterized in Leishmania major. It was demonstrated that aziridines 13b and 13e mainly inhibited the parasitic cathepsin B (CB)-like CPC enzyme and, additionally, mammalian CL. Although these compounds induced cell death of Leishmania promastigotes and amastigotes in vitro, the induction of a proleishmanial T helper type 2 (Th2) response caused by host CL inhibition was observed in vivo. Therefore, we describe here the synthesis of a new library of more selective peptidomimetic aziridine-2,3-dicarboxylates discriminating between host and parasite CPs. The new compounds are based on 13b and 13e as lead structures. One of the most promising compounds of this series is compound s9, showing selective inhibition of the parasite CPs LmaCatB (a CB-like enzyme of L. major; also named L. major CPC) and LmCPB2.8 (a CL-like enzyme of Leishmania mexicana) while not affecting mammalian CL and CB. It displayed excellent leishmanicidal activities against L. major promastigotes (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 37.4 μM) and amastigotes (IC50 = 2.3 μM). In summary, we demonstrate a new selective aziridine-2,3-dicarboxylate, compound s9, which might be a good candidate for future in vivo studies. PMID:26596939

  1. Development of a New Antileishmanial Aziridine-2,3-Dicarboxylate-Based Inhibitor with High Selectivity for Parasite Cysteine Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Schad, Caroline; Baum, Ulrike; Frank, Benjamin; Dietzel, Uwe; Mattern, Felix; Gomes, Carlos; Ponte-Sucre, Alicia; Moll, Heidrun

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the major neglected tropical diseases of the world. Druggable targets are the parasite cysteine proteases (CPs) of clan CA, family C1 (CAC1). In previous studies, we identified two peptidomimetic compounds, the aziridine-2,3-dicarboxylate compounds 13b and 13e, in a series of inhibitors of the cathepsin L (CL) subfamily of the papain clan CAC1. Both displayed antileishmanial activity in vitro while not showing cytotoxicity against host cells. In further investigations, the mode of action was characterized in Leishmania major. It was demonstrated that aziridines 13b and 13e mainly inhibited the parasitic cathepsin B (CB)-like CPC enzyme and, additionally, mammalian CL. Although these compounds induced cell death of Leishmania promastigotes and amastigotes in vitro, the induction of a proleishmanial T helper type 2 (Th2) response caused by host CL inhibition was observed in vivo. Therefore, we describe here the synthesis of a new library of more selective peptidomimetic aziridine-2,3-dicarboxylates discriminating between host and parasite CPs. The new compounds are based on 13b and 13e as lead structures. One of the most promising compounds of this series is compound s9, showing selective inhibition of the parasite CPs LmaCatB (a CB-like enzyme of L. major; also named L. major CPC) and LmCPB2.8 (a CL-like enzyme of Leishmania mexicana) while not affecting mammalian CL and CB. It displayed excellent leishmanicidal activities against L. major promastigotes (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 37.4 μM) and amastigotes (IC50 = 2.3 μM). In summary, we demonstrate a new selective aziridine-2,3-dicarboxylate, compound s9, which might be a good candidate for future in vivo studies. PMID:26596939

  2. Reduction of Toxoplasma gondii Development Due to Inhibition of Parasite Antioxidant Enzymes by a Dinuclear Iron(III) Compound

    PubMed Central

    Portes, J. A.; Souza, T. G.; dos Santos, T. A. T.; da Silva, L. L. R.; Ribeiro, T. P.; Pereira, M. D.; Horn, A.; Fernandes, C.; DaMatta, R. A.; de Souza, W.

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, is an obligate intracellular protozoan that can infect a wide range of vertebrate cells. Here, we describe the cytotoxic effects of the dinuclear iron compound [Fe(HPCINOL)(SO4)]2-μ-oxo, in which HPCINOL is the ligand 1-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino)-3-chloropropan-2-ol, on T. gondii infecting LLC-MK2 host cells. This compound was not toxic to LLC-MK2 cells at concentrations of up to 200 μM but was very active against the parasite, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 3.6 μM after 48 h of treatment. Cyst formation was observed after treatment, as indicated by the appearance of a cyst wall, Dolichos biflorus lectin staining, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy characteristics. Ultrastructural changes were also seen in T. gondii, including membrane blebs and clefts in the cytoplasm, with inclusions similar to amylopectin granules, which are typically found in bradyzoites. An analysis of the cell death pathways in the parasite revealed that the compound caused a combination of apoptosis and autophagy. Fluorescence assays demonstrated that the redox environment in the LLC-MK2 cells becomes oxidant in the presence of the iron compound. Furthermore, a reduction in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in the treated parasites and the presence of reactive oxygen species within the parasitophorous vacuoles were observed, indicating an impaired protozoan response against these radicals. These findings suggest that this compound disturbs the redox equilibrium of T. gondii, inducing cystogenesis and parasite death. PMID:26392498

  3. Reduction of Toxoplasma gondii Development Due to Inhibition of Parasite Antioxidant Enzymes by a Dinuclear Iron(III) Compound.

    PubMed

    Portes, J A; Souza, T G; dos Santos, T A T; da Silva, L L R; Ribeiro, T P; Pereira, M D; Horn, A; Fernandes, C; DaMatta, R A; de Souza, W; Seabra, S H

    2015-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, is an obligate intracellular protozoan that can infect a wide range of vertebrate cells. Here, we describe the cytotoxic effects of the dinuclear iron compound [Fe(HPCINOL)(SO4)]2-μ-oxo, in which HPCINOL is the ligand 1-(bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-amino)-3-chloropropan-2-ol, on T. gondii infecting LLC-MK2 host cells. This compound was not toxic to LLC-MK2 cells at concentrations of up to 200 μM but was very active against the parasite, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 3.6 μM after 48 h of treatment. Cyst formation was observed after treatment, as indicated by the appearance of a cyst wall, Dolichos biflorus lectin staining, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy characteristics. Ultrastructural changes were also seen in T. gondii, including membrane blebs and clefts in the cytoplasm, with inclusions similar to amylopectin granules, which are typically found in bradyzoites. An analysis of the cell death pathways in the parasite revealed that the compound caused a combination of apoptosis and autophagy. Fluorescence assays demonstrated that the redox environment in the LLC-MK2 cells becomes oxidant in the presence of the iron compound. Furthermore, a reduction in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in the treated parasites and the presence of reactive oxygen species within the parasitophorous vacuoles were observed, indicating an impaired protozoan response against these radicals. These findings suggest that this compound disturbs the redox equilibrium of T. gondii, inducing cystogenesis and parasite death. PMID:26392498

  4. Extensive lysine acetylation occurs in evolutionarily conserved metabolic pathways and parasite-specific functions during Plasmodium falciparum intraerythrocytic development

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jun; Lawrence, Matthew; Jeffers, Victoria; Zhao, Fangqing; Parker, Daniel; Ge, Ying; Sullivan, William J.; Cui, Liwang

    2013-01-01

    Summary Lysine acetylation has emerged as a major posttranslational modification involved in diverse cellular functions. Using a combination of immunoisolation and liquid chromatography coupled to accurate mass spectrometry, we determined the first acetylome of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum during its active proliferation in erythrocytes with 421 acetylation sites identified in 230 proteins. Lysine-acetylated proteins are distributed in the nucleus, cytoplasm, mitochondrion, and apicoplast. Whereas occurrence of lysine acetylation in a similarly wide range of cellular functions suggests conservation of lysine acetylation through evolution, the Plasmodium acetylome also revealed significant divergence from those of other eukaryotes and even the closely-related parasite Toxoplasma. This divergence is reflected in the acetylation of a large number of Plasmodium-specific proteins and different acetylation sites in evolutionarily conserved acetylated proteins. A prominent example is the abundant acetylation of proteins in the glycolysis pathway but relatively deficient acetylation of enzymes in the citrate cycle. Using specific transgenic lines and inhibitors, we determined that the acetyltransferase PfMYST and lysine deacetylases play important roles in regulating the dynamics of cytoplasmic protein acetylation. The Plasmodium acetylome provides an exciting start point for further exploration of functions of acetylation in the biology of malaria parasites. PMID:23796209

  5. Anti-Plasmodial Activity of Aroylhydrazone and Thiosemicarbazone Iron Chelators: Effect on Erythrocyte Membrane Integrity, Parasite Development and the Intracellular Labile Iron Pool

    PubMed Central

    Walcourt, Asikiya; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Kwagyan, John; Adenuga, Babafemi B.; Kalinowski, Danuta S.; Lovejoy, David B.; Lane, Darius J. R.; Richardson, Des R.

    2013-01-01

    Iron chelators inhibit the growth of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, in culture and in animal and human studies. We previously reported the anti-plasmodial activity of the chelators, 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311), 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (N4mT), and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde 4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (N4pT). In fact, these ligands showed greater growth inhibition of chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and chloroquine-resistant (7G8) strains of P. falciparum in culture compared to desferrioxamine (DFO). The present study examined the effects of 311, N4mT and N4pT on erythrocyte membrane integrity and asexual parasite development. While the characteristic biconcave disk shape of the erythrocytes was unaffected, the chelators caused very slight hemolysis at IC50 values that inhibited parasite growth. The chelators 311, N4mT and N4pT affected all stages of the intra-erythrocytic development cycle (IDC) of P. falciparum in culture. However, while these ligands primarily affected the ring-stage, DFO inhibited primarily trophozoite and schizont-stages. Ring, trophozoite and schizont-stages of the IDC were inhibited by significantly lower concentrations of 311, N4mT, and N4pT (IC50 = 4.45 ± 1.70, 10.30 ± 4.40, and 3.64 ± 2.00 μM, respectively) than DFO (IC50 = 23.43 ± 3.40 μM). Complexation of 311, N4mT and N4pT with iron reduced their anti-plasmodial activity. Estimation of the intracellular labile iron pool (LIP) in erythrocytes showed that the chelation efficacy of 311, N4mT and N4pT corresponded to their anti-plasmodial activity, suggesting that the LIP may be a potential source of non-heme iron for parasite metabolism within the erythrocyte. This study has implications for malaria chemotherapy that specifically disrupts parasite iron utilization. PMID:24028863

  6. Anti-plasmodial activity of aroylhydrazone and thiosemicarbazone iron chelators: effect on erythrocyte membrane integrity, parasite development and the intracellular labile iron pool.

    PubMed

    Walcourt, Asikiya; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Kwagyan, John; Adenuga, Babafemi B; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Lovejoy, David B; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R

    2013-12-01

    Iron chelators inhibit the growth of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, in culture and in animal and human studies. We previously reported the anti-plasmodial activity of the chelators, 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311), 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (N4mT), and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde 4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (N4pT). In fact, these ligands showed greater growth inhibition of chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and chloroquine-resistant (7G8) strains of P. falciparum in culture compared to desferrioxamine (DFO). The present study examined the effects of 311, N4mT and N4pT on erythrocyte membrane integrity and asexual parasite development. While the characteristic biconcave disk shape of the erythrocytes was unaffected, the chelators caused very slight hemolysis at IC50 values that inhibited parasite growth. The chelators 311, N4mT and N4pT affected all stages of the intra-erythrocytic development cycle (IDC) of P. falciparum in culture. However, while these ligands primarily affected the ring-stage, DFO inhibited primarily trophozoite and schizont-stages. Ring, trophozoite and schizont-stages of the IDC were inhibited by significantly lower concentrations of 311, N4mT, and N4pT (IC50=4.45±1.70, 10.30±4.40, and 3.64±2.00μM, respectively) than DFO (IC50=23.43±3.40μM). Complexation of 311, N4mT and N4pT with iron reduced their anti-plasmodial activity. Estimation of the intracellular labile iron pool (LIP) in erythrocytes showed that the chelation efficacy of 311, N4mT and N4pT corresponded to their anti-plasmodial activities, suggesting that the LIP may be a potential source of non-heme iron for parasite metabolism within the erythrocyte. This study has implications for malaria chemotherapy that specifically disrupts parasite iron utilization. PMID:24028863

  7. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Tiago N; Cypel, Marcelo

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  8. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  9. Influence of the gestational stage on the clinical course, lesional development and parasite distribution in experimental ovine neosporosis.

    PubMed

    Arranz-Solís, David; Benavides, Julio; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Fuertes, Miguel; Ferre, Ignacio; Ferreras, Maria Del Carmen; Collantes-Fernández, Esther; Hemphill, Andrew; Pérez, Valentín; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Neospora caninum is considered one of the main causes of abortion in cattle, yet recent studies have also emphasised its relevance as an abortifacient in small ruminants. In order to gain deeper insight into the pathogenesis of ovine neosporosis, pregnant ewes were intravenously inoculated with 10(6) tachyzoites of the Nc-Spain7 isolate at days 40, 90 or 120 of gestation. Infection during the first term resulted in the death of all foetuses between days 19 and 21 post-infection, showing mainly necrotic lesions in foetal liver and the highest parasite DNA detection and burden in both placenta and foetal viscera. After infection at day 90, foetal death was also detected in all ewes, although later (34-48 days post-infection). In this group, lesions were mainly inflammatory. Foetal livers showed the lowest frequency of lesions, as well as the lowest parasite detection and burden. All ewes infected at day 120 delivered viable lambs, although 3 out of 9 showed weakness and recumbency. Neospora DNA was detected in all lambs but one, and parasite burden was similar to that observed in day 90 group. Lesions in this group showed more conspicuous infiltration of inflammatory cells and higher frequency in foetal brain and muscle when compared to both previous groups. These results highlight the crucial role that the stage of gestation plays on the course of ovine neosporosis, similar to that reported in bovine neosporosis, and open the doors to consider sheep as a valid model for exogenous transplacental transmission for ruminant neosporosis. PMID:25884945

  10. Visual analysis of longitudinal brain tumor perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaßer, Sylvia; Oeltze, Steffen; Preim, Uta; Bjørnerud, Atle; Hauser, Helwig; Preim, Bernhard

    2013-02-01

    In clinical research on diagnosis and evaluation of brain tumors, longitudinal perfusion MRI studies are acquired for tumor grading as well as to monitor and assess treatment response and patient prognosis. Within this work, we demonstrate how visual analysis techniques can be adapted to multidimensional datasets from such studies within a framework to support the computer-aided diagnosis of brain tumors. Our solution builds on two innovations: First, we introduce a pipeline yielding comparative, co-registered quantitative perfusion parameter maps over all time steps of the longitudinal study. Second, based on these time-dependent parameter maps, visual analysis methods were developed and adapted to reveal valuable insight into tumor progression, especially regarding the clinical research area of low grade glioma transformation into high grade gliomas. Our examination of four longitudinal brain studies demonstrates the suitability of the presented visual analysis methods and comprises new possibilities for the clinical researcher to characterize the development of low grade gliomas.

  11. Microbial parasitism cross-reactive with host antigen: implications concerning loss of "self" tolerance and development of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Paterson, P Y

    1981-09-01

    The implications of inserting eukaryotic genetic material coding for human "self" antigens into prokaryotic microbe vectors that parasitize humans are discussed against the background of contemporary concepts of immunologic tolerance to "self" constituents and the types of host autoreactive immune responses that might occur. The injurious potential of autoreactive immune responses elicited by infecting microbes which share antigenic constituents with host "self" antigens is carefully weighed. The risk of similar cross-reacting microbial vectors arising as a consequence of ongoing recombinant DNA technology and experimentation and posing public health concerns for humans is examined. On balance, the risk would appear to be extraordinarily low. PMID:6169118

  12. Lipids and the malarial parasite*

    PubMed Central

    Holz, George G.

    1977-01-01

    Merozoite endocytosis initiates Plasmodium development in a vacuole bounded by an erythrocyte-derived membrane, whose asymmetrical distribution of lipids and proteins is reversed in its orientation with respect to the parasite plasma membrane. Reorientation may accompany the proliferation of the membrane associated with the parasite's growth and phagocytic and pinocytic feeding. Increases in the membrane surface area of the parasite, and in some cases of the erythrocyte, parallel parasite growth and segmentation. Augmentation of all the membrane systems of the infected erythrocyte causes the lipid content to rise rapidly, but the parasite lipid composition differs from that of the erythrocyte in many respects: it is higher in diacyl phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, polyglycerol phosphatides, diacylglycerols, unesterified fatty acids, triacylglycerols, and hexadecanoic and octadecenoic fatty acids and lower in sphingomyelin, phosphatidylserine, alkoxy phosphatidylethanolamine, cholesterol, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Active lipid metabolism accompanies the membrane proliferation associated with feeding, growth, and reproduction. Plasmodium is incapable of de novo biosynthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol; however, it can fabricate its glycerides and phosphoglycerides with host-supplied fatty acids, nitrogenous bases, alcohols, ATP, and coenzyme A, and can generate the glyceryl moiety during glycolysis. Cholesterol is obtained from the host but nothing is known of sphingolipid origins. Lipid metabolism of the parasite may be associated with alterations in the amounts of octadecenoic fatty acids and cholesterol in the erythrocyte plasma membrane, which in turn are responsible for changes in permeability and fragility. PMID:412602

  13. A Single-Electron Reducing Quinone Oxidoreductase Is Necessary to Induce Haustorium Development in the Root Parasitic Plant Triphysaria[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Bandaranayake, Pradeepa C.G.; Filappova, Tatiana; Tomilov, Alexey; Tomilova, Natalya B.; Jamison-McClung, Denneal; Ngo, Quy; Inoue, Kentaro; Yoder, John I.

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae develop haustoria in response to contact with host roots or chemical haustoria-inducing factors. Experiments in this manuscript test the hypothesis that quinolic-inducing factors activate haustorium development via a signal mechanism initiated by redox cycling between quinone and hydroquinone states. Two cDNAs were previously isolated from roots of the parasitic plant Triphysaria versicolor that encode distinct quinone oxidoreductases. QR1 encodes a single-electron reducing NADPH quinone oxidoreductase similar to ζ-crystallin. The QR2 enzyme catalyzes two electron reductions typical of xenobiotic detoxification. QR1 and QR2 transcripts are upregulated in a primary response to chemical-inducing factors, but only QR1 was upregulated in response to host roots. RNA interference technology was used to reduce QR1 and QR2 transcripts in Triphysaria roots that were evaluated for their ability to form haustoria. There was a significant decrease in haustorium development in roots silenced for QR1 but not in roots silenced for QR2. The infrequent QR1 transgenic roots that did develop haustoria had levels of QR1 similar to those of nontransgenic roots. These experiments implicate QR1 as one of the earliest genes on the haustorium signal transduction pathway, encoding a quinone oxidoreductase necessary for the redox bioactivation of haustorial inducing factors. PMID:20424175

  14. Morphology, ultrastructure, and development of the parasitic larva and its surrounding trophamnion of Polypodium hydriforme Ussov (Coelenterata).

    PubMed

    Raikova, E V

    1980-01-01

    The larval stage of Polypodium hydriforme is planuliform and parasitic inside the growing oocytes of acipenserid fishes. The larva has inverted germ layers and a special envelope, the trophamnion, surrounding it within the host oocyte. The trophamnion is a giant unicellular provisory structure derived from the second polar body and performing both protective and digestive functions, clearly a result of adaptation to parasitism. The trophamnion displays microvilli on its inner surface, and irregular protrusions anchoring it to the yolk on its outer surface. Its cytoplasm contains long nuclear fragments, ribosomes, mitochondria, microtubules, microfilaments, prominent Golgi bodies, primary lysosomes, and secondary lysosomes with partially digested inclusions. The cells of the larva proper are poorly differentiated. No muscular, glandular, neural, interstitial, or nematocyst-forming cells have been found. The entodermal (outer layer) cells bear flagella and contain rough endoplasmic reticulum; the ectodermal (inner layer) cells lack cilia and contain an apical layer of acid mucopolysaccharid granules. The cells of both layers contain mitochondria, microtubules, and Golgi bodies; their nuclei display large nucleoli with nucleolonema-like structure, decondensed chromatin, and some perichromatin granules. At their apical rims, the ectodermal cells from septate junctions; laterally, the cells of both layers form simple contacts and occasional interdigitations. The lateral surfaces of entodermal cells are strengthened by microtubules. PMID:6104540

  15. Creation of an ensemble of simulated cardiac cases and a human observer study: tools for the development of numerical observers for SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. Michael; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Gifford, Howard C.; Licho, Robert; Joffe, Samuel; McGuiness, Matthew; Mehurg, Shannon; Zacharias, Michael; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2012-02-01

    Our previous Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) research explored the utility of numerical observers. We recently created two hundred and eighty simulated SPECT cardiac cases using Dynamic MCAT (DMCAT) and SIMIND Monte Carlo tools. All simulated cases were then processed with two reconstruction methods: iterative ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) and filtered back-projection (FBP). Observer study sets were assembled for both OSEM and FBP methods. Five physicians performed an observer study on one hundred and seventy-nine images from the simulated cases. The observer task was to indicate detection of any myocardial perfusion defect using the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) 17-segment cardiac model and the ASNC five-scale rating guidelines. Human observer Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) studies established the guidelines for the subsequent evaluation of numerical model observer (NO) performance. Several NOs were formulated and their performance was compared with the human observer performance. One type of NO was based on evaluation of a cardiac polar map that had been pre-processed using a gradient-magnitude watershed segmentation algorithm. The second type of NO was also based on analysis of a cardiac polar map but with use of a priori calculated average image derived from an ensemble of normal cases.

  16. RNA trafficking in parasitic plant systems.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Megan; Kim, Gunjune; Westwood, James H

    2012-01-01

    RNA trafficking in plants contributes to local and long-distance coordination of plant development and response to the environment. However, investigations of mobile RNA identity and function are hindered by the inherent difficulty of tracing a given molecule of RNA from its cell of origin to its destination. Several methods have been used to address this problem, but all are limited to some extent by constraints associated with accurately sampling phloem sap or detecting trafficked RNA. Certain parasitic plant species form symplastic connections to their hosts and thereby provide an additional system for studying RNA trafficking. The haustorial connections of Cuscuta and Phelipanche species are similar to graft junctions in that they are able to transmit mRNAs, viral RNAs, siRNAs, and proteins from the host plants to the parasite. In contrast to other graft systems, these parasites form connections with host species that span a wide phylogenetic range, such that a high degree of nucleotide sequence divergence may exist between host and parasites and allow confident identification of most host RNAs in the parasite system. The ability to identify host RNAs in parasites, and vice versa, will facilitate genomics approaches to understanding RNA trafficking. This review discusses the nature of host-parasite connections and the potential significance of host RNAs for the parasite. Additional research on host-parasite interactions is needed to interpret results of RNA trafficking studies, but parasitic plants may provide a fascinating new perspective on RNA trafficking. PMID:22936942

  17. A pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Goral, Vasiliy N; Tran, Elizabeth; Yuen, Po Ki

    2015-09-01

    In this article, we present a microfluidic platform for passive fluid pumping for pump-free perfusion cell culture, cell-based assay, and chemical applications. By adapting the passive membrane-controlled pumping principle from the previously developed perfusion microplate, which utilizes a combination of hydrostatic pressure generated by different liquid levels in the wells and fluid wicking through narrow strips of a porous membrane connecting the wells to generate fluid flow, a series of pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic devices was developed and their use for pump-free perfusion cell culture and cell-based assays was demonstrated. Each pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic device comprises at least three basic components: an open well for generating fluid flow, a micron-sized deep chamber/channel for cell culture or for fluid connection, and a wettable porous membrane for controlling the fluid flow. Each component is fluidically connected either by the porous membrane or by the micron-sized deep chamber/channel. By adapting and incorporating the passive membrane-controlled pumping principle into microfluidic devices, all the benefits of microfluidic technologies, such as small sample volumes, fast and efficient fluid exchanges, and fluid properties at the micro-scale, can be fully taken advantage of with this pump-free membrane-controlled perfusion microfluidic platform. PMID:26392835

  18. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure.

  19. A syndromic approach to common parasitic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shafran, Stephen D.; Chow, Anthony W.

    1985-01-01

    Standard textbooks discuss parasitic disease according to specific organisms. In contrast, patients with parasitic infections present to physicians with a variety of clinical manifestations that may involve any of several organ systems and that often mimic nonparasitic diseases. A syndromic approach to the clinical situation may help the physician in considering the most important parasitic agents. Many parasitic infections can be acquired in temperate climates. While often considered tropical or exotic, other parasitic diseases are now seen more frequently in developed countries because of immigration and increased world travel. In this review the clinical syndromes associated with common parasitic diseases in North America are discussed, with an emphasis on risk factors and diagnosis of specific infections. PMID:4042057

  20. Parasites, Plants, and People.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Marion; Moore, Tony

    2016-06-01

    Anthelminthic resistance is acknowledged worldwide and is a major problem in Aotearoa New Zealand, thus alternative parasite management strategies are imperative. One Health is an initiative linking animal, human, and environmental health. Parasites, plants, and people illustrate the possibilities of providing diverse diets for stock thereby lowering parasite burdens, improving the cultural wellbeing of a local community, and protecting the environment. PMID:27105933

  1. MR Perfusion Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Copen, William A.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Wu, Ona

    2011-01-01

    MR perfusion imaging offers the potential for measuring brain perfusion in acute stroke patients, at a time when treatment decisions based upon these measurements may affect outcomes dramatically. Rapid advancements in both acute stroke therapy and perfusion imaging techniques have resulted in continuing redefinition of the role that perfusion imaging should play in patient management. This review first discusses the basic pathophysiology of acute stroke, with specific attention to alterations in the various perfusion-related parameters that can be studied by MR perfusion imaging. Although these parameters are sometimes treated as somewhat interchangeable, they reveal greatly different information about brain perfusion. Therefore, subsequent discussion of the utility of different kinds of perfusion images focuses on the differences between them, as well as important artifacts that can complicate their interpretation. Finally, research on the continually evolving role of MR perfusion imaging in acute stroke care is summarized. PMID:21640299

  2. Evaluation of the role of galectins in parasite immunity.

    PubMed

    Preston, Sarah; Dunphy, Jillian; Beddoe, Travis; Meeusen, Els; Young, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-11 and galectin-14 are ruminant galectins involved in parasitic infections. Although their roles in parasite immunity are still being elucidated, its appears that their functions are parasite specific. In gastrointestinal infections with the nematode Haemonchus contortus, both galectin-11 and galectin-14 appear to be protective. However, in a chronic infection of liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, these galectins may aid parasite survival. This chapter discusses the methods designed to study parasitic infections in sheep, which have provided us with insight into the functions of galectin-11 and galectin-14 during host-parasite interactions. These methods include parasite cultivation and infection, galectin staining of host and parasite tissue, surface staining of parasites with recombinant galectins and in vitro assays to monitor the effect of galectins on larval development. PMID:25253154

  3. Parasites and supernormal manipulation.

    PubMed

    Holen, Ø H; Saetre, G P; Slagsvold, T; Stenseth, N C

    2001-12-22

    Social parasites may exploit their hosts by mimicking other organisms that the hosts normally benefit from investing in or responding to in some other way. Some parasites exaggerate key characters of the organisms they mimic, possibly in order to increase the response from the hosts. The huge gape and extreme begging intensity of the parasitic common cuckoo chick (Cuculus canorus) may be an example. In this paper, the evolutionary stability of manipulating hosts through exaggerated signals is analysed using game theory. Our model indicates that a parasite's signal intensity must be below a certain threshold in order to ensure acceptance and that this threshold depends directly on the rate of parasitism. The only evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) combination is when hosts accept all signallers and parasites signal at their optimal signal intensity, which must be below the threshold. Supernormal manipulation by parasites is only evolutionarily stable under sufficiently low rates of parasitism. If the conditions for the ESS combination are not satisfied, rejector hosts can invade using signal intensity as a cue for identifying parasites. These qualitative predictions are discussed with respect to empirical evidence from parasitic mimicry systems that have been suggested to involve supernormal signalling, including evicting avian brood parasites and insect-mimicking Ophrys orchids. PMID:11749709

  4. Parasitic Skin Infections for Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Dadabhoy, Irfan; Butts, Jessica F

    2015-12-01

    The 2 epidermal parasitic skin infections most commonly encountered by primary care physicians in developed countries are scabies and pediculosis. Pediculosis can be further subdivided into pediculosis capitis, corporis, and pubis. This article presents a summary of information and a review of the literature on clinical findings, diagnosis, and treatment of these commonly encountered parasitic skin infestations. PMID:26612378

  5. Schistosoma mansoni Infection in Preschool-Aged Children: Development of Immunoglobulin E and Immunoglobulin G4 Responses to Parasite Allergen-Like Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pinot de Moira, Angela; Sousa-Figueiredo, Jose C.; Jones, Frances M.; Fitzsimmons, Colin M.; Betson, Martha; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Stothard, J. Russell; Dunne, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) responses are upregulated during chronic schistosome infection and during allergy. These responses are tightly regulated during schistosomiasis. We have previously shown that IgE regulation depends on the extent and length of exposure to individual parasite allergen-like proteins. Here we compare the development of IgE and immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) responses to the differentially expressed allergen-like proteins SmTAL1 and SmTAL2 among preschool-aged children from 2 villages with different levels of Schistosoma mansoni transmission. We found a lack of SmTAL1 responsiveness among all children, but evidence for IgG4-dependent IgE-SmTAL2 desensitization in both villages, occurring earlier among children from the village where the level of transmission was greater. Findings provide insights into the development and regulation of allergic-type immune responses. PMID:23125445

  6. An interplay between 2 signaling pathways: Melatonin-cAMP and IP{sub 3}–Ca{sup 2+} signaling pathways control intraerythrocytic development of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Furuyama, Wakako; Enomoto, Masahiro; Mossaad, Ehab; Kawai, Satoru; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • A melatonin receptor antagonist blocked Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in P. falciparum and inhibited parasite growth. • P. falciparum development is controlled by Ca{sup 2+}- and cAMP-signaling pathways. • The cAMP-signaling pathway at ring form and late trophozoite stages governs parasite growth of P. falciparum. - Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum spends most of its asexual life cycle within human erythrocytes, where proliferation and maturation occur. Development into the mature forms of P. falciparum causes severe symptoms due to its distinctive sequestration capability. However, the physiological roles and the molecular mechanisms of signaling pathways that govern development are poorly understood. Our previous study showed that P. falciparum exhibits stage-specific spontaneous Calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in ring and early trophozoites, and the latter was essential for parasite development. In this study, we show that luzindole (LZ), a selective melatonin receptor antagonist, inhibits parasite growth. Analyses of development and morphology of LZ-treated P. falciparum revealed that LZ severely disrupted intraerythrocytic maturation, resulting in parasite death. When LZ was added at ring stage, the parasite could not undergo further development, whereas LZ added at the trophozoite stage inhibited development from early into late schizonts. Live-cell Ca{sup 2+} imaging showed that LZ treatment completely abolished Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the ring forms while having little effect on early trophozoites. Further, the melatonin-induced cAMP increase observed at ring and late trophozoite stage was attenuated by LZ treatment. These suggest that a complex interplay between IP{sub 3}–Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signaling pathways is involved in intraerythrocytic development of P. falciparum.

  7. A rabbit pulmonary vein myocyte isolation method based on simultaneous heart and pulmonary vein perfusion.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Miao-Miao; Zhang, Liang-Pin; Yang, Shu-Lin; Yao, Ke-Jun; Song, Yuan-Long

    2016-02-25

    Myocytes in the pulmonary veins (PV) play a pivotal role in the development of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). It is therefore important to understand physiological characteristics of these cells. Studies on these cells are, however, markedly impeded by the fact that single PV myocytes are very difficult to obtain due to lack of effective isolation methods. In this study, we described a novel PV myocyte isolation method. The key aspect of this method is to establish a combination of retrograde heart perfusion (via the aorta) and anterograde PV perfusion (via the pulmonary artery). With this simultaneous perfusion method, a better perfusion of the PV myocytes can be obtained. As results, the output and viability of single myocytes isolated by simultaneous heart and PV perfusion method were increased compared with those in conventional retrograde heart perfusion method. PMID:26915322

  8. Dynamic chest image analysis: model-based pulmonary perfusion analysis with pyramid images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jianming; Haapanen, Arto; Jaervi, Timo; Kiuru, Aaro J.; Kormano, Martti; Svedstrom, Erkki; Virkki, Raimo

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the study 'Dynamic Chest Image Analysis' is to develop computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected at different phases of the respiratory/cardiac cycles in a short period of time. We have proposed a framework for ventilation study with an explicit ventilation model based on pyramid images. In this paper, we extend the framework to pulmonary perfusion study. A perfusion model and the truncated pyramid are introduced. The perfusion model aims at extracting accurate, geographic perfusion parameters, and the truncated pyramid helps in understanding perfusion at multiple resolutions and speeding up the convergence process in optimization. Three cases are included to illustrate the experimental results.

  9. Paradigms for parasite conservation.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Eric R; Carlson, Colin J; Bueno, Veronica M; Burgio, Kevin R; Cizauskas, Carrie A; Clements, Christopher F; Seidel, Dana P; Harris, Nyeema C

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic species, which depend directly on host species for their survival, represent a major regulatory force in ecosystems and a significant component of Earth's biodiversity. Yet the negative impacts of parasites observed at the host level have motivated a conservation paradigm of eradication, moving us farther from attainment of taxonomically unbiased conservation goals. Despite a growing body of literature highlighting the importance of parasite-inclusive conservation, most parasite species remain understudied, underfunded, and underappreciated. We argue the protection of parasitic biodiversity requires a paradigm shift in the perception and valuation of their role as consumer species, similar to that of apex predators in the mid-20th century. Beyond recognizing parasites as vital trophic regulators, existing tools available to conservation practitioners should explicitly account for the unique threats facing dependent species. We built upon concepts from epidemiology and economics (e.g., host-density threshold and cost-benefit analysis) to devise novel metrics of margin of error and minimum investment for parasite conservation. We define margin of error as the risk of accidental host extinction from misestimating equilibrium population sizes and predicted oscillations, while minimum investment represents the cost associated with conserving the additional hosts required to maintain viable parasite populations. This framework will aid in the identification of readily conserved parasites that present minimal health risks. To establish parasite conservation, we propose an extension of population viability analysis for host-parasite assemblages to assess extinction risk. In the direst cases, ex situ breeding programs for parasites should be evaluated to maximize success without undermining host protection. Though parasitic species pose a considerable conservation challenge, adaptations to conservation tools will help protect parasite biodiversity in the face of

  10. Plasmodium falciparum cysteine protease falcipain-2 cleaves erythrocyte membrane skeletal proteins at late stages of parasite development.

    PubMed

    Hanspal, Manjit; Dua, Meenakshi; Takakuwa, Yuichi; Chishti, Athar H; Mizuno, Akiko

    2002-08-01

    Plasmodium falciparum-derived cysteine protease falcipain-2 cleaves host erythrocyte hemoglobin at acidic pH and specific components of the membrane skeleton at neutral pH. Analysis of stage-specific expression of these 2 proteolytic activities of falcipain-2 shows that hemoglobin-hydrolyzing activity is maximum in early trophozoites and declines rapidly at late stages, whereas the membrane skeletal protein hydrolyzing activity is markedly increased at the late trophozoite and schizont stages. Among the erythrocyte membrane skeletal proteins, ankyrin and protein 4.1 are cleaved by native and recombinant falcipain-2 near their C-termini. To identify the precise peptide sequence at the hydrolysis site of protein 4.1, we used a recombinant construct of protein 4.1 as substrate followed by MALDI-MS analysis of the cleaved product. We show that falcipain-2-mediated cleavage of protein 4.1 occurs immediately after lysine 437, which lies within a region of the spectrin-actin-binding domain critical for erythrocyte membrane stability. A 16-mer peptide containing the cleavage site completely inhibited the enzyme activity and blocked falcipain-2-induced fragmentation of erythrocyte ghosts. Based on these results, we propose that falcipain-2 cleaves hemoglobin in the acidic food vacuole at the early trophozoite stage, whereas it cleaves specific components of the red cell skeleton at the late trophozoite and schizont stages. It is the proteolysis of skeletal proteins that causes membrane instability, which, in turn, facilitates parasite release in vivo. PMID:12130521

  11. Schistosoma mansoni: migration potential of normal and radiation attenuated parasites in naive guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, H.; McLaren, D.J.

    1987-02-01

    Compressed tissue autoradiography using (75Se)selenomethionine labelled parasites has been used to investigate the migration potential of normal and radiation attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni in naive guinea pigs. By Day 14 after infection. 44% of normal parasites were detected as reduced silver foci in the liver; this value corresponded well with the number of liver parasites recovered by retrograde perfusion of the hepatic portal system on Day 42 (42% of the challenge). In contrast, cercariae subjected to 50 krad of gamma irradiation failed to migrate out of the skin. The migration capacity of 20 krad irradiated parasites was less severely affected in that about half of the challenge parasites reached the lungs, but virtually none moved to the liver. These data are discussed in relation to the kinetics of immunity induced in guinea pigs by infection or vaccination with normal or radiation attenuated parasites.

  12. Parasites and marine invasions: Ecological and evolutionary perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goedknegt, M. Anouk; Feis, Marieke E.; Wegner, K. Mathias; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; Buschbaum, Christian; Camphuysen, Kees (C. J.); van der Meer, Jaap; Thieltges, David W.

    2016-07-01

    Worldwide, marine and coastal ecosystems are heavily invaded by introduced species and the potential role of parasites in the success and impact of marine invasions has been increasingly recognized. In this review, we link recent theoretical developments in invasion ecology with empirical studies from marine ecosystems in order to provide a conceptual framework for studying the role of parasites and their hosts in marine invasions. Based on an extensive literature search, we identified six mechanisms in which invaders directly or indirectly affect parasite and host populations and communities: I) invaders can lose some or all of their parasites during the invasion process (parasite release or reduction), often causing a competitive advantage over native species; II) invaders can also act as a host for native parasites, which may indirectly amplify the parasite load of native hosts (parasite spillback); III) invaders can also be parasites themselves and be introduced without needing co-introduction of the host (introduction of free-living infective stages); IV) alternatively, parasites may be introduced together with their hosts (parasite co-introduction with host); V) consequently, these co-introduced parasites can sometimes also infect native hosts (parasite spillover); and VI) invasive species may be neither a host nor a parasite, but nevertheless affect native parasite host interactions by interfering with parasite transmission (transmission interference). We discuss the ecological and evolutionary implications of each of these mechanisms and generally note several substantial effects on natural communities and ecosystems via i) mass mortalities of native populations creating strong selection gradients, ii) indirect changes in species interactions within communities and iii) trophic cascading and knock-on effects in food webs that may affect ecosystem function and services. Our review demonstrates a wide range of ecological and evolutionary implications of

  13. Biological warfare: Microorganisms as drivers of host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Poulin, Robert; Thomas, Frédéric

    2015-08-01

    Understanding parasite strategies for evasion, manipulation or exploitation of hosts is crucial for many fields, from ecology to medical sciences. Generally, research has focused on either the host response to parasitic infection, or the parasite virulence mechanisms. More recently, integrated studies of host-parasite interactions have allowed significant advances in theoretical and applied biology. However, these studies still provide a simplistic view of these as mere two-player interactions. Host and parasite are associated with a myriad of microorganisms that could benefit from the improved fitness of their partner. Illustrations of such complex multi-player interactions have emerged recently from studies performed in various taxa. In this conceptual article, we propose how these associated microorganisms may participate in the phenotypic alterations induced by parasites and hence in host-parasite interactions, from an ecological and evolutionary perspective. Host- and parasite-associated microorganisms may participate in the host-parasite interaction by interacting directly or indirectly with the other partner. As a result, parasites may develop (i) the disruptive strategy in which the parasite alters the host microbiota to its advantage, and (ii) the biological weapon strategy where the parasite-associated microorganism contributes to or modulates the parasite's virulence. Some phenotypic alterations induced by parasite may also arise from conflicts of interests between the host or parasite and its associated microorganism. For each situation, we review the literature and propose new directions for future research. Specifically, investigating the role of host- and parasite-associated microorganisms in host-parasite interactions at the individual, local and regional level will lead to a holistic understanding of how the co-evolution of the different partners influences how the other ones respond, both ecologically and evolutionary. The conceptual framework we

  14. Parasite and host assemblages: embracing the reality will improve our knowledge of parasite transmission and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Rigaud, Thierry; Perrot-Minnot, Marie-Jeanne; Brown, Mark J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Interactions involving several parasite species (multi-parasitized hosts) or several host species (multi-host parasites) are the rule in nature. Only a few studies have investigated these realistic, but complex, situations from an evolutionary perspective. Consequently, their impact on the evolution of parasite virulence and transmission remains poorly understood. The mechanisms by which multiple infections may influence virulence and transmission include the dynamics of intrahost competition, mediation by the host immune system and an increase in parasite genetic recombination. Theoretical investigations have yet to be conducted to determine which of these mechanisms are likely to be key factors in the evolution of virulence and transmission. In contrast, the relationship between multi-host parasites and parasite virulence and transmission has seen some theoretical investigation. The key factors in these models are the trade-off between virulence across different host species, variation in host species quality and patterns of transmission. The empirical studies on multi-host parasites suggest that interspecies transmission plays a central role in the evolution of virulence, but as yet no complete picture of the phenomena involved is available. Ultimately, determining how complex host–parasite interactions impact the evolution of host–parasite relationships will require the development of cross-disciplinary studies linking the ecology of quantitative networks with the evolution of virulence. PMID:20667874

  15. Retrograde heart perfusion: the Langendorff technique of isolated heart perfusion.

    PubMed

    Bell, Robert M; Mocanu, Mihaela M; Yellon, Derek M

    2011-06-01

    In the late 19th century, a number of investigators were working on perfecting isolated heart model, but it was Oscar Langendorff who, in 1895, pioneered the isolated perfused mammalian heart. Since that time, the Langendorff preparation has evolved and provided a wealth of data underpinning our understanding of the fundamental physiology of the heart: its contractile function, coronary blood flow regulation and cardiac metabolism. In more recent times, the procedure has been used to probe pathophysiology of ischaemia/reperfusion and disease states, and with the dawn of molecular biology and genetic manipulation, the Langendorff perfused heart has remained a stalwart tool in the study of the impact upon the physiology of the heart by pharmacological inhibitors and targeted deletion or up-regulation of genes and their impact upon intracellular signalling and adaption to clinically relevant stressful stimuli. We present here the basic structure of the Langendorff system and the fundamental experimental rules which warrant a viable heart preparation. In addition, we discuss the use of the isolated retrograde perfused heart in the model of ischaemia-reperfusion injury ex-vivo, and its applicability to other areas of study. The Langendorff perfusion apparatus is highly adaptable and this is reflected not only in the procedure's longevity but also in the number of different applications to which it has been turned. PMID:21385587

  16. Secretory Pathway of Trypanosomatid Parasites

    PubMed Central

    McConville, Malcolm J.; Mullin, Kylie A.; Ilgoutz, Steven C.; Teasdale, Rohan D.

