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Sample records for dgeba epoxy resin

  1. Characterization of DGEBA (diglycidyl ethers bisphenol-A) epoxy resins

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, F.N.; Spieker, D.A.

    1987-04-01

    High-resolution gel permeation chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography can be applied to commercially available DGEBA epoxy resins to elucidate small but significant differences in the oligomer and impurity compositions of these resins. The GPC profiles can be used to type or identify the various commercial grades of these DGEBA resins. Lot-to-lot consistency and aging characteristics can also be determined using GPC and HPLC. Quantitation of the various oligomers and impurities such as the ..cap alpha..-glycol, isomer, and chlorohydrin species is possible. Using 20% isoconversion predictive cure thermal analysis data, the relative resin reactivity of several liquid, low-molecular DGEBA resins has been measured. These data show that the higher viscosity, higher oligomer content resins, which have higher hydroxyl content, reacted faster with amine cure agents than the lower viscosity, higher purity - and consequently lower hydroxyl content - resins. Thus, a combination of liquid chromatography (GPC or HPLC) and DSC kinetics can be used to establish a correlation or equivalency beween the commercially available low-molecular-weight DGEBA epoxy resins.

  2. Isothermal reacting comparison of DGEBA (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A)-type epoxy resins

    SciTech Connect

    Spieker, D.A.; Larsen, F.N.

    1989-07-01

    The trend toward miniaturization of electronic components has prompted the need for materials with improved dielectric properties and decreased tendency to promote corrosion resulting from low levels of ionic impurities. Epoxy resins based on the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), which have reduced levels of total, ionic, and/or saponifiable chlorine, have recently been introduced commercially for use in microelectronic applications. These electronic-grade resins have been either manufactured specifically to reduce, or purified to remove, the molecular species that are responsible for the ionic and saponifiable chlorine. Because some of these species have been shown to affect the bulk resin processing parameters, a study was undertaken to compare the reactivities of some electronic-grade resins to the non-electronic-grade materials. This paper presents the results of the DSC kinetic study performed on commercially available DGEBA resins to determine if process changes were required to replace a traditional DGEBA-type resin with a reduced chlorine version. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Insight on mendable resin made by combining Diels-Alder epoxy adducts with DGEBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Iacono, S.; Martone, A.; Filippone, G.; Acierno, D.; Zarrelli, M.; Giordano, M.; Amendola, E.

    2016-05-01

    Formation of micro-cracks is a critical problem in polymers and polymer composites during their service in structural applications. In this context, materials endowed with self-healing features would lead to the next polymers generation. In the present paper, an epoxy system integrating Diels-Alder epoxy adducts is investigated by thermal and spectroscopic analysis. The direct and retro D-A reaction have been studied by FTIR and specific absorption bands have been identified. Finally, mechanical tests have been performed on the system. The polymer is able to heal fracture and micro-cracks recovering its stiffness after a thermal treatment.

  4. Epoxy resin

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Glenn R.; Salyer, Ival O.; Ball, III, George L.

    1976-07-13

    By mixing one part of a prepolymer containing a polyamine partially polymerized with an organic epoxide and subsequently reacted with a fatty acid containing from 8 to 32 carbon atoms, and then reacting this prepolymer mixture with 3 parts of an organic epoxide, a composition was obtained which made a gas frothable, shear-stable, room temperature curing, low density foam. A particularly advantageous prepolymer was prepared using a polyamine selected from the group consisting of diethylenetriamine, triethylenetetramine, and tetraethylenepentamine, partially polymerized with an organic epoxide having an average molecular weight of about 350 and having an epoxide equivalent of 185 to 192, and reacted with 2-10 weight percent linoleic acid. When one part of this prepolymer was reacted with about three parts of epoxy, and frothed by whipping in air or nitrogen an epoxy foam was produced which could be troweled onto surfaces and into corners or crevices, and subsequently cured, at near ambient temperature, to a strong dimensionally stable foam product.

  5. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  6. Epoxy resin holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Limón, B.; Wetzel, G. B. J.; Olivares Pérez, A.; Ponce-Lee, E. L.; Ramos-Garcia, R.; Toxqui López, S.; Hernández-Garay, M. P.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2006-02-01

    We observed that a commercial epoxy resin (Comex (R) is enable to record images by means of lithography techniques. We can generate a hologram using a digital image and a computer simulation program and transferred it on our resin by microlithography techniques to get a phase hologram and increase its efficiency. The exposition to the heat produce temperature gradients and the information in the mask is transferred to the material by the refraction index changes, thus the film is recorded. At the same time the hologram is cured.

  7. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.; Pater, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    High char yield epoxy using novel bisimide amines (BIA's) as curing agents with a state of the art epoxy resin was developed. Stoichiometric quantities of the epoxy resin and the BIA's were studied to determine the cure cycle required for preparation of resin specimens. The bisimide cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these novel resins were determined. The levels of moisture absorption exhibited by the bisimide amine cured expoxies (IME's) were considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies. The strain-to-failure of the control resin system was improved 25% by replacement of DDS with 6F-DDS. Each BIA containing resin exhibited twice the char yield of the control resin MY 720/DDS. Graphite fiber reinforced control (C) and IME resins were fabricated and characterized. Two of the composite systems showed superior properties compared to the other Celion 6000/IME composite systems and state of the art graphite epoxy systems. The two systems exhibited excellent wet shear and flexural strengths and moduli at 300 and 350 F.

  8. Relaxation Characteristics of 828 DGEBA Epoxy Over Long Time Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoo, Jasmine; Reprogle, Riley C.; Wisler, Brian; Arechederra, Gabriel K.; McCoy, John D.; Kropka, Jamie M.; Long, Kevin N.

    The mechanical relaxation response in uniaxial compression of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy was studied over long time periods. The epoxy, 828DEA, was Epon 828 cured with diethanolamine (DEA). A sample was compressed at constant strain rate and held at various strain levels for days to allow the sample to relax. The sample was then compressed further and held once more. The relaxation curves were fit with a stretched exponential function. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. The stability of new transparent polymeric materials: The epoxy trimethoxyboroxine system. Part 1: The preparation, characterization and curing of epoxy resins and their copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, E.; Lin, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of resin composition, curing conditions fillers, and flame retardant additives on the flammability of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) as measured by the oxygen index is examined. The oxygen index of DGEBA cured with various curing agents was between 0.198 to 0.238. Fillers and flame retardant additives can increase the oxygen index dependent on the material and the amount used. Changes in the basic cured resin properties can be anticipated with the addition of noncompatible additives. High flame resistant epoxy resins with good stability and mechanical properties are investigated.

  10. Synthesis and properties of a bio-based epoxy resin with high epoxy value and low viscosity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Songqi; Liu, Xiaoqing; Fan, Libo; Jiang, Yanhua; Cao, Lijun; Tang, Zhaobin; Zhu, Jin

    2014-02-01

    A bio-based epoxy resin (denoted TEIA) with high epoxy value (1.16) and low viscosity (0.92 Pa s, 258C) was synthesized from itaconic acid and its chemical structure was confirmed by 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Its curing reaction with poly(propylene glycol) bis(2-aminopropyl ether) (D230) and methyl hexahydrophthalic anhydride (MHHPA) was investigated. For comparison, the commonly used diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) was also cured with the same curing agents. The results demonstrated that TEIA showed higher curing reactivity towards D230/MHHPA and lower viscosity compared with DGEBA, resulting in the better processability. Owing to its high epoxy value and unique structure, comparable or better glass transition temperature as well as mechanical properties could be obtained for the TEIA-based network relative to the DGEBA-based network. The results indicated that itaconic acid is a promising renewable feedstock for the synthesis of bio-based epoxy resin with high performance. PMID:24136894

  11. Glass Reinforcement of Various Epoxy Resins-Polyurea Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Medha; Jauhari, Smita

    2012-07-01

    Polyureas (PUs) were prepared by the polycondensation reaction of disperse dyes containing -NH2 group and toluene 2, 4-diisocyanate. The disperse dyes have been prepared by coupling of various 2-diazobenzothiazoles with 1,3-benzenediamine. All the PUs were characterized by elemental analysis, spectral studies, number average molecular weight ( {overline{{Mn}} } ), and thermogravimetry. Further reaction of PUs was carried out with an epoxy resin (i.e., DGEBA). The curing study of prepared resins was monitored by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Based on DSC, thermograms glass fiber-reinforced composites have been laminated and characterized by chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties. The unreinforced cured resins were subjected to thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The laminated composites showed excellent resistance properties against chemicals and good mechanical and electrical properties.

  12. Formulation and Characterization of Epoxy Resin Copolymer for Graphite Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keck, F. L.

    1983-01-01

    Maximum char yield was obtained with a copolymer containing 25% mol fraction DGEBE and 75% mol fraction DGEBA (Epon 828). To achieve the high values (above 40%), a large quantity of catalyst (trimethoxyboroxine) was necessary. Although a graphite laminate 1/8" thick was successfully fabricated, the limited life of the catalyzed epoxy copolymer system precludes commercial application. Char yields of 45% can be achieved with phenolic cured epoxy systems as indicated by data generated under NAS2-10207 contract. A graphite laminate using this type of resin system was fabricated for comparison purposes. The resultant laminate was easier to process and because the graphite prepreg is more stable, the fabrication process could readily be adapted to commercial applications.

  13. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy (IME) resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are presented. State of the art epoxy resin, MY720, was used. Three aromatic bisimide amines and one aromatic aliphatic BIA were evaluated. BIA's derived from 6F anhydride (3,3 prime 4,4 prime-(hexafluoro isopropyl idene) bis (phthalic anhydride) and diamines, 3,3 prime-diam nodiphenyl sulfone (3,3 prime-DDS), 4,4 prime-diamino diphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS), 1.12-dodecane diamine (1,12-DDA) were used. BIA's were abbreviated 6F-3,3 prime-DDS, 6F-4,4 prime-DDS, 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime DDS, and 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA corresponding to 6F anhydride and diamines mentioned. Epoxy resin and BIA's (MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA and a 50:50 mixture of a BIA and parent diamine, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA/3,3 prime-DDS were studied to determine effect of structure and composition. Effect of the addition of two commercial epoxies, glyamine 200 and glyamine 100 on the properties of several formulations was evaluated. Bisimide amine cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). Physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these resins were determined. Moisture absorption in boiling water exhibited by several of the IME's was considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies (from 3.2% for the control and state of the art to 2.0 wt% moisture absorption). Char yields are increased from 20% for control and state of the art epoxies to 40% for IME resins. Relative toughness characteristics of IME resins were measured by 10 deg off axis tensile tests of Celion 6000/IME composites. Results show that IME's containing 6F-3,3 prime-DDS or 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA improved the "toughness" characteristics of composites by about 35% (tensile strength), about 35% (intralaminar shear

  14. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  15. Water transport into epoxy resins and composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    The processing-property relationships were established for the epoxy system of tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM) cured with diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). The TGDDM-DDS epoxy system was selected for analysis as the ensuing polymer matrix is most common in high-performance fiber-reinforced epoxy composites. Experiments on water transport in epoxy resins with varying compositions were performed and a relaxation-coupled transport behavior was observed in these epoxy resins. By post-curing vitrified epoxy resins, the additional free volume usually measured in them was removed and maximum water uptake was reduced. Since epoxy resins were in a quasi-equilibrium glassy state after the post-cure, Fick's law with a constant diffusion coefficient could adequately describe the water sorption behavior. A network formation model based on the branching theory was developed, taking into account the difference in reactivities of primary and secondary amines and the etherification reaction. Using this network formation model, water uptake in post-cured epoxy resins was found to be proportional to tertiary amine concentration.

  16. Flammability of Epoxy Resins Containing Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G.; Connell, J. W.; Hinkley, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire-resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial and general aviation aircraft, flame-retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured neat epoxy formulations were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis, microscale combustion calorimetry, and fire calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness and compressive strength of several cured formulations showed no detrimental effect due to phosphorus content. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  17. Epoxy resins in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Spee, Ton; Van Duivenbooden, Cor; Terwoert, Jeroen

    2006-09-01

    Epoxy resins are used as coatings, adhesives, and in wood and concrete repair. However, epoxy resins can be highly irritating to the skin and are strong sensitizers. Some hardeners are carcinogenic. Based on the results of earlier Dutch studies, an international project on "best practices,"--Epoxy Code--with epoxy products was started. Partners were from Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK. The "Code" deals with substitution, safe working procedures, safer tools, and skin protection. The feasibility of an internationally agreed "ranking system" for the health risks of epoxy products was studied. Such a ranking system should inform the user of the harmfulness of different epoxies and stimulate research on less harmful products by product developers. PMID:17119222

  18. Some experiences with epoxy resin grouting compounds.

    PubMed

    Hosein, H R

    1980-07-01

    Epoxy resin systems are used in tiling and grouting in the construction industry. Because of the nature of the application, skin contact is the primary hazard. The most prevalent reaction was reddening of the forearms, followed by whole body reddening and loss of appetite, these latter two being associated with smoking while applying the resin. PMID:7415974

  19. Mobility restrictions and glass transition behaviour of an epoxy resin under confinement.

    PubMed

    Djemour, A; Sanctuary, R; Baller, J

    2015-04-01

    Confinement can have a big influence on the dynamics of glass formers in the vicinity of the glass transition. Already 40 to 50 K above the glass transition temperature, thermal equilibration of glass formers can be strongly influenced by the confining substrate. We investigate the linear thermal expansion and the specific heat capacity cp of an epoxy resin (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A, DGEBA) in a temperature interval of 120 K around the glass transition temperature. The epoxy resin is filled into controlled pore glasses with pore diameters between 4 and 111 nm. Since DGEBA can form H-bonds with silica surfaces, we also investigate the influence of surface silanization of the porous substrates. In untreated substrates a core/shell structure of the epoxy resin can be identified. The glass transition behaviours of the bulk phase and that of the shell phase are different. In silanized substrates, the shell phase disappears. At a temperature well above the glass transition, a second transition is found for the bulk phase - both in the linear expansion data as well as in the specific heat capacity. The cp data do not allow excluding the glass transition of a third phase as being the cause for this transition, whereas the linear expansion data do so. The additional transition temperature is interpreted as a separation between two regimes: above this temperature, macroscopic flow of the bulk phase inside the porous structure is possible to balance the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between DGEBA and the substrate. Below the transition temperature, this degree of freedom is hindered by geometrical constraints of the porous substrates. Moreover, this second transition could also be found in the linear expansion data of the shell phase. PMID:25689879

  20. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. Cobalt Ions Improve the Strength of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Technique developed for improving mechanical strength of epoxy resins by adding cobalt ions in form of tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt (III) complex. Solid cast disks prepared from cobalt ion-containing epoxy resins tested for flexural strength and stiffness. Incorporation of cobalt ions into epoxies increased flexural strength of resins by 10 to 95 percent. Suitable resins for this technique include any liquid or solid TGMDA resins. Improved epoxy formulation proves useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft.

  4. Dielectric relaxations investigation of a synthesized epoxy resin polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilani, Wissal; Mzabi, Nissaf; Gallot-Lavallée, Olivier; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Zerrouki, Rachida; Guermazi, Hajer

    2015-04-01

    A diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resin was synthesized, and cured with 3,3'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) at a curing temperature of 120 °C. The relaxation properties of the realized polymers were studied by two complementary techniques: dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS), in the temperature range 173-393K and in the frequency interval 10-1-106 Hz, and thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) with a windowing polarization process. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements were also carried out to study interfacial relaxations. Dielectric data were analyzed in terms of permittivity and electric modulus variations. Three relaxation processes ( γ, β and α) have been identified. They were found to be frequency and temperature dependent and were interpreted in terms of the Havriliak-Negami approach. Relaxation parameters were determined by fitting the experimental data. The temperature dependence of the relaxation time was well fitted by the Arrhenius law for secondary relaxations, while the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamann model was found to better fit the τ( T) variations for α relaxation. We found τ 0 = 4.9 10-12 s, 9.6 10-13 s and 1.98 10-7 s for γ, β and α relaxations, respectively. The obtained results were found to be consistent with those reported in the literature. Due to the calculation of the low-frequency data of dielectric loss by the Hamon approximation, the Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars (MWS) relaxation was highlighted.

  5. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  6. Electroactive polymer gels based on epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samui, A. B.; Jayakumar, S.; Jayalakshmi, C. G.; Pandey, K.; Sivaraman, P.

    2007-04-01

    Five types of epoxy gels have been synthesized from common epoxy resins and hardeners. Fumed silica and nanoclay, respectively, were used as fillers and butyl methacrylate/acrylamide were used as monomer(s) for making interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) in three compositions. Swelling study, tensile property evaluation, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and electroactive property evaluation were done. The gels have sufficient mechanical strength and the time taken for bending to 20° was found to be 22 min for forward bias whereas it was just 12 min for reverse bias.

  7. High char imide-modified epoxy matrix resins. [for graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The synthesis of a class of bis(imide-amine) curing agents for epoxy matrix resins is discussed. Glass transition temperatures and char yield data of an epoxy cured with various bis(imide-amines) are presented. The room temperature and 350 F mechanical properties, and char yields of unidirectional graphite fiber laminates prepared with conventional epoxy and imide-modified epoxy resins are presented.

  8. Strain Rate Dependence of Compressive Yield and Relaxation in DGEBA Epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arechederra, Gabriel K.; Reprogle, Riley C.; Clarkson, Caitlyn M.; McCoy, John D.; Kropka, Jamie M.; Long, Kevin N.; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-03-01

    The mechanical response in uniaxial compression of two diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxies were studied. These were 828DEA (Epon 828 cured with diethanolamine (DEA)) and 828T403 (Epon 828 cured with Jeffamine T-403). Two types of uniaxial compression tests were performed: A) constant strain rate compression and B) constant strain rate compression followed by a constant strain relaxation. The peak (yield) stress was analyzed as a function of strain rate from Eyring theory for activation volume. Runs at different temperatures permitted the construction of a mastercurve, and the resulting shift factors resulted in an activation energy. Strain and hold tests were performed for a low strain rate where a peak stress was lacking and for a higher strain rate where the peak stress was apparent. Relaxation from strains at different places along the stress-strain curve was tracked and compared. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Complex Cure Kinetics of the Hydroxyl-Epoxide Reaction in DGEBA Epoxy Hardened with Diethanolamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancipink, Windy; McCoy, John; Kropka, Jamie; Celina, Mathias

    The curing of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A Epoxy (Epon 828) with diethanolamine (DEA) involves a fast amine-epoxide reaction followed by a slower hydroxyl-epoxide reaction. At curing temperatures below 100°C, the time scales of these two reactions are well separated, and the hydroxyl addition can be studied as an ''isolated'' reaction. The hydroxyl-epoxide reaction is of great interest due to the complex kinetics involved, which are brought about by competing reactions. The reaction kinetics are believed to be tertiary amine catalyzed and are well fit to a modified form of the Kamal-type equation. Here we study the complex long term reaction kinetics at various temperatures, by using isothermal modulated differential scanning calorimetry, micro calorimetry, and infrared spectroscopy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Mechanical behaviors of hyberbranched epoxy toughened bisphenol F epoxy resin for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingwen; Wu, Zhixiong; Huang, Chuanjun; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Laifeng

    2014-01-01

    Epoxy resins have been widely employed in cryogenic engineering fields. In this work, bisphenol F epoxy resin was modified by an aromatic polyester hyperbranched epoxy resin (HTDE-2). Mechanical behaviors of the modified epoxy resins in terms of tensile properties and impact property were studied at both room and cryogenic temperatures. Moreover, the toughening mechanism was discussed by fracture surface morphology analysis. The results demonstrated that, the mechanical properties of composites initially increased until reaches the maximum value with increasing the mass content of the HTDE-2, and then decreased at both room temperature (RT) and 77K. Especially, the impact strength at 77 K was improved 40.7% compared with the pure epoxy matrix when 10 wt% HTDE-2 was introduced. The findings suggest that the HTDE-2 will be an effective toughener for the brittle bisphenol F epoxy resin for cryogenic applications.

  11. Gamma-rays initiated cationic polymerization of epoxy resins and their carbon nanotubes composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybytniak, Grażyna; Nowicki, Andrzej; Mirkowski, Krzysztof; Stobiński, Leszek

    2016-04-01

    Epoxy resins based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) in the presence cationic initiator in the form of iodonium salt were exposed to gamma-rays in order to initiate curing process. The influence of the initiator concentration, dose rate, chemical structure of monomers and the presence of carbon nanotubes were determined on the basis of the recorded on-line thermal effects. The induction time of radiation curing increased with lowering concentration of the initiator and oxirane groups as well as with decreasing dose rates. As was confirmed by SEM images, carbon nanotubes were uniformly distributed over the matrix and closely surrounded by the macromolecules. Such a structure resulted from adsorption of the initiator on the filler surface what allowed to begin polymerization around nanoparticles and facilitated their incorporation into the matrix. As a consequence, the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were improved.

  12. Process for improving moisture resistance of epoxy resins by addition of chromium ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, T. L.; Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A process for improving the moisture resistance properties of epoxidized TGMDA and DGEBA resin system by chemically incorporating chromium ions is described. The addition of chromium ions is believed to prevent the absorption of water molecules.

  13. Epoxy resin developments for large superconducting magnets impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, J. M.; Gallet, B.; Kircher, F.; Lottin, J. C.

    The future detectors ATLAS and CMS of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will use two huge superconducting magnets. Both are now under design, and their electrical insulation could be realized using epoxy resin and a wet impregnation technique. Because of their large dimensions, and the indirect cooling of the superconductor, the strengths of the resin and of the resin/conductor interface are of major importance. A new generation of epoxy resins for vacuum/pressure impregnation methods has been tested, and compared with some classical and well-known epoxy resins used in impregnation techniques. In order to understand the mechanical behaviour at 4 K, the complete evolution from liquid state to low temperature service condition is considered. The paper will present some results on the mechanical properties, the density and the chemical shrinkage occurring during the polymerization and the thermal contraction between room temperature and 4 K for these different types of epoxy resins.

  14. Effects of gamma-ray irradiation on a cyanate ester/epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idesaki, Akira; Uechi, Hiroki; Hakura, Yoshihiko; Kishi, Hajime

    2014-05-01

    Effects of γ-ray irradiation on a cyanate ester/epoxy resin composed of dicyanate ester of bisphenol A (DCBA) and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) were investigated by changes in physicochemical and mechanical properties after the γ-ray irradiation with dose of 100 MGy as maximum at around 40 °C under vacuum. After the irradiation, gases of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were evolved, glass transition temperature decreased, and flexural strength also decreased. It was concluded that ether linkages bonded to cyanurate, isocyanurate and oxazolidinone structures are mainly decomposed by the irradiation. After 100 MGy irradiation, the flexural strength of DCBA/DGEBA was maintained more than 170 MPa which is 90% of initial value of 195 MPa. Flexural modulus and density slightly increased to the values of 3.9 GPa and 1.211 g/cm3 from initial values of 3.4 GPa and 1.199 g/cm3, respectively.

  15. Microwave processing of epoxy resins and synthesis of carbon nanotubes by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Liming

    Microwave processing of advanced materials has been studied as an attractive alternative to conventional thermal processing. In this dissertation, work was preformed in four sections. The first section is a review on research status of microwave processing of polymer materials. The second section is investigation of the microwave curing kinetics of epoxy resins. The curing of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and 3, 3'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) system under microwave radiation at 145 °C was governed by an autocatalyzed reaction mechanism. A kinetic model was used to describe the curing progress. The third section is a study on dielectric properties of four reacting epoxy resins over a temperature range at 2.45 GHz. The epoxy resin was DGEBA. The four curing agents were DDS, Jeffamine D-230, m-phenylenediamine, and diethyltoluenediamine. The mixtures of DGEBA and the four curing agents were stoichiometric. The four reacting systems were heated under microwave irradiation to certain cure temperatures. Measurements of temperature and dielectric properties were made during free convective cooling of the samples. The cooled samples were analyzed with a Differential Scanning Calorimeter to determine the extents of cure. The Davidson-Cole model can be used to describe the dielectric data. A simplified Davidson-Cole expression was proposed to calculate the parameters in the Davidson-Cole model and describe the dielectric properties of the DGEBA/DDS system and part of the dielectric data of the other three systems. A single relaxation model was used with the Arrhenius expression for temperature dependence to model the results. The evolution of all parameters in the models during cure was related to the decreasing number of the epoxy and amine groups in the reactants and the increasing viscosity of the reacting systems. The last section is synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on silicon substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition of a gas mixture of

  16. Photosensitive filler minimizes internal stresses in epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    Photosensitive filler is added to curable epoxy resins to minimize stress from internal shrinkage during curing or polymerization. Cinnamic acid resins and cinnamal ketones may be added in the amount of 1 to 3 percent by weight of the resin mixture.

  17. Preparation and cured properties of novel cycloaliphatic epoxy resins

    SciTech Connect

    Tokizawa, Makoto; Okada, Hiroyoshi; Wakabayashi, Nobukatsu; Kimura, Tomiaki . Research Center)

    1993-10-20

    Preparation and characterization of novel cycloaliphatic epoxy resins, which are derived from octadienyl compounds, were studied. From a model peracetic acid epoxidation reaction using 2,7-octadienyl acetate-1, the structure of the liquid resins is estimated to be mainly terminal epoxides and some amount of inner epoxide depending on the epoxide content. The epoxy resins offer lower toxicity and lower vapor pressure. The reactivity of the resin with acid anhydrides is moderate but faster than that of traditional cyclohexane epoxide-type resins and slower than that of the glycidyl ester-type resins. This reactivity was also examined using model compounds. The heat deflection temperature of the hexahydro-phthalic anhydride-cured resins is shown to be directly proportional to the number of epoxy groups in the molecules. The flexural strength of the cured resins is nearly equivalent to that of the commercial resins, although the flexural elongation of the resins is larger than that of the rigid cyclohexane epoxide-type resins. The thermal stability of the cured resins is compared to typical rigid cycloaliphatic resins; furthermore, high water resistance of the cured resins is suggested to be attributed to the hydrophobic character of the C[sub 8] chain by cross-linking.

  18. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.

    1998-01-01

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  19. Toughened epoxy resin system and a method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, C.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Havens, S.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1998-03-10

    Mixtures of epoxy resins with cationic initiators are curable under high energy ionizing radiation such as electron beam radiation, X-ray radiation, and gamma radiation. The composition of this process consists of an epoxy resin, a cationic initiator such as a diaryliodonium or triarylsulfonium salt of specific anions, and a toughening agent such as a thermoplastic, hydroxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, epoxy-containing thermoplastic oligomer, reactive flexibilizer, rubber, elastomer, or mixture thereof. Cured compositions have high glass transition temperatures, good mechanical properties, and good toughness. These properties are comparable to those of similar thermally cured epoxies.

  20. Testing Penetration of Epoxy Resin and Diamine Hardeners through Protective Glove and Clothing Materials.

    PubMed

    Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Mäkelä, Erja A; Suuronen, Katri

    2015-10-01

    Efficient, comfortable, yet affordable personal protective equipment (PPE) is needed to decrease the high incidence of allergic contact dermatitis arising from epoxy resin systems (ERSs) in industrial countries. The aim of this study was to find affordable, user-friendly glove and clothing materials that provide adequate skin protection against splashes and during the short contact with ERS that often occurs before full cure. We studied the penetration of epoxy resin and diamine hardeners through 12 glove or clothing materials using a newly developed test method. The tests were carried out with two ERS test mixtures that had a high content of epoxy resin and frequently used diamine hardeners of different molar masses. A drop (50 µl) of test mixture was placed on the outer surface of the glove/clothing material, which had a piece of Fixomull tape or Harmony protection sheet attached to the inner surface as the collection medium. The test times were 10 and 30 min. The collecting material was removed after the test was finished and immersed into acetone. The amounts of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), isophorone diamine (IPDA), and m-xylylenediamine (XDA) in the acetone solution were determined by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The limit for acceptable penetration of XDA, IPDA, and DGEBA through glove materials was set at 2 µg cm(-2). Penetration through the glove materials was 1.4 µg cm(-2) or less. The three tested chemical protective gloves showed no detectable penetration (<0.5 µg cm(-2)). Several affordable glove and clothing materials were found to provide adequate protection during short contact with ERS, in the form of, for example, disposable gloves or clothing materials suitable for aprons and as additional protective layers on the most exposed parts of clothing, such as the front of the legs and thighs and under the forearms. Every ERS combination in use should be tested separately to find the best skin protection material

  1. High-performance epoxy casting resins for SMD-LED packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, Georg; Debray, Alexandra; Hoehn, Klaus

    2000-04-01

    In order to come up with high volume SMD-LED production encompassing 1.9 billion devices for current fiscal year we did basic exploratory work to establish structure-processing- property relations for robust epoxy casting resin packages with identical ppm level of one. Bisphenol A-based epoxy casting resins (DGEBA) with acidic ester modified Hexahydrophthalic anhydride (HHPA) hardeners using strictly controlled high-grade raw materials were formulated and thermally transferred to highly transparent polyester networks. For 1 mm thick samples transparency in the 400 to 800 nm region is above 90%. Thermal aging tests for 6 weeks at 120 degrees Celsius reveal only slight discoloration with a color distance of 2. To avoid significant light losses within the LED operating life of 100,000 hrs stress on mechanically sensitive light-emitting chips was reduced by matching glass transition temperature Tg and E-modulus to 115 degrees Celsius and 2,800 MPa, respectively. Total chloride content below 1,000 ppm imply low corrosion potential. Further, resin composition, epoxy-hardener mixing ratio as well as curing profile were adapted to materialize fast curing for demand quantities while introducing effective low stress moieties in the final structure. Low internal stress, superior thermal shock and crack resistance were derived from supreme fracture toughness: KIC and GIC values were 1.350 MPam1/2 and 560 J/m2. With favorable water absorption behavior LED-packages withstand all soldering processes including TTW (through the wave) soldering. Thus, SMD-LEDs fulfill electronic industry standard JEDEC LEVEL 2.

  2. Toughening of epoxy resins by epoxidized soybean oil

    SciTech Connect

    Frischinger, I.; Dirlikov, S.

    1993-12-31

    Homogeneous mixtures of a liquid rubber based on prepolymers of epoxidized soybean oil with amines, diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy resins, and commercial diamines form, under certain conditions, two-phase thermosetting materials that consist of a rigid epoxy matrix and randomly distributed small rubbery soybean particles (0.1-5 {mu}m). These two-phase thermosets have improved toughness, similar to that of other rubber-modified epoxies, low water absorption, and low sodium content. In comparison to the unmodified thermosets, the two-phase thermosets exhibit slightly lower glass-transition temperatures and Young`s moduli, but their dielectric properties do not change. The epoxidized soybean oil is available at a price below that of commercial epoxy resins and appears very attractive for epoxy toughening on an industrial scale. 15 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Physical aging of linear and network epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S.-W.; Wilkes, G. L.; Mcgrath, J. E.; Banthia, A. K.; Mohajer, Y.; Tant, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    Network and linear epoxy resins principally based on the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A and its oligomers are prepared and studied using diamine and anhydride crosslinking agents. Rubber modified epoxies and a carbon fiber reinforced composite are also investigated. All materials display time-dependent changes when stored at temperatures below the glass transition temperature after quenching (sub-T/g/ annealing). Solvent sorption experiments initiated after different sub-T(g) annealing times demonstrate that the rate of solvent uptake can be indirectly related to the free volume of the epoxy resins. Residual thermal stresses and water are found to have little effect on the physical aging process, which affects the sub-T(g) properties of uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy material. Finally, the importance of the recovery phenomenon which affects the durability of epoxy glasses is considered.

  4. Reaction mechanisms, microstructure, and fracture properties of thermoplastic polysulfone-modified epoxy resin

    SciTech Connect

    Min, B.G.; Stachurski, Z.H. . Dept. of Materials Engineering); Hodgkin, J.H. . Div. of Chemicals and Polymers)

    1993-11-10

    The microstructure and fracture properties of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resins modified with phenolic hydroxyl-terminated polysulfone (PSF) and cured with diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) hardener have been investigated as a function of the molecular weight and concentration of PSF. The microstructure changed from a typical particulate structure to a phase-inverted structure as the molecular weight and/or the concentration of the modifier increased. The fracture toughness, measured by compact tension tests, increased with the microstructural changes toward the phase-inverted structure. The level of minor reactions such as etherification and homopolymerization reactions increased with increasing molecular weight and/or concentration of the modifier, in line with the tendencies observed in microstructure and fracture toughness. In the system containing 20 wt% of M[sub n] 10,000 PSF, about 30% of the epoxy groups were consumed by etherification and homopolymerization reactions, whereas none of these reactions occurred in the unmodified system. The increase in minor reactions in the modified systems may be to be due to the restricted molecular mobility, resulting from the increase of system viscosity caused by the modification.

  5. Thermal Expansion and Swelling of Cured Epoxy Resin Used in Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal expansion and swelling of resin material as influenced by variations in temperature during moisture absorption is discussed. Comparison measurements using composites constructed of graphite fibers and each of two epoxy resin matrices are included. Polymer theory relative to these findings is discussed and modifications are proposed.

  6. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... condensation of xylene-formaldehyde resin and 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to... include resins produced by the condensation of allyl ether of mono-, di-, or trimethylol phenol and...

  7. Epoxy foams using multiple resins and curing agents

    DOEpatents

    Russick, Edward M.; Rand, Peter B.

    2000-01-01

    An epoxy foam comprising a plurality of resins, a plurality of curing agents, at least one blowing agent, at least one surfactant and optionally at least one filler and the process for making. Preferred is an epoxy foam comprising two resins of different reactivities, two curing agents, a blowing agent, a surfactant, and a filler. According to the present invention, an epoxy foam is prepared with tailorable reactivity, exotherm, and pore size by a process of admixing a plurality of resins with a plurality of curing agents, a surfactant and blowing agent, whereby a foamable mixture is formed and heating said foamable mixture at a temperature greater than the boiling temperature of the blowing agent whereby said mixture is foamed and cured.

  8. From waste to functional additive: toughening epoxy resin with lignin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanshuang; Zhou, Rui; Goh, Hwee Li Sally; Huang, Shu; Lu, Xuehong

    2014-04-23

    A novel approach to toughen epoxy resin with lignin, a common waste material from the pulp and paper industry, is presented in this article. First, carboxylic acid-functionalized alkali lignin (AL-COOH) was prepared and subsequently incorporated into anhydride-cured epoxy networks via a one-pot method. The results of mechanical tests show that covalent incorporation of rigid AL-COOH into epoxy networks can significantly toughen the epoxy matrix without deteriorating its tensile strength and modulus. The addition of 1.0 wt % AL-COOH gives increases of 68 and 164% in the critical stress intensity factor (K(IC)) and critical strain energy release rate (G(IC)), respectively, relative to that of neat epoxy. This article opens up the possibility of utilizing low-cost and renewable lignin feedstocks as effective toughening agents for thermoset polymers. PMID:24660855

  9. The modifications of epoxy resin and their crystalline polymer particle filled epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    Huei-Hsiung Wang

    1996-12-31

    The chemical linking of the modifier to the epoxy network was overcome by using Bisphenol A, 4,4`-diaminodiphenyl sulphone or benzophenone-tetracarboxylic dianhydride as a coupling agent between the PU and the epoxy oligomer. From the experimental results, it was shown that the values of fracture energy, G{sub IC} for PU-modified epoxy were dependent on the macroglycols and the coupling agents. Scanning electron microscopy and the glass transition temperature were used to assess the morphology and their compatibility of these modified epoxies. It revealed that the ether type (PTMG) of PU modified epoxy showed the present of an aggregated separated phase. However, the ester type (PBA) PU-modified epoxy resin showed a homogenous morphology. In addition, the {Beta}-relaxation of cured epoxy resin showed a more clear two-phase separation existed in Bis-A as a coupling agents. The additive of the semi-crystalline PBT powder was more efficient in fracture energies of epoxy network than that of the Nylon 6,6 powder.

  10. Synthesis and Characterizations of Melamine-Based Epoxy Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ricciotti, Laura; Roviello, Giuseppina; Tarallo, Oreste; Borbone, Fabio; Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Catauro, Michelina; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    A new, easy and cost-effective synthetic procedure for the preparation of thermosetting melamine-based epoxy resins is reported. By this innovative synthetic method, different kinds of resins can be obtained just by mixing the reagents in the presence of a catalyst without solvent and with mild curing conditions. Two types of resins were synthesized using melamine and a glycidyl derivative (resins I) or by adding a silane derivative (resin II). The resins were characterized by means of chemical-physical and thermal techniques. Experimental results show that all the prepared resins have a good thermal stability, but differ for their mechanical properties: resin I exhibits remarkable stiffness with a storage modulus value up to 830 MPa at room temperature, while lower storage moduli were found for resin II, indicating that the presence of silane groups could enhance the flexibility of these materials. The resins show a pot life higher than 30 min, which makes these resins good candidates for practical applications. The functionalization with silane terminations can be exploited in the formulation of hybrid organic-inorganic composite materials. PMID:24013372

  11. Electron beam curing of epoxy resins by cationic polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Havens, S.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1995-10-01

    Preliminary investigations have determined that conventional epoxy resins can be cured at selectable temperatures with high glass transition temperatures (essentially the same as with thermal curing), while still exhibiting equivalent or comparable mechanical properties. A cationic photoinitiator at a concentration of 1--3 parts per hundred of the epoxy resin is required for this process. Gamma cell screening of cationic photoinitiators with bisphenol A, bisphenol F, and cycloaliphatic epoxies demonstrated that diaryliodonium salts of weakly nucleophilic anions such as hexafluoroantimonate are most effective. Diaryliodonium salts were also found to be most effective initiators for the cationic polymerization of epoxy resins when a high energy/power electron beam accelerator was used as the source of ionizing radiation. For example Dow Tactix 123 (bisphenol A epoxy) containing 3 phr (4-octyloxyphenyl)phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate was irradiated at a total dosage of 100 kGy. Glass transition temperature (tan delta) of the cured material as determined by dynamic mechanical analysis was 182 C as compared to 165 C thermally cured material.

  12. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). 721.2752 Section 721.2752 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). 721.2752 Section 721.2752 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752...

  14. Synchrotron Radiation Investigation in Epoxy Resin Modified with Polysiloxane System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Wenjun; Li, Weizhen; Ding, Jindian; Gu, Xiaodan; Wang, Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Epoxy resins are one of the most important classes of thermosetting polymers. Epoxy resin modified with polysiloxane is expected that the siloxane moiety may exert its qualities of thermal stability, impact toughness and surface-modification properties. Our group tried to introduce polysiloxane into epoxy resin by blending diglycidyl-ether of bisphenol-A with epoxypropoxypropyl terminated polydimethyl-siloxane and polyetherimide-siloxane in different proportion. These polysiloxane modified epoxy resins have been investigated using a combination of small- and wide angle X-ray scatterings (SAXS and WAXS) and scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy (STXM). Nano- to micro-scale domain size, distribution and chemical composition were observed with spatial and spectroscopic sensitivities offered by both hard and soft x-ray scattering/microscopy. In-situ SAXS experiments were performed to understand the mechanism of microphase separation and dynamics of nanostructure evolution. Acknowledgment: The authors thank Shanghai Municipal Education Commission (Overseas Visiting Scholar Program 2012) and Shanghai University of Engineering Science (2011xz04) for financial supports.

  15. Cryogenic compressive properties of basic epoxy resin systems

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.W.; Hoffman, J.A.; Muniz, D.P.

    1985-09-01

    The compressive properties of short cylindrical samples of many different epoxy resin systems have been measured at ambient temperature and at 77/sup 0/K. These are pure resin systems of known chemistry, without the inorganic fillers or fibrous reinforcements needed in final cryogenic systems. Of course, chemically incorporated modifiers such as flexibilizing resins have been included. This data should make possible inferences about cryogenic properties from molecular structures and provide specific data useful to formulators and end users. Measurements on some other plastics such as PTFE, Polyimides, and UHMWPE have been made for comparison purposes.

  16. Nonlinear Inelastic Mechanical Behavior Of Epoxy Resin Polymeric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yekani Fard, Masoud

    Polymer and polymer matrix composites (PMCs) materials are being used extensively in different civil and mechanical engineering applications. The behavior of the epoxy resin polymers under different types of loading conditions has to be understood before the mechanical behavior of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMCs) can be accurately predicted. In many structural applications, PMC structures are subjected to large flexural loadings, examples include repair of structures against earthquake and engine fan cases. Therefore it is important to characterize and model the flexural mechanical behavior of epoxy resin materials. In this thesis, a comprehensive research effort was undertaken combining experiments and theoretical modeling to investigate the mechanical behavior of epoxy resins subject to different loading conditions. Epoxy resin E 863 was tested at different strain rates. Samples with dog-bone geometry were used in the tension tests. Small sized cubic, prismatic, and cylindrical samples were used in compression tests. Flexural tests were conducted on samples with different sizes and loading conditions. Strains were measured using the digital image correlation (DIC) technique, extensometers, strain gauges, and actuators. Effects of triaxiality state of stress were studied. Cubic, prismatic, and cylindrical compression samples undergo stress drop at yield, but it was found that only cubic samples experience strain hardening before failure. Characteristic points of tensile and compressive stress strain relation and load deflection curve in flexure were measured and their variations with strain rate studied. Two different stress strain models were used to investigate the effect of out-of-plane loading on the uniaxial stress strain response of the epoxy resin material. The first model is a strain softening with plastic flow for tension and compression. The influence of softening localization on material behavior was investigated using the DIC system. It was found that

  17. Toughening mechanism in elastomer-modified epoxy resins, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, A. F.; Pearson, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The role of matrix ductility on the toughenability and toughening mechanism of elastomer-modified DGEBRA epoxies was investigated. Matrix ductility was varied by using epoxide resins of varying epoxide monomer molecular weights. These epoxide resins were cured using 4,4' diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) and, in some cases, modified with 10% HYCAR(r)CTBN 1300X8. Fracture roughness values for the neat epoxies were found to be almost independent on the monomer molecular weight of the epoxide resin used. However, it was found that the fracture toughness of the elastomer-modified epoxies was very dependent upon the epoxide monomer molecular weight. Tensile dilatometry indicated that the toughening mechanism, when present, is similar to the mechanisms found for the piperidine cured epoxies in Part 1. SEM and OM corroborate this finding. Dynamic mechanical studies were conducted to shed light on the toughenability of the epoxies. The time-dependent small strain behavior of these epoxies were separated into their bulk and shear components. The bulk component is related to brittle fracture, whereas the shear component is related to yielding. It can be shown that the rates of shear and bulk strain energy buildup for a given stress are uniquely determined by the values of Poisson's ratio, nu. It was found that nu increases as the monomer molecular weight of the epoxide resin used increases. This increase in nu can be associated with the low temperature beta relaxation. The effect of increasing cross-link density is to shift the beta relaxation to higher temperatures and to decrease the magnitude of the beta relaxation. Thus, increasing cross-link density decreases nu and increases the tendency towards brittle fracture.

  18. New hybrid thermosets based on epoxy resins and benzocylobutenes

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, D.J.; White, J.E.; Burks, B.T.

    1995-12-31

    A series of new, one component thermosets have been prepared by combining Dow`s epoxy resin and benzo-cyclobutene (BCB) technologies. The hybrid epoxy/BCB thermosetting monomers are prepared in the melt by reactions of amine-, phenol-, and carboxyl-functionalized benzocyclobutenes with epoxy-containing species such as bisphenol-A diglycidyl ether, chain-extended bisphenol-A epoxy resins, 9,9-bis(4-glycidyloxy-phenyl)fluorene, and epichlorohydrin. The monomers have outstanding processing characteristics, potentially long shelf life, and the convenience of an uncatalyzed, thermally cured, one component system. The resins are cured at >170{degrees}C (T{sub max}=260{degrees}C) and exhibit glass transition temperatures (Tg) of 85 to over 250{degrees}C. The examples shown below (n=0, 1, and 3.5) were prepared as part of this work. The chain extended species (n=3.5) is an extraordinarily tough thermoset, with a fracture toughness (K{sub Ic}) of over 3,000 psi-in{sup 0.5}.

  19. Preparation of Epoxy Resin Thin Film by Electroless Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Hitoshi; Hirai, Makoto; Shinagawa, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Chigane, Masaya; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Fujita, Naoyuki

    The electrodeposition coating process, which is a polymer film deposition method using water electrolysis, is widely used for automobile body primers. Recently this process is being used in the insulating polymer films deposition for the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) or micro electric components. However, this process has difficulty in depositing polymer film on complex shapes and non-conductive surfaces. In this paper, we demonstrate that epoxy resin thin films used extensively as insulating polymer films were successfully deposited using the electroless chemical reaction in aqueous solution on a non-conductive surface and high aspect glass tube. The substrates catalyzed using a commercialized three-step Sn/Ag/Pd activation process were immersed in the reaction solution containing water-soluble resin and NO3- ion, reducing agent (DMAB). The pH near the substrate rose when NO3- was reduced by released electrons from DMAB. Water-soluble resin combined with OH- hence, polymer thin film was deposited by the electroless deposition reaction. By FE-SEM and FT-IR measurement, it was clear that the conformal and dense epoxy resin films were deposited. Using the present method, epoxy films could be deposited on the surface of a high aspect ratio glass tube 50 mm in length and φ3 in inner diameter. These films had high insulation resistivity of 108∼1011Ωm with applied voltage of 250 V.

  20. Thermal properties of epoxy resins at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakane, H.; Nishijima, S.; Fujishiro, H.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yoshizawa, S.; Yamazaki, S.

    2002-05-01

    In order to establish the design technique of epoxy resin at cryogenic temperature, its thermal contraction coefficients and dynamic Young's modulus were measured from room to cryogenic temperatures when plasticizer was both present and absent. The disappearance of the effects of the plasticizer were confirmed by measuring its thermal expansion coefficient. The process in which the addition of plasticizer reduces the glass transition temperature was clarified by measuring its dynamic Young's modulus. It was also discovered that blunt peak is caused by addition of plasticizer. The data obtained by measuring the dynamic Young's modulus clearly indicate that this peak disappears at cryogenic temperature resulting in the disappearance of the effects of the plastizer. The conclusion is that when epoxy resin is to be used at cryogenic temperature it is desirable that the addition of plastizer is kept at the minimum level.

  1. Electron beam curing of epoxy resins by cationic polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Havens, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners has been established to develop high performance Electron Beam (EB) curable polymer matrix composites. EB curing of composites has a number of advantages over conventional thermal curing. Composites cured by EB have much shorter cure times, lower overall energy requirements, and reduced thermal stresses in the cured part. Furthermore, less expensive tooling can be used since the process occurs at lower temperatures. Preliminary investigations have determined that conventional epoxy resins can be cured at selectable temperatures with high glass transition temperatures (essentially the same as with thermal curing), while still exhibiting equivalent or comparable mechanical properties. A cationic photoinitiator at a concentration of 1-3 parts per hundred of the epoxy resin is required for this process. Gamma cell screening of cationic photoinitiators with bisphenol A, bisphenol F, and cycloaliphatic epoxies demonstrated that diaryliodonium salts of weakly nucleophilic anions such as hexafluoroantimonate are most effective. Diaryliodonium salts were also found to be the most effective initiators for the cationic polymerization of epoxy resins when a high energy/power electron beam accelerator was used as the source of ionizing radiation. For example Dow Tactix 123 (bisphenol A epoxy) containing 3 phr (4-octyloxyphenyl) phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate was irradiated at a total dosage of 100 kGy. Glass transition temperature (tan delta) of the cured material as determined by dynamic mechanical analysis was 182{degrees}C as compared to 165{degrees}C for the thermally cured material.

  2. Viscoelastic properties of graphene-based epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Fierro, Annalisa; Rosolia, Salvatore; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Lafdi, Khalid; Guadagno, Liberata

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the viscoelastic properties of an epoxy resin filled with graphene-based nanoparticles have been investigated in the liquid state, before curing, by means of a rotational rheometer equipped with a parallel plate geometry. Exfoliated graphite was prepared using traditional acid intercalation followed by a sudden treatment at high temperature (900°C). The percentage of exfoliated graphite was found to be 56%. The epoxy matrix was prepared by mixing a tetrafunctional precursor with a reactive diluent which produces a significant decrease in the viscosity of the epoxy precursor so that the dispersion step of nanofillers in the matrix can easily occur. The hardener agent, the 4,4-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), was added at a stoichiometric concentration with respect to all the epoxy rings. The inclusion of the partially exfoliated graphite (pEG) in the formulated epoxy mixture significantly modifies the rheological behaviour of the mixture itself. The epoxy mixture, indeed, shows a Newtonian behaviour while, at 3 wt % pEG content, the complex viscosity of the nanocomposite clearly shows a shear thinning behaviour with η* values much higher at the lower frequencies. The increase in complex viscosity with the increasing of the partially exfoliated graphite content was mostly caused by a dramatic increase in the storage modulus. All the graphene-based epoxy mixtures were cured by a two-stage curing cycles: a first isothermal stage was carried out at the lower temperature of 125°C for 1 hour while the second isothermal stage was performed at the higher temperature of 200°C for 3 hours. The mechanical properties of the cured nanocomposites show high values in the storage modulus and glass transition temperature.

  3. Investigation of the effect of resin material on impact damage to graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental program are described which establishes the feasibility and guide lines for resin development. The objective was to identify the basic epoxy neat resin properties that improve low velocity impact resistance and toughness to graphite-epoxy laminates and at the same time maintain useful structural laminate mechanical properties. Materials tests from twenty-three toughened epoxy resin matrix systems are included.

  4. Cure reaction of epoxy resins catalyzed by graphite-based nanofiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcione, C. Esposito; Acocella, Maria Rosaria; Giuri, Antonella; Maffezzoli, Alfonso; Guerra, Gaetano

    2015-12-01

    A significant effort was directed to the synthesis of graphene stacks/epoxy nanocomposites and to the analysis of the effect of a graphene precursor on cure reaction of a model epoxy matrix. A comparative thermal analysis of epoxy resins filled with an exfoliated graphite oxide eGO were conducted. The main aim was to understand the molecular origin of the influence of eGO on the Tg of epoxy resins. The higher Tg values previously observed for low curing temperatures, for epoxy resins with graphite-based nanofillers, were easily rationalized by a catalytic activity of graphitic layers on the reaction between the epoxy and amine groups of the resin, which leads to higher crosslinking density in milder conditions. A kinetic analysis of the cure mechanism of the epoxy resin associated to the catalytical activity of the graphite based filler was performed by isothermal DSC measurements. The DSC results showed that the addition of graphite based filler greatly increased the enthalpy of epoxy reaction and the reaction rate, confirming the presence of a catalytic activity of graphitic layers on the crosslinking reaction between the epoxy resin components (epoxide oligomer and di-amine). A kinetic modelling analysis, arising from an auto-catalyzed reaction mechanism, was finally applied to isothermal DSC data, in order to predict the cure mechanism of the epoxy resin in presence of the graphite based nanofiller.

  5. Dielectric properties of epoxy resin fly ash composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanaik, A.; Bhuyan, S. K.; Samal, S. K.; Behera, A.; Mishra, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    Epoxy resin is widely used as an insulating material in high voltage applications. Ceramic fillers are always added to the polymer matrix to enhance its mechanical properties. But at the same time, filler materials decreases the electrical properties. So while making the fly ash epoxy composite, it is obvious to detect the effect of fly ash reinforcement on the dielectric nature of the material. In the present research work, fly ash is added to four different weight percentages compositions and post-curing has been done in the atmospheric condition, normal oven and micro oven. Tests were carried out on the developed polymer composite to measure its dielectric permittivity and tan delta value in a frequency range of 1 Hz - 1 MHz. The space charge behaviours were also observed by using the pulse electroacoustic (PEA) technique. The dielectric strength and losses are compared for different conditions.

  6. Impact properties of rubber-modified epoxy resin-graphite-fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Nir, Z.

    1984-01-01

    To improve the impact resistance of graphite-fiber composites, a commercial and an experimental epoxy resin were modified with liquid reactive rubber and a brominated epoxy resin. The commercial epoxy was a tetrafunctional resin, and the experimental epoxy was a trifunctional resin. The reactive rubber was a carboxyl-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer. The rubber content was varied from 0 to 25 percent (wt). The brominated epoxy resin was used at Br levels of 4, 19, and 35 percent of the resin. Composites were prepared with woven graphite cloth reinforcement. The composites were evaluated by using flexural strength in the dry state and an elevated temperature after saturation with water. The impact properties were determined by measuring shear strength after falling-ball impact and instrumented impact. The rubber-modified, trifunctional resin exhibited better properties, when tested in hot-wet conditions in a heated oven at 366 K (after boiling the material for 2 h in demineralized water), than the tetrafunctional resin. Improved impact resistance was observed with the addition of the reactive rubber to the epoxy resin. Further improvement was observed with the addition of the brominated epoxy resin.

  7. The response of human tissues to carbon reinforced epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Howard, C B; Tayton, K J; Gibbs, A

    1985-08-01

    The tissue surrounding carbon fibre reinforced epoxy resin plates applied to forearm and tibial fractures was biopsied in 32 patients at the time the plates were removed. The reaction was minimal and was compared with that in a control group of 16 similar patients in whom stainless steel plates were used. No significant histological differences were found. A series of experiments on rats, in which the histology was studied from 2 to 78 weeks, also showed that there was very little reaction to carbon fibre reinforced plastic. PMID:4030870

  8. Acoustic Emissions in Borosilicate and epoxy resin composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatica, N.; Guerra, S.; Vargas, Y.; Gaete, L.; Galleguillos, E.; Ruzzante, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a research looking for to extend the acoustic emission (AE) technique from the evaluation of stress state of rock samples to know its composition is presented. For this purpose the rock samples were simulated by a composite made of a resin and borosilicate spheres. The epoxy resin playing the role of country rock and Borosilicate spheres represent the coarse grain. These samples were undergone to uniaxial compression test and the AE signals were recorded and studied looking for the identification of each material characteristic spectrum. The spectral analysis of these recorded signals shown that it is possible to identify the characteristic spectra of each material from the full spectra of composite.

  9. Epoxy-resin patterns speed shell-molding of aluminum parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Half patterns cast from commercial epoxy resin containing aluminum powder are used for shell-molding of aluminum parts. The half patterns are cast in plastic molds of the original wooden pattern. Ten serviceable sand resin molds are made from each epoxy pattern.

  10. High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators

    DOEpatents

    Janke, C.J.; Lopata, V.J.; Havens, S.J.; Dorsey, G.F.; Moulton, R.J.

    1999-03-02

    A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

  11. High energy electron beam curing of epoxy resin systems incorporating cationic photoinitiators

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Havens, Stephen J.; Dorsey, George F.; Moulton, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    A mixture of epoxy resins such as a semi-solid triglycidyl ether of tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane and a low viscosity bisphenol A glycidyl ether and a cationic photoinitiator such as a diaryliodonium salt is cured by irradiating with a dosage of electron beams from about 50 to about 150 kGy, forming a cross-linked epoxy resin polymer.

  12. Industrially relevant epoxy-acrylate hybrid resin photopolymerizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajiboye, Gbenga I.

    Photopolymerization of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins takes advantages of inherent properties present in the free-radical and cationic reactions to reduce oxygen inhibition problems that plague free-radical reactions. Similarly, the combined reaction mechanisms reduce moisture sensitivity of the cationic reactions. Despite the advantages of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins, problems persist that need to be addressed. For example, low conversion and polymerization rate of the epoxides are a problem, because the fast acrylate conversion prevents the epoxide from reaching high conversion. Controlling phase separation is challenging, since two moieties with different properties are reacting. The physical properties of the polymer will be impacted by the availability of different moieties. High shrinkage stress results from the acrylate moiety, causing buckling and cracking in film and coating applications. The overall goal of this study is to use the fundamental knowledge of epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins to formulate industrially viable polymers. In order to achieve this goal, the study focuses on the following objectives: (I) determine the apparent activation energy of the hybrid monomer METHB, (II) increase epoxide conversion and polymerization rate of hybrid formulations, and (III) control physical properties in epoxy-acrylate hybrid resins. In order to increase the epoxide conversion and rate of polymerization, the sensitivity of epoxides to alcohol is used to facilitate the activated monomer (AM) mechanism and induce a covalent bond between the epoxide and acrylate polymers through the hydroxyl group. It is hypothesized that if the AM mechanism is facilitated, epoxide conversion will increase. As a result, the resins can be tailored to control phase separation and physical properties, and shrinkage stress can be reduced. In pursuit of these objectives, the hybrid monomer METHB was polymerized at temperatures ranging from 30°C to 70°C to obtain apparent activation

  13. Cure kinetics of epoxy matrix resin by differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cizmecioglu, M.; Gupta, A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made on the cure kinetics of an epoxy neat-resin (Narmco 5208) using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Two interrelated analytical methods were applied to dynamic DSC data for evaluating the kinetic parameters, such as activation energy, E, the order of reaction, n, and the total heat of polymerization (or crosslinking), delta H sub t. The first method was proposed by Ellerstein (1968), and uses a thorough differential-integral analysis of a single DSC curve to evaluate the kinetic parameters. The second method was proposed by Kissinger (1957), and uses multiple DSC curves obtained at various heating rates to evaluate E regardless of n. Kinetic analysis of Narmco 5208 epoxy resin showed that the reaction order, n, is substantially affected by the rate of heating; i.e., n is approximately 2 at slow scan rates but is reduced to 1.5 at higher scan rates. The activation energy, E, is not affected by the scan rate, and the average value of E is 25.6 + or - 1.8 kcal/mole.

