Science.gov

Sample records for device manufacturing ii

  1. Medical devices; exemption from premarket notification; Class II devices; optical impression systems for computer assisted design and manufacturing. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2003-04-22

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is publishing an order granting a petition requesting exemption from the premarket notification requirements for data acquisition units for ceramic dental restoration systems. This rule exempts from premarket notification data acquisition units for ceramic dental restoration systems and establishes a guidance document as a special control for this device. FDA is publishing this order in accordance with the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). PMID:12708463

  2. Device overlay method for high volume manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honggoo; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Youngsik; Kim, Myoungsoo; Heo, Hoyoung; Jeon, Sanghuck; Choi, DongSub; Nabeth, Jeremy; Brinster, Irina; Pierson, Bill; Robinson, John C.

    2016-03-01

    Advancing technology nodes with smaller process margins require improved photolithography overlay control. Overlay control at develop inspection (DI) based on optical metrology targets is well established in semiconductor manufacturing. Advances in target design and metrology technology have enabled significant improvements in overlay precision and accuracy. One approach to represent in-die on-device as-etched overlay is to measure at final inspection (FI) with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Disadvantages to this approach include inability to rework, limited layer coverage due to lack of transparency, and higher cost of ownership (CoO). A hybrid approach is investigated in this report whereby infrequent DI/FI bias is characterized and the results are used to compensate the frequent DI overlay results. The bias characterization is done on an infrequent basis, either based on time or triggered from change points. On a per-device and per-layer basis, the optical target overlay at DI is compared with SEM on-device overlay at FI. The bias characterization results are validated and tracked for use in compensating the DI APC controller. Results of the DI/FI bias characterization and sources of variation are presented, as well as the impact on the DI correctables feeding the APC system. Implementation details in a high volume manufacturing (HVM) wafer fab will be reviewed. Finally future directions of the investigation will be discussed.

  3. Manufacturing and Reliability of Nanoscale Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Owen Yin

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) identifies emerging technologies with the potential to sustain Moore's Law. A necessary progression from conventional CMOS, to non-planer/dual gate CMOS, and ultimately to novel device architectures such as nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) is envisioned. The ITRS also identifies critical roadblocks which currently preclude advances beyond CMOS as a means to guide research and development efforts. Roadblocks specific to NEMS include widespread manufacturing challenges associated with manipulating one-dimensional nanostructures, and poor reliability arising from a number of prevalent failure modes. The weight of these roadblocks is evident well beyond the goals of the ITRS, where nanoelectromechanical sensors and other devices face similar obstacles. This thesis focuses on two critical challenges facing the development of robust carbon nanotube-based NEMS: scalable manufacturing methods, and understanding and eliminating prevalent failure modes. Toward the first challenge, probe-based nanomanufacturing schemes are developed to construct well-ordered arrays of individual carbon nanotubes from which NEMS can be fabricated. This work extends beyond the goals of the semiconductor industry, and demonstrates the ability to create functional sub-100-nanometer protein and drug arrays, as well as novel in vitro injection methods for single cell studies. The second part of this thesis indentifies prevalent failure modes and their point of onset within the device design space. Again, these are addressed by the ITRS but have implications reaching well beyond the semiconductor industry. It then seeks to find the underlying mechanisms for the observed failure modes, and introduces easily-implemented solutions which exhibit the ability to eliminate or greatly-suppress the prevalent failure modes, enabling numerous device actuation cycles without failure and demonstrations of functionality not possible with failure

  4. Three-Dimensional Printing Based Hybrid Manufacturing of Microfluidic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Richang; Gurkan, Umut A.

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic platforms offer revolutionary and practical solutions to challenging problems in biology and medicine. Even though traditional micro/nanofabrication technologies expedited the emergence of the microfluidics field, recent advances in advanced additive manufacturing hold significant potential for single-step, stand-alone microfluidic device fabrication. One such technology, which holds a significant promise for next generation microsystem fabrication is three-dimensional (3D) printing. Presently, building 3D printed stand-alone microfluidic devices with fully embedded microchannels for applications in biology and medicine has the following challenges: (i) limitations in achievable design complexity, (ii) need for a wider variety of transparent materials, (iii) limited z-resolution, (iv) absence of extremely smooth surface finish, and (v) limitations in precision fabrication of hollow and void sections with extremely high surface area to volume ratio. We developed a new way to fabricate stand-alone microfluidic devices with integrated manifolds and embedded microchannels by utilizing a 3D printing and laser micromachined lamination based hybrid manufacturing approach. In this new fabrication method, we exploit the minimized fabrication steps enabled by 3D printing, and reduced assembly complexities facilitated by laser micromachined lamination method. The new hybrid fabrication method enables key features for advanced microfluidic system architecture: (i) increased design complexity in 3D, (ii) improved control over microflow behavior in all three directions and in multiple layers, (iii) transverse multilayer flow and precisely integrated flow distribution, and (iv) enhanced transparency for high resolution imaging and analysis. Hybrid manufacturing approaches hold great potential in advancing microfluidic device fabrication in terms of standardization, fast production, and user-independent manufacturing.

  5. Femtosecond laser internal manufacturing of three-dimensional microstructure devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chong; Hu, Anming; Chen, Tao; Oakes, Ken D.; Liu, Shibing

    2015-10-01

    Potential applications for three-dimensional microstructure devices developed rapidly across numerous fields including microoptics, microfluidics, microelectromechanical systems, and biomedical devices. Benefiting from many unique fabricating advantages, internal manufacturing methods have become the dominant process for three-dimensional microstructure device manufacturing. This paper provides a brief review of the most common techniques of femtosecond laser three-dimensional internal manufacturing (3DIM). The physical mechanisms and representative experimental results of 3D manufacturing technologies based on multiphoton polymerization, laser modification, microexplosion and continuous hollow structure internal manufacturing are provided in details. The important progress in emerging applications based on the 3DIM technologies is introduced as well.

  6. Sterile devices: A GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices) workshop manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derision, R.; Lower, A.; Bimonte, R.

    1983-05-01

    The manual, which covers GMPs for sterilization processes, presents model procedures and forms as well as a variety of articles and reprints. It is a compilation of GMP materials that small device firms may find useful in understanding how some manufacturers have successfully compiled with the GMP requirements as they apply to the manufacture of sterile devices.

  7. Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    McCown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt W.; Rohde, Kenneth W.

    2012-05-08

    Wireless device monitoring methods, wireless device monitoring systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, a wireless device monitoring method includes accessing device configuration information of a wireless device present at a secure area, wherein the device configuration information comprises information regarding a configuration of the wireless device, accessing stored information corresponding to the wireless device, wherein the stored information comprises information regarding the configuration of the wireless device, comparing the device configuration information with the stored information, and indicating the wireless device as one of authorized and unauthorized for presence at the secure area using the comparing.

  8. 78 FR 12068 - Device Good Manufacturing Practice Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Device Good Manufacturing Practice Advisory Committee... meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Device Good Manufacturing Practice Advisory... effects of extreme weather and natural disasters on medical device manufacturing chain processes...

  9. Flexible manufacturing for photonics device assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Shin-Yee; Pocha, Michael D.; Strand, Oliver T.; Young, K. David

    1994-01-01

    The assembly of photonics devices such as laser diodes, optical modulators, and opto-electronics multi-chip modules (OEMCM), usually requires the placement of micron size devices such as laser diodes, and sub-micron precision attachment between optical fibers and diodes or waveguide modulators (usually referred to as pigtailing). This is a very labor intensive process. Studies done by the opto-electronics (OE) industry have shown that 95 percent of the cost of a pigtailed photonic device is due to the use of manual alignment and bonding techniques, which is the current practice in industry. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are working to reduce the cost of packaging OE devices through the use of automation. Our efforts are concentrated on several areas that are directly related to an automated process. This paper will focus on our progress in two of those areas, in particular, an automated fiber pigtailing machine and silicon micro-technology compatible with an automated process.

  10. Laser-assisted manufacturing of thermal energy devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Tewolde, Mahder; Kim, Ki-Hoon; Seo, Dong-Min; Longtin, Jon P.; Hwang, David J.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we will present recent progress in the laser-assisted manufacturing of thermal energy devices that require suppressed thermal transport characteristics yet maintaining other functionalities such as electronic transport or mechanical strength. Examples of such devices to be demonstrated include thermoelectric generator or insulating materials. To this end, it will be shown that an additive manufacturing approaches can be facilitated and improved by unique processing capabilities of lasers in composite level. In order to tailor thermal characteristics in thermal devices, we will mainly investigate the potential of laser heating, curing, selective removal and sintering processes of material systems in the composite level.

  11. Multijunction photovoltaic device and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Arya, Rejeewa R.; Catalano, Anthony W.; Bennett, Murray

    1995-04-04

    A multijunction photovoltaic device includes first, second, and third amorphous silicon p-i-n photovoltaic cells in a stacked arrangement. The intrinsic layers of the second and third cells are formed of a-SiGe alloys with differing ratios of Ge such that the bandgap of the intrinsic layers respectively decrease from the first uppermost cell to the third lowermost cell. An interface layer, composed of a doped silicon compound, is disposed between the two cells and has a lower bandgap than the respective n- and p-type adjacent layers of the first and second cells. The interface layer forms an ohmic contact with the one of the adjacent cell layers of the same conductivity type, and a tunnel junction with the other of the adjacent cell layers.

  12. INSERTION DEVICE ACTIVITIES FOR NSLS-II.

    SciTech Connect

    TANABE,T.; HARDER, D.A.; HULBERT, S.; RAKOWSKI, G.; SKARITKA, J.

    2007-06-25

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) will be a medium energy storage ring of 3GeV electron beam energy with sub-nm.rad horizontal emittance and top-off capability at 500mA. Damping wigglers will be used not only to reduce the beam emittance but also used as broadband sources for users. Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMUs) are considered for hard X-ray linear device, and permanent magnet based elliptically polarized undulators (EPUs) for variable polarization devices for soft X-ray. 6T superconducting wiggler with minimal fan angle will be installed in the second phase as well as quasi-periodic EPU for VUV and possibly high-temperature superconducting undulator. R&D plans have been established to pursue the performance enhancement of the baseline devices and to design new types of insertion devices. A new insertion device development laboratory will also be established.

  13. Radiation analysis devices, radiation analysis methods, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Roybal, Lyle Gene

    2010-06-08

    Radiation analysis devices include circuitry configured to determine respective radiation count data for a plurality of sections of an area of interest and combine the radiation count data of individual of sections to determine whether a selected radioactive material is present in the area of interest. An amount of the radiation count data for an individual section is insufficient to determine whether the selected radioactive material is present in the individual section. An article of manufacture includes media comprising programming configured to cause processing circuitry to perform processing comprising determining one or more correction factors based on a calibration of a radiation analysis device, measuring radiation received by the radiation analysis device using the one or more correction factors, and presenting information relating to an amount of radiation measured by the radiation analysis device having one of a plurality of specified radiation energy levels of a range of interest.

  14. Roll-to-roll manufacturing of electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, N. A.; Stolley, T.; Hermanns, U.; Kroemer, U.; Reus, A.; Lopp, A.; Campo, M.; Landgraf, H.

    2012-03-01

    Roll-to-Roll (R2R) production of thin film based electronic devices (e.g. solar cells, activematrix TFT backplanes & touch screens) combine the advantages of the use of inexpensive, lightweight & flexible substrates with high throughput production. Significant cost reduction opportunities can also be found in terms of processing tool capital cost, utilized substrate area and process gas flow when compared with batch processing systems. Nevertheless, material handling, device patterning and yield issues have limited widespread utilization of R2R manufacturing within the electronics industry.

  15. Soft ionization device with characterization systems and methods of manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Various configurations of characterization systems such as ion mobility spectrometers and mass spectrometers are disclosed that are coupled to an ionization device. The ionization device is formed of a membrane that houses electrodes therein that are located closer to one another than the mean free path of the gas being ionized. Small voltages across the electrodes generate large electric fields which act to ionize substantially all molecules passing therethrough without fracture. Methods to manufacture the mass spectrometer and ion mobility spectrometer systems are also described.

  16. Measuring devices for precision manufacturing and quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, J.; Jacoby, H. D.; Preuss, H. J.

    1980-12-01

    Various miniaturized and low cost transducers were developed for different applications in metrology, precision manufacturing and fabrication control. They comprise: (1) photoelectric linear transducer with micron step pression; (2) incremental and coded transducers; (3) concave mirror x-y transducer; (4) correlation systems for linear and speed measurements; (5) high resolution angle transducers; and (6) correlation optical sensor for distance measurement. Operation principles are explained and several applications are illustrated. Some of the devices are already available.

  17. Hypothesis analysis methods, hypothesis analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Cowell, Andrew J.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Baddeley, Robert L.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Hohimer, Ryan E.

    2012-03-20

    Hypothesis analysis methods, hypothesis analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a hypothesis analysis method includes providing a hypothesis, providing an indicator which at least one of supports and refutes the hypothesis, using the indicator, associating evidence with the hypothesis, weighting the association of the evidence with the hypothesis, and using the weighting, providing information regarding the accuracy of the hypothesis.

  18. Direct digital manufacturing of autonomous centrifugal microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukita, Yoshiaki; Takamura, Yuzuru; Utsumi, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents strategies that attempt to solve two key problems facing the commercialization of microfluidics: cost reduction in microfluidic chip manufacturing and microfluidic device driver development. To reduce the cost of microfluidic chip manufacturing, we propose to use of three-dimensional (3D) printers for direct digital manufacturing (DDM). An evaluation of 3D micro-scale structure printing using several 3D printers is reported, and some of the technical issues to be addressed in the future are suggested. To evaluate micro-scale printing, three types of 3D printers, with the ability to print structures on the scale of several hundred meters, were selected by first screening six 3D printers. Line and space patterns with line widths of 100–500 µm and an aspect ratio of one were printed and evaluated. The estimated critical dimension was around 200 µm. The manufacturing of a monolithic microfluidic chip with embedded channels was also demonstrated. Monolithic microfluidic chips with embedded microchannels having 500 × 500 and 250 × 250 µm2 cross sections and 2–20 mm lengths were printed, and the fidelity of the channel shape, residual supporting material, and flow of liquid water were evaluated. The liquid flow evaluation showed that liquid water could flow through all of the microchannels with the 500 × 500 µm2 cross section, whereas this was not possible through some of the channels with the 250 × 250 µm2 cross section because of the residual resin or supporting material. To reduce the device-driver cost, we propose to use of the centrifugal microfluidic concept. An autonomous microfluidic device that could implement sequential flow control under a steadily rotating condition was printed. Four-step flow injection under a steadily rotating condition at 1500 rpm was successfully demonstrated without any external triggering such as changing the rotational speed.

  19. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes

    1997-10-07

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells.

  20. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, Scot P.; Chamberlin, Rhodes

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells.

  1. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1997-10-07

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  2. Thin film photovoltaic device and process of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Albright, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.

    1999-02-09

    Provided is a thin film photovoltaic device and a method of manufacturing the device. The thin film photovoltaic device comprises a film layer having particles which are smaller than about 30 microns in size held in an electrically insulating matrix material to reduce the potential for electrical shorting through the film layer. The film layer may be provided by depositing preformed particles onto a surrogate substrate and binding the particles in a film-forming matrix material to form a flexible sheet with the film layer. The flexible sheet may be separated from the surrogate substrate and cut into flexible strips. A plurality of the flexible strips may be located adjacent to and supported by a common supporting substrate to form a photovoltaic module having a plurality of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells. 13 figs.

  3. Digital capture, design, and manufacturing of an extraoral device for a clarinet player with Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Aita-Holmes, Cynthia; Liacouras, Peter; Wilson, William O; Grant, Gerald T

    2015-08-01

    An extraoral device was fabricated to assist a clarinet player with Bell's palsy. The device was fabricated by using stereophotogrammetry, digital design, and additive manufacturing technologies. PMID:25985740

  4. Manufacturing and wetting low-cost microfluidic cell separation devices

    PubMed Central

    Pawell, Ryan S.; Inglis, David W.; Barber, Tracie J.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) is a microfluidic size-based particle separation or filter technology with applications in cell separation and enrichment. Currently, there are no cost-effective manufacturing methods for this promising microfluidic technology. In this fabrication paper, however, we develop a simple, yet robust protocol for thermoplastic DLD devices using regulatory-approved materials and biocompatible methods. The final standalone device allowed for volumetric flow rates of 660 μl min−1 while reducing the manufacturing time to <1 h. Optical profilometry and image analysis were employed to assess manufacturing accuracy and precision; the average replicated post height was 0.48% less than the average post height on the master mold and the average replicated array pitch was 1.1% less than the original design with replicated posts heights of 62.1 ± 5.1 μm (mean ± 6 standard deviations) and replicated array pitches of 35.6 ± 0.31 μm. PMID:24404077

  5. Towards roll-to-roll manufacturing of polymer photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbaraman, Harish; Lin, Xiaohui; Ling, Tao; Guo, L. Jay; Chen, Ray T.

    2014-03-01

    Traditionally, polymer photonic devices are fabricated using clean-room processes such as photolithography, e-beam lithography, reactive ion etching (RIE) and lift-off methods etc, which leads to long fabrication time, low throughput and high cost. We have utilized a novel process for fabricating polymer photonic devices using a combination of imprinting and ink jet printing methods, which provides high throughput on a variety of rigid and flexible substrates with low cost. We discuss the manufacturing challenges that need to be overcome in order to realize true implementation of roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible polymer photonic systems. Several metrology and instrumentation challenges involved such as availability of particulate-free high quality substrate, development and implementation of high-speed in-line and off-line inspection and diagnostic tools with adaptive control for patterned and unpatterned material films, development of reliable hardware, etc need to be addressed and overcome in order to realize a successful manufacturing process. Due to extreme resolution requirements compared to print media, the burden of software and hardware tools on the throughput also needs to be carefully determined. Moreover, the effect of web wander and variations in web speed need to accurately be determined in the design of the system hardware and software. In this paper, we show the realization of solutions for few challenges, and utilizing these solutions for developing a high-rate R2R dual stage ink-jet printer that can provide alignment accuracy of <10μm at a web speed of 5m/min. The development of a roll-to-roll manufacturing system for polymer photonic systems opens limitless possibilities for the deployment of high performance components in a variety of applications including communication, sensing, medicine, agriculture, energy, lighting etc.

  6. Text analysis devices, articles of manufacture, and text analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Alan E; Hetzler, Elizabeth G; Nakamura, Grant C

    2013-05-28

    Text analysis devices, articles of manufacture, and text analysis methods are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a text analysis device includes processing circuitry configured to analyze initial text to generate a measurement basis usable in analysis of subsequent text, wherein the measurement basis comprises a plurality of measurement features from the initial text, a plurality of dimension anchors from the initial text and a plurality of associations of the measurement features with the dimension anchors, and wherein the processing circuitry is configured to access a viewpoint indicative of a perspective of interest of a user with respect to the analysis of the subsequent text, and wherein the processing circuitry is configured to use the viewpoint to generate the measurement basis.

  7. Text analysis devices, articles of manufacture, and text analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Alan E; Hetzler, Elizabeth G; Nakamura, Grant C

    2015-03-31

    Text analysis devices, articles of manufacture, and text analysis methods are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a text analysis device includes a display configured to depict visible images, and processing circuitry coupled with the display and wherein the processing circuitry is configured to access a first vector of a text item and which comprises a plurality of components, to access a second vector of the text item and which comprises a plurality of components, to weight the components of the first vector providing a plurality of weighted values, to weight the components of the second vector providing a plurality of weighted values, and to combine the weighted values of the first vector with the weighted values of the second vector to provide a third vector.

  8. Medical Devices; hematology and pathology devices; reclassification of automated blood cell separator device operating by filtration principle from class III to class II. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2003-02-28

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reclassifying the automated blood cell separator (ABCS) device operating by filtration principle, intended for routine collection of blood and blood components, from class III to class II (special controls). The special control requirement for this device is an annual report with emphasis on adverse reactions to be filed by the manufacturer for a minimum of 3 years. The agency is taking this action in response to a petition submitted under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the 1976 amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (the SMDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). The agency is reclassifying the automated blood cell separator devices operating by filtration principle into class II (special controls) because special controls, in addition to general controls, are capable of providing a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:12617085

  9. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... manufacturing. 801.122 Section 801.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... act if its label bears the statement “Caution: For manufacturing, processing, or repacking”....

  10. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... manufacturing. 801.122 Section 801.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... act if its label bears the statement “Caution: For manufacturing, processing, or repacking”....

