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Sample records for diabetes field study

  1. Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) study: baseline characteristics and short-term effects of fenofibrate [ISRCTN64783481

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Objective The Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) Study is examining the effects of long-term fibrate therapy on coronary heart disease (CHD) event rates in patients with diabetes mellitus. This article describes the trial's run-in phase and patients' baseline characteristics. Research design and methods FIELD is a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 63 centres in 3 countries evaluating the effects of fenofibrate versus placebo on CHD morbidity and mortality in 9795 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients were to have no indication for lipid-lowering therapy on randomization, but could start these or other drugs at any time after randomization. Follow-up in the study was to be for a median duration of not less than 5 years and until 500 major coronary events (fatal coronary heart disease plus nonfatal myocardial infarction) had occurred. Results About 2100 patients (22%) had some manifestation of cardiovascular disease (CVD) at baseline and thus high risk status. Less than 25% of patients without CVD had a (UKPDS determined) calculated 5-year CHD risk of <5%, but nearly all had a 5-year stroke risk of <10%. Despite this, half of the cohort were obese (BMI > 30), most were men, two-thirds were aged over 60 years, and substantial proportions had NCEP ATP III features of the metabolic syndrome independent of their diabetes, including low HDL (60%), high blood pressure measurement or treatment for hypertension (84%), high waist measurement (68%), and raised triglycerides (52%). After a 6-week run-in period before randomisation with all participants receiving 200 mg comicronized fenofibrate, there were declines in total and LDL cholesterol (10%) and triglycerides (26%) and an increase in HDL cholesterol (6.5%). Conclusion The study will show the effect of PPAR-alpha agonist action on CHD and other vascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes including substantial numbers with low to moderate CVD risk but with the various components of the metabolic syndrome. The main results of the study will be reported in late 2005. PMID:16111499

  2. Sensitivity and specificity of Norwegian optometrists’ evaluation of diabetic retinopathy in single-field retinal images – a cross-sectional experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the working age group, diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of visual impairment. Regular eye examinations and early treatment of retinopathy can prevent visual loss, so screening for diabetic retinopathy is cost-effective. Dilated retinal digital photography with the additional use of ophthalmoscopy is the most effective and robust method of diabetic retinopathy screening. The aim of this study was to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of diabetic retinopathy screening when performed by Norwegian optometrists. Methods This study employed a cross-sectional experimental design. Seventy-four optometrists working in private optometric practice were asked to screen 14 single-field retinal images for possible diabetic retinopathy. The screening was undertaken using a web-based visual identification and management of ophthalmological conditions (VIMOC) examination. The images used in the VIMOC examination were selected from a population survey and had been previously examined by two independent ophthalmologists. In order to establish a “gold standard”, images were only chosen for use in the VIMOC examination if they had elicited diagnostic agreement between the two independent ophthalmologists. To reduce the possibility of falsely high specificity occurring by chance, half the presented images were of retinas that were not affected by diabetic retinopathy. Sensitivity and specificity for diabetic retinopathy was calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results The mean (95%CI) sensitivity for identifying eyes with any diabetic retinopathy was 67% (62% to 72%). The mean (95%CI) specificity for identifying eyes without diabetic retinopathy was 84% (80% to 89%). The mean (95%CI) sensitivity for identifying eyes with mild non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy or moderate non-proliferative diabetes was 54% (47% to 61%) and 100%, respectively. Only four optometrists (5%) met the required standard of at least 80% sensitivity and 95% specificity that has been previously set for diabetic retinopathy screening programmes. Conclusions The evaluation of retinal images for diabetic retinopathy by Norwegian optometrists does not meet the required screening standard of at least 80% sensitivity and 95% specificity. The introduction of measures to improve this situation could have implications for both formal optometric training and continuing optometric professional education. PMID:23305337

  3. Introduction The Diabetic Retinopathy Study estab-

    E-print Network

    Palanker, Daniel

    Introduction The Diabetic Retinopathy Study estab- lished panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) as an effective treatment for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (ET- DRS, 1991). While the exact mecha- nism produced in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy scheduled for PRP using 100-, 20- and 10-ms

  4. Blood Glucose Levels and Performance in a Sports Camp for Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Dylan; Hamilton, Jill K.; Riddell, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Acute hypo- and hyperglycemia causes cognitive and psychomotor impairment in individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) that may affect sports performance. Objective. To quantify the effect of concurrent and antecedent blood glucose concentrations on sports skills and cognitive performance in youth with T1DM attending a sports camp. Design/Methods. 28 youth (ages 6–17 years) attending a sports camp carried out multiple skill-based tests (tennis, basketball, or soccer skills) with glucose monitoring over 4 days. Glucose levels at the time of testing were categorized as (a) hypoglycemic (<3.6?mM); (b) within an acceptable glycemic range (3.6–13.9?mM); or (c) hyperglycemic (>13.9?mM). Results. Overall, sports performance skill was ?20% lower when glucose concentrations were hypoglycemic compared to either acceptable or hyperglycemic at the time of skill testing (P < .05). During Stroop testing, “reading” and “color recognition” also degraded during hypoglycemia, while “interference” scores improved (P < .05). Nocturnal hypoglycemia was present in 66% of subjects, lasting an average of 84 minutes, but this did not affect sports skill performance the following day. Conclusions. Mild hypoglycemia markedly reduces sports skill performance and cognition in young athletes with T1DM. PMID:20811595

  5. Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  6. Burden of Diabetes Related Complications Among Hypertensive and Non Hypertensive Diabetics: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kesavamoorthy, Goutham; Singh, Awnish K; Sharma, Shruti; Kasav, Jyoti Bala; Joshi, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes and hypertension are the conditions with overlapping risk factors and complications. Objective of present study was to compare the burden of complications of diabetes among hypertensive and non hypertensive diabetes individuals. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at Saveetha medical college and hospital, Chennai, India. A total of 100 diabetics having hypertension and 50 non-hypertensive diabetic patients were enrolled on the basis of purposive sampling. Information about sociodemograpic characteristics, general health, health distress, diabetes symptoms, communication with physician, healthcare utilization and lifetime occurrence of diabetes related complications. Mean, standard deviation and median of continuous variables and proportion of categorical variables were recorded. Results Average age of the hypertensive diabetes patients (M=57; SD=11) was higher than non hypertensive diabetes patients (M=52; SD=11) which was statistically significant (p=.009). Diabetic neuropathy was reported by 45% of the hypertensive and 38% of the non-hypertensive diabetics. Mean self reported general health score was higher among hypertensive diabetic participants (M=3.4; SD=1) in comparison to non hypertensive diabetic participants (M=3; SD=1) and it was found statistically significant (p=.03) indicating towards poor self health perception among hypertensive’s. Results of the study have shown that the proportion of participants who have prepared any list of questions before visiting doctor’s clinic (fairly often to always) was significantly higher among hypertensive diabetics (30%) in comparison to non-hypertensive diabetics (14%). Conclusion The proportion of participants reporting diabetes neuropathy and retinopathy was higher among hypertensive diabetics in comparison to non hypertensive diabetics. PMID:26500926

  7. The context of empowerment and self-care within the field of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Scambler, Sasha; Newton, Paul; Asimakopoulou, Koula

    2014-11-01

    There is a growing emphasis within the diabetes literature on the importance of empowerment as a way of encouraging people to take control of and responsibility for the successful management of their disease. Patients are actively encouraged to become active participants in their care, and there is an expectation that health-care professionals will facilitate this process. This article uses Bourdieu's concept of field, as a bounded social space in which actors conduct their lives day-to-day, to explore the context within which issues of empowerment are addressed and negotiated. The practice of empowerment within the biologically defined and biomedically 'policed' field of diabetes is explored using empirical data from a study of diabetes health-care professionals' understanding and practices around empowerment. It is concluded that rather than promoting active self-management and empowerment, the nature of the field of diabetes, and in particular its privileging of the biomedical, can mitigate against people with diabetes negotiating the field effectively and taking control of the disease and its management. PMID:24695383

  8. Too Many Seniors with Diabetes Are Overtreated, Study Suggests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... news/fullstory_155428.html Too Many Seniors With Diabetes Are Overtreated, Study Suggests Even when blood sugar, ... News) -- When it comes to treating seniors with diabetes, new research suggests that doctors often don't ...

  9. Detection of a diabetic sural nerve from the magnetic field after electric stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Takehito; Iramina, Keiji; Hyodo, Akira; Chen, Xian; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we proposed a new diagnostic technique for diabetic neuropathy using biomagnetic measurement. Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes. To examine the injury, the skin potential around the nerve is often measured after electric stimulation. However, measuring the magnetic field may reveal precise condition of the injury. To evaluate the effect of measuring the magnetic field, a simulation study was performed. A diabetic sural nerve was simulated as a bundle of myelinated nerve fibers. Each fiber was modeled as an electric cable of Ranvier's nodes. Anatomical data were used to determine the number of nerve fibers and distribution of nerve fiber diameters. The electric potential and the magnetic field on the skin after electric stimulation were computed to the boundary element method. Biphasic time courses were obtained as the electric potential and the magnetic flux density at measurement points. In diabetic nerves, the longer interpeak latency of the electric potential wave and the shorter interpeak latency of the magnetic flux wave were obtained. Measuring both the electric potential and the magnetic flux density seemed to provide a noninvasive and objective marker for diabetic neuropathy.

  10. Sweet taste sensitivity in pre-diabetics, diabetics and normoglycemic controls: a comparative cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing prevalence of pre-diabetes is an emerging public health problem. Decrease in sweet taste sensitivity which can lead to an increase in sugar intake might be a factor driving them to overt diabetes. The aim of the present study was to assess the sweet taste sensitivity in pre-diabetics in comparison with diabetics and with normoglycemic controls. Methods Forty pre-diabetics, 40 diabetics and 34 normoglycemic controls were studied. The three groups were matched for age, sex and BMI. The division into groups was based on their glycated hemoglobin levels. The detection and recognition thresholds were determined by the multiple forced-choice method using sucrose solutions prepared in ¼ log dilutions. The intensities of perceived sensations for a series of suprathreshold concentrations of sucrose solutions prepared in ½ log dilution were determined by rating on a visual analogue scale. Statistical analyses were performed by SPSS version 21. Results The mean (SD) detection thresholds of diabetic, pre-diabetic and normoglycemic groups were 0.025 (0.01), 0.018 (0.01) and 0.015 (0.01) respectively with a significant increase in diabetic group compared to normoglycemic group (p?=?0.03). The mean recognition thresholds were not different among the three groups. When the intensity ratings for suprathreshold concentrations of sucrose were compared between the three groups, for all suprathreshold concentrations tested, significant differences were observed across the four concentrations (p?diabetic group had significantly lower suprathreshold ratings than the normoglycemic group (p?diabetic group were between the normoglycemic and diabetic groups, the differences were not significant. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the sweet taste sensitivity in pre-diabetics. The findings of the present study do not support the hypothesis of decreased sweet taste sensitivity of pre-diabetics. However, the results confirm the previous findings of blunted taste response in diabetics. The observation of pre-diabetics having intermediate values for all taste thresholds and suprathreshold ratings warrants a future investigation with a larger pre-diabetic sample recruited with more specific screening criteria to test this hypothesis further. PMID:25123551

  11. Selenium and diabetes - evidence from animal studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Huang, Kaixun; Lei, Xin Gen

    2013-01-01

    Whereas selenium was found to act as an insulin-mimic and to be anti-diabetic in earlier studies, recent animal experiments and human trials have shown unexpected risk of prolonged high Se intake in potentiating insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Elevating dietary Se intakes (0.4 to 3.0 mg/kg of diet) above the nutrient requirements, similar to overproduction of selenoproteins, led to insulin resistance and(or) diabetes-like phenotypes in mice, rats, and pigs. Although its diabetogenic mechanism remains unclear, the high Se intake elevated activity or production of selenoproteins including GPx1, MsrB1, SelS, and SelP. This up-regulation diminished intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and then dys-regulated key regulators of ? cells and insulin synthesis and secretion, leading to chronic hyperinsulinaemia. Over-scavenging intracellular H2O2 also attenuated oxidative inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases and suppressed insulin signaling. High Se intake might affect expression and(or) function of key regulators for glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and lipogenesis. Future research is needed to find out if certain forms of Se metabolites in addition to selenoproteins and if mechanisms other than intracellular redox control mediate the diabetogenic effect of high Se intakes. Furthermore, a potential interactive role of high Se intakes in the interphase of carcinogenesis and diabetogenesis should be explored to make the optimal use of Se in human nutrition and health. PMID:23867154

  12. Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 01, 2011 National Diabetes Education Program. Overview of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents. Accessed January 01, 2011 National Institutes of Health. Type 1 Diabetes Fact Sheet. Accessed January 01, 2011 Diagnosis and ...

  13. Diabetic foot risk factors in type 2 diabetes patients: a cross-sectional case control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot is a serious condition in patients with a long lasting diabetes mellitus. Diabetic foot treated improperly may lead not only to delayed ulceration healing, generalized inflammation, unnecessary surgical intervention, but also to the lower limb amputation. The aim of this study was to compare diabetic foot risk factors in population with type 2 diabetes and risk factors for diabetes in healthy subjects. Methods The study included 900 subjects: 145 with diabetic foot, 293 with type 2 diabetes without diabetic foot and 462 healthy controls matched in terms of mean age, gender structure and cardiovascular diseases absence. Study was conducted in Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases Department, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland. In statistical analysis a logistic regression model, U Mann-Whitney’s and t-Student test were used. Results The binomial logit models analysis showed that the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type 2 diabetes was decreased by patient’s age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92-0.96; p = 0.00001) and hyperlipidaemia (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.36-0.81; p = 0.01). In contrast, male gender (OR = 2.83; 95% CI: 1.86-4.28; p = 0.00001) diabetes duration (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.03-1.06; p = 0.0003), weight (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.03-1.06; p = 0.00001), height (OR = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.05-1.11; p = 0.00001) and waist circumference (OR = 1.028; 95% CI: 1.007-1.050; p = 0.006) increase the risk of diabetic foot. The onset of type 2 diabetes in healthy subjects was increased by weight (OR = 1.035; 95% CI: 1.024-1.046; p = 0.00001), WC (OR = 1.075; 95% CI: 1.055-1.096; p = 00001), hip circumference (OR = 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05; p = 0.005), overweight defined with body mass index (BMI) above 24,9 kg/m2 (OR = 2.49; 95% CI: 1.77-3.51; p = 0.00001) and hyperlipidaemia (OR = 3.53; 95% CI: 2.57-4.84; p = 0.00001). Conclusions Risk factors for Type 2 diabetes and diabetic foot are only partially common. Study proved that patients who are prone to developing diabetic foot experience different risk factors than patients who are at risk of diabetes. Identification of relationship between diabetic foot and diabetes risk factors in appropriate groups may help clinicians to focus on certain factors in diabetic foot prevention. PMID:25114882

  14. Metabolomics - the complementary field in systems biology: a review on obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Abu Bakar, Mohamad Hafizi; Sarmidi, Mohamad Roji; Cheng, Kian-Kai; Ali Khan, Abid; Suan, Chua Lee; Zaman Huri, Hasniza; Yaakob, Harisun

    2015-07-01

    Metabolomic studies on obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus have led to a number of mechanistic insights into biomarker discovery and comprehension of disease progression at metabolic levels. This article reviews a series of metabolomic studies carried out in previous and recent years on obesity and type 2 diabetes, which have shown potential metabolic biomarkers for further evaluation of the diseases. Literature including journals and books from Web of Science, Pubmed and related databases reporting on the metabolomics in these particular disorders are reviewed. We herein discuss the potential of reported metabolic biomarkers for a novel understanding of disease processes. These biomarkers include fatty acids, TCA cycle intermediates, carbohydrates, amino acids, choline and bile acids. The biological activities and aetiological pathways of metabolites of interest in driving these intricate processes are explained. The data from various publications supported metabolomics as an effective strategy in the identification of novel biomarkers for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Accelerating interest in the perspective of metabolomics to complement other fields in systems biology towards the in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the diseases is also well appreciated. In conclusion, metabolomics can be used as one of the alternative approaches in biomarker discovery and the novel understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms in obesity and type 2 diabetes. It can be foreseen that there will be an increasing research interest to combine metabolomics with other omics platforms towards the establishment of detailed mechanistic evidence associated with the disease processes. PMID:25919044

  15. Diabetes mellitus and male sexual function: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Schiavi, R C; Stimmel, B B; Mandeli, J; Rayfield, E J

    1993-08-01

    There is an extensive clinical literature on the erectile disorders of diabetic men but a paucity of controlled studies that have taken into account the effects of age, concurrent illnesses and medication on sexual function. This investigation was carried out on 40 diabetic men free from other illness or drugs that could affect sexual capacity and 40 age-matched healthy control subjects. Each subject and his female partner underwent semistructured interviews and the men had comprehensive medical evaluations and polygraphic assessment of sleep and nocturnal penile tumescence in the sleep laboratory during three nights. In comparison to control subjects, diabetic patients reported significant decreases in sexual desire, subjective arousal, erectile capacity, coital frequency and sexual satisfaction. The diabetic group also had significant decrements in duration of rapid eye movement sleep and in frequency, duration and degree of nocturnal penile tumescent episodes. There were no differences between Type 1 (insulin-dependent) and Type 2 (non-insulin dependent) diabetic patients in prevalence of sexual problems or in nocturnal tumescent measures. Significant relations were observed between lack of metabolic control, diabetic complications and impaired nocturnal tumescence. Sexually non-dysfunctional diabetic men had significant nocturnal penile tumescence abnormalities. Diabetic men without coital failures may have a subclinical impairment in erectile function which, although of not significant magnitude to interfere with penetration, is reflected in nocturnal penile tumescent measures. This result raises a note of caution in the interpretation of the nocturnal penile tumescence test for the differential diagnosis of diabetic erectile impotence. PMID:8405742

  16. Systemic Perturbations of Key Metabolites in Diabetic Rats During the Evolution of Diabetes Studied by Urine Metabonomics

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Mimi; Xie, Liyun; Diao, Chengfeng; Wang, Na; Hu, Wenyi; Zheng, Yongquan; Jin, Litai; Yan, Zhihan; Gao, Hongchang

    2013-01-01

    Background Elucidation of metabolic profiles during diabetes progression helps understand the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. In this study, urine metabonomics was used to identify time-related metabolic changes that occur during the development of diabetes mellitus and characterize the biochemical process of diabetes on a systemic, metabolic level. Methodology/Principal Findings Urine samples were collected from diabetic rats and age-matched controls at different time points: 1, 5, 10, and 15 weeks after diabetes modeling. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectra of the urine samples were obtained and analyzed by multivariate data analysis and quantitative statistical analysis. The metabolic patterns of diabetic groups are separated from the controls at each time point, suggesting that the metabolic profiles of diabetic rats were markedly different from the controls. Moreover, the samples from the diabetic 1-wk group are closely associated, whereas those of the diabetic 15-wk group are scattered, suggesting that the presence of various of complications contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of diabetes. Quantitative analysis indicated that urinary metabolites related to energy metabolism, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and methylamine metabolism are involved in the evolution of diabetes. Conclusions/Significance The results highlighted that the numbers of metabolic changes were related to diabetes progression, and the perturbed metabolites represent potential metabolic biomarkers and provide clues that can elucidate the mechanisms underlying the generation and development of diabetes as well as its complication. PMID:23573250

  17. Glycemic Control in Youth with Diabetes: The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study

    PubMed Central

    Petitti, Diana B.; Klingensmith, Georgeanna J.; Bell, Ronny A.; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Dabelea, Dana; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Marcovina, Santica; Pihoker, Catherine; Standiford, Debra; Waitzfelder, Beth; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess correlates of glycemic control in a diverse population of children and youth with diabetes. Study design This was a cross-sectional analysis of data from a 6-center US study of diabetes in youth, including 3947 individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and 552 with type 2 diabetes (T2D), using hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels to assess glycemic control. Results HbA1c levels reflecting poor glycemic control (HbA1c ? 9.5%) were found in 17% of youth with T1D and in 27% of those with T2D. African-American, American Indian, Hispanic, and Asian/Pacific Islander youth with T1D were significantly more likely to have higher HbA1c levels compared with non-Hispanic white youth (with respective rates for poor glycemic control of 36%, 52%, 27%, and 26% vs 12%). Similarly poor control in these 4 racial/ethnic groups was found in youth with T2D. Longer duration of diabetes was significantly asso*ciated with poorer glycemic control in youth with T1D and T2D. Conclusions The high percentage of US youth with HbA1c levels above the target value and with poor glycemic control indicates an urgent need for effective treatment strategies to improve metabolic status in youth with diabetes. PMID:19643434

  18. Correlates of depression among people with diabetes: The Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) study

    PubMed Central

    Gerzoff, Robert B.; Karter, Andrew J.; Crystal, Stephen; Bair, Mathew J.; Ettner, Susan L.; Brown, Arleen F.; Subramanian, Usha; Lu, Shou-En; Marrero, David; Herman, William H.; Selby, Joseph V.; Dudley, R. Adams

    2014-01-01

    Aim The broad objective of this study was to examine multiple dimensions of depression in a large, diverse population of adults with diabetes. Specific aims were to measure the association of depression with: (1) patient characteristics; (2) outcomes; and (3) diabetes-related quality of care. Methods Cross-sectional analyses were performed using survey and chart data from the Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) study, including 8790 adults with diabetes, enrolled in 10 managed care health plans in 7 states. Depression was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-8). Patient characteristics, outcomes and quality of care were measured using validated survey items and chart data. Results Nearly 18% of patients had major depression, with prevalence 2-3 times higher among patients with low socioeconomic status. Pain and limited mobility were strongly associated with depression, controlling for other patient characteristics. Depression was associated with slightly worse glycemic control, but not other intermediate clinical outcomes. Depressed patients received slightly fewer recommended diabetes-related processes of care. Conclusions In a large, diverse cohort of patients with diabetes, depression was most prevalent among patients with low socioeconomic status and those with pain, and was associated with slightly worse glycemic control and quality of care. PMID:20832375

  19. Diabetes Drug Improves Gut Bacteria, Study Finds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and without type 2 diabetes who lived in China, Denmark and Sweden. The results showed that taking ... they -- irrespective of whether they were from Denmark, China or Sweden -- had fewer of the bacteria which ...

  20. Correlates of Dietary Intake in Youth with Diabetes: Results from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bortsov, Andrey; Liese, Angela D.; Bell, Ronny A.; Dabelea, Dana; D'Agostino, Ralph B., Jr.; Hamman, Richard F.; Klingensmith, Georgeanna J.; Lawrence, Jean M.; Maahs, David M.; McKeown, Robert; Marcovina, Santica M.; Thomas, Joan; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore demographic, socioeconomic, diabetes-related, and behavioral correlates of dietary intake of dairy, fruit, vegetables, sweetened soda, fiber, calcium, and saturated fat in youth with diabetes. Methods: Cross-sectional study of youth 10-22 years old with type 1 (T1DM, n = 2,176) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM, n = 365). Association…

  1. SERPINE 1 Links Obesity and Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Punit; Reis, Michael D.; Couchman, Glen R.; Forjuoh, Samuel N.; Greene, John F.; Asea, Alexzander

    2010-01-01

    In the past decade there has been a dramatic increase in the number of Americans considered obese. Over this same period, the number of individuals diagnosed with diabetes has increased by over 40%. Interestingly, in a great number of cases individuals considered obese develop diabetes later on. Although a link between obesity and diabetes has been suggested, conclusive scientific evidence is thus far just beginning to emerge. The present pilot study is designed to identify a possible link between obesity and diabetes. The plasma proteome is a desirable biological sample due to their accessibility and representative complexity due, in part, to the wide dynamic range of protein concentrations, which lead to the discovery of new protein markers. Here we present the results for the specific depletion of 14 high-abundant proteins from the plasma samples of obese and diabetic patients. Comparative proteomic profiling of plasma from individuals with either diabetes or obesity and individuals with both obesity and diabetes revealed SERPINE 1 as a possible candidate protein of interest, which might be a link between obesity and diabetes. PMID:21113241

  2. Prevalence of Diabetes in U.S. Youth in 2009: The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study

    PubMed Central

    Pettitt, David J.; Talton, Jennifer; Dabelea, Dana; Divers, Jasmin; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Lawrence, Jean M.; Liese, Angela D.; Linder, Barbara; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.; Pihoker, Catherine; Saydah, Sharon H.; Standiford, Debra A.; Hamman, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of diabetes in U.S. youth aged <20 years in 2009 and to estimate the total number of youth with diabetes in the U.S. by age, race/ethnicity, and diabetes type. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS To address one of its primary aims, the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study identified youth aged <20 years on 31 December 2009 with physician-diagnosed diabetes in selected areas of Colorado, Ohio, South Carolina, and Washington, among health plan members of Kaiser Permanente Southern California and among American Indians living on reservations in Arizona and New Mexico. Diabetes was classified as type 1, type 2, or other. Race/ethnicity was by self-report. RESULTS From a population of 3,458,974 youth aged <20 years, 7,695 youth with diabetes were identified (2.22/1,000): 6,668 with type 1 diabetes (1.93/1,000), 837 with type 2 diabetes (0.24/1,000), and 190 (0.05/1,000) with other diabetes types. Prevalence increased with age, was slightly higher in females than males, and was most prevalent in non-Hispanic White and least prevalent in Asian/Pacific Islanders, with Native American and black youth having the highest prevalence of type 2 diabetes. An estimated 191,986 U.S. youth aged <20 years have diabetes; 166,984 type 1 diabetes, 20,262 type 2 diabetes, and 4,740 other types. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes, one of the leading chronic diseases in childhood, affects >190,000 (1 of 433) youth aged <20 years in the U.S., with racial and ethnic disparities seen in diabetes prevalence, overall and by diabetes type. PMID:24041677

  3. Frequency, severity and risk indicators of retinopathy in patients with diabetes screened by fundus photographs: a study from primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Saleh; Ahsan, Shahid; Riaz, Qamar; Basit, Abdul; Ali Sheikh, Sikandar; Fawwad, Asher; Shera, A Samad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency, severity and risk indicators of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients with diabetes attending a primary care diabetes centre. Methods: This observational study was conducted at Diabetic Association of Pakistan - a World Health Organization collaborating center in Karachi, from March 2009 to December 2011. Registered patients with diabetes were screened by two field fundus photographs. Retina specialists graded the signs of retinopathy according to diabetic retinopathy disease severity scale. Results: Of total registered diabetic patients (n=11,158), 10,768 (96.5 %) were screened for DR. Overall DR was found in 2661 (24.7%) patients. DR was found in decreasing order of frequency in patients with type 2 (n= 2555, 23.7%) followed by patients with type 1 diabetes (n=101, 0.93% ) and patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (n=5, 0.46%). Among patients with DR, signs of non-sight threatening retinopathy was dominant. Females and patients of working age group predominantly had retinopathy. Type 1 patients >16 years and type 2 patients < 5 years of history of diabetes had sign of retinopathy in increased frequency. Conclusion: Every forth patient with diabetes in this large cohort had signs of diabetic retinopathy. Females and patients in working age group predominantly had retinopathy. Type 2 patients with short while type 1 patients with long history of diabetes most frequently had DR. Dissemination of the present study findings may help in increasing the awareness of this serious complication of diabetes. PMID:24772145

  4. New vessels detected on wide-field imaging compared to two-field and seven-field imaging: implications for diabetic retinopathy screening image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Talks, Stephen James; Manjunath, Vina; Steel, David H W; Peto, Tunde; Taylor, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Wide-field retinal imaging (Optomap), used for detecting diabetic retinopathy (DR), has been shown to compare well with seven-field early treatment diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS) photographs. An Optomap 200° image covers 80% of the retinal surface, compared with the standard seven-field, 30° images, covering 30% of the retinal surface. In England, DR screening is performed by grading two, 45° images per eye, by the DR screening service (DRSS). Purpose To assess how often retinal new vessels (NVs) are observed on Optomap imaging, outside the DRSS two fields and standard seven-field photography, in a cohort of patients referred by the DRSS. Method A consecutive series of treatment naïve patients with DR, referred from DRSS with pre-proliferative or proliferative DR or diabetic maculopathy, were imaged with Optomap colour images, within 3?months of DRSS referral. The incidence and distribution of NVs were recorded in relation to two-field and seven-field areas. Results NVs were found in 102 of 1562 treatment naïve eyes (6.5%) of 781 patients. Of these, 72 were referred from DRSS as having NVs, but an additional 30 eyes (29% of NVs detected) from 25 patients were referred with a lesser degree of DR. In 25 of the 30 eyes without NVs reported on referral, NVs were located outside the standard two fields taken at DRSS, and in 12, NVs were outside the area covered on seven-field imaging (11.7% of eyes with NVs). Conclusions Wide-field imaging with Optomap detected approximately 30% more NVs than standard two-field imaging in patients referred from a UK DRSS. PMID:26271269

  5. Evaluating diabetes health policies using natural experiments: the natural experiments for translation in diabetes study.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Ronald T; Kenrik Duru, O; Albu, Jeanine B; Schmittdiel, Julie A; Soumerai, Stephen B; Wharam, James F; Ali, Mohammed K; Mangione, Carol M; Gregg, Edward W

    2015-06-01

    The high prevalence and costs of type 2 diabetes makes it a rapidly evolving focus of policy action. Health systems, employers, community organizations, and public agencies have increasingly looked to translate the benefits of promising research interventions into innovative policies intended to prevent or control diabetes. Though guided by research, these health policies provide no guarantee of effectiveness and may have opportunity costs or unintended consequences. Natural experiments use pragmatic and available data sources to compare specific policies to other policy alternatives or predictions of what would likely have happened in the absence of any intervention. The Natural Experiments for Translation in Diabetes (NEXT-D) Study is a network of academic, community, industry, and policy partners, collaborating to advance the methods and practice of natural experimental research, with a shared aim of identifying and prioritizing the best policies to prevent and control diabetes. This manuscript describes the NEXT-D Study group's multi-sector natural experiments in areas of diabetes prevention or control as case examples to illustrate the selection, design, analysis, and challenges inherent to natural experimental study approaches to inform development or evaluation of health policies. PMID:25998925

  6. Diabetic Retinopathy in Pregnancy: A Population-Based Study of Women with Pregestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Aoife M.; McVicker, Lyle; Heerey, Adrienne; Carmody, Louise; Harney, Fiona; Dunne, Fidelma P.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this observational study was to evaluate screening and progression of diabetic retinopathy during pregnancy in women with pregestational diabetes attending five antenatal centres along the Irish Atlantic seaboard. An adequate frequency of screening was defined as at least two retinal evaluations in separate trimesters. Progression was defined as at least one stage of deterioration of diabetic retinopathy and/or development of diabetic macular edema on at least one eye. Women with pregestational diabetes who delivered after 22 gestational weeks (n = 307) were included. In total, 185 (60.3%) had an adequate number of retinal examinations. Attendance at prepregnancy care was associated with receiving adequate screening (odds ratio 6.23; CI 3.39–11.46 (P < 0.001)). Among those who received adequate evaluations (n = 185), 48 (25.9%) had retinopathy progression. Increasing booking systolic blood pressure (OR 1.03, CI 1.01–1.06, P = 0.02) and greater drop in HbA1c between first and third trimesters of pregnancy (OR 2.05, CI 1.09–3.87, P = 0.03) significantly increased the odds of progression. A significant proportion of women continue to demonstrate retinopathy progression during pregnancy. This study highlights the role of prepregnancy care and the importance of close monitoring during pregnancy and identifies those patients at the highest risk for retinopathy progression. PMID:25945354

  7. Incidence, morbidity, mortality, and prevalence of diabetes in Denmark, 2000–2011: results from the Diabetes Impact Study 2013

    PubMed Central

    Green, Anders; Sortsø, Camilla; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Emneus, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose As part of the Danish Diabetes Impact Study 2013, we present trends in the incidence, morbidity, mortality, and prevalence of diabetes in Denmark for the period 2000 through 2011. Patients and methods The Danish National Diabetes Register was established in 2006 and is assumed to cover all patients with diabetes, alive as of the end of 1996, and all subsequent new cases. The present study is based on the content of the register as of July 3, 2013 (n=497,232 patients). Using the personal identification code assigned to all Danish inhabitants, all available supplementary information from the Danish National Patient Register and the Danish Civil Registration Service was used to define the date of diagnosis of diabetes and the first date of experiencing complications (grouped according to impact and severity). Results During the period of 2000 to 2011, the incidence rate of diabetes increased approximately 5% annually. During the same period, decreasing trends were observed for both the rates of progression in complications and of the complication-specific mortality. During the same period, the prevalence of diabetes doubled. Conclusion The increasing prevalence of diabetes in Denmark is driven by increasing incidence combined with decreasing morbidity and mortality in the population of patients with diabetes. These mechanisms will be explored further as part of the Diabetes Impact Study 2013, together with investigations into the socioeconomic and health economic aspects of diabetes. PMID:26604822

  8. The epidemiology of diabetes complications study. IV. Correlates of diabetic background and proliferative retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kostraba, J N; Klein, R; Dorman, J S; Becker, D J; Drash, A L; Maser, R E; Orchard, T J

    1991-02-15

    The roles of potential risk factors for background and proliferative retinopathy were evaluated in cross-sectional analyses from the Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This report presents results from the 657 insulin-dependent diabetic participants seen at the baseline examination (1986-1988). The presence of and severity of retinopathy were judged from stereoscopic photographs of three views of the ocular fundus using the modified Airlie House classification system. Fifty-three percent of the participants had background retinopathy, and 31% had proliferative retinopathy. Logistic regression analyses showed that among participants aged less than 18 years, those with background retinopathy were older and had higher levels of glycosylated hemoglobin compared with those without retinopathy. In the 18-29-year age group, participants with background retinopathy had a longer duration of diabetes, higher low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, and lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and were more likely to have microalbuminuria compared with those without retinopathy. Participants aged 18-29 years with proliferative retinopathy had a longer duration of diabetes, higher diastolic blood pressure, and higher fibrinogen and LDL cholesterol levels than those with background retinopathy. In the age group greater than or equal to 30 years, diabetes duration, diastolic blood pressure, and fibrinogen, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were increased in participants with proliferative retinopathy versus those with background retinopathy. In a multivariate model of proliferative retinopathy, controlling for concurrent renal disease weakened the influence of blood pressure, fibrinogen, triglycerides, and LDL cholesterol and improved the overall fit of the model. These results suggest that diabetic nephropathy may contribute to the development of proliferative (but not background) retinopathy by increasing blood pressure and fibrinogen, by altering the lipoprotein profile, and possibly through other mechanisms. PMID:1994702

  9. Streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in rodents as a model for studying mitochondrial mechanisms of diabetic ? cell glucotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinzi; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia and the corresponding glucotoxicity are the main pathogenic mechanisms of diabetes and its complications. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic animal models are useful platforms for the understanding of ? cell glucotoxicity in diabetes. As diabetes induced by a single STZ injection is often referred to as type 1 diabetes that is caused by STZ’s partial destruction of pancreas, one question often being asked is whether the STZ type 1 diabetes animal model is a good model for studying the mitochondrial mechanisms of ? cell glucotoxicity. In this mini review, we provide evidence garnered from the literature that the STZ type 1 diabetes is indeed a suitable model for studying mitochondrial mechanisms of diabetic ? cell glucotoxicity. Evidence presented includes: 1) continued ? cell derangement is due to chronic hyperglycemia after STZ is completely eliminated out of the body; 2) STZ diabetes can be reversed by insulin treatment, which indicates that ? cell responds to treatment and shows ability to regenerate; and 3) STZ diabetes can be ameliorated or alleviated by administration of phytochemicals. In addition, mechanisms of STZ action and fundamental gaps in understanding mitochondrial mechanisms of ? cell dysfunction are also discussed. PMID:25897251

  10. Psychological stress associated with diabetes during pregnancy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lydon, K; Dunne, F P; Owens, L; Avalos, G; Sarma, K M; O'Connor, C; Nestor, L; McGuire, B E

    2012-05-01

    Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) affects approximately 12% of women. The impact of a diagnosis of GDM may lead to increased stress in pregnancy due to the demands of adherence to a treatment regimen and maternal concern about adverse outcomes for the mother and baby. We examined the psychosocial profile of 25 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and compared them to 25 non-diabetic pregnant women. Measures administered included the Pregnancy Experiences Scale (PES), the Depression, Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS), the Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale (PAID-5) and the Perceived Social Support Scale (PSSS). The GDM group reported a significantly greater ratio of pregnancy 'hassles' to pregnancy 'uplifts'. The GDM group also had a significantly higher Depression score and were twice as likely to score above the cut-off for possible depression. Elevated levels of diabetes-related distress were found in 40% of women with GDM. In addition, the GDM group reported less social support from outside the family. Our preliminary study indicates that the experience of GDM appears to be associated with increased psychological distress in comparison to the experience of non-diabetic pregnant women. This may indicate the need for psychological screening in GDM and the provision of psychological support in some cases. PMID:22838106

  11. Optomap ultrawide field imaging identifies additional retinal abnormalities in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Price, Liam D; Au, Stephanie; Chong, N Victor

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare diabetic retinopathy (DR) severity grading between Optomap ultrawide field scanning laser ophthalmoscope (UWFSLO) 200° images and an Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) seven-standard field view. Methods Optomap UWFSLO images (total: 266) were retrospectively selected for evidence of DR from a database of eye clinic attendees. The Optomap UWFSLO images were graded for DR severity by two masked assessors. An ETDRS seven-field mask was overlaid on the Optomap UWFSLO images, and the DR grade was assessed for the region inside the mask. Any interassessor discrepancies were adjudicated by a senior retinal specialist. Kappa agreement levels were used for statistical analysis. Results Fifty images (19%) (P<0.001) were assigned a higher DR level in the Optomap UWFSLO view compared to the ETDRS seven-field view, which resulted in 40 images (15%) (P<0.001) receiving a higher DR severity grade. DR severity grades in the ETDRS seven-field view compared with the Optomap UWFSLO view were identical in 85% (226) of the images and within one severity level in 100% (266) of the images. Agreement between the two views was substantial: unweighted ? was 0.74±0.04 (95% confidence interval: 0.67–0.81) and weighted ? was 0.80±0.03 (95% confidence interval: 0.74–0.86). Conclusion Compared to the ETDRS seven-field view, a significant minority of patients are diagnosed with more severe DR when using the Optomap UWFSLO view. The clinical significance of additional peripheral lesions requires evaluation in future prospective studies using large cohorts. PMID:25848202

  12. Pregnancy and Neonatal Diabetes Outcomes in Remote Australia (PANDORA) study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes in pregnancy carries an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes for both the mother and foetus, but it also provides an excellent early opportunity for intervention in the life course for both mother and baby. In the context of the escalating epidemic of chronic diseases among Indigenous Australians, it is vital that this risk is reduced as early as possible in the life course of the individual. The aims of the PANDORA Study are to: (i) accurately assess rates of diabetes in pregnancy in the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia, where 38% of babies are born to Indigenous mothers; (ii) assess demographic, clinical, biochemical, anthropometric, socioeconomic and early life development factors that may contribute to key maternal and neonatal birth outcomes associated with diabetes in pregnancy; and (iii) monitor relevant post-partum clinical outcomes for both the mothers and their babies. Methods/Design Eligible participants are all NT women with diabetes in pregnancy aged 16 years and over. Information collected includes: standard antenatal clinical information, diagnosis and management of diabetes in pregnancy, socio-economic status, standard clinical birth information (delivery, gestational age, birth weight, adverse antenatal and birth outcomes). Cord blood is collected at the time of delivery and detailed neonatal anthropometric measurements performed within 72 hours of birth. Information will also be collected regarding maternal post-partum glucose tolerance and cardio-metabolic risk factor status, breastfeeding and growth of the baby up to 2 years post-partum in the first instance. Discussion This study will accurately document rates and outcomes of diabetes in pregnancy in the NT of Australia, including the high-risk Indigenous Australian population. The results of this study should contribute to policy and clinical guidelines with the goal of reducing the future risk of obesity and diabetes in both mothers and their offspring. PMID:24289168

  13. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy and cardiovascular risk. Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study III.

    PubMed

    Maser, R E; Pfeifer, M A; Dorman, J S; Kuller, L H; Becker, D J; Orchard, T J

    1990-06-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) has been shown to confer a high risk of mortality. The association between DAN and cardiovascular risk factors was examined in a well-defined cohort of 25- to 34-year-old insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus subjects (n = 168) with and without DAN as evaluated by heart rate response to deep breathing, standing, and the Valsalva maneuver. The autonomic tests were performed using both an office-based procedure and a method employed by the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial with analyses performed by the Diabetes Research and Analysis Association, Lexington, Ky. Good agreement was found between the procedures for the assessment modalities of heart rate response to deep breathing. Modeling potential correlates in logistic analyses, where heart rate response to deep breathing was the dependent variable, revealed hypertension status, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and gender (female) to be independent determinants of DAN. These results suggest that traditional cardiovascular risk factors are important correlates of DAN and may relate to both its cause and poor prognosis. Since these results are from a cross-sectional study, prospective follow-up of this cohort will be needed for confirmation. PMID:2353855

  14. [Advance in studies on anti-diabetic mechanism of Gardeniae Fructus and its active ingredient geniposide].

    PubMed

    Yao, Dong-Dong; Shu, Luan; Yang, Lei; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2014-04-01

    The diabetes is mainly treated by the oral administration of western medicines at present. Despite their rapid curative effect, there have been still many reports for the western medicines about their clinical adverse reactions, failure of effective prevention and treatment of complications and drug resistance. Hence, they are not suitable for long-term administration. Traditional Chinese medicines have a long history in treating diabetes mellitus (DM) , which is commonly known as Xiaokezheng in the theory of traditional Chinese medicines. In recent years, many scholars have taken extracts from traditional Chinese medicines or separated active constituents as the study objects in the expectation of developing new-type drugs for treating and preventing diabetes. Therefore, a large number of study reports have been emerged in this field. Due to their significant glucose-reducing effect and specific effect in treating complications of diabetes, traditional Chinese medicine Gardeniae Fructus and its iridoid component geniposide shall be given full attention. This paper summarized the advance in studies on the curative effect and action mechanism of Gardeniae Fructus and geniposide in preventing and treating diabetes. PMID:25039166

  15. Genetic Studies on Diabetic Microvascular Complications: Focusing on Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Soo Heon

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a common metabolic disorder with a worldwide prevalence of 8.3% and is the leading cause of visual loss, end-stage renal disease and amputation. Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified genetic risk factors for diabetic microvascular complications of retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. We summarized the recent findings of GWASs on diabetic microvascular complications and highlighted the challenges and our opinion on future directives. Five GWASs were conducted on diabetic retinopathy, nine on nephropathy, and one on neuropathic pain. The majority of recent GWASs were underpowered and heterogeneous in terms of study design, inclusion criteria and phenotype definition. Therefore, few reached the genome-wide significance threshold and the findings were inconsistent across the studies. Recent GWASs provided novel information on genetic risk factors and the possible pathophysiology of diabetic microvascular complications. However, further collaborative efforts to standardize phenotype definition and increase sample size are necessary for successful genetic studies on diabetic microvascular complications. PMID:26194074

  16. Impairment of Colour Vision in Diabetes with No Retinopathy: Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study (SNDREAMS- II, Report 3)

    PubMed Central

    Gella, Laxmi; Raman, Rajiv; Kulothungan, Vaitheeswaran; Pal, Swakshyar Saumya; Ganesan, Suganeswari; Sharma, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess impairment of colour vision in type 2 diabetics with no diabetic retinopathy and elucidate associated risk factors in a population-based cross-sectional study. Methods This is part of Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular-genetics Study (SN-DREAMS II) which was conducted between 2007–2010. FM 100 hue-test was performed in 253 subjects with no clinical evidence of diabetic retinopathy. All subjects underwent detailed ophthalmic evaluation including cataract grading using LOCS III and 45° 4-field stereoscopic fundus photography. Various ocular and systemic risk factors for impairment of colour vision (ICV) were assessed in subjects with diabetes but no retinopathy. P value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The mean age of the study sample was 57.08 ± 9.21 (range: 44–86 years). Gender adjusted prevalence of ICV among subjects with diabetes with no retinopathy was 39.5% (CI: 33.5–45.5). The mean total error score in the study sample was 197.77 ± 100 (range: 19–583). The risk factors for ICV in the study were women OR: 1.79 (1.00–3.18), increased resting heart rate OR: 1.04 (1.01–1.07) and increased intraocular pressure OR: 1.12 (1.00–1.24). Significant protective factor was serum high-density lipoprotein OR: 0.96 (0.93–0.99). Conclusions Acquired ICV is an early indicator of neurodegenerative changes in the retina. ICV found in diabetic subjects without retinopathy may be of non-vascular etiology. PMID:26053017

  17. Diabetes Education Needs of Chinese Australians: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Tammie S. T.; Walker, Karen Z.; Ralston, Robin A.; Palermo, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate a type 2 diabetes education programme for Chinese Australians, based on the experience of participants and by exploring the unique needs of Chinese patients, their health beliefs and their cultural behaviours. Design and setting: A qualitative ethnographic study was undertaken in a community health…

  18. Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers through Systemic Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejo-Núñez, A. D.; Pérez-Chávez, F.; García-Sánchez, C.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Cañendo-Dorantes, L.

    2008-08-01

    This study was designed to, investigate the healing effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on diabetic foot ulcers and test two different exposure systems aimed at reducing the ELF-EMF exposure time of patients. In the first system the ELF-EMF were applied to the arm where only 3% of the total blood volume/min circulates at any given time. In the second system the ELF-EMF were applied to the thorax where more than 100% of the total blood volume/minute circulates at any given time. Twenty-six diabetic patients, with superficial neuropathic ulcers unresponsive to medical treatment were included in this preliminary report. In the first group (17 patients), the arm was exposed two hours twice a week to a extremely low frequency electromagnetic field of 0.45-0.9 mTrms, 120 Hz generated inside a solenoid coil of 10.1 cm by 20.5 cm long. In the second group the thorax of 7 patients was exposed 25 minutes twice a week to an electromagnetic field of 0.4-0.85 mTrms, 120 Hz generated in the center of a squared quasi-Helmholtz coil 52 cm by side. One patient was assigned to a placebo configuration of each exposure system with identical appearance as the active equipment but without magnetic field. Patients with deep ulcers, infected ulcers, cancer, or auto-immune disease were excluded. These preliminary results showed that the two exposure systems accelerate the healing process of neuropathic ulcers. Complete healing of the ulcer had a median duration of 90 days in both exposure systems. Therefore thorax exposure where more blood is exposed to ELF-EMF per unit of time was able to reduce 4.8 times the patient treatment time. In those patients assigned to the placebo equipment no healing effects were observed. This study will continue with a parallel, double blind placebo controlled protocol.

  19. Studying Cat (Felis catus) Diabetes: Beware of the Acromegalic Imposter

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, Stijn J. M.; Forcada, Yaiza; Mantis, Panagiotis; Lamb, Christopher R.; Harrington, Norelene; Fowkes, Rob; Korbonits, Márta; Smith, Ken; Church, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring diabetes mellitus (DM) is common in domestic cats (Felis catus). It has been proposed as a model for human Type 2 DM given many shared features. Small case studies demonstrate feline DM also occurs as a result of insulin resistance due to a somatotrophinoma. The current study estimates the prevalence of hypersomatotropism or acromegaly in the largest cohort of diabetic cats to date, evaluates clinical presentation and ease of recognition. Diabetic cats were screened for hypersomatotropism using serum total insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1; radioimmunoassay), followed by further evaluation of a subset of cases with suggestive IGF-1 (>1000 ng/ml) through pituitary imaging and/ or histopathology. Clinicians indicated pre-test suspicion for hypersomatotropism. In total 1221 diabetic cats were screened; 319 (26.1%) demonstrated a serum IGF-1>1000 ng/ml (95% confidence interval: 23.6–28.6%). Of these cats a subset of 63 (20%) underwent pituitary imaging and 56/63 (89%) had a pituitary tumour on computed tomography; an additional three on magnetic resonance imaging and one on necropsy. These data suggest a positive predictive value of serum IGF-1 for hypersomatotropism of 95% (95% confidence interval: 90–100%), thus suggesting the overall hypersomatotropism prevalence among UK diabetic cats to be 24.8% (95% confidence interval: 21.2–28.6%). Only 24% of clinicians indicated a strong pre-test suspicion; most hypersomatotropism cats did not display typical phenotypical acromegaly signs. The current data suggest hypersomatotropism screening should be considered when studying diabetic cats and opportunities exist for comparative acromegaly research, especially in light of the many detected communalities with the human disease. PMID:26023776

  20. Primary and Specialty Medical Care among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  1. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes.…

  2. Mendelian randomization studies of biomarkers and type 2 diabetes

    E-print Network

    Abbasi, Ali

    2015-10-07

    -wide association studies (GWAS) were used: 1) DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis (DIAGRAMv3) for T2D, and 2) the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC) for glycaemic traits. GWAS summary statistics were extracted...

  3. Does diabetic status in the ICU predict haemofiltration requirement? The haemofiltration in the ICU and diabetic status (HIDS) study.

    PubMed

    Williams, P D; Chan, S C

    2014-07-01

    Diabetes is already a major health burden and prevalence is expected to double by 2025. The impact of diabetes and clinical outcomes in the intensive care unit is an evolving area of research. This study seeks to identify whether diabetic status is an independent risk factor for haemofiltration. This is a retrospective cohort study. All unique patients from a seven-year period from 2004 to 2010 at a major intensive care unit in Melbourne, Australia were analysed using multivariate regression to look for an association between diabetic status and haemofiltration. After exclusion criteria there were 7262 patients, 1674 with a history of diabetes (median age of 69, 66.72% male) and 5588 without a history of diabetes (median age 64, 64.13% male). Diabetic status was an independent risk factor (odds ratio 1.401, 95% confidence interval 1.079 to 1.820, P=0.011) for haemofiltration. Further research may identify intensive care unit-based renoprotective measures specifically for patients with diabetes. PMID:24967758

  4. Association Between Diabetic Macular Edema and Cardiovascular Events in Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Multicenter Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Leveziel, Nicolas; Ragot, Stéphanie; Gand, Elise; Lichtwitz, Olivier; Halimi, Jean Michel; Gozlan, Julien; Gourdy, Pierre; Robert, Marie-Françoise; Dardari, Dured; Boissonnot, Michèle; Roussel, Ronan; Piguel, Xavier; Dupuy, Olivier; Torremocha, Florence; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Maréchaud, Richard; Hadjadj, Samy

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the main cause of visual loss associated with diabetes but any association between DME and cardiovascular events is unclear.This study aims to describe the possible association between DME and cardiovascular events in a multicenter cross-sectional study of patients with type 2 diabetes.Two thousand eight hundred seven patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from diabetes and nephrology clinical institutional centers participating in the DIAB 2 NEPHROGENE study focusing on diabetic complications. DME (presence/absence) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) classification were based on ophthalmological report and/or on 30° color retinal photographs. DR was defined as absent, nonproliferative (background, moderate, or severe) or proliferative. Cardiovascular events were stroke, myocardial infarction, and lower limb amputation.Details regarding associations between DME and cardiovascular events were evaluated.The study included 2807 patients with type 2 diabetes, of whom 355 (12.6%) had DME. DME was significantly and independently associated with patient age, known duration of diabetes, HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, and DR stage. Only the prior history of lower limb amputation was strongly associated with DME in univariate and multivariate analyses, whereas no association was found with regard to myocardial infarction or stroke. Moreover, both major (n?=?32) and minor lower limb (n?=?96) amputations were similarly associated with DME, with respective odds ratio of 3.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77-7.74; P?=?0.0012) and of 4.29 (95% CI, 2.79-6.61; P?diabetic patients. PMID:26287408

  5. Studies on the Cost of Diabetes Thomas J Songer, PhD, MSc

    E-print Network

    Songer, Thomas J.

    for health care services in diabetes, by study 30 4. Estimates of health care utilization with data sources, by study 31 5. Cost components included in estimates of direct health care costs for diabetes 35 6. Comparison of unit costs used by American Diabetes Association studies for hospital care and nursing home

  6. David Fields, PhD CMRI Chickasaw Nation Endowed Research Chair in Pediatric Diabetes

    E-print Network

    in childhood, adolescence and adulthood. His current NIH study ("Maternal Obesity, Breast Milk Composition factors (e.g. diet, physical activity, diabetes, obesity and mode of feeding) on the development

  7. Rationale and Design of the Vitamin D and Type 2 Diabetes (D2d) Study: A Diabetes Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pittas, Anastassios G.; Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Rosen, Clifford J.; Ware, James H.; Knowler, William C.; Staten, Myrlene A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Observational studies suggest that vitamin D may lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. However, data from long-term trials are lacking. The Vitamin D and Type 2 Diabetes (D2d) study is a randomized clinical trial designed to examine whether a causal relationship exists between vitamin D supplementation and the development of diabetes in people at high risk for type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS D2d was designed with support from a U34 planning grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The final protocol was approved by the D2d Research Group, the data and safety monitoring board, and NIDDK. Key eligibility criteria are age ?30 years, BMI of 24 (22.5 for Asian Americans) to 42 kg/m2, increased risk for diabetes (defined as meeting two of three glycemic criteria for prediabetes established by the American Diabetes Association [fasting glucose 100–125 mg/dL (5.5–6.9 mmol/L), 2-h postload glucose after 75-g glucose load 140–199 mg/dL (7.7–11.0 mmol/L), hemoglobin A1c 5.7–6.4% (39–46 mmol/mol)]), and no hyperparathyroidism, nephrolithiasis, or hypercalcemia. D2d participants are randomized to once-daily vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol 4,000 IU) or placebo and followed for an average of 3 years. The primary end point is time to incident diabetes as assessed by laboratory criteria during the study or by adjudication if diagnosed outside of D2d. Recruitment was initiated at the end of 2013. CONCLUSIONS D2d will test whether vitamin D supplementation is safe and effective at lowering the risk of progression to diabetes in people at high risk for type 2 diabetes. PMID:25205139

  8. Comparative and Mixture Effect of Cynodon Dactylon, ElectroMagnetic Field and Insulin on Diabetic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nafisi, Saeid; Nezhady, Mohammad Ali Mohammad; Asghari, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Objective: New investigations are in progress to find some alternative treatments for diabetes mellitus. Herbs are some of the interesting medications in this regard. Cynodon dactylon (C.d) is a potential plant to be considered as a new medication. On the other hand, the effect of the Electromagnetic Field (EMF) on bio organisms is becoming clearer. In this study, the effect of C.d, EMF and insulin have been investigated on the diabetic mouse. Material and Methods: Diabetes was induced by a combination of ketamine (60 mg/Kg) and xylazine (10 mg/Kg) which induces a sustained hyperglycemia. Mice were divided into 12 groups: 1) control, 2) normal saline, 3 and 4) 50mg/Kg C.d, 5 and 6) 100 mg/Kg C.d, 7) insulin, 8) insulin and C.d, 9) EMF (110 KHz, 700±20 mG), 10) insulin and EMF, 11) EMF plus C.d and 12) insulin plus C.d and EMF. Blood glucose level was measured after 5 and 60 minutes in C.d administrated groups, and 5 minutes in the other groups by a glucometer set. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and different means were compared by Tukey and Bonferroni tests (p<0.05). Results: According to results, both dosages of C.d had significant lowering effect on blood glucose level. The first dose was more effective than the second, and its impact was just like insulin. The 6th, 9th and 10th groups were significant, also. However, they did not show a higher effect than insulin or C.d. The application of EMF had a significant effect compared to the second group, but it did not reduce the glucose level to the normal range. The effect of the 8th group was very impressive and the mean glucose levels in this group were lower than the control group. Conclusion: Considering the data, C.d is a good alternative medication for diabetes mellitus. PMID:25207031

  9. Prospective Study of Social and Other Risk Factors for Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    Prospective Study of Social and Other Risk Factors for Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in the incidence of type 2 diabetes and the relation of health behaviors and psy- chosocial factors to the incidence of type 2 diabetes are not well established. Methods: Prospective occupational cohort study

  10. Finding Temporal Patterns in Noisy Longitudinal Data: A Study in Diabetic

    E-print Network

    Coenen, Frans

    Finding Temporal Patterns in Noisy Longitudinal Data: A Study in Diabetic Retinopathy Vassiliki is a large longitudinal patient database collected as part of a diabetic retinopathy screening programme. The diabetic retinopathy application, the data warehousing and cleaning process, and the frequent pattern

  11. Diabetes Care Policy Study, Kreulen, p. 1 MSU Michigan Applied Public Policy Research Grant

    E-print Network

    Riley, Shawn J.

    Diabetes Care Policy Study, Kreulen, p. 1 MSU Michigan Applied Public Policy Research Grant Project Report Executive Summary A Risk-Based Model of Diabetic Case Management: Improving the Quality of Primary Care for the Michigan Medicaid Diabetic Population Principal Investigator: Grace Kreulen, PhD, RN (MSU

  12. Morphological and functional outcomes following modified early treatment diabetic retinopathy study laser in diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Rajiv; Santhanam, Kiruthika; Gella, Laxmi; Pal, Bikramjit P.; Sharma, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to report morphological and functional outcomes following modified early treatment diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS) laser in diabetic macular edema (DME). Materials and Methods: Structural and functional changes using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) and microperimetry (MP) were studied before and 4 months after laser in 37 eyes with clinically significant macular edema (ME) requiring modified ETDRS laser treatment. Paired t-test was used to compare pre and postlaser outcomes P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Central foveal thickness showed a significant reduction after laser P = 0.004. There was a significant reduction in mean retinal thickness (MRT) and retinal volume in all the quadrants of ETDRS except for the temporal and nasal quadrants in outer 6 mm ring. Maximum reduction in MRT was seen in eyes with DME having neurosensory detachment (382.66 ? to 292.61 ?). Retinal sensitivities reduced in all quadrants following laser, however, fixation patterns showed improvements. The change in VA was positively correlated to change in MRT (r = 0.468, P = 0.032). Conclusion: Laser not only causes structural benefits such as reduction of retinal thickness and volume, it also causes improvement of fixation patterns.

  13. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Studies were performed enhanced oil recovery field pilot was performed in Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Studies were performed to determine a nutrient system to encourage growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria an inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient material were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor an additional production well in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicated the additional production well monitored during the field trial was also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels of tertiary oil was recovered. Microbial activity increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulphide concentration was experienced. These observations indicate that an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. The three production wells monitored in the pilot area demonstrated significant permeability reduction indicated by interwell pressure interference tests. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform (15 md maximum difference between post-treatment permeability values) indicating that preferential plugging had occurred.

  14. A method for the epidemiologic study of early diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rand, C. G.; Jackson, R. J. D.; Mackie, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    A diabetic survey was conducted among 4048 subjects well enough to report for work, using a questionnaire covering past, present, family and obstetric history, and a capillary blood glucose determination at least 1½ hours after eating. A “positive screen” was obtained in 267 individuals, in 67 on the basis of elevated blood glucose value alone, in 179 on the basis of questionnaire responses alone, and in 21 by both criteria. Glucose tolerance tests were performed on 130 subjects (49% of eligible individuals) and yielded diabetic curves in 18, 6 and 33% respectively for the three categories of positive screening tests. It is suggested that the magnitude of the group with positive history only is such that future natural history studies must take this subsample into consideration. PMID:4442014

  15. Diabetes in the workplace - diabetic’s perceptions and experiences of managing their disease at work: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes represents one of the biggest public health challenges facing the UK. It is also associated with increasing costs to the economy due to working days lost as people with diabetes have a sickness absence rate 2–3 times greater than the general population. Workplaces have the potential to support or hinder self- management of diabetes but little research has been undertaken to examine the relationship between work and diabetes in the UK. This paper seeks to go some way to addressing this gap by exploring the perceptions and experiences of employees with diabetes. Methods Forty three people with diabetes were purposively recruited to ascertain ways in which they managed their disease in the workplace. Semi-structured, interviews were undertaken, tape recorded and transcribed. Analysis was conducted using a constant comparative approach. Results Although respondents had informed managers of their diabetic status they felt that their managers had little concept of the effects of the work environment on their ability to manage their disease. They did not expect support from their managers and were concerned about being stigmatised or treated inappropriately. Work requirements took priority. They had to adapt their disease management to fit their job and reported running their blood glucose levels at higher than optimal levels, thereby putting themselves at higher risk of long term complications. Conclusions Little research has examined the way in which employees with diabetes manage their disease in the workplace. This research shows there is a need to increase the awareness of managers of the short and long term economic benefit of supporting employees with diabetes to manage their disease effectively whist at work. Employees may need individually assessed and tailored support on the job in order to manage their disease effectively. PMID:23617727

  16. Improvements in the life expectancy of type 1 diabetes: the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications study cohort.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachel G; Secrest, Aaron M; Sharma, Ravi K; Songer, Thomas J; Orchard, Trevor J

    2012-11-01

    Survival in type 1 diabetes has improved, but the impact on life expectancy in the U.S. type 1 diabetes population is not well established. Our objective was to estimate the life expectancy of the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications (EDC) study cohort and quantify improvements by comparing two subcohorts based on year of diabetes diagnosis (1950-1964 [n = 390] vs. 1965-1980 [n = 543]). The EDC study is a prospective cohort study of 933 participants with childhood-onset (aged <17 years) type 1 diabetes diagnosed at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh from 1950 to 1980. Mortality ascertainment was censored 31 December 2009. Abridged cohort life tables were constructed to calculate life expectancy. Death occurred in 237 (60.8%) of the 1950-1964 subcohort compared with 88 (16.2%) of the 1965-1980 subcohort. The life expectancy at birth for those diagnosed 1965-1980 was ~15 years greater than participants diagnosed 1950-1964 (68.8 [95% CI 64.7-72.8] vs. 53.4 [50.8-56.0] years, respectively) (P < 0.0001); this difference persisted regardless of sex or pubertal status at diagnosis. This improvement in life expectancy emphasizes the need for insurance companies to update analysis of the life expectancy of those with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes because weighting of insurance premiums is based on outdated estimates. PMID:22851572

  17. Biomarker discovery study design for type 1 diabetes in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Seung; Burkhardt, Brant R.; McLeod, Wendy; Smith, Susan; Eberhard, Chris; Lynch, Kristian; Hadley, David; Rewers, Marian; Simell, Olli; She, Jin-Xiong; Hagopian, Bill; Lernmark, Ake; Akolkar, Beena; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Krischer, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) planned biomarker discovery studies on longitudinal samples for persistent confirmed islet cell autoantibodies and type 1 diabetes (T1D) using dietary biomarkers, metabolomics, microbiome/viral metagenomics and gene expression. Methods: This paper describes the details of planning the TEDDY biomarker discovery studies using a nested case-control design that was chosen as an alternative to the full cohort analysis. In the frame of a nested case-control design, it guides the choice of matching factors, selection of controls, preparation of external quality control samples, and reduction of batch effects along with proper sample allocation. Results and Conclusion: Our design is to reduce potential bias and retain study power while reduce the costs by limiting the numbers of samples requiring laboratory analyses. It also covers two primary end points (the occurrence of diabetes-related autoantibodies and the diagnosis of T1D). The resulting list of case-control matched samples for each laboratory was augmented with external quality control (QC) samples. PMID:24339168

  18. Phenotyping animal models of diabetic neuropathy: a consensus statement of the diabetic neuropathy study group of the EASD (Neurodiab).

    PubMed

    Biessels, G J; Bril, V; Calcutt, N A; Cameron, N E; Cotter, M A; Dobrowsky, R; Feldman, E L; Fernyhough, P; Jakobsen, J; Malik, R A; Mizisin, A P; Oates, P J; Obrosova, I G; Pop-Busui, R; Russell, J W; Sima, A A; Stevens, M J; Schmidt, R E; Tesfaye, S; Veves, A; Vinik, A I; Wright, D E; Yagihashi, S; Yorek, M A; Ziegler, D; Zochodne, D W

    2014-06-01

    NIDDK, JDRF, and the Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of EASD sponsored a meeting to explore the current status of animal models of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The goal of the workshop was to develop a set of consensus criteria for the phenotyping of rodent models of diabetic neuropathy. The discussion was divided into five areas: (1) status of commonly used rodent models of diabetes, (2) nerve structure, (3) electrophysiological assessments of nerve function, (4) behavioral assessments of nerve function, and (5) the role of biomarkers in disease phenotyping. Participants discussed the current understanding of each area, gold standards (if applicable) for assessments of function, improvements of existing techniques, and utility of known and exploratory biomarkers. The research opportunities in each area were outlined, providing a possible roadmap for future studies. The meeting concluded with a discussion on the merits and limitations of a unified approach to phenotyping rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and a consensus formed on the definition of the minimum criteria required for establishing the presence of the disease. A neuropathy phenotype in rodents was defined as the presence of statistically different values between diabetic and control animals in 2 of 3 assessments (nocifensive behavior, nerve conduction velocities, or nerve structure). The participants propose that this framework would allow different research groups to compare and share data, with an emphasis on data targeted toward the therapeutic efficacy of drug interventions. PMID:24934510

  19. Phenotyping animal models of diabetic neuropathy: a consensus statement of the diabetic neuropathy study group of the EASD (Neurodiab)

    PubMed Central

    Biessels, G.J.; Bril, V.; Calcutt, N.A.; Cameron, N.E.; Cotter, M.A.; Dobrowsky, R.; Feldman, E.L.; Fernyhough, P.; Jakobsen, J.; Malik, R.A.; Mizisin, A.P.; Oates, P.J.; Obrosova, I.G.; Pop-Busui, R.; Russell, J.W.; Sima, A.A.; Stevens, M.J.; Schmidt, R.E.; Tesfaye, S.; Veves, A.; Vinik, A.I.; Wright, D.E.; Yagihashi, S.; Yorek, M.A.; Ziegler, D.; Zochodne, D.W.

    2015-01-01

    NIDDK, JDRF, and the Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of EASD sponsored a meeting to explore the current status of animal models of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The goal of the workshop was to develop a set of consensus criteria for the phenotyping of rodent models of diabetic neuropathy. The discussion was divided into five areas: (1) status of commonly used rodent models of diabetes, (2) nerve structure, (3) electrophysiological assessments of nerve function, (4) behavioral assessments of nerve function, and (5) the role of biomarkers in disease phenotyping. Participants discussed the current understanding of each area, gold standards (if applicable) for assessments of function, improvements of existing techniques, and utility of known and exploratory biomarkers. The research opportunities in each area were outlined, providing a possible roadmap for future studies. The meeting concluded with a discussion on the merits and limitations of a unified approach to phenotyping rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and a consensus formed on the definition of the minimum criteria required for establishing the presence of the disease. A neuropathy phenotype in rodents was defined as the presence of statistically different values between diabetic and control animals in 2 of 3 assessments (nocifensive behavior, nerve conduction velocities, or nerve structure). The participants propose that this framework would allow different research groups to compare and share data, with an emphasis on data targeted toward the therapeutic efficacy of drug interventions. PMID:24934510

  20. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  1. Pediatric diabetes consortium type 1 diabetes new onset (NeOn) study: Factors associated with HbA1c levels one year after diagnosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To identify determinants of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels 1 yr after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in participants in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) T1D New Onset (NeOn) Study. Diabetes-specific as well as socioeconomic factors during the first year following diagnosis were analyze...

