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Sample records for diabetic neurogenic bladder

  1. Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dorsher, Peter T.; McIntosh, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented. PMID:22400020

  2. Neurogenic bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the cause. They often include symptoms of urinary incontinence . Symptoms of overactive bladder: Having to urinate too ... If you are having urinary incontinence, organizations are available for further information and support.

  3. Neuromodulation in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Melissa T.

    2016-01-01

    While neuromodulation is a well-established treatment option for patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder and urinary retention, its applicability to the neurogenic bladder population has only recently been examined more in depth. In this article we will discuss the outcomes, contraindications, and special considerations of sacral and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26904417

  4. Permanent neonatal diabetes with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita and neurogenic bladder - a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Goksen, Damla; Darcan, Sukran; Coker, Mahmut; Aksu, Güzide; Yildiz, Basak; Kara, Sinan; Kültürsay, Nilgün

    2006-10-01

    Neonatal diabetes mellitus is a rare (1/400 000 newborns) but potentially devastating condition, which may be transient or permanent; typical symptoms occur within the first 4 wk of life. The transient form is a developmental insulin production disorder that resolves postnatally. Fifty to 60% of cases can be seen as transient form. Cases that require lifelong insulin therapy can be described as permanent condition. This fraction of cases is less common than the transient form. There are no clinical features that can predict whether a neonate with diabetes mellitus but no other dysmorphology will eventually have permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) or transient neonatal diabetes mellitus. Some metabolic or genetic defects such as complete deficiency of glucokinase or heterozygous activating mutations of KCNJ11, encoding Kir6.2, were found in patients with PNDM. A preterm female infant with a gestational age of 36 wk was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit in the first hours of life due to prematurity and intra-uterine growth retardation. She was diagnosed as having arthrogryposis multiplex congenita on the first day. Hyperglycemia was detected on the third day of life, and she required insulin treatment. The patient is now 6 yr old with PNDM, arthrogryposis multiplex, neurogenic bladder, immune deficiency, constipation, and ichthyosis. Is this a new form of neonatal diabetes mellitus? PMID:17054450

  5. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  6. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Çetinel, Bülent; Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  7. Staphylococcus saprophyticus native valve endocarditis in a diabetic patient with neurogenic bladder: A case report.

    PubMed

    Magarifuchi, Hiroki; Kusaba, Koji; Yamakuchi, Hiroki; Hamada, Yohei; Urakami, Toshiharu; Aoki, Yosuke

    2015-09-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with 2-day history of malaise and dyspnea. He had mitral prolapse and type II diabetes mellitus with neurogenic bladder, which was cared for by catheterization on his own. On arrival the patient was in septic condition with hypoxemia, and physical examination revealed systolic murmur at the apex. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed vegetation of the mitral and the aortic valve. The presence of continuous bacteremia was confirmed by multiple sets of blood culture, whereby gram-positive cocci was retrieved and identified as Staphylococcus saprophyticus (S. saprophyticus) both phenotypically and genetically. Because two major criteria of the Modified Duke Criteria were met, the patient was diagnosed with native valve endocarditis due to S. saprophyticus. The urine culture was also positive for gram-positive cocci, phenotypically identified as Staphylococcus warneri, which was subsequently identified as S. saprophyticus with the use of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and MALDI-TOF MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry), indicating strongly that the intermittent catheterization-associated urinary tract infection resulted in bacteremia that eventually lead to infective endocarditis. This patient was treated with vancomycin and clindamycin. Because of multiple cerebral infarctions, the patient underwent mitral and aortic valve replacement on hospital day 5. Blood culture turned negative at 6th hospital day. Antibiotic therapy was continued for six weeks after surgery. The patient's clinical course was uneventful thereafter, and was discharged home. This is the first case report of native valve endocarditis caused by S. saprophyticus of confirmed urinary origin. PMID:26184852

  8. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can’t be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose. PMID:26904409

  9. UTIs in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Mona S; Mure, Amanda; Gomez, Christopher S

    2014-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) remain one of the most prevalent and frustrating morbidities for neurogenic bladder patients, and death attributed to urosepsis in the spinal cord injury (SCI) patient is higher when compared to the general population. Risk factors include urinary stasis, high bladder pressures, bladder stones, and catheter use. While classic symptoms of UTI include dysuria, increased frequency and urgency, neurogenic bladder patients present differently with increased spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary incontinence, and vague pains. Multiple modalities have been assessed for prevention including catheter type, oral supplements, bladder irrigation, detrusor injections and prophylactic antimicrobials. Of these, bladder inoculation with E. coli HU2117, irrigation with iAluRil(®), detrusor injections, and weekly prophylaxis with alternating antibiotics appear to have a positive reduction in UTI but require further study. Ultimately, treatment for symptomatic UTI should account for the varied flora and possible antibiotic resistances including relying on urine cultures to guide antibiotic therapy. PMID:25113150

  10. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  11. Optimizing therapy and management of neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, David

    2013-01-01

    Clinicians managing patients with neurogenic bladder (NGB) and neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) are faced with a myriad of complex choices when deciding on appropriate medical and/or surgical interventions to relieve bothersome symptoms associated with NGB and NDO, especially urinary incontinence. Therapies must provide maximum benefits while minimizing patients' risk for adverse events. A thorough knowledge and understanding of available and emerging medical and surgical treatment options for NGB/NDO is vital to assist clinicians in choosing appropriate treatment pathways and optimize response to therapy and individual outcomes. PMID:24495241

  12. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. PMID:26475949

  13. Management options for sphincteric deficiency in adults with neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Erik N.; Lenherr, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a very broad disease definition that encompasses varied disease and injury states affecting the bladder. The majority of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction do not have concomitant intrinsic sphincteric deficiency (ISD), but when this occurs the challenges of management of urinary incontinence from neurogenic bladder are compounded. There are no guidelines for surgical correction of ISD in adults and most of the literature on treatment of the problem comes from treatment of children with congenital diseases, such as myelomeningocele. Our goal, in this review, is to present some of the common surgical options for ISD [including artificial urinary sphincters, bladder slings, bladder neck reconstruction (BNR) and urethral bulking agents] and the evidence underlying these treatments in adults with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26904420

  14. Ureteral reimplantation in children with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Belloli, G P; Musi, L; Campobasso, P; Cattaneo, A

    1979-04-01

    The treatment of urologic complications from myelomeningocele and especially of vesico-renal reflux is a controversial problem. A series of 26 reimplanted ureters in 17 children, with good results in more than 85%, is reported. Ureteroneocystostomy, carried out with a few technical innovation, may represent a useful method for the treatment of vesico-renal reflux and obstruction of the uretero-vesical junction in neurogenic bladder associated with myelomeningocele. This surgical approach leads to the disappearance of the reflux, decrease of dilatation of the upper urinary tract and preservation of renal function in most cases; moreover, infection can be more easily controlled. Ureteral reimplantation should be preceded by periodic urethral dilatation, external transurethral sphincterotomy, and pharmacologic regulation in order to attempt to decrease urethral resistance. After successful surgery, it is possible to try to reeducate the bladder. Reimplantation should be preferred to permanent urinary diversion even if there is gross reflux. PMID:458534

  15. [Sacral neuromodulation for neurogenic bladder dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Kessler, T M; Wöllner, J; Kozomara, M; Mordasini, L; Mehnert, U

    2012-02-01

    Sacral neuromodulation (SNM) represents a promising option for managing treatment-refractory neurogenic bladder dysfunction. It remains to be seen, however, which types of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and which underlying neurological disorders best respond to SNM. Constant improvements in SNM have been achieved and it is now a minimally invasive approach performed under local anesthesia which should be considered before undertaking larger reconstructive procedures. An electrode is implanted in the S3 or S4 sacral foramen and during a test phase lasting for days to weeks the patient keeps a bladder diary to determine whether SNM has provided a relevant benefit. If the results of the test phase are positive, a neuromodulator is implanted in the gluteal area (or more rarely in the abdominal wall).The mechanism of action of SNM has not been completely clarified, but the afferent nerves most likely play a key role. It appears that SNM produces a modulation of medullary reflexes and brain centers by peripheral afferents. The implanted neuromodulation system does not lead to limitation of the patient's activities. However, it should be noted that high-frequency diathermy and unipolar electrocauterization are contraindicated in patients with neuromodulators, that during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy the focal point should not be in the direct vicinity of the neuromodulator or the electrode, that ultrasound and radiotherapy in the region of the implanted components should be avoided, that the neuromodulation should be discontinued in pregnancy, and that MRI examinations should only be conducted when urgently indicated and the neuromodulator is turned off. PMID:22269992

  16. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Humberto R; Hickling, Duane R

    2016-02-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥10(3) CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5-14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  17. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  18. Treatment of neurogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie

    2011-12-01

    Central or neurogenic diabetes insipidus results from a deficiency in antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or arginine-vasopressin (AVP). Treatment is based on replacement therapy with the hormone analog desmopressin (d-DAVP). d-DAVP can be administered subcutaneously to infants or patients with postoperative or posttraumatic brain injury being monitored for transient diabetes insipidus. Intranasal and oral forms are also available. The recently introduced lyophilisate, which melts under the tongue, has replaced the tablet form (recently withdrawn from the market in France) and provides better bioavailability. Irrespective of the mode of administration, it is usually the patient who finds the effective minimal dose necessary for a normal life, i.e. without excessive polyuria, particularly at night. Patient education is necessary to avoid the risk of water intoxication and hyponatremia. PMID:22071315

  19. Not all neurogenic bladders are the same: a proposal for a new neurogenic bladder classification system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder (NGB) has long been defined as a clinical entity that describes a heterogeneous collection of syndromes. The common theme is a bladder disorder concomitant with a neurologic disorder. This definition does not give the clinician much information about the bladder disorder, nor how to treat it, or even what the natural history of the disorder is likely to be. It may be time for a new classification scheme to better define the bladder defect and prognosis, as well as inform treatment. We propose a classification system based on seven categories, each having a neurologic defect in a distinct anatomic location. This is termed SALE (Stratify by Anatomic Location and Etiology). In addition, the presence or absence of bowel dysfunction and autonomic dysreflexia will be reported. In the future, as more definite prognostic information can be gleaned from biomarkers, we anticipate adding urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) and urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels to the definition. We expect the SALE system to efficiently describe a patient suffering from NGB and simultaneously inform the most appropriate treatment, follow-up regimen, and long-term prognosis. PMID:26904408

  20. Evaluation and Management of Neurogenic Bladder: What Is New in China?

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder (NB) or neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD), a dysfunction of the urinary bladder and urethra due to disease of the central nervous system or peripheral nerves, is a major global medical and social problem. Numerous nervous system abnormalities, such as: stroke, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, traumatic spinal cord injury, spinal cord tumors, congenital spina bifida, and diabetes, can cause NB/NLUTD. There are two major types of bladder control problems associated with NB/NLUTD: the bladder becomes either overactive or underactive depending on the nature, level, and extent of nerve damage. This review specifically focuses on the diagnosis and management of NB/NLUTD in China as well as on recent efforts to treat this disease. PMID:26266405

  1. Evaluation and Management of Neurogenic Bladder: What Is New in China?

    PubMed

    Liao, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder (NB) or neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD), a dysfunction of the urinary bladder and urethra due to disease of the central nervous system or peripheral nerves, is a major global medical and social problem. Numerous nervous system abnormalities, such as: stroke, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, traumatic spinal cord injury, spinal cord tumors, congenital spina bifida, and diabetes, can cause NB/NLUTD. There are two major types of bladder control problems associated with NB/NLUTD: the bladder becomes either overactive or underactive depending on the nature, level, and extent of nerve damage. This review specifically focuses on the diagnosis and management of NB/NLUTD in China as well as on recent efforts to treat this disease. PMID:26266405

  2. A case of idiopathic diabetes insipidus presented with bilateral hydroureteronephrosis and neurogenic bladder: A pediatric case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Ozgur Haki; Kivrak, Mithat; Sahin, Aytac; Akan, Serkan; Urkmez, Ahmet; Verit, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition with heterogeneous clinical symptoms characterized by polyuria (urine output >4 mL/kg/hr) and polydipsia (water intake >2 L/m 2/d). In children, acquired nephrogenic DI (NDI) is more common than central DI (CDI). Diagnosis is based on the presence of high plasma osmolality and low urinary osmolality with significant water diuresis. A water deprivation test with vasopressin challenge, though has limitations, is done to differentiate NDI from CDI and diagnose their incomplete forms. Neonates and young infants are better managed with hydration therapy alone. Older children with CDI are treated with desmopressin (1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin, dDAVP). Its oral form is safe, highly effective and has dosing flexibility. We report a case of an 8-year-old male patient with CDI with severe bilateral non-obstructive hydronephrosis and megaureter. Dramatic clinical and radiological responses to dDAVP treatment were achieved and therapy reduced urine volume and led to marked radiological improvement in hydronephrosis. PMID:26600892

  3. A case of idiopathic diabetes insipidus presented with bilateral hydroureteronephrosis and neurogenic bladder: A pediatric case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Ozgur Haki; Kivrak, Mithat; Sahin, Aytac; Akan, Serkan; Urkmez, Ahmet; Verit, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition with heterogeneous clinical symptoms characterized by polyuria (urine output >4 mL/kg/hr) and polydipsia (water intake >2 L/m (2)/d). In children, acquired nephrogenic DI (NDI) is more common than central DI (CDI). Diagnosis is based on the presence of high plasma osmolality and low urinary osmolality with significant water diuresis. A water deprivation test with vasopressin challenge, though has limitations, is done to differentiate NDI from CDI and diagnose their incomplete forms. Neonates and young infants are better managed with hydration therapy alone. Older children with CDI are treated with desmopressin (1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin, dDAVP). Its oral form is safe, highly effective and has dosing flexibility. We report a case of an 8-year-old male patient with CDI with severe bilateral non-obstructive hydronephrosis and megaureter. Dramatic clinical and radiological responses to dDAVP treatment were achieved and therapy reduced urine volume and led to marked radiological improvement in hydronephrosis. PMID:26600892

  4. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series. PMID:26904412

  5. Preventing kidney injury in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Larijani, Faezeh Javadi; Moghtaderi, Mastaneh; Hajizadeh, Nilofar; Assadi, Farahnak

    2013-12-01

    The most common cause of neurogenic bladder dysfunction (NBD) in newborn infants is myelomeningocele. The pathophysiology almost always involves the bladder detrusor sphincter dyssynergy (DSD), which if untreated can cause severe and irreversible damage to the upper and lower urinary tracts. Early diagnosis and adequate management of NBD is critical to prevent both renal damage and bladder dysfunction and to reduce chances for the future surgeries. Initial investigation of the affected newborn infant includes a renal and bladder ultrasound, measurement of urine residual, determination of serum creatinine level, and urodynamics study. Voiding cystogram is indicated when either hydronephrosis or DSD is present. The main goal of treatment is prevention of urinary tract deterioration and achievement of continuance at an appropriate age. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) in combination with anticholinergic (oxybutynin) and antibiotics are instituted in those with high filling and voiding pressures, DSD and/or high grade reflux immediately after the myelomeningocele is repaired. Botulium toxin-A injection into detrusor is a safe alternative in patients with insufficient response or significant side effects to anticholinergic (oral or intravesical instillation) therapy. Surgery is an effective alternative in patients with persistent detrusor hyperactivity and/or dyssynergic detrusor sphincter despites of the CIC and maximum dosage of anticholinergic therapy. Children with NBD require care from a multidisciplinary team approach consisting of pediatricians, neurosurgeon, urologist, nephrologists, orthopedic surgeon, and other allied medical specialists. PMID:24498490

  6. Bibliometric profile of neurogenic bladder in the literature: a 20-year bibliometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuan; Qu, Bo; Shen, Yan; Su, Xiao-jing; Dong, Xiao-yan; Chen, Xue-mei; Zhou, Yu-hong; Pi, Hong-ying

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a dysfunction of the lower urinary tract caused by nervous system disorder. We investigated the trends in publication of articles under the topic “neurogenic bladder” using bibliometric analysis. Articles on neurogenic bladder, published between 1995 and 2014, were retrieved from the ISI Web of Science citation database. We analyzed the search results for authors, countries, institutions, journals, and top-cited papers. A total of 1,904 articles were retrieved. There was a small increase in the number of articles on neurogenic bladder from 1995 (n = 43) to 2014 (n = 117). The USA was the leading country in the total number of articles (n = 598). However, the number of publications from China has rapidly increased, and China was ranked second in 2014. Emmanuel Chartier-Kastler (n = 65) was the most productive author, and University of Paris VI (Paris 6) (n = 61) was the most productive institution. The Journal of Urology published the greatest number of articles on this topic (n = 285). Articles on neurogenic bladder were often published in a professional journal under the category Urology & Nephrology, Neurosciences & Neurology, or Rehabilitation. Visualization analysis based on co-citation networks was conducted using CiteSpace III. Visualization analysis revealed that the hot spots in neurogenic bladder were botulinum toxin-A, prazosin, bethanechol, and afferent pathways. These findings provide new insight into the publication trends and hot spots in neurogenic bladder. PMID:26109957

  7. The role of botulinum toxin A in treating neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Weckx, Filip; Tutolo, Manuela; De Ridder, Dirk; Van der Aa, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) can result in lower and upper urinary tract complications and eventually even in end-stage kidney failure. Since the driving force of this clinical cascade is high bladder pressure, controlling intravesical pressure in NDO patients improves both quality of life and life-expectancy in these patients. Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) has proven its efficacy in reducing intravesical pressure and in reducing incontinence episodes. BTX-A also improves quality of life in patients with NDO. Both onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox(®), Allergan, Irvine, USA) and abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport(®), Ipsen, Paris, France) have a level A recommendation for NDO-treatment. The recommended dose for intradetrusor injections in NDO patients is 200 U of onabotulinumtoxinA or 500 U of abobotulinumtoxinA. The drug is generally administered extratrigonal in the detrusor muscle, via cystoscopic guided injection at 20 sites in 1 mL injections. Intradetrusor BTX-A injections are safe, with mostly local complications such as urinary tract infection and high post-void residual or retention. The effect of the toxin lasts for approximately 9 months. Repeat injections can be performed without loss of efficacy. Different injection techniques, novel ways of BTX-A administration, eliminating the need for injection or new BTX-A types with better/longer response rates could change the field in the future. PMID:26904413

  8. The role of botulinum toxin A in treating neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Weckx, Filip; Tutolo, Manuela; De Ridder, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) can result in lower and upper urinary tract complications and eventually even in end-stage kidney failure. Since the driving force of this clinical cascade is high bladder pressure, controlling intravesical pressure in NDO patients improves both quality of life and life-expectancy in these patients. Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) has proven its efficacy in reducing intravesical pressure and in reducing incontinence episodes. BTX-A also improves quality of life in patients with NDO. Both onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox®, Allergan, Irvine, USA) and abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport®, Ipsen, Paris, France) have a level A recommendation for NDO-treatment. The recommended dose for intradetrusor injections in NDO patients is 200 U of onabotulinumtoxinA or 500 U of abobotulinumtoxinA. The drug is generally administered extratrigonal in the detrusor muscle, via cystoscopic guided injection at 20 sites in 1 mL injections. Intradetrusor BTX-A injections are safe, with mostly local complications such as urinary tract infection and high post-void residual or retention. The effect of the toxin lasts for approximately 9 months. Repeat injections can be performed without loss of efficacy. Different injection techniques, novel ways of BTX-A administration, eliminating the need for injection or new BTX-A types with better/longer response rates could change the field in the future. PMID:26904413

  9. Management of detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia in neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, W; Corcos, J

    2011-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects 11.5 to 53.4 individuals per million of the population in developed countries each year. SCI is caused by trauma, although it can also result from myelopathy, myelitis, vascular disease or arteriovenous malformations and multiple sclerosis. Patients with complete lesions of the spinal cord between spinal cord level T6 and S2, after they recover from spinal shock, generally exhibit involuntary bladder contractions without sensation, smooth sphincter synergy, but with detrusor striated sphincter dyssynergia (DESD). Those with lesions above spinal cord level T6 may experience, in addition, smooth sphincter dyssynergia and autonomic hyperreflexia. DESD is a debilitating problem in patients with SCI. It carries a high risk of complications, and even life expectancy can be affected. Nearly half of the patients with untreated DESD will develop deleterious urologic complications, due to high intravesical pressures, resulting in urolithiasis, urinary tract infection (UTI), vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), hydronephrosis, obstructive uropathy, and renal failure. The mainstay of treatment is the use of antimuscarinics and catheterization, but in those for whom this is not possible external sphincterotomy has been a last resort option. External sphincterotomy is associated with significant risks, including haemorrhage; erectile dysfunction and the possibility of redo procedures. Over the last decade alternatives have been investigated, such as urethral stents and intrasphincteric botulinum toxin injection. In this review, we will cover neurogenic DESD, with emphasis on definition, classifications, diagnosis and different therapeutic options available. PMID:22081065

  10. Bladder wall thickness in the assessment of neurogenic bladder: a translational discussion of current clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Renea M; Cheng, Earl Y

    2016-01-01

    The prospective trial by Kim et al. "Can Bladder Wall Thickness Predict Videourodynamic Findings in Children with Spina Bifida?" published in Journal of Urology investigated the measurement of bladder wall thickness (BWT) as a non-invasive assessment tool for lower urinary tract changes in neurogenic bladder (NGB). In this study, no significant association was observed between BWT and high-risk urodynamic parameters. This editorial discusses the basic science of bladder wall thickening as well as prior studies relating wall thickness to clinical parameters. Although Kim et al. provide a unique literature contribution in terms of assessment of BWT at defined percent cystometric capacity, specific aspects of study methodology and population may have contributed to a lack of correlation with high-risk urodynamic findings. The application of non-invasive modalities to lower urinary tract assessment of NGB remains a promising and relevant area of future research to prevent progression to end stage lower urinary tract changes for all individuals with spina bifida. PMID:26889485

  11. Bladder wall thickness in the assessment of neurogenic bladder: a translational discussion of current clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Renea M.

    2016-01-01

    The prospective trial by Kim et al. “Can Bladder Wall Thickness Predict Videourodynamic Findings in Children with Spina Bifida?” published in Journal of Urology investigated the measurement of bladder wall thickness (BWT) as a non-invasive assessment tool for lower urinary tract changes in neurogenic bladder (NGB). In this study, no significant association was observed between BWT and high-risk urodynamic parameters. This editorial discusses the basic science of bladder wall thickening as well as prior studies relating wall thickness to clinical parameters. Although Kim et al. provide a unique literature contribution in terms of assessment of BWT at defined percent cystometric capacity, specific aspects of study methodology and population may have contributed to a lack of correlation with high-risk urodynamic findings. The application of non-invasive modalities to lower urinary tract assessment of NGB remains a promising and relevant area of future research to prevent progression to end stage lower urinary tract changes for all individuals with spina bifida. PMID:26889485

  12. Bladder neck closure and suprapubic catheter placement as definitive management of neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Colli, Janet; Lloyd, L. Keith

    2011-01-01

    Objective Surgical management for neurogenic bladder may require abandonment of the native urethra due to intractable urinary incontinence, irreparable urethral erosion, severe scarring from previous transurethral procedures, or urethrocutaneous fistula. In these patients, bladder neck closure (BNC) excludes the native urethra and provides continence while preserving the antireflux mechanism of the native ureters. This procedure is commonly combined with ileovesicostomy or continent catheterizable stoma, with or without augmentation enterocystoplasty. Alternatively, BNC can be paired with suprapubic catheter diversion. This strategy does not require a bowel segment, resulting in shorter operative times and less opportunity for bowel-related morbidity. The study purpose is to examine preoperative characteristics, indications, complications, and long-term maintenance of renal function of BNC patients. Methods A retrospective review of medical records of 35 patients who underwent BNC with suprapubic catheter placement from 1998 to 2007 by a single surgeon (LKL) was completed. Results Neurogenic bladder was attributable to spinal cord injury in 71%, 23% had multiple sclerosis, and 9% had cerebrovascular accident. Indications for BNC included severe urethral erosion in 80%, decubitus ulcer exacerbated by urinary incontinence in 34%, urethrocutaneous fistula in 11%, and other indications in 9%. The overall complication rate was 17%. All but two patients were continent at follow-up. Forty-nine per cent of patients had imaging available for review, none of which showed deterioration of the upper tracts. Conclusions Our results suggest that BNC in conjunction with suprapubic catheter diversion provides an excellent chance at urethral continence with a reasonable complication rate. PMID:21756565

  13. Bioimpedance based monitoring system for people with neurogenic dysfunction of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Palla, Alessandro; Rossi, Stefano; Fanucci, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Patients with impaired bladder volume sensation have the necessity to monitor bladder level in order to avoid urinary tract infections and urinary reflux that can lead to renal failure. In this paper the the effectiveness of an embedded and wearable solution for bladder volume monitoring using the bioimpedance measurement is tested. Data are streamed real-time using Bluetooth wireless technology. The bioimpedance measurements on a healthy subject prove the effectiveness of the proposed solution. In the future the system will be evaluated in real world scenarios with patients affected by spinal paralysis and bladder neurogenic dysfunction. PMID:26294580

  14. Urodynamic and physiologic patterns associated with the common causes of neurogenic bladder in adults

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Andrew Charles

    2016-01-01

    The clinical presentation of the neurogenic bladder can be as vast as the pathologic causes however urodynamics (UDS) can help guide clinical decision-making and help simplify a complex disease state. UDS may be considered as the gold standard in helping to break down complex and multifactorial voiding dysfunction into manageable goals; these include protecting the upper tracts, limiting urinary tract infections (UTI) via avoiding urinary stasis, and maintaining quality of life. Included within are examples of normal to pathologic tracings including normal filling and voiding, detrusor sphincteric coordination, changes in compliance, etc. Additionally we have provided expected UDS findings based on neurogenic disease process, including but not limited to, Parkinson’s, dementia, multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury based on lesion location. Pattern recognition and understanding of UDS can help lead to quality of life improvements and optimal management for the patient with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. PMID:26904410

  15. Acupuncture for neurogenic bladder due to spinal cord injury: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Liu, Huilin; Liu, Zhishun; Wang, Linpeng

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neurogenic bladder is one of the most common complications following spinal cord injury (SCI). In China, acupuncture therapy is a common treatment for neurogenic bladder due to SCI, but its effects and safety remain uncertain. A protocol is described for a systematic review to investigate the beneficial effects and safety of acupuncture for neurogenic bladder due to SCI. Methods and analysis Eight databases will be searched from their inception: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, Embase, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), the VIP database, the Wanfang database, the China Doctoral Dissertations Full-text Database (CDFD) and the China Master's Theses Full-text Database (CMFD). Any clinical randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and the first period of randomised cross-over studies related to acupuncture for neurogenic bladder due to SCI will be included. Outcomes will include change in urinary symptoms, urodynamic tests, clinical assessment and quality of life (QoL). The incidence of adverse events will be assessed as the safety outcome. Study selection, data extraction and quality assessment will be performed independently by two reviewers. Assessment of risk of bias, data synthesis and subgroup analysis will be carried out using Review Manager software. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval is not required as this is a protocol for a systematic review. The findings of this systematic review will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number PROSPERO (CRD42014010448). PMID:25208851

  16. Complications of untreated and ineffectively treated neurogenic bladder dysfunctions in children: our own practical classification.

    PubMed

    Kroll, P; Zachwieja, J

    2016-04-01

    The neurogenic dysfunctions of the detrusor and the sphincter are caused by either a known congenital defect of the nervous system or by acquired damage to the nervous system. In patients with idiopathic bladder dysfunctions neurological examinations fail to reveal any pathology in the nervous system. The treatment strategy for the patient with detrusor-sphincter dysfunction should be based on a comprehensive functional and morphological evaluation. Clean Intermittent Catheterization is mandatory if voiding is ineffective. Reduced bladder capacity related to detrusor overactivity and decreased bladder walls compliance is successfully managed conservatively with oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment prevents complications in the majority of patients. However, despite proper conservative treatment, some patients still develop complications. We propose our own practical classification of complications characteristic for the bladder and sphincter dysfunctions: 1. Urinary tract infections; 2. Urolithiasis; 3. Anatomic changes in the lower urinary tract; 4. Anatomic changes in the upper urinary tract; 5. Functional disturbances of kidneys parenchyma; 6. Urinary incontinence. Proposed practical classification of complications of bladder and sphincter dysfunctions is clear and simple. This classification can be used both in children with neurogenic and non-neurogenic dysfunctions. It is helpful in planning follow-up procedures and evaluation of treatment results. PMID:27097940

  17. Congenital causes of neurogenic bladder and the transition to adult care

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The population of patients with congenital genitourinary disorders has unique healthcare demands that require an additional interpersonal and medical skillset. Adults with congenital neurogenic bladder may have complex urinary anatomy, abnormal bladder function and atypical voiding mechanisms. While initial surgery and care of these patients is typically managed by a pediatric urologist, growth and development into adulthood necessitates transition of care to an adult care team. Failure of transition to adult care has been demonstrated to result in lower quality healthcare and increased risk of developing preventable complications. PMID:26904411

  18. [The treatment of neurogenic hyperreflexic bladder dysfunctions in girls with low-intensity laser radiation].

    PubMed

    Kosilov, K V; Itskovich, A I; Orekhov, V R

    1995-01-01

    120 girls were investigated for the efficacy of three methods of treatment: conventional, infrared laser radiation on the projection of the bladder plus He-Ne laser radiation on biologically active points (BAP), red He-Ne laser BAP radiation. All the patients suffered from neurogenic hyperreflexic dysfunctions of the bladder, 99.8% had the diagnosis of vegetovascular dystonia, 94.9% had sympathetic-tonic or mixed patterns. The combined laser exposure brought about the greatest response rate-90.0%. PMID:7785111

  19. Management of neurogenic bladder in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Phé, Véronique; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Panicker, Jalesh N

    2016-05-01

    Lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction is common in patients with multiple sclerosis and is a major negative influence on the quality of life of these patients. The most commonly reported symptoms are those of the storage phase, of which detrusor overactivity is the most frequently reported urodynamic abnormality. The clinical evaluation of patients' LUT symptoms should include a bladder diary, uroflowmetry followed by measurement of post-void residual urine volume, urinalysis, ultrasonography, assessment of renal function, quality-of-life assessments and sometimes urodynamic investigations and/or cystoscopy. The management of these patients requires a multidisciplinary approach. Intermittent self-catheterization is the preferred option for management of incomplete bladder emptying and urinary retention. Antimuscarinics are the first-line treatment for patients with storage symptoms. If antimuscarinics are ineffective, or poorly tolerated, a range of other approaches, such as intradetrusor botulinum toxin A injections, tibial nerve stimulation and sacral neuromodulation are available, with varying levels of evidence in patients with multiple sclerosis. Surgical procedures should be performed only after careful selection of patients. Stress urinary incontinence owing to sphincter deficiency remains a therapeutic challenge, and is only managed surgically if conservative measures have failed. Multiple sclerosis has a progressive course, therefore, patients' LUT symptoms require regular, long-term follow-up monitoring. PMID:27030526

  20. The various types of neurogenic bladder dysfunction: an update of current therapeutic concepts.

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, H

    1990-05-01

    weak reflex detrusor contractions are present. (3) With the combination of an areflexive or hyporeflexive detrusor and a flaccid pelvic floor, passive voiding by abdominal straining or by the Credé manoeuvre is usually recommended, but should be replaced by CIC if this mechanism of bladder emptying creates unphysiological high and dangerous intravesical pressures, or if vesico-uretero-renal reflux is present. Neurogenic urinary stress incontinence is usually associated with this type of lesion and can be successfully treated by the implantation of an artificial urinary sphincter (Scott). However in two thirds of the patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction, additional, usually operative treatment is necessary to meet the criteria for implantation. Moreover, a 30% rate of repair operations must be accepted by patients, but is becoming less frequently required with an improved design of the device.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2235029

  1. Neurogenic bladder: Highly selective rhizotomy of specific dorsal rootlets maybe a better choice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Genying; Zhou, Mouwang; Wang, Wenting; Zeng, Fanshuo

    2016-02-01

    Spinal cord injury results not only in motor and sensory dysfunctions, but also in loss of normal urinary bladder functions. A number of clinical studies were focused on the strategies for improvement of functions of the bladder. Completely dorsal root rhizotomy or selective specific S2-4 dorsal root rhizotomy suppress autonomic hyper-reflexia but have the same defects: it could cause detrusor and sphincter over-relaxation and loss of reflexive erection in males. So precise operation needs to be considered. We designed an experimental trail to test the possibility on the basis of previous study. We found that different dorsal rootlets which conduct impulses from the detrusor or sphincter can be distinguished by electro-stimulation in SD rats. Highly selective rhizotomy of specific dorsal rootlets could change the intravesical pressure and urethral perfusion pressure respectively. We hypothese that for neurogenic bladder following spinal cord injury, highly selective rhizotomy of specific dorsal rootlets maybe improve the bladder capacity and the detrusor sphincter dyssynergia, and at the same time, the function of other pelvic organ could be maximize retainment. PMID:26643667

  2. Optimal bladder diary duration for patients with suprapontine neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinidis, Charalampos; Kratiras, Zisis; Samarinas, Michael; Skriapas, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To identify the minimum bladder diary's length required to furnish reliable documentation of LUTS in a specific cohort of patients suffering from neurogenic urinary dysfunction secondary to suprapontine pathology. Materials and Methods: From January 2008 to January 2014, patients suffering from suprapontine pathology and LUTS were requested to prospectively complete a bladder diary form for 7 consecutive days. Micturitions per day, excreta per micturition, urgency and incontinence episodes and voided volume per day were evaluated from the completed diaries. We compared the averaged records of consecutive days (2-6 days) to the total 7 days records for each patient's diary, seeking the minimum diary's length that could provide records comparable to the 7 days average, the reference point in terms of reliability. Results: From 285 subjects, 94 male and 69 female patients enrolled in the study. The records of day 1 were significantly different from the average of the 7 days records in every parameter, showing relatively small correlation and providing insufficient documentation. Correlations gradually increased along the increase in diary's duration. According to our results a 3-day duration bladder diary is efficient and can provide results comparable to a 7 day length for four of our evaluated parameters. Regarding incontinence episodes, 3 days seems inadequate to furnish comparable results, showing a borderline difference. Conclusions: A 3-day diary can be used, as its reliability is efficient regarding number of micturition per day, excreta per micturition, episodes of urgency and voided volume per day. PMID:27564288

  3. Evaluation of educational content of YouTube videos relating to neurogenic bladder and intermittent catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Matthew; Stothers, Lynn; Lazare, Darren; Tsang, Brian; Macnab, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Many patients conduct internet searches to manage their own health problems, to decide if they need professional help, and to corroborate information given in a clinical encounter. Good information can improve patients’ understanding of their condition and their self-efficacy. Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) featuring neurogenic bladder (NB) require knowledge and skills related to their condition and need for intermittent catheterization (IC). Methods: Information quality was evaluated in videos accessed via YouTube relating to NB and IC using search terms “neurogenic bladder intermittent catheter” and “spinal cord injury intermittent catheter.” Video content was independently rated by 3 investigators using criteria based on European Urological Association (EAU) guidelines and established clinical practice. Results: In total, 71 videos met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 12 (17%) addressed IC and 50 (70%) contained information on NB. The remaining videos met inclusion criteria, but did not contain information relevant to either IC or NB. Analysis indicated poor overall quality of information, with some videos with information contradictory to EAU guidelines for IC. High-quality videos were randomly distributed by YouTube. IC videos featuring a healthcare narrator scored significantly higher than patient-narrated videos, but not higher than videos with a merchant narrator. About half of the videos contained commercial content. Conclusions: Some good-quality educational videos about NB and IC are available on YouTube, but most are poor. The videos deemed good quality were not prominently ranked by the YouTube search algorithm, consequently user access is less likely. Study limitations include the limit of 50 videos per category and the use of a de novo rating tool. Information quality in videos with healthcare narrators was not higher than in those featuring merchant narrators. Better material is required to improve patients

  4. Neurogenic Bladder and Urodynamic Outcomes in Patients with Spinal Cord Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urodynamics (UDs) are routine in traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), but there are few reports regarding nontraumatic spinal cord myelopathy (SCM) patients. Purpose: To describe the neurogenic bladder and UD outcomes in SCM patients and determine whether the UD recommendations result in clinically important changes to bladder management. Methods: This retrospective case study examined a series of SCM patients admitted to a spinal rehabilitation service who underwent UDs between January 1, 2000 and June 30, 2010. Results: Sixty-five UD tests were performed a median of 7 months post SCM. Most (n = 34; 57%) patients were male, and the median age was 60 years. Most patients (n = 46; 77%) were paraplegic and were continent of urine (n = 38; 58%). Thirty-five (46%) patients voided on sensation, 26 (40%) performed intermittent self-catheterization, and 9 (14%) had an indwelling catheter. The most common UD finding was overactive detrusor with no dysynergia (n = 31; 48%), followed by overactive detrusor with sphincter dysynergia (n = 16; 25%) and detrusor areflexia/underactive (n = 12; 18%). Key UD findings were median cystometric capacity 414 mL (interquartile range [IQR], 300–590), median maximum detrusor contraction 49.5 cmH2O (IQR, 25–85), and median residual volume post voiding 100 mL (IQR, 5–200). The recommendations for changes to bladder management following UDs resulted in clinically important changes to existing strategies in 57 studies (88%). Conclusions: Future studies should ascertain whether our screening protocol is appropriate, and a longer-term follow-up should examine the relationship between UD recommendations and prevention of complications. PMID:26363592

  5. Stimulation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels inhibits neurogenic contraction of human bladder from patients with urinary symptoms and reverses acetic acid-induced bladder hyperactivity in rats.

    PubMed

    La Fuente, José M; Fernández, Argentina; Cuevas, Pedro; González-Corrochano, Rocío; Chen, Mao Xiang; Angulo, Javier

    2014-07-15

    We have analysed the effects of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BK) stimulation on neurogenic and myogenic contraction of human bladder from healthy subjects and patients with urinary symptoms and evaluated the efficacy of activating BK to relief bladder hyperactivity in rats. Bladder specimens were obtained from organ donors and from men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Contractions elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and carbachol (CCh) were evaluated in isolated bladder strips. in vivo cystometric recordings were obtained in anesthetized rats under control and acetic acid-induced hyperactive conditions. Neurogenic contractions of human bladder were potentiated by blockade of BK and small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK) but were unaffected by the blockade of intermediate calcium-activated potassium channels (IK). EFS-induced contractions were inhibited by BK stimulation with NS-8 or NS1619 or by SK/IK stimulation with NS309 (3µM). CCh-induced contractions were not modified by blockade or stimulation of BK, IK or SK. The anti-cholinergic agent, oxybutynin (0.3µM) inhibited either neurogenic or CCh-induced contractions. Neurogenic contractions of bladders from BPH patients were less sensitive to BK inhibition and more sensitive to BK activation than healthy bladders. The BK activator, NS-8 (5mg/kg; i.v.), reversed bladder hyperactivity induced by acetic acid in rats, while oxybutynin was ineffective. NS-8 did not significantly impact blood pressure or heart rate. BK stimulation specifically inhibits neurogenic contractions in patients with urinary symptoms and relieves bladder hyperactivity in vivo without compromising bladder contractile capacity or cardiovascular safety, supporting its potential therapeutic use for relieving bladder overactivity. PMID:24747752

  6. The effect of spinal cord-injury level on the outcome of neurogenic bladder treatment using OnabotulinumtoxinA

    PubMed Central

    Al Taweel, Waleed; Alzyoud, Khalil Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to report the effectiveness and safety OnabotulinumtoxinA (Botox, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) intradetrusor injections in spinal cord-injured (SCI) patients with refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity. And to assess the result based on SCI level. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the chart of 103 patients with neurogenic bladder secondary to SCI at the rehab center who received OnabotulinumtoxinA in our Neurourology Department for treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms between January 2007 and December 2013. All patients had a clinical examination, urinalysis, and an urodynamic study at baseline and 3 months after treatment as well as a visual analogue scale (VAS; range scale: 0–10) and a bladder diary checked for 3 days. 300 IU of OnabotulinumtoxinA, detrusor muscle injections were performed in 30 sites under cystoscopic guidance. Outcome measures included frequency of urge urinary incontinence collected by bladder diaries; changes in urodynamic parameters such as maximum cystometric bladder capacity, reflex volume, maximum detrusor pressure; side-effects; antimuscarinic drug consumption and quality of life (QOL) measured with VAS. Results: The study includes 32 female and 71 male with a mean patient age of 29 years (range: 18–56 year). The effect of Botox injection on bladder function was observed within 1–2 week after treatment. The urodynamic parameters were improved significantly after treatment compared with baseline values. There were significant reductions in the frequencies of incontinence episodes after treatment as seen in the voiding diary. A significant improvement in patient satisfaction was found after treatment which was expressed on the VAS assessment, with an improvement of the mean of 3 points. Patients with thoracic and lumbar injury have better result compare to cervical injury patients. The earliest recurrence of clinical symptoms was at 10 weeks. Overall, the mean duration of symptomatic improvement was 8

  7. [Spinal lipoma with a dural closure defect as a cause of neurogenic bladder and chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Eichler, I; Ungersböck, K; Waldhauser, F; Balzar, E; Nürnberger, N; Pflüger, H; Frisch, H

    1986-04-01

    It is reported on a 6-year-old boy, in whom 3 years after the appearance of a neurogenic disturbance of the urinary bladder a lipoma in the spinal canal of the inferior thoracic region was diagnosed myelographically. The operative removal of the growing and displacing fatty tissue which by a (congenital?) dural gap continued in epidural direction indeed resulted in a far-reaching regression of the paresis of the lower extremities, not, however, in an improvement of the urological picture of the disease. The renal insufficiency caused by the hydronephrosis was no more reversible, which emphasizes the importance of the early diagnosis of this relatively infrequent malformation. PMID:3727820

  8. Bladder stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as: Bladder diverticulum Enlarged prostate Neurogenic bladder Urinary tract infection Almost all bladder stones occur in men. Bladder ... stream Pain, discomfort in the penis Signs of urinary tract infection (such as fever, pain when urinating, and need ...

  9. Erythromycin induces supranormal gall bladder contraction in diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Catnach, S M; Ballinger, A B; Stevens, M; Fairclough, P D; Trembath, R C; Drury, P L; Watkins, P J

    1993-01-01

    Gall bladder motor function is impaired in some patients with diabetes. It has been suggested that the abnormalities of gall bladder motility are confined to those patients with autonomic neuropathy. Erythromycin, a motilin receptor agonist, causes gall bladder contraction in both normal subjects and patients with gall stones with impaired gall bladder emptying. The effect of erythromycin on gall bladder motility in seven patients with diabetes with an autonomic neuropathy, six patients with diabetes without autonomic neuropathy, and 17 normal subjects was studied using ultrasound. There was no significant difference in gall bladder fasting volume between the three groups, but the patients with diabetes with autonomic neuropathy had impaired postprandial gall bladder emptying compared with normal subjects (percentage emptied (SEM) 40 (10.3)% v 64 (2.8)%, p < 0.01) and those with autonomic neuropathy (48 (7.7)%, NS). Erythromycin produced a dramatic reduction in gall bladder fasting volume in patients with diabetes with an autonomic neuropathy, compared with either normal subjects or patients with diabetes without autonomic neuropathy (percentage reduction 62 (4.6)% in patients with autonomic neuropathy, v 37 (17.6)% in those without autonomic neuropathy, and 26 (7.3)% in the normal subjects, (p < 0.02) and returned gall bladder emptying to normal in all patients with impaired emptying. The pronounced effect of erythromycin in diabetic autonomic neuropathy suggests denervation supersensitivity and that the action of erythromycin on the gall bladder is neurally modulated. PMID:8174966

  10. Loss of capsaicin-induced meningeal neurogenic sensory vasodilatation in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Dux, M; Rosta, J; Pintér, S; Sántha, P; Jancsó, G

    2007-11-30

    Neuropathic alterations of sensory nerves involved in the mediation of neurogenic inflammation of the meninges may contribute to the increased incidence of headaches in diabetics. In the rat, activation of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptors, which express the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor, induces meningeal vasodilatation, a significant component of neurogenic inflammation, through the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). This study examines the effects of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on TRPV1 receptor-mediated neurogenic sensory vasodilatation, CGRP release and nerve fiber density in the rat dura mater. In a cranial window preparation, epidural application of capsaicin (10(-7) M) produced distinct vasodilatory responses in control animals as measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. In diabetic rats, capsaicin-induced vasodilatation was reduced or even abolished 6, but not 2 or 4 weeks after diabetes induction. In contrast, vasoconstriction, a non-neurogenic response to capsaicin at a higher concentration (10(-5) M), was not altered in diabetic rats. The vasodilatory effects of histamine (10(-5) M), acetylcholine (10(-4) M) and CGRP (10(-5) M) were similar in control, diabetic and insulin-treated diabetic animals. In diabetic rats, a significant decrease in the capsaicin-evoked release of CGRP and reduction in the density of TRPV1-immunoreactive (IR) nerves were demonstrated. Treatment of the diabetic rats with insulin restored both the vasodilatory response and the capsaicin-induced CGRP release toward control values. In conclusion, this study revealed a marked impairment of meningeal TRPV1-IR nerves in streptozotocin diabetic rats by showing reduced neurogenic sensory vasodilatation, decreased capsaicin-evoked CGRP release and reduction in the number of TRPV1-IR nerve fibers of the dura mater. The findings suggest that capsaicin-sensitive afferents may play an important role in meningeal nociceptor function and their

  11. Quick note on tissue engineering-based surgical measures to treat patients with neurogenic bladder-due detrusor/sphincter dyssynergia.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Contardo

    2015-01-01

    To treat the neurogenic bladder-due detrusor/urethral rhabdosphincter dyssynergia, early combined clean intermittent catheterization/ pharmacotherapy (anticholinergic-, β3-adrenoceptor agonist drugs) management may be at times crowned with success of preserving an adequate bladder compliance and renal safe conditions.The persistence, instead, of elevated bladder filling pressure levels with high voiding pressure/uroflow values, together with aberrant urethral rhabdosphincter electromyographic findings, make necessary the resort to surgery strategies, among which - a part from rhabdosphincterotomy or alternatively intrasphincteric botulinum A toxin injection or urethral stent insertion - the bladder augmentation cystoplasty, with either reconfigurated bowel- or gastric segment, is today the most efficacious surgical measure to increase the bladder urinary storage meanwhile lowering bladder filling pressure. Given the enterocistoplasty-dependent both potential systemic metabolic imbalances - such as hyperchloremic acidosis/hypokaliemia, hyperoxaluria, bone demineralization, chologenic diarrhoea/steatorrhoea, vit B12 deficiency - together with bowel prosthetic mucus overproduction-due recurrent stone formation, and, sometimes, malignant complications particularly at the intestinal-urinary tract suture line, tissue engineering techniques have been taken into consideration, more than twenty years ago, as alternative measure for bladder augmentation cystoplasty, until to reach successful clinical validation just in patients suffering from either congenital dysraphism- or acquired spinal cord injury-dependent neurogenic bladder. Nevertheless, also the tissue engineering-made augmentation cistoplasty, as well as that bowel-based one, unfortunately remains influenced by spinal cord neuropathydue dysfunctional effects, hence the tissue engineering research could be today directed to suitably overcome such disadvantageous conditions. PMID:26042661

  12. Association Between the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score and Urodynamic Examination in Multiple Sclerosis Patients With Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Di Rosa, Alessandro; Giardina, Raimondo; Privitera, Salvatore; Favilla, Vincenzo; Patti, Francesco; Welk, Blayne; Cimino, Sebastiano; Castelli, Tommaso; Morgia, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between the neurogenic bladder symptoms score (NBSS) and urodynamic examination in patients affected by multiple sclerosis (MS) and related lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). Methods: We recruited 122 consecutive patients with MS in remission and LUTD from January 2011 to September 2013 who underwent their first urodynamic examination. Neurological impairment was assessed using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and bladder symptoms were studied with the NBSS. Results: Median NBSS was 20.0 (interquartile range, 12.75–31.0). Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) was discovered in 69 patients (56.6%). The concordance between patients with NDO and maximum detrusor pressure during involuntary detrusor contraction (PdetmaxIDC)≥20.0 cm H2O was 0.89 (κ-Cohen; P<0.05). Patients with EDSS scores of ≥4.5 had a greater NBSS (25.41 vs. 20.19, P<0.05), NBSS-incontinence (8.73 vs. 4.71, P<0.05), NBSS-consequence (4.51 vs. 3.13, P<0.05) and NBSS-quality of life (2.14 vs. 1.65, P<0.05). The NBSS was not associated with PdetmaxIDC≥20 cm H2O (P=0.77) but with maximum cystometric capacity<212 mL (odds ratio, 0.95; P<0.05). Conclusions: The NBSS cannot give adequate information the way urodynamic studies can, in patients with MS and LUTD. PMID:26739182

  13. An Evaluation of the Efficacy of Selective Alpha-Blockers in the Treatment of Children with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction-Preliminary Findings.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Paweł; Gajewska, Ewa; Zachwieja, Jacek; Sobieska, Magdalena; Mańkowski, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of selective α1-blockers in children with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunctions and increased leak point pressure (LPP). 14 children from age 6 to 16 years with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunctions (neurogenic bladder) and LPP > 40 cm H₂O were enrolled in the study. All patients received a selective α1-blocker (doxazosin) for 6-8 weeks with an initial dosage of 0.03 mg/kg. During the observation period the continuation of oral anticholinergics, Clean Intermittent Catheterization (CIC), observation of "urinary dryness" and urinary incontinence periods were recommended. Patients were scheduled for a follow-up visit and urodynamic investigation after 6-8 weeks after the doxazosin therapy was started. In 4 patients, urine leakage occurred at lower pressures; in 9 patients, no significant changes in urine leak point pressures were detected; in 3 patients, there was a significant increase in the bladder capacity; in one patient, deterioration in continence was noted. The differences both in LPP and LPV before and after the treatment were not statistically significant. Our observations are consistent with the conclusions from other studies and showed no evident efficacy of doxazosin in children with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26999168

  14. An Evaluation of the Efficacy of Selective Alpha-Blockers in the Treatment of Children with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction—Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Paweł; Gajewska, Ewa; Zachwieja, Jacek; Sobieska, Magdalena; Mańkowski, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of selective α1-blockers in children with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunctions and increased leak point pressure (LPP). 14 children from age 6 to 16 years with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunctions (neurogenic bladder) and LPP > 40 cm H2O were enrolled in the study. All patients received a selective α1-blocker (doxazosin) for 6–8 weeks with an initial dosage of 0.03 mg/kg. During the observation period the continuation of oral anticholinergics, Clean Intermittent Catheterization (CIC), observation of “urinary dryness” and urinary incontinence periods were recommended. Patients were scheduled for a follow-up visit and urodynamic investigation after 6–8 weeks after the doxazosin therapy was started. In 4 patients, urine leakage occurred at lower pressures; in 9 patients, no significant changes in urine leak point pressures were detected; in 3 patients, there was a significant increase in the bladder capacity; in one patient, deterioration in continence was noted. The differences both in LPP and LPV before and after the treatment were not statistically significant. Our observations are consistent with the conclusions from other studies and showed no evident efficacy of doxazosin in children with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26999168

  15. Strategies for prevention of urinary tract infections in neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Lance L; Klausner, Adam P

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the problem of urinary tract infections (UTIs) after spinal cord injury and disorders is defined, the relationship of bladder management to UTIs is discussed, and mechanical and medical strategies for UTI prevention in spinal cord injury and disorders are described. PMID:25064790

  16. A case of hypokalemic paralysis in a patient with neurogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Frederic N; Kar, Jitesh K; Verduzco-Gutierrez, Monica; Zakaria, Asma

    2014-04-01

    Acute hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by muscle weakness or paralysis secondary to low serum potassium levels. Neurogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition where the patient excretes large volume of dilute urine due to low levels of antidiuretic hormone. Here, we describe a patient with neurogenic DI who developed hypokalemic paralysis without a prior history of periodic paralysis. A 30-year-old right-handed Hispanic male was admitted for refractory seizures and acute DI after developing a dental abscess. He had a history of pituitary adenoma resection at the age of 13 with subsequent pan-hypopituitarism and was noncompliant with hormonal supplementation. On hospital day 3, he developed sudden onset of quadriplegia with motor strength of 0 of 5 in the upper extremities bilaterally and 1 of 5 in both lower extremities with absent deep tendon reflexes. His routine laboratory studies revealed severe hypokalemia of 1.6 mEq/dL. Nerve Conduction Study (NCS) revealed absent compound motor action potentials (CMAPs) with normal sensory potentials. Electromyography (EMG) did not reveal any abnormal insertional or spontaneous activity. He regained full strength within 36 hours following aggressive correction of the hypokalemia. Repeat NCS showed return of CMAPs in all nerves tested and EMG revealed normal motor units and normal recruitment without myotonic discharges. In patients with central DI with polyuria, hypokalemia can result in sudden paralysis. Hypokalemic paralysis remains an important differential in an acute case of paralysis and early recognition and appropriate management is key. PMID:24707338

  17. Sacral Agenesis with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction-A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Seema; Sharma, Vipin; Awasthi, Bhanu; Sehgal, Manik; Singla, Deeksha A

    2015-06-01

    Sacral agenesis (part of the caudal regression syndrome) is a rare and severe sacral developmental abnormality. It is a congenital malformation of unknown aetiology with possible involvement of genetic and teratogenic factors. It is described by various degrees of developmental failure, the most extreme and rare being sirenomelia or mermaid syndrome. The associated malformations comprise anorectal, vertebral, urological, genital, and lower limb anomalies. Approximately 15-20% mothers of these children have insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. The case is being reported for its rarity and educative value because prognosis is good in isolated sacral agenesis. PMID:26266174

  18. Sacral Agenesis with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction—A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Seema; Awasthi, Bhanu; Sehgal, Manik; Singla, Deeksha A

    2015-01-01

    Sacral agenesis (part of the caudal regression syndrome) is a rare and severe sacral developmental abnormality. It is a congenital malformation of unknown aetiology with possible involvement of genetic and teratogenic factors. It is described by various degrees of developmental failure, the most extreme and rare being sirenomelia or mermaid syndrome. The associated malformations comprise anorectal, vertebral, urological, genital, and lower limb anomalies. Approximately 15-20% mothers of these children have insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. The case is being reported for its rarity and educative value because prognosis is good in isolated sacral agenesis. PMID:26266174

  19. Impact of diabetes mellitus on bladder uroepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hanna-Mitchell, Ann T; Ruiz, Giovanni W; Daneshgari, Firouz; Liu, Guiming; Apodaca, Gerard; Birder, Lori A

    2013-01-15

    Diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD), a prevalent complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), is characterized by a broad spectrum of symptoms including urinary urgency, frequency, and incontinence. As DBD is commonly diagnosed late, it is important to understand the chronic impact of DM on bladder tissues. While changes in bladder smooth muscle and innervation have been reported in diabetic patients, the impact of DM on the specialized epithelial lining of the urinary bladder, the urothelium (UT), is largely unknown. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and electron microscopy were used to evaluate UT gene expression and cell morphology 3, 9, and 20 wk following streptozotocin (STZ) induction of DM in female Sprague-Dawley rats compared with age-matched control tissue. Desquamation of superficial (umbrella) cells was noted at 9 wk DM, indicating a possible breach in barrier function. One causative factor may be metabolic burden due to chronic hyperglycemia, suggested by upregulation of the polyol pathway and glucose transport genes in DM UT. While superficial UT repopulation occurred by 20 wk DM, the phenotype was different, with significant upregulation of receptors associated with UT mechanosensation (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1; TRPV1) and UT autocrine/paracrine signaling (acetylcholine receptors AChR-M2 and -M3, purinergic receptors P2X(2) and P2X(3)). Compromised barrier function and alterations in UT mechanosensitivity and cell signaling could contribute to bladder instability, hyperactivity, and altered bladder sensation by modulating activity of afferent nerve endings, which appose the urothelium. Our results show that DM impacts urothelial homeostasis and may contribute to the underlying mechanisms of DBD. PMID:23174855

  20. Impact of diabetes mellitus on bladder uroepithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Giovanni W.; Daneshgari, Firouz; Liu, Guiming; Apodaca, Gerard; Birder, Lori A.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD), a prevalent complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), is characterized by a broad spectrum of symptoms including urinary urgency, frequency, and incontinence. As DBD is commonly diagnosed late, it is important to understand the chronic impact of DM on bladder tissues. While changes in bladder smooth muscle and innervation have been reported in diabetic patients, the impact of DM on the specialized epithelial lining of the urinary bladder, the urothelium (UT), is largely unknown. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and electron microscopy were used to evaluate UT gene expression and cell morphology 3, 9, and 20 wk following streptozotocin (STZ) induction of DM in female Sprague-Dawley rats compared with age-matched control tissue. Desquamation of superficial (umbrella) cells was noted at 9 wk DM, indicating a possible breach in barrier function. One causative factor may be metabolic burden due to chronic hyperglycemia, suggested by upregulation of the polyol pathway and glucose transport genes in DM UT. While superficial UT repopulation occurred by 20 wk DM, the phenotype was different, with significant upregulation of receptors associated with UT mechanosensation (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1; TRPV1) and UT autocrine/paracrine signaling (acetylcholine receptors AChR-M2 and -M3, purinergic receptors P2X2 and P2X3). Compromised barrier function and alterations in UT mechanosensitivity and cell signaling could contribute to bladder instability, hyperactivity, and altered bladder sensation by modulating activity of afferent nerve endings, which appose the urothelium. Our results show that DM impacts urothelial homeostasis and may contribute to the underlying mechanisms of DBD. PMID:23174855

  1. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  2. Use of Intravesicular Amikacin Irrigations for the Treatment and Prophylaxis of Urinary Tract Infections in a Patient with Spina Bifida and Neurogenic Bladder: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Donna; Morgan, Jill A.