  11. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... manufacturing. 801.122 Section 801.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... act if its label bears the statement “Caution: For manufacturing, processing, or repacking”....

  12. Improved Method of Manufacturing SiC Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    The phrase, "common-layered architecture for semiconductor silicon carbide" ("CLASSiC") denotes a method of batch fabrication of microelectromechanical and semiconductor devices from bulk silicon carbide. CLASSiC is the latest in a series of related methods developed in recent years in continuing efforts to standardize SiC-fabrication processes. CLASSiC encompasses both institutional and technological innovations that can be exploited separately or in combination to make the manufacture of SiC devices more economical. Examples of such devices are piezoresistive pressure sensors, strain gauges, vibration sensors, and turbulence-intensity sensors for use in harsh environments (e.g., high-temperature, high-pressure, corrosive atmospheres). The institutional innovation is to manufacture devices for different customers (individuals, companies, and/or other entities) simultaneously in the same batch. This innovation is based on utilization of the capability for fabrication, on the same substrate, of multiple SiC devices having different functionalities (see figure). Multiple customers can purchase shares of the area on the same substrate, each customer s share being apportioned according to the customer s production-volume requirement. This makes it possible for multiple customers to share costs in a common foundry, so that the capital equipment cost per customer in the inherently low-volume SiC-product market can be reduced significantly. One of the technological innovations is a five-mask process that is based on an established set of process design rules. The rules provide for standardization of the fabrication process, yet are flexible enough to enable multiple customers to lay out masks for their portions of the SiC substrate to provide for simultaneous batch fabrication of their various devices. In a related prior method, denoted multi-user fabrication in silicon carbide (MUSiC), the fabrication process is based largely on surface micromachining of poly Si

  13. 78 FR 41069 - Medical Device Reporting for Manufacturers; Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Medical Device Reporting for Manufacturers.'' This draft guidance describes and explains the current FDA regulation that addresses reporting and recordkeeping requirements applicable to manufacturers of medical devices for certain device-related adverse events. This draft guidance is intended......

  14. 47 CFR 15.124 - DTV transition notices by manufacturers of televisions and related devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false DTV transition notices by manufacturers of televisions and related devices. 15.124 Section 15.124 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Unintentional Radiators § 15.124 DTV transition notices by manufacturers of televisions and related devices....

  15. 47 CFR 15.124 - DTV transition notices by manufacturers of televisions and related devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false DTV transition notices by manufacturers of televisions and related devices. 15.124 Section 15.124 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Unintentional Radiators § 15.124 DTV transition notices by manufacturers of televisions and related devices....

  16. Towards manufacturing of advanced logic devices by double-patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, Chiew-seng; Halle, Scott; Holmes, Steven; Petrillo, Karen; Colburn, Matthew; van Dommelen, Youri; Jiang, Aiqin; Crouse, Michael; Dunn, Shannon; Hetzer, David; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Cantone, Jason; Huli, Lior; Rodgers, Martin; Martinick, Brian

    2011-04-01

    As reported previously, the IBM Alliance has established a DETO (Double-Expose-Track-Optimized) baseline, in collaboration with ASML, TEL, and CNSE, to evaluate commercially available DETO photoresist system for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. Although EUV lithography is the baseline strategy for <2x nm logic nodes, alternative techniques are still being pursued. The DETO technique produces pitch-split patterns capable of supporting 16 nm and 11 nm node semiconductor devices. We present the long-term monitoring performances of CD uniformity (CDU), overlay, and defectivity of our DETO process. CDU and overlay performances for controlled experiments are also presented. Two alignment schemes in DETO are compared experimentally for their effects on inter-level & intralevel overlays, and space CDU. We also experimented with methods for improving CDU, in which the CD-OptimizerTMand DoseMapperTM were evaluated separately and in tandem. Overlay improvements using the Correction Per Exposure (CPE) and the intra-field High-Order Process Correction (i-HOPC) were compared against the usual linear correction method. The effects of the exposure field size are also compared between a small field and the full field. Included in all the above, we also compare the performances derived from stack-integrated wafers and bare-Si wafers.

  17. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... when tested in accordance with 40 CFR Part 136. (b) The 40 samples must be taken from the device as...: Type II devices. (a) The arithmetic mean of the fecal coliform bacteria in 38 of 40 samples of...

  18. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... when tested in accordance with 40 CFR Part 136. (b) The 40 samples must be taken from the device as...: Type II devices. (a) The arithmetic mean of the fecal coliform bacteria in 38 of 40 samples of...

  19. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... when tested in accordance with 40 CFR Part 136. (b) The 40 samples must be taken from the device as...: Type II devices. (a) The arithmetic mean of the fecal coliform bacteria in 38 of 40 samples of...

  20. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... when tested in accordance with 40 CFR Part 136. (b) The 40 samples must be taken from the device as...: Type II devices. (a) The arithmetic mean of the fecal coliform bacteria in 38 of 40 samples of...

  1. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... when tested in accordance with 40 CFR part 136. (b) The 40 samples must be taken from the device as...: Type II devices. (a) The arithmetic mean of the fecal coliform bacteria in 38 of 40 samples of...

  2. A UNIX device driver for a Translink II Transputer board

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    A UNIX device driver for a TransLink II Transputer board is described. A complete listing of the code is presented. The device driver allows a transputer array to be used with the A/UX operating system.

  3. Space manufacturing of surface acoustic wave devices, appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sardella, G.

    1973-01-01

    Space manufacturing of transducers in a vibration free environment is discussed. Fabrication of the masks, and possible manufacturing of the surface acoustic wave components aboard a space laboratory would avoid the inherent ground vibrations and the frequency limitation imposed by a seismic isolator pad. The manufacturing vibration requirements are identified. The concepts of space manufacturing are analyzed. A development program for manufacturing transducers is recommended.

  4. 75 FR 51829 - Public Workshop on Medical Devices and Nanotechnology: Manufacturing, Characterization, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Public Workshop on Medical Devices and Nanotechnology...) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Medical Devices & Nanotechnology: Manufacturing... brief statement that describes your experience or expertise with nanotechnology. There will be a...

  5. Workplace for manufacturing devices based on optical fiber tapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martan, Tomáš; Honzátko, Pavel; Kaňka, Jiři; Novotný, Karel

    2007-04-01

    Many important optical fiber components are based on tapered optical fibers. A taper made from a single-mode optical fiber can be used, e.g., as a chemical sensor, bio-chemical sensor, or beam expander. A fused pair of tapers can be used as a fiber directional coupler. Fiber tapers can be fabricated in several simple ways. However, a tapering apparatus is required for more sophisticated fabrication of fiber tapers. The paper deals with fabrication and characterization of fiber tapers made from a single-mode optical fiber. A tapering apparatus was built for producing devices based on fiber tapers. The apparatus is universal and enables one to taper optical fibers of different types by a method utilizing stretching a flame-heated section of a silica fiber. Fiber tapers with constant waist length and different waist diameters were fabricated. The transition region of each fiber taper monotonically decreased in diameter along its length from the untapered fiber to the taper waist. The fiber tapers were fabricated with a constant drawing velocity, while the central zone of the original single-mode fiber was heated along a constant length. The spectral transmissions of the manufactured fiber tapers with different parameters were measured by the cut-back method.

  6. 21 CFR 1301.33 - Application for bulk manufacture of Schedule I and II substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application for bulk manufacture of Schedule I and... manufacture of Schedule I and II substances. (a) In the case of an application for registration or reregistration to manufacture in bulk a basic class of controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II,...

  7. 21 CFR 1301.33 - Application for bulk manufacture of Schedule I and II substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Application for bulk manufacture of Schedule I and... manufacture of Schedule I and II substances. (a) In the case of an application for registration or reregistration to manufacture in bulk a basic class of controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II,...

  8. 21 CFR 1301.33 - Application for bulk manufacture of Schedule I and II substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Application for bulk manufacture of Schedule I and... manufacture of Schedule I and II substances. (a) In the case of an application for registration or reregistration to manufacture in bulk a basic class of controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II,...

  9. 21 CFR 1301.33 - Application for bulk manufacture of Schedule I and II substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Application for bulk manufacture of Schedule I and... manufacture of Schedule I and II substances. (a) In the case of an application for registration or reregistration to manufacture in bulk a basic class of controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II,...

  10. 21 CFR 1301.33 - Application for bulk manufacture of Schedule I and II substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Application for bulk manufacture of Schedule I and... manufacture of Schedule I and II substances. (a) In the case of an application for registration or reregistration to manufacture in bulk a basic class of controlled substance listed in Schedule I or II,...

  11. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 801.122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices for processing, repacking,...

  12. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 801.122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices for processing, repacking,...

  13. WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF ELECTRICAL ROTATING DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers, Waste Minimization Assessment Cen...

  14. 10 CFR 32.30 - Certain industrial devices containing byproduct material: Requirements for license to manufacture...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Certain industrial devices containing byproduct material... CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Exempt Concentrations and Items § 32.30 Certain industrial devices containing... application for a license to transfer byproduct material in such industrial devices manufactured,...

  15. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    West, Phillip B.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Wright, Jerry P.

    2011-09-27

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  16. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    West, Phillip B.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Wright, Jerry P.

    2012-05-29

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  17. 21 CFR 821.30 - Tracking obligations of persons other than device manufacturers: distributor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracking obligations of persons other than device manufacturers: distributor requirements. 821.30 Section 821.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Additional Requirements...

  18. A nanolaminate manufacturing technique for multifunctional materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Marriner H.

    A new method of quickly, simply, and efficiently assembling nanolayered materials and devices is developed. The method is called Spin-Spray Layer by Layer Self Assembly (SSLbL) and is a modification of the well-established Layer by Layer Self Assembly (LbL) method. SSLBL is a conceptually simple process. Very dilute, aqueous solutions of polymers, nanoparticles, or other colloids are sprayed onto a rapidly spinning substrate, quickly spreading over the surface. As the solvent evaporates, the chosen polymer or colloid adheres to the surface via electrostatic, physical, and other interactions. Typically this process is carried out in bilayers of colloids or polymers that are attracted to each other. Called nanolaminae, these bilayers are the fundamental building blocks of SSLbL. With thicknesses on the order of a single nanometer, nanolaminae consisting of different materials can be stacked in almost any sequence, allowing the creation of nanostructured materials. A model of the SSLbL process is developed based primarily on spin-coating physics. This model gives a qualitative understanding of the dynamic fluid processes as well as quantitative results. These quantitative results include the amount of solution that should be sprayed on a spinning disk, the solution concentration, and dry time. The parameters gained from the model are used as inputs for SSLbL experimentation. SSLbL experimentation is then shown to both validate the model as well as offer fine-tuning of the parameters for specific materials or applications. SSLbL represents a significant advancement of the state of the art by increasing the speed and efficiency of existing LbL techniques. It is demonstrated here to be capable of effectively building high quality nanolaminae similar to those produced via LbL. However, SSLbL is significantly faster, constructing each nanolamina in about 20 s, compared to 20min using LbL, an improvement of two orders of magnitude. Additionally, traditional LbL is quite

  19. Method for anisotropic etching in the manufacture of semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor); Cross, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Hydrocarbon polymer coatings used in microelectronic manufacturing processes are anisotropically etched by hyperthermal atomic oxygen beams (translational energies of 0.2 to 20 eV, preferably 1 to 10 eV). Etching with hyperthermal oxygen atom species obtains highly anisotropic etching with sharp boundaries between etched and mask protected areas.

  20. Method for anisotropic etching in the manufacture of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Koontz, Steven L.; Cross, Jon B.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrocarbon polymer coatings used in microelectronic manufacturing processes are anisotropically etched by atomic oxygen beams (translational energies of 0.2-20 eV, preferably 1-10 eV). Etching with hyperthermal (kinetic energy>1 eV) oxygen atom species obtains highly anisotropic etching with sharp boundaries between etched and mask-protected areas.

  1. Bioharness™ Multivariable Monitoring Device: Part. II: Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, James A.; Ford, Paul A.; Hughes, Gerwyn; Watson, Tim; Garrett, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    The Bioharness™ monitoring system may provide physiological information on human performance but the reliability of this data is fundamental for confidence in the equipment being used. The objective of this study was to assess the reliability of each of the 5 Bioharness™ variables using a treadmill based protocol. 10 healthy males participated. A between and within subject design to assess the reliability of Heart rate (HR), Breathing Frequency (BF), Accelerometry (ACC) and Infra-red skin temperature (ST) was completed via a repeated, discontinuous, incremental treadmill protocol. Posture (P) was assessed by a tilt table, moved through 160°. Between subject data reported low Coefficient of Variation (CV) and strong correlations(r) for ACC and P (CV< 7.6; r = 0.99, p < 0.01). In contrast, HR and BF (CV~19.4; r~0.70, p < 0.01) and ST (CV 3.7; r = 0.61, p < 0.01), present more variable data. Intra and inter device data presented strong relationships (r > 0.89, p < 0.01) and low CV (<10.1) for HR, ACC, P and ST. BF produced weaker relationships (r < 0.72) and higher CV (<17.4). In comparison to the other variables BF variable consistently presents less reliability. Global results suggest that the Bioharness™ is a reliable multivariable monitoring device during laboratory testing within the limits presented. Key pointsHeart rate and breathing frequency data increased in variance at higher velocities (i.e. ≥ 10 km.h-1)In comparison to the between subject testing, the intra and inter reliability presented good reliability in data suggesting placement or position of device relative to performer could be important for data collectionUnderstanding a devices variability in measurement is important before it can be used within an exercise testing or monitoring setting PMID:24149347

  2. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.153 Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to...

  3. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.153 Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to...

  4. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.153 Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to...

  5. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.153 Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to...

  6. 27 CFR 478.153 - Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... weapons and large capacity ammunition feeding devices manufactured or imported for the purposes of testing... AMMUNITION Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.153 Semiautomatic assault weapons and large capacity... weapon, and § 478.40a with respect to large capacity ammunition feeding devices, shall not apply to...

  7. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Device tracking system and content requirements... Requirements § 821.25 Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements. (a) A... tracking system or to the data collected and maintained under the tracking system, reasons for...

  8. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Device tracking system and content requirements... Requirements § 821.25 Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements. (a) A... all modifications or changes to the tracking system or to the data collected and maintained under...

  9. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Device tracking system and content requirements... Requirements § 821.25 Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements. (a) A... tracking system or to the data collected and maintained under the tracking system, reasons for...

  10. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Device tracking system and content requirements... Requirements § 821.25 Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements. (a) A... tracking system or to the data collected and maintained under the tracking system, reasons for...

  11. 21 CFR 821.25 - Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Device tracking system and content requirements... Requirements § 821.25 Device tracking system and content requirements: manufacturer requirements. (a) A... tracking system or to the data collected and maintained under the tracking system, reasons for...

  12. Communications device identification methods, communications methods, wireless communications readers, wireless communications systems, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Kerry D [Kennewick, WA; Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Gilbert, Ronald W [Morgan Hill, CA

    2011-02-01

    Communications device identification methods, communications methods, wireless communications readers, wireless communications systems, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a communications device identification method includes providing identification information regarding a group of wireless identification devices within a wireless communications range of a reader, using the provided identification information, selecting one of a plurality of different search procedures for identifying unidentified ones of the wireless identification devices within the wireless communications range, and identifying at least some of the unidentified ones of the wireless identification devices using the selected one of the search procedures.

  13. A manufacturable process integration approach for graphene devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaziri, Sam; Lupina, Grzegorz; Paussa, Alan; Smith, Anderson D.; Henkel, Christoph; Lippert, Gunther; Dabrowski, Jarek; Mehr, Wolfgang; Östling, Mikael; Lemme, Max C.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we propose an integration approach for double gate graphene field effect transistors. The approach includes a number of process steps that are key for future integration of graphene in microelectronics: bottom gates with ultra-thin (2 nm) high-quality thermally grown SiO2 dielectrics, shallow trench isolation between devices and atomic layer deposited Al2O3 top gate dielectrics. The complete process flow is demonstrated with fully functional GFET transistors and can be extended to wafer scale processing. We assess, through simulation, the effects of the quantum capacitance and band bending in the silicon substrate on the effective electric fields in the top and bottom gate oxide. The proposed process technology is suitable for other graphene-based devices such as graphene-based hot electron transistors and photodetectors.

  14. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

    2006-01-17

    The employment of metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The fuel cell includes an electrolyte membrane comprising a membrane support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, an anode disposed on one side of the electrolyte membrane, and a cathode disposed on an opposite side of the electrolyte membrane. At least one of the anode and the cathode comprises an electrode support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, and a catalyst disposed in or on the electrode support structure.

  15. CdTe devices and method of manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Noufi, Rommel; Dhere, Ramesh G.; Albin, David S.; Barnes, Teresa; Burst, James; Duenow, Joel N.; Reese, Matthew

    2015-09-29

    A method of producing polycrystalline CdTe materials and devices that incorporate the polycrystalline CdTe materials are provided. In particular, a method of producing polycrystalline p-doped CdTe thin films for use in CdTe solar cells in which the CdTe thin films possess enhanced acceptor densities and minority carrier lifetimes, resulting in enhanced efficiency of the solar cells containing the CdTe material are provided.

  16. An analytic framework for developing inherently-manufacturable pop-up laminate devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aukes, Daniel M.; Goldberg, Benjamin; Cutkosky, Mark R.; Wood, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    Spurred by advances in manufacturing technologies developed around layered manufacturing technologies such as PC-MEMS, SCM, and printable robotics, we propose a new analytic framework for capturing the geometry of folded composite laminate devices and the mechanical processes used to manufacture them. These processes can be represented by combining a small set of geometric operations which are general enough to encompass many different manufacturing paradigms. Furthermore, such a formulation permits one to construct a variety of geometric tools which can be used to analyze common manufacturability concepts, such as tool access, part removability, and device support. In order to increase the speed of development, reduce the occurrence of manufacturing problems inherent with current design methods, and reduce the level of expertise required to develop new devices, the framework has been implemented in a new design tool called popupCAD, which is suited for the design and development of complex folded laminate devices. We conclude with a demonstration of utility of the tools by creating a folded leg mechanism.

  17. 10 CFR 32.74 - Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices... SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Generally Licensed Items § 32.74 Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing byproduct material...

  18. 10 CFR 32.74 - Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices... SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Generally Licensed Items § 32.74 Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing byproduct material...

  19. 10 CFR 32.74 - Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices... SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specifically Licensed Items § 32.74 Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing...

  20. 10 CFR 32.74 - Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices... SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Generally Licensed Items § 32.74 Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing byproduct material...

  1. 10 CFR 32.74 - Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing byproduct material for medical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices... SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Specifically Licensed Items § 32.74 Manufacture and distribution of sources or devices containing...