  2. A Qualitative Study of Acculturation and Diabetes Risk among Urban, Immigrant Latinas: Implications for Diabetes Prevention Efforts

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Matthew J.; Shuman, Sara J.; Barrios, Dulce M.; Alos, Victor A.; Whitaker, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand how acculturation influences diabetes risk among urban, immigrant Latinas (Hispanic women). Methods Five focus groups were conducted with 26 urban, immigrant Latinas who were at high clinical risk for developing diabetes. The focus group sessions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The authors independently analyzed transcripts using an inductive method of open coding, and themes were established by consensus among authors. Results All of the participants were foreign-born and had low levels of acculturation. During the acculturation process, they noted changes in their lifestyle behaviors and the family context in which those behaviors are shaped. They reported that since living in the U.S., their improved economic circumstances led to increased consumption of less healthy foods and beverages and a more sedentary lifestyle. They also described changing family roles and responsibilities, including working outside the home, which constrained healthy food choices. However, they perceived that their position of influence within the family offered opportunities to help family members prevent diabetes. Conclusions Lifestyle interventions to prevent diabetes in Latinas should address their acculturation experiences, which impact family functioning and health behaviors related to diabetes risk. For example, given the perceived link between Latinas’ improved economic circumstances and their diabetes risk, prevention programs should incorporate strategies to help Latinas avoid adopting less healthy lifestyle behaviors that become affordable during the acculturation process. PMID:24872386

  3. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  4. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  5. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  6. Study design of DIACORE (DIAbetes COhoRtE) – a cohort study of patients with diabetes mellitus type 2

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) is highly associated with increased risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD), end stage renal disease (ESRD) and cardiovascular morbidity. Epidemiological and genetic studies generate hypotheses for innovative strategies in DM2 management by unravelling novel mechanisms of diabetes complications, which is essential for future intervention trials. We have thus initiated the DIAbetes COhoRtE study (DIACORE). Methods DIACORE is a prospective cohort study aiming to recruit 6000 patients of self-reported Caucasian ethnicity with prevalent DM2 for at least 10 years of follow-up. Study visits are performed in University-based recruiting clinics in Germany using standard operating procedures. All prevalent DM2 patients in outpatient clinics surrounding the recruiting centers are invited to participate. At baseline and at each 2-year follow-up examination, patients are subjected to a core phenotyping protocol. This includes a standardized online questionnaire and physical examination to determine incident micro- and macrovascular DM2 complications, malignancy and hospitalization, with a primary focus on renal events. Confirmatory outcome information is requested from patient records. Blood samples are obtained for a centrally analyzed standard laboratory panel and for biobanking of aliquots of serum, plasma, urine, mRNA and DNA for future scientific use. A subset of the cohort is subjected to extended phenotyping, e.g. sleep apnea screening, skin autofluorescence measurement, non-mydriatic retinal photography and non-invasive determination of arterial stiffness. Discussion DIACORE will enable the prospective evaluation of factors involved in DM2 complication pathogenesis using high-throughput technologies in biosamples and genetic epidemiological studies. PMID:23409726

  7. A pilot study of motivational interviewing in adolescents with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Channon, S; Smith, V; Gregory, J

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To obtain preliminary data on the impact of motivational interviewing, a counselling approach to behaviour change, on glycaemic control, wellbeing, and self-care of adolescents with diabetes. Methods: Twenty two patients aged 14–18 years participated in motivational interviewing sessions during a six month intervention. The effects of the intervention on HbA1c and a range of psychological factors were assessed. Results: Mean HbA1c decreased from 10.8% to 9.7% during the study and remained significantly lower after the end of the study. Fear of hypoglycaemia was reduced and diabetes was perceived as easier to live with. There were no other significant changes in the psychological measures. By contrast no reduction in HbA1c values was observed in a comparison group who did not receive the motivational interviewing intervention. Conclusion: The findings of this pilot study indicate that motivational interviewing may be a useful intervention in helping adolescents improve their glycaemic control. A larger, longer term randomised controlled study is indicated to clarify the mechanisms and extent of these benefits. PMID:12876161

  8. Diabetic patients' willingness to use tele-technology to manage their disease – A descriptive study.

    PubMed Central

    Saddik, Basema; Al-Dulaijan, Norah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Diabetes mellitus is a public health concern worldwide. TeleHealth technology may be an effective tool for empowering patients in the self-management of diabetes mellitus. However despite the great impact of diabetes on healthcare in Saudi Arabia, no research has investigated diabetic patients' willingness to use this technology. This study investigates diabetic patients' willingness to use tele-technology as a tool to monitor their disease. Methods: Data were collected from diabetic patients attending the diabetes education clinic at the Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs (MNGHA) in the Eastern region of Saudi Arabia over a three month period. A survey was developed which measured patients' willingness to use tele-technology in the self-management of their diabetes as well as their perceived expectations from the technology. Results: The study found that the majority of patients were willing to use tele-technology to self- monitor their diabetes. However, a minority (11.3%) indicated willingness to use the system daily and only half indicated preference to use it once a week (53.8%). Patients who were younger, had higher education levels, were employed, had internet access and had Type II diabetes were significantly more likely to report willingness to use the technology. Conclusions: Diabetic patients could be ready to play a more active role in their care if given the opportunity. Results from this study could serve as a baseline for future studies to develop targeted interventions by trialing tele-technology on a sample of the diabetic population. Patients with diabetes need to be in charge of their own care in order to improve health outcomes across the country. PMID:26284148

  9. Underuse of an invasive strategy for patients with diabetes with acute coronary syndrome: a nationwide study

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Ida; Hvelplund, Anders; Hansen, Kim Wadt; Galatius, Søren; Madsen, Mette; Jensen, Jan Skov; Tilsted, Hans-Henrik; Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Jørgensen, Erik; Madsen, Jan Kyst; Abildstrøm, Steen Zabell

    2015-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend an early invasive strategy for patients with diabetes with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We investigated if patients with diabetes with ACS are offered coronary angiography (CAG) and revascularisation to the same extent as patients without diabetes. Methods and results The study is a nationwide cohort study linking Danish national registries containing information on healthcare. The study population comprises all patients hospitalised with first-time ACS in Denmark during 2005–2007 (N=24?952). Diabetes was defined as claiming of a prescription for insulin and/or oral hypoglycaemic agents within 6?months prior to the ACS event. Diabetes was present in 2813 (11%) patients. Compared with patients without diabetes, patients with diabetes were older (mean 69 vs 67?years, p<0.0001), less often males (60% vs 64%, p=0.0001) and had more comorbidity. Fewer patients with diabetes underwent CAG: cumulative incidence 64% vs 74% for patients without diabetes, HR=0.72 (95% CI 0.69 to 0.76, p<0.0001); adjusted for age, sex, previous revascularisation and comorbidity HR=0.78 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.82, p<0.0001). More patients with diabetes had CAG showing two-vessel or three-vessel disease (53% vs 38%, p<0.0001). However, revascularisation after CAG revealing multivessel disease was less likely in patients with diabetes (multivariable adjusted HR=0.76, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.85, p<0.0001). Conclusions In this nationwide cohort of patients with incident ACS, patients with diabetes were found to be less aggressively managed by an invasive treatment strategy. The factors underlying the decision to defer an invasive strategy in patients with diabetes are unclear and merit further investigation. PMID:25685362

  10. Mendelian randomization studies of biomarkers and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Many biomarkers are associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in epidemiological observations. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize current evidence for causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. A systematic literature search in PubMed and EMBASE (until April 2015) was done to identify Mendelian randomization studies that examined potential causal effects of biomarkers on T2D. To replicate the findings of identified studies, data from two large-scale, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were used: DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis (DIAGRAMv3) for T2D and the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC) for glycaemic traits. GWAS summary statistics were extracted for the same genetic variants (or proxy variants), which were used in the original Mendelian randomization studies. Of the 21 biomarkers (from 28 studies), ten have been reported to be causally associated with T2D in Mendelian randomization. Most biomarkers were investigated in a single cohort study or population. Of the ten biomarkers that were identified, nominally significant associations with T2D or glycaemic traits were reached for those genetic variants related to bilirubin, pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, delta-6 desaturase and dimethylglycine based on the summary data from DIAGRAMv3 or MAGIC. Several Mendelian randomization studies investigated the nature of associations of biomarkers with T2D. However, there were only a few biomarkers that may have causal effects on T2D. Further research is needed to broadly evaluate the causal effects of multiple biomarkers on T2D and glycaemic traits using data from large-scale cohorts or GWAS including many different genetic variants. PMID:26446360

  11. Clinical study on erectile dysfunction in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects and its management with Ficus relegiosa Linn.

    PubMed Central

    Virani, Nilesh V.; Chandola, H. M.; Vyas, S. N.; Jadeja, D. B.

    2010-01-01

    Healthy sexual functioning plays an essential role in maintaining the harmony and happiness in marital life. It provides a media to express love, which is the base for all sorts of creative activities. The absence of this function hampers the marital relationship, leading to frustration and, sometimes, ending in divorce, and causes inadequacy in performing the routine duties. In this study, 53 patients having diabetes mellitus were surveyed to find out the incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED). Considering the high prevalence of the disease and the need to look for alternative medicine, a clinical trial on 44 patients of ED was carried out. These patients were divided into two main groups: diabetic and non-diabetic, and were further divided into two subgroups as trial group and placebo group. In the trial group, Ashvattha Kshirpaka prepared with 10 g powder of its root bark, stem bark, fruit and tender leaf buds was given twice a day. In both the diabetic and the non-diabetic subjects, Ashvattha provided encouraging results on ED as well as on seminal parameters in comparison to the placebo. PMID:22131726

  12. Is social support universally adaptive in diabetes? A correlational study in an Arabic-speaking population with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sukkarieh-Haraty, Ola; Howard, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between diabetes self-care, diabetes-specific emotional distress, and social support and glycemic control (hemoglobin A1C levels: HbA1c) among a sample of Lebanese adults with type 2 diabetes. A descriptive correlational design was adapted with descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regressions for analyses. A convenience sample of 140 adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes was recruited from 2 diabetes clinics in Greater Beirut. Participants were asked to complete 4 questionnaires in Arabic. Significant associations (P < .05) were found between following a general diet for more than 3.5 days per week and higher social support and HbA1c levels of 7% or more. Social support was positively associated with HbA1c levels such that participants with uncontrolled glycemic levels, as evidenced by higher values for HbA1c, received more support from their social network. PMID:25470479

  13. Educational Disparities in Rates of Smoking Among Diabetic Adults: The Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Karter, Andrew J.; Stevens, Mark R.; Gregg, Edward W.; Brown, Arleen F.; Tseng, Chien-Wen; Marrero, David G.; Duru, O. Kenrik; Gary, Tiffany L.; Piette, John D.; Waitzfelder, Beth; Herman, William H.; Beckles, Gloria L.; Safford, Monika M.; Ettner, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed educational disparities in smoking rates among adults with diabetes in managed care settings. Methods. We used a cross-sectional, survey-based (2002–2003) observational study among 6538 diabetic patients older than 25 years across multiple managed care health plans and states. For smoking at each level of self-reported educational attainment, predicted probabilities were estimated by means of hierarchical logistic regression models with random intercepts for health plan, adjusted for potential confounders. Results. Overall, 15% the participants reported current smoking. An educational gradient in smoking was observed that varied significantly (P<.003) across age groups, with the educational gradient being strong in those aged 25 to 44 years, modest in those aged 45 to 64 years, and nonexistent in those aged 65 years or older. Of particular note, the prevalence of smoking observed in adults aged 25–44 years with less than a high school education was 50% (95% confidence interval: 36% to 63%). Conclusions. Approximately half of poorly educated young adults with diabetes smoke, magnifying the health risk associated with early-onset diabetes. Targeted public health interventions for smoking prevention and cessation among young, poorly educated people with diabetes are needed. PMID:17600269

  14. A genome-wide association study for diabetic nephropathy genes in African Americans.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Caitrin W; Palmer, Nicholette D; Hicks, Pamela J; Roh, Bong H; An, S Sandy; Cooke, Jessica N; Hester, Jessica M; Wing, Maria R; Bostrom, Meredith A; Rudock, Megan E; Lewis, Joshua P; Talbert, Matthew E; Blevins, Rebecca A; Lu, Lingyi; Ng, Maggie C Y; Sale, Michele M; Divers, Jasmin; Langefeld, Carl D; Freedman, Barry I; Bowden, Donald W

    2011-03-01

    A genome-wide association study was performed using the Affymetrix 6.0 chip to identify genes associated with diabetic nephropathy in African Americans. Association analysis was performed adjusting for admixture in 965 type 2 diabetic African American patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and in 1029 African Americans without type 2 diabetes or kidney disease as controls. The top 724 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with evidence of association to diabetic nephropathy were then genotyped in a replication sample of an additional 709 type 2 diabetes-ESRD patients and 690 controls. SNPs with evidence of association in both the original and replication studies were tested in additional African American cohorts consisting of 1246 patients with type 2 diabetes without kidney disease and 1216 with non-diabetic ESRD to differentiate candidate loci for type 2 diabetes-ESRD, type 2 diabetes, and/or all-cause ESRD. Twenty-five SNPs were significantly associated with type 2 diabetes-ESRD in the genome-wide association and initial replication. Although genome-wide significance with type 2 diabetes was not found for any of these 25 SNPs, several genes, including RPS12, LIMK2, and SFI1 are strong candidates for diabetic nephropathy. A combined analysis of all 2890 patients with ESRD showed significant association SNPs in LIMK2 and SFI1 suggesting that they also contribute to all-cause ESRD. Thus, our results suggest that multiple loci underlie susceptibility to kidney disease in African Americans with type 2 diabetes and some may also contribute to all-cause ESRD. PMID:21150874

  15. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Diabetes and Diabetic Retinopathy in Liaoning Province, China: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuedong; Teng, Weiping; Liu, Limin; Chen, Kang; Liu, Lei; Hua, Rui; Chen, Jun; Zhou, Yun; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in northeast area of China with a population-based study. Methods A population of 3173 (aged from 20 to 80 years old) was stratified by geographical location and age in Liaoning province, China. Prediabetes and diabetes were diagnosed according to the guideline of American Diabetes Association. Retinal photographs were obtained by using digital non-mydriatic camera for the presence and grading of DR according to the modified ETDRS Airlie house classification. Blood samples and comprehensive questionnaires were obtained for evaluation of laboratory results and risk factors. Results The prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes was 20.7% and 10.4%, respectively. Among diabetes patients, DR prevalence was 11.9%. Age, obesity, total cholesterol, triglycerides, hypertension, living in rural areas and diabetes family history are all risk factors for prediabetes and diabetes. Waist-to-hip circumference rate served as a better obesity index to estimate diabetes risk compared with body mass index and waist circumference. Among all risk factors that we investigated, only the length of diabetes history was associated with the incidence of DR. However, DR prevalence in the newly discovered patients in rural areas was significantly higher than that in urban areas. Conclusion According to this study, 1 in 10 people has diabetes, 2 in 10 people have prediabetes, and 1 in 10 diabetics has DR in Liaoning province. In rural areas, diabetes was poorly recognized with limited medical resources, which probably resulted in more diabetes patient at a high risk of DR. PMID:25785633

  16. Detection of retinal lesions in diabetic retinopathy: comparative evaluation of 7-field digital color photography versus red-free photography.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Pradeep; Sharma, Reetika; Vashist, Nagender; Vohra, Rajpal; Garg, Satpal

    2015-10-01

    Red-free light allows better detection of vascular lesions as this wavelength is absorbed by hemoglobin; however, the current gold standard for the detection and grading of diabetic retinopathy remains 7-field color fundus photography. The goal of this study was to compare the ability of 7-field fundus photography using red-free light to detect retinopathy lesions with corresponding images captured using standard 7-field color photography. Non-stereoscopic standard 7-field 30° digital color fundus photography and 7-field 30° digital red-free fundus photography were performed in 200 eyes of 103 patients with various grades of diabetic retinopathy ranging from mild to moderate non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy to proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The color images (n = 1,400) were studied with corresponding red-free images (n = 1,400) by one retina consultant (PV) and two senior residents training in retina. The various retinal lesions [microaneurysms, hemorrhages, hard exudates, soft exudates, intra-retinal microvascular anomalies (IRMA), neovascularization of the retina elsewhere (NVE), and neovascularization of the disc (NVD)] detected by all three observers in each of the photographs were noted followed by determination of agreement scores using ? values (range 0-1). Kappa coefficient was categorized as poor (?0), slight (0.01-0.20), fair (0.2 -0.40), moderate (0.41-0.60), substantial (0.61-0.80), and almost perfect (0.81-1). The number of lesions detected by red-free images alone was higher for all observers and all abnormalities except hard exudates. Detection of IRMA was especially higher for all observers with red-free images. Between image pairs, there was substantial agreement for detection of hard exudates (average ? = 0.62, range 0.60-0.65) and moderate agreement for detection of hemorrhages (average ? = 0.52, range 0.45-0.58), soft exudates (average ? = 0.51, range 0.42-0.61), NVE (average ? = 0.47, range 0.39-0.53), and NVD (average ? = 0.51, range 0.45-0.54). Fair agreement was noted for detection of microaneurysms (average ? = 0.29, range 0.20-0.39) and IRMA (average ? = 0.23, range 0.23-0.24). Inter-observer agreement with color images was substantial for hemorrhages (average ? = 0.72), soft exudates (average ? = 0.65), and NVD (average ? = 0.65); moderate for microaneurysms (average ? = 0.42), NVE (average ? = 0.44), and hard exudates (average ? = 0.59) and fair for IRMA (average ? = 0.21). Inter-observer agreement with red-free images was substantial for hard exudates (average ? = 0.63) and moderate for detection of hemorrhages (average ? = 0.56), SE (average ? = 0.60), IRMA (average ? = 0.50), NVE (average ? = 0.44), and NVD (average ? = 0.45). Digital red-free photography has a higher level of detection ability for all retinal lesions of diabetic retinopathy. More advanced grades of retinopathy are likely to be detected earlier with red-free imaging because of its better ability to detect IRMA, NVE, and NVD. Red-free monochromatic imaging of the retina is a more effective and less costly alternative for detection of vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy. PMID:22961609

  17. A Pilot Study of School Counselor's Preparedness to Serve Students with Diabetes: Relationship to Self-Reported Diabetes Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Julie; James, Amy

    2006-01-01

    This cross-sectional, observational pilot study investigated the knowledge, attitudes, and awareness of 132 school counselors regarding students with diabetes. Respondents were primarily white, female, with a masters degree, aged 42 years, and with 10 years of school counseling experience. Most counselors worked at large, public, suburban, and…

  18. Diabetes Control among Vietnamese Patients in Ho Chi Minh City: An Observational Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yokokawa, Hirohide; Khue, Nguyen Thy; Goto, Aya; Nam, Tran Quang; Trung, Tran The; Khoa, Vo Tuan; Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Boi; Minh, Pham Nghiem; Vinh, Nguyen Quang; Okayama, Akira; Yasumura, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the extent of diabetic control and its associated factors among Vietnamese patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). The study was conducted among 652 outpatients who were recruited at a public general hospital (People Hospital 115) and a private clinic (Medic Center) in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Median age…

  19. Incident Diabetes and Pesticide Exposure among Licensed Pesticide Applicators: Agricultural Health Study 1993 – 2003

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, M. P.; Kame, F.; Saldana, T. M.; Alavanja, M. C. R.; Sandler, D. P.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to certain environmental toxicants may be associated with increased risk of developing diabetes. Our aim was to investigate the relationship between lifetime exposure to specific agricultural pesticides and diabetes incidence among pesticide applicators. The study included 33,457 licensed applicators, predominantly non-Hispanic white males, enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study. Incident diabetes was self-reported in a 5-year follow-up interview (1999–2003), giving 1,176 diabetics and 30,611 non-diabetics for analysis. Lifetime exposure to pesticides and covariate information was reported by participants at enrollment (1993–1997). Using logistic regression, we considered two primary measures of pesticide exposure: ever use and cumulative lifetime days of use. We found seven specific pesticides (aldrin, chlordane, heptachlor, dichlorvos, trichlorfon, alachlor, and cyanazine) for which the odds of diabetes incidence increased with both ever use and cumulative days of use. Applicators who had used the organochlorine insecticides aldrin, chlordane, and heptachlor more than 100 lifetime days had 51%, 63%, and 94% increased odds of diabetes, respectively. The observed association of organochlorine and organophosphate insecticides with diabetes is consistent with previous human and animal studies. Long-term exposure from handling certain pesticides, in particular organochlorine and organophosphate insecticides, may be associated with increased risk of diabetes. PMID:18343878

  20. Serum adipokine concentrations in dogs with diabetes mellitus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Hye-Sun; Kang, Ji-Houn; Yang, Mhan-Pyo

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether serum adipokine concentrations differed between healthy dogs and dogs with diabetes mellitus (DM). To accomplish this, 19 dogs with newly diagnosed DM were compared to 20 otherwise healthy dogs. The serum concentrations of visfatin, leptin, IL-1?, IL-6, IL-18, and TNF-? were significantly higher in diabetic dogs than in healthy dogs, whereas the serum adiponectin concentrations were lower in diabetic dogs. However, there were no significant differences in the IL-10 and resistin levels between groups. The serum leptin concentrations in diabetic dogs with and without concurrent disorders differed significantly. Treatment with insulin induced a significant decrease in IL-6 in diabetic dogs without concurrent disorders. These results show that the clinical diabetic state of dogs could modulate the circulating visfatin and adiponectin concentrations directly, while upregulation of leptin was probably a result of concurrent disorders rather than an effect of persistent hyperglycemia as a result of DM. PMID:25643799

  1. Serum adipokine concentrations in dogs with diabetes mellitus: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Hye-Sun; Yang, Mhan-Pyo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether serum adipokine concentrations differed between healthy dogs and dogs with diabetes mellitus (DM). To accomplish this, 19 dogs with newly diagnosed DM were compared to 20 otherwise healthy dogs. The serum concentrations of visfatin, leptin, IL-1?, IL-6, IL-18, and TNF-? were significantly higher in diabetic dogs than in healthy dogs, whereas the serum adiponectin concentrations were lower in diabetic dogs. However, there were no significant differences in the IL-10 and resistin levels between groups. The serum leptin concentrations in diabetic dogs with and without concurrent disorders differed significantly. Treatment with insulin induced a significant decrease in IL-6 in diabetic dogs without concurrent disorders. These results show that the clinical diabetic state of dogs could modulate the circulating visfatin and adiponectin concentrations directly, while upregulation of leptin was probably a result of concurrent disorders rather than an effect of persistent hyperglycemia as a result of DM. PMID:25643799

  2. Electromagnetic Field Penetration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    A numerical method is presented to determine electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of rectangular enclosure with apertures on its wall used for input and output connections, control panels, visual-access windows, ventilation panels, etc. Expressing EM fields in terms of cavity Green's function inside the enclosure and the free space Green's function outside the enclosure, integral equations with aperture tangential electric fields as unknown variables are obtained by enforcing the continuity of tangential electric and magnetic fields across the apertures. Using the Method of Moments, the integral equations are solved for unknown aperture fields. From these aperture fields, the EM field inside a rectangular enclosure due to external electromagnetic sources are determined. Numerical results on electric field shielding of a rectangular cavity with a thin rectangular slot obtained using the present method are compared with the results obtained using simple transmission line technique for code validation. The present technique is applied to determine field penetration inside a Boeing-757 by approximating its passenger cabin as a rectangular cavity filled with a homogeneous medium and its passenger windows by rectangular apertures. Preliminary results for, two windows, one on each side of fuselage were considered. Numerical results for Boeing-757 at frequencies 26 MHz, 171-175 MHz, and 428-432 MHz are presented.

  3. "This does my head in". Ethnographic study of self-management by people with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-management is rarely studied 'in the wild'. We sought to produce a richer understanding of how people live with diabetes and why self-management is challenging for some. Method Ethnographic study supplemented with background documents on social context. We studied a socio-economically and ethnically diverse UK population. We sampled 30 people with diabetes (15 type 1, 15 type 2) by snowballing from patient groups, community contacts and NHS clinics. Participants (aged 5-88, from a range of ethnic and socio-economic groups) were shadowed at home and in the community for 2-4 periods of several hours (total 88 visits, 230 hours); interviewed (sometimes with a family member or carer) about their self-management efforts and support needs; and taken out for a meal. Detailed field notes were made and annotated. Data analysis was informed by structuration theory, which assumes that individuals' actions and choices depend on their dispositions and capabilities, which in turn are shaped and constrained (though not entirely determined) by wider social structures. Results Self-management comprised both practical and cognitive tasks (e.g. self-monitoring, menu planning, medication adjustment) and socio-emotional ones (e.g. coping with illness, managing relatives' input, negotiating access to services or resources). Self-management was hard work, and was enabled or constrained by economic, material and socio-cultural conditions within the family, workplace and community. Some people managed their diabetes skilfully and flexibly, drawing on personal capabilities, family and social networks and the healthcare system. For others, capacity to self-manage (including overcoming economic and socio-cultural constraints) was limited by co-morbidity, cognitive ability, psychological factors (e.g. under-confidence, denial) and social capital. The consequences of self-management efforts strongly influenced people's capacity and motivation to continue them. Conclusion Self-management of diabetes is physically, intellectually, emotionally and socially demanding. Non-engagement with self-management may make sense in the context of low personal resources (e.g. health literacy, resilience) and overwhelming personal, family and social circumstances. Success of self-management as a policy solution will be affected by interacting influences at three levels: [a] at micro level by individuals' dispositions and capabilities; [b] at meso level by roles, relationships and material conditions within the family and in the workplace, school and healthcare organisation; and [c] at macro level by prevailing economic conditions, cultural norms and expectations, and the underpinning logic of the healthcare system. We propose that the research agenda on living with diabetes be extended and the political economy of self-management systematically studied. PMID:22458767

  4. Assessment of Diabetic Retinopathy Using Nonmydriatic Ultra-Widefield Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (Optomap) Compared With ETDRS 7-Field Stereo Photography

    PubMed Central

    Kernt, Marcus; Hadi, Indrawati; Pinter, Florian; Seidensticker, Florian; Hirneiss, Christoph; Haritoglou, Christos; Kampik, Anselm; Ulbig, Michael W.; Neubauer, Aljoscha S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the diagnostic properties of a nonmydriatic 200° ultra-widefield scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) versus mydriatic Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) 7-field photography for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A consecutive series of 212 eyes of 141 patients with different levels of DR were examined. Grading of DR and clinically significant macular edema (CSME) from mydriatic ETDRS 7-field stereo photography was compared with grading obtained by Optomap Panoramic 200 SLO images. All SLO scans were performed through an undilated pupil, and no additional clinical information was used for evaluation of all images by the two independent, masked, expert graders. RESULTS Twenty-two eyes from ETDRS 7-field photography and 12 eyes from Optomap were not gradable by at least one grader because of poor image quality. A total of 144 eyes were analyzed regarding DR level and 155 eyes regarding CSME. For ETDRS 7-field photography, 22 eyes (18 for grader 2) had no or mild DR (ETDRS levels ? 20) and 117 eyes (111 for grader 2) had no CSME. A highly substantial agreement between both Optomap DR and CSME grading and ETDRS 7-field photography existed with ? = 0.79 for DR and 0.73 for CSME for grader 1, and ? = 0.77 (DR) and 0.77 (CSME) for grader 2. CONCLUSIONS Determination of CSME and grading of DR level from Optomap Panoramic 200 nonmydriatic images show a positive correlation with mydriatic ETDRS 7-field stereo photography. Both techniques are of sufficient quality to assess DR and CSME. Optomap Panoramic 200 images cover a larger retinal area and therefore may offer additional diagnostic properties. PMID:22912430

  5. Immigrant Generation and Diabetes Risk Among Mexican Americans: The Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging

    PubMed Central

    Afable-Munsuz, Aimee; Mayeda, Elizabeth Rose; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Haan, Mary N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined whether acculturation and immigrant generation, a marker for assimilation, are associated with diabetes risk in an aging Mexican-origin population. Methods We analyzed data on 1789 adults aged 60 to 101 years from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging. We ascertained type 2 diabetes on the basis of diabetic medication use, self-report of physician diagnosis, or a fasting glucose 126 milligrams/deciliter or greater. Logistic regression modeled prevalent diabetes. Results Adjusting for age and gender, we observed significant but divergent associations between immigrant generation, acculturation, and diabetes risk. Relative to first-generation adults, second-generation adults had an odds ratio OR) of 1.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4, 2.4) and third-generation adults had an OR of 2.1 (95% CI = 1.4, 3.1) of having diabetes. Greater US acculturation, however, was associated with a slightly decreased diabetes rate. In the full model adjusting for socioeconomic and lifestyle factors, the association between generation (but not acculturation) and diabetes remained significant. Conclusions Our study lends support to the previously contested notion that assimilation is associated with an increased diabetes risk in Mexican immigrants. Researchers should examine the presence of a causal link between assimilation and health more closely. PMID:24899459

  6. Immigrant Generation and Diabetes Risk Among Mexican Americans: The Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging

    PubMed Central

    Mayeda, Elizabeth Rose; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Haan, Mary N.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether acculturation and immigrant generation, a marker for assimilation, are associated with diabetes risk in an aging Mexican-origin population. Methods. We analyzed data on 1789 adults aged 60 to 101 years from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging. We ascertained type 2 diabetes on the basis of diabetic medication use, self-report of physician diagnosis, or a fasting glucose of 126 milligrams/deciliter or greater. Logistic regression modeled prevalent diabetes. Results. Adjusting for age and gender, we observed significant but divergent associations between immigrant generation, acculturation, and diabetes risk. Relative to first-generation adults, second-generation adults had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]?=?1.4, 2.4) and third-generation adults had an OR of 2.1 (95% CI?=?1.4, 3.1) of having diabetes. Greater US acculturation, however, was associated with a slightly decreased diabetes rate. In the full model adjusting for socioeconomic and lifestyle factors, the association between generation (but not acculturation) and diabetes remained significant. Conclusions. Our study lends support to the previously contested notion that assimilation is associated with an increased diabetes risk in Mexican immigrants. Researchers should examine the presence of a causal link between assimilation and health more closely. PMID:23488481

  7. Immigrant Generation and Diabetes Risk Among Mexican Americans: The Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging

    PubMed Central

    Afable-Munsuz, Aimee; Mayeda, Elizabeth Rose; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Haan, Mary N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We examined whether acculturation and immigrant generation, a marker for assimilation, are associated with diabetes risk in an aging Mexican-origin population. Methods We analyzed data on 1789 adults aged 60 to 101 years from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging. We ascertained type 2 diabetes on the basis of diabetic medication use, self-report of physician diagnosis, or a fasting glucose of 126 milligrams/deciliter or greater. Logistic regression modeled prevalent diabetes. Results Adjusting for age and gender, we observed significant but divergent associations between immigrant generation, acculturation, and diabetes risk. Relative to first-generation adults, second-generation adults had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4, 2.4) and third-generation adults had an OR of 2.1 (95% CI = 1.4, 3.1) of having diabetes. Greater US acculturation, however, was associated with a slightly decreased diabetes rate. In the full model adjusting for socioeconomic and lifestyle factors, the association between generation (but not acculturation) and diabetes remained significant. Conclusions Our study lends support to the previously contested notion that assimilation is associated with an increased diabetes risk in Mexican immigrants. Researchers should examine the presence of a causal link between assimilation and health more closely. PMID:24096980

  8. Diabetic Nephropathy without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Revuelta, Katia; Méndez Abreu, Angel A.; Gerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Stanescu, Ramona-Ionela; Martínez Marín, Maria Isabel; Pérez Fernández, Elia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy without diabetes (DNND), previously known as idiopathic nodular glomerulosclerosis, is an uncommon entity and thus rarely suspected; diagnosis is histological once diabetes is discarded. In this study we describe two new cases of DNND and review the literature. We analyzed all the individualized data of previous publications except one series of attached data. DNND appears to be favored by recognized cardiovascular risk factors. However, in contrast with diabetes, apparently no factor alone has been demonstrated to be sufficient to develop DNND. Other factors not considered as genetic and environmental factors could play a role or interact. The most plausible hypothesis for the occurrence of DNND would be a special form of atherosclerotic or metabolic glomerulopathy than can occur with or without diabetes. The clinical spectrum of cardiovascular risk factors and histological findings support this theory, with hypertension as one of the characteristic clinical features. PMID:26239683

  9. 49 CFR 391.64 - Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... false Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. 391.64 Section 391...391.64 Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. (a) The...

  10. 49 CFR 391.64 - Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... false Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. 391.64 Section 391...391.64 Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. (a) The...

  11. 49 CFR 391.64 - Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... false Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. 391.64 Section 391...391.64 Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. (a) The...

  12. 49 CFR 391.64 - Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... false Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. 391.64 Section 391...391.64 Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. (a) The...

  13. 49 CFR 391.64 - Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... false Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. 391.64 Section 391...391.64 Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. (a) The...

  14. Baja California: Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, John; Stewart, Jack

    1974-01-01

    Describes how to plan and execute an extended field trip which provides first hand observation of biological and cultural systems. Socialization of the participants was achieved through common planning and goal achievement. (BR)

  15. Vertebral hyperostosis and diabetes mellitus: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Daragon, A; Mejjad, O; Czernichow, P; Louvel, J P; Vittecoq, O; Durr, A; Le Loët, X

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare glucose metabolism in patients with vertebral hyperostosis (VH), with that in control patients. METHODS--We studied 50 patients aged 60 years or more who had VH according to Resnick's criteria, and 50 control patients without VH, matched for sex, age, weight and height. Plasma glucose was evaluated before and 120 minutes after ingestion of 75 g glucose. World Health Organisation criteria for diabetes mellitus (DM) were used. Radiographs of the pelvis and thoracic and lumbar spine were performed and read blind by two physicians. RESULTS--Statistical analysis showed no difference between cases and control patients for prevalence of DM, and plasma glucose at 0 and 120 minutes. CONCLUSION--These data suggest that glucoregulation in patients with VH does not differ from that in matched controls. PMID:7794043

  16. The Factors Associated With Disease Mismanagement in Young Patients with Type 1 Diabetes: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Selda; Kelleci, Meral; Satman, Ilhan

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this qualitative study on young adults with type 1 diabetes was to determine the factors associated with mismanagement of diabetes. Methods In this qualitative study, a descriptive phenomenological and psychological method was followed. Purposeful sampling method was used in this study. 28 young adults aged 18-25 with type 1 diabetes (16 females, 12 males) with HbA1c levels >6.5% were interviewed in-depth. Each interview lasted 40-45 minutes. The recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim, examined line-by-line and coded using open coding techniques and managed by QSR NVivo 7. During the research period, Guba ve Lincolln criteria were used to ensure the accuracy and precision of the study findings. Results The study identified seven themes which affect the diabetes management of the patients. These themes were negative emotions about the disease, difficulties arising from living condition, difficulties arising from the treatment treatment process, lack of social support, not solution oriented coping methods, concerns about the future and issues of developing knowledge and attitude regarding diabetes management. Conclusion There are multiple factors affecting the management of diabetes in young adults with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes has a biopsychosocial impact on young adults’ lives, developing a negative attitude toward their future and that of their family. PMID:26005688

  17. A Resilience Intervention in African American Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study of Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Steinhardt, Mary A.; Mamerow, Madonna M.; Brown, Sharon A.; Jolly, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of offering our Diabetes Coaching Program (DCP), adapted for African Americans, in a sample of African American adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods The study utilized a one-group, pretest-posttest design to test the acceptance and potential effectiveness of the DCP. Subjects were a convenience sample of 16 African Americans (8 females; 8 males) with type 2 diabetes; twelve subjects (6 females; 6 males) completed the program. The DCP included four weekly class sessions devoted to resilience education and diabetes self-management, followed by eight biweekly support group meetings. Psychosocial process variables (resilience, coping strategies, diabetes empowerment), and proximal (perceived stress, depressive symptoms, diabetes self-management) and distal outcomes (BMI, fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, lipidemia, blood pressure) were assessed at baseline and six-months post study entry. Qualitative data were collected at eight-months via a focus group conducted to examine the acceptability of the DCP. Results Preliminary paired t-tests indicated statistically significant improvements in diabetes empowerment, diabetes self-management, BMI, HbA1c, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Medium to large effect sizes were reported. Resilience, perceived stress, fasting blood glucose, and HDL-cholesterol improved, but changes were not statistically significant. Focus group data confirmed that participants held positive opinions regarding the DCP and follow-up support group sessions, although they suggested an increase in program length from 4 to 8 weeks. Conclusions The pilot study documented the feasibility and potential effectiveness of the DCP to enhance diabetes empowerment, diabetes self-management, and reductions in the progression of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and CVD in the African American community. Randomized experimental designs are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:19204102

  18. Challenges of diabetes prevention in the real world: results and lessons from the Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, James A; Hernan, Andrea L; Janus, Edward D; Vartiainen, Erkki; Laatikainen, Tiina; Versace, Vincent L; Reynolds, John; Best, James D; Skinner, Timothy C; O'Reilly, Sharleen L; Mc Namara, Kevin P; Stewart, Elizabeth; Coates, Michael; Bennett, Catherine M; Carter, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess effectiveness and implementability of the public health programme Life! Taking action on diabetes in Australian people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Research design and methods Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study (MDPS) was a unique study assessing effectiveness of Life! that used a randomized controlled trial design. Intervention participants with AUSDRISK score ?15 received 1 individual and 5 structured 90?min group sessions. Controls received usual care. Outcome measures were obtained for all participants at baseline and 12?months and, additionally, for intervention participants at 3?months. Per protocol set (PPS) and intention to treat (ITT) analyses were performed. Results PPS analyses were considered more informative from our study. In PPS analyses, intervention participants significantly improved in weight (?1.13?kg, p=0.016), waist circumference (?1.35?cm, p=0.044), systolic (?5.2?mm?Hg, p=0.028) and diastolic blood pressure (?3.2?mm?Hg, p=0.030) compared with controls. Based on observed weight change, estimated risk of developing diabetes reduced by 9.6% in the intervention and increased by 3.3% in control participants. Absolute 5-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk reduced significantly for intervention participants by 0.97 percentage points from 9.35% (10.4% relative risk reduction). In control participants, the risk increased by 0.11 percentage points (1.3% relative risk increase). The net effect for the change in CVD risk was ?1.08 percentage points of absolute risk (p=0.013). Conclusions MDPS effectively reduced the risk of diabetes and CVD, but the intervention effect on weight and waist reduction was modest due to the challenges in recruiting high-risk individuals and the abbreviated intervention. PMID:26464804

  19. Awareness, Treatment, and Control of Diabetes in Bangladesh: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Shafiur; Akter, Shamima; Abe, Sarah Krull; Islam, Md. Rafiqul; Mondal, Md. Nazrul Islam; Rahman, J. A. M. Shoquilur; Rahman, Md. Mizanur

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine awareness, treatment, and control of diabetes mellitus among the adult population in Bangladesh. Methods The study used data from the 2011 nationally representative Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS). The BDHS sample is comprised of 7,786 adults aged 35 years or older. The primary outcome variables were fasting blood glucose, diagnosis, treatment, and control of diabetes. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to identify the risk factors for diabetes awareness. Results Overall, age-standardized prevalence of diabetes was 9.2%. Among subjects with diabetes, 41.2% were aware of their condition, 36.9% were treated, and 14.2% controlled their condition. A significant inequality in diabetes management was found from poor to wealthy households: 18.2% to 63.2% (awareness), 15.8% to 56.6% (treatment), and 8.2% to 18.4% (control). Multilevel models suggested that participants who had a lower education and lower economic condition were less likely to be aware of their diabetes. Poor management was observed among non-educated, low-income groups, and those who lived in the northwestern region. Conclusions Diabetes has become a national health concern in Bangladesh; however, treatment and control are quite low. Improving detection, awareness, and treatment strategies is urgently needed to prevent the growing burden associated with diabetes. PMID:25692767

  20. Linkage study of embryopathy-polygenic inheritance of diabetes-induced skeletal malformations in the rat.

    PubMed

    Nordquist, Niklas; Luthman, Holger; Pettersson, Ulf; Eriksson, Ulf J

    2012-06-01

    We developed an inbred rat model of diabetic embryopathy, in which the offspring displays skeletal malformations (agnathia or micrognathia) when the mother is diabetic, and no malformations when she is not diabetic. Our aim was to find genes controlling the embryonic maldevelopment in a diabetic environment. We contrasted the fetal outcome in inbred Sprague-Dawley L rats (20% skeletal malformations in diabetic pregnancy) with that of inbred Wistar Furth rats (denotedW, no skeletal malformations in diabetic pregnancy). We used offspring from the backcross F(1)×L to probe for the genetic basis for malformation of the mandible in diabetic pregnancy. A set of 186 fetuses (93 affected, 93 unaffected) was subjected to a whole genome scan with 160 micro satellites. Analysis of genotype distribution indicated 7 loci on chromosome 4, 10 (3 loci), 14, 18, and 19 in the teratogenic process (and 14 other loci on 12 chromosomes with less strong association to the malformations), several of which contained genes implicated in other experimental studies of diabetic embryopathy. These candidate genes will be scrutinized in further experimentation. We conclude that the genetic involvement in rodent diabetic embryopathy is polygenic and predisposing for congenital malformations. PMID:22227068

  1. Diabetes Burden in Urban and Rural Senegalese Populations: A Cross-Sectional Study in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Seck, S. M.; Dia, D. G.; Doupa, D.; Diop-Dia, A.; Thiam, I.; Ndong, M.; Gueye, L.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes represents a challenging global health issue in the 21st century. Data from sub-Saharan African populations are scarce and are usually restricted to urban settings. The objective of this study was to compare prevalence and risk factors of diabetes in rural and urban areas in Senegal. Methods. In a community-based survey between January and May 2012, we included 1027 adults aged ?18 years living in northern Senegal. Sociodemographic, clinical, and biological data were collected during household visits. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with diabetes. Results. Mean age of participants was 48.0 ± 16.9 years and 65.7% were female. Participants from urban area represented 55.7%. The age-standardized prevalence of diabetes was 7.6% (6.0% in men versus 9.0% in women). Prevalence of diabetes was higher in urban areas (8.1%) compared to rural areas (4.6%). Disease awareness rate was 43%. After multivariate analysis, age (OR = 1.63, p = 0.001), familial history of diabetes (OR = 1.42, p = 0.001), and abdominal obesity (OR = 1.17, p = 0.05) were associated with diabetes. Conclusion. Diabetes is frequent in urban and rural areas in Senegal. Awareness rate is very low among populations. Age, family history of diabetes, and abdominal obesity are the main risk factors identified. PMID:26491437

  2. Work, Diabetes and Obesity: A Seven Year Follow-Up Study among Danish Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Kjeld; Cleal, Bryan; Clausen, Thomas; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The rise in prevalence of diabetes is alarming and research ascribes most of the increase to lifestyle. However, little knowledge exists about the influence of occupational factors on the risk for developing diabetes. This study estimates the importance of work and lifestyle as risk factors for developing diabetes mellitus among healthcare workers and explores the association of work factors and obesity, which is a risk factor for diabetes. Methods Questionnaire-based prospective cohort study among 7,305 health care workers followed for seven years in the Danish National Diabetes Register. We used bivariate comparisons to give an unadjusted estimate of associations, followed by adjusted survival analysis and logistic regression models to estimate the influences of potential risk factors related to job, health and lifestyle on diabetes and obesity. Results During seven years of follow up, 3.5% of participants developed diabetes, associated with obesity (HR ?=? 6.53; 95% CI 4.68–9.10), overweight (HR ?=? 2.89; CI 2.11–3.96) age 50–69 y (HR ?=? 2.27; 95% CI 1.57–3.43) and high quality of leadership (HR ?=? 1.60; CI 1.19–2.16). Obesity at baseline was most common among the youngest employees, and was mainly associated with developing diabetes (OR ?=? 3.84; CI 2.85–5.17), impaired physical capacity and physical inactivity. In the occupational setting, obesity was associated with shift work, severe musculoskeletal pain, low influence, but also by good management, fewer role conflicts and a positive work-life balance. Looking only at non-smokers, removed the influence of age and pain. However, non-smokers also had higher depression scores and more role conflicts. Conclusions Confirming obesity as the strongest risk factor for developing diabetes, the present study identified few occupational risk factors. However, obesity, the key risk factor for diabetes, had a more variable relation with work than did diabetes. PMID:25068830

  3. Diabetes in midlife and cognitive change over 20 years: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Neurocognitive Study

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Andreea M.; Sharrett, A. Richey; Schneider, Andrea L.C.; Coresh, Josef; Albert, Marilyn; Couper, David; Griswold, Michael; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Windham, B. Gwen; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with dementia risk, however evidence is limited for possible associations of diabetes and pre-diabetes with cognitive decline. Objective To determine if diabetes in mid-life is associated with 20-year cognitive decline, and to characterize long-term cognitive decline across clinical categories of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Design Prospective cohort. Setting The community-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Participants 13351 black and white adults aged 48-67 years at baseline (1990-1992). Measurements Diabetes was defined by self-report of physician diagnosis or medication use or HbA1c?6.5%. Undiagnosed diabetes, pre-diabetes, and glucose control in persons with diagnosed diabetes were defined using clinical categories of HbA1c. Delayed Word Recall, Digit Symbol Substitution, and Word Fluency tests were used to assess cognitive performance, and were summarized using a global Z-score. Results Diabetes in midlife was associated with significantly greater cognitive decline over 20 years (adjusted global Z-score difference=-0.15, 95% CI:-0.22,-0.08), representing a 19% greater decline than those without diabetes. Cognitive decline was significantly greater among persons with pre-diabetes (HbA1c 5.7-6.4%) than those without diabetes and HbA1c<5.7%. Participants with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c?7.0%) had a larger decline compared to persons whose diabetes was controlled (adjusted global Z-score difference=-0.16,p-value=0.071). Longer duration of diabetes was also associated with greater late-life cognitive decline (p-value-for-trend=<0.001). No significant differences in the rates of declines were seen in whites compared to blacks (p-value-for-interaction=0.4357). Limitations Single measurement of HbA1c at baseline, only one test to per cognitive domain, potential geographic confounding of race comparisons. Conclusions These findings suggest that diabetes prevention and glucose control in midlife may protect against late-life cognitive decline. PMID:25437406

  4. Prescription Pattern of Chinese Herbal Products for Diabetes Mellitus in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chung-Yu; Lai, Jung-Nien; Hsu, Feng-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), when given as a therapy for symptom relief, has gained widespread popularity among diabetic patients. The aim of this study is to analyze the utilization of TCM among type 2 diabetic patients in Taiwan. Methods. The use of TCM for type 2 diabetic patients were evaluated using a randomly sampled cohort of 1,000,000 beneficiaries recruited from the National Health Insurance Research Database. Results. Overall, 77.9% (n = 31,289) of type 2 diabetic patients utilized TCM and 13.9% (n = 4,351) of them used TCM for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Among the top ten most frequently prescribed herbal formulae, four remedies, Zhi-Bo-Di-Huang-Wan, Qi-Ju-Di-Huang-Wan, Ji-Sheng-Shen-Qi-Wan and Ba-Wei-Di-Huang-Wan are derivative formulae of Liu-Wei-Di-Huang-Wan. In other words, Liu-Wei-Di-Huang-Wan and its derivatives were found to be the most common herbal formulae prescribed by TCM doctors for the treatment of diabetes in Taiwan. Conclusion. Although some evidence does support the use TCM to treat diabetes, the results from the current study may have been confounded by placebo effect, which emphasize the need for well conducted, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies in order to further evaluate the efficacy of Liu-Wei-Di-Huang-Wan on patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23843864

  5. Study on The Effect of Royal Jelly on Reproductive Parameters in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Elham; Nejati, Vahid; Najafi, Gholamreza; Khazaei, Mozafar; Babaei, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus has a variety of structural and functional effects on the male reproductive system. Diabetes results in reduced sperm parameters and libido. The present study aims to investigate the effects of royal jelly (RJ) on reproductive parameters of testosterone and malondialdehyde (MDA) production in diabetic rats. Materials and Methods This experimental study was conducted on adult male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into four groups (n=8 per group): control, RJ, diabetic and diabetic treated with RJ. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg body weight (BW) of streptozotocin (STZ). RJ, at a dose of 100 mg/kg BW was given by gavage. The duration of treatment was six weeks. After the treatment period the rats were sacrificed. The testes were weighed and changes in sperm count, motility, viability, deformity, DNA integrity and chromatin quality were analyzed. Serum testosterone and MDA concentrations of testicular tissue were determined. Data were analyzed by oneway ANOVA with p<0.05 as the significant level. Results STZ-induced diabetes decreased numerous reproductive parameters in rats. Testicular weight, sperm count, motility, viability and serum testosterone levels increased in the diabetic group treated with RJ. There was a significant decrease observed in sperm deformity, DNA integrity, chromatin quality, and tissue MDA levels in diabetic rats treated with RJ compared to the diabetic group (p<0.05). Conclusion RJ improved reproductive parameters such as testicular weight, sperm count, viability, motility, deformity, DNA integrity, chromatin quality, serum testosterone and testicular tissue MDA levels in diabetic rats. PMID:25918599

  6. Implementation of Ramadan-specific diabetes management recommendations: a multi-centered prospective study from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To observe the outcome of implementation of Ramadan-specific diabetes management recommendations in fasting individuals with diabetes through health care providers. Methods This multi-centered prospective study was conducted at nine diabetes specialist centers in four provinces of Pakistan. The study was carried out in two phases; pre-Ramadan recruitment interview (visit A) and post-Ramadan follow up interview (visit B) of the same patients. Pre-Ramadan individual counseling was given and educational material provided to each patient by health care providers during visit A. Results Out of 388 patients with diabetes, blood glucose level was checked by all patients with type 1 and 71.43% patients with type 2 diabetes when they developed hypoglycemic symptoms during Ramadan. Of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, 33.33% and 48% discontinued their fast when they felt hypoglycemic symptoms, respectively. None of the patient with type 1, while 18.87% patients with type 2 diabetes discontinued fast on the development of hyperglycemic symptoms. Drug dosage and timing were altered in 80% patients with type 1 and 90.5% patients with type 2 diabetes during Ramadan. Majority of the patients with type 2 diabetes changed from moderate/severe levels of physical activity before Ramadan to light physical activity during Ramadan (p<0.000). None of the patients required hospitalization when they developed symptomatic hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia and none developed diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state during Ramadan. Conclusion We observed that it is practicable to implement Ramadan-specific diabetes management recommendations through health care providers. PMID:24559109

  7. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Identifying Risk Factors for Racial Disparities in Diabetes Outcomes: the Translating Research into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) Study

    PubMed Central

    Duru, O. Kenrik; Gerzoff, Robert B.; Selby, Joseph V.; Brown, Arleen F.; Ackermann, Ronald T.; Karter, Andrew J.; Ross, Sonja; Steers, W. Neil; Herman, William H.; Waitzfelder, Beth; Mangione, Carol M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Versus whites, blacks with diabetes have poorer control of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), and higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol as well as higher rates of morbidity and microvascular complications. Objective To examine whether several mutable risk factors were more strongly associated with poor control of multiple intermediate outcomes among blacks with diabetes than among similar whites. Design Case-control study. Subjects A total of 764 blacks and whites with diabetes receiving care within 8 managed care health plans. Measures Cases were patients with poor control of at least two of three intermediate outcomes (HbA1c?8.0%, SBP?140 mmHg, LDL cholesterol?130 mg/dl) and controls were patients with good control of all three (HbA1c<8.0%, SBP<140 mmHg, LDL cholesterol<130 mg/dl). In multivariate analyses, we determined whether each of five potentially mutable risk factors, including depression, low health literacy, poor adherence to medication, low self-efficacy for reducing cardiovascular risk, and poor patient-provider communication, predicted case or control status. Results Among blacks but not whites, in multivariate analyses depression (odds ratio [OR] 2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-4.75) and having missed medication doses (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.01-3.81) were associated with greater odds of being a case rather than a control. None of the other risk factors were associated for either blacks or whites. Conclusions Depression and missing medication doses are more strongly associated with poor diabetes control among blacks than in whites. These two risk factors may represent important targets for patient-level interventions to address racial disparities in diabetes outcomes. PMID:19480090

  9. Gestational Age, Infant Birth Weight, and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mothers: Nurses' Health Study II

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Birth Weight, and Subsequent Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Mothers: Nurses’ Health Study II Navigate This ... as 10 pounds or more at term. Gestational diabetes In the NHSII 1989 baseline questionnaire and subsequent ...

  10. Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes (GoKinD) study: a genetics collection available for identifying genetic susceptibility factors for diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Patricia W; Rogus, John J; Cleary, Patricia A; Zhao, Yuan; Smiles, Adam M; Steffes, Michael W; Bucksa, Jean; Gibson, Therese B; Cordovado, Suzanne K; Krolewski, Andrzej S; Nierras, Concepcion R; Warram, James H

    2006-07-01

    The Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes (GoKinD) study is an initiative that aims to identify genes that are involved in diabetic nephropathy. A large number of individuals with type 1 diabetes were screened to identify two subsets, one with clear-cut kidney disease and another with normal renal status despite long-term diabetes. Those who met additional entry criteria and consented to participate were enrolled. When possible, both parents also were enrolled to form family trios. As of November 2005, GoKinD included 3075 participants who comprise 671 case singletons, 623 control singletons, 272 case trios, and 323 control trios. Interested investigators may request the DNA collection and corresponding clinical data for GoKinD participants using the instructions and application form that are available at http://www.gokind.org/access. Participating scientists will have access to three data sets, each with distinct advantages. The set of 1294 singletons has adequate power to detect a wide range of genetic effects, even those of modest size. The set of case trios, which has adequate power to detect effects of moderate size, is not susceptible to false-positive results because of population substructure. The set of control trios is critical for excluding certain false-positive results that can occur in case trios and may be particularly useful for testing gene-environment interactions. Integration of the evidence from these three components into a single, unified analysis presents a challenge. This overview of the GoKinD study examines in detail the power of each study component and discusses analytic challenges that investigators will face in using this resource. PMID:16775037

  11. The Relationship between Hypomagnesemia, Metformin Therapy and Cardiovascular Disease Complicating Type 2 Diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Kirsten E.; Chubb, S. A. Paul; Davis, Wendy A.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low serum magnesium concentrations have been associated with cardiovascular disease risk and outcomes in some general population studies but there are no equivalent studies in diabetes. Metformin may have cardiovascular benefits beyond blood glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes but its association with hypomagnesemia appears paradoxical. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between metformin therapy, magnesium homoeostasis and cardiovascular disease in well-characterized type 2 patients from the community. Methods and Findings We studied 940 non-insulin-treated patients (mean±SD age 63.4±11.6 years, 49.0% males) from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1) who were followed for 12.3±5.3 years. Baseline serum magnesium was measured using stored sera. Multivariate methods were used to determine associates of prevalent and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) as ascertained from self-report and linked morbidity/mortality databases. 19% of patients were hypomagnesemic (serum magnesium <0.70 mmol/L). Patients on metformin, alone or combined with a sulfonylurea, had lower serum magnesium concentrations than those on diet alone (P<0.05). There were no independent associations between serum magnesium or metformin therapy and either CHD or CVD at baseline. Incident CVD, but not CHD, was independently and inversely associated with serum magnesium (hazard ratio (95% CI) 0.28 (0.11–0.74); P?=?0.010), but metformin therapy was not a significant variable in these models. Conclusions Since hypomagnesemia appears to be an independent risk factor for CVD complicating type 2 diabetes, the value of replacement therapy should be investigated further, especially in patients at high CVD risk. PMID:24019966

  12. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-05-02

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Results are reported on the isolation/characterization of anaerobic bacteria; bacterial mobility and the importance of chemotaxis; careflood experiments; microbial modeling; and surface facilities design. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Infant feeding patterns in families with a diabetes history – observations from The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Sandra; Vehik, Kendra; Uusitalo, Ulla; McLeod, Wendy; Aronsson, Carin Andrén; Frank, Nicole; Gesualdo, Patricia; Yang, Jimin; Norris, Jill M; Virtanen, Suvi M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between diabetes family history and infant feeding patterns. Design Data on breast-feeding duration and age at first introduction of cow’s milk and gluten-containing cereals were collected in 3-month intervals during the first 24 months of life. Setting Data from the multicentre TEDDY (The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young) study, including centres in the USA, Sweden, Finland and Germany. Subjects A total of 7026 children, including children with a mother with type 1 diabetes (T1D; n 292), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM; n 404) or without diabetes but with a father and/or sibling with T1D (n 464) and children without diabetes family history (n 5866). Results While exclusive breast-feeding ended earlier and cow’s milk was introduced earlier in offspring of mothers with T1D and GDM, offspring of non-diabetic mothers but a father and/or sibling with T1D were exclusively breast-fed longer and introduced to cow’s milk later compared with infants without diabetes family history. The association between maternal diabetes and shorter exclusive breast-feeding duration was attenuated after adjusting for clinical variables (delivery mode, gestational age, Apgar score and birth weight). Country-specific analyses revealed differences in these associations, with Sweden showing the strongest and Finland showing no association between maternal diabetes and breast-feeding duration. Conclusions Family history of diabetes is associated with infant feeding patterns; however, the associations clearly differ by country, indicating that cultural differences are important determinants of infant feeding behaviour. These findings need to be considered when developing strategies to improve feeding patterns in infants with a diabetes family history. PMID:24477208

  14. The Relation of Markers of Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction to the Prevalence and Progression of Diabetic Retinopathy. Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Barbara E.K.; Knudtson, Michael D.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Klein, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Context Levels of glycemia, blood pressure, and serum total cholesterol are associated with prevalence and incidence of diabetic retinopathy. It has been reported the markers of systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction may be important additional risk factors. Objective To determine the association of several systemic markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction to prevalence and incidence of diabetic retinal outcomes in persons with long duration type 1 diabetes. Design Longitudinal population based study of persons with type 1 diabetes who were receiving care for their diabetes in south central Wisconsin in 1978-1979. Data for this investigation were from 1990-1992 through 2005-2007. Main Outcome Measures Severity of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema. Results In prevalence data from 1990-1992, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM-1), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) and homocysteine (Hcy) were associated with increased odds of more severe retinopathy (Odds ratios [highest versus lowest quartile] 2.43, 95% Confidence Interval 1.56, 3.78; 3.14 [1.98, 4.99]; 3.79 [2.33, 6.15], respectively) in those with kidney disease while controlling for relevant confounders. Similar odds were found for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Only homocysteine was associated with increased odds of macular edema (4.68; 1.25-17.57) irrespective of kidney disease. None of the markers were associated with incidence of proliferative retinopathy, macular edema, or progression of retinopathy 15 years later. Conclusions A limited number of markers was associated with increased odds of prevalent retinal outcomes in persons with type 1 diabetes and kidney disease. Only Hcy was associated with macular edema in those with and without kidney disease. In the absence of kidney disease the markers do not add to the more conventional descriptors and predictors of diabetic retinopathy in persons with type 1 diabetes. This may reflect the close association of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic kidney disease. PMID:19752427

  15. Glycated Hemoglobin and Incident Type 2 Diabetes in Singaporean Chinese Adults: The Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Bancks, Michael P.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Gross, Myron D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The American Diabetes Association recently included glycated hemoglobin in the diagnostic criteria for diabetes, but research on the utility of this biomarker in Southeast Asians is scant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between percent HbA1c and incident diabetes in an Asian population of adult men and women without reported diabetes. Methods Data analysis of 5,770 men and women enrolled in the Singapore Chinese Health Study who provided a blood sample at the follow-up I visit (1999–2004) and had no cancer and no reported history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease events. Diabetes was defined as self-report of physician diagnosis, identified at the follow-up II visit (2006–2010). Results Hazard ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) for incident diabetes by 5 categories of HbA1c were estimated with Cox regression models and continuous HbA1c with cubic spline analysis. Compared to individuals with an HbA1c ? 5.7% (?39 mmol/mol), individuals with HbA1c 5.8–5.9% (40–41 mmol/mol), 6.0–6.1% (42–43 mmol/mol), 6.2–6.4% (44–47 mmol/mol), and ? 6.5% (?48 mmol/mol) had significantly increased risk for incident diabetes during follow-up. In cubic spline analysis, levels below 5.7% HbA1c were not significantly associated with incident diabetes. Conclusions Our study found a strong and graded association with HbA1c 5.8% and above with incident diabetes in Chinese men and women. PMID:25775375

  16. Improving Diabetes Care for Young People With Type 1 Diabetes Through Visual Learning on Mobile Phones: Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Frøisland, Dag Helge; Skårderud, Finn

    2012-01-01

    Background Only 17% of Norwegian children and adolescents with diabetes achieve international treatment goals measured by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Classic patient–physician consultations seem to be poorly adapted to young children. New strategies that are better attuned to young people to improve support of adolescents’ self-management of diabetes need to be tested and evaluated. Objective (1) To explore how applications for mobile phones can be used in follow-up of adolescents with type 1 diabetes, and (2) to use the findings to guide further development of the applications and as a basis for future studies. Method We pilot tested two mobile phone applications: (1) an application that contained a picture-based diabetes diary to record physical activity and photos taken with the phone camera of food eaten, where the phone also communicated with the glucometer by Bluetooth technology to capture blood glucose values, and (2) a Web-based, password-secured and encrypted short message service (SMS), based on access using login passwords received via SMS to be used by participants to send messages to their providers when they faced obstacles in everyday life, and to send educational messages to the participants. At the end of the 3-month pilot study, 12 participants (7 girls and 5 boys ) aged 13–19 years completed semistructured interviews. The participants had a mean HbA1c value of 8.3 (SD 0.3), mean age of 16.2 (SD 1.7) years, mean body mass index of 23.3 (SD 3.2) kg/m2, and mean diabetes duration of 7.5 (SD 4.6) years. We applied three additional measurements: change in metabolic control as measured by HbA1c, the System Usability Scale, and diabetes knowledge. Results From the interviews, three main categories emerged: visualization, access, and software changes. Participants appreciated the picture-based diary more than the SMS solution. Visualization of cornerstones in diabetes self-care (ie, diet, insulin dosage, physical activity, and pre- and postprandial glucose measurements all transformed into one picture) in the mobile diary was found to be an important educational tool through reflections in action. This led to a change in participants’ applied knowledge about the management of their disease. Additional measurements supplemented and supported the qualitative findings. However, changes in HbA1c and participants’ theoretical knowledge as tested by a 27-item questionnaire, based on a national health informatics’ diabetes quiz, before and after the intervention were not statistically significant (P = .38 and P = .82, respectively, paired-samples t test). Participants suggested additional functionality, and we will implement this in the design of the next software generation. Conclusion Participants reported an increased understanding of applied knowledge, which seem to positively affect diabetes self-care. Visual impressions seem well adapted to the maturation of the adolescent brain, facilitating the link between theoretical knowledge and executive functions. SMS gave the adolescents a feeling of increased access and security. Participants gave valuable input for further development of these applications. PMID:22868871

  17. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions or the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Injection of nutrient stimulates the growth and metabolism of reservoir bacteria, which produces beneficial products to enhance oil recovery. Sometimes, chemical treatments are used to clean or condition injection water. Such a chemical treatment has been initiated by Sullivan and Company at the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit. The unit injection water was treated with a mixture of water, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, and three proprietary chemicals. To determine if the chemicals would have an impact on the pilot, it was important to determine the effects of the chemical additives on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria from wells in this field. Two types of media were used: a mineral salts medium with molasses and nitrate, and this medium with 25 ppm of the treatment chemicals added. Samples were collected anaerobically from each of two wells, 1A-9 and 7-2. A sample from each well was inoculated and cultured in the broth tubes of molasses-nitrate medium with and without the chemicals. Culturing temperature was 35{degrees}C. Absorbance, pressure and cell number were checked to determine if the chemicals affected the growth and metabolism of bacteria in the brine samples. 12 figs.

  18. Experimental study of the protective effects of SYVN1 against diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuo; He, Heng; Ma, Qi Si; Zhang, Yong; Zhu, Ying; Wan, Xing; Wang, Feng Wen; Wang, Shuai Shuai; Liu, Lei; Li, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). While many studies have focused on genes that increase susceptibility to DR, herein, we aimed to explore genes that confer DR resistance. Previously, we identified Hmg CoA reductase degradation protein 1 (SYVN1) as a putative DR protective gene via gene expression analysis. Transgenic mice overexpressing SYVN1 and wild-type (WT) mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes were used in this experiment. Retinal damage and vascular leakage were investigated 6 months after induction of diabetes by histopathological and retinal cell apoptosis analyses and by retinal perfusion of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated dextran. Compared with diabetic WT mice, diabetic SYVN1 mice had significantly more cells and reduced apoptosis in the retinal ganglion layer. Retinal vascular leakage was significantly lower in diabetic SYVN1 mice than in diabetic WT mice. The expression levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related, pro-inflammatory, and pro-angiogenic genes were also analyzed. Lower expression levels were observed in diabetic SYVN1 mice than in WT controls, suggesting that SYVN1 may play an important role in inhibiting ER stress, chronic inflammation, and vascular overgrowth associated with DR. Thus, these results strongly supported our hypothesis that SYVN1 confers DR resistance. PMID:26358086

  19. Educational disparities in health behaviors among patients with diabetes: the Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD) Study

    PubMed Central

    Karter, Andrew J; Stevens, Mark R; Brown, Arleen F; Duru, O Kenrik; Gregg, Edward W; Gary, Tiffany L; Beckles, Gloria L; Tseng, Chien-Wen; Marrero, David G; Waitzfelder, Beth; Herman, William H; Piette, John D; Safford, Monika M; Ettner, Susan L

    2007-01-01

    Background Our understanding of social disparities in diabetes-related health behaviors is incomplete. The purpose of this study was to determine if having less education is associated with poorer diabetes-related health behaviors. Methods This observational study was based on a cohort of 8,763 survey respondents drawn from ~180,000 patients with diabetes receiving care from 68 provider groups in ten managed care health plans across the United States. Self-reported survey data included individual educational attainment ("education") and five diabetes self-care behaviors among individuals for whom the behavior would clearly be indicated: foot exams (among those with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy or a history of foot ulcers); self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG; among insulin users only); smoking; exercise; and certain diabetes-related health seeking behaviors (use of diabetes health education, website, or support group in last 12 months). Predicted probabilities were modeled at each level of self-reported educational attainment using hierarchical logistic regression models with random effects for clustering within health plans. Results Patients with less education had significantly lower predicted probabilities of being a non-smoker and engaging in regular exercise and health-seeking behaviors, while SMBG and foot self-examination did not vary by education. Extensive adjustment for patient factors revealed no discernable confounding effect on the estimates or their significance, and most education-behavior relationships were similar across sex, race and other patient characteristics. The relationship between education and smoking varied significantly across age, with a strong inverse relationship in those aged 25–44, modest for those ages 45–64, but non-evident for those over 65. Intensity of disease management by the health plan and provider communication did not alter the examined education-behavior relationships. Other measures of socioeconomic position yielded similar findings. Conclusion The relationship between educational attainment and health behaviors was modest in strength for most behaviors. Over the life course, the cumulative effect of reduced practice of multiple self-care behaviors among less educated patients may play an important part in shaping the social health gradient. PMID:17967177

  20. Medication Adherence in Type 2 Diabetes: The ENTRED Study 2007, a French Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Tiv, Michel; Viel, Jean-François; Mauny, Frédéric; Eschwège, Eveline; Weill, Alain; Fournier, Cécile; Fagot-Campagna, Anne; Penfornis, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    Background Adherence to prescribed medications is a key dimension of healthcare quality. The aim of this large population-based study was to evaluate self-reported medication adherence and to identify factors linked with poor adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes in France. Methodology The ENTRED study 2007, a French national survey of people treated for diabetes, was based on a representative sample of patients who claimed reimbursement for oral hypoglycaemic agents and/or insulin at least three times between August 2006 and July 2007, and who were randomly selected from the database of the two main National Health Insurance Systems. Medication adherence was determined using a six-item self-administered questionnaire. A multinomial polychotomous logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with medication adherence in the 3,637 persons with type 2 diabetes. Principal Findings Thirty nine percent of patients reported good medication adherence, 49% medium adherence and 12% poor adherence. The factors significantly associated with poor adherence in multivariate analysis were socio-demographic factors: age <45 years, non-European geographical origin, financial difficulties and being professionally active; disease and therapy-related factors: HbA1c>8% and existing diabetes complications; and health care-related factors: difficulties for taking medication alone, decision making by the patient only, poor acceptability of medical recommendations, lack of family or social support, need for information on treatment, reporting no confidence in the future, need for medical support and follow-up by a specialist physician. Conclusions In a country with a high level of access to healthcare, our study demonstrated a substantial low level of medication adherence in type 2 diabetic patients. Better identification of those with poor adherence and individualised suitable recommendations remain essential for better healthcare management. PMID:22403654

  1. Alcohol and the risk for latent autoimmune diabetes in adults: results based on Swedish ESTRID study

    PubMed Central

    Rasouli, Bahareh; Andersson, Tomas; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Dorkhan, Mozhgan; Grill, Valdemar; Groop, Leif; Martinell, Mats; Tuomi, Tiinamaja; Carlsson, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Objective Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Our aim was to investigate whether alcohol consumption is associated with the risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), an autoimmune form of diabetes with features of type 2 diabetes. Design A population-based case–control study was carried out to investigate the association of alcohol consumption and the risk of LADA. Methods We used data from the ESTRID case–control study carried out between 2010 and 2013, including 250 incident cases of LADA (glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADAs) positive) and 764 cases of type 2 diabetes (GADA negative), and 1012 randomly selected controls aged ?35. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) of diabetes in relation to alcohol intake, adjusted for age, sex, BMI, family history of diabetes, smoking, and education. Results Alcohol consumption was inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.92–0.99 for every 5-g increment in daily intake). Similar results were observed for LADA, but stratification by median GADA levels revealed that the results only pertained to LADA with low GADA levels (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.76–0.94/5?g alcohol per day), whereas no association was observed with LADA having high GADA levels (OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.94–1.06/5?g per day). Every 5-g increment of daily alcohol intake was associated with a 10% increase in GADA levels (P=0.0312), and a 10% reduction in homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (P=0.0418). Conclusions Our findings indicate that alcohol intake may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and type 2-like LADA, but has no beneficial effects on diabetes-related autoimmunity. PMID:25117461

  2. The multinational second Diabetes, Attitudes, Wishes and Needs study: results of the French survey

    PubMed Central

    Reach, Gérard; Consoli, Silla M; Halimi, Serge; Colas, Claude; Duclos, Martine; Fontaine, Pierre; Martineau, Caroline; Avril, Carole; Tourette-Turgis, Catherine; Pucheu, Sylvie; Brunet, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Aim The second Diabetes, Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2™) multinational cross-sectional study was aimed at generating insights to facilitate innovative efforts by people with diabetes (PWD), family members (FMs), and health care professionals (HCPs) to improve self-management and psychosocial support in diabetes. Here, the French data from the DAWN2™ study are described. Methods In France, 500 PWD (80 with type 1 diabetes [T1] and 420 with type 2 diabetes [T2]), 120 FMs, and 288 HCPs were recruited. The questionnaires assessed the impact of diabetes on quality of life and mood, self-management, attitudes/beliefs, and care/support. Results Diabetes negatively impacted the emotional well-being of 59% of people with T1 versus 45% of people with T2 (P<0.05) and about half of FMs. A high level of distress was felt by about half of PWD and FMs. About half of HCPs reported assessing depression in their patients. Sixty-two percent of FMs considered managing diabetes to be a burden. Hypoglycemia was a source of concern for 64% of people with T1 and 73% of FMs of insulin users. About two-thirds of non-insulin-medicated people with T2 agreed to start insulin if prescribed, while half of HCPs preferred to delay insulin initiation. A discrepancy between HCPs’ perceptions of their interactions with their patients and PWD’s recollection of these interactions with regard to patients’ personal needs and distress was also observed. Conclusion While distress remains under-assessed by HCPs, the negative impact of diabetes on the lives of PWD and FMs clearly induces distress on both groups. These findings provide new understanding of barriers precluding optimal management of diabetes. Developing strategies to overcome these barriers is now warranted. PMID:25709415

  3. Momordica charantia and type 2 diabetes: from in vitro to human studies.

    PubMed

    Habicht, Sandra D; Ludwig, Christine; Yang, Ray-yu; Krawinkel, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a growing health problem worldwide that is particularly severe in India and China. In these areas, bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is a popular vegetable which is traditionally known to have health beneficial effects not only, but mainly, on diabetes. Bitter gourd could be a cheap possibility to help the poor in these and other countries to control their blood glucose levels. This review describes anti-diabetic effects of bitter gourd reported in the literature and discusses what still needs to be clarified for developing an evidence-based and safe use of the bitter gourd for diabetes. Analyses of bioactive compounds have shown that bitter gourd is rich in nutrients and phytochemicals of which some have anti-diabetic effects. Juices, powders, extracts, and isolated compounds have been tested in vitro and in vivo. Bitter gourd increases insulin secretion of the pancreas, decreases intestinal glucose uptake, and increases uptake and utilization of glucose in peripheral tissues. Although human studies with type 2 diabetics are weak in their design and/or results, some of the studies do indicate anti-diabetic effects in patients and safety for bitter gourd treatment in humans. In the future, well designed studies with rodents will help to understand what kind of bitter gourd variety, dosage, preparation, and duration of administration is optimal. Such results will help to design human studies which are necessary to prove the effectiveness of bitter gourd in patients. PMID:24295371

  4. Wright Field turboprop study

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzetti, R.C.; Dull, P.P.