  14. Physical properties of epoxy resin/titanium dioxide nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; More, Karren Leslie

    2011-01-01

    A polymeric nanocomposite system (nanodielectric) was fabricated, and its mechanical properties were determined. The fabricated nanocomposite was composed of low concentrations of monodispersed titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles and an epoxy resin specially designed for cryogenic applications. The monodispersed TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous solution of titanium chloride and polyethylene glycol and subsequently dispersed in a commercial-grade epoxy resin (Araldite{reg_sign} 5808). Nanocomposite thin sheets were prepared at several weight fractions of TiO{sub 2}. The morphology of the composites, determined by transmission electron microscopy, showed that the nanoparticles aggregated to form particle clusters. The influence of thermal processing and the effect of filler dispersion on the structure-property relationships were identified by differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical analysis at a broad range of temperatures. The effect of the aggregates on the electrical insulation properties was determined by dielectric breakdown measurements. The optical properties of the nanocomposites and their potential use as filters in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) range were determined by UV-vis spectroscopy.

  15. Toughening mechanism in elastometer-modified epoxy resins: Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, A. F.; Pearson, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Several plaques of Epon 828, cured with piperidine, modified with hycar(r) CTBN 1300X8, Hycar(R) CTBN 1300X13, and Hycar(R) CTBN 1300x15, and in some cases modified with biphenol A (BPA), yielded properly toughened epoxies with rubber particle diameters ranging from 0.1 to 10 microns. Fracture toughness experiments indicate that toughness was more a function of rubber content than the rubber particle size. Tensile volumetric behavior of the near resin exhibits two regions: an initial region where the increase in volume strain was due to the Poisson's effect, and a second region where a slower rate of increase in volume strain was due to shear deformation. Tensile volumetric deformation of an elastomer-modified epoxy exhibits the same type of behavior to that of the neat resin at low rates ( 3.2x0.01 sec(-1)). But at very high strain rates, which correspond more closely to the strain rates at the crack tip, there exists an increase in volume strain beyond the Poisson's effect. TEM, SEM and OM studies indicate that the rubber particles had voided. When a thin section from the deformed region is viewed under crossed-polarized light, shear bands are seen connecting voided rubber particles. From this information cavitation and enhanced shear band formation is proposed as the toughening mechanism.

  16. Development and characterization of soy-based epoxy resins and pultruded FRP composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang

    This dissertation focuses on the development, manufacture and characterization of novel soy-based epoxy FRP composites. Use of alternative epoxy resin systems derived from a renewable resource holds potential for low cost raw materials for the polymer and composite industries. Epoxidized Allyl Soyate (EAS) and Epoxidized Methyl Soyate (EMS) were developed from soybean oil with two chemical modification procedures: transesterification and epoxidation. This research investigates the curing characteristics and thermal and mechanical properties of the neat soyate resin systems. The derived soyate resins have higher reactivity and superior performance compared to commercially available epoxidized soybean oil. An efficient two-step curing method was developed in order to utilize these soyate resins to their full potential. The epoxy co-resin systems with varied soyate resin content were successfully used to fabricate composite material through pultrusion. The pultrusion resin systems with 30 wt% soyate resins yielded improved, or comparable mechanical properties with neat commercial resins. A finite element analysis of the heat transfer and curing process was performed to study the processing characterization on glass/epoxy composite pultrusion. This model can be used to establish baseline process variables and will benefit subsequent optimization. This research demonstrates that soy-based resins, especially EAS, show considerable promise as an epoxy resin supplement for use in polymer and composite structural applications. The new products derived from soybean oil can provide competitive performance, low cost and environmental advantages.

  17. High Tg and fast curing epoxy-based anisotropic conductive paste for electronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeratitham, Waralee; Somwangthanaroj, Anongnat

    2016-03-01

    Herein, our main objective is to prepare the fast curing epoxy system with high glass transition temperature (Tg) by incorporating the multifunctional epoxy resin into the mixture of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) as a major epoxy component and aromatic diamine as a hardener. Furthermore, the curing behavior as well as thermal and thermomechanical properties were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermomechanical analysis (TMA). It was found that Tg obtained from tan δ of DGEBA/aromatic diamine system increased from 100 °C to 205 °C with the presence of 30 percentage by weight of multifunctional epoxy resin. Additionally, the isothermal DSC results showed that the multifunctional epoxy resin can accelerate the curing reaction of DGEBA/aromatic diamine system. Namely, a high degree of curing (˜90%) was achieved after a few minutes of curing at low temperature of 130 °C, owing to a large number of epoxy ring of multifunctional epoxy resin towards the active hydrogen atoms of aromatic diamine.

  18. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  19. Effect of matrix resin on the impact fracture characteristics of graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertzberg, P. E.; Smith, B. W.; Miller, A. G.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of resin chemistry on basic impact energy absorbent mechanisms exibited by graphite-epoxy composites was investigated. Impact fracture modes and microscopic resin deformation characteristics were examined for 26 NASA-impacted graphite epoxy laminates with different resin chemistries. Discrete specimen fracture modes were identified through cross sectional examination after impact, and subsequently compared with measured glass transition temperatures, cure cycles, and residual impact capabilities. Microscopic resin deformation mechanisms and their overall relationship to impact loading conditions, voids, and resin content were also characterized through scanning electron microscopic examination of separated fracture surfaces.

  20. Synthesis and properties of transparent cycloaliphatic epoxy-silicone resins for opto-electronic devices packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Nan; Liu, WeiQu; Yan, ZhenLong; Wang, ZhengFang

    2013-01-01

    Cycloaliphatic epoxy-silicone resins were successfully synthesized through a two-step reaction route: (і) hydrosilylation of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (TMCTS) and 1,2-epoxy-4-vinyl-cyclohexane (VCMX), (іі) blocking of unreacted Sisbnd H in (і) with n-butanol. The molecular structures of the cycloaliphatic epoxy-silicone resins were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR and 29Si NMR). High grafting efficiencies of epoxy groups were confirmed by 1H NMR combined with weighting results, indicating over 90 mol% of cycloaliphatic epoxy were grafted on the silicone resins. Subsequently, Sisbnd H groups from TMCTS were almost totally consumed after the blocking reactions. In comparison with commercial available cycloaliphatic epoxy resin 3,4-epoxycyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ERL-4221) cured by MHHPA, the cured cycloaliphatic epoxy-silicone resins exhibited better thermal stability, lower water absorption and higher UV/thermal resistance. Moreover, the characteristics of transmittance (>90%, 800 nm), 5 wt.% mass loss temperature (>330 °C) and no yellowing during thermal aging at 120 °C or UV aging for 288 h of the cured cycloaliphatic epoxy-silicone resins, made them possible for power light-emitting diode (LED) encapsulants, or other packaging materials, like optical lenses, and electronic sealings.

  1. Photoinitiation study of Irgacure 784 in an epoxy resin photopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Sabol, Dusan; Gleeson, Michael R.; Liu, Shui; Sheridan, John T.

    2010-03-15

    A deeper understanding of the processes, which occur during free radical photopolymerization, is necessary in order to develop a fully comprehensive model, which represents their behavior during exposure. One of these processes is photoinitiation, whereby a photon is absorbed by a photosensitizer producing free radicals, which can initiate polymerization. These free radicals can also participate in polymer chain termination (primary termination), and it is therefore necessary to understand their generation in order to predict the temporally varying kinetic effects present during holographic grating formation. In this paper, a study of the photoinitiation mechanisms of Irgacure 784 photosensitizer, in an epoxy resin matrix, is presented. We report our experimental results and present a theoretical model to predict the physically observed behavior.

  2. The Electrical Properties for Phenolic Isocyanate-Modified Bisphenol-Based Epoxy Resins Comprising Benzoate Group.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Yong; Chae, Il Seok; Park, Dongkyung; Suh, Hongsuk; Kang, Sang Wook

    2016-03-01

    Epoxy resin has been required to have a low dielectric constant (D(k)), low dissipation factor (Df), low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), low water absorption, high mechanical, and high adhesion properties for various applications. A series of novel phenolic isocyanate-modified bisphenol-based epoxy resins comprising benzoate group were prepared for practical electronic packaging applications. The developed epoxy resins showed highly reduced dielectric constants (D(k)-3.00 at 1 GHz) and low dissipation values (Df-0.014 at 1 GHz) as well as enhanced thermal properties. PMID:27455751

  3. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4â²-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES...

  4. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4â²-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES...

  5. Analysis of Molding Process for Epoxy Resin Used for Electrical Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushizaki, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Toshiro

    2007-05-01

    Epoxy resin has been used widely in electronic devices because of its excellent electrical properties for insulators. The curing process of epoxy resin has serious issues such as delamination on the metal-epoxy resin interface and the crack failure in epoxy resin due to cure shrinkage. It is known that there are serious issues of the delamination on the metal-epoxy resin interface and the crack failure in epoxy resin due to cure shrinkage when epoxy resin is used as an encapsulating medium of insulators in electrical and electronic equipments. Though several papers have been reported on the attempts to predict the stress-strain behavior during curing reaction except for our reports, their simulation model are proposed in no consideration of all of cure shrinkage, heat generation in reaction, reaction progress, delamination and crack failure. Especially, the authors cannot find reports on a practical multistage curing reaction process cure shrinkage, heat generation in reaction, reaction progress, delamination and crack failure. Especially, the authors cannot find reports on a practical multistage curing reaction process in consideration of all of cure shrinkage, heat generation in reaction, reaction progress, delamination and crack failure. In this paper the authors attempted simulation with a finite element method for the following molding process suitable for practical use from the start of potting to the completion of curing. Epoxy resin is potted between the inner and outer iron cylinders. The potted epoxy resin is cured under a lower given temperature before gel point and afterwards under a higher temperature after gel point. Finally, the cured epoxy resin is cooled down to a room temperature. In order to express the deformation behavior of epoxy resin in the molding process where it changes from the liquid state to solid state, the equation of cure reaction has been corrected and the dependence of viscoelastic properties on temperature, time and conversion

  6. Properties of two composite materials made of toughened epoxy resin and high-strain graphite fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Marvin B.; Smith, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental evaluation of IM7/8551-7 and IM6/18081, two new toughened epoxy resin, high strain graphite fiber composite materials. Data include ply-level strengths and moduli, notched tension and compression strengths and compression-after-impact assessments. The measured properties are compared with those of other graphite-epoxy materials.

  7. Volume shrinkage and rheological studies of epoxidised and unepoxidised poly(styrene-block-butadiene-block-styrene) triblock copolymer modified epoxy resin-diamino diphenyl methane nanostructured blend systems.

    PubMed

    George, Sajeev Martin; Puglia, Debora; Kenny, Josè M; Parameswaranpillai, Jyotishkumar; Vijayan P, Poornima; Pionteck, Jűrgen; Thomas, Sabu

    2015-05-21

    Styrene-block-butadiene-block-styrene (SBS) copolymers epoxidised at different epoxidation degrees were used as modifiers for diglycidyl ether of the bisphenol A-diamino diphenyl methane (DGEBA-DDM) system. Epoxy systems containing modified epoxidised styrene-block-butadiene-block-styrene (eSBS) triblock copolymer with compositions ranging from 0 to 30 wt% were prepared and the curing reaction was monitored in situ using rheometry and pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) analysis. By controlling the mole percent of epoxidation, we could generate vesicles, worm-like micelles and core-shell nanodomains. At the highest mole percent of epoxidation, the fraction of the epoxy miscible component in the triblock copolymer (epoxidised polybutadiene (PB)) was maximum. This gave rise to core-shell nanodomains having a size of 10-15 nm, in which the incompatible polystyrene (PS) becomes the core, the unepoxidised PB becomes the shell and the epoxidised PB interpenetrates with the epoxy phase. On the other hand, the low level of epoxidation gave rise to bigger domains having a size of ∼1 μm and the intermediate epoxidation level resulted in a worm-like structure. This investigation specifically focused on the importance of cure rheology on nanostructure formation, using rheometry. The reaction induced phase separation of the PS phase in the epoxy matrix was carefully explored through rheological measurements. PVT measurements during curing were carried out to understand the volume shrinkage of the blend, confirming that shrinkage behaviour is related to the block copolymer phase separation process during curing. The volume shrinkage was found to be maximum in the case of blends with unmodified SBS, where a heterogeneous morphology was observed, while a decrease in the shrinkage was evidenced in the case of SBS epoxidation. It could be explained by two effects: (1) solubility of the epoxidised block copolymer in the DGEBA leads to the formation of nanoscopic domains upon

  8. Thermal and Mechanical Characteristics of Polymer Composites Based on Epoxy Resin, Aluminium Nanopowders and Boric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, O. B.; Melnikova, T. V.; Visakh, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The epoxy polymers are characterized by low thermal stability and high flammability. Nanoparticles are considered to be effective fillers of polymer composites for improving their thermal and functional properties. In this work, the epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, polyethylene polyamine as a hardener, aluminum nanopowder and boric acid fine powder as flame-retardant filler. The thermal characteristics of the obtained samples were studied using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The mechanical characteristics of epoxy composites were also studied. It was found that an addition of all fillers enhances the thermal stability and mechanical characteristics of the epoxy composites. The best thermal stability showed the epoxy composite filled with boric acid. The highest flexural properties showed the epoxy composite based on the combination of boric acid and aluminum nanopowder.

  9. Partial discharges within two spherical voids in an epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illias, H. A.; Chen, G.; Bakar, A. H. A.; Mokhlis, H.; Tunio, M. A.

    2013-08-01

    A void in a dielectric insulation material may exist due to imperfection in the insulation manufacturing or long term stressing. Voids have been identified as one of the common sources of partial discharge (PD) activity within an insulation system, such as in cable insulation and power transformers. Therefore, it is important to study PD phenomenon within void cavities in insulation. In this work, a model of PD activity within two spherical voids in a homogeneous dielectric material has been developed using finite element analysis software to study the parameters affecting PD behaviour. The parameters that have been taken into account are the void surface conductivity, electron generation rate and the inception and extinction fields. Measurements of PD activity within two spherical voids in an epoxy resin under ac sinusoidal applied voltage have also been performed. The simulation results have been compared with the measurement data to validate the model and to identify the parameters affecting PD behaviour. Comparison between measurements of PD activity within single and two voids in a dielectric material have also been made to observe the difference of the results under both conditions.

  10. Hierarchical 3D microstructures from pyrolysis of epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Volder, Michael; Reynaerts, Dominiek; van Hoof, Chris; Hart, A. John

    2012-02-01

    Nature is replete with examples of microscale dendrites connected to tree-like backbones ranging from the overall structures of trees to vascular networks. These branched structures have emerged as a result of an optimization between the maximization of a surface area and the minimization of transport losses. Elucidating these sophisticated designs proposed by nature is of paramount importance for the creation of higher-efficiency materials. The fabrication of such structures is however particularly challenging at small scale. In this paper, we focus on amorphous carbon microstructures, which provide a wide electrochemical stability window, excellent bio-compatibility, and cost-effective fabrication. However, relatively few methods have been developed for the fabrication of hierarchical amorphous carbon microstructures.Here we show that novel anisotropic microarchitectures comprising vertically aligned amorphous carbon nanowires CNWs can be made by oxygen plasma treatment of epoxy resins, followed by pyrolysis. Interestingly, these structures can also be shaped into deterministic three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical structures where nanowires are anchored to a microsized solid carbon core. These structures could play a key role in the development of new electrodes for microsensors, bioprobes, batteries, and fuel cells.

  11. An evaluation of epoxy resin phantom materials for electron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisbet, A.; Thwaites, D. I.

    1998-06-01

    The use of epoxy resin `solid water' (water substitute) phantoms is becoming increasingly common in radiotherapy dosimetry, and depth ionization curves and conversion factors from ionization to dose identical to water have often been assumed. Fluence ratios of water to solid water for WTe (produced by Radiation Physics, St Bartholomew's Hospital, London) and RMI 457 (produced by Radiation Measurements Inc., Middleton, Wisconsin) have therefore been determined and have been found to decrease with energy, which, within measurement uncertainty, can be described with a linear function dependent on mean electron beam energy at the depth of measurement, . The fluence ratios for WTe are very close to unity (i.e. within the measuring uncertainty) for most of the energies examined, the exception being a nominal 20 MeV beam. The results also show that an assumption of unity for the fluence ratios of RMI 457 may introduce a systematic error of the order of 1% in electron beam dosimetry at lower energies. As regards the depth ionization curves measured in the respective solid water materials, these are shown to be in agreement with those measured in water within the limits of the measuring uncertainty.

  12. The quantification and characterization of endocrine disruptor bisphenol-A leaching from epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Bae, B; Jeong, J H; Lee, S J

    2002-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA), a known endocrine disruptor, is a main building block of epoxy resin which has been widely used as a surface coating agent on residential water storage tanks. Therefore, BPA leaching from the epoxy resin can adversely affect human health. In this study, BPA leaching from three epoxy resins were quantified at 20, 50, 75 and 100 degrees C both in deionized water and the specified test water, respectively. BPA leached to the test water was identified using GC-MS and quantified with GC-FID after a sequential extraction and concentration. The results showed that BPA leaching has occurred in all three samples tested. The quantity of BPA from unit area of epoxy resin coating was in the range of 01.68-273. 12 microg/m2 for sample A, 29.74-1734.05 microg/m2 for sample B and 52.86-548.78 microg/m2 for sample C depending on the test temperature, respectively. In general, the amount of BPA leashing increased as the water temperature increases. This result implies a higher risk of BPA leaching to drinking water during a summer season. In addition, microbial growth, measured by colony forming units, in epoxy coated water tanks was higher than that in a stainless steel tank. The results suggest that compounds leaching from epoxy resin may support the growth of microorganisms in a residential water holding tank. PMID:12523782

  13. Epoxy resin synthesis using low molecular weight lignin separated from various lignocellulosic materials.

    PubMed

    Asada, Chikako; Basnet, Sunita; Otsuka, Masaya; Sasaki, Chizuru; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    2015-03-01

    A low molecular weight lignin from various lignocellulosic materials was used for the synthesis of bio-based epoxy resins. The lignin extracted with methanol from steam-exploded samples (steaming time of 5 min at steam pressure of 3.5 MPa) from different biomasses (i.e., cedar, eucalyptus, and bamboo) were functionalized by the reaction with epichlorohydrin, catalyzed by a water-soluble phase transfer catalyst tetramethylammonium chloride, which was further reacted with 30 wt% aqueous NaOH for ring closure using methyl ethyl ketone as a solvent. The glycidylated products of the lignin with good yields were cured to epoxy polymer networks with bio-based curing agents i.e., lignin itself and a commercial curing agent TD2131. Relatively good thermal properties of the bio-based epoxy network was obtained and thermal decomposition temperature at 5% weight loss (Td5) of cedar-derived epoxy resin was higher than that derived from eucalyptus and bamboo. The bio-based resin satisfies the stability requirement of epoxy resin applicable for electric circuit boards. The methanol-insoluble residues were enzymatically hydrolyzed to produce glucose. This study indicated that the biomass-derived methanol-soluble lignin may be a promising candidate to be used as a substitute for petroleum-based epoxy resin derived from bisphenol A, while insoluble residues may be processed to give a bioethanol precursor i.e., glucose. PMID:25572718

  14. Effects of Hygrothermal Cycling on the Chemical, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties of 862/W Epoxy Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Roberts, Gary D.; Copa, Christine C.; Bail, Justin L.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    2011-01-01

    The hygrothermal aging characteristics of an epoxy resin were characterized over 1 year, which included 908 temperature and humidity cycles. The epoxy resin quickly showed evidence of aging through color change and increased brittleness. The influence of aging on the material s glass transition temperature (Tg) was evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). The Tg remained relatively constant throughout the year long cyclic aging profile. The chemical composition was monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) where evidence of chemical aging and advancement of cure was noted. The tensile strength of the resin was tested as it aged. This property was severely affected by the aging process in the form of reduced ductility and embrittlement. Detailed chemical evaluation suggests many aging mechanisms are taking place during exposure to hygrothermal conditions. This paper details the influence of processes such as: advancement of cure, chemical degradation, and physical aging on the chemical and physical properties of the epoxy resin.

  15. Toughening epoxy resin with poly(methyl methacrylate)-grafted natural rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Rezaifard, A.H.; Hodd, K.A.; Barton, J.M.

    1993-12-31

    A novel rubber, poly(methyl methacrylate)-g-natural rubber (Hevea-plus MG), has been studied as a toughening agent for bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (Shell 828 epoxy resin) cured with piperidine. Effective dispersions of the rubber, in concentrations of 2-10 parts per hundred parts resin, were achieved by adjusting the solubility parameter of the epoxy to approximate that of poly(methyl methacrylate) by adding bisphenol A. The fracture energy of the rubber-modified resin was determined by compact tension tests (in the temperature range -60 to +40{degrees}C) and by Charpy impact tests. The poly(methyl methacrylate)-g-natural rubber was found to be an effective toughening agent for the epoxy resin at both low and high rates of strain. Possible fracture mechanisms are discussed. 22 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Thermosetting epoxy resin/thermoplastic system with combined shape memory and self-healing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yongtao; Wang, Jingjie; Lu, Haibao; Xu, Ben; Fu, Yongqing; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    A novel and facile strategy was proposed to construct a thermosetting/thermoplastic system with both shape memory and self-healing properties based on commercial epoxy resin and poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-PCL. Thermoplastic material is capable of re-structuring and changing the stiffness/modulus when the temperature is above melting temperature. PCL microfiber was used as a plasticizer in epoxy resin-based blends, and served as a ‘hard segment’ to fix a temporary shape of the composites during shape memory cycles. In this study, the electrospun PCL membrane with a porous network structure enabled a homogenous PCL fibrous distribution and optimized interaction between fiber and epoxy resin. The self-healing capability is achieved by phase transition during curing of the composites. The mechanism of the shape memory effect of the thermosetting (rubber)/thermoplastic composite is attributed to the structural design of the thermoplastic network inside the thermosetting resin/rubber matrix.

  17. Molecular dynamics study on the tensile deformation of cross-linking epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Xin, Dong R; Han, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Various epoxy resins are used in the electronic industry as encapsulants, adhesive, printed wiring boards, electronic packagings, and so on. In this study, molecular dynamics method is employed to simulate the tensile deformation of the typical electronic epoxy resin. An efficient cross-linking procedure is developed to build the molecular model. Based on the cross-linking algorithm, the effects of moisture content, cross-linking conversion, strain rate, and temperature on the mechanical properties of epoxy resins are investigated. The stress-strain curves are plotted. Also the Young's modulus and Poisson ratio are calculated. The simulation results are compared with existing experimental data. Good agreements are observed. The results show that mechanical properties of epoxy resin decrease obviously with increasing moisture content and temperature. However the high cross-linking conversion and strain rate enhance the mechanical properties of resin. This study is significant to understanding the mechanical properties of cross-linking epoxies in high temperature and high humidity. PMID:25605604

  18. Influence of thermo-oxidation on dielectric and mechanical properties of epoxy/amine resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernault, Estève; Richaud, Emmanuel; Fayolle, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    This objective of this work is to compare the changes of electrical and mechanical properties during thermo-oxidation of epoxy, in order to improve the choice of end life criterion. The thermal oxidation of DGEBA totally cured with linear aliphatic hardener is investigated under several temperature and oxygen pressure. Chemical changes are followed thanks to infra-red spectroscopy, macromolecular changes thanks to differential scanning calorimetry (changes of Tg). During thermo-oxidation at 110°C in air, volume resistivity and tensile properties in terms of modulus and deformation at break changes are assessed. The results show a formation of polar groups corresponding to oxidation products and a decrease of molecular mobility associated to a crosslinking process. Furthermore, it appears that the oxidation process leads to an embrittlement process whereas electrical properties are not significantly modified.

  19. Shrinkage of polyurethane molecular stamp fixed on epoxy resin modified glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengchun; He, Quanguo; Xiao, Pengfeng; Tang, Jianxin; He, Nongyue; Lu, Zuhong

    2003-01-01

    The shrinkage of polyurethane stamps used for the in situ synthesis of DNA microarrays via molecular stamping method was studied with Micron XYZ Scope. It was found that the polyurethane stamp fixed on the epoxy resin modified glass strongly and showed minimum linear shrinkage. The linear shrinkage of the whole polyurethane stamp and that of each feature of polyurethane stamp were controlled within 0.0341% and 0.309%, respectively, which were due to the strong van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds between polyurethane and epoxy resin. It was also confirmed by scanning electron microscope that the polyurethane stamp fixed on the epoxy resin modified glass replicated the patterns of motherboard with a high fidelity. All these underlay the synthesis of DNA microarray through molecular stamping method.

  20. 40 CFR 721.10209 - Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin (generic). 721.10209 Section 721.10209 Protection... Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin (generic... identified generically as epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10209 - Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin (generic). 721.10209 Section 721.10209 Protection... Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin (generic... identified generically as epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10209 - Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin (generic). 721.10209 Section 721.10209 Protection... Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin (generic... identified generically as epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10209 - Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin (generic). 721.10209 Section 721.10209 Protection... Epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of phenol-formaldehyde resin (generic... identified generically as epoxy terminated, hydrolyzed trialkoxysilane and glycidyl ether of...

  4. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  5. Development of silane grafted ZnO core shell nanoparticles loaded diglycidyl epoxy nanocomposites film for antimicrobial applications.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Saravanan, P; Jayamoorthy, K; Ananda Kumar, S; Karthikeyan, S

    2016-07-01

    In this article a series of epoxy nanocomposites film were developed using amine functionalized (ZnO-APTES) core shell nanoparticles as the dispersed phase and a commercially available epoxy resin as the matrix phase. The functional group of the samples was characterized using FT-IR spectra. The most prominent peaks of epoxy resin were found in bare epoxy and in all the functionalized ZnO dispersed epoxy nanocomposites (ZnO-APTES-DGEBA). The XRD analysis of all the samples exhibits considerable shift in 2θ, intensity and d-spacing values but the best and optimum concentration is found to be 3% ZnO-APTES core shell nanoparticles loaded epoxy nanocomposites supported by FT-IR results. From TGA measurements, 100wt% residue is obtained in bare ZnO nanoparticles whereas in ZnO core shell nanoparticles grafted DGEBA residue percentages are 37, 41, 45, 46 and 52% for 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7% ZnO-APTES-DGEBA respectively, which is confirmed with ICP-OES analysis. From antimicrobial activity test, it was notable that antimicrobial activity of 7% ZnO-APTES core shell nanoparticles loaded epoxy nanocomposite film has best inhibition zone effect against all pathogens under study. PMID:27127055

  6. DGEBF epoxy blends for use in the resin impregnation of extremely large composite parts

    SciTech Connect

    Madhukar, M. S.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-01-16

    Large superconducting electromagnets used in fusion reactors utilize a large amount of glass/epoxy composite for electrical insulation and mechanical and thermal strengths. Moreover, the manufacture of these magnets involves wrapping each superconducting cable bundle with dry glass cloth followed by the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding of the entire magnet. Due to their enormous size (more than 100 tons), it requires more than 40 h for resin impregnation and the subsequent pressure cycles to ensure complete impregnation and removal of any trapped air pockets. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F epoxy resin cross-linked with methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride with an accelerator has been shown to be a good candidate for use in composite parts requiring long impregnation cycles. Viscosity, gel time, and glass transition temperature of four resin-blends of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F resin system were monitored as a function of time and temperature with an objective to find the blend that provides a working window longer than 40h at low viscosity without lowering its glass transition temperature. A resin-blend in the weight ratios of resin:hardener:accelerator=100:82:0.125 is shown to provide more than 60h at low resin viscosity while maintaining the same glass transition temperature as obtained with previously used resin-blends, based on the results.

  7. DGEBF epoxy blends for use in the resin impregnation of extremely large composite parts

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Madhukar, M. S.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-01-16

    Large superconducting electromagnets used in fusion reactors utilize a large amount of glass/epoxy composite for electrical insulation and mechanical and thermal strengths. Moreover, the manufacture of these magnets involves wrapping each superconducting cable bundle with dry glass cloth followed by the vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding of the entire magnet. Due to their enormous size (more than 100 tons), it requires more than 40 h for resin impregnation and the subsequent pressure cycles to ensure complete impregnation and removal of any trapped air pockets. Diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F epoxy resin cross-linked with methyltetrahydrophthalic anhydride with an accelerator has been shownmore » to be a good candidate for use in composite parts requiring long impregnation cycles. Viscosity, gel time, and glass transition temperature of four resin-blends of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F resin system were monitored as a function of time and temperature with an objective to find the blend that provides a working window longer than 40h at low viscosity without lowering its glass transition temperature. A resin-blend in the weight ratios of resin:hardener:accelerator=100:82:0.125 is shown to provide more than 60h at low resin viscosity while maintaining the same glass transition temperature as obtained with previously used resin-blends, based on the results.« less

  8. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, J.A.; Newey, H.A.

    Primary diamines are prepared for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and preimpregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses a room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  9. Free volume hole size of Cyanate ester resin/Epoxy resin interpenetrating networks and its correlations with physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Minfeng; Lu, Cuiyun; Wang, Baoyi; Qi, Chenze

    2010-09-01

    Cyanate ester (CE) resin was blended with epoxy resin (EP) at different mass ratios (CE/EP: 100/0, 90/10, 70/30, 50/50, 30/70, 10/90, and 0/100). The curing process of the blend system was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Examination of the mechanical properties, thermal stability, and morphology of the blend systems showed that addition of epoxy resin resulted in improved toughness but a little sacrifice in thermal stability when compared with neat CE. The free volume size of the blend system determined by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) decreased with the epoxy resin content, which is consistent with the chemical structure changes for the copolymerization between CE and EP. The crosslinking units of curing products (oxazoline, oxazolidinone, and polyether network) of the blends are all smaller in size than those of triazine ring structure from neat CE. Therefore, the free volume size of the blends decreases with increase of EP content. The correlations between the free volume properties and other physical properties (thermal stability and mechanical properties) have also been discussed.

  10. A positron annihilation study on the microstructure of the interpenetration polymer networks of cyanate ester resin/epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenze, Qi; Chunqing, Li; Minfeng, Zeng; Baoyi, Wang; Jian, Zhang

    2010-04-01

    Cyanate ester (CE) resin was blended with epoxy resin (EP) at different mass ratios (CE/EP: 100/0, 90/10, 70/30, 50/50, 30/70, 10/90, 0/100). The free volume size of CE/EP IPNs has been determined by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). The size decreased as the epoxy resin content increased. The PALS results are consistent with the chemical structure changes for the copolymerizing between CE and EP. The crosslinking units of curing products (oxazoline, oxazolidinone, and polyether network) of the blends are all smaller in size than those of triazine ring structure from neat CE. Therefore, the free volume size of the blends decreases with increase of EP content. Examination of the mechanical properties, thermal stability, and morphology of the blend systems showed that addition of epoxy resin resulted in improved toughness but a little sacrifice in thermal stability when compared with pure CE. The correlations between the free volume properties and physical properties (thermal stability and mechanical properties) have been discussed.

  11. Effect of network structure on thermal and mechanical properties of cured epoxy resin containing mesogenic group

    SciTech Connect

    Ochi, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Tsuyuno, N.

    1996-10-01

    Epoxy resin containing biphenol group as a mesogenic group was cured with phenol (PN) and catechol (CN) novolacs. In the CN-cured biphenol type epoxy resin, the glass-rubber transition, almost disappeared and thus the very high elastic modulus was obtained in the high temperature region. It is clear that the micro-Brownian motion of the network chains is highly suppressed in this cured system. On the other hand, the PN-cured resin showed the well-defined glass-rubber transition and thus the low rubbery modulus. In addition, in the former system, the characteristic pattern like a schlieren texture was clearly observed in the polarized optical microphotographs. This shows that the mesogenic group contained in the epoxy molecule is oriented in the system cued with catechol novolac, which has neighboring active hydrogens. The computer simulation based on the molecular mechanics also showed that the orientation of the network chains should occur in the CN-cured biphenol epoxy system. Thus, we conclude that the suppression of the micro-Brownian motion in the CN-cured system is due to the orientation of network chains containing a mesogenic group. Moreover, it has been shown that die mechanical and bonding strength at high temperature is considerably improved by the suppression of the network chain in the CN-cured biphenol resin system.

  12. Synthesis and application of polyepoxide cardanol glycidyl ether as biobased polyepoxide reactive diluent for epoxy resin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyepoxide cardanol glycidyl ether (PECGE), a novel cardanol derivative, was synthesized and used as reactive diluent for petroleum-based epoxy resin in this work. The synthetic condition was first optimized, and the resultant PECGE diluent was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectro...

  13. Occupational sensitization to epoxy resins in Northeastern Italy (1996–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Prodi, Andrea; Rui, Francesca; Fortina, Anna Belloni; Corradin, Maria Teresa; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the main health concerns of epoxy resins is their role as skin sensitizer. This sensitization is not uncommon, because the prevalence ranges around 1–12% of the general population. Objectives: Perform a cross sectional study in a patch test population from Northeastern Italy to investigate the prevalence of epoxy resins sensitization among patients with suspected contact dermatitis. Subsequently, relate findings to patients’ occupation and evaluate time trend of prevalence. Methods: The final study database included 19 088 consecutive patients, tested from 1996 to 2010 in Northeastern Italy. Results: The overall prevalence of epoxy resins sensitization was 0·89%. Dermatitis most frequently involved hands (40·25%). In both sexes, we find a significant correlation in mechanics, woodworkers, and chemical industry workers; and in males only, among farmers and fishers, construction workers, and unemployed. We found significant increase of sensitization in construction workers in the analyzed period. Conclusions: The overall prevalence of sensitization to epoxy resins in Northeastern Italy is in line with other European countries, but we found an increased risk of sensitization in some professions and an increasing trend of prevalence in construction workers. Better preventive actions are strongly advised in higher risk professions, with particular attentions towards building sector. PMID:25633931

  14. γ-Ray irradiation stability and damage mechanism of glycidyl amine epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Feiyu; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yujian; Fang, Jun; Luan, Weilin

    2016-09-01

    Irradiation stability of triglycidyl-p-aminophenol (TGPAP) epoxy resins was evaluated according to the changes of physico-chemical and mechanical properties under 60Co γ-ray irradiation with a dose rate of 10 kGy/h. The result shows that with the increase of radiation dose, bending strength, thermal stability, free radical concentration and storage modulus of epoxy resin decrease first, then increase slightly, and decline sharply at the end with a dose of 960 kGy, due to competition effects between radiation-induced degradation and cross-linking reaction. The damage mechanism was derived by analyzing structure and composition change of AFG-90 resins after irradiation via IR and XPS. Irradiation will result in weak bond breaking such as Csbnd C and Csbnd N bond, and new bond forming like Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O.

  15. The effect of resin on the impact damage tolerance of graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Rhodes, M. D.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of the matrix resin on the impact damage tolerance of graphite-epoxy composite laminates was investigated. The materials were evaluated on the basis of the damage incurred due to local impact and on their ability to retain compression strength in the presence of impact damage. Twenty-four different resin systems were evaluated. Five of the systems demonstrated substantial improvements compared to the baseline system including retention of compression strength in the presence of impact damage. Examination of the neat resin mechanical properties indicates the resin tensile properties influence significantly the laminate damage tolerance and that improvements in laminate damage tolerance are not necessarily made at the expense of room temperature mechanical properties. Preliminary results indicate a resin volume fraction on the order of 40 percent or greater may be required to permit the plastic flow between fibers necessary for improved damage tolerance.

  16. Green Preparation of Epoxy/Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites Using a Glycidylamine Epoxy Resin as the Surface Modifier and Phase Transfer Agent of Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xinlei; Zhou, Yang; Peng, Mao

    2016-01-27

    In studies of epoxy/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites, organic solvents are commonly used to disperse GO, and vigorous mechanical processes and complicated modification of GO are usually required, increasing the cost and hindering the development and application of epoxy nanocomposites. Here, we report a green, facile, and efficient method of preparing epoxy/GO nanocomposites. When triglycidyl para-aminophenol (TGPAP), a commercially available glycidyl amine epoxy resin with one tertiary amine group per molecule, is used as both the surface modifier and phase transfer agent of GO, GO can be directly and rapidly transferred from water to diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A and other types of epoxy resins by manual stirring under ambient conditions, whereas GO cannot be transferred to these epoxy resins in the absence of TGPAP. The interaction between TGPAP and GO and the effect of the TGPAP content on the dispersion of GO in the epoxy matrix were investigated systematically. Superior dispersion and exfoliation of GO nanosheets and remarkably improved mechanical properties, including tensile and flexural properties, toughness, storage modulus, and microhardness, of the epoxy/GO nanocomposites with a suitable amount of TGPAP were demonstrated. This method is organic-solvent-free and technically feasible for large-scale preparation of high-performance nanocomposites; it opens up new opportunities for exploiting the unique properties of graphene or even other nanofillers for a wide range of applications. PMID:26720708

  17. Properties of Two Carbon Composite Materials Using LTM25 Epoxy Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.; Shah, C. H.; Postyn, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, the properties of two carbon-epoxy prepreg materials are presented. The epoxy resin used in these two materials can yield lower manufacturing costs due to its low initial cure temperature, and the capability of being cured using vacuum pressure only. The two materials selected for this study are MR50/LTM25, and CFS003/LTM25 with Amoco T300 fiber; both prepregs are manufactured by The Advanced Composites Group. MR50/LTM25 is a unidirectional prepreg tape using Mitsubishi MR50 carbon fiber impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. CRS003/LTM25 is a 2 by 2 twill fabric using Amoco T300 fiber and impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. Among the properties presented in this report are strength, stiffness, bolt bearing, and damage tolerance. Many of these properties were obtained at three environmental conditions: cold temperature/dry (CTD), room temperature/dry (RTD), and elevated temperature/wet (ETW). A few properties were obtained at room temperature/wet (RTW), and elevated temperature/dry (ETD). The cold and elevated temperatures used for testing were -125 F and 180 F, respectively. In addition, several properties related to processing are presented.

  18. Chronic Dermal Toxicity of Epoxy Resins I. Skin Carcinogenic Potency and General Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, J.M.

    2001-01-16

    Epoxy resins are a diverse class of chemicals that differ in structure, physical properties, and, presumably, biological activity. The purpose of these experiments was to compare the chronic dermal toxicity and carcinogenicity of selected commercial epoxy resins and to determine the potential for positive synergistic carcinogenic interactions between different resins. This work is an extension and continuation of a Department of Energy sponsored program to evaluate epoxy resins for potential occupational health risks. The materials examined were chosen on the basis of their interest to the U.S. government. They are representative of the manufacturer's production at the time, and therefore the data are completely valid only for the specific production period. Results of the experimental exposures will be reported in two parts. This report describes the test materials, their chemical and physical characteristics and the experimental design. General (systemic) toxicity will be evaluated and the skin carcinogenicity of the materials compared. A subsequent report will provide morphological descriptions of skin and significant internal pathology induced by the various treatments.

  19. Thermosetting polymer for dynamic nuclear polarization: Solidification of an epoxy resin mixture including TEMPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Yohei; Kumada, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Shamoto, Shin-ichi

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of typical thermosetting polymers (two-component type epoxy resins; Araldite® Standard or Araldite® Rapid) doped with a (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-yl)oxy (TEMPO) radical. The doping process was developed by carefully considering the decomposition of TEMPO during the solidification of the epoxy resin. The TEMPO electron spin in each two-component paste decayed slowly, which was favorable for our study. Furthermore, despite the dissolved TEMPO, the mixture of the two-component paste successfully solidified. With the resulting TEMPO-doped epoxy-resin samples, DNP experiments at 1.2 K and 3.35 T indicated a magnitude of a proton-spin polarization up to 39%. This polarization is similar to that (35%) obtained for TEMPO-doped polystyrene (PS), which is often used as a standard sample for DNP. To combine this solidification of TEMPO-including mixture with a resin-casting technique enables a creation of polymeric target materials with a precise and complex structure.

  20. Curing agent for polyepoxides and epoxy resins and composites cured therewith. [preventing carbon fiber release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A curing for a polyepoxide is described which contains a divalent aryl radical such as phenylene a tetravalent aryl radical such as a tetravalent benzene radical. An epoxide is cured by admixture with the curing agent. The cured epoxy product retains the usual properties of cured epoxides and, in addition, has a higher char residue after burning, on the order of 45% by weight. The higher char residue is of value in preventing release to the atmosphere of carbon fibers from carbon fiber-epoxy resin composites in the event of burning of the composite.

  1. Method of neutralizing the corrosive surface of amine-cured epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. Y. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    The corrosive alkaline surface layer of an epoxy resin product formed by the curing of the epoxy with an aliphatic amine is eliminated by first applying a non-solvent to remove most or all of the free unreacted amine and then applying a layer of a chemical reagent to neutralize the unused amine or amine functional groups by forming a substituted urea. The surface then may be rinsed with acetone and then with alcohol. The non-solvent may be an alcohol. The neutralizing chemical reagent is a mono-isocyanate or a mono-isothiocyanate. Preferred is an aromatic mono-isocyanate such as phenyl isocyanate, nitrophenyl isocyanate and naplthyl isocyanate.

  2. Electrical properties of epoxy resin based nano-composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Aytug, Tolga; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; More, Karren Leslie; Li, Jing; Goyal, Amit

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the electrical properties of composite materials prepared as nano and sub-micro scale metal-oxide particles embedded in a commercial resin. The filler particles are barium titanate and calcium copper titanate. The physical and structural characteristics of constituents and the fabricated composites are reported. The electrical characterization of the composite samples are performed with the time- and frequency-domain dielectric spectroscopy techniques. The electrical breakdown strength of samples with nano and sub-micron size particles have better electrical insulation properties than the unfilled resin.

  3. Fluorinated epoxy resins with high glass transition temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Easily processed liquid resins of low dielectric constants and high glass transition temperatures are useful for the manufacture of certain composite electronic boards. That combination of properties is difficult to acquire when dielectric constants are below 2.5, glass transition temperatures are above 200 C and processability is of conventional practicality. A recently issued patent (US 4,981,941 of 1 Jan. 1991) teaches practical materials and is the culmination of 23 years of research and effort and 15 patents owned by the Navy in the field of fluorinated resins of several classes. In addition to high fluorine content, practical utility was emphasized.

  4. Curing of epoxy resins with 1-DI(2-chloroethoxyphosphinyl) methyl-2,4 and -2,6-diaminobenzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikroyannidis, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Fire resistant compositions were prepared using 1-di(2-chloroethoxy-phosphinyl)methyl-2,4- and -2,6-diaminobenzene (DCEPD) as a curing agent for typical epoxy resins such as EPON 828 (Shell), XD 7342 (Dow), and My 720 (Ciba Geigy). In addition, compositions of these three epoxy resins with common curing agents such as m-phenylenediamine (MPD) or 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulphone (DDS) were studied to compare their reactions with those of DCEPD. The reactivity of the three curing agents toward the epoxy resins, measured by differential calorimetry (DSC), was of the order MPD DCEPD DDS. The relatively lower reactivity of DCEPD toward epoxy resins was attributed to electronic effects.

  5. Properties of halloysite nanotube epoxy resin hybrids and the interfacial reactions in the systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingxian; Guo, Baochun; Du, Mingliang; Cai, Xiaojia; Jia, Demin

    2007-11-01

    A naturally occurred microtubullar silicate, halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), was co-cured with epoxy/cyanate ester resin to form organic-inorganic hybrids. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the hybrids with low HNT concentration was found to be substantially lower than that of the plain cured resin. The moduli of the hybrids in the glassy state and rubbery state were significantly higher than those for the plain cured resin. The dispersion of HNTs in the resin matrix was very uniform as revealed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. The interfacial reactions between the HNTs and cyanate ester (CE) were revealed by the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The substantially increased properties of the hybrids were attributed to the covalent bonding between the nanotubes and the matrix.

  6. Thermal investigation of tetrafunctional epoxy resin filled with different carbonaceous nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Vittorio; Naddeo, Carlo; Vertuccio, Luigi; Lafdi, Khalid; Guadagno, Liberata

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a preliminary investigation of thermal behaviour of epoxy nanocomposites containing different types of nanofillers, such as 1-D Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) and 2-D predominant shape of Exfoliated Graphite nanoparticles (EG). The cure behavior of the different epoxy formulations (filled and unfilled) was studied by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The DSC technique is particularly advantageous for studying the cure of reactive epoxy systems because the curing process is accompanied by the liberation of heat. For all the epoxy nanocomposites analyzed in this work, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) investigation shows curing degree (DC) values higher than 92% for the curing cycle up to 200°C, reaching up to 100% for the samples filled with Exfoliated Graphite nanoparticles (EG). The calorimetric results also show that Exfoliated Graphite nanoparticles accelerate the curing process of the epoxy resin of about 20°C. Transient Plane Source measurements of thermal conductivity show that this acceleration is directly related to the better heat conduction obtained through the incorporation in the epoxy matrix of carbonaceous nanostructures with predominantly two-dimensional shape (Exfoliated Graphite nanoparticles). The experimental results clearly demonstrate that the use of graphene sheets is very hopeful for obtaining nanocomposites characterized by high performance that are able to meet the ambitious requirements in the aeronautical field.

  7. Antiplasticization-driven stiffening in epoxy-amine networks: Effects of the resin formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandini, Stefano; Bignotti, Fabio; Baldi, Francesco; Sartore, Luciana

    2016-05-01

    In this work several epoxies with various and structurally related network architectures were prepared using mixtures of a diepoxide resin, a monoepoxide resin, and an aromatic diamine hardener. The effects of the systems formulation on their mechanical and thermal properties were investigated through dynamic-mechanical tests and room temperature tensile testing. The change in glass transition temperature and the stiffening effects measured at room temperature were interpreted at the light of the macromolecular architecture and the chain mobility hindrance connected to the antiplasticization phenomenology.

  8. Mechanical and Anticorrosive Properties of Graphene/Epoxy Resin Composites Coating Prepared by in-Situ Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Wenhui; Li, Diansen; Sun, Youyi; Wang, Zhuo; Hou, Chunling; Chen, Lu; Cao, Yang; Liu, Yaqing

    2015-01-01

    The graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating (0, 0.1, 0.4 and 0.7 wt %) was prepared by a situ-synthesis method. The effect of polyvinylpyrrolidone/reduced graphene oxide (PVP-rGO) on mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy resin coating was investigated using nanoindentation technique and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. A significant enhancement (ca. 213% and 73 °C) in the Young modulus and thermal stability of epoxy resin coating was obtained at a loading of 0.7 wt %, respectively. Furthermore, the erosion resistance of graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating was investigated by electrochemical measurement. The results showed also that the Rrcco (ca. 0.3 mm/year) of graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating was far lower than neat epoxy resin (1.3 mm/year). Thus, this approach provides a novel route for improving erosion resistance and mechanical-thermal stability of polymers coating, which is expected to be used in mechanical-thermal-corrosion coupling environments. PMID:25608656

  9. Mechanical and anticorrosive properties of graphene/epoxy resin composites coating prepared by in-situ method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Wenhui; Li, Diansen; Sun, Youyi; Wang, Zhuo; Hou, Chunling; Chen, Lu; Cao, Yang; Liu, Yaqing

    2015-01-01

    The graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating (0, 0.1, 0.4 and 0.7 wt %) was prepared by a situ-synthesis method. The effect of polyvinylpyrrolidone/reduced graphene oxide (PVP-rGO) on mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy resin coating was investigated using nanoindentation technique and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. A significant enhancement (ca. 213% and 73 °C) in the Young modulus and thermal stability of epoxy resin coating was obtained at a loading of 0.7 wt %, respectively. Furthermore, the erosion resistance of graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating was investigated by electrochemical measurement. The results showed also that the Rrcco (ca. 0.3 mm/year) of graphene nanosheets-based epoxy resin coating was far lower than neat epoxy resin (1.3 mm/year). Thus, this approach provides a novel route for improving erosion resistance and mechanical-thermal stability of polymers coating, which is expected to be used in mechanical-thermal-corrosion coupling environments. PMID:25608656

  10. Electrical transport in carbon black-epoxy resin composites at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macutkevic, J.; Kuzhir, P.; Paddubskaya, A.; Maksimenko, S.; Banys, J.; Celzard, A.; Fierro, V.; Bistarelli, S.; Cataldo, A.; Micciulla, F.; Bellucci, S.

    2013-07-01

    Results of broadband electric/dielectric properties of different surface area—carbon black/epoxy resin composites above the percolation threshold are reported in a wide temperature range (25-500 K). At higher temperatures (above 400 K), the electrical conductivity of composites is governed by electrical transport in polymer matrix and current carriers tunneling from carbon black clusters to polymer matrix. The activation energy of such processes decreases when the carrier concentration increases, i.e., with the increase of carbon black concentration. At lower temperatures, the electrical conductivity is governed by electron tunneling and hopping. The electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of composites strongly decrease after annealing composites at high temperatures (500 K); at the same time potential barrier for carriers tunneling strongly increases. All the observed peculiarities can be used for producing effective low-cost materials on the basis of epoxy resin working at different temperatures for electrical applications.

  11. Quantitation of buried contamination by use of solvents. Part 1: Solvent degradation of amine cured epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheineck, A. E.; Heskin, R. A.; Hill, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    The solubility and/or swelling of cured epoxy resins was studied using the solubility parameter method. Determination of solubility parameters were found in order to select solvents for solvent-assisted degradation of cured epoxy polymers used in spacecraft. A method for improving recovery of seeded spores is suggested for assay of buried contaminants. Three commercial epoxy resins were cured using four different alkyl amines. For each resin-amine combination, three levels of amine were used, corresponding to 1/3, 2/3, and all of the amine required to react with the oxirane groups of the resin. The solubility parameters of the 36 resulting model compounds were determined in poorly and moderately hydrogen-bonded solvents. No strongly hydrogen-bonded solvents caused dissolution or swelling. The tolerance of cured resins is discussed in terms of polymer structure.

  12. Electrical properties of epoxy resin based nano-composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, D. Randy; Ellis, Alvin R.; Parans Paranthaman, M.; Aytug, Tolga; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; More, Karren L.; Li, Jing; Goyal, Amit

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the electrical properties of composite materials prepared as nano- and sub-micron-scale metal-oxide particles embedded in a commercial resin. The filler particles are barium titanate and calcium copper titanate. The physical and structural characteristics of the constituents and the fabricated composites are reported. Electrical characterization of the composite samples is performed using time- and frequency-domain dielectric spectroscopy techniques. The electrical breakdown strength of samples with nano- and sub-micron-sized particles have better electrical insulation properties than the unfilled resin. The start-up funding for the research was provided by the US Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, and follow-on funding was continued by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the US Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 (D06-100).

  13. Effects of WO3 Particle Size in WO3/Epoxy Resin Radiation Shielding Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yu; Chang, Shu-Quan; Zhang, Hong-Xu; Ren, Chao; Kang, Bin; Dai, Ming-Zhu; Dai, Yao-Dong

    2012-10-01

    To verify the influence of the functional elements particular size for the radiation attenuation coefficients and mechanical properties radiation shielding material based on epoxy resin, we prepare two WO3/E44 samples with different particular sizes of WO3 by a solidified forming approach. The linear attenuation coefficients of these samples are measured for γ-ray photo energies of 59.6, 121.8, and 344.1 keV, etc. using narrow beam transmission geometry. It is found that the linear attenuation coefficients would increase with the decreasing particle size of the WO3 in the epoxy resin based radiation shielding material. The theoretical values of the linear attenuation coefficients and mass attenuation are calculated using WinXcom, and good agreements between the experimental data and the theoretical values are observed. From the studies of the obtained results, it is reported that from the shielding point of view the nano-WO3 is more effective than micro-WO3 in the epoxy resin based radiation shielding material.

  14. Drinking water contaminants from epoxy resin-coated pipes: A field study.

    PubMed

    Rajasärkkä, Johanna; Pernica, Marek; Kuta, Jan; Lašňák, Jonáš; Šimek, Zdenĕk; Bláha, Luděk

    2016-10-15

    Rehabilitation of aged drinking water pipes is an extensive renovation and increasingly topical in many European cities. Spray-on-lining of drinking water pipes is an alternative cost-effective rehabilitation technology in which the insides of pipes are relined with organic polymer. A commonly used polymer is epoxy resin consisting of monomer bisphenol A (BPA). Leaching of BPA from epoxy lining to drinking water has been a concern among public and authorities. Currently epoxy lining is not recommended in some countries. BPA leaching has been demonstrated in laboratory studies but the behavior and ageing process of epoxy lining in situ is not well known. In this study 6 locations with different age epoxy linings of drinking water pipes done using two distinct technologies were studied. While bisphenol F, 4-n-nonylphenol, and 4-t-octylphenol were rarely found and in trace concentrations, BPA was detected in majority of samples. Pipes lined with the older technology (LSE) leached more BPA than those with more recent technology (DonPro): maxima in cold water were 0.25 μg/L and 10 ng/L, respectively. Incubation of water in pipes 8-10 h prior to sampling increased BPA concentration in cold water 1.1-43-fold. Hot water temperature caused even more BPA leaching - at maximum 23.5 μg/L. The influence of ageing of epoxy lining on BPA leaching on could be shown in case of LSE technology: locations with 8-9 years old lining leached 4-20-fold more BPA compared to a location with 2-year-old lining. Analysis of metals showed that epoxy lining can reduce especially iron concentration in water. No significant burden to water could be shown by the analyzed 72 volatile organic compounds, including epichlorhydrin, precursor used in epoxy resin. Estrogenicity was detected in water samples with the highest BPA loads. Comparable responses of two yeast bioreporters (estrogen receptor α and BPA-targeted) indicated that bisphenol-like compounds were the main cause of estrogenicity

  15. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, J.A.; Newey, H.A.

    1981-02-24

    Primary diamines are disclosed of the formula shown in a diagram wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzomethane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  16. Use of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexane diamine as a curing agent for epoxy resins

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, James A. [Livermore, CA; Newey, Herbert A. [Lafayette, CA

    1981-02-24

    Primary diamines of the formula ##STR1## wherein R is a straight chain saturated hydrocarbon of 2 to 4 carbons, a disubstituted benzene ring, or disubstituted dibenzo methane for use as a curing agent for epoxy resins. These curing agents can be used to form epoxy resin mixtures useful in filament winding and pre-impregnated fiber molding and in formulating film adhesives, powder coatings and molding powders. The epoxy mixtures form for such uses as room temperature non-reacting, intermediate stable state which has a latent cross-linking capability.

  17. 21 CFR 177.2280 - 4,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false 4,4â²-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin...,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins. 4,4... applicable to 4,4′-isopropylidenedi-phenol-epichlorohydrin resins listed in other sections of parts 174,...

  18. 21 CFR 177.2280 - 4,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false 4,4â²-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin...,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins. 4,4... applicable to 4,4′-isopropylidenedi-phenol-epichlorohydrin resins listed in other sections of parts 174,...

  19. 21 CFR 177.2280 - 4,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true 4,4â²-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin...,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins. 4,4... applicable to 4,4′-isopropylidenedi-phenol-epichlorohydrin resins listed in other sections of parts 174,...

  20. 21 CFR 177.2280 - 4,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false 4,4â²-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin...,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins. 4,4... applicable to 4,4′-isopropylidenedi-phenol-epichlorohydrin resins listed in other sections of parts 174,...

  1. Effect of resin on impact damage tolerance of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Rhodes, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-four different epoxy resin systems were evaluated by a variety of test techniques to identify materials that exhibited improved impact damage tolerance in graphite/epoxy composite laminates. Forty-eight-ply composite panels of five of the material systems were able to sustain 100 m/s impact by a 1.27-cm-diameter aluminum projectile while statically loaded to strains of 0.005. Of the five materials with the highest tolerance to impact, two had elastomeric additives, two had thermoplastic additives, and one had a vinyl modifier; all the five systems used bisphenol A as the base resin. An evaluation of test results shows that the laminate damage tolerance is largely determined by the resin tensile properties, and that improvements in laminate damage tolerance are not necessarily made at the expense of room-temperature mechanical properties. The results also suggest that a resin volume fraction of 40 percent or greater may be required to permit the plastic flow between fibers necessary for improved damage tolerance.