  2. Post-market clinical research conducted by medical device manufacturers: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph S; Blount, Katrina L; Ritchie, Jessica D; Hodshon, Beth; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-01-01

    Background In the US, once a medical device is made available for use, several requirements have been established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ensure ongoing post-market surveillance of device safety and effectiveness. Our objective was to determine how commonly medical device manufacturers initiate post-market clinical studies or augment FDA post-market surveillance requirements for higher-risk devices that are most often approved via the FDA’s pre-market approval (PMA) pathway. Methods and results We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 47 manufacturers with operations in California, Minnesota, and Massachusetts who market devices approved via the PMA pathway. Among 22 respondents (response rate =47%), nearly all self-reported conducting post-market clinical research studies, commonly between 1 and 5; only 1 respondent reported never conducting post-market clinical research studies. While manufacturers most often engaged in these studies to satisfy FDA requirements, other reasons were reported, including performance monitoring and surveillance and market acceptance initiatives. Risks of conducting and not conducting post-market clinical research studies were described through open-ended response to questions. Conclusion Medical device manufacturers commonly initiate post-market clinical studies at the request of the FDA. Clinical data from these studies should be integrated into national post-market surveillance initiatives. PMID:26060416

  3. Fast detection of manufacturing systematic design pattern failures causing device yield loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Denmat, Jean-Christophe; Feldman, Nelly; Riewer, Olivia; Yesilada, Emek; Vallet, Michel; Suzor, Christophe; Talluto, Salvatore

    2015-03-01

    Starting from the 45nm technology node, systematic defectivity has a significant impact on device yield loss with each new technology node. The effort required to achieve patterning maturity with zero yield detractor is also significantly increasing with technology nodes. Within the manufacturing environment, new in-line wafer inspection methods have been developed to identify device systematic defects, including the process window qualification (PWQ) methodology used to characterize process robustness. Although patterning is characterized with PWQ methodology, some questions remain: How can we demonstrate that the measured process window is large enough to avoid design-based defects which will impact the device yield? Can we monitor the systematic yield loss on nominal wafers? From device test engineering point of view, systematic yield detractors are expected to be identified by Automated Test Pattern Generator (ATPG) test results diagnostics performed after electrical wafer sort (EWS). Test diagnostics can identify failed nets or cells causing systematic yield loss [1],[2]. Convergence from device failed nets and cells to failed manufacturing design pattern are usually based on assumptions that should be confirmed by an electrical failure analysis (EFA). However, many EFA investigations are required before the design pattern failures are found, and thus design pattern failure identification was costly in time and resources. With this situation, an opportunity to share knowledge exists between device test engineering and manufacturing environments to help with device yield improvement. This paper presents a new yield diagnostics flow dedicated to correlation of critical design patterns detected within manufacturing environment, with the observed device yield loss. The results obtained with this new flow on a 28nm technology device are described, with the defects of interest and the device yield impact for each design pattern. The EFA done to validate the design

  4. Additively Manufactured Combustion Devices Components for LOX/Methane Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Sandra Elam; Protz, Christopher; Garcia, Chance; Goodman, Dwight; Baker, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has designed, fabricated, and hot-fire tested a variety of successful injectors, chambers, and igniters for potential liquid oxygen (LOX) and methane (CH4) systems since 2005. The most recent efforts have focused on components with additive manufacturing (AM) to include unique design features, minimize joints, and reduce final machining efforts. Inconel and copper alloys have been used with AM processes to produce a swirl coaxial injector and multiple methane cooled thrust chambers. The initial chambers included unique thermocouple ports for measuring local coolant channel temperatures along the length of the chamber. Results from hot-fire testing were used to anchor thermal models and generate a regeneratively cooled thruster for a 4,000 lbf LOX/CH4 engine. The completed thruster will be hot-fire tested in the summer of 2016 at MSFC. The thruster design can also be easily scaled and used on a 25,000 lbf engine. To further support the larger engine design, an AM gas generator injector has been designed. Hot-fire testing on this injector is planned for the summer of 2016 at MSFC.

  5. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

    2011-06-07

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  6. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-28

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  7. Manufacturing and device options for the delivery of biotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hoe, Susan; Boraey, Mohammed A; Ivey, James W; Finlay, Warren H; Vehring, Reinhard

    2014-10-01

    Biotherapeutic aerosol formulations are an intense area of interest for systemic and local drug delivery. This article provides a short overview of typical factors required specifically for biotherapeutic aerosol formulation design, the processing options open for consideration, and the issue of inhalation device selection. Focusing on spray drying, four case studies are used to highlight the relevant issues, describing investigations into: (1) the mechanical stresses occurring in bacteriophage formulations during spray-dryer atomization; (2) modeling of the spray-dryer process and droplet drying kinetics, to assist process design and predictions of formulation stability; (3) a predictive approach to the design and processing of a five-component dry powder aerosol formulation; and (4) the survival of bacteriophages after pressurized metered dose inhaler atomization. PMID:24299502

  8. Current situation of the development and manufacture of vary large scale integrated devices in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yubiao, He

    1988-06-01

    The manufacture of Large Scale Integration (LSI) and Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) devices in foreign countries is a highly competitive high-tech industry. It requires high-precision manufacturing technology, and very expensive manufacturing equipment. Therefore, it is impossible to conduct research and form industrial production capability by merely relying on obsolete manufacturing equipment and semi-manual production techniques. According to the experience of our foreign counterparts and based on our current situation, it is highly desirable for domestic LSI and VLSI research institutes and manufacturers to establish unified development-manufacturing units, concentrate resources, amass available funds to upgrade equipment and technology, improve management, conduct theoretical research, and develop new technology and new devices under a unified planning and assigned responsibility. It is only in this way that we can reduce the gap between domestic and foreign VLSI device industries, and promote our micro-electronic industry. This should be the trend for the development of the microelectronic industry in China.

  9. Simulating The Technological Movements Of The Equipment Used For Manufacturing Prosthetic Devices Using 3D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicea, Anca-Lucia

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the process of building geometric and kinematic models of a technological equipment used in the process of manufacturing devices. First, the process of building the model for a six axes industrial robot is presented. In the second part of the paper, the process of building the model for a five-axis CNC milling machining center is also shown. Both models can be used for accurate cutting processes simulation of complex parts, such as prosthetic devices.

  10. 24 CFR 3280.404 - Standard for egress windows and devices for use in manufactured homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... interior pressure tests for components and cladding must be conducted at the design wind loads required by... conducted at the design wind loads specified in § 3280.305(c)(1). (f) Protection of egress window openings in high wind areas. For homes designed to be located in Wind Zones II and III, manufacturers...

  11. 24 CFR 3280.404 - Standard for egress windows and devices for use in manufactured homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard for egress windows and devices for use in manufactured homes. 3280.404 Section 3280.404 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR...

  12. Medical devices; reclassification of three anesthesiology preamendments class III devices into class II. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2001-11-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reclassifying three anesthesiology preamendments devices from class III (premarket approval) into class II (special controls). FDA is also identifying the special controls that the agency believes will reasonably ensure the safety and effectiveness of the devices. This reclassification is being undertaken on the agency's own initiative based on new information under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 and the FDA Modernization Act of 1997. PMID:11776278

  13. 21 CFR 801.63 - Medical devices; warning statements for devices containing or manufactured with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 40 CFR part 82 and appear with such prominence and conspicuousness as to render it likely to be read... relieve a person from any requirements imposed under 40 CFR part 82. ... containing or manufactured with chlorofluorocarbons and other class I ozone-depleting substances....

  14. 21 CFR 801.63 - Medical devices; warning statements for devices containing or manufactured with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 40 CFR part 82 and appear with such prominence and conspicuousness as to render it likely to be read... relieve a person from any requirements imposed under 40 CFR part 82. ... containing or manufactured with chlorofluorocarbons and other class I ozone-depleting substances....

  15. 21 CFR 801.63 - Medical devices; warning statements for devices containing or manufactured with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 40 CFR part 82 and appear with such prominence and conspicuousness as to render it likely to be read... relieve a person from any requirements imposed under 40 CFR part 82. ... containing or manufactured with chlorofluorocarbons and other class I ozone-depleting substances....

  16. 21 CFR 801.63 - Medical devices; warning statements for devices containing or manufactured with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 40 CFR part 82 and appear with such prominence and conspicuousness as to render it likely to be read... relieve a person from any requirements imposed under 40 CFR part 82. ... containing or manufactured with chlorofluorocarbons and other class I ozone-depleting substances....

  17. 78 FR 14015 - Medical Devices; Exemption From Premarket Notification; Class II Devices; Powered Patient Transport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ..., 1998 (63 FR 3142). Section 510(m)(2) of the FD&C Act provides that FDA may exempt a device from..., p. 3.) In the Federal Register of June 1, 2012 (77 FR 32642), FDA published a notice announcing that... against the criteria laid out in the Class II 510(k) Exemption Guidance and in 63 FR 3142, and agrees...

  18. INSERTION DEVICES R AND Ds FOR NSLS-II.

    SciTech Connect

    TANABE,T.; HARDER, D.A.; RAKOWSKY, G.; SHAFTAN, T.; SKARITKA, J.

    2007-06-25

    NSLS-II is a medium energy storage ring of 3GeV electron beam energy with sub-nm.rad horizontal emittance and top-off capability at 500mA. Damping wigglers will be used not only to reduce the beam emittance but also for broadband sources for users. Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMUs) are considered for hard X-ray linear device, and permanent magnet based Elliptically Polarized Undulators (EPUs) are for polarization control. Rigorous R&D plans have been established to pursue the performance enhancement of the above devices as well as building new types of insertion devices such as high temperature superconducting wiggler/undulators. This paper describes the details of these activities and discuss technical issues.

  19. Patient views on financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Mark W.; Gross, Allan E.; McKneally, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, revelations of inappropriate financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers have challenged the presumption that surgeons can collaborate with surgical device manufacturers without damaging public trust in the surgical profession. We explored postoperative Canadian patients’ knowledge and opinions about financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers. Methods This complex issue was explored using qualitative methods. We conducted semistructured face-to-face interviews with postoperative patients in follow-up arthroplasty clinics at an academic hospital in Toronto, Canada. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed. Patient-derived concepts and themes were uncovered. Results We interviewed 33 patients. Five major themes emerged: 1) many patients are unaware of the existence of financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers; 2) patients approve of financial relationships that support innovation and research but are opposed to relationships that involve financial incentives that benefit only the surgeon and the manufacturer; 3) patients do not support disclosure of financial relationships during the consent process as it may shift focus away from the more important risks; 4) patients support oversight at the professional level but reject the idea of government involvement in oversight; and 5) patients entrust their surgeons to make appropriate patient-centred choices. Conclusion This qualitative study deepens our understanding of financial relationships between surgeons and industry. Patients support relationships with industry that provide potential benefit to current or future patients. They trust our ability to self-regulate. Disclosure combined with appropriate oversight will strengthen public trust in professional collaboration with industry. PMID:26384147

  20. Regulatory Considerations in the Design and Manufacturing of Implantable 3D-Printed Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Robert J; Kashlan, Khaled N; Flanangan, Colleen L; Wright, Jeanne K; Green, Glenn E; Hollister, Scott J; Weatherwax, Kevin J

    2015-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing, or additive manufacturing, technology has rapidly penetrated the medical device industry over the past several years, and innovative groups have harnessed it to create devices with unique composition, structure, and customizability. These distinctive capabilities afforded by 3D printing have introduced new regulatory challenges. The customizability of 3D-printed devices introduces new complexities when drafting a design control model for FDA consideration of market approval. The customizability and unique build processes of 3D-printed medical devices pose unique challenges in meeting regulatory standards related to the manufacturing quality assurance. Consistent material powder properties and optimal printing parameters such as build orientation and laser power must be addressed and communicated to the FDA to ensure a quality build. Postprinting considerations unique to 3D-printed devices, such as cleaning, finishing and sterilization are also discussed. In this manuscript we illustrate how such regulatory hurdles can be navigated by discussing our experience with our group's 3D-printed bioresorbable implantable device. PMID:26243449

  1. An academic, clinical and industrial update on electrospun, additive manufactured and imprinted medical devices.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Christina N M; Fuller, Kieran P; Larrañaga, Aitor; Biggs, Manus; Bayon, Yves; Sarasua, Jose R; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning, additive manufacturing and imprint lithography scaffold fabrication technologies have attracted great attention in biomedicine, as they allow production of two- and three- dimensional constructs with tuneable topographical and geometrical features. In vitro data demonstrate that electrospun and imprinted substrates offer control over permanently differentiated and stem cell function. Advancements in functionalisation strategies have further enhanced the bioactivity and reparative capacity of electrospun and additive manufactured devices, as has been evidenced in several preclinical models. Despite this overwhelming success in academic setting, only a few technologies have reached the clinic and only a fraction of them have become commercially available products. PMID:26111642

  2. Medical devices; reclassification of six cardiovascular preamendments class III devices into class II. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2001-04-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reclassifying six cardiovascular pre amendments devices from class III (pre market approval) into class II (special controls). FDA is also identifying the special controls that the agency believes will reasonably ensure the safety and effectiveness of the devices. This reclassification is being undertaken on the agency's own initiative based on new information under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997. The agency is also revising the identification of one of the devices subject to this rule to simplify the classification regulation and is correcting a typographical error that was incorporated into the regulations. PMID:11721689

  3. A manufactured solution for verifying CFD boundary conditions: part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Ryan Bomar; Ober, Curtis Curry; Knupp, Patrick Michael

    2005-01-01

    Order-of-accuracy verification is necessary to ensure that software correctly solves a given set of equations. One method to verify the order of accuracy of a code is the method of manufactured solutions. In this study, a manufactured solution has been derived and implemented that allows verification of not only the Euler, Navier-Stokes, and Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation sets, but also some of their associated boundary conditions (BC's): slip, no-slip (adiabatic and isothermal), and outflow (subsonic, supersonic, and mixed). Order-of-accuracy verification has been performed for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations and these BC's in a compressible computational fluid dynamics code. All of the results shown are on skewed, non-uniform meshes. RANS results will be presented in a future paper. The observed order of accuracy was lower than the expected order of accuracy in two cases. One of these cases resulted in the identification and correction of a coding mistake in the CHAD gradient correction that was reducing the observed order of accuracy. This mistake would have been undetectable on a Cartesian mesh. During the search for the CHAD gradient correction problem, an unrelated coding mistake was found and corrected. The other case in which the observed order of accuracy was less than expected was a test of the slip BC; although no specific coding or formulation mistakes have yet been identified. After the correction of the identified coding mistakes, all of the aforementioned equation sets and BC's demonstrated the expected (or at least acceptable) order of accuracy except the slip condition.

  4. TOPAZ II Anti-Criticality Device Rapid Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Donald R.; Otting, William D.

    1994-07-01

    The Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) has been working on a Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Project (NEPSTP) using an existing Russian Topaz II reactor system to power the NEPSTP satellite. Safety investigations have shown that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the United States with some modification to preclude water flooded criticality. A ``fuel-out'' water subcriticality concept was selected by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as the baseline concept. A fuel-out anti-criticality device (ACD) conceptual design was developed by Rockwell. The concept functions to hold the fuel from the four centermost thermionic fuel elements (TFEs) outside the reactor during launch and reliably inserts the fuel into the reactor once the operational orbit is achieved. A four-tenths scale ACD rapid prototype model, fabricated from the CATIA solids design model, clearly shows in three dimensions the relative size and spatial relationship of the ACD components.

  5. Manufacture of micro fluidic devices by laser welding using thermal transfer printing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, R.; Klein, K. F.; Tobisch, T.; Thoelken, D.; Belz, M.

    2016-03-01

    Micro-fluidic devices are widely used today in the areas of medical diagnostics and drug research, as well as for applications within the process, electronics and chemical industry. Microliters of fluids or single cell to cell interactions can be conveniently analyzed with such devices using fluorescence imaging, phase contrast microscopy or spectroscopic techniques. Typical micro-fluidic devices consist of a thermoplastic base component with chambers and channels covered by a hermetic fluid and gas tight sealed lid component. Both components are usually from the same or similar thermoplastic material. Different mechanical, adhesive or thermal joining processes can be used to assemble base component and lid. Today, laser beam welding shows the potential to become a novel manufacturing opportunity for midsize and large scale production of micro-fluidic devices resulting in excellent processing quality by localized heat input and low thermal stress to the device during processing. For laser welding, optical absorption of the resin and laser wavelength has to be matched for proper joining. This paper will focus on a new approach to prepare micro-fluidic channels in such devices using a thermal transfer printing process, where an optical absorbing layer absorbs the laser energy. Advantages of this process will be discussed in combination with laser welding of optical transparent micro-fluidic devices.

  6. Transfer-Free, Wafer-Scale Manufacturing of Graphene-Based Electromechanical Resonant Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullinan, Michael; Gorman, Jason

    2013-03-01

    Nanoelectromechanical (NEMS) resonators offer the potential to extend the limits of force and mass detection due to their small size, high natural frequencies and high Q-factors. Graphene-based NEMS resonators are particularly promising due to their high elastic modulus and atomic thickness. However, widespread use of graphene in such systems is limited by the way in which graphene-based devices are typically fabricated. Most graphene-based NEMS devices are fabricated in a ``one-off'' manner using slow, limited scale methods such as mechanical exfoliation, electron beam lithography, or transfer from copper foils which can't be incorporated into standard micro/nanofabrication lines. This talk will present a method that can be used to manufacture graphene-based NEMS devices at the wafer scale using conventional microfabrication techniques. In this method graphene is grown directly on thin film copper using chemical vapor deposition. The copper film is then patterned and etched to produce graphene-based NEMS resonators. This talk will also address some of the challenges in fabricating a large number of graphene devices at the wafer scale including achieving high uniformity across the wafer, increasing device-to-device repeatability, and producing high device yields.

  7. New Computing Devices and the Drive toward Nanometer-scale Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    In recent decades, we have become used to the idea of exponentially compounding improvements in manufacturing precision. These improvements are driven in large part by the economic imperative to continuously shrink the devices of information technology, particularly the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect transistor. However, CMOS technology is clearly approaching some important physical limits. Since roughly 2003, the inability to reduce supply voltages according to constant-field scaling rules, combined with economic constraints on areal power density and total power, has forced designers to limit clock frequencies even as devices have continued to shrink. New channel materials, new device structures, and novel circuits cannot fundamentally alter this new status quo. The device physics must change in a more fundamental way if we are to realize fast digital logic with very low power dissipation. The continued vitality of the information technology revolution and the continued push of manufacturing precision toward nanometer dimensions, will depend on it. Fortunately, there is no shortage of new digital switch concepts based on physical principles which avoid the fundamental voltage-scaling limit of the field-effect transistor. The Nanoelectronics Research Initiative (NRI) is a consortium of leading semiconductor companies established in 2005 to guide and fund fundamental research at U.S. universities with the goal of finding the ``next switch'' to replace the CMOS transistor for storing and manipulating digital information. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) have partnered with NRI to fund this research. To date, NRI has funded the exploration of many novel device concepts, and has guided research comparing the capabilities of these devices. Although no single device has yet emerged as a clear winner with the potential to eclipse the field-effect transistor, results are

  8. 21 CFR 801.1 - Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; name and place of business of..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.1 Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor. (a)...

  9. 21 CFR 801.1 - Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; name and place of business of..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.1 Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor. (a)...

  10. 21 CFR 801.1 - Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; name and place of business of..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.1 Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor. (a)...

  11. 21 CFR 801.1 - Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; name and place of business of..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.1 Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor. (a)...

  12. 21 CFR 801.1 - Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; name and place of business of..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.1 Medical devices; name and place of business of manufacturer, packer or distributor. (a)...

  13. Final Design And Manufacturing of the PEP II High Energy Ring Arc Bellows Module

    SciTech Connect

    Kurita, Nadine R.; Kulikov, Artem; Corlett, John; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-09-01

    A novel RF shield bellows module developed at SLAC has been successfully manufactured and installed in the PEP-II High Energy Ring (HER). Tests indicate that the module meets its performance and operational requirements. The primary function of the bellows module is to allow for thermal expansion of the chambers and for lateral, longitudinal and angular offsets due to tolerances and alignment, while providing RF continuity between adjoining chambers. An update on the Arc bellows module for the PEP-II High Energy Ring is presented. Final design, manufacturing issues, material and coating selection, and tribological and RF testing are discussed. Performance and operational requirements are also reviewed. The RF shield design has been proven during assembly to allow for large manufacturing tolerances without reducing the mechanical spring force below required values. In addition, the RF shield maintains electrical contact even with large misalignments across the module.

  14. The Latest Status of NSLS-II Insertion Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Toshi; Kitegi, Charles; He, Ping; Musardo, Marco; Rank, Oleg Chubar James; Cappadoro, Peter; Fernandes, Huston; Harder, David; Corwin, Todd

    2014-03-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) project is now in the final stage of construction. The Linac, the Booster synchrotron, and the Storage Ring magnets girder assemblies have been installed. The first damping wiggler has been delivered and its field characteristics are carefully measured. A Three Pole Wiggler (3PW) and Apple-II type elliptically polarizing undulators (EPUs) have been fabricated by the vendors. Two 3.0m long in-vacuum undulators (IVUs) and one 1.5m long IVU are almost complete and waiting for factory acceptance tests. One 3.0m long IVU for Inelastic X-ray Scattering beamline is in fabrication by a different vendor. Recently two 2.8m long IVUs for long straight sections (LSSs) have been added to the project for "future beamlines". In addition, two 1.5m long IVUs and one 2.8m long IVU for LSSs have been procured for Advanced Beamlines for Biological Investigations with X-rays (ABBIX) project funded by National Institure of Health (NIH). Further, two 3.5m long EPUs for LSSs are being designed for NSLS-II Experimental Tools (NEXT) -Major Item of Equipment (MIE) project. To succeed these conventional IVUs, PrFeB based cryo-permanent magnet undulator (CPMU) is considered as next generation device of hard X-ray sources. An In-Vacuum Magnetic Measurement System (IVMMS) for cold in-situ Hall probe mapping of CPMUs up to 1.5m in length has been developed. Summary of the current status of each project and future plans for the NSLS-II ring will be discussed.

  15. Manufacturing process and material selection in concurrent collaborative design of MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Xuan F.; Du, H.