    1981-01-01

    The considered investigation was conducted as part of an effort to reduce aircraft fuel costs. Turboprops are very fuel efficient at speeds below Mach 0.6. One of the most promising approaches to reduce fuel consumption in the speed range from Mach 0.6 to 0.8 is related to an employment of the swept eight to ten blade propeller (propfan) being developed by NASA. All studies to date indicate that turboshaft engines with propfans might save 15% or more of the fuel used by a turbofan engine of comparable technology. Attention is given to a turboprop status review, contractor studies, the NASA propfan program, an in-house performance study, specific problems which have to be solved to make a twin-turboprop, 100-150 passenger transport a viable possibility for the early 1990s, and turboprop dilemmas.

  5. Yang Deficiency Body Constitution Acts as a Predictor of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Taichung Diabetic Body Constitution Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Hung; Li, Tsai-Chung; Tsai, Chia-I; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Hsin-Jung; Wu, Ya-Chi; Su, Yi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), can cause severe visual impairment and blindness. To prevent the development of DR, identifying the associated risk factors for patient classification is critical. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine whether body constitution (BC) is an independent predictor of DR. Method. 673 type 2 DM (T2DM) patients were recruited from a medical center, all received DR examination and body constitution questionnaire to assess BC. Other risk factors for DR were also recorded, including life style, history of diabetes, and blood pressure, etc. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) for DR. Results. The prevalence of DR was significantly lower in Yang deficiency patients compared with non-Yang deficiency patients (24.69% versus 38.18% P = 0.02). After adjusting for other risk factors, we observed that patients exhibiting Yang deficiency BC were less likely to present with DR (OR = 0.531; 95% confidence interval = 0.312–0.903, P = 0.018). Conclusion. In addition to traditional risk factors, Yang deficiency BC might be an independent predictor of DR among T2DM patients and the results can be used as evidence for traditional Chinese medicine patient classification. PMID:26167195

  6. The Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study (MDPS): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) prevalence has more than doubled over two decades. In Australia, diabetes is the second highest contributor to the burden of disease. Lifestyle modification programs comprising diet changes, weight loss and moderate physical activity, have been proven to reduce the incidence of T2DM in high risk individuals. As part of the Council of Australia Governments, the State of Victoria committed to develop and support the diabetes prevention program ‘Life! Taking action on diabetes’ (Life!) which has direct lineage from effective clinical and implementation trials from Finland and Australia. The Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study (MDPS) has been set up to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a specific version of the Life! program. Methods/design We intend to recruit 796 participants for this open randomized clinical trial; 398 will be allocated to the intervention arm and 398 to the usual care arm. Several methods of recruitment will be used in order to maximize the number of participants. Individuals aged 50 to 75 years will be screened with a risk tool (AUSDRISK) to detect those at high risk of developing T2DM. Those with existing diabetes will be excluded. Intervention participants will undergo anthropometric and laboratory tests, and comprehensive surveys at baseline, following the fourth group session (approximately three months after the commencement of the intervention) and 12 months after commencement of the intervention, while control participants will undergo testing at baseline and 12 months only. The intervention consists of an initial individual session followed by a series of five structured-group sessions. The first four group sessions will be carried out at two week intervals and the fifth session will occur eight months after the first group session. The intervention is based on the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) model and sessions will empower and enable the participants to follow the five goals of the Life! program. Discussion This study will determine whether the effect of this intervention is larger than the effect of usual care in reducing central obesity and cardiovascular risk factors and thus the risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Also it will evaluate how these two options compare economically. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000507280 PMID:23369724

  7. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and type 2 diabetes: a study of 897 cases and 1010 controls

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, P F; Mowbray, C; Patel, S K; Elson, J L; Sampson, M; Hitman, G A; McCarthy, M I; Hattersley, A T; Walker, M

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria play a central role in the secretion of insulin by pancreatic ??cells, and pathogenic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause diabetes. The aetiology of type 2 diabetes has a strong genetic component, raising the possibility that genetic variants of mtDNA alter the risk of developing the disorder. Recent studies have produced conflicting results. By studying 897 UK cases of type 2 diabetes and 1010 population?matched controls, it is shown that European mtDNA haplogroups are unlikely to play a major role in the risk of developing the disorder. PMID:17551080

  8. The Challenge of Diabetes in the Elderly and Affecting Factors: A Turkish Study.

    PubMed

    Ovayolu, Özlem; Ovayolu, Nimet; Do?ru, Ay?e; Özkaya, Mesut

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted with the goal of evaluating the challenge of diabetes in elderly individuals and affecting factors. This descriptive study was conducted with 88 diabetic patients 65 years of age or older who were admitted to the endocrinology and metabolism disorders outpatient clinic data of the study collected by using a questionnaire prepared by the researchers and the Elderly Diabetes Burden Scale. Total score of the scale varies between 19 and 92 points. While a higher score indicates a higher burden a lower score indicates a lower burden, data were analyzed by using Student t test, 1-way analysis of variance, Mann-Whitney U test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. Subscale and total mean scores of patients were as follows: 9.4 ± 3.2 for symptom burden; 12.4 ± 3.4 for social burden; 11.4 ± 3.3 for burden by dietary restrictions; 11.9 ± 3.7 for burden of worry about diabetes; 4.3 ± 1.3 for burden from treatment dissatisfaction; 9.4 ± 4.6 for burden by oral antidiabetic drugs or insulin; and 58.5 ± 9.6 for total diabetes burden score. Diabetes burden was found to be higher for patients who were at an advanced age, single, female, had a lower income, receiving oral antidiabetic or insulin treatment, and had diabetes duration of 6 to 11 years, a concomitant chronic condition or a diabetic person among first-degree relatives and who did not come for regular follow-up visits, had no assistance for their care, and who stated a poor quality of life and treatment compliance. Elderly diabetic patients were found to have a high total Elderly Diabetes Burden Scale score, and the highest scores were observed for the subscales of burden by dietary restrictions, social burden, and burden of worry about diabetes. Thus, it could be recommended to perform appropriate nursing interventions in order to assess and reduce diabetes challenge during planning of necessary treatment and care in elderly diabetic patients. PMID:26263288

  9. Hypertension is an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes: the Korean genome and epidemiology study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ju; Lim, Nam-Kyoo; Choi, Sun-Ja; Park, Hyun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and diabetes share common risk factors and frequently co-occur. Although high blood pressure (BP) was reported as a significant predictor of type 2 diabetes, little is known about this association in Korea. This study investigated the relationship of prehypertension and hypertension with type 2 diabetes in 7150 middle-aged Koreans, as well as the effect of BP control on diabetes development over 8 years. At 8 years, 1049 (14.7%) of the 7150 participants had newly developed diabetes, including 11.2, 16.7 and 21.5% of baseline normotensive, prehypertensive and hypertensive subjects, respectively. The overall incidence rate of diabetes was 22.3 events per 1000 person-years. Subjects with baseline prehypertension (hazard ratio (HR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09–1.48) and hypertension (HR 1.51; 95% CI, 1.29–1.76) were at higher risk of diabetes than normotensive subjects after controlling for potential confounders (P-value for trend <0.001). These associations persisted even when subjects were stratified by baseline glucose status, sex and body mass index (BMI). The risk of diabetes was significantly higher in subjects who had normal BP at baseline and progressed to prehypertention or hypertension at 8 years (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.20–1.83) than those with controlled BP, but these associations were not observed in subjects with baseline prehypertension and hypertension. These findings showed that prehypertension and hypertension are significantly associated with the development of diabetes, independent of baseline glucose status, sex and BMI. Active BP control reduced incident diabetes only in normotensive individuals, suggesting the need for early BP management. PMID:26178151

  10. Vascular health, diabetes, APOE and dementia: The Aging, Demographics, And Memory Study

    E-print Network

    Llewellyn, David J.; Lang, Iain A.; Matthews, Fiona E.; Plassman, Brenda L.; Rogers, Mary A. M.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Fisher, Gwenith G.; Kabeto, Mohammed U.; Langa, Kenneth M.

    2010-06-24

    Abstract Introduction Evidence from clinical samples and geographically limited population studies suggests that vascular health, diabetes and apolipoprotein ?4 (APOE) are associated with dementia. Methods A population-based sample of 856...

  11. Diabetes Care, Glycemic Control, Complications, and Concomitant Autoimmune Diseases in Children with Type 1 Diabetes in Turkey: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    ?im?ek, Damla Gök?en; Aycan, Zehra; Özen, Samim; Çetinkaya, Semra; Kara, Cengiz; Abal?, Sayg?n; Demir, Korcan; Tunç, Özgül; Uçaktürk, Ahmet; Asar, Gülgün; Ba?, Firdevs; Çetinkaya, Ergun; Ayd?n, Murat; Karagüzel, Gülay; Orbak, Zerrin; Orbak, Zerrin; ??klar, Zeynep; Alt?nc?k, Ayça; Ökten, Ay?enur; Özkan, Behzat; Öçal, Gönül; Semiz, Serap; Arslano?lu, ?lknur; Evliyao?lu, Olcay; Bundak, Rüveyde; Darcan, ?ükran

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Epidemiologic and clinical features of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) may show substantial differences among countries. The primary goal in the management of T1DM is to prevent micro- and macrovascular complications by achieving good glycemic control. The present study aimed to assess metabolic control, presence of concomitant autoimmune diseases, and of acute and long-term complications in patients diagnosed with T1DM during childhood and adolescence. The study also aimed to be a first step in the development of a national registry system for T1DM, in Turkey. Methods: Based on hospital records, this cross-sectional, multicenter study included 1 032 patients with T1DM from 12 different centers in Turkey, in whom the diagnosis was established during childhood. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the patients were recorded. Metabolic control, diabetes care, complications, and concomitant autoimmune diseases were evaluated. Results: Mean age, diabetes duration, and hemoglobin A1c level were 12.5±4.1 years, 4.7±3.2 years, and 8.5±1.6%, respectively. Acute complications noted in the past year included ketoacidosis in 5.2% of the patients and severe hypoglycemia in 4.9%. Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis was noted in 12%, Graves’ disease in 0.1%, and celiac disease in 4.3% of the patients. Chronic complications including neuropathy, retinopathy, and persistent microalbuminuria were present in 2.6%, 1.4%, and 5.4% of the patients, respectively. Diabetic nephropathy was not present in any of the patients. Mean diabetes duration and age of patients with neuropathy, retinopathy and microalbuminuria were significantly different from the patients without these long-term complications (p<0.01). A significant difference was found between pubertal and prepubertal children in terms of persistent microalbuminuria and neuropathy (p=0.02 and p<0.001, respectively). Of the patients, 4.4% (n:38) were obese and 5% had short stature; 17.4% of the patients had dyslipidemia, and 14% of the dyslipidemic patients were obese. Conclusions: Although the majority of the patients in the present study were using insulin analogues, poor glycemic control was common, and chronic complications were encountered. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23419424

  12. Association between Albuminuria and Different Body Constitution in Type 2 Diabetes Patients: Taichung Diabetic Body Constitution Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Hung; Li, Tsai-Chung; Tsai, Chia-I; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Hsin-Jung; Wu, Ya-Chi; Su, Yi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Albuminuria in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients increases the risk of diabetic nephropathy, the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. Because albuminuria is modifiable, identifying relevant risk factors could facilitate prevention and/or management. This cross-sectional study investigated whether body constitution (BC) independently predicts albuminuria. Method. Patients with T2DM (n = 846) received urinalysis, a blood test, and diabetic retinopathy examination. Albuminuria was defined by an elevated urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (?30??g/mg). BC type (Yang deficiency, Yin deficiency, and Phlegm stasis) was assessed using a body constitution questionnaire (BCQ). Traditional risk factors for albuminuria were also recorded. Odds ratios (ORs) of albuminuria for BC were estimated using multivariate logistic regression. Results. Albuminuria was more prevalent in patients with Yang deficiency or Phlegm stasis (both P < 0.01). After adjustment, patients with both Yang deficiency and Phlegm stasis exhibited a significantly higher risk of albuminuria (OR = 3.037; 95% confidence interval = 1.572–5.867, and P < 0.001). Conclusion. BC is strongly associated with albuminuria in T2DM patients. Using a BCQ to assess BC is noninvasive, convenient, and inexpensive and can provide information for health care professionals to identify T2DM patients who are at a high risk of albuminuria. PMID:26587046

  13. Intuitive Eating Practices Among African-American Women Living With Type 2 Diabetes: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Willig, Amanda L.; Richardson, Brittany S.; Agne, April; Cherrington, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Intuitive Eating programs that improve self-efficacy and dietary habits could enhance glycemic control in African-American women with type 2 diabetes. The goal of this study was to investigate how current eating practices and beliefs of African-American women living with diabetes aligned with intuitive eating concepts. African-American women with type 2 diabetes referred for diabetes education class in 2009–2012 were recruited for a qualitative study using focus groups for data collection. Verbatim group transcriptions were analyzed by two independent reviewers for themes using a combined inductive-deductive approach. Participants (n=35) had an average age of 52±9 years, mean body mass index of 39±7, and mean time with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis of 10±10 years. Participants’ self-reported dietary practices were poorly aligned with intuitive eating concepts. The women reported a lack of self-control with food and regularly eating in the absence of hunger, yet stated that the determinant factor for when to stop eating was to recognize a feeling of fullness. Participants reported knowing they were full when they felt physically uncomfortable or actually became sick. Women frequently cited the belief that individuals with diabetes have to follow a different diet than that recommended for the general public. Many women also discussed diabetes-related stigma from family/friends, and often did not tell others about their diabetes diagnosis. These findings demonstrate that intuitive eating techniques are not currently applied by the women in this sample. Future studies should assess the impact of intuitive eating interventions on dietary habits among low-income African-American women with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24699138

  14. Intuitive eating practices among African-American women living with type 2 diabetes: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Willig, Amanda L; Richardson, Brittany S; Agne, April; Cherrington, Andrea

    2014-06-01

    Intuitive eating programs that improve self-efficacy and dietary habits could enhance glycemic control in African-American women with type 2 diabetes. The goal of our study was to investigate how current eating practices and beliefs of African-American women living with diabetes aligned with intuitive eating concepts. African-American women with type 2 diabetes referred for diabetes education class during 2009-2012 were recruited for a qualitative study using focus groups for data collection. Verbatim group transcriptions were analyzed by two independent reviewers for themes using a combined inductive-deductive approach. Participants (n=35) had an average age 52±9 years, mean body mass index 39±7, and mean time with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis of 10±10 years. Participants' self-reported dietary practices were poorly aligned with intuitive eating concepts. The women reported a lack of self-control with food and regularly eating in the absence of hunger, yet stated that the determinant factor for when to stop eating was to recognize a feeling of fullness. Participants reported knowing they were full when they felt physically uncomfortable or actually became sick. Women frequently cited the belief that individuals with diabetes have to follow a different diet than that recommended for the general public. Many women also discussed diabetes-related stigma from family/friends, and often did not tell others about their diabetes diagnosis. These findings demonstrate that intuitive eating techniques are not currently applied by the women in this sample. Future studies should assess the influence of intuitive eating interventions on dietary habits among low-income African-American women with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24699138

  15. Impact of diagnosis of diabetes on health-related quality of life among high risk individuals: the Diabetes Prevention Program outcomes study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Q.; Barrett-Connor, E.; de Groot, M.; Zhang, P.; Percy, C.; Florez, H.; Ackermann, R.; Montez, M.; Rubin, R. R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to assess if diagnosis of type 2 diabetes affected health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program/Diabetes Prevention Program Outcome Study and changes with treatment or diabetes duration. Methods 3,210 participants with pre-diabetes were randomized to metformin (MET), intensive lifestyle intervention (ILS), or placebo (PLB). HRQoL was assessed using the SF-36 including: (1) 8 SF-36 subscales; (2) the physical component (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores; and (3) the SF-6D. The sample was categorized by diabetes free versus diagnosed. For diagnosed subgroup, mean scores in the diabetes-free period, at 6 months, 2, 4 and 6 years post-diagnosis, were compared. Results PCS and SF-6D scores declined in all participants in all treatment arms (P <.001). MCS scores did not change significantly in any treatment arm regardless of diagnosis. ILS participants reported a greater decrease in PCS scores at 6 months post-diagnosis (P <.001) and a more rapid decline immediately post-diagnosis in SF-6D scores (P = .003) than the MET or PLB arms. ILS participants reported a significant decrease in the social functioning subscale at 6 months (P <.001) and two years (P <.001) post-diagnosis. Conclusions Participants reported a decline in measures of overall health state (SF-6D) and overall physical HRQoL, whether or not they were diagnosed with diabetes during the study. There was no change in overall mental HRQoL. Participants in the ILS arm with diabetes reported a more significant decline in some HRQoL measures than those in the MET and PLB arms that developed diabetes. PMID:23709097

  16. Diabetes and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2 diabetes. Recently, studies show that type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents is increasing, particularly in American Indians, African Americans, and Hispanic/Latino Americans. Warning Signs Some symptoms of diabetes include: Frequent urination Excessive thirst Extreme hunger Unusual ...

  17. "I'm Managing My Diabetes between Two Worlds": Beliefs and Experiences of Diabetes Management in British South Asians on Holiday in the East-A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neesha R; Kennedy, Anne; Blickem, Christian; Reeves, David; Chew-Graham, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diabetes is disproportionately high among British South Asians compared to the general UK population. Whilst the migrant British South Asians group has received most attention on research related to diabetes management, little consideration has been given to impact of travel back to the East. This study aimed to explore the role of social networks and beliefs about diabetes in British South Asians, to better understand their management behaviours whilst holidaying in the East. Methods. Semistructured interviews were conducted in Greater Manchester. Forty-four participants were recruited using random and purposive sampling techniques. Interviews were analysed thematically using a constant comparison approach. Results. Migrant British South Asians expressed a strong preference to be in a hot climate; they felt they had a healthier lifestyle in the East and often altered or abandoned their diabetes medication. Information acquisition on diabetes and availability of social networks in the East was valued. Conclusion. Social networks in the East are a valued source of information and support for diabetes. The lack of adherence to medication whilst abroad suggests that some migrant British South Asians have a poor understanding of diabetes. Future research needs to explore whether patients are seeking professional advice on diabetes management prior to their extended holiday. PMID:26697499

  18. “I'm Managing My Diabetes between Two Worlds”: Beliefs and Experiences of Diabetes Management in British South Asians on Holiday in the East—A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Neesha R.; Kennedy, Anne; Blickem, Christian; Reeves, David; Chew-Graham, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diabetes is disproportionately high among British South Asians compared to the general UK population. Whilst the migrant British South Asians group has received most attention on research related to diabetes management, little consideration has been given to impact of travel back to the East. This study aimed to explore the role of social networks and beliefs about diabetes in British South Asians, to better understand their management behaviours whilst holidaying in the East. Methods. Semistructured interviews were conducted in Greater Manchester. Forty-four participants were recruited using random and purposive sampling techniques. Interviews were analysed thematically using a constant comparison approach. Results. Migrant British South Asians expressed a strong preference to be in a hot climate; they felt they had a healthier lifestyle in the East and often altered or abandoned their diabetes medication. Information acquisition on diabetes and availability of social networks in the East was valued. Conclusion. Social networks in the East are a valued source of information and support for diabetes. The lack of adherence to medication whilst abroad suggests that some migrant British South Asians have a poor understanding of diabetes. Future research needs to explore whether patients are seeking professional advice on diabetes management prior to their extended holiday. PMID:26697499

  19. A prospective study of dietary selenium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Growing evidence raises concern about possible associations of high selenium exposure with diabetes in selenium-replete populations such as the US. In countries with lower selenium status, such as Italy, there is little epidemiological evidence on the association between selenium and diabetes. This study examined the prospective association between dietary selenium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes. Methods The ORDET cohort study comprised a large sample of women from Northern Italy (n = 7,182). Incident type 2 diabetes was defined as a self-report of a physician diagnosis, use of antidiabetic medication, or a hospitalization discharge. Dietary selenium intake was measured by a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire at the baseline examination (1987-1992). Participants were divided in quintiles based on their baseline dietary selenium intake. Results Average selenium intake at baseline was 55.7 ?g/day. After a median follow-up of 16 years, 253 women developed diabetes. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, the odds ratio for diabetes comparing the highest to the lowest quintile of selenium intake was 2.39, (95% CI: 1.32, 4.32; P for linear trend = 0.005). The odds ratio for diabetes associated with a 10 ?g/d increase in selenium intake was 1.29 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.52). Conclusions In this population, increased dietary selenium intake was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. These findings raise additional concerns about the association of selenium intake above the Recommended Dietary Allowance (55 ?g/day) with diabetes risk. PMID:20858268

  20. Association between depression and diabetes amongst adults in Bangladesh: a hospital based case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful; Ferrari, Uta; Seissler, Jochen; Niessen, Louis; Lechner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Methods A matched case–control study was conducted among 591 consecutive patients with diabetes attending a tertiary hospital in Dhaka and 591 controls matched for age, sex and area of residence without diabetes not related with the index–case. Depression was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire–9. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to examine the association between depression and diabetes. Results The mean age (±standard deviation) of the participants was 50.4?±?11.4 years, with a male to female ratio of 43:57. The prevalence of depression was 45.2% and 19.8% among cases and controls, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, mild as well as moderate to severe depression were significantly associated with diabetes and independent of sociodemographic factors and co–morbidity (adjusted odds ratio (OR)?=?2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI)?=?1.4–2.9 and adjusted OR?=?6.4, 95% CI?=?3.4–12.3; P?diabetes in Bangladesh suggests that depression should be routinely screened for patients with diabetes at the clinics and that management strategies adequate for resource–poor settings need to be developed. Further research to determine the pathophysiological role of depression in the development of diabetes is merited.

  1. Impact of Ellagic Acid in Bone Formation after Tooth Extraction: An Experimental Study on Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Obaidi, Mazen M. Jamil; Al-Bayaty, Fouad Hussain; Hussaini, Jamal; Khor, Goot Heah

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the impact of ellagic acid (EA) towards healing tooth socket in diabetic animals, after tooth extraction. Methods. Twenty-four Sprague Dawley male rats weighing 250–300?g were selected for this study. All animals were intraperitoneally injected with 45?mg/kg (b.w.) of freshly prepared streptozotocin (STZ), to induce diabetic mellitus. Then, the animals were anesthetized, and the upper left central incisor was extracted and the whole extracted sockets were filled with Rosuvastatin (RSV). The rats were separated into three groups, comprising 8 rats each. The first group was considered as normal control group and orally treated with normal saline. The second group was regarded as diabetic control group and orally treated with normal saline, whereas the third group comprised diabetic rats, administrated with EA (50?mg/kg) orally. The maxilla tissue stained by eosin and hematoxylin (H&E) was used for histological examinations and immunohistochemical technique. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were used to evaluate the healing process in the extracted tooth socket by immunohistochemistry test. Results. The reactions of immunohistochemistry for FGF-2 and ALP presented stronger expression, predominantly in EA treated diabetic rat, than the untreated diabetic rat. Conclusion. These findings suggest that the administration of EA combined with RSV may have accelerated the healing process of the tooth socket of diabetic rats, after tooth extraction. PMID:25485304

  2. Compound Danshen Dripping Pill for Treating Early Diabetic Retinopathy: A Randomized, Double-Dummy, Double-Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dan; Qin, Yali; Yuan, Wei; Deng, Hui; Zhang, Youhua; Jin, Ming

    2015-01-01

    This randomized, double-dummy, double-blind study was to observe the therapeutic effects of compound Danshen dripping pill (CDDP) in treating early diabetic retinopathy (DR). All the 57 type 2 diabetes cases in nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) stage were divided into two groups randomly: 28 cases treated with CDDP as the treated group and 29 cases treated with calcium dobesilate as the control group. The best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in the treated group was significantly improved after treatment when compared to that before treatment (P < 0.05). Mean defect (MD) of visual field, hemorrhage area of the fundus, microaneurysm number, fluorescent leakage area, and capillary nonperfusion area evaluated by visual field, fundus photography, and fundus fluorescein angiography in the treated group had the same results as BCVA. However, there was no statistical difference in each index between the two groups. No obvious adverse events with clinical significance occurred. Our present study showed that CDDP has a similar improvement and safety to calcium dobesilate for NPDR. In future DR treatments, CDDP may function as the auxiliary drug. PMID:26457110

  3. The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of type 1 diabetes (T1D) remains unknown, but a growing body of evidence points to infectious agents and/or components of early childhood diet. The National Institutes of Health has established the TEDDY Study consortium of six clinical centers in the United States and Europe and a data coordinating center to identify environmental factors predisposing to, or protective against, islet autoimmunity and T1D. From 2004–2009, TEDDY will screen more than 360,000 newborns from both the general population and families already affected by T1D to identify an estimated 17,804 children with high-risk HLA-DR, DQ genotypes. Of those, 7,801 (788 first-degree relatives and 7,013 newborns with no family history of T1D) will be enrolled in prospective follow-up beginning before the age of 4.5 months. As of May 2008, TEDDY has screened more than 250,000 newborns and enrolled nearly 5,000 infants—approximately 70% of the final cohort. Participants are seen every 3 months up to 4 years of age, with subsequent visits every 6 months until the subject is 15 years of age. Blood samples are collected at each visit for detection of candidate infectious agents and nutritional biomarkers; monthly stool samples are collected for infectious agents. These samples are saved in a central repository. Primary endpoints include (1) appearance of one or more islet autoantibodies (to insulin, GAD65 or IA-2) confirmed at two consecutive visits; (2) development of T1D. By age 15, an estimated 800 children will develop islet autoimmunity and 400 will progress to T1D; 67 and 27 children have already reached these endpoints. PMID:19120261

  4. The Development and Field Testing of Materials on Diabetes for Persons with Low Vision or Low Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, A. W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Instructional materials on hypoglycemia, foot care, and exercise were developed and field tested with 98 diabetes patients who had low vision and/or low literacy. A pretest and posttest revealed an 81% reduction in wrong answers overall and a 72% reduction in wrong answers by a subset with low vision. (Author/DB)

  5. Height, Ethnicity, and the Incidence of Diabetes: the San Antonio Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Carlos; Williams, Ken; Stern, Michael P; Haffner, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Mexican Americans are more obese and have more diabetes than non-Hispanic whites, but are also shorter. Height is used in some diabetes prediction models. Therefore we examined the effect of height on the relationship between ethnicity and incident diabetes. Incident diabetes was ascertained in 1,730 participants in the San Antonio Heart Study (age range, 25 to 64 years) after 7.4 years of follow-up. Height predicted diabetes in neither men (odds ratio [OR] × 1 standard deviation [SD], 1.14 [0.85 – 1.51]) nor women (OR × 1 SD, 0.88 [0.70 – 1.11]) after adjusting for age and ethnicity. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for predicting diabetes of a model that included waist circumference (in men, 0.775; in women, 0.781) was similar to that of models that included waist circumference + height (in men, 0.775, p = 0.702; in women, 0.783, p = 0.680) or waist-to-height ratio (in men, 0.764, p = 0.161; in women, 0.783, p = 0.619). The OR of incident diabetes according to ethnicity was lower in the model that was adjusted for the waist-to-height ratio than in the model that accounted only for waist circumference (in women, 1.45 (0.86 – 2.46) vs. 1.84 (1.10 – 3.08), p <0.001; in men, 2.00 (1.11 – 3.58) vs. 2.74 (1.52 – 4.95), p <0.001). In conclusion, the addition of height to adjust waist circumference does not increase the ability of waist circumference to predict diabetes, but may be useful in exploring differences in diabetic risk between populations of different race/ethnicity. PMID:19586642

  6. Risk of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in Patients With Diabetes: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Lu, Chien-Jung; Chen, Rong-Chi; Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Li, Chung-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background Glucose intolerance in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been inconsistently reported. Evidence for the association of ALS and diabetes mellitus is limited. We aimed to assess the overall and age- and sex-specific risks of ALS among patients with diabetes in Taiwan. Methods The study cohort included 615 492 diabetic patients and 614 835 age- and sex-matched subjects as a comparison cohort, followed from 2000 to 2008. We estimated the incidence densities of ALS and calculated the relative hazard ratios (HRs) of ALS (ICD-9-CM 335.20) in relation to diabetes using a Cox proportional hazard regression model, with adjustment for potential confounders, including sex, age, geographic area, urbanization status, Charlson Comorbidity Index, frequency of medical visit, and histories of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Results Over a 9-year period, 255 diabetic and 201 non-diabetic subjects developed ALS, corresponding to incidence densities of 7.42 and 5.06 per 100 000 person-years, respectively. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with diabetes experienced a significantly elevated HR of 1.35 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10–1.67). A higher covariate adjusted HR was noted in men (HR 1.48; 95% CI, 1.13–1.94) than in women (HR 1.17; 95% CI, 0.84–1.64), while men aged ?65 years showed the most increased HR of 1.67 (95% CI, 1.18–2.36). Conclusions This study demonstrated a moderate but significant association of diabetes with ALS onset, and such association is not confounded by socio-demographic characteristics or certain ALS-related co-morbidities. Further studies are warranted to examine whether the findings observed in our study can be replicated. PMID:25947580

  7. Exploring the impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on diabetes control in diabetes patients: a prospective observational study in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Luijks, Hilde D; de Grauw, Wim JC; Bor, Jacobus HJ; van Weel, Chris; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine LM; Biermans, Marion CJ; Schermer, Tjard R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the association between COPD and diabetes control parameters. Aims: To explore the association between comorbid COPD and longitudinal glycaemic control (HbA1C) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in a primary care cohort of diabetes patients. Methods: This is a prospective cohort study of type 2 diabetes patients in the Netherlands. In a mixed model analysis, we tested differences in the 5-year longitudinal development of HbA1C and SBP according to COPD comorbidity (present/absent). We corrected for relevant covariates. In subgroup effect analyses, we tested whether potential differences between diabetes patients with/without COPD were modified by age, sex, socio-economic status (SES) and body mass index (BMI). Results: We analysed 610 diabetes patients. A total of 63 patients (10.3%) had comorbid COPD. The presence of COPD was not significantly associated with the longitudinal development of HbA1C (P=0.54) or SBP (P=0.33), but subgroup effect analyses showed significant effect modification by SES (P<0.01) and BMI (P=0.03) on SBP. Diabetes patients without COPD had a flat SBP trend over time, with higher values in patients with a high BMI. For diabetes patients with COPD, SBP gradually increased over time in the middle- and high-SES groups, and it decreased over time in those in the low-SES group. Conclusions: The longitudinal development of HbA1C was not significantly associated with comorbid COPD in diabetes patients. The course of SBP in diabetes patients with COPD is significantly associated with SES (not BMI) in contrast to those without COPD. Comorbid COPD was associated with longitudinal diabetes control parameters, but it has complex interactions with other patient characteristics. Further research is needed. PMID:25906025

  8. Effects of diabetes definition on global surveillance of diabetes prevalence and diagnosis: a pooled analysis of 96 population-based studies with 331?288 participants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Diabetes has been defined on the basis of different biomarkers, including fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h plasma glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test (2hOGTT), and HbA1c. We assessed the effect of different diagnostic definitions on both the population prevalence of diabetes and the classification of previously undiagnosed individuals as having diabetes versus not having diabetes in a pooled analysis of data from population-based health examination surveys in different regions. Methods We used data from 96 population-based health examination surveys that had measured at least two of the biomarkers used for defining diabetes. Diabetes was defined using HbA1c (HbA1c ?6·5% or history of diabetes diagnosis or using insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs) compared with either FPG only or FPG-or-2hOGTT definitions (FPG ?7·0 mmol/L or 2hOGTT ?11·1 mmol/L or history of diabetes or using insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs). We calculated diabetes prevalence, taking into account complex survey design and survey sample weights. We compared the prevalences of diabetes using different definitions graphically and by regression analyses. We calculated sensitivity and specificity of diabetes diagnosis based on HbA1c compared with diagnosis based on glucose among previously undiagnosed individuals (ie, excluding those with history of diabetes or using insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs). We calculated sensitivity and specificity in each survey, and then pooled results using a random-effects model. We assessed the sources of heterogeneity of sensitivity by meta-regressions for study characteristics selected a priori. Findings Population prevalence of diabetes based on FPG-or-2hOGTT was correlated with prevalence based on FPG alone (r=0·98), but was higher by 2–6 percentage points at different prevalence levels. Prevalence based on HbA1c was lower than prevalence based on FPG in 42·8% of age–sex–survey groups and higher in another 41·6%; in the other 15·6%, the two definitions provided similar prevalence estimates. The variation across studies in the relation between glucose-based and HbA1c-based prevalences was partly related to participants' age, followed by natural logarithm of per person gross domestic product, the year of survey, mean BMI, and whether the survey population was national, subnational, or from specific communities. Diabetes defined as HbA1c 6·5% or more had a pooled sensitivity of 52·8% (95% CI 51·3–54·3%) and a pooled specificity of 99·74% (99·71–99·78%) compared with FPG 7·0 mmol/L or more for diagnosing previously undiagnosed participants; sensitivity compared with diabetes defined based on FPG-or-2hOGTT was 30·5% (28·7–32·3%). None of the preselected study-level characteristics explained the heterogeneity in the sensitivity of HbA1c versus FPG. Interpretation Different biomarkers and definitions for diabetes can provide different estimates of population prevalence of diabetes, and differentially identify people without previous diagnosis as having diabetes. Using an HbA1c-based definition alone in health surveys will not identify a substantial proportion of previously undiagnosed people who would be considered as having diabetes using a glucose-based test. Funding Wellcome Trust, US National Institutes of Health. PMID:26109024

  9. Beliefs about Racism and Health among African American Women with Diabetes: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Julie A.; Osborn, Chandra Y.; Mendenhall, Emily A.; Budris, Lisa M.; Belay, Sophia; Tennen, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to racism has been linked to poor health outcomes. Little is known about the impact of racism on diabetes outcomes. This study explored African American (AA) women’s beliefs about how racism interacts with their diabetes self-management and control. Four focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of 28 adult AA women with type 2 diabetes who were recruited from a larger quantitative study on racism and diabetes. The focus group discussions were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by the authors. Women reported that exposure to racism was a common phenomenon, and their beliefs did in fact link racism to poor health. Specifically, women reported that exposure to racism caused physiological arousal including cardiovascular and metabolic perturbations. There was consensus that physiological arousal was generally detrimental to health. Women also described limited, and in some cases maladaptive, strategies to cope with racist events including eating unhealthy food choices and portions. There was consensus that the subjective nature of perceiving racism and accompanying social prohibitions often made it impossible to address racism directly. Many women described anger in such situations, and the tendency to internalize anger and other negative emotions, only to find that the negative emotions would be reactivated repeatedly with exposure to novel racial stressors, even long after the original racist event remitted. AA women in this study believed that racism affects their diabetes self-management and control. Health beliefs can exert powerful effects on health behaviors and may provide an opportunity for health promotion interventions in diabetes. PMID:21528110

  10. Expression study of GLUT4 translocation-related genes in a porcine pre-diabetic model.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Thea; Fredholm, Merete; Cirera, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is a world-wide exponentially growing health problem that increases the risk of co-morbidities including metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), and cancer. These co-morbidities are all complex conditions constituting a big challenge when searching for susceptibility genes. Identification of relevant genes, which could contribute to an earlier identification of individuals prone to develop diabetes, is urgently needed as many long-term complications can be avoided by preventive measures. Pre-diabetes is mainly associated with hyperglycemia; thus studying this phenotype might provide knowledge on relevant genes implicated in molecular mechanisms underlying pre-diabetes, and contributing to the development of T2DM. In the present study, two groups of pigs with high (HGG, N = 6) and low (NGG, N = 6) fasting plasma glucose level respectively were selected from a large pig population. Transcriptional levels of seven genes involved in the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation pathway were studied by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) in diabetes relevant tissues (pancreas, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, liver and kidney). Three of the genes, TBC (Tre-2, BUB2, CDC16) 1 Domain Family Member 4 (TBC1D4), insulin receptor and GLUT4 showed altered expression in some of the tissues. The expression pattern observed is in agreement with what has previously been reported in pre-diabetic humans confirming the pre-diabetic status of our pigs. Moreover, a novel isoform of TBC1D4 was detected by Western blotting using protein extracted from pancreas. The expression level of this novel isoform was further verified by qPCR in all tissues, showing the highest expression in the pancreas. PMID:26346769

  11. A Mendelian Randomization Study of Circulating Uric Acid and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sluijs, Ivonne; Holmes, Michael V; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Beulens, Joline W J; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Huerta, José María; Palmer, Tom M; Arriola, Larraitz; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boeing, Heiner; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Fagherazzi, Guy; Franks, Paul W; Gavrila, Diana; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kühn, Tilman; Molina-Montes, Esther; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Nilsson, Peter M; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quirós, J Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sala, Núria; Schmidt, Julie A; Scott, Robert A; Sieri, Sabina; Slimani, Nadia; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; Tjonneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L; Sharp, Stephen J; Forouhi, Nita G; Langenberg, Claudia; Riboli, Elio; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2015-08-01

    We aimed to investigate the causal effect of circulating uric acid concentrations on type 2 diabetes risk. A Mendelian randomization study was performed using a genetic score with 24 uric acid-associated loci. We used data of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct case-cohort study, comprising 24,265 individuals of European ancestry from eight European countries. During a mean (SD) follow-up of 10 (4) years, 10,576 verified incident case subjects with type 2 diabetes were ascertained. Higher uric acid was associated with a higher diabetes risk after adjustment for confounders, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.20 (95% CI 1.11, 1.30) per 59.48 µmol/L (1 mg/dL) uric acid. The genetic score raised uric acid by 17 µmol/L (95% CI 15, 18) per SD increase and explained 4% of uric acid variation. By using the genetic score to estimate the unconfounded effect, we found that a 59.48 µmol/L higher uric acid concentration did not have a causal effect on diabetes (HR 1.01 [95% CI 0.87, 1.16]). Including data from the Diabetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis (DIAGRAM) consortium, increasing our dataset to 41,508 case subjects with diabetes, the summary odds ratio estimate was 0.99 (95% CI 0.92, 1.06). In conclusion, our study does not support a causal effect of circulating uric acid on diabetes risk. Uric acid-lowering therapies may therefore not be beneficial in reducing diabetes risk. PMID:25918230

  12. Diabetes and the risk of sudden cardiac death, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.

    PubMed

    Kucharska-Newton, Anna M; Couper, David J; Pankow, James S; Prineas, Ronald J; Rea, Thomas D; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Folsom, Aaron R; Siscovick, David S; Rosamond, Wayne D

    2010-12-01

    Studies suggest that diabetes may specifically elevate the risk of sudden cardiac death in excess of other heart disease outcomes. In this study, we examined the association of type 2 diabetes with the incidence of sudden cardiac death when compared to the incidence of non-sudden cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI). We used data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study to examine the incidence of sudden and non-sudden cardiac death and non-fatal MI among persons with and without diabetes in follow-up from the baseline data collection (1987-1989) through December 31, 2001. There were 209 cases of sudden cardiac death, 119 of non-sudden cardiac death, and 739 of non-fatal MI identified in this cohort over an average 12.4 years of follow-up. In analyses adjusted for age, race/ARIC center, gender, and smoking, the Cox proportional hazard ratio of the association of baseline diabetes was 3.77 (95% CI 2.82, 5.05) for sudden cardiac death, 3.78 (95% CI 2.57, 5.53) for non-sudden cardiac death, and 3.20 (95% CI 2.71, 3.78) for non-fatal MI. Elevated risk for each of the three outcomes associated with diabetes was independent of adjustment for measures of blood pressure, lipids, inflammation, hemostasis, and renal function. Among those with diabetes, the risk of cardiac death, but not of non-fatal MI, was similar for men and women. Findings from this prospective, population-based cohort investigation indicate that diabetes does not confer a specific excess risk of sudden cardiac death. Our results suggest that diabetes attenuates gender differences in the risk of fatal cardiac events. PMID:19855920

  13. A study of sociodemographic clinical and glycemic control factors associated with co-morbid depression in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hritu; Raju, M. S. V. K.; Dubey, Vaibhav; Kurrey, Ravindra; Bansal, Shaifali; Malik, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Context: Diabetes affects 9.2% of adults in India. About 8–16% of its population also suffer from depression. Both diseases pose a serious health challenge at individual and system level. The prevalence of depression in diabetes is much higher than in the general population. Undiagnosed and untreated depression puts people at higher morbidity and mortality risk. Aim: To study the prevalence of depression in diabetes and to identify associated risk factors. Settings and Design: Case control study carried out in an outpatient setting of a tertiary hospital in central India. Materials and Methods: One hundred and nine type 2 diabetes patients and 91 healthy controls formed the subjects of the study. Sociodemographic data were obtained on seven parameters. Comprehensive clinical data were obtained by means of standard procedures. Blood sugar levels and glycosylated hemoglobin levels were measured to assess glycemic control. Data of diabetic patients and controls as well as that of depressed and nondepressed diabetics were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: About 42.2% of diabetes patients and only 4.39% of controls had depression. About 19% of diabetics had peripheral neuropathy but had much higher neuropathic symptoms. Depression was not related to any sociodemographic or clinical factors but was strongly associated with poor glycemic control. Conclusion: Depression is highly prevalent in diabetes. Physical symptoms mask depression. Special attention needs to be paid to diagnose depression in diabetes and treat it appropriately along with effective glycemic control. Diabetes patients need to be treated collaboratively by physicians and psychiatrists. PMID:25788803

  14. Profiling Amino Acids of Jordanian Scalp Hair as a Tool for Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Rashaid, Ayat H B; Harrington, Peter de B; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-07-21

    Hair analysis is an area of increasing interest in the fields of medical and forensic sciences. Human scalp hair has attractive features in clinical studies because hair can be sampled easily and noninvasively from human subjects, and unlike blood and urine samples, it contains a chronological record of medication use. Keratin protein is the major component of scalp hair shaft material and it is composed of 21 amino acids. The method used herein for the amino acid determination in hair included keratin protein acid hydrolysis using 6 M hydrochloric acid (HCl), followed by amino acids derivatization using N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA), and the determination of derivatized amino acids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Amino acid profiles of scalp hair of 27 Jordanian subjects (15 diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2 patients and 12 control subjects) were analyzed. A fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES) classified the amino acid profiles into diabetic and control groups based on multivariate analyses of the abundance of 14 amino acids. The sensitivity and specificity were 100% for diabetes detection using leave-one-individual-out cross-validation. The areas under the receiver operative characteristics (ROC) curves were 1.0, which represents a highly sensitive and specific diabetes test. The nonessential amino acids Gly and Glu, and the essential amino acid Ile were more abundant in the scalp hair of diabetic patients compared to the hair of control subjects. The associations between the abundance of amino acids of human hair and health status may have clinical applications in providing diagnostic indicator or predicting other chronic or acute diseases. PMID:26075473

  15. Cardiac dysfunction in the diabetic rat: quantitative evaluation using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    E-print Network

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Bilgen, Mehmet; Al-Hafez, Baraa; Alenezy, Mohammed D.; Smirnova, Irina V.

    2006-04-04

    . The functional abnormalities of diabetic myocardium have been attributed to the pathological changes of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Methods: In this study, we used high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the left ventricular functional...

  16. The Patient's Attitude Toward Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, a Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemi, Reyhaneh; Sedaghat, Mojtaba

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes is an important health problem through the world. In comprehensive diabetes care, therapists must understand not just the observable behavior but the underlying attitudes which drive that behavior. Health, then sickness, has many aspects, and one of the famous descriptions is guided by WHO. This study aimed to explore dimensions of attitudes in diabetic patients about their disease, attending two medical centers in Tehran (capital of Iran). We conducted the open semi-structured face-to-face interviews with 27 patients. We used new methods for collecting data, reliability, validity, analyzing and ethical approval. We identified eighteen themes in four aspects of attitude: physical, mental, social and spiritual. Based on health promotion idea, we can divide themes in two broad categories: progressive attitude toward the higher level of health care and inhibitors attitude for this. The result of this research can be used in evidence-based education and management programs in comprehensive care of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24599712

  17. Barriers to medication taking among Kuwaiti patients with type 2 diabetes: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Jeragh-Alhaddad, Fatima B; Waheedi, Mohammad; Barber, Nick D; Brock, Tina Penick

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonadherence to medications among Kuwaitis with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is believed to be a major barrier to appropriate management of the disease. Published studies of barriers to medication adherence in T2DM suggest a Western bias, which may not adequately describe the Kuwaiti experience. Aim The purpose of this study was to explore barriers to medication adherence among Kuwaiti adults with T2DM. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 Kuwaiti patients with type 2 diabetes. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Barriers to medication adherence were identified. Emerging themes were: 1) lack of education/awareness about diabetes/medications, 2) beliefs about medicines/diabetes, 3) spirituality and God-centered locus of control, 4) attitudes toward diabetes 5) perceptions of self-expertise with the disease and body awareness, 6) social stigma, 7) perceptions of social support, 8) impact of illness on patient’s life, 9) perceptions of health care providers’ attitudes toward patients, and 10) health system-related factors, such as access difficulties and inequalities of medication supply and services. Conclusion Personal, sociocultural, religious, health care provider, and health care system-related factors may impede medication adherence among Kuwaitis with type 2 diabetes. Interventions to improve care and therapeutic outcomes in this particular population must recognize and attempt to resolve these factors. PMID:26604702

  18. Prediction of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in siblings of children with diabetes. A population-based study. The Childhood Diabetes in Finland Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Kulmala, P; Savola, K; Petersen, J S; Vähäsalo, P; Karjalainen, J; Löppönen, T; Dyrberg, T; Akerblom, H K; Knip, M

    1998-01-01

    An unselected population of 755 siblings of children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) was studied to evaluate the predictive characteristics of islet cell antibodies (ICA), antibodies to the IA-2 protein (IA-2A), antibodies to the 65-kD isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA), insulin autoantibodies (IAA), and combinations of these markers. We also evaluated whether the histochemical ICA test could be replaced by the combined detection of other markers. 32 siblings progressed to IDDM within 7.7 yr of the initial sample taken at or close to the diagnosis of the index case (median follow-up, 9.1 yr). The positive predictive values of ICA, IA-2A, GADA, and IAA were 43, 55, 42, and 29%, and their sensitivities 81, 69, 69, and 25%, respectively. In contrast to the other three antibody specificities, GADA levels were not related to the risk for IDDM. The risk for IDDM in siblings with four, three, two, one, or no antibodies was 40, 70, 25, 2, and 0.8%, respectively. Combined screening for IA-2A and GADA identified 70% of all ICA-positive siblings, and all of the ICA-positive progressors were also positive for at least one of the three other markers. The sensitivity of the combined analysis of IA-2A and GADA was 81%, and the positive predictive value was 41%. In conclusion, combined screening for IA-2A and GADA may replace the ICA assay, giving comparable sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value. Accurate assessment of the risk for IDDM in siblings is complicated, as not even all those with four antibody specificities contract the disease, and some with only one or no antibodies initially will progress to IDDM. PMID:9435304

  19. Betacellulin in Chronic Periodontitis Patients With and Without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Kalburgi, Nagaraj B.; Bilichodmath, Shivaprasad; Warad, Shivaraj B.; Ugale, Mahesh S.; Koregol, Arati C.; Bijjargi, Shobha C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The host immune response to bacterial dental plaque determines periodontal disease susceptibility by increasing the secretion of inflammatory cytokines. The Epidermal Growth Factor family cytokines stimulate proliferation and keratinization of cells in dermis and oral epithelium. Epidermal Growth Factor family consists of Amphiregulin, Betacellulin, Epiregulin, Epigen, Heparin binding Epidermal Growth Factor like growth factor and transforming Growth Factor-alpha. Aim The current study aimed to investigate expression of Betacellulin in chronic periodontitis patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus and thereby assessing role of betacellulin in periodontal health and disease. Materials and Methods Present study comprised of 90 participants, age ranges from 18 to 60-year-old, for the period of March 2010 to May 2011. Participants were categorized into three groups based Gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CA Loss). Group 1 consisted 30 individuals with clinically healthy periodontium, Group-2 consisted 30 individuals with GI>1, PD?5 mm, and CA Loss>3 mm. Group-3 (Chronic Periodontitis with type 2 diabetes mellitus) consisted 30 with GI >1, PD?5 mm, and CA Loss>3 mm. Immunohistochemical localization and quantification of Betacellulin was done in gingival tissue samples from all groups. Results Data showed expression of Betacellulin were higher in chronic periodontitis as compared to healthy. A positive correlation found in Betacellulin expression and Probing Depth in chronic periodontitis. Conclusion This footmark study impacts the role of Betacellulin in pathogenesis and progression of periodontal disease which will help in exploration of novel immunotherapeutic strategies and immunological research activity in this field. PMID:26673371

  20. Depression among Korean Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Ansan-Community-Based Epidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Young; Kim, So Young; Gil, Jong Won; Park, Min Hee; Park, Jong-Hyock; Kim, Yeonjung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There are an increasing number of studies being carried out on depression in patients with diabetes. Individuals with diabetes have been reported as having a higher prevalence of depression compared to those without diabetes. However, only a few studies involving Korean patients have been conducted. The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence of depression and to find various risk factors according to the degree of depression among Korean patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods An Ansan-community-based epidemiological study was conducted from 2005 to 2012. The total number of participants in this study was 3,540, from which patients with diabetes (n = 753) have been selected. The presence of depression was evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory total score. Results The prevalence of depression was 28.8%. The mean age of participants was 55.5 ± 8.2 years. We divided the participants into three groups (without-depression, moderate-depression, and severe-depression groups) to examine the depression prevalence among Korean T2DM patients. The unemployed participants had 2.40 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21–4.76], the low-income participants had 2.57 (95% CI 1.52–4.35), the participants using an oral diabetes medicine or insulin had 2.03 (95% CI 1.25–3.32), the participants who are currently smoking had 2.03 (95% CI 1.10–3.73), and those without regular exercise had 1.91 (95% CI 1.17–3.14) times higher odds of depression in the severe-depression group, compared with the without-depression group. Conclusion There was a significant association between depression prevalence and diabetes, and we found various risk factors according to the degree of depression in Korean patients with T2DM. PMID:26473089

  1. Change in sleep duration and type 2 diabetes: the Whitehall II study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrie, Jane E; Kivimäki, Mika; Akbaraly, Tasnime N; Tabak, Adam; Abell, Jessica; Smith, George Davey; Virtanen, Marianna; Kumari, Meena; Shipley, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that short and long sleep are associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. Using successive data waves spanning more than 20 years we examined whether a change in sleep duration is associated with incident diabetes. Research Design and Methods Sleep duration was reported at the beginning and end of four 5-year cycles: 1985-88 to 1991-94 (N=5613); 1991-94 to 1997-99 (N=4193); 1997-99 to 2002-04 (N=3840); 2002-04 to 2007-09 (N=4195). At each cycle, change in sleep duration was calculated for participants without diabetes. Incident diabetes at the end of the subsequent 5-year period was defined using: (1) fasting glucose; (2) 75g oral glucose tolerance test; and (3) glycated hemoglobin, in conjunction with diabetes medication and self-reported doctor diagnosis. Results Compared to the reference group of persistent 7-hour sleepers, an increase of ?2hours sleep per night was associated with a higher risk of incident diabetes; Odds Ratios (95% Confidence Intervals) 1.65 (95% CI: 1.15, 2.37), in analyses adjusted for age, sex, employment grade and ethnic group. This association was partially attenuated by adjustment for body mass index and change in weight; 1.50 (1.04, 2.16). An increased risk of incident diabetes was also seen in persistent short sleepers (average ?5.5 hours/night); 1.35 (1.04, 1.76), but this evidence weakened on adjustment for body mass index and change in weight; 1.25 (0.96, 1.63). Conclusion This study suggests that individuals whose sleep duration increases are at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Greater weight and weight gain in this group partly explain the association. PMID:26068863

  2. Long-Term Exposure to Road Traffic Noise and Incident Diabetes: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Zorana J.; Nordsborg, Rikke B.; Becker, Thomas; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Background: Road traffic noise at normal urban levels can lead to stress and sleep disturbances. Both excess of stress hormones and reduction in sleep quality and duration may lead to higher risk for type 2 diabetes. Objective: We investigated whether long-term exposure to residential road traffic noise is associated with an increased risk of diabetes. Methods: In the population-based Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort of 57,053 people 50–64 years of age at enrollment in 1993–1997, we identified 3,869 cases of incident diabetes in a national diabetes registry between enrollment and 2006. The mean follow-up time was 9.6 years. Present and historical residential addresses from 1988 through 2006 were identified using a national register, and exposure to road traffic noise was estimated for all addresses. Associations between exposure to road traffic noise and incident diabetes were analyzed in a Cox regression model. Results: A 10-dB higher level of average road traffic noise at diagnosis and during the 5 years preceding diagnosis was associated with an increased risk of incident diabetes, with incidence rate ratios (IRR) of 1.08 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.14) and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.18), respectively, after adjusting for potential confounders including age, body mass index, waist circumference, education, air pollution (nitrogen oxides), and lifestyle characteristics. After applying a stricter definition of diabetes (2,752 cases), we found IRRs of 1.11 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.19) and 1.14 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.22) per 10-dB increase in road traffic noise at diagnosis and during the 5 years preceding diagnosis, respectively. Conclusion: Exposure to residential road traffic noise was associated with a higher risk of diabetes. This study provides further evidence that urban noise may adversely influence population health. PMID:23229017

  3. Salivary alkaline phosphatase and calcium in caries-active type II diabetes mellitus patients: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Mithra N.; Tahiliani, Divya; Shetty, Shilpa; Devadiga, Darshana

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes Mellitus is a metabolic syndrome, affecting the oral health in various ways with dental caries being one of the most common problems encountered. Saliva is one of the most abundant secretions in the human body with a variety of natural protective and defence molecules bathing the oral cavity maintaining equilibrium. Its collection is easy and non-invasive. Aims: To compare and evaluate salivary alkaline phosphatase levels and calcium ion levels between caries active type II diabetes mellitus patients and non-diabetics. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on caries-active age and gender matched 60 non-diabetic and 60 patients with known Type II diabetes mellitus subjects of age group 25-50 years with DMFT index >10. Saliva sample was collected to analyse for alkaline phosphatase enzyme and concentration of calcium ions using Agappe kits. Statistical Analysis: Student ‘t’ test was used to correlate the salivary electrolyte concentration in non- diabetic and diabetic patients with dental caries. A ‘P’ value of 0.05 or less was considered significant. Results are presented as mean ± standard deviation (X ± SD). Results: The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in saliva was higher in diabetic patients when compared to that of non-diabetic patients with salivary calcium ions were significantly higher in non-diabetic individuals. Conclusion: Diabetes Mellitus patients are more prone to dental caries, hence require intervention to improve the quality of saliva. PMID:25395756

  4. Psoriasis and Diabetes: A Multicenter Study in 222078 Type 2 Diabetes Patients Reveals High Levels of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Schwandt, Anke; Bergis, Dominik; Dapp, Albrecht; Ebner, Stefan; Jehle, Peter M.; Köppen, Stefan; Risse, Alexander; Zimny, Stefan; Holl, Reinhard W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to investigate the association between psoriasis and disease outcome in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods. 222078 T2D patients (?10 years old) from the prospective, multicenter diabetes patient registry were analyzed. Specific search items were used to identify psoriasis patients. Multiple regression models were fitted and adjusted for demographic confounder. Results. 232 T2D patients had comorbid psoriasis. After adjusting psoriasis patients revealed a higher BMI (31.8 [31.0; 32.6] versus 30.6 [30.5; 30.6]?kg/m2, p = 0.004) and HbA1c (64.8 [62.1; 67.6] versus 59.0 [58.9; 59.1]?mmol/mol, p < 0.0001). Insulin was used more frequently (62.3 [55.7; 68.5] versus 50.9 [50.7; 51.1] %, p = 0.001), only OAD/GLP-1 was similar, and nonpharmacological treatment was less common (13.3 [9.5; 18.3] versus 21.9 [21.7; 22.1] %, p = 0.002). Severe hypoglycemia (0.31 [0.238; 0.399] versus 0.06 [0.057; 0.060] events per patient-year, p < 0.0001), hypertension (86.1 [81.1; 90.0] versus 68.0 [67.8; 68.2] %, p < 0.0001), and thyroid disease (14.0 [10.1; 19.2] versus 4.6 [4.5; 4.7] %, p < 0.0001) were more prevalent. Depression occurred more often (10.5 [7.1; 15.2] versus 2.8 [2.7; 2.8] %, p < 0.0001). Conclusions. Clinical diabetes characteristics in psoriasis T2D patients were clearly worse compared to patients without psoriasis. Comorbid conditions and depression were more prevalent, and more intensive diabetes therapy was required. PMID:26357664

  5. Chronic weight dissatisfaction predicts type 2 diabetes risk: Aerobic Center Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Michael; Blake, Christine E.; Hébert, James R.; Sui, Xuemei; Blair, Steven N

    2014-01-01

    Objective Weight dissatisfaction, defined as discordance between actual and goal weight, may be associated with increased risk for several obesity-related comorbidities. The purpose of the study was to examine the association between weight dissatisfaction and risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Methods This longitudinal study used data from 9,584 adults enrolled in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study with an average of 5.1±4.1 years of follow-up. Key variables included multiple measures of measured weight, self-reported goal weight, and incident diabetes. Weight dissatisfaction was defined as being above the median of measured weight minus goal weight. Cox proportional hazards regression estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for diabetes incidence by weight dissatisfaction. Results HRs for time-until-diabetes diagnosis revealed that family history of diabetes (HR=1.46, 95%CI=1.13-1.90), age (HR=1.03, 95%CI=1.02-1.04), and weight dissatisfaction (HR=1.83, 95%CI=1.50-2.25) at baseline were statistically significant predictors. Longitudinally, higher risk was observed in individuals who either stayed dissatisfied (HR=2.98, 95%CI=1.98-4.48) or became dissatisfied (HR=1.51, 95%CI=0.79-2.89), compared to those who either stayed satisfied (HR=1.00, referent) or became satisfied (HR=0.98, 95%CI=0.46-2.10). After additional adjustment for BMI, the elevated HR for those who remained dissatisfied compared to those who remained satisfied persisted (HR=2.85, 95%CI=1.89-4.31). Conclusions Chronic weight dissatisfaction increased type 2 diabetes risk. Weight dissatisfaction, regardless of BMI, represents a potentially important psychophysiological modifier of the relationships between BMI and risk of type 2 diabetes and warrants greater attention in future studies of chronic disease risk. PMID:24588630

  6. Predicting major outcomes in type 1 diabetes: a model development and validation study

    PubMed Central

    Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S.; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Costacou, Tina; Miller, Rachel G.; Zgibor, Janice; Chaturvedi, Nish; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Maahs, David M.; Rewers, Marian; Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Groop, Per-Henrik; Fuller, John H.; Moons, Karel G.M.; Orchard, Trevor J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Type 1 diabetes is associated with a higher risk of major vascular complications and death. A reliable method that predicts these outcomes early in the disease process would be helpful in risk classification. We therefore developed such a prognostic model and quantified its performance in independent cohorts. Methods Data were analysed of 1,973 participants with type 1 diabetes who were followed for seven years in the EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study. Strong prognostic factors of major outcomes were combined in a Weibull regression model. The model performance was tested in three different prospective cohorts: Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications study (EDC, n=554), Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy study (FinnDiane, n=2,999) and Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study (CACTI, n=580). Major outcomes included major coronary heart disease, stroke, end-stage renal failure, amputations, blindness and all-cause death. Results 95 EURODIAB patients with type 1 diabetes developed major outcomes during follow-up. Prognostic factors were age, glycated haemoglobin, waist-hip ratio, albumin/creatinine ratio, and HDL cholesterol. A high risk group could be identified with 15% risk after 3-years of follow-up, 24% after 5-years and 32% after 7-years. The discriminative ability of the model was adequate with a C-statistic of 0.74. Discrimination was similar or even better in the independent cohorts: EDC, C-statistic = 0.79; FinnDiane, 0.82; and CACTI, 0.73. Conclusions/Interpretation Our prognostic model that uses easily accessible clinical features can discriminate between type 1 diabetes patients with good and poor prognosis. Such a prognostic model may be helpful in clinical practice and for risk stratification in clinical trials. PMID:25186291

  7. Association between Genetic Variants and Diabetes Mellitus in Iranian Populations: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Khodaeian, Mehrnoosh; Enayati, Samaneh; Tabatabaei-Malazy, Ozra; Amoli, Mahsa M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetes mellitus as the most prevalent metabolic disease is a multifactorial disease which is influenced by environmental and genetic factors. In this systematic review, we assessed the association between genetic variants and diabetes/its complications in studies with Iranian populations. Methods. Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, and Persian web databases were systematically searched up to January 2014. The search terms were “gene,” “polymorphism,” “diabetes,” and “diabetic complications”; nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy, foot ulcer, and CAD (coronary artery diseases); and Persian equivalents. Animal studies, letters to editor, and in vitro studies were excluded. Results. Out of overall 3029 eligible articles, 88 articles were included. We found significant association between CTLA-4, IL-18, VDR, TAP2, IL-12, and CD4 genes and T1DM, HNF? and MODY, haptoglobin, paraoxonase, leptin, TCF7L2, calreticulin, ER?, PPAR-?2, CXCL5, calpain-10, IRS-1 and 2, GSTM1, KCNJ11, eNOS, VDR, INSR, ACE, apoA-I, apo E, adiponectin, PTPN1, CETP, AT1R, resistin, MMP-3, BChE K, AT2R, SUMO4, IL-10, VEGF, MTHFR, and GSTM1 with T2DM or its complications. Discussion. We found some controversial results due to heterogeneity in ethnicity and genetic background. We thought genome wide association studies on large number of samples will be helpful in identifying diabetes susceptible genes as an alternative to studying individual candidate genes in Iranian populations. PMID:26587547

  8. Association between Genetic Variants and Diabetes Mellitus in Iranian Populations: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies.

    PubMed

    Khodaeian, Mehrnoosh; Enayati, Samaneh; Tabatabaei-Malazy, Ozra; Amoli, Mahsa M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetes mellitus as the most prevalent metabolic disease is a multifactorial disease which is influenced by environmental and genetic factors. In this systematic review, we assessed the association between genetic variants and diabetes/its complications in studies with Iranian populations. Methods. Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, and Persian web databases were systematically searched up to January 2014. The search terms were "gene," "polymorphism," "diabetes," and "diabetic complications"; nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy, foot ulcer, and CAD (coronary artery diseases); and Persian equivalents. Animal studies, letters to editor, and in vitro studies were excluded. Results. Out of overall 3029 eligible articles, 88 articles were included. We found significant association between CTLA-4, IL-18, VDR, TAP2, IL-12, and CD4 genes and T1DM, HNF? and MODY, haptoglobin, paraoxonase, leptin, TCF7L2, calreticulin, ER?, PPAR-?2, CXCL5, calpain-10, IRS-1 and 2, GSTM1, KCNJ11, eNOS, VDR, INSR, ACE, apoA-I, apo E, adiponectin, PTPN1, CETP, AT1R, resistin, MMP-3, BChE K, AT2R, SUMO4, IL-10, VEGF, MTHFR, and GSTM1 with T2DM or its complications. Discussion. We found some controversial results due to heterogeneity in ethnicity and genetic background. We thought genome wide association studies on large number of samples will be helpful in identifying diabetes susceptible genes as an alternative to studying individual candidate genes in Iranian populations. PMID:26587547

  9. Photobiomodulation Mitigates Diabetes-Induced Retinopathy by Direct and Indirect Mechanisms: Evidence from Intervention Studies in Pigmented Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haitao; Patel, Shyam; Roberts, Robin; Berkowitz, Bruce A.; Kern, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Daily application of far-red light from the onset of diabetes mitigated diabetes-induced abnormalities in retinas of albino rats. Here, we test the hypothesis that photobiomodulation (PBM) is effective in diabetic, pigmented mice, even when delayed until weeks after onset of diabetes. Direct and indirect effects of PBM on the retina also were studied. Methods Diabetes was induced in C57Bl/6J mice using streptozotocin. Some diabetics were exposed to PBM therapy (4 min/day; 670 nm) daily. In one study, mice were diabetic for 4 weeks before initiation of PBM for an additional 10 weeks. Retinal oxidative stress, inflammation, and retinal function were measured. In some mice, heads were covered with a lead shield during PBM to prevent direct illumination of the eye, or animals were treated with an inhibitor of heme oxygenase-1. In a second study, PBM was initiated immediately after onset of diabetes, and administered daily for 2 months. These mice were examined using manganese-enhanced MRI to assess effects of PBM on transretinal calcium channel function in vivo. Results PBM intervention improved diabetes-induced changes in superoxide generation, leukostasis, expression of ICAM-1, and visual performance. PBM acted in part remotely from the retina because the beneficial effects were achieved even with the head shielded from the light therapy, and because leukocyte-mediated cytotoxicity of retinal endothelial cells was less in diabetics treated with PBM. SnPP+PBM significantly reduced iNOS expression compared to PBM alone, but significantly exacerbated leukostasis. In study 2, PBM largely mitigated diabetes-induced retinal calcium channel dysfunction in all retinal layers. Conclusions PBM induces retinal protection against abnormalities induced by diabetes in pigmented animals, and even as an intervention. Beneficial effects on the retina likely are mediated by both direct and indirect mechanisms. PBM is a novel non-pharmacologic treatment strategy to inhibit early changes of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26426815

  10. Prevalence of diabetes complications in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus and its association with baseline characteristics in the multinational A1chieve study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current International Diabetes Federation guidelines recommend a target HbA1c <7.0%, but many people with diabetes worldwide find this difficult to achieve, increasing their risk of developing complications. This publication examines the prevalence of diabetes complications and its association with baseline characteristics in people with type 2 diabetes who participated in the A1chieve study. Methods A1chieve was a 24-week, multinational, open-label, observational study of 66,726 people with type 2 diabetes who had begun using biphasic insulin aspart 30, insulin aspart, or insulin detemir in routine clinical care. Participants were enrolled from 28 countries across four continents (Asia, Africa, Europe and South America). Baseline measurements of disease characteristics included: glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting (FPG) and post-prandial plasma glucose (PPG), high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (H- or LDL-C), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and body mass index (BMI). Data on complications and use of vascular disease preventative drugs were collected. Results Complication rates were high (27.2% had macrovascular complications and 53.5% had microvascular complications), particularly in Russia, and use of vascular disease preventative drugs was lower than expected. Age, BMI, diabetes duration, LDL-C, and SBP were positively associated, and HDL-C negatively associated, with macro- and microvascular complications (all p?study design. Conclusions These results suggest a worldwide failure to achieve glycaemic targets. Better diabetes management with earlier initiation and optimisation of insulin regimens (e.g., with insulin analogues in the A1chieve population) may reduce the prevalence of vascular complications, improve the lives of people with diabetes and reduce the burden on healthcare systems. PMID:24228724

  11. Determinants of glycemic control in youth with type 2 diabetes at randomization in the TODAY study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate insulin sensitivity and secretion indices and determinants of glycemic control in youth with recent-onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM) at randomization in the TODAY study, the largest study of youth with T2DM to date. We examined estimates of insulin sensitivit...

  12. APOLIPOPROTEIN E GENE POLYMORPHISMS ARE NOT ASSOCIATED WITH DIABETIC RETINOPATHY: THE ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK IN COMMUNITIES STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PURPOSE: Polymorphism of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene has been associated with dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. This study examines the association of APOE polymorphisms and diabetic retinopathy. DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional study. METHODS: We studied 1,398 people aged 49 to ...

  13. Diabetes mellitus and comorbid depression: improvement of both diseases with milnacipran. A replication study (results of the Austrian Major Depression Diabetes Mellitus study group)

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Hofmann, Peter; Kinzl, Johann; Toplak, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Comorbid depression is common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and is associated with greater mortality risk and a higher incidence of diabetic complications and decreased quality of life. In an earlier pilot study, we found that treatment with the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant, milnacipran, significantly improved metabolic parameters in diabetic patients with comorbid depression who had an antidepressant response. We sought to replicate these results in a larger cohort (n = 135). Patients received milnacipran and metformin for 6 months and metabolic parameters and depressive symptoms were measured at baseline and after 3 and 6 months. At the end of the study, 72.6% of patients had an antidepressant response (?50% reduction of baseline Beck Depression Inventory score). Overall, there was significant improvement in the metabolic and anthropometric parameters measured. The number of patients with glycated hemoglobin > 8% (>63.9 mmol/mol), an indicator of poor metabolic control requiring intensive therapeutic intervention, decreased from 31.9% at baseline to 11.9% during the study. As found in the pilot study, levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides were only significantly decreased in antidepressant responders. Body weight was significantly reduced in both responders and nonresponders but the effect size was significantly greater in the responder group. In contrast to the pilot study, fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin were significantly decreased to a similar extent in both antidepressant-responders and nonresponders. The present study thus replicates some of the original findings. The main difference between the present and the pilot study is that in the larger cohort significant reductions in fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin were found in all patients irrespective of whether or not they responded to antidepressant treatment. The present data underline the importance of diagnosis and treatment of comorbid depression in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with milnacipran. PMID:22923994

  14. Diabetic Foot Complications and Their Risk Factors from a Large Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Al Derwish, Mohammad; Ouizi, Samir; Youssef, Amira M.; Subhani, Shazia N.; Ibrahim, Heba M.; Alamri, Bader N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Foot complications are considered to be a serious consequence of diabetes mellitus, posing a major medical and economical threat. Identifying the extent of this problem and its risk factors will enable health providers to set up better prevention programs. Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR), being a large database source, would be the best tool to evaluate this problem. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of a cohort of 62,681 patients aged ?25 years from SNDR database, selected for studying foot complications associated with diabetes and related risk factors. Results The overall prevalence of diabetic foot complications was 3.3% with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of (3.16%–3.44%), whilst the prevalences of foot ulcer, gangrene, and amputations were 2.05% (1.94%–2.16%), 0.19% (0.16%–0.22%), and 1.06% (0.98%–1.14%), respectively. The prevalence of foot complications increased with age and diabetes duration predominantly amongst the male patients. Diabetic foot is more commonly seen among type 2 patients, although it is more prevalent among type 1 diabetic patients. The Univariate analysis showed Charcot joints, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), neuropathy, diabetes duration ?10 years, insulin use, retinopathy, nephropathy, age ?45 years, cerebral vascular disease (CVD), poor glycemic control, coronary artery disease (CAD), male gender, smoking, and hypertension to be significant risk factors with odds ratio and 95% CI at 42.53 (18.16–99.62), 14.47 (8.99–23.31), 12.06 (10.54–13.80), 7.22 (6.10–8.55), 4.69 (4.28–5.14), 4.45 (4.05–4.89), 2.88 (2.43–3.40), 2.81 (2.31–3.43), 2.24 (1.98–2.45), 2.02 (1.84–2.22), 1.54 (1.29–1.83), and 1.51 (1.38–1.65), respectively. Conclusions Risk factors for diabetic foot complications are highly prevalent; they have put these complications at a higher rate and warrant primary and secondary prevention programs to minimize morbidity and mortality in addition to economic impact of the complications. Other measurements, such as decompression of lower extremity nerves, should be considered among diabetic patients. PMID:25946144

  15. Association between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and incident type 2 diabetes: a mendelian randomisation study

    E-print Network

    Ye, Zheng; Sharp, Stephen J.; Burgess, Stephen; Scott, Robert A.; Imamura, Fumiaki; InterAct Consortium; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Forouhi, Nita G.

    2014-09-30

    ciency: a genome-wide association study. Lancet 2010; 376: 180–88. 9 Jorde R, Schirmer H, Wilsgaard T, et al. Polymorphisms related to the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level and risk of myocardial infarction, diabetes, cancer and mortality. The Tromsø... Study. PLoS One 2012; 7: e37295. 10 Buijsse B, Boeing H, Hirche F, et al. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and its genetic determinants in relation to incident type 2 diabetes: a prospective case-cohort study. Euro J Epidemiol 2013; 28: 743–52. 11 Afzal S...

  16. Field of Dreams Program Evaluation: Empowering the Latino Population in Type2 Diabetes Self-Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urteaga, Edie

    2011-01-01

    Adult onset, type2 diabetes affects Latino families at a higher rate than other ethnicities and negatively impacting their quality of life, ability to financially succeed, and ultimately impacting our overall economy. Multiple resources are available in the country to help people learn how to prevent, control, and manage diabetes. However, the…

  17. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in Omani Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharef, Sharef Waadallah; Al-Yaarubi, Saif; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Al-Naamani, Khalid; Al-Hajri, Aisha; Al-Hasani, Said

    2013-01-01

    Objective Published studies on the prevalence of celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus from the Arab World are scant. We aim to report the prevalence of celiac disease in Omani children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods Children with type 1 diabetes mellitus were prospectively screened for celiac disease, at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman over a period of one year (June 2011 - May 2012). Serum anti tissue transglutaminase IgA, endomysial IgA antibodies and total IgA were measured for screening of celiac disease. Children with positive anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or endomysial IgA antibodies underwent endoscopy. Results A total of 103 children with type 1 diabetes mellitus were initially included. Ten patients were lost to follow up. Ninety-three patients aged 2-17 years underwent screening for celiac disease. Sixteen patients had positive anti-tissue transglutaminase (17%). Fourteen patients underwent endoscopy with duodenal biopsies, while two were lost to follow-up. Five patients with positive anti-tissue transglutaminase had intestinal biopsy proven celiac disease. The prevalence of celiac disease is 5.5% in our cohort of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Conclusions The prevalence of celiac disease in Omani children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus is similar to the World’s reported prevalence, but is less than that reported for Middle Eastern Arab children. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study on the prevalence of celiac disease in Omani children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:23904919

  18. Development of cataract caused by diabetes mellitus: Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furi?, Krešimir; Moha?ek-Grošev, Vlasta; Hadžija, Mirko

    2005-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus succeeded by diabetic cataract was induced to experimental animals (Wistar rats) by applying an Alloxan injection. Eye properties deterioration were monitored from clinical standpoint and using Raman and infrared spectroscopies. All cases of developed cataract were followed by important changes in vibrational spectra, but Raman spectroscopy proved to be more useful because of larger number of resolved bands. Each kth Raman spectrum of diseased lens (in our notation k denotes disease age and cataract degree as described in chapter Alloxan diabetes) can be expressed as a sum of the Raman spectrum of healthy lens, I R, multiplied by a suitable constant ck, and the fluorescent background spectrum, I FB. We introduce the ratio of integrated intensities IFB and ck* IR as a physical parameter called fluorescent background index F FB. It turns out that FFB grows as cataract progresses and has its maximum at approx. 4, whence it decreases. FFB values are larger for 200-1800 cm -1 spectral interval than for 2500-4000 cm -1 interval. In the same manner another quantity called water band index FW is defined for each Raman spectrum of diseased lens in the 2800-3730 cm -1 interval. It is the ratio of the integrated intensity from 3100 to 3730 cm -1 (water band interval) divided by the integrated intensity of the 2800-3100 cm -1 interval (C-H stretching region). FW increases monotonously with cataract progression with maximum at the end of monitored period (5 months). These two indices helped us to formulate a model describing disease development from the earliest molecular changes to its macroscopic manifestation. As glucose and other small saccharide molecules enter the lens tissue, they bind to crystallin and other proteins via O- and S-glycosidic linkages which occur probably at tyrosine and cystein sites. In Raman spectrum this corresponds to broad bands at 540 and 1100 cm -1 which grow together with the fluorescent background, because both contributions originate in nonenzimatically glycated proteins. The maximum of possible binding ends after approximately 4 months (cataract degree 4), but the water continues to enter the tissue and resides in water agglomerates. The lens impairing caused by fluorescent light scattering on aberrant glycoproteins and other fluorescent centers appears first and is usually associated with the ageing cataract, while deterioration of lens properties caused by increased binding of water steadily rises with glucose and is characteristic of diabetic cataract. This interpretation is in agreement with electron microscopy results of other groups and with our preliminary findings obtained with light microscopy.

  19. Diabetes Text-Message Self-Management Support Program (SMS4BG): A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Karen; Cutfield, Richard; Hulme, Ashley; Hulme, Richard; McNamara, Catherine; Maddison, Ralph; Murphy, Rinki; Shepherd, Matthew; Strydom, Johan; Whittaker, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of diabetes and costly long-term complications associated with poor glycemic control are issues facing health services worldwide. Diabetes self-management, with the support of health care providers, is critical for successful outcomes, however, frequent clinical contact is costly. Text messages via short message service (SMS) have the advantage of instant transmission at low cost and, given the ubiquity of mobile phones, may be the ideal platform for the delivery of diabetes self-management support. A tailored text message-based diabetes support intervention called Self-Management Support for Blood Glucose (SMS4BG) was developed. The intervention incorporates prompts around diabetes education, management, and lifestyle factors (healthy eating, exercise, and stress management), as well as blood glucose monitoring reminders, and is tailored to patient preferences and clinical characteristics. Objective To determine the usability and acceptability of SMS4BG among adults with poorly controlled diabetes. Methods Adults (aged 17 to 69 years) with type 1 (n=12) or type 2 diabetes (n=30), a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) over 70 mmol/mol (8.6%), and who owned a mobile phone (n=42) were recruited to take part in a 3-month pilot study of SMS4BG. At registration, participants selected the modules they would like to receive and, where appropriate, the frequency and timing of blood glucose monitoring reminders. Patient satisfaction and perceptions of the usability of the program were obtained via semistructured phone interviews conducted at completion of the pilot study. HbA1c was obtained from patient records at baseline and completion of the pilot study. Results Participants received on average 109 messages during the 3-month program with 2 participants withdrawing early from the study. Follow-up interviews were completed with 93% of participants with all reporting SMS4BG to be useful and appropriate to their age and culture. Participants reported a range of perceived positive impacts of SMS4BG on their diabetes and health behaviors. HbA1c results indicated a positive impact of the program on glycemic control with a significant decrease in HbA1c from baseline to follow-up. Conclusions A tailored text message-based intervention is both acceptable and useful in supporting self-management in people with poorly controlled diabetes. A randomized controlled trial of longer duration is needed to assess the efficacy and sustainability of SMS4BG. PMID:25830952

  20. Association of ADIPOQ gene variants with body weight, type 2 diabetes and serum adiponectin concentrations: the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adiponectin, secreted mainly by mature adipocytes, is a protein with insulin-sensitising and anti-atherogenic effects. Human adiponectin is encoded by the ADIPOQ gene on the chromosomal locus 3q27. Variations in ADIPOQ are associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and related phenotypes in several populations. Our aim was to study the association of the ADIPOQ variations with body weight, serum adiponectin concentrations and conversion to T2DM in overweight subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. Moreover, we investigated whether ADIPOQ gene variants modify the effect of lifestyle changes on these traits. Methods Participants in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study were randomly assigned to a lifestyle intervention group or a control group. Those whose DNA was available (n = 507) were genotyped for ten ADIPOQ single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Associations between SNPs and baseline body weight and serum adiponectin concentrations were analysed using the univariate analysis of variance. The 4-year longitudinal weight data were analysed using linear mixed models analysis and the change in serum adiponectin from baseline to year four was analysed using Kruskal-Wallis test. In addition, the association of SNPs with the risk of developing T2DM during the follow-up of 0-11 (mean 6.34) years was analysed by Cox regression analysis. Results rs266729, rs16861205, rs1501299, rs3821799 and rs6773957 associated significantly (p < 0.05) with body weight at baseline and in the longitudinal analyses. The rs266729 C allele and the rare minor alleles of rs2241766 and rs2082940 were associated with an increased adjusted hazard ratio of developing T2DM. The differences in baseline serum adiponectin concentrations were seen according to rs16861210, rs17366568, rs2241766, rs6773957 and rs2082940 and differences in the change of serum adiponectin levels from baseline to the four year examination were seen according to rs16861205, especially in subjects who were able to lose weight during the first year of intervention. Conclusions These results from the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study support the concept that genetic variation in ADIPOQ locus contributes to variation in body size and serum adiponectin concentrations and may also modify the risk of developing T2DM. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00518167 PMID:21219602

  1. Cardiovascular Risk Factors Increase the Risks of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Taiwan Diabetes Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Pai; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Hwang, Kai-Lin; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to examine whether poor glycemic control, measured by glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) and other cardiovascular risk factors, can predict diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM).Patients aged ?30 years with type 2 DM, enrolled in the National Diabetes Care Management Program, and free of DPN (n?=?37,375) in the period 2002 to 2004 were included and followed up until 2011. The related factors were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models.For an average follow-up of 7.00 years, 8379 cases of DPN were identified, with a crude incidence rate of 32.04/1000 person-years. After multivariate adjustment, patients with HbA1c levels 7 to 8%, 8 to 9%, 9 to 10%, and ?10% exhibited higher risk of DPN (adjusted HR: 1.11 [1.04-1.20], 1.30 [1.21-1.40], 1.32 [1.22-1.43], and 1.62 [1.51-1.74], respectively) compared with patients with HbA1c level 6 to 7%. There was a significant linear trend in DPN incidence with increasing HbA1c (P?

  2. Retinopathy Signs in People without Diabetes: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ojaimi, Elvis; Nguyen, Thanh T; Klein, Ronald; Islam, FM Amirul; Cotch, Mary Frances; Klein, Barbara EK; Wang, Jie-Jin; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of retinopathy and associations with cardiovascular risk factors in persons without diabetes in four racial/ethnic groups (white, black, Hispanic and Chinese). Design Population-based cross-sectional study. Participants 6,176 subjects aged 45 to 84 years without diabetes, selected from six United States communities. Methods Fundus images were taken using 45° digital camera through dark adapted pupils and were graded for retinopathy as defined by the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study severity scale: microaneurysms, hemorrhages, cotton wool spots, intraretinal microvascular abnormalities, hard exudates, venous beading and new vessels. Main Outcome Measures Retinopathy and the association with cardiovascular risk factors Results Prevalence rates of retinopathy in persons without diabetes were 12.5% overall, varying from 11.9% (white), 13.9% (black), 12.6% (Hispanic) to 17.2% (Chinese). Hypertension was strongly associated with retinopathy (odds ratio [OR] of 1.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23, 1.75). After adjusting for age, sex, race and other parameters, smoking (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.09, 2.06) and increased internal carotid intima media thickness (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.05, 1.41) were associated with retinopathy. A range of serum inflammatory factors were examined but none were found to be statistically significant. Conclusions Retinopathy in persons without diabetes is common, varies with race/ethnicity and associated with cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, smoking and carotid artery intima media thickness. PMID:21055817

  3. Periodic Acid Schiff-Diastase as a key in Exfoliative cytology in diabetics: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Latti, Bhagyashri R; Birajdar, Sanjeev B; Latti, Ramchandra G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is the fifth most common chronic condition and the sixth most frequent cause of death among the elderly. The objective of this research was to develop a new method for diabetes diagnosis by analysis of the glycogen content of the oral epithelial cells. Materials and Methods: Ten control subjects and ten diabetic patients (study group) were taken, four oral smears for both control and study group from the buccal mucosa were taken and stained with hematoxylin and eosin stain, Papanicolaou (PAP) stain, periodic acid Schiff (PAS) stain and PAS-Diastase (PAS-D) stain. Results: The results showed that in the diabetic group: (i) The epithelial cells stained with PAP stain exhibited figures of binucleation and occasional karyorrhexis, (ii) the epithelial cells treated with PAS-D showed that glycogen containing cells did not take up the stain as compared to the other cells. Conclusion: The results associated with clinical and histological observations suggest that diabetes mellitus can produce alterations of oral epithelial cells as well as in their glycogen content.

  4. A prospective study of occupational status and disability retirement among employees with diabetes in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Cleal, Bryan; Poulsen, Kjeld; Hannerz, Harald; Andersen, Lars L

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the extent and distribution of disability retirement among people with diabetes in the workforce. Using four population registries, the study examined the relative rates of disability retirement among employees in Denmark over a 10-year period. The findings highlight that the risk of disability retirement increases as occupational status decreases. With an ageing workforce and increasing prevalence of diabetes, it is important to target primary, secondary and tertiary prevention to the groups that need it most in attempts to prolong the working lives of individuals. PMID:25667155

  5. Experiences of health care transition voiced by young adults with type 1 diabetes: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Katharine C; Beste, Margaret G; Luff, Donna; Atakov-Castillo, Astrid; Wolpert, Howard A; Ritholz, Marilyn D

    2014-01-01

    Objective This qualitative study aimed to explore the experience of transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care reported by posttransition emerging adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D), with a focus on preparation for the actual transfer in care. Methods Twenty-six T1D emerging adults (mean age 26.2±2.5 years) receiving adult diabetes care at a single center participated in five focus groups stratified by two levels of current glycemic control. A multidisciplinary team coded transcripts and conducted thematic analysis. Results Four key themes on the process of transfer to adult care emerged from a thematic analysis: 1) nonpurposeful transition (patients reported a lack of transition preparation by pediatric providers for the transfer to adult diabetes care); 2) vulnerability in the college years (patients conveyed periods of loss to follow-up during college and described health risks and diabetes management challenges specific to the college years that were inadequately addressed by pediatric or adult providers); 3) unexpected differences between pediatric and adult health care systems (patients were surprised by the different feel of adult diabetes care, especially with regards to an increased focus on diabetes complications); and 4) patients’ wish list for improving the transition process (patients recommended enhanced pediatric transition counseling, implementation of adult clinic orientation programs, and peer support for transitioning patients). Conclusion Our findings identify modifiable deficiencies in the T1D transition process and underscore the importance of a planned transition with enhanced preparation by pediatric clinics as well as developmentally tailored patient orientation in the adult clinic setting. PMID:25349485

  6. Nursing consultations and control of diabetes in general practice: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Murrells, Trevor; Ball, Jane; Maben, Jill; Ashworth, Mark; Griffiths, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes affects around 3.6 million people in the UK. Previous research found that general practices employing more nurses delivered better diabetes care, but did not include data on individual patient characteristics or consultations received. Aim To examine whether the proportion of consultations with patients with diabetes provided by nurses in GP practices is associated with control of diabetes measured by levels of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Design and setting A retrospective observational study using consultation records from 319 649 patients with diabetes from 471 UK general practices from 2002 to 2011. Method Hierarchical multilevel models to examine associations between proportion of consultations undertaken by nurses and attaining HbA1c targets over time, controlling for case-mix and practice level factors. Results The proportion of consultations with nurses has increased by 20% since 2002 but patients with diabetes made fewer consultations per year in 2011 compared with 2002 (11.6 versus 16.0). Glycaemic control has improved and was more uniformly achieved in 2011 than 2002. Practices in which nurses provide a higher proportion of consultations perform no differently to those where nurse input is lower (lowest versus highest nurse contact tertile odds ratio [OR] [confidence interval {95% CI}]: HbA1c ?53 mmol/mol (7%) 2002, 1.04 [95% CI = 0.87 to 1.25] and 2011, 0.95 [95% CI = 0.87 to 1.03]; HbA1c ?86 mmol/mol (10%) 2002, 0.97 [95% CI = 0.73 to 1.29] and 2011, 0.95 [95% CI = 0.86 to 1.04]). Conclusion Practices that primarily use GPs to deliver diabetes care could release significant resources with no adverse effect by switching their services towards nurse-led care. PMID:26412840

  7. ‘I'm not a druggie, I'm just a diabetic’: a qualitative study of stigma from the perspective of adults with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Jessica L; Ventura, Adriana; Mosely, Kylie; Speight, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Objectives While health-related stigma has been the subject of considerable research in other conditions (eg, HIV/AIDS, obesity), it has not received substantial attention in diabetes. Our aim was to explore perceptions and experiences of diabetes-related stigma from the perspective of adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Design A qualitative study using semistructured interviews, which were audio recorded, transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. Setting All interviews were conducted in non-clinical settings in metropolitan areas of Victoria, Australia. Participants Adults aged ?18?years with T1DM living in Victoria were eligible to take part. Participants were recruited primarily through the state consumer organisation representing people with diabetes. A total of 27 adults with T1DM took part: 15 (56%) were women; median IQR age was 42 (23) years and diabetes duration was 15 (20) years). Results Australian adults with T1DM perceive and experience T1DM-specific stigma as well as stigma-by-association with type 2 diabetes. Such stigma is characterised by blame, negative social judgement, stereotyping, exclusion, rejection and discrimination. Participants identified the media, family and friends, healthcare professionals and school teachers as sources of stigma. The negative consequences of this stigma span numerous life domains, including impact on relationships and social identity, emotional well-being and behavioural management of T1DM. This stigma also led to reluctance to disclose the condition in various environments. Adults with T1DM can be both the target and the source of diabetes-related stigma. Conclusions Stigmatisation is part of the social experience of living with T1DM for Australian adults. Strategies and interventions to address and mitigate this diabetes-related stigma need to be developed and evaluated. PMID:25056982

  8. Mothers After Gestational Diabetes in Australia Diabetes Prevention Program (MAGDA-DPP) post-natal intervention: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as glucose intolerance with its onset or first recognition during pregnancy. Post-GDM women have a life-time risk exceeding 70% of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Lifestyle modifications reduce the incidence of T2DM by up to 58% for high-risk individuals. Methods/Design The Mothers After Gestational Diabetes in Australia Diabetes Prevention Program (MAGDA-DPP) is a randomized controlled trial aiming to assess the effectiveness of a structured diabetes prevention intervention for post-GDM women. This trial has an intervention group participating in a diabetes prevention program (DPP), and a control group receiving usual care from their general practitioners during the same time period. The 12-month intervention comprises an individual session followed by five group sessions at two-week intervals, and two follow-up telephone calls. A total of 574 women will be recruited, with 287 in each arm. The women will undergo blood tests, anthropometric measurements, and self-reported health status, diet, physical activity, quality of life, depression, risk perception and healthcare service usage, at baseline and 12 months. At completion, primary outcome (changes in diabetes risk) and secondary outcome (changes in psychosocial and quality of life measurements and in cardiovascular disease risk factors) will be assessed in both groups. Discussion This study aims to show whether MAGDA-DPP leads to a reduction in diabetes risk for post-GDM women. The characteristics that predict intervention completion and improvement in clinical and behavioral measures will be useful for further development of DPPs for this population. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ANZCTRN 12610000338066 PMID:24135085

  9. Creative Expression as a Way of Knowing in Diabetes Adult Health Education: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuckey, Heather L.

    2009-01-01

    This action research study explores the meaning-making process using forms of creative expression for eight women with insulin-dependent diabetes. The study is theoretically informed by arts-based ways of knowing and aspects of feminist poststructuralism, and explains the process of creativity used in the action research process. The findings…

  10. The Influence of Ethnicity on the Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Women with Gestational Diabetes: A Prospective Study and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Christian M.; Gunton, Jenny E.; Cheung, N. Wah

    2012-01-01

    As the worldwide prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to rise at an alarming rate, the search for susceptible populations likely to benefit from preventative measures becomes more important. One such population is women with a previous history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). In this prospective study of 101 women who had GDM in Australia, ethnicity was a major risk factor for the development of diabetes following a diagnosis of GDM. With a mean followup of 5.5 years after GDM, South Asian women had a significantly higher risk of developing abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT) (69%) than women of all other ethnicities (P < 0.05). The prevalence of diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance was also very high amongst other groups: South East and East Asian (11/27, 41%), Middle-Eastern (8/18, 44%), South European backgrounds (5/12, 42%), and Australian-born women 39% (11/28). A review of the literature supports the role of ethnicity in the development of diabetes amongst these women. These findings have implications for South Asian countries and countries such as Australia where there is a population from diverse ethnic backgrounds and where the implementation of targeted measures to stem the growing tide of diabetes is needed. PMID:22577574

  11. Risk factors for development of incipient and overt diabetic nephropathy in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus: prospective, observational study.

    PubMed Central

    Gall, M. A.; Hougaard, P.; Borch-Johnsen, K.; Parving, H. H.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate putative risk factors for the development of incipient diabetic nephropathy (persistent microalbuminuria) and overt diabetic nephropathy (persistent macroalbuminuria) in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes. DESIGN: Prospective, observational study of a cohort of white, non-insulin dependent diabetic patients followed for a median period of 5.8 years. SETTING: Outpatient clinic in tertiary referral centre. SUBJECTS: 191 patients aged under 66 years with non-insulin dependent diabetes and normoalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion rate < 30 mg/24 h) who attended the clinic during 1987. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incipient and overt diabetic nephropathy. RESULTS: Fifteen patients were lost to follow up. Thirty six of the 176 remaining developed persistent microalbuminuria (30-299 mg/24 h in two out of three consecutive 24 hour urine collections) and five developed persistent macroalbuminuria (> or = mg/24 h in two out of three consecutive collections) during follow up. The five year cumulative incidence of incipient diabetic nephropathy was 23% (95% confidence interval 17% to 30%). Cox's multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed the following risk factors for the development of incipient or overt diabetic nephropathy: increased baseline log urinary albumin excretion rate (relative risk 11.1 (3.4 to 35.9); P < 0.0001); male sex (2.6 (1.2 to 5.4); P < 0.02); presence of retinopathy (2.4 (1.3 to 4.7); P < 0.01); increased serum cholesterol concentration (1.4 (1.1 to 1.7); P < 0.01); haemoglobin A1c concentration (1.2 (1.0 to 1.4); P < 0.05); and age (1.07 (1.02 to 1.12); P < 0.01). Known duration of diabetes, body mass index, arterial blood pressure, serum creatinine concentration, pre-existing coronary heart disease, and history of smoking were not risk factors. CONCLUSION: Several potentially modifiable risk factors predict the development of incipient and overt diabetic nephropathy in normoalbuminuric patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes. PMID:9080995

  12. Assessing generalisability through the use of disease registers: findings from a diabetes cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Robert; Donald, Maria; Alati, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Knowledge of a study population's similarity to the target population allows researchers to assess the generalisability of their results. Often generalisability is assessed through a comparison of baseline characteristics between individuals who did and did not respond to an invitation to participate in a study. In this prospective population-based cohort, we broadened this assessment by comparing participants with all individuals from a chronic disease register who satisfied the study eligibility criteria but for a number of reasons, such as the absence of consent to be approached for research purposes, did not participate. Methods Data are from the Living with Diabetes Study, a population-based cohort of individuals diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, which commenced in Queensland, Australia in 2008. Individuals were sampled from a federally-funded diabetes register. We compared the characteristics of 3951 study participants with 10?488 non-participants (individuals who were invited to participate but declined) and with 129?900 non-study individuals on the register who did not participate in the study. Results Study participants were more likely than non-study registrants to be male, aged 50–69, have type 2 diabetes non-insulin requiring, be recently registered and be non-indigenous Australians. Study participants were more likely than non-participants to be aged 50–69, have type 1 diabetes and be non-indigenous Australians. Conclusions The interpretation of a study's generalisability can alter depending on which non-participating group is compared with participants. When assessing generalisability, participants should be compared with the largest possible group of non-participating individuals. When sampling from a disease register, researchers should be wary of the influence of research consent procedures on the register's coverage. PMID:22021752

  13. 49 CFR 391.64 - Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. 391.64 Section 391.64 Transportation Other Regulations... in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. (a) The provisions of § 391.41(b)(3) do not apply to a... month); (iii) Able to and has demonstrated willingness to properly monitor and manage his/her...

  14. 49 CFR 391.64 - Grandfathering for certain drivers participating in vision and diabetes waiver study programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. 391.64 Section 391.64 Transportation Other Regulations... in vision and diabetes waiver study programs. (a) The provisions of § 391.41(b)(3) do not apply to a... month); (iii) Able to and has demonstrated willingness to properly monitor and manage his/her...

  15. Health literacy issues in the care of Chinese American immigrants with diabetes: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela Yee Man; Bo, Ai; Hsiao, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Song Song; Chi, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate why first-generation Chinese immigrants with diabetes have difficulty obtaining, processing and understanding diabetes related information despite the existence of translated materials and translators. Design This qualitative study employed purposive sampling. Six focus groups and two individual interviews were conducted. Each group discussion lasted approximately 90?min and was guided by semistructured and open-ended questions. Setting Data were collected in two community health centres and one elderly retirement village in Los Angeles, California. Participants 29 Chinese immigrants aged ?45 years and diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for at least 1?year. Results Eight key themes were found to potentially affect Chinese immigrants' capacity to obtain, communicate, process and understand diabetes related health information and consequently alter their decision making in self-care. Among the themes, three major categories emerged: cultural factors, structural barriers, and personal barriers. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of cultural sensitivity when working with first-generation Chinese immigrants with diabetes. Implications for health professionals, local community centres and other potential service providers are discussed. PMID:25406155

  16. A national study of problematic care experiences among Latinos with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Hector P; Chen, Jie; Rodriguez, Michael A

    2010-11-01

    Despite the large disease burden of diabetes, little is known about the care experiences of Latinos with diabetes across diverse primary care settings. This study compares problematic care experiences among Latinos with diabetes across usual care sites (community health centers [CHCs], private physician practices, or without a usual source of care), using a national sample of Latino diabetic patients (N=583). Nearly half of the respondents reported at least one problematic care experience during their last clinician visit. Compared with respondents treated primarily by private physicians, respondents receiving care in CHCs or without a usual source of care reported more problematic care experiences. However, patient health insurance coverage and acculturation accounted for the highest proportion of explainable differences in problematic care experiences between CHCs and private physician offices. Initiatives should clarify the extent to which the care experiences of Latino diabetics, particularly uninsured and less acculturated patients who tend to be cared for by CHCs, can be improved through clinician communication and patient self-management interventions. PMID:21099068

  17. Antidiabetic Properties of Azardiracta indica and Bougainvillea spectabilis: In Vivo Studies in Murine Diabetes Model

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Menakshi; Kothiwale, Sandeepkumar K.; Tirmale, Amruta R.; Bhargava, Shobha Y.; Joshi, Bimba N.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic syndrome characterized by an increase in the blood glucose level. Treatment of diabetes is complicated due to multifactorial nature of the disease. Azadirachta indica Adr. Juss and Bougainvillea spectabilis are reported to have medicinal values including antidiabetic properties. In the present study using invivo diabetic murine model, A. indica and B. spectabilis chloroform, methanolic and aqueous extracts were investigated for the biochemical parameters important for controlling diabetes. It was found that A. indica chloroform extract and B. spectabilis aqueous, methanolic extracts showed a good oral glucose tolerance and significantly reduced the intestinal glucosidase activity. Interestingly, A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous extracts showed significant increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and hepatic, skeletal muscle glycogen content after 21 days of treatment. In immunohistochemical analysis, we observed a regeneration of insulin-producing cells and corresponding increase in the plasma insulin and c-peptide levels with the treatment of A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous, methanolic extracts. Analyzing the results, it is clear that A. indica chloroform and B. spectabilis aqueous extracts are good candidates for developing new neutraceuticals treatment for diabetes. PMID:19389871

  18. Biventricular function and glycemic load in type 1 diabetic children: Doppler tissue-imaging study.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Ahmed Anwer; Soliman, Mahmoud Ali

    2015-02-01

    To assess right- and left-ventricular function in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) as well as correlate cardiac function with diabetes duration and state of metabolic control. The present study included 30 patients with type 1 DM (group 1) and 20 apparently normal children with comparable age and sex as controls (group 2). All children were subjected to detailed history, clinical examination, and routine laboratory investigations, including glycated hemoglobin, as well as conventional echocardiographic and tissue Doppler examination. Children with type 1 DM have impaired diastolic function in both left and right ventricles before the development of systolic dysfunction when assessed with either conventional or tissue Doppler echocardiography. Resting heart rate in diabetic patients showed a significant positive correlation with mitral A flow velocity and a significant negative correlation with mitral and tricuspid E/A ratio. Regarding morphological parameters of the left ventricle, all dimensions and volumes were comparable between diabetic patients and controls; however, a significant positive correlation was found between interventricular septal thickness at diastole (IVSd), interventricular septal thickness at systole (IVSs), and left ventricular posterior wall at systole (LVPWs) and the duration of diabetes. Children with type 1 DM have impaired diastolic function in both left and right ventricles with normal systolic function when assessed with either conventional or tissue Doppler echocardiography. PMID:25304244

  19. Selective Immunoglobulin A Deficiency in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Prevalence Study in Western Sicily (Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between type 1 diabetes and immunoglobulin A deficiency (IgA-D) has long been recognized in many populations. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of IgA-D in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus all coming from a defined geographical area and to investigate the clinical features of these subjects. Methods The records of 150 consecutive patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus referred in a period of one year were analyzed. A detailed history was obtained for each patient. Information was collected concerning age, gender, time of onset of diabetes, and presence of other autoimmune diseases. Results Out of 150 patients with type 1 diabetes, eight (5.3%) had a diagnosis of IgA-D. There were one female and seven male; all these patients were diagnosed by screening: none of them had history of recurrent infections. Autoimmune thyroiditis was coexisting in five patients (62%). Although other associated autoimmune disorders were found in a number of patients, there was no different prevalence rate in IgA deficient patients. Conclusion This study shows the prevalence of IgA-D in Sicilian patients with type 1 diabetes as 5.3% which is much higher than reported in other Italian studies. Moreover, our data show a high prevalence of IgA-D in male gender and describe thyroiditis as the most frequent autoimmune disease present in these patients. Finally, in our case report, IgA-D diagnosis always followed routine IgA measurement when case finding for celiac disease with no history of recurrent infections in each patient. PMID:25922807

  20. Neighborhood level risk factors for type 1 diabetes in youth: the SEARCH case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background European ecologic studies suggest higher socioeconomic status is associated with higher incidence of type 1 diabetes. Using data from a case-control study of diabetes among racially/ethnically diverse youth in the United States (U.S.), we aimed to evaluate the independent impact of neighborhood characteristics on type 1 diabetes risk. Data were available for 507 youth with type 1 diabetes and 208 healthy controls aged 10-22 years recruited in South Carolina and Colorado in 2003-2006. Home addresses were used to identify Census tracts of residence. Neighborhood-level variables were obtained from 2000 U.S. Census. Multivariate generalized linear mixed models were applied. Results Controlling for individual risk factors (age, gender, race/ethnicity, infant feeding, birth weight, maternal age, number of household residents, parental education, income, state), higher neighborhood household income (p = 0.005), proportion of population in managerial jobs (p = 0.02), with at least high school education (p = 0.005), working outside the county (p = 0.04) and vehicle ownership (p = 0.03) were each independently associated with increased odds of type 1 diabetes. Conversely, higher percent minority population (p = 0.0003), income from social security (p = 0.002), proportion of crowded households (0.0497) and poverty (p = 0.008) were associated with a decreased odds. Conclusions Our study suggests that neighborhood characteristics related to greater affluence, occupation, and education are associated with higher type 1 diabetes risk. Further research is needed to understand mechanisms underlying the influence of neighborhood context. PMID:22230476

  1. Relationship between Type 2 Diabetes and Inflammation Diseases: Cohort Study in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, Yansong; ZHANG, Guilan; CHEN, Zhilai; ZENG, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to investigate the association of seven common inflammatory diseases with Type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the Chinese Mainland population. Methods: Participants were recruited from a great swathe of mainland from 2009 to 2013 for the cohort study. The demographic characteristics between patients with T2D or with inflammatory diseases, including age, sex, smoking status, hypertension etc. were analyzed using the ?2 test. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the independent effects of diabetes on the risks of any types of inflammatory diseases in the model and age, sex, hypertension and gout adjusted were used after that. Results: A total of 39367 participants were enrolled in the study and 1634 (4.2%) subjects with missing information on T2D and the inflammatory diseases were excluded. Compared to those without diabetes, after adjusting for age, sex, hypertension and gout, the incidences of asthma, chronic hepatitis, chronic bronchitis, chronic gastroenteritis, chronic gastritis or ulcer in diabetic patients were independently higher, with odd ratios of 0.235 (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 0.117–0.473), 0.845 (95% CI, 0.731–0.976), 0.585 (95% CI, 0.540–0.634), 0.875 (95% CI, 0.806–0.951), 0.843 (95% CI, 0.787–0.903) respectively. Only inflammatory hemorrhoid did not show any clinical significance. Conclusion: There was a decreased incidence of inflammatory diseases in the diabetic patients compared with non-diabetic subjects. Except for inflammatory hemorrhoid, asthma, chronic hepatitis, chronic bronchitis, chronic gastroenteritis, chronic gastritis and ulcer were associated with T2D of Chinese individuals, independently of hypertension and gout, and T2D might reduce the risk of these diseases.

  2. EDF field operation computerization study

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, L.; Pirus, D.

    2006-07-01

    The main control room has been the subject of extensive research and actions into improved operations assistance. On the other hand, few studies concern the need for field operation improvements, which have few assistance resources adapted to working requirements. Why? Past studies have shown the inability of technology to assume job constraints (insufficient screen readability, excessive equipment weight, prohibitive response times). Nevertheless, today new technologies can be adapted to field operations, and they justify further study. Real needs exist: local operations are often complex and are led in difficult environments where conditions prevent the use of paper-based documents. The issue is a significant risk of error which might impact plant reliability. The cumbersome nature of paper procedures, the working environment and the operational feed-back of experience led us to concentrate on the field operation to identify how it may be improved by the use of these new technologies. Such equipment would allow a better traceability and quality of actions. Possibility of communications with other plant personnel and information sharing may be also immediately available for all. This paper presents a study which intends to collect assistance requirements through an analysis of working practices and organizations with local personnel. Our aim is to identify which of those might benefit from IT support. This collection was obtained through interviews and observations. These two methods helped us to define potential needs, constraints and consequences for work organization. This paper presents the study results and findings, identifies professions which may benefit from the use of wearable computers and describes how the reliability and efficiency of human actions would be improved. Finally we identify design requirements and criteria to be used for writing the technical specifications for a test prototype. (authors)

  3. Buddy Study: Partners for better health in adolescents with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sylvetsky, Allison C; Nandagopal, Radha; Nguyen, Tammy T; Abegg, Marisa R; Nagarur, Mahathi; Kaplowitz, Paul; Rother, Kristina I

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether assigning young, healthy and motivated lay volunteer partners (“buddies”) to adolescents with type 2 diabetes improves hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). METHODS: Adolescents with type 2 diabetes were randomized to partnering with a “buddy” or to conventional treatment. During the initial screening visit, which coincided with a routine outpatient diabetes clinic visit, patients with type 2 diabetes underwent a physical examination, detailed medical history, laboratory measurement of HbA1c, and completed two questionnaires (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory and Children’s Depression Inventory) to assess their overall quality of life and the presence of depressive symptoms. Patients were then randomized to the intervention (the buddy system) or conventional treatment (standard care). All patients were scheduled to return for follow-up at 3- and 6-mo after their initial visit. HbA1c was determined at all visits (i.e., at screening and at the 3- and 6-mo follow-up visits) and quality of life and depressive symptoms were evaluated at the screening visit and were reassessed at the 6-mo visit. RESULTS: Ten adolescents, recruited from a pool of approximately 200 adolescents, enrolled over a two-year time period, leading to premature termination of the study. In contrast, we easily recruited motivated lay volunteers. We found no change in HbA1c from the initial to the 6-mo visit in either group, yet our small sample size limited systematic assessment of this outcome. Participants repeatedly missed clinic appointments, failed to conduct self-glucose-monitoring and rarely brought their glucometers to clinic visits. Total quality of life scores (72.6 ± 6.06) at screening were similar to previously reported scores in adolescents with type 2 diabetes (75.7 ± 15.0) and lower than scores reported in normal-weight (81.2 ± 0.9), overweight (83.5 ± 1.8), and obese youths without diabetes (78.5 ± 1.8) or in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (80.5 ± 13.1). Among adolescents who returned for their 6-mo visit, there were no differences in total quality of life scores (70.2 ± 9.18) between screening and follow-up. CONCLUSION: Our approach, effective in adults with type 2 diabetes, was unsuccessful among adolescents and emphasizes the need for innovative strategies for diabetes treatment in adolescent patients. PMID:26722619

  4. Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus; frequency and related risk factors: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Ghafari, Ali; PourAli, Reza; Sepehrvand, Nariman; Hatami, Sanaz; Modarres, Vanooshe

    2010-09-01

    Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a serious complication after organ transplantation, which could lead to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The rate of PTDM increased in recent years, probably due to new immunosuppressive drugs such as Tacrolimus. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the frequency of PTDM and related risk factors in 644 non diabetic patients who underwent renal transplantation. Data was analyzed by chi-square and Fisher's exact test in SPSS software ver11.5. Among 644 patients PTDM developed in 10.2% similar to literature. PTDM was significantly correlated to age (P value = 0.000), positive familial history (P= 0.003) and HBV infection (P= 0.046). In conclusion, PTDM is not uncommon in Iranian patients and a positive family history of diabetes, HBV infection and older age increases the likelihood to develop PTDM. PMID:20814117

  5. Neurological Consequences of Diabetic Ketoacidosis at Initial Presentation of Type 1 Diabetes in a Prospective Cohort Study of Children

    PubMed Central

    Scratch, Shannon E.; Nadebaum, Caroline; Northam, Elisabeth A.; Koves, Ildiko; Jennings, Juliet; Finney, Kristina; Neil, Jeffrey J.; Wellard, R. Mark; Mackay, Mark; Inder, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the impact of new-onset diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) during childhood on brain morphology and function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients aged 6–18 years with and without DKA at diagnosis were studied at four time points: <48 h, 5 days, 28 days, and 6 months postdiagnosis. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy with cognitive assessment at each time point. Relationships between clinical characteristics at presentation and MRI and neurologic outcomes were examined using multiple linear regression, repeated-measures, and ANCOVA analyses. RESULTS Thirty-six DKA and 59 non-DKA patients were recruited between 2004 and 2009. With DKA, cerebral white matter showed the greatest alterations with increased total white matter volume and higher mean diffusivity in the frontal, temporal, and parietal white matter. Total white matter volume decreased over the first 6 months. For gray matter in DKA patients, total volume was lower at baseline and increased over 6 months. Lower levels of N-acetylaspartate were noted at baseline in the frontal gray matter and basal ganglia. Mental state scores were lower at baseline and at 5 days. Of note, although changes in total and regional brain volumes over the first 5 days resolved, they were associated with poorer delayed memory recall and poorer sustained and divided attention at 6 months. Age at time of presentation and pH level were predictors of neuroimaging and functional outcomes. CONCLUSIONS DKA at type 1 diabetes diagnosis results in morphologic and functional brain changes. These changes are associated with adverse neurocognitive outcomes in the medium term. PMID:24855156

  6. Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Are at an Increased Risk of Gout But This Is Not Due to Diabetes: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wijnands, José Maria Andreas; van Durme, Caroline Marie Pierre Ghislaine; Driessen, Johanna Hendrika Maria; Boonen, Annelies; Klop, Corinne; Leufkens, Bert; Cooper, Cyrus; Stehouwer, Coen Dirk Adriaan; de Vries, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The relationship between type 2 diabetes and gout is complex. The objective of this study was to understand the role of diabetes itself and its comorbidities within the association between type 2 diabetes and gout.We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) GOLD. Persons with type 2 diabetes were identified as persons on a noninsulin antidiabetic drug (NIAD) between 2004 and 2012, and were matched to 1 control based on age, sex, and general practice. We estimated gout risk in NIAD users using Cox regression analysis. All analyses were stratified for sex.In total, 221,117 NIAD users were identified. NIAD users had an increased risk of gout (hazard ratio (HR) 1.48; 95% CI 1.41-1.54). This association was stronger in women (HR 2.23; 95% CI 2.07-2.41) compared with men (HR 1.19; 95% CI 1.13-1.26). After adjustments for BMI, eGFR, hypertension, renal transplantation, diuretics, statins, low-dose aspirin, ciclosporin, and tacrolimus, the risk disappeared in women (HR 1.01; 95% CI 0.92-1.11) and reversed in men (HR 0.61; 95% CI 0.58-0.66) (P for interaction <0.001). When stratifying gout risk according to HbA1c in male and female NIAD users, we found an inverse association between raising HbA1c and incident gout in men only. Further adjustment gave similar results.Individuals with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of gout. This is not due to diabetes itself, but to the comorbid conditions. Diabetes itself is apparently associated with a decreased risk of gout, especially in men. PMID:26266391

  7. Resistance Exercise in Already-Active Diabetic Individuals (READI): study rationale, design and methods for a randomized controlled trial of resistance and aerobic exercise in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yardley, Jane E; Kenny, Glen P; Perkins, Bruce A; Riddell, Michael C; Goldfield, Gary S; Donovan, Lois; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Wells, George A; Phillips, Penny; Sigal, Ronald J

    2015-03-01

    The Resistance Exercise in Already Active Diabetic Individuals (READI) trial aimed to examine whether adding a 6-month resistance training program would improve glycemic control (as reflected in reduced HbA?c) in individuals with type 1 diabetes who were already engaged in aerobic exercise compared to aerobic training alone. After a 5-week run-in period including optimization of diabetes care and low-intensity exercise, 131 physically active adults with type 1 diabetes were randomized to two groups for 22weeks: resistance training three times weekly, or waiting-list control. Both groups maintained the same volume, duration and intensity of aerobic exercise throughout the study as they did at baseline. HbA?c, body composition, frequency of hypoglycemia, lipids, blood pressure, apolipoproteins B and A-1 (ApoB and ApoA1), the ApoB-ApoA1 ratio, urinary albumin excretion, serum C-reactive protein, free fatty acids, total daily insulin dose, health-related quality of life, cardiorespiratory fitness and musculoskeletal fitness were recorded at baseline, 3 (for some variables), and 6 months. To our knowledge, READI is the only trial to date assessing the incremental health-related impact of adding resistance training for individuals with type 1 diabetes who are already aerobically active. Few exercise trials have been completed in this population, and even fewer have assessed resistance exercise. With recent improvements in the quality of diabetes care, the READI study will provide conclusive evidence to support or refute a major clinically relevant effect of exercise type in the recommendations for physical activity in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:25559915

  8. High prevalence of type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes in adult Zoroastrians in Yazd, Iran: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Khalilzadeh, Saeedhossein; Afkhami-Ardekani, Mohammad; Afrand, Mohammadhosain

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) varies among ethnic groups. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) for the first time in an ethnic population, specifically Zoroastrian citizens in Yazd, Iran whose ages were 30 or older. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, participants aged?30 years were selected using systematic random sampling. An inventory, including socio-demographic data, was completed. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure (BP) were measured using standard methods. Also, blood levels of glucose, triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), urea, creatinine (Cr), and uric acid were measured. The latest criteria established by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) were used to diagnose DM. Results: The mean age of the participants (n=403) was 56.9±12.8 years. The total prevalence of diabetes, including previously diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes, IFG, and IGT was 26.1%, 18.6%, 7.5%, 34.7% and 25.8%, respectively. Participants with diabetes had higher fasting blood sugar (FBS) (P<0.001), oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) (P<0.001), urea (P=0.019), BMI (P=0.001), systolic blood pressures (P<0.001), TG (P=0.007) and lower HDL (P=0.034) than patients with IFG, IGT, and normoglycemic subjects. Conclusions: The current study showed a high prevalence of T2DM in the Zoroastrian population of Yazd, Iran. One-third of the total cases with diabetes were undiagnosed. PMID:26052411

  9. Pancreatic islet beta cell protective effect of oral vanadyl sulphate in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, an ultrastructure study.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, S; Karimian, S M; Sotoudeh, M; Bahadori, M; Dehghani, G A

    2010-12-01

    We sought to determine the ultrastructure of pancreatic islet beta cells of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats treated with oral vanadyl sulphate. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by intravenous injection of 40 mg kg(-1) streptozotocin. The same volume of normal saline was injected in sham animals. Animals were divided into treated and control groups. Vanadyl sulphate was added to the drinking water of the treated animals at a concentration of 1 mg mL(-1) up to three months. Two months after vanadyl sulphate withdrawal animals were killed. Ultrastructure of islet beta cells were studied by transmission electron microscope. In diabetic treated rats plasma glucose and fluid intake returned to normal levels within three months while control animals remained diabetic. Well granulated cytoplasm, well developed endoplasmic reticulum, increase in the number of immature granules in the cytoplasm with no clear signs of cell injury were found in the islet beta cells of diabetic treated rats. Lymphocyte filteration, nuclear picnosis, cytoplasmic vacuolization were found frequently in the islet beta cells of untreated diabetic rats. In conclusion as was evident in thin sections of panceatic islet beta cells of treated diabetic rats in this study, vanadyl sulphate through preserving islet beta cells structure and ultrastructure contributes in reversing diabetic signs and symptoms in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. PMID:21313890

  10. Patient Characteristics Associated with Measurement of Routine Diabetes Care: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Van Doorn-Klomberg, Arna L.; Braspenning, Jozé C. C.; Atsma, Femke; Jansen, Birgit; Bouma, Margriet; Wolters, René J.; Wensing, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-modifiable patient characteristics, including age, gender, ethnicity as well as the occurrence of multi-morbidities, are associated with processes and outcomes of diabetes care. Information on these factors can be used in case mix adjustment of performance measures. However, the practical relevance of such adjustment is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the strength of associations between patient factors and diabetes care processes and outcomes. Methods We performed an observational study based on routinely collected data of 12,498 diabetes patients in 59 Dutch primary care practices. Data were collected on patient age, gender, whether the patient lived in a deprived area, body mass index and the co-occurrence of cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depression or anxiety. Outcomes included 6 dichotomous measures (3 process and 3 outcome related) regarding glycosylated hemoglobin, systolic blood pressure and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol. We performed separate hierarchical logistic mixed model regression models for each of the outcome measures. Results Each of the process measure models showed moderate effect sizes, with pooled areas under the curve that varied between 0.66 and 0.76. The frequency of diabetes related consultations as a measure of patient compliance to treatment showed the strongest association with all process measures (odds ratios between 5.6 and 14.5). The effect sizes of the outcome measure models were considerably smaller than the process measure models, with pooled areas under the curve varying from 0.57 to 0.61. Conclusions Several non-modifiable patient factors could be associated with processes and outcomes of diabetes care. However, associations were small. These results suggest that case-mix correction or stratification in assessing diabetes care has limited practical relevance. PMID:25822978

  11. Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in Pre-Diabetic Japanese Individuals Categorized by HbA1c Levels: A Historical Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Tetsuya; Imawatari, Ryuichiro; Kawahara, Chie; Inazu, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Gen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Reported incidence of type 2 diabetes estimated at the pre-diabetic stage differs widely (2.3–18.1% per year). Because clinicians need to know the risk of incident diabetes after a diagnosis of pre-diabetes, our objective was to estimate precise incidence of diabetes using baseline HbA1c levels. Methods A historical cohort study using electronic medical record data obtained between January 2008 and December 2013. A total of 52,781 individuals with HbA1c < 6.5% were assigned to one of six groups categorized by baseline HbA1c level: ? 5.5% (n=34,616), 5.6–5.7% (n=9,388), 5.8–5.9% (n=4,664), 6.0–6.1% (n= 2,338), 6.2–6.3% (n=1,257), and 6.4% (n=518). Participants were tracked until a subsequent diagnosis of diabetes or end of follow-up during a period of 5 years. Results During the follow-up period (mean 3.7 years), 4,369 participants developed diabetes. The incidence of diabetes in the first year was 0.7, 1.5, 2.9, 9.2, 30.4, and 44.0% in the six HbA1c groups, respectively. At five years the incidence was 3.6, 8.9, 13.8, 27.5, 51.6, and 67.8%, respectively (p < 0.0001 comparing the HbA1c ?5.5% group to the other groups). After adjustment for confounding factors, the hazard ratios compared with the HbA1c ?5.5% group were significantly elevated: 2.3 (95%CI 2.0–2.5), 3.4 (95%CI 2.9–3.7), 8.8 (95%CI 8.0–10.1), 26.3 (95%CI 23.3–30.1), and 48.7 (95%CI 40.8–58.1) in the five HbA1c groups (p < 0.0001). Conclusion By fractionating baseline HbA1c levels into narrower HbA1c range groups, accuracy of estimating the incidence of type 2 diabetes in subsequent years was increased. The risk of developing diabetes increased with increasing HbA1c levels, especially with the HbA1c level ? 6.2% in the first follow-up year. PMID:25853519

  12. Prevention of severe hypoglycaemia in type I diabetes: a randomised controlled population study

    PubMed Central

    Nordfeldt, S; Johansson, C; Carlsson, E; Hammersjo, J

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To investigate use of targeted self study material in type I diabetes patient education regarding dissemination, perceived patient benefit, and prevention of severe hypoglycaemia. Methods: In a randomised 1:1:1 controlled study, 332 patients with type I diabetes (aged 2.6–18.9 years) were studied; 313 completed clinical follow up, 261 completed endpoint questionnaire. The intervention group received videotapes and a brochure designed to review skills for self control and treatment, aimed at preventing severe hypoglycaemia. Two control groups received a videotape and brochure with general diabetes information, or traditional treatment only, respectively. Results: Yearly incidence of severe hypoglycaemia decreased from 42% to 27% in the intervention group, but not in controls. HbA1c remained unchanged. Levels of use ranged from 1 to 20 times (median 2); 40–49% had shown the materials to friends, relatives, school staff, sports coaches, etc (there was little difference between intervention and control groups). Higher benefit and learning levels resulted from the intervention material, especially in patients with severe hypoglycaemia. Conclusions: Mass distributed pedagogical devices such as high quality video programmes and brochures may contribute to the prevention of severe hypoglycaemia. Such self study materials can reach high dissemination levels and constitute a cost effective complement to regular visits to a diabetes team and to other types of education. The findings may have implications for other topics, other ages, and other diagnosis groups. PMID:12598392

  13. Predicted 25-hydroxyvitamin D score and incident type 2 diabetes in the Framingham Offspring Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vitamin D is involved in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our objective was to examine the relation between vitamin D status and incidence of T2D. We used a subsample of 1972 Framingham Offspring Study participants to develop a regression model to predict...

  14. Individual and Family Factors Impacting Diabetic Control for the Adolescent: A Preliminary Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Mary; And Others

    Sixteen adolescents between the ages of 15 and 18 years and their parents participated in a preliminary study on the impact of family and individual factors on diabetes control for the adolescent. It was hypothesized that there was a relationship between the adolescent's perception of adolescent development, social support, depression, family…

  15. Effect of dietary factors on incidence of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review of cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kentaro; Okubo, Hitomi; Sasaki, Satoshi

    2005-08-01

    We systematically reviewed cohort studies on the effect of nutrient and food intake (except for alcohol) on the incidence of type 2 diabetes, which had been published in English as of May 2004. Using the MEDLINE (PubMed) database as well as reference lists of searched papers, 15 individual cohort studies (a total of 31 papers) were identified. The number of subjects (n= 895-85,060), follow-up length (5.9-23 y), the number of diabetes cases (n= 74-4,085), dietary assessment method used (simple food questionnaire, food frequency questionnaire, food frequency interview, diet history interview, and 24-h recall), and method of case ascertainment (questionnaire, oral glucose tolerance test, fasting glucose level, death certificate, and nationwide registry) varied among studies. For nutrients, intakes of vegetable fat, polyunsaturated fatty acid, dietary fiber (particularly cereal fiber), magnesium, and caffeine were significantly inversely correlated and intakes of trans fatty acid and heme-iron, glycemic index, and glycemic load were significantly positively correlated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes in several papers. For foods and food groups, several papers showed significantly decreased risk for type 2 diabetes with the higher consumption of grain (particularly whole grain) and coffee, and significantly increased risk with processed meat consumption. Because all the studies were carried out in Western countries, however, research in non-Western countries including Japan is needed. PMID:16262005

  16. Relation of Severe Coronary Artery Narrowing to Insulin or Thiazolidinedione Use in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (from the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes Study)

    PubMed Central

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Lombardero, Manuel; Lavis, Victor; Forker, Alan; Green, Jennifer; Korytkowski, Mary; Sobel, Burton E.; Jones, Teresa L.Z.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with diabetes continue to die of coronary artery disease (CAD) at rates 2 to 4 times higher than patients without diabetes, despite advances in treatment of cardiovascular disease. The role of glycemic control therapies, independent of their glucose-lowering effects, on cardiovascular disease is a recurring question. We examined the association of glycemic control therapies with extent of CAD as measured by coronary angiogram obtained at baseline in 1,803 subjects in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial who had type 2 diabetes mellitus, documented moderate to severe CAD, and no previous cardiac revascularization procedures. The association between glycemic control therapy use recorded at baseline and percent coronary artery stenosis and myocardial jeopardy index was analyzed by multiple regression models. Insulin use at study entry was associated with 23% fewer highly stenotic lesions (?70%) (p <0.001) and a significantly lower myocardial jeopardy index compared with subjects not on insulin, despite a worse cardiac risk factor profile, more unstable angina, and increased inflammatory markers in insulin users. Subjects taking thiazolidinediones (TZDs) for ?6 months had 17% fewer highly stenotic lesions (p = 0.02) and significantly lower C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels compared with those not taking TZDs. In conclusion, this cross-sectional study of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and CAD showed that treatment with insulin or TZDs was associated with fewer highly stenotic lesions, independent of disease duration, glycemic control, and other risk factors. PMID:19576321

  17. Incidence Density and Risk Factors of Diabetic Retinopathy Within Type 2 Diabetes: A Five-Year Cohort Study in China (Report 1)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Wu, Jingyang; Yue, Song; Geng, Jin; Lian, Jie; Teng, Weiping; Huang, Desheng; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    A prospective study was carried out from August 2010 to August 2014 in the community of Fengyutan (China). Six hundred and twenty two T2D subjects were collected. The incidence density of diabetic retinopathy (DR) was 1.81% person-year (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.21–2.43% person-year). After a Cox regression model analysis and adjusted confounding factors, independent predictors related to the incidence of DR including male gender (adjusted hazard ratios, aHR: 1.47, 95% CI: 1.21–1.62), with hypertension (aHR: 1.49, 95%: 1.12–1.73), duration of diabetes > 10 years (aHR: 2.28, 95%: 2.05–2.42), uncontrolled diabetes (aHR: 1.76, 95%: 1.41–2.01), total cholesterol ? 200 mg/dL (aHR: 1.54, 95%: 1.34–1.72) and HbA1c ? 7% (mmol/mol) (aHR: 2.12, 95%: 1.87–2.32). Duration of T2D revealed the significantly dose-response relationship to the onset of DR. The incidence density of DR in the Chinese community was relatively low in comparison with other studies. More attention should be paid to the T2D patients, especially of male gender, with hypertension, longer duration of diabetes, uncontrolled diabetes, total cholesterol ? 200mg/dL and HbA1c ? 7% (mmol/mol). PMID:26184262

  18. Reticuloendothelial hyperphagocytosis occurs in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Studies with colloidal carbon, albumin microaggregates, and soluble fibrin monomers

    SciTech Connect

    Cornell, R.P.

    1982-02-01

    In contrast to previous studies of diabetic humans and animals, which reported unchanged or depressed function, reticuloendothelial system (RES) hyperphagocytosis of colloidal carbon, /sup 125/I-albumin microaggregates, and /sup 125/I-fibrin monomers were observed in rats as early as 14 days after the induction of diabetes with streptozotocin (STZ). The fact that enhanced phagocytosis by RE macrophages was prevented by chronic insulin replacement therapy indicates that the diabetic internal environment of hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia was perhaps responsible for the observed changes. Experiments involving organ localization of intravenously administered particles, perfusion of isolated livers, and microscopic examination of the liver all suggested that increased Kupffer cell activity was the primary event in RES hyperphagocytosis by STZ-diabetic rats. Both hypertrophy and hyperplasia of Kupffer cells were apparent in livers of STZ-diabetic animals as evidenced by photomicrographs and hepatic cell quantification. Plasma fibronectin, which binds fibrin monomers to RE macrophages before phagocytosis, was significantly decreased in the circulation of STZ-diabetic rats, but the level of cell-associated fibronectin was not measured. Renal localization of urea-soluble /sup 125/I-fibrin monomers exceeded splenic and pulmonary uptake in normal control rats and was enhanced in animals with STZ-diabetes. Changes in fibronectin levels, fibrin monomer localization, and Kupffer cell size and numbers in experimental diabetes in rats may have implications for the pathogenesis of vascular disease involving phagocytic mesangial and foam cells in diabetic humans.