  2. Recyclable epoxy resins: An example of green approach for advanced composite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicala, Gianluca; Rosa, Daniela La; Musarra, Marco; Saccullo, Giuseppe; Banatao, Rey; Pastine, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Automotive composite applications are increasingly growing due to demand for lightweight structures to comply to the requirements for fuel reduction. HP-RTM is gaining relevance as one of the preferred production technologies for high volume applications. The BMW i3 life module being a notable example of HP-RTM application. The key aspects of HP-RTM are the short injection times (i.e. less than 1min) and the fast curing of the thermoset resins (i.e. less than 10min). The choice of using thermosets poses relevant issues for their limited recycling options. The standard recycling solution is the incineration but, this solution poses some concerns in terms of global environmental impact. Novel solutions are presented in this work based on the use of recyclable epoxy systems. In our work the results of experimentation carried out by our group with cleavable ammines by Connora Technologies and bioepoxy resins by Entropy Resins will be discussed. The multiple uses of recycled matrices obtained treating the recyclable epoxy resins are discussed in the framework of a "cradle" to "crave" approach. Finally, Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is used to evaluate the environmental benefits of the proposed approach.

  3. Aminophenoxycyclotriphosphazene cured epoxy resins and the composites, laminates, adhesives and structures thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Devendra (Inventor); Fohlen, George M. (Inventor); Parker, John A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Aminophenoxy cyclotriphosphazenes such as hexakis (4-aminophenoxy) cyclotriphosphazene and tris (4-aminophenoxy)-tris phenoxy cyclotriphosphazene are used as curing agents for epoxy resins. These 1,2-epoxy resins are selected from di- or polyepoxide containing organic moieties of the formula (CH2-CHO-CH2) m-W-R-W- (CH2CH-CH2O)m where R is diphenyl dimethylmethane, diphenylmethane; W is a nitrogen or oxygen atom; and m is 1 when W is oxygen and 2 when W is nitrogen. The resins are cured thermally in stages at between about 110 to 135 C for between about 1 and 10 min, then at between about 175 to 185 C for between 0.5 to 10 hr and post cured at between about 215 and 235 C for between 0.1 and 2 hr. These resins are useful for making fire resistant elevated temperature stable composites, laminates, molded parts, and adhesives and structures, usually for aircraft secondary structures and for spacecraft construction.

  4. New epoxy/episulfide resin system for electronic and coating applications: Curing mechanisms and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Katsuyuki

    This work involves research on a new resin system useful for printed circuit board and protective coating applications. The system provides excellent adhesion to copper and corrosion resistance for copper. The research involved detailed studies of the reaction mechanisms, and correlation of these mechanisms with the observed properties. The epoxy/episulfide system, when used with a dicyandiamide (DICY) curing agent, exhibits better adhesion to copper substrate, a better pot life and prepreg storage life, a lower thermal expansion coefficient, a lower heat of reaction, a lower degradation temperature, and higher water absorption as compared with the standard epoxy system. From model compound studies, the sulfur of the opened episulfide ring reacts with copper, resulting in a durable bond between the copper and matrix resin even after water boiling. Since the S- formed by the reaction of the episulfide with the curing agent easily reacts with both the episulfide and the epoxy, a C-S-C bond is formed and more unreacted curing agent remains as compared to the standard epoxy system. The new bond formation causes a lower thermal expansion coefficient and somewhat lower degradation temperature. The unreacted curing agent causes slightly higher water absorption. Since the episulfide ring has less stress than the epoxy ring the epoxy/episulfide system shows lower heat of reaction, i.e., a lower exotherm. and lower shrinkage. The epoxy/episuffide system, when used with a polyamide curing agent, exhibits better corrosion protection for copper substrates, a lower thermal expansion coefficient and a lower degradation temperature. From model compound studies, the curing reactions are changed by changing curing temperature and the presence of copper: the episulfide homopolymerization and the S--epoxy reactions increase in the case of room temperature curing or in the presence of copper. In the presence of copper, the sulfur of the episulfide also reacts with copper, although the

  5. Sub-70 nm resolution patterning of high etch-resistant epoxy novolac resins using gas permeable templates in ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Satoshi; Hanabata, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to expand the resolution limits of epoxy novolac resins that have enhanced etch resistance as one of the desirable resist properties for next-generation devices. Epoxy novolac resins have high etch resistance. However, because epoxy novolac resins are either solid or semisolid at room temperature, and because the use of volatile solvents in resist can be a cause of pattern failure in nanoimprint lithography, epoxy novolac resins have been of limited utility as resist. Excellent sub-70 nm resolution patterning can be achieved by diluting 15 wt % acetone in an ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography using gas-permeable templates.

  6. Synthesis of a Novel Phosphorus-Containing Flame Retardant Curing Agent and Its Application in Epoxy Resins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkun; Xu, Miaojun; Li, Bin

    2016-03-01

    A novel phosphorus-containing compound diphenyl-(2,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-phosphine oxide defined as DPDHPPO was synthesized and used as flame retardant and curing agent for epoxy resins (EP). The chemical structure was well characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, 1H, 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance. The flame retardant properties, combusting performances and thermal degradation behaviors of the cured epoxy resins were investigated by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning tests (UL-94), cone calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) tests. The morphologies and chemical compositions of char residues for cured epoxy resins were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The water resistant properties were evaluated by putting the samples into distilled water at 70 degrees C for 168 h. The results revealed that the EP/40 wt% DPDHPPO/60 wt% PDA thermosets successfully passed UL-94 V-0 flammability rating and the LOI value was as high as 31.9%. The cone tests results revealed that the incorporation of DPDHPPO efficiently reduced the combustion parameters of epoxy resins thermosets, such as heat release rate (HRR), total heat release (THR) and so on. The TGA results indicated that the introduction of DPDHPPO promoted epoxy resins matrix decomposed ahead of time compared with that of pure EP and led to a higher char yield and thermal stability at high temperature. The morphological structures and analysis of XPS of char residues revealed that DPDHPPO benefited to the formation of a sufficient, compact and homogeneous char layer with rich flame retardant elements on the epoxy resins materials surface during combustion. After water resistance tests, EP/40 wt% DPDHPPO/60 wt% PDA thermosets still remained excellent flame retardancy, the moisture absorption of epoxy resins thermosets decreased with the increase of DPDHPPO contents in the thermosets due to the existing

  7. Organo-modified bentonites as new flame retardant fillers in epoxy resin nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benelli, Tiziana; D'Angelo, Emanuele; Mazzocchetti, Laura; Saraga, Federico; Sambri, Letizia; Franchini, Mauro Comes; Giorgini, Loris

    2016-05-01

    The present work deals with two organophilic bentonites, based on nitrogen-containing compounds: these organoclays were synthesized via an ion exchange process starting from pristine bentonite with 6-(4-butylphenyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (BFTDA) and 11-amino-N-(pyridine-2yl)undecanamide (APUA) and then used for the production of epoxy-based flame retardant nanocomposites. The amount of organic modifier in the organoclays Bento-BFTDA and Bento-APUA was determined with a TGA analysis and is around 0.4mmol/g for both samples. The effect of the organoclays on a commercial epoxy resin nanocomposite's thermo-mechanical and flammability properties was investigated. Composites containing 3wt% and 5wt% of the nanofillers were prepared by solventless addition of each organoclay to the epoxy resin, followed by further addition of the hardener component. For the sake of comparison a similar nanocomposite with the plain unmodified bentonite was produced in similar condition. The nanocomposites's thermo-mechanical properties of all the produced samples were measured and they resulted slightly improved or practically unaffected. On the contrary, when the flame behaviour was assessed in the cone-calorimeter, an encouraging decrease of 17% in the peak heat released rate (pHRR) was obtained at 3wt% loading level with Bento-APUA. This is a promising result, assessing that the APUA modified organoclay might act as flame retardant.

  8. Biodeterioration of epoxy resin: a microbial survey through culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches.

    PubMed

    Pangallo, Domenico; Bučková, Maria; Kraková, Lucia; Puškárová, Andrea; Šaková, Nikoleta; Grivalský, Tomaš; Chovanová, Katarina; Zemánková, Milina

    2015-02-01

    During the 20th century, synthetic polymers were greatly used in the field of art. In particular, the epoxy resins were used for both conservation and for creating sculptures. The biodeterioration of these polymers has not been adequately studied. The aim of this investigation was to examine the microflora responsible for the deterioration of an epoxy statue exposed to outdoor conditions. Fungal and bacterial microflora were isolated from the art object, clustered by fluorescence-ITS (internal transcribed spacer), identified by ITS and 16S rRNA sequencing and tested for their lipolytic abilities by three agar assays. Different algal, bacterial, cyanobacterial and fungal clone libraries were constructed. The surrounding airborne microflora was analyzed using culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches. The results indicated the presence, on the statue surface, of an interesting and differentiate microbial community composed of rock-inhabiting members, algal photobionts (Trebouxia spp., Chloroidium ellipsoideum and Chlorella angustoellipsoidea), Cyanobacteria (Leptolyngbya sp., Phormidium sp., Cylindrospermum stagnale, Hassallia byssoidea and Geitlerinema sp.), black yeasts related to the species Friedmanniomyces endolithicus, Pseudotaeniolina globosa, Phaeococcomyces catenatus and Catenulostroma germanicum and several plant-associated fungi. This investigation provides new information on the potential microfloral inhabitants of epoxy resin discovering a new ecological niche, occupied mainly by several members of rock-colonizing microbial species. PMID:24903534

  9. Curing and toughening of epoxy resins with phosphorus containing monomers and polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.R.; Park, I.Y.; Yoon, T.H.

    1996-12-31

    Epoxy resins have been utilized in many areas, from house holds to airplanes, for the past several decades due to some exceptional properties such as low cost, good mechanical properties and excellent adhesive properties. However, low fracture toughness and flame resistance of epoxy resins have limited their applicability. Therefore, enhancing those properties have been of great interest to many researchers and scientists. As introduced by McGrath and co-workers in 1980s, the reactive thermoplastic polymers have proven to be an excellent toughener for improving not only fracture toughness but also adhesive properties without sacrificing thermo-mechanical properties and chemical resistance. Flame retardency could be improved by adding flame retardent additives which are divided into two groups; additives and reactives. However, among the additives, halogen compounds are known to be toxic gas generator and ozone depleter. Moreover, additives could be potentially leached out of the material, while reactives are inferior to additives. Recently, a reactive type phosphine oxide containing flame retardants have been introduced by McGrath and co-workers and proven to be an excellent flame retardant. In this paper, phospine oxide containing monomers were prepared and utilized as curing agents for expoxy resins, and starting materials for the polymers.

  10. NMR detection of thermal damage in carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Steven K.; Conradi, Mark S.; Vaccaro, Christopher M.

    2005-02-01

    Composite materials of epoxy resins reinforced by carbon fibers are increasingly being used in the construction of aircraft. In these applications, the material may be thermally damaged and weakened by jet blast and accidental fires. The feasibility of using proton NMR relaxation times T1, T1 ρ, and T2 to detect and quantify the thermal damage is investigated. In conventional spectrometers with homogeneous static magnetic fields, T1 ρ is readily measured and is found to be well correlated with thermal damage. This suggests that NMR measurements of proton T1 ρ may be used for non-destructive evaluation of carbon fiber-epoxy composites. Results from T1 ρ measurements in the inhomogeneous static and RF magnetic fields of an NMR-MOUSE are also discussed.

  11. Food contamination from epoxy resins and organosols used as can coatings: analysis by gradient NPLC.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, M; Grob, K

    1998-07-01

    Normal phase LC with gradient elution enabled the analysis of a broadened range of oligomers of BADGE (Bisphenol-A diglycidyl ether) and Novolak compounds in canned foods, such as sea foods in oil, meat products and soups. A major component released from Bisphenol-A resins was identified as the cyclo-(Bisphenol-A monoglycidyl ether) dimer and was commonly present in foods at concentrations of around 1 mg/kg. For the epoxy Novolaks, concentrations of the three- to six-ring compounds often far exceeded those of BFDGE (Bisphenol-F diglycidyl ether) and reached 20 mg/kg in foods. A two-step acylation is proposed for the detection of epoxy components. PMID:9829047

  12. Robust synthesis of epoxy resin-filled microcapsules for application to self-healing materials.

    PubMed

    Bolimowski, Patryk A; Bond, Ian P; Wass, Duncan F

    2016-02-28

    Mechanically and thermally robust microcapsules containing diglycidyl ether bisphenol A-based epoxy resin and a high-boiling-point organic solvent were synthesized in high yield using in situ polymerization of urea and formaldehyde in an oil-in-water emulsion. Microcapsules were characterized in terms of their size and size distribution, shell surface morphology and thermal resistance to the curing cycles of commercially used epoxy polymers. The size distribution of the capsules and characteristics such as shell thickness can be controlled by the specific parameters of microencapsulation, including concentrations of reagents, stirrer speed and sonication. Selected microcapsules, and separated core and shell materials, were analysed using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. It is demonstrated that capsules lose minimal 2.5 wt% at temperatures no higher than 120°C. These microcapsules can be applied to self-healing carbon fibre composite structural materials, with preliminary results showing promising performance. PMID:26755765

  13. Basic failure mechanisms in advanced composites. [composed of epoxy resins reinforced with carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzio, V. F.; Mehan, R. L.; Mullin, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental failure mechanisms which result from the interaction of thermal cycling and mechanical loading of carbon-epoxy composites were studied. This work was confined to epoxy resin uniderictionally reinforced with HTS carbon fibers, and consists of first identifying local fiber, matrix and interface failure mechanisms using the model composite specimen containing a small number of fibers so that optical techniques can be used for characterization. After the local fracture process has been established for both mechanical loading and thermal cycling, engineering composite properties and gross fracture modes are then examined to determine how the local events contribute to real composite performance. Flexural strength in high fiber content specimens shows an increase in strength with increased thermal cycling. Similar behavior is noted for 25 v/o material up to 200 cycles; however, there is a drastic reduction after 200 cycles indicating a major loss of integrity probably through the accumulation of local cleavage cracks in the tensile region.

  14. An amperometric cholesterol biosensor based on epoxy resin membrane bound cholesterol oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Pundir, C.S.; Narang, Jagriti; Chauhan, Nidhi; Sharma, Preety; Sharma, Renu

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: The use of epoxy resin membrane as a support for immobilization of enzyme has resulted into improved sensitivity and stability of biosensors for uric acid, ascorbic acid and polyphenols. The present work was aimed to prepare an improved amperometric biosensor for determination of serum cholesterol required in the diagnostics and management of certain pathological conditions. Methods: Epoxy resin membrane with immobilized cholesterol oxidase was mounted on the cleaned platinum (Pt) electrode with a parafilm to construct a working electrode. This working electrode along with Ag/AgCl as reference and Ag wire as an auxiliary electrode were connected through a three terminal electrometer to construct a cholesterol biosensor. Results: The sensor showed optimum response within 25 sec at pH 7.0 and 45°C. The linear working range of biosensor was 1.0 to 8.0 mM cholesterol. Km and Imax for cholesterol were 5.0 mM and 9.09 μA, respectively. The biosensor measured serum cholesterol. The minimum detection limit of the sensor was 1.0 mM. The mean analytical recoveries of added cholesterol in serum (2.84 and 4.13 mM) were 91.4±2.8 and 92.3±3.1 per cent (n=6), respectively. Within and between assay coefficient of variation (CV) were <2 and <4 per cent, respectively. Biosensor had a storage life of 6 months at 4°C. Interpretation & conclusions: The use of epoxy resin membrane as a support for immobilization of cholesterol oxidase has resulted into an improved amperometric cholesterol biosensor. The present biosensor had an advantage over the existing biosensors as it worked at comparatively lower potential. PMID:23168704

  15. Holographic diffraction gratings with enhanced sensitivity based on epoxy-resin photopolymers.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yong-Cheol; Lee, Seungwoo; Park, Jung-Ki

    2007-02-19

    Photopolymers are interesting materials to obtain high-quality performance for the volume holographic data storage with a low noise and high diffraction efficiency. In this paper, the recording of holographic diffraction gratings with a spatial frequency of 1285lines/mm in photopolymerizable epoxy resin materials is experimentally demonstrated. Diffraction efficiency near 92% and an energetic sensitivity of 11.7 x 10-3cm2/J are achieved by designing the proper structure of matrix and also optimizing photopolymer compositions. The effect of photopolymer compositions on the fundamental optical properties is also discussed. PMID:19532382

  16. Impact and dynamic mechanical thermal properties of textile silk reinforced epoxy resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, K.; Guan, J.

    2016-07-01

    Silk fabric reinforced epoxy resin composites (SFRPs) were prepared using simple techniques of hand lay-up, hot-press and vacuum treatment, and a series of volume fractions of silk reinforcements were achieved. The impact properties and dynamic mechanical properties of SFRPs were investigated using a pendulum impact testing method and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The results suggest that silk reinforcement could greatly enhance the mechanical performances of SFRPs. The impact strength reached a maximum of 71 kJ/m2 for 60%-silk SFRP, which demonstrated a potential of silk composites for defence and impact- resistant materials.

  17. Mode I fracture toughness behavior of hydro-thermally aged carbon fibre reinforced DGEBA-HHPA-PES systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, Sabina; Pitarresi, Giuseppe; Spadaro, Giuseppe; Tumino, Davide

    2012-07-01

    In this work the Mode I fracture toughness behavior of unidirectional CFRP laminates is investigated by means of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) tests. The composite samples were manufactured by thermal curing after impregnation of a Carbon fabric with a DGEBA epoxy and anhydride HHPA curing agent. One resin batch was also mixed with a PES thermoplastic monomer to enhance the matrix toughness. Two lots of samples, toughened and untoughened, were then left to soak in hot water to achieve various degrees of aging. The influence of matrix toughening and hydrothermal aging on the delamination behavior of the composite have then been assessed and correlated with characterization data from Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

  18. Studies on characteristics and mechanisms of X-MoO sub 3 synergism in fire-retarded epoxy resin

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X. ); Cheng, S.; Li, J. )

    1992-07-05

    Molybdenum trioxide was incorporated into epoxy resin, containing halogen additive, and the performance of the system was studied. The results from LOI measurements show that X-MoO{sub 3} synergism in fire-retarded epoxy resin depends on the levels both of halogen and MoO{sub 3}, and that when Mo/X ratio is 1/3, the maximum fire retardancy is not found in the synergistic combination. The thermal analysis was carried out by thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction, and laser Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate the MoO{sub 3} acts as a synergist in condensed phase. In this paper, the mode of X-MoO{sub 3} synergism in fire-retarded epoxy resin is proposed.

  19. Etude de Degradation des Resines Epoxy Sous L'action des Decharges Partielles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudon, Claude

    Over the past few decades, epoxy resin composites have been extensively used in the high voltage insulation systems of rotating machines. Although these materials exhibit good mechanical performance, are thermally stable and present intrinsically excellent resistance against electrical discharge attack, their actual life under alienating high voltage is always shorter than predicted. Among the leading causes responsible for premature failure of rotating machine insulation are slot discharges which are characterized by extremely large pulses. Partial discharges occurring within the occluded cavities in the epoxy resin of the insulation can also lead to breakdown of the insulating system, but the degradation mechanism is somewhat more obscure. The reason is that the degradation results form a complex synergistic action of electronic and ionic surface bombardment, of ultraviolet radiation and of electrochemical reactions in a confined and non-vented space that is in most cases inaccessible for careful observation and analysis. Most investigations usually rely either on discharge signal analysis, or on the analysis of the resulting material modifications if available following failure. Most investigations on machine insulation merely attempt to predict failure in terms of partial discharge pulse data and are less concerned with the understanding of the degradation process itself. In the present work, a comparative study, using parallel-plane epoxy-covered electrodes, is carried out on the interrelation between the discharge signal behavior and the associated degradation of the epoxy resin. Examination of the behavior in terms of measured amplitude of the electrical pulse component and the light emission intensity, disclosed the presence of three types of discharges, namely spark, glow and pseudoglow discharges. Since conventional partial discharge detection only responds to fast voltage drops, the latter two forms of discharge generally evade detection. The intent of

  20. Dissolution of brominated epoxy resins by dimethyl sulfoxide to separate waste printed circuit boards.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ping; Chen, Yan; Wang, Liangyou; Qian, Guangren; Zhang, Wei Jie; Zhou, Ming; Zhou, Jin

    2013-03-19

    Improved methods are required for the recycling of waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs). In this study, WPCBs (1-1.5 cm(2)) were separated into their components using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at 60 °C for 45 min and a metallographic microscope was used to verify their delamination. An increased incubation time of 210 min yielded a complete separation of WPCBs into their components, and copper foils and glass fibers were obtained. The separation time decreased with increasing temperature. When the WPCB size was increased to 2-3 cm(2), the temperature required for complete separation increased to 90 °C. When the temperature was increased to 135 °C, liquid photo solder resists could be removed from the copper foil surfaces. The DMSO was regenerated by rotary decompression evaporation, and residues were obtained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to verify that these residues were brominated epoxy resins. From FT-IR analysis after the dissolution of brominated epoxy resins in DMSO it was deduced that hydrogen bonding may play an important role in the dissolution mechanism. This novel technology offers a method for separating valuable materials and preventing environmental pollution from WPCBs. PMID:23398278

  1. High contrast ultrasonic imaging of resin-rich regions in graphite/epoxy composites using entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Michael S.; McCarthy, John E.; Bruillard, Paul. J.; Marsh, Jon N.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2016-02-01

    This study compares different approaches for imaging a near-surface resin-rich defect in a thin graphite/epoxy plate using backscattered ultrasound. The specimen was created by cutting a circular hole in the second ply; this region filled with excess resin from the graphite/epoxy sheets during the curing process. Backscat-tered waveforms were acquired using a 4 in. focal length, 5MHz center frequency broadband transducer, scanned on a 100 × 100 grid of points that were 0.03 × 0.03 in. apart. The specimen was scanned with the defect side closest to the transducer. Consequently, the reflection from the resin-rich region cannot be gated from the large front-wall echo. At each point in the grid 256 waveforms were averaged together and subsequently used to produce peak-to-peak, Signal Energy (sum of squared digitized waveform values), as well as entropy images of two different types (a Renyi entropy, and a joint entropy). As the figure shows, all of the entropy images exhibit better border delineation and defect contrast than the either the peak-to-peak or Signal Energy. The best results are obtained using the joint entropy of the backscattered waveforms with a reference function. Two different references are examined. The first is a reflection of the insonifying pulse from a stainless steel reflector. The second is an approximate optimum obtained from an iterative parametric search. The joint entropy images produced using this reference exhibit three times the contrast obtained in previous studies.

  2. The enhancing effect of mesogen-jacketed liquid crystalline polymer PBPCS on epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, C. P.; Li, X. J.; Zhu, Y.; Gao, Y. X.; Li, G. P.; Luo, Y. J.

    2015-12-01

    The mixtures of mesogen-jacketed liquid crystalline polymers (MJLCP) and epoxy resin (E-51) have been prepared in a certain proportion. The category of the MJLCP is poly{2, 5-bis[(4-butoxyphenyl) oxycarbonyl] styrenes} (PBPCS). Methyl tetrahydro phthalic anhydride (MeTHPA) is served as a curing agent, and N, N-dimethylbenzylamine plays the role of catalyst. Then, based on the curing process, the modified materials have been acquired by casting molding. The effect of PBPCS's improvement has been researched through the mechanical properties test, dynamic thermal mechanical test and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicated that PBPCS could apparently improve the mechanical properties of resin E-51. Compared with unmodified materials, the elongation at break and the tensile strength of PBPCS have been improved remarkably through modification. Both mechanical properties of the 4wt% PBPCS/E-51/MeTHPA were enhanced by 48% and 153% separately, and the characteristics of the 3wt% one were raised by 47% and 19% respectively. Also, the ductile fracture morphology of the resins was exhibited in SEM photograph clearly.

  3. Food-contact epoxy resin: co-variation between migration and degree of cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Lambert, C; Larroque, M; Lebrun, J C; Gérard, J F

    1997-01-01

    In order to predict the behaviour towards foodstuffs of an epoxy resin composed of bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE), 4,4'-methylenedianiline (MDA) and additives (plasticizers: dibutylphthalate (DBP), dioctylphthalate (DOP); accelerator: salicylic acid; inorganic fillers), a co-variation was established between the parameters evaluating the degree of cross-linking of the three-dimensional network and the migration of constituent molecules into various food simulants (distilled water, distilled water/ethanol/acetic acid, distilled water/ethanol). Varied degrees of cross-linking were obtained by subjecting the resin to different curing temperatures: respectively, 5 degrees C, 20 degrees C, 50 degrees C and 90 degrees C for 7 days. Irrespective of the food stimulant tested, specific migrations (DBP, DOP, salicylic acid, primary aromatic amines) diminished greatly as the curing temperature increased. At the same time, the degree of cross-linking increased with curing temperature, as indicated by the increase in glass transition temperature, the decrease in residual reaction exotherms and increased stability of the rubber storage modulus E'rub (increase in cross-link nodes), the fall in relaxation enthalpies (reduction in physical ageing) and the decreased amplitude of the loss-factor, tan delta (reduction in chain mobility). Maximum cross-linking was obtained in the resin cured at 90 degrees C (temperature above Tg infinity). In contrast to the degree of cross-linking, evaporation contributed little to the reduction of migration due to the elevation of curing temperature. PMID:9102353

  4. Synthesis, Characterization, and Cross-Linking Strategy of a Quercetin-Based Epoxidized Monomer as a Naturally-Derived Replacement for BPA in Epoxy Resins.

    PubMed

    Kristufek, Samantha L; Yang, Guozhen; Link, Lauren A; Rohde, Brian J; Robertson, Megan L; Wooley, Karen L

    2016-08-23

    The natural polyphenolic compound quercetin was functionalized and cross-linked to afford a robust epoxy network. Quercetin was selectively methylated and functionalized with glycidyl ether moieties using a microwave-assisted reaction on a gram scale to afford the desired monomer (Q). This quercetin-derived monomer was treated with nadic methyl anhydride (NMA) to obtain a cross-linked network (Q-NMA). The thermal and mechanical properties of this naturally derived network were compared to those of a conventional diglycidyl ether bisphenol A-derived counterpart (DGEBA-NMA). Q-NMA had similar thermal properties [i.e., glass transition (Tg ) and decomposition (Td ) temperatures] and comparable mechanical properties (i.e., Young's Modulus, storage modulus) to that of DGEBA-NMA. However, it had a lower tensile strength and higher flexural modulus at elevated temperatures. The application of naturally derived, sustainable compounds for the replacement of commercially available petrochemical-based epoxies is of great interest to reduce the environmental impact of these materials. Q-NMA is an attractive candidate for the replacement of bisphenol A-based epoxies in various specialty engineering applications. PMID:27415143

  5. Effects of postcuring on mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced epoxy composites and the neat resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Funk, Joan G.; Collins, William D.; Gray, Stephanie L.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of postcuring on mechanical properties of pultruded fiber-reinforced epoxy-resin composites have been investigated. Composites with carbon, glass, and aramid reinforcement fibers were individually studied. The epoxy was a commercially-available resin that was especially developed for pultrusion fabrication. The pultrusions were conducted at 400 F with postcures at 400, 450, 500, and 550 F. Measurements of the flexural, shear, and interlaminar fracture-toughness properties showed that significant postcuring can occur during the pultrusion process. All three mechanical properties were degraded by the higher (500 and 550 F) temperatures; photomicrographs suggest that the degradation was caused at the fiber-resin interface for all three fiber types.

  6. An evaluation of epoxy resin phantom materials for megavoltage photon dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdi, M.; Nisbet, A.; Thwaites, D. I.

    1999-05-01

    Epoxy resin phantom materials have been available for some time and are widely used for dosimetry purposes, not least in audit phantoms. Information on their behaviour is partly available in the literature, but there are different mixes and formulations often given similar names and it may not be appropriate to transfer information from one material to another. Five commercially available water-substitute materials have been evaluated for use in megavoltage photon beams: WT1, WTe, RMI 451, RMI 457 and `plastic water'. Four independent experiments were carried out to compare these materials with water in megavoltage photon beams ranging in energy from cobalt-60 to nominal 16 MV x-rays, and some general conclusions are drawn from the results as to their use. All are suitable for relative dosimetry in megavoltage photon beams. However, differences of up to 1% are observed for absolute measurements. The newer formulations, developed for electron beam use, are also closer to water for megavoltage photon beams.

  7. A new approach to controlling the processability and properties of epoxy resins

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, P.T.; Carter, J.T.; Jenkins, S.D.

    1996-10-01

    A requirement of the aerospace industry is to be able to reproducibly manufacture void-free honeycomb core laminates. Void formation has been widely studies but, relationships between the factors which lead to the formation of voids, and the ability to get rid of them, and the phyics/chemistry of the matrix have never been established. This work describes the establishment of such relationships. A high MW, pendantly functionalised rubber, is incorporated into the epoxy resins and crosslinked in situ in a controlled fashion, prior to prepregging, to achieve the optimum balance of viscous flow and viscoelastic behaviour which is essential for void elimination. Control of this reaction also leads to control of the matrix morphology and mechanical properties.

  8. Surface Flashover on Epoxy-Resin Printed Circuit Boards in Vacuum under Electron Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Haruhisa; Hasegawa, Taketoshi; Osuga, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Katsuaki

    This paper deals with the surface flashover characteristics of dielectric material in vacuum during electron beam irradiation in order to design adequately the conductive patterns on printed circuit boards used inside a spacecraft. The dielectric material, glass-fiber reinforced epoxy resin, and the electrodes printed on it were irradiated with electrons of the energy of 3-10 keV. DC high voltage was applied between the two electrodes during electron irradiation. The voltage was increased stepwise until the surface flashover occurred on the dielectric material. We obtained the results that the surface flashover voltage increased with the insulation distance between the electrodes but electron irradiation made the flashover voltage lower. The flashover voltage characteristics were obtained as parameters of the electrode distance and the energy of the electron beam.

  9. Thermal contact conductance between aligned, unidirectional carbon/epoxy resin composites under vacuum conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, M.E.; Moses, W.M. Mercer Univ., Macon, GA )

    1991-01-01

    This paper investigates the thermal contact conductance across carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites under vacuum conditions at discrete contact pressures. Samples with unidirectional, continuous fibers oriented at 0 and 90 degrees to the contact interface are analyzed in 0/0 and 90/90 test configurations. Experimental results are compared with analytical data obtained using theory developed for homogeneous, isotropic, metallic contacts. As with earlier experiments in air, variations in the experimental data show the importance of material anisotropy and heterogeneity in governing thermal contact conductance between composites. While metallic theory can incorporate the anisotropic influence of fiber orientation, it fails to account for the distinct contributions of both fiber and matrix to the composite contact problem. 21 refs.

  10. Free volumes and gas transport in polymers: amine-modified epoxy resins as a case study.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pushkar N; Roilo, David; Brusa, Roberto S; Miotello, Antonio; Aghion, Stefano; Ferragut, Rafael; Checchetto, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    The CO2 transport process was studied in a series of amine-modified epoxy resins having different cross-linking densities but the same chemical environment for the penetrant molecules. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) was used to monitor the free volume structure of the samples and experimentally evaluate their fractional free volume fh(T) and its temperature evolution. The analysis of the free volume hole size distribution showed that all the holes have a size large enough to accommodate the penetrant molecules at temperatures T above the glass transition temperature Tg. The measured gas diffusion constants at T > Tg have been reproduced in the framework of the free volume theory of diffusion using a novel procedure based on the use of fh(T) as an input experimental parameter. PMID:26762568

  11. Mechanical characteristics of antibacterial epoxy resin adhesive wood biocomposites against skin disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zi-xiang; Zhang, Zhong-feng; Aqma, Wan Syaidatul

    2015-01-01

    Moldy wood can cause some skin disease. However epoxy resin adhesive (EP) can inhibit mold growth. Therefore, antibacterial EP/wood biocomposites were reinforced and analyzed by the nonlinear finite element. Results show that glass fiber cloth and aluminum foil have the obvious reinforced effect under flat pressure, but this was not the case under side pressure. And when the assemble pattern was presented in 5A way, the strengthening effect was better. The nonlinear finite element showed that the aluminum foil and glass fiber cloth have the obvious reinforced effect. The mutual influence and effect of span, thickness and length on the ultimate bearing capacity of specimen were studied. And the simulation results agreed with the test. It provided a theoretical basis on the preparation of antibacterial EP/wood biocomposites against skin disease. PMID:26858557

  12. Creep and recovery behaviors of magnetorheological elastomer based on polyurethane/epoxy resin IPNs matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, S.; Yu, M.; Fu, J.; Li, P. D.; Zhu, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper mainly investigated the creep and recovery behaviors of magnetorheological elastomers (MRE) based on polyurethane/epoxy resin (EP) graft interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs). The influences of constant stress level, content of EP, particle distribution, magnetic field and temperature on the creep and recovery behaviors were systematically investigated. As expected, results suggested that the presence of IPNs leads to a significant improvement of creep resistance of MRE, and creep and recovery behaviors of MRE were highly dependent on magnetic field and temperature. To further understand its deformation mechanism, several models (i.e., Findley’s power law model, Burgers model, and Weibull distribution equation) were used to fit the measured creep and recovery data. Results showed that the modeling of creep and recovery of samples was satisfactorily conducted by using these models. The influences of content of EP and magnetic field on fitting parameters were discussed, and relevant physical mechanism was proposed to explain it qualitatively.

  13. Mechanical characteristics of antibacterial epoxy resin adhesive wood biocomposites against skin disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zi-Xiang; Zhang, Zhong-Feng; Aqma, Wan Syaidatul

    2016-01-01

    Moldy wood can cause some skin disease. However epoxy resin adhesive (EP) can inhibit mold growth. Therefore, antibacterial EP/wood biocomposites were reinforced and analyzed by the nonlinear finite element. Results show that glass fiber cloth and aluminum foil have the obvious reinforced effect under flat pressure, but this was not the case under side pressure. And when the assemble pattern was presented in 5A way, the strengthening effect was better. The nonlinear finite element showed that the aluminum foil and glass fiber cloth have the obvious reinforced effect. The mutual influence and effect of span, thickness and length on the ultimate bearing capacity of specimen were studied. And the simulation results agreed with the test. It provided a theoretical basis on the preparation of antibacterial EP/wood biocomposites against skin disease. PMID:26858557

  14. Low Temperature Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy-Resin Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Biss, Emily J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of cryogenic fuels (liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen) in current space transportation vehicles, in combination with the proposed use of composite materials in such applications, requires an understanding of how such materials behave at cryogenic temperatures. In this investigation, tensile intralaminar shear tests were performed at room, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen temperatures to evaluate the effect of temperature on the mechanical response of the IM7/8551-7 carbon-fiber/epoxy-resin system. Quasi-isotropic lay-ups were also tested to represent a more realistic lay-up. It was found that the matrix became both increasingly resistant to microcracking and stiffer with decreasing temperature. A marginal increase in matrix shear strength with decreasing temperature was also observed. Temperature did not appear to affect the integrity of the fiber-matrix bond.

  15. Cryogenic lifetime tests on a commercial epoxy resin high voltage bushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenterly, S. W.; Pleva, E. F.; Ha, T. T.

    2012-06-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) power devices operating in liquid nitrogen frequently require high-voltage bushings to carry the current leads from the superconducting windings to the room temperature grid connections. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collaborating with Waukesha Electric Systems (WES), SuperPower (SP), and Southern California Edison (SCE) to develop and demonstrate an HTS utility power transformer. Previous dielectric high voltage tests in support of this program have been carried out in test cryostats with commercial epoxy resin bushings from Electro Composites Inc. (ECI). Though the bushings performed well in these short-term tests, their long-term operation at high voltage in liquid nitrogen (LN) needs to be verified for use on the utility grid. Long-term tests are being carried out on a sample 28-kV-rms-class ECI bushing. The bushing has a monolithic cast, cycloaliphatic resin body and is fire- and shatter-resistant. The test cryostat is located in an interlocked cage and is continuously energized at 25 kVac rms. LN is automatically refilled every 9.5 hours. Partial discharge, capacitance, and leakage resistance tests are periodically performed to check for deviations from factory values. At present, over 2400 hours have been accumulated with no changes in these parameters. The tests are scheduled to run for four to six months.

  16. Dry entrapment of enzymes by epoxy or polyester resins hardened on different solid supports.

    PubMed

    Barig, Susann; Funke, Andreas; Merseburg, Andrea; Schnitzlein, Klaus; Stahmann, K-Peter

    2014-06-10

    Embedding of enzymes was performed with epoxy or polyester resin by mixing in a dried enzyme preparation before polymerization was started. This fast and low-cost immobilization method produced enzymatically active layers on different solid supports. As model enzymes the well-characterized Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase and a new threonine aldolase from Ashbya gossypii were used. It was shown that T. lanuginosus lipase recombinantly expressed in Aspergillus oryzae is a monomeric enzyme with a molecular mass of 34kDa, while A. gossypii threonine aldolase expressed in Escherichia coli is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate binding homotetramer with a mass of 180kDa. The enzymes were used freeze dried, in four different preparations: freely diffusing, adsorbed on octyl sepharose, as well as cross-linked enzyme aggregates or as suspensions in organic solvent. They were mixed with standard two-component resins and prepared as layers on solid supports made of different materials e.g. metal, glass, polyester. Polymerization led to encapsulated enzyme preparations showing activities comparable to literature values. PMID:24835099

  17. CRYOGENIC LIFETIME TESTS ON A COMMERCIAL EPOXY RESIN HIGH VOLTAGE BUSHING

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenterly, S W; Pleva, Ed; Ha, Tam T

    2012-01-01

    High-temperature superconducting (HTS) power devices operating in liquid nitrogen frequently require high-voltage bushings to carry the current leads from the superconducting windings to the room temperature grid connections. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is collaborating with Waukesha Electric Systems, SuperPower, and Southern California Edison to develop and demonstrate an HTS utility power transformer. Previous dielectric high voltage tests in support of this program have been carried out in test cryostats with commercial epoxy resin bushings from Electro Composites Inc. (ECI). Though the bushings performed well in these short-term tests, their long-term operation at high voltage in liquid nitrogen needs to be verified for use on the utility grid. Long-term tests are being carried out on a sample 28-kV-class ECI bushing. The bushing has a monolithic cast, cycloaliphatic resin body and is fire- and shatter-resistant. The test cryostat is located in an interlocked cage and is energized at 25 kVac around the clock. Liquid nitrogen (LN) is automatically refilled every 9.5 hours. Partial discharge, capacitance, and leakage resistance tests are periodically performed to check for deviations from factory values. At present, over 2400 hours have been accumulated with no changes in these parameters. The tests are scheduled to run for four to six months.

  18. High-performance UV-curable epoxy resin-based microarray and microfluidic immunoassay devices.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ling; Liu, Yingshuai; Gan, Ye; Li, Chang Ming

    2009-06-15

    Immunoassay devices including microarray and microfluidic systems were fabricated with an UV-curable resin by a new economic approach, which can not only simply produce a 3-dimensional (3D) patterned structure, but also simultaneously introduce functional epoxide groups for efficient protein immobilization. The performance of the epoxy resin-based microarray was improved by optimization of printing buffer, probe concentration, and immobilization time, showing a detection dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude and a limit of detection (LOD) of 10 pg mL(-1) for immunoglobulin G (IgG). The developed microfluidic immunoassay device demonstrates a LOD of 100 pg mL(-1) for IL-5 detection. The device can also be used to colorimetrically detect proteins via naked human eyes for immunoassays. This work provides a simple and inexpensive method to fabricate a sensitive immunoassay device, especially a 3D microfluidic system, which has great potential to develop a portable immunoassay device via human eye detection for point-of-care service and/or high throughput screening of infectious diseases. PMID:19346122

  19. Surface modification of an epoxy resin with polyamines and polydopamine: The effect on the initial electroless copper deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaubroeck, David; Mader, Lothar; De Geyter, Nathalie; Morent, Rino; Dubruel, Peter; Vanfleteren, Jan

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the influence of polydopamine and polyamine surface modifications of an etched epoxy cresol novolak (ECN) resin on the initial electroless copper deposition. Three different strategies to introduce polyamines on a surface in aqueous environment are applied: via polyethyleneimine adsorption (PEI), via polydopamine and via polyamines grafted to polydopamine. Next, the influence of these surface modifications on the catalytic palladium activation is investigated through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Finally, the initial electroless copper deposition on modified epoxy surfaces is evaluated using SEM and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Grafted polyamines on polydopamine surface modifications result in a large increase of the initial deposited copper.

  20. Preparation of serial sections of arthropods using 2,2-dimethoxypropane dehydration and epoxy resin embedding under vacuum.

    PubMed

    Pernstich, A; Krenn, H W; Pass, G

    2003-02-01

    Improved methods are described for anatomical investigation of small insects and other arthropods using serial semithin sections. The specimens were dehydrated with acidified 2,2-dimethoxypropane and embedded in ERL 4206 epoxy resin under vacuum. This procedure ensures good resin impregnation of thin, long body compartments and appendages. Furthermore, it produces excellent overall preservation of the specimen and its fragile anatomical structures. This procedure saves time and gives excellent results when sectioning difficult arthropod material. A continuous recording of serial semithin sections is possible when diamond knives are used. PMID:12713135

  1. Influence of Copper Layer Content in the Elastic and Damping Behavior of Glass-Fiber/Epoxy-Resin Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, V. H.; Capela, P.; Teixeira, J. C.; Teixeira, S.; Cerqueira, F.; Macedo, F.; Ribas, L.; Soares, D.

    2016-06-01

    The impact in the elastic behavior and internal friction, caused by the introduction of Copper layers in Glass-Fiber/Epoxy Resin composites and temperature effects, were studied and evaluated recurring to Dynamic Mechanical Analysis. It is shown that the introduction of Copper layers increases the storage modulus of the composites and delays their glass transition temperature, however, it allows a faster transformation. Additionally, it is concluded that the introduction of Copper layers elevates the internal friction during the glass transition phase by the inversion of the deformation mechanism due to thermal expansion and increase in the Poisson's ratio of the epoxy resin to a value near 0.5 where its deformation is approximately isochoric. This increase in damping capacity is relevant in application with cyclic fatigue and mechanical vibration.

  2. Effects of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Nanoparticles on the Fracture Toughness of an Epoxy Resin at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Cannon, S. A.; Schneider, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of core-shell rubber (CSR) nanoparticles on the fracture toughness of an epoxy resin at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperatures. Varying amounts of Kane Ace (Registered TradeMark) MX130 toughening agent were added to a commercially available EPON 862/W epoxy resin. Resulting fracture toughness was evaluated by the use of Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The size and distribution of the CSR nanoparticles were characterized using Transmission Electric Microscopy (TEM) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Up to nominal 4.6% addition of the CSR nanoparticles, resulted in a nearly 5 times increase in the measured breaking energy. However, further increases in the amount of CSR nanoparticles had no appreciable affect on the breaking energy.

  3. Influence of radiopaque fillers on physicochemical properties of a model epoxy resin-based root canal sealer

    PubMed Central

    COLLARES, Fabrício Mezzomo; KLEIN, Mariana; SANTOS, Paula Dapper; PORTELLA, Fernando Freitas; OGLIARI, Fabrício; LEITUNE, Vicente Castelo Branco; SAMUEL, Susana Maria Werner

    2013-01-01

    Objective To verify the influence of radiopaque fillers on an epoxy resin-based sealer. Material and Methods Experimental sealers were formulated by adding 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, 100% and 120% of calcium tungstate, ytterbium trifluoride or barium sulphate by weight to an epoxy-resin-base. Setting time, flow, film thickness, radiopacity, sorption, solubility, pH and push-out bond strength were evaluated. Results The setting time ranged from 373 to 612.66 min, the flow varied from 13.81±0.49 to 22.49±0.37 mm, and the film thickness ranged from 16.67±5.77 to 33.33±11.54 µm. The lowest pH was 5.47±0.53, and the highest was 6.99±0.03. Radiopacity varied from 0.38±0.04 to 2.57±0.21 mmAl and increased with the amount of filler. Calcium tungstate sealers had a higher sorption and solubility than other sealers. There was no significant difference in the push-out bond strength among the fillers at the 120% concentration. Conclusion The inorganic fillers evaluated and their concentrations affect the physicochemical properties of an epoxy resin-based root canal sealer. PMID:24473719

  4. Investigation of the shear thinning behavior of epoxy resins for utilization in vibration assisted liquid composite molding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R.; Kirdar, C.; Rudolph, N.; Zaremba, S.; Drechsler, K.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient production and consumption of energy are of greatest importance for contemporary industries and their products. This has led to an increasing application of lightweight materials in general and of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) in particular. However, broader application of CFRP is often limited by high costs and manual labor production processes. These constraints are addressed by Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) processes. In LCM a dry fibrous preform is placed into a cavity and infiltrated mostly by thermoset resins; epoxy resins are wide spread in CFRP applications. One crucial parameter for a fast mold filling is the viscosity of the resin, which is affected by the applied shear rates as well as temperature and curing time. The work presented focuses on the characterization of the shear thinning behavior of epoxy resins. Furthermore, the correlation with the conditions in vibration assisted LCM processes, where additional shear rates are created during manufacture, is discussed. Higher shear rates result from high frequencies and/or high amplitudes of the vibration motions which are created by a vibration engine mounted on the mold. In rheological investigations the shear thinning behavior of a representative epoxy resin is studied by means of rotational and oscillatory experiments. Moreover, possible effects of shear rates on the chemical curing reaction are studied. Here, the time for gelation is measured for different levels of shear rates in a pre-shearing phase. Based on the rheological studies, the beneficial effect of vibration assistance in LCM processes with respect to mold filling can further be predicted and utilized.

  5. Processing-property relationships in epoxy resin/titanium dioxide nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; More, Karren Leslie

    2010-01-01

    In situ precipitated titanium dioxide nanoparticles improve the physical properties of polymer composites. Since the pioneering work at Toyota Research Center on exfoliated montmorillonite nanoparticles in a nylon matrix, extensive studies have been performed on polymer nanocomposites in an effort to better integrate organic and inorganic phases. Inorganic fillers, such as silicon and titanium oxides, are widely used because of their remarkable enhancement of the mechanical, electrical, barrier, and flame-retardancy properties of organic polymers. The dispersion and size of the fillers determine the performance of nanocomposites and, despite numerous methods and processing conditions reported in the literature, a universally simple method to scale up the distribution of nanofillers remains a challenge. A significant part of our research involves formulation of novel nanodielectrics that can withstand high electric fields and exhibit superior mechanical performance. Focusing on nanocomposites operating at cryogenic temperatures, our group developed an in situ method for nucleating titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles in polyvinyl alcohol. We also applied this method to a variety of polymer matrices. Here, we present our recent work on a cryogenic resin filled with TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Using a particle-precursor solution from which TiO{sub 2} precipitates, we nucleated nanoparticles within the cryogenic epoxy resin Araldite 5808 (Huntsman Advanced Materials Inc., USA). We fabricated nanocomposite films at low weight percentages ({approx}2.5%) to avoid formation of large aggregates and interfaces. The morphology and dispersion of the in situ synthesized nanoparticles are shown by low- and high-magnification transmission-electron-microscopy (TEM) images. The TiO{sub 2} particles ({le}5nm in diameter) are uniformly nucleated and form evenly distributed nanometer-sized clusters in the polymer matrix. This morphology differs significantly from nanocomposites

  6. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-11-01

    The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed.

  7. Aging Characteristics on Epoxy Resin Surface Under Repetitive Microsecond Pulses in Air at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qing; Liu, Xiong; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ruixue; Rao, Zhangquan; Shao, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Research on aging characteristics of epoxy resin (EP) under repetitive microsecond pulses is important for the design of insulating materials in high power apparatus. It is because that very fast transient overvoltage always occurs in a power system, which causes flashover and is one of the main factors causing aging effects of EP materials. Therefore, it is essential to obtain a better understanding of the aging effect on an EP surface resulting from flashover. In this work, aging effects on an EP surface were investigated by surface flashover discharge under repetitive microsecond pulses in atmospheric pressure. The investigations of parameters such as the surface micro-morphology and chemical composition of the insulation material under different degrees of aging were conducted with the aid of measurement methods such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that with the accumulation of aging energy on the material surface, the particles formed on the material surface increased both in number and size, leading to the growth of surface roughness and a reduction in the water contact angle; the surface also became more absorbent. Furthermore, in the aging process, the molecular chains of EP on the surface were broken, resulting in oxidation and carbonisation. supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province (No. E2015502081), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51222701, 51307060), and the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB239505-3)

  8. Preparation and characterization of a novel magnetorheological elastomer based on polyurethane/epoxy resin IPNs matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, M.; Qi, S.; Fu, J.; Yang, P. A.; Zhu, M.

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes the preparation of a novel magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) with improved damping and mechanical properties. This MRE is based on polyurethane (PU)/epoxy resin (EP) graft interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs). The tensile strengths, thermal stability, magnetorhelogical behavior, and damping properties of the MRE are studied systematically in terms of composition. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra verifies the formation of IPN structures, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that the thermal decomposition temperature was raised by the addition of IPN structures. The test results from the materials test machine and the rheometer show that the presence of IPN can significantly improve the tensile strength and damping properties of the MRE. In addition, the mechanism for enhancing tensile strength and damping properties is proposed. The experiment results suggest that the damping performance of the MRE has a significant correlation with the magnetic strength, content of EP, and temperature. As the thermal endurance properties, tensile strength, and loss factor are improved by incorporating EP/PU IPN structure, it is expected that the PU/EP IPN MRE can be used as an intelligent structural damping material.

  9. Thermoset nanocomposites from waterborne bio-based epoxy resin and cellulose nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo-min; Liu, Di; Liu, Gui-feng; Chen, Jian; Huo, Shu-ping; Kong, Zhen-wu

    2015-01-01

    Thermoset nanocomposites were prepared from a waterborne terpene-maleic ester type epoxy resin (WTME) and cellulose nanowhiskers (CNWs). The curing behaviors of WTME/CNWs nanocomposites were measured with rotational rheometer. The results show that the storage modulus (G') of WTME/CNWs nanocomposites increased with the increase of CNWs content. Observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrate that the incorporation of CNWs in WTME matrix caused microphase separation and destroyed the compactness of the matrix. This effect leads to the glass transition temperatures (Tg) of WTME/CNWs nanocomposites slightly decrease with the increase of CNWs content, which were confirmed by both DSC and DMA tests. The mechanical properties of WTME/CNWs nanocomposites were investigated by tensile testing. The Yong's modulus (E) and tensile strength (σb) of the nanocomposites were significantly reinforced by the addition of CNWs. These results indicate that CNWs exhibit excellent reinforcement effect on WTME matrix, due to the formation and increase of interfacial interaction by hydrogen bonds between CNWs nano-filler and the WTME matrix. PMID:25965479

  10. Linear and nonlinear mechanical properties of a series of epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curliss, D. B.; Caruthers, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The linear viscoelastic properties have been measured for a series of bisphenol-A-based epoxy resins cured with the diamine DDS. The linear viscoelastic master curves were constructed via time-temperature superposition of frequency dependent G-prime and G-double-prime isotherms. The G-double-prime master curves exhibited two sub-Tg transitions. Superposition of isotherms in the glass-to-rubber transition (i.e., alpha) and the beta transition at -60 C was achieved by simple horizontal shifts in the log frequency axis; however, in the region between alpha and beta, superposition could not be effected by simple horizontal shifts along the log frequency axis. The different temperature dependency of the alpha and beta relaxation mechanisms causes a complex response of G-double-prime in the so called alpha-prime region. A novel numerical procedure has been developed to extract the complete relaxation spectra and its temperature dependence from the G-prime and G-double-prime isothermal data in the alpha-prime region.

  11. Effect of γ irradiation on the properties of basalt fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Gu, Yizhuo; Yang, Zhongjia; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation is a crucial reason for the aging in materials used for nuclear industry. Due to high specific strength and stiffness, light weight and good corrosion resistance, fiber reinforced composites are regarded as an alternative of traditional materials used on nuclear facilities. In this study, basalt fiber (BF)/AG80 epoxy composite laminates were fabricated by autoclave process and treated with 60Co gamma irradiation dose up to 2.0 MGy. Irradiation induced polymer chain scission and oxidation of AG80 resin were detected from physical and chemical analysis. The experimental results show that the tensile and flexural performances of irradiated BF/AG80 composite maintain stable and have a low amplitude attenuation respectively, and the interlaminar shear strength has increased from irradiation dose of 0-1.5 MGy. Furthermore, the comparison between the studied BF composite and reported polymer and composite materials was done for evaluating the γ resistance property of BF composite.

  12. Mechanical properties and magnetocaloric effects in La(Fe, Si)13 hydrides bonded with different epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hu; Sun, YuJie; Li, YaWei; Wu, YuanYuan; Long, Yi; Shen, Jun; Hu, FengXia; Sun, JiRong; Shen, BaoGen

    2015-02-01

    The mechanical properties and magnetocaloric effect (MCE) of bonded La(Fe, Si)13 hydrides have been studied in detail. The mechanical strength increases with increasing the grade of epoxy resin from E-20 to E-51. This occurs because more pores and boundaries are filled with high grade resin since high epoxide content increases the degree of crosslinking and reduces the viscosity and shrinkage of resin. The compressive strength reaches 162 MPa for the bonded LaFe11.7Si1.3C0.2H1.8 with 3 wt. % E-51, which is 35% higher than that of bulk LaFe11.7Si1.3C0.2 compound (120 MPa). The mass ΔSM values remain almost same in bonded hydrides and are in a good agreement with the theoretical value. The maximum volumetric ΔSM values are 61.8, 58.0, and 54.7 mJ/cm3 K for bonded hydrides with epoxy resins E-20, E-44, and E-51, respectively, much higher than those of some magnetocaloric materials in same temperature range. The improved mechanical properties and large MCE indicate that bonded LaFe11.7Si1.3C0.2H1.8 is a promising material for room temperature magnetic refrigeration.

  13. Formation of porous epoxy monolith via concentrated emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianli; Zhang, Chen; Du, Zhongjie; Xiang, Aiming; Li, Hangquan

    2008-09-15

    Step polymerization was introduced into the concentrated emulsion templating method and was illustrated with the preparation of porous epoxy monolith. A solution of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA), its curing agent low molecular weight polyamide resin, and surfactant nonyl phenol polyoxyethylene ether in 4-methyl-2-pentanon as a solvent was used as the continuous phase, an aqueous suspension of colloidal silica as the dispersed phase of the concentrated emulsion. After the continuous phase polymerized and the dispersed phase removed, a porous material is obtained. The key point in this work is to find a compromise between the rates of curing and phase separating and thus achieve a kinetic stability of the concentrated emulsion. The effects of loading of colloidal silica, the pre-curing of the epoxy precursors, and the volume fraction of the dispersed phase were systematically investigated. PMID:18571192

  14. Improved epoxy resin for constructing cryogenic filament-wound pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molho, R.; Soffer, L. M.

    1971-01-01

    Mechanical properties of new resin at cryogenic temperatures are substantially improved over similar composite structures utilizing conventional resins, while properties at ambient temperature are identical to conventional resin composites.

  15. The nanoscale phase distinguishing of PCL-PB-PCL blended in epoxy resin by tapping mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huiqin; Sun, Limin; Shen, Guangxia; Liang, Qi

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we investigated the bulk phase distinguishing of the poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-polybutadiene-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL-PB-PCL) triblock copolymer blended in epoxy resin by tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). We found that at a set-point amplitude ratio ( r sp) less than or equal to 0.85, a clear phase contrast could be obtained using a probe with a force constant of 40 N/m. When r sp was decreased to 0.1 or less, the measured size of the PB-rich domain relatively shrank; however, the height images of the PB-rich domain would take reverse (translating from the original light to dark) at r sp = 0.85. Force-probe measurements were carried out on the phase-separated regions by TM-AFM. According to the phase shift angle vs. r sp curve, it could be concluded that the different force exerting on the epoxy matrix or on the PB-rich domain might result in the height and phase image reversion. Furthermore, the indentation depth vs. r sp plot showed that with large tapping force (lower r sp), the indentation depth for the PB-rich domain was nearly identical for the epoxy resin matrix.