    2003-09-01

    In this paper we present knowledge of an intensive approach and system for selecting suitable manufacturing processes and materials for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices in concurrent collaborative design environment. In the paper, fundamental issues on MEMS manufacturing process and material selection such as concurrent design framework, manufacturing process and material hierarchies, and selection strategy are first addressed. Then, a fuzzy decision support scheme for a multi-criteria decision-making problem is proposed for estimating, ranking and selecting possible manufacturing processes, materials and their combinations. A Web-based prototype advisory system for the MEMS manufacturing process and material selection, WebMEMS-MASS, is developed based on the client-knowledge server architecture and framework to help the designer find good processes and materials for MEMS devices. The system, as one of the important parts of an advanced simulation and modeling tool for MEMS design, is a concept level process and material selection tool, which can be used as a standalone application or a Java applet via the Web. The running sessions of the system are inter-linked with webpages of tutorials and reference pages to explain the facets, fabrication processes and material choices, and calculations and reasoning in selection are performed using process capability and material property data from a remote Web-based database and interactive knowledge base that can be maintained and updated via the Internet. The use of the developed system including operation scenario, use support, and integration with an MEMS collaborative design system is presented. Finally, an illustration example is provided.

  16. Additively Manufactured Device for Dynamic Culture of Large Arrays of 3D Tissue Engineered Constructs.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro F; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L; Vaquette, Cédryck

    2015-04-22

    The ability to test large arrays of cell and biomaterial combinations in 3D environments is still rather limited in the context of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This limitation can be generally addressed by employing highly automated and reproducible methodologies. This study reports on the development of a highly versatile and upscalable method based on additive manufacturing for the fabrication of arrays of scaffolds, which are enclosed into individualized perfusion chambers. Devices containing eight scaffolds and their corresponding bioreactor chambers are simultaneously fabricated utilizing a dual extrusion additive manufacturing system. To demonstrate the versatility of the concept, the scaffolds, while enclosed into the device, are subsequently surface-coated with a biomimetic calcium phosphate layer by perfusion with simulated body fluid solution. 96 scaffolds are simultaneously seeded and cultured with human osteoblasts under highly controlled bidirectional perfusion dynamic conditions over 4 weeks. Both coated and noncoated resulting scaffolds show homogeneous cell distribution and high cell viability throughout the 4 weeks culture period and CaP-coated scaffolds result in a significantly increased cell number. The methodology developed in this work exemplifies the applicability of additive manufacturing as a tool for further automation of studies in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:25721231

  17. Manufacturing and testing flexible microfluidic devices with optical and electrical detection mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivan, Marius G.; Vivet, Frédéric; Meinders, Erwin R.

    2010-06-01

    Flexible microfluidic devices made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) were manufactured by soft lithography, and tested in detection of ionic species using optical absorption spectroscopy and electrical measurements. PDMS was chosen due to its flexibility and ease of surface modification by exposure to plasma and UV treatment, its transparency in UV-Vis regions of the light spectrum, and biocompatibility. The dual-detection mechanism allows the user more freedom in choosing the detection tool, and a functional device was successfully tested. Optical lithography was employed for manufacturing templates, which were subsequently used for imprinting liquid PDMS by thermal curing. Gold electrodes having various widths and distances among them were patterned with optical lithography on the top part which sealed the microchannels, and the devices were employed for detection of ionic species in aqueous salt solutions as well as micro-electrolysis cells. Due to the transparency of PDMS in UV-Vis the microfluidics were also used as photoreactors, and the in-situ formed charged species were monitored by applying a voltage between electrodes. Upon addition of a colorimetric pH sensor, acid was detected with absorption spectroscopy.

  18. Electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing process for PVDF polymer-based piezoelectric device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new additive manufacturing (AM) process to directly and continuously print piezoelectric devices from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymeric filament rods under a strong electric field. This process, called ‘electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing or EPAM, combines AM and electric poling processes and is able to fabricate free-form shape piezoelectric devices continuously. In this process, the PVDF polymer dipoles remain well-aligned and uniform over a large area in a single design, production and fabrication step. During EPAM process, molten PVDF polymer is simultaneously mechanically stresses in-situ by the leading nozzle and electrically poled by applying high electric field under high temperature. The EPAM system was constructed to directly print piezoelectric structures from PVDF polymeric filament while applying high electric field between nozzle tip and printing bed in AM machine. Piezoelectric devices were successfully fabricated using the EPAM process. The crystalline phase transitions that occurred from the process were identified by using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. The results indicate that devices printed under a strong electric field become piezoelectric during the EPAM process and that stronger electric fields result in greater piezoelectricity as marked by the electrical response and the formation of sharper peaks at the polar β crystalline wavenumber of the PVDF polymer. Performing this process in the absence of an electric field does not result in dipole alignment of PVDF polymer. The EPAM process is expected to lead to the widespread use of AM to fabricate a variety of piezoelectric PVDF polymer-based devices for sensing, actuation and energy harvesting applications with simple, low cost, single processing and fabrication step.

  19. 10 CFR 32.53 - Luminous safety devices for use in aircraft: Requirements for license to manufacture, assemble...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Luminous safety devices for use in aircraft: Requirements for license to manufacture, assemble, repair or initially transfer. 32.53 Section 32.53 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS...

  20. Conceptual design of the Topaz II anticriticality device

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo, D.; Bultman, D.; Potter, R.C.; Sanchez, L.; Skobelev, V.E.

    1993-10-01

    The Topaz II Flight Safety team requires that the hardware for the Rusian-built reactor be modified to ensure that the reactor remains subcritical in the event of an inadvertent accident in which the reactor is submersed in wet sand or water. In April 1993, the American Flight safety team chose the fuel-out anticriticality device as the baseline for the hardware design. We describe the initial stages of the hardware design; show how the mechanism works; and describe its function, the functional and operational requirements, and the difficult design problems encountered. Also described, are the initial interactions between the Russian and American design teams. Because the effort is to add an American modification to a Russian flight reactor, this project has required unusual technical cooperation and consultation with the Russian design team.

  1. Lexicon generation methods, lexicon generation devices, and lexicon generation articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Carter, Richard J [Richland, WA; McCall, Jonathon D [West Richland, WA; Whitney, Paul D [Richland, WA; Gregory, Michelle L [Richland, WA; Turner, Alan E [Kennewick, WA; Hetzler, Elizabeth G [Kennewick, WA; White, Amanda M [Kennewick, WA; Posse, Christian [Seattle, WA; Nakamura, Grant C [Kennewick, WA

    2010-10-26

    Lexicon generation methods, computer implemented lexicon editing methods, lexicon generation devices, lexicon editors, and articles of manufacture are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a lexicon generation method includes providing a seed vector indicative of occurrences of a plurality of seed terms within a plurality of text items, providing a plurality of content vectors indicative of occurrences of respective ones of a plurality of content terms within the text items, comparing individual ones of the content vectors with respect to the seed vector, and responsive to the comparing, selecting at least one of the content terms as a term of a lexicon usable in sentiment analysis of text.

  2. George E. Pake Prize: A Few Challenges in the Evolution of Semiconductor Device/Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, Robert

    In the early 1980s, the semiconductor industry faced the related challenges of ``scaling through the one-micron barrier'' and converting single-level-metal NMOS integrated circuits to multi-level-metal CMOS. Multiple advances in lithography technology and device materials/process integration led the way toward the deep-sub-micron transistors and interconnects that characterize today's electronic chips. In the 1990s, CMOS scaling advanced at an accelerated pace enabled by rapid advances in many aspects of optical lithography. However, the industry also needed to continue the progress in manufacturing on ever-larger silicon wafers to maintain economy-of-scale trends. Simultaneously, the increasing complexity and absolute-precision requirements of manufacturing compounded the necessity for new processes, tools, and control methodologies. This talk presents a personal perspective on some of the approaches that addressed the aforementioned challenges. In particular, early work on integrating silicides, lightly-doped-drain FETs, shallow recessed isolation, and double-level metal will be discussed. In addition, some pioneering efforts in deep-UV lithography and single-wafer processing will be covered. The latter will be mainly based on results from the MMST Program - a 100 M +, 5-year R&D effort, funded by DARPA, the U.S. Air Force, and Texas Instruments, that developed a wide range of new technologies for advanced semiconductor manufacturing. The major highlight of the program was the demonstration of sub-3-day cycle time for manufacturing 350-nm CMOS integrated circuits in 1993. This was principally enabled by the development of: (1) 100% single-wafer processing, including rapid-thermal processing (RTP), and (2) computer-integrated-manufacturing (CIM), including real-time, in-situ process control.

  3. Insertion Devices for NSLS-II Baseline and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe,T.

    2008-06-23

    NSLS-II is going to employ Damping Wigglers (DWs) not only for emittance reduction but also as broad band hard X-ray source. In-Vacuum Undulators (IVUs) with the minimum RMS phase error (< 2 degree) and possible cryo-capability are planned for X-ray planar device. Elliptically Polarized Undulators (EPUs) are envisioned for polarization controls. Due to the lack of hard X-ray flux from weak dipole magnet field (0.4 Tesla), three pole wigglers (3PWs) of the peak field over 1 Tesla will be mainly used by NSLS bending magnet beam line users. Magnetic designs and kick maps for dynamic aperture surveys were created using the latest version of Radia [1] for Mathematica 6 which we supported the development. There are other devices planned for the later stage of the project, such as quasi-periodic EPU, superconducting wiggler/undulator, and Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU) with Praseodymium Iron Boron (PrFeB) magnets and textured Dysprosium poles. For R&D, Hybrid PrFeB arrays were planned to be assembled and field-measured at room temperature, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperature using our vertical test facility. We have also developed a specialized power supply for pulsed wire measurement.

  4. Manufacturing of an aluminum alloy mold for micro-hot embossing of polymeric micro-devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, N. K.; Lam, Y. C.; Yue, C. Y.; Tan, M. J.

    2010-05-01

    In micro-hot embossing of polymeric micro-devices, e.g. microfluidic devices, the quality of the mold plays an important role in determining not only the product quality but also the overall production cost. Often the mold is made of silicon, which is brittle and fails after producing a limited number of parts. Metallic molds produced by micro-machining have a much longer life; however, the surface finish of the mold is not ideal for producing polymeric devices that require good surface finish. The metallic glass mold produced by micro-hot embossing with a silicon master is a recent development, which could produce high quality and high strength molds with long life span. However, metallic glasses are rather costly. In an attempt to reduce the production cost of the mold with acceptable quality, strength and life span, we explore here the manufacture of an aluminum alloy (AA6061-T6) mold by hot embossing using a silicon master. Using a set of channels to be produced on the aluminum alloy as the benchmark, we examine the orientation effect of the channels on the AA6061-T6 mold produced by hot embossing. Finally, to examine the effectiveness of the AA6061-T6 mold, it is employed for the hot embossing of polymeric (TOPAS 8007) substrates.

  5. II-VI Materials-Based High Performance Intersubband Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Arvind Pawan

    achieve normal-incident absorption, taking advantage of light-scattering in sloped surfaces; this method is wavelength independent and does not involve complicated fabrication techniques. With the performance of II-VI devices matching or surpassing existing commercial solutions, integrated mid-IR photonics based sensing is poised to play a big role in the future of sensing technologies.

  6. Data visualization methods, data visualization devices, data visualization apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Alan E.; Crow, Vernon L.; Payne, Deborah A.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Cook, Kristin A.; Cowley, Wendy E.

    2015-06-30

    Data visualization methods, data visualization devices, data visualization apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a data visualization method includes accessing a plurality of initial documents at a first moment in time, first processing the initial documents providing processed initial documents, first identifying a plurality of first associations of the initial documents using the processed initial documents, generating a first visualization depicting the first associations, accessing a plurality of additional documents at a second moment in time after the first moment in time, second processing the additional documents providing processed additional documents, second identifying a plurality of second associations of the additional documents and at least some of the initial documents, wherein the second identifying comprises identifying using the processed initial documents and the processed additional documents, and generating a second visualization depicting the second associations.

  7. Manufacturing microstructured tool inserts for the production of polymeric microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Srivastava, Amit; Kirwan, Brendan; Byrne, Richard; Fang, Fengzhou; Browne, David J.; Gilchrist, Michael D.

    2015-09-01

    Tooling is critical in defining multi-scale patterns for mass production of polymeric microfluidic devices using the microinjection molding process. In the present work, fabrication of various microstructured tool inserts using stainless steel, nickel and bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is discussed based on die-sinking EDM (electrical discharge machining), electroforming, focused ion beam milling and thermoplastic forming processes. Tool performance is evaluated in terms of surface roughness, hardness and tool life. Compared to stainless steel, nickel and BMGs are capable of integrating length scales from 100 to 10-8 m and are good candidates for producing polymeric microfluidics. Selection of tool materials and manufacturing technologies should consider the end-user requirements of actual applications.

  8. 3D model acquisition, design, planning, and manufacturing of orthopaedic devices: a framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidder, Justin R.; Mason, Emily; Nnaji, Bartholomew O.

    1996-12-01

    Design and manufacture of orthopedic devices using rapid prototyping technologies has been until recently a highly iterative process that involves multiple users, including doctors, design engineers and rapid prototyping experts. Existing systems for creation of orthopedic parts through rapid prototyping do not follow the principles of concurrent engineering and design for manufacture. This leads to excessive communication between parties and delays in product realization time. In this paper, we lay out the framework for a unified expert system that will enable a doctor to create quickly and easily fully functional prosthetics and orthopedic implants. Necessary components of the model acquisition process should include volumetric segmentation of objects from a CT or MRI dataset and NURBS surface fitting to the boundary points. Finite element analysis and surface model modification modules are also needed, but should be provided in an intuitive fashion for doctors who are not experienced in computer aided design. Preprocessing for rapid prototype building should be automatic, and should include optimal orientation, support structure generation and build simulation modules. Finally, the model should be passed to the rapid prototyping machine in a presliced format for speed and accuracy.

  9. Environmentally benign manufacturing of compact disc stampers [Final Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-08

    Optical data storage is currently a $10B/yr. business. With the introduction of the high capacity Digital Versatile Disc (D/D) as well as the continued growth of CD-Audio and CD-ROM worldwide sales of optical data products as a whole are growing at rate of more than 10% per year. In North America, more than 2.5 billion optical discs will be sold in 1998. By 1999, the numbers of optical discs produced for the North American market will grow to almost three billion. The optical disc manufacturing industry is dominated by Asian and European companies (e.g. Sony of Japan and Philips of Netherlands). Prism Corporation has created a process that could significantly improve US competitiveness in the business of optical disc production. The objectives of the Phase II STTR project were to build and test an ion machining system (IMS) for stamper fabrication, prove overall manufacturing system feasibility by fabrication stampers and replicas, and evaluate alternative materials and alternative process parameters to optimize the process. During tie period of the Phase II project Prism Corporation was able to meet these objectives. In the course of doing so, adjustments had been made to better the project and in turn the final product. An ion machining system was designed and built that produced stampers ready for the molding process. Also, many control steps in the manufacturing process were studied to improve the current process and make it even more compatible with the industry standards, fitting seamlessly into current manufacturing lines.

  10. 33 CFR 159.89 - Power interruption: Type I and II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.89 Power interruption: Type I and II devices. A discharge device must be designed so that a momentary loss of power... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Power interruption: Type I and...

  11. 78 FR 14013 - Medical Devices; Exemption From Premarket Notification; Class II Devices; Wheelchair Elevator

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    .../MedicalDevices/DeviceRegulationandGuidance/GuidanceDocuments/ucm080198.htm or by sending an email request... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 890 Medical Devices; Exemption From Premarket... Part 890 Medical devices, Physical medicine devices. Therefore, under the Federal Food, Drug,...

  12. Fabrication of Thermoelectric Devices Using Additive-Subtractive Manufacturing Techniques: Application to Waste-Heat Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewolde, Mahder

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid-state devices that convert heat directly into electricity. They are well suited for waste-heat energy harvesting applications as opposed to primary energy generation. Commercially available thermoelectric modules are flat, inflexible and have limited sizes available. State-of-art manufacturing of TEG devices relies on assembling prefabricated parts with soldering, epoxy bonding, and mechanical clamping. Furthermore, efforts to incorporate them onto curved surfaces such as exhaust pipes, pump housings, steam lines, mixing containers, reaction chambers, etc. require custom-built heat exchangers. This is costly and labor-intensive, in addition to presenting challenges in terms of space, thermal coupling, added weight and long-term reliability. Additive manufacturing technologies are beginning to address many of these issues by reducing part count in complex designs and the elimination of sub-assembly requirements. This work investigates the feasibility of utilizing such novel manufacturing routes for improving the manufacturing process of thermoelectric devices. Much of the research in thermoelectricity is primarily focused on improving thermoelectric material properties by developing of novel materials or finding ways to improve existing ones. Secondary to material development is improving the manufacturing process of TEGs to provide significant cost benefits. To improve the device fabrication process, this work explores additive manufacturing technologies to provide an integrated and scalable approach for TE device manufacturing directly onto engineering component surfaces. Additive manufacturing techniques like thermal spray and ink-dispenser printing are developed with the aim of improving the manufacturing process of TEGs. Subtractive manufacturing techniques like laser micromachining are also studied in detail. This includes the laser processing parameters for cutting the thermal spray materials efficiently by

  13. Assessing performance of manufactured treatment devices for the removal of phosphorus from urban stormwater.

    PubMed

    Sample, David J; Grizzard, Thomas J; Sansalone, John; Davis, Allen P; Roseen, Robert M; Walker, Jane

    2012-12-30

    Nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus in urban runoff can be controlled through a variety of nonstructural and structural controls commonly known as best management practices (BMPs). Manufactured treatment devices (MTDs) are structural BMPs that may be used in portions of a site, often when space is limited. MTDs use a variety of technologies to achieve potentially greater treatment efficiency while reducing spatial requirements. However, verifying the performance of MTDs is difficult because of the variability of runoff water quality, the variability in treatment technologies, and the lack of standardized protocols for field testing. Performance testing of MTDs has focused almost exclusively upon removal of sediment; however MTDs are now being applied to the task of removing other constituents of concern, including nutrients such as phosphorus. This paper reviews current methods of assessing treatment performance of MTDs and introduces the Virginia Technology Assessment Protocol (VTAP), a program developed to evaluate the removal of phosphorus by MTDs. The competing goals of various stakeholders were considered when developing the VTAP. A conceptual framework of the tradeoffs considered is presented; these tradeoffs require compromise among the competing interests in order that innovation proceeds and benefits accrue. The key strengths of VTAP are also presented and compared with other existing programs. PMID:23079117

  14. CMOS/LCOS-based image transceiver device: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efron, Uzi; Davidov, Isak; Sinelnikov, Vladimir; Friesem, Asher A.

    2001-11-01

    A CMOS-liquid crystal-based image transceiver device (ITD) is under development at the Holon Institute of Technology. The device combines both functions of imaging and display in a single array configuration. This unique structure allows the combination of see-through, aiming, imaging and the displaying of a superposed image to be combined in a single, compact, head mounted display. The CMOS-based pixel elements are designed to provide efficient imaging in the visible range as well as driver capabilities for the overlying liquid crystal modulator. The image sensor part of the pixel is based on an n-well photodiode and a three-transistor readout circuit. The imaging function is based on a back- illuminated sensor configuration. In order to provide a high imager fill-factor, two pixel configurations are proposed: 1) A p++/p-/p-well silicon structure using twin- well CMOS process; 2) An n-well processed silicon structure with a micro-lens array. The display portion of the IT device is to be fabricated on a silicon-based reflective, active matrix driver, using nematic liquid crystal material, in LCOS technology. The timing, sequencing and control of the IT device array are designed in a pipeline array processing scheme. A preliminary prototype system and device design have been performed and the first test device is currently undergoing testing. Details of the device design as well as its Smart Goggle applications are presented.

  15. Smart Rehabilitation Devices: Part II – Adaptive Motion Control

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J. Q.; Rudolph, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a study of adaptive motion control of smart versatile rehabilitation devices using MR fluids. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training and is reconfigurable for several human joints. Adaptive controls are developed to regulate resistance force based on the prescription of the therapist. Special consideration has been given to the human–machine interaction in the adaptive control that can modify the behavior of the device to account for strength gains or muscle fatigue of the human subject. PMID:18548131

  16. Medical devices; exemptions from premarket notification; class II devices. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2001-11-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is publishing a final rule exempting from the premarket notification requirements the fluoroscopic compression device, a manual compression device that allows a radiologist to press on the abdomen during a fluoroscopic procedure without exposing his or her hand to the x-ray beam. The device is classified as an accessory to the image-intensified fluoroscopic x-ray system. FDA received a petition requesting an exemption for the F-Spoon device, a type of fluoroscopic manual compression device. FDA is expanding the exemption for this type of generic device to include other fluoroscopic compression devices. FDA is publishing this order in accordance with the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). PMID:11776279

  17. 33 CFR 159.126a - Suspended solids test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... suspended solids in accordance with 40 CFR Part 136. The arithmetic mean of the total suspended solids in 38... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Suspended solids test: Type II... Suspended solids test: Type II devices. During the sewage processing test (§ 159.121) 40 effluent...