    2002-01-01

    The Trypanosomatidae comprise a large group of parasitic protozoa, some of which cause important diseases in humans. These include Trypanosoma brucei (the causative agent of African sleeping sickness and nagana in cattle), Trypanosoma cruzi (the causative agent of Chagas' disease in Central and South America), and Leishmania spp. (the causative agent of visceral and [muco]cutaneous leishmaniasis throughout the tropics and subtropics). The cell surfaces of these parasites are covered in complex protein- or carbohydrate-rich coats that are required for parasite survival and infectivity in their respective insect vectors and mammalian hosts. These molecules are assembled in the secretory pathway. Recent advances in the genetic manipulation of these parasites as well as progress with the parasite genome projects has greatly advanced our understanding of processes that underlie secretory transport in trypanosomatids. This article provides an overview of the organization of the trypanosomatid secretory pathway and connections that exist with endocytic organelles and multiple lytic and storage vacuoles. A number of the molecular components that are required for vesicular transport have been identified, as have some of the sorting signals that direct proteins to the cell surface or organelles in the endosome-vacuole system. Finally, the subcellular organization of the major glycosylation pathways in these parasites is reviewed. Studies on these highly divergent eukaryotes provide important insights into the molecular processes underlying secretory transport that arose very early in eukaryotic evolution. They also reveal unusual or novel aspects of secretory transport and protein glycosylation that may be exploited in developing new antiparasite drugs. PMID:11875130

  17. For Host's Sake: The Pluses of Parasite Preservation.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Hamish G; Zuk, Marlene

    2016-05-01

    Conservation biologists now realize that parasites of endangered hosts should be conserved for their own sake and as part of their host's natural environment. But parasites should also be conserved because parasitic exposure might be crucial to the host's development of a fully functional immune system and hence to the survival of the host. PMID:27020732

  18. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Model-Based Perfusion Analysis in Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jianming; Järvi, Timo; Kiuru, Aaro; Kormano, Martti; Svedström, Erkki

    2003-12-01

    The "Dynamic Chest Image Analysis" project aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the dynamic pulmonary imaging technique. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model for ventilation analysis. This paper presents a new model-based method for pulmonary perfusion analysis. According to perfusion properties, we first devise a novel mathematical function to form a perfusion model. A simple yet accurate approach is further introduced to extract cardiac systolic and diastolic phases from the heart, so that this cardiac information may be utilized to accelerate the perfusion analysis and improve its sensitivity in detecting pulmonary perfusion abnormalities. This makes perfusion analysis not only fast but also robust in computation; consequently, perfusion analysis becomes computationally feasible without using contrast media. Our clinical case studies with 52 patients show that this technique is effective for pulmonary embolism even without using contrast media, demonstrating consistent correlations with computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine (NM) studies. This fluoroscopical examination takes only about 2 seconds for perfusion study with only low radiation dose to patient, involving no preparation, no radioactive isotopes, and no contrast media.

  19. Intracellular Parasite Invasion Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, L. D.

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular parasites use various strategies to invade cells and to subvert cellular signaling pathways and, thus, to gain a foothold against host defenses. Efficient cell entry, ability to exploit intracellular niches, and persistence make these parasites treacherous pathogens. Most intracellular parasites gain entry via host-mediated processes, but apicomplexans use a system of adhesion-based motility called ``gliding'' to actively penetrate host cells. Actin polymerization-dependent motility facilitates parasite migration across cellular barriers, enables dissemination within tissues, and powers invasion of host cells. Efficient invasion has brought widespread success to this group, which includes Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, and Cryptosporidium.

  20. Sphingolipids in parasitic protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Bangs, James D.; Beverley, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The surface of most protozoan parasites relies heavily upon lipid-anchored molecules, to form protective barriers and play critical functions required for infectivity. Sphingolipids (SLs) play important roles through their abundance and involvement in membrane microdomain formation, as well as serving as the lipid anchor for many of these molecules, and in some but possibly not all species, as important signaling molecules. Interactions of parasite sphingolipid metabolism with that of the host may potentially contribute to parasite survival and/or host defense. In this chapter we summarize current knowledge of SL structure, synthesis and function in several of the major parasitic protozoan groups. PMID:20919659

  1. Climate change and parasitic disease: farmer mitigation?

    PubMed

    Morgan, Eric R; Wall, Richard

    2009-07-01

    Global climate change predictions suggest that far-ranging effects might occur in the population dynamics and distributions of livestock parasites, provoking fears of widespread increases in disease incidence and production loss. However, several biological mechanisms (including increased parasite mortality and more rapid acquisition of immunity), in tandem with changes in husbandry practices (including reproduction, housing, nutrition, breed selection, grazing patterns and other management interventions), might act to mitigate increased parasite development rates, preventing dramatic rises in overall levels of disease. Such changes might, therefore, counteract predicted climate-driven increases in parasite challenge. Optimum mitigation strategies will be highly system specific and depend on detailed understanding of interactions between climate, parasite abundance, host availability and the cues for and economics of farmer intervention. PMID:19540163

  2. Development of in situ hybridization and PCR assays for the detection of Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP), a microsporidian parasite infecting penaeid shrimp.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kathy F J; Pantoja, Carlos R; Redman, Rita M; Han, Jee Eun; Tran, Loc H; Lightner, Donald V

    2015-09-01

    A microsporidian parasite, Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (abbreviated as EHP), is an emerging pathogen for penaeid shrimp. EHP has been found in several shrimp farming countries in Asia including Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia and China, and is reported to be associated with growth retardation in farmed shrimp. We examined the histological features from infected shrimp collected from Vietnam and Brunei, these include the presence of basophilic inclusions in the hepatopancreas tubule epithelial cells, in which EHP is found at various developmental stages, ranging from plasmodia to mature spores. By a PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene, a 1.1kb 18S rRNA gene fragment of EHP was amplified, and this sequence showed a 100% identity to EHP found in Thailand and China. This fragment was cloned and labeled with digoxigenin-11-dUTP, and in situ hybridized to tissue sections of infected Penaeus vannamei (from Vietnam) and P. stylirostris (Brunei). The results of in situ hybridization were specific, the probe only reacted to the EHP within the cytoplasmic inclusions, not to a Pleistophora-like microsporidium that is associated with cotton shrimp disease. Subsequently, we developed a PCR assay from this 18S rRNA gene region, this PCR is shown to be specific to EHP, did not react to 2 other parasitic pathogens, an amoeba and the cotton shrimp disease microsporidium, nor to genomic DNA of various crustaceans including polychaetes, squids, crabs and krill. EHP was detected, through PCR, in hepatopancreatic tissue, feces and water sampled from infected shrimp tanks, and in some samples of Artemia biomass. PMID:26146228

  3. Cell-mediated immunity to Toxoplasma gondii develops primarily by local Th-1 host immune responses in the absence of parasite replication1

    PubMed Central

    Gigley, Jason P.; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.

    2008-01-01

    A single inoculation of mice with the live attenuated Toxoplasma gondii uracil auxotroph strain cps1-1 induces long-lasting immunity against lethal challenge with hyper-virulent strain RH. The mechanism for this robust immunity in the absence of parasite replication has not been addressed. The mechanism of long-lasting immunity, the importance of route of immunization, cellular recruitment to the site of infection, and local and systemic inflammation were evaluated. Our results show that infection with cps1-1 elicits long-lasting CD8+ T cell mediated immunity. We show that immunization with cps1-1 infected DCs elicits long-lasting immunity. Intraperitoneal infection with cps1-1 induced a rapid influx of GR1+ neutrophils and 2 stages of GR1+ CD68+ inflammatory monocyte infiltration into the site of inoculation. CD19+ B cells and CD3+ T cells steadily increase for 8 days after infection. CD8+ T cells were rapidly recruited to the site of infection and increased faster than CD4+ T cells. Surprisingly, cps1-1 infection induced high systemic levels of bioactive IL-12p70 and very low level and transient systemic Ifn-γ. Furthermore, we show significant levels of these inflammatory cytokines were locally produced at the site of cps1-1 inoculation. These findings offer new insight into immunological mechanisms and local host responses to a non-replicating Type I parasite infection associated with development of long-lasting immunity to Toxoplasma gondii. PMID:19124750

  4. Cell-mediated immunity to Toxoplasma gondii develops primarily by local Th1 host immune responses in the absence of parasite replication.

    PubMed

    Gigley, Jason P; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2009-01-15

    A single inoculation of mice with the live, attenuated Toxoplasma gondii uracil auxotroph strain cps1-1 induces long-lasting immunity against lethal challenge with hypervirulent strain RH. The mechanism for this robust immunity in the absence of parasite replication has not been addressed. The mechanism of long-lasting immunity, the importance of route of immunization, cellular recruitment to the site of infection, and local and systemic inflammation were evaluated. Our results show that infection with cps1-1 elicits long-lasting CD8+ T cell- mediated immunity. We show that immunization with cps1-1-infected dendritic cells elicits long-lasting immunity. Intraperitoneal infection with cps1-1 induced a rapid influx of GR1+ neutrophils and two stages of GR1+CD68+ inflammatory monocyte infiltration into the site of inoculation. CD19+ B cells and CD3+ T cells steadily increase for 8 days after infection. CD8+ T cells were rapidly recruited to the site of infection and increased faster than CD4+ T cells. Surprisingly, cps1-1 infection induced high systemic levels of bioactive IL-12p70 and a very low level and transient systemic IFN-gamma. Furthermore, we show significant levels of these inflammatory cytokines were locally produced at the site of cps1-1 inoculation. These findings offer new insight into immunological mechanisms and local host responses to a non-replicating type I parasite infection associated with development of long-lasting immunity to Toxoplasma gondii. PMID:19124750

  5. Complete inhibition of creatine kinase in isolated perfused rat hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Fossel, E.T.; Hoefeler, H.

    1987-01-01

    Transient exposure of an isolated isovolumic perfused rat heart to low concentrations (0.5 mM) of perfusate-born iodoacetamide resulted in complete inhibition of creatine kinase and partial inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the heart. At low levels of developed pressure, hearts maintained mechanical function, ATP, and creatine phosphate levels at control values. However, iodoacetamide-inhibited hearts were unable to maintain control values of end diastolic pressure or peak systolic pressure as work load increased. Global ischemia resulted in loss of all ATP without loss of creatine phosphate, indicating lack of active creatine kinase. These results indicate that isovolumic perfused rat hearts are able to maintain normal function and normal levels of high-energy phosphates without active creatine kinase at low levels of developed pressure. /sup 31/P-NMR of the heart was carried out.

  6. Pharmacologic effects of a nitrate coronary vasodilator on cardiac perfusion and function, measured semiquantitatively

    SciTech Connect

    Winsor, D.W.; Winsor, T.; Krohn, B.G.; Bernett, J.R.

    1982-09-01

    Peritrate (pentaerythritol tetranitrate), a nitrate coronary vasodilator, was capable of significantly increasing perfusion and function in ischemic heart muscle. The A2 image-processing computer with software developed by Burow was used to evaluate regional perfusion and segmental wall motion in six patients with ischemic areas in the myocardium. These image-processing techniques were satisfactory for evaluation of ischemic heart muscle.

  7. Does moving up a food chain increase aggregation in parasites?

    PubMed

    Lester, R J G; McVinish, R

    2016-05-01

    General laws in ecological parasitology are scarce. Here, we evaluate data on numbers of fish parasites published by over 200 authors to determine whether acquiring parasites via prey is associated with an increase in parasite aggregation. Parasite species were grouped taxonomically to produce 20 or more data points per group as far as possible. Most parasites that remained at one trophic level were less aggregated than those that had passed up a food chain. We use a stochastic model to show that high parasite aggregation in predators can be solely the result of the accumulation of parasites in their prey. The model is further developed to show that a change in the predators feeding behaviour with age may further increase parasite aggregation. PMID:27170651

  8. Parasitism as a Driver of Trophic Niche Specialisation.

    PubMed

    Britton, J Robert; Andreou, Demetra

    2016-06-01

    The population trophic niche of free-living species can be subdivided into smaller niches comprising individuals specialising on specific food items. The roles of parasites in creating these specialised subgroups remain unclear. Intrapopulation differences in parasite infections can develop from specialist individuals within populations. Their differences in morphology and habitat can increase their exposure to intermediate hosts via infected prey, altering their parasite fauna. However, we also suggest that parasite infections can drive this niche specialisation. Through mechanisms including parasite manipulation, altered host phenotypes, and/ or parasite-mediated competition, parasites can alter the resource availability of their hosts, altering their trophic niches. Thus, trophic niche specialisations could result from parasitism via varying influences on host traits, raising questions for future research. PMID:26968643

  9. Demographic and socio-economic factors affecting the physical development, haemoglobin and parasitic infection status of schoolchildren in Sanliurfa province, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ulukanligil, M; Seyrek, A

    2004-03-01

    A cross-sectional population-based survey was undertaken to evaluate the relationship between nutritional status and parasitic infections of schoolchildren and demographic, socio-economic factors in Sanliurfa province, southern Turkey. Nine hundred and eight schoolchildren took part in the survey: 57.2% boys and 42.7% girls. The children's mean z scores were as follows: height for age-0.8 (+/-1.0) and weight for age-1.0 (+/-0.9). The mean haemoglobin concentration was 123 g/l (+/-2.1) and the prevalence of parasitic infections was 55.1%. In total, 50.2% of children were hungry when they arrived at school and 13.4% worked after school. Over 70% (70.4%) of mothers and 18.1% of fathers were illiterate, 16.1% of fathers were unemployed and 46.3% of fathers were engaged in low-income labour. The mean number of children in each family was 5.4 (+/-2.5), and the mean number of children from each family who attended school was 2.1 (+/-1.1). The school-attendance ratio was 0.4 (+/-1.0). Data indicated that older children had significantly lower mean z scores of height (P < 0.0001) and weight for age (P < 0.0001) than younger children, and boys had significantly lower mean z scores of height for age than girls (P < 0.0001). Children living in shantytown areas had significantly lower mean z scores of height for age (P < 0.0001) and weight for age (P < 0.0001), lower mean haemoglobin concentrations (P : 0.003)and a worse parasitic infection status (P < 0.0001) than those living in apartment areas. Children who were hungry when they arrived at school had significantly lower mean haemoglobin concentrations than those who had eaten (P : 0.04). Multiple regression analyses indicated that mean z scores of height for age were significantly related to maternal (multiple R = 0.183; P < 0.0001) and paternal illiteracy (multiple R = 0.216; P : 0.004). Mean z scores of weight for age were significantly related to maternal illiteracy (multiple R = 0.154; P < 0.0001), as was parasitic

  10. Water-Related Parasitic Diseases in China

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Shan; Tian, Li-Guang; Liu, Qin; Qian, Men-Bao; Fu, Qing; Steinmann, Peter; Chen, Jia-Xu; Yang, Guo-Jing; Yang, Kun; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2013-01-01

    Water-related parasitic diseases are directly dependent on water bodies for their spread or as a habitat for indispensable intermediate or final hosts. Along with socioeconomic development and improvement of sanitation, overall prevalence is declining in the China. However, the heterogeneity in economic development and the inequity of access to public services result in considerable burden due to parasitic diseases in certain areas and populations across the country. In this review, we demonstrated three aspects of ten major water-related parasitic diseases, i.e., the biology and pathogenicity, epidemiology and recent advances in research in China. General measures for diseases control and special control strategies are summarized. PMID:23685826

  11. Designing Anti-inflammatory Drugs from Parasitic Worms: A Synthetic Small Molecule Analogue of the Acanthocheilonema viteae Product ES-62 Prevents Development of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In spite of increasing evidence that parasitic worms may protect humans from developing allergic and autoimmune diseases and the continuing identification of defined helminth-derived immunomodulatory molecules, to date no new anti-inflammatory drugs have been developed from these organisms. We have approached this matter in a novel manner by synthesizing a library of drug-like small molecules based upon phosphorylcholine, the active moiety of the anti-inflammatory Acanthocheilonema viteae product, ES-62, which as an immunogenic protein is unsuitable for use as a drug. Following preliminary in vitro screening for inhibitory effects on relevant macrophage cytokine responses, a sulfone-containing phosphorylcholine analogue (11a) was selected for testing in an in vivo model of inflammation, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Testing revealed that 11a was as effective as ES-62 in protecting DBA/1 mice from developing CIA and mirrored its mechanism of action in downregulating the TLR/IL-1R transducer, MyD88. 11a is thus a novel prototype for anti-inflammatory drug development. PMID:24228757

  12. Modelling of temperature and perfusion during scalp cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, F. E. M.; Van Leeuwen, G. M. J.; Van Steenhoven, A. A.

    2005-09-01

    Hair loss is a feared side effect of chemotherapy treatment. It may be prevented by cooling the scalp during administration of cytostatics. The supposed mechanism is that by cooling the scalp, both temperature and perfusion are diminished, affecting drug supply and drug uptake in the hair follicle. However, the effect of scalp cooling varies strongly. To gain more insight into the effect of cooling, a computer model has been developed that describes heat transfer in the human head during scalp cooling. Of main interest in this study are the mutual influences of scalp temperature and perfusion during cooling. Results of the standard head model show that the temperature of the scalp skin is reduced from 34.4 °C to 18.3 °C, reducing tissue blood flow to 25%. Based upon variations in both thermal properties and head anatomies found in the literature, a parameter study was performed. The results of this parameter study show that the most important parameters affecting both temperature and perfusion are the perfusion coefficient Q10 and the thermal resistances of both the fat and the hair layer. The variations in the parameter study led to skin temperature ranging from 10.1 °C to 21.8 °C, which in turn reduced relative perfusion to 13% and 33%, respectively.

  13. Hyperventilation induces release of cytokines from perfused mouse lung.

    PubMed

    von Bethmann, A N; Brasch, F; Nüsing, R; Vogt, K; Volk, H D; Müller, K M; Wendel, A; Uhlig, S

    1998-01-01

    Artificial mechanical ventilation represents a major cause of iatrogenic lung damage in intensive care. It is largely unknown which mediators, if any, contribute to the onset of such complications. We investigated whether stress caused by artificial mechanical ventilation leads to induction, synthesis, and release of cytokines or eicosanoids from lung tissue. We used the isolated perfused and ventilated mouse lung where frequent perfusate sampling allows determination of mediator release into the perfusate. Hyperventilation was executed with either negative (NPV) or positive pressure ventilation (PPV) at a transpulmonary pressure that was increased 2.5-fold above normal. Both modes of hyperventilation resulted in an approximately 1.75-fold increased expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA, but not of cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA. After switching to hyperventilation, prostacyclin release into the perfusate increased almost instantaneously from 19 +/- 17 pg/min to 230 +/- 160 pg/min (PPV) or 115 +/- 87 pg/min (NPV). The enhancement in TNFalpha and IL-6 production developed more slowly. In control lungs after 150 min of perfusion and ventilation, TNFalpha and IL-6 production was 23 +/- 20 pg/min and 330 +/- 210 pg/min, respectively. In lungs hyperventilated for 150 min, TNFalpha and IL-6 production were increased to 287 +/- 180 pg/min and more than 1,000 pg/min, respectively. We conclude that artificial ventilation might cause pulmonary and systemic adverse reactions by inducing the release of mediators into the circulation. PMID:9445308

  14. Real-time vascular mechanosensation through ex vivo artery perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell-based perfusion studies have provided great insight into fluid-sensing mechanisms, such as primary cilia in the renal and vascular systems. However, the intrinsic limitations of in vitro cell culture, such as the inability to reflect cellular organization within tissues, has distanced observed paradigms from possible clinical developments. Here we describe a protocol that applies ex vivo artery perfusion and calcium imaging to observe real-time cellular responses to fluid-shear stress. Results Through our ex vivo artery perfusion method, we were able to simulate physiological flow and initiate distinct fluid shear stress mechanosensory responses, as well as induced acetylcholine responses in mouse aortic tissue. The observed calcium profiles confirm results found through previous in vitro cell culture experiments. The overall procedure, including dissection, sample preparation and perfusion, takes around 3 hours to complete. Conclusion Through our unique method, we are able to induce laminar flow within intact mouse aortic tissue and illicit subsequent cellular responses. This method of ex vivo artery perfusion provides the opportunity to bridge the novel findings of in vitro studies with subsequent physiological models of fluid-shear stress mechanosensation in vascular tissues. PMID:24685068

  15. Perfused Multiwell Plate for 3D Liver Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Domansky, Karel; Inman, Walker; Serdy, James; Dash, Ajit; Lim, Matthew H. M.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro models that capture the complexity of in vivo tissue and organ behaviors in a scalable and easy-to-use format are desirable for drug discovery. To address this, we have developed a bioreactor that fosters maintenance of 3D tissue cultures under constant perfusion and we have integrated multiple bioreactors into an array in a multiwell plate format. All bioreactors are fluidically isolated from each other. Each bioreactor in the array contains a scaffold that supports formation of hundreds of 3D microscale tissue units. The tissue units are perfused with cell culture medium circulated within the bioreactor by integrated pneumatic diaphragm micropumps. Electronic controls for the pumps are kept outside the incubator and connected to the perfused multiwell by pneumatic lines. The docking design and open-well bioreactor layout make handling perfused multiwell plates similar to using standard multiwell tissue culture plates. A model of oxygen consumption and transport in the circulating culture medium was used to predict appropriate operating parameters for primary liver cultures. Oxygen concentrations at key locations in the system were then measured as a function of flow rate and time after initiation of culture to determine oxygen consumption rates. After seven days in culture, tissue formed from cells seeded in the perfused multiwell reactor remained functionally viable as assessed by immunostaining for hepatocyte and liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC) phenotypic markers. PMID:20024050

  16. Renal vascular perfusion index in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Shau, Yio-Wha; Pao, Sun-Hua; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Chang, King-Jen; Shyu, Jeou-Jong

    2009-01-01

    Decreased renal perfusion plays an important role in the progression toward renal failure. In this study, a novel measure was proposed to quantify renal perfusion using canine model. Serial renal vascular images at different vascular areas including the whole vascular tree, interlobar, arcuate and interlobular vessels were captured. Image processing software was designed to analyze the changes of power Doppler intensity of colored pixels within regions-of-interest (ROI). For a given ROI, the power Doppler vascular index (PDVI) was found to fluctuate with the cardiac cycle. It was also noted that the power Doppler signals generated by arterial vessels have different fluctuating waveforms and different phase compared with the signal derived from venous vessels. A power Doppler correlation-map was developed to differentiate the arteries and veins in the ROI. Using the serial power Doppler images and the derived flow direction information, the interlobular perfusion can be strongly quantified. The renal vascular perfusion index (RVPI) defined as the ratio of PDVI(max) versus PDVI(min) was significantly higher in the interlobular vessel areas than three other areas for seven healthy dogs. The RVPI resembles the systolic/diastolic (S/D) ratio that commonly reflects arterial hemodynamics. RVPI and power Doppler correlation-map reveal more "dynamic" sense of vascular perfusion and provide a novel approach for the examination of renal function in clinical practice. PMID:18805627

  17. Tomographic digital subtraction angiography for lung perfusion estimation in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Badea, Cristian T.; Hedlund, Laurence W.; De Lin, Ming; Boslego Mackel, Julie S.; Samei, Ehsan; Allan Johnson, G.

    2007-05-15

    In vivo measurements of perfusion present a challenge to existing small animal imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance microscopy, micro computed tomography, micro positron emission tomography, and microSPECT, due to combined requirements for high spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate the use of tomographic digital subtraction angiography (TDSA) for estimation of perfusion in small animals. TDSA augments conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) by providing three-dimensional spatial information using tomosynthesis algorithms. TDSA is based on the novel paradigm that the same time density curves can be reproduced in a number of consecutive injections of {mu}L volumes of contrast at a series of different angles of rotation. The capabilities of TDSA are established in studies on lung perfusion in rats. Using an imaging system developed in-house, we acquired data for four-dimensional (4D) imaging with temporal resolution of 140 ms, in-plane spatial resolution of 100 {mu}m, and slice thickness on the order of millimeters. Based on a structured experimental approach, we optimized TDSA imaging providing a good trade-off between slice thickness, the number of injections, contrast to noise, and immunity to artifacts. Both DSA and TDSA images were used to create parametric maps of perfusion. TDSA imaging has potential application in a number of areas where functional perfusion measurements in 4D can provide valuable insight into animal models of disease and response to therapeutics.

  18. Varactor diode assembly with low parasitic reactances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickens, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    Development of varactor diode assembly overcomes parasitic reactances of conventional varactor packages. In specially constructed assembly very high idler-frequency to signal-frequency ratios are used to obtain low-noise operation over maximum bandwidth.

  19. The pediatric template of brain perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Avants, Brian B; Duda, Jeffrey T; Kilroy, Emily; Krasileva, Kate; Jann, Kay; Kandel, Benjamin T; Tustison, Nicholas J; Yan, Lirong; Jog, Mayank; Smith, Robert; Wang, Yi; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) captures the dynamics of brain development with multiple modalities that quantify both structure and function. These measurements may yield valuable insights into the neural patterns that mark healthy maturation or that identify early risk for psychiatric disorder. The Pediatric Template of Brain Perfusion (PTBP) is a free and public neuroimaging resource that will help accelerate the understanding of childhood brain development as seen through the lens of multiple modality neuroimaging and in relation to cognitive and environmental factors. The PTBP uses cross-sectional and longitudinal MRI to quantify cortex, white matter, resting state functional connectivity and brain perfusion, as measured by Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), in 120 children 7–18 years of age. We describe the PTBP and show, as a demonstration of validity, that global summary measurements capture the trajectories that demarcate critical turning points in brain maturation. This novel resource will allow a more detailed understanding of the network-level, structural and functional landmarks that are obtained during normal adolescent brain development. PMID:25977810

  20. Where are the parasites?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Review by E. Post et al. (“Ecological dynamics across the Arctic associated with recent climate change,” 11 September, p. 1355) paid little heed to parasites and other pathogens. The rapidly growing literature on parasites in arctic and subarctic ecosystems provides empirical and observational e...

  1. PARASITES OF FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intent of this chapter is to describe the parasites of importance to fishes maintained and used in laboratory settings. In contrast to the frist edition, the focus will be only on those parasites that pose a serious threat to or are common in fishes held in these confined en...

  2. Evaluating acellular versus cellular perfusate composition during prolonged ex vivo lung perfusion after initial cold ischaemia for 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Becker, Simon; Steinmeyer, Jasmin; Avsar, Murat; Höffler, Klaus; Salman, Jawad; Haverich, Axel; Warnecke, Gregor; Ochs, Matthias; Schnapper, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has developed as a powerful technique to evaluate particularly marginal donor lungs prior to transplantation. In this study, acellular and cellular perfusate compositions were compared in an identical experimental setting as no consensus has been reached on a preferred technique yet. Porcine lungs underwent EVLP for 12 h on the basis of an acellular or a cellular perfusate composition after 24 h of cold ischaemia as defined organ stress. During perfusion, haemodynamic and respiratory parameters were monitored. After EVLP, the lung condition was assessed by light and transmission electron microscopy. Aerodynamic parameters did not show significant differences between groups and remained within the in vivo range during EVLP. Mean oxygenation indices were 491 ± 39 in the acellular group and 513 ± 53 in the cellular group. Groups only differed significantly in terms of higher pulmonary artery pressure and vascular resistance in the cellular group. Lung histology and ultrastructure were largely well preserved after prolonged EVLP and showed only minor structural alterations which were similarly present in both groups. Prolonged acellular and cellular EVLP for 12 h are both feasible with lungs prechallenged by ischaemic organ stress. Physiological and ultrastructural analysis showed no superiority of either acellular or cellular perfusate composition. PMID:26264867

  3. Regional pulmonary perfusion following human heart-lung transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Hakim, T.S.; Dean, G.W.; Langleben, D.; Guerraty, A.; Levy, R.D. )

    1989-08-01

    Ventilation and perfusion scans were obtained in six subjects who had undergone heart-lung transplantation with consequent denervation of the cardiopulmonary axis. Two of the subjects had developed obliterative bronchiolitis, which is believed to be a form of chronic rejection. Their pulmonary function tests demonstrated airflow obstruction and their scintigraphic studies were abnormal. In the remaining four subjects without obstructive airways disease, ventilation and planar perfusion scans were normal. Single photon emission computed tomography imaging of pulmonary perfusion in these patients revealed a layered distribution of blood flow indistinguishable from that of normal individuals. It is concluded that neurogenic mechanisms have little influence on the pattern of local pulmonary blood flow at rest.

  4. Static and dynamic assessment of myocardial perfusion by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Danad, Ibrahim; Szymonifka, Jackie; Schulman-Marcus, Joshua; Min, James K

    2016-08-01

    Recent developments in computed tomography (CT) technology have fulfilled the prerequisites for the clinical application of myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging. The evaluation of myocardial perfusion by CT can be achieved by static or dynamic scan acquisitions. Although both approaches have proved clinically feasible, substantial barriers need to be overcome before its routine clinical application. The current review provides an outline of the current status of CTP imaging and also focuses on disparities between static and dynamic CTPs for the evaluation of myocardial blood flow. PMID:27013250

  5. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  6. Myocardial Perfusion Scintigraphy: Techniques, Interpretation, Indications and Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Fathala, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion single photon emission-computed tomography (MPS) has been one of the most important and common non-invasive diagnostic cardiac test. Gated MPS provides simultaneous assessment of myocardial perfusion and function with only one study. With appropriate attention to the MPS techniques, appropriate clinical utilization and effective reporting, gated MPS will remain a useful diagnostic test for many years to come. The aim of this article is to review the basic techniques of MPS, a simplified systematic approach for study interpretation, current clinical indications and reporting. After reading this article the reader should develop an understanding of the techniques, interpretation, current clinical indications and reporting of MPS studies. PMID:22048510

  7. Perfusion Electronic Record Documentation Using Epic Systems Software

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, Thomas G.; Gunser, John M.; Saviello, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: This paper describes the design and use of Epic Systems software for documentation of perfusion activities as part of the patient electronic medical record. The University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics adapted the Anesthesia software module and developed an integrated perfusion/anesthesia record for the documentation of cardiac and non-cardiac surgical procedures. This project involved multiple committees, approvals, and training to successfully implement. This article will describe our documentation options, concepts, design, challenges, training, and implementation during our initial experience. PMID:26834288

  8. Vascular Tissue Engineering: Building Perfusable Vasculature for Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Liqiong; Niklason, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue and organ replacement is required when there are no alternative therapies available. Although vascular tissue engineering was originally developed to meet the clinical demands of small-diameter vascular conduits as bypass grafts, it has evolved into a highly advanced field where perfusable vasculatures are generated for implantation. Herein, we review several cutting-edge techniques that have led to implantable human blood vessels in clinical trials, the novel approaches that build complex perfusable microvascular networks in functional tissues, the use of stem cells to generate endothelial cells for vascularization, as well as the challenges in bringing vascular tissue engineering technologies into the clinics. PMID:24533306

  9. Research needs on internal parasites of horses.

    PubMed

    1984-08-01

    The importance of the horse industry to the economy of the United States and the impact of parasitic infections on the industry are well documented. However, contemporary research activity on internal parasites of horses has not kept pace with growth of the horse population. Parasitic infections are a major facet of enteritis and colic in horses. Parasites are also associated with poor growth and development, respiratory tract disease, dermatitis, and CNS lesions. Babesia infections remain a threat to horses imported from some regions of the world. Most research activity has dealt with the development of new antiparasitic drugs. Efforts must be made to integrate these studies with observations on the bionomics of parasites in different regions and under different management conditions into more effective and less costly integrated parasite control programs. Increased research activity concerning the pathogenesis and immune response to equine parasitic infections is also necessary. A better understanding of these factors will lead to improved diagnostic, treatment, and preventative measures. Specific research objectives designed to produce short-term and long-term benefits are suggested. PMID:6383147

  10. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound of slaughterhouse porcine livers in machine perfusion.

    PubMed

    Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Efstathiades, Andreas; Keravnou, Christina; Leen, Edward L; Averkiou, Michalakis A

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to enable investigations into novel imaging and surgical techniques by developing a readily accessible, versatile liver machine perfusion system. Slaughterhouse pig livers were used, and dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound was introduced to optimize the procurement process and provide real-time perfusion monitoring. The system comprised a single pump, oxygenator, bubble trap and two flowmeters for pressure-controlled perfusion of the vessels using an off-the-shelf perfusate at room temperature. Successful livers exhibited homogeneous perfusion in both the portal vein and hepatic artery with dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound, which correlated with stable oxygen uptake, bile production and hepatic resistance and normal histology at the end of 3 h of perfusion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound revealed perfusion abnormalities invisible to the naked eye, thereby providing context to the otherwise systemic biochemical/hemodynamic measurements and focal biopsy findings. The model developed here is a simple, cost-effective approach for stable ex vivo whole-organ machine perfusion. PMID:25023101

  11. Imidazopyridazine Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1 Also Target Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase and Heat Shock Protein 90 To Kill the Parasite at Different Stages of Intracellular Development

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Robert W.; Whalley, David; Bowyer, Paul W.; Wallace, Claire; Rochani, Ankit; Nageshan, Rishi K.; Howell, Steven A.; Grainger, Munira; Jones, Hayley M.; Ansell, Keith H.; Chapman, Timothy M.; Taylor, Debra L.; Osborne, Simon A.; Baker, David A.; Tatu, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Imidazopyridazine compounds are potent, ATP-competitive inhibitors of calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1) and of Plasmodium falciparum parasite growth in vitro. Here, we show that these compounds can be divided into two classes depending on the nature of the aromatic linker between the core and the R2 substituent group. Class 1 compounds have a pyrimidine linker and inhibit parasite growth at late schizogony, whereas class 2 compounds have a nonpyrimidine linker and inhibit growth in the trophozoite stage, indicating different modes of action for the two classes. The compounds also inhibited cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG), and their potency against this enzyme was greatly reduced by substitution of the enzyme's gatekeeper residue at the ATP binding site. The effectiveness of the class 1 compounds against a parasite line expressing the modified PKG was also substantially reduced, suggesting that these compounds kill the parasite primarily through inhibition of PKG rather than CDPK1. HSP90 was identified as a binding partner of class 2 compounds, and a representative compound bound to the ATP binding site in the N-terminal domain of HSP90. Reducing the size of the gatekeeper residue of CDPK1 enabled inhibition of the enzyme by bumped kinase inhibitors; however, a parasite line expressing the modified enzyme showed no change in sensitivity to these compounds. Taken together, these findings suggest that CDPK1 may not be a suitable target for further inhibitor development and that the primary mechanism through which the imidazopyridazines kill parasites is by inhibition of PKG or HSP90. PMID:26711771

  12. Imidazopyridazine Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1 Also Target Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase and Heat Shock Protein 90 To Kill the Parasite at Different Stages of Intracellular Development.

    PubMed

    Green, Judith L; Moon, Robert W; Whalley, David; Bowyer, Paul W; Wallace, Claire; Rochani, Ankit; Nageshan, Rishi K; Howell, Steven A; Grainger, Munira; Jones, Hayley M; Ansell, Keith H; Chapman, Timothy M; Taylor, Debra L; Osborne, Simon A; Baker, David A; Tatu, Utpal; Holder, Anthony A

    2016-03-01

    Imidazopyridazine compounds are potent, ATP-competitive inhibitors of calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1) and of Plasmodium falciparum parasite growth in vitro. Here, we show that these compounds can be divided into two classes depending on the nature of the aromatic linker between the core and the R2 substituent group. Class 1 compounds have a pyrimidine linker and inhibit parasite growth at late schizogony, whereas class 2 compounds have a nonpyrimidine linker and inhibit growth in the trophozoite stage, indicating different modes of action for the two classes. The compounds also inhibited cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG), and their potency against this enzyme was greatly reduced by substitution of the enzyme's gatekeeper residue at the ATP binding site. The effectiveness of the class 1 compounds against a parasite line expressing the modified PKG was also substantially reduced, suggesting that these compounds kill the parasite primarily through inhibition of PKG rather than CDPK1. HSP90 was identified as a binding partner of class 2 compounds, and a representative compound bound to the ATP binding site in the N-terminal domain of HSP90. Reducing the size of the gatekeeper residue of CDPK1 enabled inhibition of the enzyme by bumped kinase inhibitors; however, a parasite line expressing the modified enzyme showed no change in sensitivity to these compounds. Taken together, these findings suggest that CDPK1 may not be a suitable target for further inhibitor development and that the primary mechanism through which the imidazopyridazines kill parasites is by inhibition of PKG or HSP90. PMID:26711771

  13. Emerging parasitic diseases of sheep.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M A

    2012-09-30

    There have been changes in the emergence and inability to control of a number of sheep parasitic infections over the last decade. This review focuses on the more globally important sheep parasites, whose reported changes in epidemiology, occurrence or failure to control are becoming increasingly evident. One of the main perceived driving forces is climate change, which can have profound effects on parasite epidemiology, especially for those parasitic diseases where weather has a direct effect on the development of free-living stages. The emergence of anthelmintic-resistant strains of parasitic nematodes and the increasing reliance placed on anthelmintics for their control, can exert profound changes on the epidemiology of those nematodes causing parasitic gastroenteritis. As a consequence, the effectiveness of existing control strategies presents a major threat to sheep production in many areas around the world. The incidence of the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, is inextricably linked to high rainfall and is particularly prevalent in high rainfall years. Over the last few decades, there have also been increasing reports of other fluke associated diseases, such as dicroceliosis and paramphistomosis, in a number of western European countries, possibly introduced through animal movements, and able to establish with changing climates. External parasite infections, such as myiasis, can cause significant economic loss and presents as a major welfare problem. The range of elevated temperatures predicted by current climate change scenarios, result in an elongated blowfly season with earlier spring emergence and a higher cumulative incidence of fly strike. Additionally, legislative decisions leading to enforced changes in pesticide usage and choices have resulted in increased reports and spread of ectoparasitic infections, particularly mite, lice and tick infestations in sheep. Factors, such as dip disposal and associated environmental concerns, and, perhaps more

  14. Antigenic glycans in parasitic infections: implications for vaccines and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Nyame, A Kwame; Kawar, Ziad S; Cummings, Richard D

    2004-06-15

    Infections by parasitic protozoans and helminths are a major world-wide health concern, but no vaccines exist to the major human parasitic diseases, such as malaria, African trypanosomiasis, amebiasis, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, and lymphatic filariasis. Recent studies on a number of parasites indicate that immune responses to parasites in infected animals and humans are directed to glycan determinants within cell surface and secreted glycoconjugates and that glycoconjugates are important in host-parasite interactions. Because of the tremendous success achieved recently in generating carbohydrate-protein conjugate vaccines toward microbial infections, such as Haemophilus influenzae type b, there is renewed interest in defining parasite-derived glycans in the prospect of developing conjugate vaccines and new diagnostics for parasitic infections. Parasite-derived glycans are compelling vaccine targets because they have structural features that distinguish them from mammalian glycans. There have been exciting new developments in techniques for glycan analysis and the methods for synthesizing oligosaccharides by chemical or combined chemo-enzymatic approaches that now make it feasible to generate parasite glycans to test as vaccine candidates. Here, we highlight recent progress made in elucidating the immunogenicity of glycans from some of the major human and animal parasites, the potential for developing conjugate vaccines for parasitic infections, and the possible utilization of these novel glycans in diagnostics. PMID:15158669

  15. Postresection bronchopleural fistula: detection by regional ventilation-perfusion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, C.; Ali, M.K.; Atallah, M.R.; Ewer, M.S.

    1983-04-01

    In three patients, bronchopleural fistula developed after right pneumonectomy for bronchogenic carcinoma. In each instance, radiologic and clinical evidence was inconclusive. Xenon 133 regional ventilation-perfusion studies confirmed the diagnosis of a bronchopleural fistula in both the immediate and late postoperative periods.

  16. Intensity correlation of ventilation-perfusion lung images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Antonio A.; Vaz de Carvalho, Carlos; Seixas, M.; Ferreira, F. N.; Guedes, M. A.; Amaral, I.

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method to create new images, based on lung verification and perfusion raw nuclear medicine images obtained from a gamma camera, that may help the correlation of their intrinsic information. Another major topic of this study is the assessment of the usefulness of this method in the detection of lung malfunction.

  17. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  18. House and stable fly (Diptera: Muscidae) seasonal abundance, larval development substrates, and natural parasitism on small equine farms in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This 1-year study was designed to determine adult fly population levels and development substrates on four small equine farms. Results showed that pest flies were present year-round, but differences existed in population levels among farms and seasons. Fly larvae were not found on two of the farms, ...