  16. The nanoscale phase distinguishing of PCL-PB-PCL blended in epoxy resin by tapping mode atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the bulk phase distinguishing of the poly(ε-caprolactone)-polybutadiene-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL-PB-PCL) triblock copolymer blended in epoxy resin by tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). We found that at a set-point amplitude ratio (rsp) less than or equal to 0.85, a clear phase contrast could be obtained using a probe with a force constant of 40 N/m. When rsp was decreased to 0.1 or less, the measured size of the PB-rich domain relatively shrank; however, the height images of the PB-rich domain would take reverse (translating from the original light to dark) at rsp = 0.85. Force-probe measurements were carried out on the phase-separated regions by TM-AFM. According to the phase shift angle vs. rsp curve, it could be concluded that the different force exerting on the epoxy matrix or on the PB-rich domain might result in the height and phase image reversion. Furthermore, the indentation depth vs. rsp plot showed that with large tapping force (lower rsp), the indentation depth for the PB-rich domain was nearly identical for the epoxy resin matrix. PMID:22360980

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Resin Composites Filled with Combustion Synthesized h-BN Particles.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shyan-Lung; Lin, Jeng-Shung

    2016-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of epoxy resin composites filled with combustion-synthesized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) particles was investigated. The mixing of the composite constituents was carried out by either a dry method (involving no use of solvent) for low filler loadings or a solvent method (using acetone as solvent) for higher filler loadings. It was found that surface treatment of the h-BN particles using the silane 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) increases the thermal conductivity of the resultant composites in a lesser amount compared to the values reported by other studies. This was explained by the fact that the combustion synthesized h-BN particles contain less -OH or active sites on the surface, thus adsorbing less amounts of GPTMS. However, the thermal conductivity of the composites filled with the combustion synthesized h-BN was found to be comparable to that with commercially available h-BN reported in other studies. The thermal conductivity of the composites was found to be higher when larger h-BN particles were used. The thermal conductivity was also found to increase with increasing filler content to a maximum and then begin to decrease with further increases in this content. In addition to the effect of higher porosity at higher filler contents, more horizontally oriented h-BN particles formed at higher filler loadings (perhaps due to pressing during formation of the composites) were suggested to be a factor causing this decrease of the thermal conductivity. The measured thermal conductivities were compared to theoretical predictions based on the Nielsen and Lewis theory. The theoretical predictions were found to be lower than the experimental values at low filler contents (< 60 vol %) and became increasing higher than the experimental values at high filler contents (> 60 vol %). PMID:27213325

  18. Modification of epoxy resin, silicon and glass surfaces with alkyl- or fluoroalkylsilanes for hydrophobic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marczak, Jacek; Kargol, Marta; Psarski, Maciej; Celichowski, Grzegorz

    2016-09-01

    Preparation of superhydrophobic materials inspired by nature has attracted a great scientific interest in recent decades. Some of these materials have hierarchical lotus-like structures, i.e. micro- and nano-objects coated by hydrophobic compounds. A major challenge of applying the superhydrophobic surfaces for the self-cleaning coatings preparation is their improved efficiency in varying atmospheric conditions, e.g. UV light. The objective of this research work was to investigate the effect of the different chemical structure and the surface free energy on the hydrophobic and tribological properties of the alkylsilanes and fluoroalkylsilanes deposited on silicon wafers, glass slides and epoxy resin. Tribological and hydrophobic properties of the modified surfaces were correlated with their chemical structures. Chemical structures of the deposited materials were examined by using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and hydrophobic properties were investigated by water contact angle (WCA) and surface free energy (SFE) measurements. The modified surfaces exhibited water contact angles of above 100° for the selected modifiers. It was noticed that the replacement of hydrogen atoms by fluorine atoms in alkyl chain caused an increase in the water contact angle values and a decrease in friction coefficients. The obtained results showed that the carbon chain length of a modifier and its chemical structure can strongly affect the hydrophobic and tribological properties of the modified surfaces. The highest values of WCA, lowest values of SFE and coefficient of friction were obtained for samples covered by fluorinated compounds. Moreover, some preliminary aging test was performed to give an insight into the effectiveness of deposited alkylsilanes and fluoroalkylsilanes coatings. After accelerated UV exposure, no significant changes in the chemical structure, hydrophobic and tribological properties of the modified surfaces were noticed. The samples degradation

  19. Effect of root canal filling techniques on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based sealers.

    PubMed

    Rached-Júnior, Fuad Jacob Abi; Souza, Angélica Moreira; Macedo, Luciana Martins Domingues; Raucci-Neto, Walter; Baratto-Filho, Flares; Silva, Bruno Marques; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different root canal filling techniques on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based sealers. Sixty single-rooted canines were prepared using ProTaper (F5) and divided into the following groups based on the root filling technique: Lateral Compaction (LC), Single Cone (SC), and Tagger Hybrid Technique (THT). The following subgroups (n = 10) were also created based on sealer material used: AH Plus and Sealer 26. Two-millimeter-thick slices were cut from all the root thirds and subjected to push-out test. Data (MPa) was analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The push-out values were significantly affected by the sealer, filling technique, and root third (p < 0.05). AH Plus (1.37 ± 1.04) exhibited higher values than Sealer 26 (0.92 ± 0.51), while LC (1.80 ± 0.98) showed greater bond strength than THT (1.16 ± 0.50) and SC (0.92 ± 0.25). The cervical (1.45 ± 1.14) third exhibited higher bond strength, followed by the middle (1.20 ± 0.72) and apical (0.78 ± 0.33) thirds. AH Plus/LC (2.26 ± 1.15) exhibited the highest bond strength values, followed by AH Plus/THT (1.32 ± 0.61), Sealer 26/LC (1.34 ± 0.42), and Sealer 26/THT (1.00 ± 0.27). The lowest values were obtained with AH Plus/SC and Sealer 26/SC. Thus, it can be concluded that the filling technique affects the bond strength of sealers. LC was associated with higher bond strength between the material and intra-radicular dentine than THT and SC techniques. PMID:26910020

  20. Rapid bonding of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to various stereolithographically (STL) structurable epoxy resins using photochemically cross-linked intermediary siloxane layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Elisabeth; Neumann, Christiane; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Länge, Kerstin; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a fast, low cost bonding technology for combining rigid epoxy components with soft membranes made out of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Both materials are commonly used for microfluidic prototyping. Epoxy resins are often applied when rigid channels are required, that will not deform if exposed to high pressure. PDMS, on the other hand, is a flexible material, which allows integration of membrane valves on the chip. However, the integration of pressure driven components, such as membrane valves and pumps, into a completely flexible device leads to pressure losses. In order to build up pressure driven components with maximum energy efficiency a combination of rigid guiding channels and flexible membranes would be advisable. Stereolithographic (STL) structuring would be an ideal fabrication technique for this purpose, because complex 3D-channels structures can easily be fabricated using this technology. Unfortunately, the STL epoxies cannot be bonded using common bonding techniques. For this reason we propose two UV-light based silanization techniques that enable plasma induced bonding of epoxy components. The entire process including silanization and corona discharge bonding can be carried out within half an hour. Average bond strengths up to 350 kPa (depending on the silane) were determined in ISO-conform tensile testing. The applicability of both techniques for microfluidic applications was proven by hydrolytic stability testing lasting more than 40 hours.

  1. Ageing of organic electrical insulating materials due to radiation. Physical properties of a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin irradiated under vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparado, G.; Calderaro, E.; Schifani, R.; Tutone, R.; Rizzo, G.

    Physical properties of a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin irradiated under vacuum have been investigated. In particular dynamic-mechanical, dielectric and tensile measurements have been performed. This is a useful basis with a view to studying the ageing phenomenon of organic insulating materials due to radiation under the combined effect of environmental conditions. The results indicate that, in the dose range investigated (0-1.5 x 10 6Gy), the main effect of γ-rays under vacuum is to increase the degree of crosslinking

  2. Polyester and epoxy resins: Abrasion resistance. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and materials for enhanced wear and abrasion resistance of polyester and epoxy resins. Topics include test procedures and results, compounds and additives, forming processes, reinforcement effects, and applications. Electrical insulation, linings and coatings for numerous substrates, solar control film glazing material, hoses, material to rebuild worn metal parts, pipes, boats, industrial floor coverings, and ladder rungs are among the applications discussed. Trade name materials and manufacturers are included. (Contains a minimum of 130 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Color Schemes and Biocompatibility of Epoxy Resin/polytetrafluorethylene Coat on the Surface of Tini Arth Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Ping; Feng, Xue; Sui, Jie He; Cai, Wei; Wang, Tao; Ma, Wei

    In order to avoid the "metallic smile" appearance of metal wires when undergoing orthodontic treatment, epoxy resin/polytetrafluorethylene coating TiNi arch wires were made by dipping method. TiO2 and FeFe2O4 were chosen as dyes in order to match the color of teeth and the color schemes were fixed by spectrophotometer method. The biocompatibility of coating was also examined. The results showed that the cytotoxicity of the coating was grade I, and without mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Skin sensitization assay showed no erythema or oedema response and epithelial was integrated according to mucous membrane irritation. Thus, good behavior in clinic can be anticipated.

  4. Evaluation of Nanomaterial Approaches to Damping in Epoxy Resin and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Structures by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G.; Heimann, Paula J.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Johnston, J. Chris; Roberts, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Vibration mitigation in composite structures has been demonstrated through widely varying methods which include both active and passive damping. Recently, nanomaterials have been investigated as a viable approach to composite vibration damping due to the large surface available to generate energy dissipation through friction. This work evaluates the influence of dispersed nanoparticles on the damping ratio of an epoxy matrix. Limited benefit was observed through dispersion methods, however nanoparticle application as a coating resulting in up to a three-fold increase in damping.

  5. Epoxy-rubber interactions

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, F.J.; Rosner, R.B.

    1993-12-31

    Films containing amine-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile (ATBN) rubber and diglycidal ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy, cross-linked with amine curing agent, exhibit tensile extensibility over the composition range of 50-600 parts by weight rubber to 100 parts by weight epoxy. This tensile extensibility suggests the presence of ductile behavior in the second-phase particles of ATBN rubber-toughened DGEBA epoxy systems, even if the particles contain substantial amounts of epoxy. Such cured films also are capable of absorbing large additional amounts of liquid epoxy that contains the cure agent. When the epoxy is cured in situ, the film tensile behavior is consistent with the overall proportions of rubber and epoxy present. The solubility behavior also suggests that the glassy epoxy matrix immediately surrounding a precipated particle contains rubber in solid solution and thereby can plastically yield under shear-stress action. As observations confirm, such flow would be heat recoverable. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. The effect of resin toughness and modulus on compressive failure modes of quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohi, M. M.; Hahn, H. T.; Williams, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Compressive failure mechanisms in quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy laminates were characterized for both unnotched and notched specimens and also following damage by impact. Two types of fibers (Thornel 300 and 700) and four resin systems (Narmco 5208, American Cyanamid BP907, and Union Carbide 4901/MDA and 4901/mPDA) were studied. For all material combinations, failure of unnotched specimens was initiated by kinking of fibers in the 0-degree plies. A major difference was observed, however, in the mode of failure propagation after the 0-degree ply failure. The strength of quasi-isotropic laminates in general increased with increasing resin tensile modulus. The laminates made with Thornel 700 fibers exhibited slightly lower compressive strengths than did the laminates made with Thornel 300 fibers. The notch sensitivity as measured by the hole strength was lowest for the BP907 resin and highest for the 5208 resin. For the materials studied, however, the type of fiber had no effect on the notch sensitivity.

  7. Radiation effect on interlaminar shear strength of the electric insulation system with cyanate ester and epoxy blended resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, A.; Izumi, Y.; Imaizumi, M.; Nishijima, S.

    2012-06-01

    A fusion reactor will generate a lot of fast neutrons which will activate the materials in the reactor. Since fusion neutrons will reach superconducting magnets and the activated materials will emit a gamma ray, the materials in the reactor will be exposed by the neutron and the gamma ray at the same time. The weakest material against radiation exposure is an organic material for an electric insulation. Cyanate ester resin has been proposed as a candidate material for the insulation system of ITER and it is clarified that the blended resin with epoxy has a potential to survive a design period in the radiation environment. In this study, a molecular structure analysis of the blended resin was carried out and heat flux measurements by differential scanning calorimetry and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) tests at 77 K were performed using irradiated samples with the gamma ray and neutrons. The results show that a triazine ring which has excellent resistance against radiation is formed during the curing process and the insulation composite material with 100% cyanate resin shows almost no degradation after irradiation of over 400 MGy.

  8. Improvement of interfacial property between PBO fibers and epoxy resin by surface grafting of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Meng, L. H.; Huang, Y. D.

    2012-10-01

    PBO fiber as reinforced material has been widely applied in various fields such as aerospace, automobile and sport apparatus due to excellent mechanic property during past two decades. However, poor interfacial adhesion limits the further application of PBO fiber. To solve this problem, plenty of work has been done. In the present study, the surface of PBO fibers was treated through surface grafting of polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxanes (POSS). The effect of POSS grafting on bulk mechanic property and interfacial property of PBO fiber were studied. Surface chemical composition, surface morphologies, surface free energy, single-fiber tensile strength of untreated and treated PBO fiber were characterized. The results show that POSS nanoparticles were grafted on the fiber surface successfully. The surface characteristics of treated PBO fiber were different from that of untreated one. Oxygen-containing polar functional groups, elemental ratio of oxygen to carbon, surface roughness and surface free energy increased significantly. In addition, interfacial shear strength between treated PBO fibers and epoxy resin increased to 54.9 MPa comparative with untreated one. Meanwhile tensile strength of treated PBO fibers only very little decreased. Therefore, POSS surface grafting can be utilized to enhance the interfacial adhesion between PBO fibers and epoxy resin matrix.

  9. A Robust Epoxy Resins @ Stearic Acid-Mg(OH)2 Micronanosheet Superhydrophobic Omnipotent Protective Coating for Real-Life Applications.

    PubMed

    Si, Yifan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2016-06-29

    Superhydrophobic coating has extremely high application value and practicability. However, some difficult problems such as weak mechanical strength, the need for expensive toxic reagents, and a complex preparation process are all hard to avoid, and these problems have impeded the superhydrophobic coating's real-life application for a long time. Here, we demonstrate one kind of omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating via a simple antideposition route and one-step superhydrophobization process. The whole preparation process is facile, and expensive toxic reagents needed. This omnipotent coating can be applied on any solid substrate with great waterproof ability, excellent mechanical stability, and chemical durability, which can be stored in a realistic environment for more than 1 month. More significantly, this superhydrophobic coating also has four protective abilities, antifouling, anticorrosion, anti-icing, and flame-retardancy, to cope with a variety of possible extreme natural environments. Therefore, this omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating not only satisfies real-life need but also has great application potential in many respects. PMID:27265834

  10. Filled and Unfilled Temperature-Dependent Epoxy Resin Blends for Lossy Transducer Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Eames, Matthew D.C.; Hossack, John A.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of our ongoing investigation of low-cost 2-dimensional (2-D) arrays, we studied the temperature-dependent acoustic properties of epoxy blends that could serve as an acoustically lossy backing material in compact 2-D array-based devices. This material should be capable of being machined during array manufacture, while also providing adequate signal attenuation to mitigate backing block reverberation artifacts. The acoustic impedance and attenuation of 5 unfilled epoxy blends and 2 filled epoxy blends—tungsten and fiberglass fillers—were analyzed across a 35°C temperature range in 5°C increments. Unfilled epoxy materials possessed an approximately linear variation of impedance and sigmoidal variation of attenuation properties over the range of temperatures of interest. An intermediate epoxy blend was fitted to a quadratic trend line with R2 values of 0.94 and 0.99 for attenuation and impedance, respectively. It was observed that a fiberglass filler induces a strong quadratic trend in the impedance data with temperature, which results in increased error in the characterization of attenuation and impedance. The tungsten-filled epoxy was not susceptible to such problems because a different method of fabrication was required. At body temperature, the tungsten-filled epoxy could provide a 44 dB attenuation of the round-trip backing block echo in our application, in which the center frequency is 5 MHz and the backing material is 1.1 mm thick. This is an 11 dB increase in attenuation compared with the fiberglass-filled epoxy in the context of our application. This work provides motivation for exploring the use of custom-made tungsten-filled epoxy materials as a substitute PCB-based substrate to provide electrical signal interconnect. PMID:19406716

  11. Process for improving mechanical properties of epoxy resins by addition of cobalt ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A resin product useful as an adhesive, composite or casting resin is described as well as the process used in its preparation to improve its flexural strength mechanical property characteristics. Improved flexural strength is attained with little or no change in density, thermal stability or moisture resistance by chemically incorporating 1.2% to 10.6% by weight Co(3) ions in an epoxidized resin system.

  12. Strain Rate Sensitivity of Epoxy Resin in Tensile and Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilat, Amos; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical response of E-862 and PR-520 resins is investigated in tensile and shear loadings. At both types of loading the resins are tested at strain rates of about 5x10(exp 5), 2, and 450 to 700 /s. In addition, dynamic shear modulus tests are carried out at various frequencies and temperatures, and tensile stress relaxation tests are conducted at room temperature. The results show that the toughened PR-520 resin can carry higher stresses than the untoughened E-862 resin. Strain rate has a significant effect on the response of both resins. In shear both resins show a ductile response with maximum stress that is increasing with strain rate. In tension a ductile response is observed at low strain rate (approx. 5x10(exp 5) /s), and brittle response is observed at the medium and high strain rates (2, and 700 /s). The hydrostatic component of the stress in the tensile tests causes premature failure in the E-862 resin. Localized deformation develops in the PR-520 resin when loaded in shear. An internal state variable constitutive model is proposed for modeling the response of the resins. The model includes a state variable that accounts for the effect of the hydrostatic component of the stress on the deformation.

  13. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES AND COMPONENTS OF COATINGS Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.380... resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as a food-contact coating for... paragraph (a) of this section may be used as a food-contact coating for articles intended for contact...

  14. Curing kinetics and morphology of a nanovesicular epoxy/stearyl-block-poly(ethylene oxide) surfactant system.

    PubMed

    Bogaerts, K; Lavrenova, A; Spoelstra, A B; Boyard, N; Goderis, B

    2015-08-21

    Brittle epoxy based thermosets can be made tougher by introducing structural inhomogeneities at the micro- or nanoscale. In that respect, nano vesicles and worm-like micelles from self-assembling blockcopolymers have been shown to be very effective. This paper describes the curing kinetics and morphology of an epoxy composed of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and 4,4'-methylenedianiline (MDA), modified by 20% of the surfactant stearyl-block-poly(ethylene oxide). Time resolved, synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering demonstrates that at any time during the epoxy curing process, the surfactant predominantly adopts a bilayer vesicular nano-morphology. Transmission electron microscopy on fully cured systems reveals the coexistence of spherical and worm-like micelles. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments prove that the presence of surfactant reduces the epoxy curing rate but that ultimately full curing is accomplished. The material glass transition temperature falls below that of the pure resin due to plasticization. It is suggested that favorable secondary interactions between the PEO segments and the epoxy resin are responsible for the observed phenomena. PMID:26144526

  15. Ageing of organic electrical insulating materials due to radiation—III. Dielectric properties of a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin: Effect of irradiation environmental conditions and dose rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spadaro, G.; Calderaro, E.; Schifani, R.; Rizzo, G.

    The effect of dose rate under different environmental conditions on a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin is considered. In particular dielectric measurements were performed. The dose rate is an interesting parameter on evaluating the behaviour of insulating materials in real operating conditions by means of accelerated ageing laboratory tests.

  16. Ageing of organic electrical insulating materials due to radiation—II. Physical properties of a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin irradiated in moisture saturated air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spadaro, G.; Calderaro, E.; Rizzo, G.

    Physical properties of a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin irradiated in moisture saturated air have been investigated. In particular dynamic-medical, dielectric and tensile measurements have been performed. The results suggest that at low irradiation doses the degradation, due to moisture absorption, predominates, whereas at high doses the main effect is an increase of the degree of crosslinking due to irradiation.

  17. DSC and curing kinetics study of epoxy grouting diluted with furfural -acetone slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H.; Sun, D. W.; Li, B.; Liu, Y. T.; Ran, Q. P.; Liu, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The use of furfural-acetone slurry as active diluents of Bisphenol-A epoxy resin (DGEBA) groutings has been studied by dynamic and non-isothermal DSC for the first time. Curing kinetics study was investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetries at different heating rates. Activation enery (Ea) was calculated based on Kissinger and Ozawa Methods, and the results showed that Ea increased from 58.87 to 71.13KJ/mol after the diluents were added. The furfural-acetone epoxy matrix could cure completely at the theoretical curing temperature of 365.8K and the curing time of 139mins, which were determined by the kinetic model parameters.

  18. Surface modification of an epoxy resin with polyamines and polydopamine: Adhesion toward electroless deposited copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaubroeck, David; Mader, Lothar; Dubruel, Peter; Vanfleteren, Jan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper the influence of the epoxy roughness, surface modifications and ELD (electroless copper deposition) temperatures on the adhesive strength of the copper is studied. Good adhesion at low roughness values is targeted due to their applicability in high density electronic circuits. Roughened epoxy surfaces are modified with adsorbed polyamines, polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine. Next the, adhesive strength of ELD copper is determined with peel strength measurements and the interphases are examined with SEM (scanning electron microscopy). Polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine can lead to increased adhesive strength at lower roughness values compared to the non-modified samples at specific plating temperatures.

  19. Bisimide amine cured epoxy /IME/ resins and composites. II - Ten-degree off-axis tensile and shear properties of Celion 6000/IME composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Bisimide amines (BIAs), which are presently used as curing agents in a state-of-the-art epoxy resin, are oligomeric and polymeric mixtures. A series of composites consisting of the novel BIA-cured epoxy resin reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fibers were fabricated and evaluated, and the ten-degree, off-axis uniaxial tensile and shear properties of these composites were determined. The use of the intralaminar shear strain-to-failure was used in the calculation of resin shear strain-to-failure. Study results indicate that several of these novel composite systems exhibit shear strain properties that are superior to those of the control composite system of the present experiments, which employed a sulfone curing agent.

  20. Microautoradiography of Water-Soluble Compounds in Plant Tissue after Freeze-Drying and Pressure Infiltration with Epoxy Resin

    PubMed Central

    Vogelmann, Thomas C.; Dickson, Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    It is difficult to retain and localize radioactive, water-soluble compounds within plant cells. Existing techniques retain water-soluble compounds with varying rates of efficiency and are limited to processing only a few samples at one time. We developed a modified pressure infiltration technique for the preparation of microautoradiographs of 14C-labeled, water-soluble compounds in plant tissue. Samples from cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) labeled with 14C were excised, quick frozen in liquid N2, freeze-dried at −50°C, and pressure-infiltrated with epoxy resin without intermediate solvents or prolonged incubation times. The technique facilitates the mass processing of samples for microautoradiography, gives good cellular retention of labeled water-soluble compounds, and is highly reproducible. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16662542

  1. Dynamics and mechanism of cavitation erosion on perspex and epoxy resins tested in a rotating disk device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Rao, N. S. L.; Rao, B. C. S.

    1982-01-01

    The cavitation erosion behavior including the initiation, dynamics and mechanism of damage process on perspex and epoxy resin specimens tested in a rotating disk device were discussed with respect to exposure time. The inception of erosion always took place at the location nearest to the center of rotation of the disk. Subsequently, as exposure time increased, erosion initiated at other locations as well. Light optical photographs and scanning electron micrographs clearly indicate that most of the material loss appears to occur form the networks of cracks due to their interaction and pits indicate particle debris. The optical degradation (loss of transmittance) on perspex was observed to be more on the rear side than on the front side.

  2. Effect of titania particles on the microstructure and properties of the epoxy resin coatings on sintered NdFeB permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J. L.; Huang, Z. X.; Luo, J. M.; Zhong, Z. C.

    2014-04-01

    The nanometer titania particles enhanced epoxy resin composite coatings were prepared on the sintered NdFeB permanent magnets by cathodic electrophoretic deposition. The effects of titania particle concentrations on the microstructure and properties of the epoxy coatings were investigated by surface and cross-sectional morphologies observation, surface roughness and microhardness measurement, H2SO4 solution immersion test, neutral salt spray test and magnetic properties measurement. The results showed that the thickness of epoxy coatings with and without the titania particles addition was about 40 μm. The titania particles could be uniformly dispersed and embedded in the epoxy matrix if the titania particles concentration was lower than 40 g/l. With increasing titania particle concentrations, the number of the particles embedded in the epoxy matrix increased and the surface roughness and microhardness of the composite coatings increased. At the same time, the weight loss of the coated samples immersed in H2SO4 solution decreased and the neutral salt spray time of the coated samples prolonged. It could be concluded that the titania particles did not change the thickness of the epoxy coatings and did not deteriorate the magnetic properties of NdFeB substrates, but could greatly improve the microhardness and corrosion resistance of the epoxy coatings.

  3. Effect of nanoclay reinforcement on the X-band dielectric properties of epoxy resins for use in radome applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Carla; Fittipaldi, Mauro; Grace, Landon R.

    2015-05-01

    The suitability of nanoclay reinforcement for improvement of structural and electrical properties of thermosetting epoxy systems at 10 GHz is investigated via a resonant technique. The potential of nanoclay reinforcement to improve mechanical properties and mitigate moisture diffusion in polymer materials has been well-documented in recent years. Further, evidence has shown that the presence of moisture in polymer systems has a profoundly deleterious effect on relative permittivity and loss tangent of the material. This is particularly important for construction or coating of radar protecting structures (radome), in which low relative permittivity and loss tangent are critical to radar transparency. Therefore, the addition of nanoclay reinforcement to polymer composites used in radome applications may prove a viable method for dielectric and structural performance improvement and moisture absorption minimization. The relative permittivity and loss tangent of two epoxy resin systems are evaluated as a function of organoclay weight percentage using a split-post dielectric resonator operating at an X-band frequency. Nanoclay content up to 5% by weight is investigated for both systems. The addition of nanoclay did not have a significant effect on the relative permittivity of the material, contributing only up to a 1% decrease (improvement) compared to the neat epoxy. The material loss tangent, however, exhibited a consistent downward trend, with a nearly 13% decrease recorded for the nanoclay content of 5% by weight in the most extreme case. Based on these results, the addition of nanoclay to polymer composite materials used in radome applications has no detrimental effect on the dielectric properties of the material, and as such may prove to be a viable option for improving radome performance and longevity.

  4. Thermal Properties and Crystallite Morphology of Nylon 66 Modified with a Novel Biphenyl Aromatic Liquid Crystalline Epoxy Resin

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhiqi; Mei, Shuang; Lu, Yuan; He, Yuanqi; Pi, Pihui; Cheng, Jiang; Qian, Yu; Wen, Xiufang

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the thermal properties of important engineering plastics, a novel kind of liquid crystalline epoxy resin (LCER), 3,3′,5,5′-Tetramethylbiphenyl-4,4′-diyl bis(4-(oxiran-2-ylmethoxy)benzoate) (M1) was introduced to blend with nylon 66 (M2) at high temperature. The effects of M1 on chemical modification and crystallite morphology of M2 were investigated by rheometry, thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarized optical microscopy (POM). TGA results showed that the initial decomposition temperature of M2 increased by about 8 °C by adding 7% wt M1, indicating the improvement of thermal stability. DSC results illustrated that the melting point of composites decreased by 12 °C compared to M2 as the content of M1 increased, showing the improvement of processing property. POM measurements confirmed that dimension of nylon-66 spherulites and crystallization region decreased because of the addition of liquid crystalline epoxy M1. PMID:24132153

  5. Suppression of surface charge accumulation on Al2O3-filled epoxy resin insulator under dc voltage by direct fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Boya; Zhang, Guixin; Wang, Qiang; Li, Chuanyang; He, Jinliang; An, Zhenlian

    2015-12-01

    Surface charge accumulation on insulators under high dc voltage is a major factor that may lead to the reduction of insulation levels in gas insulated devices. In this paper, disc insulators made of Al2O3-filled epoxy resin were surface fluorinated using a F2/N2 mixture (12.5% F2) at 50 °C and 0.1 MPa for different durations of 15 min, 30 min and 60 min. A dc voltage was applied to the insulator for 30 min and the charge density on its surface was measured by an electrostatic probe. The results revealed significant lower surface charge densities on the fluorinated insulators in comparison with the original one. Surface conductivity measurements indicated a higher surface conductivity by over three orders of magnitude after fluorination, which would allow the charges to transfer along the surface and thus may suppress their accumulation. Further, attenuated total reflection infrared analysis and surface morphology observations of the samples revealed that the introduction of fluoride groups altered the surface physicochemical properties. These structure changes, especially the physical defects reduced the depth of charge traps in the surface layer, which was verified by the measurement of energy distributions of the electron and hole traps based on the isothermal current theory. The results in this paper demonstrate that fluorination can be a promising and effective method to suppress surface charge accumulation on epoxy insulators in gas insulated devices.

  6. Preparation and characterization of sizable macroporous epoxy resin-based monolithic supports for flow-through systems.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh Mai; Dinh, Ngoc Phuoc; Cam, Quach Minh; Sparrman, Tobias; Irgum, Knut

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents further results from our efforts to prepare sizable macroporous monolithic materials from epoxy resins and polyamines by emulsion polymerization. For their uses as supports in flow systems, the study aimed at developing materials possessing maximum fluid permeability, high mechanical stability, and a controlled porosity and surface area. Characterization of the materials has been carried out using different techniques, focusing on morphological and mechanical features, and on the surface chemistry. Morphology and porosity were studied with SEM, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), and (2)H NMR cryoporosimetry. The chemical composition of the bulk structures and their surfaces was studied by means of bulk elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and potentiometric titration was used to assess the relative amounts of amines and epoxy groups. Essentially, the morphological features were a high fluid permeability, but rather low specific surface area. Convective flow was facilitated by large, interconnected, and evenly spaced macropores which were formed by nonporous skeletons of the connected-rod type. Despite the interfacial nature of the polymerization, the bulk and the surface of the fully cured materials showed similar elemental compositions. All materials were found to have a high surface density of hydroxyl groups, which facilitates functionalization reactions. PMID:19670275

  7. Effect of amino-modified silica nanoparticles on the corrosion protection properties of epoxy resin-silica hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kung-Chin; Lin, Hui-Fen; Lin, Chang-Yu; Kuo, Tai-Hung; Huang, Hsin-Hua; Hsu, Sheng-Chieh; Yeh, Jui-Ming; Yang, Jen-Chang; Yu, Yuan-Hsiang

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, a series of organic-inorganic hybrid materials consisting of epoxy resin frameworks and dispersed nanoparticles of amino-modified silica (AMS) were successfully prepared. First of all, the AMS nanoparticles were synthesized by carrying out the conventional acid-catalyzed sol-gel reactions of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) in the presence of (3-aminopropyl)-trimethoxysilane (APTES) molecules. The as-prepared AMS nanoparticles were then characterized by FTIR, 13C-NMR and 29Si-NMR spectroscopy. Subsequently, a series of hybrid materials were prepared by performing in-situ thermal ring-opening polymerization reactions of epoxy resin in the presence of as-prepared AMS nanoparticles and raw silica (RS) particles. The as-prepared epoxy-silica hybrid materials with AMS nanoparticles were found to show better dispersion capability than that of RS particles existed in hybrid materials based on the morphological observation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The hybrid materials containing AMS nanoparticles in the form of coating on cold-rolled steel (CRS) were found to be much superior in corrosion protection over those of hybrid materials with RS particles when tested by a series of electrochemical measurements of potentiodynamic and impedance spectroscopy in 5 wt% aqueous NaCI electrolyte. The increase of corrosion protection effect of hybrid coatings may have probably resulted from the enhancement of the adhesion strength of the hybrid coatings on CRS coupons, which may be attributed to the formation of Fe-O-Si covalent bond at the interface of coating/CRS system based on the FTIR-RAS (reflection absorption spectroscopy) studies. The better dispersion capability of AMS nanoparticles in hybrid materials were found to lead more effectively enhanced molecular barrier property, mechanical strength, surface hydrophobicity and optical clarity as compared to that of RS particles, in the form of coating and membrane, based on the measurements of molecular

  8. Development of palm oil-based UV-curable epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins for wood coating application

    SciTech Connect

    Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Salleh, Mek Zah; Salleh, Nik Ghazali Nik; Ibrahim, Mohammad Izzat; Yunus, Nurulhuda Mohd

    2014-02-12

    The trend of using renewable sources such as palm oil as raw material in radiation curing is growing due to the demand from the market to produce a more environmental friendly product. In this study, the radiation curable process was done using epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins which are known as epoxidised palm olein acrylate (EPOLA) and palm oil based urethane acrylate (POBUA), respectively. The purpose of the study was to investigate curing properties and the application of this UV-curable palm oil resins for wood coating. Furthermore, the properties of palm oil based coatings are compared with the petrochemical-based compound such as ebecryl (EB) i.e. EB264 and EB830. From the experiment done, the resins from petrochemical-based compounds resulted higher degree of crosslinking (up to 80%) than the palm oil based compounds (up to 70%), where the different is around 10-15%. The hardness property from this two type coatings can reached until 50% at the lower percentage of the oligomer. However, the coatings from petrochemical-based have a high scratch resistance as it can withstand at least up to 3.0 Newtons (N) compared to the palm oil-based compounds which are difficult to withstand the load up to 1.0 N. Finally, the test on the rubber wood substrate showed that the coatings containing benzophenone photoinitiator give higher adhesion property and their also showed a higher glosiness property on the glass substrate compared to the coatings containing irgacure-819 photoinitiator. This study showed that the palm oil coatings can be a suitable for the replacement of petrochemicals compound for wood coating. The palm oil coatings can be more competitive in the market if the problems of using high percentage palm oil oligomer can be overcome as the palm oil price is cheap enough.

  9. Development of palm oil-based UV-curable epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins for wood coating application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajau, Rida; Ibrahim, Mohammad Izzat; Yunus, Nurulhuda Mohd; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Salleh, Mek Zah; Salleh, Nik Ghazali Nik

    2014-02-01

    The trend of using renewable sources such as palm oil as raw material in radiation curing is growing due to the demand from the market to produce a more environmental friendly product. In this study, the radiation curable process was done using epoxy acrylate and urethane acrylate resins which are known as epoxidised palm olein acrylate (EPOLA) and palm oil based urethane acrylate (POBUA), respectively. The purpose of the study was to investigate curing properties and the application of this UV-curable palm oil resins for wood coating. Furthermore, the properties of palm oil based coatings are compared with the petrochemical-based compound such as ebecryl (EB) i.e. EB264 and EB830. From the experiment done, the resins from petrochemical-based compounds resulted higher degree of crosslinking (up to 80%) than the palm oil based compounds (up to 70%), where the different is around 10-15%. The hardness property from this two type coatings can reached until 50% at the lower percentage of the oligomer. However, the coatings from petrochemical-based have a high scratch resistance as it can withstand at least up to 3.0 Newtons (N) compared to the palm oil-based compounds which are difficult to withstand the load up to 1.0 N. Finally, the test on the rubber wood substrate showed that the coatings containing benzophenone photoinitiator give higher adhesion property and their also showed a higher glosiness property on the glass substrate compared to the coatings containing irgacure-819 photoinitiator. This study showed that the palm oil coatings can be a suitable for the replacement of petrochemicals compound for wood coating. The palm oil coatings can be more competitive in the market if the problems of using high percentage palm oil oligomer can be overcome as the palm oil price is cheap enough.

  10. [Microbial settlement of paint- and building-materials in the sphere of drinking water. 7. Communication: long time observations in two drinking water reservoirs coated by epoxy resin (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schoenen, D; Dott, W; Thofern, E

    1981-01-01

    In two potable water reservoirs with an epoxy resin lining an increase of the colony count in the water and a visible microbial growth on the surface could be observed. The slime consists of bacteria and fungi. In one case higher organisms like protozoa were found too. The growth of microorganisms is caused by organic compounds of the epoxy resin which can be deteriorated by microorganisms. After a period of 3 years both materials still promote microbial growth on the surface. PMID:6792815

  11. ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TITANIUM DIOXIDE NANOPARTICLE FILLED EPOXY RESIN COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Polizos, G.; Tuncer, E.; Sauers, I.; James, D. R.; Ellis, A. R.; More, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous solution. They were dispersed into an epoxy polymer matrix (commercially available under the trade name Araldite 5808) using a planetary mixer. Nanocomposite materials were prepared with several weight loadings of nanoparticles In this work we Investigate the effects of the particle agglomeration on the mechanical and electrical properties of the composites. The structure of the composites was probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For investigating the mechanical properties, a dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA) was employed. The dielectric breakdown strength and the impedance response were also measured in order to characterize the insulating properties of the nanocomposites and their potential use in high voltage applications.

  12. Nanoscale surface charge detection in epoxy resin materials using electrostatic force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khoury, D.; Arinero, R.; Laurentie, J. C.; Castellon, J.

    2016-03-01

    Electrostatic force spectroscopy (EFS) operated in a conventional force gradient detection method allows determining local surface charges in epoxy samples. This is made possible through a detailed analysis of gradient versus DC voltage curves. The parabolic dependence of these curves is closely related to the charge density. Both maximum and origin-ordinate are key data from which it is possible to extract quantitative information on the detected charge. The study is based on the combined use of numerical and analytical simulations of the probe sample interaction. Excellent sensitivities to very low surface charge densities are reported.

  13. Electrical and Mechanical Properties of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle Filled Epoxy Resin Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polizos, G.; Tuncer, E.; Sauers, I.; James, D. R.; Ellis, A. R.; More, K. L.

    2010-04-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous solution. They were dispersed into an epoxy polymer matrix (commercially available under the trade name Araldite 5808) using a planetary mixer. Nanocomposite materials were prepared with several weight loadings of nanoparticles. In this work we investigate the effects of the particle agglomeration on the mechanical and electrical properties of the composites. The structure of the composites was probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For investigating the mechanical properties, a dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA) was employed. The dielectric breakdown strength and the impedance response were also measured in order to characterize the insulating properties of the nanocomposites and their potential use in high voltage applications.

  14. CARBON FIBRE COMPOSITE MATERIALS PRODUCED BY GAMMA RADIATION INDUCED CURING OF EPOXY RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Dispenza, C.; Spadaro, G.; Alessi, S.

    2008-08-28

    It is well known that ionizing radiation can initiate polymerization of suitable monomers for many applications. In this work an epoxy difunctional monomer has been used as matrix of a carbon fibre composite in order to produce materials through gamma radiation, for aerospace and advanced automotive applications. Radiation curing has been performed at different absorbed doses and, as comparison, also thermal curing of the same monomer formulations has been done. Furthermore some irradiated samples have been also subjected to a post irradiation thermal curing in order to complete the polymerization reactions. The properties of the cured materials have been studied by moisture absorption isotherms, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis and mechanical flexural tests.

  15. Sorption of uranyl ions from various acido systems by amphoteric epoxy amine ion-exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Rychkov, V.N.; Radionov, B.K.; Molochnikov, L.S.

    1995-03-01

    Sorption of uranyl ions by epoxy amine ampholytes with N-monomethylenephosphonic acid groups modified with pyridine or quaternary ammonium groups was studied under dynamic conditions. Heterocyclic nitrogen favors sorption of uranyl ion from fluoride, sulfate, and fluoride-sulfate solutions. The ESR studies of mono- and bimetallic forms of nitrogen-containing ampholytes with copper(II) as paramagnetic marker revealed the characteristics of uranium(VI) interaction with cation- and anion-exchange groups and its dependence on the fluoride content in solution.

  16. Effect of Graphene Addition on Shape Memory Behavior of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Tiffany; Meador, Michael; Miller, Sandi; Scheiman, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) and composites are a special class of smart materials known for their ability to change size and shape upon exposure to an external stimulus (e.g. light, heat, pH, or magnetic field). These materials are commonly used for biomedical applications; however, recent attempts have been made towards developing SMPs and composites for use in aircraft and space applications. Implementing SMPs and composites to create a shape change effect in some aircraft structures could potentially reduce drag, decrease fuel consumption, and improve engine performance. This paper discusses the development of suitable materials to use in morphing aircraft structures. Thermally responsive epoxy SMPs and nanocomposites were developed and the shape memory behavior and thermo-mechanical properties were studied. Overall, preliminary results from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) showed that thermally actuated shape memory epoxies and nanocomposites possessed Tgs near approximately 168 C. When graphene nanofiller was added, the storage modulus and crosslinking density decreased. On the other hand, the addition of graphene enhanced the recovery behavior of the shape memory nanocomposites. It was assumed that the addition of graphene improved shape memory recovery by reducing the crosslinking density and increasing the elasticity of the nanocomposites.

  17. Effect of fluorination on the surface electrical properties of epoxy resin insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaqiang; Li, Liqiang; Du, Xuelian

    2014-09-01

    Epoxy samples were surface fluorinated in a laboratory vessel using a F2/N2 gas mixture to suppress surface charge accumulation. Attenuated total reflection infrared analyses indicate that the fluorination led to substantial variations in chemical composition and structure of the sample surface layer. Measurement results of surface properties indicate that surface conductivity and wettability or polarity were dramatically increased by the fluorination. A very likely decrease in charge trap depth and the adsorbed water on the surface in air are responsible for the high surface conductivity. As a result, charge cannot accumulate on the fluorinated surface even at room temperature, rapidly transporting along the surface. Surface charging current measurements further show a much larger steady state current flowing along the fluorinated surface, suggesting much lower dynamic surface potential or charge density during charging, compared with those for the original surface.

  18. Effect of fluorination on the surface electrical properties of epoxy resin insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaqiang; Li, Liqiang; Du, Xuelian

    2015-02-01

    Epoxy samples were surface fluorinated in a laboratory vessel using a F2/N2 gas mixture to suppress surface charge accumulation. Attenuated total reflection infrared analyses indicate that the fluorination led to substantial variations in chemical composition and structure of the sample surface layer. Measurement results of surface properties indicate that surface conductivity and wettability or polarity were dramatically increased by the fluorination. A very likely decrease in charge trap depth and the adsorbed water on the surface in air are responsible for the high surface conductivity. As a result, charge cannot accumulate on the fluorinated surface even at room temperature, rapidly transporting along the surface. Surface charging current measurements further show a much larger steady state current flowing along the fluorinated surface, suggesting much lower dynamic surface potential or charge density during charging, compared with those for the original surface.

  19. Structural Testing of a Stitched/Resin Film Infused Graphite-Epoxy Wing Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Bush, Harold G.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a series of tests conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to evaluate the behavior of an all-composite full-scale wing box are presented. The wing box is representative of a section of a 220-passenger commercial transport aircraft wing box and was designed and constructed by The Boeing Company as part of the NASA Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) program. The semi-span wing was fabricated from a graphite-epoxy material system with cover panels and spars held together using Kevlar stitches through the thickness. No mechanical fasteners were used to hold the stiffeners to the skin of the cover panels. Tests were conducted with and without low-speed impact damage, discrete source damage and repairs. Up-bending, down-bending and brake roll loading conditions were applied. The structure with non-visible impact damage carried 97% of Design Ultimate Load prior to failure through a lower cover panel access hole.

  20. 40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28214 thermosetting resins including those resins and resin groups listed below. Product groups are indicated with an asterisk (*). *Alkyd Resins Dicyanodiamide Resin *Epoxy Resins *Fumaric Acid Polyesters *Furan Resins Glyoxal-Urea Formaldehyde Textile Resin...

  1. 40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28214 thermosetting resins including those resins and resin groups listed below. Product groups are indicated with an asterisk (*). *Alkyd Resins Dicyanodiamide Resin *Epoxy Resins *Fumaric Acid Polyesters *Furan Resins Glyoxal-Urea Formaldehyde Textile Resin...

  2. 40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28214 thermosetting resins including those resins and resin groups listed below. Product groups are indicated with an asterisk (*). *Alkyd Resins Dicyanodiamide Resin *Epoxy Resins *Fumaric Acid Polyesters *Furan Resins Glyoxal-Urea Formaldehyde Textile Resin...

  3. 40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28214 thermosetting resins including those resins and resin groups listed below. Product groups are indicated with an asterisk (*). *Alkyd Resins Dicyanodiamide Resin *Epoxy Resins *Fumaric Acid Polyesters *Furan Resins Glyoxal-Urea Formaldehyde Textile Resin...

  4. 40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the products classified under SIC 28214 thermosetting resins including those resins and resin groups listed below. Product groups are indicated with an asterisk (*). *Alkyd Resins Dicyanodiamide Resin *Epoxy Resins *Fumaric Acid Polyesters *Furan Resins Glyoxal-Urea Formaldehyde Textile Resin...

  5. A Carboxyl-Terminated Polybutadiene Liquid Rubber Modified Epoxy Resin with Enhanced Toughness and Excellent Electrical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lina; Zhou, Wenying; Sui, Xuezhen; Wang, Zijun; Cai, Huiwu; Wu, Peng; Zuo, Jing; Liu, Xiangrong

    2016-07-01

    The modification of epoxy (EP) resin with carboxyl-terminated polybutadiene (CTPB) liquid rubber was carried out in this work. The chemical reaction between the oxirane ring of EP and the carboxyl group of CTPB and kinetic parameters were investigated by Fourier transform infrared and differential scanning calorimetry. The resulting pre-polymers were cured with methyl hexahydrophthalic anhydride. Scanning electron microscopic observations indicate that the micro-sized CTPB particles dispersed uniformly in the EP matrix formed a two-phase morphology, mainly contributing to the improved toughness of the modified network. The best overall mechanical performance was achieved with 20 phr CTPB; above it, a fall in the strength and modulus was observed. The storage modulus and loss declined with the CTPB concentration due to its lower modulus and plasticizing effect from dynamic mechanical analysis measurements. Moreover, due to the weak polarity and excellent electrical insulation of CTPB, the CTPB-modified EP presented higher electrical resistivities and breakdown strength, and low dielectric permittivity and loss compared with neat EP.

  6. A Carboxyl-Terminated Polybutadiene Liquid Rubber Modified Epoxy Resin with Enhanced Toughness and Excellent Electrical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lina; Zhou, Wenying; Sui, Xuezhen; Wang, Zijun; Cai, Huiwu; Wu, Peng; Zuo, Jing; Liu, Xiangrong

    2016-04-01

    The modification of epoxy (EP) resin with carboxyl-terminated polybutadiene (CTPB) liquid rubber was carried out in this work. The chemical reaction between the oxirane ring of EP and the carboxyl group of CTPB and kinetic parameters were investigated by Fourier transform infrared and differential scanning calorimetry. The resulting pre-polymers were cured with methyl hexahydrophthalic anhydride. Scanning electron microscopic observations indicate that the micro-sized CTPB particles dispersed uniformly in the EP matrix formed a two-phase morphology, mainly contributing to the improved toughness of the modified network. The best overall mechanical performance was achieved with 20 phr CTPB; above it, a fall in the strength and modulus was observed. The storage modulus and loss declined with the CTPB concentration due to its lower modulus and plasticizing effect from dynamic mechanical analysis measurements. Moreover, due to the weak polarity and excellent electrical insulation of CTPB, the CTPB-modified EP presented higher electrical resistivities and breakdown strength, and low dielectric permittivity and loss compared with neat EP.

  7. Effect of final irrigation protocols on push-out bond strength of an epoxy resin root canal sealer to dentin.

    PubMed

    Leal, Fernanda; Simão, Renata Antoun; Fidel, Sandra Rivera; Fidel, Rivail Antônio Sérgio; do Prado, Maíra

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different final irrigation protocols on push-out bond strength of an epoxy resin root canal sealer to dentin. Eighty single-rooted anterior teeth were used. The root canals were partially prepared using a rotary system and the final diameter was standardised using a #5 Gates-Glidden drill prior to the push-out bond test. During chemomechanical preparation, 5.25% NaOCl or 2% CHX gel was used. For smear layer removal, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or QMix 2 in 1 was applied for 3 min. As final irrigant, 1 mL of NaOCl, CHX solution or distilled water was used. On conclusion of preparation, canals were filled with gutta-percha/AH Plus sealer. Bond strength was measured by the push-out test. Data were statistically analysed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests. The group NaOCl/EDTA/NaOCl showed significantly higher bond strength values than other groups. In all groups, there were mainly mixed failure patterns. It can be concluded that 5.25% NaOCl proved to be the best solution for the final irrigation when combined with EDTA. The final irrigation protocols affect the push-out bond strength of AH Plus to dentin. PMID:25950117

  8. Flow injection spectrophotometric method for chloride determination in natural waters using Hg(SCN)(2) immobilized in epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Silva, Claudineia R; Vieira, Heberth J; Canaes, Larissa S; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2005-02-28

    A flow injection (FI) spectrophotometric method was proposed for the determination of chloride ion in natural waters. The determination of chloride was carried out by reaction with Hg(SCN)(2) immobilized in an epoxy resin bead in a solid-phase reactor (SPR) and the thiocyanate ions released were determined spectrophotometrically at 480nm after complexing reaction with Fe(III). The analytical curve for chloride was linear in the concentration range from 5.6 x 10(-5) to 2.2 x 10(-4)moll(-1) with a detection limit of 1.4 x 10(-5)moll(-1). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 2.2% for a solution containing 2.2 x 10(-4)moll(-1) (n = 10). The simple manifold allows a routine analytical frequency of 100 determinations per hour. The main advantage of the developed method is the 400% reduction of the Hg waste solution generated when compared to conventional methods for chloride determination based on the same spectrophotometric reaction. PMID:18969896

  9. Wear-resistant and electromagnetic absorbing behaviors of oleic acid post-modified ferrite-filled epoxy resin composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zang, Chongguang; Jiao, Qingjie

    2015-03-01

    The post-modified Mn-Zn ferrite was prepared by grafting oleic acid on the surface of Mn-Zn ferrite to inhibit magnetic nanoparticle aggregation. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the particle surfaces. The friction and electromagnetic absorbing properties of a thin coating fabricated by dispersing ferrite into epoxy resin (EP) were investigated. The roughness of the coating and water contact angle were measured using the VEECO and water contact angle meter. Friction tests were conducted using a stainless-steel bearing ball and a Rockwell diamond tip, respectively. The complex permittivity and complex permeability of the composite coating were studied in the low frequency (10 MHz-1.5 GHz). Surface modified ferrites are found to improve magnetic particles dispersion in EP resulting in significant compatibility between inorganic and organic materials. Results also indicate that modified ferrite/EP coatings have a lower roughness average value and higher water contact angle than original ferrite/EP coatings. The enhanced tribological properties of the modified ferrite/EP coatings can be seen from the increased coefficient value. The composite coatings with modified ferrite are observed to exhibit better reflection loss compared with the coatings with original ferrite.

  10. Study of AC Magnetic Properties and Core Losses of Fe/Fe3O4-epoxy Resin Soft Magnetic Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxminarayana, T. A.; Manna, Subhendu Kumar; Fernandes, B. G.; Venkataramani, N.

    Soft Magnetic Composites (SMC) were prepared by coating of nanocrystalline Fe3O4 particles, synthesized by co-precipitation method, on atomized iron powder of particle size less than 53 μm in size using epoxy resin as a binder between iron and Fe3O4. Fe3O4 was chosen, for its high electric resistivity and suitable magnetic properties, to keep the coating layer magnetic and seek improvement to the magnetic properties of SMC. SEM images and XRD patterns were recorded in order to investigate the coatings on the surface of iron powder. A toroid was prepared by cold compaction of coated iron powder at 1050 MPa and subsequently cured at 150˚C for 1 hr in argon atmosphere. For comparison of properties, a toroid of uncoated iron powder was also compacted at 1050 MPa and annealed at 600˚C for 2 hr in argon atmosphere. The coated iron powder composite has a resistivity of greater than 200 μΩm, measured by four probe method. A comparison of Magnetic Hysteresis loops and core losses using B-H Loop tracer in the frequency range 0 to 1500 Hz on the coated and uncoated iron powder is reported.

  11. Photobleaching effect in azo-dye containing epoxy resin films: the potentiality of carbon nanotubes as azo-dye dispensers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Costanzo, Guadalupe; Goyanes, Silvia; Ledesma, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Azo-dye molecules may suffer from bleaching under certain illumination conditions. When this photoinduced process occurs, it generates an irreversible effect that is characterized by the loss of absorption of the dye molecule. Moreover, the well-known isomerization of azodye molecules does not occur anymore. In this work it is shown how the addition of a small amount of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) helps to decrease the bleaching effect in a photosensitive guest-host azo-polymer film. Two different systems were fabricated using an epoxy resin as polymer matrix. An azo-dye, Disperse Orange 3, was used as photosensitive material in both systems and MWCNTs were added into one of them. The optical response of the polymeric systems was studied considering the degree of photoinduced birefringence. Photobleaching of the azo-dye was observed in all cases however, the effect is lower for the composite material containing 0.2 wt % MWCNTs. The weak interaction between MWCNTs and dye molecules is less favorable when the material is heated. The optical behavior of the heated composite material suggests that carbon nanotubes can be potentially used as azo dye dispensers. The results are interpreted in terms of the non-covalent interaction between azo-dye molecules and MWCNTs.

  12. Application of supercritical water to decompose brominated epoxy resin and environmental friendly recovery of metals from waste memory module.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuo; Xu, Zhenming

    2015-02-01

    Waste Memory Modules (WMMs), a particular kind of waste printed circuit board (WPCB), contain a high amount of brominated epoxy resin (BER), which may bring a series of environmental and health problems. On the other hand, metals like gold and copper are very valuable and are important to recover from WMMs. In the present study, an effective and environmental friendly method using supercritical water (SCW) to decompose BER and recover metals from WMMs was developed instead of hydrometallurgy or pyrometallurgy simultaneously. Experiments were conducted under external-catalyst-free conditions with temperatures ranging from 350 to 550 °C, pressures from 25 to 40 MPa, and reaction times from 120 to 360 min in a semibatch-type reactor. The results showed that BER could be quickly and efficiently decomposed under SCW condition, and the mechanism was possibly free radical reaction. After the SCW treatments, the glass fibers and metal foils in the solid residue could be easily liberated and recovered, respectively. The metal recovery rate reached 99.80%. The optimal parameters were determined as 495 °C, 33 MPa, and 305 min on the basis of response surface methodology (RSM). This study provides an efficient and environmental friendly approach for WMMs recycling compared with electrolysis, pyrometallurgy, and hydrometallurgy. PMID:25582426

  13. Effect of Monomer Structure on Curing Behavior, CO2 Solubility, and Gas Permeability of Ionic Liquid-Based Epoxy-Amine Resins and Ion-Gels

    SciTech Connect

    McDanel, WM; Cowan, MG; Barton, JA; Gin, DL; Noble, RD

    2015-04-29

    New imidazolium- and pyrrolidinium-based bis(epoxide)-functionalized ionic liquid (IL) monorners were synthesized: and reacted with multifunctional amine monomers to produce cross-linked, epoxy-amine poly(ionic liquid) (PIL) resins and PIL/IL ion-gel membranes. The length and chemical nature (i.e., alkyl versus ether) between the irrildazolium group and epokitie groups were studied to determine their effects on CO2 affinity. The CO2 uptake (millimoles per gram) of the epoxy amine resins (between 0.1 and 1 mmol/g) was found to depend predominately on the epoxide-to-amine ratio and the bis(epoxide) IL molecular weight. The effect of using a primary versus a secondary amine-containing multifunctional monoiner was also assessed for the resin-synthesis. Secondary amines can increase CO2 permeability but also increase the iime required for biS(epoxide) coriversion. When either the epoxide or athine monomer structure is changed, the CO2 solubility and permeability of the resulting PIL resins and ion-sel membranes can be tuned.

  14. Block Copolymer Modified Epoxy Amine System for Reactive Rotational Molding: Structures, Properties and Processability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecocq, Eva; Nony, Fabien; Tcharkhtchi, Abbas; Gérard, Jean-François

    2011-05-01

    Poly(styrene-butadiene-methylmethacrylate) (SBM) and poly(methylmethacrylate-butyle-acrylate-methylmethacrylate) (MAM) triblock copolymers have been dissolved in liquid DGEBA epoxy resin which is subsequently polymerized by meta-xylene diamine (MXDA) or Jeffamine EDR-148. A chemorheology study of these formulations by plate-plate rheology and by thermal analysis has allowed to conclude that the addition of these copolymer blocks improve the reactive rotational moulding processability without affecting the processing time. Indeed, it prevents the pooling of the formulation at the bottom of the mould and a too rapid build up of resin viscosity of these thermosetting systems. The morphology of the cured blends examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows an increase of fracture surface area and thereby a potential increase of the toughness with the modification of epoxy system. Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMA) and opalescence of final material show that the block PMMA, initially miscible, is likely to induce phase separation from the epoxy-amine matrix. Thereby, the poor compatibilisation between the toughener and the matrix has a detrimental effect on the tensile mechanical properties. The compatibilisation has to be increased to improve in synergy the processability and the final properties of these block copolymer modified formulations. First attempts could be by adapting the length and ratio of each block.

  15. Non destructive FTIR-photoacoustic spectroscopy studies on carbon fiber reinforced polyimide composite and water diffusion in epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Ravikumar

    Photo-acoustic (PA) detection is a non-destructive, non-disruptive mode of sample analysis. The principle of PA detection is monitoring the change in thermal properties of the material as a result of optical absorption. The ability to use with any incident radiation source makes it an attractive technique to study molecular excitations, vibrations and defects in any sample. Given the need for non-destructive analysis, the tool can be employed to study plethora of samples ranging from organic to inorganic. In the polymeric domain, there is a significant need for studying samples non-destructively with the architecture intact. For instance, molecular characterization in carbon fiber reinforced polymer, chemical diffusion in polymer resin/membrane and particulate/fillers incorporated thermosets suffer in characterization due to sample make-up. These samples are affected by opacity and thickness, which make them a very difficult set-up to study using conventional spectroscopic tools. We have employed PA mode of detection in tandem with a FTIR source to study the molecular vibrations to get an understanding of the systems considered. The first part of the work involved employing PA spectroscopy to study the curing in carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP). Phenyl-ethynyl terminated oligoamic acid impregnated composite system was studied. The curing of composite and resin was monitored using PAS and compared with Transmission FTIR on resin and dynamic scanning calorimetry (DSC). The composite showed two distinct reactions as a function of thermal treatment. (1) Imidization at low temperatures due to cyclo-dehydration and (2) at high temperatures, crosslinking due to ethynyl addition reaction. Composite exhibited enhanced curing trends compared to neat resin. Our results indicate that the thermal conductivity of the carbon fiber might play a role in heat transfer facilitating the reaction. The activation energy was found to be 23kcal/mol for the crosslinking step. The

  16. Equilibrium moisture content of a crosslinked epoxy network via molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, M. T.; Staiger, M. P.; Bishop, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    This study presents molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods for determining the solubility limit of water in a crosslinked epoxy network. Procedures are first presented for dynamically crosslinking an epoxy network consisting of diglycidyl ether bisphenol a (DGEBA) and isophorone diamine (IPD). Water molecules are then introduced into the crosslinked DGEBA-IPD structure. The excess chemical potential for the absorbed water was determined through combining thermodynamic integration and Widom’s test particle insertion methods. The limiting moisture uptake of the epoxy structure was determined through comparing the reduced chemical potential of the water held within the epoxy to that of pure water. The DGEBA-IPD epoxy system was found to have a moisture solubility of 3.50–3.75 wt.% when immersed in water at 300 K.

  17. Development of a removable conformal coating through the synthetic incorporation of Diels-Adler thermally reversible adducts into an epoxy resin.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, James Henry; Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Tallant, David Robert; Garcia, Manuel Joseph

    2005-02-01

    An epoxy-based conformal coating with a very low modulus has been developed for the environmental protection of electronic devices and for stress relief of those devices. The coating was designed to be removable by incorporating thermally-reversible Diels-Alder (D-A) adducts into the epoxy resin utilized in the formulation. The removability of the coating allows us to recover expensive components during development, to rebuild during production, to upgrade the components during their lifetime, to perform surveillance after deployment, and it aids in dismantlement of the components after their lifetime. The removability is the unique feature of this coating and was characterized by modulus versus temperature measurements, dissolution experiments, viscosity quench experiments, and FTIR. Both the viscosity quench experiments and the FTIR measurements allowed us to estimate the equilibrium constant of the D-A adducts in a temperature range from room temperature to 90 C.

  18. Radiation curing of epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Lawrence W.; Singh, Ajit

    The literature on radiation polymerization of epoxy compounds has been reviewed to assess the potential use of radiation for curing these industrially important monomers. Chemical curing of epoxies may proceed by either cationic or anionic mechanisms depending on the nature of the curing agent, but most epoxies polymerize by cationic mechanisms under the influence of high-energy radiation. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of epoxy compounds is inhibited by trace quantities of water because of proton transfer from the chain-propagating epoxy cation to water. Several different methods with potential for obtaining high molecular weight polymers by curing epoxies with high-energy radiation have been studied. Polymeric products with epoxy-like properties have been produced by radiation curing of epoxy oligomers with terminal acrylate groups and mixtures of epoxies with vinyl monomers. Both of these types of resin have good potential for industrial-scale curing by radiation treatment.

  19. Evaluation of inter-laminar shear strength of GFRP composed of bonded glass/polyimide tapes and cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resin for ITER TF coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmi, T.; Nishimura, A.; Matsui, K.; Koizumi, N.; Nishijima, S.; Shikama, T.

    2014-01-01

    The insulation system of the ITER TF coils consists of multi-layer glass/polyimide tapes impregnated a cyanate-ester/epoxy resin. The ITER TF coils are required to withstand an irradiation of 10 MGy from gamma-ray and neutrons since the ITER TF coils is exposed by fast neutron (>0.1 MeV) of 1022 n/m2 during the ITER operation. Cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resins and bonded glass/polyimide tapes are developed as insulation materials to realize the required radiation-hardness for the insulation of the ITER TF coils. To evaluate the radiation-hardness of the developed insulation materials, the inter-laminar shear strength (ILSS) of glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) fabricated using developed insulation materials is measured as one of most important mechanical properties before/after the irradiation in a fission reactor of JRR-3M. As a result, it is demonstrated that the GFRPs using the developed insulation materials have a sufficient performance to apply for the ITER TF coil insulation.

  20. Evaluation of inter-laminar shear strength of GFRP composed of bonded glass/polyimide tapes and cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resin for ITER TF coils

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmi, T.; Matsui, K.; Koizumi, N.; Nishimura, A.; Nishijima, S.; Shikama, T.

    2014-01-27

    The insulation system of the ITER TF coils consists of multi-layer glass/polyimide tapes impregnated a cyanate-ester/epoxy resin. The ITER TF coils are required to withstand an irradiation of 10 MGy from gamma-ray and neutrons since the ITER TF coils is exposed by fast neutron (>0.1 MeV) of 10{sup 22} n/m{sup 2} during the ITER operation. Cyanate-ester/epoxy blended resins and bonded glass/polyimide tapes are developed as insulation materials to realize the required radiation-hardness for the insulation of the ITER TF coils. To evaluate the radiation-hardness of the developed insulation materials, the inter-laminar shear strength (ILSS) of glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) fabricated using developed insulation materials is measured as one of most important mechanical properties before/after the irradiation in a fission reactor of JRR-3M. As a result, it is demonstrated that the GFRPs using the developed insulation materials have a sufficient performance to apply for the ITER TF coil insulation.

  1. A study of the influence of micro and nano phase morphology on the mechanical properties of a rubber-modified epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Bobby Glenn

    Epoxy resins are thermosets with extraordinary adhesion; high strength; good resistance to creep, heat, and chemicals; and they have low shrinkage. Conversely, these polymers are brittle, they are sensitive to moisture, and they exhibit poor toughness. To improve their toughness, they are often modified by introducing dispersed rubber particles in the primary phase. In this study, the epoxy resin was modified with carboxyl-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile (CTBN), liquid-reactive rubbers. The initiator concentration, percent acrylonitrile in the CTBN rubber, and cure temperatures were altered to give varying materials properties. Statistical analysis of the morphology data showed that the percentage of rubber acrylonitrile had an effect on both the rubber particle size and volume fraction. The cure temperature had an effect on the rubber particle volume and modulus. Plots of the rubber particle size, volume fraction, and modulus versus bulk elastic storage modulus and fracture toughness revealed that rubber particle size had no effect on bulk properties, volume fraction and rubber particle modulus had an effect on both the bulk storage elastic modulus and fracture toughness.

  2. A new technology for separation and recovery of materials from waste printed circuit boards by dissolving bromine epoxy resins using ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Zhu, P; Chen, Y; Wang, L Y; Qian, G Y; Zhou, M; Zhou, J

    2012-11-15

    Recovery of valuable materials from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) is quite difficult because WPCBs is a heterogeneous mixture of polymer materials, glass fibers, and metals. In this study, WPCBs was treated using ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimizadolium tetrafluoroborate [EMIM+][BF4-]). Experimental results showed that the separation of the solders went to completion, and electronic components (ECs) were removed in WPCBs when [EMIM+][BF4-] solution containing WPCBs was heated to 240 °C. Meanwhile, metallographic observations verified that the WPCBs had an initial delamination. When the temperature increased to 260 °C, the separation of the WPCBs went to completion, and coppers and glass fibers were obtained. The used [EMIM+][BF4-] was treated by water to generate a solid-liquid suspension, which was separated completely to obtain solid residues by filtration. Thermal analyses combined with infrared ray spectra (IR) observed that the solid residues were bromine epoxy resins. NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) showed that hydrogen bond played an important role for [EMIM+][BF4-] dissolving bromine epoxy resins. This clean and non-polluting technology offers a new way to recycle valuable materials from WPCBs and prevent environmental pollution from WPCBs effectively. PMID:22985818

  3. Metal ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of metallic and organometallic complexes to be used as potential additives for an epoxy used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin were investigated. A total of 9 complexes were screened for compatibility and for their ability to accelerate or inhibit the cure of a highly crosslinkable epoxy resin. Methods for combining the metallic complexes with the resin were investigated, gel times recorded, and cure exotherms studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition temperatures of cured metal ion containing epoxy castings were determined by thermomechanical analysis. Thermal stabilities of the castings were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Mechanical strength and stiffness of these doped epoxies were also measured.

  4. The influence of different dispersion methods on the size of the aggregate of CNTs in epoxy resin for the manufacturing of carbon fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barra, Giuseppina; Guadagno, Liberata; Simonet, Bartolome; Santos, Bricio

    2016-05-01

    Different industrial mixing methods and some of their combinations (1) ultrasound; (2) stirring; (3) (4) by roller machine, (5) by gears machine (6) Ultrasound radiation + high stirring were investigated for incorporating Multi walled Carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) into a resin based on an aeronautical epoxy precursor, cured with 4,4' diamine-dibenzylsulfone (DDS). The effect of different parameters, ultrasound intensity, number of cycles, type of blade, gears speed on the nanofiller dispersion were analyzed. The inclusion of the nanofiller in the resin causes a drastic increase in the viscosity, preventing the homogenization of the resin and a drastic increase in temperature in the zones closest to the ultrasound probe. To overcome these challenges, the application of high speed agitation simultaneously with the application of ultrasonic radiation was used. This allows on the one hand a homogeneous dispersion, on the other hand an improvement of the dissipation of heat generated by ultrasonic radiation. A comprehensive study with parameters like viscosity and temperature was performed. It is necessary a balance between viscosity and temperature. Viscosity must be low enough to facilitate the dispersion and homogenization of the nanofillers, whereas the temperature cannot be too high because of re-agglomerations

  5. Cobalt ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Varying concentrations of an organometallic cobalt complex were added to an epoxy system currently used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin. Methods for combining cobalt (III) acetylacetonate with a tetraglycidyl 4,4 prime - diaminodiphenylmethane-based epoxy were investigated. The effects of increasing cobalt ion concentration on the epoxy cure were demonstrated by epoxy gel times and differential scanning calorimetry cure exotherms. Analysis on cured cobalt-containing epoxy castings included determination of glass transition temperatures by thermomechanical analysis, thermooxidative stabilities by thermogravimetric analysis, and densities in a density gradient column. Flexural strength and stiffness were also measured on the neat resin castings.

  6. Development and utilization of digital image correlation techniques for the study of structural isomerism effects on strain development in epoxy network glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Stephen Robert

    The specific aim of this dissertation is to present the findings regarding the effects of molecular structure on macroscopic mechanical performance and strain development in epoxy networks. Network molecular structure was altered through monomer isomerism and crosslink density/molecular weight between crosslinks. The use of structural isomerism provided a pathway for altering mechanical performance while maintaining identical chemical composition within the network. Isomerism was investigated primarily by the curing of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) using either the para- or meta-substituted derivatives of diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). Additional insights into isomerism were gained through the investigation of networks composed of either para- or meta-triglycidyl aminophenol (TGAP) cured with 3,3'- or 4,4'-DDS. Crosslink density of the network was varied through two different methods: (a) increasing the equivalent weight of the linear DGEBA epoxy resin and (b) increasing the functionality of the epoxy resin through the use of TGAP. The effects of molecular structure on mechanical properties and strain development were monitored using a relatively new strain measurement technique known as digital image correlation (DIC). Strain measurement via DIC was particularly useful for the development of strain recovery procedures, which provided key insights to the deformation of epoxy network glasses of varying molecular structure by providing full field analysis of the epoxy specimens. Specific findings of this research revealed that network isomerism plays an important role in the deformation of epoxy network glasses. Networks containing meta-substituted monomers possessed higher modulus and yield stress values and lower yield strains. On the contrary, networks with para-substituted monomers displayed lower modulus and yield stress values, but increased ability to store energy through anelastic strain mechanisms, thereby delaying the onset of yielding. The

  7. Critical parameters for electron beam curing of cationic epoxies and property comparison of electron beam cured cationic epoxies versus thermal cured resins and composites

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Norris, R.E.; Yarborough, K.; Havens, S.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1997-01-16

    Electron beam curing of composites is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process offering the following advantages compared to conventional thermal curing: substantially reduced manufacturing costs and curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvements in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance electron beam curing of composites. The CRADA has successfully developed hundreds of new toughened and untoughened resins, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility. Several patent applications have been filed for this work. Composites made from these easily processable, low shrinkage material match the performance of thermal cured composites and exhibit: low void contents comparable to autoclave cured composites (less than 1%); superb low water absorption values in the same range as cyanate esters (less than 1%); glass transition temperatures rivaling those of polyimides (greater than 390 C); mechanical properties comparable to high performance, autoclave cured composites; and excellent property retention after cryogenic and thermal cycling. These materials have been used to manufacture many composite parts using various fabrication processes including hand lay-up, tow placement, filament winding, resin transfer molding and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding.

  8. Thickness dependence of the poling and current-voltage characteristics of paint films made up of lead zirconate titanate ceramic powder and epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egusa, Shigenori; Iwasawa, Naozumi

    1995-11-01

    A specially prepared paint made up of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic powder and epoxy resin was coated on an aluminum plate and was cured at room temperature, thus forming the paint film of 25-300 μm thickness with a PZT volume fraction of 53%. The paint film was then poled at room temperature, and the poling behavior was determined by measuring the piezoelectric activity as a function of poling field. The poling behavior shows that the piezoelectric activity obtained at a given poling field increases with an increase in the film thickness from 25 to 300 μm. The current-voltage characteristic of the paint film, on the other hand, shows that the increase in the film thickness leads not only to an increase in the magnitude of the current density at a given electric field but also to an increase in the critical electric field at which the transition from the ohmic to space-charge-limited conduction takes place. This fact indicates that the amount of the space charge of electrons injected into the paint film decreases as the film thickness increases. Furthermore, comparison of the current-voltage characteristic of the paint film with that of a pure epoxy film reveals that the space charge is accumulated largely at the interface between the PZT and epoxy phases in the paint film. On the basis of this finding, a model is developed for the poling behavior of the paint film by taking into account a possible effect of the space-charge accumulation and a broad distribution of the electric field in the PZT phase. This model is shown to give an excellent fit to the experimental data of the piezoelectric activity obtained here as a function of poling field and film thickness.

  9. Suppression of surface charge accumulation on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-filled epoxy resin insulator under dc voltage by direct fluorination

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boya; Zhang, Guixin Li, Chuanyang; He, Jinliang; Wang, Qiang; An, Zhenlian

    2015-12-15

    Surface charge accumulation on insulators under high dc voltage is a major factor that may lead to the reduction of insulation levels in gas insulated devices. In this paper, disc insulators made of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-filled epoxy resin were surface fluorinated using a F{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixture (12.5% F{sub 2}) at 50 °C and 0.1 MPa for different durations of 15 min, 30 min and 60 min. A dc voltage was applied to the insulator for 30 min and the charge density on its surface was measured by an electrostatic probe. The results revealed significant lower surface charge densities on the fluorinated insulators in comparison with the original one. Surface conductivity measurements indicated a higher surface conductivity by over three orders of magnitude after fluorination, which would allow the charges to transfer along the surface and thus may suppress their accumulation. Further, attenuated total reflection infrared analysis and surface morphology observations of the samples revealed that the introduction of fluoride groups altered the surface physicochemical properties. These structure changes, especially the physical defects reduced the depth of charge traps in the surface layer, which was verified by the measurement of energy distributions of the electron and hole traps based on the isothermal current theory. The results in this paper demonstrate that fluorination can be a promising and effective method to suppress surface charge accumulation on epoxy insulators in gas insulated devices.

  10. Cloning SU8 silicon masters using epoxy resins to increase feature replicability and production for cell culture devices

    PubMed Central

    Kamande, J. W.; Wang, Y.; Taylor, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) devices for cell-based studies. Commonly, the negative tone photoresist, SU8, is used to pattern features onto silicon wafers to create masters (SU8-Si) for PDMS replica molding. However, the complexity in the fabrication process, low feature reproducibility (master-to-master variability), silane toxicity, and short life span of these masters have been deterrents for using SU8-Si masters for the production of cell culture based PDMS microfluidic devices. While other techniques have demonstrated the ability to generate multiple devices from a single master, they often do not match the high feature resolution (∼0.1 μm) and low surface roughness that soft lithography masters offer. In this work, we developed a method to fabricate epoxy-based masters that allows for the replication of features with high fidelity directly from SU8-Si masters via their PDMS replicas. By this method, we show that we could obtain many epoxy based masters with equivalent features to a single SU8-Si master with a low feature variance of 1.54%. Favorable feature transfer resolutions were also obtained by using an appropriate Tg epoxy based system to ensure minimal shrinkage of features ranging in size from ∼100 μm to <10 μm in height. We further show that surface coating epoxy masters with Cr/Au lead to effective demolding and yield PDMS chambers that are suitable for long-term culturing of sensitive primary hippocampal neurons. Finally, we incorporated pillars within the Au-epoxy masters to eliminate the process of punching media reservoirs and thereby reducing substantial artefacts and wastage. PMID:26180572

  11. Effect of addition of Ag nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy/polyaminoamide adduct coatings filled with conducting polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Samad, Ubair Abdus; Khan, Rawaiz; Alam, Mohammad Asif; Al-Othman, Othman Y.; Al-Zahrani, Saeed M.

    2015-05-22

    In this study the effect of Ag Nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy coatings filled with optimized ratio of conducting polymers (Polyaniline and Polyppyrole) was evaluated. Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether epoxy resin (DGEBA) along with polyaminoamide adduct (ARADUR 3282-1 BD) is used as curing agent under optimized stoichiometry values. Curing is performed at room temperature with different percentages of Nano filler. Glass and steel panels were used as coating substrate. Bird applicator was used to coat the samples in order to obtain thin film with wet film thickness (WFT) of about 70-90 µm. The samples were kept in dust free environment for about 7 days at room temperature for complete curing. The coated steel panels were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of coating such as hardness, scratch and impact tests whereas coated glass panels were used for measuring pendulum hardness of the coatings. To check the dispersion and morphology of Nano filler in epoxy matrix scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used in addition Nano indentation was also performed to observe the effect of Nano filler on modulus of elasticity and hardness at Nano scale.

  12. Effect of addition of Ag nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy/polyaminoamide adduct coatings filled with conducting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samad, Ubair Abdus; Khan, Rawaiz; Alam, Mohammad Asif; Al-Othman, Othman Y.; Al-Zahrani, Saeed M.

    2015-05-01

    In this study the effect of Ag Nano powder on mechanical properties of epoxy coatings filled with optimized ratio of conducting polymers (Polyaniline and Polyppyrole) was evaluated. Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether epoxy resin (DGEBA) along with polyaminoamide adduct (ARADUR 3282-1 BD) is used as curing agent under optimized stoichiometry values. Curing is performed at room temperature with different percentages of Nano filler. Glass and steel panels were used as coating substrate. Bird applicator was used to coat the samples in order to obtain thin film with wet film thickness (WFT) of about 70-90 µm. The samples were kept in dust free environment for about 7 days at room temperature for complete curing. The coated steel panels were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of coating such as hardness, scratch and impact tests whereas coated glass panels were used for measuring pendulum hardness of the coatings. To check the dispersion and morphology of Nano filler in epoxy matrix scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used in addition Nano indentation was also performed to observe the effect of Nano filler on modulus of elasticity and hardness at Nano scale.

  13. 21 CFR 177.2280 - 4,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin thermo-setting epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false 4,4â²-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol-epichloro-hydrin... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2280 4,4′-Isopropyl-idenedi-phenol...′-isopropylidenedi-phenol-epichlorohydrin resins listed in other sections of parts 174, 175, 176, 177, 178 and 179...

  14. Macroscopic fracture behavior: Correlation with microscopic aspects of deformation in toughened epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, S.

    1993-12-31

    The deformation and failure processes involved in the fracture of unmodified epoxies are discussed in this chapter. A review of the fracture behavior of the carboxyl-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (CTBN) rubber-modified diglycidyl ether of bisphenol. A (DGEBA) polymers with or without a rigid particulate - fiber phase is presented in relation to the microscopic aspects of localized deformation and their relationship to microscopic fracture behavior are illustrated. The degree of improvement in fracture properties in modified materials depends to a great extent on the unmodified epoxy. If the latter is capable of even small-scale deformation at the crack tip, this induces in the modified system a number of additional microscopic failure mechanisms such as cavitation of rubber particles; enhanced shear deformation of the matrix, debonding and tearing of rubber, crack pinning, and debonding and pull-out of fibers. The recent research trend in toughening of high-temperature-grade TGMDA (tetraglycidyl 4,4{prime}-methylenedianiline) resin is also outlined. 73 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Cytoxicity, dynamic and thermal properties of bio-based rosin-epoxy resin/ castor oil polyurethane/ carbon nanotubes bio-nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Huo, Li; Wang, Dan; Liu, Hongmei; Jia, Pan; Gao, Jungang

    2016-08-01

    In order to prepare bio-nanocomposites with no-cytotoxicity, the rosin-based epoxy resin (MPAER) and castor oil-based polyurethane (COPU) were synthesized and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was used to enhance the properties of curing MPAER/COPU materials. The curing reaction, dynamic mechanical and thermal properties of this system were characterized by FTIR, NMR, DMA, TG et al. The cytotoxicity of materials is evaluated for HeLa cells using a MTT cell-viability assay. The results showed that COPU can cure MPAER and CNTs can increase effectively the properties of MPAER/COPU nanocomposites. The Tg of MPAER/COPU/CNTs has the highest value when CNTs content is 0.4 wt%, which is 52.4 °C higher than the pure MPAER/COPU. Thermal stability of the nanocomposites is enhanced by the addition of CNTs, the initial decomposition temperature Td5 of the sample No. 0.4 has increased from 284.5 to 305.2 °C, which is 20.7 °C higher than No. 0. The impact strength of the No. 0.4 film is 15 kg cm higher than the pure resin system. The survival rate of HeLa cells to the products is greater than 90% within 48 and 72 h, which demonstrate that this material has excellent biocompatibility and no obvious cytotoxicity for HeLa cells, which may be used in the medical treatment. PMID:27117086

  16. Monomers for thermosetting and toughening epoxy resins. [glycidyl amine derivatives, propargyl-containing amines, and mutagenic testing of aromatic diamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Eight glycidyl amines were prepared by alkylating the parent amine with epichlorohydrin to form chlorohydrin, followed by cyclization with aqueous NaOH. Three of these compounds contained propargyl groups with postcuring studies. A procedure for quantitatively estimating the epoxy content of these glycidyl amines was employed for purity determination. Two diamond carbonates and several model propargly compounds were prepared. The synthesis of three new diamines, two which contain propargyloxy groups, and another with a sec-butyl group is in progress. These materials are at the dinitro stage ready for the final hydrogenation step. Four aromatic diamines were synthesized for mutagenic testing purposes. One of these compounds rapidly decomposes on exposure to air.

  17. Characterization of the pentacene thin-film transistors with an epoxy resin-based polymeric gate insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. H.; Tondelier, D.; Geffroy, B.; Bonnassieux, Y.; Horowitz, G.

    2012-02-01

    The organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) incorporating pentacene/SU-8 interface were fabricated and characterized. SU-8, a reliable epoxy-based photoresist, is tested as a potential highly-stable polymeric gate dielectric for OTFTs. The fabricated devices showed promising electrical performance with on-off ratio up to 107 and field-effect mobility up to 0.56 cm2/V s. Several device characteristics are further analyzed. There existed a leakage current path due to the uncontrolled pentacene coverage and we revealed that precise alignment of the evaporation mask of pentacene is critical for eliminating this problem. Pentacene grain formation largely depended on the growth condition on the SU-8 surface and small-grain films offered outstanding performance possibly owing to enhanced inter-domain connections. Natural degradation of the OTFTs is also discussed in terms of environmental stability and the pentacene/SU-8 transistor operated with noticeable air stability under ambient conditions.

  18. Investigation on creeping discharges propagating over epoxy resin and glass insulators in the presence of different gases and mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beroual, A.; Coulibaly, M. L.; Aitken, O.; Girodet, A.

    2011-12-01

    This paper deals with the experimental characterization of discharges propagating over insulators of epoxy and glass, immersed in a gas or a gaseous mixture, under lightning impulse voltages (1.2/50 μs), using a point-plane electrode arrangement. The gases and mixtures we considered are SF6, N2, CO2, SF6-N2 and SF6-CO2. The morphology of creeping discharges and their final lengths are investigated versus the kind of insulator material, the amplitude and polarity of the voltage, the type of the gas (resp. mixture) and its pressure. It is shown that the shape of discharges and their final (stopping) lengths Lf depend significantly on the solid insulator and the type of gas. For given solid and gas, Lf increases quasi-linearly with the voltage and decreases when the gas pressure increases. The discharges do not always present a radial structure as reported in the literature. For given voltage and pressure, Lf is longer when the point electrode is positive than when it is negative while the initiation voltage of discharges is higher with a negative point than with a positive one; and Lf is longer with glass than with epoxy. Lf is shorter in SF6 than in CO2 or N2. On the other hand, the increase of SF6 content in SF6-CO2 mixture leads to a significant decrease of Lf. Therefore, the addition of small concentration of SF6 in a given gas mixture improves the dielectric strength of insulating structure.

  19. Facile preparation of superamphiphobic epoxy resin/modified poly(vinylidene fluoride)/fluorinated ethylene propylene composite coating with corrosion/wear-resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaiyuan; Liu, Zhanjian; Wang, Enqun; Zhang, Xiguang; Yuan, Ruixia; Wu, Shiqi; Zhu, Yanji

    2015-12-01

    A robust superamphiphobic epoxy resin (EP)/modified poly(vinylidene fluoride) (MPVDF)/fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) composite coating has been prepared through the combination of chemical modification and spraying technique. Nanometer silica (SiO2, 2.5 wt.%) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs, 2.5 wt.%) were added in the coating to construct the necessary reticulate papillae structures for superamphiphobic surface. The prepared EP composite coating demonstrated high static contact angles (166°, 155°) and low sliding angles (3°, 5°) to water and glycerol, respectively. Moreover, the prepared coating can also retain superhydrophobicity under strongly acidic and alkaline conditions. The brittleness of EP can be avoided by introducing the malleable MPVDF. The wear life of the EP composite coating with 25 wt.% FEP was improved to 18 times of the pure EP coating. The increased wear life of the coating can be attributed to the designed nano/micro structures, the self-lubrication of FEP and the chemical reaction between EP and MPVDF. The anti-corrosion performance of the coatings was investigated in 3.5% NaCl solution using potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the prepared superamphiphobic composite coating was most effective in corrosion resistance, primarily due to the barrier effect for the diffusion of O2 and H2O molecules. It is believed that this robust superamphiphobic EP/MPVDF/FEP composite coating prepared by the facile spray method can pave a way for the large-scale application in pipeline transport.

  20. Rheological and thermal study of the curing process of a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin: application to the optimization of the ultimate thermomechanical and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomo, B.; Habas-Ulloa, A.; Pignolet, P.; Quentin, N.; Fellmann, D.; Habas, J. P.

    2013-02-01

    The curing process of a cycloaliphatic epoxy resin was defined using different experimental techniques to obtain a material with optimal mechanical and electrical behaviour and with the ultimate objective of its application in the production of polymer-based insulator for railway transportation. The temperature domain characteristic of the crosslinking was determined by differential scanning calorimetry. However, thermogravimetric analyses of the reactive species supported that a low curing temperature had to be chosen during the initial crosslinking stage. Then, kinetic viscoelastic experiments were performed to identify the time and temperature conditions necessary to observe the gelation and vitrification of the reactive mixture. To fulfil higher requirements of productivity and performances, a two-step thermal cycle was defined and optimized by investigating the influence of different curing schedules on the glass transition temperature of the crosslinked material. The effects of the curing profile on the dielectric strength of the material were also investigated. Good correlations between the different techniques were observed and explained in terms of structure-property relationships.

  1. White light emitting diodes realized by using an active packaging method with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots dispersed in photosensitive epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Lee, Kyu-Seung; Ryu, Jae-Hyoung; Hong, Chang-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hoon

    2008-04-01

    White light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been realized using the active packaging (AP) method. The starting materials were bare InGaN LED chips and CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) dispersed in photosensitive epoxy resins. Such hybrid LED devices were fabricated using QD mixtures with one ('single'), two ('dual') or four ('multi') emission wavelengths. The AP method allows for convenient adjustment of multiple parameters such as the CIE-1931 coordinate (x, y), color temperature, and color rending index (CRI). All samples show good white balance, and under a 20 mA working current the luminous efficacies of the single, dual, and multi hybrid devices were 8.1 lm W-1, 5.1 lm W-1, and 6.4 lm W-1, respectively. The corresponding quantum efficiencies were 4.1%, 3.1%, and 3.1%; the CRIs were 21.46, 43.76, and 66.20; and the color temperatures were 12 000, 8190, and 7740 K. This shows that the CRI of the samples can be enhanced by broadening the QD emission band, as is exemplified by the 21.46 CRI of the single hybrid LED compared to the 66.20 value for the multi hybrid LED. In addition, we were able to increase the CRI of the single hybrid LED from 15.31 to 32.50 by increasing the working currents from 1 to 50 mA.

  2. Improved Dielectric Properties and Energy Storage Density of Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) Nanocomposite with Hydantoin Epoxy Resin Coated BaTiO3.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hang; Zhang, Dou; Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Xi; Chen, Chao; Zhou, Kechao

    2015-04-22

    Energy storage materials are urgently demanded in modern electric power supply and renewable energy systems. The introduction of inorganic fillers to polymer matrix represents a promising avenue for the development of high energy density storage materials, which combines the high dielectric constant of inorganic fillers with supernal dielectric strength of polymer matrix. However, agglomeration and phase separation of inorganic fillers in the polymer matrix remain the key barriers to promoting the practical applications of the composites for energy storage. Here, we developed a low-cost and environmentally friendly route to modifying BaTiO3 (BT) nanoparticles by a kind of water-soluble hydantoin epoxy resin. The modified BT nanoparticles exhibited homogeneous dispersion in the ferroelectric polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (P(VDF-HFP)) matrix and strong interfacial adhesion with the polymer matrix. The dielectric constants of the nanocomposites increased significantly with the increase of the coated BT loading, while the dielectric loss of the nanocomposites was still as low as that of the pure P(VDF-HFP). The energy storage density of the nanocomposites was largely enhanced with the coated BT loading at the same electric field. The nanocomposite with 20 vol % BT exhibited an estimated maximum energy density of 8.13 J cm(-3), which was much higher than that of pure P(VDF-HFP) and other dielectric polymers. The findings of this research could provide a feasible approach to produce high energy density materials for practical application in energy storage. PMID:25822911

  3. Effects of surface treating methods of high-strength carbon fibers on interfacial properties of epoxy resin matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Quansheng; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to study the effects of surface treating methods, including electrolysis of anodic oxidation, sizing and heat treatment at 200 °C, on physical and chemical properties of T700 grade high-strength carbon fiber GQ4522. The fiber surface roughness, surface energy and chemical properties were analyzed for different treated carbon fibers, using atom force microscopy, contact angle, Fourier transformed infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the adopted surface treating methods significantly affect surface roughness, surface energy and active chemical groups of the studied carbon fibers. Electrolysis and sizing can increase the roughness, surface energy and chemical groups on surface, while heat treatment leads to decreases in surface energy and chemical groups due to chemical reaction of sizing. Then, unidirectional epoxy 5228 matrix composite laminates were prepared using different treated GQ4522 fibers, and interlaminar shear strength and flexural property were measured. It is revealed that the composite using electrolysis and sizing-fiber has the strongest interfacial bonding strength, indicating the important roles of the two treating processes on interfacial adhesion. Moreover, the composite using heat-treating fiber has lower mechanical properties, which is attributed to the decrease of chemical bonding between fiber surface and matrix after high temperature treatment of fiber.

  4. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical properties of neat resin samples and graphite fiber reinforced samples of thermoplastic resins were characterized with particular emphasis directed to the effects of environmental exposure (humidity, temperature and ultraviolet radiation). Tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear, creep and impact strengths were measured for polysulfone, polyarylsulfone and a state-of-the-art epoxy resin samples. In general, the thermoplastic resins exhibited environmental degradation resistance equal to or superior to the reference epoxy resin. Demonstration of the utility and quality of a graphite/thermoplastic resin system was accomplished by successfully thermoforming a simulated compressor blade and a fan exit guide vane.

  5. Development of ricehusk ash reinforced bismaleimide toughened epoxy nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Kanimozhi, K.; Sethuraman, K.; Selvaraj, V.; Alagar, M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent past decades have witnessed remarkable advances in composites with potential applications in biomedical devices, aerospace, textiles, civil engineering, energy, electronic engineering, and household products. Thermoset polymer composites have further enhanced and broadened the area of applications of composites. In the present work epoxy-BMI toughened-silica hybrid (RHA/DGEBA-BMI) was prepared using bismaleimide as toughener, bisphenol-A as matrix and a silica precursor derived from rice husk ash as reinforcement with glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane as coupling agent. Differential scanning calorimetry, electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and goniometry were used to characterize RHA/DGEBA-BMI composites developed in the present work. Tensile, impact and flexural strength, tensile and flexural modulus, hardness, dielectric properties were also studied and discussed. The hybrid nanocomposites possess the higher values of the glass transition temperature (Tg) and mechanical properties than those of neat epoxy matrix. PMID:25279372

  6. Development of ricehusk ash reinforced bismaleimide toughened epoxy nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Kanimozhi, K; Sethuraman, K; Selvaraj, V; Alagar, M

    2014-01-01

    Recent past decades have witnessed remarkable advances in composites with potential applications in biomedical devices, aerospace, textiles, civil engineering, energy, electronic engineering, and household products. Thermoset polymer composites have further enhanced and broadened the area of applications of composites. In the present work epoxy-BMI toughened-silica hybrid (RHA/DGEBA-BMI) was prepared using bismaleimide as toughener, bisphenol-A as matrix and a silica precursor derived from rice husk ash as reinforcement with glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane as coupling agent. Differential scanning calorimetry, electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and goniometry were used to characterize RHA/DGEBA-BMI composites developed in the present work. Tensile, impact and flexural strength, tensile and flexural modulus, hardness, dielectric properties were also studied and discussed. The hybrid nanocomposites possess the higher values of the glass transition temperature (Tg) and mechanical properties than those of neat epoxy matrix. PMID:25279372

  7. Development of ricehusk ash reinforced bismaleimide toughened epoxy nanocomposites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, Kanimozhi; Sethuraman, K.; V, Selvaraj; Alagar, Muthukaruppan

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Recent past decades have witnessed remarkable advances in composites with potential applications in biomedical devices, aerospace, textiles, civil engineering, energy, electronic engineering, and household products. Thermoset polymer composites have further enhanced and broadened the area of applications of composites. In the present work epoxy-BMI toughened-silica hybrid (RHA/DGEBA-BMI) was prepared using bismaleimide as toughener, bisphenol-A as matrix and a silica precursor derived from rice husk ash as reinforcement with glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane as coupling agent. Differential scanning calorimetry, electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and goniometry were used to characterize RHA/DGEBA-BMI composites developed in the present work. Tensile, impact and flexural strength, tensile and flexural modulus, hardness, dielectric properties were also studied and discussed. The hybrid nanocomposites possess the higher values of the glass transition temperature (Tg) and mechanical properties than those of neat epoxy matrix.

  8. Epoxy Grout With Silica Thickener

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Grout cures quickly, even in presence of hydraulic oil. Grout is mixture of aggregate particles, finely-divided silica, epoxy resin, and triethylenetetramine curing agent, with mixture containing about 85 percent silica and aggregate particle sand 15 percent resin and curing agent. Silica is thickening agent and keeps grout from sagging.

  9. White light emitting diodes realized by using an active packaging method with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots dispersed in photosensitive epoxy resins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Lee, Kyu-Seung; Ryu, Jae-Hyoung; Hong, Chang-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hoon

    2008-04-01

    White light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been realized using the active packaging (AP) method. The starting materials were bare InGaN LED chips and CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) dispersed in photosensitive epoxy resins. Such hybrid LED devices were fabricated using QD mixtures with one ('single'), two ('dual') or four ('multi') emission wavelengths. The AP method allows for convenient adjustment of multiple parameters such as the CIE-1931 coordinate (x, y), color temperature, and color rending index (CRI). All samples show good white balance, and under a 20 mA working current the luminous efficacies of the single, dual, and multi hybrid devices were 8.1 lm W(-1), 5.1 lm W(-1), and 6.4 lm W(-1), respectively. The corresponding quantum efficiencies were 4.1%, 3.1%, and 3.1%; the CRIs were 21.46, 43.76, and 66.20; and the color temperatures were 12 000, 8190, and 7740 K. This shows that the CRI of the samples can be enhanced by broadening the QD emission band, as is exemplified by the 21.46 CRI of the single hybrid LED compared to the 66.20 value for the multi hybrid LED. In addition, we were able to increase the CRI of the single hybrid LED from 15.31 to 32.50 by increasing the working currents from 1 to 50 mA. PMID:21817754

  10. Influence of non-smooth surface on tribological properties of glass fiber-epoxy resin composite sliding against stainless steel under natural seawater lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaofeng; Gao, Dianrong; Liang, Yingna; Chen, Bo

    2015-11-01

    With the development of bionics, the bionic non-smooth surfaces are introduced to the field of tribology. Although non-smooth surface has been studied widely, the studies of non-smooth surface under the natural seawater lubrication are still very fewer, especially experimental research. The influences of smooth and non-smooth surface on the frictional properties of the glass fiber-epoxy resin composite (GF/EPR) coupled with stainless steel 316L are investigated under natural seawater lubrication in this paper. The tested non-smooth surfaces include the surfaces with semi-spherical pits, the conical pits, the cone-cylinder combined pits, the cylindrical pits and through holes. The friction and wear tests are performed using a ring-on-disc test rig under 60 N load and 1000 r/min rotational speed. The tests results show that GF/EPR with bionic non-smooth surface has quite lower friction coefficient and better wear resistance than GF/EPR with smooth surface without pits. The average friction coefficient of GF/EPR with semi-spherical pits is 0.088, which shows the largest reduction is approximately 63.18% of GF/EPR with smooth surface. In addition, the wear debris on the worn surfaces of GF/EPR are observed by a confocal scanning laser microscope. It is shown that the primary wear mechanism is the abrasive wear. The research results provide some design parameters for non-smooth surface, and the experiment results can serve as a beneficial supplement to non-smooth surface study.

  11. Synthesis of polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Benjamin J

    2014-10-07

    The synthesis of a polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy uses a one-step cure by applying an external stimulus to release the acid from the polyoxometalate and thereby catalyze the cure reaction of the epoxy resin. Such polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites afford the cured epoxy unique properties imparted by the intrinsic properties of the polyoxometalate. For example, polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites can be used as corrosion resistant epoxy coatings, for encapsulation of electronics with improved dielectric properties, and for structural applications with improved mechanical properties.

  12. Effect of Co-60 gamma radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy blends and epoxy-graphite fiber interface

    SciTech Connect

    Netravali, A.N.; Manji, A. )

    1991-06-01

    The effect of Co-60 gamma radiation of up to 100 Mrads on an IM6-G graphite fiber-epoxy interface was studied using the single-fiber-composite (SFC) technique. Flexible epoxy blends were formulated using DGEBA based and polyglycol diepoxide epoxies which were cured with aliphatic and aromatic curing agents. Bulk epoxy specimens and graphite fibers were tension tested to obtain their tensile properties. The fragment length distribution from SFC tests, single fiber strength data, and a Monte Carlo simulation of Poisson/Weibull model for fiber strength and flaws were used to obtain the effective interfacial shear strength values. The results indicate that while graphite fiber strength is not affected by radiation, the tensile properties of the epoxies used are adversely affected by the radiation. The interfacial shear strength, however, increases significantly with the radiation dose. 36 refs.

  13. Method for epoxy foam production using a liquid anhydride

    DOEpatents

    Celina, Mathias

    2012-06-05

    An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 50 wt % and 100 wt %, an anhydride cure agent of between approximately 0 wt % and approximately 50 wt %, a tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride foaming agent of between proximately 0.1-20 wt %, a surfactant and an imidazole or similar catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt %, where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-10 wt % tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the resin in a suitable viscosity range, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which in the presence of an epoxy curative can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

  14. Incombustible resin composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Incombustible resin compositions composed of aromatic compounds were obtained through (1) combustion polymer material and (2) bisphenol A or halogenated bisphenol A and bisphenol A diglycidl ether or halogenated bisphenol A diglycidyl ether. The aromatic compound is an adduct of bifunctional phenols and bifunctional epoxy resins.

  15. Epoxy composites based on inexpensive tire waste filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmetli, Gulnare; Gungor, Ahmet; Kocaman, Suheyla

    2014-05-01

    Tire waste (TW) was recycled as raw material for the preparation of DGEBA-type epoxy composite materials. The effects of filler amount and epoxy type on the mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the composites with NPEL were generally higher than composites with NPEF. The appropriate mass level for TW in both type composites was found to be 20 wt%. The equilibrium water sorption of NPEL/TW and NPEF/TW composites for 14-day immersion was determined as 0.10 % and 0.21 %, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for characterization of the composites.

  16. Nature of the adhesion bond between epoxy adhesive and steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettegren', V. I.; Mamalimov, R. I.; Savitskii, A. V.; Shcherbakov, I. P.; Sytov, V. V.; Sytov, V. A.

    2014-03-01

    The potential difference that appears in the epoxy resin located between two grade 3 steel plates is studied. One of them is stored in epoxy resin to reach equilibrium, and the second plate is coated with an asprepared mixture of epoxy resin with a hardener. It is found that the potential difference decreases in time because of charge transfer by Fe2+ ions through epoxy resin. The luminescence and infrared absorption spectra of the epoxy adhesive on the grade 3 steel surface are recorded. An analysis of these spectra shows that Fe2+ ions penetrate into the as-prepared mixture of epoxy resin with the hardener, and interact with CN groups in the mixture, and form coordination compounds. As a result, a diffusion layer saturated by the coordination compounds forms at the interface between the steel and the adhesive.

  17. Ionic Liquid Epoxy Resin Monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paley, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Ionic liquid epoxide monomers capable of reacting with cross-linking agents to form polymers with high tensile and adhesive strengths. Ionic liquid epoxide monomers comprising at least one bis(glycidyl) N-substituted nitrogen heterocyclic cation are made from nitrogen heterocycles corresponding to the bis(glycidyl) N-substituted nitrogen heterocyclic cations by a method involving a non-nucleophilic anion, an alkali metal cation, epichlorohydrin, and a strong base.

  18. Interaction of water with epoxy.

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-07-01

    The chemistries of reactants, plasticizers, solvents and additives in an epoxy paint are discussed. Polyamide additives may play an important role in the absorption of molecular iodine by epoxy paints. It is recommended that the unsaturation of the polyamide additive in the epoxy cure be determined. Experimental studies of water absorption by epoxy resins are discussed. These studies show that absorption can disrupt hydrogen bonds among segments of the polymers and cause swelling of the polymer. The water absorption increases the diffusion coefficient of water within the polymer. Permanent damage to the polymer can result if water causes hydrolysis of ether linkages. Water desorption studies are recommended to ascertain how water absorption affects epoxy paint.

  19. Evaluation of experimental epoxy monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St.clair, T. L.; Pratt, J. R.; Ficklin, R.

    1985-01-01

    Future generation aircraft need higher performance polymer matrices to fully achieve the weight savings possible with composite materials. New resins are being formulated in an effort to understand basic polymer behavior and to develop improved resins. Some polymer/curing agent combinations that could be useful are difficult to process. In the area of epoxies, a major problem is that some components have physical properties which make them difficult to utilize as matrix resins. A previous study showed that the use of ultrasonic energy can be advantageous in the mixing of curing agents into a standard epoxy resin, such as MY 720 (Ciba-Geigy designation). This work is expanded to include three novel epoxides.

  20. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    DOEpatents

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  1. Solving the Problem of Building Models of Crosslinked Polymers: An Example Focussing on Validation of the Properties of Crosslinked Epoxy Resins

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Stephen A.; Howlin, Brendan J; Hamerton, Ian; Baidak, Alex; Billaud, Claude; Ward, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The construction of molecular models of crosslinked polymers is an area of some difficulty and considerable interest. We report here a new method of constructing these models and validate the method by modelling three epoxy systems based on the epoxy monomers bisphenol F diglycidyl ether (BFDGE) and triglycidyl-p-amino phenol (TGAP) with the curing agent diamino diphenyl sulphone (DDS). The main emphasis of the work concerns the improvement of the techniques for the molecular simulation of these epoxies and specific attention is paid towards model construction techniques, including automated model building and prediction of glass transition temperatures (Tg). Typical models comprise some 4200–4600 atoms (ca. 120–130 monomers). In a parallel empirical study, these systems have been cast, cured and analysed by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) to measure Tg. Results for the three epoxy systems yield good agreement with experimental Tg ranges of 200–220°C, 270–285°C and 285–290°C with corresponding simulated ranges of 210–230°C, 250–300°C, and 250–300°C respectively. PMID:22916182

  2. Thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Amelkovich, Yu A.; Melnikova, T. V.

    2015-04-01

    The thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid fine powder at different percentage were studied. Epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, boric acid as flame-retardant filler, hexamethylenediamine as a curing agent. The prepared samples and starting materials were examined using methods of thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. It was found that the incorporation of boric acid fine powder enhances the thermal stability of epoxy composites.

  3. Electrophysical behavior of ion-conductive organic-inorganic polymer system based on aliphatic epoxy resin and salt of lithium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matkovska, Liubov; Iurzhenko, Maksym; Mamunya, Yevgen; Matkovska, Olga; Demchenko, Valeriy; Lebedev, Eugene; Boiteux, Gisele; Serghei, Anatoli

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, ion-conductive hybrid organic-inorganic polymers based on epoxy oligomer of diglycide aliphatic ester of polyethylene glycol (DEG) and lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) were synthesized. The effect of LiClO4 content on the electrophysical properties of epoxy polymers has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS). The effect of LiClO4 content on the structure has been studied by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). It was found that LiClO4 impacts on the structure of the synthesized hybrid epoxy polymers, probably, by formation of coordinative complexes {ether oxygen-lithium cations-ether oxygen} as evidenced from a significant increase in their glass transition temperatures with increasing LiClO4 concentration and WAXS studies. The presence of ether oxygen in DEG macromolecules provides a transfer mechanism of the lithium cations with the ether oxygen similar to polyethylene oxide (PEO). Thus, the obtained hybrid polymers have high values of ionic conductivity σ' (approximately 10-3 S/cm) and permittivity ɛ' (6 × 105) at elevated temperatures (200°C). On the other hand, DEG has higher heat resistance compared to PEO that makes these systems perspective as solid polymer electrolytes able to operate at high temperature.

  4. Free-volume characteristics of epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe; Shultz, William J.; St.clair, Terry L.

    1992-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was used to measure free-volume characteristics of selected epoxies. Fluorene resins, a new family of high-temperature thermosetting resins, were selected as the test medium. Experimental results indicate that the free-volume cell size V sub f varies with the molecular weight between the cross-links M sub c according to an equation of the form V sub f = AM sub c sup B, where A and B are structural constants. In two of the samples, the concentration of bulky fluorene groups was increased in the network backbone by replacement of some of the conventional bisphenol A epoxy resin with fluorene-derived epoxy resin. This resulted in an increase in their glass transition temperature for a given level of cross-linking. It was found that in these samples, the Doppler broadening of the annihilation peak decreases with the increasing fluorene content, presumably due to enhanced damping of the chain motions.

  5. Free-volume characteristics of epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Eftekhari, A.; Shultz, W.J.; St.Clair, T.L.

    1992-09-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was used to measure free-volume characteristics of selected epoxies. Fluorene resins, a new family of high-temperature thermosetting resins, were selected as the test medium. Experimental results indicate that the free-volume cell size V sub f varies with the molecular weight between the cross-links M sub c according to an equation of the form V sub f = AM sub c sup B, where A and B are structural constants. In two of the samples, the concentration of bulky fluorene groups was increased in the network backbone by replacement of some of the conventional bisphenol A epoxy resin with fluorene-derived epoxy resin. This resulted in an increase in their glass transition temperature for a given level of cross-linking. It was found that in these samples, the Doppler broadening of the annihilation peak decreases with the increasing fluorene content, presumably due to enhanced damping of the chain motions.

  6. Biodegradable Epoxy Networks Cured with Polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shigeo; Kramer, Edward J.

    2006-03-01

    Epoxy resins are used widely for adhesives as well as coatings. However, once cured they are usually highly cross-linked and are not biodegradable. To obtain potentially biodegradable polypeptides that can cure with epoxy resins and achieve as good properties as the conventional phenol novolac hardeners, poly(succinimide-co-tyrosine) was synthesized by thermal polycondensation of L-aspartic acid and L-tyrosine with phosphoric acid under reduced pressure. The tyrosine/succinimide ratio in the polypeptide was always lower than the tyrosine/(aspartic acid) feed ratio and was influenced by the synthesis conditions. Poly(succinimide-tyrosine- phenylalanine) was also synthesized from L-aspartic acid, L- tyrosine and L-phenylalanine. The thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy resins cured with these polypeptides are comparable to those of similar resins cured with conventional hardeners. In addition, enzymatic degradability tests showed that Chymotrypsin or Subtilisin A could cleave cured films in an alkaline borate buffer.

  7. Atomistic Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Nanotube Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasanella, Nicholas A.; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2016-05-01

    The Green-Kubo method was used to investigate the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature for epoxy/single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanocomposites. An epoxy network of DGEBA-DDS was built using the `dendrimer' growth approach, and conductivity was computed by taking into account long-range Coulombic forces via a k-space approach. Thermal conductivity was calculated in the direction perpendicular to, and along the SWNT axis for functionalized and pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposites. Inefficient phonon transport at the ends of nanotubes is an important factor in the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites, and for this reason discontinuous nanotubes were modeled in addition to long nanotubes. The thermal conductivity of the long, pristine SWNT/epoxy system is equivalent to that of an isolated SWNT along its axis, but there was a 27% reduction perpendicular to the nanotube axis. The functionalized, long SWNT/epoxy system had a very large increase in thermal conductivity along the nanotube axis (~700%), as well as the directions perpendicular to the nanotube (64%). The discontinuous nanotubes displayed an increased thermal conductivity along the SWNT axis compared to neat epoxy (103-115% for the pristine SWNT/epoxy, and 91-103% for functionalized SWNT/epoxy system). The functionalized system also showed a 42% improvement perpendicular to the nanotube, while the pristine SWNT/epoxy system had no improvement over epoxy. The thermal conductivity tensor is averaged over all possible orientations to see the effects of randomly orientated nanotubes, and allow for experimental comparison. Excellent agreement is seen for the discontinuous, pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. These simulations demonstrate there exists a threshold of the SWNT length where the best improvement for a composite system with randomly oriented nanotubes would transition from pristine SWNTs to functionalized SWNTs.

  8. Structural and electrical properties of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube/epoxy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantayat, S.; Rout, D.; Swain, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of the functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotube on the structure and electrical properties of composites was investigated. Samples based on epoxy resin with different weight percentage of MWCNTs were prepared and characterized. The interaction between MWCNT & epoxy resin was noticed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The structure of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (f-MWCNT) reinforced epoxy composite was studied by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The dispersion of f-MWCNT in epoxy resin was evidenced by high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Electrical properties of epoxy/f-MWCNT nanocomposites were measured & the result indicated that the conductivity increased with increasing concentration of f-MWCNTs.

  9. Process modeling, optimization and analysis of esterification reaction of cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL)-derived epoxy resin using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Sultania, Minakshi; Rai, J S P; Srivastava, Deepak

    2011-01-30

    Concept of five-levels-four-factors central composite rotatable design was utilized for the optimization of reaction conditions of cardanol-based vinyl ester resin production, by employing response surfaces methodology, to establish a relationship between the process variables and the extent of conversion under a wide range of operating conditions which resulted in different extent of conversions. The maximum extent of conversion of cardanol-based epoxidised novolac resin (CNE) and methacrylic acid (MA) catalyzed by triphenylphosphine was found to be 95% at optimum set of conditions of molar ratio (1:0.9) between CNE and MA, catalyst concentration (1.49%), reaction temperature (89.96 °C) and reaction time (17,991s). Geometrical representation of the mathematical models in three-dimensional response surface plots and isoresponse contour plots served as a good aid in understanding the behavior of reaction under different operating conditions by only limited sets of experiments. A statistical model predicted that the highest conversion yield of novolac resin would be greater than 95% at the optimized reaction conditions. The predicted values thus obtained were close to the experimental values indicating suitability of the model. PMID:21051142

  10. Technical assessment for quality control of resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosnell, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Survey visits to companies involved in the manufacture and use of graphite-epoxy prepregs were conducted to assess the factors which may contribute to variability in the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy composites. In particular, the purpose was to assess the contributions of the epoxy resins to variability. Companies represented three segments of the composites industry - aircraft manufacturers, prepreg manufacturers, and epoxy resin manufacturers. Several important sources of performance variability were identified from among the complete spectrum of potential sources which ranged from raw materials to composite test data interpretation.

  11. Characterization of Epoxy Functionalized Graphite Nanoparticles and the Physical Properties of Epoxy Matrix Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Bauer, Jonathan L.; Maryanski, Michael J.; Heimann, Paula J.; Barlow, Jeremy P.; Gosau, Jan-Michael; Allred, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach to the functionalization of graphite nanoparticles. The technique provides a mechanism for covalent bonding between the filler and matrix, with minimal disruption to the sp2 hybridization of the pristine graphene sheet. Functionalization proceeded by covalently bonding an epoxy monomer to the surface of expanded graphite, via a coupling agent, such that the epoxy concentration was measured as approximately 4 wt.%. The impact of dispersing this material into an epoxy resin was evaluated with respect to the mechanical properties and electrical conductivity of the graphite-epoxy nanocomposite. At a loading as low as 0.5 wt.%, the electrical conductivity was increased by five orders of magnitude relative to the base resin. The material yield strength was increased by 30% and Young s modulus by 50%. These results were realized without compromise to the resin toughness.

  12. Physical aging and its influence on the reliability of network epoxies and epoxy-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.

    1983-01-01

    The matrix-dominated physical and mechanical properties of a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite and a neat epoxy resin were found to be affected by sub-Tg annealing in nitrogen and dark atmosphere. Postcured specimens of Thornel 300 carbon-fiber/Fiberite 934 epoxy as well as Fiberite 934 epoxy resin were quenched from above Tg and given annealing at 140 C, 110 C, or 80 C, for time up to one-hundred thousand minutes. No weight loss was observed during annealing at these temperatures. Significant variations were found in density, modulus, hardness, damping, moisture absorption ability, thermal expansivity. Moisture-epoxy interactious were also studied. The kinetics of aging as well as the molecular aggregation during this densification process were monitored by differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis, density gradient column, microhardness tester, Instron, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  13. Interfacial engineering of the interphase between carbon fibers and vinyl ester resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lanhong

    Vinyl ester resins have been extensively used for the manufacture of low cost high performance composites. Carbon fibers are important reinforcement materials. The use of vinyl ester composites reinforced with carbon fibers requires an improvement in the fiber/matrix adhesion levels. The objectives of this study were to gain an understanding of the factors controlling interfacial adhesion between carbon fibers and vinyl ester resin; to model the contributions of the factors controlling fiber/matrix adhesion; and to provide an engineered and optimized interface between carbon fiber and vinyl ester for tailoring structurally efficient carbon fiber/vinyl ester composites. This work consists of three parts. Part I. A partially cross-linked DGEBA epoxy polymer sizing placed onto carbon fiber surface was found to be a beneficial interphase between the carbon fiber and vinyl ester resin resulting in an increase in fiber-matrix adhesion. The adhesion was evaluated as interfacial shear strength (IFSS) with micro-indentation. Nano-indentation and nano-scratch technique were used to investigate the gradient between this epoxy sizing and vinyl ester resin. An optimized thickness of this sizing was found and the mechanism by which this sizing improved adhesion was also investigated. A set of 2-D non-linear finite element models was set up for simulation of the micro-indentation process and consistent results were found between the experimental data and numerical results. It was found that the epoxy sizing formed more chemical bonds with the surface of the carbon fiber reinforcement and an interpenetrating interphase with the vinyl ester resin. The resulting interphase between vinyl ester matrix and epoxy sizing reduced the residual stress caused by the volume shrinkage of the vinyl ester after curing. Part II. Since it is known that the carbon fiber surface can interfere with the vinyl ester polymerization, the effects of preferential adsorption of the catalysts and styrene on

  14. Toughening mechanisms in melt manipulated thermoplastics (PS and PC) and in novel modified epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hydro, Ryan Michael

    This study examined the deformation mechanisms associated with the fatigue and fracture of polystyrene (PS) and polycarbonate (PC) processed using a novel polymer melt manipulation technique, vibration-assisted injection molding (VAIM), as well as the toughening mechanisms of several epoxy resins modified with several novel block co-polymers. VAIM processed PS was found to possess a tensile strength 28% greater than conventionally processed PS, which is in agreement with previous research. The increase in tensile strength is due to the higher craze initiation stress required to overcome the thicker "frozen in" layer of the VAIM processed specimens. Also, the residual orientation present in VAIM specimens appears to retard craze propagation and this is evident by shear banding. Unfortunately, VAIM processed PS did not result in a fatigue lifetime improvement. In fatigue, the PS specimens processed either way usually resulted in the initiation and propagation of a single "killer craze" that caused failure. In contrast, the VAIM processed PC did not exhibit a significant improvement in tensile strength compared against the conventionally molded specimens. In cyclic loading, for the two stress levels examined, both the VAIM and conventional PC specimens were found to perform equally---when examining the average lifetimes and their corresponding standard deviations. In addition, this work studied the deformation mechanisms associated with novel block co-polymer modified epoxies. It was found that the plane strain fracture toughness, KIC, was on the order of 3.0MPa√m for the NanoStrength(TM) E20 modified AEP and PIP cured systems, which is comparable to micro-segregated core-shell particles. Toughness improvements significantly depended on cross-link density of the epoxy matrix, curing agent, and on the amount of polybutadiene present in the toughening agents examined. The system with the highest, KIC, was selected to make a conductive adhesive using 30nm diameter Ag

  15. Synthesis of improved phenolic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.; Mcleod, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty seven addition cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to give char residues comparable to state-of-the-art phenolic resins. Cyanate, epoxy, allyl, acrylate, methacrylate and ethynyl derivatized phenolic oligomers were investigated. The novolac-cyanate and propargyl-novolac resins provided anaerobic char yields at 800 C of 58 percent. A 59 percent char yield was obtained from modified epoxy novolacs. A phosphonitrilic derivative was found to be effective as an additive for increasing char yields. The novolac-cyanate, epoxy-novolac and methacrylate-epoxy-novolac systems were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. All three resins showed good potential as composite matrices. The free radical cured methacrylate-epoxy-novolac graphite composite provided short beam shear strengths at room temperature of 93.3 MPa (13.5 ksi). The novolac-cyanate graphite composite produced a short beam shear strength of 74 MPa (10.7 ksi) and flexural strength of 1302 MPa (189 ksi) at 177 C. Air heat aging of the novolac-cyanate and epoxy novolac based composites for 12 weeks at 204 C showed good property retention.

  16. The fabrication of monolithic capillary column based on poly (bisphenol A epoxy vinyl ester resin-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) and its applications for the separation of small molecules in high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenjing; Wang, Lijuan; Bai, Ligai; Yang, Gengliang

    2013-07-01

    A new polymeric monolith was synthesized in fused-silica capillary by in situ polymerization technique. In the polymerization, bisphenol A epoxy vinyl ester resin (VER) was used as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as the crosslinking monomer, 1,4-butanediol, 1-propanol and water as the co-porogens, and azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator. The conditions of polymerization have been optimized. Morphology of the prepared poly (VER-co-EDMA) monolith was investigated by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM); pore properties were assayed by mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption. The optimized poly (VER-co-EDMA) monolith showed a uniform structure, good permeability and mechanical stability. Then, the column was used as the stationary phase of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to separate the mixture of benzene derivatives. The best column efficiency achieved for phenol was 235790 theoretical plates per meter. Baseline separations of benzene derivatives and halogenated benzene compounds under optimized isocratic mode conditions were achieved with high column efficiency. The column showed good reproducibility: the relative standard deviation (RSD) values based on the retention times (n=3) for run-to-run, column-to-column and batch-to-batch were less than 0.98, 1.68, 5.48%, respectively. Compared with poly (BMA-co-EDMA) monolithic column, the proposed monolith exhibited more efficiency in the separation of small molecules. PMID:23726080

  17. Manufacturing of vegetable oils-based epoxy and composites for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongpeng

    Epoxidized vegetable oil (EVO) is one of the largest industrial applications of vegetable oils (VOs) and is widely used as a plasticizer and as a synthetic intermediate for polyol or unsaturated polyester. However, the utility of EVO as monomer for high performance epoxy thermoset polymer is limited by its reactivity and by the resulting physical properties. Herein, VO-based epoxy monomers, i.e., glycidyl esters of epoxidized fatty acids derived from soybean oil (EGS) or linseed oil (EGL), have been synthesized and were benchmarked against commercial available diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and also epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) controls. EGS and EGL possessed higher oxirane content, more reactivity and lower viscosity than ESO or epoxidized linseed oil (ELO), provided better compatibility with DGEBA as a reactive diluent, and yielded thermally and mechanically stronger polymers than polymers obtained using ESO. Glass transition temperatures (T g) of the VO-based epoxy thermoset polymers were mostly a function of monomer oxirane content with some added structural influences of epoxy reactivity, and presence of a pendant chain. Organo-modified montmorillonite clay (OMMT) and long glass fiber reinforced composites (FRC) were efficiently manufactured using anhydride cured EGS as matrices. The OMMT nanocomposites showed higher mechanical and thermal strength than the neat polymers but were also dependent on the dispersion techniques and the clay concentration. Surprisingly, the neat EGS-anhydride matrix FRC showed comparable properties, such as flexural and impact strengths and slightly lower Tg, versus DGEBA based counterparts. These high performance monomers, polymers, and composites have potential to replace petroleum-based epoxy as value-added products from VOs compared to EVOs.

  18. Thermochemical tests on resins: Char resistance of selected phenolic cured epoxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keck, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Curing epoxy resins with novalac phenolic resins is a feasible approach for increasing intact char of the resin system. Char yields above 40% at 700 C were achieved with epoxy novalac (DEN 438)/novalac phenolic (BRWE 5833) resin systems with or without catalyst such as ethyl tri-phenyl phosphonium iodide. These char yields are comparable to commercially used epoxy resin systems like MY-720/DDS/BF3. Stable prepregs are easily made from a solvent solution of the epoxy/phenolic system and this provides a feasible process for fabrication of same into commercial laminates.

  19. Cationic cure kinetics of a polyoxometalate loaded epoxy nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Benjamin J.

    2012-08-06

    The reaction cure kinetics of a novel polyoxometalate (POM) loaded epoxy nanocomposite is described. The POM is dispersed in the epoxy resin up to volume fractions of 0.1. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements show the cure of the epoxy resin to be sensitive to the POM loading. A kinetics study of the cure exotherm confirms that POM acts as a catalyst promoting cationic homopolymerization of the epoxy resin. The cure reaction is shown to propagate through two cure regimes. A fast cure at short time is shown to be propagation by the activated chain end (ACE) mechanism. A slow cure at long time is shown to be propagation by the activated monomer (AM) mechanism. The activation energies for the fast and slow cure regimes agree well with other epoxy based systems that have been confirmed to propagate by the ACE and AM mechanisms.

  20. Insights into Epoxy Network Nanostructural Heterogeneity Using AFM-IR.

    PubMed

    Morsch, Suzanne; Liu, Yanwen; Lyon, Stuart B; Gibbon, Simon R

    2016-01-13

    The first direct observation of a chemically heterogeneous nanostructure within an epoxy resin is reported. Epoxy resins comprise the matrix component of many high performance composites, coatings and adhesives, yet the molecular network structure that underpins the performance of these industrially essential materials is not well understood. Internal nodular morphologies have repeatedly been reported for epoxy resins analyzed using SEM or AFM, yet the origin of these features remains a contentious subject, and epoxies are still commonly assumed to be chemically homogeneous. Uniquely, in this contribution we use the recently developed AFM-IR technique to eliminate previous differences in interpretation, and establish that nodule features correspond to heterogeneous network connectivity within an epoxy phenolic formulation. PMID:26694687

  1. The Effect of Canal Dryness on Bond Strength of Bioceramic and Epoxy-resin Sealers after Irrigation with Sodium Hypochlorite or Chlorhexidine

    PubMed Central

    Razmi, Hasan; Bolhari, Behnam; Karamzadeh Dashti, Negar; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of canal dryness on the push-out bond strength of two resin sealers (AH-Plus and Adseal) and a bioceramic sealer (Endosequence BC sealer) after canal irrigation with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and chlorhexidine (CHX). Methods and Materials: A total of 18 extracted human premolars were used. Canals were prepared and were divided to two groups based on irrigation solution (either NaOCl or CHX). The samples were again divided based on pre-obturation canal condition (wet, half-wet and dry). The samples were sub-divided into 3 groups based on the sealer type; the teeth were obturated with gutta-percha and test sealers (Adseal, AH-Plus or BC sealer). A total number of 18 groups were available to be cut into dentine disks (12 disks in each group). The type of bond failure was also assessed in each group. Data were analyzed using the 3-way ANOVA, post hoc Tukey’s tests, t-test and the Fisher’s exact test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The bond strength of Adseal was not affected by the canal condition or irrigation with either NaOCl or CHX. Although the bond strength of AH-Plus was not affected by the irrigant type, the highest bond strength was seen in dry canals. For Endosequence BC sealer, the canal conditions did not affect the bond strength; however, CHX reduced the bond strength. Conclusion: Bond strength of resin sealers was not affected by irrigation solution; however, canal moisture negatively affected the bond strength of AH-Plus. CHX reduced the bond strength of BC sealer. PMID:27141222

  2. Molecular Description of Yield in Densely Crosslinked Epoxy Thermosets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattaraj, Sandipan; Pant, Prita; Pawaskar, Dnyanesh; Nanavati, Hemant

    In densely crosslinked networks, macroscopic yield is a transition from deformations of bond lengths and angles, to cooperative deformation of multiple effective network chains via bond torsions. In this work, we examine this yield in terms of the ''activation number'', ν, of microscopic effective chains between crosslinks. ν is the number of effective network chains, in one Eyring activation volume, V*. It is thus a measure of the number of network chains 'activated' at yield, for cooperative deformation. Microcompression experiments have been performed on SU-8 micropillars, to determine its V* value. SU-8 is an important epoxy thermoset, which is used extensively in the microelectronics industry, in microfluidics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The effective chain length based on Arruda and Boyce's 8-chain model, compares well with the rms length, obtained by chain conformer analyses. We find that ν ~ 2-4, at room temperature, for DGEBA-based epoxies including SU-8 and DGEBA-amine networks, over a range of network junction functionalities and V*. That ν corresponds very well with the reduced temperature, T/Tg, also demonstrates its viability as a molecular descriptor of yield in densely crosslinked thermosets.

  3. Epoxy composites based on inexpensive tire waste filler

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmetli, Gulnare Gungor, Ahmet Kocaman, Suheyla

    2014-05-15

    Tire waste (TW) was recycled as raw material for the preparation of DGEBA-type epoxy composite materials. The effects of filler amount and epoxy type on the mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Tensile strength and Young’s modulus of the composites with NPEL were generally higher than composites with NPEF. The appropriate mass level for TW in both type composites was found to be 20 wt%. The equilibrium water sorption of NPEL/TW and NPEF/TW composites for 14-day immersion was determined as 0.10 % and 0.21 %, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for characterization of the composites.

  4. Morphology development of rubber-modified epoxy thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, O.; Ward, T.C.

    1996-12-31

    Epoxy thermosets have been widely used as high performance adhesives and matrix resins for composites due to their outstanding mechanical and thermal properties, such as high modulus and tensile strength, high glass transition temperature, high thermal stability, and moisture resistance. Incorporation of a secondary rubbery phase into the glassy epoxy matrix can improve impact and fracture toughness of epoxy thermosets without sacrificing the other desirable properties of the neat epoxy thermoset. During the curing process, the initial homogeneous solution of epoxy resin-curing agent-rubber generally forms rubber-rich and epoxy-rich phases by a phase separation process which is arrested by gelation or vitrification. The final morphology developed by the cure depends on relative rates of cure reaction and phase separation. Cure conditions and the initial rubber composition control the morphology of the system and thus control the mechanical properties of the system.

  5. Epoxy Foam Encapsulants: Processing and Dielectric Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Domeier; Marion Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The dielectric performance of epoxy foams was investigated to determine if such materials might provide advantages over more standard polyurethane foams in the encapsulation of electronic assemblies. Comparisons of the dielectric characteristics of epoxy and urethane encapsulant foams found no significant differences between the two resin types and no significant difference between as-molded and machined foams. This study specifically evaluated the formulation and processing of epoxy foams using simple methylhydrosiloxanes as the flowing agent and compared the dielectric performance of those to urethane foams of similar density.

  6. Large boron--epoxy filament-wound pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, W. M.; Bailey, R. L.; Knoell, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    Advanced composite material used to fabricate pressure vessel is prepeg (partially cured) consisting of continuous, parallel boron filaments in epoxy resin matrix arranged to form tape. To fabricate chamber, tape is wound on form which must be removable after composite has been cured. Configuration of boron--epoxy composite pressure vessel was determined by computer program.

  7. Epoxy nanocomposites based on high temperature pyridinium-modified clays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingxin; Naito, Kimiyoshi; Qi, Ben; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites are generally fabricated by thermal curing or melt compounding at elevated temperatures, however the thermal stability of common alkyl ammonium treated clays is poor and decomposition occurs inevitably during high temperature processing. In this study, we modified clays with an aromatic pyridinium salt. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the onset degradation temperature (Td(onset)) and maximum decomposition temperature (Td(max)) of the pyridinium treatment clays was up to 310 and 457 degrees C respectively implying high thermal stability. The thermal decomposition behaviour of the pyridinium modified clays was discussed. A series of epoxy/clay nanocomposites were synthesized using a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy and diethyltoluene diamine (DETDA). The morphology of epoxy/clay nanocomposites was characterized with wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), and intercalated structures were observed. The storage modulus of epoxy was increased but glass transition temperature was decreased with clay incorporation. The effects of clays on glass transition temperature (Tg) of epoxy were also discussed. PMID:19441298

  8. Development of Graphite/Epoxy Corner Fittings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faile, G.; Hollis, R.; Ledbetter, F.; Maldonado, J.; Sledd, J.; Stuckey, J.; Waggoner, G.; Engler, E.

    1986-01-01

    Report documents development project aimed at improving design and load-carrying ability of complicated corner fitting for optical bench. New fitting made of graphite filaments in epoxy-resin matrix. Composite material selected as replacement for titanium because lighter and dimensions change little with temperature variations.

  9. Effects of Nanofillers on the Thermo-Mechanical Properties and Chemical Resistivity of Epoxy Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Atchudan, Raji; Pandurangan, Arumugam; Joo, Jin

    2015-06-01

    MWCNTs was synthesized using Ni-Cr/MgO by CVD method and were purified. The purified MWCNT was used as a filler material for the fabrication of epoxy nanocomposites. The epoxy nanocomposites with different amount (wt% = 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0) of nanofillers (CB, SiO2 and MWCNTs) were prepared by casting method. The effects of nanofillers on the properties of neat epoxy matrix were well studied. The thermal properties of nanocomposites were studied using DSC, TGA and flame retardant, and also the mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength, compressive strength, impact strength, determination of hardness and chemical resistance were studied extensively. Based on the experiment's results, 2 wt% MWCNTs loading in epoxy resin showed the highest improvement in tensile strength, as compared to neat epoxy and to other epoxy systems (CB/epoxy, SiO2/epoxy). Improvements in tensile strength, glass transition temperature and decomposition temperature were observed by the addition of MWCNTs. The mechanical properties of the epoxy nanocomposites were improved due to the interfacial bonding between the MWCNTs and epoxy resin. Strain hardening behavior was higher for MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites compared with CB/epoxy and SiO2/epoxy nanocomposites. The investigation of thermal and mechanical properties reveals that the incorporation of MWCNTs into the epoxy nanocomposites increases its thermal stability to a great extent. Discrete increase of glass transition temperature of nanocomposites is linearly dependent on MWCNTs content. Due to strong interfacial bonding between MWCNTs and epoxy resin, the chemical resistivity of MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites is superior to neat epoxy and other epoxy systems. PMID:26369037

  10. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  11. Development of a heterogeneous laminating resin system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, T. F.; Hopper, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    The factors which effect the impact resistance of laminating resin systems and yet retain equivalent performance with the conventional 450 K curing epoxy matrix systems in other areas were studied. Formulation work was conducted on two systems, an all-epoxy and an epoxy/bismaleimide, to gain fundamental information on the effect formulation changes have upon neat resin and composite properties. The all-epoxy work involved formulations with various amounts and combinations of eight different epoxy resins, four different hardeners, fifteen different toughening agents, a filler, and a catalyst. The epoxy/bismaleimide effort improved formulations with various amounts and combinations of nine different resins, four different hardeners, eight different toughening agents, four different catalysts, and a filler. When a formulation appeared to offer the proper combination of properties required for a laminating resin Celion 3K-70P fabric was prepregged. Initial screening tests on composites primarily involved Gardner type impact and measurement of short beam shear strengths under dry and hot/wet conditions.

  12. Development of tough, moisture resistant laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    Tough, moisture resistant laminating resins for employment with graphite fibers were developed. The new laminating resins exhibited cost, handleability and processing characteristics equivalent to 394K (250 F) curing epoxies. The laminating resins were based on bisphenol A dicyanate and monofunctional cyanates with hydrophobic substituents. These resins sorb only small quantities of moisture at equilibrium (0.5% or less) with minimal glass transition temperature depression and represent an improvement over epoxies which sorb around 2% moisture at equilibrium. Toughening was accomplished by the precipitation of small diameter particles of butadiene nitrile rubber throughout the resin matrix. The rubber domains act as microcrack termini and energy dissipation sites, allowing increased stress accommodation prior to catastrophic failure. A unique blend of amine terminated butadiene nitrile elastomer (MW 2,000) and a high nitrile content butadiene nitrile rubber yielded the desired resin morphology.

  13. Respiratory effects of exposure of shipyard workers to epoxy paints.

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, D; Jones, J; Atterbury, M; Balmes, J

    1991-01-01

    Epoxy resin systems have been associated with occupational asthma in several case reports, but medical publications contain little on the potential adverse respiratory effects of these chemicals in exposed worker populations. To further evaluate the association of workplace exposure to epoxy paints and respiratory dysfunction, the cross workshift changes in pulmonary function and symptoms of 32 shipyard painters exposed to epoxy paints were compared with 28 shipyard painters not exposed to epoxy paints. The prevalence of lower respiratory tract symptoms was significantly higher among painters exposed to epoxy paints compared with controls. Among exposed painters the mean cross workshift change in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (-3.4%) was greater than the decrement in the non-exposed group (-1.4%). A significant linear relation was seen between % decrement in FEV1 and hours of exposure to epoxy paints. This study suggests that epoxy resin coatings as used by shipyard painters are associated with increased lower respiratory tract symptoms and acute decrements in FEV1. Adequate respiratory protection and medical surveillance programmes should be established in workplaces where exposure to epoxy resin systems occurs. PMID:1954156

  14. Synthesis of improved phenolic and polyester resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to provide improved char residues and moisture resistance over state of the art epoxy resin composite matrices. Cyanate, epoxy novolac and vinyl ester resins were investigated. Char promoter additives were found to increase the anaerobic char yield at 800 C of epoxy novolacs and vinyl esters. Moisture resistant cyanate and vinyl ester compositions were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. A cyanate composite matrix provided state of the art composite mechanical properties before and after humidity exposure and an anaerobic char yield of 46 percent at 800 C. The outstanding moisture resistance of the matrix was not completely realized in the composite. Vinyl ester resins showed promise as candidates for improved composite matrix systems.

  15. Flammability screening tests of resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arhart, R. W.; Farrar, D. G.; Hughes, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    Selected flammability characteristics of glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins are evaluated. A protocol for the evaluation of the flammability hazards presented by glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins and the usefulness of that protocol with two laminates are presented. The glass laminates of an epoxy resin, M-751 are evaluated for: (1) determination of smoke generation from the laminates; (2) analysis of products of oxidative degradation of the laminates; (3) determination of minimum oxygen necessary to maintain flaming oxidation; (4) evaluation of toxicological hazards.

  16. Colorless triphenylamine-based aliphatic thermoset epoxy for multicolored and near-infrared electrochromic applications.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ya-Wen; Yen, Hung-Ju; Wu, Jia-Hao; Liou, Guey-Sheng

    2014-03-12

    In this study, two novel colorless thermoset epoxy resins with anodically electrochromism were prepared from the thermal curing of two triphenylamine-based diamine monomers, 4,4'-diamino-4″-methoxytriphenylamine (1) and N,N'-bis(4-aminophenyl)-N,N'-di(4-methoxylphenyl)-1,4-phenylenediamine (2) with aliphatic epoxy triglycidyl isocyanurate, respectively. The resulting thermoset epoxy resins showed excellent softening temperature (Ts, 270 and 280 °C) due to the rigid structure and highly crosslinking density. In addition, novel colorless epoxy resin films revealed good reversible electrochemical oxidation and interesting multi-electrochromic behavior with high contrast ratio both in visible and near-infrared regions. The aliphatic thermoset epoxy resins also exhibited high transparency in visible region as colorless and great potential for practical electrochromic applications. PMID:24456516

  17. Effect of Liquid-Crystalline Epoxy Backbone Structure on Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy-Alumina Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang, Thanhkieu; Kim, Jinhwan

    2016-06-01

    In a series of papers published recently, we clearly demonstrated that the most important factor governing the thermal conductivity of epoxy-Al2O3 composites is the backbone structure of the epoxy. In this study, three more epoxies based on diglycidyl ester-terminated liquid-crystalline epoxy (LCE) have been synthesized to draw conclusions regarding the effect of the epoxy backbone structure on the thermal conductivity of epoxy-alumina composites. The synthesized structures were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and optical microscopy were also employed to examine the thermal and optical properties of the synthesized LCEs and the cured composites. All three LCE resins exhibited typical liquid-crystalline behaviors: clear solid crystalline state below the melting temperature (T m), sharp crystalline melting at T m, and transition to nematic phase above T m with consequent isotropic phase above the isotropic temperature (T i). The LCE resins displayed distinct nematic liquid-crystalline phase over a wide temperature range and retained liquid-crystalline phase after curing, with high thermal conductivity of the resulting composite. The thermal conductivity values ranged from 3.09 W/m-K to 3.89 W/m-K for LCE-Al2O3 composites with 50 vol.% filler loading. The steric effect played a governing role in the difference. The neat epoxy resin thermal conductivity was obtained as 0.35 W/m-K to 0.49 W/m-K based on analysis using the Agari-Uno model. The results clearly support the objective of this study in that the thermal conductivity of the LCE-containing networks strongly depended on the epoxy backbone structure and the degree of ordering in the cured network.

  18. Acetylene terminated matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfarb, I. J.; Lee, Y. C.; Arnold, F. E.; Helminiak, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of resins with terminal acetylene groups has provided a promising technology to yield high performance structural materials. Because these resins cure through an addition reaction, no volatile by-products are produced during the processing. The cured products have high thermal stability and good properties retention after exposure to humidity. Resins with a wide variety of different chemical structures between the terminal acetylene groups are synthesized and their mechanical properties studied. The ability of the acetylene cured polymers to give good mechanical properties is demonstrated by the resins with quinoxaline structures. Processibility of these resins can be manipulated by varying the chain length between the acetylene groups or by blending in different amounts of reactive deluents. Processing conditions similar to the state-of-the-art epoxy can be attained by using backbone structures like ether-sulfone or bis-phenol-A. The wide range of mechanical properties and processing conditions attainable by this class of resins should allow them to be used in a wide variety of applications.

  19. Performance Properties of Graphite Reinforced Composites with Advanced Resin Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1980-01-01

    This article looks at the effect of different resin matrices on thermal and mechanical properties of graphite composites, and relates the thermal and flammability properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins. The processing parameters of graphite composites utilizing graphite fabric and epoxy or other advanced resins as matrices are presented. Thermoset resin matrices studied were: aminecured polyfunctional glycidyl aminetype epoxy (baseline), phenolicnovolac resin based on condensation of dihydroxymethyl-xylene and phenol cured with hexamine, two types of polydismaleimide resins, phenolic resin, and benzyl resin. The thermoplastic matrices studied were polyethersulfone and polyphenylenesulfone. Properties evaluated in the study included anaerobic char yield, limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, moisture absorption, and mechanical properties at elevated temperatures including tensile, compressive, and short-beam shear strengths. Generally, it was determined that graphite composites with the highest char yield exhibited optimum fire-resistant properties.

  20. Progress toward Making Epoxy/Carbon-Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiano, Thomas; Roylance, Margaret; Gassner, John; Kyle, William

    2008-01-01

    A modicum of progress has been made in an effort to exploit single-walled carbon nanotubes as fibers in epoxy-matrix/fiber composite materials. Two main obstacles to such use of carbon nanotubes are the following: (1) bare nanotubes are not soluble in epoxy resins and so they tend to agglomerate instead of becoming dispersed as desired; and (2) because of lack of affinity between nanotubes and epoxy matrices, there is insufficient transfer of mechanical loads between the nanotubes and the matrices. Part of the effort reported here was oriented toward (1) functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with methyl methacrylate (MMA) to increase their dispersability in epoxy resins and increase transfer of mechanical loads and (2) ultrasonic dispersion of the functionalized nanotubes in tetrahydrofuran, which was used as an auxiliary solvent to aid in dispersing the functionalized nanotubes into a epoxy resin. In another part of this effort, poly(styrene sulfonic acid) was used as the dispersant and water as the auxiliary solvent. In one experiment, the strength of composite of epoxy with MMA-functionalized-nanotubes was found to be 29 percent greater than that of a similar composite of epoxy with the same proportion of untreated nanotubes.

  1. Rate dependent response and failure of a ductile epoxy and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Rae, Philip J; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Stahl, David B

    2010-01-01

    An extensive characterization suite has been performed on the response and failure of a ductile epoxy 55A and uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite of IM7 fibers in 55A resin from the quasistatic to shock regime. The quasistatic and intermediate strain rate response, including elastic modulus, yield and failure have are characterized by quasistatic, SHPB, and DMA measurements as a function of fiber orientation and temperature. The high strain rate shock effect of fiber orientation in the composite and response of the pure resin are presented for plate impact experiments. It has previously been shown that at lower impact velocities the shock velocity is strongly dependent on fiber orientation but at higher impact velocity the in-plane and through thickness Hugoniots converge. The current results are compared with previous studies of the shock response of carbon fiber composites with more conventional brittle epoxy matrices. The spall response of the composite is measured and compared with quasistatic fracture toughness measurements.

  2. Mechanical Property and Structure of Covalent Functionalised Graphene/Epoxy Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Naebe, Minoo; Wang, Jing; Amini, Abbas; Khayyam, Hamid; Hameed, Nishar; Li, Lu Hua; Chen, Ying; Fox, Bronwyn

    2014-01-01

    Thermally reduced graphene nanoplatelets were covalently functionalised via Bingel reaction to improve their dispersion and interfacial bonding with an epoxy resin. Functionalised graphene were characterized by microscopic, thermal and spectroscopic techniques. Thermal analysis of functionalised graphene revealed a significantly higher thermal stability compared to graphene oxide. Inclusion of only 0.1 wt% of functionalised graphene in an epoxy resin showed 22% increase in flexural strength and 18% improvement in storage modulus. The improved mechanical properties of nanocomposites is due to the uniform dispersion of functionalised graphene and strong interfacial bonding between modified graphene and epoxy resin as confirmed by microscopy observations. PMID:24625497

  3. Interphase tailoring in graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, R. V.; Sanadi, A. R.; Crasto, A. S.

    1988-01-01

    The fiber-matrix interphase in graphite fiber-epoxy matrix composites is presently modified through the electrodeposition of a coating of the polymer poly(styrene-comaleic anhydride), or 'SMA' on the graphite fibers; optimum conditions have been established for the achievement of the requisite thin, uniform coatings, as verified by SEM. A single-fiber composite test has shown the SMA coating to result in an interfacial shear strength to improve by 50 percent over commercially treated fibers without sacrifice in impact strength. It is suggested that the epoxy resin's superior penetration into the SMA interphase results in a tougher fiber/matrix interface which possesses intrinsic energy-absorbing mechanisms.

  4. Correlation of the crack initiation stress with epoxy network topology

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Weeks, T.; McCoy, J.

    1997-03-01

    Much controversy surrounds the dependence of stress intensity factor of glassy thermosets, epoxies in particular, with crosslink density. One could scan the literature and find references that claim K{sub Ic} increases with crosslink density, decreases with crosslink density, or is independent of crosslink density. The authors feel that two factors contribute to this confusion. First, a typical method for assessing this dependence relies on modifying the crosslink density by changing the precursor epoxy molecular weight. On the other hand, one could change stoichiometry or quench the reaction at intermediate extents of reaction to obtain large changes in crosslink density. However, most studies have not measured the resulting stress intensity factor of these partially cured systems at constant T-T{sub g}, where T{sub g} is the glass transition temperature of the epoxy. Since T{sub g} can change significantly with cure and since fracture processes at the crack tip are dissipative, they must work at constant T-T{sub g} to ensure that the nonlinear viscoelastic mechanisms are fairly compared. In this study, they quenched the reaction of the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and diethanolamine (DEA) at various stages past the gel point and measured the three-point-bend stress intensity factor at a constant T-T{sub g} = {minus}50 C. The trend is clear and significant; increasing crosslink density directly increases the load-to-fail.

  5. Fabricating Thin-Film High-Temperature Thermoset Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, G. E.; Long, E. R. J.; Kitts, R., G.

    1982-01-01

    To prepare an epoxy thin film, quantity of uncured epoxy to be cast placed in vacuum oven and heated to melting temperature. Vacuum of about 30 mm Hg is applied to deaerate epoxy charge. Pressure is cycled with each foaming until all air and excess volatiles are revoved. thermoset (cross-linked) resin is cast between thin, flexible, releasing substrate films. Films less than 0.025 mm in thickness are made routinely with this facility.

  6. Fabrication of graphite/epoxy cases for orbit insertion motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, W. W.

    1973-01-01

    The fabrication procedures are described for filament-wound rocket motor cases, approximately 26.25 inches long by 25.50 inches diameter, utilizing graphite fibers. The process utilized prepreg tape which consists of Fortafil 4-R fibers in the E-759 epoxy resin matrix. This fabrication effect demonstrated an ability to fabricate high quality graphite/epoxy rocket motor cases in the 26.25 inch by 25.50 inch size range.

  7. Epoxy Nanocomposites—Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, S. O.; Kotomin, S. V.; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2010-06-01

    Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.

  8. Epoxy Nanocomposites - Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyin, S. O.; Kotomin, S. V.; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2010-06-02

    Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.

  9. Void-free epoxy castings for cryogenic insulators and seals

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    The design of the Westinghouse Magnet for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Large Coil Program (LCP) incorporates a main lead bushing which transmits heat-leak loads by conduction to the supercritical helium stream. The bushing, which consists of epoxy resin cast about a copper conductor, must be electrically insulated, vacuum tight and be capable of withstanding the stresses encountered in cryognic service. The seal design of the bushing is especially important; leakage from either the helium system or the external environment into the vacuum will cause the magnet to quench. Additionally, the epoxy-resin casting must resist mechanical loads caused by the weight of leads attached to the bushing and thermal stresses transmitted to the epoxy via the conductor. The epoxy resin is cast about the conductor in such a way as to provide the required vacuum tight seal. The technique by which this is accomplished is reviewed. Equally important is the elimination of voids in the epoxy which will act as stress-concentrating discontinuities during cooling to or warming from 4K. The types of voids that could be expected and their causes are described. The paper reviews techniques employed to eliminate voids within the cast-resin portion of the bushing.

  10. Microwave assisted pultrusion of an epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Methven, J.M.; Abidin, A.Z.

    1995-12-01

    A 6mm diameter cylindrical profile based on E-glass fibers and a BF{sub 3}-triamine-epoxy resin system has been manufactured by Microwave Assisted Pultrusion (MAP) using a single mode resonant microwave cavity operating in a TM{sub 010} mode at 2450 MHz. Power transfer is at least 70% and pulling speeds of more than 2m/minute have been achieved for a power input of about 800W. The results are consistent with earlier MAP studies using unsaturated polyesters, epoxies urethane acrylates and vinyl esters. The results provide a sound basis for proposing the use of this type of epoxy system as a material that is suitable for a high speed gel-cure pultrusion process that uses both a microwave heating cavity and a conventional pultrusion die.

  11. Rheological monitoring of phase separation induced by chemical reaction in thermoplastic-modified epoxy

    SciTech Connect

    Vinh-Tung, C.; Lachenal, G.; Chabert, B.

    1996-12-31

    The phase separation induced by chemical reaction in blends of tetraglycidyl-diaminodiphenylmethane epoxy resin with an aromatic diamine hardener and a thermoplastic was monitored. Rheological measurements and morphologies are described.

  12. Development of quality assurance methods for epoxy graphite prepreg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. S.; Hunter, A. B.

    1982-01-01

    Quality assurance methods for graphite epoxy/prepregs were developed. Liquid chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, and gel permeation chromatography were investigated. These methods were applied to a second prepreg system. The resin matrix formulation was correlated with mechanical properties. Dynamic mechanical analysis and fracture toughness methods were investigated. The chromatography and calorimetry techniques were all successfully developed as quality assurance methods for graphite epoxy prepregs. The liquid chromatography method was the most sensitive to changes in resin formulation. The were also successfully applied to the second prepreg system.

  13. Silicone modified resins for graphite fiber laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, L. W.; Bower, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The development of silicon modified resins for graphite fiber laminates which will prevent the dispersal of graphite fibers when the composites are burned is discussed. Eighty-five silicone modified resins were synthesized and evaluated including unsaturated polyesters, thermosetting methacrylates, epoxies, polyimides, and phenolics. Neat resins were judged in terms of Si content, homogeneity, hardness, Char formation, and thermal stability. Char formation was estimated by thermogravimetry to 1,000 C in air and in N2. Thermal stability was evaluated by isothermal weight loss measurements for 200 hrs in air at three temperatures. Four silicone modified epoxies were selected for evaluation in unidirectional filament wound graphite laminates. Neat samples of these resins had 1,000 C char residues of 25 to 50%. The highest flexural values measured for the laminates were a strength of 140 kpsi and a modulus of 10 Mpsi. The highest interlaminar shear strength was 5.3 kpsi.

  14. Space environmental effects on graphite-epoxy compressive properties and epoxy tensile properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Derek J.; Sykes, George F., Jr.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    This study characterizes the effects of electron radiation and temperature on a graphite-epoxy composite material. Compressive properties of the T300/934 material system were obtained at -250 F (-157 C), room temperature, and 250 F (121 C). Tensile specimens of the Fiberite 934 epoxy resin were fabricated and tested at room temperature and 250 F (121 C). Testing was conducted in the baseline (nonirradiated) and irradiated conditions. The radiation exposure was designed to simulate 30 year, worst-case exposure in geosynchronous Earth orbit. Mechanical properties tended to degrade at elevated temperature and improve at cryogenic temperature. Irradiation generally degraded properties at all temperatures.

  15. Advanced composites: Environmental effects on selected resin matrix materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welhart, E. K.

    1976-01-01

    The effects that expected space flight environment has upon the mechanical properties of epoxy and polyimide matrix composites were analyzed. Environmental phenomena covered water immersion, high temperature aging, humidity, lightning strike, galvanic action, electromagnetic interference, thermal shock, rain and sand erosion, and thermal/vacuum outgassing. The technology state-of-the-art for graphite and boron reinforced epoxy and polyimide matrix materials is summarized to determine the relative merit of using composites in the space shuttle program. Resin matrix composites generally are affected to some degree by natural environmental phenomena with polyimide resin matrix materials less affected than epoxies.

  16. Toughening reinforced epoxy composites with brominated polymeric additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z. (Inventor); Gilwee, W. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polyfunctional epoxy resins including tris(hydroxyphenyl)methane triglycidyl ether are toughened by addition of polybrominated polymeric additives having an EE below 1500 to the pre-cure composition. Carboxy-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber is optionally present in the pre-cure mixture as such or as a pre-formed copolymer with other reactants. Reinforced composites, particularly carbon-reinforced composites, of these resins are disclosed and shown to have improved toughness.

  17. Toughening reinforced epoxy composites with brominated polymeric additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Gilwee, W. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polyfunctional epoxy resins including tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane triglycidyl ether are toughened by addition of polybrominated polymeric additives having an EE below 1500 to the pre-cure composition. Carboxy terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber is optionally present in the precure mixture as such or as a pre-formed copolymer with other reactants. Reinforced composites, particularly carbon reinforced composites, of these resins are disclosed and shown to have improved toughness.

  18. SECURING CONTAINERIZED HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH POLYETHYLENE RESIN AND FIBERGLASS ENCAPSULATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigates the fabrication and use of polyethylene resin and fiberglass to encapsulate and secure containerized hazardous wastes. Laboratory-scale encapsulates of composite structure were made from powdered, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and epoxy-resin-wetted fib...

  19. Advanced thermoset resins for fire-resistant composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal and flammability properties of some thermoset polymers and composites are described. The processing and evaluation of composites fabricated from currently used resins and advanced fire-resistant resins are also described. Laboratory test methodology used to qualify candidate composite materials includes thermochemical characterization of the polymeric compounds and evaluation of the glass reinforced composites for flammability and smoke evolution. The use of these test methods will be discussed in comparing advanced laminating resins and composites consisting of modified epoxies, phenolics and bismaleimide, with conventional baseline materials consisting of epoxy.

  20. Photocured epoxy/graphene nanocomposites with enhanced water vapor barrier properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periolatto, M.; Sangermano, M.; Spena, P. Russo

    2016-05-01

    A transparent, water vapor barrier film made of an epoxy resin and graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized by photopolymerization process. The epoxy/GO film with just 0.05 wt% GO gives a 93% WVTR reduction with respect to the pristine polymer, reaching barrier properties better than other polymer composites containing higher amounts of graphene. The excellent water vapor barrier is attributed to the good dispersion of GO in the polymer matrix. Moreover, GO significantly enhances the toughness and the damping capacity of the epoxy resins. The hybrid film can have potential applications in anticorrosive coatings, electronic devices, pharmaceuticals and food packaging.

  1. Nanofiltration membranes of poly(styrene-co-chloro-methylstyrene)-grafted-DGEBA reinforced with gold and polystyrene nanoparticles for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausar, Ayesha; Siddiq, Muhammad

    2015-10-01

    The matrix material for nanofiltration membranes was prepared through chemical grafting of poly(styrene-co-chloromethylstyrene) (PSCMS) to DGEBA using hexamethylenediamine as linker. The phase inversion technique was used to form PSCMS-g-DGEBA membranes. This effort also involves the designing of gold nanoparticles and its composite nanoparticles with polystyrene microspheres as matrix reinforcement. The nanoporous morphology was observed at lower filler content and there was formation of nanopattern at increased nanofiller content. The tensile strength was improved from 32.5 to 35.2 MPa with the increase in AuNPs-PSNPs loading from 0.1 to 1 wt%. The glass transition temperature was also enhanced from 132 to 159 °C. The membrane properties were measured via nanofiltration set-up. Higher pure water permeation flux, recovery, and salt rejection were measured for novel membranes. PSCMS-g-DGEBA/AuNPs-PSNPs membrane with 1 wt% loading showed flux of 2.01 mL cm-2 min-1 and salt rejection ratio of 70.4 %. Efficiency of the gold/polystyrene nanoparticles reinforced membranes for the removal of Hg2+ and Pb2 was found to be 99 %. Novel hybrid membranes possess fine characteristics to be utilized in industrial water treatment units.

  2. Woven graphite epoxy composite test specimens with glass buffer strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnar, G. R.; Palmer, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Woven unidirectional graphite cloth with bands of fiberglass replacing the graphite in discrete lengthwise locations was impregnated with epoxy resin and used to fabricate a series of composite tensile and shear specimens. The finished panels, with the fiberglass buffer strips, were tested. Details of the fabrication process are reported.

  3. Effects of hydrothermal exposure on a low-temperature cured epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal mechanical analysis was employed to monitor the penetration temperature of a low-temperature epoxy resin. Both neat resin and E-glass composite samples were examined. The effects of cure temperature variation and moisture content on the apparent glass transition temperature were determined.

  4. Effects of hydrothermal exposure on a low-temperature cured epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal mechanical analysis was employed to monitor the penetration temperature of a low-temperature epoxy resin (EPON 826/D230). Both neat resin and E-glass composite samples were examined. The effects of cure temperature variation and moisture content on the apparent glass transition temperature were determined.

  5. DEGRADATION OF MAGNET EPOXY AT NSLS X-RAY RING.

    SciTech Connect

    HU,J.P.; ZHONG,Z.; HAAS,E.; HULBERT,S.; HUBBARD,R.

    2004-05-24

    Epoxy resin degradation was analyzed for NSLS X-ring magnets after two decades of 2.58-2.8 GeV continuous electron-beam operation, based on results obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeters irradiated along the NSLS ring and epoxy samples irradiated at the beamline target location. A Monte Carlo-based particle transport code, MCNP, was utilized to verify the dose from synchrotron radiation distributed along the axial- and transverse-direction in a ring model, which simulates the geometry of a ring quadrupole magnet and its central vacuum chamber downstream of the bending-magnet photon ports. The actual life expectancy of thoroughly vacuum baked-and-cured epoxy resin was estimated from radiation tests on similar polymeric materials using a radiation source developed for electrical insulation and mechanical structure studies.

  6. Study of Lignocellulose/Epoxy Composites for Carbon-neutral Insulation Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Gen; Hayami, Tokusuke; Murayama, Kiyoko; Sato, Junichi; Kinoshita, Susumu; Todo, Yoko; Amano, Yoshihiko

    Carbon-neutral materials, which do not affect the density of CO2 in the atmosphere even if they burn, have attracted much attention form the viewpoint of environmental friendliness. In this study, lignocellulose/epoxy composites were newly prepared as carbon-neutral insulation materials, and their properties were evaluated. Hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose, which is composed of lignin and crystalline cellulose, was prepared by a treatment of corncob under high-pressure hot water at 190°C, 1.8 MPa for 10min. The 13C-NMR spectra showed that the amounts of non-crystalline cellulose in the hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose were less than those of non-hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose. Moreover, hydrothermal reaction and oligoesterification lignocellulose was obtained by a reaction of maleic anhydride and glycidyl ether with the hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose. The epoxy resin containing the hydrothermal reaction and oligoesterification lignocellulose had lower water absorption and viscosity than those of the epoxy resin containing the non-hydrothermal reaction lignocellulose. The epoxy resin containing the hydrothermal reaction and oligoesterification lignocellulose with SiO2 fillers showed an insulation breakdown strength as same as conventional material (an epoxy resin containing SiO2 fillers). In addition, mechanical and thermal properties of the epoxy-based composite were also comparable with a conventional material. Therefore, the epoxy-based composite seems to be a candidate as practical carbon neutral insulation materials.

  7. Electron and proton absorption calculations for a graphite/epoxy composite model. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The Bethe-Bloch stopping power relations for inelastic collisions were used to determine the absorption of electron and proton energy in cured neat epoxy resin and the absorption of electron energy in a graphite/epoxy composite. Absorption of electron energy due to bremsstrahlung was determined. Electron energies from 0.2 to 4.0 MeV and proton energies from 0.3 to 1.75 MeV were used. Monoenergetic electron energy absorption profiles for models of pure graphite, cured neat epoxy resin, and graphite/epoxy composites are reported. A relation is determined for depth of uniform energy absorption in a composite as a function of fiber volume fraction and initial electron energy. Monoenergetic proton energy absorption profiles are reported for the neat resin model. A relation for total proton penetration in the epoxy resin as a function of initial proton energy is determined. Electron energy absorption in the composite due to bremsstrahlung is reported. Electron and proton energy absorption profiles in cured neat epoxy resin are reported for environments approximating geosynchronous earth orbit.

  8. The Effect of Water on the Work of Adhesion at Epoxy Interfaces by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, J.A.; Frankland, S.J.V.; Clancy, T.C.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation can be used to explore the detailed effects of chemistry on properties of materials. In this paper, two different epoxies found in aerospace resins are modeled using molecular dynamics. The first material, an amine-cured tetrafunctional epoxy, represents a composite matrix resin, while the second represents a 177 C-cured adhesive. Surface energies are derived for both epoxies and the work of adhesion values calculated for the epoxy/epoxy interfaces agree with experiment. Adding water -- to simulate the effect of moisture exposure -- reduced the work of adhesion in one case, and increased it in the other. To explore the difference, the various energy terms that make up the net work of adhesion were compared and the location of the added water was examined.

  9. Performance of filament-wound vessels from an organic fiber in several epoxy matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Jessop, E. S.; Hamstad, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    A study was carried out to select a state-of-the-art epoxy for wet filament winding. Ten epoxy systems were used to filament wind pressure vessels with a high-modulus, high-strength organic fiber. Data are reported on vessel performance, fiber strand strengths, and shear strengths for the different systems. Using our criteria (processibility, neat resin properties, and vessel performance), we find that an epoxy system based on the rubber-modified bis-phenol-F resin, diluted with vinyl cyclohexane dioxide and cured with mixed aromatic amines, can easily replace bis-phenol-A epoxies diluted with bis-(2, 3-epoxycyclopentyl) ether (such as ERL 2256 epoxy of Union Carbide) with comparable overall performance.

  10. Effect of metal ions on positron annihilation characteristics in metal ion containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; St. Clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In the course of developing improved moisture-resistant epoxy resins, two different types of epoxy resins containing variable mole ratios of chromium ions per polymer repeat unit were developed. Positron annihilation characteristics have been investigated in these resins as a function of their metal ion content. In both cases, the presence of metal ions reduces the lifetime as well as the intensity of the long life component. The long life component intensity reduction is considerably more pronounced than the lifetime reduction. These results have been discussed in terms of increased unpaired electron density at Ps formation sites due to the presence of chromium ions in the matrix.

  11. Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites and Methods of Making Same Without the Use of Oven or Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Stienecker, Rick D. (Inventor); Nickerson, David M. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Method embodiments for producing a fiber-reinforced epoxy composite comprise providing a mold defining a shape for a composite, applying a fiber reinforcement over the mold, covering the mold and fiber reinforcement thereon in a vacuum enclosure, performing a vacuum on the vacuum enclosure to produce a pressure gradient, insulating at least a portion of the vacuum enclosure with thermal insulation, infusing the fiber reinforcement with a reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent under vacuum conditions, wherein the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent generates exothermic heat, and producing the fiber-reinforced epoxy composite having a glass transition temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. by curing the fiber reinforcement infused with the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent by utilizing the exothermically generated heat, wherein the curing is conducted inside the thermally insulated vacuum enclosure without utilization of an external heat source or an external radiation source.

  12. Bearingless helicopter main rotor development. Volume 2: Combined load fatigue evaluation of weathered graphite/epoxy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rackiewicz, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Small scale combined load fatigue tests were conducted on six artificially and six naturally weathered test specimens. The test specimen material was unidirectionally oriented A-S graphite - woven glass scrim epoxy resin laminate.

  13. Novel masked mercaptans based on thiolacetic acid/diallyl bisphenol a adducts as hardeners for epoxy adhesive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, H.; Zahir, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Epoxy resin formulations based on these masked mercaptans show adhesive properties equivalent to epoxy resin formulations cured with classical hardeners such as dicyandiamide. In addition the use of the masked mercaptans as an epoxy resin hardener leads to adhesive joints which show outstanding resistance to moisture. Thus Al/Al joints cured with a clinical epoxy formulation based on dicyandiamide as hardener (AV 8) failed in 30 days after exposure to water at (90{degrees}C) for 90 days. We believe that chemi-adsorption at the interface between metal/adhesive/metal plays an important role in giving this outstanding hot water resistance. This paper discusses the synthesis, the mechanism of cure with epoxide resins and the adhesive properties of these novel masked mercaptans.

  14. Buckling of a fiber bundle embedded in epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Sohi, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    Buckling of a fiber bundle embedded in epoxy resin was studied to gain insight into compressive failure mechanisms in unidirectional composites. The fibers used were E-glass, T300 graphite, T700 graphite, and P75 graphite. These fibers were combined with two different resins: Epon 815/V140 and Epon 828/Z. In both resins the failure mode of the bundle was found to be microbuckling of fibers for the first three types of fibers; however, the high-modulus P75 fibers failed in shear without any sign of microbuckling. The strains at which microbuckling occurred were higher than the compressive failure strains of the corresponding unidirectional composites. In the soft resin, Epon 815/V140, fibers buckled at lower strains than in the stiff resin, Epon 828/Z. The buckling strains and the segment lengths followed the trends predicted for a single filament embedded in an infinite matrix.

  15. The failure mode of natural silk epoxy triggered composite tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshkour, R. A.; Ariffin, A. K.; Zulkifli, R.; Sulong, A. B.; Azhari, C. H.

    2012-09-01

    In this study the quasi static compression test over natural silk epoxy triggered composite tubes has been carried out, the natural silk epoxy composite tubes consist of 24 layer of woven natural silk as reinforcement and thermoset epoxy resin as matrix which both of them i e natural silk and epoxy have excellent mechanical properties More over the natural silk have better moisture resistance in comparison with other natural reinforcements, the length of tubes are 50, 80 and 120 mm The natural silk epoxy composite tubes are associated with an external trigger which includes 4 steel pieces welded on downside flat plate fixture The hand lay up fabrication method has been used to make the natural silk epoxy composite tubes Instron universal testing machine with 250 KN load capacity has been employed to accomplish this investigation The failure modes of natural silk epoxy triggered composite tubes has been investigated by representative photographs which has been taken by a high resolution camera(12 2 Mp) during the quasi static compression test, from the photographs is observed the failure modes is progressive local buckling

  16. Aspects of the Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube Modified Epoxy Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirjalili, Vahid

    Epoxy resins used in fibre reinforced composites exhibit a brittle fracture behaviour, because they show no sign of damage prior to a catastrophic failure. Rubbery materials and micro-particles have been added to epoxy resins to improve their fracture toughness, which reduces strength and elastic properties. In this research, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated as a potential toughening agent for epoxy resins and carbon fibre reinforced composites, which can also enhance strength and elastic properties. More specifically, the toughening mechanisms of CNTs are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The effect of aligned and randomly oriented carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the fracture toughness of polymers was modelled using Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics. Toughening from CNT pull-out and rupture were considered, depending on the CNTs critical length. The model was used to identify the effect of CNTs geometrical and mechanical properties on the fracture toughness of CNT-modified epoxies. The modelling results showed that a uniform dispersion and alignment of a high volume fraction of CNTs normal to the crack growth plane would lead to the maximum fracture toughness enhancement. To achieve a uniform dispersion, the effect of processing on the dispersion of single walled and multi walled CNTs in epoxy resins was investigated. An instrumented optical microscope with a hot stage was used to quantify the evolution of the CNT dispersion during cure. The results showed that the reduction of the resin viscosity at temperatures greater than 100 °C caused an irreversible re-agglomeration of the CNTs in the matrix. The dispersion quality was then directly correlated to the fracture toughness of the modified resin. It was shown that the fine tuning of the ratio of epoxy resin, curing agent and CNT content was paramount to the improvement of the base resin fracture toughness. For the epoxy resin (MY0510 from Hexcel), an improvement of 38% was achieved with 0.3 wt

  17. Tensile properties of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H.; Trada, Mohan

    2013-08-01

    Kinetic epoxy resin was filled with nanoclay to increase tensile properties of the composite for civil and structural. This project manufactured samples with different percentages by weight of nanoclay in the composites in steps of 1 wt %, which were then post-cured in an oven. The samples were then subjected to tensile tests. The results showed that the composite with 3 wt % of nanoclay produced the highest yield and tensile strengths. However, the Young's modulus increased with increasing nanoparticulate loading. It is hoped that the discussion and results in this work would not only contribute towards the further development of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites with enhanced material properties, but also provide useful information for the studies of fracture toughness, tensile properties and flexural properties of other composites.

  18. Influence of the reaction stoichiometry on the mechanical and thermal properties of SWCNT-modified epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, Behnam; Martinez-Rubi, Yadienka; Khoun, Lolei; Yourdkhani, Mostafa; Kingston, Christopher T.; Hubert, Pascal; Simard, Benoit; Johnston, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies suggest that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a considerable influence on the curing behavior and crosslink density of epoxy resins. This invariably has an important effect on different thermal and mechanical properties of the epoxy network. This work focuses on the important role of the epoxy/hardener mixing ratio on the mechanical and thermal properties of a high temperature aerospace-grade epoxy (MY0510 Araldite as an epoxy and 4,4‧-diaminodiphenylsulfone as an aromatic hardener) modified with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The effects of three different stoichiometries (stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric) on various mechanical and thermal properties (fracture toughness, tensile properties, glass transition temperature) of the epoxy resin and its SWCNT-modified composites were obtained. The results were also supported by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For the neat resin, it was found that an epoxy/hardener molar ratio of 1:0.8 provides the best overall properties. In contrast, the pattern in property changes with the reaction stoichiometry was considerably different for composites reinforced with unfunctionalized SWCNTs and reduced SWCNTs. A comparison among composites suggests that a 1:1 molar ratio considerably outperforms the other two ratios examined in this work (1:0.8 and 1:1.1). This composition at 0.2 wt% SWCNT loading provides the highest overall mechanical properties by improving fracture toughness, ultimate tensile strength and ultimate tensile strain of the epoxy resin by 40%, 34%, 54%, respectively.

  19. Moisture absorption and mechanical properties for high-modulus Pitch 75 graphite-fiber-modified cyanate ester resin laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Christopher; Zakrzewski, Jerry

    1992-09-01

    Structural epoxy resins used in the fabrication of composite structures for spacecraft applications absorb significant amounts of water. This moisture absorption results in swelling of the structures during fabrication and assembly and subsequent desorption shrinkage in space. Reduction of this effect will be required for development of dimensionally stable large advanced space structures. In the last several years modified epoxy resins, cyanate esters and cyanate esters/epoxy resins have been developed with lower moisture absorption structures to address this issue. Work has continued for several years on the evaluation of high modulus Pitch 75 laminates made using modified low moisture absorption epoxy and cyanate systems to developed structural and thermophysical data for use in the design of stable structures. This paper describes the evaluation of moisture absorption and mechanical properties of unidirectional and quasi-isotropic Pitch 75 laminates made from selected cyanate esters and cyanate ester-epoxy resins.

  20. Toughened epoxy polymers: Fatigue crack propagation mechanisms. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Azimi, H.R.

    1994-01-01

    This study examines several mechanisms by which the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) resistance of shear-yielding thermoset polymers can be improved. Specifically, this research has four objectives as follows: first, to develop a mechanistic understanding of the FCP behavior of rubber-modified thermoset polymers; second, to understand the effect of strength and shape of the inorganic fillers on the FCP resistance and micromechanisms in filled epoxy polymers; third, to elucidate the nature of the interactions among the crack-tip shielding mechanisms in thermoset polymers subjected to cyclic loading and synergistically toughened with both rubber and inorganic particles (i.e., hybrid composites); fourth, to study the role of interfaces on the synergistic interactions in FCP behavior of hybrid composites. The model - matrix material consists of a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) based type epoxy cured with piperidine. Parallel to the first objective, the epoxy matrix was modified with rubber while changing volume fraction, type, and size of the rubber particles. To accomplish the second goal, the epoxy polymers were modified by a total 10 volume percent of either one of the following three types of inorganic modifiers: hollow glass spheres (HGS); solid glass spheres (SGS); and short glass fibers (SGF). The third goal was met by processing three different systems of hybrid epoxy composites modified by (1) CTBN rubber and HGS, (2) CTBN rubber and SGS, and (3) CTBN rubber and SGF. The total volume fraction of the two modifiers in each hybrid system was kept constant at 10 percent while systematically changing their ratio. To meet the fourth objective, the surface properties of the SGS particles in the hybrid system were altered using adhesion promoter. A mechanistic understanding of the FCP behavior of rubber-modified epoxies was achieved by relating fractographs to observed FCP behavior.

  1. Contactless optoelectronic technique for monitoring epoxy cure.

    PubMed

    Cusano, A; Buonocore, V; Breglio, G; Calabrò, A; Giordano, M; Cutolo, A; Nicolais, L

    2000-03-01

    We describe a novel noninvasive optical technique to monitor the refractive-index variation in an epoxy-based resin that is due to the polymerization process. This kind of resin is widely used in polymer matrix composites. It is well known that the process of fabricating a thermoset-based composite involves mass and heat transfer coupled with irreversible chemical reactions that induce physical changes. To improve the quality and the reliability of these materials, monitoring the cure and optimization of the manufacturing process are of key importance. We discuss the basic operating principles of an optical system based on angle deflection measurements and present typical cure-monitoring results obtained from optical characterization. The method provides a flexible, high-sensitivity, material-independent, low-cost, noninvasive tool for monitoring real-time refractive-index variation. PMID:18337994

  2. Preparation and Insulation Properties of Epoxy-Layered Silicate Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takahiro; Sawa, Fumio; Ozaki, Tamon; Nakano, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Toshio; Yoshimitsu, Tetsuo

    Recent rapid progress in nanotechnology has focused research and development efforts on new high performance materials. Organic-inorganic hybrid materials such as nylon-layered silicate nanocomposites have attracted special interest and various studies continue to be conducted on thermoplastic resins. In this study, we found out the best organic modifier of layered silicate that contributed to an affinity for epoxy resin (thermosetting resin), and succeeded in creating an intercalated-type epoxy-layered silicate nanocomposite. This nanocomposite realized some improvements by the addition of 5 or 6 weight percentage of organically modified layered silicates, which have 20oC higher thermal resistance, 60% higher fracture toughness, 19% higher flexural strength and 10% higher insulation breakdown strength than these of an epoxy resin without layered silicate fillers. An electrical treeing growth was observed in the nanocomposite. The electrical treeing progress with many branches in the nanocomposite seemed to result in an increase in the insulation breakdown strength. These results suggest the possibility of practical use as an insulating material in heavy apparatuses.

  3. Latent Hardeners for the Assembly of Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank; Wohl, Christopher J.; Connell, John W.; Mercado, Zoar; Galloway, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale composite structures are commonly joined by secondary bonding of molded-and-cured thermoset components. This approach may result in unpredictable joint strengths. In contrast, assemblies made by co-curing, although limited in size by the mold, result in stable structures, and are certifiable for commercial aviation because of structural continuity through the joints. Multifunctional epoxy resins were prepared that should produce fully-cured subcomponents with uncured joining surfaces, enabling them to be assembled by co-curing in a subsequent out-of-autoclave process. Aromatic diamines were protected by condensation with a ketone or aldehyde to form imines. Properties of the amine-cured epoxy were compared with those of commercially available thermosetting epoxy resins and rheology and thermal analysis were used to demonstrate the efficacy of imine protection. Optimum conditions to reverse the protecting chemistry in the solid state using moisture and acid catalysis were determined. Alternative chemistries were also investigated. For example, chain reaction depolymerization and photoinitiated catalysts would be expected to minimize liberation of volatile organic content upon deprotection and avoid residual reactive species that could damage the resin. Results from the analysis of protected and deprotected resins will be presented.

  4. Qualification of S-glass/epoxy thermal isolator bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    Unidirectional fiberglass reinforced epoxy structures have been evaluated as thermal isolator tension straps for the charge-coupled devices on the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field/Planetary Camera. Mechanical and thermal properties are reported for filament-wound S-2 glass in a generic epoxy resin and compared to S-901 glass bands used on a previous camera. Measurements were performed on very small paper clip-shaped bands. Probably the smallest in length and have a load carrying mean cross sectional area of only 0.00024 square inches.

  5. Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms for low cost composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, J. G.; Bayha, T. D.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced resin systems and 3D textile preforms are being evaluated at Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company (LASC) under NASA's Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program. This work is aimed towards the development of low-cost, damage-tolerant composite fuselage structures. Resin systems for resin transfer molding and powder epoxy towpreg materials are being evaluated for processability, performance and cost. Three developmental epoxy resin systems for resin transfer molding (RTM) and three resin systems for powder towpregging are being investigated. Various 3D textile preform architectures using advanced weaving and braiding processes are also being evaluated. Trials are being conducted with powdered towpreg, in 2D weaving and 3D braiding processes for their textile processability and their potential for fabrication in 'net shape' fuselage structures. The progress in advanced resin screening and textile preform development is reviewed here.

  6. Effect of clay surface silylation and dispersion method on the mechanical properties of epoxy-clay composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, V.; Piscitelli, F.; Scamardella, A. M.; Amendola, E.; Lavorgna, M.; Mensitieri, G.; Acierno, D.

    2010-06-01

    Epoxy-clay nanocomposites were prepared dispersing both pristine and functionalized sodium montmorillonite powders (1 and 3 wt%) in epoxy resin by means of sonication and sonication/ball-milling high energy mixing processes. Silylation reaction of sodium montmorillonite (Na-MMT) was performed by using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (A1100) and N-2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (A1120) as coupling agents. Morphological investigations showed that the MMT stacks are only slightly intercalated. However the surface modification of MMT clays improves the interfacial interaction with epoxy resins and the nanocomposites obtained through sonication exhibit enhanced mechanical properties compared to the nanocomposites prepared from pristine Na-MMT.

  7. Interlaminar shear properties of graphite fiber, high-performance resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.; Kourtides, D. A.; Fish, R. H.; Varma, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Short beam testing was used to determine the shear properties of laminates consisting of T-300 and Celion 3000 and 6000 graphite fibers, in epoxy, hot melt and solvent bismaleimide, polyimide and polystyrylpyridine (PSP). Epoxy, composites showed the highest interlaminar shear strength, with values for all other resins being substantially lower. The dependence of interlaminar shear properties on the fiber-resin interfacial bond and on resin wetting characteristics and mechanical properties is investigated, and it is determined that the lower shear strength of the tested composites, by comparison with epoxy resin matrix composites, is due to their correspondingly lower interfacial bond strengths. An investigation of the effect of the wettability of carbon fiber tow on shear strength shows wetting variations among resins that are too small to account for the large shear strength property differences observed.

  8. Investigation of the effects of cobalt ions on epoxy properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of Co(acac)sub x complexes on MY-720 epoxy properties have been investigated. It appears that Co2(+) ions form antibonding or nonbonding orbitals which increase the free volume and also reduce the cohesiveness of the host epoxy. The effects of Co2(+) ions, on the other hand, seem to result in increased Cohesiveness of the epoxy. The experimental values of magnetic moments of both types of ions in MY-720 suggest that the orbital momentum contributions of the (3d) electrons are partially conserved, though the effect is more pronounced for Co2(+) ions. The coordination environment of the cobalt ions in the host epoxy does not appear to be uniquely defined. These results indicate that the effects of metal ions on resin properties cannot be easily predicted on the basis of ligand field theory argument alone. Complex interactions between metal ions and host epoxy molecular structure suggest the desirability of parallel experimental investigations of electronic, magnetic, and mechanical properties of metal ion-containing epoxy samples for comparison with theory.

  9. Effect of Boric Acid on Volatile Products of Thermooxidative Degradation of Epoxy Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, O. B.; Bukhareva, P. B.; Melnikova, T. V.; Visakh, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The polymeric materials are characterized by high flammability. The use of flame retardants in order to reduce the flammability of polymers can lead to the formation of toxic gaseous products under fire conditions. In this work we studied the effect of boric acid on the volatile products of thermooxidative degradation of epoxy polymers. The comparative investigations were carried out on the samples of the unfilled epoxy resin and epoxy resin filled with a boric acid at percentage 10 wt. %. The analysis of the volatile decomposition products and thermal stability of the samples under heating in an oxidizing medium was performed using a thermal mass-spectrometric analysis. It is found that the incorporation of boric acid into the polymer matrix increases the thermal stability of epoxy composites and leads to a reduction in the 2-2.7 times of toxic gaseous products

  10. Modeling and Prediction of Thermal Cycle Induced Failure in Epoxy-Silica Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmita, Grzegorz; Nowak, Tomasz; Sekula, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Epoxy resins filled with dielectric mineral particles are frequently used as insulating materials in power industry applications. Due to their excellent dielectric properties and relatively good thermal performance (resistance, ageing and conductivity) their usability is common and extensive. However, the mechanical performance of the resins is influenced by several factors such as resistance to crack propagation, especially in low temperature applications. This phenomenon is normally linked with appearance of two phase systems where particle filled epoxy material interacts with metallic inserts having significantly different thermal expansion coefficients. This kind of epoxy-metal interface can produce relatively high stresses in the product structure during thermal cycle loading. The paper deals with mechanical problems of power industry products and introduces the methodology for numerical modeling of failure in silica filled epoxy systems subjected to severe temperature gradients. Various aspects of material behavior modeling are covered in this article, including polymerization process, viscoelastic stress relaxation as well as stochastic cracking.

  11. Rubber-toughened polyfunctional epoxies - Brominated vs nonbrominated formulated for graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Gilwee, W. J.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A new, commercially available, trifunctional epoxy resin (tris-(hydroxyphenyl)-methane triglycidyl ether) was modified with synthetic rubber to increase the impact resistance of epoxy/graphite composites. These composites were reinforced with commercially available satin-weave carbon cloth using two formulations of epoxies (brominated and nonbrominated) containing various amounts of carboxy-terminated butadience acrylonitrile (CTBN) rubber that had been prereacted with epoxy resin. The impact resistance was determined by measuring the interlaminar shear strength of the composites after impact. The mechanical properties, such as flexural strength and modulus at room temperature and at 93 C, were also determined. Measurements were taken of the flammability and glass transition temperature (Tg); and a thermal-gravimetric analysis was made.

  12. The fabrication, testing and delivery of boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy nondestructive test standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pless, W. M.; Lewis, W. H.

    1971-01-01

    A description is given of the boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy nondestructive test standards which were fabricated, tested and delivered to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Detailed design drawings of the standards are included to show the general structures and the types and location of simulated defects built into the panels. The panels were laminates with plies laid up in the 0 deg, + or - 45 deg, and 90 deg orientations and containing either titanium substrates or interlayered titanium perforated shims. Panel thickness was incrementally stepped from 2.36 mm (0.093 in.) to 12.7 mm (0.500 in.) for the graphite/epoxy standards, and from 2.36 mm (0.093 in.) to 6.35 mm (0.25 in.) for the boron/epoxy standards except for the panels with interlayered shims which were 2.9 mm (0.113 in.) maximum thickness. The panel internal conditions included defect free regions, resin variations, density/porosity variations, cure variations, delaminations/disbonds at substrate bondlines and between layers, inclusions, and interlayered shims. Ultrasonic pulse echo C-scan and low-kilovoltage X-ray techniques were used to evaluate and verify the internal conditions of the panels.

  13. Effects of moisture exposure on the crosslinked epoxy system: an atomistic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, S.; Valipour, H.

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion of water into the polymer structures can influence the structure and properties of the polymers. The absorbed water is believed to degrade the strength and properties of the polymers and hence it is important to study how it affects the thermal and mechanical properties of the polymers. In this report, the effects of moisture on the epoxy network and its properties are studied. The epoxy in this work is considered as the result of the curing of diglycidyl ether bisphenol-A (DGEBA) with JEFFAMINE®-D230 hardener. Several structural and dynamics analysis has been conducted to investigate the effects of the ingress of water into the polymer structure. The significant changes in the epoxy structure as a result of introducing water to the system are observed. The molecular structure has been monitored as it underwent the water uptake process. The variation of the atomic correlations due to the exposure to the moisture is reported. Moreover, the effects of adding water on the glass transition temperature and Young’s modulus is revealed. The changes in the properties are explained by the results obtained from monitoring the molecular structure.

  14. Non-Fickian behavior of water absorption in an epoxy-amidoamine network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brethous, R.; Colin, X.; Fayolle, B.; Gervais, M.

    2016-05-01

    The water absorption in a DGEBA-amidoamine network synthesized with an amine excess was studied between 10 and 90% RH at 30, 50 and 70°C. This quasi-ideal epoxy network displays deviations from the classical Fick's behavior after the transient period. The amplitude of these deviations is an increasing function of both the relative humidity and temperature. In a first approximation, it was assumed that they result exclusively from the hydrolysis of the elastically active chains constituted by the amidoamine hardener. Indeed, at low conversion ratios, the reaction of amides with water and the accumulation of dangling chains with highly polar extremities (carboxylic acids) in the epoxy network could explain the progressive increase in the equilibrium water mass uptake m∞ over time. At highest conversions ratios, i.e. when the probability of having two hydrolysis events on a same elastically active chain cannot be ignored, the physical loss of short macromolecular fragments (of diacid type) from the epoxy network could then explain the decrease in m∞ over time. Complementary physico-chemical analyses are in progress to check these assumptions.

  15. Thermal and mechanical behavior of flame retardant epoxy-polyesterurethane blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Hirani, A. V.; Kachhia, P. H.

    2016-05-01

    Polyesterurethanes are used in different applications due to their unique combination of the properties like toughness, flexibility, solvent resistance, etc. Nowadays flame retardant properties of polymers are of commercial interest because of their potential use in high performance applications. In the present study attempts have been taken to improve the flame retardant properties of conventional epoxy resin by incorporating phosphorus based polyesterurethane. Polyesterurethane has been synthesized in the laboratory and characterized by chemical and instrumental analysis techniques. Thermal stability and char value of the blends have been determined using thermogravimetric analysis technique. Limiting Oxygen Index (LOI) and UL-94 test methods have been used to determine the flame retardant properties of neat polymer and their blends in film form. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, elongation and impact resistance of the blends have been found out. Polyblend of epoxy resin with phosphorus based polyesterurethane has improved flame retardant properties compare to neat epoxy resin.

  16. The effects of electron and gamma radiation on epoxy-based materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Memory, J. D.; Gilbert, R. D.; Long, E. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of graphite/epoxy composites and epoxy resins were exposed to electron and gamma radiation, followed by mechanical property and fundamental measurements. Measurement techniques included: scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and electron spin resonance spectroscopic analysis. Results indicate little or no change in flexural properties of miniature specimens of a graphite/epoxy composite and no change in failure mode at the fiber-resin interface and in the crystallinity of the fiber and the resin. Some doubt in the observation of stable flexural properties is cast by electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of a relatively large number of radiation-generated radicals. These generally lead to a change in cross-linking and in chain-scissioning which should alter mechanical properties.

  17. Ultrasonic mixing of epoxy curing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for mixing solid curing agents into liquid epoxy resins using ultrasonic energy was developed. This procedure allows standard curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents with very high melt temperatures such as 4,4 prime-diaminobenzophenone (4,4 prime-DABP) (242 C) to be mixed without premature curing. Four aromatic diamines were ultrasonically blended into MY-720 epoxy resin. These were 4,4 prime-DDS; 3,3 prime-DDA; 4,4 prime-DABP and 3,3 prime-DABP. Unfilled moldings were cast and cured for each system and their physical and mechanical properties compared.

  18. Characterization of Polyimide Matrix Resins and Prepregs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximovich, M. G.; Galeos, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/polyimide composite materials are attractive candidates for a wide range of aerospace applications. They have many of the virtues of graphite/epoxies, i.e., high specific strengths and stiffness, and also outstanding thermal/oxidative stability. Yet they are not widely used in the aerospace industry due to problems of procesability. By their nature, modern addition polyimide (PI) resins and prepregs are more complex than epoxies; the key to processing lies in characterizing and understanding the materials. Chemical and rheological characterizations are carried out on several addition polyimide resins and graphite reinforced prepregs, including those based on PMR-15, LARC 160 (AP 22), LARC 160 (Curithane 103) and V378A. The use of a high range torque transducer with a Rheometrics mechanical spectrometer allows rheological data to be generated on prepreg materials as well as neat resins. The use of prepreg samples instead of neat resins eliminates the need for preimidization of the samples and the data correlates well with processing behavior found in the shop. Rheological characterization of the resins and prepregs finds significant differences not readily detected by conventional chemical characterization techniques.

  19. Clay/Polyaniline Hybrid through Diazonium Chemistry: Conductive Nanofiller with Unusual Effects on Interfacial Properties of Epoxy Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Jlassi, Khouloud; Chandran, Sarath; Poothanari, Mohammed A; Benna-Zayani, Mémia; Thomas, Sabu; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2016-04-12

    The concept of conductive network structure in thermoset matrix without sacrificing the inherent mechanical properties of thermoset polymer (e.g., epoxy) is investigated here using "hairy" bentonite fillers. The latter were prepared through the in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of 4-diphenylamine diazonium (DPA)-modified bentonite (B-DPA) resulting in a highly exfoliated bentonite-DPA/polyaniline (B-DPA/PANI). The nanocomposite filler was mixed with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), and the curing agent (4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone) (DDS) at high temperature in order to obtain nanocomposites through the conventional melt mixing technique. The role of B-DPA in the modification of the interface between epoxy and B-DPA/polyaniline (B-DPA/PANI) is investigated and compared with the filler B/PANI prepared without any diazonium modification of the bentonite. Synergistic improvement in dielectric properties and mechanical properties points to the fact that the DPA aryl groups from the diazonium precursor significantly modify the interface by acting as an efficient stress transfer medium. In DPA-containing nanocomposites, unique fibril formation was observed on the fracture surface. Moreover, dramatic improvement (210-220%) in fracture toughness of epoxy composite was obtained with B-DPA/PANI filler as compared to the weak improvement of 20-30% noted in the case of the B/PANI filler. This work shows that the DPA diazonium salt has an important effect on the improvement of the interfacial properties and adhesion of DGEBA and clay/PANI nanofillers. PMID:26963747

  20. Safe epoxy encapsulant for high voltage magnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.O.; Archer, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Formula 456, an aliphatic amine cured epoxy for impregnating coils and high voltage transformers. Sandia has evaluated a number of MDA-free epoxy encapsulants which relied on either anhydride or other aromatic amine curing agents. The use of aliphatic amine curing agents was more recently evaluated and has resulted in the definition of Formula 456 resin. Methylene dianiline (MDA) has been used for more than 20 years as the curing agent for various epoxy formulations throughout the Department of Energy and much of industry. Sandia National Laboratories began the process of replacing MDA with other formulations because of regulations imposed by OSHA on the use of MDA. OSHA has regulated MDA because it is a suspect carcinogen. Typically the elimination of OSHA-regulated materials provides a rare opportunity to qualify new formulations in a range of demanding applications. It was important to take full advantage of that opportunity, although the associated materials qualification effort was costly. Small high voltage transformers are one of those demanding applications. The successful implementation of the new formulation for high reliability transformers will be described. The test results that demonstrate the parts are qualified for use in DOE weapon systems will be presented.

  1. Development of a Heterogeneous Laminating Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosnell, R.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of toughening the common types of matrix resins such as Narmco 5208 by utilizing a heterogeneous additive was examined. Some basic concepts and principles in the toughening of matrix resins for advanced composites were studied. The following conclusions were advanced: (1) the use of damage volume as a guide for measurement of impact resistance appears to be a valid determination; (2) short beam shear is a good test to determine the effect of toughening agents on mechanical properties; (3) rubber toughening results in improved laminate impact strength, but with substantial loss in high temperature dry and wet strength; (4) in the all-epoxy systems, the polycarbonate toughening agent seemed to be the most effective, although hot-wet strength is sacrificed; ABS was not as effective; and (5) in general, the toughened all-epoxy systems showed better damage tolerance, but less hot-wet strength; toughened bismaleimides had better hot-wet strength.

  2. Sliding wear resistance of epoxy polymers against stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Spinks, G.M.; Dimovski, L.; Samandi, M.

    1993-12-31

    The wear mechanisms occurring during sliding contact between epoxy resins and a smooth steel counterface have been investigated. The samples were prepared from a commercial diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A epoxy and cured with various hardeners. The cured resins displayed a wide range of mechanical properties (particularly fracture toughness), and crosslink densities. The wear rates of the samples were found to vary by up to four orders of magnitude. It was found that the wear rates correlated to the inverse of the fracture toughness, which was in accord with previous studies on the wear of plastics by Omar et al. The mechanism was found to involve an ``adhesive/fatigue`` process, as proposed by Omar. Additionally, it was found that the addition of a rubber toughening agent had no effect on the wear rate, whilst sliding contact between polymer and polymer resulted in a much higher rate of wear. Possible explanations for this behavior are given.

  3. Fabrication of silica-decorated graphene oxide nanohybrids and the properties of composite epoxy coatings research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu; Di, Haihui; Yu, Zongxue; Liang, Ling; Lv, Liang; Pan, Yang; Zhang, Yangyong; Yin, Di

    2016-01-01

    With the purpose of preparing anticorrosive coatings, solvent-based epoxy resins often serve as raw material. Unfortunately, plentiful micro-pores are fabricated via solvent evaporation in the resin' curing process, which is an intrinsic shortcoming and it is thus necessary to obstacle their micro-pore for enhancing antiseptic property. To reduce the intrinsic defect and increase the corrosion resistance of coating, we synthesize a series of SiO2-GO hybrids through anchoring silica (SiO2) on graphene oxide (GO) sheets with the help of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane, and disperse the hybrids into epoxy resin at a low weight fraction of 2%. Furthermore, we investigate the appropriate preparation proportion of SiO2-GO hybrids (namely: SiO2-GO (1:5)). The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) test and coatings' morphology monitoring in corrosion process reveal that the anticorrosive performance of epoxy coatings is significantly enhanced by incorporation of SiO2-GO (1:5) hybrids to epoxy compared with neat epoxy and other nanofillers including SiO2 or GO at the same contents. The superiority of the SiO2-GO (1:5) hybrids is related to their excellent dispersion in resin and sheet-like structure.

  4. Thermoplastic impact property improvement in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite bumper beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, M. M.; Sapuan, S. M.; Ali, Aidy; Ahmad, D.; Khalina, A.

    2010-05-01

    Utilization of thermoset resin as a bumper beam composite matrix is currently more dominated in car manufacturer suppliers, because of availability, easy processing, low material cost and production equipment investment. Moreover, low viscosity, shrinkage and excellent flow facilitate better fibre impregnation and proper surface resin wetting. Three-dimensional cross linking curing increase impact, creep and environmental stress cracking resistance properties. Low impact properties of natural fibre epoxy composite, are main issues in its employment for automotive structural components. Impact properties in epoxy composite bumper beam could be increased by modifying the resin, reinforcement and manufacturing process as well as geometry parameters such as cross section, thickness, added ribs and fixing method optimizations could strengthen impact resistance. There are two main methods, flexibilisation and toughening, as modifying the resin in order to improve the impact properties of epoxy composite, which form single phase or two-phase morphology to make modifier as epoxy or from separate phase to keep the thermo-mechanical properties. Liquid rubber, thermoplastic, core shell particle and rigid particle are different methods of toughening improvements. In this research, thermoplastic toughening has used to improve impact properties in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite for automotive bumper beam and has achieved reasonable impact improvements.

  5. Low-temperature mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R. P.; Madhukar, M.; Thaicharoenporn, B.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2014-01-27

    Selected mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminate candidates for use in the electrical turn and ground insulation of the ITER Central solenoid (CS) modules were measured. Short-beam shear and flexural tests have been conducted on various E-glass cloth weaves/epoxy laminates at 295 and 77 K. Types of glass weave include 1581, 7500, 7781, and 38050, which represent both satin and plain weaves. The epoxy, planned for use for vacuum-pressure impregnation of the CS module, consists of an anhydride-cured bisphenol F resin system. Inter-laminar shear strength, flexural elastic modulus, and flexural strength have been measured. The data indicate that these properties are dependent on the volume percent of glass. Short-beam shear strength was measured as a function of the span-to-thickness ratio for all laminates at 77 K. Comprehensive fractography was conducted to obtain the failure mode of each short-beam shear test sample.

  6. Low-temperature mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.; Madhukar, M.; Thaicharoenporn, B.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2014-01-01

    Selected mechanical properties of glass/epoxy laminate candidates for use in the electrical turn and ground insulation of the ITER Central solenoid (CS) modules were measured. Short-beam shear and flexural tests have been conducted on various E-glass cloth weaves/epoxy laminates at 295 and 77 K. Types of glass weave include 1581, 7500, 7781, and 38050, which represent both satin and plain weaves. The epoxy, planned for use for vacuum-pressure impregnation of the CS module, consists of an anhydride-cured bisphenol F resin system. Inter-laminar shear strength, flexural elastic modulus, and flexural strength have been measured. The data indicate that these properties are dependent on the volume percent of glass. Short-beam shear strength was measured as a function of the span-to-thickness ratio for all laminates at 77 K. Comprehensive fractography was conducted to obtain the failure mode of each short-beam shear test sample.

  7. Multiple welding of long fiber epoxy vitrimer composites.

    PubMed

    Chabert, Erwan; Vial, Jérôme; Cauchois, Jean-Pierre; Mihaluta, Marius; Tournilhac, François

    2016-05-25

    Vitrimers appear as a new class of polymers that exhibit mechanical strength and are insoluble even at high temperatures, like thermosets, and yet, like thermoplastics, they are heat processable, recyclable and weldable. The question arises whether this welding property is maintained in composite materials made of more than 50 vol% of reinforcing fibers. In this paper, we quantitatively analyze the bond strength of epoxy vitrimer-based composite plates made by resin transfer molding and compare them to their non-vitrimer counterparts made of a standard thermoset epoxy. It is demonstrated that only epoxy vitrimer samples show substantial bond strength and the ability to be repeatedly welded thanks to the exchange reactions, which promote improved surface conformity and chemical bonding between the adherands at the joint interface. This opens the way towards joining composite parts without adhesives nor mechanical fasteners. PMID:27140663

  8. Thermophysical and flammability characterization of phosphorylated epoxy adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.; Giants, T. W.; Bilow, N.; Hsu, M.-T.

    1980-01-01

    Some of the thermophysical and flammability properties of a phosphorylated epoxy adhesive, which has potential applications in aircraft interior panels, are described. The adhesive consists of stoichiometric ratios of bis(3-glycidyloxphenyl)methylphosphine oxide and bis(3-aminophenyl)methylphosphine oxide containing approximately 7.5% phosphorus. Preliminary data are presented from adhesive bonding studies conducted utilizing this adhesive with polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) film and phenolic-glass laminates. Limiting oxygen index and smoke density data are presented and compared with those of the tetraglycidyl methylene dianiline epoxy resin-adhesive system currently used in aircraft interiors. Initial results indicate that the phosphorylated epoxy compound has excellent adhesive properties when used with PVF film and that desirable fire-resistant properties are maintained.

  9. Selective Clay Placement within a Silicate Clay-Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite and the Effect on Physical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Scheiman, Daniel A; Kohlmman, Lee W.

    2009-01-01

    Many epoxy systems under consideration for composite pressure vessels are composed of toughened epoxy resins. In this work, epoxy blends containing both rigid aromatic and flexible aliphatic components were prepared, to model toughened systems, and determine the optimum route of silicate addition. Compositions were chosen such that both glassy and rubbery resins were obtained at room temperature. The physical properties of the nanocomposites varied with T(g) and silicate placement, however, nanocomposite T(g)s were observed which exceeded that of the base resin by greater than 10 C. The tensile strength of the glassy resin remained constant or decreased on the dispersion of clay while that of the rubbery material doubled. Selectively placing the clay in the aliphatic component of the rubbery blend resulted in a greater than 100% increase in material toughness.

  10. Single Frequency Characterization of a Commercial Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Sauers, Isidor; Tuncer, Enis; Polizos, Georgios; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Pace, Marshall O

    2009-10-01

    Electrical impedance measurement methods are extensively utilized to characterize dielectric materials. There are not many inexpensive commercially available measurement systems for low frequencies. In this paper an impedance measurement method using an electrometer is presented. The method can be employed for frequencies lower than 100 mHz. To illustrate the usefulness of the presented method, an epoxy resin is characterized and the influence of thermal aging is investigated.

  11. Measurement of the degree of cure in epoxies with ultrasonic velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, W. P.; Parker, F. R.

    1986-01-01

    The use of ultrasonic longitudinal velocity values to measure the degree of cure (defined for an epoxide system as the concentration of epoxide/amine bonds divided by the initial epoxide concentration) in epoxy resins is investigated. The experimental setup used to measure the changes in longitudinal velocity with time is described, together with the technique used to calculate the degree of cure from the acoustic data, using the principle of additive module. Measurements were done with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy resin cured with an amine adduct agent. Good qualitative agreement was shown between the time dependence of the acoustically measured degree of cure and the predicted rate of reaction.

  12. Investigation of Hygro-Thermal Aging on Carbon/Epoxy Materials for Jet Engine Fan Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Roberts, Gary D.; Miller, Sandi G.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    This poster summarizes 2 years of aging on E862 epoxy and E862 epoxy with triaxial braided T700s carbon fiber composite. Several test methods were used to characterize chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of both the resin and composite materials. The aging cycle that was used included varying temperature and humidity exposure. The goal was to evaluate the environmental effects on a potential jet engine fan section material. Some changes were noted in the resin which resulted in increased brittleness, though this did not significantly affect the tensile and impact test results. A potential decrease in compression strength requires additional investigation.

  13. Influence of surface modification of halloysite nanotubes on their dispersion in epoxy matrix: Mesoscopic DPD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, P.; Markina, A.; Ivanov, V.

    2016-06-01

    The problems of constructing of a meso-scale model of composites based on polymers and aluminosilicate nanotubes for prediction of the filler's spatial distribution at early stages of material formation have been considered. As a test system for the polymer matrix, the mixture of 3,4-epoxycyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate as epoxy resin monomers and 4-methylhexahydrophthalic anhydride as curing agent has been used. It is shown that the structure of a mixture of uncured epoxy resin and nanotubes is (mainly) determined by the surface functionalization of nanotubes. The results indicate that only nanotubes with maximum functionalization can preserve a uniform distribution in space.

  14. Bismaleimide resins for flame resistant honeycomb sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzenberger, H. D.

    1978-01-01

    Bismaleimide resins are prime candidates for nonflammable aircraft interior panels. Three resin types with different structures and processing characteristics were formulated. Resin M 751 was used to fabricate 100 kg of glass fabric prepregs which were used for the preparation of face sheets for honeycomb sandwich panels. Prepreg characteristics and curing cycles for laminate fabrication are provided. In order to advance beyond the current solvent resin technology for fibre and fabric impregnation, a hot melt solvent-less resin system was prepared and characterized. Preliminary tests were performed to develop a wet bonding process for the fabrication of advanced sandwich honeycomb panels by use of polybismaleimide glass fabric face sheets and polybismaleimide Nomex honeycomb core. B-stage material was used for both the core and the face sheet, providing flatwise tensile properties equivalent to those obtained by the state-of-the-art 3-step process which includes an epoxy adhesive resin.

  15. Thermal properties and dynamic mechanical properties of ceramic fillers filled epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidina, D. S.; Mariatti, M.; Juliewatty, J.

    2015-07-01

    This present study is aimed to enhance the thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of ceramic fillers such as Calcium Copper Titanate, CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) and Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) filled epoxy thin film composites. As can be seen from the results, 20 vol% BaTiO3/epoxy thin film composite showed the lowest coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value, the highest decomposition temperature (T5 and Tonset) and weight of residue among the composites as the filler has low CTE value, distributed homogeneously throughout the composite and less voids can be seen between epoxy resin and BaTiO3 filler.

  16. Toughening Mechanisms in Silica-Filled Epoxy Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Binay S.

    Epoxies are widely used as underfill resins throughout the microelectronics industry to mechanically couple and protect various components of flip-chip assemblies. Generally rigid materials largely surround underfill resins. Improving the mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy resins to better match those of their rigid counterparts can help extend the service lifetime of flip-chip assemblies. Recently, researchers have demonstrated that silica nanoparticles are effective toughening agents for lightly-crosslinked epoxies. Improvements in the fracture toughness of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites have primarily been attributed to two toughening mechanisms: particle debonding with subsequent void growth and matrix shear banding. Various attempts have been made to model the contribution of these toughening mechanisms to the overall fracture energy observed in silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites. However, disparities still exist between experimental and modeled fracture energy results. In this dissertation, the thermal, rheological and mechanical behavior of eight different types of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites was investigated. Each nanocomposite consisted of up to 10 vol% of silica nanoparticles with particle sizes ranging from 20 nm to 200 nm, with a variety of surface treatments and particle structures. Fractographical analysis was conducted with new experimental approaches in order to accurately identify morphological evidence for each proposed toughening mechanism. Overall, three major insights into the fracture behavior of real world silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites were established. First, microcracking was observed as an essential toughening mechanism in silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites. Microcracking was observed on the surface and subsurface of fractured samples in each type of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposite. The additional toughening contribution of microcracking to overall fracture energy yielded excellent agreement between experimental

  17. Feasibility study on the development of tough, moisture-resistant laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1979-01-01

    The potential of cyanate resins as replacement for epoxy resins in composites with graphite fiber reinforcement was investigated in an effort to provide improved moisture resistance and toughness in laminating systems at a projected cost, handleability, and processing requirements equivalent to 400 K (260 F) curing epoxies. Monomer synthesis, formulation, blending, resin preparation, catalysis studies, prepreg preparation, laminate fabrication, and testing are discussed. A graphite fiber reinforced laminate was developed with 95 percent retention of the original 363 K (180 F) flexural strength and 70 percent retention of the 363 K (180 F) short beam shear strength after 500 hour exposure to 95 + 7 relative humidity at 324 K (120 F).

  18. Ballistic impact behavior of carbon nanotube and nanosilica dispersed resin and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, K. S.; Akella, K.; Joshi, M.; Naik, N. K.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental studies are presented on the ballistic impact behavior of nanoparticle dispersed materials viz. symmetric balanced cross-ply laminates made using unidirectional E-glass fabric with epoxy resin and neat epoxy resin. The nanoparticles used are nanosilica and multi-walled carbon nanotube for polymer matrix composites and nanosilica for epoxy resin. For comparison, studies are carried out on symmetric balanced cross-ply E-glass/epoxy and neat epoxy resin without nanoparticles. Effect of nanoparticle dispersion on ballistic limit velocity, V50 and energy absorbed has been studied. It is observed that V50 can be enhanced up to 6.3% for polymer matrix composites and up to 7.3% for neat resin on addition of nanoparticles. Also, energy absorbed can be increased up to 13.0% for polymer matrix composites and up to 15.2% for neat resin on addition of nanoparticles. Damage and energy absorbing mechanisms for different types of materials studied is also presented. Further, it is observed that the damage size on the target around the point of impact decreases on addition of nanoparticles. Quantitative data are given for high velocity impact behavior of the five types of specimens studied.

  19. Influence of the resin on interlaminar mixed-mode fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Mangalgiri, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    Both literature review data and new data on toughness behavior of seven matrix and adhesive systems in four types of tests were studied in order to assess the influence of the resin on interlaminar fracture. Mixed mode (i.e., various combinations of opening mode 1, G sub 1, and shearing mode 2; G sub 2) fracture toughness data showed that the mixed mode relationship for failure appears to be linear in terms of G sub 1 and G sub 2. The study further indicates that fracture of brittle resins is controlled by the G sub 1 component, and that fracture of many tough resins is controlled by total strain-energy release rate, G sub T. Regarding the relation of polymer structure and the mixed mode fracture: high mode 1 toughness requires resin dilatation; dilatation is low in unmodified epoxies at room temperature/dry conditions; dilatation is higher in plasticized epoxies, heated epoxies, and in modified epoxies; modification improves mode 2 toughness only slightly compared with mode 1 improvements. Analytical aspects of the cracked lap shear test specimen were explored.

  20. High-performance fiber/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.; Toland, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Activities described include: (1) determining the applicability of an ultrahigh-strength graphite fiber to composite pressure vessels; (2) defining the fatigue performance of thin-titanium-lined, high-strength graphite/epoxy pressure vessel; (3) selecting epoxy resin systems suitable for filament winding; (4) studying the fatigue life potential of Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels; and (5) developing polymer liners for composite pressure vessels. Kevlar 49/epoxy and graphite fiber/epoxy pressure vessels, 10.2 cm in diameter, some with aluminum liners and some with alternation layers of rubber and polymer were fabricated. To determine liner performance, vessels were subjected to gas permeation tests, fatigue cycling, and burst tests, measuring composite performance, fatigue life, and leak rates. Both the metal and the rubber/polymer liner performed well. Proportionately larger pressure vessels (20.3 and 38 cm in diameter) were made and subjected to the same tests. In these larger vessels, line leakage problems with both liners developed the causes of the leaks were identified and some solutions to such liner problems are recommended.

  1. Fiber-Reinforced Reactive Nano-Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene/ matrix interface based on the fabrication of a reactive nano-epoxy matrix with lower surface energy has been improved. Enhanced mechanical properties versus pure epoxy on a three-point bend test include: strength (25 percent), modulus (20 percent), and toughness (30 percent). Increased thermal properties include higher Tg (glass transition temperature) and stable CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion). Improved processability for manufacturing composites includes faster wetting rates on macro-fiber surfaces, lower viscosity, better resin infusion rates, and improved rheological properties. Improved interfacial adhesion properties with Spectra fibers by pullout tests include initial debonding force of 35 percent, a maximum pullout force of 25 percent, and energy to debond at 65 percent. Improved mechanical properties of Spectra fiber composites (tensile) aging resistance properties include hygrothermal effects. With this innovation, high-performance composites have been created, including carbon fibers/nano-epoxy, glass fibers/nano-epoxy, aramid fibers/ nano-epoxy, and ultra-high-molecularweight polyethylene fiber (UHMWPE).

  2. New thermal and microbial resistant metal-containing epoxy polymers.

    PubMed

    Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M

    2010-01-01

    A series of metal-containing epoxy polymers have been synthesized by the condensation of epichlorohydrin (1-chloro-2,3-epoxy propane) with Schiff base metal complexes in alkaline medium. Schiff base was initially prepared by the reaction of 2,6 dihydroxy 1-napthaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine in 1 : 2 molar ratio and then with metal acetate. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental, spectral, and thermal analysis. The physicochemical properties, viz., epoxy value, hydroxyl content, and chlorine content [mol/100 g] were measured by standard procedures. The antimicrobial activities of these metal-containing epoxy polymers were carried out by using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) methods against S. aureus, B. subtilis (Gram-positive bacteria), and E. coli, P. aeruginosa (Gram-negative bacteria). It was found that the ECu(II) showed higher antibacterial activity than other metal-chelated epoxy resin while EMn(II) exhibited reduced antibacterial activity against all bacteria. PMID:20689716

  3. New Thermal and Microbial Resistant Metal-Containing Epoxy Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of metal-containing epoxy polymers have been synthesized by the condensation of epichlorohydrin (1-chloro-2,3-epoxy propane) with Schiff base metal complexes in alkaline medium. Schiff base was initially prepared by the reaction of 2,6 dihydroxy 1-napthaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine in 1  :  2 molar ratio and then with metal acetate. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental, spectral, and thermal analysis. The physicochemical properties, viz., epoxy value, hydroxyl content, and chlorine content [mol/100 g] were measured by standard procedures. The antimicrobial activities of these metal-containing epoxy polymers were carried out by using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) methods against S. aureus, B. subtilis (Gram-positive bacteria), and E. coli, P. aeruginosa (Gram-negative bacteria). It was found that the ECu(II) showed higher antibacterial activity than other metal-chelated epoxy resin while EMn(II) exhibited reduced antibacterial activity against all bacteria. PMID:20689716

  4. Resin flow and void formation in an autoclave cure cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionetto, Francesca; Lucia, Massimo; Dell'Anna, Riccardo; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    A finite element (FE) model able to evaluate both the evolution of resin flow, degree of reaction and void formation during autoclave cure cycles was developed. The model was implemented using a commercial epoxy matrix widely used in aeronautic field. The FE model also included a kinetic and rheological model whose input parameters were experimentally determined by Differential Scanning Calorimetry and rheological analysis. The FE model was able to predict the evolution of degree of reaction with very good agreement with the experimental data. Moreover, the predicted resin losses were lower than 3% of the overall composite resin content.

  5. Investigation of the deformation mechanisms of core-shell rubber-modified epoxy at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Hayley Rebecca

    The industrial demand for high strength-to-weight ratio materials is increasing due to the need for high performance components. Epoxy polymers, although often used in fiber-reinforced polymeric composites, have an inherent low toughness that further decreases with decreasing temperatures. Second-phase additives have been effective in increasing the toughness of epoxies at room temperature; however, the mechanisms at low temperatures are still not understood. In this study, the deformation mechanisms of a DGEBA epoxy modified with MX960 core-shell rubber (CSR) particles were investigated under quasi-static tensile and impact loads at room temperature (RT) and liquid nitrogen (LN 2) temperature. Overall, the CSR had little effect on the tensile properties at RT and LN2 temperature. The impact strength decreased from neat to 3 wt% but increased from neat to 5 wt% at RT and LN2 temperature, with a higher impact strength at RT at all CSR loadings. The CSR particles debonded in front of the crack tip, inducing voids into the matrix. It was found that an increase in shear deformation and void growth likely accounted for the higher impact strength at 5 wt% CSR loading at RT while the thermal stress fields due to the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between rubber and epoxy and an increase in secondary cracking is likely responsible for the higher impact strength at 5 wt% tested at LN2 temperature. While a large toughening effect was not seen in this study, the mechanisms analyzed herein will likely be of use for further material investigations at cryogenic temperatures.

  6. Composites with improved fiber-resin interfacial adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cizmecioglu, Muzaffer (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The adhesion of fiber reinforcement such as high modulus graphite to a matrix resin such as polycarbonate is greatly enhanced by applying a very thin layer, suitably from 50 Angstroms to below 1000 Angstroms, to the surface of the fiber such as by immersing the fiber in a dilute solution of the matrix resin in a volatile solvent followed by draining to remove excess solution and air drying to remove the solvent. The thin layer wets the fiber surface. The very dilute solution of matrix resin is able to impregnate multifilament fibers and the solution evenly flows onto the surface of the fibers. A thin uniform layer is formed on the surface of the fiber after removal of the solvent. The matrix resin coated fiber is completely wetted by the matrix resin during formation of the composite. Increased adhesion of the resin to the fibers is observed at fracture. At least 65 percent of the surface of the graphite fiber is covered with polycarbonate resin at fracture whereas uncoated fibers have very little matrix resin adhering to their surfaces at fracture and epoxy sized graphite fibers exhibit only slightly higher coverage with matrix resin at fracture. Flexural modulus of the composite containing matrix resin coated fibers is increased by 50 percent and flexural strength by 37 percent as compared to composites made with unsized fibers.

  7. Hybrid-particulate composites based on an epoxy matrix, a reactive rubber, and glass beads: Morphology, viscoelastic, and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Maazouz, A.; Sautereau, H.; Gerard, J.F. . Lab. des Materiaux Macromoleculaires)

    1993-10-20

    The deformation and fracture behaviors of hybrid-particulate epoxy composites have been examined. These materials were based on a DGEBA/DDA matrix with various volume fractions of glass beads and different rubber contents. Young's modulus, yield stress, dynamic mechanical spectra, and fracture energy have been determined at room temperature. The Kerner model fits well the Young's modulus for the hybrid complexes with various glass bead contents. The analysis of the relaxation peak recorded from viscoelastic measurements allow us to discuss the influence of the introduction of the glass beads on the mobility of macromolecular chains and the characteristics of the rubber-separated phase. The fracture energy displays a strong improvement and synergism effect due to the presence of both kinds of particles. The toughening mechanisms were discussed.

  8. Preparation, Characterization, and Enhanced Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Epoxy-Titania Composites

    PubMed Central

    Rubab, Zakya; Siddiqi, Humaira M.; Saeed, Shaukat

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy-titania composites. First, submicron titania particles are prepared via surfactant-free sol-gel method using TiCl4 as precursor. These particles are subsequently used as inorganic fillers (or reinforcement) for thermally cured epoxy polymers. Epoxy-titania composites are prepared via mechanical mixing of titania particles with liquid epoxy resin and subsequently curing the mixture with an aliphatic diamine. The amount of titania particles integrated into epoxy matrix is varied between 2.5 and 10.0 wt.% to investigate the effect of sub-micron titania particles on thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy-titania composites. These composites are characterized by X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric (TG), and mechanical analyses. It is found that sub-micron titania particles significantly enhance the glass transition temperature (>6.7%), thermal oxidative stability (>12.0%), tensile strength (>21.8%), and Young's modulus (>16.8%) of epoxy polymers. Epoxy-titania composites with 5.0 wt.% sub-micron titania particles perform best at elevated temperatures as well as under high stress. PMID:24578638

  9. Mechanical and thermal studies of unsaturated polyester-toughened epoxy composites filled with amine-functionalized nanosilica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaya Vinse Ruban, Y.; Ginil Mon, S.; Vetha Roy, D.

    2013-02-01

    The inter-crosslinking networks of unsaturated polyester (UP)-toughened epoxy-nanosilica hybrid nanocomposites have been developed. Epoxy resin was toughened with 5 and 10% (by wt) of unsaturated polyester using benzoyl peroxide as radical initiator and 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane (DDM) as a curing agent at appropriate condition, and the resulting product was identified by FT-IR spectra. Unsaturated polyester-toughened epoxy system (10%) was further filled with 1, 3, 5 and 7% (by wt) of amine-functionalized nanosilica particles prepared by sol-gel method. Modified nanosilica-filled hybrid UP-epoxy matrices developed in the form of casting were characterized for their thermal, mechanical properties and water absorption capacity according to ASTM standards. The degree of dispersion of nanosilica in the matrices was investigated by SEM technique. Mechanical testing data indicate that the introduction of UP into epoxy resin has improved the impact strength. Significant improvement in the flexural properties, tensile properties and impact strength were observed in the UP-epoxy blends with increase in the percentage of amine-modified nanosilica particles. The T g value decreases with UP toughening and increases with concentration of modified nanosilica on the UP-epoxy matrix. The water absorption behavior is found to decrease with UP toughening and concentration of modified nanosilica on the UP-epoxy matrix.

  10. On the Use of Self-Assembling Block Copolymers to Toughen A Model Epoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yilin

    Block copolymers have been receiving considerable attention in toughening epoxy due to their ability to form a wide variety of nanostructures. This study focuses on using both triblock and diblock copolymers to improve the fracture toughness of an aromatic-amine cured epoxy system. The curing system consisted of 1,3- phenylenediamine (mPDA) as curing agent and aniline as a chain extender. Three triblock copolymers and three diblock copolymers were incorporated in the same lightly crosslinked model epoxy system, which was chosen to mimic an underfill material in flip-chip packaging for the microelectronics industry. In this research, rubber particles were formed in situ using self-assembling block copolymers. Mechanical, thermal and microscopic studies were conducted with the main goal to study the relationship between the block parameters and the final morphologies and their effects on static and dynamic mechanical properties of the toughened resin, especially fracture toughness. In these block-copolymer-modified epoxies, spherical micelles and wormlike micelles were obtained by varying block lengths, molecular weight, polarities and compositions. It was found that miscibility of the epoxy-miscible block played a crucial role in the formation of different types of morphologies. At a low loading level, diblock copolymers were able to toughen the model epoxy as effectively as triblock copolymers. The fracture toughness was improved to almost three times with respect to that of the neat resin with addition of 10 phr AM*-27. At the same time, other mechanical properties, such as yield strength and modulus, were well retained. Incorporation of block copolymers did not have a significant effect on glass transition temperature but caused an increase in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the modified epoxy. Particle cavitation and matrix void growth were proved to be the toughening mechanisms for SBM-Modified epoxies. However, these typical toughening mechanisms for

  11. Preparation and Various Characteristics of Epoxy/Alumina Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozako, Masahiro; Ohki, Yoshimichi; Kohtoh, Masanori; Okabe, Shigemitsu; Tanaka, Toshikatsu

    Epoxy/ alumina nanocomposites were newly prepared by dispersing 3, 5, 7, and 10 weight (wt) % boehmite alumina nanofillers in a bisphenol-A epoxy resin using a special two-stage direct mixing method. It was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy imaging that the nanofillers were homogeneously dispersed in the epoxy matrix. Dielectric, mechanical, and thermal properties were investigated. It was elucidated that nanofillers affects various characteristics of epoxy resins, when they are nanostructrued. Such nano-effects we obtained are summarized as follows. Partial discharge resistance increases as the filler content increases; e.g. 7 wt% nanofiller content creates a 60 % decrease in depth of PD-caused erosion. Weibull analysis shows that short-time electrical treeing breakdown time is prolonged to 265 % by 5 wt% addition of nanofillers. But there was more data scatter in nanocomposites than in pure epoxy. Permittivity tends to increase from 3.7 to 4.0 by 5 wt% nanofiller addition as opposed to what was newly found in the recent past. Glass transition temperature remains unchanged as 109 °C. Mechanical properties such as flexural strength and flexural modulus increase; e.g. flexural strength and flexural modulus are improved by 5 % and 8 % with 5 wt% content, respectively. Excess addition causes a reverse effect. It is concluded from permittivity and glass transition temperature characteristics that interfacial bonding seems to be more or less weak in the nanocomposite specimens prepared this time, even though mechanical strengths increase. There is a possibility that the nanocomposites specimens will be improved in interfacial quality.

  12. Silica-alumina trihydrate filled epoxy castings resistant to arced SF.sub.6

    DOEpatents

    Chenoweth, Terrence E.; Yeoman, Frederick A.

    1978-01-01

    A cured, insulating, casting composition, having a coefficient of linear thermal expansion of below about 38 .times. 10.sup.-6 in./in./.degree. C and being resistant to arced sulfur hexafluoride gas, in contact with a metal surface in a sulfur hexafluoride gas environment, is made from hydantoin epoxy resin, anhydride curing agent and a filler combination of fused silica and alumina trihydrate.

  13. Creep-rupture of polymer-matrix composites. [graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, H. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Morris, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An accelerated characterization method for resin matrix composites is reviewed. Methods for determining modulus and strength master curves are given. Creep rupture analytical models are discussed as applied to polymers and polymer matrix composites. Comparisons between creep rupture experiments and analytical models are presented. The time dependent creep rupture process in graphite epoxy laminates is examined as a function of temperature and stress level.

  14. Rapid bonding of polydimethylsiloxane to stereolithographically manufactured epoxy components using a photogenerated intermediary layer.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Elisabeth; Neumann, Christiane; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Schmitt, Tobias; Länge, Kerstin; Rapp, Bastian E

    2013-06-21

    We describe a low cost, photo-induced, room-temperature bonding technique for bonding epoxy components to flexible PDMS membranes in less than half an hour. Bond strengths (~350 kPa) were characterized by ISO-conform tensile testing for a popular stereolithography resin and found comparable bond strengths as reported for PDMS/PDMS bonds. PMID:23645317

  15. Single-walled carbon nanotube incorporated novel three phase carbon/epoxy composite with enhanced properties.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sohel; Alagirusamy, Ramasamy; Joshi, Mangala

    2011-08-01

    In the present work, single-walled carbon nanotubes were dispersed within the matrix of carbon fabric reinforced epoxy composites in order to develop novel three phase carbon/epoxy/single-walled carbon nanotube composites. A combination of ultrasonication and high speed mechanical stirring at 2000 rpm was used to uniformly disperse carbon nanotubes in the epoxy resin. The state of carbon nanotube dispersion in the epoxy resin and within the nanocomposites was characterized with the help of optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Pure carbon/epoxy and three phase composites were characterized for mechanical properties (tensile and compressive) as well as for thermal and electrical conductivity. Fracture surfaces of composites after tensile test were also studied in order to investigate the effect of dispersed carbon nanotubes on the failure behavior of composites. Dispersion of only 0.1 wt% nanotubes in the matrix led to improvements of 95% in Young's modulus, 31% in tensile strength, 76% in compressive modulus and 41% in compressive strength of carbon/epoxy composites. In addition to that, electrical and thermal conductivity also improved significantly with addition of carbon nanotubes. PMID:22103118

  16. The effect of synthetic nanosilica on tribological properties of graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spandern, Christian; Khunova, Viera

    2016-05-01

    Development of new advanced friction materials with improved tribological and mechanical properties is of high priority for a number of industrial applications. This paper explores the effect of synthetic spherical nanosilica Nanopox® F400 on tribological and mechanical properties of graphite/epoxy composites. The composites have been prepared by mixing in four paddle-stirrer standard mixer at 500 rpm. During the mixing nanosilica particles did not create agglomerates and are well dispersed within the epoxy matrix. The impact of the nanosilica on abrasive wear, dynamic and static coefficient of friction as well as mechanical properties (strength) has been studied. It was found that by application of 5 wt% graphite as well as 5 wt% nanosilica in epoxy resin a reduction of wear properties did not exceed 16 % in comparison to neat epoxy matrix. However, by simultaneous application of hybrid graphite and nanosilica fillers in epoxy resin reduction of wear increased up to 42 %. The highest improvement (61 %) of wear has been achieved in composites containing 5 wt % of graphite and 10 wt% of nanosilica. Contrary to wear, it was not observed a synergic effect of hybrid graphite/nanosilica fillers on static and dynamic coefficient of friction, as well as on tensile strength of studied epoxy composites.

  17. The Design and Synthesis of Epoxy Matrix Composites Curable by Electron Beam Induced Cationic Polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crivello, James V.

    2000-01-01

    Several new series of novel, high reactivity epoxy resins are described which are designed specifically for the fabrication of high performance carbon fiber reinforced composites for commercial aircraft structural applications using cationic UV and e-beam curing. The objective of this investigation is to provide resin matrices which rapidly and efficiently cure under low e-beam doses which are suitable to high speed automated composite fabrication techniques such as automated tape and tow placement. It was further the objective of this work to provide resins with superior thermal, oxidative and atomic oxygen resistance.

  18. Improving interfacial adhesion with epoxy matrix using hybridized carbon nanofibers containing calcium phosphate nanoparticles for bone repairing.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xukang; Lan, Jinle; Jia, Xiaolong; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-04-01

    Hybridized carbon nanofibers containing calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CNF/CaP) were investigated as osteocompatible nanofillers for epoxy resin. The CNF/CaP was produced by electrospinning mixture solution of polyacrylonitrile and CaP precursor sol-gel, followed by preoxidation and carbonization. The continuous and long CNF/CaP was ultrasonically chopped, mixed into epoxy resin and thermo-cured. Compared to pure CNFs with similar ultrasonication treatment, the shortened CNF/CaP reinforced composites demonstrated significant enhancement in flexural properties of epoxy composites, benefiting from the improved interfacial adhesion between CNF/CaP and resin matrix. The resulting composites also displayed good biocompatibility and sustained calcium ion release, which categorized them as promising materials for bone repairing. PMID:26838838

  19. Flow and Compaction During the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Hubert, Pascal; Song, Xiao-Lan; Cano, Roberto J.; Loos, Alfred C.; Pipes, R. Byron

    2001-01-01

    The flow of an epoxy resin and compaction behavior of carbon fiber preform during vacuum- assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) infiltration was measured using an instrumented tool. Composite panels were fabricated by the VARTM process using SAERTEX(R)2 multi-axial non- crimp carbon fiber fabric and the A.T.A.R.D. SI-ZG-5A epoxy resin. Resin pressure and preform thickness variation was measured during infiltration. The effects of the resin on the compaction behavior of the preform were measured. The local preform compaction during the infiltration is a combination of wetting and spring-back deformations. Flow front position computed by the 3DINFIL model was compared with the experimental data.

  20. Electrical properties of epoxy/silver nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, P.; Boudefel, A.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the electrical properties of nanocomposites made of epoxy resin filled with 70-nm-sized silver particles. These composites were studied for the fabrication of integrated capacitors in electronics packaging. The dc conductivity was studied as a function of the filler concentration and as a function of temperature. We also studied the ac conductivity and the permittivity in the 10-1-105 Hz range as a function of the filler concentration. Experimental properties were analyzed using standard percolation theories. The dc conductivity varies as (φ-φc)t, where φ is the filler concentration, φc is the percolation threshold, and t is the dc critical exponent. A very low percolation threshold is obtained (φc=1%) which is believed to be related to a segregated distribution of the fillers in the epoxy matrix. We also measured a very high dc critical exponent (t=5) probably related to the interparticle electrical contact. A universal scaling law is observed for σ(ω) and ɛ(ω). Above a cutoff frequency (ωc, which scales with the dc conductivity as ωc~σdcq) the conductivity and the permittivity follow the universal power laws (σ~ωu and V~ω-v) with critical exponents taking nonstandard values (q=0.83-0.98, u=0.79, and v=0.03).

  1. Epoxy adhesive formulations for engineered wood manufacturing: Design of Experiment (DOE) and hardener modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangkheeree, W.; Meekum, U.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of IPDA, DDS, BPA and DICY, as main ingredient of TETA based hardener were examined. The 2k design of experiment(DOE) with k=3 were preliminary explored. The designed parameters A(IPDA), B(DDS) and C(BPA) were assigned as low(-) and high(+) levels, respectively. The Design Expert™ was hired as the analyzing tool at α=0.05. The mixed epoxy resin was based on the commercial one. The designed responds including tcure, t50, impact strengths, flexural properties and HDT were measured, respectively. Regarding to ANOVA conclusion, it was found that, there were no significant effects on the assigned parameters on the interested responds, except for the HDT where BPA(C) was negative effect was found. The lower in the crosslink density of cured epoxy, inferior in HDT, the higher in BPA addition was hypothesized. It was found that impact strength of cured epoxy derived from all formula were unacceptable low and tcure and t50, were too short. Thus, the further investigation by adding DICY into hardener was explored. The results showed that no significant change by mechanical means of cured epoxy by resolving 5-30 phr of DICY into the hardener. However, it was observed that the DICY added formula showed the obvious long cure times and behave as prepreg formula. The room temperature cured epoxy was incompletely crosslinked. The degrees of linear chain fragment were evidence, by weight, when higher DICY loading was engaged. Complete crosslink was achieved at 150°C post curing. The hardener comprised of TETA/aliphatic Epoxy(RD108) adduct was studied for enhancing the toughness of epoxy resin. It was observed that longer cure time at 150°C but lower toughness was experienced, on both prepreg and engineered wood made from the resins, at high TETA/RD108 ratio. Incomplete cure was explained for the mechanical inferior at high RD108 loading.

  2. Nanovoid formation in cross-linked epoxy and poly(dicyclopentadiene) networks during high strain rate deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Robert M.; Knorr, Daniel B., Jr.; Lenhart, Joseph L.; Andzelm, Jan W.; Sirk, Timothy W.

    2015-03-01

    Cross-linked polymer networks are widely used as structural and protective materials under extremes of temperature, pressure, or strain rate. In particular, substantial effort has been devoted to improving the high strain rate impact resistance of epoxy resins. Although epoxy resins are widely used in applications requiring impact resistance, epoxy resins with the strength and stiffness necessary in structural applications typically have poor toughness. Recent work showed that other chemistries in cross-linked polymers can overcome this trade-off between strength and toughness. Specifically, cross-linked polydicyclopentadiene (pDCPD) was found to have exceptional performance compared to epoxy resins, which is related to the high toughness of pDCPD. Based on the physicochemical properties of epoxy and pDCPD, it was hypothesized that the excellent toughness of pDCPD was due to the formation and growth of nanovoids during impact events. Void growth dissipates energy that otherwise would contribute to failure. We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to quantify void formation in these cross-linked polymer networks and to examine the molecular-level properties of the voids. Our findings suggest methods to increase void formation and growth, which may improve toughness.

  3. Fast Fourier Transform IR Characterization of Epoxy GY Systems Crosslinked with Aliphatic and Cycloaliphatic EH Polyamine Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Goran; Zlatkovic, Sasa; Cakic, Milorad; Cakic, Suzana; Lacnjevac, Caslav; Rajic, Zoran

    2010-01-01

    The use of fast FT-IR spectroscopy as a sensitive method to estimate a change of the crosslinking kinetics of epoxy resin with polyamine adducts is described in this study. A new epoxy formulation based on the use of polyamine adducts as the hardeners was analyzed. Crosslinking reactions of the different stoichiometric mixtures of the unmodified GY250 epoxy resin with the aliphatic EH606 and the cycloaliphatic EH637 polyamine adducts were studied using mid FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. As the crosslinking proceeded, the primary amine groups in polyamine adduct are converted to secondary and the tertiary amines. The decrease in the IR band intensity of epoxy groups at about 915 cm−1, as well as at about 3,056 cm−1, was observed due to process. Mid IR spectral analysis was used to calculate the content of the epoxy groups as a function of crosslinking time and the crosslinking degree of resin. The amount of all the epoxy species was estimated from IR spectra to changes during the crosslinking kinetics of epichlorhydrin. PMID:22315562

  4. Effects of environmental exposure on fiber/epoxy interfacial shear strength

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, U.; Miller, B. )

    1990-08-01

    A microbond technique for direct determination of fiber/resin interfacial shear strength in composites (Miller et al., 1987) has been used to investigate the influence of environmental conditions on adhesive bonding in certain systems. The small dimensions involved in the method facilitate uniform exposure and short exposure times. Significant changes in both average shear strength and in shear strength distributions are observed on exposing aramid/epoxy and glass/epoxy microbond assemblies to steam or hot water. Shear strength drops to a plateau value in both cases, the reduction being more drastic with the glass fiber. Vacuum drying restores shear strength completely in aramid/epoxy microassemblies, even when the surface of the aramid fiber has been chemically modified, but there is only partial regeneration of bond strength with the glass/epoxy system. 15 refs.

  5. Mechanical properties of photo-polymerized sustainable epoxy materials from vegetable oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Chang; Ravalli, Matthew; Yang, Zheqin; Crivello, James

    2014-03-01

    Our research program aimed at advancing our ability to tailor the photocationic polymerization and physical properties of sustainable epoxy materials derived from crosslinked epoxidized vegetable oils using onium salt photoinitiators. Specifically, we developed solventless, photopolymerizable epoxy monomer and oligomer systems derived from sustainable biorenewable sources as alternatives to existing highly polluting and energy-intensive thermal curing of epoxy resin chemistry. Two sustainable epoxy network polymer systems will be presented to investigate how the network formation can be controlled. The first system is a series of epoxidized vegetable oils that offer various degrees of crosslinking densities, and the second system represents the blends of epoxidized vegetable oils with epoxidized terpenes to tailor their photocuring and mechanical properties for the potential usage in ``green'' coating, adhesive, 3D printing, and composite applications. NSF DMR POLYMERS 1308617.

  6. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy/graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Gilbert, R. D.; Memory, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The epoxy resin system formed by tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diamino diphenyl methane (TGDDM) and 4,4'-diamino diphenyl sulfone (DDS) was characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Dynamic mechanical properties of graphite fiber epoxy composite specimens formulated with two different adhesive systems (NARMCO 5208, NARMCO 5209) were determined. The specimens were exposed to varying dose levels of ionizing radiation (0.5 MeV electrons) with a maximum absorbed dose of 10,000 Mrads. Following irradiation, property measurements were made to assess the influence of radiation on the epoxy and composite specimens. The results established that ionizing radiation has a limited effect on the properties of epoxy and composite specimens.

  7. The challenges of manufacturing graphite-epoxy structural columns for space platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, R. L.; Friend, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of the manufacturing processes developed for large-quantity production of space structure graphite/epoxy composite tubes. The tubes are to be delivered to orbit by the Space Shuttle and assembled by astronaut-assisted assembly machines. The tooling and manufacturing system uses a novel method of dry fiber placement which carefully controls fiber position and orientation and a non-autoclave cure for the epoxy resin. The means of dimensional tolerance control over differential thermal expansion between metal tooling and graphite tubes, resin shrinkage during cure, hot pressurized resins in close tolerance tooling, and tool wear, are examined in detail. A successful pilot production program is also reported.

  8. Nanoparticle Filtration in a RTM Processed Epoxy/Carbon Fiber Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Micham, Logan; Copa, Christine C.; Criss, James M., Jr.; Mintz, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    Several epoxy matrix composite panels were fabricated by resin transfer molding (RTM) E862/W resin onto a triaxially braided carbon fiber pre-form. Nanoparticles including carbon nanofiber, synthetic clay, and functionalized graphite were dispersed in the E862 matrix, and the extent of particle filtration during processing was characterized. Nanoparticle dispersion in the resin flashing on both the inlet and outlet edges of the panel was compared by TEM. Variation in physical properties such as Tg and moisture absorption throughout the panel were also characterized. All nanoparticle filled panels showed a decrease in Tg along the resin flow path across the panel, indicating nanoparticle filtration, however there was little change in moisture absorption. This works illustrates the need to obtain good nano-particle dispersion in the matrix resin to prevent particle agglomeration and hence particle filtration in the resultant polymer matrix composites (PMC).

  9. Epoxy-borax-coal tar composition for a radiation protective, burn resistant drum liner and centrifugal casting method

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, N.W.; Taylor, R.S.

    1980-10-28

    A boron containing burn resistant, low level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source. The material is basically composed of borax in the range of 25-50%, coal tar in the range of 25-37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  10. Epoxy-borax-coal tar composition for a radiation protective, burn resistant drum liner and centrifugal casting method

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Robert S.; Boyer, Norman W.

    1980-01-01

    A boron containing burn resistant, low level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source. The material is basically composed of Borax in the range of 25-50%, coal tar in the range of 25-37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% Borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  11. Functionalizing CNTs for Making Epoxy/CNT Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jian; Rajagopal, Ramasubramaniam

    2009-01-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with linear molecular side chains of polyphenylene ether (PPE) has been shown to be effective in solubilizing the CNTs in the solvent components of solutions that are cast to make epoxy/CNT composite films. (In the absence of solubilization, the CNTs tend to clump together instead of becoming dispersed in solution as needed to impart, to the films, the desired CNT properties of electrical conductivity and mechanical strength.) Because the PPE functionalizes the CNTs in a noncovalent manner, the functionalization does not damage the CNTs. The functionalization can also be exploited to improve the interactions between CNTs and epoxy matrices to enhance the properties of the resulting composite films. In addition to the CNTs, solvent, epoxy resin, epoxy hardener, and PPE, a properly formulated solution also includes a small amount of polycarbonate, which serves to fill voids that, if allowed to remain, would degrade the performance of the film. To form the film, the solution is drop-cast or spin-cast, then the solvent is allowed to evaporate.

  12. Development of aircraft lavatory compartments with improved fire resistance characteristics. Phase 2: Sandwich panel resin system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. A.; Arnold, D. B.; Johnson, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    A NASA-funded program is described which aims to develop a resin system for use in the construction of lavatory wall panels, sidewall panels, and ceiling panels possessing flammability, smoke and gas emission, and toxicity (FS&T) characteristics superior to the existing epoxy resin. Candidate resins studied were phenolic, polyimide, and bismaleimide. Based on the results of a series of FS&T as well as mechanical and aesthetic property tests, a phenolic resin was chosen as the superior material. Material and process specifications covering the phenolic resin based materials were prepared and a method of rating sandwich panel performance was developed.

  13. Rectal impaction with epoxy resin: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hemandas, Anil K; Muller, Guy W; Ahmed, Ibrahim

    2005-01-01

    We describe a unique case of a patient presenting with rectal impaction following self-administration of a liquid used as masonry adhesive for anal sexual gratification. The solidified matter required laparotomy for its removal. Strategies for removing rectal foreign bodies are discussed as well as other consequences of inserting foreign material per rectum. PMID:15862274

  14. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... P-98-105) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described in....125 (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), (f), (g), (h), and (i) are applicable to manufacturers, importers, and... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... P-98-105) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described in....125 (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), (f), (g), (h), and (i) are applicable to manufacturers, importers, and... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific...

  16. Epoxy resin composition containing metal tetrafluoroborate and boron ester

    SciTech Connect

    Morehead, G.T.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a curable composition. It comprises: a polyepoxide; a metal tetrafluoroborate; and at least one boron ester selected from the group consisting of triesters of boric acid and diesters of boronic acid.

  17. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...(q). (b) Specific requirements. The provisions of subpart A of this part apply to this section except...), (a)(5)(x), (a)(6)(ii), (b) (concentration set at 0.1 percent), and (c). As an alternative to the...) Hazard communication program. Requirements as specified in § 721.72 (a), (b), (c), (d),...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...(q). (b) Specific requirements. The provisions of subpart A of this part apply to this section except...), (a)(5)(x), (a)(6)(ii), (b) (concentration set at 0.1 percent), and (c). As an alternative to the...) Hazard communication program. Requirements as specified in § 721.72 (a), (b), (c), (d),...

  19. Moisture effects on the high-temperature strength of fiber-reinforced resin composites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertz, J.

    1972-01-01

    Under NAS 8-27435, the Convair Aerospace Division of General Dynamics and their subcontractor, Hercules Incorporated, have conducted studies on the effects of moisture on the properties of fiber-reinforced resin composites and on the epoxy resins presently used in advanced composites. Data are presented on the resins and composites subjected to varying time/temperature/humidity or time/temperature/water-boil exposures. The effects of moisture on matrix, reinforcement, and fiber/resin interface are discussed and supported by experimental test data.

  20. Magnetic epoxy nanocomposites with superparamagnetic MnFe2O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiangnan; Cao, Yonghai; Zhang, Xi; Li, Yutong; Guo, Jiang; Wei, Suying; Peng, Xiangfang; Shen, Tong D.; Guo, Zhanhu

    2015-09-01

    Manganese iron oxide (MnFe2O4) nanoparticles successfully served as nanofillers for obtaining magnetic epoxy nanocomposites. The viscosities of MnFe2O4/epoxy resin liquid suspensions increased with increasing the nanoparticles loading except the suspension with 5.0 and 1.0 wt% loading, whose viscosities were lower than that of pure epoxy. The introduction of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles showed a lower onset decomposition temperature and glass transition temperature (Tg), which decreased with increasing the nanoparticles loading. The storage modulus and tensile strength of 1.0 wt% MnFe2O4/epoxy were a little higher than that of pure epoxy. The coercivity of MnFe2O4/epoxy nanocomposites with 5.0 wt% (44.7 Oe) and 10.0 wt% (43.9 Oe) displayed much higher than that of pure MnFe2O4 nanoparticles (14.94 Oe). The magnetic moment (m) of nanocomposites (1.354 μB for 10 wt% MnFe2O4/epoxy) are higher than that of pure MnFe2O4 nanoparticles (1.244 μB). The increased real permittivity observed in the nanocomposites was attributed to the interfacial polarization. The intrinsic permittivity of the MnFe2O4 nanoparticles was also calculated.

  1. Thermal expansion of epoxy-fiberglass composite specimens

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Bridgman, C.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal expansion behavior of three epoxy-fiberglass composite specimens was measured from 20 to 120/sup 0/C (70 to 250/sup 0/F) using a fused quartz push-rod dilatometer. Billets produced by vacuum impregnating layers of two types of fiberglass cloth with an epoxy resin were core-drilled to produce cylindrical specimens. These were used to study expansion perpendicular and parallel to the fiberglass layers. The dilatometer is held at a preselected temperature until steady-state is indicated by stable length and temperature data. Before testing the composite specimens, a reliability check of the dilatometer was performed using a copper secondary standard. This indicated thermal expansion coefficient (..cap alpha..) values within +-2% of expected values from 20 to 200/sup 0/C.

  2. Rheological and morphological properties of graphene-epoxy nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Lafdi, Khalid; Guadagno, Liberata

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the rheological and morphological properties of an epoxy resin filled with graphene-based nanoparticles have been investigated. Two samples of partially exfoliated graphite (pEG) and carboxylated partially exfoliated graphite (CpEG), differing essentially for the content of carboxylated groups, are used. The percentage of exfoliated graphite is slightly different for the two samples: 56% for pEG and and 60% for CpEG. Exfoliated graphite is prepared using traditional acid intercalation followed by a sudden treatment at high temperature (900°C). The epoxy matrix is prepared by mixing a tetrafunctional precursor with a reactive diluent which produces a significant decrease in the viscosity of the epoxy precursor so that the dispersion step of nanofillers in the matrix can easily occur. The hardener agent, the 4,4-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), is added at a stoichiometric concentration with respect to all the epoxy rings. The inclusion of the pEG and CpEG samples in the formulated epoxy mixture significantly modifies the rheological behaviour of the mixture itself. The epoxy mixture, indeed, shows a Newtonian behavior; on the contrary the complex viscosity of the nanocomposites clearly shows a shear thinning behavior at 3 wt % of pEG content and at 0.75 wt% of CpEG content. The increase in complex viscosity with the increasing of pEG and CpEG content is mostly caused by a dramatic increase in the storage modulus of the nanocomposites. All the graphene-based epoxy mixtures are cured by a two-stage curing cycles: a first isothermal stage is carried out at the lower temperature of 125°C for 1 hour and, then, a second isothermal stage at the higher temperature of 200°C for 3 hours. The different morphology shown by the two pEG and CpEG samples is consistent with the difference in the percentage of exfoliation degree and well correlates with the rheological behavior of investigated graphene-epoxy nanocomposites.

  3. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites.

    PubMed

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.It is established that the changes of the relative intensities of the bands in FTIR spectra indicate the destruction of the carboxyl group -COOH and group -OH. Electrical conductivity of composites has percolation character and graphite nanoplatelets (ultraviolet ozone treatment for 20 min) addition which leads to a decrease of percolation threshold 0.005 volume fraction and increase values of electrical conductivity (by 2-3 orders of magnitude) above the percolation threshold in comparison with composite materials-graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin. The changes of the value and behavior of temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity of epoxy composites with ultraviolet/ozone-treated graphite nanoparticles have been analyzed within the model of effective electrical conductivity. The model takes into account the own electrical conductivity of the filler and the value of contact electric resistance between the filler particles of the formation of continuous conductive pathways. PMID:27550050

  4. Study of AC electrical conduction mechanisms in an epoxy polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilani, Wissal; Mzabi, Nissaf; Gallot-Lavallée, Olivier; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Zerrouki, Rachida; Guermazi, Hajer

    2015-11-01

    The AC conductivity of an epoxy resin was investigated in the frequency range 10^{-1} - 106 Hz at temperatures ranging from -100 to 120 °C. The frequency dependence of σ_{ac} was described by the law: σ_{ac}=ω \\varepsilon0\\varepsilon^''_{HN}+Aωs. The study of temperature variation of the exponent (s) reveals two conduction models: the AC conduction dependence upon temperature is governed by the small polaron tunneling mechanism (SPTM) at low temperature (-100 -60 °C) and the correlated barrier hopping (CHB) model at high temperature (80-120 °C).

  5. Resin Permeation Through Compressed Glass Insulation for Iter Central Solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R.; Roundy, F.; Martovetsky, N.; Miller, J.; Mann, T.

    2010-04-01

    Concern has been expressed about the ability of the resin system to penetrate the compressed dry glass of the turn and layer insulation during vacuum-pressure impregnation of ITER Central Solenoid (CS) modules. The stacked pancake layers of each module result in compression loads up to 9×104 kg (100 tons) on the lowest layers of each segment. The objective of this program was to assess the effects of this compressive load on resin permeation under resin-transfer conditions and with materials identical to that expected to be used in actual coil fabrication [45-50 °C, vacuum of 133 Pa (1 torr), DGEBF/anhydride epoxy resin system, E-glass satin weave, applied pressure of 125 kPa]. The experimental conditions and materials are detailed and the permeation results presented in this paper.

  6. Investigation of the relations between resin and advanced composite mechanical properties. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, R. S.; Adams, D. F.; Walrath, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    One untoughened epoxy baseline resin and three toughened epoxy resin systems were evaluated. The Hercules 3502, 2220-1, and 2220-3, and Ciba-Geigy Fibredux 914 resin systems were supplied in the uncured state by NASA-Langley and cast into thin flat specimens and round dogbone specimens. Tensile and torsional shear measurements were performed at three temperatures and two moisture conditions. Coefficients of thermal expansion and moisture expansion were also measured. Extensive scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental conditions under which the various specimens were tested. A micromechanics analysis was used to predict the unidirectional composite response under the various test conditions, incorporating the neat resin experimental results as the required input data. The mechanical and physical test results, the scanning electron microscope observations, and the analytical predictions were then correlated.

  7. Investigation of the relations between neat resin and advanced composite mechanical properties. Volume 1: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, R. S.; Adams, D. F.; Walrath, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed evaluation of one untoughened epoxy baseline resin and three toughened epoxy resin systems was performed. The Hercules 3502, 2220-1, and 2220-3, and Ciba-Geigy Fibredux 914 resin systems were supplied in the uncured state by NASA-Langley and cast into thin flat specimens and round dogbone specimens. Tensile and torsional shear measurements were performed at three temperatures and two moisture conditions. Coefficients of thermal expansion and moisture expansion were also measured. Extensive scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed, to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental conditions under which the various specimens were tested. A micromechanics analysis was used to predict the unidirectional composite response under the various test conditions, using the neat resin experimental results as the required input data. Mechanical and physical test results, the scanning electron microscope observations, and the analytical predictions were then correlated.

  8. Silane coupling agent for attaching fusion-bonded epoxy to steel.

    PubMed

    Tchoquessi Diodjo, Madeleine R; Belec, Lénaïk; Aragon, Emmanuel; Joliff, Yoann; Lanarde, Lise; Perrin, François-Xavier

    2013-07-24

    We describe the possibility of using γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS) to increase the durability of epoxy powder coating/steel joints. The curing temperature of epoxy powder coatings is frequently above 200 °C, which is seen so far as a major limitation for the use of the heat-sensitive aminosilane coupling agent. Despite this limitation, we demonstrate that aminosilane is a competitive alternative to traditional chromate conversion to enhance the durability of epoxy powder coatings/steel joints. Fourier-transform reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (FT-RAIRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to identify the silane deposition conditions that influence the adhesion of epoxy powder coatings on steel. We show that AFM analysis provides highly sensitive measurements of mechanical property development and, as such, the degree of condensation of the silane. The joint durability in water at 60 °C was lower when the pH of the γ-APS solution was controlled at 4.6 using formic acid, rather than that at natural pH (10.6). At the curing temperature of 220 °C, oxidation of the carbon adjacent to the amine headgroup of γ-APS gives amide species by a pseudofirst-order kinetics. However, a few amino functionalities remain to react with oxirane groups of epoxy resin and, thus, strengthen the epoxy/silane interphase. The formation of ammonium formate in the acidic silane inhibits the reaction between silane and epoxy, which consequently decreases the epoxy/silane interphase cohesion. We find that the nanoroughness of silane deposits increases with the cure temperature which is beneficial to the wet stability of the epoxy/steel joints, due to increased mechanical interlocking. PMID:23790122

  9. Process development and fabrication of space station type aluminum-clad graphite epoxy struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ring, L. R.

    1990-01-01

    The manufacture of aluminum-clad graphite epoxy struts, designed for application to the Space Station truss structure, is described. The strut requirements are identified, and the strut material selection rationale is discussed. The manufacturing procedure is described, and shop documents describing the details are included. Dry graphite fiber, Pitch-75, is pulled between two concentric aluminum tubes. Epoxy resin is then injected and cured. After reduction of the aluminum wall thickness by chemical milling the end fittings are bonded on the tubes. A discussion of the characteristics of the manufactured struts, i.e., geometry, weight, and any anomalies of the individual struts is included.

  10. X-ray imaging inspection of fiberglass reinforced by epoxy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rique, A. M.; Machado, A. C.; Oliveira, D. F.; Lopes, R. T.; Lima, I.

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this work was to study the voids presented in bonded joints in order to minimize failures due to low adhesion of the joints in the industry field. One of the main parameters to be characterized is the porosity of the glue, since these pores are formed by several reasons in the moment of its adhesion, which are formed by composite of epoxy resin reinforced by fiberglass. For such purpose, it was used high energy X-ray microtomography and the results show its potential effective in recognizing and quantifying directly in 3D all the occlusions regions presented at glass fiber-epoxy adhesive joints.

  11. Evaluation of adhesives for adhering carbon/epoxy composites to various metallic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bonk, R.B.; Osterndorf, J.F.; Ambrosio, A.M.; Pettenger, B.L.

    1996-12-31

    The strength properties of composite matrix resins and adhesive are dependent on time, temperature, environment, and stress factors. All of these conditions combine to influence the properties of adhesives and composites in ways that are not yet fully known or quantifiable. Therefore, it is important to know the service conditions that structural adhesive bonded composite joints will encounter prior to fielding. This paper details an evaluation of five epoxy adhesives used to adhere a carbon/epoxy composite to 7075-T6 aluminum, 4340 steel and aluminum coated steel. Test results indicate that certain paste adhesives are capable of better lap-shear and peel performance than film adhesives, especially at elevated temperatures.

  12. The effects of aircraft fuel and fluids on the strength properties of Resin Transfer Molded (RTM) composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falcone, Anthony; Dow, Marvin B.

    1993-01-01

    The resin transfer molding (RTM) process offers important advantages for cost-effective composites manufacturing, and consequently has become the subject of intense research and development efforts. Several new matrix resins have been formulated specifically for RTM applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. For successful use on aircraft, composite materials must withstand exposure to the fluids in common use. The present study was conducted to obtain comparative screening data on several state-ofthe-art RTM resins after environmental exposures were performed on RTM composite specimens. Four graphite/epoxy composites and one graphite/bismaleimide composite were tested; testing of two additional graphite epoxy composites is in progress. Zero-deg tension tests were conducted on specimens machined from eight-ply (+45-deg, -45-deg) laminates, and interlaminar shear tests were conducted on 32-ply 0-deg laminate specimens. In these tests, the various RTM resins demonstrated widely different strengths, with 3501-6 epoxy being the strongest. As expected, all of the matrix resins suffered severe strength degradation from exposure to methylene chloride (paint stripper). The 3501-6 epoxy composites exhibited about a 30 percent drop in tensile strength in hot, wet tests. The E905-L epoxy exhibited little loss of tensile strength (less than 8 percent) after exposure to water. The CET-2 and 862 epoxies as well as the bismaleimide exhibited reduced strengths at elevated temperature after exposure to oils and fuel. In terms of the percentage strength reductions, all of the RTM matrix resins compared favorably with 3501-6 epoxy.

  13. Reinforced Epoxy Nanocomposite Sheets Utilizing Large Interfacial Area from a High Surface Area Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, Kazufumi; Nishino, Hidekazu; Yamada, Takeo; Futaba, Don; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2011-03-01

    We employed single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with the available highest specific surface area (more than 1000 m2/g) that provided very large interfacial area for the matrix to fabricate epoxy composite sheets. Through mechanical redirection of the SWNT alignment to horizontal to create a laterally aligned scaffold sheet, into which epoxy resin was impregnated. The SWNT scaffold was engineered in structure to meet the these two nearly mutually exclusive demands, i.e. to have nanometer meso-pores (2-50 nm) to facilitate homogeneous impregnation of the epoxy resin and to have mechanical strength to tolerate the compaction forces generated during impregnation. Through this approach, a SWNT/epoxy composite sheet with a nearly ideal morphology was realized where long and aligned SWNTs were loaded at high weight fraction (33 percent) with an intertube distance approaching the radius of gyration for polymers. The resultant composite showed a Young's modulus of 15.0 GPa and a tensile strength of 104 MPa, thus achieving 5.4 and 2.1 times reinforcement as compared to the neat epoxy resin.

  14. Approach by Nano- and Micro-filler Mixture toward Epoxy-based Nanocomposites as Industrial Insulating Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takahiro; Sawa, Fumio; Ozaki, Tamon; Shimizu, Toshio; Kuge, Shin-Ichi; Kozako, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshikatsu

    The main contribution of this paper is to show the realizability of epoxy-based nanocomposites as industrial insulating materials. The nano- and micro-filler mixture was invented to boost the nanocomposite in industrial insulating materials. Nano- and micro-filler mixture composites were newly made by dispersing a few weight-percentages of nano-filler and approximately 60 weight-percentages of micro-silica fillers in epoxy resin. Two kinds of nano-filler were used, such as layered silicate and silica. Experimental results demonstrated that the approach by nano- and micro-filler mixture enables the nanocomposite to have not only superior insulation properties but also the same low thermal expansion in comparison with the conventional filled epoxy (approximately 60 weight-percentages of micro-silica loading). Moreover, the nano-silica and micro-filler mixture composite has the desired properties of resin viscosity and curing reaction whereas the layered silicate and micro-filler composite has higher resin viscosity and faster curing reaction than those of the conventional filled epoxy due to modifier ions of layered silicates. Consequently, the nano-silica and micro-filler mixture composite is presently the closest to the epoxy-based nanocomposite as an industiral insulation material.

  15. The effect of cross linking density on the mechanical properties and structure of the epoxy polymers: molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Shokuhfar, Ali; Arab, Behrouz

    2013-09-01

    Recently, great attention has been focused on using epoxy polymers in different fields such as aerospace, automotive, biotechnology, and electronics, owing to their superior properties. In this study, the classical molecular dynamics (MD) was used to simulate the cross linking of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) with diethylenetriamine (DETA) curing agent, and to study the behavior of resulted epoxy polymer with different conversion rates. The constant-strain (static) approach was then applied to calculate the mechanical properties (Bulk, shear and Young's moduli, elastic stiffness constants, and Poisson's ratio) of the uncured and cross-linked systems. Estimated material properties were found to be in good agreement with experimental observations. Moreover, the dependency of mechanical properties on the cross linking density was investigated and revealed improvements in the mechanical properties with increasing the cross linking density. The radial distribution function (RDF) was also used to study the evolution of local structures of the simulated systems as a function of cross linking density. PMID:23793720

  16. Fracture, failure and compression behaviour of a 3D interconnected carbon aerogel (Aerographite) epoxy composite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Liebig, W. V.; Mecklenberg, M.; Fiedler, B.; Smazna, D.; Adelung, R.; Schulte, K.

    2015-11-04

    Aerographite (AG) is a mechanically robust, lightweight synthetic cellular material, which consists of a 3D interconnected network of tubular carbon [1]. The presence of open channels in AG aids to infiltrate them with polymer matrices, thereby yielding an electrical conducting and lightweight composite. Aerographite produced with densities in the range of 7–15 mg/cm3 was infiltrated with a low viscous epoxy resin by means of vacuum infiltration technique. Detailed morphological and structural investigations on synthesized AG and AG/epoxy composite were performed by scanning electron microscopic techniques. Our present study investigates the fracture and failure of AG/epoxy composites and its energy absorptionmore » capacity under compression. The composites displayed an extended plateau region when uni-axially compressed, which led to an increase in energy absorption of ~133% per unit volume for 1.5 wt% of AG, when compared to pure epoxy. Preliminary results on fracture toughness showed an enhancement of ~19% in KIC for AG/epoxy composites with 0.45 wt% of AG. Furthermore, our observations of fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscope gives evidence of pull-out of arms of AG tetrapod, interface and inter-graphite failure as the dominating mechanism for the toughness improvement in these composites. These observations were consistent with the results obtained from photoelasticity experiments on a thin film AG/epoxy model composite.« less

  17. Fracture, failure and compression behaviour of a 3D interconnected carbon aerogel (Aerographite) epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Liebig, W. V.; Mecklenberg, M.; Fiedler, B.; Smazna, D.; Adelung, R.; Schulte, K.

    2015-11-04

    Aerographite (AG) is a mechanically robust, lightweight synthetic cellular material, which consists of a 3D interconnected network of tubular carbon [1]. The presence of open channels in AG aids to infiltrate them with polymer matrices, thereby yielding an electrical conducting and lightweight composite. Aerographite produced with densities in the range of 7–15 mg/cm3 was infiltrated with a low viscous epoxy resin by means of vacuum infiltration technique. Detailed morphological and structural investigations on synthesized AG and AG/epoxy composite were performed by scanning electron microscopic techniques. Our present study investigates the fracture and failure of AG/epoxy composites and its energy absorption capacity under compression. The composites displayed an extended plateau region when uni-axially compressed, which led to an increase in energy absorption of ~133% per unit volume for 1.5 wt% of AG, when compared to pure epoxy. Preliminary results on fracture toughness showed an enhancement of ~19% in KIC for AG/epoxy composites with 0.45 wt% of AG. Furthermore, our observations of fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscope gives evidence of pull-out of arms of AG tetrapod, interface and inter-graphite failure as the dominating mechanism for the toughness improvement in these composites. These observations were consistent with the results obtained from photoelasticity experiments on a thin film AG/epoxy model composite.

  18. Hand/face/neck localized pattern: sticky problems--resins.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lauren Y; Sood, Apra; Taylor, James S

    2009-07-01

    Plastic resin systems have an increasingly diverse array of applications but also induce health hazards, the most common of which are allergic and irritant contact dermatitis. Contact urticaria, pigmentary changes, and photoallergic contact dermatitis may occasionally occur. Other health effects, especially respiratory and neurologic signs and symptoms, have also been reported. These resin systems include epoxies, the most frequent synthetic resin systems to cause contact dermatitis, (meth)acrylics, polyurethanes, phenol-formaldehydes, polyesters, amino resins (melamine-formaldehydes, urea-formaldehydes), polyvinyls, polystyrenes, polyolefins, polyamides and polycarbonates. Contact dermatitis usually occurs as a result of exposure to the monomers and additives in the occupational setting, although reports from consumers, using the raw materials or end products periodically surface. Resin- and additive-induced direct contact dermatitis usually presents on the hands, fingers, and forearms, while facial, eyelid, and neck involvement may occur through indirect contact, eg, via the hands, or from airborne exposure. Patch testing with commercially available materials, and in some cases the patient's own resins, is important for diagnosis. Industrial hygiene prevention techniques are essential to reduce contact dermatitis when handling these resin systems. PMID:19580919

  19. Cure shrinkage in epoxy grouts for grouted repairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsuddoha, Md.; Islam, Md. Mainul; Aravinthan, Thiru; Manalo, Allan; Lau, Kin-tak

    2013-08-01

    Structures can go through harsh environmental adversity and can experience material loss and cracks during their service lives. Infill material is used to ensure a supporting bed for a grouted repair. Epoxy grouts are used for repairing and rehabilitating structures, such as foundations, bridges, piers, transportation pipelines, etc., because they are resistant to typical chemicals and possess superior mechanical properties than other grouts. The resin based infill used inside the void or cracked space of the repair is vulnerable to shrinkage. When these filled grouts have high resin content, cracks can develop from residual stresses, which can affect the load transfer performance. It follows that interlayer separation and cracking of infill layer can occur in a grouted repair. In this study, volumetric shrinkage of two epoxy grouts was measured over 28 days using a Pycnometer. The highest volumetric shrinkage measured after 7 days was found to be 2.72%. The results suggest that the volumetric shrinkage can be reduced to 1.1% after 7 days, through the introduction of a coarse aggregate filler; a 2.5 times reduction in shrinkage. About 98% and 92% of the total shrinkage over the 28 day period, of the unfilled and filled grouts respectively, was found to occur within 7 days of mixing. The gel-time shrinkages were also calculated, to determine the "postgel" part of the curing contraction which subsequently produces residual stresses in the hardened grout systems.

  20. Dispersion monitoring of carbon nanotube modified epoxy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, G.; Saganas, Ch.; Grammatikos, S. A.; Maistros, Gh. M.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Paipetis, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    The remarkable mechanical and electrical properties exhibited by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have encouraged efforts to develop mass production techniques. As a result, CNTs are becoming increasingly available, and more attention from both the academic world and industry has focused on the applications of CNTs in bulk quantities. These opportunities include the use of CNTs as conductive filler in insulating polymer matrices and as reinforcement in structural materials. The use of composites made from an insulating matrix and highly conductive fillers is becoming more and more important due to their ability to electromagnetically shield and prevent electrostatic charging of electronic devices. In recent years, different models have been proposed to explain the formation of the conductive filler network. Moreover, intrinsic difficulties and unresolved issues related to the incorporation of carbon nanotubes as conductive fillers in an epoxy matrix and the interpretation of the processing behavior have not yet been resolved. In this sense, a further challenge is becoming more and more important in composite processing: cure monitoring and optimization. This paper considers the potential for real-time control of cure cycle and dispersion of a modified epoxy resin system commonly utilized in aerospace composite parts. It shows how cure cycle and dispersion control may become possible through realtime in-situ acquisition of dielectric signal from the curing resin, analysis of its main components and identification of the significant features.

  1. Online monitoring of amine concentration in the processing of amine/epoxy-based thermosets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tonguy; Elsby, S.; Fernando, Gerard F.

    1999-05-01

    Amine/epoxy based thermosets are used as matrices in a wide variety of advanced fiber reinforced composite structures. Thermosets can be formulated for specified processing routes, for example, pultrusion, prepregging, resin transfer moulding and filament winding. In general, the resin system has two or more components, which have to be mixed prior to use. Issues of concern in this area are (1) the homogeneity of the mixed resin systems; (2) the stoichiometry of the reagents and (3) the chemical stability of the individual components as a function of storage conditions prior to mixing. The availability of an on-line 'resin quality' sensor system could overcome some of the above mentioned problems. This paper reports on an on-line monitoring system for determining the amine concentration in an amine/epoxy-based thermoset, which is used for filament winding. The system is based on a dual- wavelength optical fiber sensor design. One light source at 1548 nm corresponds to the amine (N-H) absorption band and the second is centered around 670 nm. The latter serves as a reference to compensate for the scattering effects. The proposed system is capable of quantitatively determining amine concentrations during processing and offers the option of on- line process optimization for multi-component resins.

  2. Mechanical behavior of Kenaf/Epoxy corrugated sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhori, S.; Hassan, M. Z.; Daud, Y.; Sarip, S.; Rahman, N.; Ismail, Z.; Aziz, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents the response of kenaf/epoxy corrugated sandwich structure during quasi-static test. Force-displacements curves have been deducted to determine the deformation pattern and collapse behavior of the structure. Kenaf/epoxy sandwich structures skins fabricated by using hand layup technique and the corrugated core were moulded by using steel mould. Different thicknesses of corrugated core web with two sizes of kenaf fibers were used. The corrugated core is then bonded with the skins by using poly-epoxy resin and has been cut into different number of cells. The specimens then tested under tensile and compression at different constant speeds until the specimens fully crushed. Tensile tests data showed the structure can be considered brittle when it breaking point strain, ε less than 0.025. In compression test, the specimens fail due to dominated by stress concentration that initiated by prior cracks. Also, the specimens with more number of cells and thicker core web have higher strength and the ability to absorb higher energy.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Triaxial Braided Carbon/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, C. L.; Roberts, G. D.; Braley, M. S.; Xie, M.; Booker, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    In an on-going effort to increase the safety and efficiency of turbine engines, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is exploring lightweight alternatives to the metal containment structures that currently encase commercial jet engines. Epoxy reinforced with braided carbon fibers is a candidate structural material which may be suitable for an engine case. This paper reports flat-coupon mechanical-property experiments performed to compliment previously reported subcomponent impact testing and analytical simulation of containment structures. Triaxial-braid T700/5208 epoxy and triaxial-braid T700h436 toughened epoxy composites were evaluated. Also, two triaxial-braid architectures (0 degrees plus or minus 60 degrees, and 0 degrees plus or minus 45 degrees) with the M36 resin were evaluated through tension, compression, and shear testing. Tensile behavior was compared between standard straight-sided specimens (ASTM D3039) and bow-tie specimens. Both double-notch shear (ASTM D3846) and Iosepescu (ASTM D5379) tests were performed as well. The M36/O degrees plus or minus 45 degrees configuration yield the best response when measurements were made parallel to the axial tows. Conversely, the M36/0 degrees plus or minus 60 degrees configuration was best when measurements were made perpendicular to the axial tows. The results were used to identify critical properties and to augment the analysis of impact experiments.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Triaxial Braided Carbon/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, C. L.; Roberts, G. D.; Braley, M. S.; Xie, M.; Booker, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    In an on-going effort to increase the safety and efficiency of turbine engines, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is exploring lightweight alternatives to the metal containment structures that currently encase commercial jet engines. Epoxy reinforced with braided carbon fibers is a candidate structural material which may be suitable for an engine case. This paper reports flat-coupon mechanical-property experiments performed to compliment previously reported subcomponent impact testing and analytical simulation of containment structures. Triaxial-braid T700/5208 epoxy and triaxial-braid T700/M36 toughened epoxy composites were evaluated. Also, two triaxial-braid architectures (0 +/- 60 deg., 0 +/- 45 deg.) with the M36 resin were evaluated through tension, compression, and shear testing. Tensile behavior was compared between standard straight-sided specimens (ASTM D3039) and bowtie specimens. Both double-notch shear (ASTM D3846) and Iosepescu (ASTM D5379) tests were performed as well. The M36/0 +/- 45 deg. configuration yield the best response when measurements were made parallel to the axial tows. Conversely, the M36/0 +/- 60 deg. configuration was best when measurements were made perpendicular to the axial tows. The results were used to identify critical properties and to augment the analysis of impact experiments.

  5. Development of design data for graphite reinforced epoxy and polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheck, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Processing techniques and design data were characterized for a graphite/epoxy composite system that is useful from 75 K to 450 K, and a graphite/polyimide composite system that is useful from 75 K to 589 K. The Monsanto 710 polyimide resin was selected as the resin to be characterized and used with the graphite fiber reinforcement. Material was purchased using the prepreg specification for the design data generation for both the HT-S/710 and HM-S/710 graphite/polyimide composite system. Lamina and laminate properties were determined at 75 K, 297 K, and 589 K. The test results obtained on the skin-stringer components proved that graphite/polyimide composites can be reliably designed and analyzed much like graphite/epoxy composites. The design data generated in the program includes the standard static mechanical properties, biaxial strain data, creep, fatigue, aging, and thick laminate data.

  6. Thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance of cyanate ester epoxy mix and tri-functional epoxy electrical insulations at superfluid helium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrowicz, S.; Four, A.; Jones, S.; Canfer, S.; Baudouy, B.

    2012-02-01

    In the framework of the European Union FP7 project EuCARD, two composite insulation systems made of cyanate ester epoxy mix and tri-functional epoxy (TGPAP-DETDA) with S-glass fiber have been thermally tested as possible candidates to be the electrical insulation of 13 T Nb3Sn high field magnets under development for this program. Since it is expected to be operated in pressurized superfluid helium at 1.9 K and 1 atm, the thermal conductivity and the Kapitza resistance are the most important input parameters for the thermal design of this type of magnet and have been determined in this study. For determining these thermal properties, three sheets of each material with different thicknesses varying from 245 to 598 μm have been tested in steady-state condition in the temperature range of 1.6-2.0 K. The thermal conductivity for the tri-functional epoxy (TGPAP-DETDA) epoxy resin insulation is found to be k = [(34.2 ± 5.5)ṡT - (16.4 ± 8.2)] × 10-3 Wm-1 K-1 and for the cyanate ester epoxy k = [(26.8 ± 4.8)ṡT - (9.6 ± 5.2)] × 10-3 Wm-1 K-1. For the Kapitza resistance, Rk, the best curve fitting the experimental data is described by Rk = (3057 ± 593) × 10-6ṡT (-1.79 ± 0.34) m2 KW-1 for the TGPAP-DETDA insulation and Rk = (4114 ± 971) × 10-6ṡT (-1.73 ± 0.41) m2 KW-1 for the cyanate ester epoxy insulation. Our results are compared with other epoxy based composite electrical insulation found in the literature.

  7. 1,2,3-Triazolium-Based Epoxy-Amine Networks: Ion-Conducting Polymer Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Ly Nguyen, Thi Khanh; Obadia, Mona Marie; Serghei, Anatoli; Livi, Sébastien; Duchet-Rumeau, Jannick; Drockenmuller, Eric

    2016-07-01

    A diepoxy-functionalized 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquid is synthesized in three steps and used in combination with a poly(propylene glycol) diamine to obtain ion-conducting epoxy-amine networks (EANs). The curing kinetics are followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, while the physical, mechanical, and ion-conducting properties of the resulting networks are studied by swelling experiments, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, and broadband dielectric spectroscopy. The curing kinetics and thermomechanical properties of this system are relatively similar to those of conventional DGEBA- (bisphenol A diglycidyl ether)-based EANs with low glass transition temperature (Tg = -44 and -52 °C, respectively) characteristic of rubbery polymer networks. The anhydrous ionic conductivity of the pure network at 30 °C reaches a remarkably high value of 2 × 10(-7) S cm(-1) that could be further increased to 10(-6) S cm(-1) by the addition of 10 wt% LiTFSI. PMID:26924313

  8. A study of thermal diffusivity of carbon-epoxy and glass-epoxy composites using the modified pulse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terpiłowski, Janusz; Piotrowska-Woroniak, Joanna; Romanowska, Julita

    2014-09-01

    Transient heat transfer is studied and compared in two planeparallel composite walls and one EPIDIAN 53 epoxy resin wall acting as a matrix for both composites. The first of the two walls is made of carbonepoxy composite; the other wall is made of glass-epoxy composite, both with comparable thickness of about 1 mm and the same number of carbon and glass fabric layers (four layers). The study was conducted for temperatures in the range of 20-120 °C. The results of the study of thermal diffusivity which characterizes the material as a heat conductor under transient conditions have a preliminary character. Three series of tests were conducted for each wall. Each series took about 24 h. The results from the three series were approximated using linear functions and were found between (0.7-1.35)×10-7m2/s. In the whole range of temperature variation, the thermal diffusivity values for carbon-epoxy composite are from 1.2 to 1.5 times higher than those for the other two materials with nearly the same thermal diffusivity characteristics.

  9. Improved wetting behavior and thermal conductivity of the three-dimensional nickel foam/epoxy composites with graphene oxide as interfacial modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang; Zhu, Pengli; Li, Gang; Sun, Rong

    2016-05-01

    The partial reduced graphene oxide (P-rGO) sheets-wrapped nickel foams (NF@P-rGO) were prepared by hydrothermal method, and then their epoxy composites were fabricated via a simple drop-wetting process. The P-rGO sheets on the metal networks could effectively improve the compatibility between nickel foam and epoxy resin, thus greatly accelerate the wetting of epoxy resin on the foams and avoid cracks in the network-polymer interface. Owing to the existence of high-efficiency conductive metal networks, the NF@P-rGO/epoxy composite has a high thermal conductivity of 0.584 W m-1 K-1, which is 2.6 times higher than that of neat epoxy resin. Additionally, owing to the improved wetting ability, NF@P-rGO-10 wt% boron nitride (BN) microsheets/epoxy composites could be fabricated and have a further higher thermal conductivity of 0.71 W m-1 K-1. We believe the use of P-rGO as a novel surface modifier and the following liquid polymer drop-wetting could be an effective method to obtain novel and outstanding metal foam/polymer composites.

  10. Designing of epoxy composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes grown carbon fiber fabric for improved electromagnetic interference shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Choudhary, Veena; Saini, Parveen; Mathur, R. B.

    2012-06-01

    In this letter, we report preparation of strongly anchored multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) carbon fiber (CF) fabric preforms. These preforms were reinforced in epoxy resin to make multi scale composites for microwave absorption in the X-band (8.2-12.4GHz). The incorporation of MWCNTs on the carbon fabric produced a significant enhancement in the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE) from -29.4 dB for CF/epoxy-composite to -51.1 dB for CF-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale composites of 2 mm thickness. In addition to enhanced EMI-SE, interlaminar shear strength improved from 23 MPa for CF/epoxy-composites to 50 MPa for multiscale composites indicating their usefulness for making structurally strong microwave shields.

  11. Epoxy-photopolymer composites: thick recording media for holographic data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentler, Timothy J.; Boyd, Joel E.; Colvin, Vicki L.

    2001-06-01

    Archival data-storage based on holographic methods requires high performance recording materials. Here, we describe an epoxy-photopolymer composite material which is sensitive to visible light and can be fabricated as thick films. These materials are prepared by combining photopolymerizable vinyl monomers with a liquid epoxy resin and an amine hardener. As the epoxy cures at room temperature, a solid matrix is formed which surrounds the unreacted photopolymer. These vinyl monomers are subsequently photopolymerized during hologram recording. Typically the material consists of a low index matrix, composed of diethylenetriamine and 1,4- butanediol diglycidyl ether, and a high index photopolymer mixture of N-vinylcarbazole and N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone. Because the polymers can be prepared in thick formats, narrow angular bandwidth holograms with high diffraction efficiency can be recorded. A dynamic range up to 13 has been measured in these materials.

  12. Application of In Situ Fiberization for fabrication of improved strain isolation pads and graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Seibold, R. W.; Basiulis, D. I.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of applying the in situ fiberization process to the fabrication of strain isolation pads (SIP) for the Space Shuttle and to the fabrication of graphite-epoxy composites was evaluated. The ISF process involves the formation of interconnected polymer fiber networks by agitation of dilute polymer solutions under controlled conditions. High temperature polymers suitable for SIP use were fiberized and a successful fiberization of polychloro trifluoroethylene, a relatively high melting polymer, was achieved. Attempts to fiberize polymers with greater thermal stability were unsuccessful, apparently due to characteristics caused by the presence of aromaticity in the backbone of such materials. Graphite-epoxy composites were fabricated by interconnecting two dimensional arrays of graphite fiber with polypropylene IS fibers with subsequent epoxy resin impregnation. Mechanical property tests were performed on laminated panels of this material to evaluate intralaminar and interlaminar shear strength, and thus fracture toughness. Test results were generally unpromising.

  13. New high-temperature flame-resistant resin matrix for RP/C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The processing parameters of graphite composites utilizing graphite fabric and epoxy or other advanced thermoset and thermoplastic resins as matrices are discussed. The evaluated properties include anaerobic char yield, limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, moisture absorption, and high-temperature mechanical properties. It is shown that graphite composites having the highest char yield exhibit optimum fire-resistant properties.

  14. Matrix Characterization and Development for the Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, B. W.; Hubert, P.; Hou, T. H.; Cano, R. J.; Loos, A. C.; Pipes, R. B.

    2001-01-01

    The curing kinetics and viscosity of an epoxy resin system, SI-ZG-5A, have been characterized for application in the vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) process. Impregnation of a typical carbon fiber perform provided the test bed for the characterization. Process simulations were carried out using the process model, COMPRO, to examine heat transfer and curing kinetics for a fully impregnated panel, neglecting resin flow. The predicted viscosity profile and final degree of cure were found to be in good agreement with experimental observations.

  15. Effect of heat treatment on carbon fiber surface properties and fibers/epoxy interfacial adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhishuang; Zhang, Baoyan; Shi, Fenghui; Li, Min; Zhang, Zuoguang; Gu, Yizhuo

    2011-08-01

    Carbon fiber surface properties are likely to change during the molding process of carbon fiber reinforced matrix composite, and these changes could affect the infiltration and adhesion between carbon fiber and resin. T300B fiber was heat treated referring to the curing process of high-performance carbon fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites. By means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), activated carbon atoms can be detected, which are defined as the carbon atoms conjunction with oxygen and nitrogen. Surface chemistry analysis shows that the content of activated carbon atoms on treated carbon fiber surface, especially those connect with the hydroxyl decreases with the increasing heat treatment temperature. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) analysis reveals that the dispersive surface energy γSd increases and the polar surface energy γSsp decreases as the heat treatment temperature increases to 200. Contact angle between carbon fiber and epoxy E51 resin, which is studied by dynamic contact angle test (DCAT) increases with the increasing heat treatment temperature, indicating the worse wettability comparing with the untreated fiber. Moreover, micro-droplet test shows that the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of the treated carbon fiber/epoxy is lower than that of the untreated T300B fiber which is attributed to the decrement of the content of reactive functional groups including hydrogen group and epoxy group.

  16. Effect of nano-sized oxide particles on thermal and electrical properties of epoxy silica composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Heon; Choi, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Polymer matrix composites were fabricated using a modified injection molding technique in which nano-sized silicon oxides, titanium oxides, and aluminium oxides were contained. Nano-sized oxides were uniformly distributed in the composites produced by modified injection molding combining vacuum degassing and curing at a moderate temperature. The thermal decomposition and evaporation of the epoxy resin matrix depended on the composition of the composites. The relative permittivity of the nano-sized silicon carbide-epoxy composites increased from 5.16 to 5.37 by adding 2.0 wt % titanium oxide. The addition of titanium oxide of up to 2.0 wt % had little influence on the permittivity. The addition of 2.0 wt % of titanium oxide to epoxy resin showed the maximum thermal properties. Both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the silicon oxide-epoxy composites tended to increase with titanium oxide content. The maximum thermal conductivity was observed in the composites with 2.0 wt % titanium oxide.

  17. Fabrication of Epoxy Vesicles using Self-Assembling Polystyrene-Montmorillonite Nanocomposite Reusable Template.

    PubMed

    Sivankuttynair, Prasad Vadakkethonippurathu; Chacko, Asha Susan; Nair, Bindu P; Thulasibai, Bijini T; Chorappan, Pavithran

    2015-08-01

    We report the fabrication of thermoset vesicles using a thermoplastic-clay nanocomposite vesicle reusable template. Epoxy polymer vesicles (EPV) of micrometer diameters were synthesized from bisphenol-A diglycidyl ether resin encapsulated within a self-assembled, polystyrene-montmorillonite hybrid nanocomposite (PCN) template and in situ cross-linked with polyamine curing agent. The size and wall thickness of the EPV vesicles were shown to be controlled by the epoxy resin concentration up to a critical epoxy concentration of 20 wt %, beyond which the wall thickness alone was found to be increasing. The EPVs dispersed in a polystyrene matrix at a loading of 2 wt % were found to reduce the dielectric constant of polystyrene from 3.1 to 2.0, and a linear decrease with decreasing wall thickness of the EPV, attributed to the increase in free volume involving the intrinsic porosity from the rigid epoxy vesicles and the composite, exhibited improved thermal stability also. The result suggests that vesicles produced by micromolding using self-assembled PCN can be utilized for the synthesis of polymer microcomposites having good interfacial bonding as well as low dielectric constant and good thermal stability for use in electronic packaging applications. PMID:26140515

  18. A Kinetics Study on Electrical Resistivity Transition of In Situ Polymer Aging Sensors Based on Carbon-Black-Filled Epoxy Conductive Polymeric Composites (CPCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qizhen; Nyugen, Mark T.; Moon, Kyoung-Sik; Watkins, Ken; Morato, Lilian T.; Wong, Ching Ping

    2013-06-01

    Sensors based on carbon-black-filled bisphenol A-type epoxy conductive polymeric composites (CPCs) have been prepared and applied to monitor thermal oxidation aging of polymeric materials. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is applied to characterize weight loss of epoxy resin in the aging process. By using a mathematical model based on the Boltzmann equation, a relationship between the electrical resistivity of the sensors based on epoxy/carbon black composites and aging time is established, making it possible to monitor and estimate the aging status of polymeric components in situ based on a fast and convenient electrical resistance measurement.

  19. Resin systems for producing polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1988-09-01

    When plastics are combined with mixtures of inorganic materials, high-strength, durable, fast-setting composites are produced. These materials are used in structural engineering and other applications, and as a result of the many commercial successes that have been achieved, considerable research and development work is in progress throughout the world. One family of polymer-based composites receiving considerable attention is called polymer concrete. Work in this area is directed toward developing new high-strength durable materials by combining cement and concrete technology with that of polymer chemistry. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the types of resins that can be used to form polymer concretes. Resin selection is normally based upon the desired properties for the composite and cost. However, the physical and chemical properties of the resins before and during curing are also important, particularly for field-applied materials. Currently, for normal temperature (0/degree/ to 30/degree/C) applications, epoxy resins, vinyl monomers such as polyester-styrene, methylmethacrylate, furfuryl alcohol, furan derivatives, urethane, and styrene, are being used. Styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) mixtures and styrene-acrylamide-TMPTMA mixtures yield composites with excellent hydrothermal stability at temperatures up to 150/degree/ and 250/degree/C, respectively, and organosiloxane resins have been successfully tested at 300/degree/C. Of equal importance is the selection of the composition of the inorganic phase of the composite, since chemical interactions between the two phases can significantly enhance the final properties. Further work to elucidate the mechanisms of these interactions is needed. 6 refs.

  20. Multifunctional epoxy composites with natural Moroccan clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsif, M.; Zerouale, A.; Kandri, N. Idrissi; Allali, F.; Sgarbossa, P.; Bartolozzi, A.; Tamburini, S.; Bertani, R.

    2016-05-01

    Two natural Moroccan clays, here firstly completely characterized, have been used as fillers without modification in epoxy composites. Mechanical properties resulted to be improved and a significant antibacterial activity is exhibited by the epoxy composite containing the C2 clay.