  18. 33 CFR 159.126a - Suspended solids test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... suspended solids in accordance with 40 CFR part 136. The arithmetic mean of the total suspended solids in 38... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspended solids test: Type II... Suspended solids test: Type II devices. During the sewage processing test (§ 159.121) 40 effluent...

  19. 33 CFR 159.126a - Suspended solids test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... suspended solids in accordance with 40 CFR Part 136. The arithmetic mean of the total suspended solids in 38... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Suspended solids test: Type II... Suspended solids test: Type II devices. During the sewage processing test (§ 159.121) 40 effluent...

  20. 33 CFR 159.126a - Suspended solids test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... suspended solids in accordance with 40 CFR Part 136. The arithmetic mean of the total suspended solids in 38... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Suspended solids test: Type II... Suspended solids test: Type II devices. During the sewage processing test (§ 159.121) 40 effluent...

  1. 33 CFR 159.126a - Suspended solids test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... suspended solids in accordance with 40 CFR Part 136. The arithmetic mean of the total suspended solids in 38... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspended solids test: Type II... Suspended solids test: Type II devices. During the sewage processing test (§ 159.121) 40 effluent...

  2. Interband cascade light emitting devices based on type-II quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Rui Q.; Lin, C.H.; Murry, S.J.

    1997-06-01

    The authors discuss physical processes in the newly developed type-II interband cascade light emitting devices, and review their recent progress in the demonstration of the first type-II interband cascade lasers and the observation of interband cascade electroluminescence up to room temperature in a broad mid-infrared wavelength region (extended to 9 {mu}m).

  3. 75 FR 44172 - Neurological and Physical Medicine Devices; Designation of Special Controls for Certain Class II...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... Register of April 5, 2010 (75 FR 17093). The document proposed to amend certain neurological and physical.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In the Federal Register of April 5, 2010 (75 FR 17093), FDA published a... Physical Medicine Devices; Designation of Special Controls for Certain Class II Devices and Exemption...

  4. 21 CFR 610.42 - Restrictions on use for further manufacture of medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... devices. (a) In addition to labeling requirements in subchapter H of this chapter, when a medical device... medical devices. 610.42 Section 610.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... reactivity of the human blood or blood component in the medical device presents no significant health...

  5. 21 CFR 610.42 - Restrictions on use for further manufacture of medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... devices. (a) In addition to labeling requirements in subchapter H of this chapter, when a medical device... medical devices. 610.42 Section 610.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... reactivity of the human blood or blood component in the medical device presents no significant health...

  6. 21 CFR 610.42 - Restrictions on use for further manufacture of medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... devices. (a) In addition to labeling requirements in subchapter H of this chapter, when a medical device... medical devices. 610.42 Section 610.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... reactivity of the human blood or blood component in the medical device presents no significant health...

  7. 21 CFR 610.42 - Restrictions on use for further manufacture of medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... devices. (a) In addition to labeling requirements in subchapter H of this chapter, when a medical device... medical devices. 610.42 Section 610.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... reactivity of the human blood or blood component in the medical device presents no significant health...

  8. 21 CFR 610.42 - Restrictions on use for further manufacture of medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... devices. (a) In addition to labeling requirements in subchapter H of this chapter, when a medical device... medical devices. 610.42 Section 610.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... reactivity of the human blood or blood component in the medical device presents no significant health...

  9. X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, David C.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Barnes, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes research on use of x-ray diffraction to measure stresses in metal conductors of complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits exposed to ionizing radiation. Expanding upon report summarized in "X-Ray-Diffraction Tests Of Irradiated Electronic Devices: I" (NPO-18803), presenting data further suggesting relationship between electrical performances of circuits and stresses and strains in metal conductors.

  10. Assurance of Medical Device Quality with Quality Management System: An Analysis of Good Manufacturing Practice Implementation in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Pei-Weng; Wu, Shiow-Ing

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of an effective quality management system has always been considered a principal method for a manufacturer to maintain and improve its product and service quality. Globally many regulatory authorities incorporate quality management system as one of the mandatory requirements for the regulatory control of high-risk medical devices. The present study aims to analyze the GMP enforcement experience in Taiwan between 1998 and 2013. It describes the regulatory implementation of medical device GMP requirement and initiatives taken to assist small and medium-sized enterprises in compliance with the regulatory requirement. Based on statistical data collected by the competent authority and industry research institutes, the present paper reports the growth of Taiwan local medical device industry after the enforcement of GMP regulation. Transition in the production, technologies, and number of employees of Taiwan medical device industry between 1998 and 2013 provides the competent authorities around the world with an empirical foundation for further policy development. PMID:26075255

  11. Assurance of medical device quality with quality management system: an analysis of good manufacturing practice implementation in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Tzu-Wei; Tu, Pei-Weng; Liu, Li-Ling; Wu, Shiow-Ing

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of an effective quality management system has always been considered a principal method for a manufacturer to maintain and improve its product and service quality. Globally many regulatory authorities incorporate quality management system as one of the mandatory requirements for the regulatory control of high-risk medical devices. The present study aims to analyze the GMP enforcement experience in Taiwan between 1998 and 2013. It describes the regulatory implementation of medical device GMP requirement and initiatives taken to assist small and medium-sized enterprises in compliance with the regulatory requirement. Based on statistical data collected by the competent authority and industry research institutes, the present paper reports the growth of Taiwan local medical device industry after the enforcement of GMP regulation. Transition in the production, technologies, and number of employees of Taiwan medical device industry between 1998 and 2013 provides the competent authorities around the world with an empirical foundation for further policy development. PMID:26075255

  12. Investigation of the Application of Process Analytical Technology for a Laser Welding Process in Medical Device Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Sean; Conneely, Alan; Stenzel, Eric; Murphy, Eamonn

    In FDA regulated medical device manufacturing, real time inspection of manufactured product is limited by the requirement to destructively test random samples of the product post production. Infra Red thermography offers the ability to non-destructively test, key critical to quality attributes of medical devices during laser welding and facilitates real time statistical process control for enhanced product quality and yield. This paper will present results of research work focused on non-destructive methods using Infra Red Thermography to potentially replace destructive methods of assessment for laser welded joints in stent delivery catheters. The approach utilizes designed experiments in conjunction with IR assessment and also identifies some limitations of the proposed method.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: POLLUTION PREVENTION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF LOCKING DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. n an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Cent...

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: WASTE MINIMIZATION FOR A MANUFACTURER OF ELECTRICAL ROTATING DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. n an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Cent...

  15. 21 CFR 821.30 - Tracking obligations of persons other than device manufacturers: distributor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Additional Requirements and Responsibilities § 821.30 Tracking obligations of persons other than device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracking obligations of persons other than...

  16. 21 CFR 821.30 - Tracking obligations of persons other than device manufacturers: distributor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Additional Requirements and Responsibilities § 821.30 Tracking obligations of persons other than device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracking obligations of persons other than...

  17. 21 CFR 821.30 - Tracking obligations of persons other than device manufacturers: distributor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Additional Requirements and Responsibilities § 821.30 Tracking obligations of persons other than device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracking obligations of persons other than...

  18. 21 CFR 821.30 - Tracking obligations of persons other than device manufacturers: distributor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Additional Requirements and Responsibilities § 821.30 Tracking obligations of persons other than device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracking obligations of persons other than...

  19. Method And Apparatus For Coupling Optical Elements To Optoelectronic Devices For Manufacturing Optical Transceiver Modules

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Chu, Dahwey; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; Giunta, Rachel Knudsen; Mitchell, Robert T.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Peterson, David W.; Rising, Merideth A.; Reber, Cathleen A.; Reysen, Bill H.

    2005-06-14

    A process is provided for aligning and connecting at least one optical fiber to at least one optoelectronic device so as to couple light between at least one optical fiber and at least one optoelectronic device. One embodiment of this process comprises the following steps: (1) holding at least one optical element close to at least one optoelectronic device, at least one optical element having at least a first end; (2) aligning at least one optical element with at least one optoelectronic device; (3) depositing a first non-opaque material on a first end of at least one optoelectronic device; and (4) bringing the first end of at least one optical element proximate to the first end of at least one optoelectronic device in such a manner that the first non-opaque material contacts the first end of at least one optoelectronic device and the first end of at least one optical element. The optical element may be an optical fiber, and the optoelectronic device may be a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. The first non-opaque material may be a UV optical adhesive that provides an optical path and mechanical stability. In another embodiment of the alignment process, the first end of at least one optical element is brought proximate to the first end of at least one optoelectronic device in such a manner that an interstitial space exists between the first end of at least one optoelectronic device and the first end of at least one optical element.

  20. A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing, Part II: Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Arnold, Steven M.; Draper, Robert D.; Shin, Eugene; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom; Lao, Chao; Rhein, Morgan; Mehl, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the second part of the three part report of the project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing" funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce aircraft engine components by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), using commercially available polyetherimides-Ultem 9085 and experimental Ultem 1000 mixed with 10% chopped carbon fiber. A property comparison between FDM-printed and injection molded coupons for Ultem 9085, Ultem 1000 resin and the fiber-filled composite Ultem 1000 was carried out. Furthermore, an acoustic liner was printed from Ultem 9085 simulating conventional honeycomb structured liners and tested in a wind tunnel. Composite compressor inlet guide vanes were also printed using fiber-filled Ultem 1000 filaments and tested in a cascade rig. The fiber-filled Ultem 1000 filaments and composite vanes were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and acid digestion to determine the porosity of FDM-printed articles which ranged from 25 to 31%. Coupons of Ultem 9085, experimental Ultem 1000 composites and XH6050 resin were tested at room temperature and 400F to evaluate their corresponding mechanical properties. A preliminary modeling was also initiated to predict the mechanical properties of FDM-printed Ultem 9085 coupons in relation to varied raster angles and void contents, using the GRC-developed MAC/GMC program.

  1. 10 CFR 32.30 - Certain industrial devices containing byproduct material: Requirements for license to manufacture...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... water and body fluids of the forms of the byproduct material identified in paragraphs (b)(3) and (b)(12... the method of measurement; (7) Degree of access of human beings to the device during normal handling... material in each unit; (3) Chemical and physical form of the byproduct material in the device and...

  2. Medical Device; exemption from premarket notification; class II devices; pharmacy compounding systems. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2001-03-21

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is publishing an order granting a petition requesting exemption from the premarket notification requirements for pharmacy compounding systems classified within the intravascular administration set, with certain limitations. This rule will exempt from pre market notification pharmacy compounding systems classified within the intravascular administration set and establishes a guidance document as a special control for this device. FDA is publishing this order in accordance with the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). PMID:11706859

  3. Development of Inorganic Precursors for Manufacturing of Photovoltaic Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-308

    SciTech Connect

    van Hest, M.; Ginley, D.

    2013-06-01

    Both NREL and Rohm and Haas Electronic Materials are interested in the development of solution phase metal and semiconductive precursors for the manufacturing of photovoltaic devices. In particular, we intend to develop material sets for atmospheric deposition processes. The cooperation between these two parties will enable high value materials and processing solutions for the manufacturing of low cost, roll-to-roll photovoltaics.

  4. POLLUTION PREVENTION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF LOCKING DEVICES (EPA/600/S-95/013)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected u...

  5. Development and fabrication of improved power transistor switches. [fabrication and manufacturing of semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.; Chu, C. K.

    1976-01-01

    A new class of high-voltage power transistors has been achieved by adapting present interdigitated thyristor processing techniques to the fabrication of NPN Si transistors. Present devices are 2.3 cm in diameter. The electrical performance obtained is consistent with the predictions of an optimum design theory specifically developed for power switching transistors. The forward safe operating area of the experimental transistors shows a significant improvement over commercially available devices. The report describes device design, wafer processing, and various measurements which include dc characteristics, forward and reverse second breakdown limits, and switching times.

  6. Photovoltaic device with increased light absorption and method for its manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Glatfelter, Troy; Vogeli, Craig; Call, Jon; Hammond, Ginger

    1993-07-20

    A photovoltaic cell having a light-directing optical element integrally formed in an encapsulant layer thereof. The optical element redirects light to increase the internal absorption of light incident on the photovoltaic device.

  7. Cobrahead Deformity in the Right Atrial Disc of a New-Generation Occlutech Figulla Flex II Atrial Septal Defect Occluder Device

    PubMed Central

    Ural, Ertan; Sahin, Tayfun

    2015-01-01

    Cobrahead deformity is a known (but uncommon) phenomenon associated with the left atrial disc of the Amplatzer or Occlutech Figulla septal occluder device during percutaneous transcatheter atrial septal defect closure. It has also been postulated that the right atrial disc of the Amplatzer septal occluder device might upon occasion exhibit the cobrahead malformation. To date, only one case report concerning the cobrahead deformity in the right atrial disc of an Amplatzer septal occluder has been published, if we discount a report published as a letter to the manufacturer. Here we present the first report (known to us) of a cobrahead deformity in the right atrial disc of an Occlutech Figulla Flex II atrial septal defect occluder device during transcatheter closure of a complex atrial septal defect. PMID:26504440

  8. Additive manufacturing of lab-on-a-chip devices: promises and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feng; Macdonald, Niall P.; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2013-12-01

    This work describes a preliminary investigation of commercially available 3D printing technologies for rapid prototyping and low volume fabrication of Lab-on-a-Chip devices. The main motivation of the work was to use off-the-shelf 3D printing methods in order to rapidly and inexpensively build microfluidic devices with complex geometric features and reduce the need to use clear room environment and conventional microfabrication techniques. Both multi-jet modelling (MJM) and stereolithography (SLA) processes were explored. MJM printed devices were fabricated using a HD3500+ (3D Systems) high-definition printer using a thermo-polymer VisiJet Crystal (3D Systems) substratum that allows for a z-axis resolution of 16 μm and 25 μm x-y accuracy. SLA printed devices were produced using a Viper Pro (3D Systems) stereolithography system using Watershed 11122XC (DSM Somos) and Dreve Fototec 7150 Clear (Dreve Otoplastik GmbH) resins which allow for a z-axis resolution of 50 μm and 25 μm x-y accuracy. Fabrication results compared favourably with other forms of rapid prototyping such as laser cut PMMA devices and PDMS moulded microfluidic devices of the same design. Both processes allowed for fabrication of monolithic, optically transparent devices with features in the 100 μm range requiring minimal post-processing. Optical polymer qualities following different post-processing methods were also tested in both brightfield and fluorescence imaging of transgenic zebrafish embryos. Finally, we show that only ethanol-treated Dreve Fototec 7150 Clear resign proved to be non-toxic to human cell lines and fish embryos in fish toxicity assays (FET) requiring further investigation of 3D printing materials.

  9. Additive technology of soluble mold tooling for embedded devices in composite structures: A study on manufactured tolerances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Madhuparna

    Composite textiles have found widespread use and advantages in various industries and applications. The constant demand for high quality products and services requires companies to minimize their manufacturing costs, and delivery time in order to compete in general and niche marketplaces. Advanced manufacturing methods aim to provide economical methods of mold production. Creation of molding and tooling options for advanced composites encompasses a large portion of the fabrication time, making it a costly process and restraining factor. This research discusses a preliminary investigation into the use of soluble polymer compounds and additive manufacturing to fabricate soluble molds. These molds suffer from dimensional errors due to several factors, which have also been characterized. The basic soluble mold of a composite is 3D printed to meet the desired dimensions and geometry of holistic structures or spliced components. The time taken to dissolve the mold depends on the rate of agitation of the solvent. This process is steered towards enabling the implantation of optoelectronic devices within the composite to provide sensing capability for structural health monitoring. The shape deviation of the 3D printed mold is also studied and compared to its original dimensions to optimize the dimensional quality to produce dimensionally accurate parts. Mechanical tests were performed on compact tension (CT) resin samples prepared from these 3D printed molds and revealed crack propagation towards an embedded intact optical fiber.

  10. National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing. Program summary report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The National Center for Advanced Information Components Manufacturing focused on manufacturing research and development for flat panel displays, advanced lithography, microelectronics, and optoelectronics. This report provides an overview of the program, program history, summaries of the technical projects, and key program accomplishments.

  11. Device exchange in HeartMate II recipients: long-term outcomes and risk of thrombosis recurrence.

    PubMed

    Levin, Allison P; Uriel, Nir; Takayama, Hiroo; Mody, Kanika P; Ota, Takeyoshi; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Colombo, Paolo C; Garan, Arthur R; Dionizovik-Dimanovski, Marija; Sladen, Robert N; Naka, Yoshifumi; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2015-01-01

    Successful long-term use of the HeartMate II (HM II) left ventricular assist device has become commonplace but may be complicated by mechanical failure, infection, or thrombosis necessitating device exchange (DE). A subcostal approach to device exchange with motor exchange only is less traumatic, but long-term outcomes have not been reported. A retrospective chart review of all patients who required HM II to HM II device exchange at our institution was conducted. Of the 232 HM II patients implanted between January 2008 and July 2013, 28 required 36 device exchanges during a follow-up of 33.72 ± 17.25 months. The Kaplan-Meier 1 year survival was 63% for sternotomy exchanges and 100% for subcostal exchanges. Twenty-one exchanges were performed for initial or recurring device thrombosis. Although there was no difference in the risk of subsequent thrombosis after subcostal versus sternotomy exchange, the overall risk of recurring device thrombosis after device exchange for the same was high (31%). HM II device exchange via the subcostal approach has excellent short- and long-term outcomes. Device exchange performed for thrombosis is associated with a high recurrence risk irrespective of surgical approach. PMID:25396274

  12. CURRENT STATUS OF INSERTION DEVICE DEVELOPMENT AT THE NSLS-II AND ITS FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, T.; Chubar, O.; Corwin, T.; Harder, D.A.; He, P.; Kitegi, C.; Rank, J.; Rhein, C.; Rakowsky, G.; Spataro, C.

    2011-03-28

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) project is currently under construction. Procurement of various insertion devices (IDs) has begun. This ring assumes a very high beam stability requirement which imposes tighter field specifications on insertion devices (IDs) compared to the rings of previous generation. The state of the art ID Magnetic Measurement Facility is being set up in order to be able to certify the stringent requirements on the magnetic field of NSLS-II IDs. The IDs in the project baseline scope include six 3.5m long damping wigglers (DWs) with 100mm period length and 15mm pole gap, two 2.0m Elliptically Polarizing Undulator (EPU) with 49mm period and 11.5mm minimum magnetic gap, two 3.0m long 20mm period and one 1.5m long 21mm period IVU, which the minimum gap of these is 5mm and 5.5mm, respectively. Recently a special device for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) beamline has been added to the collection of baseline devices. Three pole wigglers with a 28mm magnetic gap and a peak field over 1 Tesla will be utilized to accommodate the users of the type of radiation which is currently produced with bending magnets at the NSLS.

  13. 21 CFR 821.20 - Devices subject to tracking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Tracking Requirements § 821.20 Devices subject to tracking. (a) A manufacturer of any class II or class III device that fits within one of the three criteria within § 821.1(a) must track that device in accordance with this part, if FDA issues a tracking order...

  14. 21 CFR 821.20 - Devices subject to tracking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Tracking Requirements § 821.20 Devices subject to tracking. (a) A manufacturer of any class II or class III device that fits within one of the three criteria within § 821.1(a) must track that device in accordance with this part, if FDA issues a tracking order...

  15. 21 CFR 821.20 - Devices subject to tracking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE TRACKING REQUIREMENTS Tracking Requirements § 821.20 Devices subject to tracking. (a) A manufacturer of any class II or class III device that fits within one of the three criteria within § 821.1(a) must track that device in accordance with this part, if FDA issues a tracking order...

  16. Spectroscopic ellipsometry as a process control tool for manufacturing cadmium telluride thin film photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Westcott P.