  19. Lifestyle changes – a continuous, inner struggle for women with type 2 diabetes: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Ahlin, Kristina; Billhult, Annika

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe how women handle necessary lifestyle changes due to a chronic disease using diabetes as a model. Design Interview study. Setting Ten women living in western Sweden were interviewed. Method In-depth interviews and analysis were performed using the phenomenological ideas of Giorgi. Subjects Ten women diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, mean age 65. All were either on disability pension or retired with varying complications ranging from none to stroke. Results The findings revealed five themes: the ambiguous feeling of others’ involvement, becoming a victim of pressurizing demands, experiencing knowledge deficits, experiencing an urge, and finding reasons to justify not changing. The invariant meaning of a continuous inner struggle illuminates the experience of making lifestyle changes for women with type 2 diabetes. Conclusion The findings of the present study show that it is vital for health care professionals to treat women diagnosed with type 2 diabetes with great respect and understanding regarding the struggle that they are going through. By being aware of the everyday burden for these women, acknowledging the fact that they want their lives to go on as before, may serve as a “key” to assist women in changing attitudes towards living in accordance with the disease and appreciating the lifestyle changes as a challenge as they become healthier and improve their quality of life. PMID:22324486

  20. Acceptance Factors of Mobile Apps for Diabetes by Patients Aged 50 or Older: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Reichelt, Julius; Bellmann, Maike; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Background Mobile apps for people with diabetes offer great potential to support therapy management, increase therapy adherence, and reduce the probability of the occurrence of accompanying and secondary diseases. However, they are rarely used by elderly patients due to a lack of acceptance. Objective We investigated the question “Which factors influence the acceptance of diabetes apps among patients aged 50 or older?” Particular emphasis was placed on the current use of mobile devices/apps, acceptance-promoting/-inhibiting factors, features of a helpful diabetes app, and contact persons for technical questions. This qualitative study was the third of three substudies investigating factors influencing acceptance of diabetes apps among patients aged 50 or older. Methods Guided interviews were chosen in order to get a comprehensive insight into the subjective perspective of elderly diabetes patients. At the end of each interview, the patients tested two existing diabetes apps to reveal obstacles in (first) use. Results Altogether, 32 patients with diabetes were interviewed. The mean age was 68.8 years (SD 8.2). Of 32 participants, 15 (47%) knew apps, however only 2 (6%) had already used a diabetes app within their therapy. The reasons reported for being against the use of apps were a lack of additional benefits (4/8, 50%) compared to current therapy management, a lack of interoperability with other devices/apps (1/8, 12%), and no joy of use (1/8, 12%). The app test revealed the following main difficulties in use: nonintuitive understanding of the functionality of the apps (26/29, 90%), nonintuitive understanding of the menu navigation/labeling (19/29, 66%), font sizes and representations that were too small (14/29, 48%), and difficulties in recognizing and pressing touch-sensitive areas (14/29, 48%). Furthermore, the patients felt the apps lacked individually important functions (11/29, 38%), or felt the functions that were offered were unnecessary for their own therapy needs (10/29, 34%). The most important contents of a helpful diabetes app were reported as the ability to add remarks to measured values (9/28, 32%), the definition of thresholds for blood glucose values and highlighting deviating values (7/28, 25%), and a reminder feature for measurement/medication (7/28, 25%). The most important contact persons for technical questions were family members (19/31, 61%). Conclusions A lack of additional benefits and ease of use emerged as the key factors for the acceptance of diabetes apps among patients aged 50 or older. Furthermore, it has been shown that the needs of the investigated target group are highly heterogeneous due to varying previous knowledge, age, type of diabetes, and therapy. Therefore, a helpful diabetes app should be individually adaptable. Personal contact persons, especially during the initial phase of use, are of utmost importance to reduce the fear of data loss or erroneous data input, and to raise acceptance among this target group. PMID:25733033

  1. Randomised controlled trial of an automated, interactive telephone intervention to improve type 2 diabetes self-management (Telephone-Linked Care Diabetes Project): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An estimated 285 million people worldwide have diabetes and its prevalence is predicted to increase to 439 million by 2030. For the year 2010, it is estimated that 3.96 million excess deaths in the age group 20-79 years are attributable to diabetes around the world. Self-management is recognised as an integral part of diabetes care. This paper describes the protocol of a randomised controlled trial of an automated interactive telephone system aiming to improve the uptake and maintenance of essential diabetes self-management behaviours. Methods/Design A total of 340 individuals with type 2 diabetes will be randomised, either to the routine care arm, or to the intervention arm in which participants receive the Telephone-Linked Care (TLC) Diabetes program in addition to their routine care. The intervention requires the participants to telephone the TLC Diabetes phone system weekly for 6 months. They receive the study handbook and a glucose meter linked to a data uploading device. The TLC system consists of a computer with software designed to provide monitoring, tailored feedback and education on key aspects of diabetes self-management, based on answers voiced or entered during the current or previous conversations. Data collection is conducted at baseline (Time 1), 6-month follow-up (Time 2), and 12-month follow-up (Time 3). The primary outcomes are glycaemic control (HbA1c) and quality of life (Short Form-36 Health Survey version 2). Secondary outcomes include anthropometric measures, blood pressure, blood lipid profile, psychosocial measures as well as measures of diet, physical activity, blood glucose monitoring, foot care and medication taking. Information on utilisation of healthcare services including hospital admissions, medication use and costs is collected. An economic evaluation is also planned. Discussion Outcomes will provide evidence concerning the efficacy of a telephone-linked care intervention for self-management of diabetes. Furthermore, the study will provide insight into the potential for more widespread uptake of automated telehealth interventions, globally. Trial Registration Number ACTRN12607000594426 PMID:20937148

  2. Diabetes, diabetes treatment and breast cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Virnig, Beth; Hendryx, Michael; Wen, Sijin; Chelebowski, Rowan; Chen, Chu; Rohan, Tomas; Tinker, Lesley; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Lessin, Lawrence; Margolis, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to assess the impact of pre-existing diabetes and diabetes treatment on breast cancer prognosis. 8,108 women with centrally confirmed invasive breast cancer in the Women’s Health Initiative diagnosed between 1998 and 2013 were followed through the date of death or September 20, 2013. Information on diabetes and diabetes therapy were obtained via self-report and face-to-face review of current medication containers, respectively. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate adjusted relative hazard ratios for overall mortality. The proportional subdistribution hazard model was used to estimate hazard ratios for breast cancer-specific mortality. Compared with women without diabetes, women with diabetes had significantly increased risk of overall mortality (HR 1.26 95 % CI 1.06–1.48), especially among those who took insulin or had longer duration of diabetes. However, diabetes was not associated with increased risk of breast cancer-specific mortality, regardless of type of treatment and duration of diabetes, despite the significant association of diabetes with unfavorable tumor characteristics. Our large prospective cohort study provides additional evidence that pre-existing diabetes increases risk of total mortality among women with breast cancer. The increased total mortality associated with diabetes was mainly driven by increased risk of dying from diseases other than breast cancer. Thus, the continuum of care for breast cancer patients with diabetes should include careful attention to CVD risk factors and other non-cancer conditions. PMID:25261292

  3. Cognitive Impairment in Diabetes: Rationale and Design Protocol of the Cog-ID Study

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Jolien; Kooistra, Minke; van den Berg, Esther; Kappelle, L Jaap; Biessels, Geert Jan; Rutten, Guy EHM

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment frequently co-occurs with type 2 diabetes but is often undiagnosed. Cognitive impairment affects self-management leading to treatment-related complications. Objective The aim of this study is to develop a stepped diagnostic procedure, consisting of a screening test complemented by an evaluation by a general practitioner (GP), to detect undiagnosed cognitive impairment in older people with type 2 diabetes. Methods The accuracy of two self-administered cognitive tests, the “Test Your Memory” (TYM) and “Self-Administered Gerocognitive Examination” (SAGE) alone, and in combination with an evaluation by a GP will be assessed. A diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia at a memory clinic will serve as reference standard. This cognitive impairment in diabetes (Cog-ID) study will include 513 people from primary care facilities aged ?70 with type 2 diabetes. The participants will first fill out the TYM and SAGE tests, followed by a standardized GP evaluation for cognitive impairment, including a mini mental state examination (MMSE). Subsequently, participants suspected of cognitive impairment (on either test or the GP assessment) and a random sample of 15% (65/435) of participants without suspected cognitive impairment will be referred to the memory clinic. At the memory clinic, a medical examination, neuropsychological examination, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain will be performed. Participants will also fill out questionnaires assessing health status and depressive symptoms at baseline and after 6 and 24 months. Results This research obtained funding and ethical approval. Enrolment started in August, 2012, and all study-related activities will be completed in September, 2016. Conclusions With the results from this study, physicians will be able to detect cognitive impairment affecting type 2 diabetes patients through case-finding, and can use tailored care to reduce associated complications. Additionally, the results may stimulate discussions about cognitive impairment and whether early recognition is desirable. PMID:26058427

  4. Diagnostic perspective of saliva in insulin dependent diabetes mellitus children: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, P. V. S. Deepa; Sridevi, E.; Sai Sankar, A. J.; Manoj Kumar, M. G.; Sridhar, M.; Sujatha, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The absence, destruction, or loss of ?-cells of pancreas results in type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus [IDDM]). Presently, diagnosis and periodic monitoring of diabetes is achieved by evaluating blood glucose levels as it is relatively invasive and dreaded by children. In the light of this, present study was planned to compare salivary glucose values with blood glucose values and the biochemical characteristics of saliva in IDDM children were evaluated and obtained results were compared with the salivary parameters of normal children. Materials and Methods: Thirty IDDM children and 30 healthy children were selected for the study. Fasting blood sample and unstimulated salivary sample were collected from all the subjects and were subjected for analysis. Results: A weak positive correlation was noticed between fasting blood glucose and salivary glucose values in IDDM children. But a mean average of salivary glucose was high in IDDM children when compared with healthy children. The biochemical parameters like acid phosphatase, total protein count, and ?-amylase were increased, whereas salivary urea did not show significant variation between the groups. Conclusion: With presently used diagnostic armamentarium, estimation of salivary glucose cannot replace the standard method of estimation of glucose in diabetic mellitus children. The established relationship was very weak with many variations. PMID:26681845

  5. Aerobic exercise in obese diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease: a randomized and controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients with obesity, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are generally physically inactive, have a high mortality rate, and may benefit from an exercise program. Methods We performed a 24-week randomized controlled feasibility study comparing aerobic exercise plus optimal medical management to medical management alone in patients with type 2 diabetes, obesity (body mass index [BMI] > 30 kg/m2), and stage 2-4 CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 15-90 mL/min/1.73 m2 with persistent proteinuria). Subjects randomized to exercise underwent thrice weekly aerobic training for 6 followed by 18 weeks of supervised home exercise. The primary outcome variable was change in proteinuria. Results Seven subjects randomized to exercise and 4 control subjects completed the study. Exercise training resulted in an increase in exercise duration during treadmill testing, which was accompanied by slight but insignificant decreases in resting systolic blood pressure and 24-hour proteinuria. Exercise did not alter GFR, hemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, serum lipids, or C-reactive protein (CRP). Caloric intake and body weight and composition also did not change with exercise training. Conclusion Exercise training in obese diabetic patients with CKD is feasible and may have clinical benefits. A large-scale randomized controlled trial to determine the effects of exercise on renal functions, cardiovascular fitness, inflammation, and oxidative stress in diabetic patients with CKD is planned. PMID:20003224

  6. Mastication and Risk for Diabetes in a Japanese Population: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Toru; Yamori, Masashi; Asai, Keita; Nakano-Araki, Ikuko; Yamaguchi, Akihiko; Takahashi, Katsu; Sekine, Akihiro; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Kosugi, Shinji; Nakayama, Takeo; Inagaki, Nobuya; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Background Associations between mastication and insufficient nutrient intake, obesity, and glucose metabolism have been shown in previous studies. However, the association between mastication and diabetes has not been clarified. Our objective was to examine the association between mastication, namely masticatory performance or rate of eating, and diabetes in a population-based cohort. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of the association between mastication and diabetes in the Nagahama Prospective Cohort Study, an ongoing study which recruits citizens of Nagahama City in Shiga Prefecture, central Japan. 2,283 male and 4,544 female residents aged 40–74 years were enrolled from July 2009 to November 2010. Masticatory performance was evaluated by spectrophotometric measurement of color changes after masticating color-changeable chewing gum. Categorical rate of eating (fast, intermediate or slow) was self-assessed using a questionnaire. Results 177 males (7.7%) and 112 (2.4%) females were diagnosed with diabetes. We divided participants into four groups by quartile of masticatory performance, namely Q1 (lowest), 2, and 3 and 4 (highest). Compared to the lowest performance group, the multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) of diabetes was 0.91 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.58–1.4) in Q2, 0.77 (95% CI, 0.48–1.2) in Q3, and 0.53 (95% CI, 0.31–0.90) in the highest group in males, and 1.2 (95% CI, 0.73–2.0), 0.95 (95% CI, 0.54–1.6) and 0.56 (95% CI, 0.30–1.0) in females. We also estimated ORs of diabetes by rate of eating. Compared to the fast eating group, ORs in males were 0.87 (95% CI, 0.61–1.2) in the intermediate group and 0.38 (95% CI, 0.16–0.91) in the slow group, and ORs in females were 0.92 (95% CI, 0.59–1.4) and 1.5 (95% CI, 0.73–3.0). Conclusions These findings support the hypothesis that higher masticatory performance and slow eating prevent the occurrence of diabetes. PMID:23755114

  7. Diet, lifestyle, and genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetes: a review from the Nurses’ Health Study, Nurses’ Health Study 2, and Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Ardisson Korat, Andres V.; Willett, Walter C.; Hu, Frank B.

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiological evidence collected from three large US cohorts (Nurses’ Health Study, Nurses’ Health Study 2, and Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study) has yielded important information regarding the roles of overall diet, individual foods and nutrients, physical activity and other lifestyle factors in the development of type 2 diabetes. Excess adiposity is a major risk factor for diabetes, and thus, maintaining a healthy body weight and avoidance of weight gain during adulthood is the cornerstone of diabetes prevention. Independent of body weight, the quality or type of dietary fat and carbohydrate is more crucial than the quantity in determining diabetes risk. Higher consumption of coffee, whole grains, fruits, and nuts is associated with lower risk of diabetes, whereas regular consumption of refined grains, red and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages including fruits juices is associated with increased risk. Dietary patterns rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and nuts and legumes but lower in red and processed meats, refined grains, and sugar-sweetened beverages are consistently associated with diabetes risk, even after adjustment for body mass index. The genome-wide association studies conducted in these cohorts have contributed substantially to the discoveries of novel genetic loci for type 2 diabetes and other metabolic traits, although the identified common variants explain only a small proportion of overall diabetes predisposition. Taken together, these ongoing large cohort studies have provided convincing epidemiologic evidence that a healthy diet, together with regular physical activity, maintenance of a healthy weight, moderate alcohol consumption, and avoidance of sedentary behaviors and smoking would prevent the majority of type 2 diabetes cases. PMID:25599007

  8. Factors Associated With Maternal-Reported Actions to Prevent Type 1 Diabetes in the First Year of the TEDDY Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Laura B.; Lynch, Kristian F.; Baxter, Judith; Lernmark, Barbro; Roth, Roswith; Simell, Tuula; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Mothers of children at risk for type 1 diabetes report engaging in preventive behaviors. The purpose of this study is to further document these actions in an international, longitudinal sample and examine variables that predict whether mothers engage in these behaviors. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study examined an international sample (from Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the U.S.) from the naturalistic, longitudinal The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study, which tracked children genetically at risk for type 1 diabetes from birth to age 15 years. Mothers of 7,613 infants aged 6 months and 6,503 infants aged 15 months completed questionnaires assessing psychosocial factors and actions intended to prevent diabetes. RESULTS Many mothers (29.9% at 6 months and 42.8% at 15 months) reported engaging in a behavior intended to prevent type 1 diabetes, with the largest percentages (20.9–29.2%) reporting making changes to their child’s diet (e.g., reducing the consumption of sweets and carbohydrates). Factors related to engaging in preventive behaviors include older maternal age; higher maternal education; minority status; having only one child; having a first-degree relative with type 1 diabetes; being from a country other than Sweden; having an accurate perception of the child’s increased risk for developing diabetes; having postpartum depression, maternal anxiety, and worry about the risk of diabetes; and believing that diabetes can be prevented. CONCLUSIONS The findings of this study suggest that many mothers engage in actions to prevent diabetes and highlight the importance of tracking these behaviors to ensure the validity of naturalistic observational studies. PMID:24041684

  9. Infrared dermal thermography on diabetic feet soles to predict ulcerations: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Klein, Marvin E.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Bus, Sicco A.; van Netten, Jaap J.

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication for patients with diabetes mellitus. If not adequately treated, these ulcers may lead to foot infection, and ultimately to lower extremity amputation, which imposes a major burden to society and great loss in health-related quality of life for patients. Early identification and subsequent preventive treatment have proven useful to limit the incidence of foot ulcers and lower extremity amputation. Thus, the development of new diagnosis tools has become an attractive option. The ultimate objective of our project is to develop an intelligent telemedicine monitoring system for frequent examination on patients' feet, to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration. Inflammation in diabetic feet can be an early and predictive warning sign for ulceration, and temperature has been proven to be a vicarious marker for inflammation. Studies have indicated that infrared dermal thermography of foot soles can be one of the important parameters for assessing the risk of diabetic foot ulceration. This paper covers the feasibility study of using an infrared camera, FLIR SC305, in our setup, to acquire the spatial thermal distribution on the feet soles. With the obtained thermal images, automated detection through image analysis was performed to identify the abnormal increased/decreased temperature and assess the risk for ulceration. The thermography for feet soles of patients with diagnosed diabetic foot complications were acquired before the ordinary foot examinations. Assessment from clinicians and thermography were compared and follow-up measurements were performed to investigate the prediction. A preliminary case study will be presented, indicating that dermal thermography in our proposed setup can be a screening modality to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration.

  10. Concordance rates of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus: a population based study of young Danish twins.

    PubMed Central

    Kyvik, K. O.; Green, A.; Beck-Nielsen, H.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study the genetic contribution to the aetiology of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. DESIGN--Historical cohort study of twins, with information on diabetes being gathered by questionnaire, verification of the diagnosis by the subject's diabetologist or general practitioner, and clinical examination in available twins. SETTING--Danish twin register and diabetic clinics and general practices throughout Denmark. SUBJECTS--20,888 twin pairs born during 1953-82, included in a population based nationwide register. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Crude and cumulative concordance rates and heritability in monozygotic and dizygotic twins. RESULTS--The crude probandwise concordance rate was 0.53 (95% confidence interval 0.33 to 0.73) for monozygotic twin pairs and 0.11 (0.05 to 0.21) for dizygotic twin pairs. When adjusted for age at onset of diabetes and age at last observation among unaffected twin partners the cumulative proband-wise risk from birth to age 35 was estimated as 0.70 (0.45 to 0.95) for monozygotic twins and 0.13 (0.05 to 0.20) for dizygotic twins. The correlations of liability for monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs were estimated as 0.96 (SE 0.09) and 0.58 (0.07), with a heritability estimate of 0.72 (0.21). CONCLUSIONS--The risk of insulin dependent diabetes in monozygotic twins is higher than previously thought and for dizygotic twins is higher than in ordinary first degree relatives. Based on the findings of this study the genetic component to the disease seems more important than hitherto believed. PMID:7580548

  11. Circadian Gene Variants and Susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, M. Ann; Rees, Simon D.; Hydrie, M. Zafar I.; Shera, A. Samad; Bellary, Srikanth; O’Hare, J. Paul; Kumar, Sudhesh; Taheri, Shahrad; Basit, Abdul; Barnett, Anthony H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Disruption of endogenous circadian rhythms has been shown to increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, suggesting that circadian genes might play a role in determining disease susceptibility. We present the results of a pilot study investigating the association between type 2 diabetes and selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in/near nine circadian genes. The variants were chosen based on their previously reported association with prostate cancer, a disease that has been suggested to have a genetic link with type 2 diabetes through a number of shared inherited risk determinants. Methodology/Principal Findings The pilot study was performed using two genetically homogeneous Punjabi cohorts, one resident in the United Kingdom and one indigenous to Pakistan. Subjects with (N?=?1732) and without (N?=?1780) type 2 diabetes were genotyped for thirteen circadian variants using a competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method. Associations between the SNPs and type 2 diabetes were investigated using logistic regression. The results were also combined with in silico data from other South Asian datasets (SAT2D consortium) and white European cohorts (DIAGRAM+) using meta-analysis. The rs7602358G allele near PER2 was negatively associated with type 2 diabetes in our Punjabi cohorts (combined odds ratio [OR]?=?0.75 [0.66–0.86], p?=?3.18×10?5), while the BMAL1 rs11022775T allele was associated with an increased risk of the disease (combined OR?=?1.22 [1.07–1.39], p?=?0.003). Neither of these associations was replicated in the SAT2D or DIAGRAM+ datasets, however. Meta-analysis of all the cohorts identified disease associations with two variants, rs2292912 in CRY2 and rs12315175 near CRY1, although statistical significance was nominal (combined OR?=?1.05 [1.01–1.08], p?=?0.008 and OR?=?0.95 [0.91–0.99], p?=?0.015 respectively). Conclusions/significance None of the selected circadian gene variants was associated with type 2 diabetes with study-wide significance after meta-analysis. The nominal association observed with the CRY2 SNP, however, complements previous findings and confirms a role for this locus in disease susceptibility. PMID:22485135

  12. The Effect of Intensive Glycemic Treatment on Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetic Participants of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Patricia A.; Orchard, Trevor J.; Genuth, Saul; Wong, Nathan D.; Detrano, Robert; Backlund, Jye-Yu C.; Zinman, Bernard; Jacobson, Alan; Sun, Wanjie; Lachin, John M.; Nathan, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study, an observational follow-up of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) type 1 diabetes cohort, measured coronary artery calcification (CAC), an index of atherosclerosis, with computed tomography (CT) in 1,205 EDIC patients at ~7–9 years after the end of the DCCT. We examined the influence of the 6.5 years of prior conventional versus intensive diabetes treatment during the DCCT, as well as the effects of cardiovascular disease risk factors, on CAC. The prevalences of CAC >0 and >200 Agatston units were 31.0 and 8.5%, respectively. Compared with the conventional treatment group, the intensive group had significantly lower geometric mean CAC scores and a lower prevalence of CAC >0 in the primary retinopathy prevention cohort, but not in the secondary intervention cohort, and a lower prevalence of CAC >200 in the combined cohorts. Waist-to-hip ratio, smoking, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia, before or at the time of CT, were significantly associated with CAC in univariate and multivariate analyses. CAC was associated with mean HbA1c (A1C) levels before enrollment, during the DCCT, and during the EDIC study. Prior intensive diabetes treatment during the DCCT was associated with less atherosclerosis, largely because of reduced levels of A1C during the DCCT. PMID:17130504

  13. Biomechanical characteristics of bone in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats: An in-vivo randomized controlled experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Korres, Nektarios; Tsiridis, Eleftherios; Pavlou, George; Mitsoudis, Athanasios; Perrea, Despina N; Zoumbos, Aristedes B

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the in vivo effects of type?I?diabetes on the mechanical strength of tibial bone in a rodent model. METHODS: The biomechanical effect of diabetes on the structural integrity of the tibia in streptozotocin induced diabetic Wistar rats was analysed. Induction of diabetes was achieved by an intra-peritoneal injection and confirmed by measuring serial blood glucose levels (> 150 mg/dL). After 8 wk the tibiae were harvested and compared to a control group. Biomechanical analysis of harvested tibiae was performed using a three-point bending technique on a servo hydraulic MTS 858 MiniBionix frame. Maximum force applied to failure (N), stiffness (N × mm) and energy absorbed (N/mm) were recorded and plotted on load displacement curves. A displacement control loading mode of 1 mm/min was selected to simulate quasi-static loading conditions. Measurements from load-displacement curves were directly compared between groups. RESULTS: Fourteen streptozotocin induced diabetic Wistar rats were compared against nineteen non-diabetic controls. An average increase of 155.2 g in body weight was observed in the control group compared with only 5 g in the diabetic group during the experimental study period. Levels of blood glucose increased to 440.25 mg/dL in the diabetic group compared to 116.62 mg/dL in the control group.The biomechanical results demonstrate a highly significant reduction in the maximum load to failure from 69.5 N to 58 N in diabetic group compared to control (P = 0.011). Energy absorption to fracture was reduced from 28.2 N in the control group to 23.5 N in the diabetic group (P = 0.082). No significant differences were observed between the groups for bending stiffness. CONCLUSION: Streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rodents reduces the maximum force and energy absorption to failure of bone, suggesting a predisposition for fracture risk. PMID:23878780

  14. New Methods in Exploring Old Topics: Case Studying Brittle Diabetes in the Family Context.

    PubMed

    Günther, Moritz Philipp; Winker, Peter; Wudy, Stefan A; Brosig, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Background. In questing for a more refined quantitative research approach, we revisited vector autoregressive (VAR) modeling for the analysis of time series data in the context of the so far poorly explored concept of family dynamics surrounding instable diabetes type 1 (or brittle diabetes). Method. We adopted a new approach to VAR analysis from econometrics referred to as the optimized multivariate lag selection process and applied it to a set of raw data previously analyzed through standard approaches. Results. We illustrated recurring psychosomatic circles of cause and effect relationships between emotional and somatic parameters surrounding glycemic control of the child's diabetes and the affective states of all family members. Conclusion. The optimized multivariate lag selection process allowed for more specific, dynamic, and statistically reliable results (increasing R (2) tenfold in explaining glycemic variability), which were derived from a larger window of past explanatory variables (lags). Such highly quantitative versus historic more qualitative approaches to case study analysis of psychosomatics surrounding diabetes in adolescents were reflected critically. PMID:26634215

  15. New Methods in Exploring Old Topics: Case Studying Brittle Diabetes in the Family Context

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Moritz Philipp; Winker, Peter; Wudy, Stefan A.; Brosig, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Background. In questing for a more refined quantitative research approach, we revisited vector autoregressive (VAR) modeling for the analysis of time series data in the context of the so far poorly explored concept of family dynamics surrounding instable diabetes type 1 (or brittle diabetes). Method. We adopted a new approach to VAR analysis from econometrics referred to as the optimized multivariate lag selection process and applied it to a set of raw data previously analyzed through standard approaches. Results. We illustrated recurring psychosomatic circles of cause and effect relationships between emotional and somatic parameters surrounding glycemic control of the child's diabetes and the affective states of all family members. Conclusion. The optimized multivariate lag selection process allowed for more specific, dynamic, and statistically reliable results (increasing R2 tenfold in explaining glycemic variability), which were derived from a larger window of past explanatory variables (lags). Such highly quantitative versus historic more qualitative approaches to case study analysis of psychosomatics surrounding diabetes in adolescents were reflected critically. PMID:26634215

  16. The natural course of microalbuminuria among African American with type 2 diabetes: A 3 year study

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Mohamed G; Baptiste-Roberts, Kesha; Brancati, Frederick L.; Gary, Tiffany L.

    2009-01-01

    Background The natural course of microalbuminuria in African Americans (AA) with type 2 diabetes is not well established. Method Longitudinal analysis of 186 AA with type 2 diabetes enrolled in Project Sugar, a randomized controlled trial of primary care-based interventions to improve diabetes control. Results Mean age was 59.4 and 85% were female. Mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) were 75.90 ml/min/1.73 m2 and 1.62 respectively. Thirty nine patients had macroalbuminuria and significantly higher systolic blood pressure compared to those with microalbuminuria (p=0.01). Sixty patients had microalbuminuria, 19 progressed to macroalbuminuria and none regressed. Progression was significantly associated with systolic blood pressure ? 115 and requirement for blood pressure medication in the univariate model. In the multivariate model, the degree of ACR (odds ratio [OR] = 35.51, 95% CI 2.21, 571.65) and need for blood pressure medication (OR= 8.96, 95% CI 1.35, 59.70) were independently associated with progression. No association observed with the use of specific antihypertensive agent. Conclusion This study suggests that AA with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria experience irreversible disease that not infrequently progresses to overt proteinuria. The degree of microalbuminuria and blood pressure are key determinants in this process and should be primary targets in treating this population regardless of the antihypertensive class used. PMID:19114173

  17. Group Singing as a Therapy during Diabetes Training - A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Groener, J B; Neus, I; Kopf, S; Hartmann, M; Schanz, J; Kliemank, E; Wetekam, B; Kihm, L; Fleming, T; Herzog, W; Nawroth, P P

    2015-11-01

    Comprehensive diabetes treatment has been shown to reduce quality of life in diabetic patients. However, there is evidence to suggest that group singing can have positive effects on quality of life in various clinical settings. In this randomized controlled pilot study, the effect of singing as a therapy to reduce stress and improve quality of life was investigated in insulin-dependent diabetic patients, undergoing a lifestyle intervention program. Patients from the singing group felt less discontented following treatment. This effect, however, was lost after 3 months. No effect on serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels could be seen when comparing the singing group with the control group, although reduced levels of ACTH and cortisol 3 days after treatment could be found and were still present after 3 months within the group of patients who undertook singing as a therapy. Singing led to an increase in bodyweight, which interestingly had no effect on glucose control or methylglyoxal levels. Therefore, singing during a lifestyle intervention program for insulin-dependent diabetic patients had a short lasting and weak effect on patients' mood without affecting glucose control, but no significant effect on stress related hormones. PMID:26240957

  18. Low Socioeconomic Status is Associated with Increased Risk for Hypoglycemia in Diabetes Patients: the Diabetes Study of Northern California (DISTANCE)

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Seth A.; Karter, Andrew J.; Lyles, Courtney R.; Liu, Jennifer Y.; Schillinger, Dean; Adler, Nancy E.; Moffet, Howard H.; Sarkar, Urmimala

    2014-01-01

    Background Social risk factors for hypoglycemia are not well understood. Methods Cross-sectional analysis from the DISTANCE study, a multi-language, ethnically-stratified random sample of adults in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California diabetes registry, conducted in 2005-2006 (response rate 62%). Exposures were income and educational attainment; outcome was patient report of severe hypoglycemia. To test the association, we used multivariable logistic regression to adjust for demographic and clinical factors. Results 14,357 patients were included. Reports of severe hypoglycemia were common (11%), and higher in low-income vs. high-income (16% vs. 8.8) and low-education vs. high-education (11.9% vs. 8.9%) groups. In multivariable analysis, incomes of less than $15,000 (OR 1.51 95%CI 1.19-1.91), $15,000-$24,999 (OR 1.57 95%CI 1.27-1.94), and high school or less education (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.24-1.63) were associated with increased hypoglycemia, similar to insulin use (OR 1.44 95%CI 1.19-1.74). Conclusions Low income and educational attainment are important risk factors for hypoglycemia. PMID:24858863

  19. Factors Affecting Mobile Diabetes Monitoring Adoption Among Physicians: Questionnaire Study and Path Model

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda, José Alberto; Sanz, Silvia; Henseler, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes often find it difficult to control their blood glucose level on a daily basis because of distance or physical incapacity. With the increase in Internet-enabled smartphone use, this problem can be resolved by adopting a mobile diabetes monitoring system. Most existing studies have focused on patients’ usability perceptions, whereas little attention has been paid to physicians’ intentions to adopt this technology. Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the perceptions and user acceptance of mobile diabetes monitoring among Japanese physicians. Methods A questionnaire survey of physicians was conducted in Japan. The structured questionnaire was prepared in a context of a mobile diabetes monitoring system that controls blood glucose, weight, physical activity, diet, insulin and medication, and blood pressure. Following a thorough description of mobile diabetes monitoring with a graphical image, questions were asked relating to system quality, information quality, service quality, health improvement, ubiquitous control, privacy and security concerns, perceived value, subjective norms, and intention to use mobile diabetes monitoring. The data were analyzed by partial least squares (PLS) path modeling. Results In total, 471 physicians participated from 47 prefectures across Japan, of whom 134 were specialized in internal and gastrointestinal medicine. Nine hypotheses were tested with both the total sample and the specialist subsample; results were similar for both samples in terms of statistical significance and the strength of path coefficients. We found that system quality, information quality, and service quality significantly affect overall quality. Overall quality determines the extent to which physicians perceive the value of mobile health monitoring. However, in contrast to our initial predictions, overall quality does not have a significant direct effect on the intention to use mobile diabetes monitoring. With regard to net benefits, both ubiquitous control and health improvement are significant predictors. Net benefits in turn significantly motivate physicians to use mobile health monitoring, and has a strong influence on perceived value. Perceived value and subjective norms are predictors of intention to use. In our sample, concerns over privacy and security risk have no significant effects on intention to use mobile diabetes monitoring. Among the 3 control variables, only age significantly affected intention to use mobile diabetes monitoring, whereas experience and gender were not significant predictors of intention. Conclusions Physicians consider perceived value and net benefits as the most important motivators to use mobile diabetes monitoring. Overall quality assessment does affect their intention to use this technology, but only indirectly through perceived value. Net benefits seem to be a strong driver in both a direct and indirect manner, implying that physicians may perceive health improvement with ubiquitous control as a true utility by enhancing cost-effective monitoring, and simultaneously recognize it as a way to create value for their clinical practices. PMID:23257115

  20. Productivity of authors in the field of diabetes: bibliographic analysis of trial publications

    PubMed Central

    Uijldert, Mick; Donswijk, Lennart F; Gale, Edwin A M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether trial publications of glucose lowering drugs are dominated by a small group of highly prolific authors (“supertrialists”) and to identify some of their characteristics. Design Bibliographic analysis of trial publications. Data sources and review methods We searched PubMed for all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) relating to glucose lowering drugs published between 1 January 1993 and 31 December 2013. From these publications we identified the 110 most prolific authors using PubReMiner. The 991 RCTs they published were examined for various characteristics such as author number, commercial sponsorship, company authorship, conflicts of interest, etc. The track record of the top 11 authors was studied in more detail. Main outcome measure Proportion of articles published by the top 110 and the top 11 authors. Results 3782 articles from 13?592 authors were identified. The top 110 authors were named in 1227 (32.4%) of all articles, and the top 11 authors in 397 (10.5%) of all articles. The top 110 authors published 991 RCTs for a median of 20 (range 4-77) RCTs per author; the top 11 published 354 RCTs for a median of 42 (36-77) RCTs per author. Of the 110 top authors, 48 were employed by a pharmaceutical company. Of the 991 RCTs, 906 were commercially sponsored. Of 704 articles that could be assessed for conflicts of interest, only 42 (6%) were considered fully independent. Medical writing assistance was acknowledged in 439 (44.3%) of 991 RCTs. Conclusion The past two decades have seen an explosive increase in the number of published clinical trials regarding glucose lowering treatment. Some authors have made a disproportionate contribution to the therapeutic evidence base; one third of the RCT evidence base on glucose lowering drug treatment for diabetes was generated by <1% of authors. Of these, 44% were company employees and 56% were academics who work closely with the pharmaceutical companies. PMID:26136272

  1. Ethnic Differences in Associations Between Fat Deposition and Incident Diabetes and Underlying Mechanisms: The SABRE Study

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Sophie V; Tillin, Therese; Dehbi, Hakim-Moulay; Wright, Andrew; Forouhi, Nita G; Godsland, Ian; Whincup, Peter; Sattar, Naveed; Hughes, Alun D; Chaturvedi, Nishi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine ethnic differences in ectopic fat and associations with incident diabetes. Methods In a UK cohort study, 1338 Europeans, 838 South Asians, and 330 African Caribbeans living in London were aged 40-69 years at baseline. Baseline assessment included blood tests, anthropometry, and questionnaires. Anthropometry-based prediction equations estimated baseline visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Incident diabetes was ascertained from record review, self-report, or oral glucose tolerance testing. Results South Asians had more and African Caribbeans less estimated VAT than Europeans. Both ethnic minorities had larger truncal skinfolds than Europeans. In men, adjustment for risk factors (BMI, smoking, systolic blood pressure, and HDL-cholesterol) markedly attenuated the association between estimated VAT and diabetes in Europeans (standardized subhazard ratios [95% CI]: from 1.74 [1.49, 2.03] to 1.16 [0.77, 1.76]) and African Caribbeans (1.72 [1.26, 2.35] to 1.44 [0.69, 3.02]) but not South Asians (1.60 [1.38, 1.86] to 1.90 [1.37, 2.64]). In women, attenuation was observed only for South Asians (1.80 [1.01, 3.23] to 1.07 [0.49, 2.31]). Associations between truncal skinfolds and diabetes appeared less affected by multivariable adjustment in South Asians and African Caribbeans than Europeans (1.24 [0.97, 1.57] and 1.28 [0.89, 1.82] versus 1.02 [0.77, 1.36] in men; 1.91 [1.03, 3.56] and 1.42 [0.86, 2.34] versus 1.23 [0.74, 2.05] in women). Conclusions Differences in overall truncal fat, as well as VAT, may contribute to the excess of diabetes in South Asian and African Caribbean groups, particularly for women. PMID:25645144

  2. Sputum Glucose and Glycemic Control in Cystic Fibrosis-Related Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Van Sambeek, Lindsey; Cowley, Elise S.; Newman, Dianne K.; Kato, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes affects up to half of cystic fibrosis patients and is associated with increased mortality and more frequent pulmonary exacerbations. However, it is unclear to what degree good glycemic control might mitigate these risks and clinical outcomes have not previously been studied in relation to glucose from the lower airways, the site of infection and CF disease progression. We initially hypothesized that diabetic cystic fibrosis patients with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) > 6.5% have worse pulmonary function, longer and more frequent exacerbations and also higher sputum glucose levels than patients with HbA1c ? 6.5% or cystic fibrosis patients without diabetes. To test this, we analyzed spontaneously expectorated sputum samples from 88 cystic fibrosis patients. The median sputum glucose concentration was 0.70 mM (mean, 4.75 mM; range, 0-64.6 mM). Sputum glucose was not correlated with age, sex, body mass index, diabetes diagnosis, glycemic control, exacerbation frequency or length, or pulmonary function. Surprisingly, sputum glucose was highest in subjects with normal glucose tolerance, suggesting the dynamics of glycemic control, sputum glucose and pulmonary infections are more complex than previously thought. Two-year mean HbA1c was positively correlated with the length of exacerbation admission (p < 0.01), and negatively correlated with measures of pulmonary function (p < 0.01). While total number of hospitalizations for exacerbations were not significantly different, subjects with an HbA1c > 6.5% were hospitalized on average 6 days longer than those with HbA1c ? 6.5% (p < 0.01). Current clinical care guidelines for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes target HbA1c ? 7% to limit long-term microvascular damage, but more stringent glycemic control (HbA1c ? 6.5%) may further reduce the short-term pulmonary complications. PMID:25803537

  3. Resveratrol and diabetic cardiac function: focus on recent in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Turan, Belma; Tuncay, Erkan; Vassort, Guy

    2012-04-01

    Resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin found in wine has the potential to impact a variety of human diseases. Resveratrol like other polyphenols activates many of the same intracellular pathways as those activated by caloric restriction. It can quench reactive oxidative species, ROS and induce eNOS and iNOS expression. Resveratrol also can activate SIRT1, a NAD?-dependent deacetylase, that leads an improved in mitochondrial function, and then this procedure turns to activate the transcription factor Nrf2 that coordinates expression of key antioxidant mechanisms by binding to the antioxidant response elements. Resveratrol provides cardioprotection by triggering preconditioning and inducing autophagy. It also presents chemical similarities with estrogen and was reported to activate both nuclear and extranuclear estrogen receptors. Resveratrol treatment alleviated diabetes-induced cardiovascular system disorders via different endogeneous signaling pathways including oxidative stress/antioxidant defense system, glucose/insulin metabolism, overexpression of iNOS/nitrotyrosine, and preconditioning. Resveratrol treatment significantly reduced the blood glucose level in STZ-treated type 1 diabetic animals through insulin-dependent and insulin-independent pathways. Resveratrol triggers some of the similar intracellular insulin signalling components in myocardium such as eNOS, AKT through the AMPK pathway, and plays an essential role in Glut-4 translocation and glucose uptake in STZ-induced diabetic myocardium. However, resveratrol can exhibit hormetic action expressing health benefits at lower doses whereas being detrimental at higher doses. It might also exert antidiabetic effects by activating SIRT1 directly in the brain. This review includes a summary of the role of resveratrol and diabetic cardiac function including a brief discussion on in vitro and in vivo studies as well as our original observations in diabetic rats. PMID:22437738

  4. Estimation of 10-Year Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Nepalese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Framingham Versus United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Pokharel, Daya Ram; Khadka, Dipendra; Sigdel, Manoj; Yadav, Naval Kishor; Sapkota, Lokendra Bahadur; Kafle, Ramchandra; Nepal, Sarthak; Sapkota, Ravindra Mohan; Choudhary, Niraj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Predicting future coronary heart disease (CHD) risk with the help of a validated risk prediction function helps clinicians identify diabetic patients at high risk and provide them with appropriate preventive medicine. Aim: The aim of this study is to estimate and compare 10-year CHD risks of Nepalese diabetic patients using two most common risk prediction functions: The Framingham risk equation and United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk engine that are yet to be validated for Nepalese population. Patients and Methods: We conducted a hospital-based, cross-sectional study on 524 patients with type 2 diabetes. Baseline and biochemical variables of individual patients were recorded and CHD risks were estimated by the Framingham and UKPDS risk prediction functions. Estimated risks were categorized as low, medium, and high. The estimated CHD risks were compared using kappa statistics, Pearson's bivariate correlation, Bland-Altman plots, and multiple regression analysis. Results: The mean 10-year CHD risks estimated by the Framingham and UKPDS risk functions were 17.7 ± 12.1 and 16.8 ± 15 (bias: 0.88, P > 0.05), respectively, and were always higher in males and older age groups (P < 0.001). The two risk functions showed moderate convergent validity in predicting CHD risks, but differed in stratifying them and explaining the patients' risk profile. The Framingham equation predicted higher risk for patients usually below 70 years and showed better association with their current risk profile than the UKPDS risk engine. Conclusions: Based on the predicted risk, Nepalese diabetic patients, particularly those associated with increased numbers of risk factors, bear higher risk of future CHDs. Since this study is a cross-sectional one and uses externally validated risk functions, Nepalese clinicians should use them with caution, and preferably in combination with other guidelines, while making important medical decisions in preventive therapy of CHD. PMID:26417557

  5. Pediatric Diabetes Consortium Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) New Onset (NeOn) Study: Factors Associated with HbA1c Levels One Year after Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Maria J.; Connor, Crystal G.; Ruedy, Katrina J.; Beck, Roy W.; Kollman, Craig; Wood, Jamie R.; Buckingham, Bruce; Klingensmith, Georgeanna; Silverstein, Janet; Tamborlane, William V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify determinants of HbA1c levels one year after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in participants in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) T1D New Onset (NeOn) Study. Research Design and Methods Diabetes-specific as well as socioeconomic factors during the first year following diagnosis were analyzed in 857 participants (mean age 9.1 years, 51% female, 66% non-Hispanic White) not participating in an intervention study who had an HbA1c value at 12 months. Results Mean ± SD HbA1c at one year was 62 ± 16 mmol/mol (7.8% ± 1.5). In univariate and multivariate analyses, clinical center, non-Hispanic White race, private health insurance, living with both parents, higher frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), and lower insulin requirements were associated with lower HbA1c concentrations at one year (p<0.01). No association was found with gender, age, Tanner stage, BMI, DKA at onset, number of positive autoantibodies or HbA1c at onset, or number of visits to diabetes physician during the first year. Conclusions White race, higher socioeconomic status, two-parent household, more frequent SMBG and low insulin requirements are associated with lower HbA1c concentration one year after the onset of T1D in children. PMID:23889707

  6. Evaluation of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Colombian population: A longitudinal observational study

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Arbelaez, Diego; Alvarado-Jurado, Laura; Ayala-Castillo, Miguel; Forero-Naranjo, Leonardo; Camacho, Paul Anthony; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the performance of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) questionnaire for detecting and predicting type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) in a Colombian population. METHODS: This is a longitudinal observational study conducted in Floridablanca, Colombia. Adult subjects (age ? 35 years) without known diabetes, were included. A modified version of FINDRISC was completed, and the glycemia values from all the subjects were collected from the hospital’s database. Firstly, a cross-sectional analysis was performed and then, the subsample of prediabetic participants was followed for diabetes incidence. RESULTS: A total of 772 subjects were suitable for the study. The overall prevalence of undiagnosed DM2 was 2.59%, and the incidence of DM2 among the prediabetic participants was 7.5 per 100 person-years after a total of 265257 person-years follow-up. The FINDRISC at baseline was significantly associated with undiagnosed and incident DM2. The area under receiver operating characteristics curve of the FINDRISC score for detecting undiagnosed DM2 in both men and women was 0.7477 and 0.7175, respectively; and for predicting the incidence of DM2 among prediabetics was 71.99% in men and 67.74% in women. CONCLUSION: The FINDRISC questionnaire is a useful screening tool to identify cross-sectionally unknown DM2 and to predict the incidence of DM2 among prediabetics in the Colombian population. PMID:26675051

  7. Incidence and Predictors of Hospitalization for Bacterial Infection in Community-Based Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Emma J.; Martin, Natalie; Makepeace, Ashley; Sillars, Brett A.; Davis, Wendy A.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The few studies that have examined the relationship between diabetes and bacterial infections have utilized administrative databases and/or have had limited/incomplete data including recognized infection risk factors. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and associates of bacterial infection severe enough to require hospitalization in well-characterized community-based patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods and Findings We studied a cohort of 1,294 patients (mean±SD age 64.1±11.3 years) from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1) and 5,156 age-, gender- and zip-code-matched non-diabetic controls. The main outcome measure was incident hospitalization for bacterial infection as principal diagnosis between 1993 and 2010. We also examined differences in statin use in 52 FDS1 pairs hospitalized with pneumonia (cases) or a contemporaneous non-infection-related cause (controls). During 12.0±5.4 years of follow-up, 251 (19.4%) patients were hospitalized on 368 occasions for infection (23.7/1,000 patient-years). This was more than double the rate in matched controls (incident rate ratio (IRR) (95% CI), 2.13 (1.88–2.42), P<0.001). IRRs for pneumonia, cellulitis, and septicemia/bacteremia were 1.86 (1.55–2.21), 2.45 (1.92–3.12), and 2.08 (1.41–3.04), respectively (P<0.001). Among the diabetic patients, older age, male sex, prior recent infection-related hospitalization, obesity, albuminuria, retinopathy and Aboriginal ethnicity were baseline variables independently associated with risk of first hospitalization with any infection (P?0.005). After adjustment for these variables, baseline statin treatment was not significant (hazard ratio (95% CI), 0.70 (0.39–1.25), P?=?0.22). Statin use at hospitalization for pneumonia among the case-control pairs was similar (23.1% vs. 13.5%, P?=?0.27). Conclusions The risk of severe infection is increased among type 2 diabetic patients and is not reduced by statin therapy. There are a number of other easily-accessible sociodemographic and clinical variables that could be used to optimize infection-related education, prevention and management in type 2 diabetes. PMID:23536910

  8. Establishing consensus criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy following the HAPO study.

    PubMed

    Hadar, Eran; Hod, Moshe

    2010-09-01

    The current diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus are controversial because they lack correlation to maternal and perinatal outcome. The results of the hyperglycemia and adverse pregnancy outcome (HAPO) study demonstrate a linear association between increasing levels of fasting, 1- and 2-h plasma glucose post a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test to several significant outcome endpoints, such as birth weight above the 90th percentile, cord blood serum C-peptide level above the 90th percentile, primary cesarean delivery, clinical neonatal hypoglycemia, premature delivery, shoulder dystocia or birth injury, intensive neonatal care admission, hyperbilirubinemia, and preeclampsia. A consensus report by the IADPSG, based on a vigorous assessment of the HAPO results and other studies, recommended an endorsement of risk-based, internationally accepted criteria for the diagnosis and classification of diabetes in pregnancy. This review follows the steps from defining the problem to the endpoint of achieving a worldwide policy change. PMID:20840258

  9. Tight Diabetes Control

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Tight Diabetes Control Keeping your blood glucose levels as close ... and syringes, than before. What About Type 2 Diabetes? The DCCT studied only people with type 1 ...

  10. Glucose tolerance status is a better predictor of diabetes and cardiovascular outcomes than metabolic syndrome: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Backround To evaluate the importance of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in predicting diabetes and cardiovascular disease in patients with and without Metabolic Syndrome from a population treated in a primary care unit. Research design and methods A prospective cohort study was conducted with subjects regularly attending the primary care unit of Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre. Participants underwent a 75?g OGTT. Metabolic syndrome definition was based on the criteria of IDF/AHA/NHLBI-2010. Results Participants mean age was 61?±?12?years (males: 38%; whites: 67%). Of the 148 subjects included, 127 (86%) were followed for 36?±?14?months, 21 (14%) were lost. Subjects were classified into four groups based on baseline OGTT: 29% normal (n?=?43), 28% impaired fasting glucose (IFG; n?=?42), 26% impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n?=?38), and 17% diabetes (n?=?25). Metabolic syndrome prevalence was lower in normal group (28%), intermediate in IFG (62%) and IGT (65%) groups, and higher among subjects with diabetes (92%; P <0.001). Incidence of diabetes increased along with the stages of glucose metabolism disturbance (normal: 0%, IFG: 16%, IGT: 28%; P?=?0.004). No patient with normal OGTT developed diabetes, regardless metabolic syndrome presence. Diabetes at baseline was the major determinant of cardiovascular disease occurrence (normal: 0%, IFG: 4%, IGT: 0%, diabetes: 24%; P?=?0.001). In Cox-regression analysis, only the 2?h OGTT results were associated with diabetes (OR?=?1.03; 95%CI 1.01–1.06; P <0.001) and cardiovascular disease development (OR?=?1.013; 95%CI 1.002–1.025; P?=?0.024). Conclusions In this sample of subjects undergoing diabetes screening, the OGTT predicted diabetes and cardiovascular disease more effectively than the metabolic syndrome status. PMID:22682107

  11. The Effects and Costs of a Group-Based Education Programme for Self-Management of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. A Community-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B.; Snorgaard, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Seven hundred and two patients…

  12. ‘I call it the blame and shame disease’: a qualitative study about perceptions of social stigma surrounding type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Jessica L; Ventura, Adriana; Mosely, Kylie; Speight, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives While health-related stigma has been the subject of considerable research in other conditions (obesity and HIV/AIDS), it has not received substantial attention in diabetes. The aim of the current study was to explore the social experiences of Australian adults living with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with a particular focus on the perception and experience of diabetes-related stigma. Design A qualitative study using semistructured interviews, which were audio recorded, transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. Setting This study was conducted in non-clinical settings in metropolitan and regional areas in the Australian state of Victoria. Participants were recruited primarily through the state consumer organisation representing people with diabetes. Participants All adults aged ?18?years with T2DM living in Victoria were eligible to take part. Twenty-five adults with T2DM participated (12 women; median age 61?years; median diabetes duration 5?years). Results A total of 21 (84%) participants indicated that they believed T2DM was stigmatised, or reported evidence of stigmatisation. Specific themes about the experience of stigma were feeling blamed by others for causing their own condition, being subject to negative stereotyping, being discriminated against or having restricted opportunities in life. Other themes focused on sources of stigma, which included the media, healthcare professionals, friends, family and colleagues. Themes relating to the consequences of this stigma were also evident, including participants’ unwillingness to disclose their condition to others and psychological distress. Participants believed that people with type 1 diabetes do not experience similar stigmatisation. Conclusions Our study found evidence of people with T2DM experiencing and perceiving diabetes-related social stigma. Further research is needed to explore ways to measure and minimise diabetes-related stigma at the individual and societal levels, and also to explore perceptions and experiences of stigma in people with type 1 diabetes. PMID:24247325

  13. A dietary intervention for chronic diabetic neuropathy pain: a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bunner, A E; Wells, C L; Gonzales, J; Agarwal, U; Bayat, E; Barnard, N D

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetic neuropathy is a common and often debilitating condition for which available treatments are limited. Because a low-fat plant-based diet has been shown to improve glycemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes, we hypothesized that such a diet would reduce painful symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Methods: In this 20-week pilot study, individuals with type 2 diabetes and painful diabetic neuropathy were randomly assigned to two groups. The intervention group was asked to follow a low-fat, plant-based diet, with weekly classes for support in following the prescribed diet, and to take a vitamin B12 supplement. The control group was asked to take the same vitamin B12 supplement, but received no other intervention. At baseline, midpoint and 20 weeks, clinical, laboratory and questionnaire data were collected. Questionnaires included an analog ‘worst pain' scale, Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument, global impression scale, Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, Neuropathy Total Symptom Score, a weekly pain diary and Norfolk Quality of Life Questionnaire. Results: After 20 weeks, body weight change with the intervention was ?6.4?kg (95% confidence interval (CI) ?9.4 to ?3.4, P<0.001) in an effect size analysis. Electrochemical skin conductance in the foot improved by an average of 12.4 microseimens (95% CI 1.2–23.6, P=0.03) with the intervention in an effect size analysis. The between-group difference in change in pain, as measured by the McGill pain questionnaire, was ?8.2 points (95% CI ?16.1 to ?0.3, P=0.04). Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument questionnaire score change was ?1.6 points (95% CI ?3.0 to ?0.2, P=0.03). Conclusions: Improvements were seen in some clinical and pain measures. This pilot study suggests the potential value of a plant-based diet intervention, including weekly support classes, for treating painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26011582

  14. Effects of age and diabetes on scleral stiffness.

    PubMed

    Coudrillier, Baptiste; Pijanka, Jacek; Jefferys, Joan; Sorensen, Thomas; Quigley, Harry A; Boote, Craig; Nguyen, Thao D

    2015-07-01

    The effects of diabetes on the collagen structure and material properties of the sclera are unknown but may be important to elucidate whether diabetes is a risk factor for major ocular diseases such as glaucoma. This study provides a quantitative assessment of the changes in scleral stiffness and collagen fiber alignment associated with diabetes. Posterior scleral shells from five diabetic donors and seven non-diabetic donors were pressurized to 30?mm Hg. Three-dimensional surface displacements were calculated during inflation testing using digital image correlation (DIC). After testing, each specimen was subjected to wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements of its collagen organization. Specimen-specific finite element models of the posterior scleras were generated from the experimentally measured geometry. An inverse finite element analysis was developed to determine the material properties of the specimens, i.e., matrix and fiber stiffness, by matching DIC-measured and finite element predicted displacement fields. Effects of age and diabetes on the degree of fiber alignment, matrix and collagen fiber stiffness, and mechanical anisotropy were estimated using mixed effects models accounting for spatial autocorrelation. Older age was associated with a lower degree of fiber alignment and larger matrix stiffness for both diabetic and non-diabetic scleras. However, the age-related increase in matrix stiffness was 87% larger in diabetic specimens compared to non-diabetic controls and diabetic scleras had a significantly larger matrix stiffness (p?=?0.01). Older age was associated with a nearly significant increase in collagen fiber stiffness for diabetic specimens only (p?=?0.06), as well as a decrease in mechanical anisotropy for non-diabetic scleras only (p?=?0.04). The interaction between age and diabetes was not significant for all outcomes. This study suggests that the age-related increase in scleral stiffness is accelerated in eyes with diabetes, which may have important implications in glaucoma. PMID:25751456

  15. Dietary education must fit into everyday life: a qualitative study of people with a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hempler, Nana F; Nicic, Sara; Ewers, Bettina; Willaing, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Background The high prevalence of diabetes among South Asian populations in European countries partially derives from unhealthy changes in dietary patterns. Limited studies address perspectives of South Asian populations with respect to utility of diabetes education in everyday life. This study explores perspectives on dietary diabetes education and healthy food choices of people living in Denmark who have a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted between October 2012 and December 2013 with 12 participants with type 2 diabetes who had received dietary diabetes education. Data analysis was systematic and was based on grounded theory principles. Results Participants described the process of integrating and utilizing dietary education in everyday life as challenging. Perceived barriers of the integration and utilization included a lack of a connection between the content of the education and life conditions, a lack of support from their social networks for dietary change, difficulty integrating the education into everyday life, and failure to include the participants’ taste preferences in the educational setting. Conclusion Dietary education that is sensitive to the attitudes, wishes, and preferences of the participants and that aims at establishing a connection to the everyday life of the participants might facilitate successful changes in dietary practices among people with a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes. The findings suggest that more focus should be placed on collaborative processes in the dietary educational setting in order to achieve appropriate education and to improve communication between this population and health care professionals. PMID:25750523

  16. A Case-Cohort Study of Cadmium Body Burden and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in American Women

    PubMed Central

    Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Simpson, Christopher D.; Checkoway, Harvey; Williams, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Environmental cadmium (Cd) exposure is associated with type 2 diabetes. However, the association of Cd and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is unknown. Objectives We examined the association between body burden of Cd and GDM risk. Methods We used 140 GDM cases and 481 randomly selected noncase subcohort members from the Omega Study to conduct a case-cohort study. Creatinine (Cr)–corrected Cd in early pregnancy urine (U-Cd) was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Tertiles (< 0.29; 0.29–0.42; ? 0.43 ?g/g Cr) were defined using the subcohort’s U-Cd distribution. GDM was diagnosed using the 2004 American Diabetes Association guidelines. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression. Results GDM cases had higher geometric mean U-Cd (0.39 ?g/g Cr; 95% CI: 0.37, 0.41) than noncases (0.31 ?g/g Cr; 95% CI: 0.29, 0.33). Odds ratios for GDM increased with increasing U-Cd tertile (OR = 1.64; 95% CI: 0.88, 3.05 for middle vs. low tertile; OR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.15, 3.73 for high vs. low tertile; p-trend = 0.015). Overweight/obesity (body mass index ? 25 kg/m2) did not modify the association between U-Cd and GDM (p = 0.26). Conclusions Our findings suggest that body burden of Cd increases risk of GDM in a dose-dependent manner. Improved understanding of environmental factors influencing GDM may facilitate early identification of women at high risk of GDM. Citation Romano ME, Enquobahrie DA, Simpson CD, Checkoway H, Williams MA. 2015. A case-cohort study of cadmium body burden and gestational diabetes mellitus in American women. Environ Health Perspect 123:993–998;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408282 PMID:25712731

  17. Genetic Risk Score Associations With Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality in the Diabetes Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Amanda J.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Ng, Maggie C.Y.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Freedman, Barry I.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Bowden, Donald W.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Given the high rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and associated mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes, identifying and understanding predictors of CVD events and mortality could help inform clinical management in this high-risk group. Recent large-scale genetic studies may provide additional tools in this regard. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Genetic risk scores (GRSs) were constructed in 1,175 self-identified European American (EA) individuals comprising the family-based Diabetes Heart Study based on 1) 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 2) 30 SNPs with previously documented associations with CVD in genome-wide association studies. Associations between each GRS and a self-reported history of CVD, coronary artery calcified plaque (CAC) determined by noncontrast computed tomography scan, all-cause mortality, and CVD mortality were examined using marginal models with generalized estimating equations and Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS The weighted 13-SNP GRS was associated with prior CVD (odds ratio [OR] 1.51 [95% CI 1.22–1.86]; P = 0.0002), CAC (?-coefficient [?] 0.22 [0.02–0.43]; P = 0.04) and CVD mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.35 [1.10–1.81]; P = 0.04) when adjusting for the other known CVD risk factors: age, sex, type 2 diabetes affection status, BMI, current smoking status, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The weighted 30-SNP GRS was also associated with prior CVD (OR 1.33 [1.08–1.65]; P = 0.008), CAC (? 0.29 [0.08–0.50]; P = 0.006), all-cause mortality (HR 1.28 [1.05–1.56]; P = 0.01), and CVD mortality (HR 1.46 [1.08–1.96]; P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS These findings support the utility of two simple GRSs in examining genetic associations for adverse outcomes in EAs with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24574349

  18. Interaction between the NOS3 Gene and Obesity as a Determinant of Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Bressler, Jan; Pankow, James S.; Coresh, Josef; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3) catalyzes the production of nitric oxide from L-arginine in endothelial cells. Obesity is a modifiable risk factor for diabetes, and obese individuals have been reported to have reduced nitric oxide availability compared to controls whose weight is in the normal range. Since homozygous carriers of the NOS3 G894T variant are predicted to have decreased enzyme activity, the association between NOS3 genotype and type 2 diabetes, and possible effect modification by body mass index (BMI) were evaluated. The prevalence of diabetes and BMI was determined at baseline in 14,374 participants 45–66 years of age from the prospective biracial population-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study of the development of atherosclerosis in four communities in the United States. Individuals with a BMI ?30 kg/m2 were considered obese. Those subjects not meeting the case definition were the comparison groups for the 728 African American and 980 white participants with diabetes. Multivariable logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, and field center were used to test for main genetic effects and interaction with obesity. Although the NOS3 G894T variant was not independently associated with diabetes in either African Americans or whites, significant interaction between BMI and the NOS3 polymorphism indicated that obesity was an effect modifier of diabetes risk for white individuals with the TT genotype (odds ratio (OR) for interaction?=?1.65, p?=?0.04). In stratified analyses, homozygosity for the NOS3 T allele in obese white participants but not in those whose BMI <30 kg/m2 was associated with an elevated risk of diabetes (OR?=?1.47, p?=?0.02) when compared to the common GG genotype. These results suggest that interaction between obesity and NOS3 genotype may be a determinant of diabetes case status in whites in the ARIC cohort. Replication in other populations will be required to confirm these observations. PMID:24278136

  19. Study of the effect of vitamin D supplementation on glycemic control in type 2 diabetic prevalent hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Sarhan, Iman I; Halawa, Mohamed R; Afify, Essam N; Hebah, Hayam A; Al-Gohary, Eman A; El-Shazly, Islam O

    2015-10-01

    Vitamin D is claimed to have an adjuvant effect on glycemic control by dual action on pancreatic ?-cells and insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to assess the possible effect of short-term alfacalcidol supply on glycemic control in type 2 diabetic hemodialysis (HD) patients. Twenty type 2 diabetic HD patients (using diet and oral drugs but not insulin) were randomly selected from our dialysis unit as well as 20 non-diabetic HD patients as control. A third group of 12 healthy subjects were studied as well. All three groups were similar in age, sex, and body mass index. Oral alfacalcidol therapy was administrated daily as recommended by Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) guidelines for 12 weeks guided by monthly serum phosphorus and Cax PO4 product. Corrected total calcium, phosphorus, intact parathyroid hormone, 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25[OH]D), and glucoparameters (fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c%], insulin resistance by homeostatic model assessment, and ?-cell function by HOMA-?%) were measured under basal conditions and after 3 months of therapy. 25(OH)D was non-significantly lower in diabetic than non-diabetic HD patients, but significantly lower than healthy subjects at the start of the study. However, vitamin D level increased significantly after 3 months of trial, although the levels did not reach normal values. This vitamin D rise was associated with highly significant improvement in concentrations of fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting insulin, HbA1c%, and HOMA-?-cell function in diabetic and non-diabetic controls. However, there was a significant rise in insulin resistance after treatment. The percentage of change was evident more in diabetics regarding FBS and 25(OH)D concentration. Adjustment of 25(OH)D level in type 2 diabetic prevalent HD patients may improve, at least with short-term therapy, glycemic control mainly through improving ?-cell function. PMID:26448381

  20. Albuminuria, cardiovascular risk factors and disease management in subjects with type 2 diabetes: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Meisinger, Christa; Heier, Margit; Landgraf, Rüdiger; Happich, Michael; Wichmann, H-Erich; Piehlmeier, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown that microalbuminuria is an important risk factor for arteriosclerosis, coronary heart disease and other vascular diseases in persons with type 2 diabetes. In the present study we examined the prevalence and risk factors for micro- and macroalbuminuria and examined glycemic control as well as treatment of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in persons with known type 2 diabetes in Germany. Methods The presented data were derived from the 'KORA Augsburg Diabetes Family Study', conducted between October 2001 and September 2002. Participants were adults aged 29 years and older with previously diagnosed type 2 diabetes (n = 581). Microalbuminuria was defined as an albumin-creatinine ratio of 30 to 300 mg/g, and macroalbuminuria as an albumin-creatinine ratio of more than 300 mg/g. Results Microalbuminuria was revealed in 27.2% and macroalbuminuria in 9.0% of the 581 included diabetic persons. Multivariable regression analysis identified HBA1c, duration of diabetes, systolic blood pressure, serum creatinine, smoking and waist circumference as independent risk factors associated with albuminuria (micro- or macroalbuminuria). Relatively few persons with type 2 diabetes achieved treatment targets of HbA1c < 7% (46.6%), total cholesterol < 200 mg/dl (44.1%), and LDL cholesterol < 100 mg/dl (16.0%). Optimal HDL cholesterol values (> 45 mg/dl in men, > 55 mg/dl in women) were found in 55.8%, and blood pressure values < 130 and < 85 mmHg in 31.3% of the persons Conclusion Albuminuria is common among German persons with known type 2 diabetes. Despite evidence-based guidelines, only a small proportion of type 2 diabetic persons achieved the recommended levels of glycemic control and control of cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:18986536

  1. Smoking and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mühlhauser, I

    1990-01-01

    The frequency of smoking in diabetic patients is not appreciably different from that in the general population. As in non-diabetic subjects, smoking is a major cardiovascular risk factor in diabetic patients. For young diabetic patients, smoking has been identified as a risk for macroproteinuric nephropathy. In respect of retinopathy, study results are more controversial. Recent studies also suggest smoking as a risk indicator for extra-articular connective tissue changes and neuropathy. Patients who already present with vascular complications, pregnant women, and women who use oral contraceptive drugs appear to run a particularly high risk by smoking. Stopping smoking reduces the risk of vascular morbidity and mortality in non-diabetic subjects. Although no comparable studies are available for diabetic populations, it should be assumed that the beneficial effects of stopping smoking are applicable to diabetic patients as well. Programmes to encourage diabetic patients to stop smoking are scarce and have not been successful. PMID:2137057

  2. Current Concepts in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Su Jeong

    2014-01-01

    For the past several decades, tremendous efforts have been made to decrease the complications of diabetes, including diabetic retinopathy. New diagnostic modalities like ultrawide field fundus fluorescein angiography and spectral domain optical coherence tomography has allowed more accurate diagnosis of early diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema. Antivascular endothelial growth factors are now extensively used to treat diabetic retinopathy and macular edema with promising results. There remains uncertainty over the long term effects and the socioeconomic costs of these agents. PMID:25541604

  3. An update on the use of NOD mice to study autoimmune (Type 1) diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chaparro, Rodolfo José; DiLorenzo, Teresa P

    2011-01-01

    The widely used nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of autoimmune (Type 1) diabetes mellitus shares multiple characteristics with the human disease, and studies employing this model continue to yield clinically relevant and important information. Here, we review some of the recent key findings obtained from NOD mouse investigations that have both advanced our understanding of disease pathogenesis and suggested new therapeutic targets and approaches. Areas discussed include antigen discovery, identification of genes and pathways contributing to disease susceptibility, development of strategies to image islet inflammation and the testing of therapeutics. We also review recent technical advances that, combined with an improved understanding of the NOD mouse model’s limitations, should work to ensure its popularity, utility and relevance in the years ahead. PMID:20979558

  4. Association of DASH Diet With Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Youth With Diabetes Mellitus The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study

    PubMed Central

    Liese, Angela D.; Bortsov, Andrey; Günther, Anke L.B.; Dabelea, Dana; Reynolds, Kristi; Standiford, Debra A.; Liu, Lenna; Williams, Desmond E.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Bell, Ronny; Marcovina, Santica

    2015-01-01

    Background We have shown that adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is related to blood pressure in youth with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. We explored the impact of the DASH diet on other cardiovascular disease risk factors. Methods and Results Between 2001 and 2005, data on total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein particle density, apolipoprotein B, body mass index, waist circumference, and adipocytokines were ascertained in 2130 youth aged 10 to 22 years with physician-diagnosed diabetes mellitus. Dietary intake was assessed by food frequency questionnaire, categorized into the DASH food groups, and assigned an adherence score. Among youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus, higher adherence to the DASH diet was significantly and inversely associated with low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio and A1c in multivariable-adjusted models. Youth in the highest adherence tertile had an estimated 0.07 lower low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio and 0.2 lower A1c levels than those in the lowest tertile adjusted for confounders. No significant associations were observed with triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein particle density, adipocytokines, apolipoprotein B, body mass index Z score, or waist circumference. Among youth with type 2 diabetes mellitus, associations were observed with low-density lipoprotein particle density and body mass index Z score. Conclusions The DASH dietary pattern may be beneficial in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease risk in youth with diabetes mellitus. PMID:21422385

  5. Evidence for a Specific Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: An Observational Retrospective Echocardiographic Study in 656 Asymptomatic Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Isabelle; Cosson, Emmanuel; Nguyen, Minh Tuan; Banu, Isabela; Genevois, Isabelle; Poignard, Patricia; Valensi, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Our aim was to assess the prevalence of subclinical diabetic cardiomyopathy, occurring among diabetic patients without hypertension or coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods. 656 asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes for 14 ± 8 years (359 men, 59.7 ± 8.7 years old, HbA1c 8.7 ± 2.1%) and at least one cardiovascular risk factor had a cardiac echography at rest, a stress cardiac scintigraphy to screen for silent myocardial ischemia (SMI), and, in case of SMI, a coronary angiography to screen for silent CAD. Results. SMI was diagnosed in 206 patients, and 71 of them had CAD. In the 157 patients without hypertension or CAD, left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH: 24.1%) was the most frequent abnormality, followed by left ventricular dilation (8.6%), hypokinesia (5.3%), and systolic dysfunction (3.8%). SMI was independently associated with hypokinesia (odds ratio 14.7 [2.7–81.7], p < 0.01) and systolic dysfunction (OR 114.6 [1.7–7907], p < 0.01), while HbA1c (OR 1.9 [1.1–3.2], p < 0.05) and body mass index (OR 1.6 [1.1–2.4], p < 0.05) were associated with systolic dysfunction. LVH was more prevalent among hypertensive patients and hypokinesia in the patients with CAD. Conclusion. In asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients, diabetic cardiomyopathy is highly prevalent and is predominantly characterized by LVH. SMI, obesity, and poor glycemic control contribute to structural and functional LV abnormalities. PMID:26074964

  6. Insulin versus oral agents in the management of Cystic Fibrosis Related Diabetes: a case based study

    PubMed Central

    Onady, Gary M; Langdon, Leora J

    2006-01-01

    Background Insulin is the recommend therapeutic agent of choice for the management of Cystic Fibrosis Related Diabetes (CFRD), despite only sub-optimal reductions in glycemic control and increased morbidity and mortality reported by centers using this agent. The newer insulin sensitizing agents demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory mechanisms may provide an alternative management option for CFRD. Methods A prospective case based therapeutic comparison between insulin, sulfonylurea, metformin and thiazolidinedione was observed over one decade with 20 CFRD patients diagnosed using American Diabetes Association guideline standards. Patients entering the study elected treatment based on risk and benefit information provided for treatment options. Patients receiving organ transplant or requiring combination diabetic medications were excluded from the study. Results No statistical advantage was achieved regarding overall glycemic control for oral agents over insulin. Additional outcome measures including changes in weight, liver function testing and FEV1 were not statistically significant. Conclusion Insulin alone may not be the only therapeutic option in managing CFRD. Oral hypoglycemic agents were equally effective in treating CFRD and may provide an alternative class of agents for patients reluctant in using insulin. PMID:16790062

  7. Ticagrelor versus prasugrel in diabetic patients with an acute coronary syndrome. A pharmacodynamic randomised study.

    PubMed

    Laine, Marc; Frère, Corinne; Toesca, Richard; Berbis, Julie; Barnay, Pierre; Pansieri, Michel; Michelet, Pierre; Bessereau, Jacques; Camilleri, Elise; Ronsin, Olivia; Helal, Olfa; Paganelli, Franck; Dignat-George, Françoise; Bonello, Laurent

    2014-02-01

    Optimal P2Y12 receptor blockade is critical to prevent ischaemic recurrence in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We aimed to compare the level of platelet reactivity (PR) inhibition achieved by prasugrel and ticagrelor loading dose (LD) in diabetic acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients undergoing PCI. We performed a single-center prospective open-label randomised trial. Patients with diabetes mellitus undergoing PCI for an ACS were randomised to receive prasugrel 60 mg or ticagrelor 180 mg. The primary endpoint of the study was the level of platelet reactivity (PR) assessed between 6 and 18 hours post-LD using the VASP index. We randomised 100 diabetic patients undergoing PCI for an ACS. No difference was observed in baseline characteristics between the two groups. In particular, the rate of patient receiving insulin therapy was identical (25 vs 28.6%; p =0.7). Ticagrelor achieved a significantly lower PR compared to prasugrel loading dose (17.3 ± 14.2 vs 27.7 ± 23.3%; p=0.009). In addition the rate of high on-treatment platelet reactivity, defined by a VASP ?50%, tend to be lower in the ticagrelor group although the difference did not reach statistical significance (6 vs 16%; p=0.2). The rate of low on treatment PR was identical (60 vs 54%; p=0.8). The present study demonstrates that ticagrelor LD is superior to prasugrel LD to reduce PR in ACS patients with diabetes mellitus. Whether the higher potency of ticagrelor could translate into a clinical benefit should be investigated. PMID:24154787