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes the use of intravesicular amikacin irrigations to treat and prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs) in a pediatric patient with spina bifida and neurogenic bladder. A 15 year old Hispanic female was admitted for a UTI caused by Enterobacter cloacae and multiple-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A 7 day course of daily intravenous amikacin and ceftazidime was initiated along with twice daily intravesicular amikacin irrigations (15 mg/30 mL) with a dwell time of 2 hours. The patient improved and was discharged on prophylactic Bactrim SS (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim) 1 tablet daily and intravesicular amikacin irrigations (15 mg/30 mL) once every other day. Approximately 2 months after discharge, the patient developed another UTI from multidrug resistant Escherichia coli and was treated with a 14 day course of daily intravenous ciprofloxacin accompanied by daily intravesicular amikacin irrigations. Adjunctive therapy with either once daily or twice daily intravesicular amikacin irrigations successfully treated the patient's UTI. However, prophylactic treatment with intravesicular amikacin failed to prevent future UTIs in this patient. PMID:22477833

  3. [Experiences with temporary intravesical electro-stimulation of the neurogenic bladder in spina bifida children (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Seiferth, J; Larkamp, H; Heising, J

    1978-09-01

    This is a report of a special method of a temporary intravesical electrostimulation of the bladder for the treatment of urinary incontinence of spina bifida children. The technique with presentation of apparatus and catheter is described in details. The criterias for the selection of the patients are explained, the most important of which is the response of the detrusor muscle during the stimulation recorded by uromanometry. 28 spina bifida-children were treated. There is success in 70% of the patients, if the criteria are fulfilled. PMID:360556

  4. Grape Seed Proanthocyanidin Extract Ameliorates Diabetic Bladder Dysfunction via the Activation of the Nrf2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shouzhen; Zhu, Yaofeng; Liu, Zhifeng; Gao, Zhaoyun; Li, Baoying; Zhang, Dongqing; Zhang, Zhaocun; Jiang, Xuewen; Liu, Zhengfang; Meng, Lingquan; Yang, Yue; Shi, Benkang

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM)-induced bladder dysfunction is predominantly due to the long-term oxidative stress caused by hyperglycemia. Grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) has been reported to possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological and therapeutic properties against oxidative stress. However, its protective effects against diabetic bladder dysfunction have not been clarified. This study focuses on the effects of GSPE on bladder dysfunction in diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin. After 8 weeks of GSPE administration, the bladder function of the diabetic rats was improved significantly, as indicated by both urodynamics analysis and histopathological manifestation. Moreover, the disordered activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD and GSH-Px) and abnormal oxidative stress levels were partly reversed by treatment with GSPE. Furthermore, the level of apoptosis in the bladder caused by DM was decreased following the administration of GSPE according to the Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay. Additionally, GSPE affected the expression of apoptosis-related proteins such as Bax, Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3. Furthermore, GSPE showed neuroprotective effects on the bladder of diabetic rats, as shown by the increased expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and decreased expression of the precursor of nerve growth factor (proNGF). GSPE also activated nuclear erythroid2-related factor2 (Nrf2), which is a key antioxidative transcription factor, with the concomitant elevation of downstream hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1). These findings suggested that GSPE could ameliorate diabetic bladder dysfunction and decrease the apoptosis of the bladder in diabetic rats, a finding that may be associated with its antioxidant activity and ability to activate the Nrf2 defense pathway. PMID:25974036

  5. Rosiglitazone Use and the Risk of Bladder Cancer in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eugene; Jang, Suk-Yong; Kim, Gyuri; Lee, Yong-ho; Choe, Eun Yeong; Nam, Chung Mo; Kang, Eun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with diabetes have a higher incidence of bladder cancer; however, the association between thiazolidinedione use and bladder cancer risk has been controversial. We aimed to investigate whether pioglitazone or rosiglitazone use is associated with bladder cancer risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This nationwide nested case-control study used data set obtained from the Korean National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort 2002 to 2013. Among the 47,738 patients with incident diabetes, 85 cases of newly diagnosed bladder cancer and 850 controls (1:10 matched by age, sex, index year, and diabetes diagnosis year) were recruited. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and bladder cancer were diagnosed using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision code. More cases of bladder cancer were diagnosed in men (81.2%), and the stratified age peaked at 70 to 79 years old. Exclusive rosiglitazone use raised the incidence of bladder cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 3.07, 95% confidence interval [CI ] = 1.48–6.37). The risk of bladder cancer started to increase after less than 3 months use (OR = 3.30, 95% CI = 1.02–10.70) and peaked at 3 to 12 months of rosiglitazone use (OR = 4.48, 95% CI = 1.51–13.31). Patients were first exposed to exclusive rosiglitazone within 1 year (OR = 11.74, 95% CI = 2.46–56.12) and those who had consistently used it for 1 year (OR = 4.48 95% CI = 1.51–13.31), had higher risks of bladder cancer compared with nonthiazolidinedione users. Neither pioglitazone use nor exclusive pioglitazone use were associated with an increased incidence of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone use is associated with an increased risk of incident bladder cancer independent of age and sex in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The highest odds of bladder cancer in rosiglitazone users was seen in those with <1 year of exposure. PMID:26871835

  6. Rosiglitazone Use and the Risk of Bladder Cancer in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Jang, Suk-Yong; Kim, Gyuri; Lee, Yong-Ho; Choe, Eun Yeong; Nam, Chung Mo; Kang, Eun Seok

    2016-02-01

    Patients with diabetes have a higher incidence of bladder cancer; however, the association between thiazolidinedione use and bladder cancer risk has been controversial. We aimed to investigate whether pioglitazone or rosiglitazone use is associated with bladder cancer risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.This nationwide nested case-control study used data set obtained from the Korean National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort 2002 to 2013. Among the 47,738 patients with incident diabetes, 85 cases of newly diagnosed bladder cancer and 850 controls (1:10 matched by age, sex, index year, and diabetes diagnosis year) were recruited. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and bladder cancer were diagnosed using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision code.More cases of bladder cancer were diagnosed in men (81.2%), and the stratified age peaked at 70 to 79 years old. Exclusive rosiglitazone use raised the incidence of bladder cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 3.07, 95% confidence interval [CI ] = 1.48-6.37). The risk of bladder cancer started to increase after less than 3 months use (OR = 3.30, 95% CI = 1.02-10.70) and peaked at 3 to 12 months of rosiglitazone use (OR = 4.48, 95% CI = 1.51-13.31). Patients were first exposed to exclusive rosiglitazone within 1 year (OR = 11.74, 95% CI = 2.46-56.12) and those who had consistently used it for 1 year (OR = 4.48 95% CI = 1.51-13.31), had higher risks of bladder cancer compared with nonthiazolidinedione users. Neither pioglitazone use nor exclusive pioglitazone use were associated with an increased incidence of bladder cancer.Rosiglitazone use is associated with an increased risk of incident bladder cancer independent of age and sex in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The highest odds of bladder cancer in rosiglitazone users was seen in those with <1 year of exposure. PMID:26871835

  7. Effect of exercise on neurogenic inflammation in spinal cord of Type 1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Vikram; Gonzalez, Mayra; Pennington, Kristen; Nargis, Syeda; Chattopadhyay, Munmun

    2016-07-01

    Neuropathy is a long-standing and hard to treat complication of diabetes that interferes almost 25-30% of diabetic patients and impacts the quality of life of the patients. Unforeseen side effects, dependency and addiction made the existing medical treatments comparatively ineffective. A number of studies indicate that moderate physical activity provides health-related advantages. However, existing data do not confirm whether regular physical activity would reduce the amount of inflammation in the nervous system of the subjects with Type 1 diabetes. This study reveals the significance of exercise to alleviate inflammation in the spinal cord of the nervous system and preserve sensory nerve function in animals with Type 1 diabetes after 6 weeks of exercise paradigm. Streptozotocin-diabetic animals were placed in motorized running wheels for sixty minutes per day, for five days a week for 6 weeks starting at one week after diabetes. Emerging evidence suggests that the increases in inflammatory mediators play an important role in the development of sensory neuropathy. This study shows that moderate exercise can reduce the release of a number of proinflammatory cytokines in the dorsal horn (DH) of spinal cord, subsequently delaying the development of neuropathy along with an increase in the anti-inflammatory mediator IL10 in the DH. In general, this study indicates that exercise may provide an alternative to the treatment for sensory neuropathy in Type 1 diabetic subjects via reducing the use of medication and providing an easier way to manage neuropathy. PMID:27018295

  8. Functional and biochemical characteristics of urinary bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Jeová Nina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To re-examine the function of the urinary bladder in vivo as well as to determine the functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan-induced diabetes rats. Methods Two-month-old male Wistar rats were injected with alloxan and the animals showing blood glucose levels >300mg/dL together with age-paired untreated animals were kept for 11 months. Body weight, bladder weight, blood glucose, and urinary volume over a period of 24 hours were determined in both groups of animals. A voiding cystometry in conscious control and diabetic rats was performed to determine maximal micturition pressure, micturition contraction interval and duration as well as voided and post-voiding residual volume. In addition, concentration-response curves for bethanechol in isolated bladder strips, as well as [3H]-N methyl-scopolamine binding site characteristics in bladder homogenates were determined. Results Mean bladder weight was 162.5±21.2mg versus 290±37.9mg in control and treated animals, respectively (p<0.05). Micturition contraction amplitude (34.6±4.7mmHg versus 49.6±2.5mmHg), duration (14.5±1.7 seconds versus 23.33±4.6 seconds) and interval (87.5±17.02 seconds versus 281.11±20.24 seconds) were significantly greater in alloxan diabetic rats. Voided urine volume per micturition contraction was also significantly higher in diabetic animals. However the post-voiding residual volume was not statistically different. Bethanechol potency (EC50 3µM versus 5µM) and maximal effect (31.2±5.9g/g versus 36.1±6.8g/g) in isolated bladder strips as well as number (169±4fmol/mg versus 176±3fmol/mg protein) and affinity (0.69±0.1nM versus 0.57±0.1nM) of bladder muscarinic receptors were also not statistically different. Conclusion Bladder function in vivo is altered in chronic alloxan-induced diabetes rats without changes in functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors. PMID:26466064

  9. Bladder Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... life (the person’s level of health, comfort, and happiness). In fact, people with bladder problems may have a lower quality of life than people with diabetes, heart disease, or high blood pressure. Bladder problems ...

  10. Bladder and erectile dysfunctions in the Type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rat.

    PubMed

    Oger-Roussel, Stephanie; Behr-Roussel, Delphine; Caisey, Stephanie; Kergoat, Micheline; Charon, Christine; Audet, Annick; Bernabé, Jacques; Alexandre, Laurent; Giuliano, Francois

    2014-01-15

    Despite the fact that urogenito-sexual complications significantly impact the quality of life of diabetic patients, a robust in vivo experimental model is lacking. Bladder and erectile function in the Type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat and responses to standard-of-care treatments for each disorder have been assessed. GK rats (n = 25, 18-wk-old, GK/Par colony) and age-matched Wistar rats (n = 23), characterized for their metabolic parameters, were used. Bladder function was assessed by cystometry in conscious rats treated by intravenous solifenacin (1 mg/kg). Subsequently, erectile function was assessed under anesthesia following electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve in presence of intravenous sildenafil (0.3 mg/kg). GK rats displayed detrusor overactivity with a significant increase in frequency/amplitude of nonvoiding contractions during the filling phase, together with an increase in bladder capacity, intercontraction interval, voided volume, and maximal pressure of voiding contraction. Solifenacin significantly decreased parameters characterizing voiding contractions without modifying voiding efficiency. Erectile function in GK rats was markedly impaired and remained so after sildenafil treatment despite a significant improvement. GK rats display both bladder and erectile dysfunctions and respond at least partially to standard-of-care treatments for each disorder, thus representing a suitable model to investigate the pathophysiology and assess the efficacy of new therapeutic agents for Type 2 diabetes-associated bladder and erectile complications. PMID:24305064

  11. Neurogenic bladder: etiology and assessment

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    A review of the various causes of neurologic impairment to the lower urinary tract in children was the aim of this presentation. The emphasis was on diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment that strive to maintain as normal a function as possible in order to achieve eventual urinary continence and health of the upper urinary tract. The latest principles based on the most up to date evidence are promulgated but with an eye towards historical prospective. The reader should gain an adequate understanding of various disorders that comprise this condition and feel comfortable with proposing options for management when faced with the responsibility of caring for an affected child. PMID:18270749

  12. [Neurogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Meister, Rafael; Pasquier, Mathieu; Clerc, David; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2014-08-13

    The neurogenic shock is a common complication of spinal cord injury, especially when localized at the cervical level. Characterized by a vasoplegia (hypotension) and bradycardia, the neurogenic shock is secondary to the damage of the sympathetic nervous system. The clinical presentation often includes tetraplegia, with or without respiratory failure. Early treatment aims to minimize the occurrence of secondary spinal cord lesions resulting from systemic ischemic injuries. Medical management consists in a standardized ABCDE approach, in order to stabilize vital functions and immobilize the spine. The hospital care includes performing imaging, further measures of neuro-resuscitation, and coordinated surgical assessment and treatment of any other injury. PMID:25199226

  13. The effect of vascular endothelial growth factor in the progression of bladder cancer and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Aldebasi, Yousef H; Rahmani, Arshad H; Khan, Amjad A; Aly, Salah Mesalhy

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer and diabetic retinopathy is a major public health and economical burden worldwide. Despite its high prevalence, the molecular mechanisms that induce or develop bladder carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy progression are poorly understood but it might be due to the disturbance in balance between angiogenic factors such as VEGF and antiangiogenic factors such as pigment epithelium derived growth factor. VEGF is one of the important survival factors for endothelial cells in the process of normal physiological and abnormal angiogenesis and induce the expression of antiapoptotic proteins in the endothelial cells. It is also the major initiator of angiogenesis in cancer and diabetic retinopathy, where it is up-regulated by oncogenic expression and different type of growth factors. The alteration in VEGF and VEGF receptors gene and overexpression, determines a diseases phenotype and ultimately the patient’s clinical outcome. However, expressional and molecular studies were made on VEGF to understand the exact mechanism of action in the genesis and progression of bladder carcinoma and diabetic retinopathy , but still how VEGF mechanism involve in such type of disease progression are not well defined. Some other factors also play a significant role in the process of activation of VEGF pathways. Therefore, further detailed analysis via molecular and therapeutic is needed to know the exact mechanisms of VEGF in the angiogenesis pathway. The detection of these types of diseases at an early stage, predict how it will behave and act in response to treatment through regulation of VEGF pathways. The present review aimed to summarize the mechanism of alteration of VEGF gene pathways, which play a vital role in the development and progression of bladder cancer and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:23641300

  14. Factors impacting bladder underactivity and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Van Koeveringe, G A; Rademakers, K L J

    2015-06-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms in the voiding phase can be due to an underactive bladder, but are usually similar to symptoms of infravesical obstruction or dysfunctional voiding. The underactive bladder can be caused by an impaired detrusor contraction but also by a derangement of local and central neuro-cognitive regulatory systems or an impairment of bladder sensation. Potential risk factors of bladder underactivity include: ageing, diabetes, neurogenic disease, cardiovascular disease, obstruction and psychological causes. Comprehensive diagnostic and detection techniques for an underactive detrusor are necessary. To establish the diagnosis and follow up new treatments, useful urodynamic parameters and threshold values have to be determined. As neuro-cognitive regulation plays an important role in the control of voiding, psychological factors have to be taken into account during the assessment in these patients. Ambulatory urodynamic techniques therefore have to be considered. Voiding is determined by the balance of both the detrusor contraction and the resistance of the bladder outlet, a dysfunction in one factor can be compensated by a counter-acting function of the other factor. Therefore, to predict voiding problems in the future, it will be indicated to assess the compensatory capacity of the detrusor contractility, contractile reserve, and the outlet relaxation capacity. If novel treatments and evaluation techniques have become available, it is likely that in the future, many patients that get a TURP now, can be treated by pharmacological agents directed towards increasing the bladder contractility in a balanced combination with medication directed towards lowering the bladder outlet resistance. PMID:25645344

  15. Diabetic Ulcer (Neurogenic Ulcer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... body's ability to fight infection and slows down wound healing. When to Seek Medical Care People can develop ... also medications that use growth factors to stimulate wound healing that your doctor may prescribe. Trusted Links MedlinePlus: ...

  16. The role of histamine in neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, A C; Fantozzi, R

    2013-01-01

    The term ‘neurogenic inflammation’ has been adopted to describe the local release of inflammatory mediators, such as substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, from neurons. Once released, these neuropeptides induce the release of histamine from adjacent mast cells. In turn, histamine evokes the release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide; thus, a bidirectional link between histamine and neuropeptides in neurogenic inflammation is established. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings on the role of histamine in neurogenic inflammation, with particular regard to nociceptive pain, as well as neurogenic inflammation in the skin, airways and bladder. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23734637

  17. [Faropenem 300 mg 3 times daily versus levofloxacin 100 mg 3 times daily in the treatment of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder and/or benign prostatic hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Muratani, Tetsuro; Iihara, Kiyotaka; Nishimura, Takehisa; Inatomi, Hisato; Fujimoto, Naohiro; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Yamada, Yoji; Takahashi, Koichi; Matsumoto, Tetsuro

    2002-11-01

    Faropenem (FRPM) is an only penem antibiotics. Though it has been reported that FRPM had good efficacy (overall efficacy rate: 82.0%) against patients with complicated urinary tract infection, FRPM has not been frequently used for UTI patients. This multicenter clinical study was designed to compare FRPM 300 mg 3 times daily to Levofloxacin (LVFX), which is the standard treatment for patients with UTI, 100 mg 3 times daily for 7 days in the treatment of urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder and/or benign prostatic hypertrophy. A total of 60 patients with significant bacteriuria and pyuria were included in this study. Overall efficacy rate (excellent plus moderate) was achieved in 90.6% (29/32) of patients treated with FRPM versus 82.1% (23/28) of those treated with LVFX. The ratios of eliminated bacteriuria and cleared pyuria were 71.9% and 56.3% of patients treated with FRPM, and 64.3% and 75.0% of those treated with LVFX. These data were not significant difference. In conclusion, FRPM 300 mg 3 times daily is at least as effective as LVFX 100 mg 3 times daily in patients with complicated urinary tract infection. PMID:12508476

  18. Risk of bladder cancer in patients with diabetes: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zeegers, Maurice P; Bazelier, Marloes T; De Bruin, Marie L; Buntinx, Frank; de Vries, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to examine the association between diabetes, and both urinary bladder cancer (UBC) risk and mortality. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) linked to the Office of National Statistics (ONS). Patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2, or using antidiabetic drugs (ADDs), were compared to matched non-diabetic controls. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the risk and mortality of UBC. We adjusted for age, sex, smoking status and body mass index. Results The cohort included 329 168 patients using ADD, and 307 315 controls with 1295 and 1071 patients, respectively, diagnosed as having UBC during follow-up. The adjusted HRs of UBC were 0.77 (95% CI 0.57 to 1.05) and 1.04 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.14) for type 1 and 2 diabetes, respectively. These results were similar if we restricted our analysis to an inception cohort. We noticed a small increased risk during the first year after diagnosis (HR=1.26 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.52)), which could be explained by detection bias. There was no influence of the severity of diabetes as measured by the glycated haemoglobin. Mortality of UBC was not increased for patients with either type 1 (HR=0.95 (95% CI 0.39 to 2.34)) or type 2 diabetes (HR=1.16 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.46)). Conclusions Neither the risk of UBC nor the mortality from UBC was increased in patients with type 1 and patients with type 2 diabetes in the CPRD data. PMID:26033947

  19. Effects of Moderate Alcohol Intake in the Bladder of the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Woong Jin; Choi, Yong Sun; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Kim, Sae Woong; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Kim, Dai Jin

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is related with a number of cystopathic complications. However, there have been no studies about the influence of alcohol consumption in the bladder of type 2 diabetes. Thus, we investigated the effect of moderate alcohol intake in the bladder of the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) diabetic rat. The non-diabetic Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO, n=14) and the OLETF control group (n=14) were fed an isocaloric diet; the LETO (n=14) and the OLETF ethanol group (n=14) were fed 36% ethanol 7 g/kg/day. After ten weeks, muscarinic receptors, RhoGEFs, myogenic change, and the level of oxidative stress were evaluated. Moderate alcohol intake significantly decreased excessive muscarinic receptor and Rho kinase expressions in the OLETF rats compared with the LETO rats. In addition, iNOS and collagen expression were not changed in the OLETF rats in spite of alcohol consumption. Superoxide dismutase levels, which is involved in antioxidant defense, in the LETO rats were significantly decreased after alcohol consumption, however those in the OLETF rats were similar. Moderate alcohol consumption reduces the oxidative stress, and may prevent molecular and pathologic changes of the bladder of rats with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26339173

  20. Patients With Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Following Spinal Cord Injury Are at Increased Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Wei-Chih; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Lin, Yu-Ching; Liang, Fu-Wen; Hsieh, Pei-Chun; Li, Chung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate whether patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) following spinal cord injury (SCI) are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The retrospective cohort study used a subset of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) comprising information on 2 million beneficiaries randomly sampled from the general population. A total of 3515 patients with newly diagnosed SCI were identified during the period of 2001 to 2008. Among them, 170 developed NLUTD following SCI. The control group was consisted of 656 patients without NLUTD over the study period randomly selected by matching NLUTD cases on the date of NLUTD incidence, age, sex, and duration since diagnosis of SCI. The study groups were then followed to the end of 2009. T2DM was the end-point. The incidence rate ratios of T2DM were higher in the NLUTD group than in the control group (4.94 vs. 2.61 per 10,000 person-years), representing an adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) of 1.70 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11–2.61). Age-specific AHR was significantly elevated only in patients aged > = 60 years (AHR = 2.52 (95% CI 1.35–4.70)). This study showed that the NLUTD following SCI may significantly increase the risk of developing T2DM. PMID:26765476

  1. Novel insights into development of diabetic bladder disorder provided by metabolomic analysis of the rat nondiabetic and diabetic detrusor and urothelial layer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Deng, Gary G; Davies, Kelvin P

    2016-08-01

    There are at present no published studies providing a global overview of changes in bladder metabolism resulting from diabetes. Such studies have the potential to provide mechanistic insight into the development of diabetic bladder disorder (DBD). In the present study, we compared the metabolome of detrusor and urothelial layer in a 1-mo streptozotocin-induced rat model of type 1 diabetes with nondiabetic controls. Our studies revealed that diabetes caused both common and differential changes in the detrusor and urothelial layer's metabolome. Diabetes resulted in similar changes in the levels of previously described diabetic markers in both tissues, such as glucose, lactate, 2-hydroxybutyrate, branched-chain amino acid degradation products, bile acids, and 1,5-anhydroglucitol, as well as markers of oxidative stress. In the detrusor (but not the urothelial layer), diabetes caused activation of the pentose-phosphate and polyol pathways, concomitant with a reduction in the TCA cycle and β-oxidation. Changes in detrusor energy-generating pathways resulted in an accumulation of sorbitol that, through generation of advanced glycation end products, is likely to play a central role in the development of DBD. In the diabetic urothelial layer there was decreased flux of glucose via glycolysis and changes in lipid metabolism, particularly prostaglandin synthesis, which also potentially contributes to detrusor dysfunction. PMID:27354236

  2. Bladder afferent hyperexcitability in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Oguchi, Tomohiko; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yasuhito; Yoshikawa, Satoru; Sugino, Yoshio; Kawamorita, Naoki; Kashyap, Mahendra P; Chancellor, Michael B; Tyagi, Pradeep; Ogawa, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is a disease with lower urinary tract symptoms, such as bladder pain and urinary frequency, which results in seriously impaired quality of life of patients. The extreme pain and urinary frequency are often difficult to treat. Although the etiology of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis is still not known, there is increasing evidence showing that afferent hyperexcitability as a result of neurogenic bladder inflammation and urothelial dysfunction is important to the pathophysiological basis of symptom development. Further investigation of the pathophysiology will lead to the effective treatment of patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. PMID:24807488

  3. Risk of Malignant Neoplasms of Kidney and Bladder in a Cohort Study of the Diabetic Population in Taiwan With Age, Sex, and Geographic Area Stratifications

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Fen; Chen, Shwe-Winn; Chang, Ya-Hui; Li, Chung-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Diabetes has been reported to increase the risk of malignant neoplasms of kidney and bladder, but the studies’ results are still inconclusive. Age, sex, and geographical area-specific incidence and relative risks of above neoplasms are also scarce in the literature. We prospectively investigated the age, sex, geographical area-specific incidence and relative risks of kidney and bladder neoplasms in diabetic population of Taiwan. Diabetic patients (n = 615,532) and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 614,871) were linked to inpatient claims (2000–2008) to identify the admissions for malignant neoplasm of kidney (International Classification of Diagnosis, 9th version, Clinical Modification: 189) and bladder (International Classification of Diagnosis, 9th version, Clinical Modification: 188). The person-year approach with Poisson assumption was used to evaluate the incidence density. We also estimated the age, sex, and geographical area-specific relative risks of above malignancy in relation to diabetes with Cox proportional hazard regression model. The overall incidence density of malignant neoplasm of kidney for diabetic men and women were 3.87 and 4.28 per 10,000 patient-years, respectively; the corresponding figures for malignant neoplasm of bladder were 5.73 and 3.25 per 10,000 patient-years. Compared with the controls, diabetic men were at significantly increased hazards of kidney (covariate adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18–1.46) and bladder aHR: 1.13, 95% CI 1.04–1.23). Diabetic women, on the contrary, only experienced significantly elevated hazard of kidney neoplasm (aHR: 1.14, 95% CI 1.04–1.26). Diabetic men aged >65 years showed the most significantly increased hazard of developing neoplasm of kidney (aHR: 1.40) and bladder (aHR: 1.13). The most significantly increased hazard of kidney neoplasm was noted for women diabetic patients aged >65 years. There was also a significant interactive effect of

  4. Identification of eight new mutations in familial neurogenic diabetes insipidus supports the concept that defective folding of the mutant provasopressin-neurophysin causes the disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rittig, S.; Siggaard, C.; Pedersen, E.B.

    1994-09-01

    Familial neurogenic diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder with a uniform phenotype characterized by polyuria, polydipsia and a severe deficiency of arginine vasopressin (AVP). These abnormalities develop postnatally and appear to be due to progressive degeneration of AVP producing neurons. Previous studies in 8 FNDI kindreds have identified 5 different mutations in the gene that codes for the AVP-neurophysin (NP) precursor, AVP-NP. Four kindreds had the same missense mutation in the part of exon 1 that codes for the C-terminal amino acid of the signal peptide (SP). The other 4 had different missense mutations or a codon deletion in exon 2 which codes for the highly conserved part of NP. In the present study, the AVP-NP genes from 8 other kindreds with FNDI were sequenced bidirectionally using sequence and single-stranded DNA amplified by PCR with biotinylated primers flanking each of the 3 exons. We find that each of the 8 kindreds has a different, previously unreported mutation in either the SP coding part of exon 1, in exon 2 or in the variable, NP-coding part of exon 3. Combining these 8 new mutations with the 5 described previously reveals a distribution pattern that corresponds closely to the domains involved in the mutually interactive processes of AVP binding, folding and dimerization of NP. Based on these findings and the clinical features of FNDI, we postulate that the precursors produced by the mutant alleles are cytotoxic because they do not fold or dimerize properly for subsequent packaging and processing.

  5. Does diabetes affect the distribution and number of interstitial cells and neuronal tissue in the ureter, bladder, prostate, and urethra of humans?

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Hayriye; Kandemir, Olcay; Atmaca, Ali Fuat; Akbulut, Ziya; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the distribution and number of interstitial cells (ICs) and neuronal tissue in the ureter, bladder, prostate, and urethra of human patients with and without diabetes. Material and methods Human tissue was obtained from patients who had undergone radical cystectomy for bladder cancer (10 diabetic and 11 non–diabetic males). Interstitial cells were stained immunohistochemically with anti–human CD117 (c–kit) rabbit polyclonal antibody, Vimentin, and Connexin–43. Neural tissue was stained with synaptophysin. The number of ICs and neurons was evaluated and compared between the groups (diabetic versus non–diabetic). Results The mean number of c–kit (+) ICs in bladder lamina propria was significantly decreased in diabetics (32.40 ±12.96 versus 57.18 ±25.37, p = 0.036). The mean number of ICs in the detrusor muscle was significantly decreased in diabetics (40.50 ±16.79 versus 64.55 ±22.08, p = 0.013). Between the groups, no significant differences were detected regarding the number of ICs at the level of the ureter, urethra, and prostate. No significant differences were detected regarding the number of nerves in the ureter, bladder, prostate, and urethra of both groups. Conclusions The number of ICs may be decreased in the lamina propria and detrusor muscle of the human bladder in diabetes. This can be an underlying cause of lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction in diabetics. Research into the development of drugs targeting or stimulating IC function in order to prevent diabetic LUT dysfunction is warranted. PMID:25667756

  6. [Melanosis of the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Wöllner, J; Janzen, J; Pannek, J

    2016-01-01

    Melanosis of the bladder is rare. Only 10 cases have been described in the literature. We present the case of an 80-year-old woman with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to spinal paralysis. During the diagnostic work-up which included cystoscopy, black spots in the bladder wall were observed. Histopathological evaluation revealed a benign suburothelial melanosis. Thus, with cystoscopic suspicion of a malignancy (melanoma), a biopsy is mandatory and regular cystoscopic follow-up is recommended. PMID:26358438

  7. Neurogenic heterotopic ossification.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L L; Halar, E; Little, J W; Brooke, M M

    1987-12-01

    Neurogenic heterotopic ossification is a potential sequela of neurological disorders, especially spinal cord injury and head injury. The etiology is unknown. Clinical, radiologic, and bone scan findings are typical. Complications may threaten function. The differential diagnosis is crucial in its early stages. Treatment options include diphosphonates, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and surgery. This article has reviewed the literature on neurogenic heterotopic ossification (HO), soft tissue ossification of neurologic disease, including pathogenesis, histology, presentation, diagnosis, natural history, complications, and current treatments. PMID:3124630

  8. [Neurogenic erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Ramos, Antonio Sánchez; Durán, Juan Antonio Godino; Oliviero, Antonio

    2010-10-01

    Neurogenic erectile dysfunction is a consequence of alterations in neural pathways, autonomic, somatic, the combination of both or brain components that induce erection. This review aims to explain the physiopathological mechanisms of the most frequent neurological alterations causing erectile dysfunction and sexual disorders. PMID:20978292

  9. Inhibitory effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on non-cholinergic motor transmission in rat detrusor and its prevention by sorbinil.

    PubMed Central

    Luheshi, G. N.; Zar, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    1. Non-cholinergic motor transmission in the urinary bladder of streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats was studied by recording contractile activity of strips of detrusor in vitro. 2. The neurogenic contractile responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS) of atropine-treated detrusor strips were decreased in 4, 8 and 12 week STZ-diabetic rats. The decrease was most marked in 12 week diabetic rats and least in 4 week ones. 3. Concentration-response curves showed no change in sensitivity of the detrusor to acetylcholine (ACh) in diabetic rats. The maximum tension generated by ACh was similar in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. 4. The contractile responses to EFS at frequencies greater than or equal to 1 Hz were not maintained during stimulation. The 'fade' was significantly greater in detrusor strips of diabetic rats. 5. The contractile response of detrusor to EFS was significantly greater in 12 week diabetic rats treated with the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil, than in untreated 12 week diabetic rats. The sensitivity to ACh was similar in the two groups. 6. It is concluded that the reduction of the neurogenic non-cholinergic responses of detrusor to EFS in STZ-diabetic rats is probably caused by a reduction in the release of the non-cholinergic motor transmitter. The results are discussed in relation to bladder dysfunction in human diabetes mellitus. PMID:2175235

  10. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment. PMID:25673127

  11. Neurogenic neuroprotection: clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Mauricio; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Chadi, Gerson

    2012-01-01

    Summary Neurogenic neuroprotection is a promising approach for treating patients with ischemic brain lesions. In rats, stimulation of the deep brain nuclei has been shown to reduce the volume of focal infarction. In this context, protection of neural tissue can be a rapid intervention that has a relatively long-lasting effect, making fastigial nucleus stimulation (FNS) a potentially valuable method for clinical application. Although the mechanisms of neuroprotection induced by FNS remain partially unclear, important data have been presented in the last two decades. A 1-h electrical FNS reduced, by 59%, infarctions triggered by permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in Fisher rats. The acute effect of electrical FNS is likely mediated by a prolonged opening of potassium channels, and the sustained effect appears to be linked to inhibition of the apoptotic cascade. A better understanding of the neuronal circuitry underlying neurogenic neuroprotection may contribute to improving neurological outcomes in ischemic brain insults. PMID:23597434

  12. [Traumatic neurogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Maurin, O; de Régloix, S; Caballé, D; Arvis, A-M; Perrochon, J-C; Tourtier, J-P

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic neurogenic shock is a rare but serious complication of spinal cord injury. It associates bradycardia and hypotension caused by a medullary trauma. It is life-threatening for the patient and it aggravates the neurological deficit. Strict immobilization and a quick assessment of the gravity of cord injury are necessary as soon as prehospital care has begun. Initial treatment requires vasopressors associated with fluid resuscitation. Steroids are not recommended. Early decompression is recommended for incomplete deficit seen in the first 6 hours. We relate the case of secondary spinal shock to a luxation C6/C7 treated in prehospital care. PMID:23566590

  13. Pioglitazone use and risk of bladder cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes: retrospective cohort study using datasets from four European countries

    PubMed Central

    Heintjes, Edith M; Williams, Rachael; Hoti, Fabian; Christopher, Solomon; Majak, Maila; Kool-Houweling, Leanne; Strongman, Helen; Linder, Marie; Dolin, Paul; Bahmanyar, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between pioglitazone use and bladder cancer risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. Design Retrospective cohort study using propensity score matched cohorts. Settings Healthcare databases from Finland, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Data comprised country specific datasets of linked records on prescriptions, hospitals, general practitioners, cancer, and deaths. Participants Patients with type 2 diabetes who initiated pioglitazone (n=56 337) matched with patients with type 2 diabetes in the same country exposed to diabetes drug treatments other than pioglitazone (n=317 109). Two matched cohorts were created, using a 1:1 fixed ratio (nearest match cohort) and a 1:10 variable ratio (multiple match cohort). Patients were matched on treatment history and propensity scores accounting for several variables associated with pioglitazone initiation. Main outcome measures Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by Cox’s proportional hazards model with adjustments for relevant confounders. To assess the robustness of the findings, several sensitivity and stratified analyses were performed. Results In the cohort exposed to pioglitazone treatment, 130 bladder cancers occurred over a mean follow-up time of 2.9 years. In the nearest match and multiple match cohorts not exposed to pioglitazone treatment, 153 and 970 bladder cancers were recorded, with a mean follow‑up time of 2.8 and 2.9 years, respectively. With regards to bladder cancer risk, the adjusted hazard ratio for patients ever exposed versus never exposed to pioglitazone was 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.75 to 1.30) and 1.00 (0.83 to 1.21) in the nearest and multiple match cohorts, respectively. Increasing duration of pioglitazone use and increasing cumulative dose were not associated with risk of bladder cancer (>48 months of pioglitazone use, adjusted hazard ratio 0.86 (0.44 to 1.66); >40 000 mg cumulative dose, 0.65 (0.33 to 1

  14. Impact of Glycemic Control and Metformin Use on the Recurrence and Progression of Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential relationships of glycemic control and use of metformin with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer characteristics. We reviewed data from 645 patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer between January 2004 and May 2015. We analyzed the association of pre and post-operative glycemic control and use of metformin with clinical characteristics of bladder tumors. We also analyzed the association of glycemic control and use of metformin with recurrence-free and progression-free survivals. Diabetes mellitus patients showed decreased recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio 1.42; 95% confidence interval 1.1–1.9; P = 0.021) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 1.79; 95% confidence interval 1.1–2.8; P = 0.013). Diabetes mellitus patients with a HbA1c ≥ 7.0% demonstrated a higher rate of progression (P = 0.026). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that progression-free survival rate was associated with poor baseline glycemic control (P = 0.026) and post-operative glycemic control (P = 0.025). However, use of metformin had no impact on the recurrence (P = 1.00) and progression (P = 0.282). In conclusion, poor baseline and post-operative glycemic control was related with shorter progression-free survival of patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Use of metformin had no impact on the recurrence and progression. Therefore, tight glycemic control and close follow-up for bladder tumor may be beneficial in patients with poor glycemic control. PMID:27510392

  15. Bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder; Urothelial cancer ... In the United States, bladder cancer usually starts from the cells lining the bladder. These cells are called transitional cells. These tumors are classified by the way ...

  16. Neutral endopeptidase modulates neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nadel, J A

    1991-06-01

    A noncholinergic, nonadrenergic nervous system has been described, involving the sensory nerves in the airways. Chemicals, dusts and other irritants stimulate these sensory nerves to release substance P and related neuropeptides. These neuropeptides have the remarkable ability to affect multiple cells in the airways and to provoke many responses including cough, mucus secretion, smooth muscle contraction, plasma extravasation and neutrophil adhesion. This series of effects is termed "neurogenic inflammation." An enzyme exists on the surfaces of all lung cells that contain receptors for these neuropeptides. This enzyme, neutral endopeptidase (NEP), by cleaving and thus inactivating the neuropeptides, limits the concentration of the neuropeptide that reaches the receptor on the cell surface. Thus, neurogenic inflammatory responses are normally mild and presumably protective in nature. However, when NEP is inhibited pharmacologically (with NEP inhibitors) or by cigarette smoke, respiratory viral infection, or by inhalation of the industrial pollutant toluene diisocyanate, neurogenic inflammatory responses are exaggerated. Delivery of exogenous human recombinant NEP inhibits neurogenic inflammation. Finally, evidence is provided that corticosteroids suppress neurogenic plasma extravasation and that this drug can upregulate NEP in human airway tissue. Neutral endopeptidase cleaves multiple peptides. Thus, its selectivity resides, at least in part, on its fixed location on the surfaces of specific cells where it can modulate effects of peptides exposed to the cells' surfaces. PMID:1889501

  17. Bladder cancer arising in a spina bifida patient.

    PubMed

    Game, X; Villers, A; Malavaud, B; Sarramon, J

    1999-11-01

    We report the case of a 52-year-old patient with spina bifida, neurologic bladder, and a history of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) in whom a bladder cancer was incidentally discovered. Cytology, cystoscopy, and cystography showed nonspecific, extensive inflammatory lesions. Cystography demonstrated a complex of diverticulae and cellules. Pathologic examination of a diverticulectomy specimen revealed a grade III pT3b transitional and squamous cell carcinoma. Because of the similar disease causation (recurrent UTIs, stones, and indwelling catheterization), we suggest extension of the guidelines proposed for patients with spinal cord injuries (ie, annual serial bladder biopsies) to patients with nontraumatic neurogenic bladder. PMID:10754152

  18. Botulinum Toxin in Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rúiter Silva; Rassi, Mauricio Carneiro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of botulinum toxin on urodynamic parameters and quality of life in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Methods Thirty four adult patients with spinal cord injury and detrusor overactivity were selected. The patients received 300 units of botulinum toxin type A. The endpoints evaluated with the episodes of urinary incontinence and measured the maximum cystometric capacity, maximum amplitude of detrusor pressure and bladder compliance at the beginning and end of the study (24 weeks) and evaluated the quality of life by applying the Qualiveen questionnaire. Results A significant decrease in the episodes of urinary incontinence was observed. All urodynamic parameters presented a significant improvement. The same was observed in the quality of life index and the specific impact of urinary problems scores from the Qualiveen questionnaire. Six patients did not complete the study, two due to incomplete follow-up, and four violated protocol and were excluded from the analyses. No systemic adverse events of botulinum toxin type A were reported. Conclusions A botulinum toxin type A showed a significantly improved response in urodynamics parameters and specific and general quality of life. PMID:23094220

  19. Bladder stones

    MedlinePlus

    Stones - bladder; Urinary tract stones; Bladder calculi ... Benway BM, Bhayani SM. Lower urinary tract calculi. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 89. Sharma R, Dill CE, Gelman DY. Urinary ...

  20. How botulinum toxin in neurogenic detrusor overactivity can reduce upper urinary tract damage?

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Maximilien; Grise, Philippe; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin are the cornerstone of medical treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The primary aim of this treatment is to ensure a low pressure regimen in the urinary bladder, but the mechanisms leading to long-term protection of the urinary tract remain poorly understood. In this paper, we highlight the potential benefits of intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin regarding local effects on the bladder structures, urinary tract infections, stone disease, vesico ureteral reflux, hydronephrosis, renal function based on a comprehensive literature review. PMID:26981445

  1. A comprehensive review of urologic complications in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Arrellano-Valdez, Fernando; Urrutia-Osorio, Marta; Arroyo, Carlos; Soto-Vega, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, as a result of abnormal insulin production, insulin function, or both. DM is associated with systemic complications, such as infections, neuropathy and angiopathy, which involve the genitourinary tract. The three most significant urologic complications include: bladder cystopathy, sexual dysfunction and urinary tract infections. Almost half of the patients with DM have bladder dysfunction or cystopathy, which can be manifested in women as hypersensitivity (in 39-61% of the diabetic women) or neurogenic bladder. In males it can be experienced as lower urinary tract symptoms (in 25% of diabetic males with a nearly twofold increased risk when seen by age groups). Additionally, an increased prostate volume affects their micturition as well as their urinary tract. Involving sexual dysfunction in women, it includes reduced libido, decreased arousal, clitoral erectile dysfunction and painful or non-sensitive intercourse; and in diabetic males it varies from low libido, ejaculatory abnormalities and erectile dysfunction. Globally, sexual disorders have a prevalence of 18-42%. Erectile dysfunction is ranked as the third most important complication of DM. Urinary tract infections are observed frequently in diabetic patients, and vary from emphysematous infections, Fournier gangrene, staghorn infected lithiasis to repetitive bacterial cystitis. The most frequent finding in diabetic women has been lower urinary tract infections. Because of the high incidence of obesity worldwide and its association with diabetes, it is very important to keep in mind the urologic complication associated with DM in patients, in order to better diagnose and treat this population. PMID:25332855

  2. Botulinum toxin injections for treating neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Bayrak, Ömer; Sadioğlu, Erkan; Onur, Rahmi

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a disorder that can cause high intravesical pressure, decreased capacity, decreased bladder compliance, and upper urinary system damage. The current treatment options for NDO are established on the basis of agents that block parasympathetic innervation of the detrusor and inhibit involuntary bladder contractions. Several side effects, such as dryness of mouth, constipation, dyspepsia, changes in visual accommodation, somnolence, and being unable to obtain consistently favorable results, caused by anticholinergic agents, which are frequently used for this purpose, decrease the patient’s compliance to treatment. Procedures such as neuromodulation, auto-augmentation, and enterocystoplasty are surgical options, and they could be used as the last alternative. Thus, botulinum toxin (BTX) injections to the detrusor have been commonly performed in recent years and lead to satisfactory results. The mechanism of action of BTX in NDO is based on the principal of smooth muscle relaxation in the bladder by the transient inhibition of neuromuscular nerve signals. The aim is to decrease acetylcholine secretion by blocking presynaptic vesicles in the neuromuscular junction. When studies were evaluated, it was observed that BTX injections to the detrusor muscle are a necessary and effective option in patients with incontinence caused by NDO. This treatment option could be indicated in situations where anticholinergic agents are not effective or could not be tolerated, and it could be a valuable alternative to major surgical treatments. In this review, we evaluated the effectiveness and reliability of BTX in patients with NDO. PMID:26623152

  3. AB200. Treatment effect of TURP plus urethral sphincter botox A injection on male neurogenic micturition dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao; Jiang, Hai; Shen, Yuehong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the treatment effect of TURP plus urethral sphincter botox A injection on male neurogenic micturition dysfunction. Methods Sixteen cases of male neurogenic bladder dysfunction patients. Age from 50 to 68 years old. Average 56 years old. All patients have dysuria symptom with normal bladder capacity. Detrusor underactivity 15 cases. Normal detrusor contractility 1 case. Reasons for neurogenic bladder: spinal cord injury 8 cases, spinal cord tumor 3 cases, postencephalitic 1 case, unknown reasons 4 cases, re-injection 1 case. Residual urine from 80 to 220 mL. Different degrees of prostatic hyperplasia were verified by ultrasound in 15 cases. Routine TURP were administrated under plasma cystoscopy. 100u botox A was injected into urethral sphincter muscle in 10 spots evenly. Symptom scores and ultrasound residual urine were recorded before and 4 weeks after surgery. Results were analyzed for treatment effect estimation. Results The average residual urine volume reduced from 154.8sidua to 57.3erage mL (P<0.01). Three cases stress urinary incontinence were observed, and reduced or recovered after 2–3 months pelvic floor muscle training. All patients were satisfied with the treatment results. The treatment effect lasted more than 15 months. Conclusions TURP plus urethral sphincter botox A injection is an effective and economic treatment on male neurogenic micturition dysfunction.

  4. Best practice in the assessment of bladder function in infants

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Michael; Castagnetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review normal developmental bladder physiology in infants and bladder dysfunction in conditions such as neurogenic bladder, posterior urethral valves and high grade vesicoureteric reflux. We contrast the classical concept that bladder function in nontoilet-trained children is thought to be ‘reflexive’ or ‘uninhibited’, with the results of more recent research showing that infants most commonly have a stable detrusor. The infant bladder is physiologically distinct from the state seen in older children or adults. The voiding pattern of the infant is characterized by an interrupted voiding stream due to lack of proper urinary sphincter relaxation during voiding. This is called physiologic detrusor sphincter dyscoordination and is different from the pathologic ‘detrusor sphincter dyssynergy’ seen in patients with neurogenic bladder. Urodynamic abnormalities in neonates born with spina bifida are common and depend on the level and severity of the spinal cord malformation. Upper neuron lesions most commonly lead to an overactive bladder with or without detrusor sphincter dyssynergy while a lower neuron lesion is associated with an acontractile detrusor with possible denervation of the external urinary sphincter. In infants with neurogenic bladder, the role of ‘early prophylactic treatment (clean intermittent catheterization and anticholinergics)’ versus initial ‘watchful waiting and treatment as needed’ is still controversial and needs more research. Many urodynamic-based interventions have been suggested in patients with posterior urethral valves and are currently under scrutiny, but their impact on the long-term outcome of the upper and lower urinary tract is still unknown. Cumulative data suggest that there is no benefit to early intervention regarding bladder function in infants with high-grade vesicoureteric reflux. PMID:25083164

  5. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  6. Do We Need Surveillance Urethro-Cystoscopy in Patients with Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Knüpfer, Stephanie C.; Mehnert, Ulrich; Bode-Lesniewska, Beata; Kessler, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the value of surveillance urethro-cystoscopy in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) in regard to the conflicting literature as it is generally agreed that patients with NLUTD are at increased risk for bladder cancer. Materials and Methods In a cross-sectional study, a consecutive series of 129 patients (50 females, 79 males, mean age 51, range 18–88) suffering from NLUTD for at least 5 years was prospectively investigated using urethro-cystoscopy and bladder washing cytology at a single university spinal cord injury (SCI) center. Results Due to suspicious urethro-cystoscopy and/or bladder washing cytology findings, 13 (10%) of 129 patients underwent transurethral resection of the bladder lesion and/or random bladder biopsies. Overall, 9 relevant histological findings were found in 5% (7/129) of our patients: bladder melanosis (n = 1), nephrogenic adenoma (n = 3), keratinizing squamous metaplasia (n = 1), intestinal metaplasia (n = 3), and muscle-invasive adenocarcinoma of the bladder (n = 1). Conclusions Using surveillance urethro-cystoscopy, we found relevant histological findings in 5% of our patients suffering from NLUTD for at least 5 years. Thus, surveillance urethro-cystoscopy might be warranted, although the ideal starting point and frequency remain to be determined in further prospective studies. PMID:26513149

  7. Bladder Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Diagnostic Ultrasound Corporation's Bladder Scan Monitor continuously records and monitors bladder fullness and alerts the wearer or caretaker when voiding is required. The sensor is held against the lower abdomen by a belt and connected to the monitor by a cable. The sensor obtains bladder volume data from sound waves reflecting off the bladder wall. The device was developed by Langley Research Center, the Ames Research Center and the NASA Technology Applications Team. It utilizes Langley's advanced ultrasound technology. It is licensed to the ARC for medical applications, and sublicensed to Diagnostics Ultrasound. Central monitoring systems are planned for the future.

  8. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient’s quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  9. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review.

    PubMed

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient's quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  10. Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Considerations for Non-Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in Children.

    PubMed

    Kakizaki, Hidehiro; Kita, Masafumi; Watanabe, Masaki; Wada, Naoki

    2016-05-01

    Non-neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) in children is very common in clinical practice and is important as an underlying cause of lower urinary tract symptoms, urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux in affected children. LUTD in children is caused by multiple factors and might be related with a delay in functional maturation of the lower urinary tract. Behavioral and psychological problems often co-exist in children with LUTD and bowel dysfunction. Recent findings in functional brain imaging suggest that bladder bowel dysfunction and behavioral and psychiatric disorders in children might share common pathophysiological factors in the brain. Children with suspected LUTD should be evaluated properly by detailed history taking, validated questionnaire on voiding and defecation, voiding and bowel diary, urinalysis, screening ultrasound, uroflowmetry and post-void residual measurement. Invasive urodynamic study such as videourodynamics should be reserved for children in whom standard treatment fails. Initial treatment of non-neurogenic LUTD is standard urotherapy comprising education of the child and family, regular optimal voiding regimens and bowel programs. Pelvic floor muscle awareness, biofeedback and neuromodulation can be used as a supplementary purpose. Antimuscarinics and α-blockers are safely used for overactive bladder and dysfunctional voiding, respectively. For refractory cases, botulinum toxin A injection is a viable treatment option. Prudent use of urotherapy and pharmacotherapy for non-neurogenic LUTD should have a better chance to cure various problems and improve self-esteem and quality of life in affected children. PMID:27111618

  11. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP) in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic approach to treatment

  12. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP) in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic approach to treatment

  13. Droxidopa in neurogenic orthostatic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Horacio; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Palma, Jose-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH) is a fall in blood pressure on standing due to reduced norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve terminals. nOH is a feature of several neurological disorders that affect the autonomic nervous system, most notably Parkinson disease (PD), multiple system atrophy, pure autonomic failure and other autonomic neuropathies. Droxidopa, an orally active synthetic amino acid that is converted to norepinephrine by the enzyme aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (dopa-decarboxylase), was recently approved by the FDA for the short-term treatment of nOH. It is presumed to raise blood pressure by acting at the neurovascular junction to increase vascular tone. This review summarizes the pharmacological properties of droxidopa, its mechanism of action, and the efficacy and safety results of clinical trials. PMID:26092297

  14. Droxidopa in neurogenic orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Horacio; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Palma, Jose-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH) is a fall in blood pressure (BP) on standing due to reduced norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve terminals. nOH is a feature of several neurological disorders that affect the autonomic nervous system, most notably Parkinson disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA), pure autonomic failure (PAF), and other autonomic neuropathies. Droxidopa, an orally active synthetic amino acid that is converted to norepinephrine by the enzyme aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (dopa-decarboxylase), was recently approved by the FDA for the short-term treatment of nOH. It is presumed to raise BP by acting at the neurovascular junction to increase vascular tone. This article summarizes the pharmacological properties of droxidopa, its mechanism of action, and the efficacy and safety results of clinical trials. PMID:26092297

  15. Bladder exstrophy repair

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder birth defect repair; Everted bladder repair; Exposed bladder repair; Repair of bladder exstrophy ... in boys and is often linked to other birth defects. Surgery is necessary to: Allow the child to ...

  16. Overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Karen M.; Drake, Marcus J.

    2015-01-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is highly prevalent, and increasingly so with aging. It is characterized by the presence of urinary urgency, and can be associated with incontinence, increased voiding frequency, and nocturia. Assessment needs to exclude serious medical disorders that might present with similar symptoms, and a bladder diary is an invaluable part of understanding the presentation. Initial management is conservative, comprising education, bladder training, and advice on fluid intake. Drug therapy options include antimuscarinic medications and beta-3 adrenergic receptor agonists. Persistent overactive bladder syndrome, despite initial therapy, requires a review of the patient’s understanding of conservative management and compliance, and adjustment of medications. For refractory cases, specialist review and urodynamic testing should be considered; this may identify detrusor overactivity or increased filling sensation, and needs to exclude additional factors, such as stress incontinence and voiding dysfunction. Botulinum neurotoxin-A bladder injections can be used in severe overactivity, provided the patient is able and willing to do intermittent self-catheterisation, which is necessary in about 5% of treated patients. Sacral nerve stimulation and tibial nerve stimulation are other approaches. Major reconstructive surgery, such as augmentation cystoplasty, is rarely undertaken in modern practice but remains a possibility in extreme cases. PMID:26918151

  17. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction: how, when, and with which patients do we use urodynamics?

    PubMed

    Danforth, Teresa L; Ginsberg, David A

    2014-08-01

    Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) affects many patients and requires close monitoring. Initial studies establishing patients at risk for upper tract disease revealed that high detrusor leak point pressures were predictive of upper tract disease. Urodynamics in patients with NLUTD have specific challenges. Initial studies in patients after an acute injury should be delayed until after the spinal shock phase. In children with spinal dysraphism, studies should be done early to established potential risk. The goals are maintaining low bladder pressures, decreasing risk of infection, and maintaining continence. PMID:25063601

  18. Cervicobrachial pain - How Often is it Neurogenic?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, N. Sreekumaran; Bhat, Anil K; Solomon, John M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neck pain associated with pain in the arm (cervicobrachial pain) is a common complaint in patients seeking physiotherapy management. The source of symptoms for this complaint is commonly presumed to be neural. However, this pain pattern could also result from various other innervated tissue structures of the upper quarter. Knowledge about frequency of neural structures being a predominant source of symptoms would help in implementing appropriate therapeutic strategies such as neural tissue mobilization along with other complimentary therapies for optimal outcomes. Aim To determine the frequency of cervicobrachial pain being neurogenic. Materials and Methods Participants (n=361) aged between 20-65 years, reporting cervicobrachial pain were screened for neurogenic nature of symptoms. These physical signs included: active and passive movement dysfunction, adverse responses to neural tissue provocation tests, tenderness on palpating nerve trunks and related cutaneous tissues and evidence of a related local area of pathology (Clinical/radiological). The consistency of all these signs was checked to identify a significant neural involvement. Results Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data. Of 361 participants, 206 were males (44.6 ±10.8 years) and 155 were females (41.8 ± 11.2 years). The frequency of neurogenic cervicobrachial pain was determined to be 19.9% (n=72) and the non-neurogenic sources for symptoms were attributed to 80.1% (n=289) of screened participants. Conclusion Lower frequency of cervicobrachial pain being neurogenic indicates thorough screening for appropriate therapeutic interventions to be successful. PMID:27134988

  19. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the development of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO).

    PubMed

    Frias, Bárbara; Santos, João; Morgado, Marlene; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Gray, Susannah M Y; McCloskey, Karen D; Allen, Shelley; Cruz, Francisco; Cruz, Célia Duarte

    2015-02-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a well known consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI), recognizable after spinal shock, during which the bladder is areflexic. NDO emergence and maintenance depend on profound plastic changes of the spinal neuronal pathways regulating bladder function. It is well known that neurotrophins (NTs) are major regulators of such changes. NGF is the best-studied NT in the bladder and its role in NDO has already been established. Another very abundant neurotrophin is BDNF. Despite being shown that, acting at the spinal cord level, BDNF is a key mediator of bladder dysfunction and pain during cystitis, it is presently unclear if it is also important for NDO. This study aimed to clarify this issue. Results obtained pinpoint BDNF as an important regulator of NDO appearance and maintenance. Spinal BDNF expression increased in a time-dependent manner together with NDO emergence. In chronic SCI rats, BDNF sequestration improved bladder function, indicating that, at later stages, BDNF contributes NDO maintenance. During spinal shock, BDNF sequestration resulted in early development of bladder hyperactivity, accompanied by increased axonal growth of calcitonin gene-related peptide-labeled fibers in the dorsal horn. Chronic BDNF administration inhibited the emergence of NDO, together with reduction of axonal growth, suggesting that BDNF may have a crucial role in bladder function after SCI via inhibition of neuronal sprouting. These findings highlight the role of BDNF in NDO and may provide a significant contribution to create more efficient therapies to manage SCI patients. PMID:25653370

  20. The Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in the Development of Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity (NDO)

    PubMed Central

    Frias, Bárbara; Santos, João; Morgado, Marlene; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Gray, Susannah M.Y.; McCloskey, Karen D.; Allen, Shelley; Cruz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a well known consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI), recognizable after spinal shock, during which the bladder is areflexic. NDO emergence and maintenance depend on profound plastic changes of the spinal neuronal pathways regulating bladder function. It is well known that neurotrophins (NTs) are major regulators of such changes. NGF is the best-studied NT in the bladder and its role in NDO has already been established. Another very abundant neurotrophin is BDNF. Despite being shown that, acting at the spinal cord level, BDNF is a key mediator of bladder dysfunction and pain during cystitis, it is presently unclear if it is also important for NDO. This study aimed to clarify this issue. Results obtained pinpoint BDNF as an important regulator of NDO appearance and maintenance. Spinal BDNF expression increased in a time-dependent manner together with NDO emergence. In chronic SCI rats, BDNF sequestration improved bladder function, indicating that, at later stages, BDNF contributes NDO maintenance. During spinal shock, BDNF sequestration resulted in early development of bladder hyperactivity, accompanied by increased axonal growth of calcitonin gene-related peptide-labeled fibers in the dorsal horn. Chronic BDNF administration inhibited the emergence of NDO, together with reduction of axonal growth, suggesting that BDNF may have a crucial role in bladder function after SCI via inhibition of neuronal sprouting. These findings highlight the role of BDNF in NDO and may provide a significant contribution to create more efficient therapies to manage SCI patients. PMID:25653370

  1. Droxidopa for neurogenic orthostatic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Roy; Biaggioni, Italo; Low, Phillip; Pedder, Simon; Hewitt, L. Arthur; Mauney, Joe; Feirtag, Michael; Mathias, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether droxidopa, an oral norepinephrine precursor, improves symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH). Methods: Patients with symptomatic nOH due to Parkinson disease, multiple system atrophy, pure autonomic failure, or nondiabetic autonomic neuropathy underwent open-label droxidopa dose optimization (100–600 mg 3 times daily), followed, in responders, by 7-day washout and then a 7-day double-blind trial of droxidopa vs placebo. Outcome measures included patient self-ratings on the Orthostatic Hypotension Questionnaire (OHQ), a validated, nOH-specific tool that assesses symptom severity and symptom impact on daily activities. Results: From randomization to endpoint (n = 162), improvement in mean OHQ composite score favored droxidopa over placebo by 0.90 units (p = 0.003). Improvement in OHQ symptom subscore favored droxidopa by 0.73 units (p = 0.010), with maximum change in “dizziness/lightheadedness.” Improvement in symptom-impact subscore favored droxidopa by 1.06 units (p = 0.003), with maximum change for “standing a long time.” Mean standing systolic blood pressure (BP) increased by 11.2 vs 3.9 mm Hg (p < 0.001), and mean supine systolic BP by 7.6 vs 0.8 mm Hg (p < 0.001). At endpoint, supine systolic BP >180 mm Hg was observed in 4.9% of droxidopa and 2.5% of placebo recipients. Adverse events reported in ≥3% of double-blind droxidopa recipients were headache (7.4%) and dizziness (3.7%). No patients discontinued double-blind treatment because of adverse events. Conclusions: In patients with symptomatic nOH, droxidopa improved symptoms and symptom impact on daily activities, with an associated increase in standing systolic BP, and was generally well tolerated. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that in patients with symptomatic nOH who respond to open-label droxidopa, droxidopa improves subjective and objective manifestation of nOH at 7 days. PMID:24944260

  2. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diabetic retinopathy Islets of Langerhans Pancreas Insulin pump Type I diabetes Diabetic blood circulation in foot Food and insulin release ... Saunders; 2015:chap 39. Dungan KM. Management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, de ... hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome Gestational diabetes Hardening of the ...