    In recent decades, there has been concern regarding the sustainability of fossil fuels. One of the more promising alternatives is Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices. Improved quality measurement techniques may aid in improving this existing technology. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is a common, non-destructive technique for measuring thin films in the silicon wafer industry. SE results have also been tied to properties believed to play a role in CdTe PV device efficiency. A study assessing the potential of SE for use as a quality measurement tool had not been previously reported. Samples of CdTe devices produced by both laboratory and industrial scale processes were measured by SE and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Mathematical models of the optical characteristics of the devices were developed and fit to SE data from multiple angles and locations on each sample. Basic statistical analysis was performed on results from the automated fits to provide an initial evaluation of SE as a quantitative quality measurement process. In all cases studied, automated SE models produced average stack thickness values within 10% of the values produced by SEM, and standard deviations for the top bulk layer thickness were less than 1% of the average values.

  17. 75 FR 53704 - Public Workshop on Medical Devices and Nanotechnology: Manufacturing, Characterization, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... notice that appeared in the Federal Register of August 23, 2010 (75 FR 51829). The notice announced the... INFORMATION: In FR Doc. 2010-20837, appearing on page 51829 in the Federal Register of Monday, August 23, 2010... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Public Workshop on Medical Devices and...

  18. Transparent stacked organic light emitting devices. II. Device performance and applications to displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, G.; Parthasarathy, G.; Tian, P.; Burrows, P. E.; Forrest, S. R.

    1999-10-01

    Vertical stacking of organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) that emit the three primary colors is shown to be a means for achieving efficient and bright full-color displays. In Paper I, we addressed stacked OLED (SOLED) design and fabrication principles to optimize emission colors, operating voltage, and efficiency. Here, we present results on two different (metal-containing and metal-free cathode) SOLED structures that exhibit performance suitable for many full-color display applications. The operating voltages at 10 mA/cm2 (corresponding to video display brightnesses) are 6.8, 8.5, and 12.1 V for the red (R), green (G), and blue (B) elements of the metal-containing SOLED, respectively. The respective subpixel luminous efficiencies are 0.53, 1.44, and 1.52 cd/A, and the Commission Internationale de L'Éclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates are (0.72, 0.28), (0.42, 0.56), and (0.20, 0.22). In the high transparency metal-free SOLED, an insulating layer was inserted between the two upper subpixels to allow for independent grounding of all color emitters in the stack. At operating voltages of 12-14 V, video display brightnesses were achieved with luminous efficiencies of 0.35, 1.36, and 1.05 cd/A for the R, G, and B subpixels, respectively. The respective CIE coordinates for R, G, and B emissions are (0.72, 0.28), (0.26, 0.63), and (0.17, 0.28) in the normal viewing direction, shifting inperceptibly as the viewing angle is increased to as large as 60°. Finally, we discuss addressing schemes of SOLED displays, and compare them with other strategies for achieving full-color, OLED-based displays.

  19. Nanotubes, nanorods and nanowires having piezoelectric and/or pyroelectric properties and devices manufactured therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Thomas P.; Lutkenhaus, Jodie

    2012-05-15

    Disclosed herein is a device comprising a pair of electrodes; and a nanotube, a nanorod and/or a nanowire; the nanotube, nanorod and/or nanowire comprising a piezoelectric and/or pyroelectric polymeric composition; the pair of electrodes being in electrical communication with opposing surfaces of the nanotube, nanorod and/or a nanowire; the pair of electrodes being perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the nanotube, nanorod and/or a nanowire.

  20. IMPROVED EQUIPMENT CLEANING IN COATED AND LAMINATED SUBSTRATE MANUFACTURING FACILITIES (PHASE II)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses EPA efforts to identify, demonstrate, and publish pollution prevention information and opportunities for equipment cleaning for the coated and laminated substrate manufacturing industry. It summarizes initial data collected and summarized during industry obse...

  1. Temperature & stress issues in devices with diamond substrates during manufacturing and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, B.; Schmidt, W.F.; Gordon, M.H.

    1995-12-31

    Finite element thermal and stress analyses were performed on a backside attached GaAs laser diode with a CVD diamond substrate. Two situations were one corresponding to thermal conditions during manufacture and the other to thermal conditions while operating. The influence of different solder coverage areas and voids in the solder layer on the maximum temperature and stress in the diode were determined. The results show that the stresses in the diode decrease and the maximum temperature increases when the area of the solder layer with respect to the die area decreases from the edges towards the center. It was also found that voids in the solder layer do not significantly increase the maximum temperature in the diode.

  2. Numerical study of the Columbia high-beta device: Torus-II

    SciTech Connect

    Izzo, R.

    1981-01-01

    The ionization, heating and subsequent long-time-scale behavior of the helium plasma in the Columbia fusion device, Torus-II, is studied. The purpose of this work is to perform numerical simulations while maintaining a high level of interaction with experimentalists. The device is operated as a toroidal z-pinch to prepare the gas for heating. This ionization of helium is studied using a zero-dimensional, two-fluid code. It is essentially an energy balance calculation that follows the development of the various charge states of the helium and any impurities (primarily silicon and oxygen) that are present. The code is an atomic physics model of Torus-II. In addition to ionization, we include three-body and radiative recombination processes.

  3. Templated growth of II-VI semiconductor optical fiber devices and steps towards infrared fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazio, Pier J. A.; Sparks, Justin R.; He, Rongrui; Krishnamurthi, Mahesh; Fitzgibbons, Thomas C.; Chaudhuri, Subhasis; Baril, Neil F.; Peacock, Anna C.; Healy, Noel; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Badding, John V.

    2015-02-01

    ZnSe and other zinc chalcogenide semiconductor materials can be doped with divalent transition metal ions to create a mid-IR laser gain medium with active function in the wavelength range 2 - 5 microns and potentially beyond using frequency conversion. As a step towards fiberized laser devices, we have manufactured ZnSe semiconductor fiber waveguides with low (less than 1dB/cm at 1550nm) optical losses, as well as more complex ternary alloys with ZnSxSe(1-x) stoichiometry to potentially allow for annular heterostructures with effective and low order mode corecladding waveguiding.

  4. Improvement of process control using wafer geometry for enhanced manufacturability of advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honggoo; Lee, Jongsu; Kim, Sang Min; Lee, Changhwan; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kwon, Wontaik; Park, Sung-Ki; Vukkadala, Pradeep; Awasthi, Amartya; Kim, J. H.; Veeraraghavan, Sathish; Choi, DongSub; Huang, Kevin; Dighe, Prasanna; Lee, Cheouljung; Byeon, Jungho; Dey, Soham; Sinha, Jaydeep

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive advancements in semiconductor technology have resulted in integrated chip (IC) manufacturing capability at sub-20nm half-pitch nodes. With this, lithography overlay error budgets are becoming increasingly stringent. The delay in EUV lithography readiness for high volume manufacturing (HVM) and the need for multiple-patterning lithography with 193i technology has further amplified the overlay issue. Thus there exists a need for technologies that can improve overlay errors in HVM. The traditional method for reducing overlay errors predominantly focused on improving lithography scanner printability performance. However, processes outside of the lithography sector known as processinduced overlay errors can contribute significantly to the total overlay at the current requirements. Monitoring and characterizing process-induced overlay has become critical for advanced node patterning. Recently a relatively new technique for overlay control that uses high-resolution wafer geometry measurements has gained significance. In this work we present the implementation of this technique in an IC fabrication environment to monitor wafer geometry changes induced across several points in the process flow, of multiple product layers with critical overlay performance requirement. Several production wafer lots were measured and analyzed on a patterned wafer geometry tool. Changes induced in wafer geometry as a result of wafer processing were related to down-stream overlay error contribution using the analytical in-plane distortion (IPD) calculation model. Through this segmentation, process steps that are major contributors to down-stream overlay were identified. Subsequent process optimization was then isolated to those process steps where maximum benefit might be realized. Root-cause for the within-wafer, wafer-to-wafer, tool-to-tool, and station-to-station variations observed were further investigated using local shape curvature changes - which is directly related to

  5. Method of manufacturing semiconductor having group II-group VI compounds doped with nitrogen

    DOEpatents

    Compaan, Alvin D.; Price, Kent J.; Ma, Xianda; Makhratchev, Konstantin

    2005-02-08

    A method of making a semiconductor comprises depositing a group II-group VI compound onto a substrate in the presence of nitrogen using sputtering to produce a nitrogen-doped semiconductor. This method can be used for making a photovoltaic cell using sputtering to apply a back contact layer of group II-group VI compound to a substrate in the presence of nitrogen, the back coating layer being doped with nitrogen. A semiconductor comprising a group II-group VI compound doped with nitrogen, and a photovoltaic cell comprising a substrate on which is deposited a layer of a group II-group VI compound doped with nitrogen, are also included.

  6. LASER Additive Manufacturing of Titanium-Tantalum Alloy Structured Interfaces for Modular Orthopedic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, Jacob; Medlin, Dana; Carter, Michael; Sears, James; Vander Voort, George

    2015-04-01

    Tantalum is recognized to have better biocompatibility and osseointegrative properties than other more commonly used orthopedic grade alloys. There are several novel methods that tantalum or tantalum-titanium could be used to augment orthopedic implants. A tantalum or tantalum-titanium alloy at the bone/implant or modular component interfaces would substantially increase the longevity and performance of modular devices. Bonding a functional tantalum coating to a titanium orthopedic device is inherently difficult because of the small difference between the melting temperature of tantalum, 3017°C, and the boiling point of titanium, 3287°C. LASER powder deposition (LPD) is a fusion operation using an Nd:YAG to melt a small volume of substrate into which metal powder is sprayed achieving high temperature with a high solidification rate. LPD of Ti-Ta onto a Ti-6Al-4V substrate produced both a solid surface and structured coating with a pore size in the optimal 350-500 μm range.

  7. Multi-functional micro electromechanical devices and method of bulk manufacturing same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method of bulk manufacturing SiC sensors is disclosed and claimed. Materials other than SiC may be used as the substrate material. Sensors requiring that the SiC substrate be pierced are also disclosed and claimed. A process flow reversal is employed whereby the metallization is applied first before the recesses are etched into or through the wafer. Aluminum is deposited on the entire planar surface of the metallization. Photoresist is spun onto the substantially planar surface of the Aluminum which is subsequently masked (and developed and removed). Unwanted Aluminum is etched with aqueous TMAH and subsequently the metallization is dry etched. Photoresist is spun onto the still substantially planar surface of Aluminum and oxide and then masked (and developed and removed) leaving the unimidized photoresist behind. Next, ITO is applied over the still substantially planar surface of Aluminum, oxide and unimidized photoresist. Unimidized and exposed photoresist and ITO directly above it are removed with Acetone. Next, deep reactive ion etching attacks exposed oxide not protected by ITO. Finally, hot phosphoric acid removes the Al and ITO enabling wires to connect with the metallization. The back side of the SiC wafer may be also be etched.

  8. A low-cost, manufacturable method for fabricating capillary and optical fiber interconnects for microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Daniel M; Nevill, J Tanner; Pettigrew, Kenneth I; Votaw, Gregory; Kung, Pang-Jen; Crenshaw, Hugh C

    2008-04-01

    Microfluidic chips require connections to larger macroscopic components, such as light sources, light detectors, and reagent reservoirs. In this article, we present novel methods for integrating capillaries, optical fibers, and wires with the channels of microfluidic chips. The method consists of forming planar interconnect channels in microfluidic chips and inserting capillaries, optical fibers, or wires into these channels. UV light is manually directed onto the ends of the interconnects using a microscope. UV-curable glue is then allowed to wick to the end of the capillaries, fibers, or wires, where it is cured to form rigid, liquid-tight connections. In a variant of this technique, used with light-guiding capillaries and optical fibers, the UV light is directed into the capillaries or fibers, and the UV-glue is cured by the cone of light emerging from the end of each capillary or fiber. This technique is fully self-aligned, greatly improves both the quality and the manufacturability of the interconnects, and has the potential to enable the fabrication of interconnects in a fully automated fashion. Using these methods, including a semi-automated implementation of the second technique, over 10,000 interconnects have been formed in almost 2000 microfluidic chips made of a variety of rigid materials. The resulting interconnects withstand pressures up to at least 800psi, have unswept volumes estimated to be less than 10 femtoliters, and have dead volumes defined only by the length of the capillary. PMID:18369517

  9. Optical wafer metrology sensors for process-robust CD and overlay control in semiconductor device manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Boef, Arie J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents three optical wafer metrology sensors that are used in lithography for robustly measuring the shape and position of wafers and device patterns on these wafers. The first two sensors are a level sensor and an alignment sensor that measure, respectively, a wafer height map and a wafer position before a new pattern is printed on the wafer. The third sensor is an optical scatterometer that measures critical dimension-variations and overlay after the resist has been exposed and developed. These sensors have different optical concepts but they share the same challenge that sub-nm precision is required at high throughput on a large variety of processed wafers and in the presence of unknown wafer processing variations. It is the purpose of this paper to explain these challenges in more detail and give an overview of the various solutions that have been introduced over the years to come to process-robust optical wafer metrology.

  10. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF ETHANOL MANUFACTURING FACILITIES. PART II: PROCESS ENGINEERING CONSIDERATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol manufacturing facilities represent an important segment of our agricultural production system. The ethanol industry is currently experiencing a rapid expansion throughout the country, and is poised to substantially contribute to our country’s growing need for energy, especially as non-renew...

  11. IMPACTS OF MATERIAL SUBSTITUTION IN AUTOMOBILE MANUFACTURE ON RESOURCE RECOVERY. VOLUME II. APPENDICES A-E

    EPA Science Inventory

    Probable changes in the mix of materials used to manufacture automobiles were examined to determine if economic or technical problems in recycling could arise such that the 'abandoned automobile problem' would be resurrected. Future trends in materials composition of the automobi...

  12. Screening of Potential Landing Gear Noise Control Devices at Virginia Tech For QTD II Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravetta, Patricio A.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Ng, Wing F.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Stoker, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    In support of the QTD II (Quiet Technology Demonstrator) program, aeroacoustic measurements of a 26%-scale, Boeing 777 main landing gear model were conducted in the Virginia Tech Stability Tunnel. The objective of these measurements was to perform risk mitigation studies on noise control devices for a flight test performed at Glasgow, Montana in 2005. The noise control devices were designed to target the primary main gear noise sources as observed in several previous tests. To accomplish this task, devices to reduce noise were built using stereo lithography for landing gear components such as the brakes, the forward cable harness, the shock strut, the door/strut gap and the lower truck. The most promising device was down selected from test results. In subsequent stages, the initial design of the selected lower truck fairing was improved to account for all the implementation constraints encountered in the full-scale airplane. The redesigned truck fairing was then retested to assess the impact of the modifications on the noise reduction potential. From extensive acoustic measurements obtained using a 63-element microphone phased array, acoustic source maps and integrated spectra were generated in order to estimate the noise reduction achievable with each device.

  13. 10 CFR 32.61 - Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to manufacture or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...; requirements for license to manufacture or initially transfer. 32.61 Section 32.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL... manufacture or initially transfer. An application for a specific license to manufacture or initially...

  14. 10 CFR 32.61 - Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to manufacture or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...; requirements for license to manufacture or initially transfer. 32.61 Section 32.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL... manufacture or initially transfer. An application for a specific license to manufacture or initially...

  15. 10 CFR 32.61 - Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to manufacture or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...; requirements for license to manufacture or initially transfer. 32.61 Section 32.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL... manufacture or initially transfer. An application for a specific license to manufacture or initially...

  16. 10 CFR 32.61 - Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to manufacture or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...; requirements for license to manufacture or initially transfer. 32.61 Section 32.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL... manufacture or initially transfer. An application for a specific license to manufacture or initially...

  17. 10 CFR 32.61 - Ice detection devices containing strontium-90; requirements for license to manufacture or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...; requirements for license to manufacture or initially transfer. 32.61 Section 32.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING BYPRODUCT MATERIAL... manufacture or initially transfer. An application for a specific license to manufacture or initially...

  18. PROGRESS ON INSERTION DEVICE RELATED ACTIVITIES AT THE NSLS-II AND ITS FUTURE PLANS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, T.; Chubar, O.; Corwin, T.; Harder, D. A.; He, P.; Rank, J.; Rakowsky, G.; Spataro, C.

    2010-05-23

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) project is now in the construction stage. A new insertion device (ID) magnetic measurement facility (MMF) is being set up at Brookhaven National Laboratory in order to satisfy the stringent requirement on the magnetic field measurement of IDs. ISO-Class7 temperature stabilized clean room is being constructed for this purpose. A state-of-the-art Hall probe bench and integrated field measurement system will be installed therein. IDs in the project baseline scope include six damping wigglers, two elliptically polarizing undulators (EPUs), three 3.0m long in-vacuum undulators (IVUs) and one 1.5m long IVU. Three-pole wigglers with peak field over 1 Tesla will be utilized to accommodate the users of bending magnet radiation at the NSLS. Future plans includes: (1) an in-vacuum magnetic measurement system, (2) use of PrFeB magnet for improved cryo undulator, (3) development of advanced optimization program for sorting and shimming of IDs, (4) development of a closed loop He gas refrigerator, (5) switchable quasi-periodic EPU. Design features of the baseline devices, IDMMF and the future plans for NSLS-II ID activities are described.

  19. Credibility and Confidence in Your Dental Laboratory Work-How Quality Assurance Systems Can Be Used in the Manufacturing of Individual Custom-Made Dental Devices.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    Manufacturing of custom-made dental devices such as removable dentures, fixed prosthodontics and orthodontics are subject to the requirements of the Medical Devices Directive (MDD). Many dental laboratories often enhance these requirements by implementing quality assurance procedures that then provide enhanced consistency. This paper provided a personal view of some of the systems currently being used in dental laboratories to provide a quality assured product and associated issues. PMID:26556514

  20. Measured Infiltration and Ventilation in Manufactured Homes : Residential Construction Demonstration Project, Cycle II.

    SciTech Connect

    Palmiter, Larry S.; Ecotope, Inc.

    1992-04-28

    Air infiltration is an important factor in heat loss and indoor air quality; in modern well-insulated homes, it may account for as much as half of the total heat loss. Due to the recent emphasis by home buyers and manufacturers on energy efficiency, tighter homes are being constructed. In the past, it was assumed that natural infiltration would provide adequate ventilation to maintain acceptable indoor air quality, but this is no longer the case in modern energy-efficient homes. This report summarizes the results of infiltration measurements made on two groups of manufactured homes in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) service area: 131 energy-efficient homes constructed under RCDP, and a control group of 29 homes not participating in energy-efficiency programs.

  1. Annex II technical documentation assessed.

    PubMed

    van Drongelen, A W; Roszek, B; van Tienhoven, E A E; Geertsma, R E; Boumans, R T; Kraus, J J A M

    2005-12-01

    Annex II of the Medical Device Directive (MDD) is used frequently by manufacturers to obtain CE-marking. This procedure relies on a full quality assurance system and does not require an assessment of the individual medical device by a Notified Body. An investigation into the availability and the quality of technical documentation for Annex II devices revealed severe shortcomings, which are reported here. PMID:16419921

  2. Development of superconducting contacts for the CRESST II 66-channel superconducting quantum interference device readout system.

    PubMed

    Majorovits, B; Henry, S; Kraus, H

    2007-07-01

    The CRESST experiment is designed to search for weakly interacting massive particle dark matter with cryogenic detectors. CRESST II will use up to 33 CaWO(4) crystals with a total mass of approximately 10 kg. These many detectors require a readout system based on 66-channel superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In this article we report on the development of a modular superconducting connector for the 66-channel SQUID readout circuit. We show that the technique developed reliably produces superconducting contacts. PMID:17672757

  3. Development of superconducting contacts for the CRESST II 66-channel superconducting quantum interference device readout system

    SciTech Connect

    Majorovits, B.; Henry, S.; Kraus, H.

    2007-07-15

    The CRESST experiment is designed to search for weakly interacting massive particle dark matter with cryogenic detectors. CRESST II will use up to 33 CaWO{sub 4} crystals with a total mass of {approx}10 kg. These many detectors require a readout system based on 66-channel superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In this article we report on the development of a modular superconducting connector for the 66-channel SQUID readout circuit. We show that the technique developed reliably produces superconducting contacts.