  8. Telmisartan ameliorates germ cell toxicity in the STZ-induced diabetic rat: studies on possible molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, S; Jena, G B

    2013-07-01

    Testicular damage is a common clinical problem in diabetic individuals that severely affects the quality of life. The present study investigates the possible protective mechanisms of telmisartan, an angiotensin II-receptor antagonist in the germ cell of diabetic rat. Male SD rats were used and randomized into six groups: control, telmisartan control, diabetic control and diabetic group treated with telmisartan at the doses of 3, 6 and 12mg/kg/day, per oral for 4 weeks. Diabetes was induced by injecting a single dose of streptozotocin (STZ), (55mg/kg) dissolved in ice-cold 10mM citrate buffer; pH 4.4 and administered i.p. immediately after preparation to the SD rats. At the end of the study, rats were sacrificed and the levels of nitrite, superoxide, malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (reduced and peroxidase) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured. Germ cell toxicity was evaluated by using sperm count, sperm comet assay, histology of testes and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Further to confirm the oxidative and nitrosative damage, immunohistological quantification of 8-oxo-dG (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and 3-nitrotyrosine were evaluated respectively. Results showed that telmisartan significantly restored the levels of nitrite, superoxide, malondialdehyde, and glutathione and superoxide dismutase in diabetic testes. Further, telmisartan significantly increased the sperm counts, reduced apoptotic cell death, sperm DNA damage, oxidative and nitrosative damage in diabetic rat. Western blot analysis showed that telmisartan reduced the testicular inflammation and cell death by down-regulating the expression of NF-?B, IL-6, TNF-?, p-ERK1/2, iNOS, caspase-3 and increasing the PPAR-? expression. Results clearly indicate that telmisartan significantly reduced the both oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation and cell death in diabetic testes. The present results confirmed that telmisartan exhibited beneficial role in the germ cell of diabetic rat. PMID:23648321

  9. Low utilisation of diabetes medicines in Iran, despite their affordability (2000–2012): a time-series and benchmarking study

    PubMed Central

    Sarayani, Amir; Rashidian, Arash; Gholami, Kheirollah

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Diabetes is a major public health concern worldwide, particularly in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). Limited data exist on the status of access to diabetes medicines in LMICs. We assessed the utilisation and affordability of diabetes medicines in Iran as a middle-income country. Design We used a retrospective time-series design (2000–2012) and assessed national diabetes medicines’ utilisation using pharmaceuticals wholesale data. Methods We calculated defined daily dose consumptions per population days (DDDs/1000 inhabitants/day; DIDs) indicator. Findings were benchmarked with data from Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. We also employed Drug Utilization-90% (DU-90) method to compare DU-90s with the Essential Medicines List published by the WHO. We measured affordability using number of minimum daily wage required to purchase a treatment course for 1?month. Results Diabetes medicines’ consumption increased from 4.47 to 33.54 DIDs. The benchmarking showed that medicines’ utilisation in Iran in 2011 was only 54% of the median DIDs of 22 OECD countries. Oral hypoglycaemic agents consisted over 80% of use throughout the study period. Regular and isophane insulin (NPH), glibenclamide, metformin and gliclazide were the DU-90 drugs in 2012. Metformin, glibenclamide and regular/NPH insulin combination therapy were affordable throughout the study period (?0.4, ?0.1, ?0.3 of minimum daily wage, respectively). While the affordability of novel insulin preparations improved over time, they were still unaffordable in 2012. Conclusions The utilisation of diabetes medicines was relatively low, perhaps due to underdiagnosis and inadequate management of patients with diabetes. This had occurred despite affordability of essential diabetes medicines in Iran. Appropriate policies are required to address the underutilisation of diabetes medicines in Iran. PMID:25324322

  10. Diabetes Research in Iran: a Scientometric Analysis of Publications Output

    PubMed Central

    Rasolabadi, Masoud; Khaledi, Shahnaz; Ardalan, Marlin; Kalhor, Marya Maryam; Penjvini, Susan; Gharib, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the developing countries, diabetes mellitus as a chronic diseases, have replaced infectious diseases as the main causes of morbidity and mortality. International Diabetes Federation (IDF) recently estimates 382 million people have diabetes globally and more than 34.6 million people in the Middle East Region and this number will increase to 67.9 million by 2035. The aim of this study was to analyze Iran’s research performance on diabetes in national and international context. Methods: This Scientometric analysis is based on the Iranian publication data in diabetes research retrieved from the Scopus citation database till the end of 2014. The string used to retrieve the data was developed using “diabetes” keyword in title, abstract and keywords, and finally Iran in the affiliation field was our main string. Results: Iran’s cumulative publication output in diabetes research consisted of 4425 papers from 1968 to 2014, with an average number of 96.2 papers per year and an annual average growth rate of 25.5%. Iran ranked 25th place with 4425 papers among top 25 countries with a global share of 0.72 %. Average of Iran’s publication output was 6.19 citations per paper. The average citation per paper for Iranian publications in diabetes research increased from 1.63 during 1968-1999 to 10.42 for 2014. Conclusions: Although diabetic population of Iran is increasing, number of diabetes research is not remarkable. International Diabetes Federation suggested increased funding for research in diabetes in Iran for cost-effective diabetes prevention and treatment. In addition to universal and comprehensive services for diabetes care and treatment provided by Iranian health care system, Iranian policy makers should invest more on diabetes research. PMID:26236083

  11. Cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus in different ethnic groups: the Finnmark study.

    PubMed

    Njølstad, I; Arnesen, E; Lund-Larsen, P G

    1998-09-01

    The mortality from coronary and cerebrovascular diseases is higher in Finnmark County than in other Norwegian counties. In a population-based cohort study, we compared the incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke, and diabetes mellitus in different ethnic groups in Finnmark. A total of 10,622 subjects of Norse, Sami, and Finnish origin were followed for 14 years. During approximately 150,000 person-years, we identified 509 and 84 cases of myocardial infarction, 107 and 75 cases of stroke, and 96 and 73 cases of clinical diabetes mellitus among men and women, respectively. A total of 533 men and 199 women died. Norse subjects born outside of Finnmark had the most favorable risk factor levels and, in general, the lowest incidence of disease. Men of Finnish origin had a higher incidence rate of all endpoints than other men, and Finnish women had a higher incidence rate of myocardial infarction than other women. Sami women were more obese but did not have a higher diabetes mellitus incidence than other women. After adjustment for major cardiovascular risk factors and height, most ethnic differences were attenuated. PMID:9730036

  12. Quality of online information on type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Weymann, Nina; Härter, Martin; Dirmaier, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Evidence-based health information is a prerequisite for patients with type 2 diabetes to engage in self-management and to make informed medical decisions. The Internet is an important source of health information. In the present study, we systematically assessed formal quality, quality of decision support and usability of German and English language websites on type 2 diabetes. The search term 'type 2 diabetes' was entered in the two most popular search engines. Descriptive data on website quality are presented. Additionally, associations between website quality and affiliation (commercial vs. non-commercial), presence of the HON code quality seal and website traffic were explored. Forty-six websites were included. Most websites provided basic information necessary for decision-making, while only one website also provided decision support. Websites with a HON code had significantly better formal quality than websites without HON code. We found a highly significant correlation between usability and website traffic and a significant correlation between formal quality and website traffic. Most websites do not provide sufficient information to support patients in medical decision-making. Our finding that usability and website traffic are tightly associated is consistent with previous research indicating that design is the most important cue for users assessing website credibility. PMID:24688114

  13. Innovations In Diabetes Care Around the World: Case Studies Of Care Transformation Through Accountable Care Reforms.

    PubMed

    Thoumi, Andrea; Udayakumar, Krishna; Drobnick, Elizabeth; Taylor, Andrea; McClellan, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The rising prevalence, health burden, and cost of chronic diseases such as diabetes have accelerated global interest in innovative care models that use approaches such as community-based care and information technology to improve or transform disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Although evidence on the effectiveness of innovative care models is emerging, scaling up or extending these models beyond their original setting has been difficult. We developed a framework to highlight policy barriers-institutional, regulatory, and financial-to the diffusion of transformative innovations in diabetes care. The framework builds on accountable care principles that support higher-value care, or better patient-level outcomes at lower cost. We applied this framework to three case studies from the United States, Mexico, and India to describe how innovators and policy leaders have addressed barriers, with a focus on important financing barriers to provider and consumer payment. The lessons have implications for policy reform to promote innovation through new funding approaches, institutional reforms, and performance measures with the goal of addressing the growing burdens of diabetes and other chronic diseases. PMID:26355050

  14. A Mendelian randomization study of the effect of type-2 diabetes on coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Omar S.; Morris, John A.; Mujammami, Muhammad; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Leong, Aaron; Li, Rui; Turgeon, Maxime; Greenwood, Celia M.T.; Thanassoulis, George; Meigs, James B.; Sladek, Robert; Richards, J. Brent

    2015-01-01

    In observational studies, type-2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), yet interventional trials have shown no clear effect of glucose-lowering on CHD. Confounding may have therefore influenced these observational estimates. Here we use Mendelian randomization to obtain unconfounded estimates of the influence of T2D and fasting glucose (FG) on CHD risk. Using multiple genetic variants associated with T2D and FG, we find that risk of T2D increases CHD risk (odds ratio (OR)=1.11 (1.05–1.17), per unit increase in odds of T2D, P=8.8 × 10?5; using data from 34,840/114,981 T2D cases/controls and 63,746/130,681 CHD cases/controls). FG in non-diabetic individuals tends to increase CHD risk (OR=1.15 (1.00–1.32), per mmol·per l, P=0.05; 133,010 non-diabetic individuals and 63,746/130,681 CHD cases/controls). These findings provide evidence supporting a causal relationship between T2D and CHD and suggest that long-term trials may be required to discern the effects of T2D therapies on CHD risk. PMID:26017687

  15. Retrobulbar blood flow changes in eyes with diabetic retinopathy: a 10-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Neudorfer, Meira; Kessner, Rivka; Goldenberg, Dafna; Lavie, Anat; Kessler, Ada

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We sought to assess long-term changes in the flow parameters of retrobulbar vessels in diabetic patients. Methods The retrobulbar circulation of 138 eyes was evaluated between 1994 and 1995 and 36 eyes were reevaluated between 2004 and 2008 (study group). They were divided into four groups: eyes of diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy (DR), eyes with nonproliferative DR, eyes with proliferative DR, and eyes of nondiabetic patients (controls). Color Doppler imaging was used to assess the flow velocities in the major retrobulbar vessels. The resistive index (RI) was calculated and compared among the groups and between the two time periods. Results RI values of the central retinal artery and posterior ciliary artery had increased in the two non-DR groups and in the nonproliferative DR group, with a surprising decrease measured in eyes with proliferative DR (P= nonsignificant [NS]). Combining the nonproliferative DR and proliferative DR groups resulted in a milder increase of the RI of the posterior ciliary artery (P= NS) and the central retinal artery (P=0.02) in the DR group compared to the other groups. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that an increase of the resistance in the retrobulbar vessels, as a part of DR, can lessen over time and may even be reversed. PMID:25473257

  16. HD047703, a New Promising Anti-Diabetic Drug Candidate: In Vivo Preclinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, SoRa; Kim, Dae Hoon; Kim, Young-Seok; Ha, Tae-Young; Yang, Jin; Park, Soo Hyun; Jeong, Kwang Won; Rhee, Jae-Keol

    2014-09-01

    G-protein coupled receptor 119 (GPR119) has emerged as a novel target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. GPR119 is involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from the pancreatic ?-cells and intestinal cells. In this study, we identified a novel small-molecule GPR119 agonist, HD047703, which raises intracellular cAMP concentrations in pancreatic ?-cells and can be expected to potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from human GPR119 receptor stably expressing cells (CHO cells). We evaluated the acute efficacy of HD047703 by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in normal C57BL/6J mice. Then, chronic administrations of HD047703 were performed to determine its efficacy in various diabetic rodent models. Single administration of HD047703 caused improved glycemic control during OGTT in a dose-dependent manner in normal mice, and the plasma GLP-1 level was also increased. With respect to chronic efficacy, we observed a decline in blood glucose levels in db/db, ob/ob and DIO mice. These results suggest that HD047703 may be a potentially promising anti-diabetic agent. PMID:25414769

  17. HD047703, a New Promising Anti-Diabetic Drug Candidate: In Vivo Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, SoRa; Kim, Dae Hoon; Kim, Young-Seok; Ha, Tae-Young; Yang, Jin; Park, Soo Hyun; Jeong, Kwang Won; Rhee, Jae-Keol

    2014-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptor 119 (GPR119) has emerged as a novel target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. GPR119 is involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from the pancreatic ?-cells and intestinal cells. In this study, we identified a novel small-molecule GPR119 agonist, HD047703, which raises intracellular cAMP concentrations in pancreatic ?-cells and can be expected to potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from human GPR119 receptor stably expressing cells (CHO cells). We evaluated the acute efficacy of HD047703 by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in normal C57BL/6J mice. Then, chronic administrations of HD047703 were performed to determine its efficacy in various diabetic rodent models. Single administration of HD047703 caused improved glycemic control during OGTT in a dose-dependent manner in normal mice, and the plasma GLP-1 level was also increased. With respect to chronic efficacy, we observed a decline in blood glucose levels in db/db, ob/ob and DIO mice. These results suggest that HD047703 may be a potentially promising anti-diabetic agent. PMID:25414769

  18. The role of fibrin deposition in diabetic glomerulosclerosis: a light, electron and immunofluorescence microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Farquhar, A.; MacDonald, Mary K.; Ireland, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    The possible role of fibrin deposition in the development of diabetic glomerulosclerosis has been investigated by light, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy examination of renal tissue obtained by percutaneous biopsy from seven diabetic patients having minimal clinical evidence of renal involvement and at necropsy on nine diabetic patients. Although the biopsy specimens showed only early to moderate diffuse glomerulosclerosis without either nodular or exudative lesions, approximately 70% of glomeruli examined showed specific fluorescence for fibrinogen in a discontinuous linear pattern along the capillary basement membrane and diffusely in the mesangium. Moreover the immunofluorescence findings correlated well with the distribution patterns of material thought to be fibrin both in the light microscopy studies, by virtue of its staining properties, and by electron microscopy, because of periodicity, texture, and electron density. It is suggested that electron-dense granular deposits seen on electron microscopy may represent intermediate compounds in the fibrinogen to fibrin conversion, and that endothelial and mesangial trapping of fibrinogen or other macromolecules may initiate or accelerate mesangial enlargement, nodule formation, and irregularity of the basement membrane. Images PMID:4561948

  19. Association of Urinary Metal Profiles with Altered Glucose Levels and Diabetes Risk: A Population-Based Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wei; Cui, Xiuqing; Liu, Bing; Liu, Chuanyao; Xiao, Yang; Lu, Wei; Guo, Huan; He, Meian; Zhang, Xiaomin; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Weihong; Wu, Tangchun

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated heavy metals and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels were both associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, studies on the associations of heavy metals and essential elements with altered FPG and diabetes risk were limited or conflicting. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential associations of heavy metals and essential trace elements with FPG and diabetes risk among general Chinese population. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate the associations of urinary concentrations of 23 metals with FPG, impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and diabetes among 2242 community-based Chinese adults in Wuhan. We used the false discovery rate (FDR) method to correct for multiple hypothesis tests. Results After adjusting for potential confounders, urinary aluminum, titanium, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, selenium, rubidium, strontium, molybdenum, cadmium, antimony, barium, tungsten and lead were associated with altered FPG, IFG or diabetes risk (all P< 0.05); arsenic was only dose-dependently related to diabetes (P< 0.05). After additional adjustment for multiple testing, titanium, copper, zinc, selenium, rubidium, tungsten and lead were still significantly associated with one or more outcomes (all FDR-adjusted P< 0.05). Conclusions Our results suggest that multiple metals in urine are associated with FPG, IFG or diabetes risk. Because the cross-sectional design precludes inferences about causality, further prospective studies are warranted to validate our findings. PMID:25874871

  20. Prevalence of complications among Chinese diabetic patients in urban primary care clinics: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A territory-wide diabetes management program (Risk Assessment Management Program – RAMP) was recently established, providing comprehensive management for all diabetics, helping to delineate current level of control and complications prevalence among primary care diabetic patients in Hong Kong. Method This cross-sectional study captured anonymous clinical data from RAMP patients. Data obtained include sociodemographic details, type of diabetes, illness duration, family history, drug usage, coexisting illnesses, diabetic complications and other clinical parameters. Results Data from 15,856 type 2 diabetic patients were analyzed. 57.1% were above 60 years old, with mean disease duration of 7.3 years. Hypertension was the commonest coexisting chronic illness (57.6%). 30.2% and 61.8% have their systolic and diastolic pressure controlled to below 130 mmHg and 80 mmHg respectively. Over half (51.5%) had an HbA1c level of less than 7.0%. 88.4% did not achieve target lipid level. 15% were on diet control alone. Only 22.2% were on statins. In patients with microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria, 40.7% and 54.5% were on angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) respectively. 12.9%, 38.8% and 2.4% had diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy respectively. Overall, 37.9%, 7.3% and 0.4% had single, two and three concurrent microvascular complications respectively. Conclusion The level of diabetic control is comparable with other developed countries. We demonstrated a high prevalence of microvascular complications among Chinese primary care patients despite achieving adequate HbA1c levels, highlighting the importance of managing all aspects of diabetes including weight, lipid and blood pressure. Efforts to improve holistic management must be tailored according to the needs of our population, with the challenges that the majority have low educational background and in the older age group. PMID:24410810

  1. Serum selenium levels in diabetic children. A followup study during selenium-enriched agricultural fertilization in Finland.

    PubMed

    Wang, W C; Mäkelä, A L; Näntö, V; Mäkelä, P

    1995-01-01

    The effect of increased selenium uptake on serum selenium in diabetic children was investigated during the first 9 yr of the Finnish nationwide selenium fertilization program, which started in 1984. Serum selenium concentrations were followed in 237 diabetic children (mean age 8.1 yr) and 214 controls from 1984 to 1992. The control group consisted of 107 siblings of the diabetics and of 107 other healthy children of corresponding age groups. Selenium was determined by direct electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The effect of the increased uptake was seen in both diabetic and in control persons. Before the autumn of 1985, diabetic patients had significantly higher serum selenium levels than their siblings or the other healthy controls. Toward the end of year 1987, this difference had disappeared. After that, serum selenium levels continued to increase until the year 1990. In 1990 the mean selenium serum level of diabetic patients was 1.36 mumol/L and that of controls 1.33 mumol/L. The duration of diabetes did not have any effect on selenium serum levels. Slightly higher serum selenium in new diabetic patients before the start of therapy was explained by the dehydration state. The patients who were younger than 3 yr had slightly lower selenium serum levels when compared with older age groups. This difference was observed, however, only during the first 3 yr of the study. After that, when the selenium intake increased in general, no age-dependent differences were found anymore. There were no significant differences in serum selenium levels between males and females in either diabetic patients or in controls. PMID:7779570

  2. Smoking, Smoking Cessation, and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes among Japanese Adults: Japan Epidemiology Collaboration on Occupational Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Shamima; Okazaki, Hiroko; Kuwahara, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Murakami, Taizo; Shimizu, Chii; Shimizu, Makiko; Tomita, Kentaro; Nagahama, Satsue; Eguchi, Masafumi; Kochi, Takeshi; Imai, Teppei; Nishihara, Akiko; Sasaki, Naoko; Nakagawa, Tohru; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Honda, Toru; Uehara, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Makoto; Hori, Ai; Sakamoto, Nobuaki; Nishiura, Chiro; Totsuzaki, Takafumi; Kato, Noritada; Fukasawa, Kenji; Pham, Ngoc M.; Kurotani, Kayo; Nanri, Akiko; Kabe, Isamu; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Sone, Tomofumi; Dohi, Seitaro

    2015-01-01

    Aims To examine the association of smoking status, smoking intensity, and smoking cessation with the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) using a large database. Methods The present study included 53,930 Japanese employees, aged 15 to 83 years, who received health check-up and did not have diabetes at baseline. Diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose ?126 mg/dl, random plasma glucose ?200 mg/dl, HbA1c ?6.5% (?48 mmol/mol), or receiving medication for diabetes. Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to investigate the association between smoking and the risk of diabetes. Results During 3.9 years of median follow-up, 2,441 (4.5%) individuals developed T2D. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) for diabetes were 1 (reference), 1.16 (1.04 to 1.30) and 1.34 (1.22 to 1.48) for never smokers, former smokers, and current smokers, respectively. Diabetes risk increased with increasing numbers of cigarette consumption among current smokers (P for trend <0.001). Although the relative risk of diabetes was greater among subjects with lower BMIs (< 23 kg/m2), attributable risk was greater in subjects with higher BMIs (? 23 kg/m2). Compared with individuals who had never smoked, former smokers who quit less than 5 years, 5 to 9 years, and 10 years or more exhibited hazards ratios for diabetes of 1.36 (1.14 to 1.62), 1.23 (1.01 to 1.51), and 1.02 (0.85 to 1.23), respectively. Conclusions Results suggest that cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of T2D, which may decrease to the level of a never smoker after 10 years of smoking cessation. PMID:26200457

  3. The Association of Handgrip Strength and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Six Ethnic Groups: An Analysis of the HELIUS Study.

    PubMed

    van der Kooi, Anne-Lotte L F; Snijder, Marieke B; Peters, Ron J G; van Valkengoed, Irene G M

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether ethnic differences in handgrip strength, a marker of poor muscle strength and quality, is a potential cause of ethnic disparities in type 2 diabetes mellitus. We included 2086 Dutch, 2216 South Asian Surinamese, 2084 African Surinamese, 1786 Ghanaian, 2223 Turkish and 2199 Moroccan origin participants from the HELIUS study. We analyzed ethnic differences in handgrip strength, and its association with type 2 diabetes mellitus using logistic regression analyses adjusted for socio-demographic factors, body composition and lifestyle factors. Additionally, we investigated whether handgrip strength explained the ethnic differences in type 2 diabetes mellitus. We found that handgrip strength differed significantly across ethnic groups. After full adjustment, we found an inverse association with type 2 diabetes mellitus (OR 0.95; 95% CI 0.92-0.97) that did not differ substantially between ethnic groups, men and among women, and lean and overweight individuals. The association was not affected by the measure used to define type 2 diabetes mellitus, but was attenuated by exclusion of people with known diabetes. The ethnic differences in type 2 diabetes mellitus were not explained by handgrip strength (e.g. the OR for the South Asian Surinamese vs. Dutch changed from 5.03; 3.69-6.68 to 4.87; 3.57-6.65). In conclusion, we found large ethnic differences in handgrip strength and a consistent association of low handgrip strength with prevalent type 2 diabetes mellitus. This suggests that handgrip strength may be investigated as a target for intervention or a marker to identify people at risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26368020

  4. Low Dose of Some Persistent Organic Pollutants Predicts Type 2 Diabetes: A Nested Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Duk-Hee; Steffes, Michael W.; Sjödin, Andreas; Jones, Richard S.; Needham, Larry L.; Jacobs, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Low doses of some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) associate cross-sectionally with type 2 diabetes, whereas associations with high POP exposures are inconsistent. Objectives We investigated whether several POPs prospectively predict type 2 diabetes within the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) cohort. Methods Participants in this nested case–control study were diabetes free in 1987–1988. By 2005–2006, the 90 controls remained free of diabetes, whereas the 90 cases developed diabetes. Using serum collected in 1987–1988, we measured 8 organochlorine pesticides, 22 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCBs), and 1 polybrominated biphenyl (PBB). We compared POP concentrations from CARDIA and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2003–2004. We computed odds ratios (ORs) for incident diabetes using logistic regression analysis. Results Chlorinated POPs in CARDIA in 1987–1988 were much higher than corresponding NHANES 2003-2004 concentrations. POPs showed nonlinear associations with diabetes risk. The highest risk was observed in the second quartiles of trans-nonachlor, oxychlordane, mirex, highly chlorinated PCBs, and PBB153—a finding that suggests low-dose effects. We concentrated risk by summing these POPs and isolated very low concentrations of multiple POPs in the lowest sextile of the sum. The adjusted OR in the second sextile vs. the lowest sextile was 5.3 overall and 20.1 for body mass index ? 30 kg/m2. Conclusions Several POPs at low doses similar to current exposure levels may increase diabetes risk, possibly through endocrine disruption. Certain POPs may a play a role in the current epidemic of diabetes, which has been attributed to obesity. PMID:20444671

  5. Timing of access to secondary healthcare services and lower extremity amputations in patients with diabetes: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Claire M; Ali, Fauzi; Roberts, Graham A; Kearney, Patricia M; Perry, Ivan J; Bradley, Colin P

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between timing of patient access to secondary healthcare services for diabetes management and lower extremity amputation (LEA) among patients with diabetes. Research design and methods A case–control study was conducted in the secondary healthcare system in Ireland. Cases were 116 patients with diabetes who underwent a first major non-traumatic LEA between 2006 and 2012. Controls were 348 patients with diabetes, over 45?years, admitted to the same hospital as an emergency or electively, frequency-matched for gender, type of diabetes, and year. Data were collected for 7?years prior to the event year. ORs for LEA in patients with diabetes comparing early versus late referral from primary to secondary healthcare were calculated. Results Statistically significant risk factors associated with LEA in patients with diabetes included being single, chronic kidney disease, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. Documented retinopathy was a significant protective factor. In unconditional logistic regression analysis adjusted for potential confounders, there was no evidence of a reduced risk of LEA among patients referred earlier to secondary healthcare for diabetes management. Conclusions Specialist referral may need to occur earlier than the 7-year cut-off used to demonstrate an effect on reducing LEA risk. Documented retinopathy was associated with reduced risk of LEA, most likely as a proxy for better self-care. Variation in the management of diabetes in primary care may also be impacting on outcomes. Efforts to develop more integrated care between primary and secondary services may be beneficial, rather than focusing on timing of referral to secondary healthcare. PMID:26336607

  6. The Association of Handgrip Strength and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Six Ethnic Groups: An Analysis of the HELIUS Study

    PubMed Central

    van der Kooi, Anne-Lotte L. F.; Snijder, Marieke B.; Peters, Ron J. G.; van Valkengoed, Irene G. M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether ethnic differences in handgrip strength, a marker of poor muscle strength and quality, is a potential cause of ethnic disparities in type 2 diabetes mellitus. We included 2086 Dutch, 2216 South Asian Surinamese, 2084 African Surinamese, 1786 Ghanaian, 2223 Turkish and 2199 Moroccan origin participants from the HELIUS study. We analyzed ethnic differences in handgrip strength, and its association with type 2 diabetes mellitus using logistic regression analyses adjusted for socio-demographic factors, body composition and lifestyle factors. Additionally, we investigated whether handgrip strength explained the ethnic differences in type 2 diabetes mellitus. We found that handgrip strength differed significantly across ethnic groups. After full adjustment, we found an inverse association with type 2 diabetes mellitus (OR 0.95; 95% CI 0.92–0.97) that did not differ substantially between ethnic groups, men and among women, and lean and overweight individuals. The association was not affected by the measure used to define type 2 diabetes mellitus, but was attenuated by exclusion of people with known diabetes. The ethnic differences in type 2 diabetes mellitus were not explained by handgrip strength (e.g. the OR for the South Asian Surinamese vs. Dutch changed from 5.03; 3.69–6.68 to 4.87; 3.57–6.65). In conclusion, we found large ethnic differences in handgrip strength and a consistent association of low handgrip strength with prevalent type 2 diabetes mellitus. This suggests that handgrip strength may be investigated as a target for intervention or a marker to identify people at risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26368020

  7. Diabetic Retinopathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetic Retinopathy What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? Click for more information Can Cause Vision Loss, Blindness Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes and a leading ...

  8. Diabetic Retinopathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cases of Diabetic Retinopathy (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Diabetic retinopathy affects men and ... Cases of Diabetic Retinopathy (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Projections for Diabetic Retinopathy (2010- ...

  9. Contraceptive use in women with hypertension and diabetes: cross-sectional study in northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mekonnen, Tensae Tadesse; Woldeyohannes, Solomon Meseret; Yigzaw, Tegbar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Women with diabetes and hypertension are at increased risk of pregnancy complications, including those from surgical delivery and their offspring are at risk for congenital anomalies. Thus, diabetic and hypertensive women of reproductive age are advised to use valid contraceptive methods for reducing unwanted pregnancy and its complications. However, contraceptive use among these segments of the population had not been previously assessed in Ethiopia. Hence, the aim of this study was to assess contraceptive use and associated factors among diabetic and hypertensive women of reproductive age on chronic follow-up care at University of Gondar and Felege Hiwot Hospitals. Methods Hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted from April to May 2012 among diabetic and hypertensive women on follow-up at the chronic illness care center. The sample size calculated was 403. Structured and pretested questionnaire was used for data collection. Data were collected using interview supplemented by chart review. The data were entered using EPI info Version 2000 and analyzed using SPSS Version 16. Frequencies, proportion, and summary statistics were used to describe the study population in relation to relevant variables. Both bivariate and multivariate analyses were run to see the association of each independent variable with contraceptive practice. Results A total of 392 married women on chronic follow-up care were interviewed making the response rate of 93.3%. The contraceptive prevalence rate was found to be 53.8%. Factors such as age 25–34 years (adjusted odds ratio, AOR [95% confidence interval, CI] =3.60 [1.05–12.36]), (AOR [95% CI] =2.29 [1.15–4.53]), having middle- and high-level incomes (AOR [95% CI] =2.12 [1.19–3.77]), (AOR [95% CI] =5.03 [2.19–11.54]), receiving provider counseling (AOR [95% CI] =9.02 [4.40–18.49]), and controlled disease condition (AOR [95% CI] =4.13 [2.35–7.28]) were significantly associated with contraceptive practice. Conclusion The contraceptive utilization of women on diabetes and hypertension follow-up care was found to be low. Hence, strengthening counseling and education about family planning and controlling their medical conditions would help increase the contraceptive uptake of women on chronic follow-up. PMID:26715862

  10. DIABETES PREVENTION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a major clinical trial, or research study, aimed at discovering whether either diet and exercise or the oral diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) could prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in people with impaired glucose toleranc...

  11. Association between Diabetes and Risk of Aortic Dissection: A Case-Control Study in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    He, Xingwei; Liu, Xintian; Liu, Wanjun; Wang, Bei; Liu, Yujian; Li, Zhuxi; Wang, Tao; Tan, Rong; Gao, Bo; Zeng, Hesong

    2015-01-01

    Background It is well-recognized that diabetes represents a powerful independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. However, very few studies have investigated the relationship between diabetes and risk of aortic dissection (AD). Aim The aim of this case-control study was to evaluate the association between diabetes and risk of AD in Chinese population. Methods A hospital-based case-control study, consisting of 2160 AD patients and 4320 controls, was conducted in a Chinese population. Demographic, clinical characteristics and risk factors were collected. Diabetes rate of patients with overall AD, Stanford type A AD and type B AD group was compared with that of corresponding matched control groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for relationship between diabetes and AD risk. Results The prevalence of diabetes was lower in AD cases than that of control subjects, whether it is the overall AD, type A AD or type B AD group (4.7% vs. 10.0%, 2.9% vs. 8.8%, 5.9% vs. 10.9%, all P<0.001). Furthermore, in multivariate model, diabetes was found to be associated with lower AD risk, which not only applies to the overall AD (OR = 0.2, 95%CI: 0.15–0.26), but also type A AD (OR = 0.12, 95% CI: 0.07–0.20) and type B AD (OR = 0.25, 95%CI: 0.18–0.33). Conclusions We observed the paradoxical inverse relationship between DM and risk of AD in the Chinese population. These results suggest diabetes may play a protective role in the development of AD. However, further studies are needed to enrich related evidence, especially with regard to underlying mechanisms for these trends. PMID:26562793

  12. Association between Gastroenterological Malignancy and Diabetes Mellitus and Anti-Diabetic Therapy: A Nationwide, Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Ming; Huang, Hui-Ling; Chu, Fang-Ying; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Chen, Hung-An; Chu, Der-Ming; Wu, Li-Wei; Wang, Chung-Ching; Chen, Wei-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer incidence has been evaluated in limited kinds of cancer. The effect of anti-diabetic therapy (ADT) on carcinogenesis among diabetic patients is also unclear. Materials and Methods Using population-based representative insurance claims data in Taiwan, 36,270 DM patients and 145,080 comparison subjects without DM were identified from claims from 2005 to 2010. The association between the top ten leading causes of cancer-related death in Taiwan and DM was evaluated. Whether ADT altered the risk of developing cancer was also investigated. Results Incidence of cancer at any site was significantly higher in patients with DM than in those without (p<0.001). The risk of carcinogenesis imparted by DM was greatest in gastroenterological malignancies (liver, pancreas, and colorectal cancer) as well as lung, breast and oral cancer (p<0.001). Among the oral types of ADT, metformin decreased the risk of lung and liver cancer, but had less effect on reducing the risk of colorectal cancer. ?-glucosidase inhibitor decreased the risk of developing liver, colorectal, and breast cancer. Apart from intermediate-acting insulin, rapid-acting, long-acting, and combination insulin treatment significantly reduced the overall cancer risk among all DM patients. In subgroup analysis, long-acting insulin treatment significantly decreased the risk of lung, liver, and colorectal cancer. Conclusion Our results supported the notion that pre-existing DM increases the incidence of gastroenterological cancer. ADT, especially metformin, ?-glucosidase inhibitor, and long-acting insulin treatment, may protect patients with DM against these malignancies. It is crucial that oncologists should closely collaborate with endocrinologists to provide an optimal cancer-specific therapy and diabetic treatment to patients simultaneously with cancer and DM. PMID:25978841

  13. Type 1 diabetes patients have lower strength in femoral bone determined by quantitative computed tomography: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Koji; Fukui, Tomoyasu; Nagai, Takashi; Kuroda, Takuma; Hara, Noriko; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Inagaki, Katsunori; Hirano, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Previous studies have reported osteoporosis measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in younger patients with type 1 diabetes. Limitations of 2-D imaging, however, limit the precision of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for the measurement of bone mineral density and bone strength. Materials and Methods Three-dimensional quantitative computed tomography was used to calculate volumetric-bone mineral density (vBMD) and strength in femoral bone subfractions. A total of 17 male type 1 diabetes patients and 18 sex-matched healthy controls aged from 18 to 49 years were investigated in the present cross-sectional study. Patients with overt nephropathy were excluded. Results Type 1 diabetes patients had significantly lower cortical vBMD in the femoral neck, and significantly lower total vBMD, cortical thickness and cortical cross-sectional area (cortical CSA) in the intertrochanter. Bone strength estimated by the buckling ratio (an index of cortical instability) of the intertrochanter was significantly higher in type 1 diabetes patients. The following serum bone markers were comparable between the two groups: bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen, osteocalcin, pentosidine and homocysteine. Serum insulin-like growth factor-1 values were significantly lower in the type 1 diabetes patients than in controls. Serum insulin-like growth factor-1values were positively correlated with serum bone formation markers, and the total vBMD of the femoral neck and lumbar spine in type 1 diabetes patients. Conclusions The present study is the first investigation by quantitative computed tomography measurement to show cortical instability and lower vBMD in the intertrochanter of young and middle-aged type 1 diabetes patients. Low insulin-like growth factor-1 might be a causative factor for osteoporosis in type 1 diabetes. PMID:26543548

  14. Carbon dioxide emissions and change in prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the United States: an ecological study.

    PubMed

    Zheutlin, Alexander R; Adar, Sara D; Park, Sung Kyun

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that increasing levels of the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO2), may influence weight gain and thus may play a role in rising trends in obesity and diabetes. We conducted an ecological study to examine the associations between CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and changes in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the United States. County-level data on CO2 emissions, prevalence of obesity and diagnosed diabetes, other sociodemographic factors and neighborhood characteristics related to urbanicity, and fine particles (PM2.5) between 2004 and 2008 were obtained from the Vulcan Project, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and American Community Survey. Linear mixed effect modeling of 3019 counties for the associations between average CO2 emissions and changes in diabetes and obesity prevalence between 2004 and 2008 was performed. The average obesity and diabetes prevalence increased between 2004 and 2008 by 3.65% (SD: 1.88%) and 1.65% (SD: 1.70%), respectively. A marginally significant positive association between CO2 emission and changes in obesity prevalence was found with adjustment for sociodemographic factors, indicators of urbanicity and spatial autocorrelation (p-trend=0.06). The association became weaker and nonsignificant with further adjustment for PM2.5 (p-trend=0.17). There was a significant positive association between CO2 emission and changes in diabetes prevalence before controlling for PM2.5 (p-trend=0.05) but the association became null after controlling for PM2.5 (p-trend=0.49), suggesting that PM2.5 is a critical confounder in the association between CO2 emission and changes in diabetes prevalence. This study does not support the hypothesis that CO2 emissions, a leading driver of climate change, may be linked to increasing trends in obesity and diabetes, though there was an indication of possible link between CO2 and obesity. PMID:25108606

  15. Teleophthalmology in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been rapid strides in progress in the fields of telecommunication and medical imaging. There is growing evidence regarding use of teleophthalmology for screening of diabetic retinopathy. This article highlights some pertinent questions regarding use of telescreening for diabetic retinopathy. It deals with evidence regarding accuracy of diagnosis, patients satisfaction and cost-effectiveness. The American Telemedicine Association have given certain guidelines for teleheath practices for diabetic retinopathy. The article discusses regarding these guidelines. Finally, a working model for diabetic retinopathy screening through teleophthalmology has been described. Telescreening for diabetic retinopathy seems to be a cost-effective, accurate, and reliable method for screening for diabetic retinopathy. The American Telemedicine Association has set up guidelines for telescreening that should be adhered to provide quality screening services to people with diabetes. PMID:24876576

  16. Going mobile with diabetes support: a randomized study of a text message-based personalized behavioral intervention for type 2 diabetes self-care.

    PubMed

    Capozza, Korey; Woolsey, Sarah; Georgsson, Mattias; Black, Jeff; Bello, Nelly; Lence, Clare; Oostema, Steve; North, Christie

    2015-05-01

    Objective. Patients with type 2 diabetes often fail to achieve self-management goals. This study tested the impact on glycemic control of a two-way text messaging program that provided behavioral coaching, education, and testing reminders to enrolled individuals with type 2 diabetes in the context of a clinic-based quality improvement initiative. The secondary aim examined patient interaction and satisfaction with the program. Methods. Ninety-three adult patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (A1C >8%) were recruited from 18 primary care clinics in three counties for a 6-month study. Patients were randomized by a computer to one of two arms. Patients in both groups continued with their usual care; patients assigned to the intervention arm also received from one to seven diabetes-related text messages per day depending on the choices they made at enrollment. At 90 and 180 days, A1C data were obtained from the electronic health record and analyzed to determine changes from baseline for both groups. An exit survey was used to assess satisfaction. Enrollment behavior and interaction data were pulled from a Web-based administrative portal maintained by the technology vendor. Results. Patients used the program in a variety of ways. Twenty-nine percent of program users demonstrated frequent engagement (texting responses at least three times per week) for a period of ?90 days. Survey results indicate very high satisfaction with the program. Both groups' average A1C decreased from baseline, possibly reflecting a broader quality improvement effort underway in participating clinics. At 90 and 180 days, there was no statistically significant difference between the intervention and control groups in terms of change in A1C (P >0.05). Conclusions. This study demonstrated a practical approach to implementing and monitoring a mobile health intervention for self-management support across a wide range of independent clinic practices. PMID:25987806

  17. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... 800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are listed ...

  18. The association between resilience and diabetic neuropathy by socioeconomic position: cross-sectional findings from the KORA-Age study.

    PubMed

    Perna, Laura; Mielck, Andreas; Lacruz, Maria E; Emeny, Rebecca T; von Eisenhart Rothe, Alexander; Meisinger, Christa; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz

    2015-09-01

    We investigated whether older adults with diabetes mellitus and lower resilience have an increased risk of diabetic neuropathy as compared to older adults with higher resilience, and whether this association varies by socioeconomic position. In total, 3942 individuals took part in a health survey in Augsburg, Germany, in 2008-2010 (KORA-Age study). We found that among participants with low socioeconomic position, those with higher resilience had a lower probability of suffering from neuropathy as compared to participants with lower resilience (absolute risk reduction = 10%). Adjusted odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals for the outcome diabetic neuropathy also showed that lower resilience scores had an independent effect in increasing the risk of diabetic neuropathy among elderly individuals with a low socioeconomic position (odds ratio: 1.83; confidence interval: 1.09-3.08). Health-promoting strategies focussing on resilience should be further explored. PMID:24287803

  19. Mentoring Field Directors: A National Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Martha L.; Raskin, Miriam S.

    2014-01-01

    In social work field education, mentoring is underused and lacks research data. There is a paucity of research that examines the effect mentoring has on social work field directors who administer field programs at the undergraduate and/or graduate level. This exploratory study fills this void by examining the mentoring opportunities and…

  20. Clinical pathological characteristics of breast cancer patients with secondary diabetes after systemic therapy: a retrospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Juanjuan, Li; Wen, Wei; Zhongfen, Liu; Chuang, Chen; Jing, Cheng; Yiping, Gong; Changhua, Wang; Dehua, Yu; Shengrong, Sun

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical pathological characteristics of breast cancer (BC) patients with secondary diabetes after systemic therapy without preexisting diabetes. A total of 1434 BC patients received systemic therapy and were analyzed retrospectively. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels were monitored prior to the treatments, during the course of systemic therapy, and at the follow-up visits. Cox regression models were used to estimate the associations between the clinical pathological characteristics of BC and the cause-specific hazard of developing secondary diabetes. Among the 1434 BC patients, 151 had preexisting type 2 diabetes. Of the remaining 1283 patients with normal FPG levels prior to the systemic therapy, 59 developed secondary diabetes and 72 displayed secondary impaired fasting glucose (IFG) over a mean follow-up of 41 months. The prevalence of secondary type 2 diabetes in BC patients was 4.6 % (59/1283), which was obviously higher than that of the normal control group (1.4 %, P?diabetic group. In addition, these patients with secondary diabetes had later pathological stages (P?diabetes and IFG in subjects with later pathological stage BC (hazard ratio (HR)?=?1.623; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.128-2.335 (P?study shows that an increase in the incidence of diabetes among breast cancer survivors after systemic therapy, especially the patients with later pathological stages, more lymph node metastasis, negative hormone receptor expression, and positive HER2 expression. Our study suggests that greater diabetes screening and prevention strategies among breast cancer patients after systemic treatment are needed in China. PMID:25854171

  1. Autophagy and mitophagy in diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Liang, Qiangrong

    2015-02-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a heart muscle-specific disease that increases the risk of heart failure and mortality in diabetic patients independent of vascular pathology. Mitochondria are cellular power plants that generate energy for heart contraction and concurrently produce reactive oxygen species that, if unchecked, may damage the mitochondria and the heart. Elimination of damaged mitochondria by autophagy known as mitophagy is an essential process for maintaining normal cardiac function at baseline and in response to various stress and disease conditions. Mitochondrial structural injury and functional impairment have been shown to contribute to diabetic heart disease. Recent studies have demonstrated an inhibited autophagic flux in the hearts of diabetic animals. Surprisingly, the diminished autophagy appears to be an adaptive response that protects against cardiac injury in type 1 diabetes. This raises several questions regarding the relationship between general autophagy and selective mitophagy in the diabetic heart. However, autophagy may play a different role in the hearts of type 2 diabetic animals. In this review, we will summarize current knowledge in this field and discuss the potential functional roles of autophagy and mitophagy in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Autophagy and protein quality control in cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:24882754

  2. Participant Experiences in the Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young Study: Common Reasons for Withdrawing.

    PubMed

    Lernmark, Barbro; Lynch, Kristian; Baxter, Judith; Roth, Roswith; Simell, Tuula; Smith, Laura; Swartling, Ulrica; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett; Teddy Study Group

    2016-01-01

    Background. To characterize participant reasons for withdrawing from a diabetes focused longitudinal clinical observational trial (TEDDY) during the first three study years. Methods. 8677 children were recruited into the TEDDY study. At participant withdrawal staff recorded any reason parents provided for withdrawal. Reasons were categorized into (1) family characteristics and (2) protocol reasons. Families who informed staff of their withdrawal were classified as active withdrawals (AW); families without a final contact were considered passive withdrawals (PW). Results. Withdrawal was highest during the first study year (n = 1220). Most families were AW (n = 1549; 73.4%). PW was more common in the United States (n = 1001; 37.8%) and among young mothers (p = 0.001). The most frequent protocol characteristic was blood draw (55%) and the most common family reason was not having enough time (66%). The blood draw was more common among female participants; being too busy was more common among males. Both reasons were associated with study satisfaction. Conclusions. Results suggest that, for families of children genetically at risk for diabetes, procedures that can be painful/frightening should be used with caution. Study procedures must also be considered for the demands placed on participants. Study satisfaction should be regularly assessed as an indicator of risk for withdrawal. PMID:26682228

  3. Participant Experiences in the Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young Study: Common Reasons for Withdrawing

    PubMed Central

    Lernmark, Barbro; Lynch, Kristian; Baxter, Judith; Roth, Roswith; Simell, Tuula; Smith, Laura; Swartling, Ulrica; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett; TEDDY Study Group

    2016-01-01

    Background. To characterize participant reasons for withdrawing from a diabetes focused longitudinal clinical observational trial (TEDDY) during the first three study years. Methods. 8677 children were recruited into the TEDDY study. At participant withdrawal staff recorded any reason parents provided for withdrawal. Reasons were categorized into (1) family characteristics and (2) protocol reasons. Families who informed staff of their withdrawal were classified as active withdrawals (AW); families without a final contact were considered passive withdrawals (PW). Results. Withdrawal was highest during the first study year (n = 1220). Most families were AW (n = 1549; 73.4%). PW was more common in the United States (n = 1001; 37.8%) and among young mothers (p = 0.001). The most frequent protocol characteristic was blood draw (55%) and the most common family reason was not having enough time (66%). The blood draw was more common among female participants; being too busy was more common among males. Both reasons were associated with study satisfaction. Conclusions. Results suggest that, for families of children genetically at risk for diabetes, procedures that can be painful/frightening should be used with caution. Study procedures must also be considered for the demands placed on participants. Study satisfaction should be regularly assessed as an indicator of risk for withdrawal. PMID:26682228

  4. [Change in the incidence of diabetes mellitus in oral cancer patients based on a long-term comparative study].

    PubMed

    Végh, Dániel; Bányai, Dorottya; Ujpál, Márta

    2015-03-01

    Our research is focused on the incidence of diabetes mellitus and glucose metabolic disorders among oral cancer patients and the frequency of different oral localizations of cancer. Diabetes mellitus affects 7% of the Hungarian population. This study uses data spanning 14 years, with 2 datasets of 1998-1999 and 2012-2013, collected first hand by the authors. These datasets have led us to examine the blood glucose level in 267 patients with histologically confirmed malignant tumours in the oral cavity. Diabetes mellitus was found in 59 of them (22.1%), The blood glucose was elevated in 32 cases (12%). The most frequent tumor locations among the diabetic patients: labial, lingual and gingival tumors gingivae. Comparative epidemiological study demonstrates that in 2012-2013 dataset there was an increased observed percentage of people with diabetes mellitus [17.6% to 22.1%]. The percentage of patients with IFG (impaired fasting glucose) also increased from 9.8% to 12%. Overall the number of patients with glucose metabolic disorders climbed from 27.4% to 34.1%, (p > 0.05). Our intention of this introductory analysis is to emphasize the close connection of these two very important disease groups, and the wider spread of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26117953

  5. Lay perceptions of predictive testing for diabetes based on DNA test results versus family history assessment: a focus group study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study assessed lay perceptions of issues related to predictive genetic testing for multifactorial diseases. These perceived issues may differ from the "classic" issues, e.g. autonomy, discrimination, and psychological harm that are considered important in predictive testing for monogenic disorders. In this study, type 2 diabetes was used as an example, and perceptions with regard to predictive testing based on DNA test results and family history assessment were compared. Methods Eight focus group interviews were held with 45 individuals aged 35-70 years with (n = 3) and without (n = 1) a family history of diabetes, mixed groups of these two (n = 2), and diabetes patients (n = 2). All interviews were transcribed and analysed using Atlas-ti. Results Most participants believed in the ability of a predictive test to identify people at risk for diabetes and to motivate preventive behaviour. Different reasons underlying motivation were considered when comparing DNA test results and a family history risk assessment. A perceived drawback of DNA testing was that diabetes was considered not severe enough for this type of risk assessment. In addition, diabetes family history assessment was not considered useful by some participants, since there are also other risk factors involved, not everyone has a diabetes family history or knows their family history, and it might have a negative influence on family relations. Respect for autonomy of individuals was emphasized more with regard to DNA testing than family history assessment. Other issues such as psychological harm, discrimination, and privacy were only briefly mentioned for both tests. Conclusion The results suggest that most participants believe a predictive genetic test could be used in the prevention of multifactorial disorders, such as diabetes, but indicate points to consider before both these tests are applied. These considerations differ with regard to the method of assessment (DNA test or obtaining family history) and also differ from monogenic disorders. PMID:21729316

  6. Risk factor identification and assessment in hypertension and diabetes (RIAHD) study.

    PubMed

    Skrtic, S; Niklason, A; Leoo, T; Hedner, T

    2006-01-01

    The RIAHD (Risk factor Identification and Assessment in Hypertension and Diabetes) study was conducted as a non-interventional study in 699 patients with hypertension without additional risk factors (low-risk) or with additional risk factors (high-risk), primarily diabetes and/or micro/macroalbuminuria (MA/A). The RIAHD study aimed to assess novel cardiovascular risk factors (RFs) such as blood viscosity, inflammatory markers and selected genetic polymorphisms. In addition, the RIAHD study also aimed to examine home versus office blood pressures (BPs), objective cardiovascular risk according to ESH/ESC Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation systems (SCORE) and subjectively expressed risk (clinical judgment) by physicians and patients. The health economic impact of other RFs, associated clinical conditions and target organ damage was also studied by evaluating healthcare utilization and sick leave in high-risk patients. In terms of circulating RFs, measured and calculated whole blood viscosity did not differ between the high and low-risk patient groups. Fibrinogen was significantly increased in the high-risk group, while hsCRP did not differ between the two groups. Self-measured BPs at home differed from BPs measured in the office. The average systolic home BPs was 11.8 mmHg lower in the low-risk group and 6.7 mmHg lower in the high-risk group. The diastolic home BPs averages differed 7.1 mm Hg and 4.1 mmHg from office BPs in the low-risk and high-risk groups, respectively. A higher home BP compared with the office BP, i.e. masked high BP values, was found in 21% of patients in the low-risk group and 32% of patients in the high-risk group. Global CV risk assessment (high-risk or low-risk) by the physicians corresponded well to objective risk evaluation (ESH/ESC) in the high-risk hypertensive patients, while physicians tended to underestimate the patients CV risk in the low-risk group (without diabetes and/or MA/A). Proper global risk assessment by judgement is often difficult in cardiovascular patients. The RIAHD study emphasizes the importance of performing a more extended RF assessment in hypertensive patients with as well as without diabetes and/or micro/macroalbuminuria in order to expose the full RF profile. PMID:17472028

  7. Sexual Response in Women with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Controlled Laboratory Study Measuring Vaginal Blood Flow and Subjective Sexual Arousal.

    PubMed

    Both, Stephanie; Ter Kuile, Moniek; Enzlin, Paul; Dekkers, Olaf; van Dijk, Marieke; Weijenborg, Philomeen

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have indicated that women with diabetes mellitus are at higher risk to develop sexual dysfunctions. In the current study, we hypothesized that lower genital arousal response-as a consequence of diabetes-related damage to nerves and blood vessels-might play a part in these higher prevalence rates. Vaginal blood flow, subjective sexual response, and clitoral sensitivity were compared between women with diabetes and healthy controls, and associations with diabetes complications were investigated. In pre- and postmenopausal women with type 1 diabetes (n = 42) and healthy controls (n = 46), vaginal blood flow was measured as vaginal pulse amplitude (VPA). VPA was assessed at rest, during erotic film viewing, and during vibrotactile clitoral stimulation. Subjective sexual arousal was measured using a questionnaire. Clitoral sensitivity was assessed by a vibration perception test. Data on diabetes complications were obtained from medical records, and neuropathy was assessed by quantitative sensory testing. VPA, subjective sexual arousal, and clitoral sensitivity were not significantly different between women with diabetes and controls. Nevertheless, women with diabetes who had retinopathy showed significantly lower VPA than women without retinopathy, and women with diabetes who had neuropathy showed significantly higher sensation thresholds for vibrotactile clitoral stimulation. The results do not support the hypothesis of a disrupted genital arousal response in women with diabetes. However, the observed associations between retinopathy and vaginal blood flow, and between neuropathy and clitoral sensitivity, suggest that diabetes-related complications might adversely affect the physiological basis of female sexual response. PMID:26054485

  8. Heart Rate–Corrected QT Interval Is an Independent Predictor of All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes: The Diabetes Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Amanda J.; Azeem, Amir; Yeboah, Joseph; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Aggarwal, Shivani R.; Bertoni, Alain G.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Freedman, Barry I.; Herrington, David M.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Heart rate–corrected QT (QTc) interval is associated with mortality in the general population, but this association is less clear in individuals with type 2 diabetes. We assessed the association of QTc interval with all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in the Diabetes Heart Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 1,020 participants with type 2 diabetes (83% European Americans; 55% women; mean age 61.4 years) who were free of atrial fibrillation, major ventricular conduction defects, and antiarrhythmic therapy at baseline. QT duration was automatically calculated from a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). Following American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Foundation recommendations, a linear scale was used to correct the QT for heart rate. Using Cox regression, risk was estimated per 1-SD increase in QTc interval as well as prolonged QTc interval (>450 ms) vs. normal QTc interval for mortality. RESULTS At baseline, the mean (SD) QTc duration was 414.9 ms (18.1), and 3.0% of participants had prolonged QTc. After a median follow-up time of 8.5 years (maximum follow-up time 13.9 years), 204 participants were deceased. In adjusted multivariate models, a 1-SD increase in QTc interval was associated with an 18% higher risk for all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 1.18 [95% CI 1.03–1.36]) and 29% increased risk for CVD mortality (1.29 [1.05–1.59]). Similar results were obtained when QTc interval was used as a categorical variable (prolonged vs. normal) (all-cause mortality 1.73 [0.95–3.15]; CVD mortality 2.86 [1.35–6.08]). CONCLUSIONS Heart rate QTc interval is an independent predictor of all-cause and CVD mortality in this population with type 2 diabetes, suggesting that additional prognostic information may be available from this simple ECG measure. PMID:24574343

  9. Diabetes Complications at Presentation and One Year by Glycated Haemoglobin at Diagnosis in a Multiethnic and Diverse Socioeconomic Population: Results from the South London Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohsin; Marwood, Lindsey; Ismail, Khalida; Evans, Tyrrell; Sivaprasad, Sobha; Winkley, Kirsty; Amiel, Stephanie Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background. WHO's recommendation of HbA1c ? 48?mmol/mol (6.5%) as diagnostic for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was adopted by three UK London boroughs in May 2012. The South London Diabetes (SOUL-D) study has recruited people with newly diagnosed T2DM since 2008. We compared participants diagnosed before May 2012 with HbA1c < 48?mmol/mol to those with diagnostic HbA1c ? 48?mmol/mol. Methods. A prospective cohort study of newly diagnosed T2DM participants from 96 primary care practices, comparing demographic and biomedical variables between those with diagnostic HbA1c < 48?mmol/mol or HbA1c ? 48?mmol/mol at recruitment and after one year. Results. Of 1488 participants, 22.8% had diagnostic HbA1c < 48?mmol/mol. They were older and more likely to be white (p < 0.05). At recruitment and one year, there were no between-group differences in the prevalence of diabetic complications, except that those diagnosed with HbA1c < 48?mmol/mol had more sensory neuropathy at recruitment (p = 0.039) and, at one year, had new myocardial infarction (p = 0.012) but less microalbuminuria (p = 0.012). Conclusions. Use of HbA1c ? 48?mmol/mol as the sole T2DM diagnostic criterion may miss almost a quarter of those previously diagnosed in South London yet HbA1c < 48?mmol/mol may not exclude clinically important diabetes. PMID:26090473

  10. The role of childhood social position in adult type 2 diabetes: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Socioeconomic circumstances in childhood and early adulthood may influence the later onset of chronic disease, although such research is limited for type 2 diabetes and its risk factors at the different stages of life. The main aim of the present study is to examine the role of childhood social position and later inflammatory markers and health behaviours in developing type 2 diabetes at older ages using a pathway analytic approach. Methods Data on childhood and adult life circumstances of 2,994 men and 4,021 women from English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) were used to evaluate their association with diabetes at age 50 years and more. The cases of diabetes were based on having increased blood levels of glycated haemoglobin and/or self-reported medication for diabetes and/or being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Father’s job when ELSA participants were aged 14 years was used as the measure of childhood social position. Current social characteristics, health behaviours and inflammatory biomarkers were used as potential mediators in the statistical analysis to assess direct and indirect effects of childhood circumstances on diabetes in later life. Results 12.6 per cent of participants were classified as having diabetes. A disadvantaged social position in childhood, as measured by father’s manual occupation, was associated at conventional levels of statistical significance with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in adulthood, both directly and indirectly through inflammation, adulthood social position and a risk score constructed from adult health behaviours including tobacco smoking and limited physical activity. The direct effect of childhood social position was reduced by mediation analysis (standardised coefficient decreased from 0.089 to 0.043) but remained statistically significant (p =?0.035). All three indirect pathways made a statistically significantly contribution to the overall effect of childhood social position on adulthood type 2 diabetes. Conclusions Childhood social position influences adult diabetes directly and indirectly through inflammatory markers, adulthood social position and adult health behaviours. PMID:24884735

  11. Diabetes Should Be a Factor in Weight-Loss Surgery Decision: Study

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154684.html Diabetes Should Be a Factor in Weight-Loss Surgery ... 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Obese patients with type 2 diabetes might reap greater health-care savings after weight- ...

  12. Study of the exhaled acetone in type 1 diabetes using quantum cascade laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Reyes, Adonis; Horsten, Roland C; Urbach, H Paul; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    The acetone concentration exhaled in the breath of three type 1 diabetes patients (two minors and one adult) and one healthy volunteer is studied using a quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopic system. Using the acetone signature between 1150 and 1250 cm(-1) and a multiline fitting method, the concentration variations on the order of parts per billion by volume were measured. Blood glucose and ketone concentrations in blood measurements were performed simultaneously to study their relation with acetone in exhaled breath. We focus on personalized studies to better understand the role of acetone in diabetes. For each volunteer, we performed a series of measurements over a period of time, including overnight fastings of 11 ± 1 h and during ketosis-hyperglycemia events for the minors. Our results highlight the importance of performing personalized studies because the response of the minors to the presence of ketosis was consistent but unique for each individual. Also, our results emphasize the need for performing more studies with T1D minors, because the acetone concentration in the breath of the minors differs, with respect to those reported in the literature, which are based on adults. PMID:25506743

  13. Eating disorders in young adults with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus: a controlled study.

    PubMed Central

    Fairburn, C G; Peveler, R C; Davies, B; Mann, J I; Mayou, R A

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the prevalence of clinical eating disorders and lesser degrees of disturbed eating in young adults with insulin dependent diabetes and a matched sample of non-diabetic female controls. DESIGN--Cross sectional survey of eating habits and attitudes in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. SETTING--Outpatient clinic catering for young adults with diabetes; community sample of non-diabetic women drawn from the lists of two general practices. SUBJECTS--100 patients with insulin dependent diabetes (54 women and 46 men) aged 17-25 and 67 non-diabetic women of the same age. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Eating habits and eating disorder psychopathology were assessed by standardised research interview adapted for the assessment of patients with diabetes (eating disorder examination). Glycaemic control was assessed by glycated haemoglobin assay. RESULTS--In both non-diabetic and diabetic women disturbed eating was common, and in diabetic women the degree of disturbance was related to control of glycaemia. Twenty of the diabetic women (37%) had omitted or underused insulin to influence their weight. This behaviour was not restricted to those with a clinical eating disorder. None of the men showed any features of eating disorders, and none had misused insulin to influence their weight. CONCLUSIONS--There was no evidence that clinical eating disorders are more prevalent in young women with diabetes than in non-diabetic women. Nevertheless, disturbed eating is common and is associated with poor control of glycaemia, and the misuse of insulin to influence body weight is also common in young women with diabetes. PMID:1781827

  14. Importance of Weight Loss Maintenance and Risk Prediction in the Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes: Analysis of European Diabetes Prevention Study RCT

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Linda; White, Martin; Lindström, Jaana; den Boer, Annemieke Th.; Blaak, Ellen; Eriksson, Johan G.; Feskens, Edith; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Walker, Mark; Mathers, John C.; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2013-01-01

    Background Prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide. T2D prevention by lifestyle intervention is effective. Pragmatic scalable interventions are needed, with evidence to efficiently target and monitor such interventions. We report pooled analyses of data from three European trial cohorts: to analyse T2D incidence, sustained weight loss and utility of risk predictors. Methods We analysed data on 749 adults with impaired glucose tolerance (278 men and 471 women, mean age 56 years, mean BMI 31 kgm?2) recruited between 1993 and 2003, and randomised to intensive lifestyle intervention (I) or lifestyle advice control (C). The intervention aimed to increase physical activity, modify diet, and promote weight loss?5%. Using Cox-regression survival analysis, we assessed T2D incidence and the impact on T2D incidence of sustained weight loss, and of baseline cut-point values of FINDRISC score, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and HbA1c. Results Mean follow-up duration was 3.1 years. T2D was diagnosed in 139 participants (I?=?45/379, C?=?94/370). Cumulative T2D incidence was 57% lower in the intervention compared with the control group (HR 0.42 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.60) P<0.001). Participants with ?5% weight loss at one year had 65% lower T2D incidence (HR 0.35 (95% CI 0.22 to 0.56) P<0.001); maintaining ?5% weight loss for two and three years further reduced T2D incidence. Recommended cut-points to identify those at high risk for T2D would have identified different proportions of European Diabetes Prevention Study (EDIPS) participants with similar hazard-ratios for intervention effect. Conclusions Pooled analysis of EDIPS trial data reinforces evidence for T2D prevention by lifestyle intervention. Analysis showed the preventive effect of ?5% weight loss, especially if maintained long term, which has utility for intervention monitoring. Analysis of proposed cut-points demonstrates difficulties in balancing risk and benefit, to efficiently target interventions and suggests evidence is needed to define clinical policy. Trial registrations The Finnish Diabetes Prevention study, Helsinki, Finland: ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT00518167 The SLIM diabetes prevention study, Maastricht, The Netherlands: Clinical Trials.gov; NCT00381186 The EDIPS-Newcastle diabetes prevention study, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number; ISRCTN15670600. PMID:23451166

  15. Effect of total knee arthroplasty on type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Shrinand V; Arora, Arvind; Mathesul, Ambarish A

    2013-01-01

    Context: Advanced osteoarthritis of knee joint if bilateral, severely restricts patient mobility. This acts as an aggravating factor for pre existing comorbid elements of metabolical syndrome (MS) like Type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension as patients are unable to carry out therapeutic walks. Successfully implanted total knee arthroplasty (TKA) increases physical activity and enables to carry out therapeutic walks thus may help in better control of type II diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The objective of this prospective study was to find whether TKA for osteoarthritis knee had any effect to improve blood glucose levels and reduce blood pressure. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was done in which patients operated for tricompartmental osteoarthritis of knee with associated comorbidities like Type II diabetes mellitus or hypertension during a period of 2008 and 2009 were studied. One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled (55 diabetics, 65 hypertensives) who met our inclusion criteria. Preoperative knee society score, lower extremity activity scale fasting blood glucose level and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were compared with one year followup values. The KSS and LEAS scores were analysed by the Wilcoxon signed ranked test, while the fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels and systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels were analysed by paired ‘t’ test. Results: The reduction of systolic blood pressure by 8 mmHg (t = 5.6, P value < 0.05) and diastolic blood pressure by 6 mmHg (t = 7.6, P value < 0.05) was recorded which was statistically significant. However, no statistically significant effect on fasting blood glucose levels was observed (t = -0.77, P value = 0.442). KSS improved in DM from preoperative 29 to 86 and LEAS improved from 6.7 to 11.3. Conclusions: Authors are of the opinion that successful total knee replacement results in increased physical activity and reduces blood pressure (systolic and diastolic) in hypertensives. However, the same is not seen in blood glucose level. Increased physical activity and reduced dependence on NSAIDS postoperatively, may be contributing in reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Further studies in this aspect are necessary. PMID:23532862

  16. Patient-provider interaction from the perspectives of type 2 diabetes patients in Muscat, Oman: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Abdulhadi, Nadia; Al Shafaee, Mohammed; Freudenthal, Solveig; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Wahlström, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    Background Patients' expectations and perceptions of the medical encounter and interactions are important tools in diabetes management. Some problems regarding the interaction during encounters may be related to a lack of communication skills on the part of either the physician or the patient. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions of type 2 diabetes patients regarding the medical encounters and quality of interactions with their primary health-care providers. Methods Four focus group discussions (two women and two men groups) were conducted among 27 purposively selected patients (13 men and 14 women) from six primary health-care centres in Muscat, Oman. Qualitative content analysis was applied. Results The patients identified some weaknesses regarding the patient-provider communication like: unfriendly welcoming; interrupted consultation privacy; poor attention and eye contact; lack of encouraging the patients to ask questions on the providers' side; and inability to participate in medical dialogue or express concerns on the patients' side. Other barriers and difficulties related to issues of patient-centeredness, organization of diabetes clinics, health education and professional competency regarding diabetes care were also identified. Conclusion The diabetes patients' experiences with the primary health-care providers showed dissatisfaction with the services. We suggest appropriate training for health-care providers with regard to diabetes care and developing of communication skills with emphasis on a patient-centred approach. An efficient use of available resources in diabetes clinics and distributing responsibilities between team members in close collaboration with patients and their families seems necessary. Further exploration of the providers' work situation and barriers to good interaction is needed. Our findings can help the policy makers in Oman, and countries with similar health systems, to improve the quality and organizational efficiency of diabetes care services. PMID:17925030

  17. Pathobiochemistry of combined diabetes and atherosclerosis studied on a novel animal model. The hyperlipemic-hyperglycemic hamster.

    PubMed Central

    Simionescu, M.; Popov, D.; Sima, A.; Hasu, M.; Costache, G.; Faitar, S.; Vulpanovici, A.; Stancu, C.; Stern, D.; Simionescu, N.

    1996-01-01

    Because accelerated atherosclerosis is the main complication of diabetes, we devised a new animal model that combines these two diseases, and investigated their joint impact on the main plasma components and organs known to be most affected in each disorder. Male Golden Syrian hamsters were subjected to three experimental conditions: streptozotocin-induced diabetes (D), diet-induced hyperlipemia (H), and a combination of hyperlipemia and diabetes (HD). At time intervals ranging from 2 to 24 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, the appropriate plasma constituents were determined, and the ultrastructural modifications of relevant tissues such as the heart, cardiac valves, coronary arteries, aorta, retina, and kidney were examined. The HD hamsters were characterized by marked alternations of plasma components, ie, increase in circulating glucose, cholesterol and lipid peroxide levels, glycation of albumin, and the appearance of irreversibly glycated albumin (AGE-Alb). These humoral changes coexisted with micro- and macroangiopathic lesions characteristic to both diseases, ie, capillary narrowing, hyperplasia of endothelial basal lamina, proliferation of perivascular extracellular matrix (abnormalities reminiscent of type I diabetes), and concomitant intimal accumulation of modified lipoproteins and macrophage-derived foam cells in the aorta, coronaries, and cardiac valves, leading to accelerated formation of atherosclerotic plaques. These changes eventually appeared in the D hamsters also, but at a much slower rate, whereas the H group showed only modifications characteristic for atherosclerosis. Our findings indicate that, overall, 1) diabetes accelerated the early development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions leading to rapid calcification, and 2) hyperlipidemia associated with diabetes accelerated the rate of development of diabetes-induced microvascular disease. The hamster model may be useful to study the impact of various drugs on the diabetes-related vascular complications. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:8774154

  18. The pathway to diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children: a questionnaire study

    E-print Network

    Usher-Smith, Juliet A.; Thompson, Matthew J.; Zhu, Hannah; Sharp, Stephen J.; Walter, Fiona M.

    2015-03-17

    of type 1 diabetes among children and adolescents in the Netherlands. Pediatr Diabetes 2014. doi:10.1111/pedi.12232 [Epub ahead of print 7 Nov 2014]. 3. Usher-Smith JA, Thompson MJ, Sharp SJ, et al. Factors associated with the presence of diabetic...

  19. Regular Chinese Green Tea Consumption Is Protective for Diabetic Retinopathy: A Clinic-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qinghua; Chen, Dandan; Sun, Hong-Peng; Yan, Ning; Xu, Yong; Pan, Chen-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the association between regular Chinese green tea consumption and the risk of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in diabetic patients in China. Methods. 100 DR patients and 100 age-sex-matched diabetic controls without retinopathy were recruited in a clinic-based, case-control study. DR was defined from retinal photographs and detailed information on Chinese green tea consumption of the participants was collected through a face-to-face interview. Results. The crude odds ratio [OR] of Chinese green tea consumption for DR was 0.49 (95% confidence interval: 0.26–0.90). When stratified by sex, the protective effect of Chinese green tea consumption on DR was statistically significant in women (P = 0.01) but not in men (P = 0.63). After adjusting for age, sex, and other confounders, DR was significantly associated with Chinese green tea consumption (OR = 0.48; P = 0.04), higher systolic blood pressure (OR = 1.02; P = 0.05), longer duration of diabetes (OR = 1.07; P = 0.02), and the presence of family history of diabetes (OR = 2.35; P = 0.04). Conclusions. Diabetic patients who had regularly drunk Chinese green tea every week for at least one year in their lives had a DR risk reduction of about 50% compared with those who had not. Regular Chinese green tea consumption may be a novel approach for the prevention of DR. PMID:26539551

  20. [Glomerular filtration and renal volume in type II diabetes (non-insulin-dependent): study in normal and microalbuminuria patients].

    PubMed

    Signorini, A M; Tanganelli, I; Fondelli, C; Vattimo, A; Ferrari, F; Borgogni, P; Borgogni, L; Gragnoli, G

    1991-08-01

    In type 2 diabetes elevated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and increased renal volume (RV), often accompanied to normo or microalbuminuria, were demonstrated. This condition is considered a pathogenetic factor for clinical nephropathy. As this topic is little studied in type 2 diabetes, we have investigated 73 type 2 diabetic patients (34 normo and 39 microalbuminuric), looking for a correlation between GFR, RV, hypertension, duration of diabetes and indexes of metabolic control. GFR was measured by a scintigraphy, after infusion of 99Tc-DTPA. Renal volume was determined by ultrasound scanning. Between the groups GFR and RV weren't different; elevated GFR was demonstrated in 3 patients; increased RV in 1 patient. In the hypertensive group GFR was lower than in normotensive group and in controls. Multivariate analysis in stepwise demonstrated that GFR presents a negative correlation to systolic blood pressure as in normo as in microalbuminuric patients. In the normotensive group GFR didn't correlate to the other variables. The present data suggest that in type 2 diabetes there is a little prevalence of glomerular hyperfiltration and increased renal volume and that hypertension plays a role on GFR of hypertensive diabetic patients. PMID:1809304

  1. Sex-Differences in the Metabolic Health of Offspring of Parents with Diabetes: A Record-Linkage Study

    PubMed Central

    Aldhous, Marian C.; Reynolds, Rebecca M.; Campbell, Archie; Linksted, Pamela; Lindsay, Robert S.; Smith, Blair H.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Porteous, David J.; Norman, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal diabetes in pregnancy affects offspring health. The impact of parental diabetes on offspring health is unclear. We investigated the impact of parental diabetes on the metabolic-health of adult-offspring who did not themselves have diabetes. Data from the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study, a population-based family cohort, were record-linked to subjects’ own diabetes medical records. From F0-parents, we identified F1-offspring of: mothers with diabetes (OMD, n = 409), fathers with diabetes (OFD, n = 468), no parent with diabetes (ONoPD, n = 2489). Metabolic syndrome, body, biochemical measurements and blood-pressures were compared between F1-offspring groups by sex. A higher proportion of female OMD had metabolic syndrome than female OFD or ONoPD (P<0.0001). In female offspring, predictors of metabolic syndrome were: having a mother with diabetes (OR = 1.78, CI 1.03–3.07, [reference ONoPD]), body mass index (BMI, OR = 1.21, CI 1.13–1.30) and age (OR = 1.03, CI 1.01–1.06). In male offspring, predictors of metabolic syndrome were: BMI (OR = 1.18, CI 1.09–1.29) and percent body-fat (OR = 1.12, CI 1.05–1.19). In both sexes, OMD had higher blood-pressures than OFD (P<0.0001). In females, OMD had higher glucose (P<0.0001) and percent body-fat (P<0.0001) compared with OFD or ONoPD. OMD and OFD both had increased waist-measurements (P<0.0001), BMI (P<0.0001) and percent body-fat (P<0.0001) compared with ONoPD. Female OMD and OFD had lower HDL-cholesterol levels (P<0.0001) than female ONoPD. Parental diabetes is associated with higher offspring-BMI and body-fat. In female offspring, maternal diabetes increased the odds of metabolic syndrome, even after adjusting for BMI. Further investigations are required to determine the mechanisms involved. PMID:26308734

  2. Choosing preclinical study models of diabetic retinopathy: key problems for consideration

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Xue-Song; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Ding, Yong; Zhong, Jing-Xiang; So, Kwok-Fai

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common complication of diabetes mellitus in the eye. Although the clinical treatment for DR has already developed to a relative high level, there are still many urgent problems that need to be investigated in clinical and basic science. Currently, many in vivo animal models and in vitro culture systems have been applied to solve these problems. Many approaches have also been used to establish different DR models. However, till now, there has not been a single study model that can clearly and exactly mimic the developmental process of the human DR. Choosing the suitable model is important, not only for achieving our research goals smoothly, but also, to better match with different experimental proposals in the study. In this review, key problems for consideration in choosing study models of DR are discussed. These problems relate to clinical relevance, different approaches for establishing models, and choice of different species of animals as well as of the specific in vitro culture systems. Attending to these considerations will deepen the understanding on current study models and optimize the experimental design for the final goal of preventing DR. PMID:25429204

  3. Metformin Treatment in Type 2 Diabetes in Pregnancy: An Active Controlled, Parallel-Group, Randomized, Open Label Study in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ainuddin, Jahan Ara; Karim, Nasim; Zaheer, Sidra; Ali, Syed Sanwer; Hasan, Anjum Ara

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To assess the effect of metformin and to compare it with insulin treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy in terms of perinatal outcome, maternal complications, additional insulin requirement, and treatment acceptability. Methods. In this randomized, open label study, 206 patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy who met the eligibility criteria were selected from the antenatal clinics. Insulin was added to metformin treatment when required, to maintain the target glycemic control. The patients were followed up till delivery. Maternal, and perinatal outcomes and pharmacotherapeutic characteristics were recorded on a proforma. Results. Maternal characteristics were comparable in metformin and insulin treated group. 84.9% patients in metformin group required add-on insulin therapy at mean gestational age of 26.58 ± 3.85 weeks. Less maternal weight gain (P < 0.001) and pregnancy induced hypertension (P = 0.029) were observed in metformin treated group. Small for date babies were more in metformin group (P < 0.01). Neonatal hypoglycemia was significantly less and so was NICU stay of >24 hours in metformin group (P < 0.01). Significant reduction in cost of treatment was found in metformin group. Conclusion. Metformin alone or with add-on insulin is an effective and cheap treatment option for patients with type 2 diabetes in pregnancy. This trial is registered with clinical trial registration number: Clinical trials.gov NCT01855763. PMID:25874236

  4. Cardiovascular disease and arterial calcification in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus: interrelations and risk factor profiles. Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study-V.

    PubMed

    Maser, R E; Wolfson, S K; Ellis, D; Stein, E A; Drash, A L; Becker, D J; Dorman, J S; Orchard, T J

    1991-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a frequent complication of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), but the prevalence, interrelations, and risk factors of its principal components (coronary, cerebrovascular, and lower-extremity arterial disease) and of medial arterial wall calcification are not well understood. To address these issues, data from the Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study (n = 657) baseline examination were examined. The term coronary heart disease (CHD) was applied to those with myocardial infarction or angina, whereas lower-extremity arterial disease (LEAD) was applied to those who had undergone amputation of a lower limb or who had an ankle to arm blood pressure ratio less than 0.8 at rest or after exercise. Calcification of the lower-extremity arteries was considered to be present if ankle pressure was more than 100 mm Hg higher than brachial pressure. Although the prevalence of CHD was low, LEAD was significantly more common in women than in men (p less than 0.01), whereas calcification was more frequent in men than in women (p less than 0.01). Ten percent of those with LEAD also had CHD, and 8% with LEAD had calcification. Modeling of potential risk factors (e.g., diabetes duration and glycosylated hemoglobin) revealed that duration, female gender, fibrinogen, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol to apolipoprotein A-I ratio were independent predictors of LEAD, whereas for CHD only, diabetes duration and hypertension contributed to CHD. Calcification revealed a mixed pattern, with duration, hypertension, and triglyceride to apolipoprotein A-I ratio being the statistically significant associated factors. The results suggest that although LEAD, CHD, and calcification often coexist, their risk factor profiles differ. PMID:2065046

  5. Visit-to-Visit Glucose Variability Predicts the Development of End-Stage Renal Disease in Type 2 Diabetes: 10-Year Follow-Up of Taiwan Diabetes Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Fei; Li, Tsai-Chung; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Sung, Fung-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association of glucose variability using coefficient of variation of fasting plasma glucose (FPG-CV) and coefficient of variation of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c-CV) to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in 31,841 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes.Patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in National Diabetes Care Management Program, aged ?30 years, and free of ESRD (n?=?31,841) in January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2004 were included. Extended Cox proportional hazards regression models with competing risk of all-cause mortality were used to evaluate risk factors on ESRD incidence. Patients were followed till 2012.After a median follow-up period of 8.23 years, 1642 patients developed ESRD, giving a crude incidence rate of 6.27/1000 person-years (6.36 for men, 6.19 for women). After the multivariate adjustment, both FPG-CV and HbA1c-CV were independent predictors of ESRD with corresponding hazard ratios of 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01, 1.41), 1.24 (95% CI 1.05, 1.46) in HbA1c-CV from fourth to fifth quintile and 1.23 (95% CI 1.03, 1.47) in FPG-CV from fifth quintile.One-year visit-to-visit glucose variability expressed by FPG-CV and HbA1c-CV predicted development of ESRD in patients with type 2 diabetes, suggesting therapeutic strategies toward a goal to minimize glucose fluctuation. PMID:26554779

  6. Birth weight and later life adherence to unhealthy lifestyles in predicting type 2 diabetes: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Sylvia H; Tobias, Deirdre K; Chiuve, Stephanie E; VanderWeele, Tyler J; Rich-Edwards, Janet W; Curhan, Gary C; Willett, Walter C; Manson, JoAnn E; Hu, Frank B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To prospectively assess the joint association of birth weight and established lifestyle risk factors in adulthood with incident type 2 diabetes and to quantitatively decompose the attributing effects to birth weight only, to adulthood lifestyle only, and to their interaction. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986-2010), Nurses’ Health Study (1980-2010), and Nurses’ Health Study II (1991-2011). Participants 149?794 men and women without diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or cancer at baseline. Main outcome measure Incident cases of type 2 diabetes, identified through self report and validated by a supplementary questionnaire. Unhealthy lifestyle was defined on the basis of body mass index, smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and the alternate healthy eating index. Results During 20-30 years of follow-up, 11?709 new cases of type 2 diabetes were documented. The multivariate adjusted relative risk of type 2 diabetes was 1.45 (95% confidence interval 1.32 to 1.59) per kg lower birth weight and 2.10 (1.71 to 2.58) per unhealthy lifestyle factor. The relative risk of type 2 diabetes associated with a combination of per kg lower birth weight and per unhealthy lifestyle factor was 2.86 (2.26 to 3.63), which was more than the addition of the risk associated with each individual factor, indicating a significant interaction on an additive scale (P for interaction<0.001). The attributable proportions of joint effect were 22% (95% confidence interval 18.3% to 26.4%) to lower birth weight alone, 59% (57.1% to 61.5%) to unhealthy lifestyle alone, and 18% (13.9% to 21.3%) to their interaction. Conclusion Most cases of type 2 diabetes could be prevented by the adoption of a healthier lifestyle, but simultaneous improvement of both prenatal and postnatal factors could further prevent additional cases. PMID:26199273

  7. Qualitative study of telemonitoring of blood glucose and blood pressure in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Janet; Fairbrother, Peter; Pagliari, Claudia; Paterson, Mary; Pinnock, Hilary; Sheikh, Aziz; Wild, Sarah; McKinstry, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the experiences of patients and professionals taking part in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of blood glucose, blood pressure (BP) and weight telemonitoring in type 2 diabetes supported by primary care, and identify factors facilitating or hindering the effectiveness of the intervention and those likely to influence its potential translation to routine practice. Design Qualitative study adopting an interpretive descriptive approach. Participants 23 patients, 6 nurses and 4 doctors who were participating in a RCT of blood glucose and BP telemonitoring. A maximum variation sample of patients from within the trial based on age, sex and deprivation status of the practice was sought. Setting 12 primary care practices in Scotland and England. Method Data were collected via recorded semistructured interviews. Analysis was inductive with themes presented within an overarching thematic framework. Multiple strategies were employed to ensure that the analysis was credible and trustworthy. Results Telemonitoring of blood glucose, BP and weight by people with type 2 diabetes was feasible. The data generated by telemonitoring supported self-care decisions and medical treatment decisions. Motivation to self-manage diet was increased by telemonitoring of blood glucose, and the ‘benign policing’ aspect of telemonitoring was considered by patients to be important. The convenience of home monitoring was very acceptable to patients although professionals had some concerns about telemonitoring increasing workload and costs. Conclusions Telemonitoring of blood glucose, BP and weight in primary care is a promising way of improving diabetes management which would be highly acceptable to the type of patients who volunteered for this study. Trial registration number ISRCTN71674628; Pre-results. PMID:26700275

  8. Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of HGF gene therapy in diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, John A; Smith, A Gordon; Cha, Bong-Soo; Choi, Sung Hee; Wymer, James; Shaibani, Aziz; Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Vinik, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of a plasmid (VM202) containing two human hepatocyte growth factor isoforms given by intramuscular injections in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy. Methods In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, patients were randomized to receive injections of 8 or 16 mg VM202 per leg or placebo. Divided doses were administered on Day 0 and Day 14. The prospective primary outcome was change in the mean pain score measured by a 7 day pain diary. Secondary outcomes included a responder analysis, quality of life and pain measures, and intraepidermal nerve fiber density. Results There were no significant adverse events attributable to VM202. Eighty-four patients completed the study. Patients receiving 8 mg VM202 per leg improved the most in all efficacy measures including a significant (P = 0.03) reduction at 3 months in the mean pain score and continued but not statistically significant reductions in pain at 6 and 9 months. Of these patients, 48.4% experienced a ?50% reduction in pain compared to 17.6% of placebo patients. There were also significant improvements in the brief pain inventory for patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and the questionnaire portion of the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument. Patients not on pregabalin or gabapentin had the largest reductions in pain. Interpretation VM202 was safe, well tolerated and effective indicating the feasibility of a nonviral gene therapy approach to painful diabetic neuropathy. Two days of treatment were sufficient to provide symptomatic relief with improvement in quality of life for 3 months. VM202 may be particularly beneficial for patients not taking gabapentin or pregabalin. PMID:26000320

  9. Prevalence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in Peru: report from PERUDIAB, a national urban population-based longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Seclen, Segundo N; Rosas, Moises E; Arias, Arturo J; Huayta, Ernesto; Medina, Cecilia A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to estimate the prevalences of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) in a national sample in Peru and assess the relationships with selected sociodemographic variables. Methods We estimated prevalence in PERUDIAB study participants, a nationwide, stratified urban and suburban population selected by random cluster sampling. Between 2010 and 2012, questionnaires were completed and blood tests obtained from 1677 adults ?25?years of age. Known diabetes was defined as participants having been told so by a doctor or nurse and/or receiving insulin or oral antidiabetic agents. Newly diagnosed diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose ?126?mg/dL determined during the study and without a previous diabetes diagnosis. IFG was defined as fasting plasma glucose of 100–125?mg/dL. Results The estimated national prevalence of diabetes was 7.0% (95% CI 5.3% to 8.7%) and it was 8.4% (95% CI 5.6% to 11.3%) in metropolitan Lima. No gender differences were detected. Known and newly diagnosed diabetes prevalences were estimated as 4.2% and 2.8%, respectively. A logistic regression response surface model showed a complex trend for an increased prevalence of diabetes in middle-aged individuals and in those with no formal education. Diabetes prevalence was higher in coastal (8.2%) than in highlands (4.5%; p=0.03), and jungle (3.5%; p<0.02) regions. The estimated national prevalence of IFG was 22.4%, higher in males than in females (28.3% vs 19.1%; p<0.001), and higher in coastal (26.4%) than in highlands (17.4%; p=0.03), but not jungle regions (14.9%; p=0.07). Conclusions This study confirms diabetes as an important public health problem, especially for middle-aged individuals and those with no formal education. 40% of the affected individuals were undiagnosed. The elevated prevalence of IFG shows that nearly a quarter of the adult population of Peru has an increased risk of diabetes. PMID:26512325

  10. The Impact of an Internet-Based Self-Management Intervention (HeLP-Diabetes) on the Psychological Well-Being of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Mixed-Method Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Megan; Dack, Charlotte; Barker, Chris; Murray, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This mixed-method study assessed the impact of an internet-based, self-management intervention (“HeLP-Diabetes”) on the psychological well-being of adults with type 2 diabetes. Nineteen participants were recruited from 3 general practices. Data were collected at baseline and at 6 weeks follow-up. Access to HeLP-Diabetes was associated with a significant decrease in participants' diabetes-related distress (Z = 2.04, p = 0.04, and d = 0.28). No significant differences were found in emotional distress or self-efficacy. The qualitative data found that participants reported improvements including increased self-efficacy and support, better management of low mood, greater diabetes awareness, and taking the condition more seriously. Participants also reported making improvements to their eating habits, exercise routine, and medical management. Some negative experiences associated with using the intervention were mentioned including feelings of guilt for not using the intervention as suggested or not making any behavioral changes, as well as technical and navigational frustrations with the intervention. Internet-based self-management interventions may have the potential to decrease diabetes-related distress in people with type 2 diabetes. The qualitative data also suggests internet interventions can positively impact both psychological and behavioural outcomes of adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26682226

  11. The Impact of an Internet-Based Self-Management Intervention (HeLP-Diabetes) on the Psychological Well-Being of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Mixed-Method Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Megan; Dack, Charlotte; Barker, Chris; Murray, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This mixed-method study assessed the impact of an internet-based, self-management intervention ("HeLP-Diabetes") on the psychological well-being of adults with type 2 diabetes. Nineteen participants were recruited from 3 general practices. Data were collected at baseline and at 6 weeks follow-up. Access to HeLP-Diabetes was associated with a significant decrease in participants' diabetes-related distress (Z = 2.04, p = 0.04, and d = 0.28). No significant differences were found in emotional distress or self-efficacy. The qualitative data found that participants reported improvements including increased self-efficacy and support, better management of low mood, greater diabetes awareness, and taking the condition more seriously. Participants also reported making improvements to their eating habits, exercise routine, and medical management. Some negative experiences associated with using the intervention were mentioned including feelings of guilt for not using the intervention as suggested or not making any behavioral changes, as well as technical and navigational frustrations with the intervention. Internet-based self-management interventions may have the potential to decrease diabetes-related distress in people with type 2 diabetes. The qualitative data also suggests internet interventions can positively impact both psychological and behavioural outcomes of adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26682226

  12. Data-Mining Technologies for Diabetes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Marinov, Miroslav; Mosa, Abu Saleh Mohammad; Yoo, Illhoi; Boren, Suzanne Austin

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to conduct a systematic review of applications of data-mining techniques in the field of diabetes research. Method We searched the MEDLINE database through PubMed. We initially identified 31 articles by the search, and selected 17 articles representing various data-mining methods used for diabetes research. Our main interest was to identify research goals, diabetes types, data sets, data-mining methods, data-mining software and technologies, and outcomes. Results The applications of data-mining techniques in the selected articles were useful for extracting valuable knowledge and generating new hypothesis for further scientific research/experimentation and improving health care for diabetes patients. The results could be used for both scientific research and real-life practice to improve the quality of health care diabetes patients. Conclusions Data mining has played an important role in diabetes research. Data mining would be a valuable asset for diabetes researchers because it can unearth hidden knowledge from a huge amount of diabetes-related data. We believe that data mining can significantly help diabetes research and ultimately improve the quality of health care for diabetes patients. PMID:22226277

  13. Influence of a family history of type 2 diabetes, demographic and clinical data on carotid intima-media thickness in patients with type 1 diabetes: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery is a surrogate end point of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Identifying the factors associated with a higher IMT may contribute to the identification of subjects with higher CVD risk. Our objective was to compare the common carotid IMT of type 1 diabetes patients to healthy control subjects. The secondary objective was to determine factors associated with a higher carotid IMT. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study between March 2009 and October 2013, comprising 127 type 1 diabetes patients and 125 control subjects matched by age, gender and body mass index (BMI). Carotid IMT was measured using semi-automated edge detection software. Results Type 1 diabetes patients had a higher median IMT compared with control subjects (0.538; IQR: 0.500-0.607 vs 0.513 mm; IQR: 0.481-0.557, respectively p?=?0.001). Women with type 1 diabetes had a higher median IMT difference compared to the control group (0.537; IQR: 0.495-0.596 vs 0.502 mm; IQR: 0.472-0.543, respectively p?=?0.003) than did men with type 1 diabetes (0.547; IQR: 0.504-0.613 vs 0.528 mm; IQR: 0.492-0.575, respectively p?=?0.2). Age and diabetes duration had an additive effect on the IMT of type 1 diabetes patients. Multivariate gamma regression model analysis showed that in type 1 diabetes patients, the IMT was associated with age (Exp (?)?=?1.006, p?diabetes (Exp (?)?=?1.004, p?=?0.001), BMI (Exp (?)?=?1.005, p?=?0.021), family history of type 2 diabetes (Exp (?)?=?1.044, p?=?0.033), total cholesterol (Exp (?)?=?0.999, p?=?0.001) and creatinine clearance (Exp (?)?=?1.000, p?=?0.043). Conclusions Patients with type 1 diabetes have increased IMT, a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. The CVD risk may be similar between men and women with type 1 diabetes, suggesting a loss of gender protection. Also, CVD risk may be higher in those with a family history of type 2 diabetes. Prospective studies are needed to confirm the predictive value of these findings and the causal effect between IMT and CVD in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:24886106

  14. Quantitative effect of glycaemic improvement on the components of diabetic dyslipidaemia: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Wägner, A M; Ordóñez-Llanos, J; Caixàs, A; Bonet, R; de Leiva, A; Pérez, A

    2005-04-01

    In order to assess the effect of glycaemic improvement on lipoprotein concentrations, we studied 73 type 2 diabetic subjects before (HbA1c 10.1 (6.2-16)%) and after (HbA1c 6.6 (3.8-8.0)%) glycaemic improvement. Total triglyceride and cholesterol (c), LDLc, HDLc, non-HDLc and apolipoproteins AI (apoAI) and B (apoB) were measured. Bivariate correlations and step-wise, multivariate analysis were performed to find predictors of change in the different components of diabetic dyslipidaemia. Changes in HDLc (r = -0.358, P = 0.001), apoAI (r = -0.355, P = 0.003), apoAI/apoB ratio (r = -0.333, P = 0.005), weight (r = -0.245, P = 0.046) and BMI (r = -0.253, P = 0.039) correlated with that of HbA1c, but, in multivariate analysis, only changes in HDLc, apoAI and apoAI/apoB ratio were predicted by the decrease in HbA1c. For the median observed change in HbA1c (-3.3 percentage-points), the estimated changes were +0.14 mmol/l, +0.12 g/l and +0.20 for HDLc, apoAI and apoAI/apoB ratio, respectively, accounting for 81, 92 and 80% of the observed changes. In conclusion, for the component of diabetic dyslipidaemia for which less therapeutic tools are available, glycaemic improvement is most effective. PMID:15811569

  15. Studies on the thymus of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice: effect of transgene expression.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, L A; Healey, D; Simpson, E; Chandler, P; Lund, T; Ritter, M A; Cooke, A

    1994-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a good model of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Autoreactive T cells may play a fundamental role in disease initiation in this model, while disregulation of such cells may result from an abnormal thymic microenvironment. Diabetes is prevented in NOD mice by direct introduction of an E alpha d transgene (NOD-E) or a modified I-A beta chain of NOD origin (NOD-PRO or NOD-ASP). To investigate if disease pathology in NOD mice, protection from disease in transgenic NOD-E and NOD-PRO and partial protection from disease in NOD-ASP can be attributed to alterations in the thymic microenvironment, immunohistochemical and flow cytometric analysis of the thymi of these mouse strains was studied. Thymi from NOD and NOD-E mice showed a progressive increase in thymic B-cell percentage from 12 weeks of age. This was accompanied by a concomitant loss in thymic epithelial cells with the appearance of large epithelial-free areas mainly at the corticomedullary junction, which increased in size and number with age and contained the B-cell clusters. Such thymic B cells did not express CD5 and were absent in CBA, NOD-ASP and NOD-PRO mice as were the epithelial cell-free spaces, even at 5 months of age. Therefore the mechanisms of disease protection in the transgenic NOD-E and NOD-ASP/NOD-PRO mice may differ if these thymic abnormalities are related to disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7523287

  16. Impact of Pay for Performance on Ethnic Disparities in Intermediate Outcomes for Diabetes: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Millett, Christopher; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Saxena, Sonia; Majeed, Azeem

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a major pay for performance incentive on trends in the quality of diabetes care in white, black, and South Asian ethnic groups in an urban setting in the U.K. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We developed longitudinal models examining the quality of diabetes care in a cohort of ethnically diverse patients in Southwest London using electronic family practice records. Outcome measures were mean blood pressure and A1C values between 2000 and 2005. RESULTS—The introduction of pay for performance was associated with reductions in mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which were significantly greater than those predicted by the underlying trend in the white (?5.8 and ?4.2 mmHg), black (?2.5 and ?2.4 mmHg), and South Asian (?5.5 and ?3.3 mmHg) groups. Reductions in A1C levels were significantly greater than those predicted by the underlying trend in the white group (?0.5%) but not in the black (?0.3%) or South Asian (?0.4%) groups. Ethnic group disparities in annual measurement of blood pressure and A1C were abolished before the introduction of pay for performance. CONCLUSIONS—The introduction of a pay for performance incentive in U.K. primary care was associated with improvements in the intermediate outcomes of diabetes care for all ethnic groups. However, the magnitude of improvement appeared to differ between ethnic groups, thus potentially widening existing disparities in care. Policy makers should consider the potential impacts of pay for performance incentives on health disparities when designing and evaluating such programs. PMID:19073759

  17. Medication adherence in HIV-positive patients with diabetes or hypertension: a focus group study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background People with HIV are living longer with potent antiretroviral therapy (ART), and HIV is increasingly complicated by other chronic medical comorbidities. The objective of this study was to explore HIV-positive patients’ perspectives on living with HIV and diabetes mellitus (DM) or hypertension (HTN) and factors affecting medication adherence. Methods We conducted six focus groups. Two investigators independently coded transcripts for thematic content using editing style analysis. Codes were grouped into conceptual themes using consensus process. Results Thirty-five HIV-positive patients with diabetes or hypertension participated. Four major themes emerged: (1) Comorbidities are a source of concern and frustration, sometimes eclipsing concern regarding HIV (2) Understanding of health conditions and medications promotes adherence, (3) Simpler regimens with fewer side effects promote adherence, and (4) Untreated substance abuse and mental health issues hinder adherence. Conclusions HIV-positive patients in this study voiced concern regarding medical comorbidities and highlighted patient understanding, regimen factors, and substance abuse/mental health issues as barriers to adherence. Addressing these issues may improve outcomes in the aging HIV-positive population. Adherence to medications among HIV-positive patients with DM or HTN may be influenced by providing targeted disease-specific education, simplifying regimens, and treatment of substance abuse/mental health issues. PMID:24274688

  18. Quality of life and type 1 diabetes: a study assessing patients’ perceptions and self-management needs

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Martel, Dácil; Velasco, Rebeca; Sánchez-Hernández, Rosa M; Carrillo, Armando; Nóvoa, Francisco Javier; Wägner, Ana María

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The main objective of this study was to assess quality of life (QoL) and treatment satisfaction in a group of patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and explore their needs regarding and their perception of QoL living with diabetes. Materials and methods Patients with type 1 diabetes attending the outpatient endocrinology clinics of a reference hospital were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study. Clinical and sociodemographic data were obtained (interview and clinical records), and diabetes-related QoL was assessed using a standardized questionnaire. In 67 participants, satisfaction with treatment was also assessed, and an open interview was performed, assessing the impact of diabetes, long-term worries, flexibility, restrictions, and self-perception of QoL. Descriptive statistical analysis, bivariate analysis, and multivariate analysis were performed in order to find factors associated with QoL. Interviews were analyzed and summarized questionwise. Results Mean patient age was 31.4±11.6 years, diabetes duration 14.2±9.3 years, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) 8.5%±1.9% (69±20.8 mmol/mol International Federation of Clinical Chemistry [IFCC]). The questionnaires showed good average QoL scores (94.6+22.9) and treatment satisfaction scores (25.7±6.7). QoL worsened with increasing HbA1c, female sex, severity of complications, and lower education (r2=0.283, P<0.005). In the open interview, 68.5% of the patients reported that diabetes had changed their lives, 83.5% identified complications as their most important long-term concern, and 59.7% said that they needed more training to manage the disease. Conclusion Poor glycemic control, lower education, complications, and female sex are associated with worse QoL. Semi-structured interviews identified aspects not included in the standardized questionnaires. PMID:26396503

  19. The Effects of Resveratrol in Rats with Simultaneous Type 2 Diabetes and Renal Hypertension: a Study of Antihypertensive Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mozafari, Masoud; Nekooeian, Ali Akbar; Panjeshahin, Mohammad Reza; Zare, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background Resveratrol has beneficial effects on cardiovascular system. This study aimed at examining antidiabetic and antihypertensive effects of resveratrol in rats with simultaneous type 2 diabetes and renal hypertension. Methods Eight groups (8-10 each) of male Spargue-Dawley rats, including a control, a diabetic (induced by streptozotocin and nicotinamide), a renal hypertensive (induced by placing plexiglas clips on the left renal arteries), a sham, a simultaneously hypertensive-diabetic receiving vehicle, and 3 simultaneous hypertensive-diabetic receiving resveratrol at 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg/day were used. Four weeks after the induction of diabetes, renal hypertension was induced and animals were given vehicle or resveratrol for the next four weeks. Afterwards, blood pressure and glucose, serum markers of oxidative stress were measured and animal’s aortic rings were used for isolated studies. Results Serum malondialdehyde, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, fasting blood glucose, maximal response and effective concentration 50 of phenylephrine, and inhibitory concentration 50 of acetylcholine of hypertensive-diabetic group receiving vehicle were significantly higher than those of the control group, and treatment with resveratrol caused significant reduction of these variables. Moreover, serum superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and maximal response to acetylcholine of hypertensive-diabetic group receiving vehicle were significantly lower than those of the control group, and treatment with resveratrol caused significant increase of these variables. Conclusion The findings indicate that resveratrol has antidiabetic and antihypertensive effects, which may be partly due to antioxidant mechanism. They also show that antihypertensive effect of resveratrol may be additionally mediated by improving the release of nitric oxide and sympathoplegic activities. PMID:25821295

  20. Dynamical systems study of chameleon scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Nandan; Banerjee, Narayan

    2015-05-01

    The present work is an extensive study of the viable stable solutions of chameleon scalar field models leading to possibilities of an accelerated expansion of the universe. It is found that for various combinations of the chameleon field potential V(?) and the coupling f(?) of the chameleon field with matter, a stable solution for an accelerated expansion is quite possible. The investigation provides a diagnostics for the stability criteria for all sorts of combinations of V(?) and f(?) .

  1. The Effects of Implementing the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups Criteria for Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes on Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tai-Ho; Hsieh, T’sang-T’ang

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2010, the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) recommended a new strategy for the screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). However, no study has indicated that adopting the IADPSG recommendations improves perinatal outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of implementing the IADPSG criteria for diagnosing GDM on maternal and neonatal outcomes. Methodology/Principal Findings Previously, we used a two-step approach (a 1-h, 50-g glucose challenge test followed by a 3-h, 100-g glucose tolerance test when indicated) to screen for and diagnose GDM. In July 2011, we adopted the IADPSG recommendations in our routine obstetric care. In this study, we retrospectively compared the rates of various maternal and neonatal outcomes in all women who delivered after 24 weeks of gestation during the periods before (P1, between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010) and after (P2, between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2013) the IADPSG criteria were implemented. Pregnancies complicated by multiple gestations, fetal chromosomal or structural anomalies, and pre-pregnancy diabetes mellitus were excluded. Our results showed that the incidence of GDM increased from 4.6% using the two-step method to 12.4% using the IADPSG criteria. Compared to the women in P1, the women in P2 experienced less weight gain during pregnancy, lower birth weights, shorter labor courses, and lower rates of macrosomia (<4000 g) and large-for-gestational age (LGA) infants. P2 was a significant independent factor against macrosomia (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.43–0.90) and LGA (adjusted OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.61–0.89) after multivariable logistic regression analysis. Conclusions/Significance The adoption of the IADPSG criteria for diagnosis of GDM was associated with significant reductions in maternal weight gain during pregnancy, birth weights, and the rates of macrosomia and LGA. PMID:25756838

  2. Social distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related risk factors in Barbados: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Howitt, Christina; Hambleton, Ian R; Rose, Angela M C; Hennis, Anselm; Samuels, T Alafia; George, Kenneth S; Unwin, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related behavioural and biological risk factors in adults in Barbados by gender, education and occupation. Design Multistage probability sampling was used to select a representative sample of the adult population (?25?years). Participants were interviewed using standard questionnaires, underwent anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, and provided fasting blood for glucose and cholesterol measurements. Standard WHO definitions were used. Data were weighted for sampling and non-response, and were age and sex standardised to the 2010 Barbados population. Weighted prevalence estimates were calculated, and prevalence ratios were calculated for behavioural and biological risk factors by demographic and socioeconomic group. Results Study response rate was 55.0%, with 764 women, 470 men. Prevalence of obesity was 33.8% (95% CI 30.7% to 37.1%); hypertension 40.6% (95% CI 36.5% to 44.9%); and diabetes 18.7% (95% CI 16.2% to 21.4%). Compared with women, men were less likely to be obese (prevalence ratio 0.5; 95% CI 0.4 to 0.7), or physically inactive (0.5; 0.4 to 0.6), but more likely to smoke tobacco (4.1; 2.5 to 6.7) and consume large amounts of alcohol in a single episode (4.6; 2.7 to 7.6). Both diabetes (0.83; 0.65 to 1.05) and hypertension (0.89; 0.79 to 1.02) were lower in men, but not significantly so. In women, higher educational level was related to higher fruit and vegetable intake, more physical activity, less diabetes and less hypercholesterolaemia (p 0.01–0.04). In men, higher education was related only to less smoking (p 0.04). Differences by occupation were limited to smoking in men and hypercholesterolaemia in women. Conclusions In this developing country population, sex appears to be a much stronger determinant of behavioural risk factors, as well as obesity and its related risks, than education or occupation. These findings have implications for meeting the commitments made in the 2011 Rio Political Declaration, to eliminate health inequities. PMID:26685026

  3. Hyperglycaemia Enhances Nitric Oxide Production in Diabetes: A Study from South Indian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Adela, Ramu; Nethi, Susheel Kumar; Bagul, Pankaj K.; Barui, Ayan K.; Mattapally, Saidulu; Kuncha, Madhusudan; Patra, Chitta R.; Reddy, P. Naveen Chander; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2015-01-01

    Background We have previously reported that increased glucose levels were associated with higher serum nitric oxide (NO) levels in fructose-fed insulin resistant rats. However, the relationship between hyperglycemia and serum NO level was not clear. Therefore, the present study was designed to find the association between hyperglycemia and serum NO levels in Type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients and T2DM with cardiovascular complication. Methods Endothelial cells (HUVEC) were treated with of D-glucose (10-100mM), and NO levels and NOS gene expression was measured. Hyperglycaemia was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats, and serum NO levels were measured after 8 weeks. For clinical evaluation, five groups of patients were recruited: Control (CT, n=48), Type 2 diabetes (T2DM, n=26), T2DM with hypertension (DMHT, n=46), Coronary artery diseases (CAD, n=29) and T2DM with coronary artery diseases (DMCD, n=38). NO (nitrite + nitrate) levels were measured from human serum. Results We found a significant (p<0.05) and dose-dependent increase in NO levels in HUVEC cells after 4 hours of high glucose exposure. eNOS and iNOS gene expression was increased in HUVEC cells after different concentrations and time periods of glucose treatment. We also observed significant (149.1±25?M, p<0.01) increase in serum NO levels in hyperglycaemic rats compared to control (76.6±13.2?M). Serum NO level was significantly higher in T2DM (111.8 ?M (81.7-122.4), p<0.001) and DMCD patients ((129.4 ?M (121.2-143.5), p <0.001) but not in CAD patients (76.4 ?M (70.5-87)), as compared to control (68.2 ?M (56.4-82.3)). We found significantly lower NO levels (83.5 ?M (60.5-122.9)) in subjects suffering from diabetes since more than 5 years, compared to subjects (115.3 ?M (75.2-127.1), p<0.001) with less than 5 years. Conclusion In conclusion, high NO levels were observed in South Indian diabetic patients. Higher glucose levels in serum might be responsible for activation of endothelial cells to enhance NO levels. PMID:25894234

  4. The Medicine Wheel Nutrition Intervention: A Diabetes Education Study with the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Kibbe; Ren, Cuirong

    2009-01-01

    Objective The Northern Plains Indians of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe (CRST) have experienced significant lifestyle and dietary changes over the past seven generations that have resulted in increased rates of diabetes and obesity. The objective of this study was to determine if Northern Plains Indians with type 2 diabetes mellitus who are randomized to receive culturally adapted educational lessons based on the Medicine Wheel Model for Nutrition in addition to their usual dietary education will have better control of their type 2 diabetes than a non-intervention, usual care group who received only the usual dietary education from their personal providers. Design A 6-month, randomized, controlled trial was conducted January 2005–December 2005, with participants randomized to Education (ED) intervention or Usual Care (UC) control group. ED received six nutrition lessons based on the Medicine Wheel Model for Nutrition. UC received the usual dietary education from their personal providers. Participants 114 Northern Plains Indians from Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe aged 18 to 65, with type 2 diabetes. Methods Weight, body mass index (BMI), hemoglobin A1C, fasting serum glucose and lipid parameters, circulating insulin, and blood pressure were measured at the beginning and completion. Diet histories, physical activity and dietary satiety surveys were measured at baseline and monthly through completion. Differences were determined using Students t-tests, chi-square, and analysis of variance. Results The ED group had a significant weight loss ( 1.4 ± 0.4 kg, mean ± standard error {SE}, P ? .05) and decrease in BMI (1.0 ± 0.1 means ± SE, P ? .05) from baseline to completion. The UC group had no change in weight (0.5 ± 0.5 kg, mean ± SE) or BMI (0.5 ± 0.2, mean ± SE). There were no between group differences due to intervention in calorie, carbohydrate, protein, and fat intake and physical activity. Conclusions The culturally based nutrition intervention promoted small but positive changes in weight. Greater frequency and longer duration of educational support may be needed to influence blood glucose and lipid parameters. PMID:19699832

  5. High-serum carotenoids associated with lower risk for developing type 2 diabetes among Japanese subjects: Mikkabi cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Minoru; Nakamura, Mieko; Ogawa, Kazunori; Ikoma, Yoshinori; Yano, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent epidemiological studies show the association of antioxidant carotenoids with type 2 diabetes, but thorough longitudinal cohort studies regarding this association have not been well conducted. The objective of this study was to investigate longitudinally whether serum carotenoids are associated with the risk for developing type 2 diabetes among Japanese subjects. Research design and methods We conducted a follow-up study on 1073 males and females aged 30–79?years at the baseline from the Mikkabi prospective cohort study. Those who participated in the baseline and completed follow-up surveys were examined longitudinally. Over the 10-year period, 910 subjects (295 males and 615 females) took part in the follow-up survey at least one time. A cohort of 264 males and 600 females free of diabetes at baseline was studied. Results Over a mean follow-up period of 7.8?years (SD=2.9), 22 males and 33 females developed new type 2 diabetes. After adjustments for confounders, the HRs for type 2 diabetes in the highest tertiles of serum ?-carotene, ?-cryptoxanthin, and total provitamin A carotenoids against the lowest tertiles were 0.35 (95% CI 0.15 to 0.82), 0.43 (CI 0.20 to 0.92) and 0.41 (CI 0.19 to 0.90), respectively. For ?-carotene and zeaxanthin, borderline reduced risks were also observed, but these were not significant. Conclusions Our results further support the hypothesis that eating a diet rich in carotenoids, especially provitamin A carotenoids, might help prevent the development of type 2 diabetes in Japanese patients. Trial registration number NIFT-2013001. PMID:26688736

  6. Work Disability among Employees with Diabetes: Latent Class Analysis of Risk Factors in Three Prospective Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, Marianna; Vahtera, Jussi; Head, Jenny; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Okuloff, Annaleena; Tabak, Adam G.; Goldberg, Marcel; Ervasti, Jenni; Jokela, Markus; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Pentti, Jaana; Zins, Marie; Kivimäki, Mika

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies of work disability in diabetes have examined diabetes as a homogeneous disease. We sought to identify subgroups among persons with diabetes based on potential risk factors for work disability. Methods Participants were 2,445 employees with diabetes from three prospective cohorts (the Finnish Public Sector study, the GAZEL study, and the Whitehall II study). Work disability was ascertained via linkage to registers of sickness absence and disability pensions during a follow-up of 4 years. Study-specific latent class analysis was used to identify subgroups according to prevalent comorbid disease and health-risk behaviours. Study-specific associations with work disability at follow-up were pooled using fixed-effects meta-analysis. Results Separate latent class analyses for men and women in each cohort supported a two-class solution with one subgroup (total n = 1,086; 44.4%) having high prevalence of chronic somatic diseases, psychological symptoms, obesity, physical inactivity and abstinence from alcohol and the other subgroup (total n = 1,359; 55.6%) low prevalence of these factors. In the adjusted meta-analyses, participants in the ‘high-risk’ group had more work disability days (pooled rate ratio = 1.66, 95% CI 1.38–1.99) and more work disability episodes (pooled rate ratio = 1.33, 95% CI 1.21–1.46). These associations were similar in men and women, younger and older participants, and across occupational groups. Conclusions Diabetes is not a homogeneous disease in terms of work disability risk. Approximately half of people with diabetes are assigned to a subgroup characterised by clustering of comorbid health conditions, obesity, physical inactivity, abstinence of alcohol, and associated high risk of work disability; the other half to a subgroup characterised by a more favourable risk profile. PMID:26569491

  7. Dynamic Light Scattering of Diabetic Vitreopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sebag, J.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Dunker, Stephan; Suh, Kwang I.

    1999-01-01

    Diabetes induces pathology throughout the body via nonenzymatic glycation of proteins. Vitreous, which is replete with type 11 collagen, undergoes significant changes in diabetes. The resultant diabetic vitreopathy plays an important role in diabetic retinopathy. Detecting these molecular changes could provide insight into diabetic eye disease as well as molecular effects elsewhere in the body. Human eyes were obtained at autopsy and studied in the fresh, unfixed state. Sclera, choroid, and retina were dissected off the vitreous for dark-field slit microscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS). For the former, the entire vitreous was exposed. For the latter, only a window at the equator was dissected in some specimens, and the anterior segment was removed leaving the posterior lens capsule intact in others. DLS was performed to determine particle sizes at multiple sites 0.5 mm apart, spanning the globe at the equator (window dissections) and along the antero-posterior axis. Dark-field slit microscopy in diabetic subjects detected findings typical of age-related vitreous degeneration, but at much younger ages than nondiabetic controls. Noninvasive DLS measurements found a greater heterogeneity and larger particle sizes in vitreous of subjects with diabetes as compared to age-matched controls. DLS can detect and quantify the early molecular effects that cause vitreous collagen fibrils to cross-link and aggregate. This could provide valuable insight into ocular and systemic effects of hyperglycemia, because the molecular changes in diabetic vitreopathy could serve as an index of such effects throughout the body. In addition to the diagnostic implications, this methodology could provide a rapid, reproducible way to monitor the response to therapy with novel agents intended to prevent the complications of diabetes on a molecular level.

  8. Anthropometry and physical fitness in individuals with family history of type-2 diabetes mellitus: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Padaki, Samata; Vijayakrishna, K.; Dambal, Amrut; Ankad, Roopa; Manjula, R.; Surekharani, Chinagudi; Herur, Anita; Patil, Shailaja

    2011-01-01

    Context: The risk of becoming a diabetic for an individual with a positive family history of diabetes increases by two- to fourfold. Aim: To record the anthropometric indices and the physical fitness in individuals with family history of type-2 diabetes mellitus and compare these results with those of controls. Settings and Design: This is a comparative study done in the department of physiology. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two apparently healthy medical students with family history of type-2 Diabetes Mellitus were chosen for the study and matched with equal number of controls. Anthropometric measurements (height, weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, thigh circumference, upper segment and lower segment) were recorded. Body mass index (BMI), waist–hip ratio (WHR), waist–thigh ratio (WTR), and upper to lower segment ratio (US/LS ratio) were calculated. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured. Physical fitness was evaluated using Queen's College step test protocol. Rate Pressure Product (RPP) and Physical Fitness Index (PFI) were calculated before and after exercise. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. Results: BMI, WHR, US/LS ratio, and RPP at rest were significantly higher (P < 0.05), whereas WTR, PFI, and RPP after exercise lower (P > 0.05) in cases as compared to controls. Conclusions: It can be concluded that apparently healthy individuals with family history of type-2 diabetes mellitus have higher anthropometric values and lower physical fitness than the controls. PMID:22029005

  9. The role of collective efficacy in exercise adherence: a qualitative study of spousal support and type 2 diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Beverly, Elizabeth A; Wray, Linda A

    2010-04-01

    Adhering to increased exercise is often reported as one of the greatest challenges facing adults living with diabetes, a perception shared by the married middle-aged and older adults living with diabetes who participated in this study. Understanding how that challenge can best be met is both research and program relevant. Drawing on the social cognitive theory and social support literature, this qualitative study explored the powerful couple relationship in Type 2 diabetes management. The overarching goal of this paper was to illuminate the potentially key role of collective efficacy in exercise adherence in order to develop and test interventions that provide more effective supports for adults living with diabetes. Analyses revealed three core themes used by the couples to describe their perceived beliefs: 'Collective support', 'Collective motivation' and 'Collective responsibility'. Our findings provide insights regarding how collective beliefs of spousal support may influence the adoption and maintenance of an exercise program. As health educators look for approaches to improve exercise adherence in diabetes management, it is important to understand how couples can be empowered to assume responsibility for their management. PMID:18559399

  10. The role of collective efficacy in exercise adherence: a qualitative study of spousal support and Type 2 diabetes management

    PubMed Central

    Beverly, Elizabeth A.; Wray, Linda A.

    2010-01-01

    Adhering to increased exercise is often reported as one of the greatest challenges facing adults living with diabetes, a perception shared by the married middle-aged and older adults living with diabetes who participated in this study. Understanding how that challenge can best be met is both research and program relevant. Drawing on the social cognitive theory and social support literature, this qualitative study explored the powerful couple relationship in Type 2 diabetes management. The overarching goal of this paper was to illuminate the potentially key role of collective efficacy in exercise adherence in order to develop and test interventions that provide more effective supports for adults living with diabetes. Analyses revealed three core themes used by the couples to describe their perceived beliefs: ‘Collective support’, ‘Collective motivation’ and ‘Collective responsibility’. Our findings provide insights regarding how collective beliefs of spousal support may influence the adoption and maintenance of an exercise program. As health educators look for approaches to improve exercise adherence in diabetes management, it is important to understand how couples can be empowered to assume responsibility for their management. PMID:18559399

  11. Elevations in markers of liver injury and risk of type 2 diabetes: the insulin resistance atherosclerosis study.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Anthony J G; Williams, Ken; Festa, Andreas; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Kempf, Judy; Zinman, Bernard; Haffner, Steven M

    2004-10-01

    A limited number of studies have reported associations of markers of liver injury, including elevated concentrations of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), with prospective risk of type 2 diabetes. However, only one study has adjusted for a detailed measure of insulin sensitivity (insulin sensitivity index [S(i)]), which is important given associations of obesity and S(i) with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Our objective was to investigate the associations of elevated AST and ALT with incident type 2 diabetes among 906 participants in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study who were nondiabetic at baseline. S(i) and acute insulin response (AIR) were measured directly from the frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test among black, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic white participants aged 40-69 years. After 5.2 years, 148 individuals had developed type 2 diabetes. Baseline AST and ALT were positively correlated with fasting insulin (r = 0.22 and r = 0.35, respectively), waist circumference (r = 0.18 and r = 0.34), and fasting glucose (r = 0.13 and r = 0.29) and inversely with S(i) (r = -0.18 and r = -0.30; all P < 0.0001). In separate logistic regression models adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, clinical center, and alcohol consumption, participants in the highest quartiles (Q4) of AST and ALT were at significantly increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes compared with those in the lowest three quartiles (Q1-Q3): AST: odds ratio (OR) 1.73 (95% CI 1.17-2.57); ALT: OR 2.32 (1.36-3.75). After further adjustment for smoking, waist circumference, triglyceride, HDL, impaired glucose tolerance, S(i), and AIR, both AST and ALT remained significantly associated with incident type 2 diabetes: AST, Q4 vs. Q1-Q3: OR 1.98 (1.23-3.17); ALT, Q4 vs. Q1-Q3: OR 2.00 (1.22-3.28). There were no interactions of sex, ethnicity, obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, or S(i) with AST or ALT in the prediction of type 2 diabetes. When entered into the same model with adjustment for demographic variables, both C-reactive protein and ALT independently predicted type 2 diabetes. In addition, AST and ALT were positively associated with incident type 2 diabetes after excluding former and moderate to heavy drinkers. In conclusion, AST and ALT independently predict type 2 diabetes. Baseline elevations of these markers may reflect NAFLD or related pathologies. PMID:15448093

  12. Evaluation of Genome Wide Association Study Associated Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Loci in Sub Saharan Africans

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Bentley, Amy R.; Chen, Guanjie; Huang, Hanxia; Zhou, Jie; Shriner, Daniel; Fasanmade, Olufemi; Okafor, Godfrey; Eghan, Benjamin; Agyenim-Boateng, Kofi; Adeleye, Jokotade; Balogun, Williams; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Owusu, Samuel; Amoah, Albert; Acheampong, Joseph; Johnson, Thomas; Oli, Johnnie; Adebamowo, Clement; Collins, Francis; Dunston, Georgia; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for type 2 diabetes (T2D) undertaken in European and Asian ancestry populations have yielded dozens of robustly associated loci. However, the genomics of T2D remains largely understudied in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where rates of T2D are increasing dramatically and where the environmental background is quite different than in these previous studies. Here, we evaluate 106 reported T2D GWAS loci in continental Africans. We tested each of these SNPs, and SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with these index SNPs, for an association with T2D in order to assess transferability and to fine map the loci leveraging the generally reduced LD of African genomes. The study included 1775 unrelated Africans (1035 T2D cases, 740 controls; mean age 54 years; 59% female) enrolled in Nigeria, Ghana, and Kenya as part of the Africa America Diabetes Mellitus (AADM) study. All samples were genotyped on the Affymetrix Axiom PanAFR SNP array. Forty-one of the tested loci showed transferability to this African sample (p < 0.05, same direction of effect), 11 at the exact reported SNP and 30 others at SNPs in LD with the reported SNP (after adjustment for the number of tested SNPs). TCF7L2 SNP rs7903146 was the most significant locus in this study (p = 1.61 × 10?8). Most of the loci that showed transferability were successfully fine-mapped, i.e., localized to smaller haplotypes than in the original reports. The findings indicate that the genetic architecture of T2D in SSA is characterized by several risk loci shared with non-African ancestral populations and that data from African populations may facilitate fine mapping of risk loci. The study provides an important resource for meta-analysis of African ancestry populations and transferability of novel loci. PMID:26635871

  13. Facebook as a platform for health information and communication: a case study of a diabetes group.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; He, Dan; Sang, Yoonmo

    2013-06-01

    As one of the largest social networking sites in the world, Facebook holds a great potential for promoting health. In this exploratory study, we analyzed 1352 messages posted to an active Facebook diabetes group to identify the characteristics of the group. The results revealed that the group was international in nature. Users overcame language barriers to communicate with people with similar conditions. Users' interactions were structured around information, emotion, and community building. They exchanged medical and lifestyle information, and highly valued their peers' personal experiences, opinions, and advice. They also demonstrated a positive attitude toward the reality of living with diabetes and generously provided encouragements and affirmations to one another. Great efforts were made to maintain the proper operation of the community by the administrator and a group of core members. As a result, the group was shaped as a social network where peer users share social support, cultivate companionship, and exert social influence. Based on the results, we discussed future directions for research of health communities in a highly connected world. PMID:23588823

  14. Noninvasive assessment of diabetic foot ulcers with diffuse photon density wave methodology: pilot human study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazoglou, Elisabeth S.; Neidrauer, Michael; Zubkov, Leonid; Weingarten, Michael S.; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2009-11-01

    A pilot human study is conducted to evaluate the potential of using diffuse photon density wave (DPDW) methodology at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths (685 to 830 nm) to monitor changes in tissue hemoglobin concentration in diabetic foot ulcers. Hemoglobin concentration is measured by DPDW in 12 human wounds for a period ranging from 10 to 61 weeks. In all wounds that healed completely, gradual decreases in optical absorption coefficient, oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, and total hemoglobin concentration are observed between the first and last measurements. In nonhealing wounds, the rates of change of these properties are nearly zero or slightly positive, and a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) is observed in the rates of change between healing and nonhealing wounds. Differences in the variability of DPDW measurements over time are observed between healing and nonhealing wounds, and this variance may also be a useful indicator of nonhealing wounds. Our results demonstrate that DPDW methodology with a frequency domain NIR device can differentiate healing from nonhealing diabetic foot ulcers, and indicate that it may have clinical utility in the evaluation of wound healing potential.

  15. Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) in Type 2 Diabetes: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Aung, Eindra; Ostini, Remo; Dower, Jo; Donald, Maria; Coll, Joseph R; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A R

    2014-11-01

    The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) was designed to measure care congruent with several elements of the chronic care model (CCM), including self-management support and delivery system design. However, support for the a priori 5-subscale structure of the PACIC in previous research has been conflicting. Thus, we aim to investigate psychometric characteristics of the PACIC including the content and stability of its construct over time. A population-based prospective cohort study of patients with type 2 diabetes was conducted in Queensland, Australia, from 2008 (N = 3,761) to 2010 (N = 3,040). Participants completed annually the 20-item PACIC as well as measures of providers' adherence to guideline-recommended self-management support activities. We used exploratory factor analysis to determine its factor structure and examined internal consistency as well as agreement between the PACIC at baseline with repeated measurements at follow-up after 1 and 2 years. We also determined a criterion-related validity using multinomial logistic regression to explore PACIC's association with providers' self-management support. A one-factor structure was deemed optimal according to our findings. High internal consistency and moderate agreement within the scales over time were observed. Higher PACIC scores predicted better providers' self-management support. In conclusion, the PACIC is a reliable, valid, and reproducible instrument for assessment of diabetes care, and we recommend its promotion and use as a single scale rather than subscales as originally proposed. PMID:25380699

  16. An Empowerment Approach for Elders Living With Diabetes: A Pilot Study of a Community-Based Self-Help Group--the Diabetes Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn A.; George, Lori

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a disabling, deadly disease, affecting one in five of adults over 65. Unfortunately, for the few elders that receive diabetes self-care training it is often taught using traditional didactic methods that are insensitive to their unique needs and immersed in the traditional medical paradigm. Integrating diabetes self-care into…

  17. Usage of the www.2aida.org AIDA diabetes software Website: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Eldon D

    2003-01-01

    AIDA is a diabetes-computing program freely available from www.2aida.org on the Web. The software is intended to serve as an educational support tool, and can be used by anyone who has an interest in diabetes, whether they be patients, relatives, health-care professionals, or students. In previous "Diabetes Information Technology & WebWatch" columns various indicators of usage of the AIDA program have been reviewed, and various comments from users of the software have been documented. One aspect of AIDA, though, that has been of considerable interest has been to investigate its Web-based distribution as a wider paradigm for more general medically related usage of the Internet. In this respect we have been keen to understand in general terms: (1) why people are turning to the Web for health-care/diabetes information; (2) more specifically, what sort of people are making use of the AIDA software; and (3) what benefits they feel might accrue from using the program. To answer these types of questions we have been conducting a series of audits/surveys via the AIDA Website, and via the software program itself, to learn as much as possible about who the AIDA end users really are. The rationale for this work is that, in this way, it should be possible to improve the program as well as tailor future versions of the software to the interests and needs of its users. However, a recurring observation is that data collection is easiest if it is as unobtrusive and innocuous as possible. One aspect of learning as much as possible about diabetes Website visitors and users may be to apply techniques that do not necessitate any visitor or user interaction. There are various programs that can monitor what pages visitors are viewing at a site. As these programs do not require visitors to do anything special, over time some interesting insights into Website usage may be obtained. For the current study we have reviewed anonymous logstats data, which are automatically collected at many Websites, to try and establish a baseline level of usage for the AIDA site. For the initial pilot study the analysis was performed from October 1, 2000 to November 1, 2001. The study has yielded an interesting insight into how the AIDA Website is being used. The results also confirm those of previous audits based on different self-reported methodologies, confirming, amongst other things, what countries people are visiting from and what operating systems/computers they are using. These analyses have been informative and useful. Given this, it is proposed to repeat the current pilot survey approach on a routine basis, in the future, as a way of monitoring on-going usage of the AIDA Website. PMID:12725710

  18. Digital Technology, Diabetes and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities: A Case Study with Elderly Women from the Vietnamese Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mara, Ben; Gill, Gurjeet K.; Babacan, Hurriyet; Donahoo, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To report the processes and outcomes of a case study on digital technology, diabetes and culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities. Design: The qualitative study was based on a literature review, consultations and testing of a framework through workshops and an interactive information session. Setting: Consultations,…

  19. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder caused ...

  20. Diabetes Insipidus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Disease Organizations?? . (PDF, 345 KB)????? Alternate Language URL Diabetes Insipidus Page Content On this page: What is ... diagnosed? Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare disease ...

  1. Diabetes Myths

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Diabetes Myths There are many myths about diabetes that ... book-power-of-food-sticky.html More from diabetes.org Learn More: Special Book Promotion: Behind the ...

  2. Gestational diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar ( diabetes ) that starts or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. ... woman's blood. You are at greater risk for gestational diabetes if you: Are older than 25 when you ...

  3. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends on your type of diabetes, ... pills. Combination pills contain two kinds of diabetes medicine in one tablet. Some people take pills and ...

  4. Diabetic ketoacidosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diabetic ketoacidosis is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. ... in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of ...

  5. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by the American Academy of Family Physicians in cooperation with the American Diabetes Association. Symptoms What are ... men) and vaginal dryness (in women) Causes & Risk Factors What causes diabetic neuropathy? Diabetes causes the level ...

  6. The burden of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in India using the ADA 1997 criteria: prevalence of diabetes in India study (PODIS).

    PubMed

    Sadikot, S M; Nigam, A; Das, S; Bajaj, S; Zargar, A H; Prasannakumar, K M; Sosale, A; Munichoodappa, C; Seshiah, V; Singh, S K; Jamal, A; Sai, K; Sadasivrao, Y; Murthy, S S; Hazra, D K; Jain, S; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhay, S; Sinha, N K; Mishra, R; Dora, M; Jena, B; Patra, P; Goenka, K

    2004-12-01

    This random multistage cross sectional population survey was undertaken to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and impaired fasting glycemia/glucose (IFG) in subjects aged 25 years and above in India. The study was carried out in 108 centers (49 urban and 59 rural) to reflect the size and heterogeneity of the Indian population. 41,270 (20,534 males and 20,736 females) subjects were studied. 21,516 (10,865 males and 10,651 females) were from urban areas and 19,754 (9669 males and 10,085 females) from rural areas. Blood samples were taken after a fast of 10-12h and the subjects were categorized as having IFG or DM using the 1997 American Diabetes Association criteria. The age and gender standardized prevalence rate for DM and IFG in the total Indian population was 3.3 and 3.6% respectively (P < 0.001). The standardized prevalence of DM and IFG in urban areas was significantly higher than that for the rural population (urban DM prevalence 4.6% versus rural DM prevalence 1.9%, P < 0.001; urban IFG prevalence 4.8% versus rural IFG prevalence 2.5%, P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence between DM (4.6%) and IFG (4.8%) in the urban population. The rural prevalence of IFG (2.5%) was significantly (P <0.001) more than the rural prevalence of DM (1.9%). Type 2 diabetes is a major health problem is India. PMID:15536027

  7. Are statin trials in diabetes representative of real-world diabetes care: a population-based study on statin initiators in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Ruokoniemi, Päivi; Sund, Reijo; Arffman, Martti; Helin-Salmivaara, Arja; Huupponen, Risto; Keskimäki, Ilmo; Vehko, Tuulikki; Korhonen, Maarit Jaana

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the representativeness of the Heart Protection Study (HPS) and the Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS) for incident statin users. Design A population-based analysis with linked register data. Setting Finland. Population 56?963 patients with diabetes initiating statin use from 2005 to 2008. Main outcome measures We determined the proportions of real-world patients who fulfilled the eligibility criteria for HPS and CARDS trials and assessed the cardiovascular disease (CVD) event rates, assumed to reflect the background CVD risk, for those eligible and ineligible. We used descriptive statistics to identify the patient characteristics, lipid-lowering interventions and adherence to statin therapy. Results Of the real-world patients, 57% (N=32?582) fulfilled the eligibility criteria for HPS (DM) and 49% (N=20?499) of those without CVD for CARDS. The patients ineligible for HPS (DM) had a higher cumulative risk for CVD events than those eligible, whereas regarding CARDS the cumulative risks were of similar magnitude. The overall CVD event rates seemed to be comparable to those in the reviewed trials. Both trials were under-representative of women and users of antihypertensive agents and metformin. 27% and 29% of real-world patients had an initial statin dose corresponding to <20?mg of simvastatin. The proportions of patients who were deemed adherent were 57% in the real world and 85% in both trials. Conclusions Only half of the real-world patients would have qualified for the HPS (DM) and CARDS, limiting their representativeness for clinical practice. Women and users of antihypertensive agents and metformin were under-represented in both trials. These deviations reflect the changes in diabetes treatment over the years and are not expected to modify the average treatment effects of statins on CVD. Prescribing of lower statin doses in clinical practice than used in the trials and lower adherence may, however, attenuate the benefits in the real world. PMID:24948750

  8. Determining adult type 2 diabetes-related health care needs in an indigenous population from rural Guatemala: a mixed-methods preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Guatemala, diabetes is an emerging public health concern. Guatemala has one of the largest indigenous populations in Latin America, and this population frequently does not access the formal health care system. Therefore, knowledge about the emergence of diabetes in this population is limited. Methods Interview participants (n=23) were recruited from a convenience sample of indigenous adults with type 2 diabetes at one rural diabetes clinic in Guatemala. A structured interview was used to assess knowledge about diabetes and its complications; access to diabetes-related health care and treatment; dietary and lifestyle changes; and family and social supports for individuals living with diabetes. Interviews were supplemented with two group interviews with community leaders and health care providers. Thematic analysis was used to produce insights into diabetes knowledge, attitudes, and practices. In addition, a chart review of the clinic’s electronic medical record identified all adult patients (n=80) presenting in one calendar year for a first-time diabetic consultation. Sociodemographic and clinical variables were extracted and summarized from these records. Results Salient demographic factors in both the structured interview and chart review samples included low educational levels and high indigenous language preference. In the interview sample, major gaps in biomedical knowledge about diabetes included understanding the causes, chronicity, and long-term end-organ complications of diabetes. Medication costs, medical pluralism, and limited social supports for dietary and lifestyles changes were major practical barriers to disease management. Quantitative data from medical records review revealed high rates of poor glycemic control, overweight and obesity, and medication prescription. Conclusions This study provides a preliminary sketch of type 2 diabetes in an indigenous Guatemalan population. Combined qualitative and quantitative data point towards particular needs for implementation and future research, including the need to address gaps in diabetes knowledge, to improve social support systems, and to address the cost barriers associated with disease treatment. PMID:23260013

  9. Pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes: lessons from natural history studies of high-risk individuals

    PubMed Central

    Nokoff, Natalie; Rewers, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by known genetic risk factors with T cell–mediated infiltration and destruction of the beta cells within pancreatic islets. Autoantibodies are the most significant preclinical marker of T1D, and birth cohort studies have provided important insights into the natural history of autoimmunity and T1D. While HLA remains the strongest genetic risk factor, a number of novel gene variants associated with T1D have been found through genome-wide studies, some of which have been linked to suspected environmental risk factors. Multiple environmental factors that have been suggested to play a role in the development of T1D await confirmation. Current risk-stratification models for T1D take into account genetic risk factors and autoantibodies. In the future, metabolic profiles, epigenetics, as well as environmental risk factors may be included in such models. PMID:23360422

  10. Midcourse correction to a clinical trial when the event rate is underestimated: The Look AHEAD (Action of health in diabetes) study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) Study is a long-term clinical trial that aims to determine the cardiovascular disease (CVD) benefits of an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) in obese adults with type 2 diabetes. The study was designed to have 90% statistical power to detect an 18%...

  11. Studies on the Antidiabetic Activities of Cordyceps militaris Extract in Diet-Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuan; Jing, Tianjiao; Meng, Qingfan; Liu, Chungang; Hu, Shuang; Ma, Yihang; Liu, Yan; Lu, Jiahui; Cheng, Yingkun; Teng, Lirong

    2014-01-01

    Due to substantial morbidity and high complications, diabetes mellitus is considered as the third “killer” in the world. A search for alternative antidiabetic drugs from herbs or fungi is highly demanded. Our present study aims to investigate the antidiabetic activities of Cordyceps militaris on diet-streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus in rats. Diabetic rats were orally administered with water extract or alcohol extract at 0.05?g/kg and 2?g/kg for 3 weeks, and then, the factors levels related to blood glucose, lipid, free radicals, and even nephropathy were determined. Pathological alterations on liver and kidney were examined. Data showed that, similar to metformin, Cordyceps militaris extracts displayed a significant reduction in blood glucose levels by promoting glucose metabolism and strongly suppressed total cholesterol and triglycerides concentration in serum. Cordyceps militaris extracts exhibit antioxidative effects indicated by normalized superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase levels. The inhibitory effects on blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, uric acid, and protein revealed the protection of Cordyceps militaris extracts against diabetic nephropathy, which was confirmed by pathological morphology reversion. Collectively, Cordyceps militaris extract, a safe pharmaceutical agent, presents excellent antidiabetic and antinephropathic activities and thus has great potential as a new source for diabetes treatment. PMID:24738047

  12. Serum cytokine, chemokine and hormone levels in Saudi adults with pre-diabetes: a one-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Al-Ajlan, Abdulrahman SM; Alfawaz, Hanan; Yakout, Sobhy M; Aljohani, Naji; Kumar, Sudhesh; Alokail, Majed S

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5-10% of subjects with pre-diabetes eventually progress to diabetes every year. While inflammation is thought to be involved in the development of obesity-related type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the relation between inflammation and pre-diabetes remains largely unexplored. In this study we examined a comprehensive panel of 10 serum biomarkers involved in overweight and obese subjects with pre-diabetes. A total of 98 subjects (23 males, 75 females) were advised to reduce total intake of fat, increase fiber intake and physical activity. Serum cytokines, MCP and other hormones were assessed by multiplex cytokine profiling. Results show that CRP, IL-6, leptin, IL-10, MCP, resistin, serpin, and TNF-? were significantly lower after 12-months than baseline. Serum concentrations of other adipocytokines, including adipsin and leptin were modestly lower in the 12-month follow-up than baseline, but failed to reach statistical significance. Changes in HbA1c was found to be positively correlated with adipsin, CRP, IL-6, IL-10, resistin, serpin, and TNF-?. The results suggest that promotion of lifestyle changes for one year among overweight and obese subjects modestly changes several circulating inflammatory biomarkers which maybe favorable in reducing risk for T2DM progression.

  13. A comparative study on effect of metformin and metformin-conjugated nanotubes on blood glucose homeostasis in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mirazi, Naser; Shoaei, Jamileh; Khazaei, Ardeshir; Hosseini, Abdolkarim

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prevalent metabolic disorders. Carbon nanotubes have the advantage to cross the plasma membrane without damaging the cells, improving the biological effect of a drug and reducing its side effects. In the present study, the effect of metformin and metformin-conjugated nanotubes was investigated on blood glucose level in the streptozotocin-induced male diabetic rats. Diabetes in the animals was induced with a single dose of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg; i.p.) and after 3 days the blood glucose was analyzed. Animals showing fasting blood glucose higher than 250 mg/dL were considered as diabetic rats. The animals were treated with metformin and metformin-conjugated nanotubes (150 mg/kg; p.o.) daily and every 48-h for 1 week. Changes in animals' serum blood glucose level were evaluated daily during the treatment period. The results of this study showed that metformin reduced blood glucose levels in diabetic animals. Metformin-conjugated nanotubes significantly reduced the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats (p < 0.01). There was no significant difference in blood glucose level between metformin and metformin-conjugated nanotubes groups (p > 0.05). However, when both formulations of metformin were administered every 48-h, metformin-conjugated nanotubes reduced glycaemia for a longer time than metformin alone (p < 0.001). This study showed that the metformin-conjugated nanotubes would be able to reduce the blood glucose, prolong drug delivery and efficacy duration in animals which were treated with metformin-conjugated nanotubes compared with metformin alone. PMID:24969688

  14. Results of Automated Retinal Image Analysis for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy from the Nakuru Study, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Digital retinal imaging is an established method of screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR). It has been established that currently about 1% of the world’s blind or visually impaired is due to DR. However, the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus and DR is creating an increased workload on those with expertise in grading retinal images. Safe and reliable automated analysis of retinal images may support screening services worldwide. This study aimed to compare the Iowa Detection Program (IDP) ability to detect diabetic eye diseases (DED) to human grading carried out at Moorfields Reading Centre on the population of Nakuru Study from Kenya. Participants Retinal images were taken from participants of the Nakuru Eye Disease Study in Kenya in 2007/08 (n = 4,381 participants [NW6 Topcon Digital Retinal Camera]). Methods First, human grading was performed for the presence or absence of DR, and for those with DR this was sub-divided in to referable or non-referable DR. The automated IDP software was deployed to identify those with DR and also to categorize the severity of DR. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcomes were sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of IDP versus the human grader as reference standard. Results Altogether 3,460 participants were included. 113 had DED, giving a prevalence of 3.3% (95% CI, 2.7–3.9%). Sensitivity of the IDP to detect DED as by the human grading was 91.0% (95% CI, 88.0–93.4%). The IDP ability to detect DED gave an AUC of 0.878 (95% CI 0.850–0.905). It showed a negative predictive value of 98%. The IDP missed no vision threatening retinopathy in any patients and none of the false negative cases met criteria for treatment. Conclusions In this epidemiological sample, the IDP’s grading was comparable to that of human graders’. It therefore might be feasible to consider inclusion into usual epidemiological grading. PMID:26425849

  15. [Impact of HAPO study findings on future diagnostics and therapy of gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Graf, Ute

    2009-01-01

    The Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) Study is a trial on a high evidence level that included 25,000 women recruited in 15 centers all over the world who underwent a 75-gram oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) at 24-32 weeks of gestation. Data remained blinded if the fasting plasma glucose level was below 105 mg/dl (5.8 mmol/l) and the 2-hour plasma glucose level was below 200 mg/dl (11.1 mmol/l). The aim of the study was to clarify whether maternal hyperglycemia less severe than that in diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The results indicate a continuous association of maternal glucose levels below those diagnostic of diabetes with an adverse outcome, with the strongest risk for increased birth weight and cord blood serum C peptide levels indicating fetal hyperinsulinism. Additionally an increased risk for maternal complications like preeclampsia was seen. Like in many biological processes, there were no obvious thresholds at which risks increased. An international expert committee proposed how to transfer the HAPO data into criteria for the oGTT in pregnancy for the future diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) which will be based on acute pregnancy problems in contrast to the recent Carpenter and Coustan criteria. The availability of uniform, internationally accepted and applied GDM criteria will provide more clinical and legal security for the caregivers which will be a big advantage also in Germany where a wide diversity of GDM criteria is used. Beside the threshold discussion, the HAPO data are of enormous relevance for Germany. The HAPO data will significantly influence the decision of the German Health Authorities whether to finally establish a general screening for GDM as obligatory part of prenatal care. A report from the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) which was ordered from the German Health Authorities describes--mainly based on the HAPO Study--an indirect benefit of blood glucose screening for GDM for all pregnant women. PMID:20530938

  16. How effective is systematic care of diabetic patients? A study in one general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Koperski, M

    1992-01-01

    A method of systematic diabetic care compatible with personal lists, the 'diabetic day', was introduced into a seven partner inner city general practice. The effect on glycosylated haemoglobin levels and the recording of six process measures (fundoscopy, visual acuity, weight, blood glucose levels, glycosylated haemoglobin levels and blood pressure) was assessed. Of the 111 known registered diabetic patients, 64 entered the diabetic day and fulfilled the eligibility criteria. General practice records were analysed retrospectively over a period of four years--the two years before entry into the diabetic day were compared with the subsequent two years. Mean glycosylated haemoglobin levels fell from 10.52% in the year before entry to the diabetic day to 9.71% in the second year after entry (P < 0.01, 95% confidence intervals 0.19 to 1.39). There was a significant increase in all process measures recorded in the general practice notes after entry into the diabetic day. The introduction of systematic care for diabetic patients led to an improvement in recorded process measures and a reduction in patients' glycosylated haemoglobin levels in a general practice which had made previous efforts to improve diabetic care and was already well staffed, organized and motivated. PMID:1297371

  17. Diabetes and cognitive decline in elderly African Americans: a 15 year follow up study

    PubMed Central

    Wessels, A.M.; Lane, K.A.; Gao, S.; Hall, K.S.; Unverzagt, F.W.; Hendrie, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of cognitive impairment and vascular factors appear to play a role in this relationship. In a sample of elderly African Americans, with a follow up duration of 15 years, we tested the hypothesis that diabetes accelerates cognitive decline and explored possible mediating mechanisms. Methods A total of 1702 subjects, of which 441 had diabetes, were given the Community Screening Interview for Dementia (CSI-D) to measure cognitive functioning at 6 time points, over 15 years. Mixed effects models with repeated measures were used to examine the association of diabetes, and vascular risk factors with cognitive scores over time. Results African Americans with diabetes were shown to have significantly accelerated cognitive decline compared with those without diabetes (p=0.046) when controlling for basic demographics and baseline co morbid conditions (heart disease, hypertension, stroke and depression). Adjusting for incident heart disease, and especially stroke weakened this association (p=0.098) indicating a mediating effect of stroke on the association of diabetes and cognitive decline. However when incident stroke is incorporated into the model, the effect for participants with diabetes is greatly increased (p=0.007) Conclusions Diabetes, mediated by cerebrovascular pathology, accelerates cognitive decline in an African American sample with a follow up duration of 15 years. PMID:21784353

  18. Diabetes Prevention in the New York City Sikh Asian Indian Community: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Nadia S.; Zanowiak, Jennifer M.; Wyatt, Laura C.; Kavathe, Rucha; Singh, Hardayal; Kwon, Simona C.; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2014-01-01

    India has one of the highest burdens of diabetes worldwide, and rates of diabetes are also high among Asian Indian immigrants that have migrated into the United States (U.S.). Sikhs represent a significant portion of Asian Indians in the U.S. Diabetes prevention programs have shown the benefits of using lifestyle intervention to reduce diabetes risk, yet there have been no culturally-tailored programs for diabetes prevention in the Sikh community. Using a quasi-experimental two-arm design, 126 Sikh Asian Indians living in New York City were enrolled in a six-workshop intervention led by community health workers. A total of 108 participants completed baseline and 6-month follow-up surveys between March 2012 and October 2013. Main outcome measures included clinical variables (weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, and cholesterol) and health behaviors (changes in physical activity, food behaviors, and diabetes knowledge). Changes were significant for the treatment group in weight, BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, physical activity, food behaviors, and diabetes knowledge, and between group differences were significant for glucose, diabetes knowledge, portion control, and physical activity social interaction. Retention rates were high. Findings demonstrate that a diabetes prevention program in the Sikh community is acceptable, feasible, and efficacious. PMID:24852392

  19. Sex-Specific Prevalence of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the Middle-Aged Population of China: A Subgroup Analysis of the 2007–2008 China National Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaojun; Xing, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Wenhui; Wang, Na; Xie, Lingding; Yang, Wenying

    2015-01-01

    The sex difference in the prevalence rates of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) among the middle-aged population in China remain largely unknown. Therefore, we analyzed differences in the prevalence of diabetes, self-reported CVDs, and some CVD risk factors among men and women in the middle-aged population (30–49 years) and in individuals aged 50 years and older using data from the China National Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders Study of 2007–2008. Middle-aged men appeared to have significantly a higher prevalence of diabetes and self-reported CVDs than middle-aged women (8.07% vs 5.06% for diabetes, P < 0.001; 0.64% vs 0.22% for CVDs, P < 0.001). Men also showed higher rates of central obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia than women (all P < 0.01). Compared with women, men were more likely to drink alcohol and smoke cigarettes but less likely to be under diet control. The sex-specific differences in prediabetes, CVD, and CVD risk factors between men and women were diminished or even reversed in the population aged 50 years and older. No sex-specific differences were found in the prevalences of a family history of diabetes, coronary heart disease, and hypertension (P > 0.05) in middle-aged population. Specific strategies to reduce modifiable risk factors for the prevention and control of diabetes and CVD may be warranted in this population. PMID:26406982

  20. ATLANTIC-DIP: prevalence of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus by International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups criteria.

    PubMed

    Noctor, Eoin; Crowe, Catherine; Carmody, Louise A; Kirwan, Breda; O'Dea, Angela; Glynn, Liam G; McGuire, Brian E; O'Shea, Paula M; Dunne, Fidelma P

    2015-02-01

    Women with previous gestational diabetes (GDM) are a high-risk group for future development of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. The new International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) criteria significantly increase the number of women diagnosed with GDM. The long-term metabolic outcome in these women is unknown. We set out to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, using adult treatment panel-III criteria; and insulin resistance, using HOMA2-IR, in white European women with previous GDM. Using a cohort design, we invited women meeting IADPSG GDM criteria across four Irish antenatal centres between 2007 and 2010 to participate. Two hundred and sixty-five women with previous values meeting IADPSG criteria for GDM participated (44 % of the population eligible for participation). Mean age was 36.7 years (SD 5.0). These women were compared with a randomly selected control group of 378 women (mean age 37.6 years, SD 5.1) known to have normal glucose tolerance (NGT) in pregnancy during the same period. A total of 25.3 % of women with previous IADPSG-defined GDM met metabolic syndrome criteria, compared to 6.6 % of women with NGT [at 2.6 (SD 1.0) vs. 3.3 years (SD 0.7) post-partum]. The prevalence of HOMA2-IR >1.8 was higher in women with previous IADPSG-defined GDM (33.6 vs. 9.1 % with NGT, p < 0.001). Women with previous GDM by IADPSG criteria demonstrate a greater than threefold prevalence of metabolic syndrome compared to women with NGT in pregnancy. Efforts to prevent projected long-term consequences of this should focus on interventions both in the preconception and post-partum periods. PMID:25002067

  1. Rationale and study design for a randomised controlled trial to reduce sedentary time in adults at risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: project stand (Sedentary Time ANd diabetes)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The rising prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a major public health problem. There is an urgent need for effective lifestyle interventions to prevent the development of T2DM. Sedentary behaviour (sitting time) has recently been identified as a risk factor for diabetes, often independent of the time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Project STAND (Sedentary Time ANd Diabetes) is a study which aims to reduce sedentary behaviour in younger adults at high risk of T2DM. Methods/Design A reduction in sedentary time is targeted using theory driven group structured education. The STAND programme is subject to piloting and process evaluation in line with the MRC framework for complex interventions. Participants are encouraged to self-monitor and self-regulate their behaviour. The intervention is being assessed in a randomised controlled trial with 12 month follow up. Inclusion criteria are a) aged 18-40 years with a BMI in the obese range; b) 18-40 years with a BMI in the overweight range plus an additional risk factor for T2DM. Participants are randomised to the intervention (n = 89) or control (n = 89) arm. The primary outcome is a reduction in sedentary behaviour at 12 months as measured by an accelerometer (count < 100/min). Secondary outcomes include physical activity, sitting/lying time using the ActivPAL posture monitor, fasting and 2 h oral glucose tolerance test, lipids, inflammatory biomarkers, body weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, illness perceptions, and efficacy beliefs for behaviour change. Conclusions This is the first UK trial to address sedentary behaviour change in a population of younger adults at risk of T2DM. The results will provide a platform for the development of a range of future multidisciplinary interventions in this rapidly expanding high-risk population. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN08434554, MRC project 91409. PMID:22151909

  2. The Field Trip Book: Study Travel Experiences in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ronald V.

    2010-01-01

    Looking for social studies adventures to help students find connections to democratic citizenship? Look no further! This book provides just the answer teachers need for engaging students in field trips as researching learners with emphasis on interdisciplinary social studies plus skills in collecting and reporting data gathered from field

  3. Interleukin-11 - its role in the vicious cycle of inflammation, periodontitis and diabetes: A clinicobiochemical cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rohit; Suchetha, Aganashini; Lakshmi, Puzhankara; Darshan, Mundinamane Basawalingappa; Apoorva, Sokke Mallikarjuna; Ashit, Gulabdas Bharwani

    2015-01-01

    Context: Interleukin-11 (IL-11) is a multifunctional cytokine with a probable regulatory role in the inflamed periodontal tissue. It has also been shown to inhibit the production of potent proinflammatory cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1? in vitro. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, which demonstrates an increase in proinflammatory cytokines, might hypothetically, display a decrease in the levels of IL-11, which down-regulates synthesis of the proinflammatory cytokines. Aims: This clinicobiochemical cross-sectional study was undertaken to try to interpret the link between IL-11, diabetes and periodontitis and to explore the probable protective role of IL-11. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 patients were included in the study and were divided into five groups based on community periodontal index scores and diabetes status. Probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were measured in all the subjects. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) was collected from all the participants using micropipettes and blood samples were collected from subjects in Groups III, IV and V, for analysis of glycated hemoglobin. IL-11 levels were measured in GCF samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical Analysis: The data obtained were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: The GCF IL-11 levels decreased from periodontal health to disease and in periodontitis patients with type 2 diabetes with decreasing glycemic control. Conclusions: Interleukin-11 may play an important role in the modulation of immune response via the reduction of proinflammatory cytokine production and periodontal tissue damage. It was seen in this study that IL-11 could be detected in GCF and the levels of IL-11 in GCF decreased progressively from healthy to periodontitis sites. IL-11 levels were significantly lower in chronic periodontitis group when compared to gingivitis group. The decrease in the levels of IL-11 probably indicates that both diabetes and periodontitis may play a synergistic role in the suppression of protective host responses. The potential of IL-11 as a probable biomarker of inflammation in both periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus is indicated by the changeability of IL-11 levels with the change in periodontal disease status and glycemic control. Further longitudinal studies are needed to validate IL-11 as a “biomarker of inflammation” in periodontal disease and diabetes progression and to prove its role in the connecting link between periodontal disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26015665

  4. Monoamine Oxidases as Potential Contributors to Oxidative Stress in Diabetes: Time for a Study in Patients Undergoing Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Duicu, Oana M.; Lighezan, Rodica; Sturza, Adrian; Ceausu, Raluca A.; Borza, Claudia; Noveanu, Lavinia; Gaspar, Marian; Ionac, Adina; Feier, Horea; Muntean, Danina M.; Mornos, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a pathomechanism causally linked to the progression of chronic cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Mitochondria have emerged as the most relevant source of reactive oxygen species, the major culprit being classically considered the respiratory chain at the inner mitochondrial membrane. In the past decade, several experimental studies unequivocally demonstrated the contribution of monoamine oxidases (MAOs) at the outer mitochondrial membrane to the maladaptative ventricular hypertrophy and endothelial dysfunction. This paper addresses the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to the pathogenesis of heart failure and diabetes together with the mounting evidence for an emerging role of MAO inhibition as putative cardioprotective strategy in both conditions. PMID:26101773

  5. Intravitreal pegaptanib sodium (Macugen®) for treatment of diabetic macular oedema: a morphologic and functional study

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Michele; Chiosi, Flavia; dell'Omo, Roberto; Romano, Mario R; Parmeggiani, Francesco; Semeraro, Francesco; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Costagliola, Ciro

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To study whether morphologic (foveal thickness, FT) variations of clinically significant macular oedema (CMO) in patients suffering from diabetes following intravitreal pegaptanib sodium (IVP) injection were associated with functional [macular sensitivity (MS) and colour discrimination (CD)] changes. METHODS A longitudinal, interventional, non-randomized study was performed. FT was assessed by optical coherence tomography (OCT), MS by microperimetry, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) by early treatment diabetic retinopathy study charts (ETDRS) and CD by Farnswoth-Munsell test. The treatment protocol consisted of three consecutive injections (0.3 mg/0.05 ml; baseline, week 6 and week 12). Follow-up checks were scheduled at 18, 24, 36 and 48 weeks, after injections. RESULTS Thirty eyes of 30 patients with clinically significant CMO were included for analysis. After IVP a significant decrease of FT occurred with a mean reduction from baseline of 56.9% (P= 0.0001). An improvement of functional parameters was recorded in all patients (BCVA from 18.2 ± 8.5 letters to 25.5 ± 8.4 letters, P < 0.005, MS from 8.6 ± 2.16 dB to 10.6 ± 2.61 dB, P < 0.001, colour analysis from 376.1 ± 125.6 TES to 116 ± 34.6 TES, P= 0.0001). A statistically significant correlation between FT and BCVA as well as MS and CD was also found. Neither ocular nor systemic adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS Intravitreal pegaptanib significantly reduced FT, with a concomitant improvement of MS and CD. This association emphasizes the efficacy of IVP in the treatment of CMO. PMID:22486651

  6. The burden of diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in India using the WHO 1999 criteria: prevalence of diabetes in India study (PODIS).

    PubMed

    Sadikot, S M; Nigam, A; Das, S; Bajaj, S; Zargar, A H; Prasannakumar, K M; Sosale, A; Munichoodappa, C; Seshiah, V; Singh, S K; Jamal, A; Sai, K; Sadasivrao, Y; Murthy, S S; Hazra, D K; Jain, S; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhay, S; Sinha, N K; Mishra, R; Dora, M; Jena, B; Patra, P; Goenka, K

    2004-12-01

    This random multistage cross-sectional population survey was undertaken to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in subjects aged 25 years and above in India. The study was carried out in 77 centers (40 urban and 37 rural). 18363 (9008 males and 9355 females) subjects were studied. 10617 (5379 males and 5238 females) were from urban areas and 7746 (3629 males and 4117 females) from rural areas. Blood samples were taken after a fast of 10-12 h and 2 h after 75 g of oral glucose. Subjects were categorized as having IGT or DM using the World Health Organisation (WHO) (1999) criteria. The standardized prevalence rate for DM in the total Indian, urban and rural populations was 4.3, 5.9 and 2.7%, respectively. The corresponding IGT rates in the three populations was 5.2, 6.3 and 3.7%, respectively. The urban prevalence of DM and IGT was significantly greater than in the rural population (P < 0.001 in both instances). The prevalence of DM was significantly, more than that of IGT (P < 0.001) within both the rural and urban populations. Type 2 diabetes is a major health problem is India. PMID:15609460

  7. Comparison of 12-month clinical outcomes in diabetic and nondiabetic patients with chronic total occlusion lesions: a multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Rha, Seung-Woon; Na, Jin Oh; Lim, Hong Euy; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Eung Ju; Park, Chang Gyu; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Yu, Cheol Woong; Park, Hun Sik; Chae, In-Ho; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Moo Hyun; Hur, Seung-Ho; Ahn, Young-Keun; Jang, Yangsoo

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare 1-year clinical outcomes in diabetic and nondiabetic patients with chronic total occlusion (CTO) lesions. Methods A total of 2865 patients (age 62.82±10.64 years; 74.0% men) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for CTO were analyzed. The patients were classified as diabetic (n=977) or nondiabetic (n=1888). One-year clinical outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results One year after percutaneous coronary intervention, 241 (8.4%) patients developed major adverse cardiac events (MACEs). Target lesion revascularization (TLR), target vessel revascularization (TVR), TLR-MACEs, and total MACEs were more common in diabetics than in nondiabetics (6.1 vs. 3.9%, P=0.021; 7.2 vs. 4.8%, P=0.023; 7.7 vs. 5.5%, P=0.017; and 10.3 vs. 7.7%, P=0.011; respectively). In multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus was an independent predictor for 1-year TLR (odds ratio: 2.201, P=0.001) and total MACEs (odds ratio: 1.677, P=0.002). Among diabetic patients, total death, TLR, TVR, TLR-MACEs, TVR-MACEs, and total MACEs were more common in patients who used insulin than in those who did not (6.1 vs. 1.9%, P=0.018; 11.3 vs. 4.6%, P=0.007; 12.2 vs. 5.9%, P=0.025; 14.8 vs. 5.9%, P=0.003; 16.5 vs. 8.0%, P=0.008; and 17.4 vs. 9.2%, P=0.012, respectively). Insulin use was an independent predictor for total death, 12-month TLR, TVR, TLR-MACEs, TVR-MACEs, and total MACEs. Conclusion This study identified diabetes mellitus as an independent risk factor for 1-year TLR and total MACEs in patients with CTO lesions. PMID:26407238

  8. Depression, anxiety and stress symptoms among diabetics in Malaysia: a cross sectional study in an urban primary care setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent condition in Malaysia, increasing from 11.6% in 2006 to 15.2% in 2011 among individuals 18 years and above. Co-morbid depression in diabetics is associated with hyperglycemia, diabetic complications and increased health care costs. The aims of this study are to determine the prevalence and predictors of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms in Type II diabetics attending government primary care facilities in the urban area of Klang Valley, Malaysia. Methods The study was cross sectional in design and carried out in 12 randomly selected primary care government clinics in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. A total of 2508 eligible consenting respondents participated in the study. The Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) 21 questionnaire was used to measure depression, anxiety and stress symptoms. Data was analyzed using the SPSS version 16 software using both descriptive and inferential statistics. Results The prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms among Type II diabetics were 11.5%, 30.5% and 12.5% respectively. Using multiple logistic regression, females, Asian Indians, marital status (never married, divorced/widowed/separated), a family history of psychiatric illness, less than 2 years duration of diabetes and current alcohol consumption were found to be significant predictors of depression. For anxiety, unemployment, housewives, HbA1c level of more than 8.5%, a family history of psychiatric illness, life events and lack of physical activity were independent risk factors. Stress was significantly associated with females, HbA1c level of more than 8.5%, presence of co-morbidity, a family history of psychiatric illness, life events and current alcohol consumption. For depression (adjusted OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.1; 7.0), anxiety (adjusted OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.1;5.5) and stress (adjusted OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.8; 9.8), a family history of psychiatric illness was the strongest predictor. Conclusion We found the prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms to be high among Type II diabetics, with almost a third being classified as anxious. Screening of high risk Type II diabetics for depression, anxiety and stress symptoms in the primary care setting is recommended at regular intervals. PMID:23710584

  9. Modeling strategies to study metabolic pathways in progression to type 1 diabetes - Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Marinkovi?, Tijana; Oreši?, Matej

    2016-01-01

    Seroconversion to islet autoimmunity is preceded by metabolic disturbances in children who later progress to overt type 1 diabetes (T1D). The underlying metabolic pathways and the interaction of metabolic and immune system factors involved in progression to the disease are however poorly understood. There is a clear need for mathematical models which capture the temporal and spatial complexity of early pathogenesis of T1D. Here we review the early attempts to model the development of islet autoimmunity and T1D, including the models which emphasize the potential beneficial role of autoimmune response in specific circumstances, such as to 'correct' for the early metabolic disturbances. We also highlight the genome-scale metabolic modeling as a promising new avenue to study metabolism and its interactions with the immune system in T1D. PMID:26314918

  10. Studies on anti-hyperglycemic effect of Euphorbia antiquorum L. root in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Varadharajan; Murali, Anita; Lalitha, Doppalapudi Sree; Yoganarasimhan, Sunkam

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim: To determine the anti-hyperglycemic effect of Euphorbia antiquorum L. root. Materials and Methods: The study evaluates the anti-hyperglycemic effect of E. antiquorum root in streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced Type 2 diabetes mellitus and fructose-induced insulin resistance models. Alcohol and aqueous extracts of E. antiquorum root were administered at doses 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. Serum levels of glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), and hepatic levels of malondialdehyde, glutathione, and glycogen were estimated. Results: Treatment with the alcohol and aqueous extracts of E. antiquorum roots resulted in significant (P < 0.001) lowering of serum blood glucose and GHb levels in both the models. Flavonoids, phenolic compounds, and glycosides were detected in the preliminary phytochemical screening. Conclusion: Root of E. antiquorum showed promising anti-hyperglycemic effect which may be due to the presence of important phytochemicals. PMID:26649236

  11. Assessment of a screening protocol for type 2 diabetes in community pharmacy. The DiabNow Study.

    PubMed

    Fikri-Benbrahim, Narjis; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando; Saéz-Benito, Loreto; Luque, Blanca Suárez; Corpas, José Pedro García; Moullin, Joanna C; Sabater-Hernández, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance and feasibility of a protocol for screening type 2 diabetes in community pharmacy. Performance was primarily assessed by measuring stakeholders' adherence (pharmacists, patients and physicians) to the protocol's components. PMID:25819481

  12. Neighborhood socioeconomic status, depression, and health status in the Look AHEAD (Action for health in diabetes) study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Depression and diminished health status are common in adults with diabetes, but few studies have investigated associations with socio-economic environment. The objective of this manuscript was to evaluate the relationship between neighborhood-level SES and health status and depression. Individual-le...

  13. AS 2008: Arsenic exposure a nd health effects in Inner Mongolia: studies on cardiac, diabetes and cancer-related effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic arsenic exposure via drinking water has been of great public health concern world wide. Arsenic exposure has been associated with human cancers, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The objectives of this study were to investigate health effects of arsenic and to asses...

  14. Heritability and genetic association analysis of cognition in the Diabetes Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Amanda J.; Hugenschmidt, Christina E.; Raffield, Laura M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Freedman, Barry I.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Bowden, Donald W.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive performance is an important component of healthy aging. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with negative outcomes for the brain and cognition, although causal mechanisms have not been definitely determined. Genetic risk factors warrant further consideration in this context. This study examined the heritability of cognitive function as assessed by (1) the Digit Symbol Substitution Task; (2) the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination; (3) the Stroop Task; (4) the Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Task; and (5) the Controlled Oral Word Association Task for Phonemic and Semantic Fluency, in the family-based, T2D-enriched, Diabetes Heart Study sample (n = 550 participants from 257 families). The genetic basis of these cognitive measures was further evaluated by association analysis with candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genome-wide SNP data. Measures of cognitive function were significantly heritable (?2 = 0.28–0.62) following adjustment for age, gender, and education. A total of 31 SNPs (from 26 genes/regions) selected to form an a priori set of candidate SNPs showed limited evidence of association with cognitive function when applying conservative metrics of significance. Genome-wide assessment of both noncoding and coding variants revealed suggestive evidence of association for several coding variants including rs139509083 in CNST (p = 4.9 × 10?9), rs199968569 in PLAA (p = 4.9 × 10?9) and rs138487371 in PCDH8 (p = 3.7 × 10?8). The identification of a heritable component to cognitive performance in T2D suggests a role for genetic contributors to cognitive performance even in the presence of metabolic disease and other associated comorbidities and is supported by the identification of genetic association signals in functionally plausible candidates. PMID:24684796

  15. Stress Hyperglycaemia in Hospitalised Patients and Their 3-Year Risk of Diabetes: A Scottish Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, David A.; Hughes, Katherine A.; Lone, Nazir; Mills, Nicholas L.; Sattar, Naveed; McKnight, John; Wild, Sarah H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperglycaemia during hospital admission is common in patients who are not known to have diabetes and is associated with adverse outcomes. The risk of subsequently developing type 2 diabetes, however, is not known. We linked a national database of hospital admissions with a national register of diabetes to describe the association between admission glucose and the risk of subsequently developing type 2 diabetes. Methods and Findings In a retrospective cohort study, patients aged 30 years or older with an emergency admission to hospital between 2004 and 2008 were included. Prevalent and incident diabetes were identified through the Scottish Care Information (SCI)-Diabetes Collaboration national registry. Patients diagnosed prior to or up to 30 days after hospitalisation were defined as prevalent diabetes and were excluded. The predicted risk of developing incident type 2 diabetes during the 3 years following hospital discharge by admission glucose, age, and sex was obtained from logistic regression models. We performed separate analyses for patients aged 40 and older, and patients aged 30 to 39 years. Glucose was measured in 86,634 (71.0%) patients aged 40 and older on admission to hospital. The 3-year risk of developing type 2 diabetes was 2.3% (1,952/86,512) overall, was <1% for a glucose ?5 mmol/l, and increased to approximately 15% at 15 mmol/l. The risks at 7 mmol/l and 11.1 mmol/l were 2.6% (95% CI 2.5–2.7) and 9.9% (95% CI 9.2–10.6), respectively, with one in four (21,828/86,512) and one in 40 (1,798/86,512) patients having glucose levels above each of these cut-points. For patients aged 30–39, the risks at 7 mmol/l and 11.1 mmol/l were 1.0% (95% CI 0.8–1.3) and 7.8% (95% CI 5.7–10.7), respectively, with one in eight (1,588/11,875) and one in 100 (120/11,875) having glucose levels above each of these cut-points. The risk of diabetes was also associated with age, sex, and socio-economic deprivation, but not with specialty (medical versus surgical), raised white cell count, or co-morbidity. Similar results were obtained for pre-specified sub-groups admitted with myocardial infarction, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and stroke. There were 25,193 deaths (85.8 per 1,000 person-years) over 297,122 person-years, of which 2,406 (8.1 per 1,000 person-years) were attributed to vascular disease. Patients with glucose levels of 11.1 to 15 mmol/l and >15 mmol/l had higher mortality than patients with a glucose of <6.1 mmol/l (hazard ratio 1.54; 95% CI 1.42–1.68 and 2.50; 95% CI 2.14–2.95, respectively) in models adjusting for age and sex. Limitations of our study include that we did not have data on ethnicity or body mass index, which may have improved prediction and the results have not been validated in non-white populations or populations outside of Scotland. Conclusion Plasma glucose measured during an emergency hospital admission predicts subsequent risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Mortality was also 1.5-fold higher in patients with elevated glucose levels. Our findings can be used to inform patients of their long-term risk of type 2 diabetes, and to target lifestyle advice to those patients at highest risk. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:25136809

  16. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  17. Metabolically healthy obesity and risk of incident type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J A; Kivimaki, M; Hamer, M

    2014-01-01

    The risk of type 2 diabetes among obese adults who are metabolically healthy has not been established. We systematically searched Medline (1946–August 2013) and Embase (1947–August 2013) for prospective studies of type 2 diabetes incidence (defined by blood glucose levels or self-report) among metabolically healthy obese adults (defined by body mass index [BMI] and normal cardiometabolic clustering, insulin profile or risk score) aged ?18 years at baseline. We supplemented the analysis with an original effect estimate from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), with metabolically healthy obesity defined as BMI ??30?kg?m?2 and <2 of hypertension, impaired glycaemic control, systemic inflammation, adverse high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and adverse triglycerides. Estimates from seven published studies and ELSA were pooled using random effects meta-analyses (1,770 healthy obese participants; 98 type 2 diabetes cases). The pooled adjusted relative risk (RR) for incident type 2 diabetes was 4.03 (95% confidence interval?=?2.66–6.09) in healthy obese adults and 8.93 (6.86–11.62) in unhealthy obese compared with healthy normal-weight adults. Although there was between-study heterogeneity in the size of effects (I2?=?49.8%; P?=?0.03), RR for healthy obesity exceeded one in every study, indicating a consistently increased risk across study populations. Metabolically healthy obese adults show a substantially increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with metabolically healthy normal-weight adults. Prospective evidence does not indicate that healthy obesity is a harmless condition. PMID:24661566

  18. Prospective Study of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Parents of Children with Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landolt, Markus A.; Vollrath, Margarete; Laimbacher, Joseph; Gnehm, Hanspeter E.; Sennhauser, Felix H.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, course, and predictors of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in mothers and fathers of children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. Method: Forty-nine mothers and 48 fathers of 52 children (response rate 65%) with newly diagnosed diabetes (age 6.5-15 years) were assessed at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12…

  19. Oxidative Damage in Diabetics: Insights from a Graduate Study in La Reunion University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girard, Dorothée; Rondeau, Philippe; Catan, Aurélie; Planesse, Cynthia; Giraud, Pierre; Bourdon, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Due to the growing incidence of diabetes in developed nations, there is a compelling case to be made for teaching graduate students more deeply about mechanisms underlying this disease. Diabetes is associated with enhanced oxidative stress and protein glycation via the covalent binding of glucose molecules. Albumin represents the major plasmatic…

  20. Type 2 diabetes and incidence of cardiovascular diseases: a cohort study in 1·9 million people

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Anoop Dinesh; Langenberg, Claudia; Rapsomaniki, Eleni; Denaxas, Spiros; Pujades-Rodriguez, Mar; Gale, Chris P; Deanfield, John; Smeeth, Liam; Timmis, Adam; Hemingway, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The contemporary associations of type 2 diabetes with a wide range of incident cardiovascular diseases have not been compared. We aimed to study associations between type 2 diabetes and 12 initial manifestations of cardiovascular disease. Methods We used linked primary care, hospital admission, disease registry, and death certificate records from the CALIBER programme, which links data for people in England recorded in four electronic health data sources. We included people who were (or turned) 30 years or older between Jan 1, 1998, to March 25, 2010, who were free from cardiovascular disease at baseline. The primary endpoint was the first record of one of 12 cardiovascular presentations in any of the data sources. We compared cumulative incidence curves for the initial presentation of cardiovascular disease and used Cox models to estimate cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs). This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01804439). Findings Our cohort consisted of 1?921?260 individuals, of whom 1?887?062 (98·2%) did not have diabetes and 34?198 (1·8%) had type 2 diabetes. We observed 113?638 first presentations of cardiovascular disease during a median follow-up of 5·5 years (IQR 2·1–10·1). Of people with type 2 diabetes, 6137 (17·9%) had a first cardiovascular presentation, the most common of which were peripheral arterial disease (reported in 992 [16·2%] of 6137 patients) and heart failure (866 [14·1%] of 6137 patients). Type 2 diabetes was positively associated with peripheral arterial disease (adjusted HR 2·98 [95% CI 2·76–3·22]), ischaemic stroke (1·72 [1·52–1·95]), stable angina (1·62 [1·49–1·77]), heart failure (1·56 [1·45–1·69]), and non-fatal myocardial infarction (1·54 [1·42–1·67]), but was inversely associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm (0·46 [0·35–0·59]) and subarachnoid haemorrhage (0·48 [0·26–0.89]), and not associated with arrhythmia or sudden cardiac death (0·95 [0·76–1·19]). Interpretation Heart failure and peripheral arterial disease are the most common initial manifestations of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. The differences between relative risks of different cardiovascular diseases in patients with type 2 diabetes have implications for clinical risk assessment and trial design. Funding Wellcome Trust, National Institute for Health Research, and Medical Research Council. PMID:25466521

  1. Self Care and Medication Adherence among Type 2 Diabetics in Puducherry, Southern India: A Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    S., Arulmozhi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Micro and macro-vascular complications of Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (DM) could be decreased by maintaining a good glycaemic control, which is dependent on adherence to medication and self care. Aim: (1) To assess medication adherence and adherence to self care among type 2 diabetics who were admitted to a tertiary care hospital (2) To identify factors which were associated with medication adherence. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study involved 150 in-patients of Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College and Hospital (SMVMCH), a teaching hospital in Puducherry, southern India. Subjects who had type 2 DM for more than 1 month were included in the study, irrespective of their diagnoses at admission. They were interviewed within 24 hours of their admissions by using a pre-designed, pre-tested, structured questionnaire. The questionnaire included Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS) and questions for assessing adherence to self care activities. The factors which were associated with medication adherence were identified by Chi-square test and logistic regression. Results: The mean age of the subjects was 54 years. Only 49.3% (95% CI: 41% to 57%) of the diabetics had high medication adherence (MMAS score = 8). Only 22.7% of the diabetics were involved in physical exercise for at least 30 minutes, for at least 4 days in a week. Only 16.7% of them regularly inspected their feet. Around 67.3% of the subjects reported about consuming a diabetic diet for at least 4 days/week. Poor family support showed a significant association with low medication adherence. Conclusion: Only 49.3% of the subjects adhered to anti-diabetic medications. Less than 25% of the diabetics adhered to self care activities such as exercising/walking for 30 minutes on at least 4 days in a week, regularly inspected their feet and provided feet care. Family support played a vital role in medication adherence among the diabetic subjects. Hence, it is important to regularly assess patients for medication adherence and include their families also in counseling sessions. PMID:24959496

  2. A pilot study examining patient attitudes and intentions to adopt assistive technologies into type 2 diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Kathleen G; Hall, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Approximately half of individuals living with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have suboptimal self-management, which could be improved by using assistive technologies in self-management regimes. This study examines patient attitudes and intentions to adopt assistive technologies into T2DM self-management. Forty-four participants (M = 58.7 years) with T2DM were recruited from diabetes education classes in the southwestern Ontario, Canada, between February and April 2014. Participants completed a self-reported in-person survey assessing demographic characteristics, current diabetes management, and attitudes toward using assistive technologies in their diabetes self-management. Demographics, disease characteristics, and current technology use and preferences of the cohort were examined, followed by a correlational analysis of descriptive characteristics and attitudes and intentions to use technology in self-management. The majority of (but not all) participants felt that using Internet applications (65%) and smartphone (53.5%) applications for self-management was a good idea. The majority of participants did not currently use an Internet (92.5%) or mobile (96%) application for self-management. Of participants, 77% intended to use an Internet application to manage their diabetes in the future and 58% intended to use mobile applications. Younger age was associated with more positive attitudes (r = -.432, P = .003) and intentions (r = -.425, P = .005) to use assistive technologies in diabetes self-management. Findings suggest that patients, especially those younger in age, are favorable toward adopting assistive technologies into management practice. However, attitudes among older adults are less positive, and few currently make use of such technologies in any age group. PMID:25427965

  3. A Pilot Study Examining Patient Attitudes and Intentions to Adopt Assistive Technologies Into Type 2 Diabetes Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Kathleen G.; Hall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background: Approximately half of individuals living with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have suboptimal self-management, which could be improved by using assistive technologies in self-management regimes. This study examines patient attitudes and intentions to adopt assistive technologies into T2DM self-management. Methods: Forty-four participants (M = 58.7 years) with T2DM were recruited from diabetes education classes in the southwestern Ontario, Canada, between February and April 2014. Participants completed a self-reported in-person survey assessing demographic characteristics, current diabetes management, and attitudes toward using assistive technologies in their diabetes self-management. Demographics, disease characteristics, and current technology use and preferences of the cohort were examined, followed by a correlational analysis of descriptive characteristics and attitudes and intentions to use technology in self-management. Results: The majority of (but not all) participants felt that using Internet applications (65%) and smartphone (53.5%) applications for self-management was a good idea. The majority of participants did not currently use an Internet (92.5%) or mobile (96%) application for self-management. Of participants, 77% intended to use an Internet application to manage their diabetes in the future and 58% intended to use mobile applications. Younger age was associated with more positive attitudes (r = –.432, P = .003) and intentions (r = –.425, P = .005) to use assistive technologies in diabetes self-management. Conclusions: Findings suggest that patients, especially those younger in age, are favorable toward adopting assistive technologies into management practice. However, attitudes among older adults are less positive, and few currently make use of such technologies in any age group. PMID:25427965

  4. Cluster randomized trial in smoking cessation with intensive advice in diabetic patients in primary care. ITADI Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is a priority to achieve smoking cessation in diabetic smokers, given that this is a group of patients with elevated cardiovascular risk. Furthermore, tobacco has a multiplying effect on micro and macro vascular complications. Smoking abstinence rates increase as the intensity of the intervention, length of the intervention and number and diversity of contacts with the healthcare professional during the intervention increases. However, there are few published studies about smoking cessation in diabetics in primary care, a level of healthcare that plays an essential role in these patients. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive smoking cessation intervention in diabetic patients in primary care. Methods/Design Cluster randomized trial, controlled and multicentric. Randomization unit: Primary Care Team. Study population: 546 diabetic smokers older than 14 years of age whose disease is controlled by one of the primary care teams in the study. Outcome Measures: Continuous tobacco abstinence (a person who has not smoked for at least six months and with a CO level of less than 6 ppm measured by a cooximeter) , evolution in the Prochaska and DiClemente's Transtheoretical Model of Change, number of cigarettes/day, length of the visit. Point of assessment: one- year post- inclusion in the study. Intervention: Brief motivational interview for diabetic smokers at the pre-contemplation and contemplation stage, intensive motivational interview with pharmacotherapy for diabetic smokers in the preparation-action stage and reinforcing intevention in the maintenance stage. Statistical Analysis: A descriptive analysis of all variables will be done, as well as a multilevel logistic regression and a Poisson regression. All analyses will be done with an intention to treatment basis and will be fitted for potential confounding factors and variables of clinical importance. Statistical packages: SPSS15, STATA10 y HLM6. Discussion The present study will try to describe the profile of a diabetic smoker who receives the most benefit from an intensive intervention in primary care. The results will be useful for primary care professionals in their usual clinical practice. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT00954967 PMID:20132540

  5. Studies of Association between the Gene for Calpain-10 and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Julie C.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Cassell, Paul G.; Saker, Philip J.; Hitman, Graham A.; Walker, Mark; Levy, Jonathan C.; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Rao, Pamidighantam V. Subba; Bennett, Amanda J.; Jones, Elizabeth C.; Menzel, Stephan; Prestwich, Philip; Simecek, Nikol; Wishart, Marie; Dhillon, Ranjit; Fletcher, Chris; Millward, Ann; Demaine, Andrew; Wilkin, Terence; Horikawa, Yukio; Cox, Nancy J.; Bell, Graeme I.; Ellard, Sian; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2001-01-01

    Variation in CAPN10, the gene encoding the ubiquitously expressed cysteine protease calpain-10, has been associated with type 2 diabetes in Mexican Americans and in two northern-European populations, from Finland and Germany. We have studied CAPN10 in white subjects of British/Irish ancestry, using both family-based and case-control studies. In 743 sib pairs, there was no evidence of linkage at the CAPN10 locus, which thereby excluded it as a diabetes-susceptibility gene, with an overall sib recurrence risk, ?S, of 1.25. We examined four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP-44, -43, -19, and -63) previously either associated with type 2 diabetes or implicated in transcriptional regulation of calpain-10 expression. We did not find any association between SNP-43, -19, and -63, either individually or as part of the previously described risk haplotypes. We did, however, observe significantly increased (P=.033) transmission of the less common C allele at SNP-44, to affected offspring in parents-offspring trios (odds ratio 1.6). An independent U.K. case-control study and a small discordant-sib study did not show significant association individually. In a combined analysis of all U.K. studies (P=.015) and in combination with a Mexican American study (P=.004), the C allele at SNP-44 is associated with type 2 diabetes. Sequencing of the coding region of CAPN10 in a group of U.K. subjects revealed four coding polymorphisms—L34V, T504A, R555C, and V666I. The T504A polymorphism was in perfect linkage disequilibrium with the diabetes-associated C allele at SNP-44, suggesting that the synthesis of a mutant protein and/or altered transcriptional regulation could contribute to diabetes risk. In conclusion, we were not able to replicate the association of the specific calpain-10 alleles identified by Horikawa et al. but suggest that other alleles at this locus may increase type 2 diabetes risk in the U.K. population. PMID:11481585

  6. Impact of Information Technology on the Therapy of Type-1 Diabetes: A Case Study of Children and Adolescents in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Rolf-Dietrich; Takenga, Claude; Preik, Petra; Kuehn, Sebastian; Berndt, Luise; Mayer, Herbert; Kaps, Alexander; Schiel, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Being able to manage and adjust insulin doses is a key part of managing type-1 diabetes. Children and adolescents with type-1 diabetes mellitus often have serious difficulties with this dosage adjustment. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the impact of using novel mobile, web and communication technologies in assisting their therapy and treatment. A trial was conducted in the north-eastern part of Germany to evaluate the impact of the “Mobil Diab”, a mobile diabetes management system, on the clinical outcome. 68 subjects aged between 8 and 18 years, divided randomly into control and intervention groups, were included into the study. Metrics such as changes in the quality of metabolic control, changes in psychological parameters, usability and acceptance of the technology were used for evaluation purpose. Metabolic control was mainly assessed by the mean HbAlc. Analysis showed a good acceptance of the proposed system. An overall improvement in mean levels of HbA1c was observed, however further studies will be conducted to prove evidence of the weight and BMI improvements. Moreover, initial indications of positive impact on the improvement in psychological parameters were presumed based on the result of the conducted study. The system appeared to be an efficient and time saving tool in diabetes management. PMID:25563223

  7. Association of common variation in the PPARAgene with incident myocardial infarction in individuals with type 2 diabetes: A Go-DARTS study

    E-print Network

    Doney, Alex S. F.; Fischer, Bettina; Lee, Simon; Morris, Andrew D.; Leese, Graham P.; Palmer, Colin N. A.

    2005-11-25

    with altered lipid measures. We therefore sought to determine the effect of PPARA gene variation on susceptibility to myocardial infarction in patients with type 2 diabetes. 1810 subjects with type 2 diabetes from the prospective Go-DARTS study were genotyped...

  8. Bilirubin as a potential causal factor in type 2 diabetes risk: a Mendelian randomization study

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Ali; Deetman, Petronella E.; Corpeleijn, Eva; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gans, Rijk O.B.; Hillege, Hans L.; van der Harst, Pim; Stolk, Ronald P.; Navis, Gerjan; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Bakker, Stephan J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating bilirubin, a natural antioxidant, is associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the nature of the relationship remains unknown. We performed Mendelian randomization in a prospective cohort of 3,381 participants free of diabetes at baseline (aged 28-75 years; women, 52.6%). We used rs6742078 located in UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT1A1) locus as instrumental variable (IV) to study a potential causal effect of serum total bilirubin on T2D risk. T2D developed in a total of 210 (6.2%) participants during a median follow-up of 7.8 years. In adjusted analyses, rs6742078, which explained 19.5% of bilirubin variation, was strongly associated with total bilirubin (a 0.68-SD increase in bilirubin levels per T allele; P<1×10?122) and was also associated with T2D risk (OR 0.69 [95%CI, 0.54-0.90]; P=0.006). Per 1-SD increase in log-transformed bilirubin levels, we observed a 25% (OR 0.75 [95%CI, 0.62-0.92]; P=0.004) lower risk of T2D. In Mendelian randomization analysis, the causal risk reduction for T2D was estimated to be 42% (causal ORIVestimation per 1-SD increase in log-transformed bilirubin 0.58 [95%CI, 0.39-0.84]; P=0.005), which was comparable to the observational estimate (Durbin-Wu-Hausman chi-square test Pfor difference =0.19). These novel results provide evidence that elevated bilirubin is causally associated with risk of T2D and support its role as a protective determinant. PMID:25368098

  9. Leisure-Time Physical Activity and the Metabolic Syndrome in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Laaksonen, David E.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Lakka, Timo A.; Lindstr, Jaanaöm; Peltonen, Markku; Aunola, Sirkka; Keinánen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and resistance training on metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in a post hoc analysis of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study, a randomized controlled lifestyle counseling trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A cohort of 486 middle-aged overweight men and women with impaired glucose tolerance were followed for an average of 4.1 years. The intervention and control groups were combined in the analyses. LTPA was assessed by questionnaires, dietary intake by food records, and features of the MetS by anthropometric and biochemical measures annually. Resistance training sessions were documented for 137 participants. RESULTS Increased moderate-to-vigorous LTPA, even after adjustments for changes in dietary intakes of total and saturated fat, fiber, and energy, and change in BMI was associated with a greater likelihood for resolution (29.7 vs. 19.1%; P = 0.004 in the upper versus lower third of change) and a lesser likelihood for development (23.5 vs. 44.7%; P = 0.041) of the MetS. Of the components of the MetS, the increase in moderate-to-vigorous LTPA was associated most strongly with improvement of glycemia. Among the 137 participants who participated in resistance training, MetS components were favorable in individuals who were in the upper third of participation rate (median 51 times/year) compared with individuals in the lowest third (median 8.5 times/year). CONCLUSIONS Increased moderate-to-vigorous LTPA was associated with a decreased likelihood of developing the MetS and an increased likelihood of its resolution in individuals at high risk for type 2 diabetes. PMID:20413514

  10. Interaction Between Flames and Electric Fields Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between flames and electric fields has long been an interesting research subject that has theoretical importance as well as practical significance. Many of the reactions in a flame follow an ionic pathway: that is, positive and negative ions are formed during the intermediate steps of the reaction. When an external electric field is applied, the ions move according to the electric force (the Coulomb force) exerted on them. The motion of the ions modifies the chemistry because the reacting species are altered, it changes the velocity field of the flame, and it alters the electric field distribution. As a result, the flame will change its shape and location to meet all thermal, chemical, and electrical constraints. In normal gravity, the strong buoyant effect often makes the flame multidimensional and, thus, hinders the detailed study of the problem.

  11. DIABETES PREVENTION TRIAL TYPE 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Diabetes Prevention Trial--Type 1 (DPT-1) is a nationwide study to see if we can prevent or delay type 1 diabetes, also known as insulin-dependent diabetes. Nine medical centers and more than 350 clinics in the United States and Canada are taking part in the study.

  12. Prevention of gestational diabetes through lifestyle intervention: study design and methods of a Finnish randomized controlled multicenter trial (RADIEL)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal overweight, obesity and consequently the incidence of gestational diabetes are increasing rapidly worldwide. The objective of the study was to assess the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a combined diet and physical activity intervention implemented before, during and after pregnancy in a primary health care setting for preventing gestational diabetes, later type 2 diabetes and other metabolic consequences. Methods RADIEL is a randomized controlled multi-center intervention trial in women at high risk for diabetes (a previous history of gestational diabetes or prepregnancy BMI ?30 kg/m2). Participants planning pregnancy or in the first half of pregnancy were parallel-group randomized into an intervention arm which received lifestyle counseling and a control arm which received usual care given at their local antenatal clinics. All participants visited a study nurse every three months before and during pregnancy, and at 6 weeks, 6 and 12 months postpartum. Measurements and laboratory tests were performed on all participants with special focus on dietary and exercise habits and metabolic markers. Of the 728 women [mean age 32.5 years (SD 4.7); median parity 1 (range 0-9)] considered to be eligible for the study 235 were non-pregnant and 493 pregnant [mean gestational age 13 (range 6 to 18) weeks] at the time of enrollment. The proportion of nulliparous women was 29.8% (n?=?217). Out of all participants, 79.6% of the non-pregnant and 40.4% of the pregnant women had previous gestational diabetes and 20.4% of the non-pregnant and 59.6% of the pregnant women were recruited because of a prepregnancy BMI ?30 kg/m2. Mean BMI at first visit was 30.1 kg/m2 (SD 6.2) in the non-pregnant and 32.7 kg/m2 (SD 5.6) in the pregnant group. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first randomized lifestyle intervention trial, which includes, besides the pregnancy period, both the prepregnancy and the postpartum period. This study design also provides an opportunity to focus upon the health of the next generation. The study is expected to produce novel information on the optimal timing and setting of interventions and for allocating resources to prevent obesity and diabetes in women of reproductive age. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01698385 PMID:24524674

  13. Predictors of Study Completion and Withdrawal in a Randomized Clinical Trial of a Pediatric Diabetes Adherence Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Kimberly A.; Killian, Michael; Johnson, Suzanne Bennett; Silverstein, Janet H.; Deeb, Larry C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Loss of participants in randomized clinical trials threatens the validity of study findings. The purpose of this study was to determine pre-randomization predictors of study withdrawal throughout the course of a randomized clinical trial involving young children with type 1 diabetes and their primary caregivers. Methods An intervention to improve adherence to the diabetes treatment regimen was delivered as part of the child’s regular 3-month diabetes clinic visit. The study protocol involved 7 clinic visits across 18 months for the Immediate Treatment group and 9 clinic visits across 24 months for the Delayed Treatment group. Among those who completed the study and regardless of treatment group, participants were categorized into two groups: On-Time Completers (n = 41) and Late Completers (n = 39). Demographic, disease, and psychosocial characteristics of children and their primary caregivers measured prior to study randomization were tested for their association with the participants’ completion status (i.e., On-Time Completers, Late Completers, or Withdrawals). Results Of the 108 participants, 28 (25.9%) withdrew and 80 (74.1%) completed the study. On-Time Completers (i.e., study completed within 4 months of expected date) were more likely to have private insurance and primary caregivers with some college education. Late Completers (i.e., study completion took longer than 4 months) were more likely to be boys and to have primary caregivers who reported mild to moderate levels of depression. Children who subsequently withdrew from the study reported poorer diabetes-related quality of life and poorer school-related quality of life at study inception and were more likely to have primary caregivers who did not work outside the home. Conclusions Pre-randomization screening of participants on both demographic and psychological variables may help identify those at greatest risk for study withdrawal or poor study protocol adherence, permitting the investigators to develop retention strategies aimed at this high-risk group. PMID:19470311

  14. Study protocol of the Diabetes and Depression Study (DAD): a multi-center randomized controlled trial to compare the efficacy of a diabetes-specific cognitive behavioral group therapy versus sertraline in patients with major depression and poorly controlled diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is common in diabetes and associated with hyperglycemia, diabetes related complications and mortality. No single intervention has been identified that consistently leads to simultaneous improvement of depression and glycemic control. Our aim is to analyze the efficacy of a diabetes-specific cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBT) compared to sertraline (SER) in adults with depression and poorly controlled diabetes. Methods/Design This study is a multi-center parallel arm randomized controlled trial currently in its data analysis phase. We included 251 patients in 70 secondary care centers across Germany. Key inclusion criteria were: type 1 or 2 diabetes, major depression (diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, SCID) and hemoglobin A1C >7.5% despite current insulin therapy. During the initial phase, patients received either 50–200 mg/d sertraline or 10 CBT sessions aiming at the remission of depression and enhanced adherence to diabetes treatment and coping with diabetes. Both groups received diabetes treatment as usual. After 12 weeks of this initial open-label therapy, only the treatment-responders (50% depression symptoms reduction, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, 17-item version [HAMD]) were included in the subsequent one year study phase and represented the primary analysis population. CBT-responders received no further treatment, while SER-responders obtained a continuous, flexible-dose SER regimen as relapse prevention. Adherence to treatment was analyzed using therapeutic drug monitoring (measurement of sertraline and N-desmethylsertraline concentrations in blood serum) and by counting the numbers of CBT sessions received. Outcome assessments were conducted by trained psychologists blinded to group assignment. Group differences in HbA1c (primary outcome) and depression (HAMD, secondary outcome) between 1-year follow-up and baseline will be analyzed by ANCOVA controlling for baseline values. As primary hypothesis we expect that CBT leads to significantly greater improvement of glycemic control in the one year follow-up in treatment responders of the short term phase. Discussion The DAD study is the first randomized controlled trial comparing antidepressants to a psychological treatment in diabetes patients with depression. The study is investigator initiated and was supported by the ‘Förderprogramm Klinische Studien (Clinical Trials)’ and the ‘Competence Network for Diabetes mellitus’ funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (FKZ 01KG0505). Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN89333241. PMID:23915015

  15. Changes in Metabolic Health Status Over Time and Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yang, Hae Kyung; Ha, Hee-Sung; Lee, Jin-Hee; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Park, Yong-Moon; Yim, Hyeon-Woo; Kang, Moo-Il; Lee, Won-Chul; Son, Ho-Young; Yoon, Kun-Ho

    2015-10-01

    Metabolic health and obesity are not stable conditions, and changes in the status of these conditions might lead to different clinical outcomes. We aimed to determine whether changes in metabolic health status or obesity over time have any effect on the risk of future diabetes.Nondiabetic individuals (n?=?2692) from a population-based prospective cohort study with baseline and 2 follow-up examinations at 4-year intervals were included. Being "metabolically obese" (MO) was defined as being in the highest quartile of the TyG index (ln [fasting triglycerides (mg/dL)?×?fasting glucose (mg/dL)/2]), whereas falling into the lower 3 quartiles was regarded as being "metabolically healthy" (MH). Individuals were classified as "obese" (O) or "nonobese" (NO) using a body mass index of 25?kg/m as a cut-off. The risk of diabetes at year 8 was assessed according to changes of metabolic health status between year 0 and 4.Multivariate-adjusted relative risks (RRs) (95% confidence interval [CI]) of diabetes were significantly higher in individuals who retained the MONO phenotype (RR 3.72, 95% CI 2.10, 6.60) or who had progressed to MONO from the MHNO phenotype (RR 1.96, 95% CI 1.06, 3.61), whereas it was not significant in individuals who had improved to MHNO from the MONO phenotype (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.26, 1.74) compared with individuals who retained the MHNO phenotype. In contrast, obese individuals had significantly higher RRs for diabetes, independent of changes in metabolic health status, whereas weight reduction resulted in a decreased risk of diabetes. Sensitivity analysis using the presence or absence of the metabolic syndrome as a definition of metabolic health revealed similar results.Changes in metabolic health status were an independent risk factor for future diabetes in nonobese individuals, whereas general obesity had a greater contribution to the risk of obese individuals developing diabetes. These observations might imply a different intervention strategy for diabetes prevention according to obesity status. PMID:26448024

  16. Study of Auditory, Visual Reaction Time and Glycemic Control (HBA1C) in Chronic Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sembian, Umapathy; Babitha; N, Ethiya; K, Muthuselvi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is a disease of insulin deficiencyleads to micro and macro vascular disorder. Neuropathy is one of the major complication of chronic uncontrolled Diabetes affecting the Reaction time. Objectives: To study the correlation between the glycosylated HbA1C and Auditory, visual Reaction time in chronic Type II diabetes (40-60y) of on oral hypoglycemic drugs of>10 y duration in two groups (n-100 in each group , both Males & females) and compared within the study groups and also with the age matched control group (100). Materials and Methods: HbA1C–Glycosylated HbA1C was measured by Particle enhanced immunoturbidimetric test method. Auditory and visual reaction time (ART, VRT) were measured by PC 1000 Reaction timer for control & study groups i.e. Group-I – Chronic Type II DM for >10 y with HbA1c < 7.0, and Group II - chronic Type-IIDM for >10 y with HbA1c > 7.0 ie impaired glycemic control. Exclusion Criteria- Subjects with Auditory and visual disturbances, alcoholism and smoking. Statistical Analysis – One-way ANOVA. Using SPSS 21 software. Result: Both the groups had prolonged ART and VRT than controls. Among the study group, G-II (DM with HbA1C >7) had increased Auditory & Visual Reaction time than Group I which is statistically significant p-value <0.05. Conclusion: Impairment of sensory motor function of peripheral nervous system is more in chronic diabetic with less glycemic control ie., HbA1C>7 who have shown increased Auditory and Visual Reaction time than chronic DM with HbA1C<7.Severity of Peripheral neuropathy in Type II Diabetics could be due to elevated HbA1C. PMID:25386423

  17. Finding Needles in a Haystack: Application of Network Analysis and Target Enrichment Studies for the Identification of Potential Anti-Diabetic Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Fayaz, Shaik M.; Suvanish Kumar, Valsala S.; Rajanikant, Krishnamurthy G.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a debilitating metabolic disorder and remains a significant threat to public health. Herbal medicines have been proven to be effective anti-diabetic agents compared to synthetic drugs in terms of side effects. However, the complexity in their chemical constituents and mechanism of action, hinder the effort to discover novel anti-diabetic drugs. Hence, understanding the biological and chemical basis of pharmacological action of phytochemicals is essential for the discovery of potential anti-diabetic drugs. Identifying important active compounds, their protein targets and the pathways involved in diabetes would serve this purpose. In this context, the present study was aimed at exploring the mechanism of action of anti-diabetic plants phytochemicals through network and chemical-based approaches. This study also involves a focused and constructive strategy for preparing new effective anti-diabetic formulations. Further, a protocol for target enrichment was proposed, to identify novel protein targets for important active compounds. Therefore, the successive use of network analysis combined with target enrichment studies would accelerate the discovery of potential anti-diabetic phytochemicals. PMID:25396726

  18. "Obesity" and "Clinical Obesity" Men's understandings of obesity and its relation to the risk of diabetes: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Nicola F; Hayes, Louise; Unwin, Nigel C; Murtagh, Madeleine J

    2008-01-01

    Background The 2007 Wanless report highlights the ever increasing problem of obesity and the consequent health problems. Obesity is a significant cause of diabetes. An increasing evidence base suggests that in terms of reducing diabetes and CVD risk, it is better to be "fit and fat" than unfit and of normal weight. There has been very little previous research into the understandings that men in the general population hold about the issues of weight, exercise and health; we therefore undertook this study in order to inform the process of health promotion and diabetes prevention in this group. Methods A qualitative study in North East England General Practice using a purposive sample of men aged 25 and 45 years (selection process designed to include 'normal', 'overweight' and 'obese' men). One to one audio-recorded semi structured interviews focused on: overweight and obesity, diet, physical activity and diabetes. Transcripts were initially analysed using framework analysis. Emerging themes interlinked. Results The men in this study (n = 17) understand the word obesity differently from the clinical definition; "obesity" was used as a description of those with fat in a central distribution, and understandings of the term commonly take into account fitness as well as weight. Men in their late 30s and early 40s described becoming more aware of health issues. Knowledge of what constitutes a 'healthy lifestyle' was generally good, but men described difficulty acting upon this knowledge for various reasons e.g. increasing responsibilities at home and at work. Knowledge of diabetes and the link between obesity and diabetes was poor. Conclusion Men in this study had a complex understanding of the interlinked importance of weight and fitness in relation to health. Obesity is understood as a description of people with centrally distributed fat, in association with low fitness levels. There is a need to increase understanding of the causes and consequences of diabetes. Discussion of increased health awareness by men round the age of 40 may indicate a window of opportunity to intervene at this time. PMID:18789165

  19. Study of the cutaneous electric potentials and the perception threshold to an electric stimulus in diabetic patients with and without clinical neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ionescu-Tîrgovi?te, C; B?jenaru, O; Zugr?vescu, I; Doroban?u, E; Hartia, D; Dumitrescu, C; Che?a, D; Mincu, I

    1985-01-01

    Clinical heterogeneity of diabetic peripheral neuropathy could express a neurophysiological and electrophysiological heterogeneity possibly related with the dissociated metabolic susceptibility of the difference types of nerve fibres and endings. To evaluate the functional status of the skin autonomous nervous system and of the deep pain sensitivity system in diabetics we studied two electrophysiological parameters skin electrical potential (using Digital Multimeter 3466 Hewlet Packard, USA) and the perception threshold (microA) at an electrical stimulus (spike wave, 0.5 m sec duration) 1 cm deeply applied through 2 acupuncture needles placed 30 cm distance each other, in 3 groups: Ia-18 diabetic patients with clinical signs of neuropathy (12 M, 6 F, aged 55 +/- 17 yrs); Ib - 17 diabetic patients without clinical signs of diabetic neuropathy (12 M, 5 F, aged 57 +/- 16 yrs); I1 - 10 age and sex matched non-diabetic controls. Our data show: a higher mean value of the potential in the acupuncture points as against neighbour areas, both in non-diabetic control (- 111 +/- 25 mV v.s. -81 +/- 29 mV, p less than 0.05) and in diabetics (-85 +/- 43 mV v.s. -58 +/- 25 mV, p less than 0.01); a lower mean value of the electrical potentials in diabetic with clinical signs of neuropathy as against in those without clinical signs of neuropathy (-66 +/- 29 mV v.s. -108 +/- 43 mV, p less than 0.01): a higher mean value of the perception threshold in diabetics with clinical signs of neuropathy as against in diabetics without clinical signs of neuropathy (213 +/- 82 microA. v.s. 102 +/- 40 microA, p less than 0.01); a significant correlation (r = -0.81) between the perception threshold and the electrical potentials of the studied points. PMID:4048802

  20. Jupiter Environmental Research & Field Studies Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttemeyer, Bob

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development and workings of the Jupiter Environmental Research and Field Studies Academy that focuses on enabling both teachers and students to participate in real-life learning experiences. Discusses qualifications for admittance, curriculum, location, ongoing projects, students, academics, preparation for life, problem solving, and…

  1. Outdoor Education, Junior Biology Field Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aikman, John H.; And Others

    Field studies for grade nine and ten biology students are developed in this teacher and student guide for outdoor education. A small section is devoted to teacher pre-planning and final sections are concerned with equipment, audio-visual resources, and a large booklist. Twenty-three investigations related to earth science and biology topics are…

  2. Marine and Environmental Studies Field Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranston School Dept., RI.

    This laboratory manual was developed for a field-oriented high school oceanology program. The organization of the units includes a selection of supplementary activities to allow students to explore ocean studies in more depth. Included are 19 units. The units include biological oceanography, physical oceanography, and some social science topics. A…

  3. Thiazolidinediones and Risk of Long-Term Dialysis in Diabetic Patients with Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Hsin; Chiang, Ming-Han; Liu, Jia-Sin; Chang, Yu-Kang; Kuo, Ko-Lin; Hung, Szu-Chun; Tai, Hsin-Ling; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) reduce urinary albumin excretion and proteinuria in diabetic nephropathy. The effect of TZDs on hard renal outcome in diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unknown. We investigate the association of TZDs and risk of long-term dialysis or death in diabetic patients with advanced CKD. The nationwide population-based cohort study was conducted using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. From January 2000 to June 2009, 12350 diabetic patients with advanced CKD (serum creatinine levels greater than 6 mg/dL but not yet receiving renal replacement therapy) were selected for the study. We used multivariable Cox regression models and a propensity score-based matching technique to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for development of long-term dialysis and the composite outcome of long-term dialysis or death for TZD users (n=1224) as compared to nonusers (n=11126). During a median follow-up of 6 months, 8270 (67.0%) patients required long-term dialysis and 2593 (21.0%) patients died before starting long-term dialysis. Using propensity score matched analysis, we found TZD users were associated with a lower risk for long-term dialysis (HR, 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.74-0.86) and the composite outcome of long-term dialysis or death (HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.80-0.91). The results were consistent across most patient subgroups. Use of TZDs among diabetic patients with advanced CKD was associated with lower risk for progression to end-stage renal disease necessitating long-term dialysis or death. Further randomized controlled studies are required to validate this association. PMID:26083376

  4. Mining the human phenome using semantic web technologies: a case study for Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Jyotishman; Kiefer, Richard C; Bielinski, Suzette J; Chute, Christopher G

    2012-01-01

    The ability to conduct genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has enabled new exploration of how genetic variations contribute to health and disease etiology. However, historically GWAS have been limited by inadequate sample size due to associated costs for genotyping and phenotyping of study subjects. This has prompted several academic medical centers to form "biobanks" where biospecimens linked to personal health information, typically in electronic health records (EHRs), are collected and stored on large number of subjects. This provides tremendous opportunities to discover novel genotype-phenotype associations and foster hypothesis generation. In this work, we study how emerging Semantic Web technologies can be applied in conjunction with clinical and genotype data stored at the Mayo Clinic Biobank to mine the phenotype data for genetic associations. In particular, we demonstrate the role of using Resource Description Framework (RDF) for representing EHR diagnoses and procedure data, and enable federated querying via standardized Web protocols to identify subjects genotyped wi