  3. [Neurogenic pulmonary edema. Report of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Dragosavac, D; Falcão, A L; Araújo, S; Terzi, R G

    1997-06-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a rare and serious complication in patients with head injury. It also may develop after a variety of cerebral insults such as subarachnoid hemorrhage, brain tumors and after epileptic seizures. Thirty six patients with severe head injury and four patients with cerebrovascular insults treated in Intensive Care Unit of HC-UNICAMP from January to September 1995 were evaluated. In this period there were two patients with neurogenic pulmonary edema, one with head injury and other with intracerebral hemorrhage. Diagnosis was made by rapid onset of pulmonary edema, severe hypoxemia, decrease of pulmonary complacence and diffuse pulmonary infiltrations, without previous history of tracheal aspiration or any other risk factor for development of adult respiratory distress syndrome. In the first case, with severe head trauma, neurogenic pulmonary edema was diagnosed at admission one hour after trauma, associated with severe systemic inflammatory reaction, and good outcome in three days. The second case, with hemorrhagic vascular insult, developed neurogenic pulmonary edema the fourth day after drainage of intracerebral hematoma and died. PMID:9629392

  4. Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookshire, Robert H.

    This book provides an overview of the causes and symptoms, and the typical courses, treatments, and outcomes of neurogenic communication disorders. Chapter 1 reviews the human nervous system and neurologic causes of adult communication disorders. Chapter 2 discusses the neurologic assessment and arriving at a diagnosis, including the neurologist's…

  5. Diabetes and Sexual and Urologic Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Sexual and Urologic Problems Troublesome bladder symptoms ... early onset of these sexual and urologic problems. Diabetes and Sexual Problems Both men and women with ...

  6. Neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Dutta, Tanya; Melcer, Joshua; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac manifestations are recognized complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy is one complication that is seen in acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. It can present as transient diffuse left ventricular dysfunction or as transient regional wall motion abnormalities. It occurs more frequently with neurologically severe-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with increased morbidity and poor clinical outcomes. Managing this subset of patients is challenging. Early identification followed by a multidisciplinary team approach can potentially improve outcomes. PMID:25606704

  7. Neurogenic fibrosarcoma following radiation therapy for seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, W.M.; Abbondanzo, S.L.; Chun, B.K.; Manz, H.J.; Maxted, W.C.

    1989-05-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced neurogenic fibrosarcoma that developed in a patient who received radiation therapy for seminoma. The sarcoma developed within the irradiated field after a latency period of nineteen years. Although the occurrence of a secondary neoplasm is unusual, this possibility should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with tumor growth after a long interval following radiation therapy.

  8. Prolonged Cardiac Dysfunction After Intraparenchymal Hemorrhage and Neurogenic Stunned Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Wilson, Thomas; Sharma, Deepak; Vavilala, Monica S

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction occurring secondary to neurologic disease, termed neurogenic stunned myocardium, is an incompletely understood phenomenon that has been described after several distinct neurologic processes. We present a case of neurogenic stunned myocardium, discovered intraoperatively after anesthetic induction, in a patient who presented to our operating room with a recent intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We discuss the longitudinal cardiac functional course after neurogenic stunned myocardium. Finally, we discuss the pathophysiology of neurogenic stunned myocardium, as well as its implications for anesthesiologists caring for neurosurgical patients. PMID:26462162

  9. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... glucose or pre-diabetes. These levels are risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Hemoglobin A1c (A1C) test: Normal is less than 5.7%; prediabetes is 5.7 to 6.4%; and diabetes is 6.5% or higher. Oral ...

  10. Research Findings on Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Phani B.; Patra, Sayani

    2015-01-01

    Several physiopathologic conditions lead to the manifestation of overactive bladder (OAB). These conditions include ageing, diabetes mellitus, bladder outlet obstruction, spinal cord injury, stroke and brain injury, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, interstitial cystitis, stress and depression. This review has discussed research findings in human and animal studies conducted on the above conditions. Several structural and functional changes under these conditions have not only been observed in the lower urinary tract, but also in the brain and spinal cord. Significant changes were observed in the following areas: neurotransmitters, prostaglandins, nerve growth factor, Rho-kinase, interstitial cells of Cajal, and ion and transient receptor potential channels. Interestingly, alterations in these areas showed great variation in each of the conditions of the OAB, suggesting that the pathophysiology of the OAB might be different in each condition of the disease. It is anticipated that this review will be helpful for further research on new and specific drug development against OAB. PMID:26195957

  11. Real-Time Classification of Bladder Events for Effective Diagnosis and Treatment of Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Karam, Robert; Bourbeau, Dennis; Majerus, Steve; Makovey, Iryna; Goldman, Howard B; Damaser, Margot S; Bhunia, Swarup

    2016-04-01

    Diagnosis of lower urinary tract dysfunction with urodynamics has historically relied on data acquired from multiple sensors using nonphysiologically fast cystometric filling. In addition, state-of-the-art neuromodulation approaches to restore bladder function could benefit from a bladder sensor for closed-loop control, but a practical sensor and automated data analysis are not available. We have developed an algorithm for real-time bladder event detection based on a single in situ sensor, making it attractive for both extended ambulatory bladder monitoring and closed-loop control of stimulation systems for diagnosis and treatment of bladder overactivity. Using bladder pressure data acquired from 14 human subjects with neurogenic bladder, we developed context-aware thresholding, a novel, parameterized, user-tunable algorithmic framework capable of real-time classification of bladder events, such as detrusor contractions, from single-sensor bladder pressure data. We compare six event detection algorithms with both single-sensor and two-sensor systems using a metric termed Conditional Stimulation Score, which ranks algorithms based on projected stimulation efficacy and efficiency. We demonstrate that adaptive methods are more robust against day-to-day variations than static thresholding, improving sensitivity and specificity without parameter modifications. Relative to other methods, context-aware thresholding is fast, robust, highly accurate, noise-tolerant, and amenable to energy-efficient hardware implementation, which is important for mapping to an implant device. PMID:26292331

  12. Missed Iatrogenic Bladder Rupture Following Normal Vaginal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Baheti, Vidyasagar H; Patwardhan, Sujata K

    2015-01-01

    Bladder rupture following caesarian section is well documented complications. Intraperitoneal bladder rupture following normal vaginal delivery is very rare. Hereby, we present a case report of intraperitoneal bladder rupture presented late following normal vaginal delivery. We report a case of spontaneous intraperitoneal urinary bladder rupture following uneventful outlet forceps delivery in a 22-year-old primi gravid woman with gestational diabetes mellitus and fetal macrosomia who presented with large urinary ascites, anuria and renal failure. Emergent exploratory laparotomy with repair of the intraperitoneal bladder rupture helped to prevent its potential complications. Postpartum patients who undergo episiotomy or perineal repair may land up in unnoticed urinary retention which may rarely terminate in spontaneous urinary bladder rupture. Awareness of its manifestations amongst emergency physician would help to initiate appropriate timely management. PMID:26557563

  13. Missed Iatrogenic Bladder Rupture Following Normal Vaginal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Baheti, Vidyasagar H; Wagaskar, Vinayak G; Patwardhan, Sujata K

    2015-10-01

    Bladder rupture following caesarian section is well documented complications. Intraperitoneal bladder rupture following normal vaginal delivery is very rare. Hereby, we present a case report of intraperitoneal bladder rupture presented late following normal vaginal delivery. We report a case of spontaneous intraperitoneal urinary bladder rupture following uneventful outlet forceps delivery in a 22-year-old primi gravid woman with gestational diabetes mellitus and fetal macrosomia who presented with large urinary ascites, anuria and renal failure. Emergent exploratory laparotomy with repair of the intraperitoneal bladder rupture helped to prevent its potential complications. Postpartum patients who undergo episiotomy or perineal repair may land up in unnoticed urinary retention which may rarely terminate in spontaneous urinary bladder rupture. Awareness of its manifestations amongst emergency physician would help to initiate appropriate timely management. PMID:26557563

  14. A case of tubular adenoma developing after bladder augmentation: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yutaka; Shiyanagi, Satoko; Nagae, Itsuro; Ishizaki, Tetsuo; Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Katsumata, Kenji; Yamataka, Atsuyuki; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We encountered a rare case of tubular adenoma developing after bladder augmentation. We here report our case as well as summarize reports in the literature on adenomas developing after bladder augmentation. Presentation of case A 23-year-old man came to our hospital for routine surveillance cystoscopy. He was born with a lipomyelomeningocele and neurogenic bladder with low bladder compliance, and hence his bladder was routinely emptied by clean intermittent catheterization. He was also treated with anticholinergic agents. However, because the patient’s neurogenic bladder was unstable, he underwent sigmoidocolocystoplasty when he was 8-years old. After the bladder augmentation, he was examined annually by surveillance cystoscopy. On cystoscopy, a 5-mm pedunculated polyp was found on the front side of the sigmoid colon cap. Therefore, we performed snare polypectomy together with electrocoagulation under cystoscopy. The patient’s final diagnosis was tubular adenoma (mild atypia) with no malignancy, as assessed by histopathology. There has been no evidence of recurrence after the polypectomy on routine surveillance cystoscopy. Discussion To the best of our knowledge, there have been 11 cases of adenoma occurring after bladder augmentation reported in the literature, including our present case. There are several carcinogenic pathways associated with colorectal oncogenesis. Adenomas that are larger than 1.0 cm in diameter with a marked villous component have a high risk of oncogenesis. Conclusion We believe that the early detection of carcinoma or adenoma and their treatment at an early stage is crucial. Therefore, we recommend routine surveillance cystoscopy for patients after bladder augmentation. PMID:26706596

  15. Bladder Preservation for Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Arafat; Choudhury, Ananya

    2016-01-01

    The standard treatment for muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) has been considered to be radical cystectomy (RC) with pelvic lymphadenectomy. However morbidity and impact on quality of life is significant. Radiotherapy has been used in MIBC patients who choose bladder preservation or who are unfit for RC with comparable outcomes. Evidence from some prospective and large retrospective series supports the use of radiotherapy as an attractive alternative option. In this paper we review the evidence and practice of bladder preservation strategies with radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer. PMID:27376137

  16. Long-term outcomes of urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E. U.; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-01-01

    The advent of specialized spinal units and better understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction has made long-term survival of these patients a reality. This has, in turn, led to an increase in quality and choice of management modalities offered to these patients including complex anatomic urinary tract reconstructive procedures tailored to the unique needs of each individual with variable outcomes. We performed a literature review evaluating the long-term outcomes of these reconstructive procedures. To achieve this, we conducted a world-wide electronic literature search of long-term outcomes published in English. As the premise of this review is long-term outcomes, we have focused on pathologies where evidence of long-term outcome is available such as patients with spinal injuries and spina bifida. Therapeutic success following urinary tract reconstruction is usually measured by preservation of renal function, improvement in quality-of-life, the satisfactory achievement of agreed outcomes and the prevention of serious complications. Prognostic factors include neuropathic detrusor overactivity; sphincter dyssynergia; bladder over distension; high pressure storage and high leak point pressures; vesicoureteric reflex, stone formation and urinary tract infections. Although, the past decade has witnessed a reduction in the total number of bladder reconstructive surgeries in the UK, these procedures are essentially safe and effective; but require long-term clinical and functional follow-up/monitoring. Until tissue engineering and gene therapy becomes more mainstream, we feel there is still a place for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:24235796

  17. Photodynamic therapy of the rabbit bowel and bladder after installation and injection of delta aminolevulinic acid (ALA): uptake of protoporphyrin IX and depth of necrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merguerian, Paul A.; Pugach, Jeff L.; Park, Jane; Sepers, Marja; Lilge, Lothar D.

    1999-06-01

    Management of neurogenic bladders with high pressures and poor compliance often requires surgical enlargement of the bladder utilizing small or large bowel or stomach. The bowel segments usually retain their absorptive and secretory properties causing several complications which include hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis for small and large bowel segments, hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis for stomach segments, increased risk of bacteriuria, stone formation, altered hepatic metabolism and altered drug metabolism. There is also the potential risk of developing cancer at the anastomotic site.

  18. Bladder function - neurological control

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... with urine, sensory nerves send impulses to the brain indicating that the bladder is full. The sensory ... cord to relay this information. In turn, the brain sends impulses back to the bladder instructing the ...

  19. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... future bladder cancer research through the Patient Survey Network. Read More... Don’t Miss the 2016 BCAN ... Click here for more details Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network 4915 St. Elmo Avenue, Suite 202 Bethesda, Maryland ...

  20. A case–control study on the association between bladder cancer and prior bladder calculus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bladder calculus is associated with chronic irritation and inflammation. As there is substantial documentation that inflammation can play a direct role in carcinogenesis, to date the relationship between stone formation and bladder cancer (BC) remains unclear. This study aimed to examine the association between BC and prior bladder calculus using a population-based dataset. Methods This case–control study included 2,086 cases who had received their first-time diagnosis of BC between 2001 and 2009 and 10,430 randomly selected controls without BC. Conditional logistic regressions were employed to explore the association between BC and having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus. Results Of the sampled subjects, bladder calculus was found in 71 (3.4%) cases and 105 (1.1%) controls. Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) of having been diagnosed with bladder calculus before the index date for cases was 3.42 (95% CI = 2.48-4.72) when compared with controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic region, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and renal disease, tobacco use disorder, obesity, alcohol abuse, and schistosomiasis, bladder outlet obstruction, and urinary tract infection. We further analyzed according to sex and found that among males, the OR of having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus for cases was 3.45 (95% CI = 2.39-4.99) that of controls. Among females, the OR was 3.05 (95% CI = 1.53-6.08) that of controls. Conclusions These results add to the evidence surrounding the conflicting reports regarding the association between BC and prior bladder calculus and highlight a potential target population for bladder cancer screening. PMID:23497224

  1. Neurological dysfunction of the bladder in workers exposed to dimethylaminopropionitrile.

    PubMed

    Kreiss, K; Wegman, D H; Niles, C A; Siroky, M B; Krane, R J; Feldman, R G

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction, characterized by hesitancy, need to strain, decreased stream, and increased duration of urination, developed in 104 (63%) of 166 employees working in the manufacture of polyurethane foam. Highest rates of illness (69%) occurred in production workers, and no illness occurred in office or warehouse workers. Onset of the epidemic coincided with introduction of a catalyst, dimethylaminopropionitrile (DMAPN), and monthly case incidence rates increased as DMAPN use increased. Outbreak ceased abruptly when DMAPN use was stopped. Of eight patients who underwent neurourologic testing during recovery, seven lacked either detrusor reflex or normal sensation of bladder filling; seven had a subclinical sensory abnormality; three had prolonged sacral-evoked responses; and two of these three had limb motor neuropathies. Dimethylaminopropionitrile is unique among known neurotoxins in producing urinary symptoms more frequently than limb nerve symptoms. PMID:6243373

  2. It Takes a Village: Constructing the Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Bjornsson, Christopher S.; Apostolopoulou, Maria; Tian, Yangzi; Temple, Sally

    2016-01-01

    While many features of neurogenesis during development and in the adult are intrinsic to the neurogenic cells themselves, the role of the microenvironment is irrefutable. The neurogenic niche is a melting pot of cells and factors that influence CNS development. How do the diverse elements assemble, and when? How does the niche change structurally and functionally during embryogenesis and into adulthood? In this review, we focus on the impact of non-neural cells that participate in the neurogenic niche, highlighting how cells of different embryonic origins influence this critical germinal space. PMID:25710530

  3. Neurogenic dysphagia resulting from Chiari malformations.

    PubMed

    Pollack, I F; Pang, D; Kocoshis, S; Putnam, P

    1992-05-01

    Between 1980 and 1989, 15 of 46 patients (11 children, 4 adults) who underwent suboccipital craniectomy and cervical laminectomy for symptomatic Chiari malformations presented with manifestations of neurogenic dysphagia. Each of these patients had normal swallowing function before the development of dysphagic symptoms. Dysphagia was progressive in all 15 and, in most cases, preceded the onset of other severe brain stem signs. The rate of symptom progression varied depending on the age of the patient. Whereas the six infants (all Chiari II) deteriorated rapidly after the onset of initial symptoms, the five older children (two Chiari I, three Chiari II) and four adults (all Chiari I) showed a more gradual deterioration. In 11 patients with severe dysphagia, barium video esophagograms, pharyngoesophageal motility studies, continuous esophageal pH monitoring, and appropriate scintigraphic studies were useful in defining the scope of the swallowing impairment and determining whether perioperative nasogastric or gastrostomy feedings, gastric fundoplication, and/or tracheostomy were needed to maintain adequate nutrition and avoid aspiration. These patients all had widespread dysfunction of the swallowing mechanism, with a combination of diffuse pharyngoesophageal dysmotility, cricopharyngeal achalasia, nasal regurgitation, tracheal aspiration, and gastroesophageal reflux. The pathophysiology of these swallowing impairments and their relation to the hindbrain malformation is discussed. Postoperative outcome with regard to swallowing function correlated with the severity of preoperative symptoms. The four patients with mild dysphagia showed rapid improvement in swallowing function after surgery. Seven patients with more severe impairment but without other signs of severe brain stem compromise, such as central apnea or complete bilateral vocal cord paralysis, also improved, albeit more slowly. In contrast, the outcome in the four patients who developed other signs of severe

  4. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Polycystic ovary syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that occurs when an imbalance ... to form on the ovaries. Women who have PCOS are at an increased risk of developing type ...

  5. Neoadjuvant Intravesical Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Bladder Carcinoma Who Are Undergoing Cystectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer

  6. A Large Bladder Tumor Covered With a Thick “Shell” of Necrotic Material

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Zhe; Gong, Miao-zi; Pan, Dong-liang; Zhang, Xiang-hua; Li, Ning-chen; Na, Yan-qun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bladder tumor arising in a spina bifida patient is rare and may be clinically latent. We report the case of a 61-year-old female patient with spina bifida, neurogenic bladder, and a history of recurrent urinary tract infections. A B-ultrasound and non-contrast computed tomography scan did not reveal any bladder mass, but an unexplained “well-filled” bladder was observed, which was confusing as the catheter was present and open. However, a subsequent cystoscopic evaluation revealed a large bladder mass measuring 9.5 × 9.0 × 6.5 cm3, which almost filled the entire bladder. The mass had coarse and flocculent surface and seemed to be free from each observed wall of the urinary bladder. It was diagnosed as an infectious necrotic mass based on its appearance. During transurethral resection of the mass, a bladder tumor was suspected as small blood vessels and bleeding appeared within the inner layer of the mass. Pathological examination revealed necrotic material, inflammatory cells, and urothelial carcinoma cells. Then, a radical cystectomy was performed, and the pathological results indicated stage pT3bN0M0 transitional cell carcinoma. In the gross specimen, the base of the tumor measured 3 × 3 cm2 on the top of the back wall of the bladder. Bladder tumors may have atypical presentations in patients with spina bifida. Regular screening is helpful for earlier detection and improving outcomes of bladder tumors in such patients. PMID:27100442

  7. Transvaginal closure of the bladder neck and placement of a suprapubic catheter for destroyed urethra after long-term indwelling catheterization.

    PubMed

    Zimmern, P E; Hadley, H R; Leach, G E; Raz, S

    1985-09-01

    We report on 6 women with continuous urinary incontinence as a late complication of an indwelling urethral catheter for neurogenic bladder. Pressure necrosis by the balloon resulted in progressive destruction of the entire urethra, with subsequent incontinence despite the catheter. Surgical attempts at bladder neck closure to correct the incontinence generally have been unsuccessful. Instead of supravesical urinary diversion, we performed transvaginal closure of the bladder neck and percutaneous placement of a permanent suprapubic tube cystostomy. All 6 patients remained dry after closure and none has shown upper urinary tract deterioration at followup for as long as 5 years. PMID:4040980

  8. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer This page lists cancer ... in bladder cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer Atezolizumab Cisplatin Doxorubicin Hydrochloride ...

  9. Regulation of urinary bladder capacity by endogenous opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Booth, A M; Hisamitsu, T; Kawatani, M; De Groat, W C

    1985-02-01

    Naloxone administered to chloralose or ketamine anesthetized cats reduced urinary bladder capacity. Successive cystometrograms revealed that naloxone in doses of 0.5 microgram./kg. to 15 micrograms./kg. i.v. reduced the volume necessary to evoke micturition by 10 to 50 per cent, respectively. The effect was maximal within a few minutes, remained constant for about 1/2 hour and returned to control values over the next 2 to 3 hours. Following return to control, subsequent doses of naloxone produced no further effect on capacity. In chloralose anesthetized animals naloxone also increased the frequency and amplitude of low amplitude pressure waves on the tonus limb of the cystometrogram. Intrathecal administration of naloxone to the sacral spinal cord did not significantly reduce the volume necessary to evoke micturition even at large doses, but did increase the amplitude of micturition contractions. These data, along with previous reports, suggest that mu receptors in the brainstem alter urinary bladder capacity, while delta receptors in the spinal cord modulate the magnitude of bladder contractions. Pharmacological manipulation of these receptor systems could provide a tool for the management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. PMID:3968761

  10. DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    Limited options for clinical management of patients with juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus call for a novel therapeutic paradigm. Two innovative studies support endoplasmic reticulum as an emerging target for combating both autoimmune and heritable forms of this disease. PMID:24393784

  11. Microglia participate in neurogenic regulation of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao Z; Li, You; Li, Liang; Shah, Kandarp H; Bernstein, Kenneth E; Lyden, Patrick; Shi, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension is associated with neuroinflammation and increased sympathetic tone. Interference with neuroinflammation by an anti-inflammatory reagent or overexpression of interleukin-10 in the brain was found to attenuate hypertension. However, the cellular mechanism of neuroinflammation, as well as its impact on neurogenic regulation of blood pressure, is unclear. Here, we found that hypertension, induced by either angiotensin II or l-N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, is accompanied by microglial activation as manifested by microgliosis and proinflammatory cytokine upregulation. Targeted depletion of microglia significantly attenuated neuroinflammation, glutamate receptor expression in the paraventricular nucleus, plasma vasopressin level, kidney norepinephrine concentration, and blood pressure. Furthermore, when microglia were preactivated and transferred into the brains of normotensive mice, there was a significantly prolonged pressor response to intracerebroventricular injection of angiotensin II, and inactivation of microglia eliminated these effects. These data demonstrate that microglia, the resident immune cells in the brain, are the major cellular factors in mediating neuroinflammation and modulating neuronal excitation, which contributes to the elevated blood pressure. PMID:26056339

  12. Bladder exstrophy repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... this case, the newborn is sent home on antibiotics. The bladder, which is outside the abdomen, must be kept moist. It can take months for the bladder to grow to the right size. The infant will be followed closely by a medical team ...

  13. Daily Bladder Diary

    MedlinePlus

    ... page you would like to print out: View page 1 of the Bladder Diary View page 2 of the Bladder Diary This content is ... Information Center Phone: 1-800-860-8747 | TTY: 1-866-569-1162 | Email: healthinfo@niddk.nih.gov | Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern time, M-F

  14. [An artificial urinary bladder sphincter for men].

    PubMed

    Hanus, T; Dvorácek, J; Kocvara, R

    1997-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a condition with involuntary escape of urine and causes not only medical but also social and hygienic problems. One of the causes of incontinence is insufficiency of the urethral closure mechanism which in men is usually caused by previous prostatectomy or neurogenic dysfunction of the lower urinary pathways. The method of choice is the application of an artificial sphincter (model AMS 800) to the bulbar urethra or cervix. The authors applied an artificial sphincter in 1993-1996 to one boy and 14 men aged 11-72 years. The basic components of the artificial sphincter of the urethra-AMS 800 is a cuff, balloon and pump. The whole system is filled with isotonic solution Omnipaque 300, the cuff which is 45-80 mm long is placed either round the bulbar urethra from a perineal approach or round the cervix by a retropubic approach. The pump is placed beneath the skin of the scrotum and the balloon is in a perivesical position. All parts of the AMS are connected by tubes. Because of infectious complications the authors had to explant the sphincter in two patients. In one patient it was necessary to add another cuff. The perineal approach is simpler, but is associated with a higher risk of erosion of the urethra. Patients with a neurogenic bladder had more complications than those after prostatectomy. Despite the fact that the method and aid is expensive, the treatment is very effective and makes the patients independent on other aids for incontinent patients. PMID:9182338

  15. Retroaortic Variant of Reverse Horseshoe Kidney With Butterfly Vertebrae Presenting as Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    Esen, Baris; Telli, Onur; Ucan, Berna; Fitoz, Suat; Unlu, Agahan; Burgu, Berk; Soygur, Tarkan

    2016-09-01

    Horseshoe kidney is a relatively common congenital anomaly. In 95% of the cases, lower poles are connected to each other. In a small subset, an isthmus connects both upper poles (reverse horseshoe kidney). Almost always, the fusion of kidney poles occurs anterior to the aorta and vena cava. The fusion of renal poles posterior to both aorta and vena cava is extremely rare. Herein, we present a case with multiple rare congenital anomalies-retroaortic variant of reverse horseshoe kidney, retroaortic left renal vein, and butterfly vertebrae. PMID:27282812

  16. Origins of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Bogdan; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David

    2016-05-23

    Bladder cancer, one of the most frequently occurring human cancers, develops via two tracks referred to as papillary and nonpapillary that correspond to clinically different forms of the disease. Most bladder cancers are chemically induced, with tobacco smoking being the leading risk factor. Recent advances in bladder cancer research have enhanced our understanding of the origin of this disease from urothelial progenitor cells via field effects along papillary/luminal and nonpapillary/basal pathways. Evident from the outset of the disease, the diversity of the luminal and basal pathways, together with cell lineage tracing studies, postulates the origin of molecularly distinct subtypes from different uroprogenitor cells. The molecular mechanisms initiating field effects involve a new class of genes referred to as forerunner (FR) genes that generally map around major tumor suppressors such as RB1. These genes are silenced, predominantly by hypermethylation and less frequently by mutations, and drive the expansion of intraurothelial preneoplastic cells. Different FR genes are involved in various molecular subtypes of bladder cancer and they sensitize the uroprogenitor cells to the development of luminal and basal bladder cancers in animal models. In human bladder cancer, luminal and basal forms have dissimilar clinical behavior and response to conventional and targeted chemotherapeutic manipulations. These new research developments hold the promise of expanding our armamentarium of diagnostic and treatment options for patients with bladder cancer and improving our ability to select patients most likely to respond to a specific therapy. PMID:26907529

  17. Bladder operated robotic joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a robotic joint which is operated by inflatable bladders and which can be used in applications where it is desired to move or hold an object. A support block supports an elongated plate to which is pivotally attached a finger. A tension strip passes over a lever attached to the finger and is attached at its ends to the support block on opposite sides of the plate. Bladders positioned between the plate and the tension strip on opposite sides of the plate can be inflated by pumps to pivot the finger, with one of the bladders being inflated while the other is being deflated.

  18. Intermittent catheterization failure and an approach to bladder rehabilitation in spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Perkash, I

    1978-01-01

    Forty-six patients with spinal injury with dysfunctional neurogenic bladder were analyzed. Fourteen patients on prolonged intermittent catheterization from 12 weeks to more than 1 year did not develop a balanced bladder, 14 patients had indwelling catheters after intermittent catheterization failed elsewhere and 18 patients on external condom drainage presented with difficult voiding and repeated infections. There were 16 quadriplegics (1 incomplete), 21 paraplegics, and 9 incomplete cauda equina lesions. Urologic and urodynamic evaluation revealed detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia in 15 patients, vesicoureteral reflux in 10, and areflexic bladders in 11. Five patients over the age of 55 years showed slight enlargement of the prostrate. Some degree of bladder neck fibrosis was suspected in 26. More than one urologic pathology was encountered in the same patient. Transurethral sphincterotomy was carried out in 38 patients and only one transurethral resection of the prostrate (TURP) in an incomplete quadriplegic patient. In seven patients with no obvious urodynamic abnormality, a balanced bladder was achieved with intermittent catheterization; however, one of these patients needed a transurethral sphincterotomy on subsequent admission. A balanced bladder was achieved in all patients except the one with incomplete quadriplegia. Significant improvement in vesicoureteral reflux and relief from autonomic dysreflexic symptoms were recorded in all patients. PMID:619856

  19. Discerning Neurogenic vs. Non-Neurogenic Postnatal Lateral Ventricular Astrocytes via Activity-Dependent Input

    PubMed Central

    Adlaf, Elena W.; Mitchell-Dick, Aaron; Kuo, Chay T.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, neural stem cells (NSCs) give rise to differentiated neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes which together modulate perception, memory, and behavior in the adult nervous system. To understand how NSCs contribute to postnatal/adult brain remodeling and repair after injury, the lateral ventricular (LV) neurogenic niche in the rodent postnatal brain serves as an excellent model system. It is a specialized area containing self-renewing GFAP+ astrocytes functioning as NSCs generating new neurons throughout life. In addition to this now well-studied regenerative process, the LV niche also generates differentiated astrocytes, playing an important role for glial scar formation after cortical injury. While LV NSCs can be clearly distinguished from their neuroblast and oligodendrocyte progeny via molecular markers, the astrocytic identity of NSCs has complicated their distinction from terminally-differentiated astrocytes in the niche. Our current models of postnatal/adult LV neurogenesis do not take into account local astrogenesis, or the possibility that cellular markers may be similar between non-dividing GFAP+ NSCs and their differentiated astrocyte daughters. Postnatal LV neurogenesis is regulated by NSC-intrinsic mechanisms interacting with extracellular/niche-driven cues. It is generally believed that these local effects are responsible for sustaining neurogenesis, though behavioral paradigms and disease states have suggested possibilities for neural circuit-level modulation. With recent experimental findings that neuronal stimulation can directly evoke responses in LV NSCs, it is possible that this exciting property will add a new dimension to identifying postnatal/adult NSCs. Here, we put forth a notion that neural circuit-level input can be a distinct characteristic defining postnatal/adult NSCs from non-neurogenic astroglia. PMID:27047330

  20. Short-Term Effect of Percutaneous Bipolar Continuous Radiofrequency on Sacral Nerves in Patients Treated for Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity After Spinal Cord Injury: A Randomized Controlled Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Ahn, Sang Ho; Cho, Yun Woo; Kwak, Sang Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the short-term effects of bipolar radiofrequency applied to sacral nerves to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury. Methods Ten patients with spinal cord injury with neurogenic detrusor overactivity were recruited. These subjects were randomized to two groups: intervention (n=5) and control (n=5), members of which received conventional treatment. Voiding diary, International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire (ICIQ) and the urinary incontinence quality of life scale (IQOL) data were obtained and an urodynamic study (UDS) was performed before and after intervention. In the intervention group, percutaneous bipolar continuous radiofrequency (CRF) was performed on both the S2 and S3 nerves in each patient. Results In a comparison of daily frequency and number of urinary incontinence and ICIQ and IQOL scores at baseline and at 1 and 3 months after intervention, all variables achieved a significant effect for time (p<0.05). Regarding UDS parameters, pre/post intervention differences between baseline and 3-month post-intervention for volume at maximal detrusor pressure during filling and reflex detrusor volume at first contraction were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.05). However, pre/post intervention differences in maximum cystometric capacity and maximum detrusor pressure during filling were not significant between the two groups (p>0.05). Conclusion Percutaneous bipolar CRF applied to sacral nerves might be an effective therapy for neurogenic overactive bladder that reduces urinary incontinence and improves quality of life. PMID:26605169

  1. A practical guide to the treatment of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael J; Kimpinski, Kurt

    2014-03-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (NOH) is a debilitating condition associated with many central and peripheral neurological disorders. It has a complex pathophysiology and variable clinical presentation, which makes diagnosis and treatment difficult. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension is often confused with other disorders of orthostatic intolerance, hypovolemic states and systemic conditions. Diagnosis is usually made by an autonomic specialist following characteristic responses to head-up tilt. Symptom control can be achieved through a combination of patient education, nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapy. The purpose of this review is to provide the clinician with a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of NOH. PMID:24534025

  2. Role of Neurogenic Inflammation in Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Portocarrero, Louis; Westlund, Karin N.

    2009-01-01

    Pain arising from pancreatic diseases can become chronic and difficult to treat. There is a paucity of knowledge regarding the mechanisms that sensitize neural pathways that transmit noxious information from visceral organs. In this review, neurogenic inflammation is presented as a possible amplifier of the noxious signal from peripheral organs including the pancreas. The nerve pathways that transmit pancreatic pain are also reviewed as a conduit of the amplified signals. It is likely that components of these visceral pain pathways can also be sensitized after neurogenic inflammation. PMID:16215298

  3. Cystocele (Fallen Bladder)

    MedlinePlus

    ... interprets the images. A woman does not need anesthesia. A health care provider can also use a ... completely emptying her bladder. A woman receives local anesthesia. A health care provider may use a voiding ...

  4. Giant bladder diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Tortorelli, Antonio Pio; Rosa, Fausto; Papa, Valerio; Alfieri, Sergio; Doglietto, Giovanni Battista

    2011-03-01

    We present the case of a 73-year-old man affected by progressive and painful abdominal distension and paresthesia/hypoesthesia at the left leg. US and CT-scan revealed the presence in the left retroperitoneum of a large cystic mass without parietal thickening or enhancement after contrast injection. This mass disappeared after positioning a vesical Foley's catheter and a retrograde cystography confirmed the suspected diagnosis of a large bladder diverticulum due to a severe prostatic hypertrophy; the patient underwent an open diverticulectomy and endoscopic prostatic resection. Bladder diverticula can occasionally appear as complex pelvic masses not obviously connected to the bladder, eventually leading to diagnostic confusion; while small size diverticulum resolves with relief of bladder outlet obstruction, open or laparoscopic diverticulectomy is needed in large size diverticulum if symptomatic, even considering the possible tumor harboring. PMID:21229344

  5. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  6. Urinary Incontinence: Bladder Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... following ways: Lengthen the amount of time between bathroom trips. Increase the amount of urine your bladder ... Kegel exercises may also help control urges. Scheduled bathroom trips: Some people control their incontinence by going ...

  7. Daily Bladder Diary

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder diary. If you have Adobe's® Acrobat® Reader Software , you might prefer looking at the Print PDF Version (80 KB) of the diary as the print quality will be much enhanced. Please select which page ...

  8. A Large Bladder Tumor Covered With a Thick "Shell" of Necrotic Material: Misdiagnosis of a Patient With Spina Bifida.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Zhe; Gong, Miao-Zi; Pan, Dong-Liang; Zhang, Xiang-Hua; Li, Ning-Chen; Na, Yan-Qun

    2016-04-01

    Bladder tumor arising in a spina bifida patient is rare and may be clinically latent.We report the case of a 61-year-old female patient with spina bifida, neurogenic bladder, and a history of recurrent urinary tract infections. A B-ultrasound and non-contrast computed tomography scan did not reveal any bladder mass, but an unexplained "well-filled" bladder was observed, which was confusing as the catheter was present and open. However, a subsequent cystoscopic evaluation revealed a large bladder mass measuring 9.5 × 9.0 × 6.5 cm, which almost filled the entire bladder. The mass had coarse and flocculent surface and seemed to be free from each observed wall of the urinary bladder. It was diagnosed as an infectious necrotic mass based on its appearance.During transurethral resection of the mass, a bladder tumor was suspected as small blood vessels and bleeding appeared within the inner layer of the mass. Pathological examination revealed necrotic material, inflammatory cells, and urothelial carcinoma cells. Then, a radical cystectomy was performed, and the pathological results indicated stage pT3bN0M0 transitional cell carcinoma. In the gross specimen, the base of the tumor measured 3 × 3 cm on the top of the back wall of the bladder.Bladder tumors may have atypical presentations in patients with spina bifida. Regular screening is helpful for earlier detection and improving outcomes of bladder tumors in such patients. PMID:27100442

  9. The anatomical basis and prevention of neurogenic voiding dysfunction following radical hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Tong, X K; Huo, R J

    1991-01-01

    The disorder of neurogenic dysfunction is one of the most important complications of radical hysterectomy. In order to prevent this potential complication, the authors have studied the composition and layers of the pelvic paravisceral structures. The nerve branching and distribution of the pelvic plexus of 12 adult female cadavers were analyzed. From lateral to medial the pelvic paravisceral structure is made up of three layers. The lateral layer is the pelvic visceral fascia, the middle, a vascular layer, and the medial one, a nervous one which consists of the pelvic plexus and subsidiary plexuses. The pelvic plexus and subsidiary plexuses are laid closely to the lateral walls of pelvic organs. The ischial spine was taken as the central point and two perpendicular lines penetrating through the ischial spine were used as the longitudinal axis and transverse axis. According to these landmarks, the pelvic plexus could be divided into three parts: behind the longitudinal axis are the roots of the pelvic plexus, near the longitudinal axis is the uterovaginal plexus, and in front of the longitudinal axis are the branches distributed to bladder and urethra. The pelvic plexus and the uterosacral and cardinal ligaments are closely related. The pelvic and subsidiary plexuses can be damaged in radical hysterectomy and voiding dysfunction may then develop. Some anatomic bases are provided to explain and hopefully prevent this from happening. PMID:1925917

  10. SUSCEPTIBILITY TO POLLUTANT-INDUCED AIRWAY INFLAMMATION IS NEUROGENICALLY MEDIATED.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurogenic inflammation in the airways involves the activation of sensory irritant receptors (capsaicin, VR1) by noxious stimuli and the subsequent release of neuropeptides (e.g., SP, CGRP, NKA) from these fibers. Once released, these peptides initiate and sustain symptoms of ...

  11. Unconventional Neurogenic Niches and Neurogenesis Modulation by Vitamins

    PubMed Central

    Oyarce, Karina; Bongarzone, Ernesto R.; Nualart, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Although the generation of new neurons occurs in adult mammals, it has been classically described in two defined regions of the brain denominated neurogenic niches: the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. In these regions, neural stem cells give rise to new neurons and glia, which functionally integrate into the existing circuits under physiological conditions. However, accumulating evidence indicates the presence of neurogenic potential in other brain regions, from which multipotent precursors can be isolated and differentiated in vitro. In some of these regions, neuron generation occurs at low levels; however, the addition of growth factors, hormones or other signaling molecules increases the proliferation and differentiation of precursor cells. In addition, vitamins, which are micronutrients necessary for normal brain development, and whose deficiency produces neurological impairments, have a regulatory effect on neural stem cells in vitro and in vivo. In the present review, we will describe the progress that has been achieved in determining the neurogenic potential in other regions, known as unconventional niches, as well as the characteristics of the neural stem cells described for each region. Finally, we will revisit the roles of commonly known vitamins as modulators of precursor cell proliferation and differentiation, and their role in the complex and tight molecular signaling that impacts these neurogenic niches. PMID:26203401

  12. NEUROGENIC RESPONSES OF RAT LUNG TO DIESEL EXHAUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The investigators are among the first researchers to investigate neurogenic inflammation in the lungs of rats exposed to whole diesel exhaust. After exposure to both concentrations of diesel exhaust, consistently higher levels of plasma leakage and lower activity of the enz...

  13. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    MedlinePlus

    Injury - bladder and urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... Types of bladder injuries include: Blunt trauma (such as a blow to the body) Penetrating wounds (such as bullet or stab wounds) The ...

  14. General Information about Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Bladder Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Bladder Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. Nerve Disease and Bladder Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... KB) Alternate Language URL Nerve Disease and Bladder Control Page Content On this page: What bladder control ...

  16. Arteriovenous malformations of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Grunberger, I; DeAsis, A; Torno, R; Godec, C J

    1989-01-01

    We report a rare case of a localized arteriovenous malformation of the bladder mimicking a bladder tumor and presenting with gross hematuria. The mass was successfully resected transurethrally. PMID:2908934

  17. Superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Hall, R R

    1994-04-01

    Bladder cancer is almost certainly a product of the industrial revolution and the cigarette smoking that has accompanied it. Exposure to a chemical bladder carcinogen such as beta naphthylamine, benzidine, or 4-diphenylaniline can be proved in only a small proportion of patients and only a handful obtain industrial diseases benefit after developing "Prescribed Industrial Disease C23." None the less, the continued use of known carcinogenic substances in British industry for many years after their identification, the wide range of industries with a known or suspected increased risk of bladder cancer, and our ignorance of the carcinogenic potential of many materials used in current manufacturing should be a cause for continuing concern. PMID:8173377

  18. Botulinum toxin: An emerging therapy in female bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Aditya A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluated the utility of botulinum toxin in functional female bladder outlet obstruction. Materials and Methods: A total of 7 consecutive female patients with bladder outlet obstruction were included. Patients with neurogenic bladder were excluded. All were previously treated with periodic dilations. Diagnosis was based on symptomatology, cystometry, and micturating cystograms. A total of 2 patients had been in chronic retention with residual volumes more than 400 ml. All were managed with an injection of botulinum toxin, 100 units in 2 ml of saline injected with a flexible cystoscopic needle. The site of the injection was deep submucosally, 0.5 ml in each quadrant at the level of the most prominent narrowing seen endoscopically. All the procedures were done as day care procedures under local anaesthesia. After the procedure, no catheter was placed. Patients were followed up for changes in IPSS scores and post void residual urine measurements. In all cases, multiple injections were used. Results: The follow-up period ranged from 48–52 weeks. The IPSS reduced by an average of 12 points. Post void residual urine reduced by 62%. Improvements commenced 4.85 days (average) after the procedure and lasted for an average of 16.8 weeks (range: 10.8–28 weeks). Discussion: There is a gradual improvement in symptoms over time and the maximal effect occurred at 10–14 days. The duration of improvement was approximately 16.8 weeks. All patients were satisfied by the degree of improvement felt. Conclusions: Botulinum toxin proved successful in improving the voiding characteristics. It possibly acts at the zone of hypertonicity at the bladder neck or midurethra. The only disadvantage is the high cost of the drug. PMID:19881122

  19. The effect of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on the recovery of bladder and hindlimb function after spinal cord contusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells are widely used for transplantation into the injured spinal cord in vivo model and for safety, many human clinical trials are continuing to promote improvements of motor and sensory functions after spinal cord injury. Yet the exact mechanism for these improvements remains undefined. Neurogenic bladder following spinal cord injury is the main problem decreasing the quality of life for patients with spinal cord injury, but there are no clear data using stem cell transplantation for the improvement of neurogenic bladder for in vivo studies and the clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to delineate the effect of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) transplantation on the restoration of neurogenic bladder and impaired hindlimb function after spinal cord contusion of rats and the relationship between neurotrophic factors such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and bladder and hindlimb functions. Results Modified moderate contusion injury were performed on the thoracic spinal cord of Sprague-Dawley rats using MASCIS impactor and hMSCs, human fibroblasts or phosphate-buffered saline were transplanted into injured spinal cord 9 days after injury for hMSC and two control groups respectively. Ladder test showed more rapid restoration of hindlimb function in hMSC group than in control group, but Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan score and coupling score were not different significantly among hMSC and two control groups. Neurogenic bladder was not improved in either group. ED1 positive macrophages were significantly reduced in hMSC group than in two control groups, but ELISA and RT-PCR studies revealed BDNF and NT-3 levels in spinal cord and bladder were not different among hMSC and two control groups regardless the experimental duration. Conclusion hMSC transplantation was effective in reducing inflammatory reaction after spinal cord contusion of rats but not sufficient to recover locomotor and bladder

  20. Neurogenic thoracic outlet and pectoralis minor syndromes in children.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Richard J; Annest, Stephen J; Goldson, Edward

    2013-07-01

    Brachial plexus compression (BPC) occurs above the clavicle as neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) and below as neurogenic pectoralis minor syndrome (NPMS). It was recently noted that 75% of the adults seen for NTOS also had NPMS and in some this was the only diagnosis. This is also true in children but has not yet been reported. Because surgical treatment of NPMS is a minimum risk operation for pectoralis minor tenotomy (PMT), recognition of NPMS and distinguishing it from NTOS becomes important. In this study, 40 operations, 20 PMT and 20 NTOS procedures, were performed. Success rate for PMT was 85% and for thoracic outlet decompression was 70%. It was concluded that in children, as in adults, BPC is more often due to combined NTOS and NPMS. Surgical PMT should be considered first as the treatment of choice for children with NPMS. Thoracic outlet decompression is available if PMT is unsuccessful. PMID:23503361

  1. The treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients with neurogenic disease

    PubMed Central

    Brant, William O.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) related to compromise of the nervous system is an increasingly common occurrence. This may be due to the multifactorial nature of ED, the myriad of disorders affecting the neurotransmission of erectogenic signals, and improved awareness and diagnosis of ED. Nevertheless, neurogenic ED remains poorly understood and characterized. Disease related factors such as depression, decreased physical and mental function, the burden of chronic illness, and loss of independence may preclude sexual intimacy and lead to ED as well. The amount of data regarding treatment options in subpopulations of differing neurologic disorders remains scarce except for men with spinal cord injury. The treatment options including phosphodiesterase inhibitors, intracavernosal or intraurethral vasoactive agents, vacuum erection devices (VED) and penile prosthetic implantation remain constant. This review discusses the options in specific neurologic conditions, and briefly provides insight into new and future developments that may reshape the management of neurogenic ED. PMID:26904415

  2. The treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients with neurogenic disease.

    PubMed

    Shridharani, Anand N; Brant, William O

    2016-02-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) related to compromise of the nervous system is an increasingly common occurrence. This may be due to the multifactorial nature of ED, the myriad of disorders affecting the neurotransmission of erectogenic signals, and improved awareness and diagnosis of ED. Nevertheless, neurogenic ED remains poorly understood and characterized. Disease related factors such as depression, decreased physical and mental function, the burden of chronic illness, and loss of independence may preclude sexual intimacy and lead to ED as well. The amount of data regarding treatment options in subpopulations of differing neurologic disorders remains scarce except for men with spinal cord injury. The treatment options including phosphodiesterase inhibitors, intracavernosal or intraurethral vasoactive agents, vacuum erection devices (VED) and penile prosthetic implantation remain constant. This review discusses the options in specific neurologic conditions, and briefly provides insight into new and future developments that may reshape the management of neurogenic ED. PMID:26904415

  3. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis caused by neurogenic heterotopic ossification.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sam Yeol; Yoo, Won Joon; Park, Moon Seok; Chung, Chin Youb; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon

    2013-11-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is rare in nonambulatory patients, as mechanical factors play important roles in the development of the disease. We report a case of SCFE, which occurred in a 12-year-old girl with a nonambulatory status after cerebral infarction. SCFE occurred after she received passive range of motion exercise and extracorporeal shock wave treatment for neurogenic heterotopic ossification around the hip joint. The patient was successfully managed by a stepwise approach, with radiological and clinical improvements. PMID:23969564

  4. Preemptive analgesia: the prevention of neurogenous orofacial pain.

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Chronic neurogenous pain is often an extremely difficult condition to manage. In the orofacial region, trauma from injury or dental procedures may lead to the development of severe neuralgic pains and major distress to the patient. Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that the use of adequate preemptive regional anesthesia, systemic analgesia, and the avoidance of repeated, painful stimuli may reduce the incidence of this problem. PMID:8934952

  5. Postmenopausal overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bladder storage symptoms have a severe impact on many areas as regards the quality of life including health-related, social, psychological and working functions. Pharmacotherapy of lower urinary tract stores (LUTS) has been developed to optimize neural control of the lower urinary tract in pathologic states. The bladder can be overactive or underactive. Overactive bladder (OAB) is highly prevalent and is associated with considerable morbidity, especially in aging population. Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms. Pharmacotherapy for the OAB must be individualized based on the degree of bother, medication side-effect profile, concomitant comorbidities and current medication regimen. Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB. Alternatively to antimuscarinic therapy, β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, due to their efficacy and favorable adverse event profile, are a novel and attractive option of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of selective antimuscarinic and β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, agents with the different mechanism of action, gives a new treatment option for the patient with OAB according to its harms profile. A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future. PMID:26327873

  6. The pre-vertebrate origins of neurogenic placodes.

    PubMed

    Abitua, Philip Barron; Gainous, T Blair; Kaczmarczyk, Angela N; Winchell, Christopher J; Hudson, Clare; Kamata, Kaori; Nakagawa, Masashi; Tsuda, Motoyuki; Kusakabe, Takehiro G; Levine, Michael

    2015-08-27

    The sudden appearance of the neural crest and neurogenic placodes in early branching vertebrates has puzzled biologists for over a century. These embryonic tissues contribute to the development of the cranium and associated sensory organs, which were crucial for the evolution of the vertebrate "new head". A previous study suggests that rudimentary neural crest cells existed in ancestral chordates. However, the evolutionary origins of neurogenic placodes have remained obscure owing to a paucity of embryonic data from tunicates, the closest living relatives to those early vertebrates. Here we show that the tunicate Ciona intestinalis exhibits a proto-placodal ectoderm (PPE) that requires inhibition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and expresses the key regulatory determinant Six1/2 and its co-factor Eya, a developmental process conserved across vertebrates. The Ciona PPE is shown to produce ciliated neurons that express genes for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a G-protein-coupled receptor for relaxin-3 (RXFP3) and a functional cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGA), which suggests dual chemosensory and neurosecretory activities. These observations provide evidence that Ciona has a neurogenic proto-placode, which forms neurons that appear to be related to those derived from the olfactory placode and hypothalamic neurons of vertebrates. We discuss the possibility that the PPE-derived GnRH neurons of Ciona resemble an ancestral cell type, a progenitor to the complex neuronal circuit that integrates sensory information and neuroendocrine functions in vertebrates. PMID:26258298

  7. In silico Therapeutics for Neurogenic Hypertension and Vasovagal Syncope

    PubMed Central

    Bojić, Tijana; Perović, Vladimir R.; Glišić, Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Neurocardiovascular diseases (NCVD) are the leading cause of death in the developed world and will remain so till 2020. In these diseases the pathologically changed nervous control of cardiovascular system has the central role. The actual NCV syndromes are neurogenic hypertension, representing the sympathetically mediated disorder, and vasovagal syncope, which is the vagally mediated disorders. Vasovagal syncope, the disease far from its etiological treatment, could benefit from recruiting and application of antimuscarinic drugs used in other parasympathetic disorders. The informational spectrum method (ISM), a method widely applied for the characterization of protein-protein interactions in the field of immunology, endocrinology and anti HIV drug discovery, was applied for the first time in the analysis of neurogenic hypertension and vasovagal syncope therapeutic targets. In silico analysis revealed the potential involvement of apelin in neurogenic hypertension. Applying the EIIP/ISM bioinformatics concept in investigation of drugs for treatment of vasovagal syncope suggests that 78% of tested antimuscarinic drugs could have anti vasovagal syncope effect. The presented results confirm that ISM is a promissing method for investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying pathophysiological proceses of NCV syndromes and discovery of therapeutics targets for their treatment. PMID:26834545

  8. In silico Therapeutics for Neurogenic Hypertension and Vasovagal Syncope.

    PubMed

    Bojić, Tijana; Perović, Vladimir R; Glišić, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Neurocardiovascular diseases (NCVD) are the leading cause of death in the developed world and will remain so till 2020. In these diseases the pathologically changed nervous control of cardiovascular system has the central role. The actual NCV syndromes are neurogenic hypertension, representing the sympathetically mediated disorder, and vasovagal syncope, which is the vagally mediated disorders. Vasovagal syncope, the disease far from its etiological treatment, could benefit from recruiting and application of antimuscarinic drugs used in other parasympathetic disorders. The informational spectrum method (ISM), a method widely applied for the characterization of protein-protein interactions in the field of immunology, endocrinology and anti HIV drug discovery, was applied for the first time in the analysis of neurogenic hypertension and vasovagal syncope therapeutic targets. In silico analysis revealed the potential involvement of apelin in neurogenic hypertension. Applying the EIIP/ISM bioinformatics concept in investigation of drugs for treatment of vasovagal syncope suggests that 78% of tested antimuscarinic drugs could have anti vasovagal syncope effect. The presented results confirm that ISM is a promissing method for investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying pathophysiological proceses of NCV syndromes and discovery of therapeutics targets for their treatment. PMID:26834545

  9. Regulation of airway neurogenic inflammation by neutral endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, G U; Bellofiore, S; Geppetti, P

    1998-12-01

    Airway neurogenic inflammation is caused by tachykinins released from peripheral nerve endings of sensory neurons within the airways, and is characterized by plasma protein extravasation, airway smooth muscle contraction and increased secretion of mucus. Tachykinins are degraded and inactivated by neutral endopeptidase (NEP), a membrane-bound metallopeptidase, which is located mainly at the surface of airway epithelial cells, but is also present in airway smooth muscle cells, submucosal gland cells and fibroblasts. The key role of NEP in limiting and regulating the neurogenic inflammation provoked by different stimuli has been demonstrated in a large series of studies published in recent years. It has also been shown that a variety of factors, which are relevant for airway diseases, including viral infections, allergen exposure, inhalation of cigarette smoke and other respiratory irritants, is able to reduce NEP activity, thus enhancing the effects of tachykinins within the airways. On the basis of these observations, the reduction of neutral endopeptidase activity may be regarded as a factor that switches neurogenic airway responses from their physiological and protective functions to a detrimental role that increases and perpetuates airway inflammation. However, further studies are needed to assess the role of neutral endopeptidase down regulation in the pathogenesis of asthma and other inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:9877509

  10. Spinal cord injury markedly altered protein expression patterns in the affected rat urinary bladder during healing stages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Young; Kim, Bong Jo; Sim, Gyujin; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Kang, Dawon; Jung, Jae Hun; Hwa, Jeong Seok; Kwak, Yeon Ju; Choi, Yeon Jin; Park, Young Sook; Han, Jaehee; Lee, Cheol Soon; Kang, Kee Ryeon

    2011-06-01

    The influence of spinal cord injury (SCI) on protein expression in the rat urinary bladder was assessed by proteomic analysis at different time intervals post-injury. After contusion SCI between T9 and T10, bladder tissues were processed by 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/MS at 6 hr to 28 days after SCI to identify proteins involved in the healing process of SCI-induced neurogenic bladder. Approximately 1,000 spots from the bladder of SCI and sham groups were visualized and identified. At one day after SCI, the expression levels of three protein were increased, and seven spots were down-regulated, including heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) and heat shock protein 20 (Hsp20). Fifteen spots such as S100-A11 were differentially expressed seven days post-injury, and seven proteins including transgelin had altered expression patterns 28 days after injury. Of the proteins with altered expression levels, transgelin, S100-A11, Hsp27 and Hsp20 were continuously and variably expressed throughout the entire post-SCI recovery of the bladder. The identified proteins at each time point belong to eight functional categories. The altered expression patterns identified by 2-DE of transgelin and S100-A11 were verified by Western blot. Transgelin and protein S100-A11 may be candidates for protein biomarkers in the bladder healing process after SCI. PMID:21655070

  11. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches

    PubMed Central

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Velásquez, Zahady D.; Muñoz, Rosa I.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs), which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as “neurogenic niche”. Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their

  12. Inosculation of blood vessels allows early perfusion and vitality of bladder grafts--implications for bioengineered bladder wall.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Stephanie L; So, Michelle; Hambro, Shannon; Nolta, Jan A; Kurzrock, Eric A

    2015-06-01

    Bioengineered bladder tissue is needed for patients with neurogenic bladder disease as well as for cancer. Current technologies in bladder tissue engineering have been hampered by an inability to efficiently initiate blood supply to the graft, ultimately leading to complications that include graft contraction, ischemia, and perforation. To date, the biological mechanisms of vascularization on transplant have not been suitably investigated for urologic tissues. To better understand the mechanisms of neovascularization on bladder wall transplant, a chimeric mouse model was generated such that angiogenesis and vasculogenesis could be independently assessed in vivo. Green fluorescence protein (GFP) transgenic mice received bone marrow transplants from β-galactosidase (LacZ) transgenic animals and then subsequent bladder wall transplants from wild-type donor mice. Before euthanization, the aorta was infused with fluorescent microbeads (fluorospheres) to identify perfused vessels. The contributions of GFP (angiogenesis) and LacZ (vasculogenesis) to the formation of CD31-expressing blood vessels within the wild-type graft were evaluated by immunohistochemistry at different time points and locations within the graft (proximal, middle, and distal) to provide a spatiotemporal analysis of neovascularization. The GFP index, a measure of angiogenic host ingrowth, was significantly higher at proximal versus mid or distal regions in animals 2-16 weeks post-transplant. However, GFP index did not increase over time in any area. Within 7 days post-transplant, perfusion of primarily wild-type, donor blood vessels in the most distal areas of the graft was observed by intraluminal fluorospheres. In addition, chimeric host-donor (GFP-wild type) blood vessels were evident in proximal areas. The contribution of vasculogenesis to vascularization of the graft was limited, as LacZ cells were not specifically associated with the endothelial cells of blood vessels, but rather found primarily

  13. Does Reduction of Number of Intradetrusor Injection Sites of aboBoNTA (Dysport®) Impact Efficacy and Safety in a Rat Model of Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity?

    PubMed Central

    Huynh Le Maux, Amélie; Pignol, Bernadette; Behr-Roussel, Delphine; Blachon, Jean-Luc; Chabrier, Pierre-Etienne; Compagnie, Sandrine; Picaut, Philippe; Bernabé, Jacques; Giuliano, François; Denys, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Intradetrusor injections of Botulinum toxin A—currently onabotulinumtoxinA—is registered as a second-line treatment to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The common clinical practice is 30 × 1 mL injections in the detrusor; however, protocols remain variable and standardization is warranted. The effect of reducing the number of injection sites of Dysport® abobotulinumtoxinA (aboBoNTA) was assessed in the spinal cord-injured rat (SCI). Nineteen days post-spinalization, female rats received intradetrusor injections of saline or aboBoNTA 22.5 U distributed among four or eight sites. Two days after injection, continuous cystometry was performed in conscious rats. Efficacy of aboBoNTA 22.5 U was assessed versus aggregated saline groups on clinically-relevant parameters: maximal pressure, bladder capacity, compliance, voiding efficiency, as well as amplitude, frequency, and volume threshold for nonvoiding contractions (NVC). AboBoNTA 22.5 U significantly decreased maximal pressure, without affecting voiding efficiency. Injected in four sites, aboBoNTA significantly increased bladder capacity and compliance while only the latter when in eight sites. AboBoNTA significantly reduced NVC frequency and amplitude. This preclinical investigation showed similar inhibiting effects of aboBoNTA despite the number of sites reduction. Further studies are warranted to optimize dosing schemes to improve the risk-benefit ratio of BoNTA-based treatment modalities for NDO and further idiopathic overactive bladder. PMID:26694464

  14. Bladder leiomyoma presenting as dyspareunia

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Jun; Lai, Hai-ping; Lin, Shao-kun; Zhang, Qing-quan; Shao, Chu-xiao; Jin, Lie; Lei, Wen-hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Leiomyoma of the bladder is a rare tumor arising from the submucosa. Most patients with bladder leiomyoma may present with urinary frequency or obstructive urinary symptoms. However, there are a few cases of bladder leiomyoma coexisting with uterine leiomyoma presenting as dyspareunia. We herein report an unusual case of coexisting bladder leiomyoma and uterine leiomyoma presenting as dyspareunia. Case presentation: A 44-year-old Asian female presented to urologist and complained that she had experienced dyspareunia over the preceding several months. A pelvic ultrasonography revealed a mass lesion located in the trigone of urinary bladder. The mass lesion was confirmed on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). The CT scan also revealed a lobulated and enlarged uterus consistent with uterine leiomyoma. Then, the biopsies were then taken with a transurethral resection (TUR) loop and these biopsies showed a benign proliferation of smooth muscle in a connective tissue stroma suggestive of bladder leiomyoma. An open local excision of bladder leiomyoma and hysteromyomectomy were performed successfully. Histological examination confirmed bladder leiomyoma coexisting with uterine leiomyoma. Conclusion: This case highlights a rare presentation of bladder leiomyoma, dyspareunia, as the chief symptom in a patient who had coexisting uterine leiomyoma. Bladder leiomyomas coexisting with uterine leiomyomas are rare and can present with a wide spectrum of complaints including without symptoms, irritative symptoms, obstructive symptoms, or even dyspareunia. PMID:27428187

  15. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Po-Fan; Chiu, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Chou, Eric Chieh-Lung

    2016-01-01

    The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA) and European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder. PMID:26938559

  16. Overactive bladder in males

    PubMed Central

    Dmochowski, Roger R.; Gomelsky, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms is considerable in both men and women and the impact on quality of life (QOL) is equally substantial. Ironically, despite nearly equal prevalence, OAB symptoms in men are infrequently treated, and often with medical therapies aimed at bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). In this review, we examine the pathophysiology of OAB and its evaluation in the context of benign prostatic hypertrophy and concomitant BOO. We then consider the efficacy and safety of individual therapeutic options for lower urinary tract symptoms in men, focusing on the mainstays of medical therapy: α-adrenergic blockers, 5-α reductase inhibitors, and antimuscarinic agents. Finally, we aim to comment on new therapeutic strategies and targets that may one day be available for the treatment of male OAB. PMID:21789068

  17. Female Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Daniel S; Nitti, Victor W

    2016-04-01

    The non-specific symptoms the patients express upon the presentation of female bladder outlet obstruction make it a challenge to diagnose. There are subtle differences between the obstructed patient and those whose bladders are underactive and/or fail to mount a detrusor contraction. These disparities can be extracted through a thorough history and examination. At times, the clinician may utilize nomograms, non-invasive uroflow, and urodynamics with the addition of fluoroscopy to establish the diagnosis of obstruction. Management of the obstruction depends on the nature of the condition, whether functional or anatomical. The increase in the number of sling procedures performed to treat stress urinary incontinence has resulted in a rise in the number of iatrogenic obstructions. The temporal relationship between surgery and obstruction is the key to identifying the problem. PMID:26902625

  18. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula.

    PubMed

    Pham, Khanh N; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  19. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Khanh N.; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M.

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  20. Renal Papillary Necrosis Appearing as Bladder Cancer on Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dagrosa, Lawrence M.; Gormley, Elizabeth Ann

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A 79-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus and recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) presented with acute onset left lower quadrant pain, left-sided back pain, vomiting, and dysuria. Abdominopelvic CT scan revealed left hydroureteronephrosis to the level of the left ureterovesical junction (UVJ) where a bladder mass appeared to be obstructing the left ureteral orifice. The obstruction was ultimately found to be the result of a sloughed renal papilla lodged in the distal ureter, which created an inflammatory mass at the UVJ. Her history of diabetes and frequent UTIs likely predisposed her to the development of renal papillary necrosis (RPN) that resulted in sloughing of a renal papilla, distal ureteral obstruction with subsequent bladder inflammation that mimicked a bladder mass on imaging. RPN is a condition associated with many etiologies and likely represents a common final pathway of several diseases. Although several hypotheses exist, it is primarily thought to be ischemic in nature and is related to the underlying physiology of the renal papillae. We present a case of hydroureteronephrosis and bladder mass secondary to a sloughed renal papilla from RPN.

  1. Pharmacogenomics in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dancik, Garrett M.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common cancer worldwide. For patients presenting with muscle-invasive disease, the five year survival rate is approximately 50%. Cisplatinum-based combination chemotherapy is recommended in the neoadjuvant setting prior to cystectomy and is also the first line in the metastatic setting. However, the survival benefit of such therapy is modest. The identification of pharmacogenomic biomarkers would enable the rational and personalized treatment of patients by selecting those patients that would benefit most from such therapies sparing others the unnecessary toxicity. Conventional therapies would be recommended for an expected responder while a non-responder would be considered for alternative therapies selected on the basis of the individual’s molecular profile. Although few effective bladder cancer therapies have been introduced in the past 30 years, several targeted therapies against the molecular drivers of bladder cancer appear promising. This review summarizes pharmacogenomic biomarkers that require further investigation and/or prospective evaluation, publicly available tools for drug discovery and biomarker identification from in vitro data, and targeted agents that have been evaluated in preclinical models. PMID:24360659

  2. Contemporary Management of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David; Fradet, Yves

    1991-01-01

    Bladder cancer is currently the fifth most common cancer in Western society, and its incidence appears to be increasing. Important advances have recently occurred in both diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to bladder neoplasms. Presentation is not unique, and physician awareness is important to identify patients who are at risk for bladder neoplasia and consequently require further investigation. A diagnostic approach and contemporary management are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4 PMID:21229043

  3. [Diet in bladder cancer ethiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, V; Ilić, M; Janković, S; Djokić, M

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show influence of different foods on bladder cancer appearance, as well as possible consequent ways of prevention. Consuption of food rich in animal fat and cholesterol, fried foods, especially several times used cookin oil for frying, processed meat with additives (nitrates, nitrites, azo-colourrs) can influence bladder cancer occurrence. Regularly, continous consumption of fermented milk products, which contains come types of milky--acids bacterias, is considered as protective factor in developing bladder cancer. Reports that fruit and vegetable are protective food items are pretty consistent. Data about mineral intake and bladder cancer are obscure. PMID:16812999

  4. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  5. Neurogenic stunned myocardium and cardiac transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Caballero, C; Martín-Bermúdez, R; Revuelto-Rey, J; Aguilar-Cabello, M; Villar-Gallardo, J

    2012-09-01

    We present the case of a 46-year-old woman referred to our center for urgent heart transplantation assessment, initially diagnosed as having cardiogenic shock of uncertain etiology. Some hours before she had suffered syncope without regaining consciousness. When she arrived at our hospital, the objective examination revealed bilateral unreactive mydriasis and absent brain-stem reflexes, and echocardiography showed global left ventricle wall hypokinesis sparing the apex. An urgent computed tomography (CT) imaging of the head was performed, which showed a massive subarachnoid hemorrhage and extensive cerebral edema. In the following hours, she fulfilled the criteria of brain-stem death and indeed became a multiorgan donor. The heart was rejected for transplantation because of the existence of left ventricle wall motion abnormalities associated with neurogenic stunned myocardium. Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a stress-related cardiomyopathy that occurs after an acute brain injury. It is especially frequent in subarachnoid hemorrhage, where it reaches an incidence of up to 40% of patients. It is characterized by acute electrocardiographic changes and regional hypokinesis of the left ventricle wall not consistent with the coronary artery distribution, and is thought to be a transient condition. For this reason it should not constitute an absolute contraindication to cardiac donation in young donors with no previous cardiac disease. In our hospital during the last year one third of the potential heart donors had regional left ventricle wall motion abnormalities compatible with neurogenic stunned myocardium. With the aim of improving the number of cardiac donors, several strategies have been described to try to demonstrate the reversibility of this entity, such as dobutamine stress echocardiography. PMID:22974925

  6. Adult Neurogenesis: Ultrastructure of a Neurogenic Niche and Neurovascular Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Chaves da Silva, Paula Grazielle; Benton, Jeanne L.; Beltz, Barbara S.; Allodi, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    The first-generation precursors producing adult-born neurons in the crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) brain reside in a specialized niche located on the ventral surface of the brain. In the present work, we have explored the organization and ultrastructure of this neurogenic niche, using light-level, confocal and electron microscopic approaches. Our goals were to define characteristics of the niche microenvironment, examine the morphological relationships between the niche and the vasculature and observe specializations at the boundary between the vascular cavity located centrally in the niche. Our results show that the niche is almost fully encapsulated by blood vessels, and that cells in the vasculature come into contact with the niche. This analysis also characterizes the ultrastructure of the cell types in the niche. The Type I niche cells are by far the most numerous, and are the only cell type present superficially in the most ventral cell layers of the niche. More dorsally, Type I cells are intermingled with Types II, III and IV cells, which are observed far less frequently. Type I cells have microvilli on their apical cell surfaces facing the vascular cavity, as well as junctional complexes between adjacent cells, suggesting a role in regulating transport from the blood into the niche cells. These studies demonstrate a close relationship between the neurogenic niche and vascular system in P. clarkii. Furthermore, the specializations of niche cells contacting the vascular cavity are also typical of the interface between the blood/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-brain barriers of vertebrates, including cells of the subventricular zone (SVZ) producing new olfactory interneurons in mammals. These data indicate that tissues involved in producing adult-born neurons in the crayfish brain use strategies that may reflect fundamental mechanisms preserved in an evolutionarily broad range of species, as proposed previously. The studies described here extend our understanding of

  7. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension in Parkinson's disease and related synucleinopathies: prioritisation of treatment targets.

    PubMed

    Espay, Alberto J; LeWitt, Peter A; Hauser, Robert A; Merola, Aristide; Masellis, Mario; Lang, Anthony E

    2016-08-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension are common manifestations of cardiovascular dysautonomia in Parkinson's disease and related synucleinopathies. Because these disorders are haemodynamic opposites, improvement in one might be achieved at the expense of worsening of the other. Thus, management decisions necessitate assessment of the individual risks for patients with coexistent neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension. Whereas neurogenic orthostatic hypotension poses risks for falls and can be associated with cognitive impairment in the short term, chronic supine hypertension can be associated with stroke and myocardial infarction in the long term. Because few clinical trial data exist for outcomes in patients with coexistent neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension, clinicians need to balance, on the basis of comorbidities and disease staging, the potential immediate benefits of treatment for neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and the long-term risks of supine hypertension treatment in each patient. Future research needs to focus on ascertaining a safe degree of supine hypertension when treating neurogenic orthostatic hypotension; the effectiveness of nocturnal antihypertensive therapy in patients with coexistent neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and supine hypertension; and the prevalence, scope, and therapeutic requirements for managing neurogenic orthostatic hypotension that manifests with falls or cognitive impairment, but without postural lightheadedness or near syncope. PMID:27478953

  8. A One Year Prospective Study of Neurogenic Stuttering Following Stroke: Incidence and Co-Occurring Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theys, C.; van Wieringen, A.; Sunaert, S.; Thijs, V.; De Nil, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    In this prospective study, data on incidence, stuttering characteristics, co-occurring speech disorders, and recovery of neurogenic stuttering in a large sample of stroke participants were assessed. Following stroke onset, 17 of 319 participants (5.3%; 95% CI, 3.2-8.3) met the criteria for neurogenic stuttering. Stuttering persisted in at least…

  9. From blood to brain: the neurogenic niche of the crayfish brain.

    PubMed

    Hartenstein, Volker

    2014-08-11

    Adult neurogenic niches are present in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Where do stem cells populating these niches originate, and what are the mechanisms maintaining their self-renewal? In this issue of Developmental Cell, Benton et al. (2014) show that in crayfish, hemolymph-derived cells enter a neurogenic niche to replenish neural progenitors. PMID:25117680

  10. Autonomic nervous system activity assessment by heart rate variability in experimental bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Dobrek, Łukasz; Baranowska, Agnieszka; Skowron, Beata; Thor, Piotr J

    2013-01-01

    A syndrome with urgency, with or without associated urine incontinence and usually accompanied by higher urinary frequency and nocturia has been named "overactive bladder; OAB". OAB is an entity with complex pathophysiology, involving both myogenic and neurogenic (afferent / efferent bladder innervation) disturbances. OAB symptoms accompany benign prostatic hypertrophy--BPH ("obstructive OAB"). The aim of the study was to estimate the autonomic nervous system activity (ANS) in the experimental bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) which was an animal model of the human BPH. The study was conducted using 30 female rats, divided into two groups: BOO animals (n=15), with surgically induced BOO (by partial ligation of the proximal urethra) and control ones (n=15), which underwent sham procedure (without urethral ligation). Two weeks after the surgery, in both groups, ANS activity was estimated using time- and spectral analysis of the heart rate variability recordings. The bladder overactivity in BOO animals was confirmed using urodynamic recordings and bladder histological assessment, juxtaposed against the results of the control group. The key finding of our study was the development of autonomic disturbances in bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) rats. Our study revealed that BOO animals were characterised by diminished rMSSD and spectral HRV parameters: TP, LF and HF, in comparison with the control group. The normalised nLF and nHF parameters did not differ significantly in both groups, although slight changes in the nLF (increased) and nHF (decreased) were noted in BOO group. The absolute VLF value was almost the same in both studied populations, however, the percentage part of this component in the appropriate HRV spectrum differed considerably in both studied groups. In BOO animals, VLF percentage amounted to about 90%, whereas in control animals this parameter reached only about 53% of the total power spectrum. Thus, to sum up, our findings suggest autonomic imbalance

  11. Recognizing Charcot disease in a man with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Womack, Jamie M

    2016-05-01

    Charcot disease is a neurogenic osteoarthropathy that occurs in the foot and ankle following the loss of normal muscle tone, vascularization, and protective reflexes. Diabetes is its most common cause in the Western world. Fragmentation, destruction, and dislocation of the bones can occur spontaneously or after trauma. This article describes the care of a patient with Charcot disease. PMID:27124227

  12. Carotid body overactivity induces respiratory neurone channelopathy contributing to neurogenic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-07-15

    Why sympathetic activity rises in neurogenic hypertension remains unknown. It has been postulated that changes in the electrical excitability of medullary pre-sympathetic neurones are the main causal mechanism for the development of sympathetic overactivity in experimental hypertension. Here we review recent data suggesting that enhanced sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension is, at least in part, dependent on alterations in the electrical excitability of medullary respiratory neurones and their central modulation of sympatho-excitatory networks. We also present results showing a critical role for carotid body tonicity in the aetiology of enhanced central respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension. We propose a novel hypothesis of respiratory neurone channelopathy induced by carotid body overactivity in neurogenic hypertension that may contribute to sympathetic excess. Moreover, our data support the notion of targeting the carotid body as a potential novel therapeutic approach for reducing sympathetic vasomotor tone in neurogenic hypertension. PMID:25900825

  13. Stars from the darkest night: unlocking the neurogenic potential of astrocytes in different brain regions.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Jens P; Frisén, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    In a few regions of the adult brain, specialized astrocytes act as neural stem cells capable of sustaining life-long neurogenesis. In other, typically non-neurogenic regions, some astrocytes have an intrinsic capacity to produce neurons when provoked by particular conditions but do not use this ability to replace neurons completely after injury or disease. Why do astrocytes display regional differences and why do they not use their neurogenic capacity for brain repair to a greater extent? In this Review, we discuss the neurogenic potential of astrocytes in different brain regions and ask what stimulates this potential in some regions but not in others. We discuss the transcriptional networks and environmental cues that govern cell identity, and consider how the activation of neurogenic properties in astrocytes can be understood as the de-repression of a latent neurogenic transcriptional program. PMID:27048686

  14. Protocol for a prospective magnetic resonance imaging study on supraspinal lower urinary tract control in healthy subjects and spinal cord injury patients undergoing intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA injections for treating neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The control of the lower urinary tract is a complex, multilevel process involving both the peripheral and central nervous system. Due to lesions of the neuraxis, most spinal cord injury patients suffer from neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, which may jeopardise upper urinary tract function and has a negative impact on health-related quality of life. However, the alterations to the nervous system following spinal cord injury causing neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and potential effects of treatments such as intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA injections on lower urinary tract control are poorly understood. Methods/Design This is a prospective structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigating the supraspinal lower urinary tract control in healthy subjects and spinal cord injury patients undergoing intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA injections for treating neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Neuroimaging data will include structural magnetic resonance imaging (T1-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging) as well as functional, i.e. blood oxygen level-dependent sensitive magnetic resonance imaging using a 3 T magnetic resonance scanner. The functional magnetic resonance imaging will be performed simultaneously to three different bladder stimulation paradigms using an automated magnetic resonance compatible and synchronised pump system. All subjects will undergo two consecutive and identical magnetic resonance imaging measurements. Healthy subjects will not undergo any intervention between measurements but spinal cord injury patients will receive intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA injections for treating neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Parameters of the clinical assessment including bladder diary, urinalysis, medical history, neuro-urological examination, urodynamic investigation as well as standardised questionnaires regarding lower urinary tract function and quality of life will serve as co-variates in the magnetic

  15. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fuge, Oliver; Vasdev, Nikhil; Allchorne, Paula; Green, James SA

    2015-01-01

    It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest benefit in metastatic disease, although the role in superficial bladder cancer remains unclear. PMID:26000263

  16. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Fuge, Oliver; Vasdev, Nikhil; Allchorne, Paula; Green, James Sa

    2015-01-01

    It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest benefit in metastatic disease, although the role in superficial bladder cancer remains unclear. PMID:26000263

  17. Neurogenic gene regulatory pathways in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zheng; Angerer, Lynne M; Angerer, Robert C

    2016-01-15

    During embryogenesis the sea urchin early pluteus larva differentiates 40-50 neurons marked by expression of the pan-neural marker synaptotagmin B (SynB) that are distributed along the ciliary band, in the apical plate and pharyngeal endoderm, and 4-6 serotonergic neurons that are confined to the apical plate. Development of all neurons has been shown to depend on the function of Six3. Using a combination of molecular screens and tests of gene function by morpholino-mediated knockdown, we identified SoxC and Brn1/2/4, which function sequentially in the neurogenic regulatory pathway and are also required for the differentiation of all neurons. Misexpression of Brn1/2/4 at low dose caused an increase in the number of serotonin-expressing cells and at higher dose converted most of the embryo to a neurogenic epithelial sphere expressing the Hnf6 ciliary band marker. A third factor, Z167, was shown to work downstream of the Six3 and SoxC core factors and to define a branch specific for the differentiation of serotonergic neurons. These results provide a framework for building a gene regulatory network for neurogenesis in the sea urchin embryo. PMID:26657764

  18. Neurogenic ejaculatory disorders: focus on current and future treatments.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Rocco S; Polimeni, Giovanni; Ciurleo, Rosella; Casella, Carmela; Bramanti, Placido

    2011-09-01

    Ejaculation is a complex and still poorly understood neurological mechanism, at both spinal and cerebral levels as it is closely associated with orgasm. Physiologically, ejaculation is defined as the expulsion of seminal fluid from the urethral meatus and consists of two phases, namely emission and expulsion. Ejaculation is mediated by a spinal control center, referred to as a spinal pattern generator that coordinates sympathetic, parasympathetic and motor (somatic) outflows, integrating the latter with the inputs from the supraspinal sites in brainstem, hypothalamus and preoptic area. Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common sexual dysfunction among young men, and it has been considered mostly psychogenic in origin, although it can be associated to diverse urological and neurological diseases. On the contrary, retrograde ejaculation and anejaculation are predominantly related to organic causes, particularly to neurogenic ones. Since ejaculation is mostly a spinal reflex, it is comprehensible that ejaculatory disorders are more frequent in spinal cord injury than in other neurological disorders. Over the past decades, research has focused on PE, and evidence from clinical studies showed a beneficial effect of antidepressants for the treatment of men with PE. Other ejaculatory disorders, especially painful ejaculation, have been less investigated and the proper therapy is still controversial. Aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive description of both currently available treatments and most promising future therapies, including assigned patents, for the neurogenic ejaculatory disorders. PMID:21834782

  19. [Neurological Signs and Symptoms of True Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Higashihara, Mana; Konoeda, Fumie; Sonoo, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a well-known disorder, but many aspects of its pathology, including its definition, has been disputed. True neurogenic TOS (TN-TOS) is a rare but well-defined clinical condition. TN-TOS results from the compression of the C8/T1 roots (dominant for the T1 root) or the proximal lower trunk of the brachial plexus by a fibrous band. The band extends from the first rib to either the tip of an elongated C7 transverse process or a rudimentary cervical rib. The most common presenting symptoms of TN-TOS are insidious-onset atrophy and weakness of the intrinsic hand muscles, predominantly in the thenar eminence and radial digit flexors. Nerve conduction studies demonstrate pathognomonic findings: severely attenuated compound muscle action potential of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, and usually, loss of the sensory nerve action potential of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. Numbness and sensory loss are typically observed, mainly in the medial forearm, although they are usually mild, and may be absent in some patients. Severe pain or paresthesia proximal to the elbow is not observed. The classical concept of TOS underlie nonspecific neurogenic TOS. It has been primarily diagnosed using provocative maneuvers. However, there is controversy regarding its pathological conceptualization and existence, as objective evidence of the disease is still lacking. PMID:27156505

  20. Chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Lamm, Donald L

    2002-02-01

    The data presented herein, although highly supportive for a protective role of various nutrients against bladder cancer, are far from definitive. Many authorities question the validity of current recommendations for nutritional chemoprevention against bladder cancer. The reason for the wide variations reported in epidemiologic studies lies in the nature of observational studies. Dietary studies are limited in their conclusions because the protection afforded by the consumption of a particular nutrient may be multifactorial, with different components of the food exerting potential chemopreventive effects. Furthermore, measuring levels of nutrients in the food intake of populations is confounded by factors that might affect these levels and also the incidence of cancer. For example, vitamin A can come from animal or vegetarian sources. Because animal fat has been identified as a potential carcinogen in man, depending on the source of the vitamin, varying levels of protection might be deduced. In addition, chemoprevention studies using dietary supplements are expected to have mild effects, and large studies would be required to confirm statistical significance. Even with agents such as intravesical chemotherapy, only half the studies achieve statistical significance [29]. Prospective randomized trials with a large sample size, longer follow-up, and an extended duration of treatment are needed to clarify the association between micronutrients and cancer protection. With these caveats in mind, several recommendations can be made. Simple measures, such as drinking more fluids (especially water), can have a profound impact on the incidence of bladder cancer. Vitamins are being extensively studied in chemopreventive trials for different cancers. There is strong evidence for a chemoprotective effect of vitamin A in bladder cancer. The authors recommend 32,000 IU/day of vitamin A initially, with lower doses (24,000 IU) for persons less than 50 kg. Because liver toxicity is a

  1. Ureteral bladder augmentation.

    PubMed

    Churchill, B M; Aliabadi, H; Landau, E H; McLorie, G A; Steckler, R E; McKenna, P H; Khoury, A E

    1993-08-01

    Virtually all segments of the gastrointestinal tract have been used successfully in augmentation cystoplasty. The complications inherent in enterocystoplasty are well described. Megaureters subtending effete kidneys (poorly or nonfunctioning) provide a novel and excellent source of augmentation material with urothelium and muscular backing, free of the electrolyte and acid base disturbances, and mucus production that plague enterocystoplasty. Augmentation cystoplasty using detubularized, reconfigured, otherwise disposable megaureter, with or without ipsilateral total or partial nephrectomy, was performed in 16 patients (mean age 8.8 years, range 1 to 25) with inadequate and dysfunctional bladders. Postoperative followup varied between 8 and 38 months (mean 22). The overall renal function and radiographic appearance of the remaining upper tracts have remained stable or improved in all patients. Of the 16 patients 15 require intermittent catheterization and 1 voids spontaneously. Ten patients are continent day and night, 5 have improved continence (4 damp at night and 1 stress incontinence) and 1 has failed to gain continence despite good capacity and compliance. Complete postoperative urodynamic evaluations in 12 of 13 patients show good capacity, low pressure bladders with no instability. Complications occurred in 5 patients, including transient urine extravasation in 2, contralateral ureterovesical obstruction in 2 and Mitrofanoff stomal stenosis in 1. Augmentation ureterocystoplasty combines the benefits common to all enterocystoplasties without adding any of the untoward complications or risks associated with nonurothelial augmentations. PMID:8326632

  2. CROATIAN UROLOGISTS' CLINICAL PRACTICE AND COMPLIANCE WITH GUIDELINES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF NON-NEUROGENIC MALE LOWER URINARY TRACT SYMPTOMS.

    PubMed

    Tomasković, Igor; Tomić, Miroslav; Nikles, Sven; Neretljak, Ivan; Milicić, Valerija

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Croatian urologists' management of non-neurogenic male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and their compliance with the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines. A cross-sectional survey included 51/179 Croatian urologists. We developed a questionnaire with questions addressing compliance with EAU guidelines. The rate of performing recommended evaluations on the initial assessment of patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH)/LUTS varied from 8.0% (serum creatinine and voiding diary) to 100.0% (physical examination, prostate specific antigen and ultrasound). The international prostate symptom score was performed by 31%, analysis of urine sediment by 83%, urine culture by 53%, and serum creatinine by 8% of surveyed urologists. Only 8% of urologists regularly used bladder diary in patients with symptoms of nocturia. Our results indicated that 97% of urologists preferred alpha blockers as the first choice of treatment; 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARI) were mostly prescribed (84%) in combination with an alpha-blocker, preferably as a continuous treatment, whilst 29% of urologists used to discontinue 5ARI after 1-2 years. Half of the Croatian urologists used antimuscarinics in the treatment of BPH/LUTS and recommended phytotherapeutic drugs in their practice. In conclusion, Croatian urologists do not completely comply with the guidelines available. PMID:27017719

  3. Outcomes of bowel program in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic bowel dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ozisler, Zuhal; Koklu, Kurtulus; Ozel, Sumru; Unsal-Delialioglu, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine gastrointestinal problems associated with neurogenic bowel dysfunction in spinal cord injury patients and to assess the efficacy of bowel program on gastrointestinal problems and the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. Fifty-five spinal cord injury patients were included in this study. A bowel program according to the characteristics of neurogenic bowel dysfunction was performed for each patient. Before and after bowel program, gastrointestinal problems (constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, incontinence, abdominal pain, abdominal distension, loss of appetite, hemorrhoids, rectal bleeding and gastrointestinal induced autonomic dysreflexia) and bowel evacuation methods (digital stimulation, oral medication, suppositories, abdominal massage, Valsalva maneuver and manual evacuation) were determined. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was used to assess the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction. At least one gastrointestinal problem was identified in 44 (80%) of the 55 patients before bowel program. Constipation (56%, 31/55) and incontinence (42%, 23/55) were the most common gastrointestinal problems. Digital rectal stimulation was the most common method for bowel evacuation, both before (76%, 42/55) and after (73%, 40/55) bowel program. Oral medication, enema and manual evacuation application rates were significantly decreased and constipation, difficult intestinal evacuation, abdominal distention, and abdominal pain rates were significantly reduced after bowel program. In addition, mean neurogenic bowel dysfunction score was decreased after bowel program. An effective bowel program decreases the severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction and reduces associated gastrointestinal problems in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26330842

  4. Bladder Injury During Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tarney, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in the United States with over 30% of deliveries occurring via this route. This number is likely to increase given decreasing rates of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and primary cesarean delivery on maternal request, which carries the inherent risk for intraoperative complications. Urologic injury is the most common injury at the time of either obstetric or gynecologic surgery, with the bladder being the most frequent organ damaged. Risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean section include previous cesarean delivery, adhesions, emergent cesarean delivery, and cesarean section performed at the time of the second stage of labor. Fortunately, most bladder injuries are recognized at the time of surgery, which is important, as quick recognition and repair are associated with a significant reduction in patient mortality. Although cesarean delivery is a cornerstone of obstetrics, there is a paucity of data in the literature either supporting or refuting specific techniques that are performed today. There is evidence to support double-layer closure of the hysterotomy, the routine use of adhesive barriers, and performing a Pfannenstiel skin incision versus a vertical midline subumbilical incision to decrease the risk for bladder injury during cesarean section. There is also no evidence that supports the creation of a bladder flap, although routinely performed during cesarean section, as a method to reduce the risk of bladder injury. Finally, more research is needed to determine if indwelling catheterization, exteriorization of the uterus, and methods to extend hysterotomy incision lead to bladder injury. PMID:24876830

  5. Underactive Bladder in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Plata, Mauricio; Lamb, Laura E; Chancellor, Michael B

    2015-11-01

    Overactive bladder is one of the most common bladder problems, but an estimated 20 million Americans have underactive bladder (UAB), which makes going to the bathroom difficult, increases the risk of urinary tract infections, and even leads to institutionalization. This article provides an overview of UAB in older adults, and discusses the prevalence, predisposing factors, cause, clinical investigations, and treatments. At present, there is no effective therapy for UAB. A great deal of work still needs to be done on understanding the pathogenesis and the development of effective therapies. PMID:26476113

  6. A rare urinary bladder tumour

    PubMed Central

    Haddad-Lacle, Judella Edwina Maria; Haddad, Charles Joseph; Villas, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a 54-year-old man who presented to his primary care physician with low back pain. During his workup, an incidental finding of a bladder mass was diagnosed. He underwent transurethral resection of the bladder tumour and the resulting pathology was consistent with extra nodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma). Presentation of MALT lymphoma in the urinary bladder is rare. This malignancy is more commonly found in the stomach. The prognosis for this rare tumour is excellent. Our patient showed no sign of recurrence with transurethral excision and radiation alone. PMID:24835803

  7. Increased bladder permeability in interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Wisniewski, Amy B.; VanGordon, Samuel; Lin, HsuehKung; Kropp, Bradley P.; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    The definition of interstitial cystitis (IC) has evolved over the years from being a well-defined entity characterized by diagnostic lesion (Hunner’s ulcer) in the urothelium to a clinical diagnosis by exclusion [painful bladder syndrome (PBS)]. Although the etiology is unknown, a central theme has been an association with increased permeability of the bladder. This article reviews the evidence for increased permeability being important to the symptoms of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and in treating the disorder. Recent work showing cross-communication among visceral organs is also reviewed to provide a basis for understanding IC/PBS as a systemic disorder of a complex, interconnected system consisting of the bladder, bowel and other organs, nerves, cytokine-responding cells and the nervous system. PMID:26751576

  8. Lumbosacral perineural cysts as a cause for neurogenic muscular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Amoiridis, G; Wöhrle, J; Heye, N; Przuntek, H

    1997-08-01

    We report the case of a 40 year-old man with a severe lesion of the anterior rami of the left spinal nerves L5 and S1 who showed hypertrophy of the leg and atrophy of the intrinsic foot and gluteal muscles. In the biopsy of the hypertrophied gastrocnemius muscle, perivascular inflammatory infiltrates were observed, apart from atrophied and hypertrophied muscle fibres. Electromyography revealed no pathologic spontaneous activity but chronic neurogenic changes. The precise site of the lesion was predicted by electrophysiologic investigations. The lesion was caused by two perineural cysts in the region of the upper sacral plexus, as demonstrated by MRI and CT of the small pelvis and confirmed at operation. Three years earlier, when almost only L5 muscles were affected, an intervertebral disc prolapse L5/S1 had been suspected on myelography and CT but could not have been confirmed at operation. PMID:9298339

  9. Discriminating neurogenic from myopathic disease via measurement of muscle anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Garmirian, Lindsay P; Chin, Anne B; Rutkove, Seward B

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is electrically anisotropic, with a tendency for applied electrical current to flow more readily along muscle fibers than across them. In this study, we assessed a method for non-invasive measurement of anisotropy to determine its potential to serve as a new technique for distinguishing neurogenic from myopathic disease. Measurements were made on the biceps brachii and tibialis anterior muscles in 15 normal subjects and 12 patients with neuromuscular disease (6 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 6 with various myopathies) using 50 kHZ applied current. Consistent multi-angle anisotropic patterns were found for reactance and phase in both muscles in normal subjects. Normalized anisotropy differences for each subject were defined, and group average values identified. The amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients demonstrated increased and distorted anisotropy patterns, whereas myopathic patients demonstrated normal or reduced anisotropy. These results suggest that non-invasive measurement of muscle anisotropy has potential for diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases. PMID:19058193

  10. 5-hydroxytryptamine induced relaxation in the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Recio, Paz; Barahona, María Victoria; Orensanz, Luis M; Bustamante, Salvador; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Hernández, Medardo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is one of the inhibitory mediators in the urinary bladder outlet region. Here we investigated mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced relaxations of the pig bladder neck. Experimental approach Urothelium-denuded strips of pig bladder were mounted in organ baths for isometric force recordings of responses to 5-HT and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Key results After phenylephrine-induced contraction, 5-HT and 5-HT receptor agonists concentration-dependently relaxed the preparations, with the potency order: 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) > 5-HT = RS67333 > (±)-8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralinhydrobromide > m-chlorophenylbiguanide > α-methyl-5-HT > ergotamine. 5-HT and 5-CT relaxations were reduced by the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulphonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]pyrrolidine hydrochloride and potentiated by (S)-N-tert-butyl-3-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl)-2-phenylpropanamide dihydrochloride (WAY 100135) and cyanopindolol, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1A/1B receptor antagonists respectively. Inhibitors of 5-HT1B/1D, 5-HT2, 5-HT2B/2C, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5A and 5-HT6 receptors failed to modify 5-HT responses. Blockade of monoamine oxidase A/B, noradrenergic neurotransmission, α-adrenoceptors, muscarinic and purinergic receptors, nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase and prostanoid synthesis did not alter relaxations to 5-HT. Inhibitors of Ca2+-activated K+ and ATP-dependent K+ channels failed to modify 5-HT responses but blockade of neuronal voltage-gated Na+-, Ca2+-and voltage-gated K+ (Kv)-channels potentiated these relaxations. Adenylyl cyclase activation and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibition potentiated and reduced, respectively, 5-HT-induced responses. Under non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic, non-nitrergic conditions, EFS induced neurogenic, frequency-dependent, relaxations which were resistant to WAY 100135 and cyanopindolol. Conclusions and implications 5-HT relaxed

  11. The Neurogenic Potential of Astrocytes Is Regulated by Inflammatory Signals.

    PubMed

    Michelucci, Alessandro; Bithell, Angela; Burney, Matthew J; Johnston, Caroline E; Wong, Kee-Yew; Teng, Siaw-Wei; Desai, Jyaysi; Gumbleton, Nigel; Anderson, Gregory; Stanton, Lawrence W; Williams, Brenda P; Buckley, Noel J

    2016-08-01

    Although the adult brain contains neural stem cells (NSCs) that generate new neurons throughout life, these astrocyte-like populations are restricted to two discrete niches. Despite their terminally differentiated phenotype, adult parenchymal astrocytes can re-acquire NSC-like characteristics following injury, and as such, these 'reactive' astrocytes offer an alternative source of cells for central nervous system (CNS) repair following injury or disease. At present, the mechanisms that regulate the potential of different types of astrocytes are poorly understood. We used in vitro and ex vivo astrocytes to identify candidate pathways important for regulation of astrocyte potential. Using in vitro neural progenitor cell (NPC)-derived astrocytes, we found that exposure of more lineage-restricted astrocytes to either tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) (via nuclear factor-κB (NFκB)) or the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) inhibitor, noggin, led to re-acquisition of NPC properties accompanied by transcriptomic and epigenetic changes consistent with a more neurogenic, NPC-like state. Comparative analyses of microarray data from in vitro-derived and ex vivo postnatal parenchymal astrocytes identified several common pathways and upstream regulators associated with inflammation (including transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ)) and cell cycle control (including TP53) as candidate regulators of astrocyte phenotype and potential. We propose that inflammatory signalling may control the normal, progressive restriction in potential of differentiating astrocytes as well as under reactive conditions and represent future targets for therapies to harness the latent neurogenic capacity of parenchymal astrocytes. PMID:26138449

  12. Bladder neck contracture

    PubMed Central

    Simhan, Jay; Ramirez, Daniel; Morey, Allen F.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder neck contracture (BNC) is a well-described complication of the surgical treatment of benign and malignant prostate conditions. Nevertheless, etiologies of BNC development are highly dependent on the primary treatment modality undertaken with BNC also occurring after pelvic radiation. The treatment options for BNC can range from simple, office-based dilation procedures to more invasive, complex abdomino-perineal reconstructive surgery. Although numerous strategies have been described, a patient-specific approach is usually necessary in the management of these complex patients. In this review, we highlight various therapeutic maneuvers described for the management of BNC and further delineate a tailored approach utilized at our institution in these complicated patients. PMID:26816768

  13. Ct2 Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soloway, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    The patient is an 80-year-old man who presented with gross hematuria. His past medical history indicates he was a cigarette smoker with 50 pack/years. He was successfully treated for carcinoma of the lung 7 years ago. He received chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. He has mild COPD but has a good performance status. His laboratory studies do not indicate any abnormalities in terms of renal function. He does not have any significant cardiac disease. He has a medium build. He had prostate cancer and underwent a successful radical prostatectomy 10 years ago. His PSA is undetectable. He has some urinary incontinence and wears two pads/day. He underwent the appropriate investigations for gross hematuria. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis was normal with the exception of a 4-cm posterior mass in the bladder. There was no hydronephrosis and no enlarged lymph nodes. He underwent a transurethral resection of a solitary bladder tumor performed by another urologist. The tumor was described as large and sessile. It was located on the posterior wall and was approximately 4 cm. The bimanual examination did not reveal a mass. The pathology report stated that the tumor was a high-grade urothelial carcinoma with invasion into the muscularis propria. There was no lymphovascular invasion. I performed a reTURBT, and at that procedure, I did not identify any obvious tumor but the prior resection site was evident. I resected the prior tumor site quite extensively both in depth and width. The pathology revealed only focal carcinoma in situ. There was ample muscle in the specimen and there was some fat as well. As stated, they were free of any cancer. The patient is receptive to any treatment approach. PMID:27457483

  14. Coexistence of Malakoplakia and Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Song Liang Joshua; Teo, Jin Kiat; Lim, Sey Kiat Terence; Salkade, Hema Parag; Mancer, Kent

    2015-10-01

    Malakoplakia is a rare granulomatous disease that commonly involves the genitourinary tract, with the urinary bladder being the most frequently affected site. Grossly, malakoplakia can present as soft yellow plaques, nodules, bladder mass, or even without any visible lesion. In this article, we present a 74-year-old female with a background of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and poorly controlled diabetes who presented with sepsis of unknown origin. During the course of the investigation of the source of her sepsis, an incidental bladder tumor was discovered. She subsequently underwent transurethral resection of the bladder tumor. Histology revealed ordinary low-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma that had small colonies of malakoplakia that appeared to have developed secondary to the tumor and presented concurrently. We seek to demonstrate the rare association of papillary urothelial carcinoma and malakoplakia. PMID:26194600

  15. Spontaneous rupture of the urinary bladder (SRUB); A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sawalmeh, Haitham; Al-Ozaibi, Labib; Hussein, Ahmed; Al-Badri, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spontaneous urinary bladder rupture is a rare urological emergency. It is usually secondary to an underlying pathology and it is an uncommon complication of urosepsis. We report a case of spontaneous urinary bladder rupture as a complication of urosepsis in a 67 year old male patient, who was admitted as a case of left diabetic foot and urinary tract infection. Case presentation A 67 year old male patient with a long standing indwelling urinary catheter and chronic cystitis developed acute peritonitis. Intraoperative finding was ruptured urinary bladder. Discussion A few cases of spontaneous urinary bladder rupture due to infection were found in literature. The majority of the patients present with diffuse abdominal pain, and tenderness due to chemical peritonitis. In the majority of cases the bladder perforation was diagnosed intra-operative. Conclusion A diagnosis of spontaneous perforation of the bladder should be considered in patients presenting with an acute abdomen. The general surgeon is more likely than the urologist to encounter such patients in the first instance. There should be a high index of suspicion in patients with an acute abdomen and have associated urinary bladder condition. PMID:26451645

  16. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... chemicals. Studies suggest that chronic bladder inflammation, a parasitic infection called schistosomiasis, and some medications used to treat ... Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (2 links) American Cancer ...

  18. Diabetes and Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Takemasa, Tohru; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer's disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment. PMID:26075247

  19. Cloacal anomaly with bladder tumor

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Amlesh; Ram, Ishwar

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of squamous cell carcinoma of bladder occurring in a 36-year-old female with persistent cloacal anomaly who presented with frequency, urgency, dysuria, and recurrent urinary tract infection is reported. Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography with three dimensional reconstruction showed presence of bladder tumor and persistent cloaca. She underwent pelvic exenteration and wet colostomy. Histopathologic findings revealed locally advanced moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:23956519

  20. A novel natural product inspired scaffold with robust neurotrophic, neurogenic and neuroprotective action

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Sumana; Maitra, Swati; Reddy, R Gajendra; Das, Tapatee; Jhelum, Priya; Kootar, Scherazad; Rajan, Wenson D.; Samanta, Anumita; Samineni, Ramesh; Pabbaraja, Srihari; Kernie, Steven G.; Mehta, Goverdhan; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    In search for drugs to treat neuropsychiatric disorders wherein neurotrophic and neurogenic properties are affected, two neurotrophically active small molecules specially crafted following natural product leads based on 2-oxa-spiro[5.5]-undecane scaffold, have been thoroughly evaluated for their neurotrophic, neurogenic and neuroprotective potential in ex vivo primary culture and in vivo zebrafish and mouse models. The outcome of in vivo investigations suggest that one of these molecules is more neurotrophic than neurogenic while the other one is more neurogenic than neurotrophic and the former exhibits remarkable neuroprotection in a mouse acute ischemic stroke model. The molecular mechanisms of action of these compounds appear to be through the TrkB-MEK-ERK-CREB-BDNF pathway as pre-treatment with neurotrophin receptor TrkB inhibitor ANA-12 and MEK inhibitor PD98059 attenuates the neurotrophic action of compounds. PMID:26388493

  1. A novel natural product inspired scaffold with robust neurotrophic, neurogenic and neuroprotective action.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Sumana; Maitra, Swati; Reddy, R Gajendra; Das, Tapatee; Jhelum, Priya; Kootar, Scherazad; Rajan, Wenson D; Samanta, Anumita; Samineni, Ramesh; Pabbaraja, Srihari; Kernie, Steven G; Mehta, Goverdhan; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    In search for drugs to treat neuropsychiatric disorders wherein neurotrophic and neurogenic properties are affected, two neurotrophically active small molecules specially crafted following natural product leads based on 2-oxa-spiro[5.5]-undecane scaffold, have been thoroughly evaluated for their neurotrophic, neurogenic and neuroprotective potential in ex vivo primary culture and in vivo zebrafish and mouse models. The outcome of in vivo investigations suggest that one of these molecules is more neurotrophic than neurogenic while the other one is more neurogenic than neurotrophic and the former exhibits remarkable neuroprotection in a mouse acute ischemic stroke model. The molecular mechanisms of action of these compounds appear to be through the TrkB-MEK-ERK-CREB-BDNF pathway as pre-treatment with neurotrophin receptor TrkB inhibitor ANA-12 and MEK inhibitor PD98059 attenuates the neurotrophic action of compounds. PMID:26388493

  2. Drinking to near death--acute water intoxication leading to neurogenic stunned myocardium.

    PubMed

    Losonczy, Lia I; Lovallo, Emily; Schnorr, C Daniel; Mantuani, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a rare disease entity that has been typically described as a consequence of subarachnoid hemorrhage and, less commonly, seizures. Here we describe a case of a healthy young woman who drank excessive free water causing acute hyponatremia complicated by cerebral edema and seizure, leading to cardiogenic shock from neurogenic stunned myocardium. Two days later, she had complete return of her normal cardiac function. PMID:26238098

  3. Pathophysiology of Overactive Bladder and Urge Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Steers, William D

    2002-01-01

    Storage symptoms such as urgency, frequency, and nocturia, with or without urge incontinence, are characterized as overactive bladder (OAB). OAB can lead to urge incontinence. Disturbances in nerves, smooth muscle, and urothelium can cause this condition. In some respects the division between peripheral and central causes of OAB is artificial, but it remains a useful paradigm for appreciating the interactions between different tissues. Models have been developed to mimic the OAB associated with bladder instability, lower urinary tract obstruction, neuropathic disorders, diabetes, and interstitial cystitis. These models share the common features of increased connectivity and excitability of both detrusor smooth muscle and nerves. Increased excitability and connectivity of nerves involved in micturition rely on growth factors that orchestrate neural plasticity. Neurotransmitters, prostaglandins, and growth factors, such as nerve growth factor, provide mechanisms for bidirectional communication between muscle or urothelium and nerve, leading to OAB with or without urge incontinence. PMID:16986023

  4. Evaluation and prevention of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Aring, Ann M; Jones, David E; Falko, James M

    2005-06-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a debilitating disorder that occurs in nearly 50 percent of patients with diabetes. It is a late finding in type 1 diabetes but can be an early finding in type 2 diabetes. The primary types of diabetic neuropathy are sensorimotor and autonomic. Patients may present with only one type of diabetic neuropathy or may develop combinations of neuropathies (e.g., distal symmetric polyneuropathy and autonomic neuropathy). Distal symmetric polyneuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy also can cause motor deficits, silent cardiac ischemia, orthostatic hypotension, vasomotor instability, hyperhidrosis, gastroparesis, bladder dysfunction, and sexual dysfunction. Strict glycemic control and good daily foot care are key to preventing complications of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:15952441

  5. Human Insulin Does Not Increase Bladder Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2014-01-01

    Background Whether human insulin can induce bladder cancer is rarely studied. Methods The reimbursement databases of all Taiwanese diabetic patients from 1996 to 2009 were retrieved from the National Health Insurance. An entry date was set at 1 January 2004 and a total of 785,234 patients with type 2 diabetes were followed up for bladder cancer incidence until the end of 2009. Users of pioglitazone were excluded and the period since the initiation of insulin glargine (marketed after the entry date in Taiwan) was not included in the calculation of follow-up. Incidences for ever-users, never-users and subgroups of human insulin exposure (using tertile cutoffs of time since starting insulin, duration of therapy and cumulative dose) were calculated and the hazard ratios were estimated by Cox regression. Results There were 87,940 ever-users and 697,294 never-users, with respective numbers of incident bladder cancer of 454 (0.52%) and 3,330 (0.48%), and respective incidence of 120.49 and 94.74 per 100,000 person-years. The overall hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) indicated a significant association with insulin in the age-sex-adjusted models [1.238 (1.122–1.366)], but not in the model adjusted for all covariates [1.063 (0.951–1.187)]. There was also a significant trend for the hazard ratios for the different categories of the dose-response parameters in the age-sex-adjusted models, which became insignificant when all covariates were adjusted. Conclusions This study relieves the concern of a bladder cancer risk associated with human insulin. Appropriate adjustment for confounders is important in the evaluation of cancer risk associated with a medication. PMID:24466131

  6. Overactive bladder in children.

    PubMed

    Franco, Israel

    2016-09-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a ubiquitous syndrome that is defined by urinary urgency with, or without urinary incontinence. OAB is observed in all parts of the world, with a prevalence of 5-12% in children (5-10 years of age) and a prevalence of 0.5% in older adolescents (16-18 years of age). Published data indicate that around a third of children with OAB are likely to become adults with similar complaints. Studies in children and in adults with OAB indicate that these individuals are more likely to also have anxiety, depression and attention deficit problems, and that appropriate treatment of these comorbidities can often improve the patient's OAB symptoms. Furthermore, data from twin studies and familial surveys seem to indicate a genetic component of OAB. Pharmacological treatments of OAB in children have improved in the past 5 years, moving beyond anticholinergic agents and including the off-label use of α-blockers, β3-agonists and intravesical botulinum toxin. Use of several different electrical stimulation techniques is also effective, both as first-line treatments, and for patients with treatment-refractory symptoms. Overall the outlook of children with OAB seems to be improving, with a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Treatment modalities that target the source of the underlying problem, especially in children, are likely to provide the best patient outcomes. PMID:27530266

  7. Bladder Cancer in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Milowsky, Matthew; Droller, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Age is now widely accepted as the greatest single risk factor for developing bladder cancer, and bladder cancer is considered as primarily a disease of the elderly. Because of the close link between age and incidence of bladder cancer, it can be expected that this disease will become an enormous challenge with the growth of an aging population in the years ahead. Methods Using MEDLINE, a search of the literature between January 1966 and July 2007 was performed to describe normative physiologic changes associated with aging, elucidate genetic and epigenetic alterations that associate aging with bladder cancer and its phenotypes; and to characterize how aging influences efficacies, risks, side effects and potential complications of the treatments needed for the various stages of bladder cancer.. Results We discuss influence of aging on host physiology, genetic and epigenetic changes, environmental influences, and host factors in the development and treatment of bladder cancer. Treatments with intravesical Bacille Calmette Guerin, radical cystectomy, and perioperative chemotherapy are less well tolerated and have poorer response in elderly patients compared to their younger counterparts. Elderly patients face both clinical and broader institutional barriers to appropriate treatment and may receive less aggressive treatment and sub-therapeutic dosing. However, when appropriately selected, elderly patients tolerate and respond well to cancer treatments. Conclusions The decision to undergo treatment for cancer is a tradeoff between loss of function and/or independence and extension of life which is complicated by a host of concomitant issues such as co-morbid medical conditions, functional declines and “frailty”, family dynamics, and social and psychological issues. Chronological age should not preclude definitive surgical therapy. It is imperative that healthcare practitioners and researchers from disparate disciplines collectively focus efforts towards

  8. A healthy bladder: a consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Lukacz, E S; Sampselle, C; Gray, M; MacDiarmid, S; Rosenberg, M; Ellsworth, P; Palmer, M H

    2011-01-01

    A panel of experts in urology, urogynecology, nursing, and behavioral therapy convened in 2010 to discuss the importance of a healthy bladder on overall health. They determined that a consensus statement was necessary to raise awareness among the general public, healthcare providers, payors, and policymakers, with the goals of minimizing the impact of poor bladder health and stimulating primary prevention of bladder conditions. In this statement, ‘healthy’ bladder function is described, as well as internal and external factors that influence bladder health. It is suggested that primary prevention strategies should be aimed at providing education regarding normal lower urinary tract structures and functioning to the public, including patients and healthcare providers. This education may promote the achievement of optimal bladder health by increasing healthy bladder habits and behaviors, awareness of risk factors, healthcare seeking, and clinician engagement and reducing stigma and other barriers to treatment. Promoting optimal bladder health may reduce the personal, societal and economic impact of bladder conditions, including anxiety and depression and costs associated with conditions or diseases and their treatment. While adopting healthy bladder habits and behaviors and behaviors may improve or maintain bladder health, it is important to recognize that certain symptoms may indicate the presence of conditions that require medical attention; many bladder conditions are treatable with a range of options for most bladder conditions. Lastly, the authors propose clinical directives based on persuasive and convergent research to improve and maintain bladder health. The authors hope that this statement will lead to promotion and achievement of optimal bladder health, which may improve overall health and help minimize the effects of bladder conditions on the public, healthcare professionals, educators, employers, and payors. The advisors are in consensus regarding the

  9. Risk of Alcohol Consumption in Bladder Cancer: Case-Control Study from a Nationwide Inpatient Database in Japan.

    PubMed

    Zaitsu, Masayoshi; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Toyokawa, Satoshi; Tonooka, Akiko; Takeuchi, Takumi; Homma, Yukio; Kobayashi, Yasuki

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is common in Western countries, but not in Japan. Established risk factors are smoking and high-risk jobs such as printing and manufacturing. The risk of alcohol consumption in bladder cancer has been the recent focus; however, available literature on alcohol consumption and bladder cancer has been limited from Japanese population, thought to have a weak genetic tolerance to acetaldehyde. We aimed to determine whether alcohol consumption is an independent risk factor for bladder cancer among Japanese. The study was a matched case-control study from the nationwide Japanese clinical database administered by the Rosai Hospital group. We identified 739 cases of bladder cancer diagnosed between 2005 (when the database was established) and 2014 and 7,196 controls matched by sex, age, hospital, and admission period. We estimated the odds ratio of alcohol consumption for bladder cancer adjusted for the amount of smoking, high-risk occupations, and comorbidities (hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, hyperuricemia, and obesity) with conditional logistic regression. The risk of bladder cancer was significantly higher in ever drinkers than in never drinkers (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.06 to 1.66). Furthermore, the risk threshold for alcohol consumption was more than 15 g of alcohol intake per day (one, 180-mL cup equivalent to 6 ounces of Japanese sake containing 23 grams of alcohol). Among Japanese, alcohol consumption may be an independent risk factor for bladder cancer, with a lower risk threshold. PMID:27098227

  10. Prediction of Bladder Outcomes after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Pavese, Chiara; Schneider, Marc P.; Schubert, Martin; Curt, Armin; Scivoletto, Giorgio; Finazzi-Agrò, Enrico; Mehnert, Ulrich; Abel, Rainer; Röhrich, Frank; Weidner, Norbert; Rupp, Rüdiger; Kessels, Alfons G.; Bachmann, Lucas M.; Kessler, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurogenic bladder dysfunction represents one of the most common and devastating sequelae of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). As early prediction of bladder outcomes is essential to counsel patients and to plan neurourological management, we aimed to develop and validate a model to predict urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI. Methods and Findings Using multivariate logistic regression analysis from the data of 1,250 patients with traumatic SCI included in the European Multicenter Spinal Cord Injury study, we developed two prediction models of urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI and performed an external validation in 111 patients. As predictors, we evaluated age, gender, and all variables of the International Standards for Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI) and of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM). Urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after SCI were assessed through item 6 of SCIM. The full model relies on lower extremity motor score (LEMS), light-touch sensation in the S3 dermatome of ISNCSI, and SCIM subscale respiration and sphincter management: the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (aROC) was 0.936 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.922–0.951). The simplified model is based on LEMS only: the aROC was 0.912 (95% CI: 0.895–0.930). External validation of the full and simplified models confirmed the excellent predictive power: the aROCs were 0.965 (95% CI: 0.934–0.996) and 0.972 (95% CI 0.943–0.999), respectively. This study is limited by the substantial number of patients with a missing 1-y outcome and by differences between derivation and validation cohort. Conclusions Our study provides two simple and reliable models to predict urinary continence and complete bladder emptying 1 y after traumatic SCI. Early prediction of bladder function might optimize counselling and patient-tailored rehabilitative

  11. Caudal clonidine-bupivicaine block with bladder hydrodistension: a novel combined treatment for the painful bladder.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Heidi; Stoneham, Mark; Frampton, Claire; Noble, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a new combination procedure consisting of bladder hydrodistension with clonidine-bupivicaine caudal block for the symptomatic relief of bladder pain. They report this new technique whereby patients who had tried multiple forms of therapy with little response, including bladder hydrodistension under general anaesthesia for their chronic pelvic bladder pain, responded to this novel combination therapy. PMID:22696635

  12. Immunological regulation of neurogenic niches in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Gutierrez-Fernandez, Fernando; Lopez-Virgen, Veronica; Collas-Aguilar, Jorge; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis are germinal processes that occur in the adult brain throughout life. The subventricular (SVZ) and subgranular (SGZ) zones are the main neurogenic regions in adult brain. Therein, it resides a subpopulation of astrocytes that act as neural stem cells. Increasing evidence indicates that pro-inflammatory and other immunological mediators are important regulators of neural precursors into the SVZ and the SGZ. There are a number of inflammatory cytokines that regulate the function of neural stem cells. Some of the most studied include: interleukin-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, insulin-like growth factor-1, growth-regulated oncogene-alpha, leukemia inhibitory factor, cardiotrophin-1, ciliary neurotrophic factor, interferon-gamma, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha. This plethora of immunological mediators can control the migration, proliferation, quiescence, cell-fate choices and survival of neural stem cells and their progeny. Thus, systemic or local inflammatory processes represent important regulators of germinal niches in the adult brain. In this review, we summarized the current evidence regarding the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in the regulation of adult neural stem cells under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Additionally, we described the role of proinflammatory cytokines in neurodegenerative diseases and some therapeutical approaches for the immunomodulation of neural progenitor cells. PMID:22986164

  13. Early versus Late Surgical Treatment for Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Yousef; El Shorbgy, Ashraf Ali M. A.; Elshereef, Rawhia R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the outcome of early surgical intervention versus late surgical treatment in cases of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS). Design. Prospective study. Settings. Secondary care (Al-Minia University Hospital, Egypt) from 2007 to 2010. Participants. Thirty-five patients of NTOS (25 women and 10 men, aged 20–52 years), were classified into 2 groups. First group (20 patients) was operated within 3 months of the onset and the second group (15 patients) was operated 6 months after physiotherapy. Interventions. All patients were operated via supraclavicular surgical approach. Outcomes Measures. Both groups were evaluated clinically and, neurophysiologically and answered the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) questionnaire preoperatively and 6 months after the surgery. Results. Paraesthesia, pain, and sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) of ulnar nerve were significantly improved in group one. Muscle weakness and denervation in electromyography EMG were less frequent in group one. The postoperative DASH score improved in both groups but it was less significant in group two (P < .001 in group 1 and P < .05 in group 2). Conclusions. Surgical treatment of NTOS improves functional disability and stop degeneration of the nerves. Early surgical treatment decreases the occurrence of muscle wasting and denervation of nerves compared to late surgery. PMID:24109518

  14. Bladder cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lamm, D L; Thor, D E; Stogdill, V D; Radwin, H M

    1982-11-01

    A randomized controlled prospective evaluation of intravesical and percutaneous bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy was done in 57 patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. In addition, 9 patients at high risk for tumor recurrence were treated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin produced a self-limited cystitis and 1 complication (hydronephrosis) of immunotherapy was observed. Of the 57 randomized patients 54 were followed for 3 to 30 months. Tumor recurrence was documented in 13 of 26 controls (50 per cent) and only 6 of 28 patients (21 per cent) treated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (p equals 0.027, chi-square). The interval free of disease was prolonged significantly with bacillus Calmette-Guerin treatment (p equals 0.014, generalized Wilcoxon test). Importantly, a simple purified protein derivative skin test distinguished those patients who responded to bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy from those who did not. Only 1 of 17 treated patients (6 per cent) whose purified protein derivative test converted from negative to positive had tumor recurrence compared to 5 recurrences (38 per cent) among the 13 patients whose test remained negative or had been positive before treatment (p equals 0.022, chi-square). Bacillus Calmette-Guerin was given to 10 patients with stage B transitional cell carcinoma who were not candidates for cystectomy and 7 are free of disease. Of 5 patients with carcinoma in situ 3 remain free of tumor after bacillus Calmette-Guerin treatment and 5 of 6 who had multiple recurrences after intravesical chemotherapy responded favorably to bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy. PMID:6757467

  15. Transurethral Electrovaporization of Bladder Diverticulum: An Alternative to Open or Laparoscopic Bladder Diverticulectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chandhoke, Ryan A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We used transurethral electrovaporization of the diverticular mucosa as the primary treatment for an acquired bladder diverticulum in a female patient. The bladder diverticulum was secondary to bladder outlet obstruction from a previous pubovaginal sling. In comparison to either open or laparoscopic bladder diverticulectomy, transurethral electrovaporization of the bladder diverticulum was effective in significantly reducing the diverticular size while being less invasive, requiring a short operative time, and a quick patient recovery.

  16. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Financial Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Diabetes Medicines What do diabetes medicines do? Over time, high levels of blood glucose, ... your diabetes medicines, food choices, and physical activity. Medicines for My Diabetes Ask your doctor what type ...

  17. Nursing Care of Women With Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome.

    PubMed

    MacMullen, Nancy J; Dulski, Laura A; Martin, Patricia B; Blobaum, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome is a chronic condition affecting approximately 3.3 million women in the United States. It is defined by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases as "urinary pain that can't be attributed to other causes such as infection or urinary stones." Because of the intimate nature of the symptoms, women are often reluctant to seek treatment. When they do, they require a care provider with specialized nursing skills. Nursing practice based on carefully reviewed literature will result in the provision of comprehensive and compassionate nursing care for women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. PMID:27067933

  18. Neurogenic Fever after Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Qualitative Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Katherine E.; Oleson, Christina V.; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Sidhu, Gursukhman S.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To determine the incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcomes related to neurogenic fevers following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods  A systematic review of the literature was performed on thermodysregulation secondary to acute traumatic SCI in adult patients. A literature search was performed using PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus. Using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven relevant articles were obtained. Results  The incidence of fever of all origins (both known and unknown) after SCI ranged from 22.5 to 71.7% with a mean incidence of 50.6% and a median incidence of 50.0%. The incidence of fever of unknown origin (neurogenic fever) ranged from 2.6 to 27.8% with a mean incidence of 8.0% and a median incidence of 4.7%. Cervical and thoracic spinal injuries were more commonly associated with fever than lumbar injuries. In addition, complete injuries had a higher incidence of fever than incomplete injuries. The pathogenesis of neurogenic fever after acute SCI is not thoroughly understood. Conclusion  Neurogenic fevers are relatively common following an acute SCI; however, there is little in the scientific literature to help physicians prevent or treat this condition. The paucity of research underscored by this review demonstrates the need for further studies with larger sample sizes, focusing on incidence rate, clinical outcomes, and pathogenesis of neurogenic fever following acute traumatic SCI. PMID:27556002

  19. Replication-deficient adenoviral vector for gene transfer potentiates airway neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Piedimonte, G; Pickles, R J; Lehmann, J R; McCarty, D; Costa, D L; Boucher, R C

    1997-03-01

    Human trials for the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung disease with adenoviral vectors have been complicated by acute inflammatory reactions of unknown etiology. Because replicating respiratory viruses can potentiate tachykinin-mediated neurogenic inflammatory responses in airways, we studied whether the endotracheal administration of a replication-deficient adenoviral vector potentiated this response. The vector Ad5CMVLacZ was administered endotracheally to rats and the leakage of Evans blue dye was used to measure the capsaicin-induced neurogenic albumin extravasation. These studies show that neurogenic albumin extravasation is significantly potentiated in the airways of rats after administration of Ad5CMVLacZ. This inflammatory response can be blocked by selective antagonists of the substance P receptor or by glucocorticoids. Therefore, (1) the acute airway inflammation observed in patients after exposure to adenoviral vectors may exhibit a neurogenic component, which can be blocked pharmacologically, and (2) preclinical adenoviral vector safety studies of other organs innervated by the tachykinin system, e.g., coronary arteries and gastrointestinal tract, should include assessment of neurogenic inflammation. PMID:9070609

  20. New developments in the management of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Biaggioni, Italo

    2014-11-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is defined as a sustained reduction of ≥ 20 mmHg systolic blood pressure or ≥ 10 mmHg diastolic blood pressure upon standing for ≤ 3 min. Orthostatic hypotension is commonly associated with hypertension, and its prevalence is highest in those with uncontrolled hypertension compared to those with controlled hypertension or normotensive community elderly subjects. Orthostatic hypotension can cause significant disability, with patients experiencing dizziness, lightheadedness or syncope, and other problems that potentially have a profound negative impact on activities of daily living that require standing or walking. Furthermore, OH increases the risk of falls and, importantly, is an independent risk factor of mortality. Despite its importance, there is a paucity of treatment options for this condition. Most of the advances in treatment options have relied on small studies of repurposed drugs done in patients with severe OH due to rare neurodegenerative conditions. Midodrine, an oral prodrug converted to the selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist desglymidodrine, was approved by the FDA for the treatment of OH in 1996. For almost two decades, no other pharmacotherapy was developed specifically for the treatment of OH until 2014, when droxidopa was approved by the FDA for the treatment of neurogenic OH associated with primary autonomic neuropathies including Parkinson disease, multiple system atrophy, and pure autonomic failure. These are neurodegenerative diseases ultimately characterized by failure of the autonomic nervous system to generate norepinephrine responses appropriate to postural challenge. Droxidopa is a synthetic amino acid that is converted to norepinephrine by dopa-decarboxylase, the same enzyme that converts levodopa into dopamine in the treatment of Parkinson disease. We will review this and other advances in the treatment of OH in an attempt to provide a practical guide to its management. PMID:25303896

  1. Bladder health across the life course.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, P; Marschall-Kehrel, D; King, S; Lukacz, E

    2013-05-01

    Influences on bladder health begin during infancy and continue throughout the lifespan. Bladder anatomy and physiology change as individuals age, and the risk and propensity for bladder conditions, including lower urinary tract symptoms, throughout life are related to factors specific to age, sex, and life events. Bladder habits and dysfunctions at one stage of life may affect bladder health in subsequent stages. However, bladder problems are neither a normal part of aging nor inevitable at any stage of life. Many of the factors that negatively impact bladder health at all ages may be modifiable, and healthy bladder habits may prevent or reverse bladder dysfunctions that can occur naturally or in response to life events. There are opportunities to further define and promote healthy bladder habits through focused research and heightened public awareness of the importance of bladder health, which may lead to improvements in overall health and quality of life. It is our hope that this paper will inform and encourage public health initiatives and research programs aimed at this goal. PMID:23574100

  2. Overactive bladder - 18 years - Part II.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Castano, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; Lopez, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics - pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy - started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning - as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder - 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder. PMID:27176185

  3. Cancer of the Urinary Bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 76,960 % of All New Cancer Cases 4.6% Estimated Deaths in 2016 16,390 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 587,426 people living with bladder cancer in ...

  4. [Specific types of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Bertz, S; Hartmann, A; Knüchel-Clarke, R; Gaisa, N T

    2016-02-01

    Bladder cancer shows rare variants and special subtypes with diverse prognostic importance and therefore may necessitate different therapeutic approaches. For pathologists it is important to histologically diagnose and specify such variants. Nested variants of urothelial carcinoma with inconspicuous, well-formed tumor cell nests present with an aggressive course. The plasmacytoid variant, which morphologically resembles plasma cells is associated with a shorter survival time and a high frequency of peritoneal metastasis. Micropapillary urothelial carcinoma with small papillary tumor cell islands within artificial tissue retraction spaces and frequent lymphovascular invasion also has a poor prognosis. Other important rare differential variants listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification are microcystic, lymphoepithelioma-like, sarcomatoid, giant cell and undifferentiated urothelial carcinomas. Additionally, there are three special types of bladder cancer: squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the bladder. These tumors are characterized by pure squamous cell or glandular differentiation and are sometimes less responsive to adjuvant (chemo)therapy. Small cell carcinoma of the bladder mimics the neuroendocrine features of its pulmonary counterpart, shows an aggressive course but is sensitive to (neo-)adjuvant chemotherapy. The morphology and histology of the most important variants and special types are discussed in this review. PMID:26782034

  5. Immunotherapeutic strategies for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Mathieu F; Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise; Domingos-Pereira, Sonia; Jichlinski, Patrice; Derré, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common urologic malignancy with rising incidence in the elderly population. In most cases, bladder cancer is non-muscle-invasive at diagnosis and shows dramatically high recurrence rates, although current treatments often reduce the risk of disease progression. Immunotherapy using intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) remains the most effective therapy for patients with high risk tumors. However, BCG-therapy has important limitations including substantial adverse events and frequent treatment failure. Thus, it appears crucial to either improve or replace current therapy using new immunotherapeutic strategies. Here, we discuss the clinical trials that assessed therapeutic vaccination of bladder cancer patients using tumor associated antigens and we also argue for novel approaches arising from murine models. Vaccination routes to induce appropriate T-cell homing in the tumor site as well as the use of local immunostimulation to enhance recruitment of vaccine-induced T cells are discussed to highlight what we believe is a promising therapeutic vaccination strategy for patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. PMID:24384699

  6. Immunotherapeutic strategies for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Mathieu F; Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise; Domingos-Pereira, Sonia; Jichlinski, Patrice; Derré, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common urologic malignancy with rising incidence in the elderly population. In most cases, bladder cancer is non-muscle-invasive at diagnosis and shows dramatically high recurrence rates, although current treatments often reduce the risk of disease progression. Immunotherapy using intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) remains the most effective therapy for patients with high risk tumors. However, BCG-therapy has important limitations including substantial adverse events and frequent treatment failure. Thus, it appears crucial to either improve or replace current therapy using new immunotherapeutic strategies. Here, we discuss the clinical trials that assessed therapeutic vaccination of bladder cancer patients using tumor associated antigens and we also argue for novel approaches arising from murine models. Vaccination routes to induce appropriate T-cell homing in the tumor site as well as the use of local immunostimulation to enhance recruitment of vaccine-induced T cells are discussed to highlight what we believe is a promising therapeutic vaccination strategy for patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. PMID:24384699

  7. Nephrogenic adenoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Vorreuther, R; Nayal, W; Hake, R; Engelmann, U

    1994-01-01

    A nephrogenic adenoma of the bladder in a 4-year-old girl with a past history of urologic surgery for vesicorenal reflux is described. The multifocal tumor was treated by transurethral resection. Relapse occurred 15 months later and was again treated by transurethral resection. Pathological aspects, clinical features and therapeutic considerations of this proliferative lesion are reviewed and discussed. PMID:7855943

  8. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  9. Pathobiology and Chemoprevention of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Kuno, Toshiya; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of bladder cancer has improved considerably over the past decade. Translating these novel pathobiological discoveries into therapies, prevention, or strategies to manage patients who are suspected to have or who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer is the ultimate goal. In particular, the chemoprevention of bladder cancer development is important, since urothelial cancer frequently recurs, even if the primary cancer is completely removed. The numerous alterations of both oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis represent novel targets for therapy and prevention. In addition, knowledge about these genetic alterations will help provide a better understanding of the biological significance of preneoplastic lesions of bladder cancer. Animal models for investigating bladder cancer development and prevention can also be developed based on these alterations. This paper summarizes the results of recent preclinical and clinical chemoprevention studies and discusses screening for bladder cancer. PMID:21941546

  10. Blocking Neurogenic Inflammation for the Treatment of Acute Disorders of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kate Marie; Turner, Renée Jade

    2013-01-01

    Classical inflammation is a well-characterized secondary response to many acute disorders of the central nervous system. However, in recent years, the role of neurogenic inflammation in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases has gained increasing attention, with a particular focus on its effects on modulation of the blood-brain barrier BBB. The neuropeptide substance P has been shown to increase blood-brain barrier permeability following acute injury to the brain and is associated with marked cerebral edema. Its release has also been shown to modulate classical inflammation. Accordingly, blocking substance P NK1 receptors may provide a novel alternative treatment to ameliorate the deleterious effects of neurogenic inflammation in the central nervous system. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the role of substance P and neurogenic inflammation in acute injury to the central nervous system following traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke, and meningitis. PMID:23819099

  11. [Diabetes insipidus and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Cruz, Oswaldo; Careaga Benítez, Ricardo

    2007-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus is an uncommon pathology; its incidence varies from two to six cases in 100,000 pregnancies. It has multiple etiologies and it is classified in central and neurogenic. Patients with diabetes insipidus generally show intense thirst, polyuria, neurologic symptoms and hypernatremia. It does not seem to alter the patient's fertility. Diabetes insipidus is usually associated with pre-eclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and fatty liver disease of pregnancy. This is a report of a case seen at the Hospital General de Cholula, in Puebla, Mexico. A 19 year-old female, with 37.2 weeks of pregnancy, had a history of Langerhans cell histiocytosis since she was four years. Patient was treated with intranasal desmopressin until 2005. She went to an obstetric evaluation; laboratory and cabinet studies were obtained. A healthy 1900 g female was obtained through vaginal delivery, with a 7/9 Apgar score. We should be familiarized with this uncommon pathology because of its association with several obstetric emergencies. PMID:17849803

  12. Characterization of multiciliated ependymal cells that emerge in the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Takashi; Sawada, Masato; Takase, Hiroshi; Nakai, Chiemi; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Kaneko, Naoko; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2016-10-15

    In mammals, ventricular walls of the developing brain maintain a neurogenic niche, in which radial glial cells act as neural stem cells (NSCs) and generate new neurons in the embryo. In the adult brain, the neurogenic niche is maintained in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the lateral wall of lateral ventricles and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the neonatal V-SVZ, radial glial cells transform into astrocytic postnatal NSCs and multiciliated ependymal cells. On the other hand, in zebrafish, radial glial cells continue to cover the surface of the adult telencephalic ventricle and maintain a higher neurogenic potential in the adult brain. However, the cell composition of the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish brain has not been investigated. Here we show that multiciliated ependymal cells emerge in the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish telencephalon. These multiciliated cells appear predominantly in the dorsal part of the ventral telencephalic ventricular zone, which also contains clusters of migrating new neurons. Scanning electron microscopy and live imaging analyses indicated that these multiple cilia beat coordinately and generate constant fluid flow within the ventral telencephalic ventricle. Analysis of the cell composition by transmission electron microscopy revealed that the neurogenic niche in the aged zebrafish contains different types of cells, with ultrastructures similar to those of ependymal cells, transit-amplifying cells, and migrating new neurons in postnatal mice. These data suggest that the transformation capacity of radial glial cells is conserved but that its timing is different between fish and mice. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2982-2992, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991819

  13. Impairment of ATP hydrolysis decreases adenosine A1 receptor tonus favoring cholinergic nerve hyperactivity in the obstructed human urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ramos, M; Silva, I; Faria, M; Magalhães-Cardoso, M T; Correia, J; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether reduced adenosine formation linked to deficits in extracellular ATP hydrolysis by NTPDases contributes to detrusor neuromodulatory changes associated with bladder outlet obstruction in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The kinetics of ATP catabolism and adenosine formation as well as the role of P1 receptor agonists on muscle tension and nerve-evoked [(3)H]ACh release were evaluated in mucosal-denuded detrusor strips from BPH patients (n = 31) and control organ donors (n = 23). The neurogenic release of ATP and [(3)H]ACh was higher (P < 0.05) in detrusor strips from BPH patients. The extracellular hydrolysis of ATP and, subsequent, adenosine formation was slower (t (1/2) 73 vs. 36 min, P < 0.05) in BPH detrusor strips. The A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of evoked [(3)H]ACh release by adenosine (100 μM), NECA (1 μM), and R-PIA (0.3 μM) was enhanced in BPH bladders. Relaxation of detrusor contractions induced by acetylcholine required 30-fold higher concentrations of adenosine. Despite VAChT-positive cholinergic nerves exhibiting higher A(1) immunoreactivity in BPH bladders, the endogenous adenosine tonus revealed by adenosine deaminase is missing. Restoration of A1 inhibition was achieved by favoring (1) ATP hydrolysis with apyrase (2 U mL(-1)) or (2) extracellular adenosine accumulation with dipyridamole or EHNA, as these drugs inhibit adenosine uptake and deamination, respectively. In conclusion, reduced ATP hydrolysis leads to deficient adenosine formation and A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of cholinergic nerve activity in the obstructed human bladder. Thus, we propose that pharmacological manipulation of endogenous adenosine levels and/or A(1) receptor activation might be useful to control bladder overactivity in BPH patients. PMID:26521170

  14. The use of bi-layer silk fibroin scaffolds and small intestinal submucosa matrices to support bladder tissue regeneration in a rat model of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yeun Goo; Algarrahi, Khalid; Franck, Debra; Tu, Duong D.; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Kaplan, David L.; Estrada, Carlos R.; Mauney, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Adverse side-effects associated with enterocystoplasty for neurogenic bladder reconstruction have spawned the need for the development of alternative graft substitutes. Bi-layer silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) matrices were investigated for their ability to support bladder tissue regeneration and function in a rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI). Bladder augmentation was performed with each scaffold configuration in SCI animals for 10 wk of implantation and compared to non-augmented control groups (normal and SCI alone). Animals subjected to SCI alone exhibited a 72% survival rate (13/18) while SCI rats receiving SIS and bi-layer SF scaffolds displayed respective survival rates of 83% (10/12) and 75% (9/12) over the course of the study period. Histological (Masson’s trichrome analysis) and immunohistochemical (IHC) evaluations demonstrated both implant groups supported de novo formation of smooth muscle layers with contractile protein expression [α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and SM22α] as well as maturation of multi-layer urothelia expressing cytokeratin (CK) and uroplakin 3A proteins. Histomorphometric analysis revealed bi-layer SF and SIS scaffolds respectively reconstituted 64% and 56% of the level of α-SMA+ smooth muscle bundles present in SCI-alone controls, while similar degrees of CK+ urothelium across all experimental groups were detected. Parallel evaluations showed similar degrees of vascular area and synaptophysin+ boutons in all regenerated tissues compared to SCI-alone controls. In addition, improvements in certain urodynamic parameters in SCI animals, such as decreased peak intravesical pressure, following implantation with both matrix configurations were also observed. The data presented in this study detail the ability of acellular SIS and bi-layer SF scaffolds to support formation of innervated, vascularized smooth muscle and urothelial tissues in a neurogenic bladder model. PMID:24917031

  15. Improving Outcomes in Patients With Refractory Idiopathic and Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity: Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, David A; Schneider, Lynne Kolton; Watanabe, Thomas K

    2015-09-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a lower urinary tract dysfunction commonly seen in rehabilitation settings. The emotional, medical, and financial consequences of NDO can be substantial and management typically requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Physiatrists need to be able to identify patients who require referral to specialists for diagnostic testing or higher-tiered treatment and need to engender open lines of communication between their patients and all treating clinicians. This requires an understanding of the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunctions. PMID:26318392

  16. Painful Bladder Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation in a Case of Upper Tract Fungus Balls.

    PubMed

    Bajic, Petar; Wetterlin, Jessica; Bresler, Larissa

    2016-05-01

    Urinary tract fungus balls are a rare pathologic entity which may be asymptomatic or have variable presentations. To date, there have been no documented cases of fungus balls presenting as painful bladder syndrome. Painful bladder syndrome is a constellation of symptoms which may include pelvic pain, urgency and frequency not explained by other causes. Here, we present the first case of these two entities concurrently. Our patient had a longstanding history of diabetes, nephrolithiasis and recurrent urinary tract infections. He presented with symptoms of painful bladder syndrome and work-up revealed filling defects within the renal collecting system concerning for malignancy. Subsequent ureteroscopy revealed dense white debris consistent with candida fungus balls. Following clearance of the debris and antifungal therapy, our patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:27390583

  17. Painful Bladder Syndrome: An Unusual Presentation in a Case of Upper Tract Fungus Balls

    PubMed Central

    Bajic, Petar; Wetterlin, Jessica; Bresler, Larissa

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract fungus balls are a rare pathologic entity which may be asymptomatic or have variable presentations. To date, there have been no documented cases of fungus balls presenting as painful bladder syndrome. Painful bladder syndrome is a constellation of symptoms which may include pelvic pain, urgency and frequency not explained by other causes. Here, we present the first case of these two entities concurrently. Our patient had a longstanding history of diabetes, nephrolithiasis and recurrent urinary tract infections. He presented with symptoms of painful bladder syndrome and work-up revealed filling defects within the renal collecting system concerning for malignancy. Subsequent ureteroscopy revealed dense white debris consistent with candida fungus balls. Following clearance of the debris and antifungal therapy, our patient has remained asymptomatic. PMID:27390583

  18. Association Between Longer Therapy With Thiazolidinediones and Risk of Bladder Cancer: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of pioglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD), may increase the risk of bladder cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes. In this study, we assessed the risk of bladder cancer associated with the use of TZDs and between pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, an alternative TZD. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who initiated treatment with a TZD (n = 18 459 patients) or a sulfonylurea (SU) (n = 41 396 patients) between July 1, 2000, and August 31, 2010, using The Health Improvement Network database in the United Kingdom. Incident cancers were identified for 196 708 person-years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of bladder cancer in the TZD cohort compared with the SU cohort (referent), adjusted for potential confounders. Risk associated with increasing duration of drug exposure was also examined. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results We identified 60 incident bladder cancers in the TZD cohort and 137 cancers in the SU cohort. No difference in bladder cancer risk was found between the two cohorts (TZD vs SU, HR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.68 to 1.29) in analyses that did not account for duration of exposure. However, the risk of bladder cancer was increased among patients with the longest duration of TZD vs SU therapy (≥5 years of use, HR = 3.25, 95% CI = 1.08 to 9.71) and among those with the longest time since initiation of therapy (≥5 years since first use, HR = 2.53, 95% CI = 1.12 to 5.77). Risk of bladder cancer also increased with increasing time since initiation of pioglitazone (P trend < .001) and rosiglitazone (P trend = .006). Comparison of pioglitazone to rosiglitazone use did not demonstrate difference in cancer risk (P = .49). Conclusion Long-term TZD therapy (≥5 years) in patients with type 2 diabetes may be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer, which may be

  19. Assessment of bladder wall thickness in women with overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Üçer, Oktay; Gümüş, Bilal; Albaz, Ali Can; Pekindil, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare bladder wall thickness (BWT) between female patients with overactive bladder (OAB) and aged-matched healthy controls. Material and methods Thirty-six female patients with OAB and 31 healthy women were enrolled in the present prospective observational study. Qmax and Qave were measured by using uroflowmetry in all of the women in the patient and control groups, and also maximum bladder capacity (MBC), post- void residual urine (PVRU), prevoiding and postvoiding BWT were measured by using transabdominal ultrasound. Lower urinary tract symptoms of the participants were assessed by using Overactive Bladder Version-8 (OAB-V8) and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF). All of the data were statistically compared between the patient and control groups. In the patient group, the relationships between parameters were evaluated correlation analysis. Results The mean age of the patients and controls were similar (respectively, 45.58±12.35 and 44.21±11.60 years (p=0.68). The mean pre- and post-voiding BWT, OAB-V8 and ICIQ-SF scores of the patients were significantly higher than the controls. In the patient group, the moderate positive correlations between BWT with Qmax (p=0.02) and Qave (p=0.02) were found. Conclusion This study showed that the BWTs of the female patients with OAB are higher than those of healthy women. Further studies should investigate the changes in BWT of patients with OAB after treatment of OAB. PMID:27274895

  20. Metabolic phenotype of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Piva, Francesco; Scarpelli, Marina; Berardi, Rossana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2016-04-01

    Metabolism of bladder cancer represents a key issue for cancer research. Several metabolic altered pathways are involved in bladder tumorigenesis, representing therefore interesting targets for therapy. Tumor cells, including urothelial cancer cells, rely on a peculiar shift to aerobic glycolysis-dependent metabolism (the Warburg-effect) as the main energy source to sustain their uncontrolled growth and proliferation. Therefore, the high glycolytic flux depends on the overexpression of glycolysis-related genes (SRC-3, glucose transporter type 1 [GLUT1], GLUT3, lactic dehydrogenase A [LDHA], LDHB, hexokinase 1 [HK1], HK2, pyruvate kinase type M [PKM], and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha [HIF-1α]), resulting in an overproduction of pyruvate, alanine and lactate. Concurrently, bladder cancer metabolism displays an increased expression of genes favoring the pentose phosphate pathway (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase [G6PD]) and the fatty-acid synthesis (fatty acid synthase [FASN]), along with a decrease of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Krebs cycle activities. Moreover, the PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, hyper-activated in bladder cancer, acts as central regulator of aerobic glycolysis, hence contributing to cancer metabolic switch and tumor cell proliferation. Besides glycolysis, glycogen metabolism pathway plays a robust role in bladder cancer development. In particular, the overexpression of GLUT-1, the loss of the tumor suppressor glycogen debranching enzyme amylo-α-1,6-glucosidase, 4-α-glucanotransferase (AGL), and the increased activity of the tumor promoter enzyme glycogen phosphorylase impair glycogen metabolism. An increase in glucose uptake, decrease in normal cellular glycogen storage, and overproduction of lactate are consequences of decreased oxidative phosphorylation and inability to reuse glucose into the pentose phosphate and de novo fatty acid synthesis pathways. Moreover, AGL loss determines augmented levels of the serine-to-glycine enzyme

  1. Managing chronic bladder diseases with the administration of exogenous glycosaminoglycans: an update on the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Massimo; Hurle, Rodolfo; Casale, Paolo; Buffi, NicolòMaria; Lughezzani, Giovanni; Fiorini, Girolamo; Peschechera, Roberto; Pasini, Luisa; Zandegiacomo, Silvia; Benetti, Alessio; Taverna, Gianluigi; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Barbagli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of acute chronic cystitis and other ‘sensory’ disorders, i.e. painful bladder syndrome (PBS) or interstitial cystitis (IC), often remains multifactorial, there is a wide consensus that such clinical conditions may arise from a primary defective urothelium lining or from damaged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). A ‘cascade’ of events starting from GAG injury, which fails to heal, may lead to chronic bladder epithelial damage and neurogenic inflammation. To restore the GAG layer is becoming the main aim of new therapies for the treatment of chronic cystitis and PBS/IC. Preliminary experiences with GAG replenishment for different pathological conditions involving the lower urinary tract have been reported. There is a range of commercially available intravesical formulations of these components, alone or in combination. Literature evidence shows that exogenous intravesical hyaluronic acid markedly reduces recurrences of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Patients treated with exogenous GAGs have fewer UTI recurrences, a longer time to recurrence and a greater improvement in quality of life. Exogenous intravesical GAGs have been used for the treatment of PBS/IC. Despite the limitations of most of the studies, findings confirmed the role of combination therapy with hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate as a safe and effective option for the treatment of PBS/IC. To prevent and/or treat radiotherapy and chemotherapy induced cystitis, GAG replenishment therapy has been used showing preliminary encouraging results. The safety profile of exogenous GAGs has been reported to be very favourable, without adverse events of particular significance. PMID:27034722

  2. Diabetes - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - diabetes ... The following sites provide further information on diabetes : American Diabetes Association -- www.diabetes.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International -- www.jdrf.org National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- ...

  3. [Biochemical studies on muscles in neurogenic atrophies and central paralysis. Studies of the trophic functions of neurons].

    PubMed

    Langohr, H D

    1980-10-16

    Enzyme activities of the energy supplying metabolism were investigated in muscle specimens of brachial biceps, deltoid or anterior tibial muscles of patients with traumatic nerve lesions, polyneuropathies, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy and hemiparesis. The key enzymes of glycogenolysis (glycogen phosphorylase), glycolysis (triosephosphate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase), alpha-glycerophosphate cycle (alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase), beta-oxidation of fatty acids (beta-hydroxy-acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase), citrate acid cycle (citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase), hexokinase reaction (hexokinase) and pentosephosphate shunt (6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase) were measured. The present study shows that in case of disorders of the lower motor neuron--especially those with impaired axoplasmic transport--changes in the enzyme patterns of muscles occur at an early stage. The glycolytic enzyme activities are of particular significance because they are the most sensitive indicators of the onset, extent and course of neurogenic atrophy. There is a good correlation between severity of the lesion, functional state of the muscles and reduction of these enzyme activities. In case of traumatic nerve lesions re-innervation can prevent a permanent reduction of glycolytic enzymes only if it occurs during the first months after denervation. In all cases in which operative revision is considered, it is therefore not advisible to wait since the regenerative capacity of the motor neuron is not the only limiting factor but also the biochemical and morphological changes in the muscle fibre. These are permanent after long lasting denervation without re-innervation within the first months. Primary neuroaxonal degeneration of the nerve fibre which was found in the majority of our alcoholic patients obviously impairs the metabolism of the muscle to a greater extent than primary demyelination most frequently observed in diabetics

  4. Diabetes Insipidus and Polydipsia in a Patient with Asperger's Disorder and an Empty Sella: A Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raja, Michele; Azzoni, Antonella; Giammarco, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Describes an Italian patient with Asperger disorders, Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus, and Primary Empty Sella. His response to vasopressin treatment suggested a concomitant presence of primary polydipsia. Implications of the observed concurrence of these rare disorders are discussed in relation to diagnosis and pathogenesis. (Author/CR)

  5. Emulating a Fish Swim Bladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesenka, James; Meredith, Dawn; Bolker, Jessica; Schubert, Christopher; Kraut, Gertrud

    2009-10-01

    The University of New Hampshire and the University of New England are developing biologically relevant physics laboratories for their predominantly health science audiences. Buoyancy plays an important role in a variety of biological processes. We describe an inexpensive laboratory activity based on the Cartesian Diver that allows students to quantitatively emulate the swim bladder of a fish. Inflation of the ``bladder'' is externally controlled through an external gas syringe or squeezing on the plastic water containment vessel (a 2L soda bottle). The students can accurately determine the volume of a ``fish'' at the point of neutral buoyancy by visual measurement of the trapped air pocket. A simple electronic gas pressure sensor allows the hydrostatic pressure on the fish to be analyzed simultaneously.

  6. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K; Tsai, Y C; Spruck, C H; Miyao, N; Nichols, P W; Hermann, G G; Horn, T; Steven, K

    1993-12-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X chromosome for three tumors. Single locus alterations were detected in three tumors, while three other tumors revealed changes in two or more loci. In one tumor we found microsatellite instability in all five loci analyzed on chromosome 9. The alterations detected were either minor 2-base pair changes or larger (> 2 base pairs) alterations in repeat length. All six tumors were low stage (Ta-T1), suggesting that these alterations can occur early in bladder tumorigenesis. PMID:8242615

  7. Pioglitazone use and risk of bladder cancer: population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tuccori, Marco; Filion, Kristian B; Yin, Hui; Yu, Oriana H; Platt, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether pioglitazone compared with other antidiabetic drugs is associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer in people with type 2 diabetes. Design Population based cohort study. Setting General practices contributing data to the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Participants A cohort of 145 806 patients newly treated with antidiabetic drugs between 1 January 2000 and 31 July 2013, with follow-up until 31 July 2014. Main outcome measures The use of pioglitazone was treated as a time varying variable, with use lagged by one year for latency purposes. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals of incident bladder cancer associated with pioglitazone overall and by both cumulative duration of use and cumulative dose. Similar analyses were conducted for rosiglitazone, a thiazolidinedione not previously associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. Results The cohort generated 689 616 person years of follow-up, during which 622 patients were newly diagnosed as having bladder cancer (crude incidence 90.2 per 100 000 person years). Compared with other antidiabetic drugs, pioglitazone was associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer (121.0 v 88.9 per 100 000 person years; hazard ratio 1.63, 95% confidence interval 1.22 to 2.19). Conversely, rosiglitazone was not associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer (86.2 v 88.9 per 100 000 person years; 1.10, 0.83 to 1.47). Duration-response and dose-response relations were observed for pioglitazone but not for rosiglitazone. Conclusion The results of this large population based study indicate that pioglitazone is associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. The absence of an association with rosiglitazone suggests that the increased risk is drug specific and not a class effect. PMID:27029385

  8. Giant Leiomyosarcoma of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, José G.A.; Klojda, Carlos A.B.; Araújo, Claudio P. De; Pires, Lucas A.S.

    2016-01-01

    The bladder leiomyosarcoma is a rare and agressive mesenchymal tumour, and adult women of reproductive age have a higher incidence of developing the bladder leiomyosarcoma. The pathophysiology of the disease is not certain, and its main symptoms are hematuria, dysuria and abdominal pain. There are not a considerable amount of cases described in the literature. We report a case of a giant leiomyosarcoma of the urinary bladder in a 31-year-old woman. PMID:27437302

  9. Bladder Tumor Diagnosis—Improved Excretory Cystograms

    PubMed Central

    Amar, Arjan D.

    1967-01-01

    The correct precystoscopic diagnosis of bladder tumor was made in 20 of 23 patients with this disease, among more than 1,000 persons studied by double-dose excretory urography. There was no increase in the incidence of untoward effects. Double-dose excretory urography with delayed bladder films is recommended as the primary urographic procedure in all patients with gross or microscopic hematuria in whom bladder tumor is suspected. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:6044290

  10. Ultrasound and Biomarker Tests in Predicting Cancer Aggressiveness in Tissue Samples of Patients With Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Bladder Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  11. Ruptured spinal arteriovenous malformation: Presenting as stunned myocardium and neurogenic shock

    PubMed Central

    Mehesry, Tasneem H.; Shaikh, Nissar; Malmstrom, Mohammad F.; Marcus, Marco A. E.; Khan, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical syndrome usually defined as an acute pulmonary edema occurring shortly after a central neurologic insult. NPE was identified 100 years ago, but it is still underappreciated in the clinical setup. NPE usually appears within minutes to hours after the injury. It has a high mortality rate if not recognized early and treated appropriately. Similarly, neurogenic shock is a known complication of spinal cord injury reported incidence is more than 20% in isolated upper cervical spinal injury. But NPE is rare to occur, and stunned myocardium (SM) is not reported in spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) rupture. SM is a reversible cardiomyopathy resulting in transient left ventricular dysfunction which has been described to occur in the setting of catecholamine release during situations of physiologic stress. We report a case of high spinal AVM rupture presenting as SM, NPE, and neurogenic shock. Case Description: A 32-year-old male who presented with sudden onset of pain and weakness in upper limbs. Imaging studies showed AVM rupture by imaging techniques. Initially, the patient had severe hypertension, respiratory distress requiring intubation and ventilation, then he developed hypotension, bradycardia, and asystole, which required immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation and atropine. He remained with quadriplegia and suffered from frequent episodes of bradycardia and asystole. Conclusions: Spinal AVM rupture can present as neurogenic shock, stunned myocardium, and pulmonary edema. Early recognition of AVM rupture and prompt surgical intervention, as well as aggressive treatment of shock, may enhance recovery and decrease the long-term morbidity. PMID:26539315

  12. Central Neurogenic Hyperventilation Related to Post-Hypoxic Thalamic Lesion in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Gençpinar, Pinar; Karaali, Kamil; Haspolat, Şenay; Dursun, Oğuz

    2016-01-01

    Central neurogenic hyperventilation (CNH) is a rare clinical condition, whose mechanism is still unclear. Here, we report a 3-year-old male patient, who had bilateral thalamic, putaminal and globus pallideal infarction resulted in CNH without brainstem involvement. This case may illustrate a possible role for the thalamus in regulating ventilation. PMID:27127601

  13. A Clinician Survey of Speech and Non-Speech Characteristics of Neurogenic Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theys, Catherine; van Wieringen, Astrid; De Nil, Luc F.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents survey data on 58 Dutch-speaking patients with neurogenic stuttering following various neurological injuries. Stroke was the most prevalent cause of stuttering in our patients, followed by traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative diseases, and other causes. Speech and non-speech characteristics were analyzed separately for…

  14. miR-155 Is Essential for Inflammation-Induced Hippocampal Neurogenic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Woodbury, Maya E.; Freilich, Robert W.; Cheng, Christopher J.; Asai, Hirohide; Ikezu, Seiko; Boucher, Jonathan D.; Slack, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral and CNS inflammation leads to aberrations in developmental and postnatal neurogenesis, yet little is known about the mechanism linking inflammation to neurogenic abnormalities. Specific miRs regulate peripheral and CNS inflammatory responses. miR-155 is the most significantly upregulated miR in primary murine microglia stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a proinflammatory Toll-Like Receptor 4 ligand. Here, we demonstrate that miR-155 is essential for robust IL6 gene induction in microglia under LPS stimulation in vitro. LPS-stimulated microglia enhance astrogliogenesis of cocultured neural stem cells (NSCs), whereas blockade of IL6 or genetic ablation of microglial miR-155 restores neural differentiation. miR-155 knock-out mice show reversal of LPS-induced neurogenic deficits and microglial activation in vivo. Moreover, mice with transgenic elevated expression of miR-155 in nestin-positive neural and hematopoietic stem cells, including microglia, show increased cell proliferation and ectopically localized doublecortin-positive immature neurons and radial glia-like cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) granular cell layer. Microglia have proliferative and neurogenic effects on NSCs, which are significantly altered by microglial miR-155 overexpression. In addition, miR-155 elevation leads to increased microglial numbers and amoeboid morphology in the DG. Our study demonstrates that miR-155 is essential for inflammation-induced neurogenic deficits via microglial activation and induction of IL6 and is sufficient for disrupting normal hippocampal development. PMID:26134658

  15. Comprehensive expression map of transcription regulators in the adult zebrafish telencephalon reveals distinct neurogenic niches.

    PubMed

    Diotel, Nicolas; Rodriguez Viales, Rebecca; Armant, Olivier; März, Martin; Ferg, Marco; Rastegar, Sepand; Strähle, Uwe

    2015-06-01

    The zebrafish has become a model to study adult vertebrate neurogenesis. In particular, the adult telencephalon has been an intensely studied structure in the zebrafish brain. Differential expression of transcriptional regulators (TRs) is a key feature of development and tissue homeostasis. Here we report an expression map of 1,202 TR genes in the telencephalon of adult zebrafish. Our results are summarized in a database with search and clustering functions to identify genes expressed in particular regions of the telencephalon. We classified 562 genes into 13 distinct patterns, including genes expressed in the proliferative zone. The remaining 640 genes displayed unique and complex patterns of expression and could thus not be grouped into distinct classes. The neurogenic ventricular regions express overlapping but distinct sets of TR genes, suggesting regional differences in the neurogenic niches in the telencephalon. In summary, the small telencephalon of the zebrafish shows a remarkable complexity in TR gene expression. The adult zebrafish telencephalon has become a model to study neurogenesis. We established the expression pattern of more than 1200 transcription regulators (TR) in the adult telencephalon. The neurogenic regions express overlapping but distinct sets of TR genes suggesting regional differences in the neurogenic potential. PMID:25556858

  16. Neurogenic Language Disorders in Children. International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabbro, Franco, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Language disorders in children are one of the most frequent causes of difficulties in communication, social interaction, learning and academic achievement. It has been estimated that over 5% of children present with some kind of language disorder. This volume illustrates the state of the art in neurogenic language disorders in children. The most…

  17. Focal Ligamentum Flavum Hypertrophy with Ochronotic Deposits: An Unusual Cause for Neurogenic Claudication in Alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Vijayasaradhi, Mudumba; Biswal, Debabrat

    2012-01-01

    Neurogenic claudication resulting from focal hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum in the lumbar spine due to ochronotic deposits has not been reported till date. The authors discuss one such case highlighting the pathogenesis, histological and radiological features. Salient features of management are also emphasized upon. PMID:22708021

  18. Leiomyosarcoma of the Oropharynx and Neurogenic Tumors in a Young Patient With Turner's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Apice, Gaetano; Silvestro, Giustino; Losito, Simona; Botti, Gerardo; Ionna, Francesco; De Rosa, Vincenzo; Borghese, Annamaria; Ninfo, Vito

    2001-01-01

    Patient: A case of Turner's syndrome developing a leiomyosarcoma of the oropharynx and metachronous neurogenic tumors (mediastinal ‘ganglioneuroblastoma intermixed’, subcutaneous neurilemoma) is described. Discussion: To our knowledge, this case is the second reported leiomyosarcoma in a patient with Turner's syndrome. Also the site of involvement (palate and oropharynx) is particularly unusual for the already rare leiomyosarcomas in the young age. PMID:18521442

  19. AB208. Can bladder irrigation reduce the morbidity of bladder stones in patients with spinal cord injury?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, H; Xie, KJ; Jiang, CH; Zeng, JW; Huang, MP; Liu, QL; Huang, JB; Huang, TH; Li, YF

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of bladder irrigation for reducing the morbidity of bladder stones in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Methods From December 2011 to July 2013, SCI patients were prospectively randomized and assigned to either a bladder irrigation group or a no bladder irrigation group. Bladder irrigations were performed twice a week by urologists. The primary outcomes were incidences of bladder stones and Incontinence-Specific Quality-of-Life Instrument (I-QoL). Secondary outcomes were related adverse events. Results A total of 80 eligible patients participated and 78 (97.5%) patients (bladder irrigation, n=39; no bladder irrigation, n=39) completed 24 weeks of follow-up. Out of the 78 patients, 19 (24.3%) developed bladder stones. All occurred in no bladder irrigation group. In 8 of the 19 patients (42.1%), stones were only detected by cystoscopy .The bladder stones were mostly thin with an eggshell appearance (78.95% for diameter of stone <5 mm, 84.21% for volume of bladder stone<0.2 cm3). Bladder stones were removed by vigorous bladder irrigation guided by ultrasound (73.68%) or endoscopic lithotripsy (26.32%). The I-QOL was significantly better in the bladder irrigation group than in no bladder irrigation group at weeks 6, 12, 18, and 24 of follow-up. Conclusions Bladder irrigation may be more effective and safer than no bladder irrigation for reducing the morbidity of bladder stone in SCI patients.

  20. Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent BCG-Unresponsive Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-22

    Recurrent Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  1. Differential expression of neurogenes among breast cancer subtypes identifies high risk patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Nogueira, Patricia; Bragado, Paloma; Almendro, Vanessa; Ametller, Elisabet; Rios, Jose; Choudhury, Sibgat; Mancino, Mario; Gascón, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    The nervous system is now recognized to be a relevant component of the tumor microenvironment. Receptors for neuropeptides and neurotransmitters have been identified in breast cancer. However, very little is known about the role of neurogenes in regulating breast cancer progression. Our purpose was to identify neurogenes associated with breast cancer tumorigenesis with a potential to be used as biomarker and/or targets for treatment. We used three databases of human genes: GeneGo, GeneCards and Eugenes to generate a list of 1266 relevant neurogenes. Then we used bioinformatics tools to interrogate two published breast cancer databases SAGE and MicMa (n=96) and generated a list of 7 neurogenes that are differentially express among breast cancer subtypes. The clinical potential was further investigated using the GOBO database (n=1881). We identified 6 neurogenes that are differentially expressed among breast cancer subtypes and whose expression correlates with prognosis. Histamine receptor1 (HRH1), neuropilin2 (NRP2), ephrin-B1 (EFNB1), neural growth factor receptor (NGFR) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) were differentially overexpressed in basal and HER2-enriched tumor samples and syntaxin 1A (STX1A) was overexpressed in HER2-enriched and luminal B tumors. Analysis of HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A expression using the GOBO database showed that their expression significantly correlated with a shorter overall survival (p < 0.0001) and distant metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). In contrast, elevated co-expression of NGFR, EFNB1 and APP was associated with longer overall (p < 0.0001) and metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). We propose that HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A can be used as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for basal and HER2-enriched breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26673618

  2. Differential expression of neurogenes among breast cancer subtypes identifies high risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Nogueira, Patricia; Bragado, Paloma; Almendro, Vanessa; Ametller, Elisabet; Rios, Jose; Choudhury, Sibgat

    2016-01-01

    The nervous system is now recognized to be a relevant component of the tumor microenvironment. Receptors for neuropeptides and neurotransmitters have been identified in breast cancer. However, very little is known about the role of neurogenes in regulating breast cancer progression. Our purpose was to identify neurogenes associated with breast cancer tumorigenesis with a potential to be used as biomarker and/or targets for treatment. We used three databases of human genes: GeneGo, GeneCards and Eugenes to generate a list of 1266 relevant neurogenes. Then we used bioinformatics tools to interrogate two published breast cancer databases SAGE and MicMa (n=96) and generated a list of 7 neurogenes that are differentially express among breast cancer subtypes. The clinical potential was further investigated using the GOBO database (n=1881). We identified 6 neurogenes that are differentially expressed among breast cancer subtypes and whose expression correlates with prognosis. Histamine receptor1 (HRH1), neuropilin2 (NRP2), ephrin-B1 (EFNB1), neural growth factor receptor (NGFR) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) were differentially overexpressed in basal and HER2-enriched tumor samples and syntaxin 1A (STX1A) was overexpressed in HER2-enriched and luminal B tumors. Analysis of HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A expression using the GOBO database showed that their expression significantly correlated with a shorter overall survival (p < 0.0001) and distant metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). In contrast, elevated co-expression of NGFR, EFNB1 and APP was associated with longer overall (p < 0.0001) and metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). We propose that HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A can be used as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for basal and HER2-enriched breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26673618

  3. The effects of acupuncture on bladder interstitial cells of cajal excitability in rats with overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qi-Fan; Hou, Yuen-Hao; Hou, Wen-Guang; Lin, Zhi-Xian; Tang, Kang-Min; Chen, Yue-Lai

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that acupuncture treatment has an effect on patients with an overactive bladder, but the mechanism of its action remains to be clarified. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of acupuncture on bladder overactivity, and the excitability of interstitial cells of Cajal of the bladder in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction. Electroacupuncture (continuous wave, 30 Hz, 1 mA) was applied to stimulate the Ciliao point (BL32) and the Huiyang point (BL35) of rats for 20 min, 3 days. Results showed that acupuncture suppressed detrusor unstable contraction frequency and decreased detrusor maximum pressure in the bladder filling period. Compared with the normal control rats, HCN2 mRNA and protein expression within the bladder were upregulated and were reversed by electroacupuncture in overactive bladder rats as determined by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, in-vitro cell-cultured OAB rats bladder interstitial cells of Cajal intracellular Ca(2+) concentration were higher than normal control rats, which were lowered after acupuncture treatment. These findings suggest that acupuncture stimulation can suppress bladder overactivity, and regulate the excitability of bladder interstitial cells of Cajal in treatment of overactive bladder myogenic mechanism. PMID:24194780

  4. Beta adrenergic modulation of spontaneous microcontractions and electrical field-stimulated contractions in isolated strips of rat urinary bladder from normal animals and animals with partial bladder outflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, J I; Rouget, C; Palea, S; Granato, C; Korstanje, C

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous microcontractions and electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked contractions in isolated rat bladder strips from normal and from 6 weeks partial bladder outflow obstruction (pBOO) animals were studied to identify the potential site of action for the β3-adrenoceptor (AR) agonist mirabegron in detrusor overactivity in rats. For this, effects of the β-AR agonist isoprenaline and mirabegron were tested in presence or absence of selective antagonists for β-AR subtypes, namely CGP-20712A for β1-AR, ICI-118,551 for β2-AR, and L-748,337 for β3-AR. In detrusor strips from both normal and obstructed animals, EFS-induced contractions were weakly affected by isoprenaline and even less so by mirabegron. In contrast, microcontraction activity was more potently reduced by isoprenaline (pIC50 7.3; Emax ±85 %), whereas mirabegron showed a small effect. In pBOO strips, concentration response curves for isoprenaline and mirabegron at inhibition of EFS and spontaneous microcontractions were similar to those in normal strips. Isoprenaline-induced inhibition of microcontractions and EFS was antagonized by the β1-AR antagonist, but not by the β2- and β3-AR antagonists. In the context of β3-AR-mediated bladder functions for mirabegron in other experiments, the current data question a role for effects at spontaneous microcontractions, or neurogenic detrusor stimulation in the mode of action for mirabegron in vivo, since functional bladder effects for mirabegron are reported to occur at much lower concentrations. PMID:26047780

  5. Targeting EGFR in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Villares, G J; Zigler, M; Blehm, K; Bogdan, C; McConkey, D; Colin, D; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2007-12-01

    Expression and overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been described in several solid tumors including bladder, breast, colorectal, NSCLC, prostate, and ovarian cancers. In addition to gene amplification, point mutations within the kinase domain also occur. Previous reports indicate that the patient's response to gefitinib depends on either the presence of mutations within the kinase domain of EGFR or the expression of the most frequent alteration, the truncated EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII). Therefore, it is important to determine if these EGFR alterations are present in urothelial carcinoma. The kinase domain of EGFR (exons 18-21) from 11 bladder cancer cell lines as well as from 75 patient tumors was analyzed by automated sequencing. No mutations were detected in all samples tested. Furthermore, analysis of EGFRvIII by immunohistochemistry revealed that almost half of all the patient samples expressed this truncation in a urothelial carcinoma tissue microarray. However, there have been previous reports of inconsistencies in detecting EGFRvIII by immunohistochemistry owing to the specificity of the antibodies and the methodologies utilized. Therefore, these results were validated by reverse transcription PCR, real-time PCR and western blot analysis. In these assays, none of the samples tested positive for EGFRvIII. Taken together, these results indicate that mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR and expression of EGFRvIII are rare events in bladder cancer and therefore do not contribute to the malignant phenotype of this tumor. These results have clinical implications in selecting tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the therapy of urothelial carcinoma. PMID:17690890

  6. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, S.; Kurtzman, N.A. )

    1987-12-01

    Unidirectional {sup 45}Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (J{sup net}{sub Ca}) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed J{sup net}{sub Ca} to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that J{sup net}{sub Ca} was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, J{sup net}{sub Ca} decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, J{sup net}{sub Ca} was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue {sup 45}Ca content was {approx equal}30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa.

  7. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  8. Isolated Primary Schwannoma of Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Suresh; Paul, Fredrick

    2016-01-01

    Primary schwannoma of urinary bladder is a very rare tumour. It usually occurs in association with Von Recklinghausen’s disease. It arises from Schwann’s cells in the nerve sheath. We report here a very rare case of primary schwannoma of urinary bladder managed by complete transurethral resection. PMID:27437301

  9. Spectroscopic Imaging of Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Gandour-Edwards, R; Ramsamooj, R; deVere White, R

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of developing bladder cancer detection methods using intrinsic tissue optical properties is the focus of this investigation. In vitro experiments have been performed using polarized elastic light scattering in combination with tissue autofluorescence in the NIR spectral region under laser excitation in the green and red spectral regions. The experimental results obtained from a set of tissue specimens from 25 patients reveal the presence of optical fingerprint characteristics suitable for cancer detection with high contrast and accuracy. These photonic methods are compatible with existing endoscopic imaging modalities which make them suitable for in-vivo application.

  10. Tumours of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Pamukcu, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    Tumours of the urinary bladder are uncommon in all domestic animals except cattle in certain regions. Where cattle eat bracken (Pteridium aquilinum) there is a high incidence of these tumours. Epithelial tumours are the most frequently encountered neoplasms in cattle and in dogs—the two species most studied. They are described under the following names: papilloma, adenoma, transitional cell carcinoma (with variants), squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and undifferentiated carcinoma. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16 PMID:4371741

  11. Viscoelastic properties of human bladder tumours.

    PubMed

    Barnes, S C; Lawless, B M; Shepherd, D E T; Espino, D M; Bicknell, G R; Bryan, R T

    2016-08-01

    The urinary bladder is an organ which facilitates the storage and release of urine. The bladder can develop tumours and bladder cancer is a common malignancy throughout the world. There is a consensus that there are differences in the mechanical properties of normal and malignant tissues. However, the viscoelastic properties of human bladder tumours at the macro-scale have not been previously studied. This study investigated the viscoelastic properties of ten bladder tumours, which were tested using dynamic mechanical analysis at frequencies up to 30Hz. The storage modulus ranged between 0.052MPa and 0.085MPa while the loss modulus ranged between 0.019MPa and 0.043MPa. Both storage and loss moduli showed frequency dependent behaviour and the storage modulus was higher than the loss modulus for every frequency tested. Viscoelastic properties may be useful for the development of surgical trainers, surgical devices, computational models and diagnostic equipment. PMID:27082128

  12. Pathogenesis of human urinary bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, George T.

    1983-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bladder cancer is being analyzed at several levels of biological organization, i.e., population groups, individual whole animal, tissue, cell, molecule, etc. Each of these levels provides opportunities for mechanistic studies. Yet the integration of these several levels into a cohesive fabric is incomplete. From a clinical point of view, the following seem of importance to human bladder cancer pathogenesis. The initiation, promotion, and progression of bladder cancer involves several factors acting concurrently or sequentially. These factors appear to be naturally occurring or synthetically created chemicals present in the external environment. Human exposures to these agents may begin in utero, and varying, dynamic qualitative and quantitative exposure patterns continue through developmental and adult life. Apparent latent periods of development of clinical bladder cancer may be as short as one, or as long as 50 years or more. Individuals may exhibit differential susceptibility to vesical carcinogens, perhaps through phenotypic differences in quantitative biotransformation routes. Differences in bladder epithelial cell susceptibilities probably also occur, as well as varying local tissue and generalized resistance to neoplasia formation. Older individuals do not appear to be more resistant to bladder carcinogenesis. A number of animal model systems have been developed for the study of the in vivo, cellular, and molecular pathogenesis of bladder cancer. These models replicate many of the known salient features of human bladder cancer. Through use of appropriate whole animal models in conjunction with investigations of human and animal bladder cells and tissues in culture, controlled mechanistic and quantitative studies of bladder cancer pathogenesis should rapidly develop. PMID:6832092

  13. Diabetic Retinopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetic Retinopathy What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? Click for more information Can Cause Vision Loss, Blindness Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes and a leading ...

  14. Diabetic Retinopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cases of Diabetic Retinopathy (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Diabetic retinopathy affects men and ... Cases of Diabetic Retinopathy (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Projections for Diabetic Retinopathy (2010- ...

  15. Diabetes Insipidus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus Foundation MedlinePlus Alternate Language URL Diabetes Insipidus Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder that ...

  16. Lymphoma of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Venyo, Anthony Kodzo-Grey

    2014-01-01

    Background. Lymphoma of the urinary bladder (LUB) is rare. Aims. To review the literature on LUB. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results. LUB can be either primary or secondary. The tumour has female predominance; most cases occur in middle-age women. Secondary LUB occurs in 10% to 25% of leukemias/lymphomas and in advanced-stage systemic lymphoma. Less than 100 cases have been reported. MALT typically affects adults older than 60 years; 75% are female. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is also common and may arise from transformation of MALT. LUB presents with haematuria, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, and abdominal or back pain. Macroscopic examination of LUBs show large discrete tumours centred in the dome or lateral walls of the bladder. Positive staining of LUB varies by the subtype of lymphoma; B-cell lymphomas are CD20 positive. MALT lymphoma is positively stained for CD20, CD19, and FMC7 and negatively stained for CD5, CD10, and CD11c. LUB stains negatively with Pan-keratin, vimentin, CK20, and CK7. MALT lymphoma exhibits t(11; 18)(q21: 21). Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the MALT type of LUB with no recurrence. Conclusions. LUB is diagnosed by its characteristic morphology and immunohistochemical characteristics. Radiotherapy is a useful treatment. PMID:24511310

  17. Underactive bladder in women: is there any evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Joshua A.; Brown, Elizabeth T.; Kaufman, Melissa R.; Dmochowski, Roger R.; Reynolds, W. Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Underactive bladder (UAB) is a clinical symptom complex only recently gaining recognition as a clinical diagnosis. Lack of consensus agreement on a definition of UAB has limited its recognition and diagnosis in clinical practice. The purposes of this review are to: present existing definitions of UAB, review recent data regarding clinical and urodynamic diagnosis of the condition, and examine up-to-date hypotheses regarding its pathophysiology, with a focus on women. Recent findings The process to develop a consensus definition for UAB as a clinical symptom complex is ongoing. Symptoms associated with UAB, such as weak stream, straining to void, and history of urinary retention are well correlated to detrusor underactivity on urodynamics, which frequently develops in elderly women. In addition to aging, UAB may be the end stage of a variety of contributing pathologic conditions such as diabetes and ischemic disease. In some women, UAB may result from a progression from overactive bladder to UAB. Summary Existing evidence supports UAB in women as a symptom complex with a clinical and pathophysiologic profile distinguishable from other lower urinary tract-associated clinical conditions. Consensus definitions of clinical and urodynamic diagnostic parameters will be essential to more widespread recognition of UAB. PMID:26927630

  18. Pirfenidone attenuates bladder fibrosis and mitigates deterioration of bladder function in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liu Jian; Qi, Jun; Huang, Tao; Gu, Xin; Xu, Ding; Kong, Xiang Jie; Qian, Xiao Qiang

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the effects of pirfenidone (PFD) on the attenuation of bladder remodeling, and the associated functional changes caused by partial bladder outlet obstruction (pBOO), the present study performed surgery on adult male Sprague‑Dawley rats produce a model of pBOO. The rats in the pBOO group were administered a placebo and, in the CMC group, PFD mixed with the placebo was administered orally at 500 mg/kg body weight each day for 5 weeks, from 1 week after surgery. The rat bladders were harvested for biochemical analysis following cystometry at the end of the 6 week period. The histopathology was determined using Masson's trichrome staining. The mRNA and protein levels of pro‑fibrotic growth factors and extracellular matrix subtypes were assessed. pBOO debilitated bladder function and caused the parameters from cystometry to increase significantly compared with those in the control group (P<0.05), which were mitigated significantly following PFD treatment (P<0.05). In terms of the histology, the rats in the pBOO group exhibited significant increases in bladder weight, muscle hypertrophy and deposition of collagens, which were suppressed by PFD treatment (P<0.05). Based on the biochemical analysis, significant increases in the mRNA levels of collagen subtypes and growth factors, and protein levels of profibrotic growth factors and α‑smooth muscle actin in the bladders of rats in the pBOO group were reduced following PFD treatment. PFD prevented bladder remodeling and attenuated bladder fibrosis and, therefore, mitigated the deterioration of bladder function during the initial stage of pBOO. PMID:25997537

  19. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... 800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are listed ...

  20. Neurogenic stunned myocardium as a manifestation of encephalitis involving cerebellar tonsils.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Sou; Sung, Yueh-Feng

    2012-11-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium is defined as a myocardial injury or dysfunction after neurological insults. It is most commonly reported in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, and the presenting symptoms may mimic an acute myocardial infarction or myocarditis. In severe cases, cardiogenic shock and acute pulmonary edema may occur and lead to a devastating event. Therefore, it requires prompt recognition and proper intervention. We herein report the case of a 25-year-old woman who presented to our hospital with the symptoms of acute pulmonary edema, shock, and consciousness disturbance. The diagnosis of encephalitis of cerebellar tonsils complicated with acute hydrocephalus and neurogenic stunned myocardium was made. Detailed neurologic examinations, neuroimaging studies, and characteristic echocardiographic changes expedite the correct diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22205010

  1. Precocious puberty: clinical and endocrine profile and factors indicating neurogenic precocity in Indian children.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Anurag; Sharma, Jyoti; Kabra, Madhulika; Kumar Gupta, Arun; Menon, P S N

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical and endocrine profile of patients with precocious puberty followed up in a tertiary care hospital. Records of 140 patients (114 girls, 26 boys) with precocious puberty were reviewed. Clinical features including age of onset, stage of pubertal development, presenting symptoms, features suggestive of CNS involvement and family history were analyzed. Endocrine investigations included basal and GnRH-stimulated levels of LH and FSH as well as 17OHP, DHEA, hCG and thyroid profile. Abdominal and pelvic ultrasonography and CNS imaging were correlated with clinical features. Girls outnumbered boys in this series (4.4:1). Neurogenic central isosexual precocious puberty (CIPP) was more common in boys (10 out of 18, 55.6%) than girls (16 out of 77, 20.8%). The most common cause of neurogenic CIPP was hypothalamic hamartoma present in five girls and four boys. Other causes of neurogenic CIPP included neurotuberculosis, pituitary adenoma, hydrocephalus, post radiotherapy, CNS tumors and malformations. Peripheral precocious puberty (PPP) was secondary to adrenal causes in boys and ovarian cysts in girls. Benign variants of precocious puberty, such as premature thelarche and premature adrenarche, were present in 23 and six girls, respectively. Hypothyroidism was present in four girls and McCune-Albright syndrome in one girl. Girls with neurogenic CIPP had a lower age of onset as compared to idiopathic CIPP (3.6 +/- 2.7 years vs 5.4 +/- 2.5 years, p = 0.014). The lowest age of onset was seen in girls with hypothalamic hamartoma (1.6 +/- 0.9 years). Forty-seven girls with CIPP (seven neurogenic and 40 idiopathic) presented after the age of 6 years. Features of CNS involvement, in the form of seizures, mental retardation, raised intracranial tension or focal neurological deficits, were present in seven girls (43.8%) and four boys (40%), and gelastic seizures were present in three children. Girls with CIPP had greater bone age

  2. A Case of Neuro-Behcet’s Disease Presenting with Central Neurogenic Hyperventilation

    PubMed Central

    Alkhachroum, Ayham M.; Saeed, Saba; Kaur, Jaspreet; Shams, Tanzila; De Georgia, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 46 Final Diagnosis: Central hyperventilation Symptoms: Hyperventilation Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Neurology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Behcet’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder usually characterized by the triad of oral ulcers, genital ulcers, and uveitis. Central to the pathogenesis of Behcet’s disease is an autoimmune vasculitis. Neurological involvement, so called “Neuro-Behcet’s disease”, occurs in 10–20% of patients, usually from a meningoencephalitis or venous thrombosis. Case Report: We report the case of a 46-year-old patient with Neuro-Behcet’s disease who presented with central neurogenic hyperventilation as a result of brainstem involvement from venulitis. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, central neurogenic hyperventilation has not previously been described in a patient with Neuro-Behcet’s disease. PMID:26965646

  3. A simple assessment model to quantifying the dynamic hippocampal neurogenic process in the adult mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minee L; Begeti, Faye; Barker, Roger A; Kim, Namho

    2016-04-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is a highly dynamic process in which new cells are born, but only some of which survive. Of late it has become clear that these surviving newborn neurons have functional roles, most notably in certain forms of memory. Conventional methods to look at adult neurogenesis are based on the quantification of the number of newly born neurons using a simple cell counting methodology. However, this type of approach fails to capture the dynamic aspects of the neurogenic process, where neural proliferation, death and differentiation take place continuously and simultaneously. In this paper, we propose a simple mathematical approach to better understand the adult neurogenic process in the hippocampus which in turn will allow for a better analysis of this process in disease states and following drug therapies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26443687

  4. Topical acetyl salicylate and dipyrone attenuate neurogenic protein extravasation in rat skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schmelz, M; Weber, S; Kress, M

    2000-08-18

    The effect of topically applied acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) and dipyrone on capsaicin-evoked protein extravasation was investigated by dermal microdialysis in rat. After a baseline of 75 min, capsaicin (1%) was applied epicutaneously under occlusion for 75 min above the capillaries. Topical capsaicin stimulation induced neurogenic protein extravasation with a mean increase of protein concentration in the perfusate of 165+/-27% (mean+/-SEM; n=15), whereas in sham-stimulated sites protein concentration decreased to 73+/-7% of the prestimulation value (n=6). ASA (2-200 mg/ml) and dipyrone (3-300 mg/ml) dose-dependently reduced the capsaicin induced protein extravasation to 118+/-23% (ASA, 200 mg/ml; n=8) and 72+/-9% (dipyrone, 300 mg/ml; n=8) of the prestimulation value. ASA and dipyrone antagonized the excitatory effects of capsaicin on skin nociceptors and thus suppressed the neurogenic protein extravasation. PMID:10925174

  5. Endogenous neurogenic cell response in the mature mammalian brain following traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong

    2016-01-01

    In the mature mammalian brain, new neurons are generated throughout life in the neurogenic regions of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. Over the past two decades, extensive studies have examined the extent of adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and DG, the role of the adult generated new neurons in normal brain function and the underlying mechanisms regulating the process of adult neurogenesis. The extent and the function of adult neurogenesis under neuropathological conditions have also been explored in varying types of disease models in animals. Increasing evidence has indicated that these endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells may play regenerative and reparative roles in response to CNS injuries or diseases. This review will discuss the potential functions of adult neurogenesis in the injured brain and will describe the recent development of strategies aimed at harnessing this neurogenic capacity in order to repopulate and repair the injured brain following trauma. PMID:25936874

  6. Acute intraoperative neurogenic myocardial stunning during intracranial endoscopic fenestration and shunt revision in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Dragan, Kristen Elizabeth; Patten, William D; Elzamzamy, Osama M; Attaallah, Ahmed Fikry

    2016-02-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium (NSM) is syndrome of myocardial dysfunction following an acute neurological insult. We report a case of NSM that occurred intraoperatively in a pediatric patient undergoing endoscopic fenestration and shunt revision. Accidental outflow occlusion of irrigation fluid and ventricular distension resulted in an acute increase in heart rate and arterial blood pressure. Subsequently, the patient developed stunned myocardium with global myocardial hypokinesia and pulmonary edema. She was promptly treated intraoperatively then admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with resolution of her symptoms within 12 h. She was later discharged to home on the fourth postoperative day. In the current endoscopic era, this report highlights the possibility of intraoperative NSM and neurogenic pulmonary edema in the pediatric population. Early detection and treatment with a team approach help to achieve optimal control of this life-threatening condition and improve the outcome. PMID:26314948

  7. A Late Presentation of Spontaneous Bladder Rupture During Labor.

    PubMed

    Farahzadi, A; Mohammadipour, S

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous bladder rupture is usually due to bladder diseases. Bladder rupture during labor or postpartum is extremely rare. Acute abdomen is the usual presentation of spontaneous bladder rupture. Patients may complain of suprapubic pain, anuria and hematuria. Some patients with intraperitoneal bladder rupture may have no abdominal pain and can pass urine without any symptoms so the diagnosis of intraperitoneal rupture may be difficult in these situations. We report a nulliparous woman with abdominal pain and distension about 20 days after normal vaginal delivery. There was intraperitoneal rupture of bladder in dome of bladder which was sealed by jejunum. PMID:27313990

  8. Notch Receptor Expression in Neurogenic Regions of the Adult Zebrafish Brain

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira-Carlos, Vanessa; Ganz, Julia; Hans, Stefan; Kaslin, Jan; Brand, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The adult zebrash brain has a remarkable constitutive neurogenic capacity. The regulation and maintenance of its adult neurogenic niches are poorly understood. In mammals, Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance both in embryonic and adult CNS. To better understand how Notch signaling is involved in stem cell maintenance during adult neurogenesis in zebrafish we analysed Notch receptor expression in five neurogenic zones of the adult zebrafish brain. Combining proliferation and glial markers we identified several subsets of Notch receptor expressing cells. We found that 90 of proliferating radial glia express notch1a, notch1b and notch3. In contrast, the proliferating non-glial populations of the dorsal telencephalon and hypothalamus rarely express notch3 and about half express notch1a/1b. In the non-proliferating radial glia notch3 is the predominant receptor throughout the brain. In the ventral telencephalon and in the mitotic area of the optic tectum, where cells have neuroepithelial properties, notch1a/1b/3 are expressed in most proliferating cells. However, in the cerebellar niche, although progenitors also have neuroepithelial properties, only notch1a/1b are expressed in a high number of PCNA cells. In this region notch3 expression is mostly in Bergmann glia and at low levels in few PCNA cells. Additionally, we found that in the proliferation zone of the ventral telencephalon, Notch receptors display an apical high to basal low gradient of expression. Notch receptors are also expressed in subpopulations of oligodendrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells. We suggest that the partial regional heterogeneity observed for Notch expression in progenitor cells might be related to the cellular diversity present in each of these neurogenic niches. PMID:24039926

  9. Dynamic changes of the neurogenic potential in the rat cochlear nucleus during post-natal development.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Völker, Johannes; Frenz, Silke; Scherzed, Agmal; Radeloff, Andreas; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2013-05-01

    Neuronal stem cells have been described in the post-natal cochlear nucleus recently. The aim of the study was to analyse the neurogenic potential in the cochlear nucleus from the early post-natal days until adulthood. Cochlear nuclei from Sprague-Dawley rats from post-natal day P3 up to P40 were examined. Neurosphere assays showed persistent neurosphere formation from the early post-natal days until adulthood. The numbers of generated neurospheres were fewer in older ages. Neurospheres were smaller, but displayed the same pattern of neuronal stem cell markers. The markers GFAP, MBP and ß-III Tubulin showed differentiation of dissociated cells from the neurospheres in all cells of the neuronal lineage. BrdU incorporation could be detected, in an age-dependent decrease, in whole-mount experiments of the cochlear nucleus on all examined days. BrdU co-labelled with Atoh1 and ß-III Tubulin. In addition, gene expression and cellular distribution studies of the neuronal stem cell markers displayed an age-dependent reduction in both quantity and numbers. The presented results display a possible neurogenic potential until adulthood in the cochlear nucleus by in vitro and in vivo experiments. The fact that this potential is highest at a critical period of development reveals possible functional importance for the development of the cochlear nucleus and the auditory function. The persistent neurogenic potential displayed until adulthood could be a neurogenic niche in the adult cochlear nucleus, which might be used for potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:23455726

  10. Inhibition by ketamine and amphetamine analogs of the neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations in porcine basilar arteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Lai, Su-Yu; Kung, Po-Cheng; Lin, Yo-Cheng; Yang, Hui-I; Chen, Po-Yi; Liu, Ingrid Y; Lua, Ahai Chang; Lee, Tony Jer-Fu

    2016-08-15

    The abuse of ketamine and amphetamine analogs is associated with incidence of hypertension and strokes involving activation of sympathetic activities. Large cerebral arteries at the base of the brain from several species receive dense sympathetic innervation which upon activation causes parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation with increased regional blood flow via axo-axonal interaction mechanism, serving as a protective mechanism to meet O2 demand in an acutely stressful situation. The present study was designed to examine effects of ketamine and amphetamine analogs on axo-axonal interaction-mediated neurogenic nitrergic vasodilation in porcine basilar arteries using techniques of blood-vessel myography, patch clamp and two-electrode voltage clamp, and calcium imaging. In U46619-contracted basilar arterial rings, nicotine (100μM) and electrical depolarization of nitrergic nerves by transmural nerve stimulation (TNS, 8Hz) elicited neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs concentration-dependently inhibited nicotine-induced parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation without affecting that induced by TNS, nitroprusside or isoproterenol. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs also concentration-dependently blocked nicotine-induced inward currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing α3β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and nicotine-induced inward currents as well as calcium influxes in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons. The potency in inhibiting both inward-currents and calcium influxes is ketamine>methamphetamine>hydroxyamphetamine. These results indicate that ketamine and amphetamine analogs, by blocking nAChRs located on cerebral perivascular sympathetic nerves, reduce nicotine-induced, axo-axonal interaction mechanism-mediated neurogenic dilation of the basilar arteries. Chronic abuse of these drugs, therefore, may interfere with normal sympathetic-parasympathetic interaction mechanism resulting in diminished neurogenic vasodilation

  11. Urinary bladder cancer: role of MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sadhna; Rajesh, Arumugam; Prasad, Srinivasa R; Gaitonde, Krishnanath; Lall, Chandana G; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Aeron, Gunjan; Bracken, Robert B; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan

    2012-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is a heterogeneous disease with a variety of pathologic features, cytogenetic characteristics, and natural histories. It is the fourth most common cancer in males and the tenth most common cancer in females. Urinary bladder cancer has a high recurrence rate, necessitating long-term surveillance after initial therapy. Early detection is important, since up to 47% of bladder cancer-related deaths may have been avoided. Conventional computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are only moderately accurate in the diagnosis and local staging of bladder cancer, with cystoscopy and pathologic staging remaining the standards of reference. However, the role of newer MR imaging sequences (eg, diffusion-weighted imaging) in the diagnosis and local staging of bladder cancer is still evolving. Substantial advances in MR imaging technology have made multiparametric MR imaging a feasible and reasonably accurate technique for the local staging of bladder cancer to optimize treatment. In addition, whole-body CT is the primary imaging technique for the detection of metastases in bladder cancer patients, especially those with disease that invades muscle. PMID:22411938

  12. A molecular analysis of neurogenic placode and cranial sensory ganglion development in the shark, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, P; McCole, R B; Baker, C V H

    2007-04-01

    In order to gain insight into the evolution of the genetic control of the development of cranial neurogenic placodes and cranial sensory ganglia in vertebrates, we cloned and analysed the spatiotemporal expression pattern of six transcription factor genes in a chondrichthyan, the shark Scyliorhinus canicula (lesser-spotted dogfish/catshark). As in other vertebrates, NeuroD is expressed in all cranial sensory ganglia. We show that Pax3 is expressed in the profundal placode and ganglion, strongly supporting homology between the separate profundal ganglion of elasmobranchs and basal actinopterygians and the ophthalmic trigeminal placode-derived neurons of the fused amniote trigeminal ganglion. We show that Pax2 is a conserved pan-gnathostome marker for epibranchial and otic placodes, and confirm that Phox2b is a conserved pan-gnathostome marker for epibranchial placode-derived neurons. We identify Eya4 as a novel marker for the lateral line system throughout its development, expressed in lateral line placodes, sensory ridges and migrating primordia, neuromasts and electroreceptors. We also identify Tbx3 as a specific marker for lateral line ganglia in shark embryos. We use the spatiotemporal expression pattern of these genes to characterise the development of neurogenic placodes and cranial sensory ganglia in the dogfish, with a focus on the epibranchial and lateral line placodes. Our findings demonstrate the evolutionary conservation across all gnathostomes of at least some of the transcription factor networks underlying neurogenic placode development. PMID:17234174

  13. Neurogenic Shock Immediately following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okuda, Shinya; Haku, Takamitsu; Maeda, Kazuya; Maeno, Takafumi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and that appeared to have been caused by the vasovagal reflex after dural injury and incarceration of the cauda equina. Case Report We present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following PLIF. One patient had bradycardia, and the other developed cardiac arrest just after closing the surgical incision and opening the drainage tube. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately, and the patients recovered successfully, but they showed severe motor loss after awakening. The results of laboratory data, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, computed tomography, and echocardiography ruled out pulmonary embolism, hemorrhagic shock, and cardiogenic shock. Although the reasons for the postoperative shock were obscure, reoperation was performed to explore the cause of paralysis. At reoperation, a cerebrospinal fluid collection and the incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets through a small dural tear were observed. The incarcerated cauda equina rootlets were reduced, and the dural defect was closed. In both cases, the reoperation was uneventful. From the intraoperative findings at reoperation, it was thought that the pathology was neurogenic shock via the vasovagal reflex. Conclusion Incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets following the accidental dural tear by suction drainage caused a sudden decrease of cerebrospinal fluid pressure and traction of the cauda equina, which may have led to the vasovagal reflex. PMID:26225287

  14. Congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy in megaconial myopathy due to a mutation in CHKB gene.

    PubMed

    Castro-Gago, Manuel; Dacruz-Alvarez, David; Pintos-Martínez, Elena; Beiras-Iglesias, Andrés; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta gene (CHKB) mutations have been identified in Megaconial Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (MDCMC) patients, a very rare inborn error of metabolism with 21 cases reported worldwide. We report the case of a Spanish boy of Caucasian origin who presented a generalized congenital muscular hypotonia, more intense at lower limb muscles, mildly elevated creatine kinase (CK), serum aspartate transaminase (AST) and lactate. Electromyography (EMG) showed neurogenic potentials in the proximal muscles. Histological studies of a muscle biopsy showed neurogenic atrophy with enlarged mitochondria in the periphery of the fibers, and complex I deficiency. Finally, genetic analysis showed the presence of a homozygous mutation in the gene for choline kinase beta (CHKB: NM_005198.4:c.810T>A, p.Tyr270(∗)). We describe here the second Spanish patient whit mutation in CHKB gene, who despite having the same mutation, presented an atypical aspect: congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy progressing to a combined neuropathic and myopathic phenotype (mixed pattern). PMID:26006750

  15. A molecular analysis of neurogenic placode and cranial sensory ganglion development in the shark, Scyliorhinus canicula

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, P.; McCole, R. B.; Baker, C. V. H.

    2016-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the evolution of the genetic control of the development of cranial neurogenic placodes and cranial sensory ganglia in vertebrates, we cloned and analysed the spatiotemporal expression pattern of six transcription factor genes in a chondrichthyan, the shark Scyliorhinus canicula (lesser-spotted dogfish/catshark). As in other vertebrates, NeuroD is expressed in all cranial sensory ganglia. We show that Pax3 is expressed in the profundal placode and ganglion, strongly supporting homology between the separate profundal ganglion of elasmobranchs and basal actinopterygians and the ophthalmic trigeminal placode-derived neurons of the fused amniote trigeminal ganglion. We show that Pax2 is a conserved pan-gnathostome marker for epibranchial and otic placodes, and confirm that Phox2b is a conserved pan-gnathostome marker for epibranchial placode-derived neurons. We identify Eya4 as a novel marker for the lateral line system throughout its development, expressed in lateral line placodes, sensory ridges and migrating primordia, neuromasts and electroreceptors. We also identify Tbx3 as a specific marker for lateral line ganglia in shark embryos. We use the spatiotemporal expression pattern of these genes to characterise the development of neurogenic placodes and cranial sensory ganglia in the dogfish, with a focus on the epibranchial and lateral line placodes. Our findings demonstrate the evolutionary conservation across all gnathostomes of at least some of the transcription factor networks underlying neurogenic placode development. PMID:17234174

  16. Neurogenic pruritus: an unrecognised problem? A retrospective case series of treatment by acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Stellon, Anthony

    2002-12-01

    Intractable localised segmental pruritus without a rash has been reported over the years under various titles depending on the area of the body affected. Notalgia paresthetica and brachioradial pruritus are the two terms used for what is believed to be a form of neuropathy. The clinical observations reported here suggest that other localised cases of pruritus exist that share common clinical features, and the term neurogenic pruritus is suggested to encompass these under one clinical condition. Acupuncture has been used to treat skin conditions, of which pruritus is one symptom. This retrospective study looked at the symptomatic relief of neurogenic pruritus in 16 patients using acupuncture. In 12 cases the affected dermatomes of the body were innervated by cervical spinal nerves, seven innervated by dorsal spinal nerves and four innervated by the lumbar spinal nerves. Seven patients had areas affected by two different regions of the spine. Restricted neck or back movements were noted in patients as were areas of paravertebral spasm or tenderness of the muscles. Total resolution of symptoms as judged by VAS occurred in 75% of patients. Relapse occurred in 37% of patients within 1-12 months following treatment. Acupuncture appeared to be effective in alleviating the distressing symptom of itching in patients presenting with neurogenic pruritus. PMID:12512793

  17. Changes of neural markers expression during late neurogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Khosravizadeh, Zahra; Bahramian, Hamid; Kazemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different studies have been done to obtain sufficient number of neural cells for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, spinal cord, and traumatic brain injury because neural stem cells are limited in central nerves system. Recently, several studies have shown that adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are the appropriate source of multipotent stem cells. Furthermore, these cells are found in large quantities. The aim of this study was an assessment of proliferation and potential of neurogenic differentiation of ADSCs with passing time. Materials and Methods: Neurosphere formation was used for neural induction in isolated human ADSCs (hADSCs). The rate of proliferation was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and potential of neural differentiation of induced hADSCs was evaluated by immunocytochemical and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis after 10 and 14 days post-induction. Results: The rate of proliferation of induced hADSCs increased after 14 days while the expression of nestin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and microtubule-associated protein 2 was decreased with passing time during neurogenic differentiation. Conclusion: These findings showed that the proliferation of induced cells increased with passing time, but in early neurogenic differentiation of hADSCs, neural expression was higher than late of differentiation. Thus, using of induced cells in early differentiation may be suggested for in vivo application. PMID:26605238

  18. Effect of sertraline on proliferation and neurogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Jahromi, Maliheh; Amirpour, Nushin; Khosravizadeh, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antidepressant drugs are commonly employed for anxiety and mood disorders. Sertraline is extensively used as antidepressant in clinic. In addition, adipose tissue represents an abundant and accessible source of adult stem cells with the ability to differentiate in to multiple lineages. Therefore, human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) may be useful for autologous transplantation. Materials and Methods: In the present study, we assessed the effect of antidepressant drug Sertraline on the proliferation and neurogenic differentiation of hADSCs using MTT assay and immunofluorescence technique respectively. Results: MTT assay analysis showed that 0.5 μM Sertraline significantly increased the proliferation rate of hADSCs induced cells (P < 0.05), while immunofluorescent staining indicated that Sertraline treatment during neurogenic differentiation could be decreased the percentage of glial fibrillary acidic protein and Nestin-positive cells, but did not significantly effect on the percentage of MAP2 positive cells. Conclusion: Overall, our data show that Sertraline can be promoting proliferation rate during neurogenic differentiation of hADSCs after 6 days post-induction, while Sertraline inhibits gliogenesis of induced hADSCs. PMID:24800186

  19. Neurogenic Shock Immediately following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okuda, Shinya; Haku, Takamitsu; Maeda, Kazuya; Maeno, Takafumi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and that appeared to have been caused by the vasovagal reflex after dural injury and incarceration of the cauda equina. Case Report We present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following PLIF. One patient had bradycardia, and the other developed cardiac arrest just after closing the surgical incision and opening the drainage tube. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately, and the patients recovered successfully, but they showed severe motor loss after awakening. The results of laboratory data, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, computed tomography, and echocardiography ruled out pulmonary embolism, hemorrhagic shock, and cardiogenic shock. Although the reasons for the postoperative shock were obscure, reoperation was performed to explore the cause of paralysis. At reoperation, a cerebrospinal fluid collection and the incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets through a small dural tear were observed. The incarcerated cauda equina rootlets were reduced, and the dural defect was closed. In both cases, the reoperation was uneventful. From the intraoperative findings at reoperation, it was thought that the pathology was neurogenic shock via the vasovagal reflex. Conclusion Incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets following the accidental dural tear by suction drainage caused a sudden decrease of cerebrospinal fluid pressure and traction of the cauda equina, which may have led to the vasovagal reflex. PMID:26225287

  20. [Classification and natural history of bladder tumors].

    PubMed

    Allory, Yves

    2014-12-01

    Urinary bladder tumors are mainly of urothelial type. Classifications include stage and grade to provide with the required prognostic factors and help to select the most adequate treatment. Though somatic mutations in bladder tumors are known, their used for targeted therapy are restricted to clinical trials. Upper urinary tract tumors are classified as urinary bladder tumor at histological level, but tumor staging is specified according to calyx, renal pelvis or ureter location; in young patients with upper urinary tract tumor, a Lynch syndrome should be eliminated. PMID:25668829

  1. Urinary Bladder Leiomyosarcoma: Primary Surgical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Slaoui, Hakim; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Validire, Pierre; Barret, Eric; Rozet, François; Galiano, Marc; Cathelineau, Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Cases of bladder leiomyosarcoma represent 0.1% of all nonurothelial tumors. We present a case report of a 73-year-old man who underwent a radical cystoprostatectomy for a high-grade bladder leiomyosarcoma with an ileal diversion. The patient recovered uneventfully and no surgical margins were verified in final pathology. Early follow-up at 3 months shows no signs of computed tomography recurrence and adequate adaptation to ileal diversion. Although bladder sarcomas were once thought to have a grim prognosis, recent studies suggest that adequate surgical treatment is able to achieve optimal cancer control outcomes. PMID:26839792

  2. Urinary Bladder Leiomyosarcoma: Primary Surgical Treatment☆

    PubMed Central

    Slaoui, Hakim; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Validire, Pierre; Barret, Eric; Rozet, François; Galiano, Marc; Cathelineau, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Cases of bladder leiomyosarcoma represent 0.1% of all nonurothelial tumors. We present a case report of a 73-year-old man who underwent a radical cystoprostatectomy for a high-grade bladder leiomyosarcoma with an ileal diversion. The patient recovered uneventfully and no surgical margins were verified in final pathology. Early follow-up at 3 months shows no signs of computed tomography recurrence and adequate adaptation to ileal diversion. Although bladder sarcomas were once thought to have a grim prognosis, recent studies suggest that adequate surgical treatment is able to achieve optimal cancer control outcomes. PMID:26839792

  3. Bladder reconstruction: The past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    EL-TAJI, OMAR M.S.; KHATTAK, ALTAF Q.; HUSSAIN, SYED A.

    2015-01-01

    Ileal conduit urinary diversion is the gold standard treatment for urinary tract reconstruction following cystectomy. This procedure uses gastrointestinal segments for bladder augmentation, a technique that is often associated with significant complications. The substantial progression in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine over the previous two decades has resulted in the development of techniques that may lead to the construction of functional de novo urinary bladder substitutes. The present review identifies and discusses the complications associated with current treatment options post-cystectomy. The current techniques, achievements and perspectives of the use of biomaterials and stem cells in the field of urinary bladder reconstruction are also reviewed. PMID:26170968

  4. Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Elsa; Pereira, José; Corbusier, Florence; Demeter, Pieter; Bali, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder in a 31 year-old woman. She presented at the emergency room with low abdominal pain and urinary symptoms. Abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed and revealed asymmetric thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Cystoscopy with urinary cytology revealed a benign nature of the process. The patient underwent partial cystectomy and the pathologic examination of the specimen revealed an inflammatory pseudotumor. We reviewed the clinical, imaging and pathological features of the inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder and discussed its differential diagnosis. PMID:25926919

  5. Potter sequence complicated by congenital cystic lesion of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yoshifusa; Mizuno, Katsumi; Horie, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Yamaoka, Akiko; Mizutani, Kayo; Takeuchi, Toshio; Iikura, Yoji

    2002-07-01

    We report a case complicated by oligohydramnios, pulmonary hypoplasia, bilateral renal dysplasia, and cystic lesion of the bladder. He was clinically compatible with Potter sequence. Congenital cystic bladder is the rarest form of the bladder. We can find no report of Potter sequence complicated by cystic lesion of the bladder. This lesion was similar to multilocular bladder. The diagnosis was confirmed it by autopsy, magnetic resonance imaging, and urography after his death. PMID:12152145

  6. Advanced glycation end products facilitate bacterial adherence in urinary tract infection in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Ahmet; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Izgi, Kenan; Bicer, Fuat; Hultgren, Scott J.; Liu, Guiming; Daneshgari, Firouz

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic individuals have increased susceptibility to urinary tract infection (UTI), a common, painful condition. During diabetes mellitus, non-enzymatic reactions between reducing sugars and protein amine groups result in excessive production of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that accumulate in tissues. Since bacteria adhere to cell surfaces by binding to carbohydrates, we hypothesized that adherence of bacteria to the bladder in diabetics may be enhanced by accumulation of AGEs on urothelial surface proteins. Using a murine model of UTI, we observed increased adherence of type 1 fimbriated uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to the bladder in streptozotocin-induced diabetic female mice compared with age-matched controls, along with increased concentrations of two common AGEs in superficial urothelial cells from diabetic bladders. Several lectins with different specificities exhibited increased binding to urothelial homogenates from diabetic mice compared with controls, and two of those lectins also bound to AGEs. Furthermore, mannose-binding type 1 fimbriae isolated from UPEC bound to different AGEs, and UPEC adherence to the bladder in diabetic mice, were inhibited by pretreatment of mice with the AGE inhibitor pyridoxamine. These results strongly suggest a role for urothelial AGE accumulation in increased bacterial adherence during UTI in diabetes. PMID:25986378

  7. Urodynamic assessment of bladder and urethral function among men with lower urinary tract symptoms after radical prostatectomy: A comparison between men with and without urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hansol; Kim, Ki Bom; Lee, Sangchul; Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Myong; Cho, Sung Yong; Oh, Seung-June

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared bladder and urethral functions following radical prostatectomy (RP) between men with and without urinary incontinence (UI), using a large-scale database from SNU-experts-of-urodynamics-leading (SEOUL) Study Group. Materials and Methods Since July 2004, we have prospectively collected data on urodynamics from 303 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) following RP at three affiliated hospitals of SEOUL Study Group. After excluding 35 patients with neurogenic abnormality, pelvic irradiation after surgery, or a history of surgery on the lower urinary tract, 268 men were evaluated. We compared the urodynamic findings between men who had LUTS with UI (postprostatectomy incontinence [PPI] group) and those who had LUTS without UI (non-PPI group). Results The mean age at an urodynamic study was 68.2 years. Overall, a reduced bladder compliance (≤20 mL/cmH2O) was shown in 27.2% of patients; and 31.3% patients had idiopathic detrusor overactivity. The patients in the PPI group were older (p=0.001) at an urodynamic study and had a lower maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP) (p<0.001), as compared with those in the non-PPI group. Bladder capacity and detrusor pressure during voiding were also significantly lower in the PPI group. In the logistic regression, only MUCP and maximum cystometric capacity were identified as the related factor with the presence of PPI. Conclusions In our study, significant number of patients with LUTS following RP showed a reduced bladder compliance and detrusor overactivity. PPI is associated with both impairment of the urethral closuring mechanism and bladder storage dysfunction. PMID:26682020

  8. Bladder filling variation during radiation treatment of prostate cancer: Can the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner and biofeedback optimize bladder filling?

    SciTech Connect

    Stam, Marcel R. . E-mail: m.stam@rther.umcn.nl; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Vight, Lisette P. van der; Kaanders, Johannes; Visser, Andries G.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner in achieving a better reproducible bladder filling during irradiation of pelvic tumors, specifically prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: First, the accuracy of the bladder ultrasound scanner relative to computed tomography was validated in a group of 26 patients. Next, daily bladder volume variation was evaluated in a group of 18 patients. Another 16 patients participated in a biofeedback protocol, aiming at a more constant bladder volume. The last objective was to study correlations between prostate motion and bladder filling, by using electronic portal imaging device data on implanted gold markers. Results: A strong correlation between bladder scanner volume and computed tomography volume (r = 0.95) was found. Daily bladder volume variation was very high (1 Sd = 47.2%). Bladder filling and daily variation did not significantly differ between the control and the feedback group (47.2% and 40.1%, respectively). Furthermore, no linear correlations between bladder volume variation and prostate motion were found. Conclusions: This study shows large variations in daily bladder volume. The use of a biofeedback protocol yields little reduction in bladder volume variation. Even so, the bladder scanner is an easy to use and accurate tool to register these variations.

  9. Hepatogenic and neurogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from abattoir-derived bovine fetuses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are multipotent progenitor cells characterized by their ability to both self-renew and differentiate into tissues of mesodermal origin. The plasticity or transdifferentiation potential of MSC is not limited to mesodermal derivatives, since under appropriate cell culture conditions and stimulation by bioactive factors, MSC have also been differentiated into endodermal (hepatocytes) and neuroectodermal (neurons) cells. The potential of MSC for hepatogenic and neurogenic differentiation has been well documented in different animal models; however, few reports are currently available on large animal models. In the present study we sought to characterize the hepatogenic and neurogenic differentiation and multipotent potential of bovine MSC (bMSC) isolated from bone marrow (BM) of abattoir-derived fetuses. Results Plastic-adherent bMSC isolated from fetal BM maintained a fibroblast-like morphology under monolayer culture conditions. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that bMSC populations were positive for MSC markers CD29 and CD73 and pluripotency markers OCT4 and NANOG; whereas, were negative for hematopoietic markers CD34 and CD45. Levels of mRNA of hepatic genes α-fetoprotein (AFP), albumin (ALB), alpha1 antitrypsin (α1AT), connexin 32 (CNX32), tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) and cytochrome P450 (CYP3A4) were up-regulated in bMSC during a 28-Day period of hepatogenic differentiation. Functional analyses in differentiated bMSC cultures evidenced an increase (P < 0.05) in albumin and urea production and glycogen storage. bMSC cultured under neurogenic conditions expressed NESTIN and MAP2 proteins at 24 h of culture; whereas, at 144 h also expressed TRKA and PrPC. Levels of MAP2 and TRKA mRNA were up-regulated at the end of the differentiation period. Conversely, bMSC expressed lower levels of NANOG mRNA during both hepatogenic and neurogenic differentiation processes. Conclusion The expression patterns of linage

  10. Bladder cancer in the aluminium industry.

    PubMed

    Thériault, G; Tremblay, C; Cordier, S; Gingras, S

    1984-04-28

    The incidence of bladder cancer is unusually high in aluminium smelter workers. An epidemiological study showed that workers in Soderberg potrooms are at highest risk for bladder cancer, the adjusted overall relative risk being 2.39 (1.34-4.28). Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, of which benz(a)pyrene (BaP) served as an indicator, seems to be the causative factor. The relative risk was evaluated at 12.38 for workers with 20 or more equivalent years of BaP exposure. Cigarette smoking contributed significantly to the appearance of bladder cancer in the population studied. There is a synergistic effect when cigarette smoking and BaP exposure are combined; the numbers in our population are too small to determine whether this interaction effect is multiplicative or additive. It is concluded that bladder cancer is associated with aluminium smelting (primarily with the Soderberg process). PMID:6143877

  11. Recent advances in management of bladder overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Wein, Alan J

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacologic therapies, primarily antimuscarinic agents, have been the mainstay of treatment for overactive bladder. These drugs produce variable efficacy, a moderate rate of side effects, and rare occurrences of cure. The search for newer and better formulations and derivatives of this class of medication as well as novel therapies is ongoing and primarily fueled by the high prevalence of overactive bladder and the tremendous number of health care dollars spent on current therapy. Surgical options for overactive bladder have evolved slowly and are currently reserved for medical treatment failures and drug intolerance. This article will highlight the new drugs and therapies brought into clinical use for the treatment of overactive bladder over the last few years as well as a promising new agent in the advanced stages of development. PMID:20948824

  12. Aging changes in the kidneys and bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... and urethra. Muscle changes and changes in the reproductive system can affect bladder control. Aging Changes and Their ... the bones, muscles, and joints In the male reproductive system In the female reproductive system In organs, tissues, ...

  13. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumour of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Tarplin, Sarah; Osterberg, E Charles; Robinson, Brian D; Herman, Michael P; Rosoff, James S

    2014-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman presented with a long history of pelvic pain and urinary urgency. Prior workup by her primary care doctor had been negative. The patient's gynaecologist ultimately referred her to a urologist following an ultrasound that revealed a possible bladder mass. MRI of the abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a 4 cm soft tissue lesion arising from the bladder. Cystoscopy showed an atypical mass on the anterior bladder wall, and pathological examination of the TURBT (transurethral resection of the bladder tumour) specimen revealed a perivascular epithelioid cell tumour (PEComa) with involvement of the detrusor muscle. The patient underwent a robotically assisted laparoscopic partial cystectomy. Final pathology confirmed a PEComa with negative margins. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and is doing well following surgery. A surveillance cystoscopy at 6 months showed no evidence of recurrence. This case underscores the variability of clinical presentation of PEComas while proposing an appropriate method of surgical management. PMID:25123573

  14. Bladder Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bladder Diseases URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bladderdiseases.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  15. [Intradiverticular bladder tumors. Three case reports].

    PubMed

    Fekak, H; Rabu, R; Joual, A; Bennani, S; Moufid, K; Sarf, S; Debragh, A; el Mimu, M; Benjelloun, S

    2002-01-01

    The bladder tumours in vesical diverticula is rare, and the poor prognosis, because it was often with early invasion. We reported three cases of bladder tumours in vesical diverticula, with delay of diagnosis two, eight and twelve months respectively. The radiology exploration suspected the diagnosis and the histology biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of primary transitional cell carcinoma in two cases: PTa GI and T2 GII, and in an other case it was a invasive epidermoid carcinoma. The first patient was dead by urethral resection of the bladder tumour. The second required a cytoprototectomy and the last patient. The treatment consisted of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We insisted of the particularity diagnosis, histology and therapeutic for bladder tumour in vesical diverticula and the early diagnosis in order to have a good prognosis. PMID:11859579

  16. Bladder Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bladder Diseases URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/bladderdiseases.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  17. Recovery After Stroke: Bladder and Bowel Function

    MedlinePlus

    ... urination.  Urinary retention – trouble urinating or not completely emptying your bladder.  Constipation – being unable to have a ... or a specialist in medical problems of the stomach, intestines and associated organs.  Many nurses are trained ...

  18. Inflammatory pseudosarcoma (pseudotumor) of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Gugliada, K; Nardi, P M; Borenstein, M S; Torno, R B

    1991-04-01

    Inflammatory pseudosarcoma of the bladder is a rare benign entity that cannot be differentiated from malignant tumor at radiologic examination alone. Only pathologic examination can enable a definitive diagnosis. The authors report two cases of these benign tumors in patients with no history of bladder disease or trauma; the tumors were large, demonstrated invasion into local tissues, and recurred in one case after incomplete transurethral resection. PMID:2006306

  19. Holmium laser lithotripsy of bladder calculi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaghler, Marc A.; Poon, Michael W.

    1998-07-01

    Although the overall incidence of bladder calculi has been decreasing, it is still a significant disease affecting adults and children. Prior treatment options have included open cystolitholapaxy, blind lithotripsy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, and visual lithotripsy with ultrasonic or electrohydraulic probes. The holmium laser has been found to be extremely effective in the treatment of upper tract calculi. This technology has also been applied to the treatment of bladder calculi. We report our experience with the holmium laser in the treatment of bladder calculi. Twenty- five patients over a year and a half had their bladder calculi treated with the Holmium laser. This study was retrospective in nature. Patient demographics, stone burden, and intraoperative and post-operative complications were noted. The mean stone burden was 31 mm with a range of 10 to 60 mm. Preoperative diagnosis was made with either an ultrasound, plain film of the abdomen or intravenous pyelogram. Cystoscopy was then performed to confirm the presence and determine the size of the stone. The patients were then taken to the operating room and given a regional or general anesthetic. A rigid cystoscope was placed into the bladder and the bladder stone was then vaporized using the holmium laser. Remaining fragments were washed out. Adjunctive procedures were performed on 10 patients. These included transurethral resection of the prostate, transurethral incision of the prostate, optic internal urethrotomy, and incision of ureteroceles. No major complications occurred and all patients were rendered stone free. We conclude that the Holmium laser is an effective and safe modality for the treatment of bladder calculi. It was able to vaporize all bladder calculi and provides a single modality of treating other associated genitourinary pathology.

  20. Effects of mild bladder outlet obstruction on rabbit bladder structure and function.

    PubMed

    Kuo, H C

    1995-09-01

    Mild bladder outlet obstruction was created in 42 New Zealand white rabbits by placing a 5-mm inner diameter polyethylene tube around the urethra. Periods of obstruction lasted for 1 day (7 rabbits), 3 days (7 rabbits), 1 week (7 rabbits), 2 weeks (6 rabbits), 4 weeks (7 rabbits), 6 weeks (4 rabbits) and 8 weeks (4 rabbits). Whole bladder functional study was performed in control (5 rabbits) and the obstructed bladders. The obstructed bladders increased in weight two-to threefold. There was no significant difference in bladder weight after different periods of obstruction. Electric stimulation showed a diminished response after 3 days of obstruction. Pharmacologic stimulation with 500 microM carbachol revealed a decreased response after obstruction, but intravesical pressure returned to the control level at 6 and 8 weeks of obstruction. However, the bladder weight and the expelling function of the obstructed bladders remained the same as on day 1 of obstruction. Histologic study of control and obstructed bladders revealed that: 1) dense submucosal fibrous tissue developed after 3 days of obstruction, 2) detrusor muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia were noted with intermuscular collagenous fiber deposition after 2 weeks of obstruction, 3) trabeculation of the bladder wall with hyperplasia of muscular bundles was noted after 2 weeks of obstruction, 4) acute edematous and inflammatory reaction were apparent after 3 days and 1 week of obstruction, but resolved later and 5) degenerative changes of muscular cells were noted at 8 weeks of obstruction. The results show that despite apparent morphologic changes after outlet obstruction, no significant difference was observed in bladder expelling between short-term and long-term infravesical mild outlet obstruction. The bladder contractile apparatus appears to have a compensatory ability after mild outlet obstruction. PMID:8696170

  1. Laparoscopic Hernia Repair and Bladder Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bhoyrul, Sunil; Mulvihill, Sean J.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Bladder injury is a complication of laparoscopic surgery with a reported incidence in the general surgery literature of 0.5% and in the gynecology literature of 2%. We describe how to recognize and treat the injury and how to avoid the problem. Case Reports: We report two cases of bladder injury repaired with a General Surgical Interventions (GSI) trocar and a balloon device used for laparoscopic extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repair. One patient had a prior appendectomy; the other had a prior midline incision from a suprapubic prostatectomy. We repaired the bladder injury, and the patients made a good recovery. Conclusion: When using the obturator and balloon device, it is important to stay anterior to the preperitoneal space and bladder. Prior lower abdominal surgery can be considered a relative contraindication to extraperitoneal laparoscopic hernia repair. Signs of gas in the Foley bag or hematuria should alert the surgeon to a bladder injury. A one- or two-layer repair of the bladder injury can be performed either laparoscopically or openly and is recommended for a visible injury. Mesh repair of the hernia can be completed provided no evidence exists of urinary tract infection. A Foley catheter is placed until healing occurs. PMID:11394432

  2. Diabetic Nephropathy without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Revuelta, Katia; Méndez Abreu, Angel A.; Gerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Stanescu, Ramona-Ionela; Martínez Marín, Maria Isabel; Pérez Fernández, Elia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy without diabetes (DNND), previously known as idiopathic nodular glomerulosclerosis, is an uncommon entity and thus rarely suspected; diagnosis is histological once diabetes is discarded. In this study we describe two new cases of DNND and review the literature. We analyzed all the individualized data of previous publications except one series of attached data. DNND appears to be favored by recognized cardiovascular risk factors. However, in contrast with diabetes, apparently no factor alone has been demonstrated to be sufficient to develop DNND. Other factors not considered as genetic and environmental factors could play a role or interact. The most plausible hypothesis for the occurrence of DNND would be a special form of atherosclerotic or metabolic glomerulopathy than can occur with or without diabetes. The clinical spectrum of cardiovascular risk factors and histological findings support this theory, with hypertension as one of the characteristic clinical features. PMID:26239683

  3. Current and future drugs for treatment of MS-associated bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Andersson, K-E

    2014-07-01

    A majority of patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) will develop lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) during the course of the disease. Even if antimuscarinic (anticholinergic) treatment is currently the mainstay of conservative treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), including MS-induced NDO, extensive data regarding their effectiveness and safeness are lacking. When antimuscarinic medications fail to prove efficacious, a further option is intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxin A. In several studies, more than half (and up 76%) of the patients treated with onabotulinumtoxin A experienced significant improvement in symptoms or even achieved complete continence. Cannabis extracts have shown some promise but has still not gained wide acceptance as an effective treatment. Over the last few years many new disease-modifying drugs that have been approved and introduced for treatment of MS. These drugs may have effects not only on the MS disease process, but also on the disease symptoms, including LUTS. However, MS is not primarily a bladder disease and treatment of the underlying pathophysiology should be the main goal of treatment. Since most of the urology drugs are targeting LUTS, these drugs should be regarded as "adds on" to treatments modifying the underlying disorder. Considering that most of these drugs have not been studied specifically with respect to efficacy on LUTS, and since they are not without significant side effects, it seems important that if and when they are going to be used for treatment of bladder symptoms should be a joint decision between the neurologist and urologist taking care of the patient. PMID:24954496

  4. Impaired cytokine expression, neutrophil infiltration and bacterial clearance in response to urinary tract infection in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Ahmet; Altuntas, Cengiz Z.; Bicer, Fuat; Izgi, Kenan; Hultgren, Scott J.; Liu, Guiming; Daneshgari, Firouz

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic patients have increased susceptibility to infections, and urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common type in women with diabetes mellitus. Knowledge of bacterial clearance effectiveness following UTI in diabetics is sparse. In this study, the effects of diabetes on bacterial clearance efficiency and components of the innate immune system in response to UTI in a murine model were investigated. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic and control female C57BL/6J mice were infected with uropathogenic Escherichia coli, and bacterial load, expression of chemokines, and neutrophil infiltration in the bladder over time were investigated. Expression levels of histone deacetylases were also measured to address a potential mechanism underlying the phenotype. Bacterial clearance during UTI was significantly prolonged in diabetic mice relative to controls. Neutrophil infiltration in bladder tissue and urine, and both mRNA and protein expression of chemokines MIP-2, KC, MCP-1 and IL-6 in bladder tissue were diminished at early time points after infection in diabetic mice relative to controls. In addition, mRNA levels of histone deacetylases 1–5 were increased in diabetic mice. This is the first study to show an association of impaired bacterial clearance in diabetic mice with suppression of UTI-induced chemokine expression and neutrophil infiltration in the bladder. PMID:25663347

  5. Impaired cytokine expression, neutrophil infiltration and bacterial clearance in response to urinary tract infection in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ahmet; Altuntas, Cengiz Z; Bicer, Fuat; Izgi, Kenan; Hultgren, Scott J; Liu, Guiming; Daneshgari, Firouz

    2015-04-01

    Diabetic patients have increased susceptibility to infections, and urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common type in women with diabetes mellitus. Knowledge of bacterial clearance effectiveness following UTI in diabetics is sparse. In this study, the effects of diabetes on bacterial clearance efficiency and components of the innate immune system in response to UTI in a murine model were investigated. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic and control female C57BL/6J mice were infected with uropathogenic Escherichia coli, and bacterial load, expression of chemokines, and neutrophil infiltration in the bladder over time were investigated. Expression levels of histone deacetylases were also measured to address a potential mechanism underlying the phenotype. Bacterial clearance during UTI was significantly prolonged in diabetic mice relative to controls. Neutrophil infiltration in bladder tissue and urine, and both mRNA and protein expression of chemokines MIP-2, KC, MCP-1 and IL-6 in bladder tissue were diminished at early time points after infection in diabetic mice relative to controls. In addition, mRNA levels of histone deacetylases 1-5 were increased in diabetic mice. This is the first study to show an association of impaired bacterial clearance in diabetic mice with suppression of UTI-induced chemokine expression and neutrophil infiltration in the bladder. PMID:25663347

  6. Endoscopic Management of Free Lying Migratory Orthopedic Screw in Bladder.

    PubMed

    P, Puvai Murugan; M, Ramalingam

    2016-09-01

    75-year old gentleman presented with acute urinary retention. He had met with road traffic accident 15 years back and sustained pelvic fracture and bladder rupture, underwent bladder repair and open reduction and internal fixation of pubic symphsis. Imaging studies showed the free lying encrusted orthopedic screw in the bladder, which was removed per urethra using nephroscope. Migratory foreign bodies in the urinary bladder are rare. However there is a possibility of longstanding foreign bodies in adjacent structures to erode and perforate into the bladder. Inside the bladder these foreign bodies act as nidus for stone formation. PMID:27500087

  7. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends on your type of diabetes, ... pills. Combination pills contain two kinds of diabetes medicine in one tablet. Some people take pills and ...

  8. Gestational diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar ( diabetes ) that starts or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. ... woman's blood. You are at greater risk for gestational diabetes if you: Are older than 25 when you ...

  9. Monogenic Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... some children with monogenic diabetes are misdiagnosed with type 1 diabetes and are given insulin. When correctly diagnosed, some of these children can take diabetes pills instead, with even better ...

  10. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  11. Diabetic Dermopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Diabetic Dermopathy Information for adults A A A Brown, ... on the legs are typical in long-standing diabetics. Overview Diabetic dermopathy, also known as shin spots ...

  12. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder caused ...

  13. Radiation absorbed dose to bladder walls from positron emitters in the bladder content

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.F.; Chen, C.T.

    1987-11-01

    A method to calculate absorbed doses at depths in the walls of a static spherical bladder from a positron emitter in the bladder content has been developed. The beta ray dose component is calculated for a spherical model by employing the solutions to the integration of Loevinger and Bochkarev point source functions over line segments and a line segment source array technique. The gamma ray dose is determined using the specific gamma ray constant. As an example, absorbed radiation doses to the bladder walls from F-18 in the bladder content are presented for static spherical bladder models having radii of 2.0 and 3.5 cm, respectively. Experiments with ultra-thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) were performed to verify the results of the calculations. Good agreement between TLD measurements and calculations was obtained.

  14. Work Capacity of the Bladder During Voiding: A Novel Method to Evaluate Bladder Contractile Function and Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning; Man, Li-Bo; He, Feng; Huang, Guang-Lin; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Xiao-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Work in voiding (WIV) of the bladder may be used to evaluate bladder status throughout urination rather than at a single time point. Few studies, however, have assessed WIV owing to the complexity of its calculations. We have developed a method of calculating work capacity of the bladder while voiding and analyzed the associations of bladder work parameters with bladder contractile function and bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). Methods: The study retrospectively evaluated 160 men and 23 women, aged >40 years and with a detrusor pressure at maximal flow rate (Pdet Qmax) of ≥40 cmH2O in men, who underwent urodynamic testing. The bladder power integration method was used to calculate WIV; WIV per second (WIV/t) and WIV per liter of urine voided (WIV/v) were also calculated. In men, the relationships between these work capacity parameters and Pdet Qmax and Abrams-Griffiths (AG) number were determined using linear-by-linear association tests, and relationships between work capacity parameters and BOO grade were investigated using Spearman's association test. Results: The mean WIV was 1.15 ± 0.78 J and 1.30 ± 0.88 J, mean WIV/t was 22.95 ± 14.45 mW and 23.78 ± 17.02 mW, and mean WIV/v was 5.59 ± 2.32 J/L and 2.83 ± 1.87 J/L in men and women, respectively. In men, WIV/v showed significant positive associations with Pdet Qmax (r = 0.845, P = 0.000), AG number (r = 0.814, P = 0.000), and Schafer class (r = 0.726, P = 0.000). Conversely, WIV and WIV/t showed no associations with Pdet Qmax or AG number. In patients with BOO (Schafer class > II), WIV/v correlated positively with increasing BOO grade. Conclusions: WIV can be calculated from simple urodynamic parameters using the bladder power integration method. WIV/v may be a marker of BOO grade, and the bladder contractile function can be evaluated by WIV and WIV/t. PMID:26668148

  15. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Magnotta, F.

    1998-08-25

    A lightweight, low permeability liner is described for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using tori spherical or near tori spherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film sealed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life. 19 figs.

  16. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Myers, Blake; Magnotta, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

  17. Chemoimmunotherapy of murine bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Stogdill, B J; Lamm, D L; Livingston, R B

    1981-11-01

    The lethality of invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) has prompted a search for effective, minimally toxic, adjuvant therapy. Such agents were evaluated in a murine bladder cancer (MBT2) model which parallels the clinical disease. One hundred C3H/He mice were inoculated i.d. with 2.5 x 10(4) viable MBT2 tumor cells and randomized to receive either normal saline (control), cis-Platinum (CPT), cyclophosphamide (CY), methotrexate (MTX), BCG, (CY + MTX), or (CY + MTX + BCG). Chemotherapy was given intraperitoneally weekly starting on day 7 after inoculation. Immunotherapy was given intralesionally on days 1 and 10 only. All mice were treated for 5 weeks followed by 5 weeks of observation. At 5 weeks, tumors of mice receiving cyclophosphamide alone or either of the combinations of therapy were smaller (P less than 0.01) than tumors of controls or other single agents alone. Each regimen increased survival, but only the combination regimen increase survival significantly (P less than 0.01). In the doses and schedule used in this model. Combination chemotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy significantly delay tumor growth and increase duration of survival (P less than 0.01) when compared with controls or single agent groups. PMID:7298287

  18. Somatic modulation of spinal reflex bladder activity mediated by nociceptive bladder afferent nerve fibers in cats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiying; Rogers, Marc J; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2014-09-15

    The goal of the present study was to determine if supraspinal pathways are necessary for inhibition of bladder reflex activity induced by activation of somatic afferents in the pudendal or tibial nerve. Cats anesthetized with α-chloralose were studied after acute spinal cord transection at the thoracic T9/T10 level. Dilute (0.25%) acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder, activate nociceptive afferent C-fibers, and trigger spinal reflex bladder contractions (amplitude: 19.3 ± 2.9 cmH2O). Hexamethonium (a ganglionic blocker, intravenously) significantly (P < 0.01) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions to 8.5 ± 1.9 cmH2O. Injection of lidocaine (2%, 1-2 ml) into the sacral spinal cord or transection of the sacral spinal roots and spinal cord further reduced the contraction amplitude to 4.2 ± 1.3 cmH2O. Pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) at frequencies of 0.5-5 Hz and 40 Hz but not at 10-20 Hz inhibited reflex bladder contractions, whereas tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) failed to inhibit bladder contractions at all tested frequencies (0.5-40 Hz). These results indicate that PNS inhibition of nociceptive afferent C-fiber-mediated spinal reflex bladder contractions can occur at the spinal level in the absence of supraspinal pathways, but TNS inhibition requires supraspinal pathways. In addition, this study shows, for the first time, that after acute spinal cord transection reflex bladder contractions can be triggered by activating nociceptive bladder afferent C-fibers using acetic acid irritation. Understanding the sites of action for PNS or TNS inhibition is important for the clinical application of pudendal or tibial neuromodulation to treat bladder dysfunctions. PMID:25056352

  19. Role of opioid receptors in neurogenic dural vasodilation and sensitization of trigeminal neurones in anaesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, D J; Shepheard, S L; Cook, D A; Hargreaves, R J; Hill, R G; Cumberbatch, M J

    2001-01-01

    Migraine headache is thought to be caused by a distension of meningeal blood vessels, the activation of trigeminal sensory neurones and the the development of a central sensitization within the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). It has been proposed that clinically effective 5-HT1B/1D agonists act peripherally to inhibit the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and neurogenic dural vasodilation, and to attenuate nociceptive neurotransmission within the TNC. Since opioids are also effective anti-migraine agents the present studies investigated the role of opioids within the trigemino-vascular system in anaesthetised rats. Electrical stimulation of the dura mater evoked neurogenic dural vasodilation which was significantly inhibited by morphine (1 mg kg−1) the selective μ-opioid agonist DAGO (10 μg kg−1) and the mixed agonist/antagonist butorphanol (1 mg kg−1) but not by the κ- and δ-opioid agonists (±) U50488H (100 μg kg−1) and DPDPE (1 mg kg−1). Morphine had no effect on CGRP-evoked dural vasodilation. In electrophysiological studies morphine (1 – 10 mg kg−1) significantly attenuated brainstem neuronal activity in response to electrical stimulation of the dura by 65% at 10 mg kg−1. Morphine (3 mg kg−1) also inhibited the TNC neuronal sensitization following CGRP-evoked dilation. The present studies have demonstrated that opioids block the nociceptive neurotransmission within the trigeminal nucleus caudalis and in addition inhibit neurogenic dural vasodilation via an action on μ-opioid receptors located on trigeminal sensory fibres innervating dural blood vessels. These peripheral and central actions are similar to those of the ‘triptan' 5-HT1B/1D agonists and could account for the anti-migraine actions of opioids. PMID:11454653

  20. Double-blind, randomized, controlled, crossover trial of pregabalin for neurogenic claudication

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Maria E.; Rast, Shirley A.; McDermott, Michael P.; Gewandter, Jennifer S.; Chowdhry, Amit K.; Czerniecka, Kate; Pilcher, Webster H.; Simon, Lee S.; Dworkin, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To test the effects of pregabalin on the induction of neurogenic claudication. Methods: This study was a randomized, double-blind, active placebo-controlled, 2-period, crossover trial. Twenty-nine subjects were randomized to receive pregabalin followed by active placebo (i.e., diphenhydramine) or active placebo followed by pregabalin. Each treatment period lasted 10 days, including a 2-step titration. Periods were separated by a 10-day washout period, including a 3-day taper phase after the first period. The primary outcome variable was the time to first moderate pain symptom (Numeric Rating Scale score ≥4) during a 15-minute treadmill test (Tfirst). Secondary outcome measures included pain intensity at rest, pain intensity at the end of the treadmill test, distance walked, and validated self-report measures of pain and functional limitation including the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, modified Brief Pain Inventory–Short Form, Oswestry Disability Index, and Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire. Results: No significant difference was found between pregabalin and active placebo for the time to first moderate pain symptom (difference in median Tfirst = −1.08 [95% confidence interval −2.25 to 0.08], p = 0.61). In addition, none of the secondary outcome measures of pain or functional limitation were significantly improved by pregabalin compared with active placebo. Conclusions: Pregabalin was not more effective than active placebo in reducing painful symptoms or functional limitations in patients with neurogenic claudication associated with lumbar spinal stenosis. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with neurogenic claudication, compared with diphenhydramine, pregabalin does not increase the time to moderate pain during a treadmill test. PMID:25503625

  1. Environmental Enrichment, Age, and PPARα Interact to Regulate Proliferation in Neurogenic Niches

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Lorefice, Clara; Decara, Juan; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligands have been shown to modulate recovery after brain insults such as ischemia and irradiation by enhancing neurogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the genetic deletion of PPARα receptors on the proliferative rate of neural precursor cells (NPC) in the adult brain. The study was performed in aged Pparα−/− mice exposed to nutritional (treats) and environmental (games) enrichments for 20 days. We performed immunohistochemical analyses of cells containing the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) and the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (Dcx+) in the main neurogenic zones of the adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ), and/or hypothalamus. Results indicated a reduction in the number of BrdU+ cells in the neurogenic zones analyzed as well as Dcx+ cells in the SGZ during aging (2, 6, and 18 months). Pparα deficiency alleviated the age-related reduction of NPC proliferation (BrdU+ cells) in the SVZ of the 18-months-old mice. While no genotype effect on NPC proliferation was detected in the SGZ during aging, an accentuated reduction in the number of Dcx+ cells was observed in the SGZ of the 6-months-old Pparα−/− mice. Exposing the 18-months-old mice to nutritional and environmental enrichments reversed the Pparα−/−-induced impairment of NPC proliferation in the neurogenic zones analyzed. The enriched environment did not modify the number of SGZ Dcx+ cells in the 18 months old Pparα−/− mice. These results identify PPARα receptors as a potential target to counteract the naturally observed decline in adult NPC proliferation associated with aging and impoverished environments. PMID:27013951

  2. Furosemide modifies heart hypertrophy and glycosaminoglycan myocardium content in a rat model of neurogenic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pourzitaki, Chryssa; Tsaousi, Georgia; Manthou, Maria Eleni; Karakiulakis, Georgios; Kouvelas, Dimitrios; Papakonstantinou, Eleni

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for atherogenesis and heart hypertrophy, both of which are associated with specific morphological and functional changes of the myocardium. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are complex molecules involved both in tissue morphology and function. In the present study, we investigated the effects of neurogenic hypertension and subsequent antihypertensive treatment with furosemide, on heart hypertrophy and the content of GAGs in the myocardium. Neurogenic hypertension was achieved in male Wistar rats by bilateral aortic denervation (bAD). At days 2, 7 and 15 after surgery, animals were sacrificed and the hearts were dissected away, weighted, and homogenized. Total GAGs were assessed by measuring the uronic acid content colorimetrically and individual GAGs were isolated and characterized by enzymatic treatment, with GAG-degrading enzymes, using electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gradient gels and cellulose acetate membranes. In bAD-animals blood pressure, blood pressure lability, heart rate and heart weight were significantly increased 15 days postoperatively. These effects were prevented by treatment with furosemide. Major GAGs identified in the heart were chondroitin sulphates, heparin (H), heparan sulphate (HS) and hyaluronic acid. The content of uronic and the relative content of H and HS in the heart in bAD animals significantly decreased from day 2 to day 15 postoperatively. Furosemide prevented the bAD induced decrease in GAG content. Considering that H and HS are potent inhibitors of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, our results indicate that heart hypertrophy induced by neurogenic hypertension may be associated with decreases in the relative content of heparin and heparan sulphate in the heart. PMID:27221775

  3. Quantifiable diagnosis of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through network analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is strongly based on the histological characterization of muscle biopsies. However, this morphological analysis is mostly a subjective process and difficult to quantify. We have tested if network science can provide a novel framework to extract useful information from muscle biopsies, developing a novel method that analyzes muscle samples in an objective, automated, fast and precise manner. Methods Our database consisted of 102 muscle biopsy images from 70 individuals (including controls, patients with neurogenic atrophies and patients with muscular dystrophies). We used this to develop a new method, Neuromuscular DIseases Computerized Image Analysis (NDICIA), that uses network science analysis to capture the defining signature of muscle biopsy images. NDICIA characterizes muscle tissues by representing each image as a network, with fibers serving as nodes and fiber contacts as links. Results After a ‘training’ phase with control and pathological biopsies, NDICIA was able to quantify the degree of pathology of each sample. We validated our method by comparing NDICIA quantification of the severity of muscular dystrophies with a pathologist’s evaluation of the degree of pathology, resulting in a strong correlation (R = 0.900, P <0.00001). Importantly, our approach can be used to quantify new images without the need for prior ‘training’. Therefore, we show that network science analysis captures the useful information contained in muscle biopsies, helping the diagnosis of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies. Conclusions Our novel network analysis approach will serve as a valuable tool for assessing the etiology of muscular dystrophies or neurogenic atrophies, and has the potential to quantify treatment outcomes in preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:23514382

  4. Environmental Enrichment, Age, and PPARα Interact to Regulate Proliferation in Neurogenic Niches.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Lorefice, Clara; Decara, Juan; Pavón, Francisco J; Serrano, Antonia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligands have been shown to modulate recovery after brain insults such as ischemia and irradiation by enhancing neurogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the genetic deletion of PPARα receptors on the proliferative rate of neural precursor cells (NPC) in the adult brain. The study was performed in aged Pparα(-/-) mice exposed to nutritional (treats) and environmental (games) enrichments for 20 days. We performed immunohistochemical analyses of cells containing the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) and the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (Dcx+) in the main neurogenic zones of the adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ), and/or hypothalamus. Results indicated a reduction in the number of BrdU+ cells in the neurogenic zones analyzed as well as Dcx+ cells in the SGZ during aging (2, 6, and 18 months). Pparα deficiency alleviated the age-related reduction of NPC proliferation (BrdU+ cells) in the SVZ of the 18-months-old mice. While no genotype effect on NPC proliferation was detected in the SGZ during aging, an accentuated reduction in the number of Dcx+ cells was observed in the SGZ of the 6-months-old Pparα(-/-) mice. Exposing the 18-months-old mice to nutritional and environmental enrichments reversed the Pparα(-/-)-induced impairment of NPC proliferation in the neurogenic zones analyzed. The enriched environment did not modify the number of SGZ Dcx+ cells in the 18 months old Pparα(-/-) mice. These results identify PPARα receptors as a potential target to counteract the naturally observed decline in adult NPC proliferation associated with aging and impoverished environments. PMID:27013951

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells expressing neural antigens instruct a neurogenic cell fate on neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Croft, Adam P; Przyborski, Stefan A

    2009-04-01

    The neurogenic response to injury in the postnatal brain is limited and insufficient for restoration of function. Recent evidence suggests that transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into the injured brain is associated with improved functional recovery, mediated in part through amplification in the endogenous neurogenic response to injury. In the current study we investigate the interactions between bone marrow-derived MSCs and embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) plus their differentiated progeny using an in vitro co-culture system. Two populations of MSCs were used, MSCs induced to express neural antigens (nestin+, Tuj-1+, GFAP+) and neural antigen negative MSCs. Following co-culture of induced MSCs with differentiating NSC/progenitor cells a significant increase in Tuj-1+ neurons was detected compared to co-cultures of non-induced MSCs in which an increase in astrocyte (GFAP+) differentiation was observed. The effect was mediated by soluble interactions between the two cell populations and was independent of any effect on cell death and proliferation. Induced and non-induced MSCs also promoted the survival of Tuj-1+ cell progeny in long-term cultures and both promoted axonal growth, an effect also seen in differentiating neuroblastoma cells. Therefore, MSCs provide instructive signals that are able to direct the differentiation of NSCs and promote axonal development in neuronal progeny. The data indicates that the nature of MSC derived signals is dependent not only on their microenvironment but on the developmental status of the MSCs. Pre-manipulation of MSCs prior to transplantation in vivo may be an effective means of enhancing the endogenous neurogenic response to injury. PMID:19159625

  6. Tumor markers of bladder cancer: the schistosomal bladder tumors versus non-schistosomal bladder tumors

    PubMed Central

    Abdulamir, Ahmed S; Hafidh, Rand R; Kadhim, Haider S; Abubakar, Fatimah

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to comparatively elucidate the underlying molecular pathways and clinicopathological criteria in schistosomal bladder tumor (SBT) versus non-schistosomal bladder tumor (NSBT). Methods This study explored the role of p53, p16, bcl-2, ki-67, c-myc, Rb and EGFR, by using Immunohistochemistry assay, in 45 SBT and 39 NSBT patients in comparison with 16 schistosomal chronic cystitis (SC), 28 non-schistosomal chronic cystitis (NSC), and 20 normal control (CTL) subjects. The studied markers in SBT and NSBT were correlated with different clinicopathological criteria namely, tumor histopathology, grading, invasiveness, stage, and presentation of the disease. Results SBT was associated with high grade invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) while NSBT was associated with lower grade less invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). The expression of p53, bcl-2, c-myc, and EGFR was higher in SBT than in NSBT while Rb was higher in NSBT than in SBT. However, p16 and ki-67 were not different between SBT and NSBT. The profile of molecular markers in SC was similar to NSC except for EGFR which was higher in SC than in NSC. Both SC and NSC showed higher level of p53, bcl-2, ki-67, and EGFR than in CTL group while p16, Rb, and c-myc were not different. p53 was associated with high grade SCC in both SBT and NSBT. Bcl-2 was associated with high grade invasive tumors in SBT and NSBT. P16 was associated with low grade, late stage, and recurrent SBT and high grade, invasive, late stage, and recurrent NSBT. Rb was associated with SCC in SBT, invasive tumors in NSBT, and late stage and recurrent presentation in both SBT and NSBT. C-myc was associated with high grade, invasive, and late stage SBT and SCC, high grade, invasive, and late stage NSBT. EGFR was associated with invasive SCC in SBT and invasive, high grade, and late stage TCC in NSBT. ki-67 was associated with invasive SBT and high grade late stage NSBT. Conclusion SBT and NSBT showed distinct

  7. Back Pain, Neurogenic Symptoms, and Physical Function in Relation to Spondylolisthesis among Elderly Men

    PubMed Central

    Denard, Patrick J.; Holton, Kathleen F.; Miller, Jessica; Fink, Howard A.; Kado, Deborah M.; Marshall, Lynn M.; Yoo, Jung U.

    2010-01-01

    Background Context Degenerative spondylolisthesis is a presumed cause of back pain. Previous studies of spondylolisthesis and back pain included only women or combined results for men and women. Comparisons of the frequency of back pain, neurogenic symptoms, and functional limitations specifically among elderly men with and without spondylolisthesis are needed. Purpose To determine associations of prevalent spondylolisthesis with back pain symptoms, neurogenic symptoms, and functional limitations among elderly men. Study Design/ Setting: Cross-sectional epidemiologic study conducted within the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) cohort. The MrOS cohort is comprised of 5,995 community dwelling men ages ≥65 years who were recruited at 6 US academic medical centers. Extensive self-reported data and lumbar spine radiographs were obtained for all MrOS participants at baseline. Patient Sample For this study, 300 men were selected at random specifically for the evaluation of spondylolisthesis on the baseline spine radiographs. Outcome Measures Standardized questionnaires were used to assess self-reported back pain, leg pain (radiculopathy), lower extremity numbness (paresthesias) and lower extremity weakness occurring in the past 12 months, and to ascertain current difficulty with activities of daily living. Methods In the present study, radiographic spondylolisthesis was classified as forward slip of ≥5%. Prevalence of back pain, neurogenic symptoms and difficulty with activities of daily living were compared between men with and without spondylolisthesis using chisquare or Fisher’s exact tests. Results Spondylolisthesis was present among 92 (31%) men. Among men with and without spondylolisthesis, back pain (63% vs. 67%, p=0.46) and moderate/severe back pain (41% vs. 38%, p=0.76) were reported with similar frequency. Men with spondylolisthesis more often reported radiculopathy (33% vs. 22%, p=0.06), paresthesias (18% vs. 11%, p= 0.10) and weakness (18% vs. 9%, p=0

  8. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) Channel and Neurogenic Inflammation in Pathogenesis of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hang; Li, ShuZhuang

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, airway obstruction, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and it affects 300 million people worldwide. However, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie asthma remains limited. Recent studies have suggested that transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), one of the transient receptor potential cation channels, may be involved in airway inflammation in asthma. The present review discusses the relationship between TRPA1 and neurogenic inflammation in asthma, hoping to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:27539812

  9. The novel anti-migraine agent rizatriptan inhibits neurogenic dural vasodilation and extravasation.

    PubMed

    Williamson, D J; Shepheard, S L; Hill, R G; Hargreaves, R J

    1997-06-01

    These studies in anaesthetised rats showed, using intravital microscopy, that the novel anti-migraine agent, rizatriptan, significantly reduced electrically stimulated dural vasodilation but had no effect on increases in dural vessel diameter produced by exogenous substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Rizatriptan also significantly inhibited dural plasma protein extravasation produced by high intensity electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion. We suggest that rizatriptan inhibits the release of sensory neuropeptides from perivascular trigeminal nerves to prevent neurogenic vasodilation and extravasation in the dura mater. These prejunctional inhibitory effects may be involved in the anti-migraine action of rizatriptan. PMID:9203569

  10. Blockade of hyperalgesia and neurogenic oedema by topical application of nitroglycerin.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, S H; Lorenzetti, B B; Faccioli, L H

    1992-07-01

    Surprisingly, a single topical application of a nitroglycerin (NTG) gel in humans has been shown to cause analgesia and to reduce oedema in thrombophlebitis. In the present investigation, we showed that the NTG gel reduces prostaglandin E2-induced hyperalgesia and blocks neurogenic inflammation induced in rat skin by antidromic electrical stimulation of the saphenous nerve. These results offer an explanation for the effects of topical application of NTG observed in thrombophlebitis, which may be common to other cutaneous pathologies. The data also support the development of nitrates the effects of which are restricted to the site of application. PMID:1425939

  11. Multipotent neurogenic fate of mesenchymal stem cell is determined by Cdk4-mediated hypophosphorylation of Smad-STAT3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Janet; Kang, Dongrim; Lee, Do-Hyeong; Kim, Yoon-Ja; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Kim, Dong-Ik; Lee, Chang-Woo; Lee, Kyung-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) in complex with a corresponding cyclin plays a pivotal role in neurogenic differentiation. In particular, Cdk4 activity acts as a signaling switch to direct human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to neural transdifferentiation. However, the molecular evidence of how Cdk4 activity converts MSCs to neurogenic lineage remains unknown. Here, we found that Cdk4 inhibition in human MSCs enriches the populations of neural stem and progenitor pools rather than differentiated glial and neuronal cell pools. Interestingly, Cdk4 inhibition directly inactivates Smads and subsequently STAT3 signaling by hypophosphorylation, and both Cdk4 and Smads levels are linked during the processes of neural transdifferentiation and differentiation. In summary, our results provide novel molecular evidence in which Cdk4 inhibition leads to directing human MSCs to a multipotent neurogenic fate by inactivating Smads-STAT3 signaling. PMID:27192561

  12. Diabetes and kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic nephropathy; Nephropathy - diabetic; Diabetic glomerulosclerosis; Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease ... Diabetic kidney disease is a major cause of sickness and death in people with diabetes. It can ...

  13. Type 2 diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disease. Alternative Names Noninsulin-dependent diabetes; Diabetes - type 2; Adult-onset diabetes Images Diabetes and exercise Diabetic emergency supplies Starchy foods Low blood sugar symptoms ...

  14. Beneficial effects of urine-derived stem cells on fibrosis and apoptosis of myocardial, glomerular and bladder cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xingyou; Zhang, Teng; Liu, Qian; Zhu, Jingzhen; Zhao, Jiang; Li, Jia; Sun, Bishao; Ding, Guolin; Hu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Zhenxing; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Longkun

    2016-05-15

    Urine-derived stem cells (USCs) are isolated from voided urine and display high proliferative activity and multiple differentiation potentials. The applicability of USCs in the treatment of bladder dysfunction and in cell-based urological tissue engineering has been demonstrated. Whether they could serve as a potential stem cell source for the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM) and its complications has not been investigated. Here, we report the repairing and protective effects of USCs on pancreatic islets, the myocardium, the renal glomerulus and the bladder detrusor in diabetic rat models. Type 2 diabetic rat models were induced by means of a high fat diet and intraperitoneal injection with streptozotocin. USCs isolated from voided urine were administered via tail veins. The functional changes of pancreatic islets, left ventricle, glomerulus and bladder micturition were assessed by means of insulin tolerance tests, echocardiography, urine biochemical indexes and cystometry. The histologic changes were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining and TUNEL staining. Treatment with USCs significantly alleviated the histological destruction and functional decline. Although the USC treatment did not decrease fasting blood glucose to a significantly different level, the fibrosis and apoptosis of the myocardium, glomerulus and detrusor were significantly inhibited. This study indicates that administration of USCs may be useful for the treatment of the complications of DM. PMID:26952874

  15. [Secondary diabetes].

    PubMed

    Nomiyama, Takashi; Yanase, Toshihiko

    2015-12-01

    Secondary diabetes is diabetes that results as a consequence of another medication, endocrine disease or hereditary disease. Secondary diabetes is very broad and diverted category among diabetes. Clinically, pancreatic diabetes is one of the most popular secondary diabetes, which provides insulin deficiency following pancreatic diseases, such as pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Among endocrine diseases, Cushing's syndrome and acromegaly are typical endocrine disorders causing secondary diabetes. They mainly induce insulin resistance in early stage, however, insulin deficiency is also observed in advanced stage. Steroid is the most popular drug-induced secondary diabetes. Importantly, not only oral administered steroid but also cutaneous and inhalation steroid could induce hyperglycemia. Major hereditary diabetes are MODY and mitochondrial diabetes. Concerning secondary diabetes, careful medical examination is required. PMID:26666145

  16. Overactive bladder - 18 years - Part I.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Castano, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; Lopez, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals - including both genders and almost all age groups. The possibility of establishing the diagnosis just from clinical data made patients' access to specialized care easier. Physiotherapy resources have been incorporated into the urological daily practice. A number of more selective antimuscarinic drugs with consequent lower adverse event rates were released. Recently, a new class of oral drugs, beta-adrenergic agonists has become part of the armamentarium for Overactive Bladder. Botulinum toxin injections in the bladder and sacral neuromodulation are routine modalities of treatment for refractory cases. During the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder, a comprehensive review of the literature related to the evolution of the concept, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management was conducted. This text corresponds to the first part of the review Overactive Bladder 18-years. PMID:27176184

  17. 5-Hydroxytryptamine-induced bladder hyperactivity via the 5-HT2A receptor in partial bladder outlet obstruction in rats.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takumi; Kasahara, Ken-ichi; Tomita, Ken-ichi; Ikegaki, Ichiro; Kuriyama, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the effects of partial bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) on the function and gene expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor subtypes in rat bladder. Isometric contractions of the isolated bladders from sham-operated control and BOO rats were examined. The contractile responses to 5-HT were significantly increased in BOO rat bladder strips, while the responses to KCl, carbachol, or phenylephrine were not different from the control. The 5-HT-induced hypercontraction in BOO rat bladder strips was inhibited by ketanserin, a 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist. The contractile responses to 5-HT in bladder strips were not affected by urothelium removal from the intact bladder. The gene expression of 5-HT receptor subtypes in the bladders was analyzed by RT-PCR. The mRNA expression of the 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2B), 5-HT(2C), 5-HT(4), and 5-HT(7) receptors was detected in both the control and BOO rat bladders. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed there was a significant increase of 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA in the BOO rat bladder compared with the control bladder. On the other hand, the gene expression of the 5-HT(4) receptor was not changed in the BOO rat bladder. These results suggest that the increased contractile responses to 5-HT in BOO rat bladder may be partly caused by 5-HT(2A) receptor upregulation in the detrusor smooth muscles. PMID:23344575

  18. Erosion of repaired exstrophy bladder by a large vesical calculus

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Abdul; Sinha, Arvind; Bisht, Mayank; Gola, Neelkamal

    2011-01-01

    Formation of stones in repaired exstrophy bladder is common; however, erosion of stone through the repaired bladder and anterior abdominal wall has never been reported. We report one such case of erosion after three years of repair. PMID:21897570

  19. Autophagy and urothelial carcinoma of the bladder: A review

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekar, Thenappan

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder (bladder cancer) remains high. While other solid organ malignancies have seen significant improvement in morbidity and mortality, there has been little change in bladder cancer mortality in the past few decades. The mortality is mainly driven by muscle invasive bladder cancer, but the cancer burden remains high even in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer due to high recurrence rates and risk of progression. While apoptosis deregulation has long been an established pathway for cancer progression, nonapoptotic pathways have gained prominence of late. Recent research in the role of autophagy in other malignancies, including its role in treatment resistance, has led to greater interest in the role of autophagy in bladder cancer. Herein, we summarize the literature regarding the role of autophagy in bladder cancer progression and treatment resistance. We address it by systematically reviewing treatment modalities for nonmuscle invasive and muscle invasive bladder cancer. PMID:27326411

  20. FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158937.html FDA Approves New Drug to Treat Bladder Cancer Tecentriq boosted survival ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug to treat bladder cancer was approved by ...

  1. Agent Orange Linked to Bladder Cancer, Thyroid Problems, Panel Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... 157716.html Agent Orange Linked to Bladder Cancer, Thyroid Problems, Panel Says Herbicide was used during Vietnam ... the herbicide Agent Orange and bladder cancer and thyroid problems among U.S. military personnel exposed to the ...

  2. Whole bladder wall photodynamic therapy for refractory carcinoma in situ of the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Uchibayashi, T.; Koshida, K.; Kunimi, K.; Hisazumi, H.

    1995-01-01

    Whole bladder wall photodynamic therapy (PDT) with haematoporphyrin derivative and an argon dye laser as a light source was performed on 34 patients with refractory carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the bladder. Twenty-five of the 34 patients (73.5%) had achieved a complete response (CR) at 3 months after the treatment. The median follow-up for these CR patients is 49.3 months. Although recurrence within 2 years of follow-up occurred in 14 (77.8%) of the 18 CR patients followed to that point, since most of the recurrent tumours were superficial and low-grade papillary tumours, transurethral resection of the bladder tumours appeared to be sufficient. Of the total of 34 patients, ten were alive with bladder intact with a mean follow-up period of 64.0 months. Skin photosensitivity and transient decrease in bladder capacity were noted as adverse reactions, caused by retention of haematoporphyrin derivative in the skin and normal portion of the bladder. These data suggest that PDT can be an effective form of therapy for CIS of the bladder. PMID:7880749

  3. Types of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Types of Diabetes Learn about Diabetes You can learn how to take care of ... to take care of your diabetes. What is diabetes? Diabetes is when your blood glucose, also called ...

  4. Neural reconstruction methods of restoring bladder function

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Amaya, Sandra M.; Barbe, Mary F.; de Groat, William C.; Brown, Justin M.; Tuite, Gerald F.; Corcos, Jacques; Fecho, Susan B.; Braverman, Alan S.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    During the past century, diverse studies have focused on the development of surgical strategies to restore function of a decentralized bladder after spinal cord or spinal root injury via repair of the original roots or by transferring new axonal sources. The techniques included end-to-end sacral root repairs, transfer of roots from other spinal segments to sacral roots, transfer of intercostal nerves to sacral roots, transfer of various somatic nerves to the pelvic or pudendal nerve, direct reinnervation of the detrusor muscle, or creation of an artificial reflex pathway between the skin and the bladder via the central nervous system. All of these surgical techniques have demonstrated specific strengths and limitations. The findings made to date already indicate appropriate patient populations for each procedure, but a comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of each technique to restore urinary function after bladder decentralization is required to guide future research and potential clinical application. PMID:25666987

  5. A flowgraph model for bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Superficial bladder cancer has been the subject of numerous studies for many years, but the evolution of the disease still remains not well understood. After the tumor has been surgically removed, it may reappear at a similar level of malignancy or progress to a higher level. The process may be reasonably modeled by means of a Markov process. However, in order to more completely model the evolution of the disease, this approach is insufficient. The semi-Markov framework allows a more realistic approach, but calculations become frequently intractable. In this context, flowgraph models provide an efficient approach to successfully manage the evolution of superficial bladder carcinoma. Our aim is to test this methodology in this particular case. Results We have built a successful model for a simple but representative case. Conclusion The flowgraph approach is suitable for modeling of superficial bladder cancer. PMID:25080066

  6. Bladder cancer: smoking, beverages and artificial sweeteners

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Robert W.; Jain, Meera G.

    1974-01-01

    A matched patient-control study of bladder cancer examined the relationship of the disease to occupation, smoking and intake of tea, coffee, cola, alcohol and artificial sweeteners. There was no association of disease with occupation for these patients. Heavy smoking gave relative risks of 6.37 and 4.36 for men and women respectively; there was evidence of a dose-response relationship. Tea and coffee intake did not increase the risk of disease nor did prolonged use of artificial sweeteners. Alcohol and cola intake increased the relative risk of bladder cancer among male smokers. There is some suggestion that smoking interacts with both alcohol and cola intake in the production of bladder cancer. PMID:4429932

  7. [Recent advances in bladder urothelial carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Pignot, Géraldine; le Goux, Constance; Bieche, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    Bladder cancer is the sixth cause of cancer mortality in France and prognosis of muscle-invasive tumors remains poor due to lack of effective treatments. Recent advances in molecular biology applied to tumors and results of recent genome-wide studies have brought a important impact on the understanding of bladder carcinogenesis. Main molecular alterations concern FGFR3, TP53 and HER2, and it is now possible to distinguish three subgroups of tumors according to molecular profile. This paper proposes a review of different genetic and epigenetic alterations in bladder cancer, their potential role as theranostic markers in clinical oncology and new targeted therapies according to the concept of personalized medicine. PMID:26617115

  8. Diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Clara; Karrouz, Wassila; Douillard, Claire; Do Cao, Christine; Cortet, Christine; Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine

    2013-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is characterized by hypotonic polyuria greater than 3 liters/24 hours in adults and persisting even during water deprivation. It is mostly due to a defect in arginin-vasopressin (AVP) synthesis (central DI); other causes are: AVP resistance (nephrogenic DI), abnormal thirst regulation (primary polydipsia) or early destruction of AVP by placental enzymes (gestational DI). A thorough medical history is warranted to investigate nocturnal persistence of polyuria (night waking being a good sign of its organic nature) to specify the onset and duration of the trouble, the medication use and the potential hereditary nature of the disorder. The next step is based on weight and blood pressure measurements and especially the quantification of beverages and diuresis over a 24-hour cycle. Assessment of signs of dehydration, bladder distention, pituitary hormone hyper- or hyposecretion, tumor chiasmatic syndrome, granulomatosis and cancer is required. The diagnosis is based on biological assessment, pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and results of a desmopressin test. In severe forms of DI, urine osmolality remains below 250 mOsmol/kg and serum sodium greater than 145 mmol/L. In partial forms of DI (urine osmolality between 250 and 750), the water deprivation test demonstrating the incapacity to obtain a maximal urine concentration is valuable, together with vasopressin or copeptin measurement. The pituitary MRI is done to investigate the lack of spontaneous hyperintensity signal in the posterior pituitary, which marks the absence of AVP and supports the diagnosis of central DI rather than primary polydipsia (although not absolute); it can also recognize lesions of the pituitary gland or pituitary stalk. Acquired central DI of sudden onset should suggest a craniopharyngioma or germinoma if it occurs before the age of 30 years, and metastasis after the age of 50 years. Fifteen to 20% of head trauma lead to hypopituitarism, including DI in 2% of

  9. Electrically evoked neuropeptide release and neurogenic inflammation differ between rat and human skin.

    PubMed

    Sauerstein, K; Klede, M; Hilliges, M; Schmelz, M

    2000-12-15

    Protein extravasation and vasodilatation can be induced by neuropeptides released from nociceptive afferents (neurogenic inflammation). We measured electrically evoked neuropeptide release and concomitant protein extravasation in human and rat skin using intradermal microdialysis. Plasmapheresis capillaries were inserted intradermally at a length of 1.5 cm in the volar forearm of human subjects or abdominal skin of rats. Capillaries were perfused with Ringer solution at a flow rate of 2.5 or 1.6 microl min(-1). After a baseline period of 60 min capillaries were stimulated electrically (1 Hz, 80 mA, 0.5 ms or 4 Hz, 30 mA, 0.5 ms) for 30 min using a surface electrode directly above the capillaries and a stainless-steel wire inserted in the capillaries. Total protein concentration was assessed photometrically and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In rat skin, electrical stimulation increased CGRP and total protein concentration in the dialysate. SP measurements showed a larger variance but only for the 1 Hz stimulation was the increased release significant. In human skin, electrical stimulation provoked a large flare reaction and at a frequency of 4 Hz both CGRP and SP concentrations increased significantly. In spite of the large flare reactions no protein extravasation was induced, which suggests major species differences. It will be of interest to investigate whether the lack of neurogenic protein extravasation is also valid under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:11118507

  10. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    PubMed Central

    Coste, Cécile; Neirinckx, Virginie; Gothot, André; Wislet, Sabine; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs). Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system. PMID:26136659

  11. Electrically evoked neuropeptide release and neurogenic inflammation differ between rat and human skin

    PubMed Central

    Sauerstein, Katja; Klede, Monika; Hilliges, Marita; Schmelz, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Protein extravasation and vasodilatation can be induced by neuropeptides released from nociceptive afferents (neurogenic inflammation). We measured electrically evoked neuropeptide release and concomitant protein extravasation in human and rat skin using intradermal microdialysis. Plasmapheresis capillaries were inserted intradermally at a length of 1.5 cm in the volar forearm of human subjects or abdominal skin of rats. Capillaries were perfused with Ringer solution at a flow rate of 2.5 or 1.6 μl min−1. After a baseline period of 60 min capillaries were stimulated electrically (1 Hz, 80 mA, 0.5 ms or 4 Hz, 30 mA, 0.5 ms) for 30 min using a surface electrode directly above the capillaries and a stainless-steel wire inserted in the capillaries. Total protein concentration was assessed photometrically and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In rat skin, electrical stimulation increased CGRP and total protein concentration in the dialysate. SP measurements showed a larger variance but only for the 1 Hz stimulation was the increased release significant. In human skin, electrical stimulation provoked a large flare reaction and at a frequency of 4 Hz both CGRP and SP concentrations increased significantly. In spite of the large flare reactions no protein extravasation was induced, which suggests major species differences. It will be of interest to investigate whether the lack of neurogenic protein extravasation is also valid under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:11118507

  12. Recent Advances in Neurogenic Small Molecules as Innovative Treatments for Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Arozamena, Clara; Martí-Marí, Olaia; Estrada, Martín; de la Fuente Revenga, Mario; Rodríguez-Franco, María Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system of adult mammals has long been considered as a complex static structure unable to undergo any regenerative process to refurbish its dead nodes. This dogma was challenged by Altman in the 1960s and neuron self-renewal has been demonstrated ever since in many species, including humans. Aging, neurodegenerative, and some mental diseases are associated with an exponential decrease in brain neurogenesis. Therefore, the controlled pharmacological stimulation of the endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs) niches might counteract the neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other pathologies, opening an exciting new therapeutic avenue. In the last years, druggable molecular targets and signalling pathways involved in neurogenic processes have been identified, and as a consequence, different drug types have been developed and tested in neuronal plasticity. This review focuses on recent advances in neurogenic agents acting at serotonin and/or melatonin systems, Wnt/β-catenin pathway, sigma receptors, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2). PMID:27598108

  13. Neurogenic airway inflammation induced by repeated intra-esophageal instillation of HCl in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunli; Chen, Ruchong; Luo, Wei; Lai, Kefang; Zhong, Nanshan

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate if repeated intra-esophageal acid administrations may induce neurogenic inflammation in the airways and nodose ganglion in a guinea pig model. Guinea pigs were sedated and perfused with 0.1 N HCl in the distal esophagus via a nasoesophageal catheter for 14 consecutive days. Substance P (SP), neurokinin A (NKA), neurokinin B (NKB), and calcitonin gene-related peptide concentration were measured by ELISA or radioimmunoassay. Neuropeptide expression in the airways and nodose ganglion was detected by immunohistochemistry and assessed semi-quantitatively. Inflammation was found in the trachea and bronchi. There was a threefold increase in substance P concentration in the trachea, main bronchi, and lung homogenate and a twofold increase in NKA and NKB concentration in the main bronchi, lung homogenate, and bronchial alveolus lavage fluid, respectively. The SP and NKA expressions in the airways and nodose ganglion were also significantly increased. Chronic intra-esophageal acid instillation induces significant neurogenic inflammation in the airways and nodose ganglion in the vagus nerve in guinea pigs. PMID:23225164

  14. Microneedle Electrode Array for Electrical Impedance Myography to Characterize Neurogenic Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Li, Yi; Liu, Mingsheng; Cui, Liying; Yu, Yude

    2016-05-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a noninvasive technique for neuromuscular assessment, wherein a low-intensity alternating current is applied to a muscle, and the consequent surface voltage patterns are evaluated. Commercial wet electrodes are most commonly used for EIM. However, these electrodes are not suitable for use on small muscles, as they do not effectively solve the problem of high electrode-skin contact impedance (ESCI) that negatively influences the quality of recorded biopotentials. To address this problem, we fabricated a novel microneedle electrode array (MEA) that consists of 124-µm-long microneedles. Compared to wet electrodes, the MEA could pierce through the outer skin surface in a painless and micro-invasive manner, and could thus effectively reduce ESCI. The MEA has excellent test-retest reproducibility, with intraclass correlation coefficients exceeding 0.920. When used in combination with EIM, the MEA differentiated the affected muscles from the unaffected muscles in patients with neurogenic myopathy, by using EIM parameters of reactance and phase (p = 0.023 and 0.008, respectively). Thus, the novel MEA is a practical and reusable device for EIM assessment in cases of neurogenic myopathy. However, further refinement of the electrode is needed to enhance the clinical application of the system. PMID:26407702

  15. Neurogenically mediated contractions of dog basilar artery involve the release of a thromboxane-like substance.

    PubMed

    Connor, H E; Edwards, L A; Feniuk, W

    1989-12-19

    Electrical field stimulation of dog isolated basilar artery produced neurogenically mediated contractions which were unaffected by phentolamine (1 microM), atropine (1 microM), ketanserin (1 microM) or methiothepin (0.1 microM). Responses were abolished by GR32191 (1-10 nM), BM 13.177 (0.1-10 microM) or flurbiprofen (0.5 microM) and markedly attenuated by dazoxiben (1-10 microM). Removal of the endothelium by Triton X-100-perfusion did not modify the magnitude of contractions to electrical stimulation and GR32191 still abolished the responses. GR32191 (1-10 nM) did not modify neurogenically mediated contraction of rabbit ear artery or potassium chloride-induced contraction of dog basilar artery. The results suggest that electrical field stimulation of dog basilar artery causes contractions which are mediated via a cyclo-oxygenase product with characteristics similar to thromboxane. This thromboxane-like substance is not endothelial in origin, nor released by contraction of the cerebrovascular smooth muscle per se and is therefore derived from a subendothelial, possibly neuronal, source. PMID:2483549

  16. Neurotoxic Methamphetamine Doses Increase LINE-1 Expression in the Neurogenic Zones of the Adult Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Moszczynska, Anna; Flack, Amanda; Qiu, Ping; Muotri, Alysson R.; Killinger, Bryan A.

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused psychostimulant with the potential to cause neurotoxicity in the striatum and hippocampus. Several epigenetic changes have been described after administration of METH; however, there are no data regarding the effects of METH on the activity of transposable elements in the adult brain. The present study demonstrates that systemic administration of neurotoxic METH doses increases the activity of Long INterspersed Element (LINE-1) in two neurogenic niches in the adult rat brain in a promoter hypomethylation-independent manner. Our study also demonstrates that neurotoxic METH triggers persistent decreases in LINE-1 expression and increases the LINE-1 levels within genomic DNA in the striatum and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, and that METH triggers LINE-1 retrotransposition in vitro. We also present indirect evidence for the involvement of glutamate (GLU) in LINE-1 activation. The results suggest that LINE-1 activation might occur in neurogenic areas in human METH users and might contribute to METH abuse-induced hippocampus-dependent memory deficits and impaired performance on several cognitive tasks mediated by the striatum. PMID:26463126

  17. The subependymal zone neurogenic niche: a beating heart in the centre of the brain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian brain is a remarkably complex organ comprising millions of neurons, glia and various other cell types. Its impressive cytoarchitecture led to the long standing belief that it is a structurally static organ and thus very sensitive to injury. However, an area of striking structural flexibility has been recently described at the centre of the brain. It is the subependymal zone of the lateral wall of the lateral ventricles. The subependymal zone—like a beating heart—continuously sends new cells to different areas of the brain: neurons to the olfactory bulbs and glial cells to the cortex and the corpus callosum. Interestingly, the generation and flow of cells changes in response to signals from anatomically remote areas of the brain or even from the external environment of the organism, therefore indicating that subependymal neurogenesis—as a system—is integrated in the overall homeostatic function of the brain. In this review, it will be attempted to describe the fundamental structural and functional characteristics of the subependymal neurogenic niche and to summarize the available evidence regarding its plasticity. Special focus is given on issues such as whether adult neural stem cells are activated after neurodegeneration, whether defects in neurogenesis contribute to neuropathological conditions and whether monitoring changes in neurogenic activity can have a diagnostic value. PMID:19773354

  18. p73 is required for ependymal cell maturation and neurogenic SVZ cytoarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cano, L; Fuertes-Alvarez, S; Robledinos-Anton, N; Bizy, A; Villena-Cortes, A; Fariñas, I; Marques, M M; Marin, Maria C

    2016-07-01

    The adult subventricular zone (SVZ) is a highly organized microenvironment established during the first postnatal days when radial glia cells begin to transform into type B-cells and ependymal cells, all of which will form regenerative units, pinwheels, along the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle. Here, we identify p73, a p53 homologue, as a critical factor controlling both cell-type specification and structural organization of the developing mouse SVZ. We describe that p73 deficiency halts the transition of the radial glia into ependymal cells, leading to the emergence of immature cells with abnormal identities in the ventricle and resulting in loss of the ventricular integrity. p73-deficient ependymal cells have noticeably impaired ciliogenesis and they fail to organize into pinwheels, disrupting SVZ niche structure and function. Therefore, p73 is essential for appropriate ependymal cell maturation and the establishment of the neurogenic niche architecture. Accordingly, lack of p73 results in impaired neurogenesis. Moreover, p73 is required for translational planar cell polarity establishment, since p73 deficiency results in profound defects in cilia organization in individual cells and in intercellular patch orientation. Thus, our data reveal a completely new function of p73, independent of p53, in the neurogenic architecture of the SVZ of rodent brain and in the establishment of ependymal planar cell polarity with important implications in neurogenesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 730-747, 2016. PMID:26482843

  19. Differential vascular permeability along the forebrain ventricular neurogenic niche in the adult murine brain.

    PubMed

    Colín-Castelán, Dannia; Ramírez-Santos, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis is influenced by blood-borne factors. In this context, greater or lesser vascular permeability along neurogenic niches would expose differentially neural stem cells (NSCs), transit amplifying cells (TACs), and neuroblasts to such factors. Here we evaluate endothelial cell morphology and vascular permeability along the forebrain neurogenic niche in the adult brain. Our results confirm that the subventricular zone (SVZ) contains highly permeable, discontinuous blood vessels, some of which allow the extravasation of molecules larger than those previously reported. In contrast, the rostral migratory stream (RMS) and the olfactory bulb core (OBc) display mostly impermeable, continuous blood vessels. These results imply that NSCs, TACs, and neuroblasts located within the SVZ are exposed more readily to blood-borne molecules, including those with very high molecular weights, than those positioned along the RMS and the OBc, subregions in which every stage of neurogenesis also takes place. These observations suggest that the existence of specialized vascular niches is not a precondition for neurogenesis to occur; specialized vascular beds might be essential for keeping high rates of proliferation and/or differential differentiation of neural precursors located at distinct domains. PMID:26492830

  20. Haemangiosarcoma of the urinary bladder in a dog.

    PubMed

    Liptak, J M; Dernell, W S; Withrow, S J

    2004-04-01

    Haemangiosarcoma of the urinary bladder is reported in a dog. The bladder mass was detected incidentally during physical examination. Partial cystectomy with unilateral ureteroneocystostomy were performed to remove the tumour en bloc. Necrosis of the urinary bladder was diagnosed 10 days postoperatively and the dog was euthanased. PMID:15149071

  1. Transurethral resection and degeneration of bladder tumour

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aihua; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Feng; Li, Weiwu; Lu, Honghai; Liu, Sikuan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Binghui

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluate the efficacy and safety of transurethral resection and degeneration of bladder tumour (TURD-Bt). Methods: In total, 56 patients with bladder tumour were treated by TURD-Bt. The results in these patients were compared with 32 patients treated by current transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TUR-Bt). Patients with or without disease progressive factors were respectively compared between the 2 groups. The factors included recurrent tumour, multiple tumours, tumour ≥3 cm in diameter, clinical stage T2, histological grade 3, adenocarcinoma, and ureteral obstruction or hydronephrosis. Results: Follow-up time was 48.55 ± 23.74 months in TURD-Bt group and 56.28 ± 17.61 months in the TUR-Bt group (p > 0.05). In patients without progressive factors, no tumour recurrence was found and overall survival was 14 (100%) in the TURD-Bt group; 3 (37.50%) patients had recurrence and overall survival was 5 (62.5%) in the TUR-Bt group. In patients with progressive factors, 8 (19.05%) patients had tumour recurrence, overall survival was 32 (76.19%) and cancer death was 3 (7.14%) in TURD-Bt group; 18 (75.00%) patients had tumour recurrence (p < 0.05), overall survival was 12 (50.00%) (p < 0.01) and cancer death was 8 (33.33%) (p < 0.05) in TUR-Bt group. No significant complication was found in TURD-Bt group. Conclusion: This study suggests that complete resection and degeneration of bladder tumour can be expected by TURD-Bt. The surgical procedure is safe and efficacious, and could be predictable and controllable before and during surgery. We would conclude that for bladder cancers without lymph node metastasis and distal metastasis, TURD-Bt could be performed to replace radical TUR-Bt and preserve the bladder. PMID:24475002

  2. Acetylation phenotypes in patients with bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bicho, M P; Breitenfeld, L; Carvalho, A A; Manso, C F

    1988-01-01

    The present study was done to evaluate the possible association of bladder carcinoma with the slow acetylator phenotype in a portuguese population. 49 patients with bladder carcinoma were compared to a normal control group of 84 individuals. No statistically significant association was detected. But when subdividing the group of slow acetylators it is found that in the subgroup with 12-36% acetylation there is a higher percentage of patients, which is statistically significant. These results are in agreement with two other studies, using populations of similar ethnic origin. PMID:3265609

  3. Calcifying nanoparticles associated encrusted urinary bladder cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Roque, Rod; Yasar, Uzay; Tomchin, Shayna B; Serrato, Jose M; Deem, Samuel G; Tierney, James P; Chang, Ho-Huang

    2008-01-01

    Encrusted cystitis is a subtype of chronic cystitis characterized by multiple calcifications in the form of plaques located in the interstitium of the urinary bladder mucosa and frequently associated with mucosal ulcers. It is a very rare disease of controversial etiology. Our transmission electron microscopy of the calcified plaques of encrusted cystitis has revealed that the smallest formed particles (elementary units) of these calcifications are electron-dense shells surrounding an electron lucent core, diagnostic of calcifying nanoparticles (previously called nanobacteria). We pioneer the notion that calcifying nanoparticles are the causative agents of encrusted urinary bladder cystitis. PMID:18990947

  4. Calcifying nanoparticles associated encrusted urinary bladder cystitis.

    PubMed

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Roque, Rod; Yasar, Uzay; Tomchin, Shayna B; Serrato, Jose M; Deem, Samuel G; Tierney, James P; Chang, Ho-Huang

    2008-01-01

    Encrusted cystitis is a subtype of chronic cystitis characterized by multiple calcifications in the form of plaques located in the interstitium of the urinary bladder mucosa and frequently associated with mucosal ulcers. It is a very rare disease of controversial etiology. Our transmission electron microscopy of the calcified plaques of encrusted cystitis has revealed that the smallest formed particles (elementary units) of these calcifications are electron-dense shells surrounding an electron lucent core, diagnostic of calcifying nanoparticles (previously called nanobacteria). We pioneer the notion that calcifying nanoparticles are the causative agents of encrusted urinary bladder cystitis. PMID:18990947

  5. Catheterisation: best practice in bladder care.

    PubMed

    Blease, Megan

    2016-03-01

    Bladder care is an integral part of caring for a woman in labour and the immediate postpartum period (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) 2014a). To ensure effective bladder care, the skill of urinary catheterisation is often undertaken by a midwife and can be required in a variety of different situations. Catheterisation is a necessary intervention whether it is intermittent, indwelling, short-term or, less often, long-term. This article addresses the current recommended guidance, highlights best practice measures and provides useful hints and tips to support catheter care. PMID:27044190

  6. Small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Bruno Nagel; Maron, Paulo Eduardo Goulart; Vedovato, Bruno César; Barrese, Tomas Zecchini; Fernandes, Roni de Carvalho; Perez, Marjo Deninson Cardenuto

    2015-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely aggressive and rare tumor. Even though small cell carcinoma most commonly arises from the lungs there are several reports of small cell carcinoma in extrapulmonary sites. Due to its low frequency there is no well-established management for this disease. We report the case of a 61 year-old man with small cell carcinoma of the bladder who underwent radical cystectomy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We also reviewed the literature for the optimal treatment strategy. PMID:25517085

  7. Perioperative management of classic bladder exstrophy

    PubMed Central

    Massanyi, Eric Z; Gearhart, John P; Kost-Byerly, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    The exstrophy-epispadias complex is a rare congenital malformation of the genitourinary system, abdominal wall muscles, and pelvic structures. Modern surgical repairs focus on reconstruction of the bladder and its adjacent structures, with the goal of achieving urinary continence, a satisfactory cosmetic result, and a high quality of life. Complex surgery in neonates and young children, as well as a prolonged postoperative course require close collaboration between surgeons, anesthesiologists, intensivists, pediatricians, and an experienced nursing staff. This article will review the spectrum of bladder exstrophy anomalies, the surgical repair, and the perioperative interdisciplinary management. PMID:24400236

  8. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) Improves the Diabetic Cytopathy (DCP) via Up-Regulation of CGRP and cAMP

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chaoran; Huang, Yi; Yu, Wen; Ling, Lin; Dai, Yutian; Wei, Zhongqing

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) in the diabetic bladder. A total of 45 rats were randomly divided into diabetes mellitus (DM)/TENS group (n = 15), DM group (n = 15) and control group (n = 15). The rats in the DM/TENS and TENS groups were electronically stimulated (stimulating parameters: intensity-31 V, frequency-31 Hz, and duration of stimulation of 15 min) for three weeks. Bladder histology, urodynamics and contractile responses to field stimulation and carbachol were determined. The expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that contractile responses of the DM rats were ameliorated after 3 weeks of TENS. Furthermore, TENS significantly increased bladder wet weight, volume threshold for micturition and reduced PVR, V% and cAMP content of the bladder. The mRNA and protein levels of CGRP in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the DM/TENS group were higher than those in the DM group. TENS also significantly up-regulated the cAMP content in the bladder body and base compared with diabetic rats. We conclude that TENS can significantly improve the urine contractility and ameliorate the feeling of bladder fullness in DM rats possibly via up-regulation of cAMP and CGRP in DRG. PMID:23468996

  9. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) improves the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) via up-regulation of CGRP and cAMP.

    PubMed

    Ding, Liucheng; Song, Tao; Yi, Chaoran; Huang, Yi; Yu, Wen; Ling, Lin; Dai, Yutian; Wei, Zhongqing

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) in the diabetic bladder. A total of 45 rats were randomly divided into diabetes mellitus (DM)/TENS group (n=15), DM group (n=15) and control group (n=15). The rats in the DM/TENS and TENS groups were electronically stimulated (stimulating parameters: intensity-31 V, frequency-31 Hz, and duration of stimulation of 15 min) for three weeks. Bladder histology, urodynamics and contractile responses to field stimulation and carbachol were determined. The expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that contractile responses of the DM rats were ameliorated after 3 weeks of TENS. Furthermore, TENS significantly increased bladder wet weight, volume threshold for micturition and reduced PVR, V% and cAMP content of the bladder. The mRNA and protein levels of CGRP in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the DM/TENS group were higher than those in the DM group. TENS also significantly up-regulated the cAMP content in the bladder body and base compared with diabetic rats. We conclude that TENS can significantly improve the urine contractility and ameliorate the feeling of bladder fullness in DM rats possibly via up-regulation of cAMP and CGRP in DRG. PMID:23468996

  10. Fgfr2 is integral for bladder mesenchyme patterning and function

    PubMed Central

    Walker, K. A.; Ikeda, Y.; Zabbarova, I.; Schaefer, C. M.; Bushnell, D.; De Groat, W. C.; Kanai, A.

    2015-01-01

    While urothelial signals, including sonic hedgehog (Shh), drive bladder mesenchyme differentiation, it is unclear which pathways within the mesenchyme are critical for its development. Studies have shown that fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr)2 is necessary for kidney and ureter mesenchymal development. The objective of the present study was to determine the role of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme. We used Tbx18cre mice to delete Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme (Fgfr2BM−/−). We performed three-dimensional reconstructions, quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, immunolabeling, ELISAs, immunoblot analysis, void stain on paper, ex vivo bladder sheet assays, and in vivo decerebrated cystometry. Compared with control bladders, embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5) Fgfr2BM−/− bladders had thin muscle layers with less α-smooth muscle actin and thickened lamina propria with increased collagen type Ia and IIIa that intruded into the muscle. The reciprocal changes in mutant layer thicknesses appeared partly due to a cell fate switch. From postnatal days 1 to 30, Fgfr2BM−/− bladders demonstrated progressive muscle loss and increased collagen expression. Postnatal Fgfr2BM−/− bladder sheets exhibited decreased agonist-mediated contractility and increased passive stretch tension versus control bladder sheets. Cystometry revealed high baseline and threshold pressures and shortened intercontractile intervals in Fgfr2BM−/− versus control bladders. Mechanistically, whereas Shh expression appeared normal, mRNA and protein readouts of hedgehog activity were increased in E16.5 Fgfr2BM−/− versus control bladders. Moreover, E16.5 Fgfr2BM−/− bladders exhibited higher levels of Cdo and Boc, hedgehog coreceptors that enhance sensitivity to Shh, compared with control bladders. In conclusion, loss of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme leads to abnormal bladder morphology and decreased compliance and contractility. PMID:25656370

  11. Fgfr2 is integral for bladder mesenchyme patterning and function.

    PubMed

    Walker, K A; Ikeda, Y; Zabbarova, I; Schaefer, C M; Bushnell, D; De Groat, W C; Kanai, A; Bates, C M

    2015-04-15

    While urothelial signals, including sonic hedgehog (Shh), drive bladder mesenchyme differentiation, it is unclear which pathways within the mesenchyme are critical for its development. Studies have shown that fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr)2 is necessary for kidney and ureter mesenchymal development. The objective of the present study was to determine the role of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme. We used Tbx18cre mice to delete Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme (Fgfr2(BM-/-)). We performed three-dimensional reconstructions, quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, immunolabeling, ELISAs, immunoblot analysis, void stain on paper, ex vivo bladder sheet assays, and in vivo decerebrated cystometry. Compared with control bladders, embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5) Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladders had thin muscle layers with less α-smooth muscle actin and thickened lamina propria with increased collagen type Ia and IIIa that intruded into the muscle. The reciprocal changes in mutant layer thicknesses appeared partly due to a cell fate switch. From postnatal days 1 to 30, Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladders demonstrated progressive muscle loss and increased collagen expression. Postnatal Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladder sheets exhibited decreased agonist-mediated contractility and increased passive stretch tension versus control bladder sheets. Cystometry revealed high baseline and threshold pressures and shortened intercontractile intervals in Fgfr2(BM-/-) versus control bladders. Mechanistically, whereas Shh expression appeared normal, mRNA and protein readouts of hedgehog activity were increased in E16.5 Fgfr2(BM-/-) versus control bladders. Moreover, E16.5 Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladders exhibited higher levels of Cdo and Boc, hedgehog coreceptors that enhance sensitivity to Shh, compared with control bladders. In conclusion, loss of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme leads to abnormal bladder morphology and decreased compliance and contractility. PMID:25656370

  12. Neurogenic Stuttering

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facts FAQ Basic Research Resources Brochures Free E-Books Free Videos Webinars Blog Referral Lists Newsletters Check your Library Books on Stuttering Product LIst Links Translations Podcasts Press ...

  13. Solitary Fibrous Tumor in a Female Urinary Bladder.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Hiba J; Menon, Sharifa

    2016-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors of the bladder are extremely rare especially in the females. This is the third case of SFT in a female urinary bladder. We are presenting a case of 36-years-old female who underwent a procedure for what thought to be cervical myoma. Cystectomy and bilateral ureteral re-implantation were performed. Mass showed to be solitary fibrous tumor of the urinary bladder. These tumors are rarely occur in extrapleural spaces. Only few cases had been reported in the urinary bladder including 2 in the female and 10 in the male bladder. PMID:27335777

  14. HpD Photobiology And Photodynamic Therapy Of Bladder Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chi-Wei

    1988-02-01

    Bladder carcinoma is considered one of the most favorable targets for the application of photodynamic therapy (PDT) due to the accessibility of the bladder for light delivery. Examination of the bladder and surgical procedures are routinely performed by the insertion of an optical instrument called cystoscope through the urethra. Thus, the treatment of bladder cancer by PDT can be conducted through the cystoscope with minimal invasion. However, to achieve optimal results from this treatment, one must consider both the structure of the bladder and the nature of the carcinoma.

  15. BCG Induced Necrosis of the Entire Bladder Urothelium.

    PubMed

    Krönig, Malte; Jilg, Cordula; Burger, Dieter; Langer, Mathias; Timme-Bronsert, Sylvia; Werner, Martin; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Seemann, Wolfgang-Schultze

    2015-09-01

    Instillation therapy with attenuated tuberculosis bacteria (BCG) can significantly reduce rates of recurrence of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Local and systemic side effects such as dysuria, irritative voiding symptoms or partial bladder contracture and systemic inflammation were reported. A 75 year-old male patient with recurrent non muscle invasive bladder cancer developed necrosis of the entire bladder urothelium more than six years after BCG instillation immunotherapy. The resulting irritative voiding symptoms and low bladder capacity required radical cystectomy. BCG instillation can cause severe side effects, which develop gradually and eventually need radical surgical therapy such as cystectomy without tumor recurrence. PMID:26793538

  16. Modeling bladder cancer in mice: opportunities and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Owczarek, Tomasz B.; McKiernan, James M.; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis and treatment of bladder cancer have hardly improved in the last 20 years. Bladder cancer remains a debilitating and often fatal disease, and among the most costly cancers to treat. The generation of informative mouse models has the potential to improve our understanding of bladder cancer progression, as well as impact its diagnosis and treatment. However, relatively few mouse models of bladder cancer have been described and particularly few that develop invasive cancer phenotypes. This review focuses on opportunities for improving the landscape of mouse models of bladder cancer. PMID:25533675

  17. Noninvasive Evaluation of Bladder Wall Mechanical Properties as a Function of Filling Volume: Potential Application in Bladder Compliance Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mynderse, Lance; Husmann, Douglas; Urban, Matthew; Alizad, Azra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We propose a novel method to monitor bladder wall mechanical properties as a function of filling volume, with the potential application to bladder compliance assessment. The proposed ultrasound bladder vibrometry (UBV) method uses ultrasound to excite and track Lamb waves on the bladder wall from which its mechanical properties are derived by fitting measurements to an analytical model. Of particular interest is the shear modulus of bladder wall at different volumes, which we hypothesize, is similar to measuring the compliance characteristics of the bladder. Materials and Methods Three experimental models were used: 1) an ex vivo porcine model where normal and aberrant (stiffened by formalin) bladders underwent evaluation by UBV; 2) an in vivo study to evaluate the performance of UBV on patients with clinically documented compliant and noncompliant bladders undergoing UDS; and 3) a noninvasive UBV protocol to assess bladder compliance using oral hydration and fractionated voiding on three healthy volunteers. Results The ex vivo studies showed a high correlation between the UBV parameters and direct pressure measurement (R2 = 0.84–0.99). A similar correlation was observed for 2 patients with compliant and noncompliant bladders (R2 = 0.89–0.99) undergoing UDS detrusor pressure-volume measurements. The results of UBV on healthy volunteers, performed without catheterization, were comparable to a compliant bladder patient. Conclusion The utility of UBV as a method to monitor changes in bladder wall mechanical properties is validated by the high correlation with pressure measurements in ex vivo and in vivo patient studies. High correlation UBV and UDS in vivo studies demonstrated the potential of UBV as a bladder compliance assessment tool. Results of studies on healthy volunteers with normal bladders demonstrated that UBV could be performed noninvasively. Further studies on a larger cohort are needed to fully validate the use of UBV as a clinical tool for

  18. Intravesical Treatments of Bladder Cancer: Review

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zancong; Shen, Tong; Wientjes, M. Guillaume; O’Donnell, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    For bladder cancer, intravesical chemo/immunotherapy is widely used as adjuvant therapies after surgical transurethal resection, while systemic therapy is typically reserved for higher stage, muscle-invading, or metastatic diseases. The goal of intravesical therapy is to eradicate existing or residual tumors through direct cytoablation or immunostimulation. The unique properties of the urinary bladder render it a fertile ground for evaluating additional novel experimental approaches to regional therapy, including iontophoresis/electrophoresis, local hyperthermia, co-administration of permeation enhancers, bioadhesive carriers, magnetic-targeted particles and gene therapy. Furthermore, due to its unique anatomical properties, the drug concentration-time profiles in various layers of bladder tissues during and after intravesical therapy can be described by mathematical models comprised of drug disposition and transport kinetic parameters. The drug delivery data, in turn, can be combined with the effective drug exposure to infer treatment efficacy and thereby assists the selection of optimal regimens. To our knowledge, intravesical therapy of bladder cancer represents the first example where computational pharmacological approach was used to design, and successfully predicted the outcome of, a randomized phase III trial (using mitomycin C). This review summarizes the pharmacological principles and the current status of intravesical therapy, and the application of computation to optimize the drug delivery to target sites and the treatment efficacy. PMID:18369709

  19. Imaging of adenomyomatosis of the gall bladder.

    PubMed

    Stunell, H; Buckley, O; Geoghegan, T; O'Brien, J; Ward, E; Torreggiani, W

    2008-04-01

    Adenomyomatosis is a relatively common abnormality of the gall bladder, with a reported incidence of between 2.8 and 5%. Although mainly confined to the adult study group, a number of cases have been reported in the paediatric study group. It is characterized pathologically by excessive proliferation of the surface epithelium and hypertrophy of the muscularis propria of the gall bladder wall, with invagination of the mucosa into the thickened muscularis forming the so-called 'Rokitansky-Aschoff' sinuses. The condition is usually asymptomatic and is often diagnosed as an incidental finding on abdominal imaging. The radiological diagnosis is largely dependent on the visualization of the characteristic Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses. As the condition is usually asymptomatic, the importance of making a correct diagnosis is to prevent misinterpretation of other gall bladder conditions such as gall bladder cancer, leading to incorrect treatment. In the past, oral cholecystography was the main imaging method used to make this diagnosis. In most institutions, oral cholecystography is no longer carried out, and the diagnosis is now more commonly seen on cross-sectional imaging. In this review article, we describe the manifestations of adenomyomatosis on the various imaging methods, with an emphasis on more modern techniques such as magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. A brief section on oral cholecystography to aid readers familiar with this technique in understanding the comparable imaging features on more modern imaging techniques is included. PMID:18373800

  20. Multistage carcinogenesis in the urinary bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, S M; Greenfield, R E; Ellwein, L B

    1983-01-01

    The induction of cancer of the urinary bladder is a multi-stage process involving multiple exogenous and endogenous factors. Based on the classical initiation-promotion model, we have used N-[4-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-thiazolyl]formamide (FANFT) as initiator and sodium saccharin (SAC) or tryptophan as promoters. These latter chemicals have the properties expected of promoters: induction of hyperplasia, reversibility and nonmutagenicity. Also, tumors were induced whether the promoter was administered immediately after FANFT or beginning 6 weeks after FANFT was discontinued, but no tumors resulted if either promoter was given without initiation with FANFT. Factor(s) present in normal urine also are involved in the promotion process, in addition to the role of urine as a carrier of carcinogens. However, administration of SAC to animals with a rapidly proliferating bladder mucosa, induced by ulceration, pellet insertion, or in utero, resulted in bladder tumor induction, even without prior initiation with FANFT. To better understand the complex interaction of the multiple variables in bladder carcinogenesis, a stochastic computer model has been formulated based on long-term carcinogenicity and tissue kinetic studies in vivo. This model indicates the importance of cell proliferation and the development of hyperplasia in carcinogenesis. PMID:6832093

  1. Protein interactome of muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Akshay; Heinzel, Andreas; Mayer, Bernd; Perco, Paul; Mühlberger, Irmgard; Husi, Holger; Merseburger, Axel S; Zoidakis, Jerome; Vlahou, Antonia; Schanstra, Joost P; Mischak, Harald; Jankowski, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Muscle invasive bladder carcinoma is a complex, multifactorial disease caused by disruptions and alterations of several molecular pathways that result in heterogeneous phenotypes and variable disease outcome. Combining this disparate knowledge may offer insights for deciphering relevant molecular processes regarding targeted therapeutic approaches guided by molecular signatures allowing improved phenotype profiling. The aim of the study is to characterize muscle invasive bladder carcinoma on a molecular level by incorporating scientific literature screening and signatures from omics profiling. Public domain omics signatures together with molecular features associated with muscle invasive bladder cancer were derived from literature mining to provide 286 unique protein-coding genes. These were integrated in a protein-interaction network to obtain a molecular functional map of the phenotype. This feature map educated on three novel disease-associated pathways with plausible involvement in bladder cancer, namely Regulation of actin cytoskeleton, Neurotrophin signalling pathway and Endocytosis. Systematic integration approaches allow to study the molecular context of individual features reported as associated with a clinical phenotype and could potentially help to improve the molecular mechanistic description of the disorder. PMID:25569276

  2. Embryogenesis of bladder exstrophy: A new hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Bharati; Chaudhari, Navin

    2008-01-01

    Aims and Objective: To postulate a hypothesis to explain the embryogenesis of exstrophy bladder based on our clinical observations. Materials and Methods: In 27 cases of exstrophy, we measured the distance between the lowermost inguinal skin crease to the root of the penis (clitoris) (B) and the distance between the penis (clitoris) and the scrotum (labia majora) (C). These were compared with age, height and XP distance (distance between xiphisternum and symphysis pubis) matched control group of normal children. The distance between the lowermost inguinal skin crease and the penis (clitoris) (A) was measured in control group. Results: The observation was A = B + C. This implies that in exstrophy bladder, the position of the penis (clitoris) has moved cephalad from the lower border of A to the junction of B and C. Conclusion: Based on the observations, we postulate that abnormal origin of genital tubercle may be the cause of exstrophy bladder. The abnormal origin of primordia of the genital tubercle in more cephalad direction than normal causes wedge effect, which will interfere with the medial migration of the mesoderm as well as the midline approximation of mesodermal structures in the lower abdominal wall, thereby resulting in the exstrophy of bladder. PMID:20011468

  3. Contractile responses in bladder body, bladder neck and prostate from rat, guinea pig and cat.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M L; Drey, K

    1989-03-01

    Lower urinary tract smooth muscle displays marked heterogeneity in pharmacologic responsiveness to contractile agents. The present study details differences among species with regard to muscarinic, adrenergic, histaminergic and serotonergic agonists in the bladder body, bladder neck and prostate from guinea pig, rat and cat. Under in vitro conditions, all smooth muscle preparations contracted to potassium chloride. The muscarinic agonist, carbamylcholine, produced maximal contraction, whereas alpha receptor agonists exerted only minimal, if any, effect in bladder body preparations from all three species. In contrast, alpha receptor-mediated responses predominated relative to muscarinic responses in bladder neck preparations from all three species. Prostatic contractility was examined in tissue from guinea pig and rat and contraction occurred to both alpha and muscarinic receptor agonists. Contractile response to norepinephrine in bladder neck and prostate was potentiated by neuronal uptake inhibition but not by beta receptor blockade. Serotonin and histamine exhibited more diverse effects among species and tissues. In general, histamine contracted all three tissues from guinea pig with minimal contraction occurring in tissues from rat or cat. On the other hand, serotonin markedly contracted the cat bladder body and rat prostate, but exerted no effect on tissues from the guinea pig. These data reinforce and detail the heterogeneity of pharmacologic contractile responses in lower urinary tract smooth muscle. Furthermore, the studies document the relative similarity among species in cholinergic and adrenergic responsiveness and the dissimilarity among species in serotonergic and histaminergic responsiveness of lower urinary tract smooth muscle. PMID:2539454

  4. Cortex Moutan Induces Bladder Cancer Cell Death via Apoptosis and Retards Tumor Growth in Mouse Bladders.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei-Yi; Lee, Ying-Ray; Chiang, Su-Yin; Li, Yi-Zhen; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Hsu, Cheng-Da; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Cortex Moutan is the root bark of Paeonia suffruticosa Andr. It is the herbal medicine widely used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for the treatment of blood-heat and blood-stasis syndrome. Furthermore, it has been reported that Cortex Moutan has anticancer effect. In this study, the Cortex Moutan extract was evaluated in bladder cancer therapy in vitro and in vivo. Cortex Moutan extract reduces cell viability with IC50 between 1~2 mg/ml in bladder cancer cells, and it has lower cytotoxicity in normal urotheliums. It arrests cells in G1 and S phase and causes phosphatidylserine expression in the outside of cell membrane. It induces caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase degradation. The pan caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk reverses Cortex Moutan-induced cell death. Cortex Moutan also inhibits cell invasion activity in 5637 cells. In mouse orthotopic bladder cancer model, intravesical application of Cortex Moutan decreases the bladder tumor size without altering the blood biochemical parameters. In summary, these results demonstrate the antiproliferation and anti-invasion properties of Cortex Moutan in bladder cancer cells and its antibladder tumor effect in vivo. Cortex Moutan may provide an alternative therapeutic strategy for the intravesical therapy of superficial bladder cancer. PMID:24282433

  5. The Value of Extended Nursing Services on Patients with Bladder Cancer after Endoscopic Bladder Resection

    PubMed Central

    LI, Xueqin; ZHANG, Yan; GAO, Hang; SUN, Xiujuan; LV, Weifeng; XU, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    Background: In this study, specific measures of extended nursing services and its values on patients with bladder cancer after endoscopic bladder electrosection were examined. Methods: Sixty-six patients diagnosed with bladder cancer in Laiwu People’s Hospital(NO. 001, Xueyehu Street, Changshao Road, Laiwu, Shandong, China) between February 2012 and February 2014, and underwent endoscopic bladder electrosection were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly allocated into the control group (n=30 cases) or the observation group (n=36 cases) according to the order of hospitalization. Conventional nursing measures were given to the control group while extended nursing service measures were given to the observation group, and the differences of nursing effect were compared. Results: The occurrence rate of postoperative complications within the hospital for the observation group was significantly lower than that of the control group, as was the length of hospital stay. The nursing service satisfaction was also significantly improved within the observation group. These differences were statistically significance (P<0.05). The anxiety and depression scores for the observation group were significantly lower than that of control group and these differences were also of statistical significance (P<0.05). The follow-up compliance after hospitalization for the observation group was significantly enhanced, quality of life scores were significantly improved, and both differences were of statistical significance (P<0.05). Conclusion: Extended nursing service improves the effect and long-term prognosis of patients with bladder cancer after undergoing endoscopic bladder electrosection. PMID:27057521

  6. How frequent are overactive bladder symptoms in women with urodynamic verification of an overactive bladder?

    PubMed Central

    Yeniel, Ahmet Özgür; Ergenoğlu, Mete Ahmet; Meseri, Reci; Aşkar, Niyazi; İtil, İsmail Mete

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between overactive bladder symptoms and urodynamic verification of overactive bladder. Material and Methods Between June 2011 and November 2011, 159 patients underwent urodynamics (UDS) at our urogynecology unit in the Ege University Hospital. Of these, 95 patients who complained of urgency, did not have any overt neurological diseases, bladder outlet obstruction and did not take any medication affecting the lower urinary tract function were evaluated. SPSS (ver. 15.0) was used to evaluate the data and the chi-square test and t test for independent samples were used for analysis. Results The mean age was found to be 54.5±12. Frequency was the most frequent symptom in women with overactive bladder (OAB) (82.1%), nocturia (57.8%) and (57.8%) urgency urinary incontinence followed in frequency. Detrusor over activity incidence was found to be 38.9%. There was no significant relationship between the presence of detrusor over activity (DOA) and OAB symptoms. Leak at urodynamics was found in 46.3% and there is no significant association with detrusor overactivity. Total bladder capacity was found to be significantly lower in women who had DOA (p=0.000). Conclusion It appears that overactive bladder symptoms do not predict detrusor over activity. Urodynamic investigation is not mandatory in the initial management of women with only OAB symptoms. PMID:24592016

  7. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment of Impaired Bladder Emptying

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael B

    2004-01-01

    Although much attention is paid to urinary incontinence, the condition of incomplete bladder emptying is becoming more common with the aging of the US population and the widespread use of anticholinergic drugs to treat overactive bladder. This disorder can often be silent until end-stage presentation of overflow incontinence. In this article, we review the pathophysiologic conditions of the bladder and urethra that can cause impaired bladder emptying and discuss how to evaluate and screen the patient with a bladder that does not empty. In addition, we provide an overview of treatment options available for impaired bladder emptying and consider the research that is under way to find the best therapies for the failing bladder. PMID:16985851

  8. Alpha 1-adrenoceptors and calcium sources in adrenergic neurogenic contractions of rat vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Bültmann, R.; Kurz, A. K.; Starke, K.

    1994-01-01

    1. The involvement of alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes in adrenergic neurogenic contractions of different type was studied in epididymal and prostatic portions of the rat vas deferens. 2. The adrenergic component of neurogenic contractions was isolated by suramin (300 microM). Twitch-like and tonic contractions were elicited by appropriate pulse patterns of electrical field stimulation, and contractions relying on intracellular calcium mobilization and calcium entry were isolated by means of nifedipine (10 microM) and ryanodine (20 microM), respectively. Increasing concentrations of 2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)aminomethyl-1,4-benzodioxane (WB 4101), alpha-ethyl-3,4,5-trimethoxy-alpha-(3-((2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)ethyl)- amino)-propyl)benzeneacetonitrile (HV 723), prazosin and 5-methylurapidil progressively, monophasically and with potency decreasing in that order reduced and finally abolished all types of contraction, with one exception: concentration-effect curves of 5-methylurapidil in epididymal segments in the presence of ryanodine levelled off at about 75% inhibition. In the presence of both nifedipine (10 microM) and ryanodine (20 microM), contractions were abolished. 3. Contractions elicited by exogenous noradrenaline were also studied in the presence of either nifedipine 10 microM (prostatic segments) or ryanodine 20 microM (epididymal segments). Increasing concentrations of tamsulosin, WB 4101, benoxathian, HV 723, prazosin, 5-methylurapidil and urapidil progressively, monophasically and with potency decreasing in that order reduced and eventually abolished both kinds of contraction, with two exceptions: in epididymal segments in the presence of ryanodine, the concentration-effect curve of 5-methylurapidil was biphasic and the curve of urapidil levelled off at only partial inhibition. 4. In slices prepared from the prostatic end and preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline, WB 4101, HV 723, prazosin and 5-methylurapidil, at the highest concentrations tested against

  9. Development of the adult neurogenic niche in the hippocampus of mice

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, Zeina; Fabel, Klaus; Kempermann, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    When does adult hippocampal neurogenesis begin? We describe the development of the neurogenic niche in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. We did so from the perspective of the situation in the adult. Ontogeny of the dentate gyrus is complex and results in an ectopic neurogenic niche that lifelong generates new granule cells. Neurogenesis during the fetal and early postnatal periods builds the dentate gyrus and gives way to activity-dependent “adult” neurogenesis. We used markers most relevant to adult neurogenesis research to describe this transition: Nestin, Sox2, BLBP, GFAP, Tbr2, Doublecortin (DCX), NeuroD1 and Prox1. We found that massive changes and a local condensation of proliferating precursor cells occurs between postnatal day 7 (P7), near the peak in proliferation, and P14. Before and around P7, the spatial distribution of cells and the co-localization of markers were distinct from the situation in the adult. Unlike the adult SGZ, the marker pair Nestin/Sox2 and the radial glial marker BLBP were not overlapping during embryonic development, presumably indicating different types of radial glia-like cells. Before P7 GFAP-positive cells in the hilus lacked the radial orientation that is characteristic of the adult type-1 cells. DCX, which is concentrated in type-2b and type-3 progenitor cells and early postmitotic neurons in the adult, showed diffuse expression before P7. Intermediate progenitor cell marker Tbr2 became restricted to the SGZ but was found in the granule cell layer (GCL) and hilus before. Lineage markers NeuroD1 and Prox1 confirmed this pattern. We conclude that the neurogenic niche of adult neurogenesis is in place well before true adulthood. This might indicate that consistent with the hypothesized function of adult neurogenesis in activity-dependent plasticity, the early transition from postnatal neurogenesis to adult neurogenesis coincides with the time, when the young mice start to become active themselves

  10. Assessment of local structural disorders of the bladder wall in partial bladder outlet obstruction using polarized light imaging.

    PubMed

    Alali, Sanaz; Aitken, Karen J; Schröder, Annette; Gribble, Adam; Bagli, Darius J; Vitkin, I Alex

    2014-02-01

    Partial bladder outlet obstruction causes prominent morphological changes in the bladder wall, which leads to bladder dysfunction. In this paper, we demonstrate that polarized light imaging can be used to identify the location of obstruction induced structural changes that other imaging modalities fail to detect. We induced 2-week and 6-week partial outlet obstruction in rats, harvested obstructed bladders, then measured their retardances while distended to high pressures and compared them to controls. Our results show that the retardance of the central part of the ventral side (above the ureters) closer to the urethra can be used as a potential metric of the distending bladder obstruction. PMID:24575354

  11. Genetics of Bladder Malignant Tumors in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Zangari, Andrea; Zaini, Johan; Gulìa, Caterina

    2016-02-01

    Bladder masses are represented by either benign or malignant entities. Malignant bladder tumors are frequent causes of disease and death in western countries. However, in children they are less common. Additionally, different features are found in childhood, in which non epithelial tumors are more common than epithelial ones. Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common pediatric bladder tumor, but many other types of lesions may be found, such as malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor and neuroblastoma. Other rarer tumors described in literature include urothelial carcinoma and other epithelial neoplasms. Rhabdomyosarcoma is associated to a variety of genetic syndromes and many genes are involved in tumor development. PAX3-FKHR and PAX7-FKHR (P-F) fusion state has important implications in the pathogenesis and biology of RMS, and different genes alterations are involved in the pathogenesis of P-F negative and embryonal RMS, which are the subsets of tumors most frequently affecting the bladder. These genes include p53, MEF2, MYOG, Ptch1, Gli1, Gli3, Myf5, MyoD1, NF1, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, FGFR4, PIK3CA, CTNNB1, FBXW7, IGF1R, PDGFRA, ERBB2/4, MET, BCOR. Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) usually shows SMARCB1/INI1 alterations. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene translocations are the most frequently associated alterations in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). Few genes alterations in urothelial neoplasms have been reported in the paediatric population, which are mainly related to deletion of p16/lnk4, overexpression of CK20 and overexpression of p53. Here, we reviewed available literature to identify genes associated to bladder malignancies in children and discussed their possible relationships with these tumors. PMID:27013922

  12. Genetics of Bladder Malignant Tumors in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Zangari, Andrea; Zaini, Johan; Gulìa, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Bladder masses are represented by either benign or malignant entities. Malignant bladder tumors are frequent causes of disease and death in western countries. However, in children they are less common. Additionally, different features are found in childhood, in which non epithelial tumors are more common than epithelial ones. Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common pediatric bladder tumor, but many other types of lesions may be found, such as malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor and neuroblastoma. Other rarer tumors described in literature include urothelial carcinoma and other epithelial neoplasms. Rhabdomyosarcoma is associated to a variety of genetic syndromes and many genes are involved in tumor development. PAX3-FKHR and PAX7-FKHR (P-F) fusion state has important implications in the pathogenesis and biology of RMS, and different genes alterations are involved in the pathogenesis of P-F negative and embryonal RMS, which are the subsets of tumors most frequently affecting the bladder. These genes include p53, MEF2, MYOG, Ptch1, Gli1, Gli3, Myf5, MyoD1, NF1, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, FGFR4, PIK3CA, CTNNB1, FBXW7, IGF1R, PDGFRA, ERBB2/4, MET, BCOR. Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) usually shows SMARCB1/INI1 alterations. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene translocations are the most frequently associated alterations in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). Few genes alterations in urothelial neoplasms have been reported in the paediatric population, which are mainly related to deletion of p16/lnk4, overexpression of CK20 and overexpression of p53. Here, we reviewed available literature to identify genes associated to bladder malignancies in children and discussed their possible relationships with these tumors. PMID:27013922

  13. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury Activation of the Adult Subventricular Zone Neurogenic Niche.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eun Hyuk; Adorjan, Istvan; Mundim, Mayara V; Sun, Bin; Dizon, Maria L V; Szele, Francis G

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in both civilian and military life, placing a large burden on survivors and society. However, with the recognition of neural stem cells in adult mammals, including humans, came the possibility to harness these cells for repair of damaged brain, whereas previously this was thought to be impossible. In this review, we focus on the rodent adult subventricular zone (SVZ), an important neurogenic niche within the mature brain in which neural stem cells continue to reside. We review how the SVZ is perturbed following various animal TBI models with regards to cell proliferation, emigration, survival, and differentiation, and we review specific molecules involved in these processes. Together, this information suggests next steps in attempting to translate knowledge from TBI animal models into human therapies for TBI. PMID:27531972

  15. Neurogenic radial glial cells in reptile, rodent and human: from mitosis to migration.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Tamily; Noctor, Stephen C; Clinton, Brian K; Honig, Lawrence S; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2003-06-01

    Radial glial cells play at least two crucial roles in cortical development: neuronal production in the ventricular zone (VZ) and the subsequent guidance of neuronal migration. There is evidence that radial glia-like cells are present not only during development but in the adult mammalian brain as well. In addition, radial glial cells appear to be neurogenic in the central nervous system of a number of vertebrate species. We demonstrate here that most dividing progenitor cells in the embryonic human VZ express radial glial proteins. Furthermore, we provide evidence that radial glial cells maintain a vimentin-positive radial fiber throughout each stage of cell division. Asymmetric inheritance of this fiber may be an important factor in determining how neuronal progeny will migrate into the developing cortical plate. Although radial glial cells have traditionally been characterized by their role in guiding migration, their role as neuronal progenitors may represent their defining characteristic throughout the vertebrate CNS. PMID:12764028

  16. NTOS symptoms and mobility: a case study on neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome involving massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Streit, Robin S

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) is a neuromuscular condition affecting brachial plexus functionality. NTOS is characterized by paresthesia, pain, muscle fatigue, and restricted mobility in the upper extremity. This study quantified massage therapy's possible contribution to treatment of NTOS. A 24-year-old female with NTOS received eight treatments over 35 days. Treatment included myofascial release, trigger point therapy, cross fiber friction, muscle stripping, and gentle passive stretching. Abduction and lateral rotation at the glenohumeral (GH joint) assessments measured range of motion (ROM). A resisted muscle test evaluated upper extremity strength. The client rated symptoms daily via a visual analog scale (VAS). Findings showed improvement in ROM at the GH joint. VAS ratings revealed a reduction in muscle weakness, pain, numbness, and 'paresthesia'. Results suggest massage may be useful as part of a broad approach to managing NTOS symptoms and improving mobility. PMID:24411148

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury Activation of the Adult Subventricular Zone Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eun Hyuk; Adorjan, Istvan; Mundim, Mayara V.; Sun, Bin; Dizon, Maria L. V.; Szele, Francis G.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in both civilian and military life, placing a large burden on survivors and society. However, with the recognition of neural stem cells in adult mammals, including humans, came the possibility to harness these cells for repair of damaged brain, whereas previously this was thought to be impossible. In this review, we focus on the rodent adult subventricular zone (SVZ), an important neurogenic niche within the mature brain in which neural stem cells continue to reside. We review how the SVZ is perturbed following various animal TBI models with regards to cell proliferation, emigration, survival, and differentiation, and we review specific molecules involved in these processes. Together, this information suggests next steps in attempting to translate knowledge from TBI animal models into human therapies for TBI. PMID:27531972

  18. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  19. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  20. Slow negative evoked potentials in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta): myogenic versus neurogenic influences.

    PubMed

    Fria, T J; Saad, M M; Doyle, W J; Cantekin, E I

    1984-02-01

    The influence of myogenic activity on the generation of slow negative evoked potentials (SN10) to octave, toneburst stimuli (0.5-2 Hz) was investigated in 5 rhesus monkeys (M. mulatta) by comparing responses obtained prior to and during total paralysis induced with curare. The SN10 could be easily elicited during paralysis, regardless of stimulus intensity, rate, or frequency. During paralysis, there were no systematic changes in either response latency or amplitude; variability in latency was less than 10% and changes in response amplitude were within 30%. These findings suggest that the myogenic contribution to the SN10 response is negligible and that this response is of neurogenic origin in the rhesus monkey. PMID:6198169

  1. Transpulmonary Thermodilution-Based Management of Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Tatsushi; Kazumata, Ken; Ueyama-Mutoh, Tomoko; Taki, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Tatsuya

    2015-11-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a potentially catastrophic but treatable systemic event after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The development of NPE most frequently occurs immediately after SAH, and the severity is usually self-limiting. Despite extensive research efforts and a breadth of collective clinical experience, accurate diagnosis of NPE can be difficult, and effective hemodynamic treatment options are limited. Recently, a bedside transpulmonary thermodilution device has been introduced that traces physiological patterns consistent with current theories regarding the mechanism (hydrostatic or permeability PE) of NPE. This article provides an overview of the clinical usefulness of the advanced technique for use in the neurointensive care unit for the diagnosis and management of post-SAH NPE. PMID:26517502

  2. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome: current diagnostic criteria and advances in MRI diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Magill, Stephen T; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Weinstein, Philip R; Chin, Cynthia T; Jacques, Line

    2015-09-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (nTOS) is caused by compression of the brachial plexus as it traverses from the thoracic outlet to the axilla. Diagnosing nTOS can be difficult because of overlap with other complex pain and entrapment syndromes. An nTOS diagnosis is made based on patient history, physical exam, electrodiagnostic studies, and, more recently, interpretation of MR neurograms with tractography. Advances in high-resolution MRI and tractography can confirm an nTOS diagnosis and identify the location of nerve compression, allowing tailored surgical decompression. In this report, the authors review the current diagnostic criteria, present an update on advances in MRI, and provide case examples demonstrating how MR neurography (MRN) can aid in diagnosing nTOS. The authors conclude that improved high-resolution MRN and tractography are valuable tools for identifying the source of nerve compression in patients with nTOS and can augment current diagnostic modalities for this syndrome. PMID:26323825

  3. Neurogenic Astrocytes and Their Glycoconjugates: Not Just “Glue” Anymore

    PubMed Central

    Steindler, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells with certain attributes of very immature astroglial cells and their radial precursors can act as stem and/or progenitor cells during developmental and persistent neurogenesis. Neural stem/progenitor cells both express and are affected by a variety of developmentally regulated macromolecules and growth factors, and such signaling or recognition molecules are being uncovered through extensive genomic and proteomic studies, as well as tested using in vitro/in vivo cell growth bioassays. Glycosylated molecules are appreciated as distinct signaling molecules during morphogenesis in a variety of tissues and organs, with glycoconjugates (glycoproteins, glycolipids, and glycosaminoglycans) serving as mediators for the interactions of cells with each other and their substrates, to confer growth and differentiation cues to precursor cells in search of identity. Neurogenic astrocytes and associated glycoconjugates, especially extracellular matrix molecules, are discussed in the context of neurogenesis and stem/progenitor cell growth, fate choice, and differentiation. PMID:22144297

  4. Do changes in the coupling between respiratory and sympathetic activities contribute to neurogenic hypertension?

    PubMed

    Zoccal, Daniel B; Paton, Julian F R; Machado, Benedito H

    2009-12-01

    1. It is well known that respiration markedly modulates the sympathetic nervous system. Interactions between pontine and medullary neurons involved in the control of sympathetic and respiratory functions are the main mechanism underlying the respiratory related oscillations in sympathetic nerve activity. 2. Recently, in rats treated with chronic intermittent hypoxia, we demonstrated that alterations in respiratory pattern may drive increased sympathetic outflow and hence the development of systemic hypertension. These experiments, performed in the in situ working heart-brain stem preparation, raise the possibility that enhanced central coupling between respiratory and sympathetic activities could be a potential mechanism underpinning the development and/or the maintenance of neurogenic hypertension. 3. In the present review, we discuss the neural basis of the enhanced entrainment between respiratory and sympathetic neurons in the brain stem that can be induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia and the possible implications of these mechanisms in the genesis of sympathetic overactivity and, consequently, hypertension. PMID:19413588

  5. Diabetes - tests and checkups

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Instructions ACE inhibitors Diabetes and exercise Diabetes - eye care Diabetes - foot ulcers Diabetes - keeping active Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke ...

  6. Type 1 diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection - adults Patient Instructions Diabetes and exercise Diabetes - eye care Diabetes - foot ulcers Diabetes - keeping active Diabetes - low blood sugar - self-care Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke ...

  7. Stroke Increases Neural Stem Cells and Angiogenesis in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction. PMID:25437857

  8. Cancer stem cells from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis posits that deregulated neural stem cells (NSCs) form the basis of brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM, however, usually forms in the cerebral white matter while normal NSCs reside in subventricular and hippocampal regions. We attempted to characterize CSCs from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall. Methods We described isolating CSCs from a GBM involving the lateral ventricles and characterized these cells with in vitro molecular biomarker profiling, cellular behavior, ex vivo and in vivo techniques. Results The patient’s MRI revealed a heterogeneous mass with associated edema, involving the left subventricular zone. Histological examination of the tumor established it as being a high-grade glial neoplasm, characterized by polygonal and fusiform cells with marked nuclear atypia, amphophilic cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, frequent mitotic figures, irregular zones of necrosis and vascular hyperplasia. Recurrence of the tumor occurred shortly after the surgical resection. CD133-positive cells, isolated from the tumor, expressed stem cell markers including nestin, CD133, Ki67, Sox2, EFNB1, EFNB2, EFNB3, Cav-1, Musashi, Nucleostemin, Notch 2, Notch 4, and Pax6. Biomarkers expressed in differentiated cells included Cathepsin L, Cathepsin B, Mucin18, Mucin24, c-Myc, NSE, and TIMP1. Expression of unique cancer-related transcripts in these CD133-positive cells, such as caveolin-1 and −2, do not appear to have been previously reported in the literature. Ex vivo organotypic brain slice co-culture showed that the CD133+ cells behaved like tumor cells. The CD133-positive cells also induced tumor formation when they were stereotactically transplanted into the brains of the immune-deficient NOD/SCID mice. Conclusions This brain tumor involving the neurogenic lateral ventricular wall was comprised of tumor-forming, CD133-positive cancer stem cells, which are likely

  9. Hippocampal transcriptional and neurogenic changes evoked by combination yohimbine and imipramine treatment.

    PubMed

    Husain, Basma Fatima Anwar; Nanavaty, Ishira N; Marathe, Swananda V; Rajendran, Rajeev; Vaidya, Vidita A

    2015-08-01

    Adjunct α2-adrenoceptor antagonism is a potential strategy to accelerate the behavioral effects of antidepressants. Co-administration of the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine hastens the behavioral and neurogenic effects of the antidepressant imipramine. We examined the transcriptional targets of short duration (7days), combination treatment of yohimbine and imipramine (Y+I) within the adult rat hippocampus. Using microarray and qPCR analysis we observed functional enrichment of genes involved in intracellular signaling cascades, plasma membrane, cellular metal ion homeostasis, multicellular stress responses and neuropeptide signaling pathways in the Y+I transcriptome. We noted reduced expression of the α2A-adrenoceptor (Adra2a), serotonin 5HT2C receptor (Htr2c) and the somatostatin receptor 1 (Sstr1), which modulate antidepressant action. Further, we noted a regulation of signaling pathway genes like inositol monophosphatase 2 (Impa2), iodothyronine deiodinase 3 (Dio3), regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (Rgs4), alkaline ceramidase 2 (Acer2), doublecortin-like kinase 2 (Dclk2), nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha (Nfkbia) and serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (Sgk1), several of which are implicated in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Comparative analysis revealed an overlap in the hippocampal regulation of Acer2, Nfkbia, Sgk1 and Impa2 between Y+I treatment, the fast-acting electroconvulsive seizure (ECS) paradigm, and the slow-onset chronic (21days) imipramine treatment. Further, Y+I treatment enhanced the quiescent neural progenitor pool in the hippocampal neurogenic niche similar to ECS, and distinct from chronic imipramine treatment. Taken together, our results provide insight into the molecular and cellular targets of short duration Y+I treatment, and identify potential leads for the development of rapid-action antidepressants. PMID:25784603

  10. Clinically Relevant Progestins Regulate Neurogenic and Neuroprotective Responses in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lifei; Zhao, Liqin; She, Hongyun; Chen, Shuhua; Wang, Jun Ming; Wong, Charisse; McClure, Kelsey; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that progesterone (P4) promoted adult rat neural progenitor cell (rNPC) proliferation with concomitant regulation of cell-cycle gene expression via the P4 receptor membrane component/ERK pathway. Here, we report the efficacy of seven clinically relevant progestins alone or in combination with 17β-estradiol (E2) on adult rNPC proliferation and hippocampal cell viability in vitro and in vivo. In vitro analyses indicated that P4, norgestimate, Nestorone, norethynodrel, norethindrone, and levonorgestrel (LNG) significantly increased in rNPC proliferation, whereas norethindrone acetate was without effect, and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) inhibited rNPC proliferation. Proliferative progestins in vitro were also neuroprotective. Acute in vivo exposure to P4 and Nestorone significantly increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell division cycle 2 expression and total number of hippocampal 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, whereas LNG and MPA were without effect. Mechanistically, neurogenic progestins required activation of MAPK to promote proliferation. P4, Nestorone, and LNG significantly increased ATP synthase subunit α (complex V, subunit α) expression, whereas MPA was without effect. In combination with E2, P4, Nestorone, LNG, and MPA significantly increased BrdU incorporation. However, BrdU incorporation induced by E2 plus LNG or MPA was paralleled by a significant increase in apoptosis. A rise in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio paralleled apoptosis induced by LNG and MPA. With the exception of P4, clinical progestins antagonized E2-induced rise in complex V, subunit α. These preclinical translational findings indicate that the neurogenic response to clinical progestins varies dramatically. Progestin impact on the regenerative capacity of the brain has clinical implications for contraceptive and hormone therapy formulations prescribed for pre- and postmenopausal women. PMID:20943809

  11. A novel CGRP-neutralizing Spiegelmer attenuates neurogenic plasma protein extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Hoehlig, K; Johnson, K W; Pryazhnikov, E; Maasch, C; Clemens-Smith, A; Purschke, W G; Vauléon, S; Buchner, K; Jarosch, F; Khiroug, L; Vater, A; Klussmann, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays an important role in the pathology of migraine, and recent clinical trials suggest the inhibition of CGRP-mediated processes as a new therapeutic option in migraine. In this study, we describe the generation of NOX-L41, a CGRP-neutralizing mirror-image (l-)aptamer (Spiegelmer) and investigate its in vitro and in vivo function. Experimental Approach A CGRP-binding Spiegelmer was identified by in vitro selection. Binding studies were performed using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and the inhibitory activity was determined in cell-based assays. The pharmacokinetic profile comparing i.v. and s.c. dosing was analysed in rats. Intravital two-photon microscopy was employed to follow extravasation from meningeal vessels. Finally, in vivo efficacy was tested in a model of electrically evoked meningeal plasma protein extravasation (PPE) in rats. Key Results We identified NOX-L41, a novel CGRP-neutralizing Spiegelmer. SPR studies showed that NOX-L41 binds to human and rat/mouse CGRP with sub-nanomolar affinities and is highly selective against related peptides such as amylin. In vitro, NOX-L41 effectively inhibited CGRP-induced cAMP formation in SK-N-MC cells. In rats, NOX-L41 had a plasma half-life of 8 h. Pharmacodynamic studies showed that NOX-L41 extravasates from blood vessels in the dura mater and inhibits neurogenic meningeal PPE for at least 18 h after single dosing. Conclusions and Implications This is the first description of the CGRP-neutralizing Spiegelmer NOX-L41. Preclinical studies confirmed a role for CGRP in neurogenic PPE and provided proof-of-concept for the potential use of this new drug candidate for the treatment or prevention of migraine. PMID:25659966

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells secretome as a modulator of the neurogenic niche: basic insights and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Antonio J.; Sousa, Joao C.; Costa, Bruno M.; Pires, Ana O.; Mateus-Pinheiro, António; Teixeira, F. G.; Pinto, Luisa; Sousa, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) share few characteristics apart from self-renewal and multipotency. In fact, the neurogenic and osteogenic stem cell niches derive from two distinct embryonary structures; while the later originates from the mesoderm, as all the connective tissues do, the first derives from the ectoderm. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that stem cells isolated from one niche could form terminally differentiated cells from the other. Additionally, these two niches are associated to tissues/systems (e.g., bone and central nervous system) that have markedly different needs and display diverse functions within the human body. Nevertheless they do share common features. For instance, the differentiation of both NSCs and MSCs is intimately associated with the bone morphogenetic protein family. Moreover, both NSCs and MSCs secrete a panel of common growth factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), among others. But it is not the features they share but the interaction between them that seem most important, and worth exploring; namely, it has already been shown that there are mutually beneficially effects when these cell types are co-cultured in vitro. In fact the use of MSCs, and their secretome, become a strong candidate to be used as a therapeutic tool for CNS applications, namely by triggering the endogenous proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitors, among other mechanisms. Quite interestingly it was recently revealed that MSCs could be found in the human brain, in the vicinity of capillaries. In the present review we highlight how MSCs and NSCs in the neurogenic niches interact. Furthermore, we propose directions on this field and explore the future therapeutic possibilities that may arise from the combination/interaction of MSCs and NSCs. PMID:26217178

  13. Anatomical variations in the brachial plexus roots: implications for diagnosis of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Vanessa; Smith, Riley; Caldwell, Gregory; Smith, Heather F

    2016-07-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) is the most common type of TOS. Typically it results from impingement of the neurovasculature as it passes between the anterior and middle scalene muscles; this classic anatomical relationship being the foundation of clinical diagnosis. Positional testing relies on vascular compromise occurring when the subclavian artery is compressed in this space. This study describes several anatomical variations observed in this relationship. Sixty-five cadavers (35m/30f) were assessed to determine the frequency and extent of brachial plexus branching variants. A total of thirty-one variations from "classic" anatomy were observed (47.7%). In two specimens (3.1%), the entire superior trunk coursed completely anterior to the anterior scalene in a position of relative vulnerability. In 27 instances, a portion of or the entire superior trunk pierced the anterior scalene muscle, and in two, the middle trunk also pierced the muscle belly. Interestingly, while two bilateral branching variations were observed, the majority occurred unilaterally, and almost exclusively on the left side. There were no sex differences in frequency. The high frequency of these variations and their potential to predispose patients to neurogenic TOS suggest that current diagnostic methods may be insufficient in clinical diagnosis. Due to lack of vascular compromise, patients with the piercing variant would not display positive signs on the traditional positional tests. The use of ultrasound to determine the route of the brachial plexus could determine whether this variation is present in patients who suffer from TOS symptoms but lack a diagnosis based on traditional positional testing. PMID:27133185

  14. Expression of neurotransmitters and neurotrophins in neurogenic inflammation of the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Bronzetti, Elena; Artico, M; Kovacs, I; Felici, L M; Magliulo, G; Vignone, D; D'Ambrosio, A; Forte, F; Di Liddo, R; Feher, J

    2007-01-01

    Antidromic stimulation of the rat trigeminal ganglion triggers the release of substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from sensory nerve terminals of the capsaicin sensitive C-fibers. These pro-inflammatory neuropeptides produce a marked hyperemia in the anterior segment of the eye, accompanied by increased intraocular pressure, breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier and myosis. To assess the effects of neurogenic inflammation on the retina, specifically on the immunostaining of neurotransmitters and neurotrophins, as well as on the expression of neurotrophin receptors in the retina. RT-PCR was also accomplished in control and stimulated animals to confirm the immunohistochemical results. In the electrically stimulated eyes, immunostaining for SP, CGRP, VIP and nNOS demonstrated a marked increase in the RPE/POS (Retinal Pigment Epithelium/Photoreceptor Outer Segments), in the inner and outer granular layers and in the ganglion cells in comparison to the control eyes. CGRP and SP were found increased in stimulated animals and this result has been confirmed by RT- PCR. Changes in neurotrophin immunostaining and in receptor expression were also observed after electric stimulation of trigeminal ganglia. Decrease of BDNF and NT4 in the outer and inner layers and in ganglion cells was particularly marked. In stimulated rat retinas immunostaining and RT-PCR showed a NGF expression increase. Neurotrophin receptors remained substantially unchanged. These studies demonstrated, for the first time, that antidromic stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion and subsequent neurogenic inflammation affect immunostaining of retinal cell neurotransmitter/neuropeptides and neurotrophins as well as the expression of neurotrophin receptors. PMID:18162454

  15. Gestational diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar ( diabetes ) that starts or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. ... 9 pounds or had a birth defect Have high blood pressure Have too much amniotic fluid Have ...

  16. Diabetes Insipidus

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) causes frequent urination. You become extremely thirsty, so you drink. Then you urinate. This ... is almost all water. DI is different from diabetes mellitus (DM), which involves insulin problems and high ...

  17. Diabetes Complications

    MedlinePlus

    If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body ... as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk ...

  18. Cytochrome P4501A2 phenotype and bladder cancer risk: The Shanghai bladder cancer study.

    PubMed

    Tao, Li; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Chan, Kenneth K; Wang, Renwei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Yu, Mimi C; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2012-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) is hypothesized to catalyze the activation of arylamines, known human bladder carcinogens present in cigarette smoke. The relationship between CYP1A2 phenotype and bladder cancer risk was examined in a case-control study involving 519 patients and 514 controls in Shanghai, China. Both CYP1A2 and N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) phenotypic status were determined by a caffeine-based urinary assay. Our study showed that among smokers at urine collection, patients with bladder cancer had statistically significantly higher CYP1A2 phenotype scores compared to control subjects (p = 0.001). The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of bladder cancer for the second, third and fourth quartiles of the CYP1A2 score were 1.31 (0.53-3.28), 2.04 (0.90-4.60) and 2.82 (1.32-6.05), respectively, relative to the lowest quartile (p for trend = 0.003). NAT2 slow acetylation phenotype was associated with a statistically significant 40% increased risk of bladder cancer, and the relationship was independent of subjects' smoking status. Subjects possessing the NAT2 slow acetylation phenotype and the highest tertile of CYP1A2 scores showed the highest risk for bladder cancer. Their odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) was 2.13 (1.24-3.68) relative to their counterparts possessing the NAT2 rapid acetylation phenotype and the lowest tertile of CYP1A2 scores. The findings of our study demonstrate that CYP1A2 phenotype may be an important contributing factor in the development of smoking-related bladder cancer in humans. PMID:21480221

  19. [Diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Bosi, E

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action, or both. Diabetes is a serious health concern. The number of cases of diabetes mellitus is estimated to grow at a rate of 50% between 2000 and 2010. There are several types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and other specific types of diabetes. Beta cell dysfunction plays a key role in the physiopathology of diabetes, even when insulin resistance, which is often present in several diabetes-related diseases, is considered among the causes of hyperglycemic type 2 diabetes. The prolonged hyperglycemia that is peculiar to all kind of diabetes has long term complications on several organs and systems. The diagnosis of diabetes is based on the evaluation of glucose plasma levels performed under fasting conditions or two hours after the oral ingestion of 75 grams of glucose. Currently, achieving and maintaining normal plasma levels of glucose are the aims of therapy for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Particularly, the therapy for type 1 diabetes is based on the administration of insulin, whereas that of type 2 diabetes changes over the time: diet and physical activity are the first treatments; oral hypoglycemic drugs are used as a second therapeutic step; and the administration of insulin is the last therapeutic option. The principal therapeutic innovation of the past ten years is represented by the tight and flexible control of glucose plasma level obtained by using the insulin analogues produced by recombinant DNA technology. PMID:14523905

  20. Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia for Bladder Cancer: A Preclinical Dosimetry Study

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tiago R.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Lee, Chen-Ting; Landon, Chelsea D.; Etienne, Wiguins; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; McNerny, Katie L.; Mashal, Alireza; Nouls, John; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Beyer, Wayne F.; Inman, Brant; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This paper describes a preclinical investigation of the feasibility of thermotherapy treatment of bladder cancer with Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH), performed by analyzing the thermal dosimetry of nanoparticle heating in a rat bladder model. Materials and Methods The bladders of twenty-five female rats were instilled with magnetite-based nanoparticles, and hyperthermia was induced using a novel small animal magnetic field applicator (Actium Biosystems, Boulder, CO). We aimed to increase the bladder lumen temperature to 42°C in <10 min and maintain that temperature for 60 min. Temperatures were measured within the bladder lumen and throughout the rat with seven fiberoptic probes (OpSens Technologies, Quebec, Canada). An MRI analysis was used to confirm the effectiveness of the catheterization method to deliver and maintain various nanoparticle volumes within the bladder. Thermal dosimetry measurements recorded the temperature rise of rat tissues for a variety of nanoparticle exposure conditions. Results Thermal dosimetry data demonstrated our ability to raise and control the temperature of rat bladder lumen ≥1°C/min to a steady-state of 42°C with minimal heating of surrounding normal tissues. MRI scans confirmed the homogenous nanoparticle distribution throughout the bladder. Conclusion These data demonstrate that our MFH system with magnetite-based nanoparticles provide well-localized heating of rat bladder lumen with effective control of temperature in the bladder and minimal heating of surrounding tissues. PMID:24050253

  1. Gemcitabine, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin in Metastatic or Unresectable Bladder Cancer With Decreased Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  2. Clinical Efficacy and Changes of Urothelial Dysfunction after Repeated Detrusor Botulinum Toxin A Injections in Chronic Spinal Cord-Injured Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng-Fu; Chang, Chia-Hwei; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-01-01

    Chornic spinal cord injury (SCI) will induce bladder urothelium dysfunction. This study investigated the therapeutic effects on urothelial dysfunction after repeated detrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A) in SCI patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). Twenty chronic suprasacral SCI patients with NDO were enrolled. The patients received 300 U BoNT-A injection into the detrusor every six months. The urothelium was assessed by cystoscopic biopsy at baseline and six months after each BoNT-A treatment. Immunofluorescence staining for urothelial dysfunction, including E-cadherin, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), tryptase for mast cell activity, and urothelial apoptosis were investigated. The outcome of urothelial dysfunction parameters after BoNT-A injection were compared between baseline and six months after each treatment. Repeated 300 U BoNT-A injections showed a sustained decrease of detrusor pressure compared with baseline. After three repeated BoNT-A detrusor injections, significantly greater distributions of E-cadherin (p = 0.042) and ZO-1 (p = 0.003) expressions, but no significant changes, of urothelial apoptosis and mast cell activation were found after repeated BoNT-A therapy. Urothelial dysfunction, such as adhesive and junction protein concentrations in SCI patients’ bladders, recovered after three repeated cycles of BoNT-A treatment. The therapeutic effects sustained. However, urothelial inflammation and apoptosis after SCI were not significantly improved after three repeated BoNT-A injections. PMID:27249005

  3. Diabetes insipidus - nephrogenic

    MedlinePlus

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Congenital diabetes insipidus; NDI ... of very dilute urine. NDI is rare. Congenital diabetes insipidus is present at birth. It is a ...

  4. Diabetes insipidus - nephrogenic

    MedlinePlus

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Congenital diabetes insipidus ... be removed and returned to the blood. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) occurs when the kidney tubules do ...

  5. Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Future Potential for Bladder Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Bing; Jiang, Wenkai; Alraies, Amr; Liu, Qian; Gudla, Vijay; Oni, Julia; Wei, Xiaoqing; Sloan, Alastair; Ni, Longxing; Agarwal, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines, thus providing an alternative source of cell for tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) regeneration is a crucial step in tissue engineering of the urinary bladder. It is known that DPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a smooth muscle phenotype in vitro with differentiation agents. However, most of these studies are focused on the vascular SMCs. The optimal approaches to induce human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs are still under investigation. We demonstrate in this study the ability of human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs in a growth environment containing bladder SMCs-conditioned medium with the addition of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). After 14 days of exposure to this medium, the gene and protein expression of SMC-specific marker (α-SMA, desmin, and calponin) increased over time. In particular, myosin was present in differentiated cells after 11 days of induction, which indicated that the cells differentiated into the mature SMCs. These data suggested that human DPSCs could be used as an alternative and less invasive source of stem cells for smooth muscle regeneration, a technology that has applications for bladder tissue engineering. PMID:26880982

  6. Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells Differentiation from Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Future Potential for Bladder Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bing; Jiang, Wenkai; Alraies, Amr; Liu, Qian; Gudla, Vijay; Oni, Julia; Wei, Xiaoqing; Sloan, Alastair; Ni, Longxing; Agarwal, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lines, thus providing an alternative source of cell for tissue engineering. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) regeneration is a crucial step in tissue engineering of the urinary bladder. It is known that DPSCs have the potential to differentiate into a smooth muscle phenotype in vitro with differentiation agents. However, most of these studies are focused on the vascular SMCs. The optimal approaches to induce human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs are still under investigation. We demonstrate in this study the ability of human DPSCs to differentiate into bladder SMCs in a growth environment containing bladder SMCs-conditioned medium with the addition of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). After 14 days of exposure to this medium, the gene and protein expression of SMC-specific marker (α-SMA, desmin, and calponin) increased over time. In particular, myosin was present in differentiated cells after 11 days of induction, which indicated that the cells differentiated into the mature SMCs. These data suggested that human DPSCs could be used as an alternative and less invasive source of stem cells for smooth muscle regeneration, a technology that has applications for bladder tissue engineering. PMID:26880982

  7. Adjustable passive stiffness in mouse bladder: regulated by Rho kinase and elevated following partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Speich, John E; Southern, Jordan B; Henderson, Sheree; Wilson, Cameron W; Klausner, Adam P; Ratz, Paul H

    2012-04-15

    Detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) contributes to bladder wall tension during filling, and bladder wall deformation affects the signaling system that leads to urgency. The length-passive tension (L-T(p)) relationship in rabbit DSM can adapt with length changes over time and exhibits adjustable passive stiffness (APS) characterized by a L-T(p) curve that is a function of both activation and strain history. Muscle activation with KCl, carbachol (CCh), or prostaglandin E(2) at short muscle lengths can increase APS that is revealed by elevated pseudo-steady-state T(p) at longer lengths compared with prior T(p) measurements at those lengths, and APS generation is inhibited by the Rho Kinase (ROCK) inhibitor H-1152. In the current study, mouse bladder strips exhibited both KCl- and CCh-induced APS. Whole mouse bladders demonstrated APS which was measured as an increase in pressure during passive filling in calcium-free solution following CCh precontraction compared with pressure during filling without precontraction. In addition, CCh-induced APS in whole mouse bladder was inhibited by H-1152, indicating that ROCK activity may regulate bladder compliance during filling. Furthermore, APS in whole mouse bladder was elevated 2 wk after partial bladder outlet obstruction, suggesting that APS may be relevant in diseases affecting bladder mechanics. The presence of APS in mouse bladder will permit future studies of APS regulatory pathways and potential alterations of APS in disease models using knockout transgenetic mice. PMID:22205227

  8. Incidence of bladder cancer discovered by urethrocystoscopy at prostate biopsy: extraordinary high incidence of tiny bladder cancer in elderly males.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Koichi; Suzuki, Takanori; Kurokawa, Kohei; Ito, Kazuto; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Yamanaka, Hidetoshi

    2004-05-01

    In order to clarify the incidence of bladder cancer with and without prostate cancer, we investigated bladder cancer discovered incidentally by urethrocystoscopy at prostate biopsy. Between April 1997 and December 2003, 498 patients who were suspected prostate cancer were performed prostate biopsy and urethrocystoscopy simultaneously. We investigate possible invasion of prostate cancer into the urethra or bladder mucosa as well as bladder cancer, including other benign lesions of the bladder by urethrocystoscopy. Prostate cancer was confirmed in 175 (35.1%) of the 498 patients histologically, and bladder cancer was discovered incidentally in 12 patients (2.4 %). The incidence of bladder cancer in patients with prostate cancer of 2.3% (4/175) was not significantly different from that in patients without prostate cancer, which was 2.5% (8/323). Superficial and those with a size less than 1 cm were noted in 11 patients (92%) and 10 patients (83%) respectively. High incidence rate of bladder cancer with prostate cancer was reported previously, however, there was no study to compare the incidence rate of bladder cancer between cases with and without prostate cancer. The present study suggests that asymptomatic tiny bladder cancer may be present at an unexpectedly high incidence rate in elderly males. PMID:15185969

  9. Bladder outlet obstruction causes up-regulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in bladder-projecting pelvic ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Choong-Ku; Park, Kwang-Hwa; Jeong, Seong-Woo

    2015-03-30

    Pelvic ganglion (PG) neurons relay sympathetic and parasympathetic signals to the lower urinary tract, comprising the urinary bladder and bladder outlet, and are thus essential for both storage and voiding reflexes. Autonomic transmission is mediated by activation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in PG neurons. Previously, bladder outlet obstruction (BOO), secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia, was found to increase soma sizes of bladder-projecting PG neurons. To date, however, it remains unknown whether these morphological changes are accompanied by functional plasticity in PG neurons. In the present study, we investigated whether BOO alters acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) transcript expression and current density in bladder PG neurons. Partial ligation of the rat urethra for six weeks induced detrusor overactivity (DO), as observed during cystometrical measurement. In rats exhibiting DO, membrane capacitance of parasympathetic bladder PG neurons was selectively increased. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that BOO enhanced the expression of the transcripts encoding the nAChR α3 and β4 subunits in PG neurons. Notably, BOO significantly increased ACh-evoked current density in parasympathetic bladder PG neurons, whereas no changes were observed in sympathetic bladder and parasympathetic penile PG neurons. In addition, other ligand-gated ionic currents were immune to BOO in bladder PG neurons. Taken together, these data suggest that BOO causes upregulation of nAChR in parasympathetic bladder PG neurons, which in turn may potentiate ganglionic transmission and contribute to the development of DO. PMID:25625357

  10. Electroanatomical Mapping of the Urinary Bladder.

    PubMed

    Farag, Fawzy; Koens, Martin; Tijssen, Marij; Jong, Sytse de; Fabius, Timon; Tromp, Johnny; Breda, Hendrikje van; Smeets, Joep; Feitz, Wout; Heesakkers, John

    2016-06-01

    A noncontact mapping system (EnSite) was used for electroanatomical mapping of the bladder simultaneously with pressure flow study in three women with lower urinary tract symptoms. We selected the periods of obvious detrusor activity. Data were processed to remove baseline drift, and an envelope of electrovesicography (EVG) data was created. The correlation coefficient for the correlation between between the EVG envelope and the detrusor pressure (Pdet) was calculated. Bladder geometry was successfully created in all 3 patients. Simultaneous recording of EVG and pressure flow data was successful in 1 patient. Scatter plots were made of the highest correlation coefficient, showing a positive correlation between the Pdet and the envelope, and negative correlation between abdominal pressure (Pabd) and the envelope. Minimal electrical activity could be observed. Significant weak to moderate correlation coefficients were found for the correlations between Pdet and EVG and between Pabd and EVG. PMID:27377950

  11. E-learning for neurological bladder management.

    PubMed

    Rognoni, Carla; Fizzotti, Gabriella; Pistarini, Caterina; Mazzoleni, M Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Regarding the impact of visceral dysfunction on quality of life, bowel and bladder management is a very important problem. The management of the patient with neurological bladder is often a source of uncertainty for both patients and healthcare personnel. Since the need of specialized training is growing, two CME e-learning courses have been developed to provide physicians and nurses competencies for the enhancement of the daily life of the patients. The present study aims at evaluating courses attendance and outcomes. Attendance data confirm the interest for both courses. The results document a pretty good objective and subjective effectiveness of the e-learning courses but low attitude to exploit he support of an asynchronous tutor. The analysis of test results gives some hints for eventual quality improvement of the courses themselves. PMID:22874390

  12. Thyroid metastasis of bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mirjalili, S M M; Hashemipour, S; Salehi, S; Kazemifar, A M; Madani, P S

    2016-04-01

    The thyroid gland is a rare site for cancer metastasis. We report a 75-year-old man who was referred with a history of hematuria and generalized bone pain for the past few months. He had a past history of partial left lobe thyroidectomy for follicular adenoma. Subsequently he was referred for a thyroid mass and a subtotal thyroidectomy showed a poorly-differentiated carcinoma. On the latest admission, the patient underwent resection of a bladder tumour with malignant histology and an immunohistochemical profile of CK7+/CK20+/34 Beta E12+/CEA-/PSA-. Re-examination of thyroid sections with immunohistochemical stains revealed the malignant cells to be CK7+/CK20+/34 Beta E12+/CEA-/TTF1-. The findings were compatible with metastasis of the bladder transitional cell carcinoma to the thyroid gland.Scans revealed multiple liver and bone metastases. The patient died 2 months after the diagnosis. PMID:27126668

  13. Paraneoplastic retinopathy associated with occult bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Nivean, M; Muttuvelu, Danson V; Afzelius, Pia; Berman, Dalia C

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to report the first case of cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) presenting before bladder cancer diagnosis. A 71-year-old woman with a history of bilateral vision loss underwent subsequent complete ophthalmic examination include a fluorescein angiography, full-field electroretinogram (ERG), serology including serum antibodies for CAR, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan. The patient was diagnosed with bladder carcinoma revealed by PET-CT. Timely recognition of this entity may be crucial for an increased patient survival thus adult onset progressive photoreceptor dysfunction, confirmed by ERG, should alert to a possible remote effect of known or occult malignancy. In the latter, PET-CT may be exploited as a powerful diagnostic tool. PMID:27146943

  14. Lymphadenectomy in Management of Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Ramy F.; Raj, Ganesh V.

    2011-01-01

    Radical cystectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy represents the gold standard for treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Extent of the lymph node dissection and lymph node involvement during radical cystectomy are the most powerful prognostic factors associated with poor oncological outcome. However, the optimal boundaries of the lymph node dissection during a radical cystectomy are controversial. The published literature based mostly on retrospective studies suggests that increasing the number of nodes excised may have therapeutic and diagnostic benefits without significantly increasing the surgical morbidity. These conclusions are, however, influenced by selection and surgeon biases, inconsistencies in the quality of the surgery, and node count variability. In this paper, we establish the current understanding about the utility of lymphadenectomy during a radical cystectomy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. PMID:22312522

  15. Paraneoplastic retinopathy associated with occult bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nivean, M; Muttuvelu, Danson V; Afzelius, Pia; Berman, Dalia C

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to report the first case of cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) presenting before bladder cancer diagnosis. A 71-year-old woman with a history of bilateral vision loss underwent subsequent complete ophthalmic examination include a fluorescein angiography, full-field electroretinogram (ERG), serology including serum antibodies for CAR, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan. The patient was diagnosed with bladder carcinoma revealed by PET-CT. Timely recognition of this entity may be crucial for an increased patient survival thus adult onset progressive photoreceptor dysfunction, confirmed by ERG, should alert to a possible remote effect of known or occult malignancy. In the latter, PET-CT may be exploited as a powerful diagnostic tool. PMID:27146943

  16. Electroanatomical Mapping of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Koens, Martin; Tijssen, Marij; de Jong, Sytse; Fabius, Timon; Tromp, Johnny; van Breda, Hendrikje; Smeets, Joep; Feitz, Wout; Heesakkers, John

    2016-01-01

    A noncontact mapping system (EnSite) was used for electroanatomical mapping of the bladder simultaneously with pressure flow study in three women with lower urinary tract symptoms. We selected the periods of obvious detrusor activity. Data were processed to remove baseline drift, and an envelope of electrovesicography (EVG) data was created. The correlation coefficient for the correlation between between the EVG envelope and the detrusor pressure (Pdet) was calculated. Bladder geometry was successfully created in all 3 patients. Simultaneous recording of EVG and pressure flow data was successful in 1 patient. Scatter plots were made of the highest correlation coefficient, showing a positive correlation between the Pdet and the envelope, and negative correlation between abdominal pressure (Pabd) and the envelope. Minimal electrical activity could be observed. Significant weak to moderate correlation coefficients were found for the correlations between Pdet and EVG and between Pabd and EVG. PMID:27377950

  17. The underactive bladder: detection and diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Nadir; Mangera, Altaf; Hillary, Christopher; Inman, Richard; Chapple, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The inability to generate a voiding contraction sufficient to allow efficient bladder emptying within a reasonable time frame is a common problem seen in urological practice. Typically, the symptoms that arise are voiding symptoms, such as weak and slow urinary flow. These symptoms can cause considerable bother to patients and impact upon quality of life. The urodynamic finding of inadequate detrusor contraction has been termed detrusor underactivity (DUA). Although a definition is available for this entity, there are no widely accepted diagnostic criteria. Drawing parallels to detrusor overactivity and the overactive bladder, the symptoms arising from DUA have been referred to as the “underactive bladder” (UAB), while attempts to crystallize the definition of UAB are now ongoing. In this article, we review the contemporary literature pertaining to the epidemiology and etiopathogenesis of DUA as well as discuss the definitional aspects that are currently under consideration. PMID:27081483

  18. Improving Systemic Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rose, Tracy L; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2016-05-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is integral to the management of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer (BCa). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been increasingly utilized for muscle-invasive BCa over the past several years, and several options for cisplatin-based regimens have emerged. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be considered for select patients who did not receive neoadjuvant therapy. Systemic chemotherapy added to radiotherapy is a critical component of a bladder-preserving approach and superior to radiotherapy alone. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy has been the mainstay for metastatic BCa for more than three decades. Novel targeted agents are in development fueled by the recent molecular characterization of BCa. Recent trials of immunotherapy have demonstrated the possibility of a less toxic and potentially more effective treatment for metastatic disease. It is an extremely exciting time for BCa research, and much needed improvements in systemic treatment are most certainly on the horizon. PMID:26984414

  19. Malignant bladder pheochromocytoma with SDHB genetic mutation.

    PubMed

    Maeda, M; Funahashi, Y; Katoh, M; Fujita, T; Tsuruta, K; Gotoh, M

    2013-09-01

    A 30-year-old man presented with micturition pain and was diagnosed with a submucosal tumor in the right wall of the bladder with metastasis to the right obturator lymph node. Transurethral resection led to a diagnosis of invasive malignant pheochromocytoma. Radical cystectomy, neobladder reconstruction and bilateral iliac lymph node dissection were performed. Genetic analysis revealed succinate dehydrogenase B-associated hereditary pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma syndrome. 10 months after the operation, he had no evidence of recurrence. PMID:23807799

  20. [Photodynamic therapy of superficial bladder tumors].

    PubMed

    Misaki, T; Hisazumi, H; Hirata, A; Kunimi, K; Yamamoto, H; Amano, T; Kumaki, O; Koshida, K; Nishino, A; Nakazima, K

    1986-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), using hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) and the red light (wavelength 630 nm) of an argon-dye laser as the source of excitation energy was performed on 46 patients with superficial bladder tumors. Two methods of laser irradiation, (1) focal PDT using a 400 micron quartz fiber through a cystourethroscope in 22 patients with superficial bladder tumors and (2) whole bladder wall total PDT using a motor-driven laser light scattering device in 24 patients with multifocal carcinoma in situ and/or dysplasia of bladder mucosa associated with multicentric concurrent superficial tumors, were used. The patients in (2) had been referred for total cystectomy, and 19 of these 24 patients had a history of several transurethral resections, hyperthermia and/or instillation therapy. HPD 2-4 mg/kg was i.v. injected 48 to 72 hours before PDT. Judging from the results of 60 protrusions treated by focal PDT, the light power should be 200 mW/cm2 for 5-10 minutes or more and the total light energy should be 100 J/cm2 or more in tumors up to 2 cm in size. With focal PDT, 4 of the 22 patients had no recurrence with the mean tumor free time of 20.8 months. In 6 of the 24 patients treated with total PDT using 10, 20 or 30 J/cm2 of light energy, there was no recurrence with a mean tumor-free time of 7.5 months and there was no significant relationship between the recurrence rate and total light energy used. PMID:3825831