  4. A Disposable Microfluidic Device with a Screen Printed Electrode for Mimicking Phase II Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Vasiliadou, Rafaela; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Mehdi; Brown, Nathan J; Welham, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Human metabolism is investigated using several in vitro methods. However, the current methodologies are often expensive, tedious and complicated. Over the last decade, the combination of electrochemistry (EC) with mass spectrometry (MS) has a simpler and a cheaper alternative to mimic the human metabolism. This paper describes the development of a disposable microfluidic device with a screen-printed electrode (SPE) for monitoring phase II GSH reactions. The proposed chip has the potential to be used as a primary screening tool, thus complementing the current in vitro methods. PMID:27598162

  5. 76 FR 13432 - In the Matter of Certain Display Devices, Including Digital Televisions and Monitors II; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Display Devices, Including Digital Televisions and Monitors II; Notice of... United States after importation of certain display devices, including digital televisions and monitors by... digital televisions and monitors that infringe one or more of claims 41-44 of the `468 patent; claims...

  6. A comparison of the heat transfer capabilities of two manufacturing methods for high heat flux water-cooled devices

    SciTech Connect

    McKoon, R.H.

    1986-10-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to compare the heat transfer characteristics of water-cooled copper devices manufactured via conventional drilled passage construction and via a technique whereby molten copper is cast over a network of preformed cooling tubes. Two similar test blocks were constructed; one using the drilled passage technique, the other via casting copper over Monel pipe. Each test block was mounted in a vacuum system and heated uniformly on the top surface using a swept electron beam. From the measured absorbed powers and resultant temperatures, an overall heat transfer coefficient was calculated. The maximum heat transfer coefficient calculated for the case of the drilled passage test block was 2534 Btu/hr/ft/sup 2///sup 0/F. This corresponded to an absorbed power density of 320 w/cm/sup 2/ and resulted in a maximum recorded copper temperature of 346/sup 0/C. Corresponding figures for the cast test block were 363 Btu/hr/ft/sup 2///sup 0/F, 91 w/cm/sup 2/, and 453/sup 0/C.

  7. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  8. 10 CFR 32.53 - Luminous safety devices for use in aircraft: Requirements for license to manufacture, assemble...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... for license to manufacture, assemble, repair or initially transfer. 32.53 Section 32.53 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING...: Requirements for license to manufacture, assemble, repair or initially transfer. An application for a...

  9. 10 CFR 32.53 - Luminous safety devices for use in aircraft: Requirements for license to manufacture, assemble...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... for license to manufacture, assemble, repair or initially transfer. 32.53 Section 32.53 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING...: Requirements for license to manufacture, assemble, repair or initially transfer. An application for a...

  10. 10 CFR 32.53 - Luminous safety devices for use in aircraft: Requirements for license to manufacture, assemble...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... for license to manufacture, assemble, repair or initially transfer. 32.53 Section 32.53 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES TO MANUFACTURE OR TRANSFER CERTAIN ITEMS CONTAINING...: Requirements for license to manufacture, assemble, repair or initially transfer. An application for a...

  11. Peak radiated power measurement of the DOE Mark II container tag with integrated ST-676 sensor radio frequency identification device.

    SciTech Connect

    Jursich, Mark

    2010-04-01

    The total peak radiated power of the Department of Energy Mark II container tag was measured in the electromagnetic reverberation chamber facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The tag's radio frequency content was also evaluated for possible emissions outside the intentional transmit frequency band. No spurious emissions of any significance were found, and the radiated power conformed to the manufacturer's specifications.

  12. Development of the Second Generation Berry Impact Recording Device (BIRD II)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Li, Changying

    2015-01-01

    To quantitatively measure the impacts during blueberry harvesting and post-harvest handling, this study designed the second generation Berry Impact Recording Device (BIRD II) sensor with a size of 21 mm in diameter and a weight of 3.9 g, which reduced the size by 17% and the weight by 50% compared to the previous prototype. The sensor was able to measure accelerations up to 346 g at a maximum frequency of 2 KHz. Universal Serial Bus (USB) was used to directly connect the sensor with the computer, removing the interface box used previously. LabVIEW-based PC software was designed to configure the sensor, download and process the data. The sensor was calibrated using a centrifuge. The accuracy of the sensor was between −1.76 g to 2.17 g, and the precision was between 0.21 g to 0.81 g. Dynamic drop tests showed that BIRD II had smaller variance in measurements than BIRD I. In terms of size and weight, BIRD II is more similar to an average blueberry fruit than BIRD I, which leads to more accurate measurements of the impacts for blueberries. PMID:25664430

  13. Development of the second generation Berry Impact Recording Device (BIRD II).

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Li, Changying

    2015-01-01

    To quantitatively measure the impacts during blueberry harvesting and post-harvest handling, this study designed the second generation Berry Impact Recording Device (BIRD II) sensor with a size of 21 mm in diameter and a weight of 3.9 g, which reduced the size by 17% and the weight by 50% compared to the previous prototype. The sensor was able to measure accelerations up to 346 g at a maximum frequency of 2 KHz. Universal Serial Bus (USB) was used to directly connect the sensor with the computer, removing the interface box used previously. LabVIEW-based PC software was designed to configure the sensor, download and process the data. The sensor was calibrated using a centrifuge. The accuracy of the sensor was between -1.76 g to 2.17 g, and the precision was between 0.21 g to 0.81 g. Dynamic drop tests showed that BIRD II had smaller variance in measurements than BIRD I. In terms of size and weight, BIRD II is more similar to an average blueberry fruit than BIRD I, which leads to more accurate measurements of the impacts for blueberries. PMID:25664430

  14. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of titanium parts fabricated by additive manufacturing. Part II. Defects.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Nicola Vivienne Yorke; Tyson, Peter; Fraser, Darren; Mayo, Sheridan; Maksimenko, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography (SXRT) has been applied to the study of defects within three-dimensional printed titanium parts. These parts were made using the Arcam EBM(®) (electron beam melting) process which uses powdered titanium alloy, Ti64 (Ti alloy with approximately 6%Al and 4%V) as the feed and an electron beam for the sintering/welding. The experiment was conducted on the Imaging and Medical Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. The samples represent a selection of complex shapes with a variety of internal morphologies. Inspection via SXRT has revealed a number of defects which may not otherwise have been seen. The location and nature of such defects combined with detailed knowledge of the process conditions can contribute to understanding the interplay between design and manufacturing strategy. This fundamental understanding may subsequently be incorporated into process modelling, prediction of properties and the development of robust methodologies for the production of defect-free parts. PMID:27359151

  15. A Simple Paper-Based Colorimetric Device for Rapid Mercury(II) Assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Fang, Xueen; Li, Hua; Cao, Hongmei; Kong, Jilie

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of the environment by mercury(II) ions (Hg(2+)) poses a serious threat to human health and ecosystems. Up to now, many reported Hg(2+) sensors require complex procedures, long measurement times and sophisticated instrumentation. We have developed a simple, rapid, low cost and naked-eye quantitative method for Hg(2+) environmental analysis using a paper-based colorimetric device (PCD). The sample solution to which platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) have been added is dispensed to the detection zone on the PCD, where the 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) substrate has been pre-loaded. The PtNPs effect a rapid oxidization of TMB, inducing blue colorization on the PCD. However, Hg(2+) in the solution rapidly interact with the PtNPs, suppressing the oxidation capacity and hence causing a decrease in blue intensity, which can be observed directly by the naked eye. Moreover, Hg(2+) at concentrations as low as 0.01 uM, can be successfully monitored using a fiber optic device, which gives a digital readout proportional to the intensity of the blue color change. This paper-based colorimetric device (PCD) shows great potential for field measurement of Hg(2+). PMID:27554633

  16. A Simple Paper-Based Colorimetric Device for Rapid Mercury(II) Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiwei; Fang, Xueen; Li, Hua; Cao, Hongmei; Kong, Jilie

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of the environment by mercury(II) ions (Hg2+) poses a serious threat to human health and ecosystems. Up to now, many reported Hg2+ sensors require complex procedures, long measurement times and sophisticated instrumentation. We have developed a simple, rapid, low cost and naked-eye quantitative method for Hg2+ environmental analysis using a paper-based colorimetric device (PCD). The sample solution to which platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) have been added is dispensed to the detection zone on the PCD, where the 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) substrate has been pre-loaded. The PtNPs effect a rapid oxidization of TMB, inducing blue colorization on the PCD. However, Hg2+ in the solution rapidly interact with the PtNPs, suppressing the oxidation capacity and hence causing a decrease in blue intensity, which can be observed directly by the naked eye. Moreover, Hg2+ at concentrations as low as 0.01 uM, can be successfully monitored using a fiber optic device, which gives a digital readout proportional to the intensity of the blue color change. This paper-based colorimetric device (PCD) shows great potential for field measurement of Hg2+. PMID:27554633

  17. Thromboresistance comparison of the HeartMate II ventricular assist device with the device thrombogenicity emulation- optimized HeartAssist 5 VAD.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wei-Che; Girdhar, Gaurav; Xenos, Michalis; Alemu, Yared; Soares, Jõao S; Einav, Shmuel; Slepian, Marvin; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-02-01

    Approximately 7.5 × 106 patients in the US currently suffer from end-stage heart failure. The FDA has recently approved the designations of the Thoratec HeartMate II ventricular assist device (VAD) for both bridge-to-transplant and destination therapy (DT) due to its mechanical durability and improved hemodynamics. However, incidence of pump thrombosis and thromboembolic events remains high, and the life-long complex pharmacological regimens are mandatory in its VAD recipients. We have previously successfully applied our device thrombogenicity emulation (DTE) methodology for optimizing device thromboresistance to the Micromed Debakey VAD, and demonstrated that optimizing device features implicated in exposing blood to elevated shear stresses and exposure times significantly reduces shear-induced platelet activation and significantly improves the device thromboresistance. In the present study, we compared the thrombogenicity of the FDA-approved HeartMate II VAD with the DTE-optimized Debakey VAD (now labeled HeartAssist 5). With quantitative probability density functions of the stress accumulation along large number of platelet trajectories within each device which were extracted from numerical flow simulations in each device, and through measurements of platelet activation rates in recirculation flow loops, we specifically show that: (a) Platelets flowing through the HeartAssist 5 are exposed to significantly lower stress accumulation that lead to platelet activation than the HeartMate II, especially at the impeller-shroud gap regions (b) Thrombus formation patterns observed in the HeartMate II are absent in the HeartAssist 5 (c) Platelet activation rates (PAR) measured in vitro with the VADs mounted in recirculation flow-loops show a 2.5-fold significantly higher PAR value for the HeartMate II. This head to head thrombogenic performance comparative study of the two VADs, one optimized with the DTE methodology and one FDA-approved, demonstrates the efficacy of

  18. Design and high-volume manufacture of low-cost molded IR aspheres for personal thermal imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelazny, A. L.; Walsh, K. F.; Deegan, J. P.; Bundschuh, B.; Patton, E. K.

    2015-05-01

    The demand for infrared optical elements, particularly those made of chalcogenide materials, is rapidly increasing as thermal imaging becomes affordable to the consumer. The use of these materials in conjunction with established lens manufacturing techniques presents unique challenges relative to the cost sensitive nature of this new market. We explore the process from design to manufacture, and discuss the technical challenges involved. Additionally, facets of the development process including manufacturing logistics, packaging, supply chain management, and qualification are discussed.

  19. Various uses of ion chromatography in the manufacture of MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Beverly

    1999-08-01

    Ion Chromatography has already shown its value as a process monitoring and troubleshooting tool for the semiconductor and disk drive manufacturers. Similarly, there are many possible uses for this analytical technique in the manufacture of microelectromechanical devices. Some of these uses are: (i) the analysis of corrosive ions in ultrapure water and ultrapure chemicals; (ii) analysis of plating bath constituents and contaminants; (iii) analysis of corrosive ions found on MEMS devices during manufacturing and which can later cause device failure of reliability problems; (iv) the analysis of corrosive ions found on MEMS manufacturing tools, carriers and other materials that come in contact with the final product. This paper will explore the many uses of ion chromatography for the manufacture of MEMS devices. Special techniques, only recently developed for use on very small objects, will also be presented for the analysis of ions at part per trillion levels.

  20. Dicopper(II) metallacyclophanes as multifunctional magnetic devices: a joint experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Castellano, María; Ruiz-García, Rafael; Cano, Joan; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Pardo, Emilio; Fortea-Pérez, Francisco R; Stiriba, Salah-Eddine; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc

    2015-03-17

    nature of these metallosupramolecular complexes. This new class of oxamato-based dicopper(II) metallacyclophanes affords an excellent synthetic and theoretical set of models for both chemical and physical fundamental studies on redox- and photo-triggered, long-distance electron exchange phenomena, which are two major topics in molecular magnetism and molecular electronics. Apart from their use as ground tests for the fundamental research on the relative importance of the spin delocalization and spin polarization mechanisms of the electron exchange interaction through extended π-conjugated aromatic ligands in polymetallic complexes, oxamato-based dicopper(II) metallacyclophanes possessing spin-containing electro- and chromophores at the metal and/or the ligand counterparts emerge as potentially active (magnetic and electronic) molecular components to build a metal-based spintronic circuit. They are thus unique examples of multifunctional magnetic complexes to get single-molecule spintronic devices by controlling and allowing the spin communication, when serving as molecular magnetic couplers and wires, or by exhibiting bistable spin behavior, when acting as molecular magnetic rectifiers and switches. Oxamato-based dicopper(II) metallacyclophanes also emerge as potential candidates for the study of coherent electron transport through single molecules, both experimentally and theoretically. The results presented herein, which are a first step in the metallosupramolecular approach to molecular spintronics, intend to attract the attention of physicists and materials scientists with a large expertice in the manipulation and measurement of single-molecule electron transport properties, as well as in the processing and addressing of molecules on different supports. PMID:25697758

  1. Longevity of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators for cardiac resynchronization therapy in current clinical practice: an analysis according to influencing factors, device generation, and manufacturer

    PubMed Central

    Landolina, Maurizio; Curnis, Antonio; Morani, Giovanni; Vado, Antonello; Ammendola, Ernesto; D'onofrio, Antonio; Stabile, Giuseppe; Crosato, Martino; Petracci, Barbara; Ceriotti, Carlo; Bontempi, Luca; Morosato, Martina; Ballari, Gian Paolo; Gasparini, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Aims Device replacement at the time of battery depletion of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) may carry a considerable risk of complications and engenders costs for healthcare systems. Therefore, ICD device longevity is extremely important both from a clinical and economic standpoint. Cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators (CRT-D) battery longevity is shorter than ICDs. We determined the rate of replacements for battery depletion and we identified possible determinants of early depletion in a series of patients who had undergone implantation of CRT-D devices. Methods and results We retrieved data on 1726 consecutive CRT-D systems implanted from January 2008 to March 2010 in nine centres. Five years after a successful CRT-D implantation procedure, 46% of devices were replaced due to battery depletion. The time to device replacement for battery depletion differed considerably among currently available CRT-D systems from different manufacturers, with rates of batteries still in service at 5 years ranging from 52 to 88% (log-rank test, P < 0.001). Left ventricular lead output and unipolar pacing configuration were independent determinants of early depletion [hazard ratio (HR): 1.96; 95% 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57–2.46; P < 0.001 and HR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.25–2.01; P < 0.001, respectively]. The implantation of a recent-generation device (HR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.45–0.72; P < 0.001), the battery chemistry and the CRT-D manufacturer (HR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.47–0.89; P = 0.008) were additional factors associated with replacement for battery depletion. Conclusion The device longevity at 5 years was 54%. High left ventricular lead output and unipolar pacing configuration were associated with early battery depletion, while recent-generation CRT-Ds displayed better longevity. Significant differences emerged among currently available CRT-D systems from different manufacturers. PMID:25976906

  2. Adsorption of copper(II) by ``waste`` Fe(III)/Cr(III) hydroxide from aqueous solution and radiator manufacturing industry wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Namasivayam, C.; Senthilkumar, S.

    1999-01-01

    Waste Fe(III)/Cr(III) hydroxide has been used as an adsorbent for the effective removal of copper from aqueous solution. The parameters studied include agitation time, Cu(II) concentration, adsorbent dose, temperature, and pH. The percent adsorption of Cu(II) increased with a decrease in the concentration of Cu(II) and an increase in temperature. Quantitative removal of Cu(II) by 50 mg/50 mL adsorbent was observed at pH 5.0 for a Cu(II) concentration of 40 mg/L. The equilibrium data fit well with the Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption capacity (Q{sub 0}) calculated from the Langmuir isotherm was 92.59 mg/g at an initial pH of 5.0 at 32 C. Desorption of Cu(II) from a Cu(II)-loaded adsorbent was 55.4% at pH 3.0. Application of the adsorbent for the removal of Cu(II) was successfully demonstrated using radiator manufacturing industry wastewater.

  3. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II... STANDARD Pt. 541, App. A-II Appendix A-II to Part 541—Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543...

  4. 21 CFR 803.52 - If I am a manufacturer, what information must I submit in my individual adverse event reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... after your verification; (ii) For each event code provided by the user facility under § 803.32(e)(10) or... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES MEDICAL DEVICE REPORTING Manufacturer Reporting Requirements § 803.52 If I am a manufacturer, what information must I submit in...

  5. Scalability of carbon-nanotube-based thin film transistors for flexible electronic devices manufactured using an all roll-to-roll gravure printing system

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Wookyu; Choi, Younchang; Sun, Junfeng; Bak, Jina; Noh, Jinsoo; Subramanian, Vivek; Azuma, Yasuo; Majima, Yutaka; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate that roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure printing is a suitable advanced manufacturing method for flexible thin film transistor (TFT)-based electronic circuits, three different nanomaterial-based inks (silver nanoparticles, BaTiO3 nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) were selected and optimized to enable the realization of fully printed SWNT-based TFTs (SWNT-TFTs) on 150-m-long rolls of 0.25-m-wide poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). SWNT-TFTs with 5 different channel lengths, namely, 30, 80, 130, 180, and 230 μm, were fabricated using a printing speed of 8 m/min. These SWNT-TFTs were characterized, and the obtained electrical parameters were related to major mechanical factors such as web tension, registration accuracy, impression roll pressure and printing speed to determine whether these mechanical factors were the sources of the observed device-to-device variations. By utilizing the electrical parameters from the SWNT-TFTs, a Monte Carlo simulation for a 1-bit adder circuit, as a reference, was conducted to demonstrate that functional circuits with reasonable complexity can indeed be manufactured using R2R gravure printing. The simulation results suggest that circuits with complexity, similar to the full adder circuit, can be printed with a 76% circuit yield if threshold voltage (Vth) variations of less than 30% can be maintained. PMID:26411839

  6. Scalability of carbon-nanotube-based thin film transistors for flexible electronic devices manufactured using an all roll-to-roll gravure printing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Wookyu; Choi, Younchang; Sun, Junfeng; Bak, Jina; Noh, Jinsoo; Subramanian, Vivek; Azuma, Yasuo; Majima, Yutaka; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-09-01

    To demonstrate that roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure printing is a suitable advanced manufacturing method for flexible thin film transistor (TFT)-based electronic circuits, three different nanomaterial-based inks (silver nanoparticles, BaTiO3 nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) were selected and optimized to enable the realization of fully printed SWNT-based TFTs (SWNT-TFTs) on 150-m-long rolls of 0.25-m-wide poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). SWNT-TFTs with 5 different channel lengths, namely, 30, 80, 130, 180, and 230 μm, were fabricated using a printing speed of 8 m/min. These SWNT-TFTs were characterized, and the obtained electrical parameters were related to major mechanical factors such as web tension, registration accuracy, impression roll pressure and printing speed to determine whether these mechanical factors were the sources of the observed device-to-device variations. By utilizing the electrical parameters from the SWNT-TFTs, a Monte Carlo simulation for a 1-bit adder circuit, as a reference, was conducted to demonstrate that functional circuits with reasonable complexity can indeed be manufactured using R2R gravure printing. The simulation results suggest that circuits with complexity, similar to the full adder circuit, can be printed with a 76% circuit yield if threshold voltage (Vth) variations of less than 30% can be maintained.