  19. Immunogene and viral transcript dynamics during parasitic Varroa destructor mite infection of developing honey bee (Apis mellifera) pupae.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Ryan D; Boncristiani, Humberto F; Rueppell, Olav

    2014-05-15

    The ectoparasitic Varroa destructor mite is a major contributor to the ongoing honey bee health crisis. Varroa interacts with honey bee viruses, exacerbating their pathogenicity. In addition to vectoring viruses, immunosuppression of the developing honey bee hosts by Varroa has been proposed to explain the synergy between viruses and mites. However, the evidence for honey bee immune suppression by V. destructor is contentious. We systematically studied the quantitative effects of experimentally introduced V. destructor mites on immune gene expression at five specific time points during the development of the honey bee hosts. Mites reproduced normally and were associated with increased titers of deformed wing virus in the developing bees. Our data on different immune genes show little evidence for immunosuppression of honey bees by V. destructor. Experimental wounding of developing bees increases relative immune gene expression and deformed wing virus titers. Combined, these results suggest that mite feeding activity itself and not immunosuppression may contribute to the synergy between viruses and mites. However, our results also suggest that increased expression of honey bee immune genes decreases mite reproductive success, which may be explored to enhance mite control strategies. Finally, our expression data for multiple immune genes across developmental time and different experimental treatments indicates co-regulation of several of these genes and thus improves our understanding of the understudied honey bee immune system. PMID:24829325

  20. Parasitism and phenotypic change in colonial hosts.

    PubMed

    Hartikainen, Hanna; Fontes, Inês; Okamura, Beth

    2013-09-01

    Changes in host phenotype are often attributed to manipulation that enables parasites to complete trophic transmission cycles. We characterized changes in host phenotype in a colonial host–endoparasite system that lacks trophic transmission (the freshwater bryozoan Fredericella sultana and myxozoan parasite Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae). We show that parasitism exerts opposing phenotypic effects at the colony and module levels. Thus, overt infection (the development of infectious spores in the host body cavity) was linked to a reduction in colony size and growth rate, while colony modules exhibited a form of gigantism. Larger modules may support larger parasite sacs and increase metabolite availability to the parasite. Host metabolic rates were lower in overtly infected relative to uninfected hosts that were not investing in propagule production. This suggests a role for direct resource competition and active parasite manipulation (castration) in driving the expression of the infected phenotype. The malformed offspring (statoblasts) of infected colonies had greatly reduced hatching success. Coupled with the severe reduction in statoblast production this suggests that vertical transmission is rare in overtly infected modules. We show that although the parasite can occasionally infect statoblasts during overt infections, no infections were detected in the surviving mature offspring, suggesting that during overt infections, horizontal transmission incurs a trade-off with vertical transmission. PMID:23965820

  1. Positron emission tomography to assess hypoxia and perfusion in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Verwer, Eline E; Boellaard, Ronald; van der Veldt, Astrid AM

    2014-01-01

    In lung cancer, tumor hypoxia is a characteristic feature, which is associated with a poor prognosis and resistance to both radiation therapy and chemotherapy. As the development of tumor hypoxia is associated with decreased perfusion, perfusion measurements provide more insight into the relation between hypoxia and perfusion in malignant tumors. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a highly sensitive nuclear imaging technique that is suited for non-invasive in vivo monitoring of dynamic processes including hypoxia and its associated parameter perfusion. The PET technique enables quantitative assessment of hypoxia and perfusion in tumors. To this end, consecutive PET scans can be performed in one scan session. Using different hypoxia tracers, PET imaging may provide insight into the prognostic significance of hypoxia and perfusion in lung cancer. In addition, PET studies may play an important role in various stages of personalized medicine, as these may help to select patients for specific treatments including radiation therapy, hypoxia modifying therapies, and antiangiogenic strategies. In addition, specific PET tracers can be applied for monitoring therapy. The present review provides an overview of the clinical applications of PET to measure hypoxia and perfusion in lung cancer. Available PET tracers and their characteristics as well as the applications of combined hypoxia and perfusion PET imaging are discussed. PMID:25493221

  2. Genomics and the biology of parasites.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D A; Blaxter, M L; Degrave, W M; Foster, J; Ivens, A C; Melville, S E

    1999-02-01

    Despite the advances of modern medicine, the threat of chronic illness, disfigurement, or death that can result from parasitic infection still affects the majority of the world population, retarding economic development. For most parasitic diseases, current therapeutics often leave much to be desired in terms of administration regime, toxicity, or effectiveness and potential vaccines are a long way from market. Our best prospects for identifying new targets for drug, vaccine, and diagnostics development and for dissecting the biological basis of drug resistance, antigenic diversity, infectivity and pathology lie in parasite genome analysis, and international mapping and gene discovery initiatives are under way for a variety of protozoan and helminth parasites. These are far from ideal experimental organisms, and the influence of biological and genomic characteristics on experimental approaches is discussed, progress is reviewed and future prospects are examined. PMID:10193187

  3. Review: comparison of PET rubidium-82 with conventional SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghotbi, Adam A; Kjær, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has for many years been focused on gamma camera technology. With ever improving cameras and software applications, this modality has developed into an important assessment tool for ischaemic heart disease. However, the development of new perfusion tracers has been scarce. While cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) so far largely has been limited to centres with on-site cyclotron, recent developments with generator produced perfusion tracers such as rubidium-82, as well as an increasing number of PET scanners installed, may enable a larger patient flow that may supersede that of gamma camera myocardial perfusion imaging. PMID:24028171

  4. Recent developments in the diagnosis of ectoparasite infections and disease through a better understanding of parasite biology and host responses.

    PubMed

    Wells, Beth; Burgess, Stewart T G; McNeilly, Tom N; Huntley, John F; Nisbet, Alasdair J

    2012-02-01

    Some conventional methods of diagnosis of ectoparasite infections can have low sensitivity and/or specificity. In addition, early infestations, sub-clinical and carrier hosts often go un-diagnosed, allowing infestations to spread. This review focuses on the important ectoparasites of human, livestock and companion animals for which improved diagnostic tools are either already in use, or in development. These advances in diagnostic technologies have resulted in improved treatment, control and preventative strategies for many ectoparasitic diseases. Immunodiagnostic methods have had a large impact, with the emergence of highly sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for sarcoptic and psoroptic mange, with further improved tests in development. In the present review, the advantages and limitations of such tests are discussed and the potential for future development explored. The increasing use of molecular tools, for example, PCR and other molecular methods, has improved our understanding of the epidemiology of ectoparasitic diseases, with practical consequences for community-based control programmes. Recently, the identification of specific signalling pathways during the host response to ectoparasites has led to the identification of disease biomarkers which, along with new technologies, such as multiplexed assays and microfluidic platforms, could lead to more cost-effective, rapid and accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases. PMID:21982815

  5. Functional Characterization of Anopheles Matrix Metalloprotease 1 Reveals Its Agonistic Role during Sporogonic Development of Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Sidén-Kiamos, I.; Loukeris, Thanasis G.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to invade tissues is a unique characteristic of the malaria stages that develop/differentiate within the mosquitoes (ookinetes and sporozoites). On the other hand, tissue invasion by many pathogens has often been associated with increased matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activity in the invaded tissues. By employing cell biology and reverse genetics, we studied the expression and explored putative functions of one of the three MMPs encoded in the genome of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, namely, the Anopheles gambiae MMP1 (AgMMP1) gene, during the processes of blood digestion, midgut epithelium invasion by Plasmodium ookinetes, and oocyst development. We show that AgMMP1 exists in two alternative isoforms resulting from alternative splicing; one secreted (S-MMP1) and associated with hemocytes, and one membrane type (MT-MMP1) enriched in the cell attachment sites of the midgut epithelium. MT-MMP1 showed a remarkable response to ookinete midgut invasion manifested by increased expression, enhanced zymogen maturation, and subcellular redistribution, all indicative of an implication in the midgut epithelial healing that accompanies ookinete invasion. Importantly, RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of the AgMMP1 gene revealed a postinvasion protective function of AgMMP1 during oocyst development. The combined results link for the first time an MMP with vector competence and mosquito-Plasmodium interactions. PMID:25183733

  6. Postcolonial Ecologies of Parasite and Host: Making Parasitism Cosmopolitan.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Warwick

    2016-04-01

    The interest of F. Macfarlane Burnet in host-parasite interactions grew through the 1920s and 1930s, culminating in his book, Biological Aspects of Infectious Disease (1940), often regarded as the founding text of disease ecology. Our knowledge of the influences on Burnet's ecological thinking is still incomplete. Burnet later attributed much of his conceptual development to his reading of British theoretical biology, especially the work of Julian Huxley and Charles Elton, and regretted he did not study Theobald Smith's Parasitism and Disease (1934) until after he had formulated his ideas. Scholars also have adduced Burnet's fascination with natural history and the clinical and public health demands on his research effort, among other influences. I want to consider here additional contributions to Burnet's ecological thinking, focusing on his intellectual milieu, placing his research in a settler society with exceptional expertise in environmental studies and pest management. In part, an ''ecological turn'' in Australian science in the 1930s, derived to a degree from British colonial scientific investments, shaped Burnet's conceptual development. This raises the question of whether we might characterize, in postcolonial fashion, disease ecology, and other studies of parasitism, as successful settler colonial or dominion science. PMID:27188710

  7. Examination of the relationship between host worm community structure on transmission of the parasite, Myxobolus cerebralis by developing taxon-specific probes for multiplex qPCR to identify worm taxa in stream communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fytilis, N.; Lamb, R.; Kerans, B.; Stevens, L.; Rizzo, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Fish diseases are often caused by waterborne parasites, making them ideal systems for modeling the non-linear relationships between disease dynamics, stream dwelling oligochaete communities and geochemical features. Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of whirling disease in salmonid fishes, has been a major contributor to the loss of wild rainbow trout populations in numerous streams within the Intermountain West. The parasite alternates between an invertebrate and vertebrate host, being transmitted between the sediment feeding worm Tubifex tubifex (T.tubifex) and salmonid fishes. Worm community biodiversity and abundance are influenced by biogeochemical features and have been linked to disease severity in fish. The worm (T.tubifex) lives in communities with 3-4 other types of worms in stream sediments. Unfortunately, taxonomic identification of oligochaetes is largely dependent on morphological characteristics of sexually mature adults. We have collected and identified ~700 worms from eight sites using molecular genetic probes and a taxonomic key. Additionally, ~1700 worms were identified using only molecular genetic probes. To facilitate distinguishing among tubificids, we developed two multiplex molecular genetic probe-based quantitative polymerase reaction (qPCR) assays to assess tubificid communities in the study area. Similar qPCR techniques specific for M.cerebralis used to determine if individual worms were infected with the parasite. We show how simple Bayesian analysis of the qPCR data can predict the worm community structure and reveal relationships between biodiversity of host communities and host-parasite dynamics. To our knowledge, this is the first study that combines molecular data of both the host and the parasite to examine the effects of host community structure on the transmission of a parasite. Our work can be extended to examine the links between worm community structure and biogeochemical features using molecular genetics and Bayesian

  8. A novel dual ex vivo lung perfusion technique improves immediate outcomes in an experimental model of lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Noda, K; Isse, K; Tobita, K; Maniwa, Y; Bhama, J K; D'Cunha, J; Bermudez, C A; Luketich, J D; Shigemura, N

    2015-05-01

    The lungs are dually perfused by the pulmonary artery and the bronchial arteries. This study aimed to test the feasibility of dual-perfusion techniques with the bronchial artery circulation and pulmonary artery circulation synchronously perfused using ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) and evaluate the effects of dual-perfusion on posttransplant lung graft function. Using rat heart-lung blocks, we developed a dual-perfusion EVLP circuit (dual-EVLP), and compared cellular metabolism, expression of inflammatory mediators, and posttransplant graft function in lung allografts maintained with dual-EVLP, standard-EVLP, or cold static preservation. The microvasculature in lung grafts after transplant was objectively evaluated using microcomputed tomography angiography. Lung grafts subjected to dual-EVLP exhibited significantly better lung graft function with reduced proinflammatory profiles and more mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to better posttransplant function and compliance, as compared with standard-EVLP or static cold preservation. Interestingly, lung grafts maintained on dual-EVLP exhibited remarkably increased microvasculature and perfusion as compared with lungs maintained on standard-EVLP. Our results suggest that lung grafts can be perfused and preserved using dual-perfusion EVLP techniques that contribute to better graft function by reducing proinflammatory profiles and activating mitochondrial respiration. Dual-EVLP also yields better posttransplant graft function through increased microvasculature and better perfusion of the lung grafts after transplantation. PMID:25777770

  9. Sporogonic Cycles Calculated Using Degree-Days, as a Basis for Comparison of Malaria Parasite Development in Different Eco-Epidemiological Settings in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Poonam; Dhiman, Ramesh C

    2016-01-01

    In India, malaria transmission is prevalent across diverse geologies and ecologies. Temperature is one of the key determinants of malarial transmission, causing low endemicity in some areas than in others. Using a degree-day model, we estimated the maximum and minimum possible number of days needed to complete a malarial sporogonic cycle (SC), in addition to the possible number of SCs for Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum under two different ecological settings with either low or high endemicity for malaria at different elevations. In Raikhalkhatta (in the Himalayan foothills) SCs were modeled as not occurring from November to February, whereas in Gandhonia village (forested hills), all but only one month were suitable for malarial SCs. A minimum of 6 days and maximum of 46 days were required for completion of one SC. Forested hilly areas were more suitable for malaria parasite development in terms of SCs (25 versus 21 for P. falciparum and 32 versus 27 for P. vivax). Degree-days also provided a climatic explanation for the current transmission of malaria at different elevations. The calculation of degree-days and possible SC has applications in the regional analysis of transmission dynamics and management of malaria in view of climate change. PMID:26073732

  10. A study on cerebral hemodynamic analysis of moyamoya disease by using perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the clinical applications of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with moyamoya disease (MMD). Twenty-two patients with moyamoya disease (9 men and 13 women) with a mean age of 9.3 years (range: 4-22 years) were enrolled in this study. Perfusion MRI was performed by scanning the patients7.5 cm upward from the base of the cerebellum before their being process for post-treatment. The scan led to the acquisition of the following four map images: the cerebral blood volume (CBV), the cerebral blood flow (CBF), the mean transit time (MTT) for the contrast medium, and the time to peak (TTP) for the contrast medium. The lesions were assessed using the CBV, the CBF, the MTT and the TTP maps of perfusion MRI; the MTT and the TTP were measured in the lesion areas, as well as in the normal and the symmetric areas. Perfusion defects were recognizable in all four perfusion MRI maps, and the MTT and the TTP showed a conspicuous delay in the parts where perfusion defects were recognized. The MTT and the TTP images of perfusion MRI reflected a significant correlation between the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), as well as the development of collateral vessels. The four perfusion MRI maps could be used to predict the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior circulation, as well as the development of the collateral vessels, which enabled a hemodynamic evaluation of the parts with perfusion defects. Overall, perfusion MRI is useful for the diagnosis and the treatment of moyamoya disease and can be applied to clinical practice.

  11. Ultrasound perfusion signal processing for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MinWoo; Abbey, Craig K.; Insana, Michael F.

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced blood perfusion in a tissue mass is an indication of neo-vascularity and a sign of a potential malignancy. Ultrasonic pulsed-Doppler imaging is a preferred modality for noninvasive monitoring of blood flow. However, the weak blood echoes and disorganized slow flow make it difficult to detect perfusion using standard methods without the expense and risk of contrast enhancement. Our research measures the efficiency of conventional power-Doppler (PD) methods at discriminating flow states by comparing measurement performance to that of an ideal discriminator. ROC analysis applied to the experimental results shows that power Doppler methods are just 30-50 % efficient at perfusion flows less than 1ml/min, suggesting an opportunity to improve perfusion assessment through signal processing. A new perfusion estimator is proposed by extending the statistical discriminator approach. We show that 2-D perfusion color imaging may be enhanced using this approach.

  12. Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Food Insects Water Education and Training CDC Bottle Bioassay References and Resources How to Find A ... days, be examined. This test looks for ova (eggs) or the parasite. Your health care provider may ...

  13. Pets and Parasites

    MedlinePlus

    ... make me sick? Household pets such as dogs, cats, birds and reptiles can carry diseases or parasites ... might be used as litter boxes by neighborhood cats. Keep your children out of the dirt in ...

  14. Evolution: predator versus parasite.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Martin

    2014-05-19

    Both predators and brood parasites can be major threats to the reproduction of many birds. A new study shows that some cuckoo chicks can help deter nest predators, potentially improving host reproductive success when predation risks are high. PMID:24845665

  15. Perfusion Quality Improvement and the Reduction of Clinical Variability

    PubMed Central

    Stammers, Alfred H.; Trowbridge, Cody C.; Pezzuto, James; Casale, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to describe the development and utilization of a perfusion quality improvement program to reduce perfusion-to-perfusion variability in a large multi-center perfusion practice. Phase I of the study included the establishment of a perfusion database using standard spreadsheet format to serve multiple administrative functions including patient and procedure sequencing, predictive algorithms for yearly caseload, summary statistics, and inter-perfusionist comparison. The database used 236 separate variables, including demographic and clinical procedure-related categories. Forty of these variables are modifiable by perfusion interaction as established via protocol and algorithm. Phase II of the study used a perfusion electronic data recording system to automatically obtain patient data from physiologic monitors and the heart-lung machine. Data were transferred to a central database for perfusionist comparison. Data analysis used logical functions and macros programming, and statistical analysis used both parametric and non-parametric models within the program. Each quarter all variables underwent analysis with summary data established for the most recent 225 patients undergoing CPB. Twenty-five cases from each perfusionist (n = 9) were compared with the aggregate data of the entire staff, with reference to previous quarter’s summary statistics. The results were discussed in monthly staff meetings and methods for improving compliance were discussed. Individual variation (p < .01) varied in 17 of 40 variables (26.0 ± 8.6), with quarterly improvement (27.4 ± 2.3 vs. 24.2 ± 2.1 vs. 17.0 ± 2.1) demonstrated in seven of nine individuals. In Phase II, performance was analyzed using the same variables as in Phase I but it also included the electronically recorded data from which 27 core measures were derived. All results were discussed with the staff at monthly departmental quality improvement meetings. The perfusion quality

  16. Parasitic diseases in marine cage culture--an example of experimental evolution of parasites?

    PubMed

    Nowak, Barbara F

    2007-05-01

    Rapid development of fish culture in marine cages has been associated with an emergence of parasitic diseases. There is a general trend to an increase in infections with ectoparasites with direct life cycles and a reduced diversity of parasites in aquaculture. Some mariculture creates conditions that are similar to serial passage experiments, which are used to study adaptation during experimental evolution of pathogens. In particular, increased density of fish, repeated introduction of naive hosts, homogenous host populations, fast growth and a potential decrease in genetic diversity are attributes of both aquaculture and serial passage experiments. Some free-living organisms, for example Neoparamoeba spp. and Uronema spp. parasitise fish in culture, but have not been reported from wild populations. Farming fish in marine cages can increase the risk of outbreaks of parasitic diseases, including those caused by opportunistic parasites. However, aquaculture has the potential to control parasitic diseases through selective breeding, vaccination and general fish health management. PMID:17316650

  17. Targeting Lysine Deacetylases (KDACs) in Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Rosa, Bruce A.; Nare, Bakela; Powell, Kerrie; Valente, Sergio; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Marshall, Garland R.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    Due to an increasing problem of drug resistance among almost all parasites species ranging from protists to worms, there is an urgent need to explore new drug targets and their inhibitors to provide new and effective parasitic therapeutics. In this regard, there is growing interest in exploring known drug leads of human epigenetic enzymes as potential starting points to develop novel treatments for parasitic diseases. This approach of repurposing (starting with validated targets and inhibitors) is quite attractive since it has the potential to reduce the expense of drug development and accelerate the process of developing novel drug candidates for parasite control. Lysine deacetylases (KDACs) are among the most studied epigenetic drug targets of humans, and a broad range of small-molecule inhibitors for these enzymes have been reported. In this work, we identify the KDAC protein families in representative species across important classes of parasites, screen a compound library of 23 hydroxamate- or benzamide-based small molecules KDAC inhibitors, and report their activities against a range of parasitic species, including the pathogen of malaria (Plasmodium falciparum), kinetoplastids (Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania donovani), and nematodes (Brugia malayi, Dirofilaria immitis and Haemonchus contortus). Compound activity against parasites is compared to that observed against the mammalian cell line (L929 mouse fibroblast) in order to determine potential parasite-versus-host selectivity). The compounds showed nanomolar to sub-nanomolar potency against various parasites, and some selectivity was observed within the small panel of compounds tested. The possible binding modes of the active compounds at the different protein target sites within different species were explored by docking to homology models to help guide the discovery of more selective, parasite-specific inhibitors. This current work supports previous studies that explored the use of KDAC inhibitors in

  18. [World Collections of Parasitic Worms].

    PubMed

    Zinovieva, S V; Butorina, N N; Udalova, Zh V; Khasanova, S; Filimonova, L V; Petrosyan, V G; Pel'gunov, A N

    2015-01-01

    This article provides information about the depositories of parasitic worms in the scientific institutes and museums in the United States, Japan, and Europe (the total number of samples and the availability of types of helminths from various classes), as well as information on the availability of electronic catalogues of the collections in the continental, national, and regional centers for collective use. The extent of this material has determined the necessity of creating digital collections and libraries that would represent a new form of storing, displaying, and exchanging information for scientific research. An analysis was performed of the current state of approaches and methods of development of the specialized information retrieval system (IRS) and databases (DBs) on the parasitic worms in Russia on the basis of a common conceptual data model, taking into account their local use (as desktop systems of database management) and access by scientists worldwide via the Internet. PMID:26852482

  19. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas' disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply. PMID:20859503

  20. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas’ disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply. PMID:20859503

  1. Estimating a regional ventilation-perfusion index

    PubMed Central

    Muller, P A; Li, T; Isaacson, D; Newell, J C; Saulnier, G J; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Ashe, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This is a methods paper, where an approximation to the local ventilation-perfusion ratio is derived. This approximation, called the ventilation-perfusion index since it is not exactly the physiological ventilation-perfusion ratio, is calculated using conductivity reconstructions obtained using electrical impedance tomography. Since computation of the ventilation-perfusion index only requires knowledge of the internal conductivity, any conductivity reconstruction method may be used. The method is explained, and results are presented using conductivities obtained from two EIT systems, one using an iterative method and the other a linearization method. PMID:26006279

  2. Parasites in marine food webs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Most species interactions probably involve parasites. This review considers the extent to which marine ecologists should consider parasites to fully understand marine communities. Parasites are influential parts of food webs in estuaries, temperate reefs, and coral reefs, but their ecological importance is seldom recognized. Though difficult to observe, parasites can have substantial biomass, and they can be just as common as free-living consumers after controlling for body mass and trophic level. Parasites have direct impacts on the energetics of their hosts and some affect host behaviors, with ecosystem-level consequences. Although they cause disease, parasites are sensitive components of ecosystems. In particular, they suffer secondary extinctions due to biodiversity loss. Some parasites can also return to a system after habitat restoration. For these reasons, parasites can make good indicators of ecosystem integrity. Fishing can indirectly increase or decrease parasite populations and the effects of climate change on parasites are likely to be equally as complex.

  3. Suppression of the Insulin Receptors in Adult Schistosoma japonicum Impacts on Parasite Growth and Development: Further Evidence of Vaccine Potential.

    PubMed

    You, Hong; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Cai, Pengfei; Mou, Rong; Nawaratna, Sujeevi; Fang, Guofu; Villinger, Francois; McManus, Donald P

    2015-05-01

    To further investigate the importance of insulin signaling in the growth, development, sexual maturation and egg production of adult schistosomes, we have focused attention on the insulin receptors (SjIRs) of Schistosoma japonicum, which we have previously cloned and partially characterised. We now show, by Biolayer Interferometry, that human insulin can bind the L1 subdomain (insulin binding domain) of recombinant (r)SjIR1 and rSjIR2 (designated SjLD1 and SjLD2) produced using the Drosophila S2 protein expression system. We have then used RNA interference (RNAi) to knock down the expression of the SjIRs in adult S. japonicum in vitro and show that, in addition to their reduced transcription, the transcript levels of other important downstream genes within the insulin pathway, associated with glucose metabolism and schistosome fecundity, were also impacted substantially. Further, a significant decrease in glucose uptake was observed in the SjIR-knockdown worms compared with luciferase controls. In vaccine/challenge experiments, we found that rSjLD1 and rSjLD2 depressed female growth, intestinal granuloma density and faecal egg production in S. japonicum in mice presented with a low dose challenge infection. These data re-emphasize the potential of the SjIRs as veterinary transmission blocking vaccine candidates against zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica in China and the Philippines. PMID:25961574

  4. Fasciola hepatica: variations in redial development and cercarial production in relation to the geographic origin of the parasite

    PubMed Central

    Rondelaud, Daniel; Sanabria, Rodrigo; Vignoles, Philippe; Dreyfuss, Gilles; Romero, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Two hundred Galba truncatula, originating from a French population, were subjected to single-miracidium infections with an allopatric isolate (origin, Argentina) of Fasciola hepatica. The control group was constituted by 100 snails coming from the same population and exposed to sympatric miracidia of F. hepatica according to the same protocol. Snail samples were collected bimonthly from both groups between day 14 and day 112 p.e. (at 20 °C) and snail dissections were performed to count free rediae, intraredial morulae and free cercariae. Third and fourth generation rediae were significantly more numerous in the allopatric group, while the number of first generation rediae was significantly lower. In the sympatric group, the decrease in the number of intraredial morulae in the first, second and third redial generations was significantly faster. Free cercariae within the snail body were significantly more numerous in the sympatric than in the allopatric groups, whatever the date of snail dissection. The changes in redial development and cercarial production noted in the Argentinean group might be due to the evolution of South American flukes in a divergent way after the introduction of foreign infected ruminants in this continent from the 15th century. PMID:24054407

  5. Suppression of the Insulin Receptors in Adult Schistosoma japonicum Impacts on Parasite Growth and Development: Further Evidence of Vaccine Potential

    PubMed Central

    You, Hong; Gobert, Geoffrey N.; Cai, Pengfei; Mou, Rong; Nawaratna, Sujeevi; Fang, Guofu; Villinger, Francois; McManus, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    To further investigate the importance of insulin signaling in the growth, development, sexual maturation and egg production of adult schistosomes, we have focused attention on the insulin receptors (SjIRs) of Schistosoma japonicum, which we have previously cloned and partially characterised. We now show, by Biolayer Interferometry, that human insulin can bind the L1 subdomain (insulin binding domain) of recombinant (r)SjIR1 and rSjIR2 (designated SjLD1 and SjLD2) produced using the Drosophila S2 protein expression system. We have then used RNA interference (RNAi) to knock down the expression of the SjIRs in adult S. japonicum in vitro and show that, in addition to their reduced transcription, the transcript levels of other important downstream genes within the insulin pathway, associated with glucose metabolism and schistosome fecundity, were also impacted substantially. Further, a significant decrease in glucose uptake was observed in the SjIR-knockdown worms compared with luciferase controls. In vaccine/challenge experiments, we found that rSjLD1 and rSjLD2 depressed female growth, intestinal granuloma density and faecal egg production in S. japonicum in mice presented with a low dose challenge infection. These data re-emphasize the potential of the SjIRs as veterinary transmission blocking vaccine candidates against zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica in China and the Philippines. PMID:25961574

  6. Signatures of adaptation to plant parasitism in nematode genomes.

    PubMed

    Bird, David McK; Jones, John T; Opperman, Charles H; Kikuchi, Taisei; Danchin, Etienne G J

    2015-02-01

    Plant-parasitic nematodes cause considerable damage to global agriculture. The ability to parasitize plants is a derived character that appears to have independently emerged several times in the phylum Nematoda. Morphological convergence to feeding style has been observed, but whether this is emergent from molecular convergence is less obvious. To address this, we assess whether genomic signatures can be associated with plant parasitism by nematodes. In this review, we report genomic features and characteristics that appear to be common in plant-parasitic nematodes while absent or rare in animal parasites, predators or free-living species. Candidate horizontal acquisitions of parasitism genes have systematically been found in all plant-parasitic species investigated at the sequence level. Presence of peptides that mimic plant hormones also appears to be a trait of plant-parasitic species. Annotations of the few genomes of plant-parasitic nematodes available to date have revealed a set of apparently species-specific genes on every occasion. Effector genes, important for parasitism are frequently found among those species-specific genes, indicating poor overlap. Overall, nematodes appear to have developed convergent genomic solutions to adapt to plant parasitism. PMID:25656361

  7. Coevolution of parasite virulence and host mating strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, Ben; Boots, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Parasites are thought to play an important role in sexual selection and the evolution of mating strategies, which in turn are likely to be critical to the transmission and therefore the evolution of parasites. Despite this clear interdependence we have little understanding of parasite-mediated sexual selection in the context of reciprocal parasite evolution. Here we develop a general coevolutionary model between host mate preference and the virulence of a sexually transmitted parasite. We show when the characteristics of both the host and parasite lead to coevolutionarily stable strategies or runaway selection, and when coevolutionary cycling between high and low levels of host mate choosiness and virulence is possible. A prominent argument against parasites being involved in sexual selection is that they should evolve to become less virulent when transmission depends on host mating success. The present study, however, demonstrates that coevolution can maintain stable host mate choosiness and parasite virulence or indeed coevolutionary cycling of both traits. We predict that choosiness should vary inversely with parasite virulence and that both relatively long and short life spans select against choosy behavior in the host. The model also reveals that hosts can evolve different behavioral responses from the same initial conditions, which highlights difficulties in using comparative analysis to detect parasite-mediated sexual selection. Taken as a whole, our results emphasize the importance of viewing parasite-mediated sexual selection in the context of coevolution. PMID:26430236

  8. Diversification and host switching in avian malaria parasites.

    PubMed Central

    Ricklefs, Robert E; Fallon, Sylvia M

    2002-01-01

    The switching of parasitic organisms to novel hosts, in which they may cause the emergence of new diseases, is of great concern to human health and the management of wild and domesticated populations of animals. We used a phylogenetic approach to develop a better statistical assessment of host switching in a large sample of vector-borne malaria parasites of birds (Plasmodium and Haemoproteus) over their history of parasite-host relations. Even with sparse sampling, the number of parasite lineages was almost equal to the number of avian hosts. We found that strongly supported sister lineages of parasites, averaging 1.2% sequence divergence, exhibited highly significant host and geographical fidelity. Event-based matching of host and parasite phylogenetic trees revealed significant cospeciation. However, the accumulated effects of host switching and long distance dispersal cause these signals to disappear before 4% sequence divergence is achieved. Mitochondrial DNA nucleotide substitution appears to occur about three times faster in hosts than in parasites, contrary to findings on other parasite-host systems. Using this mutual calibration, the phylogenies of the parasites and their hosts appear to be similar in age, suggesting that avian malaria parasites diversified along with their modern avian hosts. Although host switching has been a prominent feature over the evolutionary history of avian malaria parasites, it is infrequent and unpredictable on time scales germane to public health and wildlife management. PMID:12028770

  9. Myxozoan parasitism in waterfowl.

    PubMed

    Bartholomew, Jerri L; Atkinson, Stephen D; Hallett, Sascha L; Lowenstine, Linda J; Garner, Michael M; Gardiner, Chris H; Rideout, Bruce A; Keel, M Kevin; Brown, Justin D

    2008-08-01

    Myxozoans are spore-forming, metazoan parasites common in cold-blooded aquatic vertebrates, especially fishes, with alternate life cycle stages developing in invertebrates. We report nine cases of infection in free-flying native and captive exotic ducks (Anseriformes: Anatidae) from locations across the United States and describe the first myxozoan in birds, Myxidium anatidum n. sp. We found developmental stages and mature spores in the bile ducts of a Pekin duck (domesticated Anas platyrhynchos). Spores are lens-shaped in sutural view, slightly sigmoidal in valvular view, with two polar capsules, and each valve cell has 14-16 longitudinal surface ridges. Spore dimensions are 23.1 microm x 10.8 microm x 11.2 microm. Phylogenetic analysis of the ssrRNA gene revealed closest affinity with Myxidium species described from chelonids (tortoises). Our novel finding broadens the definition of the Myxozoa to include birds as hosts and has implications for understanding myxozoan evolution, and mechanisms of geographical and host range extension. The number of infection records indicates this is not an incidental occurrence, and the detection of such widely dispersed cases suggests more myxozoans in birds will be encountered with increased surveillance of these hosts for pathogens. PMID:18342316

  10. The Pratylenchus penetrans Transcriptome as a Source for the Development of Alternative Control Strategies: Mining for Putative Genes Involved in Parasitism and Evaluation of in planta RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Paulo; Eves-van den Akker, Sebastian; Verma, Ruchi; Wantoch, Sarah; Eisenback, Jonathan D.; Kamo, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The root lesion nematode Pratylenchus penetrans is considered one of the most economically important species within the genus. Host range studies have shown that nearly 400 plant species can be parasitized by this species. To obtain insight into the transcriptome of this migratory plant-parasitic nematode, we used Illumina mRNA sequencing analysis of a mixed population, as well as nematode reads detected in infected soybean roots 3 and 7 days after nematode infection. Over 140 million paired end reads were obtained for this species, and de novo assembly resulted in a total of 23,715 transcripts. Homology searches showed significant hit matches to 58% of the total number of transcripts using different protein and EST databases. In general, the transcriptome of P. penetrans follows common features reported for other root lesion nematode species. We also explored the efficacy of RNAi, delivered from the host, as a strategy to control P. penetrans, by targeted knock-down of selected nematode genes. Different comparisons were performed to identify putative nematode genes with a role in parasitism, resulting in the identification of transcripts with similarities to other nematode parasitism genes. Focusing on the predicted nematode secreted proteins found in this transcriptome, we observed specific members to be up-regulated at the early time points of infection. In the present study, we observed an enrichment of predicted secreted proteins along the early time points of parasitism by this species, with a significant number being pioneer candidate genes. A representative set of genes examined using RT-PCR confirms their expression during the host infection. The expression patterns of the different candidate genes raise the possibility that they might be involved in critical steps of P. penetrans parasitism. This analysis sheds light on the transcriptional changes that accompany plant infection by P. penetrans, and will aid in identifying potential gene targets for

  11. Modelling Brain Temperature and Perfusion for Cerebral Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Brain temperature relies heavily on two aspects: i) blood perfusion and porous heat transport through tissue and ii) blood flow and heat transfer through embedded arterial and venous vasculature. Moreover brain temperature cannot be measured directly unless highly invasive surgical procedures are used. A 3D two-phase fluid-porous model for mapping flow and temperature in brain is presented with arterial and venous vessels extracted from MRI scans. Heat generation through metabolism is also included. The model is robust and reveals flow and temperature maps in unprecedented 3D detail. However, the Karmen-Kozeny parameters of the porous (tissue) phase need to be optimised for expected perfusion profiles. In order to optimise the K-K parameters a reduced order two-phase model is developed where 1D vessels are created with a tree generation algorithm embedded inside a 3D porous domain. Results reveal that blood perfusion is a strong function of the porosity distribution in the tissue. We present a qualitative comparison between the simulated perfusion maps and those obtained clinically. We also present results studying the effect of scalp cooling on core brain temperature and preliminary results agree with those observed clinically.

  12. Dynamic CT head phantom for perfusion and angiography studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, K.; Blazeski, A.; Dannecker, K.; Lee, Q. Y.; Holscher, C.; Donahue, C.; van Kampen, W.

    2010-03-01

    Contrast imaging is a compelling enhancement for the portable, flat panel-based brain CT scanner currently under development at Xoran. Due to the relative low temporal resolution of flat panel detectors, enabling tomographic imaging on such platform requires optimizing the imaging and injection protocols. A dynamic CT head phantom was designed to facilitate this task. The Dynamic Perfusion and Angiography Model (PAM), mimics tissue attenuation in CT images, provides physiological timing for angiography and perfusion studies, and moves fluid with properties similar to those of blood. The design consists of an arterial system, which contains bifurcating vessels that feed into perfusion chambers, mimicking blood flow through capillaries and smaller vessels, and a venous system, which is symmetrical to the arterial side and drains the perfusion chambers. The variation of geometry and flow rate in the phantom provides the physiological total time that fluid spends in the head, and the difference in material densities correlates to CT numbers for biological tissues. This paper discusses the design of Dynamic PAM and shows experimental results demonstrating its ability to realistically simulate blood flow. Results of dynamic imaging studies of the phantom are also presented.

  13. Susceptibility-Based Analysis Of Dynamic Gadolinium Bolus Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, David; Barker, Peter B.; Leigh, Richard; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Li, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An algorithm is developed for the reconstruction of dynamic, gadolinium (Gd) bolus MR perfusion images of the human brain, based on quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). Methods The method is evaluated in 5 perfusion scans obtained from 4 different patients scanned at 3T, and compared to the conventional analysis based on changes in the transverse relaxation rate ΔR2* and to theoretical predictions. QSM images were referenced to ventricular CSF for each dynamic of the perfusion sequence. Results Images of cerebral blood flow and blood volume were successfully reconstructed from the QSM-analysis, and were comparable to those reconstructed using ΔR2*. The magnitudes of the Gd-associated susceptibility effects in gray and white matter were consistent with theoretical predictions. Conclusion QSM-based analysis may have some theoretical advantages compared to ΔR2*, including a simpler relationship between signal change and Gd concentration. However, disadvantages are its much lower contrast-to-noise ratio, artifacts due to respiration and other effects, and more complicated reconstruction methods. More work is required to optimize data acquisition protocols for QSM-based perfusion imaging. PMID:24604343

  14. Technological advances in MRI measurement of brain perfusion.

    PubMed

    Duyn, Jeff H; van Gelderen, Peter; Talagala, Lalith; Koretsky, Alan; de Zwart, Jacco A

    2005-12-01

    Measurement of brain perfusion using arterial spin labeling (ASL) or dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) based MRI has many potential important clinical applications. However, the clinical application of perfusion MRI has been limited by a number of factors, including a relatively poor spatial resolution, limited volume coverage, and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is difficult to improve any of these aspects because both ASL and DSC methods require rapid image acquisition. In this report, recent methodological developments are discussed that alleviate some of these limitations and make perfusion MRI more suitable for clinical application. In particular, the availability of high magnetic field strength systems, increased gradient performance, the use of RF coil arrays and parallel imaging, and increasing pulse sequence efficiency allow for increased image acquisition speed and improved SNR. The use of parallel imaging facilitates the trade-off of SNR for increases in spatial resolution. As a demonstration, we obtained DSC and ASL perfusion images at 3.0 T and 7.0 T with multichannel RF coils and parallel imaging, which allowed us to obtain high-quality images with in-plane voxel sizes of 1.5 x 1.5 mm(2). PMID:16267852

  15. Perfusion from angiogram and a priori (PAP) with temporal regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H.

    2009-02-01

    Perfusion imaging is often used for diagnosis and for assessment of the response to the treatment. If perfusion can be measured during interventional procedures, it could lead to quantitative, more efficient and accurate treatment; however, imaging modalities that allow continuous dynamic scanning are not available in most of procedure rooms. Thus, we developed a method to measure the perfusion-time attenuation curves (TACs)-of regions-of-interest (ROIs) using xray C-arm angiography system with no gantry rotation but with a priori. The previous study revealed a problem of large oscillations in the estimated TACs and the lack of comparison with CT-based approaches. Thus the purposes of this study were (1) to reduce the variance of TDCs; and (2) to compare the performance of the improved PAP with that of the CT-based perfusion method. Our computer simulation study showed that the standard deviation of PAP method was decreased by 10.7-59.0% and that it outperformed (20× or 200× times) higher dose CT methods in terms of the accuracy, variance, and the temporal resolution.

  16. Deeper Penetration of Erythrocytes into the Endothelial Glycocalyx Is Associated with Impaired Microvascular Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J. C.; van den Berg, Bernard M.; Boels, Margien G. S.; van Teeffelen, Jurgen W.; de Mutsert, Renée; den Heijer, Martin; Rosendaal, Frits R.; van der Vlag, Johan; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Vink, Hans; Rabelink, Ton J.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in endothelial glycocalyx are one of the earliest changes in development of cardiovascular disease. The endothelial glycocalyx is both an important biological modifier of interactions between flowing blood and the vessel wall, and a determinant of organ perfusion. We hypothesize that deeper penetration of erythrocytes into the glycocalyx is associated with reduced microvascular perfusion. The population-based prospective cohort study (the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity [NEO] study) includes 6,673 middle-aged individuals (oversampling of overweight and obese individuals). Within this cohort, we have imaged the sublingual microvasculature of 915 participants using sidestream darkfield (SDF) imaging together with a recently developed automated acquisition and analysis approach. Presence of RBC (as a marker of microvascular perfusion) and perfused boundary region (PBR), a marker for endothelial glycocalyx barrier properties for RBC accessibility, were assessed in vessels between 5 and 25 µm RBC column width. A wide range of variability in PBR measurements, with a mean PBR of 2.14 µm (range: 1.43–2.86 µm), was observed. Linear regression analysis showed a marked association between PBR and microvascular perfusion, reflected by RBC filling percentage (regression coefficient β: −0.034; 95% confidence interval: −0.037 to −0.031). We conclude that microvascular beds with a thick (“healthy”) glycocalyx (low PBR), reflects efficient perfusion of the microvascular bed. In contrast, a thin (“risk”) glycocalyx (high PBR) is associated with a less efficient and defective microvascular perfusion. PMID:24816787

  17. Niche metabolism in parasitic protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Ginger, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    Complete or partial genome sequences have recently become available for several medically and evolutionarily important parasitic protozoa. Through the application of bioinformatics complete metabolic repertoires for these parasites can be predicted. For experimentally intractable parasites insight provided by metabolic maps generated in silico has been startling. At its more extreme end, such bioinformatics reckoning facilitated the discovery in some parasites of mitochondria remodelled beyond previous recognition, and the identification of a non-photosynthetic chloroplast relic in malarial parasites. However, for experimentally tractable parasites, mapping of the general metabolic terrain is only a first step in understanding how the parasite modulates its streamlined, yet still often puzzlingly complex, metabolism in order to complete life cycles within host, vector, or environment. This review provides a comparative overview and discussion of metabolic strategies used by several different parasitic protozoa in order to subvert and survive host defences, and illustrates how genomic data contribute to the elucidation of parasite metabolism. PMID:16553311

  18. Myocardial perfusion with rubidium-82. III. Theory relating severity of coronary stenosis to perfusion deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.

    1984-11-01

    The relation between the quantitative perfusion deficit, as measured by emission computerized tomography, and the severity of coronary artery stenosis is important for the noninvasive clinical evaluation of coronary artery disease in man. Positron emission tomography allows direct noninvasive measurement of myocardial perfusion and quantification of the size of the perfusion defect. Given this important imformation, a mathematical model has been derived to gauge the severity of a coronary stenosis from quantitative perfusion measurements in the normal and poststenotic regions of the heart. The theoretical basis is presented for relating regional myocardial perfusion and regional perfusion resistance to total, coronary blood flow and resistance at normal resting flow and during maximal coronary vasodilation. The concept of perfusion reserve is presented as a clinical measure of the severity of a stenosis.

  19. The host-parasite relationship in neosporosis.

    PubMed

    Hemphill, A

    1999-01-01

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite which invades many different cell types and tissues. It causes neosporosis, namely stillbirth and abortion in cattle and neuromuscular disease in dogs, and has been found in several other animal species. N. caninum is closely related to Toxoplasma gondii, and controversial opinions exist with respect to its phylogenetical status. Initially, two stages of N. caninum had been identified, namely asexually proliferating tachyzoites and bradyzoites. The sexually produced stage of this parasite, oocysts containing sporozoites, has been found only recently. In order to answer the many open questions regarding its basic biology and its relationship with the host, a number of diagnostic tools have been developed. These techniques are based on the detection of antibodies against parasites in body fluids, the direct visualization of the parasite within tissue samples by immunohistochemistry, or the specific amplification of parasite DNA by PCR. Other studies have been aiming at the identification of specific antigenic components of N. caninum, and the molecular and functional characterization of these antigens with respect to the cell biology of the parasite. Clearly, molecular approaches will also be used increasingly to elucidate the immunological and pathogenetic events during infection, but also to prepare potential new immunotherapeutic tools for future vaccination against N. caninum infection. PMID:10214690

  20. Stress and sex in malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lucy M.; Kafsack, Björn F.C.; Llinás, Manuel; Mideo, Nicole; Pollitt, Laura C.; Reece, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    For vector-borne parasites such as malaria, how within- and between-host processes interact to shape transmission is poorly understood. In the host, malaria parasites replicate asexually but for transmission to occur, specialized sexual stages (gametocytes) must be produced. Despite the central role that gametocytes play in disease transmission, explanations of why parasites adjust gametocyte production in response to in-host factors remain controversial. We propose that evolutionary theory developed to explain variation in reproductive effort in multicellular organisms, provides a framework to understand gametocyte investment strategies. We examine why parasites adjust investment in gametocytes according to the impact of changing conditions on their in-host survival. We then outline experiments required to determine whether plasticity in gametocyte investment enables parasites to maintain fitness in a variable environment. Gametocytes are a target for anti-malarial transmission-blocking interventions so understanding plasticity in investment is central to maximizing the success of control measures in the face of parasite evolution. PMID:24481194

  1. Perfusion Preservation of the Donor Heart: Basic Science to Pre-Clinical

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Andrew L.; Gallegos, Robert; Ogden, Irene M.; Bianco, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: As a consequence of technology improvements and refinement, perfusion of the donor heart has moved from the research laboratory to clinical studies. Multiple investigators are currently leading pre-clinical trials of devices using perfusion preservation, and one device is now in European clinical trials. One major problem with the donor heart is the high metabolism relative to other organs, and depletion of ATP leads rapidly to acidosis and necrosis of the myocardium. Two techniques in development to address the issue are normothermic and hypothermic perfusion. This review examines the current issues regarding donor heart preservation and techniques of pre-clinical evaluation necessary for regulatory approval. PMID:19806796

  2. Internal parasites of reptiles.

    PubMed

    Raś-Noryńska, Małgorzata; Sokół, Rajmund

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays a growing number of exotic reptiles are kept as pets. The aim of this study was to determine the species of parasites found in reptile patients of veterinary practices in Poland. Fecal samples obtained from 76 lizards, 15 turtles and 10 snakes were examined by flotation method and direct smear stained with Lugol's iodine. In 63 samples (62.4%) the presence of parasite eggs and oocysts was revealed. Oocysts of Isospora spp. (from 33% to 100% of the samples, depending on the reptilian species) and Oxyurids eggs (10% to 75%) were predominant. In addition, isolated Eimeria spp. oocysts and Giardia intestinalis cysts were found, as well as Strongylus spp. and Hymenolepis spp. eggs. Pet reptiles are often infected with parasites, some of which are potentially dangerous to humans. A routine parasitological examination should be done in such animals. PMID:26342508

  3. LIVER FUNCTION AFTER IRRADIATION BASED UPON CT PORTAL VEIN PERFUSION IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Pan, Charlie; Balter, James M.; Platt, Joel F.; Francis, Isaac R.; Knol, James A.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The role of radiation in the treatment of intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of radiation-induced liver disease (RILD), which occurs weeks after the course of radiation is completed. We hypothesized that, as the pathophysiology of RILD is veno-occlusive disease, we could assess individual and regional liver sensitivity to radiation by measuring liver perfusion during a course of treatment using dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) scanning. Materials and Methods Patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing conformal radiotherapy underwent DCE-CT (to measure perfusion distribution) and an indocyanine extraction study (to measure liver function) prior to, during, and one month after treatment. We wished to determine if the residual functioning liver (i.e. those regions showing portal vein perfusion) could be used to predict overall liver function after irradiation. Results Radiation doses from 45 to 84 Gy resulted in undectable regional portal vein perfusion one month after treatment. The volume of each liver with undectable portal vein perfusion ranged from 0% to 39% and depended both on the patient’s sensitivity and dose distribution. There was a significant correlation between indocyanine green clearance and the mean of the estimated portal vein perfusion in the functional liver parenchyma (P < .001). Conclusion This study reveals substantial individual variability in the sensitivity of the liver to irradiation. In addition, these findings suggest that hepatic perfusion imaging may be a marker for liver function, and has the potential to be a tool for individualizing therapy. PMID:17855011

  4. Parasite vaccines--a reality?

    PubMed

    Dalton, J P; Mulcahy, G

    2001-07-12

    Over the last decade, the anti-parasitics market has been the fastest growing sector of the overall $18 billion animal health market. While drugs for the treatment of parasites of livestock still dominate this sector and will continue to be developed or re-formulated, because of consumer demands for chemical-free food and of concerns regarding the environment and animal welfare there is a growing interest in the development of safe and effective vaccines. There is also a call for vaccines in the lucrative $3 billion-plus companion animal market. These demands for vaccines will add a greater impetus to an area that has seen tremendous success in the last 15 years. A number of anti-parasite vaccines have been developed, e.g. the recombinant 45w and EG95 oncosphere proteins against Taenia ovis and Echinococcus granulosis, respectively, and the Bm86 vaccine against Boophilus microplus. In addition, the cathepsin L vaccines against the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, and the H11 vaccine against Haemonchus contortus are progressing well. There are also many additional vaccine candidates for H. contortus and for other nematodes such as Ostertagia and Trichostrongylus spp. that may ultimately lead to broad-spectrum gastrointestinal worm vaccines. Live or attenuated-live vaccines are available for the control of avian coccidiosis, toxplasmosis in sheep and anaplasmosis in cattle, although molecular vaccines against protozoans are still proving elusive. The wealth of information in genomics, proteomics and immunology that has been forthcoming together will new methods of vaccine production and delivery should see many new vaccines reach the marketplace in the near future. PMID:11516584

  5. Malaria: targeting parasite and host cell kinomes.

    PubMed

    Doerig, Christian; Abdi, Abdirahman; Bland, Nicholas; Eschenlauer, Sylvain; Dorin-Semblat, Dominique; Fennell, Clare; Halbert, Jean; Holland, Zoe; Nivez, Marie-Paule; Semblat, Jean-Philippe; Sicard, Audrey; Reininger, Luc

    2010-03-01

    Malaria still remains one of the deadliest infectious diseases, and has a tremendous morbidity and mortality impact in the developing world. The propensity of the parasites to develop drug resistance, and the relative reluctance of the pharmaceutical industry to invest massively in the developments of drugs that would offer only limited marketing prospects, are major issues in antimalarial drug discovery. Protein kinases (PKs) have become a major family of targets for drug discovery research in a number of disease contexts, which has generated considerable resources such as kinase-directed libraries and high throughput kinase inhibition assays. The phylogenetic distance between malaria parasites and their human host translates into important divergences in their respective kinomes, and most Plasmodium kinases display atypical properties (as compared to mammalian PKs) that can be exploited towards selective inhibition. Here, we discuss the taxon-specific kinases possessed by malaria parasites, and give an overview of target PKs that have been validated by reverse genetics, either in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum or in the rodent model Plasmodium berghei. We also briefly allude to the possibility of attacking Plasmodium through the inhibition of human PKs that are required for survival of this obligatory intracellular parasite, and which are targets for other human diseases. PMID:19840874

  6. The Development and Initial Evaluation of a Realistic Simulated SPECT Dataset with Simultaneous Respiratory and Cardiac Motion for Gated Myocardial Perfusion SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a realistic simulation dataset for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac (R&C) gated SPECT/CT using the 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) Phantom and Monte Carlo simulation methods, and evaluated it for a sample application study. The 4D NCAT phantom included realistic respiratory motion and beating heart motion based on respiratory gated CT and cardiac tagged MRI data of normal human subjects. To model the respiratory motion, a set of 24 separate 3D NCAT phantoms excluding the heart was generated over a respiratory cycle. The beating heart motion was modelled separately with 48 frames per cardiac cycle for each of the 24 respiratory phases. The resultant set of 24×48 3D NCAT phantoms provides a realistic model of a normal human subject at different phases of combined R&C motions. An almost noise-free SPECT projection dataset for each of the 1,152 3D NCAT phantoms was generated using Monte Carlo simulation techniques and the radioactivity uptake distribution of 99mTc sestamibi in different organs. By grouping and summing the separate projection datasets, separate or simultaneous R&C gated acquired data with different gating schemes could be simulated. In the initial evaluation, we combined the projection datasets into no gating, 6 respiratory-gates only, 8 cardiac-gates only, and combined 6 respiratory-gates & 8 cardiac-gates projection datasets. Each dataset was reconstructed using 3D OS-EM without and with attenuation correction using the averaged and respiratory-gated attenuation maps, and the resulting reconstructed images were compared. These results were used to demonstrate the effects of R&C motions and the reduction of image artifact due to R&C motions by gating and attenuation corrections. We concluded that the realistic 4D NCAT phantom and Monte Carlo simulated SPECT projection datasets with R&C motions are powerful tools in the study of the effects of R&C motions, as well as in the development of R&C gating schemes and motion correction

  7. The development and initial evaluation of a realistic simulated SPECT dataset with simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion for gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-02-01

    We developed a realistic simulation dataset for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac (R&C) gated SPECT/CT using the 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) Phantom and Monte Carlo simulation methods, and evaluated it for a sample application study. The 4D NCAT phantom included realistic respiratory motion and beating heart motion based on respiratory gated CT and cardiac tagged MRI data of normal human subjects. To model the respiratory motion, a set of 24 separate 3D NCAT phantoms excluding the heart was generated over a respiratory cycle. The beating heart motion was modeled separately with 48 frames per cardiac cycle for each of the 24 respiratory phases. The resultant set of 24  ×  48 3D NCAT phantoms provides a realistic model of a normal human subject at different phases of combined R&C motions. An almost noise-free SPECT projection dataset for each of the 1152 3D NCAT phantoms was generated using Monte Carlo simulation techniques and the radioactivity uptake distribution of 99mTc sestamibi in different organs. By grouping and summing the separate projection datasets, separate or simultaneous R&C gated acquired data with different gating schemes could be simulated. In the initial evaluation, we combined the projection datasets into ungated, 6 respiratory-gates only, 8 cardiac-gates only, and combined 6 respiratory-gates & 8 cardiac-gates projection datasets. Each dataset was reconstructed using 3D OS-EM without and with attenuation correction using the averaged and respiratory-gated attenuation maps, and the resulting reconstructed images were compared. These results were used to demonstrate the effects of R&C motions and the reduction of image artifact due to R&C motions by gating and attenuation corrections. We concluded that the realistic 4D NCAT phantom and Monte Carlo simulated SPECT projection datasets with R&C motions are powerful tools in the study of the effects of R&C motions, as well as in the development of R&C gating schemes and motion

  8. The development and initial evaluation of a realistic simulated SPECT dataset with simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion for gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2015-02-21

    We developed a realistic simulation dataset for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac (R&C) gated SPECT/CT using the 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) Phantom and Monte Carlo simulation methods, and evaluated it for a sample application study. The 4D NCAT phantom included realistic respiratory motion and beating heart motion based on respiratory gated CT and cardiac tagged MRI data of normal human subjects. To model the respiratory motion, a set of 24 separate 3D NCAT phantoms excluding the heart was generated over a respiratory cycle. The beating heart motion was modeled separately with 48 frames per cardiac cycle for each of the 24 respiratory phases. The resultant set of 24  ×  48 3D NCAT phantoms provides a realistic model of a normal human subject at different phases of combined R&C motions. An almost noise-free SPECT projection dataset for each of the 1152 3D NCAT phantoms was generated using Monte Carlo simulation techniques and the radioactivity uptake distribution of (99m)Tc sestamibi in different organs. By grouping and summing the separate projection datasets, separate or simultaneous R&C gated acquired data with different gating schemes could be simulated. In the initial evaluation, we combined the projection datasets into ungated, 6 respiratory-gates only, 8 cardiac-gates only, and combined 6 respiratory-gates & 8 cardiac-gates projection datasets. Each dataset was reconstructed using 3D OS-EM without and with attenuation correction using the averaged and respiratory-gated attenuation maps, and the resulting reconstructed images were compared. These results were used to demonstrate the effects of R&C motions and the reduction of image artifact due to R&C motions by gating and attenuation corrections. We concluded that the realistic 4D NCAT phantom and Monte Carlo simulated SPECT projection datasets with R&C motions are powerful tools in the study of the effects of R&C motions, as well as in the development of R&C gating schemes and motion

  9. Parasitic and rare spinal infections.

    PubMed

    do Amaral, Lázaro Luís Faria; Nunes, Renato Hoffmann; da Rocha, Antonio Jose

    2015-05-01

    The imaging features of spinal parasitic diseases and other rare infections are herein discussed. These diseases are distributed worldwide, with increased prevalence in areas with poor sanitary conditions and in developing countries. In nonendemic areas, sporadic cases may occur, consequent to increased international travel and immunocompromising conditions. Infectious diseases are usually treatable, and early detection is often crucial. A thorough comprehension of the imaging patterns associated with the clinical features, epidemiology, and laboratory results allows the radiologist to narrow down the options for differential diagnosis and facilitates the timely implementation of appropriate therapies. PMID:25952177

  10. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth. PMID:26934465

  11. Ungulate malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Thomas J; Asada, Masahito; Jiratanh, Montakan; Ishikawa, Sohta A; Tiawsirisup, Sonthaya; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Namangala, Boniface; Takeda, Mika; Mohkaew, Kingdao; Ngamjituea, Supawan; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Inagaki, Yuji; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Kaewthamasorn, Morakot; Kaneko, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Haemosporida parasites of even-toed ungulates are diverse and globally distributed, but since their discovery in 1913 their characterization has relied exclusively on microscopy-based descriptions. In order to bring molecular approaches to bear on the identity and evolutionary relationships of ungulate malaria parasites, we conducted Plasmodium cytb-specific nested PCR surveys using blood from water buffalo in Vietnam and Thailand, and goats in Zambia. We found that Plasmodium is readily detectable from water buffalo in these countries, indicating that buffalo Plasmodium is distributed in a wider region than India, which is the only area in which buffalo Plasmodium has been reported. Two types (I and II) of Plasmodium sequences were identified from water buffalo and a third type (III) was isolated from goat. Morphology of the parasite was confirmed in Giemsa-reagent stained blood smears for the Type I sample. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequences were isolated and used to infer a phylogeny in which ungulate malaria parasites form a monophyletic clade within the Haemosporida, and branch prior to the clade containing bird, lizard and other mammalian Plasmodium. Thus it is likely that host switching of Plasmodium from birds to mammals occurred multiple times, with a switch to ungulates independently from other mammalian Plasmodium. PMID:26996979

  12. Parasitic Roundworm Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... The eggs or larvae also can enter the human body directly through the skin. With the exception of the parasitic roundworm that causes trichinosis, mature adult roundworms eventually end up or live in human intestines and cause infection and disease. In trichinosis, ...

  13. Ungulate malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Thomas J.; Asada, Masahito; Jiratanh, Montakan; Ishikawa, Sohta A.; Tiawsirisup, Sonthaya; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Namangala, Boniface; Takeda, Mika; Mohkaew, Kingdao; Ngamjituea, Supawan; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Inagaki, Yuji; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Kaewthamasorn, Morakot; Kaneko, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Haemosporida parasites of even-toed ungulates are diverse and globally distributed, but since their discovery in 1913 their characterization has relied exclusively on microscopy-based descriptions. In order to bring molecular approaches to bear on the identity and evolutionary relationships of ungulate malaria parasites, we conducted Plasmodium cytb-specific nested PCR surveys using blood from water buffalo in Vietnam and Thailand, and goats in Zambia. We found that Plasmodium is readily detectable from water buffalo in these countries, indicating that buffalo Plasmodium is distributed in a wider region than India, which is the only area in which buffalo Plasmodium has been reported. Two types (I and II) of Plasmodium sequences were identified from water buffalo and a third type (III) was isolated from goat. Morphology of the parasite was confirmed in Giemsa-reagent stained blood smears for the Type I sample. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequences were isolated and used to infer a phylogeny in which ungulate malaria parasites form a monophyletic clade within the Haemosporida, and branch prior to the clade containing bird, lizard and other mammalian Plasmodium. Thus it is likely that host switching of Plasmodium from birds to mammals occurred multiple times, with a switch to ungulates independently from other mammalian Plasmodium. PMID:26996979

  14. A Passion for Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Englund, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    I knew nothing and had thought nothing about parasites until 1971. In fact, if you had asked me before then, I might have commented that parasites were rather disgusting. I had been at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine for three years, and I was on the lookout for a new project. In 1971, I came across a paper in the Journal of Molecular Biology by Larry Simpson, a classmate of mine in graduate school. Larry's paper described a remarkable DNA structure known as kinetoplast DNA (kDNA), isolated from a parasite. kDNA, the mitochondrial genome of trypanosomatids, is a DNA network composed of several thousand interlocked DNA rings. Almost nothing was known about it. I was looking for a project on DNA replication, and I wanted it to be both challenging and important. I had no doubt that working with kDNA would be a challenge, as I would be exploring uncharted territory. I was also sure that the project would be important when I learned that parasites with kDNA threaten huge populations in underdeveloped tropical countries. Looking again at Larry's paper, I found the electron micrographs of the kDNA networks to be rather beautiful. I decided to take a chance on kDNA. Little did I know then that I would devote the next forty years of my life to studying kDNA replication. PMID:25336639

  15. Parasitic suppressing circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, J. T.; Raposa, F. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A circuit for suppressing parasitic oscillations across an inductor operating in a resonant mode is described. The circuit includes a switch means and resistive means connected serially across the inductor. A unidirectional resistive-capacitive network is also connected across the inductor and to the switch means to automatically render the switch means conducting when inductive current through the inductor ceases to flow.

  16. TISSUE ENGINEERING PERFUSABLE CANCER MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Fong, E.L.; Santoro, M.; Farach-Carson, M.C.; Kasper, F.K.; Mikos, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of fluid flow on cancer progression is currently not well understood, highlighting the need for perfused tumor models to close this gap in knowledge. Enabling biological processes at the cellular level to be modeled with high spatiotemporal control, microfluidic tumor models have demonstrated applicability as platforms to study cell-cell interactions, effect of interstitial flow on tumor migration and the role of vascular barrier function. To account for the multi-scale nature of cancer growth and invasion, macroscale models are also necessary. The consideration of fluid dynamics within tumor models at both the micro- and macroscopic levels may greatly improve our ability to more fully mimic the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24634812

  17. The Haustorium, a Specialized Invasive Organ in Parasitic Plants.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Satoko; Cui, Songkui; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Shirasu, Ken

    2016-04-29

    Parasitic plants thrive by infecting other plants. Flowering plants evolved parasitism independently at least 12 times, in all cases developing a unique multicellular organ called the haustorium that forms upon detection of haustorium-inducing factors derived from the host plant. This organ penetrates into the host stem or root and connects to its vasculature, allowing exchange of materials such as water, nutrients, proteins, nucleotides, pathogens, and retrotransposons between the host and the parasite. In this review, we focus on the formation and function of the haustorium in parasitic plants, with a specific emphasis on recent advances in molecular studies of root parasites in the Orobanchaceae and stem parasites in the Convolvulaceae. PMID:27128469

  18. Malaria diseases and parasites.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, A

    1999-09-01

    The milestones in the discovery of malaria parasites and their relationships with malaria diseases are presented and discussed with particular reference to the contribution of the Italian scientists. Laveran's discovery (1880) of the malaria parasite produced some schepticism among the Roman scientists who were under the influence of Tommasi-Crudeli, the discoverer of the supposed Bacillus malariae. However, Marchiafava and Celli confirmed soon Laveran's observations and, between 1883 and 1885, improved the description of the parasite adding important details. They described, then, the aestivo-autumnal tertian fever as a distinct disease from the 'primaverile' or benign tertian. This work influenced Golgi who went on to analyse the features that distinguish the benign tertian parasite from that of the quartan. The fact that in North Italy the aestivo-autumnal tertian fever was hardly ever found, whereas it was common in the Roman Campagna and the Pontin marshes, explains why it was Celli and Marchiafava and later Bignami and Bastianelli, and Marchiafava and Bignami--but not Golgi--who were committed to work on this pernicious form of malaria. By the early 1890s the Italian scientists came to define the three malaria parasites, presently known as Plasmodium vivax, P. malariae, and P. falciparum, and to associate them with precise anatomo-pathological and clinical features. By the middle 1890s the Italian school was prepared to contribute also to the discovery of the mosquito cycle in human malaria, clearly hypothesized by Bignami in 1896 and experimentally proved in 1898 by Bignami, Bastianelli and Grassi. PMID:10697831

  19. Foodborne and waterborne parasites.

    PubMed

    Pozio, Edoardo

    2003-01-01

    More than 72 species of protozoan and helminth parasites can reach humans by food and water, and most of these infections are zoonoses. Some parasites show a cosmopolitan distribution, others a more restricted distribution due to their complex life cycles, which need the presence of one or more intermediate hosts. Of this large number of pathogens, only Toxoplasma gondii can be transmitted to humans by two different ways, i.e., by cysts present in infected meat and by oocysts contaminating food and water. Eleven helminthic species (Taenia saginata, Taenia solium, Taenia asiatica, Trichinella spiralis, Tr. nativa, Tr. britovi, Tr. pseudospiralis, Tr. murrelli, Tr nelsoni, Tr. papuae and Tr. zimbabwensis) can grow in meat of different animal species and can be transmitted to humans by the consumption of raw meat or meat products. Twenty trematode species, four cestode species and seven nematode species can infect humans through the consumption of raw sea- and/or fresh-water food (fishes, molluscs, frogs, tadpoles, camarons, crayfishes). Six species of Cryptosporidium, Isospora belli, Cyclospora cayetanensis, Giardia duodenalis and Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar can contaminate food and water. Among the helminths, seven trematode species, seven cestode species and five species of nematodes can reach humans by contaminated food and water. Diagnostic and detection methods that can be carried out routinely on food and water samples are available only for few parasites (Cryptosporidium sp., Giardia sp., Anisakidae, Trichinella sp., Taenia sp.), i.e., for parasites which represent a risk to human populations living in industrialised countries. The majority of food and waterborne infections of parasitic origin are related to poverty, low sanitation, and old food habits. PMID:15058817

  20. Stool ova and parasites exam

    MedlinePlus

    Parasites and stool ova exam ... order this test if you have signs of parasites, diarrhea that does not go away, or other ... There are no parasites or eggs in the stool sample. Talk to your health care provider about the meaning of your specific test ...

  1. Ventilation-perfusion imaging in pulmonary papillomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Espinola, D.; Rupani, H.; Camargo, E.E.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Three children with laryngeal papillomas involving the lungs had serial ventilation-perfusion scintigrams to assess results of therapy designed to reduce the bronchial involvement. Different imaging patterns were observed depending on size, number, and location of lesions. In early parenchymal involvement a ventilation-perfusion mismatch was seen. The initial and follow-up studies correlated well with clinical and radiographic findings. This noninvasive procedure is helpful in evaluating ventilatory and perfusion impairment in these patients as well as their response to treatment.

  2. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  3. Companion cropping to manage parasitic plants.

    PubMed

    Pickett, John A; Hamilton, Mary L; Hooper, Antony M; Khan, Zeyaur R; Midega, Charles A O

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic plants, through a range of infestation strategies, can attack crop plants and thereby require management. Because such problems often occur in resource-poor farming systems, companion cropping to manage parasitic plants is an appropriate approach. Many examples of companion cropping for this purpose have been reported, but the use of cattle forage legumes in the genus Desmodium as intercrops has been shown to be particularly successful in controlling the parasitic witchweeds (Striga spp.) that afflict approximately one quarter of sub-Saharan African cereal production. Through the use of this example, the development of effective companion crops is described, together with developments toward widespread adoption and understanding the underlying mechanisms, both for sustainability and ensuring food security, and also for exploitation beyond the cropping systems described here. PMID:20429664

  4. Perfusion lung scan: an aid in detection of lymphangitic carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, S.E.; Tranum, B.L.

    1982-07-15

    Lymphangitic carcinomatosis is usually a late manifestation of metastatic disease. The patient usually presents with cough or dyspnea, and the chest radiograph is often nondiagnostic. Two patients are presented who developed symptoms while on adjuvant chemotherapy. Both had abnormal perfusion lung scans. One had matching ventilation defects; the other a normal ventilation study. Biopsy revealed metastatic carcinoma; in one case tumor was seen in both the pulmonary lymphatics and arterioles; in technique which can speed diagnosis and institution of therapy in lymphangitic carcinomatosis.

  5. Contrast-enhanced diffuse optical tomography of brain perfusion in humans using ICG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermehl, Christina; Schmitz, Christoph; Steinbrink, Jens

    2012-02-01

    Regular monitoring of brain perfusion at the bedside in neurointensive care is desirable. Currently used imaging modalities are not suited for constant monitoring and often require a transport of the patient. Noninvasive near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in combination with an injection of a safe dye (indocyanine green, ICG) could serve as a quasi-continuous brain perfusion monitor. In this work, we evaluate prerequisites for the development of a brain perfusion monitor using continuous wave (cw) NIRS technique. We present results from a high-resolution diffuse optical tomography (HR-DOT) experiment in humans demonstrating the separation of signals from skin from the brain. This technique can help to monitor neurointensive care patients on a regular basis, detecting changes in cortical perfusion in time.

  6. Pressure-driven perfusion culture microchamber array for a parallel drug cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Shinji; Edahiro, Jun-ichi; Kikuchi, Kyoko; Sumaru, Kimio; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2008-08-15

    This article reports a pressure-driven perfusion culture chip developed for parallel drug cytotoxicity assay. The device is composed of an 8 x 5 array of cell culture microchambers with independent perfusion microchannels. It is equipped with a simple interface for convenient access by a micropipette and connection to an external pressure source, which enables easy operation without special training. The unique microchamber structure was carefully designed with consideration of hydrodynamic parameters and was fabricated out of a polydimethylsiloxane by using multilayer photolithography and replica molding. The microchamber structure enables uniform cell loading and perfusion culture without cross-contamination between neighboring microchambers. A parallel cytotoxicity assay was successfully carried out in the 8 x 5 microchamber array to analyze the cytotoxic effects of seven anticancer drugs. The pressure-driven perfusion culture chip, with its simple interface and well-designed microfluidic network, will likely become an advantageous platform for future high-throughput drug screening by microchip. PMID:18553395

  7. Correlation between Dual-Energy and Perfusion CT in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gordic, Sonja; Puippe, Gilbert D; Krauss, Bernhard; Klotz, Ernst; Desbiolles, Lotus; Lesurtel, Mickaël; Müllhaupt, Beat; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To develop a dual-energy contrast media-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) protocol by using time-attenuation curves from previously acquired perfusion CT data and to evaluate prospectively the relationship between iodine enhancement metrics at dual-energy CT and perfusion CT parameters in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and Methods Institutional review board and local ethics committee approval and written informed consent were obtained. The retrospective part of this study included the development of a dual-energy CT contrast-enhanced protocol to evaluate peak arterial enhancement of HCC in the liver on the basis of time-attenuation curves from previously acquired perfusion CT data in 20 patients. The prospective part of the study consisted of an intraindividual comparison of dual-energy CT and perfusion CT data in another 20 consecutive patients with HCC. Iodine density and iodine ratio (iodine attenuation of the lesion divided by iodine attenuation in the aorta) from dual-energy CT and arterial perfusion (AP), portal venous perfusion, and total perfusion (TP) from perfusion CT were compared. Pearson R and linear correlation coefficients were calculated for AP and iodine density, AP and iodine ratio, TP and iodine density, and TP and iodine ratio. Results The dual-energy CT protocol consisted of bolus tracking in the abdominal aorta (threshold, 150 HU; scan delay, 9 seconds). The strongest intraindividual correlations in HCCs were found between iodine density and AP (r = 0.75, P = .0001). Moderate correlations were found between iodine ratio and AP (r = 0.50, P = .023) and between iodine density and TP (r = 0.56, P = .011). No further significant correlations were found. The volume CT dose index (11.4 mGy) and dose-length product (228.0 mGy · cm) of dual-energy CT was lower than those of the arterial phase of perfusion CT (36.1 mGy and 682.3 mGy · cm, respectively). Conclusion A contrast-enhanced dual-energy CT protocol developed

  8. Parasitic interference in nulling interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, A.; Defrère, D.; Danchi, W. C.; Lopez, B.; Absil, O.

    2013-05-01

    Nulling interferometry aims to detect faint objects close to bright stars. Its principle is to produce a destructive interference along the line of sight so that the stellar flux is rejected, while the flux of the off-axis source can be transmitted. In practice, various instrumental perturbations can degrade the nulling performance. Any imperfection in phase, amplitude or polarization produces a spurious flux that leaks to the interferometer output and corrupts the transmitted off-axis flux. One of these instrumental perturbations is the crosstalk phenomenon, which occurs because of multiple parasitic reflections inside transmitting optics, and/or diffraction effects related to beam propagation along finite size optics. It can include a crosstalk of a beam with itself, and a mutual crosstalk between different beams. This can create a parasitic interference pattern, which degrades the intrinsic transmission map - or intensity response - of the interferometer. In this context, we describe how this instrumental effect impairs the performance of a Bracewell interferometer. A simple formalism is developed to derive the corresponding modified intensity response of the interferometer, as a function of the two parameters of interest: the crosstalk level (or contamination rate) and the phase shift between the primary and secondary - parasitic - beams. We then apply our mathematical approach to a few scientific cases, both analytically and using the GENIESIM simulation software, adapted to handle coherent crosstalk. Our results show that a coherent crosstalk level of about 1 per cent implies a 20 per cent drop of the signal-to-noise ratio at most. Careful attention should thus be paid to reduce the crosstalk level inside an interferometric instrument and ensure an instrumental stability that provides the necessary sensitivity through calibration procedures.

  9. Luminal distension as a possible consequence of experimental intestinal perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, David; Hyams, Ashley; Phillips, Sidney

    1974-01-01

    In an experimental jejunal perfusion study, distress in healthy subjects occurred during eight out of 16 perfusions in which intestinal secretion was provoked. Calculation demonstrates the volumetric consequences of inadequate recovery of secretory perfusates, and analysis of the perfusion studies shows that distress was significantly associated with poor recovery of the perfusate. These observations are pertinent to increasing interest in the phenomenon of intestinal fluid secretion. PMID:4435588

  10. Perfusion education and training in Europe.

    PubMed

    Merkle, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Perfusion education and training varies considerably throughout Europe. Unlike in the US, where a common curriculum for perfusion education has been established, each European country has its own education system. This fact is further complicated by a multitude of national languages and cultures. Thus, perfusion education programmes vary, not only in content, but also in their academic levels. This article aims to give a comprehensive overview of the situation in each of the 20 member states of the European Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion (EBCP). The EBCP delegates were polled for a description of the process of training and education of clinical perfusionists in their respective countries. Following the initial delegate poll in 2001, an update of the material was performed in spring 2005. In summary, training of clinical perfusionists in Europe varies considerably between countries. A professional body is necessary to oversee the training process and to guarantee a minimum level of clinical competency for cardiovascular perfusionists. PMID:16485693

  11. Evolutionary Origins of Rhizarian Parasites.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Roberto; Cañas-Duarte, Silvia J; Burki, Fabien; Schwelm, Arne; Fogelqvist, Johan; Dixelius, Christina; González-García, Laura N; Gile, Gillian H; Slamovits, Claudio H; Klopp, Christophe; Restrepo, Silvia; Arzul, Isabelle; Pawlowski, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The SAR group (Stramenopila, Alveolata, Rhizaria) is one of the largest clades in the tree of eukaryotes and includes a great number of parasitic lineages. Rhizarian parasites are obligate and have devastating effects on commercially important plants and animals but despite this fact, our knowledge of their biology and evolution is limited. Here, we present rhizarian transcriptomes from all major parasitic lineages in order to elucidate their evolutionary relationships using a phylogenomic approach. Our results suggest that Ascetosporea, parasites of marine invertebrates, are sister to the novel clade Apofilosa. The phytomyxean plant parasites branch sister to the vampyrellid algal ectoparasites in the novel clade Phytorhiza. They also show that Ascetosporea + Apofilosa + Retaria + Filosa + Phytorhiza form a monophyletic clade, although the branching pattern within this clade is difficult to resolve and appears to be model-dependent. Our study does not support the monophyly of the rhizarian parasitic lineages (Endomyxa), suggesting independent origins for rhizarian animal and plant parasites. PMID:26681153

  12. Parasite host range and the evolution of host resistance.

    PubMed

    Gorter, F A; Hall, A R; Buckling, A; Scanlan, P D

    2015-05-01

    Parasite host range plays a pivotal role in the evolution and ecology of hosts and the emergence of infectious disease. Although the factors that promote host range and the epidemiological consequences of variation in host range are relatively well characterized, the effect of parasite host range on host resistance evolution is less well understood. In this study, we tested the impact of parasite host range on host resistance evolution. To do so, we used the host bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and a diverse suite of coevolved viral parasites (lytic bacteriophage Φ2) with variable host ranges (defined here as the number of host genotypes that can be infected) as our experimental model organisms. Our results show that resistance evolution to coevolved phages occurred at a much lower rate than to ancestral phage (approximately 50% vs. 100%), but the host range of coevolved phages did not influence the likelihood of resistance evolution. We also show that the host range of both single parasites and populations of parasites does not affect the breadth of the resulting resistance range in a naïve host but that hosts that evolve resistance to single parasites are more likely to resist other (genetically) more closely related parasites as a correlated response. These findings have important implications for our understanding of resistance evolution in natural populations of bacteria and viruses and other host-parasite combinations with similar underlying infection genetics, as well as the development of phage therapy. PMID:25851735

  13. Host plant resistance to parasitic weeds; recent progress and bottlenecks.

    PubMed

    Yoder, John I; Scholes, Julie D

    2010-08-01

    Parasitic witchweeds (Striga spp.) and broomrapes (Orobanche and Phelipanche spp.) directly invade the roots of crop plants connecting to the vascular system and abstracting nutrients and water. As a consequence they cause devastating losses in crop yield. Genetic resistance to parasitic weeds is a highly desirable component of any control strategy. Resistance to parasitic plants can occur at different stages of the parasite lifecycle: before attachment to the host, during penetration of the root or after establishment of vascular connections. New studies are beginning to shed light on the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in plant-plant resistance. The first resistance gene to Striga, encoding a CC-NBS-LRR Resistance protein (R) has been identified and cloned suggesting that host plants resist attack from parasitic plants using similar surveillance mechanisms as those used against fungal and bacterial pathogens. It is becoming clear that the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway plays an important role in resistance to parasitic plants and genes encoding pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are upregulated in a number of the resistant interactions. New strategies for engineering resistance to parasitic plants are also being explored, including the expression of parasite-specific toxins in host roots and RNAi to silence parasite genes crucial for development. PMID:20627804

  14. Sensing parasites: Proteomic and advanced bio-detection alternatives.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ovejero, Carlos; Benito-Lopez, Fernando; Díez, Paula; Casulli, Adriano; Siles-Lucas, Mar; Fuentes, Manuel; Manzano-Román, Raúl

    2016-03-16

    Parasitic diseases have a great impact in human and animal health. The gold standard for the diagnosis of the majority of parasitic infections is still conventional microscopy, which presents important limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity and commonly requires highly trained technicians. More accurate molecular-based diagnostic tools are needed for the implementation of early detection, effective treatments and massive screenings with high-throughput capacities. In this respect, sensitive and affordable devices could greatly impact on sustainable control programmes which exist against parasitic diseases, especially in low income settings. Proteomics and nanotechnology approaches are valuable tools for sensing pathogens and host alteration signatures within microfluidic detection platforms. These new devices might provide novel solutions to fight parasitic diseases. Newly described specific parasite derived products with immune-modulatory properties have been postulated as the best candidates for the early and accurate detection of parasitic infections as well as for the blockage of parasite development. This review provides the most recent methodological and technological advances with great potential for bio-sensing parasites in their hosts, showing the newest opportunities offered by modern "-omics" and platforms for parasite detection and control. PMID:26773860

  15. How genomics is contributing to the fight against artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Cravo, Pedro; Napolitano, Hamilton; Culleton, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the malignant malaria parasite, has developed resistance to artemisinin, the most important and widely used antimalarial drug at present. Currently confined to Southeast Asia, the spread of resistant parasites to Africa would constitute a public health catastrophe. In this review we highlight the recent contributions of genomics to our understanding how the parasite develops resistance to artemisinin and its derivatives, and how resistant parasites may be monitored and tracked in real-time, using molecular approaches. PMID:25910626

  16. The role of perfusion bioreactors in bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Diana Alves; Gomide, Viviane; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering has emerged as a possible alternative to current treatments for bone injuries and defects. However, the common tissue engineering approach presents some obstacles to the development of functional tissues, such as insufficient nutrient and metabolite transport and non-homogenous cell distribution. Culture of bone cells in three-dimensional constructs in bioreactor systems is a solution for those problems as it improves mass transport in the culture system. For bone tissue engineering spinner flasks, rotating wall vessels and perfusion systems have been investigated, and based on these, variations that support cell seeding and mechanical stimulation have also been researched. This review aims at providing an overview of the concepts, advantages and future applications of bioreactor systems for bone tissue engineering with emphasis on the design of different perfusion systems and parameters that can be optimized. PMID:23507883

  17. Myocardial perfusion imaging for detection of silent myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, G.A.

    1988-04-21

    Despite the widespread use of the exercise stress test in diagnosing asymptomatic myocardial ischemia, exercise radionuclide imaging remains useful for detecting silent ischemia in numerous patient populations, including those who are totally asymptomatic, those who have chronic stable angina, those who have recovered from an episode of unstable angina or an uncomplicated myocardial infarction, and those who have undergone angioplasty or received thrombolytic therapy. Studies show that thallium scintigraphy is more sensitive than exercise electrocardiography in detecting ischemia, i.e., in part, because perfusion defects occur more frequently than ST depression and before angina in the ischemic cascade. Thallium-201 scintigraphy can be performed to differentiate a true- from a false-positive exercise electrocardiographic test in patients with exercise-induced ST depression and no angina. The development of technetium-labeled isonitriles may improve the accuracy of myocardial perfusion imaging. 11 references.

  18. "Matching" ventilation/perfusion images in fat embolization.

    PubMed

    Skarzynski, J J; Slavin, J D; Spencer, R P; Karimeddini, M K

    1986-01-01

    Forty-eight hours after fracture of the tibia and fibula, a 27-year-old man developed the triad of findings noted in the fat embolism syndrome (neurologic changes, respiratory distress, and petechiae). An initially normal chest-x-ray, which progressed to one of bilateral fluffy diffuse infiltrates, aided in making the diagnosis. Ventilation/perfusion lung images were performed at the time of the radiographic changes and showed "matching" defects. Transcapillary passage of lipid breakdown products was considered to be the cause. While all parts of the lung showed reduced ventilation/perfusion, the upper half of the lung fields was affected more prominently, as opposed to emboli of venous origin, which most frequently involve the lung bases. PMID:3943243

  19. Myocardial perfusion imaging with 201Tl.

    PubMed

    Pagnanelli, Robert A; Basso, Danny A

    2010-03-01

    The object of this review is to provide information about (201)Tl-thallous chloride in radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging. This technique has experienced a recent resurgence because of the shortage of (99m)Tc. After reading this article, the technologist will be able to describe the properties and uptake mechanism of (201)Tl, the procedure for myocardial perfusion imaging with this agent, and the advantages and disadvantages of thallium, compared with the technetium agents. PMID:20159930

  20. Improved exercise myocardial perfusion during lidoflazine therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, W.; Narahara, K.A.; Park, J.

    1983-11-01

    Lidoflazine is a synthetic drug with calcium-channel blocking effects. In a study of 6 patients with severe classic angina pectoris, single-blind administration of lidoflazine was associated with improved myocardial perfusion during exercise as determined by thallium-201 stress scintigraphy. These studies demonstrate that lidoflazine therapy is associated with relief of angina, an increased physical work capacity, and improved regional myocardial perfusion during exercise.

  1. MARveling at parasite invasion.

    PubMed

    Hager, Kristin M; Carruthers, Vern B

    2008-02-01

    Micronemal proteins (MICs) are key mediators of cytoadherence and invasion for Toxoplasma gondii. Emerging evidence indicates that carbohydrate binding facilitates Toxoplasma entry into host cells. The recently solved Toxoplasma MIC1s (TgMIC1s) structure reveals the presence of novel specialized domains that can discriminate between glycan residues. Comparison with Plasmodium erythrocyte-binding antigen 175 reveals that terminal sialic acid residues might represent a shared but tailored invasion pathway among apicomplexan parasites. PMID:18203663

  2. Perfusion visualization and analysis for pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Michael S.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Naidich, David P.; Novak, Carol L.

    2005-04-01

    Given the nature of pulmonary embolism (PE), timely and accurate diagnosis is critical. Contrast enhanced high-resolution CT images allow physicians to accurately identify segmental and sub-segmental emboli. However, it is also important to assess the effect of such emboli on the blood flow in the lungs. Expanding upon previous research, we propose a method for 3D visualization of lung perfusion. The proposed method allows users to examine perfusion throughout the entire lung volume at a single glance, with areas of diminished perfusion highlighted so that they are visible independent of the viewing location. This may be particularly valuable for better accuracy in assessing the extent of hemodynamic alterations resulting from pulmonary emboli. The method also facilitates user interaction and may help identify small peripheral sub-segmental emboli otherwise overlooked. 19 patients referred for possible PE were evaluated by CT following the administration of IV contrast media. An experienced thoracic radiologist assessed the 19 datasets with 17 diagnosed as being positive for PE with multiple emboli. Since anomalies in lung perfusion due to PE can alter the distribution of parenchymal densities, we analyzed features collected from histograms of the computed perfusion maps and demonstrate their potential usefulness as a preliminary test to suggest the presence of PE. These histogram features also offer the possibility of distinguishing distinct patterns associated with chronic PE and may even be useful for further characterization of changes in perfusion or overall density resulting from associated conditions such as pneumonia or diffuse lung disease.

  3. Methodology for ventilation/perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Bajc, Marika; Neilly, Brian; Miniati, Massimo; Mortensen, Jan; Jonson, Björn

    2010-11-01

    Ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) is the scintigraphic technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and many other disorders that affect lung function. Data from recent ventilation studies show that the theoretic advantages of Technegas over radiolabeled liquid aerosols are not restricted to the presence of obstructive lung disease. Radiolabeled macroaggregated human albumin is the imaging agent of choice for perfusion scintigraphy. An optimal combination of nuclide activities and acquisition times for ventilation and perfusion, collimators, and imaging matrix yields an adequate V/Q SPECT study in approximately 20 minutes of imaging time. The recommended protocol based on the patient remaining in an unchanged position during the initial ventilation study and the perfusion study allows presentation of matching ventilation and perfusion slices in all projections as well as in rotating volume images based upon maximum intensity projections. Probabilistic interpretation of V/Q SPECT should be replaced by a holistic interpretation strategy on the basis of all relevant information about the patient and all ventilation/perfusion patterns. PE is diagnosed when there is more than one subsegment showing a V/Q mismatch representing an anatomic lung unit. Apart from pulmonary embolism, other pathologies should be identified and reported, for example, obstructive disease, heart failure, and pneumonia. Pitfalls exist both with respect to imaging technique and scan interpretation. PMID:20920632

  4. Towards sustainable nematode parasite control of livestock.

    PubMed

    Waller, P J

    1993-06-01

    Farmers worldwide have come to expect, and rely almost exclusively on, broad-spectrum anthelmintics to effectively control nematode parasites amongst their livestock. However, the threats of resistance, residues and ecotoxicity are of increasing concern to the future of chemotherapy. It is imperative that sustainable parasite control schemes be developed and implemented which will integrate a range of techniques to minimise anthelmintic use and still maintain high levels of profitability of the farming enterprise. At present, these need to focus on the better use of existing drugs to maximise their effectiveness and minimise the selection for resistance and impact on the environment. New drugs should also be used according to these principles. In the future it is expected that other non-chemotherapeutic options will become available, e.g. helminth vaccines, resistant hosts, biological control, nematode growth regulators, which will revolutionize the current thinking on nematode parasite control of livestock. PMID:8346643

  5. The Pentose Phosphate Pathway in Parasitic Trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Kovářová, Julie; Barrett, Michael P

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic trypanosomatids cause important diseases. Dissecting the biochemistry of these organisms offers a means of discovering targets against which inhibitors may be designed and developed as drugs. The pentose phosphate pathway is a key route of glucose metabolism in most organisms, providing NADPH for use as a cellular reductant and various carbohydrate intermediates used in cellular metabolism. The pathway and its enzymes have been studied in Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and various Leishmania species. Its functions in these parasites are becoming clear. Some enzymes of the pathway are essential to the parasites and have structural features distinguishing them from their mammalian counterparts, and this has stimulated several programs of inhibitor discovery with a view to targeting the pathway with new drugs. PMID:27174163

  6. Hypothermic machine perfusion of the liver and the critical balance between perfusion pressures and endothelial injury.

    PubMed

    't Hart, N A; van der Plaats, A; Leuvenink, H G D; van Goor, H; Wiersema-Buist, J; Verkerke, G J; Rakhorst, G; Ploeg, R J

    2005-01-01

    Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) provides better protection against cold ischemic injury than cold storage in marginal donor kidneys. Also, in liver transplantation a switch from static cold storage to HMP could be beneficial as it would allow longer preservation times and the use of marginal donors. A critical question concerning application of HMP in liver preservation is the crucial balance between perfusion pressure and occurrence of endothelial injury. Rat livers were cold-perfused for 24 hours to study perfusion pressures for both hepatic artery and portal vein. Cold storage served as control and was compared to HMP-preserved livers using a mean arterial perfusion pressure of 25 mm Hg and a portal perfusion pressure of 4 mm Hg (25% of normothermic liver circulation) and to HMP at 50 mm Hg and 8 mm Hg perfusion, respectively (50% of normothermic liver circulation). UW solution was enriched with 14.9 micromol/L propidium iodide (PI) to stain for dead cells and with an additional 13.5 micromol/L acridine orange to stain for viable hepatocytes. A low PI-positive cell count was found using HMP at 25% of normal circulation compared to cold storage. The PI count was high for the HMP group perfused at just 50% of normal circulation compared to HMP at 25% and compared to cold storage. In summary, for liver HMP, perfusion at 25% showed complete perfusion with minimal cellular injury. HMP using perfusion pressures of 25 mm Hg for the hepatic artery and 4 mm Hg for the portal vein is feasible without induction of endothelial injury. PMID:15808634

  7. Discrimination of fish populations using parasites: Random Forests on a 'predictable' host-parasite system.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Del-Olmo, A; Montero, F E; Fernández, M; Barrett, J; Raga, J A; Kostadinova, A

    2010-10-01

    We address the effect of spatial scale and temporal variation on model generality when forming predictive models for fish assignment using a new data mining approach, Random Forests (RF), to variable biological markers (parasite community data). Models were implemented for a fish host-parasite system sampled along the Mediterranean and Atlantic coasts of Spain and were validated using independent datasets. We considered 2 basic classification problems in evaluating the importance of variations in parasite infracommunities for assignment of individual fish to their populations of origin: multiclass (2-5 population models, using 2 seasonal replicates from each of the populations) and 2-class task (using 4 seasonal replicates from 1 Atlantic and 1 Mediterranean population each). The main results are that (i) RF are well suited for multiclass population assignment using parasite communities in non-migratory fish; (ii) RF provide an efficient means for model cross-validation on the baseline data and this allows sample size limitations in parasite tag studies to be tackled effectively; (iii) the performance of RF is dependent on the complexity and spatial extent/configuration of the problem; and (iv) the development of predictive models is strongly influenced by seasonal change and this stresses the importance of both temporal replication and model validation in parasite tagging studies. PMID:20602856

  8. [Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion ratio].

    PubMed

    Guenard, H

    1987-01-01

    The ratios of ventilatory (V) and perfusion (Q) flow rates in the lung are to a large extent responsible for the efficiency of gas exchange. In a simplified monocompartmental model of the lung, the arterial partial pressure of a given gas (Pa) is a function of several factors: the solubility of this gas in blood, its venous and inspired partial pressures and the V/Q ratio. In a multicompartemental model, the mean arterial partial pressure of the gas is a function of the individual values of Pa in each compartment as well as the distribution of V/Q ratios in the lung and the relationship between the concentration and the partial pressure of the gas. The heterogeneity of the distribution of V/Q results from those of both V and Q. Two factors are mainly responsible for this heterogeneity: the gravity and the morphometric characteristics of bronchi and vessels. V/Q ratios are partially controlled at least in low V/Q compartments since hypoxia in these compartments leads to pulmonary arteriolar vasoconstriction. However lungs V/Q ratios range from 0.1 to 10 with a mode around 1. Age, muscular exercise, posture, accelerations, anesthesia, O2 breathing, pulmonary pathology are factors which may alter the distribution of V/Q ratios. PMID:3332289

  9. Infection with parasitic nematodes confounds vaccination efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of IL-12 and IFN-' resulting from exposure to many bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens is responsible for Th1-derived protective responses that also can inhibit development of Th2-cells expressing IL-4-dependent immunity to extra cellular helminth parasites and vice versa. In a ...

  10. Optical analysis of perfusion bioreactor cell concentration in an acoustic separator.

    PubMed

    Gorenflo, Volker M; Chow, Vincent S; Chou, Christopher; Piret, James M

    2005-11-20

    Automated monitoring of cell concentration in perfusion bioprocesses facilitates the maintenance of constant cell specific perfusion rates. However, most on-line measuring devices are relatively complex and foul as the culture progresses. A simple external optical sensor was developed using the transparent glass walls of acoustic separators for automated optical analysis of their contents. For each measurement, the separator was filled by an automated pumping system with triplicate representative bioreactor samples that were optically analyzed and the device returned to perfusion operation within approximately 1 or 2 min. Chinese hamster ovary cell concentrations, ranging from 5 x 10(5) to 2 x 10(7) cells/mL, were highly correlated (R(2) = 0.99) with the 90 degrees scattered light response. Since the device was operated externally, it did not complicate bioreactor sterilization or cleaning. Viability was not optically analyzed, but this information was not required between manual samples of a properly operated perfusion process. Using single-point recalibration based on routine off-line samples, this external optical system remained effective during a 4-month perfusion run, thus providing a non-invasive and easily maintained on-line cell concentration monitoring system to improve the control of perfusion bioreactors. PMID:16155953

  11. Cardiac PET perfusion tracers: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Maddahi, Jamshid; Packard, René R S

    2014-09-01

    PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is increasingly being used for noninvasive detection and evaluation of coronary artery disease. However, the widespread use of PET MPI has been limited by the shortcomings of the current PET perfusion tracers. The availability of these tracers is limited by the need for an onsite ((15)O water and (13)N ammonia) or nearby ((13)N ammonia) cyclotron or commitment to costly generators ((82)Rb). Owing to the short half-lives, such as 76 seconds for (82)Rb, 2.06 minutes for (15)O water, and 9.96 minutes for (13)N ammonia, their use in conjunction with treadmill exercise stress testing is either not possible ((82)Rb and (15)O water) or not practical ((13)N ammonia). Furthermore, the long positron range of (82)Rb makes image resolution suboptimal and its low myocardial extraction limits its defect resolution. In recent years, development of an (18)F-labeled PET perfusion tracer has gathered considerable interest. The longer half-life of (18)F (109 minutes) would make the tracer available as a unit dose from regional cyclotrons and allow use in conjunction with treadmill exercise testing. Furthermore, the short positron range of (18)F would result in better image resolution. Flurpiridaz F 18 is by far the most thoroughly studied in animal models and is the only (18)F-based PET MPI radiotracer currently undergoing clinical evaluation. Preclinical and clinical experience with Flurpiridaz F 18 demonstrated a high myocardial extraction fraction, high image and defect resolution, high myocardial uptake, slow myocardial clearance, and high myocardial-to-background contrast that was stable over time-important properties of an ideal PET MPI radiotracer. Preclinical data from other (18)F-labeled myocardial perfusion tracers are encouraging. PMID:25234078

  12. Sublingual microvascular perfusion is altered during normobaric and hyperbaric hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Milstein, Dan M J; Helmers, Renée; Hackmann, Sanne; Belterman, Charly N W; van Hulst, Robert A; de Lange, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Hyperoxia and hyperbaric oxygen therapy can restore oxygen tensions in tissues distressed by ischemic injury and poor vascularization and is believed to also yield angiogenesis and regulate tissue perfusion. The aim of this study was to develop a model in which hyperoxia-driven microvascular changes could be quantified and to test the hypothesis that microcirculatory responses to both normobaric (NB) and hyperbaric (HB) hyperoxic maneuvers are reversible. Sublingual mucosa microcirculation vessel density, proportion of perfused vessels, vessel diameters, microvascular flow index, macrohemodynamic, and blood gas parameters were examined in male rabbits breathing sequential O2/air mixtures of 21%, 55%, 100%, and return to 21% during NB (1.0bar) and HB (2.5bar) conditions. The results indicate that NB hyperoxia (55% and 100%) produced significant decreases in microvascular density and vascular diameters (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively) accompanied by significant increases in systolic and mean arterial blood pressure (p<0.05, respectively) with no changes in blood flow indices when compared to NB normoxia. HB normoxia/hyperoxia resulted in significant decreases in microvascular density (p<0.05), a transient rise in systolic blood pressure at 55% (p<0.01), and no changes in blood vessel diameter and blood flow indices when compared to NB hyperoxia. All microcirculation parameters reverted back to normal values upon return to NB normoxia. We conclude that NB/HB hyperoxia-driven changes elicit reversible physiological control of sublingual mucosa blood perfusion in the presence of steady cardiovascular function and that the absence of microvascular vasoconstriction during HB conditions suggests a beneficial mechanism associated with maintaining peak tissue perfusion states. PMID:26851620

  13. Cardiac PET Perfusion Tracers: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Maddahi, Jamshid; Packard, René R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is increasingly used for non-invasive detection and evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the widespread use of PET MPI has been limited by shortcomings of the current PET perfusion tracers. Availability of these tracers is limited by need for an on-site (15O water and 13N ammonia) or nearby (13N ammonia) cyclotron or commitment to costly generators (82Rb). Due to short half-lives ranging from 76sec for 82Rb, to 2.1min for 15O water and 10min for 13N ammonia, their use in conjunction with treadmill exercise stress testing is either not possible (82Rb and 15O water) or is not practical (13N ammonia). Furthermore, the long positron range of 82Rb makes image resolution suboptimal and its low extraction limits its defect resolution. In recent years, development of an 18F labeled PET perfusion tracer has gathered considerable interest. The longer half-life of 18F (108 minutes) would make the tracer available as a unit dose from regional cyclotrons and allow use in conjunction with treadmill exercise testing. Furthermore, the short positron range of 18F would result in better image resolution. 18F flurpiridaz is by far the most thoroughly studied in animal models, and is the only F18-based PET MPI radiotracer currently undergoing clinical evaluation. Pre-clinical and clinical experience with 18F flurpiridaz demonstrated a high myocardial extraction fraction, high image and defect resolution, high myocardial uptake, slow myocardial clearance, and high myocardial-to-background contrast which was stable over time – important properties of an ideal PET MPI radiotracer. Pre-clinical data from other 18F labeled myocardial perfusion tracers are encouraging. PMID:25234078

  14. Effects of Steroid Hormones on Sex Differences in Cerebral Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ghisleni, Carmen; Bollmann, Steffen; Biason-Lauber, Anna; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Brandeis, Daniel; Martin, Ernst; Michels, Lars; Hersberger, Martin; Suckling, John

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in the brain appear to play an important role in the prevalence and progression of various neuropsychiatric disorders, but to date little is known about the cerebral mechanisms underlying these differences. One widely reported finding is that women demonstrate higher cerebral perfusion than men, but the underlying cause of this difference in perfusion is not known. This study investigated the putative role of steroid hormones such as oestradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) as underlying factors influencing cerebral perfusion. We acquired arterial spin labelling perfusion images of 36 healthy adult subjects (16 men, 20 women). Analyses on average whole brain perfusion levels included a multiple regression analysis to test for the relative impact of each hormone on the global perfusion. Additionally, voxel-based analyses were performed to investigate the sex difference in regional perfusion as well as the correlations between local perfusion and serum oestradiol, testosterone, and DHEAS concentrations. Our results replicated the known sex difference in perfusion, with women showing significantly higher global and regional perfusion. For the global perfusion, DHEAS was the only significant predictor amongst the steroid hormones, showing a strong negative correlation with cerebral perfusion. The voxel-based analyses revealed modest sex-dependent correlations between local perfusion and testosterone, in addition to a strong modulatory effect of DHEAS in cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. We conclude that DHEAS in particular may play an important role as an underlying factor driving the difference in cerebral perfusion between men and women. PMID:26356576

  15. Diffusion and perfusion MRI of the lung and mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Thomas; Schmid-Bindert, Gerald; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Fink, Christian

    2010-12-01

    With ongoing technical improvements such as multichannel MRI, systems with powerful gradients as well as the development of innovative pulse sequence techniques implementing parallel imaging, MRI has now entered the stage of a radiation-free alternative to computed tomography (CT) for chest imaging in clinical practice. Whereas in the past MRI of the lung was focused on morphological aspects, current MRI techniques also enable functional imaging of the lung allowing for a comprehensive assessment of lung disease in a single MRI exam. Perfusion imaging can be used for the visualization of regional pulmonary perfusion in patients with different lung diseases such as lung cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease, pulmonary embolism or for the prediction of postoperative lung function in lung cancer patients. Over the past years diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) of the thorax has become feasible with a significant reduction of the acquisition time, thus minimizing artifacts from respiratory and cardiac motion. In chest imaging, DW-MRI has been mainly suggested for the characterization of lung cancer, lymph nodes and pulmonary metastases. In this review article recent MR perfusion and diffusion techniques of the lung and mediastinum as well as their clinical applications are reviewed. PMID:20627435

  16. Quantification of myocardial perfusion based on signal intensity of flow sensitized MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeykoon, Sumeda B.

    The quantitative assessment of perfusion is important for early recognition of a variety of heart diseases, determination of disease severity and their cure. In conventional approach of measuring cardiac perfusion by arterial spin labeling, the relative difference in the apparent T1 relaxation times in response to selective and non-selective inversion of blood entering the region of interest is related to perfusion via a two-compartment tissue model. But accurate determination of T1 in small animal hearts is difficult and prone to errors due to long scan times. The purpose of this study is to develop a fast, robust and simple method to quantitatively assess myocardial perfusion using arterial spin labeling. The proposed method is based on signal intensities (SI) of inversion recovery slice-select, non-select and steady-state images. Especially in this method data are acquired at a single inversion time and at short repetition times. This study began by investigating the accuracy of assessment of perfusion using a two compartment system. First, determination of perfusion by T1 and SI were implemented to a simple, two-compartment phantom model. Mathematical model developed for full spin exchange models (in-vivo experiments) by solving a modified Bloch equation was modified to develop mathematical models (T1 and SI) for a phantom (zero spin exchange). The phantom result at different flow rates shows remarkable evidence of accuracy of the two-compartment model and SI, T1 methods: the SI method has less propagation error and less scan time. Next, twelve healthy C57BL/6 mice were scanned for quantitative perfusion assessment and three of them were repeatedly scanned at three different time points for a reproducibility test. The myocardial perfusion of healthy mice obtained by the SI-method, 5.7+/-1.6 ml/g/min, was similar (p=0.38) to that obtained by the conventional T1 method, 5.6+/- 2.3 ml/g/min. The reproducibility of the SI method shows acceptable results: the

  17. Imaging liver-stage malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Kathleen E; Graewe, Stefanie; Heussler, Volker T; Stanway, Rebecca R

    2010-05-01

    Plasmodium parasites, the causative agents of malaria, first invade and develop within hepatocytes before infecting red blood cells and causing symptomatic disease. Because of the low infection rates in vitro and in vivo, the liver stage of Plasmodium infection is not very amenable to biochemical assays, but the large size of the parasite at this stage in comparison with Plasmodium blood stages makes it accessible to microscopic analysis. A variety of imaging techniques has been used to this aim, ranging from electron microscopy to widefield epifluorescence and laser scanning confocal microscopy. High-speed live video microscopy of fluorescent parasites in particular has radically changed our view on key events in Plasmodium liver-stage development. This includes the fate of motile sporozoites inoculated by Anopheles mosquitoes as well as the transport of merozoites within merosomes from the liver tissue into the blood vessel. It is safe to predict that in the near future the application of the latest microscopy techniques in Plasmodium research will bring important insights and allow us spectacular views of parasites during their development in the liver. PMID:20180802

  18. FATTY ACID CHAIN-ELONGATION IN PERFUSED RAT HEART: SYNTHESIS OF STEAROYLCARNITINE FROM PERFUSED PALMITATE

    PubMed Central

    Kerner, Janos; Minkler, Paul E.; Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Rat hearts perfused for up to 60 min in the working mode with palmitate, but not with glucose, resulted in substantial formation of palmitoylcarnitine and stearoylcarnitine. To test whether lipolysis of endogenous lipids was responsible for the increased stearoylcarnitine content or whether some of the perfused palmitate underwent chain elongation, hearts were perfused with hexadecanoic-16,16,16-d3 acid (M+3). The pentafluorophenacyl ester of deuterium labeled stearoylcarnitine had an M+3 (639.4 m/z) compared to the unlabeled M+0 (636.3 m/z) consistent with a direct chain elongation of the perfused palmitate. Furthermore, the near equal isotope enrichment of palmitoyl- (90.2 ± 5.8 %) and stearoylcarnitine (78.0 ± 7.1 %) suggest that both palmitoyl- and stearoyl-CoA have ready access to mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase and that most of the stearoylcarnitine is derived from the perfused palmitate. PMID:17761175

  19. Parasitic Diseases With Cutaneous Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Ash, Mark M; Phillips, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases result in a significant global health burden. While often thought to be isolated to returning travelers, parasitic diseases can also be acquired locally in the United States. Therefore, clinicians must be aware of the cutaneous manifestations of parasitic diseases to allow for prompt recognition, effective management, and subsequent mitigation of complications. This commentary also reviews pharmacologic treatment options for several common diseases. PMID:27621348

  20. [Emerging parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Weibel Galluzzo, C; Wagner, N; Michel, Y; Jackson, Y; Chappuis, F

    2014-05-01

    Travels, migration and circulation of goods facilitate the emergence of new infectious diseases often unrecognized outside endemic areas. Most of emerging infections are of viral origin. Muscular Sarcocystis infection, an acute illness acquired during short trips to Malaysia, and Chagas disease, a chronic illness with long incubation period found among Latin American migrants, are two very different examples of emerging parasitic diseases. The former requires a preventive approach for travelers going to Malaysia and must be brought forth when they return with fever, myalgia and eosinophilia, while the latter requires a proactive attitude to screen Latin American migrant populations that may face difficulties in accessing care. PMID:24908745

  1. [Parasitic dead-end: update].

    PubMed

    Magnaval, J F

    2006-08-01

    Parasitic dead-ends occur when a parasite is unable to establish a permanent interaction in an unnatural host. Although the likelihood of successful reproduction by the pathogenic agent is nul, parasitic dead-end heralds capture of new parasites and therefore expansion of the host range. Angiostrongyliasis due to A. cantonensis or A. costaricensis, anisakiasis, Ancylostoma caninum infection, gnathostomiasis and sparganosis are undoubtedly emerging zoonoses of particular medical interest. Prevention of these diseases relies on abstinence from eating raw meat from invertebrates or cold-blooded (poikilotherm) vertebrates (e.g. used in exotic dishes). These guidelines must be included in recommendations to travelers. PMID:16999036

  2. Coevolutionary interactions between farmers and mafia induce host acceptance of avian brood parasites.

    PubMed

    Abou Chakra, Maria; Hilbe, Christian; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-05-01

    Brood parasites exploit their host in order to increase their own fitness. Typically, this results in an arms race between parasite trickery and host defence. Thus, it is puzzling to observe hosts that accept parasitism without any resistance. The 'mafia' hypothesis suggests that these hosts accept parasitism to avoid retaliation. Retaliation has been shown to evolve when the hosts condition their response to mafia parasites, who use depredation as a targeted response to rejection. However, it is unclear if acceptance would also emerge when 'farming' parasites are present in the population. Farming parasites use depredation to synchronize the timing with the host, destroying mature clutches to force the host to re-nest. Herein, we develop an evolutionary model to analyse the interaction between depredatory parasites and their hosts. We show that coevolutionary cycles between farmers and mafia can still induce host acceptance of brood parasites. However, this equilibrium is unstable and in the long-run the dynamics of this host-parasite interaction exhibits strong oscillations: when farmers are the majority, accepters conditional to mafia (the host will reject first and only accept after retaliation by the parasite) have a higher fitness than unconditional accepters (the host always accepts parasitism). This leads to an increase in mafia parasites' fitness and in turn induce an optimal environment for accepter hosts. PMID:27293783

  3. Coevolution is linked with phenotypic diversification but not speciation in avian brood parasites.

    PubMed

    Medina, Iliana; Langmore, Naomi E

    2015-12-22

    Coevolution is often invoked as an engine of biological diversity. Avian brood parasites and their hosts provide one of the best-known examples of coevolution. Brood parasites lay their eggs in the nests of other species, selecting for host defences and reciprocal counteradaptations in parasites. In theory, this arms race should promote increased rates of speciation and phenotypic evolution. Here, we use recently developed methods to test whether the three largest avian brood parasitic lineages show changes in rates of phenotypic diversity and speciation relative to non-parasitic lineages. Our results challenge the accepted paradigm, and show that there is little consistent evidence that lineages of brood parasites have higher speciation or extinction rates than non-parasitic species. However, we provide the first evidence that the evolution of brood parasitic behaviour may affect rates of evolution in morphological traits associated with parasitism. Specifically, egg size and the colour and pattern of plumage have evolved up to nine times faster in parasitic than in non-parasitic cuckoos. Moreover, cuckoo clades of parasitic species that are sympatric (and share similar host genera) exhibit higher rates of phenotypic evolution. This supports the idea that competition for hosts may be linked to the high phenotypic diversity found in parasitic cuckoos. PMID:26702044

  4. Epigenetic Regulation of Virulence Gene Expression in Parasitic Protozoa.

    PubMed

    Duraisingh, Manoj T; Horn, David

    2016-05-11

    Protozoan parasites colonize numerous metazoan hosts and insect vectors through their life cycles, with the need to respond quickly and reversibly while encountering diverse and often hostile ecological niches. To succeed, parasites must also persist within individuals until transmission between hosts is achieved. Several parasitic protozoa cause a huge burden of disease in humans and livestock, and here we focus on the parasites that cause malaria and African trypanosomiasis. Efforts to understand how these pathogens adapt to survive in varied host environments, cause disease, and transmit between hosts have revealed a wealth of epigenetic phenomena. Epigenetic switching mechanisms appear to be ideally suited for the regulation of clonal antigenic variation underlying successful parasitism. We review the molecular players and complex mechanistic layers that mediate the epigenetic regulation of virulence gene expression. Understanding epigenetic processes will aid the development of antiparasitic therapeutics. PMID:27173931

  5. [How does the apicomplexan parasite Theileria control host cell identity?].

    PubMed

    Marsolier, Justine; Weitzman, Jonathan B

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents, like bacteria or virus, are responsible for a large number of pathologies in mammals. Microbes have developed mechanisms for interacting with host cell pathways and hijacking cellular machinery to change the phenotypic state. In this review, we focus on an interesting apicomplexan parasite called Theileria. Infection by the tick-transmitted T. annulata parasite causes Tropical Theileriosis in North Africa and Asia, and the related T. parva parasite causes East Coast Fever in Sub-Saharan Africa. This parasite is the only eukaryote known to induce the transformation of its mammalian host cells. Indeed, T. annulata and T. parva infect bovine leukocytes leading to transforming phenotypes, which partially mirror human lymphoma pathologies. Theileria infection causes hyperproliferation, invasiveness and escape from apoptosis, presumably through the manipulation of host cellular pathways. Several host-signaling mechanisms have been implicated. Here we describe the mechanisms involved in parasite-induced transformation phenotypes. PMID:25840458

  6. Radionuclide cerebral perfusion imaging: Normal pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, S.J.; Stritzke, P.; Losonczy, M.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Holan, V.; DaCosta, M.; Muzinic, M.

    1991-12-31

    Regional cerebral perfusion imaging using a new class of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I labeled compounds which traverse the blood brain barrier and SPECT imaging technology provides an opportunity to assess this physiologic phenomenon during normal cerebral function and as a manifestation of disease in the central nervous system disease. These applications pose a challenge to the nuclear medicine physician for several reasons: (a) the complex and somewhat unfamiliar functional anatomy, (b) the marked regional differences in regional cerebral perfusion at rest, (c) the lack of understanding of the effect of variations in ambient conditions on regional cerebral perfusion. The difficulties in interpretation are augmented by the display itself. There is frequently no difficulty in differentiating between gray and white matter. However, the frequently used {open_quotes}hot body{close_quotes} color maps, introduce a good deal of contrast, producing displays with apparent interruption in regional cortical perfusion whereas black and white displays provide minimal contrast in the regional cortical activity. The authors sought to define how much variation in regional cerebral perfusion is {open_quotes}allowed{close_quotes} under controlled conditions, to establish a basis to interpret if changes in the environment, psychological interventions, or disease states are accompanied by a measurable change. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Pulmonary perfusion during anesthesia and mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Hedenstierna, G

    2005-06-01

    Cardiac output and the pulmonary perfusion can be affected by anesthesia and by mechanical ventilation. The changes contribute to impeded oxygenation of the blood. The major determinant of perfusion distribution in the lung is the relation between alveolar and pulmonary capillary pressures. Perfusion increases down the lung, due to hydrostatic forces. Since atelectasis is located in dependent lung regions, perfusion of non-ventilated lung parenchyma is common, producing shunt of around 8-10% of cardiac output. In addition, non-gravitational inhomogeneity of perfusion, that can be greater than the gravitational inhomogeneity, adds to impeded oxygenation of blood. Essentially all anaesthetics exert some, although mild, cardiodepressant action with one exception, ketamine. Ketamine may also increase pulmonary artery pressure, whereas other agents have little effect on pulmonary vascular tone. Mechanical ventilation impedes venous return and pushes blood flow downwards to dependent lung regions, and the effect may be striking with higher levels of PEEP. During one-lung anesthesia, there is shunt blood flow both in the non-ventilated and the ventilated lung, and shunt can be much larger in the ventilated lung than thought of. Recruitment manoeuvres shall be directed to the ventilated lung and other physical and pharmacological measures can be taken to manipulate blood flow in one lung anesthesia. PMID:15886595

  8. Perfusion harmonic imaging of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Volker H.; Seidel, Guenter; Wiesmann, Martin; Meyer, Karsten; Aach, Til

    2003-05-01

    The fast visualisation of cerebral microcirculation supports diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular diseases. However, the commonly used CT/MRI-based methods are time consuming and, moreover, costly. Therefore we propose an alternative approach to brain perfusion imaging by means of ultrasonography. In spite of the low signal/noise-ratio of transcranial ultrasound and the high impedance of the skull, flow images of cerebral blood flow can be derived by capturing the kinetics of appropriate contrast agents by harmonic ultrasound image sequences. In this paper we propose three different methods for human brain perfusion imaging, each of which yielding flow images indicating the status of the patient's cerebral microcirculation by visualising local flow parameters. Bolus harmonic imaging (BHI) displays the flow kinetics of bolus injections, while replenishment (RHI) and diminution harmonic imaging (DHI) compute flow characteristics from contrast agent continuous infusions. RHI measures the contrast agents kinetics in the influx phase and DHI displays the diminution kinetics of the contrast agent acquired from the decay phase. In clinical studies, BHI- and RHI-parameter images were found to represent comprehensive and reproducible distributions of physiological cerebral blood flow. For DHI it is shown, that bubble destruction and hence perfusion phenomena principally can be displayed. Generally, perfusion harmonic imaging enables reliable and fast bedside imaging of human brain perfusion. Due to its cost efficiency it complements cerebrovascular diagnostics by established CT/MRI-based methods.

  9. Quantifying Transmission Investment in Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Greischar, Megan A.; Mideo, Nicole; Read, Andrew F.; Bjørnstad, Ottar N.

    2016-01-01

    Many microparasites infect new hosts with specialized life stages, requiring a subset of the parasite population to forgo proliferation and develop into transmission forms. Transmission stage production influences infectivity, host exploitation, and the impact of medical interventions like drug treatment. Predicting how parasites will respond to public health efforts on both epidemiological and evolutionary timescales requires understanding transmission strategies. These strategies can rarely be observed directly and must typically be inferred from infection dynamics. Using malaria as a case study, we test previously described methods for inferring transmission stage investment against simulated data generated with a model of within-host infection dynamics, where the true transmission investment is known. We show that existing methods are inadequate and potentially very misleading. The key difficulty lies in separating transmission stages produced by different generations of parasites. We develop a new approach that performs much better on simulated data. Applying this approach to real data from mice infected with a single Plasmodium chabaudi strain, we estimate that transmission investment varies from zero to 20%, with evidence for variable investment over time in some hosts, but not others. These patterns suggest that, even in experimental infections where host genetics and other environmental factors are controlled, parasites may exhibit remarkably different patterns of transmission investment. PMID:26890485

  10. Quantifying Transmission Investment in Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Greischar, Megan A; Mideo, Nicole; Read, Andrew F; Bjørnstad, Ottar N

    2016-02-01

    Many microparasites infect new hosts with specialized life stages, requiring a subset of the parasite population to forgo proliferation and develop into transmission forms. Transmission stage production influences infectivity, host exploitation, and the impact of medical interventions like drug treatment. Predicting how parasites will respond to public health efforts on both epidemiological and evolutionary timescales requires understanding transmission strategies. These strategies can rarely be observed directly and must typically be inferred from infection dynamics. Using malaria as a case study, we test previously described methods for inferring transmission stage investment against simulated data generated with a model of within-host infection dynamics, where the true transmission investment is known. We show that existing methods are inadequate and potentially very misleading. The key difficulty lies in separating transmission stages produced by different generations of parasites. We develop a new approach that performs much better on simulated data. Applying this approach to real data from mice infected with a single Plasmodium chabaudi strain, we estimate that transmission investment varies from zero to 20%, with evidence for variable investment over time in some hosts, but not others. These patterns suggest that, even in experimental infections where host genetics and other environmental factors are controlled, parasites may exhibit remarkably different patterns of transmission investment. PMID:26890485

  11. Parasitic castration by Xenos vesparum depends on host gender.

    PubMed

    Cappa, Federico; Manfredini, Fabio; Dallai, Romano; Gottardo, Marco; Beani, Laura

    2014-07-01

    Host castration represents a mechanism used by parasites to exploit energy resources from their hosts by interfering with their reproductive development or to extend host lifespan by removing risks associated with reproductive activity. One of the most intriguing groups of parasitic castrators is represented by the insects belonging to the order Strepsiptera. The macroparasite Xenos vesparum can produce dramatic phenotypic alterations in its host, the paper wasp Polistes dominula. Parasitized female wasps have undeveloped ovaries and desert the colony without performing any social task. However, very little attention has been given to the parasitic impact of X. vesparum on the male phenotype. Here, we investigated the effects of this parasite on the sexual behaviour and the morpho-physiology of P. dominula males. We found that, differently from female wasps, parasitized males are not heavily affected by Xenos: they maintain their sexual behaviour and ability to discriminate between female castes. Furthermore, the structure of their reproductive apparatus is not compromised by the parasite. We think that our results, demonstrating that the definition of X. vesparum as a parasitoid does not apply to infected males of P. dominula, provide a new perspective to discuss and maybe reconsider the traditional view of strepsipteran parasites. PMID:24776461

  12. Parasites, immunology of hosts, and host sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Møller, A P; Saino, N

    1994-12-01

    Parasite-mediated sexual selection is reviewed with special emphasis on the bird literature. Choosy females may benefit from choosing parasite-free mates if such males provide better parental care, do not transmit contagious parasites, or provide resistance genes to offspring. There is evidence in support of each of these mechanisms. The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis posits that secondary sexual characters reliably reveal the ability of males to resist parasites due to the immunosuppressive effects of testosterone and other biochemicals. Several aspects of these negative feedback mechanisms are supported by laboratory studies, but evidence from free-living animals is almost completely absent. Corticosterone rather than testosterone may potentially mediate the immunocompetence handicap mechanism. A simple version of the immunocompetence handicap is developed suggesting that body condition of male hosts is a sufficient mediator of the handicap mechanism of reliable sexual signaling. Sexual selection appears to be more intense in sexually dichromatic bird species, and comparative studies using pairwise comparisons of closely related taxa reveal that sexually dichromatic bird species have larger spleens, larger bursa of Fabricius, and higher concentrations of leukocytes than monochromatic species. Parasite-mediated sexual selection is proposed to affect parasite biology by increasing (1) the variance-to-mean ratio in parasite abundance, (2) variance in the intensity of natural selection affecting hosts, and (3) speciation rates among parasites exploiting hosts subject to intense sexual selection as compared to those subject to less intense selection. PMID:7799157

  13. Evolutionary immune response to conserved domains in parasites and aeroallergens.

    PubMed

    Bielory, Brett Phillip; Mainardi, Timothy; Rottem, Menachem

    2013-01-01

    The immune response based on immunoglobulin E (IgE) evolved as a defense against specific parasitic infections. In the absence of active helminthic infections, the immune system has redirected its IgE epitopes toward innocuous environmental antigens. Helminths and aeroallergens have a similar stereotypical IgE response to unique antigens that can not be explained by chance alone. This study was designed to evaluate potential homology between conserved protein domains embedded in parasitic organisms and aeroallergens. Search and retrieval systems for nucleotide and protein sequences (Entrez, BLAST, and National Center for Biotechnology Information) were searched to identify conserved domains between allergens and certain parasites. A total score was developed that correlated positively with homology between compared sequences. Over 2000 domains were examined. We found matches with a high total score (>100) that signified a strong positive correlation between sequences in allergens (n = 30) and parasites (n = 13). Multiple shared conserved domains were identified between parasites and allergens. Parasite-allergen combinations with the most significant homology (greatest total score) were Plasmodium falciparum enolase and Hev b9 (total score, 612), Schistosoma mansoni albumin and Fel d 2 (total score, 991), Ascaris lumbricoides tropomyosin and Ani s3 (total score, 531), and Wuchereria bancrofti trypsin and Blo t3 (138). Homologous conserved domains exist in specific parasites and allergens, consistent with the theory that the human IgE-eosinophil immune response to common allergens is a direct consequence of stimulation by parasitic organisms. PMID:23406942

  14. Parasitism of Dasineura oxycoccana (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in North Central Florida.

    PubMed

    Roubos, Craig R; Liburd, Oscar E

    2013-06-01

    Blueberry gall midge, Dasineura oxycoccana (Johnson), is a key pest of blueberries in Florida. As a larva, this insect feeds in developing flower and leaf buds. Management of D. oxycoccana relies principally on chemical insecticides; however, efficacy is limited because D. oxycoccana is sheltered within the plant during most of its life cycle. Natural enemies, particularly parasitoids, may play an important role in regulating D. oxycoccana populations. To determine the seasonal dynamics and parasitism rates of eulophid and platygastrid wasps parasitizing D. oxycoccana larvae, we sampled D. oxycoccana larvae by collecting infested blueberry leaf buds from a minimally-managed farm in north central Florida. Midge larvae were examined under a microscope to determine parasitism status of host instars. Parasitism rates ranged from 25 to 40% over the 3-yr study. Percent parasitization was significantly higher in third instars than first or second instars. Midge larvae in the centers of leaf buds were significantly less likely to be parasitized than larvae in outer layers of leaf buds. Thirty-seven percent of midge larvae had been parasitized multiple times, suggesting these parasitoids do not discriminate between parasitized and unparasitized hosts. Implications for pesticide use in relation to the conservation of natural enemies and management of D. oxycoccana populations are discussed. PMID:23726050

  15. Prevalence and etiology of intestinal parasites in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Araj, G F; Abdul-Baki, N Y; Hamze, M M; Alami, S Y; Nassif, R E; Naboulsi, M S

    1996-01-01

    As there are no studies done on the prevalence of intestinal parasites in Lebanon since 1967, this study was undertaken to reveal the current patterns of intestinal parasitic infestations in Lebanese patients from two geographic regions: Beirut and Tripoli. Analysis was based on 33,253 stool specimens examined at the American University of Beirut Medical Center (AUH) and 11,611 specimens examined at the Islamic Hospital (IH) in Tripoli over five and three years, respectively. The prevalence of intestinal parasites at AUH and IH were 8.47% and 45.35%, respectively (overall 18%). The prevalence in males vs females was almost the same; being 8.23% vs 8.74%, and 44.67% vs 45.88%, at AUH and IH, respectively. Multiple infections were noted in 8.8% and 3.5% of stool specimens at AUH and IH, respectively. Although 18 different types of parasites were encountered, the most common pathogenic parasites found at AUH vs IH were: Giardia lamblia (20.7% vs 10.5% of parasites found), Entamoeba histolytica (19.41% vs 1.25%), Taenia spp. (6.03% vs 4.08%) and Ascaris lumbricoides (2.09% vs 46.97%). The overall yearly or monthly prevalence of parasites recovered from both hospitals did not show clear seasonal patterns. Compared to developed countries, Lebanon still suffers from a high prevalence and a wide spectrum of intestinal parasites. PMID:9260400

  16. Sex, War, and Disease: The Role of Parasite Infection on Weapon Development and Mating Success in a Horned Beetle (Gnatocerus cornutus)

    PubMed Central

    Demuth, Jeffery P.; Naidu, Amrita; Mydlarz, Laura D.

    2012-01-01

    While parasites and immunity are widely believed to play important roles in the evolution of male ornaments, their potential influence on systems where male weaponry is the object of sexual selection is poorly understood. We experimentally infect larval broad-horned flour beetles with a tapeworm and study the consequent effects on: 1) adult male morphology 2) male-male contests for mating opportunities, and 3) induction of the innate immune system. We find that infection significantly reduces adult male size in ways that are expected to reduce mating opportunities in nature. The sum of our morphological, competition, and immunological data indicate that during a life history stage where no new resources are acquired, males allocate their finite resources in a way that increases future mating potential. PMID:22247759

  17. Host ABC transporter proteins may influence the efficacy of ivermectin and possibly have broader implications for the development of resistance in parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Dooley, L A; Froese, E A; Chung, Y T; Burkman, E J; Moorhead, A R; Ardelli, B F

    2015-10-01

    ABC transporter proteins function to extrude compounds from the cell. These proteins present an obstacle for treatment and for overcoming drug resistance as they are expressed by both host and parasite, and function similarly. The contribution of host ABC proteins to drug efficacy was examined using ivermectin and a Brugia malayi model system. Parallel in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted using equal concentrations of ivermectin. The motilities and fecundity of B. malayi exposed to ivermectin in vitro were significantly lower than those treated in vivo. The higher motilities were correlated with low concentrations of ivermectin in worms extracted from treated hosts. The expression of ABC proteins was significantly higher in worms treated in vitro compared to those treated in vivo as well as in gerbils treated with ivermectin than in non-treated controls. The results suggest that host ABC transporters may influence the efficacy of ivermectin. PMID:26143231

  18. Parasites or Cohabitants: Cruel Omnipresent Usurpers or Creative “Éminences Grises”?

    PubMed Central

    Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Lenzi, Henrique L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents many types of interplays between parasites and the host, showing the history of parasites, the effects of parasites on the outcome of wars, invasions, migrations, and on the development of numerous regions of the globe, and the impact of parasitic diseases on the society and on the course of human evolution. It also emphasizes the pressing need to change the look at the parasitism phenomenon, proposing that the term “cohabitant” is more accurate than parasite, because every living being, from bacteria to mammals, is a consortium of living beings in the pangenome. Even the term parasitology should be replaced by cohabitology because there is no parasite alone and host alone: both together compose a new adaptive system: the parasitized-host or the cohabitant-cohabited being. It also suggests switching the old paradigm based on attrition and destruction, to a new one founded on adaptation and living together. PMID:21785696

  19. Parasites or cohabitants: cruel omnipresent usurpers or creative "éminences grises"?

    PubMed

    Vannier-Santos, Marcos A; Lenzi, Henrique L

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents many types of interplays between parasites and the host, showing the history of parasites, the effects of parasites on the outcome of wars, invasions, migrations, and on the development of numerous regions of the globe, and the impact of parasitic diseases on the society and on the course of human evolution. It also emphasizes the pressing need to change the look at the parasitism phenomenon, proposing that the term "cohabitant" is more accurate than parasite, because every living being, from bacteria to mammals, is a consortium of living beings in the pangenome. Even the term parasitology should be replaced by cohabitology because there is no parasite alone and host alone: both together compose a new adaptive system: the parasitized-host or the cohabitant-cohabited being. It also suggests switching the old paradigm based on attrition and destruction, to a new one founded on adaptation and living together. PMID:21785696

  20. Host-Parasite Interactions from the Inside: Plant Reproductive Ontogeny Drives Specialization in Parasitic Insects

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Thomas; Gidoin, Cindy; von Aderkas, Patrick; Safrana, Jonathan; Candau, Jean-Noël; Chalon, Alain; Sondo, Marion; El Maâtaoui, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Host plant interactions are likely key drivers of evolutionary processes involved in the diversification of phytophagous insects. Granivory has received substantial attention for its crucial role in shaping the interaction between plants and their seed parasites, but fine-scale mechanisms explaining the role of host plant reproductive biology on specialization of seed parasites remain poorly described. In a comparative approach using plant histological techniques, we tested the hypotheses that different seed parasite species synchronize their life cycles to specific stages in seed development, and that the stage they target depends on major differences in seed development programs. In a pinaceous system, seed storage products are initiated before ovule fertilization and the wasps target the ovule’s nucellus during megagametogenesis, a stage at which larvae may benefit from the by-products derived from both secreting cells and dying nucellar cells. In a cupressaceous system, oviposition activity peaks later, during embryogenesis, and the wasps target the ovule’s megagametophyte where larvae may benefit from cell disintegration during embryogenesis. Our cytohistological approach shows for the first time how, despite divergent oviposition targets, different parasite species share a common strategy that consists of first competing for nutrients with developing plant structures, and then consuming these developed structures to complete their development. Our results support the prediction that seed developmental program is an axis for specialization in seed parasites, and that it could be an important parameter in models of their ecological and taxonomic divergence. This study provides the basis for further investigating the possibility of the link between plant ontogeny and pre-dispersal seed parasitism. PMID:26441311

  1. Multiwell cell culture plate format with integrated microfluidic perfusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domansky, Karel; Inman, Walker; Serdy, Jim; Griffith, Linda G.

    2006-01-01

    A new cell culture analog has been developed. It is based on the standard multiwell cell culture plate format but it provides perfused three-dimensional cell culture capability. The new capability is achieved by integrating microfluidic valves and pumps into the plate. The system provides a means to conduct high throughput assays for target validation and predictive toxicology in the drug discovery and development process. It can be also used for evaluation of long-term exposure to drugs or environmental agents or as a model to study viral hepatitis, cancer metastasis, and other diseases and pathological conditions.

  2. Genomics of reproduction in nematodes: prospects for parasite intervention?

    PubMed

    Nisbet, Alasdair J; Cottee, Pauline A; Gasser, Robin B

    2008-02-01

    Understanding reproductive processes in parasitic nematodes has the potential to lead to the informed design of new anthelmintics and control strategies. Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanisms underlying sex determination, gametogenesis and reproductive physiology for most parasitic nematodes. Together with comparative analyses of data for the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, molecular investigations are beginning to provide insights into the processes involved in reproduction and development in parasitic nematodes. Here, we review recent developments, focusing on technological aspects and on molecules associated with sex-specific differences in adult nematodes. PMID:18182326

  3. Investigation of source-detector separation optimization for an implantable perfusion and oxygenation sensor for liver blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, J. S.; Akl, T. J.; Coté, G. L.; Wilson, M. A.; Ericson, M. N.

    2011-03-01

    An implanted system is being developed to monitor transplanted liver health during the critical 7-10 day period posttransplantation. The unit will monitor organ perfusion and oxygen consumption using optically-based probes placed on both the inflow and outflow blood vessels, and on the liver parenchymal surface. Sensing probes are based on a 3- wavelength LED source and a photodiode detector. Sample diffuse reflectance is measured at 735, 805, and 940 nm. To ascertain optimal source-to-photodetector spacing for perfusion measurement in blood vessels, an ex vivo study was conducted. In this work, a dye mixture simulating 80% blood oxygen saturation was developed and perfused through excised porcine arteries while collecting data for various preset probe source-to-photodetector spacings. The results from this study demonstrate a decrease in the optical signal with decreasing LED drive current and a reduction in perfusion index signal with increasing probe spacing. They also reveal a 2- to 4-mm optimal range for blood vessel perfusion probe source-to-photodetector spacing that allows for sufficient perfusion signal modulation depth with maximized signal to noise ratio (SNR). These findings are currently being applied to guide electronic configuration and probe placement for in vivo liver perfusion porcine model studies.

  4. Cardiac tissue engineering using perfusion bioreactor systems

    PubMed Central

    Radisic, Milica; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wang, Yadong; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    This protocol describes tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cell populations on porous scaffolds (in some cases with an array of channels) and bioreactors with perfusion of culture medium (in some cases supplemented with an oxygen carrier). The overall approach is ‘biomimetic’ in nature as it tends to provide in vivo-like oxygen supply to cultured cells and thereby overcome inherent limitations of diffusional transport in conventional culture systems. In order to mimic the capillary network, cells are cultured on channeled elastomer scaffolds that are perfused with culture medium that can contain oxygen carriers. The overall protocol takes 2–4 weeks, including assembly of the perfusion systems, preparation of scaffolds, cell seeding and cultivation, and on-line and end-point assessment methods. This model is well suited for a wide range of cardiac tissue engineering applications, including the use of human stem cells, and high-fidelity models for biological research. PMID:18388955

  5. Perfusion and ventilation of isolated canine lungs

    PubMed Central

    Otto, T. J.; Trenkner, M.; Stopczyk, A.; Gawdziński, M.; Chełstowska, B.

    1968-01-01

    In order to evaluate methods of preserving lungs for use in transplantation, experiments on 28 mongrel dogs were carried out. Two methods were tried—first, mechanical respiration of isolated lungs under deep hypothermia, with the vascular bed filled with blood; and, secondly, the perfusion of isolated lungs with the aid of a modified DeWall's apparatus. Allogenic transplantations of lungs preserved in both ways were carried out. Gasometric and histological examinations of preserved lungs, before and after transplantation, were performed. The best results were obtained with perfusion under hypothermic conditions; ventilation without perfusion resulted in failure. Lung transplantation was successful when, after being preserved, the lung remained unchanged. Major discrepancies between the macroscopic and microscopic findings in preserved lungs were observed. An original classification of the changes occurring in preserved lungs is proposed. PMID:4886091

  6. Perfusion in Britain: the early days.

    PubMed

    Braimbridge, Mark V

    2004-07-01

    Experimental perfusion was largely the province of Germany in the nineteenth century but in the mid-twentieth century the focus of perfusion switched to the USA with the explosive clinical advances of Lillehei, Kirklin and Cooley. British clinical perfusion started with Melrose in 1953 at the Postgraduate Medical School in London but, as in other centres at that time, stopped due to the high mortality. The arrival of hands-on experience of American expertise via returning research fellows and other visitors to the USA enabled the first successful on-going series to begin at the Hammersmith Hospital with Cleland in 1957 and then to spread around the country. The various problems of those early 1950s days are described in the units starting then. PMID:15376765

  7. Evaluation of Face Lift Skin Perfusion and Epinephrine Effect Using Laser Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: Face lift dissections are believed to compromise skin flap circulation, possibly leading to wound healing complications. To reduce blood loss, plastic surgeons commonly inject a solution of local anesthetic that contains epinephrine. However, the effect of surgery on skin perfusion and the degree of vasoconstriction caused by the epinephrine have not been quantitated. Little information is available to guide the selection of epinephrine concentration. Methods: Nine consecutive patients undergoing a deep-plane face lift were asked to participate in this prospective study. All patients consented (inclusion rate, 100%). The SPY Elite Intraoperative Perfusion System was used to quantitate perfusion. Measurements were made at 5 sites on both sides of the face and the neck. A nondissected temple site served as a reference. Three patients received no epinephrine in their local anesthetic solution, 3 patients received 1:800,000 epinephrine, and 3 patients were injected with 1:300,000 epinephrine. Results: All 9 patients were female nonsmokers. There was no reduction in skin perfusion measurements after surgery. In patients treated with 1:800,000 and 1:300,000 epinephrine, 4 sites showed significantly (P < 0.05) decreased perfusion compared with the no-epinephrine group. Combined perfusion data were almost 50% reduced, but the difference was nonsignificant, likely because of the small sample sizes. One patient developed a hematoma. Two of the 3 patients who received no epinephrine developed extensive bruising. Conclusions: A deep-plane face lift dissection does not impair skin flap perfusion. Both 1:300,000 epinephrine and 1:800,000 epinephrine concentrations are effective in producing intraoperative vasoconstriction. PMID:26495197

  8. Parasitation of the parasitic wasp Ephedrus Persicae(Frogatt) on the rosy apple aphid Dysaphis Plantaginea (Passerini).

    PubMed

    Peusens, G; Buntinx, L; Gobin, B

    2006-01-01

    The rosy apple aphid Dysaphis plantaginea is one of the most important leaf sucking pests in pome fruit. As damage, caused by an infestation of a relatively small number of fundatrices in spring, easily exceeds the economic threshold level, pest management is crucial. Besides the use of IPM-compatible pesticides, natural enemies (ladybird beetles, parasitic wasps, saw flies...) can play an additional role in controlling aphids. In Europe, the solitary endoparasitoid Ephedrus persicae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae) is the dominant parasitic wasp attacking rosy apple aphid. As this parasitoid develops later than its host, control is determined by the population density and the parasitising efficiency of the wasp. The population increase within a season is determined by generation turnover and parasitizing capacity, a factor poorly understood in E. persicae. To be able to estimate the number of wasps required for successful control the parasitic behaviour was studied in semi-field circumstances. Artificially infested colonies of rosy apple aphid on apple trees grown in a greenhouse, were covered with cages of gauze in which young, mated female parasitic wasps were released. The number of aphids (alatae, apterae and mummies) as well as the number of adult parasitic wasps were recorded weekly until the end of infestation or parasitation. This test method allowed a comparison of the parasitizing efficacy of Ephedrus with that of the well-studied parasitoid Aphelinus mali (Haldeman), that efficiently controls the woolly aphid Eriosoma lanigerum (Hausmann). PMID:17385502

  9. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: the evidence.

    PubMed

    Underwood, S R; Anagnostopoulos, C; Cerqueira, M; Ell, P J; Flint, E J; Harbinson, M; Kelion, A D; Al-Mohammad, A; Prvulovich, E M; Shaw, L J; Tweddel, A C

    2004-02-01

    This review summarises the evidence for the role of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It is the product of a consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society and is endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists. It was used to inform the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence in their appraisal of MPS in patients with chest pain and myocardial infarction. MPS is a well-established, non-invasive imaging technique with a large body of evidence to support its effectiveness in the diagnosis and management of angina and myocardial infarction. It is more accurate than the exercise ECG in detecting myocardial ischaemia and it is the single most powerful technique for predicting future coronary events. The high diagnostic accuracy of MPS allows reliable risk stratification and guides the selection of patients for further interventions, such as revascularisation. This in turn allows more appropriate utilisation of resources, with the potential for both improved clinical outcomes and greater cost-effectiveness. Evidence from modelling and observational studies supports the enhanced cost-effectiveness associated with MPS use. In patients presenting with stable or acute chest pain, strategies of investigation involving MPS are more cost-effective than those not using the technique. MPS also has particular advantages over alternative techniques in the management of a number of patient subgroups, including women, the elderly and those with diabetes, and its use will have a favourable impact on cost-effectiveness in these groups. MPS is already an integral part of many clinical guidelines for the investigation and management of angina and myocardial infarction. However, the technique is underutilised in the UK, as judged by the inappropriately long waiting times and by

  10. Blood parasites in North American waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.

    1968-01-01

    One thing seems to stand out in the overall knowledge we have of the blood parasites of waterfowl, as previously noted by Herman and Wehr, (1954): the greatest potential of losses is in the younger age groups, usually those birds 5-10 weeks old. In Leucocytozoon infections, death occurs as early as the first or second week of the bird's life. As a conclusion to this presentation, I wish to emphasize that there are many gaps in our knowledge of these parasites and that the answers are to be obtained by further studies in the young birds. Data obtained from studies of birds shot by hunters or from specimens taken during fall or winter banding operations can be expected to be far less rewarding and significanf than studies of goslings and ducklings. We need much more knowledge of these parasites and their vectors and other relationships before we can develop management procedures to combat or contain them. It will require many more studies in depth to achieve this goal, but the facts are there waiting to be uncovered. These parasites will have to be regulated along with breeding habitat, hunter take, and other factors that all add up to maintenance and management of waterfowl.

  11. Immunodiagnosis of parasitic diseases with synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Noya, O; Patarroyo, M E; Guzmán, F; Alarcón de Noya, B

    2003-08-01

    Parasitic diseases remain as a major public health problem worldwide, not only based on their historically high morbidity and mortality rates, but also because risk factors associated with their transmission are increasing. Laboratory diagnosis and particularly immunodiagnosis is a basic tool for the demonstration, clinical management and control of these infections. Classically, the serological tests for the detection of antibodies or antigens are based on the use of crude and purified antigens. Synthetic peptides have opened a new field and perspectives, as the source of pure epitopes and molecules for diagnosis of malaria, Chagas' disease, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, hidatidosis, cysticercosis and fasciolosis based on the detection of antibodies and circulating antigens. Herein, are critically reviewed the relevant advances and applications of the synthetic peptides on immunodiagnosis of parasitic diseases. A variety of sequences, constructs (monomers, polymers, MAPs), immunological methods and samples have been used, demonstrating their diagnostic potential. However, in most parasitic infections it is necessary to use more than a single peptide in order to avoid the genetic restriction against certain epitopes, as well as to test them in well characteized groups of patients, in order to confirm their sensitivity and specificity. The concept of multidiagnosis with synthetic peptides, using a novel multi-dot blot assay is introduced. Finally, the chemical imitation of antigens, offers a tremendous posibilities in the diagnosis of parasitic infections in developing countries since this strategy is cheaper, simpler, reproducible, useful for large scale testing and in most cases, specific and sensitive. PMID:14529537

  12. Imported parasitic infections in Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Dakić, Z.; Nikolić, A.; Lavadinović, L.; Pelemiš, M.; Klun, I.; Dulović, O.; Milošević, B.; Stevanović, G.; Ofori-Belić, I.; Poluga, J.; Pavlović, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Travel to the tropics is associated with a risk of parasitic infection, which is increasing in parallel with the rise in travel to these areas. We thus examined the prevalence and trend in the occurrence of parasitic infections in Serbian travelers. Methods A retrospective analysis of the medical records of all travelers returning from tropical and subtropical areas, who presented at the Institute for Infectious and Tropical Diseases in Belgrade between January 2001 and January 2008, was performed. Results Of a total of 2440 travelers, 169 (6.9%) were diagnosed with a parasitic infection, including malaria in 79, intestinal parasites in 84 (pathogenic species in 30 and non-pathogenic in 54), filariasis in four, and visceral leishmaniasis and fascioliasis in one patient each. Importantly, of the whole series only 583 (23.9%) were symptomatic, of which 19.4% were found to be infected with a parasite. The single pathogenic parasite occurring in asymptomatic patients was Giardia intestinalis. Conclusions Parasitic infection causing symptomatic disease among travelers returning from tropical areas to Serbia is not infrequent. In view of the expected increase in travel to the tropics, diagnostic protocols for tropical parasitic diseases should take these data into account. PMID:24466436

  13. NLR proteins and parasitic disease.

    PubMed

    Clay, Gwendolyn M; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S; Wilson, Mary E

    2014-08-01

    Parasitic diseases are a serious global health concern. Many of the most common and most severe parasitic diseases, including Chagas' disease, leishmaniasis, and schistosomiasis, are also classified as neglected tropical diseases and are comparatively less studied than infectious diseases prevalent in high income nations. The NLRs (nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich-repeat-containing proteins) are cytosolic proteins known to be involved in pathogen detection and host response. The role of NLRs in the host response to parasitic infection is just beginning to be understood. The NLR proteins NOD1 and NOD2 have been shown to contribute to immune responses during Trypanosoma cruzi infection, Toxoplasma gondii infection, and murine cerebral malaria. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by T. cruzi and Leishmania amazonensis but also induces pathology during infection with schistosomes or malaria. Both the NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasomes respond to T. gondii infection. The NLRs may play crucial roles in human immune responses during parasitic infection, usually acting as innate immune sensors and driving the inflammatory response against invading parasites. However, this inflammatory response can either kill the invading parasite or be responsible for destructive pathology. Therefore, understanding the role of the NLR proteins will be critical to understanding the host defense against parasites as well as the fine balance between homeostasis and parasitic disease. PMID:24989828

  14. Extracellular vesicles in parasitic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marcilla, Antonio; Martin-Jaular, Lorena; Trelis, Maria; de Menezes-Neto, Armando; Osuna, Antonio; Bernal, Dolores; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Almeida, Igor C.; del Portillo, Hernando A.

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic diseases affect billions of people and are considered a major public health issue. Close to 400 species are estimated to parasitize humans, of which around 90 are responsible for great clinical burden and mortality rates. Unfortunately, they are largely neglected as they are mainly endemic to poor regions. Of relevance to this review, there is accumulating evidence of the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in parasitic diseases, acting both in parasite–parasite inter-communication as well as in parasite–host interactions. EVs participate in the dissemination of the pathogen and play a role in the regulation of the host immune systems. Production of EVs from parasites or parasitized cells has been described for a number of parasitic infections. In this review, we provide the most relevant findings of the involvement of EVs in intercellular communication, modulation of immune responses, involvement in pathology, and their potential as new diagnostic tools and therapeutic agents in some of the major human parasitic pathogens. PMID:25536932

  15. Parasitic Weeds, a Scientific Challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent issue of the SCI journal Pest Management Science (May, 2009) was devoted to an overview of the problem of parasitic weeds and to the research that is being done to alleviate it. These papers are from an OECD-sponsored conference entitled Managing Parasitic Weeds that recently brought the b...

  16. Economics of gastrointestinal parasitism of cattle.

    PubMed

    Corwin, R M

    1997-11-01

    Understandably, cattle are raised for profit, as beef and/or dairy. Anything that negates that equation results in a loss to the producer and to the livestock economy. Thus, parasites negatively affect the economy of the industry. Worldwide, gastrointestinal nematode parasites, especially Ostertagia ostertagi, and those of the respiratory tract (Dictyocaulus viviparus) have a potentially major impact on herd health. In the past 10-15 years, anthelmintic (AH) drug development and the strategic use of AH have positively balanced the economic equation, so that overall, parasitism in cattle is often observed or determined to be subclinical or economical. Other control measures, such as better pasture management, are also being developed to enhance herd health and the cattle economy. The determination of the economic impact of parasitism has thus become less apparent, to the extent that measures, such as performance parameters, must be used to measure differences between treated and untreated animals or herds. These include weight gain, reproduction, lactation and forage use. To determine the effectiveness of control measures, field trials are designed to measure these parameters by the demonstration of improved performance. Because these trials are conducted in a competitive mode, results are often debated by competitors and by the scientific community because of study design. Variables must then be taken into consideration in the interpretation of results. It is now well known that, with the generation of new AH and appropriately-timed administration, parasitism of well-managed herds has been reduced to subclinical levels. Thus, we are now in the process of fine-tuning the positive effect of these control measures for enhanced production. Understandably, beef and dairy producers have 'production of high quality commodities' at a cost-effective level as a common goal. Successful cattlemen calculate expenditures and income by line item including veterinary expenses and

  17. Effects of laser acupuncture on blood perfusion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-ju; Zeng, Chang-chun; Liu, Han-ping; Liu, Song-hao; Liu, Liang-gang

    2006-09-01

    Based on Pennes equation, the influences of the intensity and the impulse frequency of laser acupuncture on the point tissues' blood flow perfusion rate are discussed. We find that the blood perfusion rate of point tissue increases with the intensity of laser acupuncture increasing. After impulse laser acupuncture the point tissue blood perfusion rate increase little, but after continuum laser acupuncture the point tissues blood perfusion rate increase much.

  18. Navigating parasite webs and parasite flow: emerging and re-emerging parasitic zoonoses of wildlife origin.

    PubMed

    Polley, Lydden

    2005-10-01

    Wildlife are now recognised as an important source of emerging human pathogens, including parasites. This paper discusses the linkages between wildlife, people, zoonotic parasites and the ecosystems in which they co-exist, revisits definitions for 'emerging' and 're-emerging', and lists zoonotic parasites that can be acquired from wildlife including, for some, estimates of the associated global human health burdens. The paper also introduces the concepts of 'parasite webs' and 'parasite flow', provides a context for parasites, relative to other infectious agents, as causes of emerging human disease, and discusses drivers of disease emergence and re-emergence, especially changes in biodiversity and climate. Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the Caribbean and the southern United States, Baylisascaris procyonis in California and Georgia, Plasmodium knowlesi in Sarawak, Malaysia, Human African Trypanosomiasis, Sarcoptes scabiei in carnivores, and Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Toxoplasma in marine ecosystems are presented as examples of wildlife-derived zoonotic parasites of particular recent interest. An ecological approach to disease is promoted, as is a need for an increased profile for this approach in undergraduate and graduate education in the health sciences. Synergy among scientists and disciplines is identified as critical for the study of parasites and parasitic disease in wildlife populations. Recent advances in techniques for the investigation of parasite fauna of wildlife are presented and monitoring and surveillance systems for wildlife disease are discussed. Some of the limitations inherent in predictions for the emergence and re-emergence of infection and disease associated with zoonotic parasites of wildlife are identified. The importance of public awareness and public education in the prevention and control of emerging and re-emerging zoonotic infection and disease are emphasised. Finally, some thoughts for the future are presented. PMID:16168994

  19. Haustorial Hairs Are Specialized Root Hairs That Support Parasitism in the Facultative Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kei; Toyooka, Kiminori

    2016-01-01

    A haustorium is the unique organ that invades host tissues and establishes vascular connections. Haustorium formation is a key event in parasitism, but its underlying molecular basis is largely unknown. Here, we use Phtheirospermum japonicum, a facultative root parasite in the Orobanchaceae, as a model parasitic plant. We performed a forward genetic screen to identify mutants with altered haustorial morphologies. The development of the haustorium in P. japonicum is induced by host-derived compounds such as 2,6-dimethoxy-p-benzoquinone. After receiving the signal, the parasite root starts to swell to develop a haustorium, and haustorial hairs proliferate to densely cover the haustorium surface. We isolated mutants that show defects in haustorial hair formation and named them haustorial hair defective (hhd) mutants. The hhd mutants are also defective in root hair formation, indicating that haustorial hair formation is controlled by the root hair development program. The internal structures of the haustoria in the hhd mutants are similar to those of the wild type, indicating that the haustorial hairs are not essential for host invasion. However, all the hhd mutants form fewer haustoria than the wild type upon infection of the host roots. The number of haustoria is restored when the host and parasite roots are forced to grow closely together, suggesting that the haustorial hairs play a role in stabilizing the host-parasite association. Thus, our study provides genetic evidence for the regulation and function of haustorial hairs in the parasitic plant. PMID:26712864

  20. Can parasites halt the invader? Mermithid nematodes parasitizing the yellow-legged Asian hornet in France

    PubMed Central

    Zuccon, Dario; Rome, Quentin; Muller, Franck; Poinar Jr, George O.; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction in France 10 years ago, the yellow-legged Asian bee-hawking hornet Vespa velutina has rapidly spread to neighboring countries (Spain, Portugal, Belgium, Italy, and Germany), becoming a new threat to beekeeping activities. While introduced species often leave behind natural enemies from their original home, which benefits them in their new environment, they can also suffer local recruitment of natural enemies. Three mermithid parasitic subadults were obtained from V. velutina adults in 2012, from two French localities. However, these were the only parasitic nematodes reported up to now in Europe, in spite of the huge numbers of nests destroyed each year and the recent examination of 33,000 adult hornets. This suggests that the infection of V. velutina by these nematodes is exceptional. Morphological criteria assigned the specimens to the genus Pheromermis and molecular data (18S sequences) to the Mermithidae, due to the lack of Pheromermis spp. sequences in GenBank. The species is probably Pheromermis vesparum, a parasite of social wasps in Europe. This nematode is the second native enemy of Vespa velutina recorded in France, after a conopid fly whose larvae develop as internal parasitoids of adult wasps and bumblebees. In this paper, we provide arguments for the local origin of the nematode parasite and its limited impact on hornet colony survival. We also clarify why these parasites (mermithids and conopids) most likely could not hamper the hornet invasion nor be used in biological control programs against this invasive species. PMID:26038716

  1. Can parasites halt the invader? Mermithid nematodes parasitizing the yellow-legged Asian hornet in France.

    PubMed

    Villemant, Claire; Zuccon, Dario; Rome, Quentin; Muller, Franck; Poinar, George O; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction in France 10 years ago, the yellow-legged Asian bee-hawking hornet Vespa velutina has rapidly spread to neighboring countries (Spain, Portugal, Belgium, Italy, and Germany), becoming a new threat to beekeeping activities. While introduced species often leave behind natural enemies from their original home, which benefits them in their new environment, they can also suffer local recruitment of natural enemies. Three mermithid parasitic subadults were obtained from V. velutina adults in 2012, from two French localities. However, these were the only parasitic nematodes reported up to now in Europe, in spite of the huge numbers of nests destroyed each year and the recent examination of 33,000 adult hornets. This suggests that the infection of V. velutina by these nematodes is exceptional. Morphological criteria assigned the specimens to the genus Pheromermis and molecular data (18S sequences) to the Mermithidae, due to the lack of Pheromermis spp. sequences in GenBank. The species is probably Pheromermis vesparum, a parasite of social wasps in Europe. This nematode is the second native enemy of Vespa velutina recorded in France, after a conopid fly whose larvae develop as internal parasitoids of adult wasps and bumblebees. In this paper, we provide arguments for the local origin of the nematode parasite and its limited impact on hornet colony survival. We also clarify why these parasites (mermithids and conopids) most likely could not hamper the hornet invasion nor be used in biological control programs against this invasive species. PMID:26038716

  2. Cross-talk in host-parasite associations: What do past and recent proteomics approaches tell us?

    PubMed

    Chetouhi, Chérif; Panek, Johan; Bonhomme, Ludovic; ElAlaoui, Hicham; Texier, Catherine; Langin, Thierry; de Bekker, Charissa; Urbach, Serge; Demettre, Edith; Missé, Dorothée; Holzmuller, Philippe; Hughes, David P; Zanzoni, Andreas; Brun, Christine; Biron, David G

    2015-07-01

    A cross-talk in host-parasite associations begins when a host encounters a parasite. For many host-parasite relationships, this cross-talk has been taking place for hundreds of millions of years. The co-evolution of hosts and parasites, the familiar 'arms race' results in fascinating adaptations. Over the years, host-parasite interactions have been studied extensively from both the host and parasitic point of view. Proteomics studies have led to new insights into host-parasite cross-talk and suggest that the molecular strategies used by parasites attacking animals and plants share many similarities. Likewise, animals and plants use several common molecular tactics to counter parasite attacks. Based on proteomics surveys undertaken since the post-genomic era, a synthesis is presented on the molecular strategies used by intra- and extracellular parasites to invade and create the needed habitat for growth inside the host, as well as strategies used by hosts to counter these parasite attacks. Pitfalls in deciphering host-parasite cross-talk are also discussed. To conclude, helpful advice is given with regard to new directions that are needed to discover the generic and specific molecular strategies used by the host against parasite invasion as well as by the parasite to invade, survive, and grow inside their hosts, and to finally discover parasitic molecular signatures associated with their development. PMID:25913042

  3. A patient-specific visualization tool for comprehensive analysis of coronary CTA and perfusion MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirisli, H. A.; Gupta, V.; Kirschbaum, S.; Neefjes, L.; van Geuns, R. J.; Mollet, N.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Reiber, J. H. C.; van Walsum, T.; Niessen, W. J.

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion imaging (CMR) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) are widely used to assess heart disease. CMR is used to measure the global and regional myocardial function and to evaluate the presence of ischemia; CTA is used for diagnosing coronary artery disease, such as coronary stenoses. Nowadays, the hemodynamic significance of coronary artery stenoses is determined subjectively by combining information on myocardial function with assumptions on coronary artery territories. As the anatomy of coronary arteries varies greatly between individuals, we developed a patient-specific tool for relating CTA and perfusion CMR data. The anatomical and functional information extracted from CTA and CMR data are combined into a single frame of reference. Our graphical user interface provides various options for visualization. In addition to the standard perfusion Bull's Eye Plot (BEP), it is possible to overlay a 2D projection of the coronary tree on the BEP, to add a 3D coronary tree model and to add a 3D heart model. The perfusion BEP, the 3D-models and the CTA data are also interactively linked. Using the CMR and CTA data of 14 patients, our tool directly established a spatial correspondence between diseased coronary artery segments and myocardial regions with abnormal perfusion. The location of coronary stenoses and perfusion abnormalities were visualized jointly in 3D, thereby facilitating the study of the relationship between the anatomic causes of a blocked artery and the physiological effects on the myocardial perfusion. This tool is expected to improve diagnosis and therapy planning of early-stage coronary artery disease.

  4. Impaired microcirculatory perfusion in a rat model of cardiopulmonary bypass: the role of hemodilution.

    PubMed

    Koning, Nick J; de Lange, Fellery; Vonk, Alexander B A; Ahmed, Yunus; van den Brom, Charissa E; Bogaards, Sylvia; van Meurs, Matijs; Jongman, Rianne M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Begieneman, Mark P V; Niessen, Hans W; Baufreton, Christophe; Boer, Christa

    2016-03-01

    Although hemodilution is attributed as the main cause of microcirculatory impairment during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), this relationship has never been investigated. We investigated the distinct effects of hemodilution with or without CPB on microvascular perfusion and subsequent renal tissue injury in a rat model. Male Wistar rats (375-425 g) were anesthetized, prepared for cremaster muscle intravital microscopy, and subjected to CPB (n = 9), hemodilution alone (n = 9), or a sham procedure (n = 6). Microcirculatory recordings were performed at multiple time points and analyzed for perfusion characteristics. Kidney and lung tissue were investigated for mRNA expression for genes regulating inflammation and endothelial adhesion molecule expression. Renal injury was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Hematocrit levels dropped to 0.24 ± 0.03 l/l and 0.22 ± 0.02 l/l after onset of hemodilution with or without CPB. Microcirculatory perfusion remained unaltered in sham rats. Hemodilution alone induced a 13% decrease in perfused capillaries, after which recovery was observed. Onset of CPB reduced the perfused capillaries by 40% (9.2 ± 0.9 to 5.5 ± 1.5 perfused capillaries per microscope field; P < 0.001), and this reduction persisted throughout the experiment. Endothelial and inflammatory activation and renal histological injury were increased after CPB compared with hemodilution or sham procedure. Hemodilution leads to minor and transient disturbances in microcirculatory perfusion, which cannot fully explain impaired microcirculation following cardiopulmonary bypass. CPB led to increased renal injury and endothelial adhesion molecule expression in the kidney and lung compared with hemodilution. Our findings suggest that microcirculatory impairment during CPB may play a role in the development of kidney injury. PMID:26747506

  5. The relationship between red blood cell deformability metrics and perfusion of an artificial microvascular network

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Jose M.; Nielsen, Nathan D.; Vignes, Seth M.; Chen, Tanya G.; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of red blood cells (RBC) to undergo a wide range of deformations while traversing the microvasculature is crucial for adequate perfusion. Interpretation of RBC deformability measurements performed in vitro in the context of microvascular perfusion has been notoriously difficult. This study compares the measurements of RBC deformability performed using micropore filtration and ektacytometry with the RBC ability to perfuse an artificial microvascular network (AMVN). Human RBCs were collected from healthy consenting volunteers, leukoreduced, washed and exposed to graded concentrations (0% – 0.08%) of glutaraldehyde (a non-specific protein cross-linker) and diamide (a spectrin-specific protein cross-linker) to impair the deformability of RBCs. Samples comprising cells with two different levels of deformability were created by adding non-deformable RBCs (hardened by exposure to 0.08% glutaraldehyde) to the sample of normal healthy RBCs. Ektacytometry indicated a nearly linear decline in RBC deformability with increasing glutaraldehyde concentration. Micropore filtration showed a significant reduction only for concentrations of glutaraldehyde higher than 0.04%. Neither micropore filtration nor ektacytometry measurements could accurately predict the AMVN perfusion. Treatment with diamide reduced RBC deformability as indicated by ektacytometry, but had no significant effect on either micropore filtration or the AMVN perfusion. Both micropore filtration and ektacytometry showed a linear decline in effective RBC deformability with increasing fraction of non-deformable RBCs in the sample. The corresponding decline in the AMVN perfusion plateaued above 50%, reflecting the innate ability of blood flow in the microvasculature to bypass occluded capillaries. Our results suggest that in vitro measurements of RBC deformability performed using either micropore filtration or ektacytometry may not represent the ability of same RBCs to perfuse microvascular networks

  6. Simultaneous detection of landmarks and key-frame in cardiac perfusion MRI using a joint spatial-temporal context model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoguang; Xue, Hui; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Guetter, Christoph; Kellman, Peter; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Arai, Andrew; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Littmann, Arne; Georgescu, Bogdan; Guehring, Jens

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proven clinical significance in diagnosis of heart diseases. However, analysis of perfusion data is time-consuming, where automatic detection of anatomic landmarks and key-frames from perfusion MR sequences is helpful for anchoring structures and functional analysis of the heart, leading toward fully automated perfusion analysis. Learning-based object detection methods have demonstrated their capabilities to handle large variations of the object by exploring a local region, i.e., context. Conventional 2D approaches take into account spatial context only. Temporal signals in perfusion data present a strong cue for anchoring. We propose a joint context model to encode both spatial and temporal evidence. In addition, our spatial context is constructed not only based on the landmark of interest, but also the landmarks that are correlated in the neighboring anatomies. A discriminative model is learned through a probabilistic boosting tree. A marginal space learning strategy is applied to efficiently learn and search in a high dimensional parameter space. A fully automatic system is developed to simultaneously detect anatomic landmarks and key frames in both RV and LV from perfusion sequences. The proposed approach was evaluated on a database of 373 cardiac perfusion MRI sequences from 77 patients. Experimental results of a 4-fold cross validation show superior landmark detection accuracies of the proposed joint spatial-temporal approach to the 2D approach that is based on spatial context only. The key-frame identification results are promising.

  7. Early detection of microcirculatory perfusion changes with a high resolution, real time laser doppler imaging camera–frostbite case study

    PubMed Central

    Erba, Paolo; Harbi, Pascal; Thacher, Tyler; Pries, Axel; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Raffoul, Wassim

    2011-01-01

    A 41-year-old male presented with severe frostbite that was monitored clinically and with a new laser Doppler imaging (LDI) camera that records arbitrary microcirculatory perfusion units (1–256 arbitrary perfusion units (APU’s)). LDI monitoring detected perfusion differences in hand and foot not seen visually. On day 4–5 after injury, LDI showed that while fingers did not experience any significant perfusion change (average of 31±25 APUs on day 5), the patient’s left big toe did (from 17±29 APUs day 4 to 103±55 APUs day 5). These changes in regional perfusion were not detectable by visual examination. On day 53 postinjury, all fingers with reduced perfusion by LDI were amputated, while the toe could be salvaged. This case clearly demonstrates that insufficient microcirculatory perfusion can be identified using LDI in ways which visual examination alone does not permit, allowing prognosis of clinical outcomes. Such information may also be used to develop improved treatment approaches. PMID:22679257

  8. Self-driven perfusion culture system using a paper-based double-layered scaffold.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Ai; Arisaka, Yoshinori; Takeda, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Shear stress caused by fluid flow is known to promote tissue development from cells in vivo. Therefore, perfusion cultures have been studied to investigate the mechanisms involved and to fabricate engineered tissues in vitro, particularly those that include blood vessels. Microfluidic devices, which function with fine machinery of chambers and microsyringes for fluid flow and have small culture areas, are conventionally used for perfusion culture. In contrast, we have developed a self-driven perfusion culture system by using a paper-based double-layered scaffold as the fundamental component. Gelatin microfibers were electrospun onto a paper material to prepare the scaffold system, in which the constant perfusion of the medium and the scaffold for cell adhesion/proliferation were functionally divided into a paper and a gelatin microfiber layer, respectively. By applying both the capillary action and siphon phenomenon of the paper-based scaffold, which bridged two medium chambers at different height levels, a self-driven medium flow was achieved and the flow rate was also stable, constant, and quantitatively controllable. Moreover, the culture area was enlargeable to the cm(2) scale. The endothelial cells cultivated on this system oriented along the medium-flow direction, suggesting that the shear stress caused by medium flow was effectively applied. This perfusion culture system is expected to be useful for fabricating three-dimensional and large engineered tissues in the future. PMID:27550929

  9. How have fisheries affected parasite communities?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Chelsea L.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    To understand how fisheries affect parasites, we conducted a meta-analysis of studies that contrasted parasite assemblages in fished and unfished areas. Parasite diversity was lower in hosts from fished areas. Larger hosts had a greater abundance of parasites, suggesting that fishing might reduce the abundance of parasites by selectively removing the largest, most heavily parasitized individuals. After controlling for size, the effect of fishing on parasite abundance varied according to whether the host was fished and the parasite's life cycle. Parasites of unfished hosts were more likely to increase in abundance in response to fishing than were parasites of fished hosts, possibly due to compensatory increases in the abundance of unfished hosts. While complex life cycle parasites tended to decline in abundance in response to fishing, directly transmitted parasites tended to increase. Among complex life cycle parasites, those with fished hosts tended to decline in abundance in response to fishing, while those with unfished hosts tended to increase. However, among directly transmitted parasites, responses did not differ between parasites with and without fished hosts. This work suggests that parasite assemblages are likely to change substantially in composition in increasingly fished ecosystems, and that parasite life history and fishing status of the host are important in predicting the response of individual parasite species or groups to fishing.

  10. Coevolutionary interactions between farmers and mafia induce host acceptance of avian brood parasites

    PubMed Central

    Hilbe, Christian; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Brood parasites exploit their host in order to increase their own fitness. Typically, this results in an arms race between parasite trickery and host defence. Thus, it is puzzling to observe hosts that accept parasitism without any resistance. The ‘mafia’ hypothesis suggests that these hosts accept parasitism to avoid retaliation. Retaliation has been shown to evolve when the hosts condition their response to mafia parasites, who use depredation as a targeted response to rejection. However, it is unclear if acceptance would also emerge when ‘farming’ parasites are present in the population. Farming parasites use depredation to synchronize the timing with the host, destroying mature clutches to force the host to re-nest. Herein, we develop an evolutionary model to analyse the interaction between depredatory parasites and their hosts. We show that coevolutionary cycles between farmers and mafia can still induce host acceptance of brood parasites. However, this equilibrium is unstable and in the long-run the dynamics of this host–parasite interaction exhibits strong oscillations: when farmers are the majority, accepters conditional to mafia (the host will reject first and only accept after retaliation by the parasite) have a higher fitness than unconditional accepters (the host always accepts parasitism). This leads to an increase in mafia parasites’ fitness and in turn induce an optimal environment for accepter hosts. PMID:27293783

  11. The prognostic value of non-perfusion variables obtained during vasodilator stress myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Navkaranbir S; Singh, Siddharth; Farag, Ayman; El-Hajj, Stephanie; Heo, Jack; Iskandrian, Ami E; Hage, Fadi G

    2016-06-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is an established diagnostic test that provides useful prognostic data in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. In more than half of the patients referred for stress testing, vasodilator stress is used in lieu of exercise. Unlike exercise, vasodilator stress does not provide information on exercise and functional capacity, heart rate recovery, and chronotropy, and ECG changes are less frequent. These non-perfusion data provide important prognostic and patient management information. Further, event rates in patients undergoing vasodilator MPI are higher than in those undergoing exercise MPI and even in those with normal images probably due to higher pretest risk. However, there are a number of non-perfusion variables that are obtained during vasodilator stress testing, which have prognostic relevance but their use has not been well emphasized. The purpose of this review is to summarize the prognostic values of these non-perfusion data obtained during vasodilator MPI. PMID:26940574

  12. Perfusion lung scan: an aid in detection of lymphangitic carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, S.E.; Tranum, B.L.

    1982-07-15

    Lymphangitic carcinomatosis is usually a late manifestation of metastatic disease. The patient usually presents with cough or dyspnea, and the chest radiograph is often nondiagnostic. Two patients are presented who developed symptoms while on adjuvant chemotherapy. Both had abnormal perfusion lung scans. One had matching ventilation defects; the other a normal ventilation study. Biopsy revealed metastatic carcinoma; in one case tumor was seen in both the pulmonary lymphatics and arterioles; in the other, tumor was identified but the site could not be specified. The radionuclide lung scan is a technique which can speed diagnosis and institution of therapy in lymphangitic carcinomatosis.

  13. Approaches to reducing radiation dose from radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Dorbala, Sharmila; Blankstein, Ron; Skali, Hicham; Park, Mi-Ae; Fantony, Jolene; Mauceri, Charles; Semer, James; Moore, Stephen C; Di Carli, Marcelo F

    2015-04-01

    Radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) plays a vital role in the evaluation and management of patients with coronary artery disease. However, because of a steep growth in MPI in the mid 2000s, concerns about inappropriate use of MPI and imaging-related radiation exposure increased. In response, the professional societies developed appropriate-use criteria for MPI. Simultaneously, novel technology, image-reconstruction software for traditional scanners, and dedicated cardiac scanners emerged and facilitated the performance of MPI with low-dose and ultra-low-dose radiotracers. This paper provides a practical approach to performing low-radiation-dose MPI using traditional and novel technologies. PMID:25766891

  14. Gradient-enhanced FAWSETS perfusion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marro, Kenneth I.; Lee, Donghoon; Hyyti, Outi M.

    2005-08-01

    This work describes the use of custom-built gradients to enhance skeletal muscle perfusion measurements acquired with a previously described arterial spin labeling technique known as FAWSETS (flow-driven arterial water stimulation with elimination of tissue signal). Custom-built gradients provide active control of the static magnetic field gradient on which FAWSETS relies for labeling. This allows selective, 180° modulations of the phase of the perfusion component of the signal. Phase cycling can then be implemented to eliminate all extraneous components leaving a signal that exclusively reflects capillary-level perfusion. Gradient-enhancement substantially reduces acquisition time and eliminates the need to acquire an ischemic signal to quantify perfusion. This removes critical obstacles to application of FAWSETS in organs other than skeletal muscle and makes the measurements more desirable for clinical environments. The basic physical principles of gradient-enhancement are demonstrated in flow phantom experiments and in vivo utility is demonstrated in rat hind limb during stimulated exercise.

  15. Urate synthesis in the perfused chick liver

    PubMed Central

    Barratt, Eileen; Buttery, Peter J.; Boorman, K. Neil

    1974-01-01

    Urate synthesis was studied in a perfused chicken liver preparation. The perfused liver had an ATP/ADP ratio of 0.29±0.05(6) compared with 0.34±0.07(10) in liver obtained from chicks under ether anaesthesia. Lactate/pyruvate ratios were 9.4±1.7(5) in the perfused liver and 14.8±1.8(5) in the rapidly sampled liver. Urate synthesis was only marginally stimulated by glycine, glutamine, aspartic acid or NH4Cl, but significant increases were observed with phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate, aminoimidazolecarboxylic acid riboside, inosine, inosinic acid and xanthine. Urate synthesis from glycine, glutamine, NH4Cl, asparagine, alanine, histidine and a mixture of 21 amino acids was obtained on inclusion of insulin in the perfusion medium. Evidence for the inclusion of the carbon of histidine into uric acid was obtained. Aspects of the energy consumption associated with the conversion of excess of amino acid into uric acid are considered. PMID:4462579

  16. Automated sonographic evaluation of testicular perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thierman, Jonathan S.; Clement, Gregory T.; Kalish, Leslie A.; O'Kane, Patrick L.; Frauscher, Ferdinand; Paltiel, Harriet J.

    2006-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the investigation of vascular disorders of the testis. We investigated the ability of two automated computer algorithms to analyse contrast-enhanced pulse inversion US data in a rabbit model of unilateral testicular ischaemia and to correctly determine relative testicular perfusion: nonlinear curve fitting of the US backscatter intensity as a function of time; and spectral analysis of the intensity time trace. We compared (i) five metrics based on the algorithmic data to testicular perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabelled microspheres, a reference standard; (ii) qualitative assessment of the US images by two independent readers blinded to the side of the experimental and control testes to the radiolabelled microsphere perfusion ratios; and (iii) results of the algorithmically-derived metrics to the qualitative assessments of the two readers. For the curve fit method, the algorithmically-derived metrics agreed with the reference standard in 54% to 68% of all cases. For the spectral method, the results agreed in 70% of all cases. The two readers agreed with the reference standard in 40% and 35% of all cases, respectively. These results suggest that automated methods of analysis may provide useful information in the assessment of testicular perfusion.

  17. Simplified prototyping of perfusable polystyrene microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Reginald; Ahn, Byungwook; R. Myers, David; Qiu, Yongzhi; Sakurai, Yumiko; Moot, Robert; Mihevc, Emma; Trent Spencer, H.; Doering, Christopher; A. Lam, Wilbur

    2014-01-01

    Cell culture in microfluidic systems has primarily been conducted in devices comprised of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or other elastomers. As polystyrene (PS) is the most characterized and commonly used substrate material for cell culture, microfluidic cell culture would ideally be conducted in PS-based microsystems that also enable tight control of perfusion and hydrodynamic conditions, which are especially important for culture of vascular cell types. Here, we report a simple method to prototype perfusable PS microfluidics for endothelial cell culture under flow that can be fabricated using standard lithography and wet laboratory equipment to enable stable perfusion at shear stresses up to 300 dyn/cm2 and pumping pressures up to 26 kPa for at least 100 h. This technique can also be extended to fabricate perfusable hybrid PS-PDMS microfluidics of which one application is for increased efficiency of viral transduction in non-adherent suspension cells by leveraging the high surface area to volume ratio of microfluidics and adhesion molecules that are optimized for PS substrates. These biologically compatible microfluidic devices can be made more accessible to biological-based laboratories through the outsourcing of lithography to various available microfluidic foundries. PMID:25379106

  18. Nuclear cardiology: Myocardial perfusion and function

    SciTech Connect

    Seldin, D.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Myocardial perfusion studies continue to be a major focus of research, with new investigations of the relationship of exercise-redistribution thallium imaging to diagnosis, prognosis, and case management. The redistribution phenomenon, which seemed to be fairly well understood a few years ago, is now recognized to be much more complex than originally thought, and various strategies have been proposed to clarify the meaning of persistent defects. Pharmacologic intervention with dipyridamole and adenosine has become available as an alternative to exercise, and comparisons with exercise imaging and catheterization results have been described. Thallium itself is no longer the sole single-photon perfusion radiopharmaceutical; two new technetium agents are now widely available. In addition to perfusion studies, advances in the study of ventricular function have been made, including reports of studies performed in conjunction with technetium perfusion studies, new insights into cardiac physiology, and the prognostic and case-management information that function studies provide. Finally, work has continued with monoclonal antibodies for the identification of areas of myocyte necrosis. 41 references.

  19. A role for insect galectins in parasite survival.

    PubMed

    Kamhawi, Shaden; Ramalho-Ortigao, Marcelo; Pham, Van M; Kumar, Sanjeev; Lawyer, Phillip G; Turco, Salvatore J; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Sacks, David L; Valenzuela, Jesus G

    2004-10-29

    Insect galectins are associated with embryonic development or immunity against pathogens. Here, we show that they can be exploited by parasites for survival in their insect hosts. PpGalec, a tandem repeat galectin expressed in the midgut of the sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi, is used by Leishmania major as a receptor for mediating specific binding to the insect midgut, an event crucial for parasite survival, and accounts for species-specific vector competence for the most widely distributed form of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Old World. In addition, these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using midgut receptors for parasite ligands as target antigens for transmission-blocking vaccines. PMID:15543683

  20. Vertebrate Cell Cycle Modulates Infection by Protozoan Parasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, James A.; Crane, Mark St. J.

    1981-11-01

    Synchronized HeLa cell populations were exposed to Trypanosoma cruzi or Toxoplasma gondii, obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that cause Chagas' disease and toxoplasmosis, respectively, in humans. The ability of the two parasites to infect HeLa cells increased as the HeLa cells proceeded from the G1 phase to the S phase of their growth cycle and decreased as the cells entered G2-M. Characterization of the S-phase cell surface components responsible for this phenomenon could be beneficial in the development of vaccines against these parasitic diseases.

  1. Effects of vascular elastosis on uterine blood flow and perfusion in anesthetized mares.

    PubMed

    Esteller-Vico, A; Liu, I K M; Vaughan, B; Steffey, E P; Brosnan, R J

    2015-04-01

    In the uterus of the mare, data obtained using transrectal Doppler ultrasonography indicate that uterine blood flow (UBF) is dynamic and changes throughout the estrous cycle. Degenerative lesions in the uterus are associated with subfertility and infertility. Among these lesions, vascular elastosis has been reported in aged, multiparous, and infertile mares. Angiosis of the uterine vasculature could potentially compromise UBF. The objectives of this experiment are to determine levels of UBF and perfusion of reproductively healthy mares and compare them to levels of subfertile/infertile mares affected by uterine vascular elastosis. Twenty mares were classified on the basis of degree of vascular degeneration and stage of cycle. A fluorescent microsphere technique was used to measure reproductive organ perfusion, where microspheres were injected into the left ventricle of the heart and became trapped in capillary beds in proportion to blood flow and tissue perfusion. The reproductive tract was removed, sectioned, and the fluorescent intensity evaluated to measure blood flow and perfusion. Additionally, full-thickness samples of the uterine wall were examined postmortem to further assess the degree of vascular degeneration in all layers of uterine wall. The mean value of uterine perfusion for the control mares during estrus (n = 5) was higher (P < 0.01) than that during diestrus (n = 5); 17.6 and 11.9 mL/min/100g, respectively. For the subfertile/infertile mares, the mean value of tissue perfusion was not different (P > 0.05) during estrus (n = 5) and diestrus (n = 5); 5.9 and 7.2 mL/min/100g, respectively. Uterine perfusion in subfertile/infertile mares affected by elastosis was lower than that of control mares during both estrus (P < 0.01) and diestrus (P < 0.01). The differences in baseline levels of perfusion between the control and elastosis groups indicate that elastosis of the uterine vasculature is associated with decreased uterine perfusion

  2. Induction of Hepatic and Endothelial Differentiation by Perfusion in a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model of Human Fetal Liver

    PubMed Central

    Pekor, Christopher; Gerlach, Jörg C.; Nettleship, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The development of functional engineered tissue constructs depends on high cell densities and appropriate vascularization. In this study we implemented a four-compartment three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture model for studying the effects of medium perfusion on endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic cell populations of primary human fetal liver in an in vivo-like environment. Human fetal liver cells were cultured in bioreactors configured to provide either perfusion or diffusion conditions. Metabolic activities of the cultures were monitored daily by measuring glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell viability during culture was analyzed by lactate dehydrogenase activity. Hepatic functionality was determined by the release of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in culture medium samples. After 4 days of culture, cells were analyzed for the expression of a variety of endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic genes, as well as the surface marker expression of CD31 and CD34 in flow cytometry. We found that medium perfusion increased the gene expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor (vWF), CD140b, CD309, and CD144 while decreasing the gene expression of the erythrocyte-surface marker CD235a. Hepatic differentiation was promoted under perfusion conditions as demonstrated by lower AFP and higher albumin secretion compared with cultures not exposed to medium perfusion. Additionally, cultures exposed to medium perfusion gave higher rates of glucose consumption and lactate production, indicating increased metabolic activity. In conclusion, high-density bioreactors configured to provide constant medium perfusion significantly induced hepatic and endothelial cell differentiation and provided improved conditions for the culture of human fetal liver cells compared with cultures without perfusion. PMID:25559936

  3. Induction of Hepatic and Endothelial Differentiation by Perfusion in a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model of Human Fetal Liver.

    PubMed

    Pekor, Christopher; Gerlach, Jörg C; Nettleship, Ian; Schmelzer, Eva

    2015-07-01

    The development of functional engineered tissue constructs depends on high cell densities and appropriate vascularization. In this study we implemented a four-compartment three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture model for studying the effects of medium perfusion on endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic cell populations of primary human fetal liver in an in vivo-like environment. Human fetal liver cells were cultured in bioreactors configured to provide either perfusion or diffusion conditions. Metabolic activities of the cultures were monitored daily by measuring glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell viability during culture was analyzed by lactate dehydrogenase activity. Hepatic functionality was determined by the release of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in culture medium samples. After 4 days of culture, cells were analyzed for the expression of a variety of endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic genes, as well as the surface marker expression of CD31 and CD34 in flow cytometry. We found that medium perfusion increased the gene expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor (vWF), CD140b, CD309, and CD144 while decreasing the gene expression of the erythrocyte-surface marker CD235a. Hepatic differentiation was promoted under perfusion conditions as demonstrated by lower AFP and higher albumin secretion compared with cultures not exposed to medium perfusion. Additionally, cultures exposed to medium perfusion gave higher rates of glucose consumption and lactate production, indicating increased metabolic activity. In conclusion, high-density bioreactors configured to provide constant medium perfusion significantly induced hepatic and endothelial cell differentiation and provided improved conditions for the culture of human fetal liver cells compared with cultures without perfusion. PMID:25559936

  4. Metabolic imaging of acute and chronic infarction in the perfused rat heart using hyperpolarised [1-13C]pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Ball, Daniel R; Cruickshank, Rachel; Carr, Carolyn A; Stuckey, Daniel J; Lee, Philip; Clarke, Kieran; Tyler, Damian J

    2013-11-01

    Hyperpolarised (13)C MRI can be used to generate metabolic images of the heart in vivo. However, there have been no similar studies performed in the isolated perfused heart. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a method for the creation of (13)C metabolite maps of the perfused rat heart and to demonstrate the technique in a study of acute and chronic myocardial infarction. Male Wistar rat hearts were isolated, perfused and imaged before and after occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, creating an acute infarct group. In addition, a chronic infarct group was generated from hearts which had their LAD coronary artery occluded in vivo. Four weeks later, hearts were excised, perfused and imaged to generate metabolic maps of infused pyruvate and its metabolites lactate and bicarbonate. Myocardial perfusion and energetics were assessed by first-pass perfusion imaging and (31)P MRS, respectively. In both acute and chronically infarcted hearts, perfusion was reduced to the infarct region, as revealed by reduced gadolinium influx and lower signal intensity in the hyperpolarised pyruvate images. In the acute infarct region, there were significant alterations in the lactate (increased) and bicarbonate (decreased) signal ratios. In the chronically infarcted region, there was a significant reduction in both bicarbonate and lactate signals. (31)P-derived energetics revealed a significant decrease between control and chronic infarcted hearts. Significant decreases in contractile function between control and both acute and chronic infracted hearts were also seen. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that hyperpolarised pyruvate can detect reduced perfusion in the rat heart following both acute and chronic infarction. Changes in lactate and bicarbonate ratios indicate increased anaerobic metabolism in the acute infarct, which is not observed in the chronic infarct. Thus, this study has successfully demonstrated a novel imaging approach to assess

  5. Isolated total lung perfusion as a means to deliver organ-specific chemotherapy: long-term studies in animals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M.R.; Christensen, C.W.; Minchin, R.F.; Rickaby, D.A.; Linehan, J.H.; Schuller, H.M.; Boyd, M.R.; Dawson, C.A.

    1985-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a surgical procedure that would allow for bilateral isolated lung perfusion in vivo as a means of delivering organ-specific chemotherapy and to evaluate the influence of the procedure on certain pulmonary physiologic parameters. The sterile surgical procedure that was carried out in dogs involved the setting up of two separate perfusion circuits. Once standard systemic cardiopulmonary bypass was established, a second circuit was devised to perfuse the lungs by placing an inflow cannula into the main pulmonary artery and collecting venous effluent in the left atrium. Cross-contamination between perfusion circuits was determined in acute studies with labeled plasma protein or red blood cells and was found to be in an acceptable range if the aorta was cross-clamped and the heart arrested. Only about 0.4 ml/min of pulmonary perfusate leaked into the systemic circulation, indicating that systemic toxicity should not be a major concern when chemotherapy agents are added to the pulmonary perfusate. Chronic studies demonstrated that hemodynamic parameters, lung water, pulmonary endothelial serotonin extraction, and histologic findings all showed minimal changes after 50 minutes of isolated lung perfusion. Five days after perfusion, lung dynamic compliance and peak serotonin extraction showed significant decreases. However, all of the measured parameters had returned toward baseline levels by the end of the 8-week postoperative study period. The procedure offers significant advantages over the previously described single lung perfusion and may provide a method of delivering immediate high-concentration adjuvant chemotherapy to coincide with resection of primary or metastatic lung tumors.

  6. Prevalence of intestinal parasites among food handlers in Western Iran.

    PubMed

    Kheirandish, Farnaz; Tarahi, Mohammad Javad; Ezatpour, Behrouz

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic infection is one of the problems that affect human health, especially in developing countries. In this study, all of the fast food shops, restaurants, and roast meat outlets of Khorramabad (Western Iran) and all the staff employed by them, some 210 people, were selected through a census and their stools were examined for the presence of parasites. The parasitological tests of direct wet-mount, Lugol's iodine staining, formaldehyde-ether sedimentation and Trichrome staining techniques were performed on the samples. The data was analyzed with a chi-square test and logistic regression was selected as the analytical model. The results showed 19 (9%) stool specimens were positive for different intestinal parasites. These intestinal parasites included Giardia lamblia 2.9%, Entamoeba coli 4.3%, Blastocystis sp. 1.4%, and Hymenolepis nana 0.5%. There was a significant difference between the presence of a valid health card, awareness of transmission of intestinal parasites, participation in training courses in environmental health with intestinal parasites (p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference was found between the rate of literacy and gender among patients infected with intestinal parasites (p > 0.05). To control parasitic infection in food handlers, several strategies are recommended such as stool examinations every three months, public education, application of health regulations, controlling the validity of health cards and training on parasitic infection transmission. In this regard, the findings of the present study can be used as a basis to develop preventive programs targeting food handlers because the spread of disease via them is a common problem worldwide. PMID:24626411

  7. Comparing Normothermic Machine Perfusion Preservation With Different Perfusates on Porcine Livers From Donors After Circulatory Death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Nassar, A; Farias, K; Buccini, L; Mangino, M J; Baldwin, W; Bennett, A; O'Rourke, C; Iuppa, G; Soliman, B G; Urcuyo-Llanes, D; Okamoto, T; Uso, T D; Fung, J; Abu-Elmagd, K; Miller, C; Quintini, C

    2016-03-01

    The utilization of normothermic machine perfusion (NMP) may be an effective strategy to resuscitate livers from donation after circulatory death (DCD). There is no consensus regarding the efficacy of different perfusates on graft and bile duct viability. The aim of this study was to compare, in an NMP porcine DCD model, the preservation potential of three different perfusates. Twenty porcine livers with 60 min of warm ischemia were separated into four preservation groups: cold storage (CS), NMP with Steen solution (Steen; XVIVO Perfusion Inc., Denver, CO), Steen plus red blood cells (RBCs), or whole blood (WB). All livers were preserved for 10 h and reperfused to simulate transplantation for 24 h. During preservation, the NMP with Steen group presented the highest hepatocellular injury. At reperfusion, the CS group had the lowest bile production and the worst hepatocellular injury compared with all other groups, followed by NMP with Steen; the Steen plus RBC and WB groups presented the best functional and hepatocellular injury outcomes, with WB livers showing lower aspartate aminotransferase release and a trend toward better results for most parameters. Based on our results, a perfusate that contains an oxygen carrier is most effective in a model of NMP porcine DCD livers compared with Steen solution. Specifically, WB-perfused livers showed a trend toward better outcomes compared with Steen plus RBCs. PMID:26663737

  8. Quasi-simultaneous multimodal imaging of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wenqi; Gan, Qi; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous and quantitative assessment of multiple tissue parameters may facilitate more effective diagnosis and therapy in many clinical applications, such as wound healing. However, existing wound assessment methods are typically subjective and qualitative, with the need for sequential data acquisition and coregistration between modalities, and lack of reliable standards for performance evaluation or calibration. To overcome these limitations, we developed a multimodal imaging system for quasi-simultaneous assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion in a quantitative and noninvasive fashion. The system integrated multispectral and laser speckle imaging technologies into one experimental setup. Tissue oxygenation and perfusion were reconstructed by advanced algorithms. The accuracy and reliability of the imaging system were quantitatively validated in calibration experiments and a tissue-simulating phantom test. The experimental results were compared with a commercial oxygenation and perfusion monitor. Dynamic detection of cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion was also demonstrated in vivo by a postocclusion reactive hyperemia procedure in a human subject and a wound healing process in a wounded mouse model. Our in vivo experiments not only validated the performance of the multimodal imaging system for cutaneous tissue oxygenation and perfusion imaging but also demonstrated its technical potential for wound healing assessment in clinical practice.

  9. Kinetics of reversible-sequestration of leukocytes by the isolated perfused rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Goliaei, B.

    1980-08-01

    The kinetics and morphology of sequestration and margination of rat leukocytes were studied using an isolated perfused and ventilated rat lung preparation. Whole rat blood, bone marrow suspension, or leukocyte suspensions, were used to perfuse the isolated rat lung. The lung was also perfused with latex particle suspensions and the passage of particles through the lung capillaries was studied. When a leukocyte suspension was perfused through the lung in the single-pass mode, the rate of sequestration decreased as more cells were perfused. In contrast, latex particles of a size comparable to that of leukocytes were totally stopped by the lung. When the leukocyte suspension was recirculated through the lung, cells were rapidly removed from circulation until a steady state was reached, after which no net removal of cells by the lung occurred. These results indicate that leukocytes are reversibly sequestered from circulation. The sequestered cells marginated and attached to the luminal surface of the endothelium of post-capillary venules and veins. A mathematical model was developed based on the assumption that the attachment and detachment of leukocytes to blood vessel walls follows first-order kinetics. The model correctly predicts the following characteristics of the system: (a) the kinetics of the sequestration of leukocytes by the lung; (b) the existence of a steady state when a suspension of leukocytes is recirculated through the lung; and (c) the independence of the fraction of cells remaining in circulation from the starting concentration for all values of starting concentration. (ERB)

  10. Quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion using dynamic three-dimensional x-ray computed angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Teslow, T.N.

    1985-01-01

    Using computed tomogram time series, myocardial perfusion was angiographically measured as distributions of x-ray circulatory indicators in three dimensions. By separating the dynamic function from the cardiac structure, these separate components were tested using region-of-interest (ROI) mensuration in simulation, phantom, and in vivo experiments. Statistical criteria were used to evaluate the dynamic component which was represented by analytic mathematical models of indicator dilution. The spatial component was represented by three-dimensional (3-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) geometric models of the heart. Each of these components were determined in individual ROI's and globally integrated to manifest the perfusion heterogeneities. A physical heart phantom with controllable regional perfusion characteristics was also developed and studied. Experiments conducted on dogs compared the accuracy of 2-D and 3-D perfusion measurements by imaging to those using gamma-radioactive microspheres. Accurate reproducible localization of the heart was found to be important for obtaining accurate measures of regional perfusion in 3-D volume images exhibiting high noise.

  11. The imaging of myocardial perfusion with 81mKr during coronary arteriography.

    PubMed

    Kleynhans, P H; Lötter, M G; van Aswegen, A; Herbst, C P; Marx, J D; Minnaar, P C

    1982-01-01

    The use of 81mKr was investigated for imaging myocardial perfusion during coronary arteriography using conventional catheters. When the significance of stenosis judged by arteriography is unclear, the effect on tissue perfusion can be established and the contribution to collateral flow by each artery separately evaluated. The distribution of 81mKr, due to its 13-s half-life, represents regional blood flow. In order to evaluate interventions, studies can be repeated at a low radiation risk to patients. A sterile pyrogen-free 81Rb-81Kr generator was developed. With slow infusion, inadequate mixing and streaming takes place due to laminar flow in coronary arteries. Fast intermittent 3-ml 81Kr-dextrose bolus injections convincingly eliminated streaming artefacts. Imaging was performed in 13 patients with a mobile scintillation camera and digital imaging system. Blood flow was calculated using the inert gas washout technique. There was good correlation (r = 0.91) between coronary blood flow determinations using 81mKr and 133Xe respectively. The perfusion images correlated well with the coronary angiograms. Total coronary arterial occlusions as demonstrated by arteriography were all shown as perfusion defects during rest. During atrial pacing myocardial flow was increased two-fold in normal coronary arteries and to a lesser extent in arteries with significant disease. The most critical lesion in a branch of a left coronary artery leads to a redistribution of perfusion during pacing. PMID:7128629

  12. Simple Machine Perfusion Significantly Enhances Hepatocyte Yields of Ischemic and Fresh Rat Livers

    PubMed Central

    Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Calhoun, Candice; Uygun, Basak E.; Guzzardi, Maria Angela; Price, Gavrielle; Luitje, Martha; Saeidi, Nima; Yarmush, Martin L.; Uygun, Korkut

    2013-01-01

    The scarcity of viable hepatocytes is a significant bottleneck in cell transplantation, drug discovery, toxicology, tissue engineering, and bioartificial assist devices, where trillions of high-functioning hepatocytes are needed annually. We took the novel approach of using machine perfusion to maximize cell recovery, specifically from uncontrolled cardiac death donors, the largest source of disqualified donor organs. In a rat model, we developed a simple 3-h room temperature (20 ± 2°C) machine perfusion protocol to treat nonpremedicated livers exposed to 1 h of warm (34°C) ischemia. Treated ischemic livers were compared to fresh, fresh-treated, and untreated ischemic livers using viable hepatocyte yields and in vitro performance as quantitative endpoints. Perfusion treatment resulted in both a 25-fold increase in viable hepatocytes from ischemic livers and a 40% increase from fresh livers. While cell morphology and function in suspension and plate cultures of untreated warm ischemic cells was significantly impaired, treated warm ischemic cells were indistinguishable from fresh hepatocytes. Furthermore, a strong linear correlation between tissue ATP and cell yield enabled accurate evaluation of the extent of perfusion recovery. Maximal recovery of warm ischemic liver ATP content appears to be correlated with optimal flow through the microvasculature. These data demonstrate that the inclusion of a simple perfusion-preconditioning step can significantly increase the efficiency of functional hepatocyte yields and the number of donor livers that can be gainfully utilized. PMID:25431743

  13. Axillary Artery Access for Combined Endoaortic Balloon Occlusion and Perfusion During Robotic Mitral Valve Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ambur, Vishnu V; Kadakia, Sagar S; Taghavi, Sharven; Jayarajan, Senthil N; Kashem, Mohammed Abul; McCarthy, James; Shiose, Akira; Wheatley, Grayson H; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Guy, T Sloane

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to develop a method that provides an alternative cannulation site in robotic mitral valve surgery that allows simultaneous endo-occlusion and antegrade perfusion. A 71-year-old man with severe mitral regurgitation and history of coronary artery bypass grafting underwent totally endoscopic robotic mitral valve repair. A 23-mm endoreturn cannula was placed through a 10-mm graft that was sewn to the left axillary artery. An endoballoon was passed through the Dacron/cannula complex and into the ascending aorta. This complex was used for simultaneous antegrade perfusion, endoballoon occlusion, and antegrade cardioplegia. Completion transesophageal echocardiography showed no evidence of mitral regurgitation. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and was doing well at his 2-month follow-up appointment. The left axillary artery is a viable option for simultaneous endoballoon occlusion, antegrade perfusion, and antegrade cardioplegia in robotic mitral valve surgery. This has the potential benefit of providing antegrade perfusion, which some studies have shown to be associated with a decreased risk of complications when compared with retrograde perfusion specifically in patients with severe peripheral vascular disease. PMID:27093272

  14. Protective effects of fluvoxamine against ischemia/reperfusion injury in isolated, perfused guinea-pig hearts.

    PubMed

    Muto, Tatsuya; Usuda, Haruki; Yamamura, Aya; Yoshida, Koji; Ohashi, Ai; Mitsui-Saitoh, Kumiko; Sakai, Junichi; Sugimoto, Yumi; Mizutani, Hideki; Nonogaki, Tsunemasa; Hotta, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) is known to be activated during ischemia-reperfusion and triggers contractile dysfunction and pathological apoptosis. Here, the beneficial effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine was demonstrated on ischemia-reperfusion injury in guinea-pig hearts perfused using the Langendorff technique. The recovery (%) of left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) by fluvoxamine (5×10(-8) M) was 95.4% (control: 32%), which was consistent with the inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+)([Ca(2+)]m) uptake induced by changes in the Ca(2+) content and acidification of the perfusate, and similar to reperfusion following global ischemia in Langendorff-perfused hearts. Fluvoxamine inhibited the increase in [Ca(2+)]m induced by changes in the Ca(2+) content of the perfusate in perfused preparations of mitochondria, which was similar to the results obtained with the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opener atractyroside. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells were significantly less in fluvoxamine-treated hearts than in control hearts, with decreases in caspase-3 activity. These results suggest that SSRI inhibits opening of the MPTP by preventing [Ca(2+)]m overload-induced apoptosis related to the endogenous accumulation of 5-HT in ischemia-reperfusion hearts. PMID:24789996

  15. Phase-based metamorphosis of diffusion lesion in relation to perfusion values in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Rekik, Islem; Allassonnière, Stéphanie; Luby, Marie; Carpenter, Trevor K; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-01-01

    Examining the dynamics of stroke ischemia is limited by the standard use of 2D-volume or voxel-based analysis techniques. Recently developed spatiotemporal models such as the 4D metamorphosis model showed promise for capturing ischemia dynamics. We used a 4D metamorphosis model to evaluate acute ischemic stroke lesion morphology from the acute diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to final T2-weighted imaging (T2-w). In 20 representative patients, we metamorphosed the acute lesion to subacute lesion to final infarct. From the DWI lesion deformation maps we identified dynamic lesion areas and examined their association with perfusion values inside and around the lesion edges, blinded to reperfusion status. We then tested the model in ten independent patients from the STroke Imaging Repository (STIR). Perfusion values varied widely between and within patients, and were similar in contracting and expanding DWI areas in many patients in both datasets. In 25% of patients, the perfusion values were higher in DWI-contracting than DWI-expanding areas. A similar wide range of perfusion values and ongoing expansion and contraction of the DWI lesion were seen subacutely. There was more DWI contraction and less expansion in patients who received thrombolysis, although with widely ranging perfusion values that did not differ. 4D metamorphosis modeling shows promise as a method to improve use of multimodal imaging to understand the evolution of acute ischemic tissue towards its fate. PMID:26288755

  16. Chemical interrogation of malarial host and parasite kinomes

    PubMed Central

    Zuzarte-Luís, Vanessa; Magalhães, Andreia D.; Kato, Nobutaka; Sanschagrin, Paul C.; Wang, Jinhua; Zhou, Wenjun; Miduturu, Chandrasekhar V.; Mazitschek, Ralph; Sliz, Piotr; Mota, Maria M.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria, an infectious disease caused by eukaryotic parasites from the genus Plasmodium, afflicts hundreds of millions of people every year. Both the parasite and its host utilize protein kinases to regulate essential cellular processes. Bioinformatic analyses of parasite genomes predict at least 65 protein kinases, but their biological functions and therapeutic potential are largely unknown. We profiled 1,358 small molecule kinase inhibitors to evaluate the role of both the human and malaria kinomes in Plasmodium infection of liver cells, the parasites’ obligatory but transient developmental stage that precedes the symptomatic blood stage. The screen identified several small molecules that inhibit parasite load in liver cells, some with nanomolar efficacy, and each compound was subsequently assessed for activity against blood stage malaria. Most of the screening hits inhibited both liver and blood stage malaria parasites, which have dissimilar gene expression profiles and infect different host cells. Evaluation of existing kinase activity profiling data for the library members suggests several kinases are essential to malaria parasites, including cyclin-dependent kinases, glycogen synthase kinases, and phosphoinositide-3-kinases. CDK inhibitors were found to bind to Plasmodium protein kinase 5, but it is likely that these compounds target multiple parasite kinases. The dual stage inhibition of the identified kinase inhibitors makes them useful chemical probes and promising starting points for antimalarial development. PMID:25111632

  17. Evaluation of parasitic consumption for a CSP plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramorakane, Relebohile John; Dinter, Frank

    2016-05-01

    With the continuous development and desire to build alternative effective and efficient power plants, Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants (and more specifically the Parabolic Trough CSP Plants) have proven to be one of the alternative energy resources for the future. On this regard more emphasis and research is being employed to better this power plant technology, where one of the main challenges to these plants is to improve their efficiency by optimizing the parasitic load, wherein one of the major causes of the power plants' reduced overall efficiency arises from their parasitic load consumption. This project is therefore aimed at evaluating the parasitic load on Andasol 3 Power Plant, which is a 50 MW Parabolic Trough Power Plant with a 7.5 hours of full load storage system. It was hence determined that the total power plant's parasitic load consumption is about 12% in summer season and between 16% and 24% in winter season. In an effort to improve the power plant's efficiency, a couple of measures to reduce the parasitic load consumption were recommended, and also an alternative and cheaper source of parasitic load feeding plant, during the day (when the parasitic load consumption is highest) was proposed/recommended.

  18. Effects of invasive parasites on bumble bee declines.

    PubMed

    Meeus, Ivan; Brown, Mark J F; De Graaf, Dirk C; Smagghe, Guy

    2011-08-01

    Bumble bees are a group of pollinators that are both ecologically and economically important and declining worldwide. Numerous mechanisms could be behind this decline, and the spread of parasites from commercial colonies into wild populations has been implicated recently in North America. Commercial breeding may lead to declines because commercial colonies may have high parasite loads, which can lead to colonization of native bumble bee populations; commercial rearing may allow higher parasite virulence to evolve; and global movement of commercial colonies may disrupt spatial patterns in local adaptation between hosts and parasites. We assessed parasite virulence, transmission mode, and infectivity. Microparasites and so-called honey bee viruses may pose the greatest threat to native bumble bee populations because certain risk factors are present; for example, the probability of horizontal transmission of the trypanosome parasite Crithidia bombi is high. The microsporidian parasite Nosema bombi may play a role in declines of bumble bees in the United States. Preliminary indications that C. bombi and the neogregarine Apicystis bombi may not be native in parts of South America. We suggest that the development of molecular screening protocols, thorough sanitation efforts, and cooperation among nongovernmental organizations, governments, and commercial breeders might immediately mitigate these threats. PMID:21771075

  19. The interplay between drug resistance and fitness in malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Controlling the spread of antimalarial drug resistance, especially resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to artemisinin-based combination therapies, is a high priority. Available data indicate that, as with other microorganisms, the spread of drug-resistant malaria parasites is limited by fitness costs that frequently accompany resistance. Resistance-mediating polymorphisms in malaria parasites have been identified in putative drug transporters and in target enzymes. The impacts of these polymorphisms on parasite fitness have been characterized in vitro and in animal models. Additional insights have come from analyses of samples from clinical studies, both evaluating parasites under different selective pressures and determining the clinical consequences of infection with different parasites. With some exceptions, resistance-mediating polymorphisms lead to malaria parasites that, compared to wild type, grow less well in culture and in animals, and are replaced by wild type when drug pressure diminishes in the clinical setting. In some cases, the fitness costs of resistance may be offset by compensatory mutations that increase virulence or changes that enhance malaria transmission. However, not enough is known about effects of resistance mediators on parasite fitness. A better appreciation of the costs of fitness-mediating mutations will facilitate the development of optimal guidelines for the treatment and prevention of malaria. PMID:23899091

  20. mRNA-Seq and microarray development for the Grooved carpet shell clam, Ruditapes decussatus: a functional approach to unravel host -parasite interaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Grooved Carpet shell clam Ruditapes decussatus is the autochthonous European clam and the most appreciated from a gastronomic and economic point of view. The production is in decline due to several factors such as Perkinsiosis and habitat invasion and competition by the introduced exotic species, the manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum. After we sequenced R. decussatus transcriptome we have designed an oligo microarray capable of contributing to provide some clues on molecular response of the clam to Perkinsiosis. Results A database consisting of 41,119 unique transcripts was constructed, of which 12,479 (30.3%) were annotated by similarity. An oligo-DNA microarray platform was then designed and applied to profile gene expression in R. decussatus heavily infected by Perkinsus olseni. Functional annotation of differentially expressed genes between those two conditionswas performed by gene set enrichment analysis. As expected, microarrays unveil genes related with stress/infectious agents such as hydrolases, proteases and others. The extensive role of innate immune system was also analyzed and effect of parasitosis upon expression of important molecules such as lectins reviewed. Conclusions This study represents a first attempt to characterize Ruditapes decussatus transcriptome, an important marine resource for the European aquaculture. The trancriptome sequencing and consequent annotation will increase the available tools and resources for this specie, introducing the possibility of high throughput experiments such as microarrays analysis. In this specific case microarray approach was used to unveil some important aspects of host-parasite interaction between the Carpet shell clam and Perkinsus, two non-model species, highlighting some genes associated with this interaction. Ample information was obtained to identify biological processes significantly enriched among differentially expressed genes in Perkinsus infected versus non-infected gills. An

  1. Infection and treatment immunizations for successful parasite vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Mutapi, Francisca; Billingsley, Peter F.; Secor, W. Evan

    2013-01-01

    Since the advent of techniques for the expression of recombinant peptide antigens, the availability of human vaccines for parasitic diseases has been ‘imminent’. Yet vaccines based on recombinant proteins are still largely aspirations, not realities. It is now apparent that vaccine development needs additional knowledge about host protective immune response(s), antigen characteristics, and the delivery required to induce those responses. The most successful immune protection against parasites has been generated by infection and treatment, the induction of protective immunity by truncating the course of an infection with drug treatment. Here, we consider the characteristics of an effective, protective anti-parasite vaccine and propose a conceptual framework to aid parasite vaccine development using malaria and schistosomiasis as examples. PMID:23415733

  2. Metabolic Enzymes of Helminth Parasites: Potential as Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Timson, David J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways that extract energy from carbon compounds are essential for an organism's survival. Therefore, inhibition of enzymes in these pathways represents a potential therapeutic strategy to combat parasitic infections. However, the high degree of similarity between host and parasite enzymes makes this strategy potentially difficult. Nevertheless, several existing drugs to treat infections by parasitic helminths (worms) target metabolic enzymes. These include the trivalent antimonials that target phosphofructokinase and Clorsulon that targets phosphoglycerate mutase and phosphoglycerate kinase. Glycolytic enzymes from a variety of helminths have been characterised biochemically, and some inhibitors identified. To date none of these inhibitors have been developed into therapies. Many of these enzymes are externalised from the parasite and so are also of interest in the development of potential vaccines. Less work has been done on tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and oxidative phosphorylation complexes. Again, while some inhibitors have been identified none have been developed into drug-like molecules. Barriers to the development of novel drugs targeting metabolic enzymes include the lack of experimentally determined structures of helminth enzymes, lack of direct proof that the enzymes are vital in the parasites and lack of cell culture systems for many helminth species. Nevertheless, the success of Clorsulon (which discriminates between highly similar host and parasite enzymes) should inspire us to consider making serious efforts to discover novel anthelminthics, which target metabolic enzymes. PMID:26983888

  3. Cystatins from filarial parasites: evolution, adaptation and function in the host-parasite relationship.

    PubMed

    Gregory, William F; Maizels, Rick M

    2008-01-01

    Cystatins, together with stefins and kininogens, are members of the cystatin superfamily of cysteine protease inhibitors (CPI) present across the animal and plant kingdoms. Their role in parasitic organisms may encompass both essential developmental processes and specific interactions with the parasite's vector and/or final host. We summarise information gathered on three cystatins from the human filarial nematode Brugia malayi (Bm-CPI-1, -2 and -3), and contrast them those expressed by other parasites and by the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Bm-CPI-2 differs from C. elegans cystatin, having acquired the additional function of inhibiting asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP), in a manner similar to some human cystatins. Thus, we propose that Bm-CPI-2 and orthologues from related filarial parasites represent a new subset of nematode cystatins. Bm-CPI-1 and CPI-3 share only 25% amino acid identity with Bm-CPI-2, and lack an evolutionarily conserved glycine residue in the N-terminal region. These sequences group distantly from the other nematode cystatins, and represent a second novel subset of filarial cystatin-like genes. Expression analyses also show important differences between the CPI-2 and CPI-1/-3 groups. Bm-cpi-2 is expressed at all time points of the parasite life cycle, while Bm-cpi-1 and -3 expression is confined to the late stages of development in the mosquito vector, terminating within 48h of infection of the mammalian host. Hence, we hypothesise that CPI-2 has evolved to block mammalian proteases (including the antigen-processing enzyme AEP) while CPI-1 and -3 function in the milieu of the mosquito vector necessary for transmission of the parasite. PMID:18249028

  4. Cellular gene expression induced by parasite antigens and allergens in neonates from parasite-infected mothers.

    PubMed

    Soboslay, Peter T; Orlikowsky, Thorsten; Huang, Xiangsheng; Gille, Christian; Spring, Bärbel; Kocherscheidt, Lars; Agossou, Abram; Banla, Meba; Bonin, Michael; Köhler, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Prenatal exposure to parasite antigens or allergens will influence the profile and strength of postnatal immune responses, such contact may tolerize and increase susceptibility to future infections or sensitize to environmental allergens. Exposure in utero to parasite antigens will distinctly alter cellular gene expression in newborns. Gene microarrays were applied to study gene expression in umbilical cord blood cell (UCBC) from parasite-exposed (Para-POS) and non-exposed (Para-NEG) neonates. UCBC were activated with antigens of helminth (Onchocerca volvulus), amoeba (Entamoeba histolytica) or allergens of mite (Dermatophagoides farinae). When UCBC from Para-POS and Para-NEG newborns were exposed to helminth antigens or allergens consistent differences occurred in the expression of genes encoding for MHC class I and II alleles, signal transducers of activation and transcription (STATs), cytokines, chemokines, immunoglobulin heavy and light chains, and molecules associated with immune regulation (SOCS, TLR, TGF), inflammation (TNF, CCR) and apoptosis (CASP). Expression of genes associated with innate immune responses were enhanced in Para-NEG, while in Para-POS, the expression of MHC class II and STAT genes was reduced. Within functional gene networks for cellular growth, proliferation and immune responses, Para-NEG neonates presented with significantly higher expression values than Para-POS. In Para-NEG newborns, the gene cluster and pathway analyses suggested that gene expression profiles may predispose for the development of immunological, hematological and dermatological disorders upon postnatal helminth parasite infection or allergen exposure. Thus, prenatal parasite contact will sensitize without generating aberrant inflammatory immune responses, and increased pro-inflammatory but decreased regulatory gene expression profiles will be present in those neonates lacking prenatal parasite antigen encounter. PMID:27062712

  5. Parasites in pet reptiles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Exotic reptiles originating from the wild can be carriers of many different pathogens and some of them can infect humans. Reptiles imported into Slovenia from 2000 to 2005, specimens of native species taken from the wild and captive bred species were investigated. A total of 949 reptiles (55 snakes, 331 lizards and 563 turtles), belonging to 68 different species, were examined for the presence of endoparasites and ectoparasites. Twelve different groups (Nematoda (5), Trematoda (1), Acanthocephala (1), Pentastomida (1) and Protozoa (4)) of endoparasites were determined in 26 (47.3%) of 55 examined snakes. In snakes two different species of ectoparasites were also found. Among the tested lizards eighteen different groups (Nematoda (8), Cestoda (1), Trematoda (1), Acanthocephala (1), Pentastomida (1) and Protozoa (6)) of endoparasites in 252 (76.1%) of 331 examined animals were found. One Trombiculid ectoparasite was determined. In 563 of examined turtles eight different groups (Nematoda (4), Cestoda (1), Trematoda (1) and Protozoa (2)) of endoparasites were determined in 498 (88.5%) animals. In examined turtles three different species of ectoparasites were seen. The established prevalence of various parasites in reptiles used as pet animals indicates the need for examination on specific pathogens prior to introduction to owners. PMID:21624124

  6. Multi-modality imaging for the assessment of myocardial perfusion with emphasis on stress perfusion CT and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sung Min; Hwang, Hweung Kon; Kim, Sung Mok; Cho, Ihn Ho

    2015-06-01

    High-quality and non-invasive diagnostic tools for assessing myocardial ischemia are necessary for therapeutic decisions regarding coronary artery disease. Myocardial perfusion has been studied using myocardial contrast echo perfusion, single-photon emission computed tomography, positron emission tomography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, and, more recently, computed tomography. The addition of coronary computed tomography angiography to myocardial perfusion imaging improves the specificity and overall diagnostic accuracy of detecting the hemodynamic significance of coronary artery stenosis. This study reviews the benefits, limitations, and imaging findings of various imaging modalities for assessing myocardial perfusion, with particular emphasis on stress perfusion computed tomography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25809387

  7. Malaria parasite epigenetics: when virulence and romance collide.

    PubMed

    Flueck, Christian; Baker, David A

    2014-08-13

    Blood-stage malaria parasites evade the immune system by switching the protein exposed at the surface of the infected erythrocyte. A small proportion of these parasites commits to sexual development to mediate mosquito transmission. Two studies in this issue (Brancucci et al., 2014; Coleman et al., 2014) shed light on shared epigenetic machinery underlying both of these events. PMID:25121742

  8. The Burden of Livestock Parasites on the Poor.

    PubMed

    Rist, Cassidy L; Garchitorena, Andres; Ngonghala, Calistus N; Gillespie, Thomas R; Bonds, Matthew H

    2015-11-01

    Parasitic diseases of humans and livestock are ubiquitous in the developing world and have substantial impacts on human wellbeing. For the estimated one billion people living in poverty who rely on livestock for their livelihoods, parasites steal valuable nutritional resources through multiple pathways. This diversion of nutrients ultimately contributes to chronic malnutrition, greater human disease burdens, and decreased productivity of both humans and livestock. PMID:26604161

  9. Uterine perfusion model for analyzing barriers to transport in fibroids.

    PubMed

    Stirland, Darren L; Nichols, Joseph W; Jarboe, Elke; Adelman, Marisa; Dassel, Mark; Janát-Amsbury, Margit-Maria; Bae, You Han

    2015-09-28

    This project uses an ex vivo human perfusion model for studying transport in benign, fibrous tumors. The uterine arteries were cannulated to perfuse the organ with a buffer solution containing blood vessel stain and methylene blue to analyze intratumoral transport. Gross examination revealed tissue expansion effects and a visual lack of methylene blue in the fibroids. Some fibroids exhibited regions with partial methylene blue penetration into the tumor environment. Histological analysis comparing representative sections of fibroids and normal myometrium showed a smaller number of vessels with decreased diameters within the fibroid. Imaging of fluorescently stained vessels exposed a stark contrast between fluorescence within the myometrium and relatively little within the fibroid tissues. Imaging at higher magnification revealed that fibroid blood vessels were indeed perfused and stained with the lipophilic membrane dye; however, the vessels were only the size of small capillaries and the blood vessel coverage was only 12% that of the normal myometrium. The majority of sampled fibroids had a strong negative correlation (Pearson's r=-0.68 or beyond) between collagen and methylene blue staining. As methylene blue was able to passively diffuse into fibroid tissue, the true barrier to transport in these fibroids is likely high interstitial fluid pressure, correlating with high collagen content and solid stress observed in the fibroid tissue. Fibroids had an average elevated interstitial fluid pressure of 4mmHg compared to -1mmHg in normal myometrium. Our findings signify relationships between drug distribution in fibroids and between vasculature characteristics, collagen levels, and interstitial fluid pressure. Understanding these barriers to transport can lead to developments in drug delivery for the treatment of uterine fibroids and tumors of similar composition. PMID:26184049

  10. Rapid casting of patterned vascular networks for perfusable engineered three-dimensional tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan S.; Stevens, Kelly R.; Yang, Michael T.; Baker, Brendon M.; Nguyen, Duc-Huy T.; Cohen, Daniel M.; Toro, Esteban; Chen, Alice A.; Galie, Peter A.; Yu, Xiang; Chaturvedi, Ritika; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2012-09-01

    In the absence of perfusable vascular networks, three-dimensional (3D) engineered tissues densely populated with cells quickly develop a necrotic core. Yet the lack of a general approach to rapidly construct such networks remains a major challenge for 3D tissue culture. Here, we printed rigid 3D filament networks of carbohydrate glass, and used them as a cytocompatible sacrificial template in engineered tissues containing living cells to generate cylindrical networks that could be lined with endothelial cells and perfused with blood under high-pressure pulsatile flow. Because this simple vascular casting approach allows independent control of network geometry, endothelialization and extravascular tissue, it is compatible with a wide variety of cell types, synthetic and natural extracellular matrices, and crosslinking strategies. We also demonstrated that the perfused vascular channels sustained the metabolic function of primary rat hepatocytes in engineered tissue constructs that otherwise exhibited suppressed function in their core.

  11. [The isolated perfused porcine kidney model for investigations concerning surgical therapy procedures].

    PubMed

    Peters, Kristina; Michel, Maurice Stephan; Matis, Ulrike; Häcker, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Experiments to develop innovative surgical therapy procedures are conventionally conducted on animals, as crucial aspects like tissue removal and bleeding disposition cannot be investigated in vitro. Extracorporeal organ models however reflect these aspects and could thus reduce the use of animals for this purpose fundamentally in the future. The aim of this work was to validate the isolated perfused porcine kidney model with regard to its use for surgical purposes on the basis of histological and radiological procedures. The results show that neither storage nor artificial perfusion led to any structural or functional damage which would affect the quality of the organ. The kidney model is highly suitable for simulating the main aspects of renal physiology and allows a constant calibration of perfusion pressure and tissue temperature. Thus, with only a moderate amount of work involved, the kidney model provides a cheap and readily available alternative to conventional animal experiments; it allows standardised experimental settings and provides valid results. PMID:17086351

  12. Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion and Transplant: State of the Art and View to the Future.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed S A

    2015-12-01

    After the first clinical application of ex vivo lung perfusion in 2001, the technique has been used in many lung transplant centers worldwide. In addition, many modifications have been tested, leading to the development of various ex vivo lung perfusion systems and application protocols. Currently, the Lund protocol, the Toronto protocol, and Organ Care System Lung protocol are the clinically applied ex vivo lung perfusion protocols, based on the favorable results of the safety studies. Accordingly, the comparison among these EVLP systems and protocols should be an important research target, in order to provide the evidence based medical data that would recommend one protocol over the others. In this manuscript, the current experience with EVLP is reviewed and some molecular and clinical targets, that could be used to compare the various protocols of the technique, are introduced. PMID:26643670

  13. Zoology: Invertebrates that Parasitize Invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Giribet, Gonzalo

    2016-07-11

    The genome of an orthonectid, a group of highly modified parasitic invertebrates, is drastically reduced and compact, yet it shows the bilaterian gene toolkit. Phylogenetic analyses place the enigmatic orthonectids within Spiralia, although their exact placement remains uncertain. PMID:27404242

  14. Vaccination against helminth parasite infections.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, James P; Maizels, Rick M

    2014-04-01

    Helminth parasites infect over one fourth of the human population and are highly prevalent in livestock worldwide. In model systems, parasites are strongly immunomodulatory, but the immune system can be driven to expel them by prior vaccination. However, no vaccines are currently available for human use. Recent advances in vaccination with recombinant helminth antigens have been successful against cestode infections of livestock and new vaccines are being tested against nematode parasites of animals. Numerous vaccine antigens are being defined for a wide range of helminth parasite species, but greater understanding is needed to define the mechanisms of vaccine-induced immunity, to lay a rational platform for new vaccines and their optimal design. With human trials underway for hookworm and schistosomiasis vaccines, a greater integration between veterinary and human studies will highlight the common molecular and mechanistic pathways, and accelerate progress towards reducing the global health burden of helminth infection. PMID:24606541

  15. Atypical parasitic ischiopagus conjoined twins.

    PubMed

    Corona-Rivera, J Román; Corona-Rivera, Enrique; Franco-Topete, Ramón; Acosta-León, Jorge; Aguila-Dueñas, Virginia; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2003-02-01

    Occurrence of asymmetrical or parasitic conjoined twins (CT) is rare, and currently they are classified analogically to the common unions of symmetrical CT. The authors report on an infant with a parasitic third limb attached to the left lateral aspect of the autosite trunk, in whom male gonadal tissue was found histologically. Parasite parts included complete left lower limb, hemipelvis, lumbosacral vertebral column, spinal cord, and one kidney with ureter and adrenal gland. Autosite anomalies comprised a small left diaphragmatic defect, omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, and lumbar meningomyelocele. The authors considered this case to be a rare atypical parasitic ischiopagus CT. The differential diagnosis of the type of twining and other entities with caudal duplications is analyzed briefly. PMID:12596123

  16. Flicker stimulated retinal perfusion changes assessed with high-speed Doppler tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoll, Tilman; Singh, Amardeep S. G.; Frily, Karine; Blatter, Cedric; Villiger, Martin; Pache, Christoph; Lasser, Theo; Leitgeb, R. A.

    2010-02-01

    We developed a high speed Doppler tomography system together with flow extraction algorithms that provide a flexible tool to assess retinal perfusion. The aim of the present study is to stimulate perfusion by flickering with light of adjustable color and to measure changes depending on light frequency and flicker location. We observed relative changes in arterial flow velocity during flicker stimulation up to 50%. We found in arteries close to the optic nerve head the highest flicker response at a frequency of 8Hz. We believe that a multimodal functional imaging concept is of high value for an accurate and early diagnosis and understanding of retinal pathologies and pathogenesis.

  17. An essential malaria protein defines the architecture of blood-stage and transmission-stage parasites.

    PubMed

    Absalon, Sabrina; Robbins, Jonathan A; Dvorin, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Blood-stage replication of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum occurs via schizogony, wherein daughter parasites are formed by a specialized cytokinesis known as segmentation. Here we identify a parasite protein, which we name P. falciparum Merozoite Organizing Protein (PfMOP), as essential for cytokinesis of blood-stage parasites. We show that, following PfMOP knockdown, parasites undergo incomplete segmentation resulting in a residual agglomerate of partially divided cells. While organelles develop normally, the structural scaffold of daughter parasites, the inner membrane complex (IMC), fails to form in this agglomerate causing flawed segmentation. In PfMOP-deficient gametocytes, the IMC formation defect causes maturation arrest with aberrant morphology and death. Our results provide insight into the mechanisms of replication and maturation of malaria parasites. PMID:27121004

  18. Vitamin and co-factor biosynthesis pathways in Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Sylke; Kappes, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Vitamins are essential components of the human diet. By contrast, the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and related apicomplexan parasites synthesise certain vitamins, de novo, either completely or in parts. The occurrence of the various biosynthesis pathways is specific to different apicomplexan parasites, emphasising their distinct requirements for nutrients and growth factors. The absence of vitamin biosynthesis from the human host implies that inhibition of the parasite pathways may be a way to interfere specifically with parasite development. However, the precise role of biosynthesis and potential uptake of vitamins for the overall regulation of vitamin homeostasis in the parasites needs to be established first. In this review Sylke Müller and Barbara Kappes focus mainly on the procurement of vitamin B1, B5 and B6 by Plasmodium and other apicomplexan parasites. PMID:17276140

  19. An essential malaria protein defines the architecture of blood-stage and transmission-stage parasites

    PubMed Central

    Absalon, Sabrina; Robbins, Jonathan A.; Dvorin, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-stage replication of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum occurs via schizogony, wherein daughter parasites are formed by a specialized cytokinesis known as segmentation. Here we identify a parasite protein, which we name P. falciparum Merozoite Organizing Protein (PfMOP), as essential for cytokinesis of blood-stage parasites. We show that, following PfMOP knockdown, parasites undergo incomplete segmentation resulting in a residual agglomerate of partially divided cells. While organelles develop normally, the structural scaffold of daughter parasites, the inner membrane complex (IMC), fails to form in this agglomerate causing flawed segmentation. In PfMOP-deficient gametocytes, the IMC formation defect causes maturation arrest with aberrant morphology and death. Our results provide insight into the mechanisms of replication and maturation of malaria parasites. PMID:27121004

  20. Pervasiveness of Parasites in Pollinators

    PubMed Central

    Evison, Sophie E. F.; Roberts, Katherine E.; Laurenson, Lynn; Pietravalle, Stéphane; Hui, Jeffrey; Biesmeijer, Jacobus C.; Smith, Judith E.; Budge, Giles; Hughes, William O. H.

    2012-01-01

    Many pollinator populations are declining, with large economic and ecological implications. Parasites are known to be an important factor in the some of the population declines of honey bees and bumblebees, but little is known about the parasites afflicting most other pollinators, or the extent of interspecific transmission or vectoring of parasites. Here we carry out a preliminary screening of pollinators (honey bees, five species of bumblebee, three species of wasp, four species of hoverfly and three genera of other bees) in the UK for parasites. We used molecular methods to screen for six honey bee viruses, Ascosphaera fungi, Microsporidia, and Wolbachia intracellular bacteria. We aimed simply to detect the presence of the parasites, encompassing vectoring as well as actual infections. Many pollinators of all types were positive for Ascosphaera fungi, while Microsporidia were rarer, being most frequently found in bumblebees. We also detected that most pollinators were positive for Wolbachia, most probably indicating infection with this intracellular symbiont, and raising the possibility that it may be an important factor in influencing host sex ratios or fitness in a diversity of pollinators. Importantly, we found that about a third of bumblebees (Bombus pascuorum and Bombus terrestris) and a third of wasps (Vespula vulgaris), as well as all honey bees, were positive for deformed wing virus, but that this virus was not present in other pollinators. Deformed wing virus therefore does not appear to be a general parasite of pollinators, but does interact significantly with at least three species of bumblebee and wasp. Further work is needed to establish the identity of some of the parasites, their spatiotemporal variation, and whether they are infecting the various pollinator species or being vectored. However, these results provide a first insight into the diversity, and potential exchange, of parasites in pollinator communities. PMID:22347356

  1. Carbohydrate metabolism of malarial parasites

    PubMed Central

    Homewood, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The evidence for the pathways involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates by malarial parasites is critically reviewed. In all species studied, glucose is catabolized mainly by glycolysis with little participation of the pentose—phosphate pathway. It has not been proved conclusively that there is a functioning citric acid cycle in the intraerythrocytic stages of avian plasmodia, nor is it certain that these stages of any malarial parasites use oxygen. PMID:338181

  2. Parasitic Effects on Memristor Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Makoto; Chua, Leon O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we show that parasitic elements have a significant effect on the dynamics of memristor circuits. We first show that certain 2-terminal elements such as memristors, memcapacitors, and meminductors can be used as nonvolatile memories, if the principle of conservation of state variables hold by open-circuiting, or short-circuiting, their terminals. We also show that a passive memristor with a strictly-increasing constitutive relation will eventually lose its stored flux when we switch off the power if there is a parasitic capacitance across the memristor. Similarly, a memcapacitor (resp., meminductor) with a positive memcapacitance (resp., meminductance) will eventually lose their stored physical states when we switch off the power, if it is connected to a parasitic resistance. We then show that the discontinuous jump that circuit engineers assumed to occur at impasse points of memristor circuits contradicts the principles of conservation of charge and flux at the time of the discontinuous jump. A parasitic element can be used to break an impasse point, resulting in the emergence of a continuous oscillation in the circuit. We also define a distance, a diameter, and a dimension, for each circuit element in order to measure the complexity order of the parasitic elements. They can be used to find higher-order parasitic elements which can break impasse points. Furthermore, we derived a memristor-based Chua’s circuit from a three-element circuit containing a memristor by connecting two parasitic memcapacitances to break the impasse points. We finally show that a higher-order parasitic element can be used for breaking the impasse points on two-dimensional and three-dimensional constrained spaces.

  3. Pervasiveness of parasites in pollinators.

    PubMed

    Evison, Sophie E F; Roberts, Katherine E; Laurenson, Lynn; Pietravalle, Stéphane; Hui, Jeffrey; Biesmeijer, Jacobus C; Smith, Judith E; Budge, Giles; Hughes, William O H

    2012-01-01

    Many pollinator populations are declining, with large economic and ecological implications. Parasites are known to be an important factor in the some of the population declines of honey bees and bumblebees, but little is known about the parasites afflicting most other pollinators, or the extent of interspecific transmission or vectoring of parasites. Here we carry out a preliminary screening of pollinators (honey bees, five species of bumblebee, three species of wasp, four species of hoverfly and three genera of other bees) in the UK for parasites. We used molecular methods to screen for six honey bee viruses, Ascosphaera fungi, Microsporidia, and Wolbachia intracellular bacteria. We aimed simply to detect the presence of the parasites, encompassing vectoring as well as actual infections. Many pollinators of all types were positive for Ascosphaera fungi, while Microsporidia were rarer, being most frequently found in bumblebees. We also detected that most pollinators were positive for Wolbachia, most probably indicating infection with this intracellular symbiont, and raising the possibility that it may be an important factor in influencing host sex ratios or fitness in a diversity of pollinators. Importantly, we found that about a third of bumblebees (Bombus pascuorum and Bombus terrestris) and a third of wasps (Vespula vulgaris), as well as all honey bees, were positive for deformed wing virus, but that this virus was not present in other pollinators. Deformed wing virus therefore does not appear to be a general parasite of pollinators, but does interact significantly with at least three species of bumblebee and wasp. Further work is needed to establish the identity of some of the parasites, their spatiotemporal variation, and whether they are infecting the various pollinator species or being vectored. However, these results provide a first insight into the diversity, and potential exchange, of parasites in pollinator communities. PMID:22347356

  4. Luminal perfusion of isolated gastric glands.

    PubMed

    Waisbren, S J; Geibel, J; Boron, W F; Modlin, I M

    1994-04-01

    We have extended to rabbit gastric glands the technique for perfusing single isolated renal tubules. We isolated glands by hand dissection and used concentric glass pipettes to hold them and perfuse their lumina. Parietal cells (PCs), which tended to be located toward the gland opening, were identified by their pyramidal shape, large size, and autofluorescence. Chief cells (CCs) were identified by their round shape and smaller size. In some experiments, we perfused the lumen with hydroxypyrenetrisulfonate, a pH-sensitive fluorophore, at pH 7.4 and used digital image processing to monitor luminal pH (pH1). Solutions were buffered with N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid to pH 7.4 at 37 degrees C. With fast perfusion, we found no evidence of decreased pH1, even with stimulation by 10 microM carbachol. With slow perfusion, pH1 often fell below the dye's sensitive range (pH < 5), especially at low perfusate buffering power. In other experiments, we loaded cells with the pH-sensitive dye 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein and monitored intracellular pH (pHi) in multiple individual PCs and CCs in a single gland. Mean pHi was 7.21 +/- 0.02 (n = 136 cells) for PCs and 7.27 +/- 0.03 (n = 103) for CCs. To examine the response to decreased pH1 and basolateral pH (pHb), we lowered pHb to 6.4 or lowered pH1 to 3.4 or 1.4. Lowering pHb to 6.4 for approximately 1 min caused pHi to fall reversibly by 0.39 +/- 0.05 (n = 53) in PCs and 0.58 +/- 0.03 (n = 50) in CCs. Lowering pH1 to 3.4 or 1.4 caused no significant pHi changes in PCs (n = 38 and 82) or in CCs (n = 44 and 77). Carbachol did not affect the response to changes in pH1 or pHb. We conclude that the apical surfaces of PCs and CCs are unusually resistant to extreme pH gradients. PMID:8178950

  5. Protective efficacy and safety of liver stage attenuated malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hirdesh; Sattler, Julia Magdalena; Singer, Mirko; Heiss, Kirsten; Reinig, Miriam; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Heussler, Volker; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    During the clinically silent liver stage of a Plasmodium infection the parasite replicates from a single sporozoite into thousands of merozoites. Infection of humans and rodents with large numbers of sporozoites that arrest their development within the liver can cause sterile protection from subsequent infections. Disruption of genes essential for liver stage development of rodent malaria parasites has yielded a number of attenuated parasite strains. A key question to this end is how increased attenuation relates to vaccine efficacy. Here, we generated rodent malaria parasite lines that arrest during liver stage development and probed the impact of multiple gene deletions on attenuation and protective efficacy. In contrast to P. berghei strain ANKA LISP2(-) or uis3(-) single knockout parasites, which occasionally caused breakthrough infections, the double mutant lacking both genes was completely attenuated even when high numbers of sporozoites were administered. However, different vaccination protocols showed that LISP2(-) parasites protected better than uis3(-) and double mutants. Hence, deletion of several genes can yield increased safety but might come at the cost of protective efficacy. PMID:27241521

  6. Protective efficacy and safety of liver stage attenuated malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Hirdesh; Sattler, Julia Magdalena; Singer, Mirko; Heiss, Kirsten; Reinig, Miriam; Hammerschmidt-Kamper, Christiane; Heussler, Volker; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    During the clinically silent liver stage of a Plasmodium infection the parasite replicates from a single sporozoite into thousands of merozoites. Infection of humans and rodents with large numbers of sporozoites that arrest their development within the liver can cause sterile protection from subsequent infections. Disruption of genes essential for liver stage development of rodent malaria parasites has yielded a number of attenuated parasite strains. A key question to this end is how increased attenuation relates to vaccine efficacy. Here, we generated rodent malaria parasite lines that arrest during liver stage development and probed the impact of multiple gene deletions on attenuation and protective efficacy. In contrast to P. berghei strain ANKA LISP2(–) or uis3(–) single knockout parasites, which occasionally caused breakthrough infections, the double mutant lacking both genes was completely attenuated even when high numbers of sporozoites were administered. However, different vaccination protocols showed that LISP2(–) parasites protected better than uis3(–) and double mutants. Hence, deletion of several genes can yield increased safety but might come at the cost of protective efficacy. PMID:27241521

  7. Parasites: what are they good for?

    PubMed Central

    Stumhofer, Jason S.; Loke, P’ng

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic diseases caused by helminth and protozoan infections remain one of the largest global public health problems for mankind. While natural immunity in man is rare or slow to develop for many parasites, the immune response is capable of recognizing and responding to infection by utilizing a number of different immunological mechanisms. This special topics journal issue examines many of the key findings in the recent literature regarding the immune response against helminth and protozoan infections, as well as highlighting areas in which our current knowledge falls short. The question of how we can tailor immune responses to prevent or reduce disease burden is a burning question within the field of immunoparasitology. PMID:24683385

  8. Parasitic Pneumonia and Lung Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Cheepsattayakorn, Ruangrong

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic infestations demonstrated a decline in the past decade as a result of better hygiene practices and improved socioeconomic conditions. Nevertheless, global immigration, increased numbers of the immunocompromised people, international traveling, global warming, and rapid urbanization of the cities have increased the susceptibility of the world population to parasitic diseases. A number of new human parasites, such as Plasmodium knowlesi, in addition to many potential parasites, have urged the interest of scientific community. A broad spectrum of protozoal parasites frequently affects the respiratory system, particularly the lungs. The diagnosis of parasitic diseases of airway is challenging due to their wide varieties of clinical and roentgenographic presentations. So detailed interrogations of travel history to endemic areas are critical for clinicians or pulmonologists to manage this entity. The migrating adult worms can cause mechanical airway obstruction, while the larvae can cause airway inflammation. This paper provides a comprehensive review of both protozoal and helminthic infestations that affect the airway system, particularly the lungs, including clinical and roentgenographic presentations, diagnostic tests, and therapeutic approaches. PMID:24995332

  9. Birds are islands for parasites

    PubMed Central

    Koop, Jennifer A. H.; DeMatteo, Karen E.; Parker, Patricia G.; Whiteman, Noah K.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms driving the extraordinary diversification of parasites is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Co-speciation, one proposed mechanism that could contribute to this diversity is hypothesized to result from allopatric co-divergence of host–parasite populations. We found that island populations of the Galápagos hawk (Buteo galapagoensis) and a parasitic feather louse species (Degeeriella regalis) exhibit patterns of co-divergence across variable temporal and spatial scales. Hawks and lice showed nearly identical population genetic structure across the Galápagos Islands. Hawk population genetic structure is explained by isolation by distance among islands. Louse population structure is best explained by hawk population structure, rather than isolation by distance per se, suggesting that lice tightly track the recent population histories of their hosts. Among hawk individuals, louse populations were also highly structured, suggesting that hosts serve as islands for parasites from an evolutionary perspective. Altogether, we found that host and parasite populations may have responded in the same manner to geographical isolation across spatial scales. Allopatric co-divergence is likely one important mechanism driving the diversification of parasites. PMID:25099959

  10. Birds are islands for parasites.

    PubMed

    Koop, Jennifer A H; DeMatteo, Karen E; Parker, Patricia G; Whiteman, Noah K

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the mechanisms driving the extraordinary diversification of parasites is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Co-speciation, one proposed mechanism that could contribute to this diversity is hypothesized to result from allopatric co-divergence of host-parasite populations. We found that island populations of the Galápagos hawk (Buteo galapagoensis) and a parasitic feather louse species (Degeeriella regalis) exhibit patterns of co-divergence across variable temporal and spatial scales. Hawks and lice showed nearly identical population genetic structure across the Galápagos Islands. Hawk population genetic structure is explained by isolation by distance among islands. Louse population structure is best explained by hawk population structure, rather than isolation by distance per se, suggesting that lice tightly track the recent population histories of their hosts. Among hawk individuals, louse populations were also highly structured, suggesting that hosts serve as islands for parasites from an evolutionary perspective. Altogether, we found that host and parasite populations may have responded in the same manner to geographical isolation across spatial scales. Allopatric co-divergence is likely one important mechanism driving the diversification of parasites. PMID:25099959

  11. Verapamil prevents silent myocardial perfusion abnormalities during exercise in asymptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Udelson, J.E.; Bonow, R.O.; O'Gara, P.T.; Maron, B.J.; Van Lingen, A.; Bacharach, S.L.; Epstein, S.E.

    1989-05-01

    Recent studies indicate that reversible 201Tl perfusion defects, compatible with silent myocardial ischemia, commonly develop during exercise in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). To determine whether this represents a dynamic process that may be modified favorably by medical therapy, we studied 29 asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients with HCM, aged 12-55 years (mean, 28), with exercise 201Tl emission computed tomography under control conditions and again after 1 week of oral verapamil (mean dosage, 453 mg/day). Treadmill time increased slightly during verapamil (21.0 +/- 3.6 to 21.9 +/- 2.7 minutes, p less than 0.005), but peak heart rate-blood pressure product was unchanged (26.3 +/- 6.0 X 10(3)) compared with 25.0 +/- 6.4 X 10(3). Two midventricular short-axis images per study were divided into five regions each, and each of these 10 regions was then analyzed on a 0-2 scale by three observers blinded with regard to the patients' therapy. Average regional scores of 1.5 or less were considered to represent perfusion defects, and a change in regional score of 0.5 or more was considered to constitute a significant change. During control studies, 15 patients (52%) developed perfusion defects with exercise (average, 3.7 regions per patient). In 14 of these patients, all perfusion defects completely reversed after 3 hours of rest; one patient had fixed defects. After administration of verapamil, exercise perfusion scores improved in 10 of the 14 patients (71%) with reversible defects; there was overall improvement in 34 of 50 (68%) regions with initially reversible perfusion defects.

  12. Hosts and parasites as aliens.

    PubMed

    Taraschewski, H

    2006-06-01

    Over the past decades, various free-living animals (hosts) and their parasites have invaded recipient areas in which they had not previously occurred, thus gaining the status of aliens or exotics. In general this happened to a low extent for hundreds of years. With variable frequency, invasions have been followed by the dispersal and establishment of non-indigenous species, whether host or parasite. In the literature thus far, colonizations by both hosts and parasites have not been treated and reviewed together, although both are usually interwoven in various ways. As to those factors permitting invasive success and colonization strength, various hypotheses have been put forward depending on the scientific background of respective authors and on the conspicuousness of certain invasions. Researchers who have tried to analyse characteristic developmental patterns, the speed of dispersal or the degree of genetic divergence in populations of alien species have come to different conclusions. Among parasitologists, the applied aspects of parasite invasions, such as the negative effects on economically important hosts, have long been at the centre of interest. In this contribution, invasions by hosts as well as parasites are considered comparatively, revealing many similarities and a few differences. Two helminths, the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, of cattle and sheep and the swimbladder nematode, Anguillicola crassus, of eels are shown to be useful as model parasites for the study of animal invasions and environmental global change. Introductions of F. hepatica have been associated with imports of cattle or other grazing animals. In various target areas, susceptible lymnaeid snails serving as intermediate hosts were either naturally present and/or were introduced from the donor continent of the parasite (Europe) and/or from other regions which were not within the original range of the parasite, partly reflecting progressive stages of a global biota change. In several

  13. Interactions of warming and exposure affect susceptibility to parasite infection in a temperate fish species.

    PubMed

    Sheath, Danny J; Andreou, Demetra; Britton, J Robert

    2016-09-01

    Predicting how elevated temperatures from climate change alter host-parasite interactions requires understandings of how warming affects host susceptibility and parasite virulence. Here, the effect of elevated water temperature and parasite exposure level was tested on parasite prevalence, abundance and burden, and on fish growth, using Pomphorhynchus laevis and its fish host Squalius cephalus. At 60 days post-exposure, prevalence was higher at the elevated temperature (22 °C) than ambient temperature (18 °C), with infections achieved at considerably lower levels of exposure. Whilst parasite number was significantly higher in infected fish at 22 °C, both mean parasite weight and parasite burden was significantly higher at 18 °C. There were, however, no significant relationships between fish growth rate and temperature, parasite exposure, and the infection parameters. Thus, whilst elevated temperature significantly influenced parasite infection rates, it also impacted parasite development rates, suggesting warming could have complex implications for parasite dynamics and host resistance. PMID:27225942

  14. The prediction of radiation-induced liver dysfunction using a local dose and regional venous perfusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Yue; Platt, Joel F.; Francis, Isaac R; Balter, James M.; Pan, Charlie; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Haken, Randall K. ten; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2007-02-15

    We have shown that high dose conformal radiation combined with chemotherapy appears to prolong the survival of patients with unresectable intrahepatic cancers. The ability to safely deliver higher doses is primarily limited by the development of radiation-induced liver disease, characterized by venous occlusion. In this study, we investigated whether portal venous perfusion measured prior to the end of radiation therapy (RT) together with dose could predict liver venous perfusion dysfunction after treatment. Ten patients with unresectable intrahepatic cancer participated in an IRB-approved computer tomography (CT) perfusion study. Hepatic arterial and portal vein perfusion distributions were estimated by using dynamic contrast enhanced CT and the single compartmental model. Scans were obtained at four time points: prior to treatment, after 15 and 30 fractions of 1.5 Gy treatments, and one month following the completion of RT. Multivariant linear regression was used to determine covariances among the first three time point measurements plus dose for prediction of the post RT measurement. The reduction in the regional venous perfusion one month following RT was predicted by the local accumulated dose and the change in the regional venous perfusion after {approx}30 fractions (F=90.6,p<0.000 01). Each Gy produced an approximately 1.2% of reduction in the venous perfusion. This local dose and venous perfusion model has the potential to predict individual sensitivity to radiation. This is the first step toward developing a method to deliver higher and potentially more curative radiation doses to the patients who can safely receive these higher doses.

  15. The algal past and parasite present of the apicoplast.

    PubMed

    van Dooren, Giel G; Striepen, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium and Toxoplasma are genera of apicomplexan parasites that infect millions of people each year. The former causes malaria, and the latter causes neurotropic infections associated with a weakened or developing immune system. These parasites harbor a peculiar organelle, the apicoplast. The apicoplast is the product of an ancient endosymbiosis between a heterotrophic and a photosynthetic protist. We explore the cellular and molecular mechanisms that enabled a stable union of two previously independent organisms. These include the exchange of metabolites, transfer of genes, transport of proteins, and overall coordination of biogenesis and proliferation. These mechanisms are still active today and can be exploited to treat parasite infection. They were shaped by the dramatic changes that occurred in the evolution of the phylum Apicomplexa--including the gain and loss of photosynthesis, adaptation to symbiosis and parasitism, and the explosion of animal diversity-that ultimately provided an aquatic alga access to every biotope on this planet. PMID:23808340

  16. Fluorescence-based enhanced reality (FLER) for real-time estimation of bowel perfusion in minimally invasive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diana, Michele

    2016-03-01

    Pre-anastomotic bowel perfusion is a key factor for a successful healing process. Clinical judgment has limited accuracy to evaluate intestinal microperfusion. Fluorescence videography is a promising tool for image-guided intraoperative assessment of the bowel perfusion at the future anastomotic site in the setting of minimally invasive procedures. The standard configuration for fluorescence videography includes a Near-Infrared endoscope able to detect the signal emitted by a fluorescent dye, more frequently Indocyanine Green (ICG), which is administered by intravenous injection. Fluorescence intensity is proportional to the amount of fluorescent dye diffusing in the tissue and consequently is a surrogate marker of tissue perfusion. However, fluorescence intensity alone remains a subjective approach and an integrated computer-based analysis of the over-time evolution of the fluorescence signal is required to obtain quantitative data. We have developed a solution integrating computer-based analysis for intra-operative evaluation of the optimal resection site, based on the bowel perfusion as determined by the dynamic fluorescence intensity. The software can generate a "virtual perfusion cartography", based on the "fluorescence time-to-peak". The virtual perfusion cartography can be overlapped onto real-time laparoscopic images to obtain the Enhanced Reality effect. We have defined this approach FLuorescence-based Enhanced Reality (FLER). This manuscript describes the stepwise development of the FLER concept.

  17. Perfusion techniques for minimally invasive valve procedures.

    PubMed

    de Jong, A; Popa, B A; Stelian, E; Karazanishvili, L; Lanzillo, G; Simonini, S; Renzi, L; Diena, M; Tesler, U F

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present, in detail, the simplified perfusion technique that we have adopted since January 2009 and that we have utilized in 200 cases for cardiac minimally invasive valvular procedures that were performed through a right lateral mini-thoracotomy in the 3(rd)-4(th) intercostal space. Cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved by means of the direct cannulation of the ascending aorta and the insertion of a percutaneous venous cannula in the femoral vein. A flexible aortic cross-clamp was applied through the skin incision and cardioplegic arrest was obtained with the antegrade delivery of a crystalloid solution. Gravity drainage was enhanced by vacuum-assisted aspiration. There were no technical complications related to this perfusion technique that we have adopted in minimally invasive surgical procedures. PMID:25280878

  18. Assessment of cerebral perfusion in childhood strokes

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, G.F.; Fishman, L.S.; Segall, H.D.

    1982-11-01

    Thirty-three children who had strokes were studied by dynamic and static scintigraphy, 29 by CT scanning, and 10 by cerebral angiography. The accuracy of dynamic scintigraphy in stroke detection during the first week of clinical symptoms was 94% while CT scanning was 60% accurate and static scintigraphy 11% accurate. During the second week the accuracy of CT scanning increased to 100%, but static scintigraphy improved to only 50%. Fifty percent of scintiangiograms performed during the first week showed either luxuriant perfusion or flip-flop patterns. In some patients these two flow patterns changed to that of cerebral hemispheric ischemia after going through a phase during which perfusion appeared to be equal in the two hemispheres. Dynamic scintigraphy is believed to be the test of choice for stroke detection in children during the first week.

  19. The "push-to-low" approach for optimization of high-density perfusion cultures of animal cells.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, Konstantin; Goudar, Chetan; Ng, Maria; Meneses, Renato; Thrift, John; Chuppa, Sandy; Matanguihan, Cary; Michaels, Jim; Naveh, David

    2006-01-01

    High product titer is considered a strategic advantage of fed-batch over perfusion cultivation mode. The titer difference has been experimentally demonstrated and reported in the literature. However, the related theoretical aspects and strategies for optimization of perfusion processes with respect to their fed-batch counterparts have not been thoroughly explored. The present paper introduces a unified framework for comparison of fed-batch and perfusion cultures, and proposes directions for improvement of the latter. The comparison is based on the concept of "equivalent specific perfusion rate", a variable that conveniently bridges various cultivation modes. The analysis shows that development of economically competitive perfusion processes for production of stable proteins depends on our ability to dramatically reduce the dilution rate while keeping high cell density, i.e., operating at low specific perfusion rates. Under these conditions, titer increases significantly, approaching the range of fed-batch titers. However, as dilution rate is decreased, a limit is reached below which performance declines due to poor growth and viability, specific productivity, or product instability. To overcome these limitations, a strategy referred to as "push-to-low" optimization has been developed. This approach involves an iterative stepwise decrease of the specific perfusion rate, and is most suitable for production of stable proteins where increased residence time does not compromise apparent specific productivity or product quality. The push-to-low approach was successfully applied to the production of monoclonal antibody against tumor necrosis factor (TNF). The experimental results followed closely the theoretical prediction, providing a multifold increase in titer. Despite the medium improvement, reduction of the specific growth rate along with increased apoptosis was observed at low specific perfusion rates. This phenomenon could not be explained with limitation or

  20. Gluconeogenesis in the perfused rat liver.

    PubMed

    Hems, R; Ross, B D; Berry, M N; Krebs, H A

    1966-11-01

    1. A modification of the methods of Miller and of Schimassek for the perfusion of the isolated rat liver, suitable for the study of gluconeogenesis, is described. 2. The main modifications concern the operative technique (reducing the period of anoxia during the operation to 3min.) and the use of aged (non-glycolysing) red cells in the semi-synthetic perfusion medium. 3. The performance of the perfused liver was tested by measuring the rate of gluconeogenesis, of urea synthesis and the stability of adenine nucleotides. Higher rates of gluconeogenesis (1mumole/min./g.) from excess of lactate and of urea synthesis from excess of ammonia (4mumoles/min./g. in the presence of ornithine) were observed than are likely to occur in vivo where rates are limited by the rate of supply of precursor. The concentrations of the three adenine nucleotides in the liver tissue were maintained within 15% over a perfusion period of 135min. 4. Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+) and phosphate were found to be required at physiological concentrations for optimum gluconeogenesis but bicarbonate and carbon dioxide could be largely replaced by phosphate buffer without affecting the rate of gluconeogenesis. 5. Maximal gluconeogenesis did not decrease maximal urea synthesis in the presence of ornithine and ammonia and vice versa. This indicates that the energy requirements were not limiting the rates of gluconeogenesis or of urea synthesis. 6. Addition of lactate, and especially ammonium salts, increased the uptake of oxygen more than expected on the basis of the ATP requirements of the gluconeogenesis and urea synthesis. PMID:5966267

  1. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques. PMID:26156231

  2. Making sense of genomes of parasitic worms: Tackling bioinformatic challenges.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Pasi K; Young, Neil D; Gasser, Robin B

    2016-01-01

    Billions of people and animals are infected with parasitic worms (helminths). Many of these worms cause diseases that have a major socioeconomic impact worldwide, and are challenging to control because existing treatment methods are often inadequate. There is, therefore, a need to work toward developing new intervention methods, built on a sound understanding of parasitic worms at molecular level, the relationships that they have with their animal hosts and/or the diseases that they cause. Decoding the genomes and transcriptomes of these parasites brings us a step closer to this goal. The key focus of this article is to critically review and discuss bioinformatic tools used for the assembly and annotation of these genomes and transcriptomes, as well as various post-genomic analyses of transcription profiles, biological pathways, synteny, phylogeny, biogeography and the prediction and prioritisation of drug target candidates. Bioinformatic pipelines implemented and established recently provide practical and efficient tools for the assembly and annotation of genomes of parasitic worms, and will be applicable to a wide range of other parasites and eukaryotic organisms. Future research will need to assess the utility of long-read sequence data sets for enhanced genomic assemblies, and develop improved algorithms for gene prediction and post-genomic analyses, to enable comprehensive systems biology explorations of parasitic organisms. PMID:26956711

  3. Inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; West, John B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the inhomogeneity of pulmonary perfusion in man were studied by performing hyperventilation-breathhold single-breath measurements before, during and after 9 days of continuous exposure to microgravity. In microgravity the indicators of inhomogeneity of perfusion, especially the size of cardiogenic oscillations in expired CO2 and the height of phase 4, were both markedly reduced. Cardiogenic oscillations were reduced to approximately 60 of their preflight standing size, while the height of phase 4 was between 0 and -8% (a terminal fall became a small terminal rise) of preflights standing. The terminal change in CO2 was nearly abolished in microgravity indicating more uniformity of blood flow between lung units that close at the end of expiration and units that remain open. This may result from the disappearance of gravity-dependent topographical inequality of blood flow. The residual cardiographic oscillations in expired CO2 imply a persisting inhomogeneity of perfusion in the absence of gravity at a level larger than acinar.

  4. Regulation of skeletal muscle perfusion during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Laughlin, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    For exercise to be sustained, it is essential that adequate blood flow be provided to skeletal muscle. The local vascular control mechanisms involved in regulating muscle perfusion during exercise include metabolic control, endothelium-mediated control, propagated responses, myogenic control, and the muscle pump. The primary determinant of muscle perfusion during sustained exercise is the metabolic rate of the muscle. Metabolites from contracting muscle diffuse to resistance arterioles and act directly to induce vasodilation, or indirectly to inhibit noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerve endings and oppose alpha-adrenoreceptor-mediated vasoconstriction. The vascular endothelium also releases vasodilator substances (e.g., prostacyclin and nitric oxide) that are prominent in establishing basal vascular tone, but these substances do not appear to contribute to the exercise hyperemia in muscle. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells may also be involved in propagating vasodilator signals along arterioles to parent and daughter vessels. Myogenic autoregulation does not appear to be involved in the exercise hyperemia in muscle, but the rhythmic propulsion of blood from skeletal muscle veins facilitates venous return to the heart and muscle perfusion. It appears that the primary determinants of sustained exercise hyperemia in skeletal muscle are metabolic vasodilation and increased vascular conductance via the muscle pump. Additionally, sympathetic neural control is important in regulating muscle blood flow during exercise.

  5. Perfusion computed tomography in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Das, Chandan J; Thingujam, Usha; Panda, Ananya; Sharma, Sanjay; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2015-07-28

    Various imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis, staging and response evaluation of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). While contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) is used as the standard of imaging for size, morphological evaluation and response assessment in RCC, a new functional imaging technique like perfusion CT (pCT), goes down to the molecular level and provides new perspectives in imaging of RCC. pCT depicts regional tumor perfusion and vascular permeability which are indirect parameters of tumor angiogenesis and thereby provides vital information regarding tumor microenvironment. Also response evaluation using pCT may predate the size criteria used in Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, as changes in the perfusion occurs earlier following tissue kinase inhibitors before any actual change in size. This may potentially help in predicting prognosis, better selection of therapy and more accurate and better response evaluation in patients with RCC. This article describes the techniques and role of pCT in staging and response assessment in patients with RCCs. PMID:26217456

  6. Noncontact blood perfusion mapping in clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iakovlev, Dmitry; Dwyer, Vincent; Hu, Sijung; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) to detect pulsatile blood microcirculation in tissue has been selected as a successor to low spatial resolution and slow scanning blood perfusion techniques currently employed by clinicians. The proposed iPPG system employs a novel illumination source constructed of multiple high power LEDs with narrow spectral emission, which are temporally modulated and synchronised with a high performance sCMOS sensor. To ensure spectrum stability and prevent thermal wavelength drift due to junction temperature variations, each LED features a custom-designed thermal management system to effectively dissipate generated heat and auto-adjust current flow. The use of a multi-wavelength approach has resulted in simultaneous microvascular perfusion monitoring at various tissue depths, which is an added benefit for specific clinical applications. A synchronous detection algorithm to extract weak photoplethysmographic pulse-waveforms demonstrated robustness and high efficiency when applied to even small regions of 5 mm2. The experimental results showed evidences that the proposed system could achieve noticeable accuracy in blood perfusion monitoring by creating complex amplitude and phase maps for the tissue under examination.

  7. Parallel perfusion imaging processing using GPGPU

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fan; Gonzalez, David Rodriguez; Carpenter, Trevor; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose The objective of brain perfusion quantification is to generate parametric maps of relevant hemodynamic quantities such as cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) that can be used in diagnosis of acute stroke. These calculations involve deconvolution operations that can be very computationally expensive when using local Arterial Input Functions (AIF). As time is vitally important in the case of acute stroke, reducing the analysis time will reduce the number of brain cells damaged and increase the potential for recovery. Methods GPUs originated as graphics generation dedicated co-processors, but modern GPUs have evolved to become a more general processor capable of executing scientific computations. It provides a highly parallel computing environment due to its large number of computing cores and constitutes an affordable high performance computing method. In this paper, we will present the implementation of a deconvolution algorithm for brain perfusion quantification on GPGPU (General Purpose Graphics Processor Units) using the CUDA programming model. We present the serial and parallel implementations of such algorithms and the evaluation of the performance gains using GPUs. Results Our method has gained a 5.56 and 3.75 speedup for CT and MR images respectively. Conclusions It seems that using GPGPU is a desirable approach in perfusion imaging analysis, which does not harm the quality of cerebral hemodynamic maps but delivers results faster than the traditional computation. PMID:22824549

  8. Whole Animal Perfusion Fixation for Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Gage, Gregory J.; Kipke, Daryl R.; Shain, William

    2012-01-01

    The goal of fixation is to rapidly and uniformly preserve tissue in a life-like state. While placing tissue directly in fixative works well for small pieces of tissue, larger specimens like the intact brain pose a problem for immersion fixation because the fixative does not reach all regions of the tissue at the same rate 5,7. Often, changes in response to hypoxia begin before the tissue can be preserved 12. The advantage of directly perfusing fixative through the circulatory system is that the chemical can quickly reach every corner of the organism using the natural vascular network. In order to utilize the circulatory system most effectively, care must be taken to match physiological pressures 3. It is important to note that physiological pressures are dependent on the species used. Techniques for perfusion fixation vary depending on the tissue to be fixed and how the tissue will be processed following fixation. In this video, we describe a low-cost, rapid, controlled and uniform fixation procedure using 4% paraformaldehyde perfused via the vascular system: through the heart of the rat to obtain the best possible preservation of the brain for immunohistochemistry. The main advantage of this technique (vs. gravity-fed systems) is that the circulatory system is utilized most effectively. PMID:22871843

  9. Myocardial perfusion analysis in cardiac computed tomography angiographic images at rest.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guanglei; Kola, Deeksha; Heo, Ran; Elmore, Kimberly; Cho, Iksung; Min, James K

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac compu