  7. Scalability of carbon-nanotube-based thin film transistors for flexible electronic devices manufactured using an all roll-to-roll gravure printing system.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Wookyu; Choi, Younchang; Sun, Junfeng; Bak, Jina; Noh, Jinsoo; Subramanian, Vivek; Azuma, Yasuo; Majima, Yutaka; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate that roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure printing is a suitable advanced manufacturing method for flexible thin film transistor (TFT)-based electronic circuits, three different nanomaterial-based inks (silver nanoparticles, BaTiO3 nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) were selected and optimized to enable the realization of fully printed SWNT-based TFTs (SWNT-TFTs) on 150-m-long rolls of 0.25-m-wide poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). SWNT-TFTs with 5 different channel lengths, namely, 30, 80, 130, 180, and 230 μm, were fabricated using a printing speed of 8 m/min. These SWNT-TFTs were characterized, and the obtained electrical parameters were related to major mechanical factors such as web tension, registration accuracy, impression roll pressure and printing speed to determine whether these mechanical factors were the sources of the observed device-to-device variations. By utilizing the electrical parameters from the SWNT-TFTs, a Monte Carlo simulation for a 1-bit adder circuit, as a reference, was conducted to demonstrate that functional circuits with reasonable complexity can indeed be manufactured using R2R gravure printing. The simulation results suggest that circuits with complexity, similar to the full adder circuit, can be printed with a 76% circuit yield if threshold voltage (Vth) variations of less than 30% can be maintained. PMID:26411839

  8. Thrombus formation patterns in the HeartMate II ventricular assist device: clinical observations can be predicted by numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wei-Che; Slepian, Marvin J; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Postimplant device thrombosis remains a life-threatening complication and limitation of continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (VADs). Using advanced computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations, we successfully depicted various flow patterns, recirculation zones, and stagnant platelet trajectories which promote thrombus formation and observed that they matched actual thrombus formation patterns observed in Thoratec HeartMate II VADs explanted from patients with pump thrombosis. Previously, these small eddies could not be captured by either digital particle image velocimetry or CFD due to insufficient resolution. Our study successfully demonstrated the potential capability of advanced CFD to be adopted for device optimization, leading to enhanced safety and efficacy of VADs for long-term destination therapy. PMID:24399065

  9. Stage-II-screening device for testing of heterogeneous catalysts in gas phase reactions with Fourier transform infrared analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüning, Rainer; Scholz, Peter; Ondruschka, Bernd

    2005-07-01

    The construction of a stage-II-screening device for heterogeneous catalysts in gas phase reactions under ambient pressure is described. The concentrations of the reaction products are determined by Fourier transform infrared analysis in combination with a chemometric interpretation of the obtained spectra. Thus, fast high-precision product analyses with complete mass balances are feasible, within the limits of accuracy of the measurements. The device is designed to screen up to 17 catalysts in one testing cycle. It is possible to determine temperature-conversion-selectivity dependencies as well as long-term measurements under constant conditions. With the help of the device described, the catalytic properties of new materials were parallel tested for the oxidative dehydrogenation of isopropanol.

  10. 10 CFR 32.53 - Luminous safety devices for use in aircraft: Requirements for license to manufacture, assemble...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... or promethium-147 for use in aircraft, for distribution to persons generally licensed under § 31.7 of... maximum quantity of tritium or promethium-147 in each device; (2) Details of construction and design; (3) Details of the method of binding or containing the tritium or promethium-147; (4) Procedures for...

  11. Experimental investigation of aerodynamic devices for wind turbine rotational speed control: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S L

    1996-02-01

    An experimental investigation was undertaken to further evaluate and enhance the performance of an aerodynamic device for wind turbine overspeed protection and power modulation applications. The trailing-edge device, known as the Spoiler-Flap, was examined in detail during wind tunnel tests. The impact of hp length, vent angle, pivot point and chord variations on aerodynamic and hinge moment characteristics were evaluated and a best overall configuration was identified. Based on this effort, a 40% chord device with a 1% hp length and 40 degree vent angle offers improved performance potential for wind turbine applications. This specific configuration appears to offer good suction coefficient performance for both turbine power modulation and overspeed (i.e., aerodynamic braking) applications. Device hinge moment loads improved (compared to other devices investigated) in magnitude and the impact of surface roughness was found to be minimal.

  12. Non-Space Heating Electrical Consumption in Manufactured Homes: Residential Construction Demonstration Project Cycle II : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Onisko, Stephen A.; Roos, Carolyn; Baylon, David

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes submeter data of the non-space heating electrical energy use in a sample of manufactured homes. These homes were built to Super Good Cents insulation standards in 1988 and 1989 under the auspices of RCDP Cycle 2 of the Bonneville Power Administration. They were designed to incorporate innovations in insulation and manufacturing techniques developed to encourage energy conservation in this important housing type. Domestic water heating (DWH) and other non-space heat energy consumption, however, were not generally affected by RCDP specifications. The purpose of this study is to establish a baseline for energy conservation in these areas and to present a method for estimating total energy saving benefits associated with these end uses. The information used in this summary was drawn from occupant-read submeters and manufacturersupplied specifications of building shell components, appliances and water heaters. Information was also drawn from a field review of ventilation systems and building characteristics. The occupant survey included a census of appliances and occupant behavior in these manufactured homes. A total of 150 manufactured homes were built under this program by eight manufacturers. An additional 35 homes were recruited as a control group. Of the original 185 houses, approximately 150 had some usable submeter data for domestic hot water and 126 had usable submeter data for all other nonheating consumption. These samples were used as the basis for all consumption analysis. The energy use characteristics of these manufactured homes were compared with that of a similar sample of RCDP site-built homes. In general, the manufactured homes were somewhat smaller and had fewer occupants than the site-built homes. The degree to which seasonal variations were present in non-space heat uses was reviewed.

  13. 48 CFR 252.225-7017 - Photovoltaic Devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., Guatemala, Honduras, Korea (Republic of), Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, or Singapore); (iii) A..., Morocco, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, or Singapore. Free Trade Agreement country photovoltaic device means an.... Moroccan photovoltaic device means an article that— (i) Is wholly manufactured in Morocco; or (ii) In...

  14. Turbulent transport of He II in active and passive phase separators using slit devices and porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Lee, J. M.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1988-01-01

    The turbulent transport mode of vapor liquid phase separators (VLPS) for He II has been investigated comparing passive porous plug separators with active phase separators (APS) using slits of variable flow paths within a common frame of reference. It is concluded that the basic transport regimes in both devices are identical. An integrated Gorter-Mellink (1949) equation, found previously to predict VLPS results of porous plugs, is employed to analyze APS data published in the literature. It is found that the Gorter-Mellink flow rate parameter for 9-micron and 14-micron APS slit widths are relatively independent of the slit width, having a rate constant of about 9 + or - 10 percent. This agrees with the early heat flow results for He II entropy transport at zero net mass flow in wide capillaries and slits.

  15. Treatment of Class II Division 2 Malocclusion Using the Forsus Fatigue Resistance Device and 5-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Ezgi; Kocadereli, Ilken

    2016-01-01

    This case report presents the treatment of a 14-year-and-8-month-old boy with Class II division 2 mandibular retrusion, severe deep bite, and concave profile. The Forsus fatigue resistance device (FRD) was effective in correcting both skeletal and dental parameters. At 5-year posttreatment follow-up, the teeth were well aligned and the occlusion was stable. FRD application with appropriate treatment time can result with prominent changes in the facial profile and dentition, and the outcomes can be maintained at the long-term follow-up periods. PMID:27034855

  16. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 Manufacturers... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted In-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 Manufacturers... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted In-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 Manufacturers... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT...

  19. Challenges and Recent Developments in Hearing Aids: Part II. Feedback and Occlusion Effect Reduction Strategies, Laser Shell Manufacturing Processes, and Other Signal Processing Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Chung, King

    2004-01-01

    This is the second part of a review on the challenges and recent developments in hearing aids. Feedback and the occlusion effect pose great challenges in hearing aid design and usage. Yet, conventional solutions to feedback and the occlusion effect often create a dilemma: the solution to one often leads to the other. This review discusses the advanced signal processing strategies to reduce feedback and some new approaches to reduce the occlusion effect. Specifically, the causes of three types of feedback (acoustic, mechanical, and electromagnetic) are discussed. The strategies currently used to reduce acoustic feedback (i.e., adaptive feedback reduction algorithms using adaptive gain reduction, notch filtering, and phase cancellation strategies) and the design of new receivers that are built to reduce mechanical and electromagnetic feedback are explained. In addition, various new strategies (i.e., redesigned sound delivery devices and receiver-in-the-ear-canal hearing aid configuration) to reduce the occlusion effect are reviewed. Many manufacturers have recently adopted laser shell-manufacturing technologies to overcome problems associated with manufacturing custom hearing aid shells. The mechanisms of selected laser sintering and stereo lithographic apparatus and the properties of custom shells produced by these two processes are reviewed. Further, various new developments in hearing aid transducers, telecoils, channel-free amplification, open-platform programming options, rechargeable hearing aids, ear-level frequency modulated (FM) receivers, wireless Bluetooth FM systems, and wireless programming options are briefly explained and discussed. Finally, the applications of advanced hearing aid technologies to enhance other devices such as cochlear implants, hearing protectors, and cellular phones are discussed. PMID:15735871

  20. Development of a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system on the Plasma Material Interaction System (PLAMIS-II) device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, I. J.; Lee, K. Y.; Lee, K. I.; Choi, Y.-S.; Cho, S. G.; Bae, M. K.; Lee, D.-H.; Hong, S. H.; Lho, T.; Chung, K.-S.

    2015-12-01

    A laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed for the plasma material interaction system (PLAMIS-II) device, which is equipped with a unique plasma gun composed of a LaB6 cathode and two anodes with electromagnets to generate a focused dense plasma. PLAMIS-II simulates the interactions of plasma with different materials and is to be used for the test of plasma facing components of fusion devices. The LIF system is composed of a seed laser with Littmann/Metcalf cavity and a master oscillator power amplifier to pump 3d4F7/2 metastable argon ion to 4p4D5/2 level at the wavelength of 668.61 nm, which has the following input parameters: laser power = 20 mW, line width < 100 kHz, and a mode-hop free tuning range > 70 GHz. For in-situ measurement of laser wavelength, the wavelength spectrum of an iodine cell was measured by a photo-transistor during LIF measurement. To measure argon ion temperature (Ti) and drift velocity (vd) in PLAMIS-II, the fluorescence light with the wavelength of 442.72 nm, emitted from 4p4D5/2 level to 4s4P3/2 level and passing through 1 nm band-width filter, was collected by the photomultiplier tube combined with a lock-in amplifier and a chopper with frequency of 3 kHz. Initial data of Ti and vd were analysed in terms of gas flow rate and applied power.

  1. Materials and device design with III-V and II-VI compound-based diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Sato, Kazunori

    2002-03-01

    Since the discovery of the carrier induced ferromagnetism in (In, Mn)As and (Ga, Mn)As, diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) have been of much interest from the industrial viewpoint because of their potentiality as a new functional material (spintronics). In this paper, the magnetism in DMS is investigated based on the first principles calculations, and materials and device design with the DMS is proposed toward the spintronics. The electronic structure is calculated by the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method combined with the coherent potential approximation based on the local spin density approximation. We calculate the electronic structure of ferromagnetic and spin-glass DMS, and total energy difference between them is calculated to estimate whether the ferromagnetic state is stable or not. It is shown that V-, Cr- and Mn-doped III-V compounds, V- and Cr-doped II-VI compounds and Fe-, Co- and Ni-doped ZnO are promising candidates for a high-Curie temperature ferromagnet. A chemical trend in the ferromagnetism is well understood based on the double exchange mechanism [1]. Based upon this material design, some prototypes of the spintronics devices, such as a spin-FET, a photo-induced-magnetic memory and a coherent-spin-infection device, are proposed. [1] K. Sato and H. Katayama-Yoshida, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 39 (2000) L555, 40 (2001) L334, L485 and L651.

  2. Static and Dynamics of a Pump Impeller with a Balancing Device Part II: Dynamic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martsinkovsky, V. A.; Zhulyov, A.; Kundera, C.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the theoretical study of the system comprising an impeller and a balancing device. It deals with the dynamic analysis of the system, i.e., the axial vibrations of the impeller, and the system stability. The dynamic analysis took into account linearized hydrodynamic forces and moments generated in the longitudinal clearances of the seals of the impeller. The theoretical analysis was supplemented with a numerical example with characteristics determined for a real single-stage centrifugal pump

  3. PREFACE: Semiconductor Nanostructures towards Electronic and Optoelectronic Device Applications II (Symposium K, E-MRS 2009 Spring Meeting)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nötzel, Richard

    2009-07-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering contains papers that were presented at the special symposium K at the EMRS 2009 Spring Meeting held 8-12 June in Strasbourg, France, which was entitled 'Semiconductor Nanostructures towards Electronic and Optoelectronic Device Applications II'. Thanks to the broad interest a large variety of quantum dots and quantum wires and related nanostructures and their application in devices could be covered. There was significant progress in the epitaxial growth of semiconductor quantum dots seen in the operation of high-power, as well as mode locked laser diodes and the lateral positioning of quantum dots on patterned substrates or by selective area growth for future single quantum dot based optoelectronic and electronic devices. In the field of semiconductor nanowires high quality, almost twin free structures are now available together with a new degree of freedom for band structure engineering based on alternation of the crystal structure. In the search for Si based light emitting structures, nanocrystals and miniband-related near infrared luminescence of Si/Ge quantum dot superlattices with high quantum efficiency were reported. These highlights, among others, and the engaged discussions of the scientists, engineers and students brought together at the symposium emphasize how active the field of semiconductor nanostructures and their applications in devices is, so that we can look forward to the progress to come. Guest Editor Richard Nötzel COBRA Research Institute Department of Applied Physics Eindhoven University of Technology 5600 MB Eindhoven The Netherlands Tel.: +31 40 247 2047; fax: +31 40 246 1339 E-mail address: r.noetzel@tue.nl

  4. The Intrauterine Device in Women with Diabetes Mellitus Type I and II: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Goldstuck, Norman D.; Steyn, Petrus S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Women with diabetes mellitus type I and type II need effective contraception for personal and medical reasons. Long acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods are among the most efficient and cost-effective methods. Study Design. We searched the Popline, PubMed, and clinicaltrials.gov databases from 1961 to March 2013 for studies on the efficacy of the IUD in diabetic women and the possible changes it may produce in laboratory parameters. Studies of at least 30 subjects with DM1 or DM2 who were studied for 6 to 12 months depending on the method of analysis were eligible. Results. The search produced seven articles which gave event rate efficacy evaluable results and three which evaluated the effect of the IUD on laboratory parameters. One of the earlier efficacy studies showed an abnormally high pregnancy rate which sparked a controversy which is discussed in the Introduction section. The remaining 6 studies produced acceptable pregnancy rates. The three laboratory studies showed that the copper and levonorgestrel releasing IUD/IUS do not affect the diabetic state in any way. Conclusions. The copper bearing and levonorgestrel releasing IUDs are safe and effective in women with diabetes type I and diabetes type II although the evidence in the latter is limited. PMID:24396605

  5. Bariatric surgery for a patient with a HeartMate II ventricular assist device for destination therapy.

    PubMed

    Lockard, Kathleen L; Allen, Carrie; Lohmann, Douglas; Severyn, Donald A; Schaub, Richard D; Kauffman, Kelly E; Hodges, Jeffrey R; Woodhall, Lorna; Ramanathan, Ramesh; Teuteberg, Jeffrey J; Eckert, Chad E; Kormos, Robert L

    2013-03-01

    A patient with a HeartMate II left ventricular assist device who had a body mass index of 52 needed gastric bypass surgery in order to qualify for a heart transplant. Unlike previous experience in which the surgery was performed at the implant hospital, the gastric bypass surgery in this case was performed at a bariatric center of excellence that was a separate facility from the implant hospital. The artificial heart program of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center worked with the bariatric center of excellence in scheduling the gastric bypass surgery using a multidisciplinary team approach at 2 hospitals to coordinate safe, high-quality patient care in a unique situation. PMID:23448817

  6. Helium leak test for sterility assurance of a sealed bag. II: Establishing a test method for the manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Miyako, Yasuhiro; Tai, Hideaki; Saitoh, Izumi; Ikeda, Kaori

    2003-01-01

    To establish a simpler and more reliable method for retaining the aseptic condition of freeze-dried bulk product of a drug substance, a helium leak test method was developed. The bulk product is for the new kit system for infusion of our antibiotic product. In manufacturing the kit system, the bulk product needs to be transported outside of the aseptic area. We had to use a proper container to enclose the bulk product under aseptic conditions and establish an appropriate method for sterility assurance of the container. We decided to use a flexible aluminum laminate bag as a container and to seal it in a polyethylene bag. To detect tears or pinholes in the bag, a helium leak test was considered. As a tear model, a pinhole of known diameter was made in the aluminum laminate bag which was then filled with helium and sealed in a polyethylene bag. Helium leaking from the pinholes was measured with a helium leak detector, and leakage from a pinhole of more than 50 microm in the aluminum laminate bag could be detected. The amount of leakage was strongly affected by the pinhole diameter, and we developed a scientific approach for measuring leakage using the Poiseiulle Equation. The detection sensitivity of our method was enough to retain an aseptic condition inside the aluminum laminate bag, confirmed by the results of the process simulation test using our helium leak test. We concluded that our helium leak test was useful for sterility assurance of the bulk product sealed in the aluminum laminate bag in the manufacturing process of our kit system for infusion of our antibiotic product. PMID:12877329

  7. Design Strategy for High-Performance Dendritic Carbazole-Containing Alkynylplatinum(II) Complexes and Their Application in Solution-Processable Organic Light-Emitting Devices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fred Ka-Wai; Tang, Man-Chung; Wong, Yi-Chun; Chan, Mei-Yee; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2016-05-18

    A new class of luminescent dendritic carbazole-containing alkynylplatinum(II) complexes has been synthesized, characterized, and applied as phosphorescent dopants in the fabrication of solution-processable organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). These complexes exhibit high photoluminescence quantum yields of up to 80% in spin-coated thin films. In addition, the incorporation of carbazole dendrons into the platinum(II) center can significantly suppress intermolecular interactions in solid-state thin films, giving rise to emission spectra that are similar to those found in solution irrespective of dopant concentrations. High-performance solution-processable OLEDs have also been fabricated, with a maximum external quantum efficiency of up to 10.4%, which is comparable to that of the vacuum-deposited devices based on the small-molecule counterpart. This is one of the highest ever reported values for solution-processable devices based on platinum(II) complexes with tridentate ligands. PMID:27145466

  8. Design optimization of pixel sensors using device simulations for the phase-II CMS tracker upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, G.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Eber, R.; Eichorn, T.; Fernandez, M.; Lalwani, K.; Messineo, A.; Palomo, F. R.; Peltola, T.; Printz, M.; Ranjan, K.; Villa, I.; Hidalgo, S.

    2016-07-01

    In order to address the problems caused by the harsh radiation environment during the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), all silicon tracking detectors (pixels and strips) in the CMS experiment will undergo an upgrade. And so to develop radiation hard pixel sensors, simulations have been performed using the 2D TCAD device simulator, SILVACO, to obtain design parameters. The effect of various design parameters like pixel size, pixel depth, implant width, metal overhang, p-stop concentration, p-stop depth and bulk doping density on the leakage current and critical electric field are studied for both non-irradiated as well as irradiated pixel sensors. These 2D simulation results of planar pixels are useful for providing insight into the behaviour of non-irradiated and irradiated silicon pixel sensors and further work on 3D simulation is underway.

  9. Active-treatment effects of the Forsus fatigue resistant device during comprehensive Class II correction in growing patients

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Giorgio; Alvetro, Lisa; Defraia, Efisio; Ghislanzoni, Luis Tomas Huanc

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the active-treatment effects of the Forsus fatigue resistant device (Forsus) during comprehensive correction of Class II malocclusion in growing patients. Methods Fifty-four patients (mean age, 12.5 ± 1.2 years) with Class II division 1 malocclusion were consecutively treated with fixed app-liances in combination with Forsus. Lateral cephalograms were analyzed at the beginning of the fixed treatment (T1), Forsus insertion (T2), its removal (T3), and end of the comprehensive therapy (T4). Statistical comparisons were carried out by repeated-measures ANOVA with Tukey's post-hoc test (p < 0.05). Results The overall therapeutic effects were mainly dentoalveolar and occurred mostly during the active treatment with Forsus (T2-T3, mean duration = 0.5 ± 0.1 years). The overjet and overbite decreased significantly (-3.5 and -1.5 mm, respectively) and the molar relationship improved by 4.3 mm. These changes were associated with significant retroclination of the maxillary incisors (-3.1°), proclination and intrusion of the mandibular incisors (+5.0° and -1.5 mm, respectively), and mesialization of the mandibular molars (+2.0 mm). Conclusions Forsus had mainly dentoalveolar effects and contributed largely to the overall therapeutic outcome. PMID:24892027

  10. 30 CFR 57.22227 - Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approved testing devices (I-A, I-B, I-C, II-A, II-B, III, IV, V-A, and V-B mines). 57.22227 Section 57.22227 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL...