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Sample records for diabetic patient case

  1. Case series of rhinocerebral mucormycosis occurring in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Rasoul; Meidani, Mohsen; Mostafavizadeh, Kamyar; Iraj, Bijan; Hamedani, Pooria; Sayedain, Sayed Mohammad Amin; Mokhtari, Mojgan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rhinocerebral mucormycosis is a fatal infection typically affecting diabetic or immunosuppressed patients. In most cases, infection is caused by inhalation of fungal spores. Mortality rate of patients is very high (40-85%). Case Presentation: In this study, three diabetic patients with rhinocerebral mucormycosis were presented. The etiologic agents of mucormycosis in two patients were isolated and identified by sequence analysis and data were registered in Gene bank database. Conclusion: In patients with mucoreosis, early detection, surgical excision and appropriate debridement, suitable antifungal therapy, and control of risk factors like diabetes mellitus are the main parameters of successful management of this lethal infection. PMID:26644901

  2. Mucormycosis in a Diabetic Ketoacidosis Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Biradar, Siddanagouda; Patil, Shivraj N; Kadeli, Deepak

    2016-05-01

    Mucormycosis is the name given to several different diseases caused by fungi of the order mucorales. It is commonly seen in patients with decreased immunity like patients with chronic renal failure, organ transplantation, neutropenia and most commonly in those with poorly controlled diabetes. We present a case of 55-year-old diabetic man who presented with headache and fever diagnosed with pulmonary and maxillary sinus mucormycosis presenting as diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:27437278

  3. Mucormycosis in a Diabetic Ketoacidosis Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shivraj N; Kadeli, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Mucormycosis is the name given to several different diseases caused by fungi of the order mucorales. It is commonly seen in patients with decreased immunity like patients with chronic renal failure, organ transplantation, neutropenia and most commonly in those with poorly controlled diabetes. We present a case of 55-year-old diabetic man who presented with headache and fever diagnosed with pulmonary and maxillary sinus mucormycosis presenting as diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:27437278

  4. Painful neuropathy in a diabetic patient resulting from lung cancer and not diabetes: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YAO, HE-BIN; CHEN, YA-NING; SHANG, JIAN; HAN, QIAO-JUN

    2015-01-01

    The current study reports the case of a 61-year-old man with diabetes who was suffering from generalized pain over the whole body and gradually progressive numbness. The patient was initially diagnosed with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and received treatment, however, the symptoms persisted. In October 2010, the patient was admitted to the Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy General Hospital (Beijing, China) for the treatment of diabetes, however, a full-body sharp pain was also described, which was relieved upon massaging the area. Causes, other than diabetes, were investigated for these symptoms. Chest computed tomography and positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans revealed a mass shadow in the right lower lobe of the lung, with multiple lymphatic metastases. Lung cancer was diagnosed with a tumor-node-metastasis stage of T1N3Mx. Following treatment of the cancer with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the patient's symptoms were significantly improved. The present study reports a rare case of a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS) that presented as painful neuropathy resulting from lung cancer, which mimicked diabetic peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26788221

  5. Spontaneous calcaneal fracture in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: Four cases report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Evran, Mehtap; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer; Akkuş, Gamze; Biçer, Ömer Sunkar

    2016-07-16

    Spontaneous calcaneal fractures in diabetic patients without obvious trauma may occur, sometimes accompanying diabetic foot ulcers. In the current study we report four cases who were hospitalized for diabetic foot ulcer with concomitant calcaneal fractures. There were four diabetic patients (one type 1 and three type 2) who registered with diabetic foot ulcers with coexisting calcaneal fractures, all of which were classified as Type A according to Essex Lopresti Calcaneal Fracture Classification. Two of the patients with renal failure were in a routine dialysis program, as well as vascular compromise and osteomyelitis in all of the patients. The diabetic foot ulcer of the 61 years old osteoporotic female patient healed with local debridement, vacuum assisted closure and then epidermal growth factor while the calcaneal fracture was then followed by elastic bandage. In two patients could not prevent progression of diabetic foot ulcers and calcaneal fractures to consequent below-knee amputation. The only patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus improved with antibiotic therapy and split thickness skin grafting, while the calcaneal fracture did not heal. In the current study we aimed to emphasize the spontaneous calcaneal fractures as possible co-existing pathologies in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. After all the medical treatment, amputation below knee had to be performed in 2 patients. It should be noted that other accompanying conditions such as impaired peripheral circulation, osteomyelitis, chronic renal failure, and maybe osteoporosis is a challenge of the recovery of calcaneal fractures and accelerate the progress to amputation in diabetic patients. PMID:27458594

  6. Spontaneous calcaneal fracture in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: Four cases report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Evran, Mehtap; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer; Akkuş, Gamze; Biçer, Ömer Sunkar

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous calcaneal fractures in diabetic patients without obvious trauma may occur, sometimes accompanying diabetic foot ulcers. In the current study we report four cases who were hospitalized for diabetic foot ulcer with concomitant calcaneal fractures. There were four diabetic patients (one type 1 and three type 2) who registered with diabetic foot ulcers with coexisting calcaneal fractures, all of which were classified as Type A according to Essex Lopresti Calcaneal Fracture Classification. Two of the patients with renal failure were in a routine dialysis program, as well as vascular compromise and osteomyelitis in all of the patients. The diabetic foot ulcer of the 61 years old osteoporotic female patient healed with local debridement, vacuum assisted closure and then epidermal growth factor while the calcaneal fracture was then followed by elastic bandage. In two patients could not prevent progression of diabetic foot ulcers and calcaneal fractures to consequent below-knee amputation. The only patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus improved with antibiotic therapy and split thickness skin grafting, while the calcaneal fracture did not heal. In the current study we aimed to emphasize the spontaneous calcaneal fractures as possible co-existing pathologies in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. After all the medical treatment, amputation below knee had to be performed in 2 patients. It should be noted that other accompanying conditions such as impaired peripheral circulation, osteomyelitis, chronic renal failure, and maybe osteoporosis is a challenge of the recovery of calcaneal fractures and accelerate the progress to amputation in diabetic patients. PMID:27458594

  7. Burns in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Aghamohammadzadeh, Naser; Khalili, Nasim

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT AND AIMS: Diabetic burn patients comprise a significant population in burn centers. The purpose of this study was to determine the demographic characteristics of diabetic burn patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective data were collected on 94 diabetic burn patients between March 20, 2000 and March 20, 2006. Of 3062 burns patients, 94 (3.1%) had diabetes; these patients were compared with 2968 nondiabetic patients with burns. Statistical analysis was performed using the statistical analysis software SPSS 10.05. Differences between the two groups were evaluated using Student's t-test and the chi square test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. RESULTS: The major mechanism of injury for the diabetic patients was scalding and flame burns, as was also the case in the nondiabetic burn patients. The diabetic burn patients were significantly older, with a lower percentage of total burn surface area (TBSA) than the nondiabetic burn population. There was significant difference between the diabetic and nondiabetic patients in terms of frequency of infection. No difference in mortality rate between diabetic and nondiabetic burn patients was observed. The most common organism in diabetic and nondiabetic burn patients was methicillin-resistant staphylococcus. Increasing %TBSA burn and the presence of inhalation injury are significantly associated with increased mortality following burn injury. CONCLUSIONS: Diabetics have a higher propensity for infection. Education for diabetic patients must include caution about potential burn mishaps and the complications that may ensue from burns. PMID:19902035

  8. A case study of a patient with diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Mohammad Hossein; Gharibi, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    The patient, in this report, is a 52 years old male driver who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) five years ago without diabetic retinopathy at the baseline. The patient was being monitored for two intervals. It was at the second interval which he was diagnosed with proliferative retinopathy; in fact, the progression rate of retinopathy from its first sign, which occurred at the middle of the first and second interval, to the point at which the patient lost his vision from the left eye occurred within a year. In this work, we introduce a new factor ignored through all the previously conducted studies, namely, type of profession. This factor which contributes to occupational stress plays an important role in the progression of proliferative retinopathy. We speculate that this factor can accelerate the progression of this disease dramatically, even when the other risk factors are not present. PMID:26907970

  9. Bisalbuminemia in a Hypothyroid Patient with Diabetes: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Jeevan K; Maradi, Ravindra; Prabhu, Krishnananda; Bhat, Gopalkrishna

    2015-09-01

    Bisalbuminemia is a rarely encountered anomaly characterized by presence of bifid albumin bands or a single widened albumin band in electrophoretogram. Inherited bisalbuminemia is quite rare and inherited as an autosomal dominant form. The acquired form of bisalbuminemia is usually transient and may be observed during long term beta lactam antibiotic therapy, acute pancreatitis, myeloma and nephrotic syndrome. This is a case of bisalbuminemia in 61-year-old diabetic female with hypothyroidism came with acute exacerbation of bronchial asthma. PMID:26500899

  10. A case of euglyacemic diabetic ketoacidosis in a patient with gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, IE; McCance, DR

    2014-01-01

    A 30-year old woman at 30 weeks gestation with insulin-controlled gestational diabetes was admitted with nausea and vomiting. Plasma glucose was 3.3 mmol/l with pH 7.23 and raised capillary ketones at 6.1 mmol/l. She was diagnosed with euglycaemic diabetic ketoacidosis. Cardiotocography showed good fetal movement and accelerations. She was given intramuscular betamethasone and started on intravenous dextrose, insulin and 0.9% saline with potassium chloride with resolution of ketosis. Euglycaemic diabetic ketoacidosis has been reported during pregnancy in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We believe that this is a report of such an occurrence in a patient with gestational diabetes.

  11. Diabetic foot risk factors in type 2 diabetes patients: a cross-sectional case control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot is a serious condition in patients with a long lasting diabetes mellitus. Diabetic foot treated improperly may lead not only to delayed ulceration healing, generalized inflammation, unnecessary surgical intervention, but also to the lower limb amputation. The aim of this study was to compare diabetic foot risk factors in population with type 2 diabetes and risk factors for diabetes in healthy subjects. Methods The study included 900 subjects: 145 with diabetic foot, 293 with type 2 diabetes without diabetic foot and 462 healthy controls matched in terms of mean age, gender structure and cardiovascular diseases absence. Study was conducted in Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases Department, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland. In statistical analysis a logistic regression model, U Mann-Whitney’s and t-Student test were used. Results The binomial logit models analysis showed that the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type 2 diabetes was decreased by patient’s age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92-0.96; p = 0.00001) and hyperlipidaemia (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.36-0.81; p = 0.01). In contrast, male gender (OR = 2.83; 95% CI: 1.86-4.28; p = 0.00001) diabetes duration (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.03-1.06; p = 0.0003), weight (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.03-1.06; p = 0.00001), height (OR = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.05-1.11; p = 0.00001) and waist circumference (OR = 1.028; 95% CI: 1.007-1.050; p = 0.006) increase the risk of diabetic foot. The onset of type 2 diabetes in healthy subjects was increased by weight (OR = 1.035; 95% CI: 1.024-1.046; p = 0.00001), WC (OR = 1.075; 95% CI: 1.055-1.096; p = 00001), hip circumference (OR = 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05; p = 0.005), overweight defined with body mass index (BMI) above 24,9 kg/m2 (OR = 2.49; 95% CI: 1.77-3.51; p = 0.00001) and hyperlipidaemia (OR = 3.53; 95% CI: 2.57-4.84; p = 0.00001). Conclusions Risk factors for Type 2 diabetes and diabetic foot are only partially common. Study proved

  12. Health care for diabetic patients in developing countries: a case from Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, M; Abdel-Fattah, M; Zaki, A; Bedwani, R; Assad, S; Tognoni, G; Nicolucci, A

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this was to evaluate the pattern of care for diabetic patients in Alexandria as a model from a developing country. It is a cross-sectional multi-centric. One thousand diabetic patients who had diabetes for no less than one year were randomly selected from 14 out-patient clinics and diabetic centres. Results showed that monitoring of the glycaemic state was based, almost entirely upon fasting blood glucose levels, with only a small minority (4%) having HbA measurements. During the previous 12 months, an electrocardiogram had not been performed in 26% of the subjects studies and the fundus was not examined in 38%. Twenty nine percent did not receive neurological examination, and feet were not inspected in 24%. Testing for albuminuria, serum creatinine, blood cholesterol, and triglycerides was performed only in 34%, 37%, 36% and 32% respectively. Patient's habits in seeking care revealed that 78% regularly attended the medical centre for follow up, 64% followed dietetic instructions, and 89% were compliant with prescribed therapy. Only 8% did self examination of blood glucose and 26% checked glucose in urine by themselves. Generally, the pattern of care provided for health insured diabetic patients is better than that received by non-health-insured cases. It is concluded that in Egypt the quality of diabetes care differs in many aspects from the recommended standards and that structural as well as organisational improvements are urgently needed, particularly to guarantee adequate care to non-health insured patients. PMID:10962591

  13. A rare case of urinary tract infection due to Trichosporonasahii in a diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Iken, Maryem; Belkouch, Ahmed; Bellarj, Badia; Naoui, Hafida; Boumhil, Laila; El Bouti, Anass; Jidane, Said; Belyamani, Lahcen; Lmimouni, Badreddine

    2015-01-01

    Trichosporonasahii is a basidiomycete yeast responsible for white piedra and onychomycosis in the immunocompetent host. In the immunocompromised patients, invasive infections are reported; their diagnosis is difficult and they are associated with high mortality rate. Urinary infection due to Trichosporon Asahi is rare but its incidenceis increasing. We report the case of a 58 year old diabetic patient. The yeast was isolated from urine samples of three consecutive crops in pure form. The patient improved after antifungal therapy. PMID:26097631

  14. A rare case of urinary tract infection due to Trichosporon asahii in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Iken, Maryem; Belkouch, Ahmed; Bellarj, Badia; Naoui, Hafida; Boumhil, Laila; El Bouti, Anass; Jidane, Said; Belyamani, Lahcen; Lmimouni, Badreddine

    2015-01-01

    Trichosporon asahii is a basidiomycete yeast responsible for white piedra and onychomycosis in the immunocompetent host. In the immunocompromised patients, invasive infections are reported; their diagnosis is difficult and they are associated with high mortality rate. Urinary infection due to Trichosporon Asahi is rare but its incidence increasing. We report the case of a 58 year old diabetic patient. The yeast was isolated from urine samples of three consecutive crops in pure form. The patient improved after antifungal therapy. PMID:26097631

  15. Rare Case of Aspergillus ochraceus Osteomyelitis of Calcaneus Bone in a Patient with Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Shokohi, Tahereh; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh; Nabili, Mojtaba; Afzalian Ashkezari, Elham; Alinezhad, Sosan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is the most common metabolic disease in humans. One of the major complications of the disease is foot ulcer that is prone to infection. The most common causes of infection which have been reported in these patients are bacteria and fungi such as Candida, Aspergillus, and Rhizopus species. We report one such rare case with calcaneal osteomyelitis caused by Aspergillus ochraceus in a patient with diabetic foot osteomyelitis. The case was a 68-year-old male with a history of type II diabetes for 2 years. The patient had two ulcers on the right heel bones for the past 6 months with no significant improvement. One of the most important predisposing factors to infectious diseases, especially opportunistic fungal infection, is diabetes mellitus. Aspergillus species can involve bony tissue through vascular system, direct infection, and trauma. Proper and early diagnosis and treatment of diabetic foot infection can reduce or prevent complications, such as osteomyelitis and amputation. The annual examination of feet for skin and nail lesion, sensation, anatomical changes, and vascular circulation can be useful for prevention and control of infection. PMID:26064128

  16. Depression in Patients with Type II Diabetes: Case study at Diabetic Outpatient Clinic, in Samut Prakan

    PubMed Central

    Thongsai, Soontareeporn; Watanabenjasopa, Suntaree; Youjaiyen, Malinee

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive research studied the depression level of patients with diabetes type II at diabetic clinics in Samut Prakarn, and, identified the causes of severe depression in patients with type 2. There were 209 participants enrolled in the study. The samples were selected by opportunistic sampling technique. The data were collected from May 2013 to July 2013, using the CES-D questionnaire, with Cronbach’s coefficient alpha 0.82 and guidelines for interviews. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Research Results: 1. 66 percent of participants had a depression score at a low level. 2. The CES-D showed that, 44 percent were unhappy and 38 percent did not feel that their life was enjoyable. 29 percent felt no hope for the future, 5.6 percent were easily upset and 8.3 percent suffered from insomnia and severe depression. 3. Half of the participants mentioned that troubled family relationships was a main cause of their depression, 42.9 percents felt worrying about their illness, 35.3 percent blamed over work and almost 15 percent identified loss of love as the cause of depression. PMID:24373272

  17. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis in a patient with type 1 diabetes presenting as toothache: a case report from Himalayan region of India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vikram; Singh, Mridu; Joshi, Chitra; Sangwan, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an angioinvasive infection caused by ubiquitous filamentous fungi of the order Mucorales. It is a rapidly progressive fatal infection mostly reported in susceptible individuals, such as those with poorly controlled diabetes or those with defects in phagocytic function. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis is the most common type of mucormycosis in diabetic patients. This case report describes a 17-year-old girl with type 1 diabetes mellitus presenting with rhinocerebral mucormycosis. The patient presented with a history of toothache and facial pain with oedema of left half of face, periorbital oedema and depressed conciousness. She had hyperglycaemia with diabetic ketoacidosis and rapidly developed hemiparesis progressing to quadriparesis and died within 3 days of admission. The current report emphasises the importance of having a high index of suspicion when dealing with patients with diabetes presenting with facial pain or cellulitis and prompt initiation of medical therapy along with surgical debridement for control of rhinocerebral mucormycosis. PMID:24172773

  18. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis in a patient with type 1 diabetes presenting as toothache: a case report from Himalayan region of India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikram; Singh, Mridu; Joshi, Chitra; Sangwan, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an angioinvasive infection caused by ubiquitous filamentous fungi of the order Mucorales. It is a rapidly progressive fatal infection mostly reported in susceptible individuals, such as those with poorly controlled diabetes or those with defects in phagocytic function. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis is the most common type of mucormycosis in diabetic patients. This case report describes a 17-year-old girl with type 1 diabetes mellitus presenting with rhinocerebral mucormycosis. The patient presented with a history of toothache and facial pain with oedema of left half of face, periorbital oedema and depressed conciousness. She had hyperglycaemia with diabetic ketoacidosis and rapidly developed hemiparesis progressing to quadriparesis and died within 3 days of admission. The current report emphasises the importance of having a high index of suspicion when dealing with patients with diabetes presenting with facial pain or cellulitis and prompt initiation of medical therapy along with surgical debridement for control of rhinocerebral mucormycosis. PMID:24172773

  19. Three ileus cases associated with the use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Kanasaki, Keizo; Konishi, Kazunori; Hayashi, Ranji; Shiroeda, Hisakazu; Nomura, Tomoe; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nagai, Takako; Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Ito, Hiroki; Tsuda, Shin-Ichi; Kitada, Munehiro; Fujii, Mizue; Kanasaki, Megumi; Nishizawa, Makoto; Nakano, Yasuharu; Tomita, Yasuto; Ueda, Nobuhiko; Kosaka, Takeo; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-11-27

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic drugs that increase incretin hormone levels to enhance blood sugar level-dependent insulinotropic effects, suppress glucagon action, and reduce bowel motility. These incretin effects are ideal for blood sugar control. However, the safety profile of DPP-4 inhibitors is not yet established. Herein, we present three cases of ileus, considered to be closely related to the use of DPP-4 inhibitors, in diabetic patients. Each of the three patients exhibited some risk of a deficiency in bowel movement; the onset of ileus was within 40 days after strengthened inhibition of DPP-4. The use of a DPP-4 inhibitor could be safe, although the cases presented herein enable us to inform the scientific community to some of the potential adverse effects of the use of DPP-4 inhibitors in select populations. PMID:24843724

  20. An interesting case of 'diabetic foot ulcer' in an HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Sivaprakasam, Venkat; Chima-Okereke, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a highly vascularised tumour affecting the skin, lymph nodes and viscera. Kaposi sarcoma is most common in HIV-infected homosexual or bisexual men. We present here a 70-year-old white British male patient, who was under the care of the podiatric team for longstanding 'diabetic foot ulcers'. He was later referred to the Dermatology team who took a biopsy; this revealed features of Kaposi sarcoma which prompted an HIV test which was positive. This patient had previously presented to several healthcare professionals with symptoms suggestive of HIV infection. He was started on antiretroviral therapy and the HIV and human herpesvirus-8 viral loads became undetectable in the blood within weeks and he showed significant clinical improvement. This case report is a reminder to clinicians to have a high index of suspicion in patients presenting with symptoms and signs suggestive of HIV infection. PMID:24841196

  1. Cyst decreased in size post maxillary sinus floor augmentation surgery in diabetic patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sijia; Song, Yingliang; Wei, Hongbo; Ren, Shuai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Whether mucosal cyst of maxillary sinus is contraindication for sinus floor augmentation surgery has been a controversial hot spot for years. Presentation of case This case aims to present the surgical procedure of sinus floor augmentation surgery with cyst (18.72 mm × 24.61 mm) in diabetic patient. And 6 months later, the cyst decreased in size. The authors elevated the sinus floor and cyst simultaneously. The surgery was carried out successfully without sinus membrane perforation and the alveolar ridge gained about 8 mm height. Six months later, the cyst decreased in size and osseointegration was observed. Discussion Interdisciplinary cooperation is encouraged to diagnose benign mucosal cyst. The isolation between sinus lumen and the grafted sub-sinus space is important. Graft contamination or dispersion into the sinus lumen should be avoided. The integrity of the sinus membrane and use of antibiotics are very important to prevent the occurrence of postoperative sinus infection Conclusion The authors conclude that sinus augmentation surgery could be done with mucosal cyst in diabetic patient. PMID:26479781

  2. Diabetes mellitus increases the prevalence of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: A nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Loutradis, Charalampos; Skodra, Alexandra; Georgianos, Panagiotis; Tolika, Panagiota; Alexandrou, Dimitris; Avdelidou, Afroditi; Sarafidis, Pantelis A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare anemia prevalence between matched chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) and to assess factors associated with anemia development. METHODS: This is a nested case-control study of 184 type-2 diabetic and 184 non-diabetic CKD patients from a prospectively assembled database of a Nephrology outpatient clinic, matched for gender, age and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin: Men: < 13 g/dL, women: < 12 g/dL and/or use of recombinant erythropoietin) was examined in comparison, in the total population and by CKD Stage. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with anemia. RESULTS: The total prevalence of anemia was higher in diabetics (47.8% vs 33.2%, P = 0.004). Accordingly, prevalence was higher in diabetics in CKD Stage 3 (53.5% vs 33.1%, P < 0.001) and particularly in Stage 3a (60.4% vs 26.4%, P < 0.001), whereas it was non-significantly higher in Stage 4 (61.3% vs 48.4%; P = 0.307). Serum ferritin was higher in diabetics in total and in CKD stages, while serum iron was similar between groups. In multivariate analyses, DM (OR = 2.206, 95%CI: 1.196-4.069), CKD Stages 3a, 3b, 4 (Stage 4: OR = 12.169, 95%CI: 3.783-39.147) and serum iron (OR = 0.976, 95%CI: 0.968-0.985 per mg/dL increase) were independently associated with anemia. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of anemia progressively increases with advancing stages of CKD and is higher in diabetic than matched non-diabetic CKD patients and diabetes is independently associated with anemia occurrence. Detection and treatment of anemia in diabetic CKD patients should be performed earlier than non-diabetic counterparts. PMID:27458564

  3. Seasonal variations of severe hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and non-diabetes mellitus: clinical analysis of 578 hypoglycemia cases.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Miyako; Noto, Hiroshi; Hachiya, Remi; Kimura, Akio; Kakei, Masafumi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2014-11-01

    Blood glucose control in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is reportedly influenced by the seasons, with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels decreasing in the summer or warm season and increasing in the winter or cold season. In addition, several studies have shown that sepsis is also associated with the seasons. Although both blood glucose control and sepsis can strongly affect the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia, few studies have examined the seasonal variation of severe hypoglycemia. The aim of the present study is to examine the association between severe hypoglycemia and the seasons in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and non-diabetes mellitus (non-DM). We retrospectively reviewed all the patients with severe hypoglycemia at a national center in Japan between April 1, 2006 and March 31, 2012. A total of 57,132 consecutive cases that had visited the emergency room by ambulance were screened, and 578 eligible cases of severe hypoglycemia were enrolled in this study. The primary outcome was to assess the seasonality of severe hypoglycemia. In the T1DM group (n  =  88), severe hypoglycemia occurred significantly more often in the summer than in the winter (35.2% in summer vs 18.2% in winter, P  =  0.01), and the HbA1c levels were highest in the winter and lowest in the summer (9.1% [7.6%-10.1%] in winter vs 7.7% [7.1%-8.3%] in summer, P  =  0.13). In the non-DM group (n  =  173), severe hypoglycemia occurred significantly more often in the winter than in the summer (30.6% in winter vs 19.6% in summer, P  =  0.01), and sepsis as a complication occurred significantly more often in winter than in summer (24.5% in winter vs 5.9% in summer, P  =  0.02). In the T2DM group (n  =  317), the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia and the HbA1c levels did not differ significantly among the seasons. The occurrence of severe hypoglycemia might be seasonal and might fluctuate with temperature changes

  4. Elevated plantar pressure and ulceration in diabetic patients after panmetatarsal head resection: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, P R; Ulbrecht, J S; Caputo, G M

    1999-08-01

    Panmetatarsal head resection (variously called forefoot arthroplasty, forefoot resection arthroplasty, the Hoffman procedure, and the Fowler procedure) was developed for the relief of pain and deformity in rheumatoid arthritis. Although there are successful retrospective series reported in the literature, such an approach is not supported by carefully designed controlled trials. This procedure has also been advocated by some for the relief of plantar pressure in diabetic patients who are at risk for plantar ulceration. The efficacy of the procedure in this context is not supported by existing pressure measurements on rheumatoid arthritis patients in the literature, which has tended to show that although pain relief is obtained, the procedure results in elevation of forefoot pressure. Case reports are described of two patients (three feet) with sensory neuropathy who presented to our clinic 1 to 2 years after panmetatarsal head resections had been performed. Peak plantar pressures in these feet during first step gait were above the 99th percentile and outside the measuring range of the device used (EMED SF platform; NOVEL Electronics Inc., St. Paul, MN). Both patients had also experienced plantar ulcers subsequent to the surgery. Combining the information on patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with that from our two case studies, we conclude that panmetatarsal head resection does not necessarily eliminate focal regions of elevated plantar pressure. PMID:10473064

  5. Renal Biopsy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, Eugenia; Agraz, Irene; Ibernon, Meritxell; Ramos, Natalia; Fort, Joan; Serón, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The majority of diabetic patients with renal involvement are not biopsied. Studies evaluating histological findings in renal biopsies performed in diabetic patients have shown that approximately one third of the cases will show pure diabetic nephropathy, one third a non-diabetic condition and another third will show diabetic nephropathy with a superimposed disease. Early diagnosis of treatable non-diabetic diseases in diabetic patients is important to ameliorate renal prognosis. The publication of the International Consensus Document for the classification of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has provided common criteria for the classification of diabetic nephropathy and its utility to stratify risk for renal failure has already been demonstrated in different retrospective studies. The availability of new drugs with the potential to modify the natural history of diabetic nephropathy has raised the question whether renal biopsies may allow a better design of clinical trials aimed to delay the progression of chronic kidney disease in diabetic patients. PMID:26239461

  6. DPP-4 Inhibitor Reduces Central Blood Pressure in a Diabetic and Hypertensive Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cosenso-Martin, Luciana Neves; Giollo-Junior, Luiz Tadeu; Vilela-Martin, José Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) are among the main risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease. Pharmacotherapy for DM should not only improve blood glucose control, but also provide beneficial glucose-independent cardiovascular effects. The central systolic blood pressure (SBP) has become more important than the brachial SBP in the assessment of cardiovascular risk.This case report describes the effect of vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, on the central SBP in a 54-year-old woman with hypertension and DM. She was submitted to applanation tonometry (AT) before and after vildagliptin association. AT of the radial artery is a non-invasive method that indirectly assesses arterial stiffness by calculating the central SBP and the augmentation index (AIx).After 3 months of follow-up using vildagliptin, central SBP and AIx were improved. Moreover, she presented better glycemic control.This case suggests an effect of DPP-4 inhibitor on arterial stiffness parameter (central SBP) in a hypertensive and diabetic patient, which shows a glucose-independent beneficial cardiovascular effect of this group of drugs. PMID:26166078

  7. Improved Clinical Outcomes of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Utilizing Integrative Medicine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Grise, Diane E.; McAllister, Heath M.

    2015-01-01

    This case report demonstrates a successful approach to managing patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Botanical herbs (including Gymnema sylvestre) and nutrients (including alpha lipoic acid and chromium) were used alongside metformin to help improve insulin sensitization; however, the greatest emphasis of treatment for this patient centered on a low-carbohydrate, whole-foods diet and regular exercise that shifted the focus to the patient's role in controlling their disease. Research on DM2 often focuses on improving drug efficacy while diet and lifestyle are generally overlooked as both a preventive and curative tool. During the 7 months of treatment, the patient's hemoglobin A1c and fasting glucose significantly decreased to within normal ranges and both cholesterol and liver enzyme markers normalized. A significant body of evidence already exists advocating for disease management using various diets, including Mediterranean, low-carb, and low-fat vegan diets; however, no clear dietary standards have been established. This study supports the use of naturopathic medicine as well as dietary and lifestyle changes to develop the most efficacious approach for the treatment of DM2. PMID:25984419

  8. Improved clinical outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus utilizing integrative medicine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grise, Diane E; McAllister, Heath M; Langland, Jeffrey

    2015-05-01

    This case report demonstrates a successful approach to managing patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Botanical herbs (including Gymnema sylvestre) and nutrients (including alpha lipoic acid and chromium) were used alongside metformin to help improve insulin sensitization; however, the greatest emphasis of treatment for this patient centered on a low-carbohydrate, whole-foods diet and regular exercise that shifted the focus to the patient's role in controlling their disease. Research on DM2 often focuses on improving drug efficacy while diet and lifestyle are generally overlooked as both a preventive and curative tool. During the 7 months of treatment, the patient's hemoglobin A1c and fasting glucose significantly decreased to within normal ranges and both cholesterol and liver enzyme markers normalized. A significant body of evidence already exists advocating for disease management using various diets, including Mediterranean, low-carb, and low-fat vegan diets; however, no clear dietary standards have been established. This study supports the use of naturopathic medicine as well as dietary and lifestyle changes to develop the most efficacious approach for the treatment of DM2. PMID:25984419

  9. Insulin antibodies in patients with type 2 diabetic receiving recombinant human insulin injection: A report of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaolei; Ma, Xiaowen; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Xiuli; Xu, Xuling; Gong, Hui; Chen, Fengling; Sun, Junjie

    2015-12-01

    We report 12 cases of patients with type 2 diabetic receiving recombinant human insulin injection, who had uncontrolled hyperglycemia or frequent episodes of hypoglycemia, high levels of serum insulin and positive insulin antibodies. The clinical characteristics and insulin antibodies pharmacokinetics parameters were analyzed. After administration of glucocorticoids, changing insulin formulations or discontinuing the insulin and switching to oral antidiabetic agents, the level of insulin antibodies decreased and the plasma glucose restored. Thus, we recommend to identify the presence of high insulin antibodies in patients with type 2 diabetes who experience unexplained high plasma glucose or frequent reoccurrence of hypoglycemia. PMID:26607016

  10. A case of hypokalemic paralysis in a patient with neurogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Frederic N; Kar, Jitesh K; Verduzco-Gutierrez, Monica; Zakaria, Asma

    2014-04-01

    Acute hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by muscle weakness or paralysis secondary to low serum potassium levels. Neurogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition where the patient excretes large volume of dilute urine due to low levels of antidiuretic hormone. Here, we describe a patient with neurogenic DI who developed hypokalemic paralysis without a prior history of periodic paralysis. A 30-year-old right-handed Hispanic male was admitted for refractory seizures and acute DI after developing a dental abscess. He had a history of pituitary adenoma resection at the age of 13 with subsequent pan-hypopituitarism and was noncompliant with hormonal supplementation. On hospital day 3, he developed sudden onset of quadriplegia with motor strength of 0 of 5 in the upper extremities bilaterally and 1 of 5 in both lower extremities with absent deep tendon reflexes. His routine laboratory studies revealed severe hypokalemia of 1.6 mEq/dL. Nerve Conduction Study (NCS) revealed absent compound motor action potentials (CMAPs) with normal sensory potentials. Electromyography (EMG) did not reveal any abnormal insertional or spontaneous activity. He regained full strength within 36 hours following aggressive correction of the hypokalemia. Repeat NCS showed return of CMAPs in all nerves tested and EMG revealed normal motor units and normal recruitment without myotonic discharges. In patients with central DI with polyuria, hypokalemia can result in sudden paralysis. Hypokalemic paralysis remains an important differential in an acute case of paralysis and early recognition and appropriate management is key. PMID:24707338

  11. Staphylococcus saprophyticus native valve endocarditis in a diabetic patient with neurogenic bladder: A case report.

    PubMed

    Magarifuchi, Hiroki; Kusaba, Koji; Yamakuchi, Hiroki; Hamada, Yohei; Urakami, Toshiharu; Aoki, Yosuke

    2015-09-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with 2-day history of malaise and dyspnea. He had mitral prolapse and type II diabetes mellitus with neurogenic bladder, which was cared for by catheterization on his own. On arrival the patient was in septic condition with hypoxemia, and physical examination revealed systolic murmur at the apex. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed vegetation of the mitral and the aortic valve. The presence of continuous bacteremia was confirmed by multiple sets of blood culture, whereby gram-positive cocci was retrieved and identified as Staphylococcus saprophyticus (S. saprophyticus) both phenotypically and genetically. Because two major criteria of the Modified Duke Criteria were met, the patient was diagnosed with native valve endocarditis due to S. saprophyticus. The urine culture was also positive for gram-positive cocci, phenotypically identified as Staphylococcus warneri, which was subsequently identified as S. saprophyticus with the use of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and MALDI-TOF MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry), indicating strongly that the intermittent catheterization-associated urinary tract infection resulted in bacteremia that eventually lead to infective endocarditis. This patient was treated with vancomycin and clindamycin. Because of multiple cerebral infarctions, the patient underwent mitral and aortic valve replacement on hospital day 5. Blood culture turned negative at 6th hospital day. Antibiotic therapy was continued for six weeks after surgery. The patient's clinical course was uneventful thereafter, and was discharged home. This is the first case report of native valve endocarditis caused by S. saprophyticus of confirmed urinary origin. PMID:26184852

  12. Recurrent facial keratoacanthoma in a patient with diabetes: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Keratoacanthoma is a relatively common low-grade malignancy that originates in the pilosebaceous glands. Pathologically, it closely resembles squamous cell carcinoma. Keratoacanthoma is believed to have a good prognosis; however, it has been reclassified as squamous cell carcinoma, keratoacanthoma type, to reflect the difficulty in histologic differentiation of this lesion as well as its uncommon but potentially aggressive nature. Keratoacanthoma infrequently presents as multiple tumors and may enlarge (5–15 cm), become locally aggressive, and rarely metastasize. Case presentation A 66-year-old Arab male patient with diabetes was referred to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department with a chief complaint of a dome-shaped nodule with a smooth, shiny surface and central crateriform ulceration with a keratin plug in the form of a horn-like projection. Skin papules were present in the right lateral canthal area and extended to the lateral border of the lower eyelid, measuring 1.3 cm. On palpation, the lesion was firm, movable, and tender. The patient had a history of a similar lesion in another area of his face that had spontaneously regressed. Conclusion Histological differentiation between keratoacanthoma and well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma is difficult, particularly when a secondary infection is present. Careful establishment of the correlation among the history, clinical findings, and histopathology is highly indicated to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention. PMID:24758418

  13. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Pernicious Anemia in an Elderly Japanese Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Kaneko, Masanori; Yano, Toshio; Sato, Naoko; Usuda, Hiroyuki; Miyakoshi, Masashi; Furukawa, Tatsuo; Koike, Tadashi; Kaneko, Kenzo; Kamoi, Kyuzi

    2015-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 66-year-old Japanese man with acute-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) accompanied by pernicious anemia. After 2 weeks of polyuria, the patient developed insulin-deficient hyperglycemia with diabetic ketoacidosis in the absence of verifiable islet-related autoantibodies and began insulin therapy in 2001. Eight years later, he developed gastric autoantibody-positive pernicious anemia and began methylcobalamin treatment. Previous studies have reported cases of slowly progressive autoimmune T1D concomitant with pernicious anemia. The present case suggests that potential associations with organ-specific autoimmune disorders should be considered during the long-term follow-up of T1D patients, even though verifiable islet-related autoantibodies are undetectable. PMID:26370862

  14. The Occurrence or Fibrillary Glomerulonephritis in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus May Not Be Coincidental: A Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    González-Cabrera, Fayna; Henríquez-Palop, Fernando; Ramírez-Puga, Ana; Santana-Estupiñán, Raquel; Plaza-Toledano, Celia; Antón-Pérez, Gloria; Marrero-Robayna, Silvia; Ramírez-Medina, Davinia; Gallego-Samper, Roberto; Vega-Díaz, Nicanor; Camacho-Galan, Rafael; Rodríguez-Pérez, José C.

    2013-01-01

    Although clinical presentation of fibrillary glomerulonephritis is similar to most forms of glomerulonephritis, it is usually difficult to make the diagnosis. Clinical manifestations include proteinuria, microscopic haematuria, nephrotic syndrome, and impairment of renal function. A diagnosis of fibrillary glomerulonephritis is only confirmed by renal biopsy and it must comprise electronmicroscopy-verified ultrastructural findings. We report four cases between 45–50 years old with documented type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and arterial hypertension. All patients were found to have fibrils on kidney biopsy. The differential diagnosis of fibrils in the setting of diabetes mellitus is also discussed. PMID:23762079

  15. Lemierre's Syndrome Caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Diabetic Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Chuncharunee, Alan; Khawcharoenporn, Thana

    2015-08-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is characterized by an oropharyngeal infection with internal jugular vein thrombosis followed by metastatic infections in other organs. This infection is usually caused by Fusobacterium spp. In this report, we present a rare case of Klebsiella pneumoniae-associated Lemierre's syndrome in a patient with poorly-controlled diabetes mellitus. The infection was complicated by septic emboli in many organs, which led to the patient's death, despite combined antibiotics, anticoagulant therapy, and surgical intervention. Therein, a literature review was performed for reported cases of Lemierre's syndrome caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and the results are summarized here. PMID:26279962

  16. Lemierre's Syndrome Caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Diabetic Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chuncharunee, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is characterized by an oropharyngeal infection with internal jugular vein thrombosis followed by metastatic infections in other organs. This infection is usually caused by Fusobacterium spp. In this report, we present a rare case of Klebsiella pneumoniae-associated Lemierre's syndrome in a patient with poorly-controlled diabetes mellitus. The infection was complicated by septic emboli in many organs, which led to the patient's death, despite combined antibiotics, anticoagulant therapy, and surgical intervention. Therein, a literature review was performed for reported cases of Lemierre's syndrome caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and the results are summarized here. PMID:26279962

  17. Diabetes Is an Independent Risk Factor for Severe Nocturnal Hypoxemia in Obese Patients. A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lloberes, Patricia; Romero, Odile; Mesa, Jordi; Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity have become two of the main threats to public health in the Western world. In addition, obesity is the most important determinant of the sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS), a condition that adversely affects glucose metabolism. However, it is unknown whether patients with diabetes have more severe SAHS than non-diabetic subjects. The aim of this cross-sectional case-control study was to evaluate whether obese patients with T2DM are more prone to severe SAHS than obese non-diabetic subjects. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty obese T2DM and 60 non-diabetic women closely matched by age, body mass index, waist circumference, and smoking status were recruited from the outpatient Obesity Unit of a university hospital. The exclusion criteria included chronic respiratory disease, smoking habit, neuromuscular and cerebrovascular disease, alcohol abuse, use of sedatives, and pregnancy. Examinations included a non-attended respiratory polygraphy, pulmonary function testing, and an awake arterial gasometry. Oxygen saturation measures included the percentage of time spent at saturations below 90% (CT90). A high prevalence of SAHS was found in both groups (T2DM:80%, nondiabetic:78.3%). No differences in the number of sleep apnea-hypopnea events between diabetic and non-diabetic patients were observed. However, in diabetic patients, a significantly increase in the CT90 was detected (20.2±30.2% vs. 6.8±13,5%; p = 0.027). In addition, residual volume (RV) was significantly higher in T2DM (percentage of predicted: 79.7±18.1 vs. 100.1±22.8; p<0.001). Multiple linear regression analyses showed that T2DM but not RV was independently associated with CT90. Conclusions/Significance T2DM adversely affects breathing during sleep, becoming an independent risk factor for severe nocturnal hypoxemia in obese patients. Given that SAHS is a risk factor of cardiovascular disease, the screening for SAHS in T2DM patients seems

  18. Complications associated with uni-portal endoscopic gastrocnemius recession in a diabetic patient population: an observational case series.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Schweinberger, Monica H

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to report the complications associated with uni-portal endoscopic gastrocnemius recession for surgical treatment of pathologic soft tissue ankle equinus contracture in diabetic patients. This is an observational case series involving a retrospective review of prospectively collected data of 23 uni-portal endoscopic gastrocnemius recessions used to treat pathologic soft tissue ankle equinus contracture in 18 consecutive diabetic patients between November 2006 and January 2009. Each patient underwent uni-portal endoscopic gastrocnemius recession under general or spinal anesthesia with thigh tourniquet control in combination with soft tissue and/or osseous reconstructive foot and/or ankle surgery. Patients were kept non-weight bearing based on the index procedure and followed until clinical healing occurred or failure was declared. There were 9 male and 9 female patients with a mean age +/- SD of 69.0 +/- 7.4-years (range: 47.0 to 71.0 years). There were 11 right and 12 left lower limbs involved, with 5 procedures performed bilateral. Complications included 3 conversions to an open incision secondary to difficulty dissecting through excessive adipose tissue, delayed healing of 3 incision sites in patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus at the time of surgery, and 3 undercorrections in patients with spastic contractures. The remainder of the procedures were deemed successful with no saphenous nerve, sural nerve, or lesser saphenous vein related injuries occurring. When properly performed, uni-portal endoscopic gastrocnemius recession represents a safe, reliable, and minimally invasive technique useful for correcting pathologic soft tissue ankle equinus contracture in patients with diabetes. A percutaneous tendo-Achilles lengthening should be performed in patients who have marginal arterial inflow that precludes tourniquet use or have a spastic contracture. An open rather than endoscopic gastrocnemius recession should be performed in

  19. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH DIABETIC RETINOPATHY AMONG TYPE 2 DIABETIC PATIENTS: A HOSPITAL BASED CASE-CONTROL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Chaveepojnkamjorn, Wisit; Somjit, Pornpana; Rattanamongkolgul, Suthee; Siri, Sukhontha; Pichainarong, Natchaporn

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine factors associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) among type 2 diabetics in Thailand. We conducted a hospital based case-control study in Nakhon Nayok Province, between August 2008 and July 2010. The subjects were comprised of 230 cases (with DR) and 230 controls (without DR) who were gender and age matched. All subjects were interviewed and their medical records were reviewed. Seventy-five percent of subjects were married and 42% were aged 60-69 years. Fifty-five percent had a primary school education, 27% had no occupation and 67% had family income > 10,000 Baht per month. On multiple logistic regression analysis, factors associated with DR were: having a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) of 141-160 mg/dl, 161-180 mg/dl and > 180 mg/dl [OR = 7.23; 95% confidence interval CI: 2.80-18.72; OR = 4.33; 95% CI: 1.66-11.33, and OR = 3.76; 95% CI: 1.39-10.18], having a HbA1c > 9% (OR = 2.26; 95% CI: 1.15-4.43), having a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 (OR = 2.09; 95% CI: 1.04-4.19), and having hypertension (OR = 1.80; 95% CI: 1.19-2.71). Elevated blood sugar, blood pressure and body weight are all associated with DR. Further study is needed to determine if controlling these factors could reduce the prevalence of DR. PMID:26513935

  20. Incentivised case finding for depression in patients with chronic heart disease and diabetes in primary care: an ethnographic study

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, Sarah L; Russell, Amy M; McLintock, Kate; Potrata, Barbara; House, Allan; Foy, Robbie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the process of case finding for depression in people with diabetes and coronary heart disease within the context of a pay-for-performance scheme. Design Ethnographic study drawing on observations of practice routines and consultations, debriefing interviews with staff and patients and review of patient records. Setting General practices in Leeds, UK. Participants 12 purposively sampled practices with a total of 119 staff; 63 consultation observations and 57 patient interviews. Main outcome measure Audio recorded consultations and interviews with patients and healthcare professionals along with observation field notes were thematically analysed. We assessed outcomes of case finding from patient records. Results Case finding exacerbated the discordance between patient and professional agendas, the latter already dominated by the tightly structured and time-limited nature of chronic illness reviews. Professional beliefs and abilities affected how case finding was undertaken; there was uncertainty about how to ask the questions, particularly among nursing staff. Professionals were often wary of opening an emotional ‘can of worms’. Subsequently, patient responses potentially suggesting emotional problems could be prematurely shut down by professionals. Patients did not understand why they were asked questions about depression. This sometimes led to defensive or even defiant answers to case finding. Follow-up of patients highlighted inconsistent systems and lines of communication for dealing with positive results on case finding. Conclusions Case finding does not fit naturally within consultations; both professional and patient reactions somewhat subverted the process recommended by national guidance. Quality improvement strategies will need to take account of our results in two ways. First, despite their apparent simplicity, the case finding questions are not consultation-friendly and acceptable alternative ways to raise the issue of depression

  1. Patient-Centered Care’ for Complex Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus—Analysis of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Hackel, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This paper serves to apply and compare aspects of person centered care and recent consensus guidelines to two cases of older adults with poorly controlled diabetes in the context of relatively similar multimorbidity. Methods After review of the literature regarding the shift from guidelines promoting tight control in diabetes management to individualized person centered care, as well as newer treatment approaches emerging in diabetes care, the newer guidelines and potential treatment approaches are applied to the cases. Results By delving into the clinical, behavioral, social, cultural and economic aspects of the two cases in applying the new guidelines, divergent care goals are reached for the cases. Conclusions Primary care practitioners must be vigilant in providing individualized diabetes treatment where multiple chronic illnesses increase the complexity of care. While two older adults with multimorbidity may appear at first to have similar care goals, their unique preferences and support systems, as well as their risks and benefits from tight control, must be carefully weighed in formulating the best approach. Newer pharmaceutical agents hold promise for improving the possibilities for better glycemic control with less self-care burden and risk of hypoglycemia. PMID:24250240

  2. Thymectomy Cures Diabetes Mellitus and Ameliorates Myasthenia Gravis in a Patient with Thymus Hyperplasia and Hyperthyroidism: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shiyun; Zhang, Yao; Cui, Youbin; Chen, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a devastating autoimmune disease that involves the acetylcholine receptor (AchR) in the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction. It is not uncommon for MG to accompany with other autoimmune diseases and complicate with multiple organ dysfunction. Here, we report on an 18-year-old female patient with a rare case of MG concomitant with thymus hyperplasia, diabetes mellitus, and hyperthyroidism. After full excision of the hyperplastic thymus gland, the patient's muscle weakness was greatly improved and her blood glucose level was restored to normal at the 6-month follow-up. PMID:26884666

  3. Future prospect of insulin inhalation for diabetic patients: The case of Afrezza versus Exubera.

    PubMed

    Al-Tabakha, Moawia M

    2015-10-10

    The current review was designed to compare between the insulin inhalation systems Exubera and Afrezza and to investigate the reasons why Exubera was unsuccessful, when Afrezza maker is expecting their product to be felicitous. In January 2006, Pfizer secured FDA and EC approval for the first of its kind, regular insulin through Exubera inhaler device for the management of types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in adults. The product was no longer available to the market after less than two years from its approval triggering a setback for competitive new inhalable insulins that were already in various clinical development phases. In contrary, MannKind Corporation started developing its ultra-rapid-acting insulin Afrezza in a bold bid, probably by managing the issues in which Exubera was not successful. Afrezza has been marketed since February, 2015 by Sanofi after getting FDA approval in June 2014. The results from this systematic review indicate the effectiveness of insulin inhalation products, particularly for patients initiating insulin therapy. Pharmaceutical companies should capitalize on the information available from insulin inhalation to produce competitive products that are able to match the bioavailability of subcutaneous (SC) insulin injection and to deal with the single insulin unit increments and basal insulin requirements in some diabetic patients or extending the horizon to inhalable drug products with completely different drug entities for other indications. PMID:26222134

  4. [Bilateral diabetic infarction of the thigh adductor muscles in a diabetic female patient-- A case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Satoh, A; Watanabe, M; Ohkoshi, N; Tamaoka, A; Shoji, S

    1999-01-01

    A 30-year-old female complained of lancinating pain in the bilateral thighs for 10 days. The patient had a 22-year history of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Physical examination revealed swelling of the bilateral lower extremities. There was exquisite tenderness on palpation over the medial thighs, with marked increase in pain on hip and knee flexion. Muscle strength of quadriceps, hamstrings, and hip adductor was decreased due to muscle pain. Pedal pulses were palpable bilaterally. Roentogenograms of the left femur revealed calcification of the left femoral arterial wall. Venogram revealed no obstruction with normal drainage. Complete blood cell count showed left shift of the neutrophils, markedly accelerated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, prolonged prothorombin time of 9 sec (normal 11.7 sec), C-reactive protein of 7.3 mg/dl and serum creatine kinase level of 175 IU/L. FBS was 225 mg/dl and Hb A 1 c was 16.4%. An MR imaging of the thighs revealed high signal intensities in the bilateral adductor muscles on T 2-weighted images. The symptoms resolved spontaneously over a three week period. From the course of the illness and MR imaging, the patient was diagnosed having diabetic muscle infarction (DMI), a rare complication of diabetes mellitus. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of DMI in Japan. Diabetic microangiopathy and hypercoagulability are thought to be responsible for inducing DMI. Because the diagnosis can be made from the characteristic clinical and the typical MR imaging findings, muscle biopsy is not always necessary to obtain the diagnosis of DMI. PMID:10391074

  5. A rare case of facial Candida albicans cellulitis in an uncontrolled diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Om-Sub; Kang, Mi-Il; Kim, Jeong-Bae; Kim, Min-Wook; Kim, Young Keun

    2009-07-01

    Facial cellulitis is defined as infections or inflammation of the skin or connective tissue in orbital, periorbital area and cheeks, and is known to be caused mainly by bacterial infections, for which treatment with proper antibiotics and incision and drainage are necessary. Candidal cellulitis is a rare disease and only two cases have been reported in the world to our knowledge. Candidal facial cellulitis is a non-haematogenous, deep-seated infection and we should figure out for known risk factors of candidal colonisation or overgrowth and possible routes of infection for candidiasis. We report one case of facial cellulitis caused by Candida albicans in an uncontrolled diabetic woman aged 50. PMID:18983432

  6. [Nutrition for diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Schindler, Karin; Brix, Johanna; Dämon, Sabine; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kruschitz, Renate; Toplak, Hermann; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Evidence demonstrates that medical diabetes treatment has to be accompanied by lifestyle modifications. Structured nutrition interventions and increased physical activity will help patients to normalise, respectively maintain their body weight. The main target of a diabetes therapy is aimed at achieving normal or nearly normal blood glucose levels. Reaching this goal may be facilitated by the following nutritional patterns: Using mainly carbohydrates from vegetables, whole grains, legumes and fruits, Restriction of mono- and disaccharides are often important factors in normalising body weight and blood glucose, Reduction of dietary fat could be indicated. However, the primary goal is the limitation of saturated fatty acids which to high percentage are consumed with animal products. There is not sufficient evidence to recommend a dietary protein consumption of more than 20% of energy intake. Individuals with diabetes should be aware of the importance of acquiring daily vitamin and mineral requirements. Natural food sources should be preferred. PMID:27052240

  7. Alternate-day dosing of linagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients controlled on once daily dose: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Manash P.; Bhuyan, Sonali B.; Deka, Jumi; Bora, Jatin; Bora, Smritisikha; Barkakati, Murchana

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP 4) inhibitor with a long terminal half life, significantly inhibits the DPP 4 enzyme at a steady state up to 48 h after the last dose. The present case series examined the hypothesis that linagliptin retains its efficacy during alternate day dosing in type 2 diabetes patients when switched over from once daily (OD) dosing. Eight type 2 diabetes patients maintaining stable glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) with acceptable fasting plasma glucose and postprandial glucose levels and receiving linagliptin 5 mg OD for at least 6 weeks, with a stable dose of concomitant antidiabetic medications were given linagliptin 5 mg every alternate day. The median HbA1c while on the OD regimen was 6.1% (43 mmol/mol) (range: 5.8–6.9% [40–52 mmol/mol]) and median duration of diabetes was 7 years (range: 0.75–16 years). After a median follow-up period of 21weeks,the glycemic control was maintained in all patients similar to their baseline values (median HbA1c: 6.0% [42 mmol/mol], range: 5.1–7.1% [32–54 mmol/mol]). The body weight, fasting, and random glucose levels at baseline were also well maintained at the end of treatment. Optimal glycemic status maintained in our study population favors our hypothesis that linagliptin used alternate daily after switching from initial OD dose of the drug in patients on a stable background antidiabetic medications retains its efficacy. Paradoxically, alternate day dosing may affect compliance if the patient forgets when they took the last dose. Further studies including larger cohorts are needed to validate this finding and identify patients who can benefit from the alternate day regimen. PMID:27366728

  8. Alternate-day dosing of linagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients controlled on once daily dose: A case series.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Manash P; Bhuyan, Sonali B; Deka, Jumi; Bora, Jatin; Bora, Smritisikha; Barkakati, Murchana

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP 4) inhibitor with a long terminal half life, significantly inhibits the DPP 4 enzyme at a steady state up to 48 h after the last dose. The present case series examined the hypothesis that linagliptin retains its efficacy during alternate day dosing in type 2 diabetes patients when switched over from once daily (OD) dosing. Eight type 2 diabetes patients maintaining stable glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) with acceptable fasting plasma glucose and postprandial glucose levels and receiving linagliptin 5 mg OD for at least 6 weeks, with a stable dose of concomitant antidiabetic medications were given linagliptin 5 mg every alternate day. The median HbA1c while on the OD regimen was 6.1% (43 mmol/mol) (range: 5.8-6.9% [40-52 mmol/mol]) and median duration of diabetes was 7 years (range: 0.75-16 years). After a median follow-up period of 21weeks,the glycemic control was maintained in all patients similar to their baseline values (median HbA1c: 6.0% [42 mmol/mol], range: 5.1-7.1% [32-54 mmol/mol]). The body weight, fasting, and random glucose levels at baseline were also well maintained at the end of treatment. Optimal glycemic status maintained in our study population favors our hypothesis that linagliptin used alternate daily after switching from initial OD dose of the drug in patients on a stable background antidiabetic medications retains its efficacy. Paradoxically, alternate day dosing may affect compliance if the patient forgets when they took the last dose. Further studies including larger cohorts are needed to validate this finding and identify patients who can benefit from the alternate day regimen. PMID:27366728

  9. Effects of low level laser therapy on the prognosis of split-thickness skin graft in type 3 burn of diabetic patients: a case series.

    PubMed

    Dahmardehei, Mostafa; Kazemikhoo, Nooshafarin; Vaghardoost, Reza; Mokmeli, Soheila; Momeni, Mahnoush; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Ansari, Fereshteh; Amirkhani, Amir

    2016-04-01

    Significant populations in burn centers are diabetic burn patients. Healing process in these patients is more difficult due to diabetes complications. The gold standard treatment for patients with grade 3 burn ulcer is split-thickness skin grafting (STSG), but in the diabetic patients, the rate of graft failure and amputation is high due to impaired tissue perfusion. The technique of low level laser therapy (LLLT) improves tissue perfusion and fibroblast proliferation, increases collagen synthesis, and accelerates wound healing. The purpose of this case report is introducing a new therapeutic method for accelerating healing with better prognosis in these patients. The protocols and informed consent were reviewed according to the Medical Ethics, Board of Shahid Beheshti Medical Sciences (IR.SBMU.RAM.REC.13940.363). Diabetic type 2 patients with 13 grade 3 burn ulcers, candidate for amputation, were enrolled in the study. We used a 650-nm red laser light, 2 J/Cm for the bed of the ulcer and an 810-nm infrared laser light 6 J/Cm(2) for the margins along with intravenous laser therapy with a 660-nm red light, before and after STSG for treating grade 3 burn ulcers in 13 diabetic ulcers. The results of this study showed complete healing in the last 8 weeks for all patients who were candidates for amputation. In this case series, we present 13 cases of diabetic ulcer with type 3 burn wound, candidate for amputation, who healed completely using LLLT and STSG. This is the first time that these two techniques are combined for treatment of burn ulcer in diabetic patients. Using LLLT with STSG might be a promising treatment for burn victims especially diabetic patients. PMID:26868033

  10. An assessment of patient education and self-management in diabetes disease management--two case studies.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Karen; Greenwood, Deborah; Payne, Hildegarde; Thomson, John; Vukovljak, Lana; McCulloch, Amber; Specker, James E

    2008-12-01

    Diabetes affects 7.8% of Americans, nearly 24 million people, and costs $174 billion yearly. People with diabetes benefit from self-management; disease management (DM) programs are effective in managing populations with diabetes. Little has been published on the intersection of diabetes education and DM. Our hypothesis was that diabetes educators and their interventions integrate well with DM and effectively support providers' care delivery. A literature review was conducted for papers published within the past 3 years and identified using the search terms "diabetes educator" and "disease management." Those that primarily addressed community health workers or the primary care/community setting were excluded. Two case studies were conducted to augment the literature. Ten of 30 manuscripts identified in the literature review were applicable and indicate that techniques and interventions based on cognitive theories and behavioral change can be effective when coupled with diabetes DM. Better diabetes self-management through diabetes education encourages participation in DM programs and adherence to recommended care in programs offered by DM organizations or those that are provider based. Improved health outcomes and reduced cost can be achieved by blending diabetes education and DM. Diabetes educators are a critical part of the management team and, with their arsenal of goal setting and behavior change techniques, are an essential component for the success of diabetes DM programs. Additional research needs to be undertaken to identify effective ways to integrate diabetes educators and education into DM and to assess clinical, behavioral, and economic outcomes arising from such programs. PMID:19108648

  11. Cerebral aspergillosis in a diabetic patient leading to cerebral artery occlusion and ischemic stroke: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Shafi, Neelofer; Periakaruppan, Ramayee; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Groth, John; Testai, Fernando D

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is a rare and highly fatal hematogenous infection most commonly found in immune compromised patients. From the onset of neurologic symptoms, the median reported rate of survival is between 5 and 9 days. Compounded with increased hemorrhagic risks and the lack of specificity in both clinical presentation and traditional imaging, a fast and noninvasive method of definitive diagnosis is necessary if there is to be any hope for positive outcomes. We describe the case of a 50-year-old female diabetic with a history of otitis media, an uncharacterized inflammatory nasopharyngeal process, and prior ischemic strokes who presented with a new cerebral infarction in the setting of an angioinvasive fungal infection of the large cerebral arteries. We also present a literature review of aspergillosis detection and treatment in hopes that future cases will be diagnosed in a timely manner and more patients may be saved. PMID:25444026

  12. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility. PMID:27052242

  13. Enterococcus gallinarum endocarditis in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Ortu, Massimiliano; Gabrielli, Eugenia; Caramma, Ilaria; Rossotti, Roberto; Gambirasio, Maria; Gervasoni, Cristina

    2008-07-01

    Recent studies pointed out the increasing rate of infective endocarditis (IE) in diabetic patients. As diabetes mellitus (DM) prevalence is expected to increase in the coming years, infective endocarditis could be more frequently reported in these patients. We here describe a rare case of Enterococcus gallinarum endocarditis developing on normal native heart valve in an elderly diabetic woman. Therapeutic options were restricted due to resistance factors of the microorganism, limited guidance in the medical literature, and the patient's history and underlying condition. Despite these challenges, adequate antibiotic therapy led to the patient's recovery. PMID:18457897

  14. Disseminated cryptococcosis in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Poojary, Shital; Khatu, Swapna

    2014-08-01

    Cryptococcosis is an opportunistic infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans that typically presents in immunocompromised patients, most commonly in those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It rarely has been described in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Defects in the host defense mechanisms due to hyperglycemia predispose diabetic patients to opportunistic infections such as cryptococcosis. We present a rare case of disseminated cryptococcosis in a 48-year-old HIV-negative man with DM. PMID:25184644

  15. Metformin for Primary Colorectal Cancer Prevention in Diabetic Patients: A Case-Control Study in a US Population

    PubMed Central

    Sehdev, Amikar; Shih, Ya-Chen T.; Vekhter, Benjamin; Bissonnette, Marc; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Polite, Blase

    2016-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence from observational studies suggests that metformin may be beneficial in the primary prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, none of these were conducted in a US population. Since environmental factors, such as Western diet and obesity, are implicated in the causation of CRC, we conducted a large case control study to assess the effects of metformin on CRC incidence in a US population. Methods MarketScan® databases were used to identify diabetic patients with CRC. A case was defined as having an incident diagnosis of CRC. Up to two controls matched for age, sex and geographical region, were selected for each case. Metformin exposure was assessed by prescription tracking in the 12 months period prior to the index date. Conditional logistic regression was used to adjust for multiple potential confounders and to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AOR). Results The mean age of participants was 55 and 57 years in the control and case group, respectively (p=1.0). Sixty percent of the study participants were males and 40% were females in each group. In the multivariable model, any metformin use was associated with 15% reduced odds of CRC (AOR, 0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.76–0.95, p<0.007). After adjusting for health-care utilization the beneficial effect of metformin was reduced to 12% (AOR, 0.88, 95% CI, 0.77–1.00, p=0.05). The dose-response analyses showed no significant association with metformin dose, duration or total exposure. Conclusions Metformin use is associated with reduced risk of developing CRC among diabetic patients in the US population. PMID:25424411

  16. Heart Health Tests for Diabetes Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Heart Health Tests for Diabetes Patients Updated:Dec 3,2015 If you have ... angiograms . This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters • Understand Your ...

  17. [Joint home follow-up of a patient with complicated diabetes mellitus by the case manager and the community nurse: II].

    PubMed

    López-Pisa, Rosa María; Prats-Guardiola, Marta

    2012-01-01

    This is a continuation of the article published in this journal (Enfermeria Clinica), entitled "Integral approach by the case manager and the community nurse to a complex case of diabetes mellitus in the home". We present the case of a 76 year- old patient with long-term and clinically complex Diabetes Mellitus. The patient was taking part in the Primary Care home care program. This article describes the follow-up of the case in which new complications appeared in the right limb, which led to the amputation of the second limb. A new evaluation following Virginia's Henderson model was performed six months after the initial care plan. Nursing diagnoses were made following the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA). These diagnoses led to changes in objectives and performance criteria using, nursing outcomes classification (NOC) and nursing interventions classification (NIC). One of the results obtained was the improvement of her well-being by enabling the patient to interact and integrate socially within her environment after mobilising the corresponding social and family resources.Involvement in clinical practice is important in the prevention of diabetes mellitus and diabetic foot complications. Difficult and complex situations are sometimes beyond the ability of the community nurse. It can be beneficial to take advantage of the clinical support offered by the case management model and the integrated approach of a multidisciplinary team. PMID:21872519

  18. Creating a Healthy Built Environment for Diabetic Patients: The Case Study of the Eastern Province of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Sidawi, Bhzad; Alhariri, Mohamed Taha; Albaker, Walid Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Many studies worldwide have demonstrated the negative impact of an unhealthy built environment on citizens. In the case of diabetes, studies have concentrated on the environmental impact and accessibility issues of a place i.e. the home and neighborhood, whereas few studies have addressed the comfort of the type and spatial arrangement of a household and linked it with the prevalence of diabetes. Also, little research has tackled the place’s impact on diabetic patients and their views concerning their environments. This paper demonstrates the outcomes of survey that was carried out on diabetic individuals who usually visit the King Fahd teaching hospital of the University of Dammam, Al-Khober, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The patients were surveyed and physically examined. The present researchers found significant links between patients’ diabetes symptoms such as reported paresthesia and blurred vision, and medical investigations results such as lipid profile, blood glucose and blood pressure with the environmental conditions of their homes and neighborhoods. The paper shows that the prevalence of the disease is not only caused by an unhealthy lifestyle but also by an unhealthy built environment. Moreover, it illustrates that unhealthy built environment promotes unhealthy life styles. It makes recommendations on how to improve the built environment in the KSA to be healthier for all citizens including the diabetic patients. PMID:24999135

  19. Case series on tropical diabetic hand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ezeani, I U; Edo, A E

    2014-01-01

    Tropical diabetic hand syndrome is a term used to describe diabetes complication of the hand affecting people in the tropics. It consists of localized cellulitis with variable swelling and ulceration of the hands, progressive, fulminant hand sepsis and gangrene in extreme cases. This syndrome is not well-recognized and is therefore less frequently reported. The authors describe three different female patients who were known diabetics of varying duration presenting with this syndrome at our tertiary health center and who were successfully managed by both the surgical and medical units. The need for early diagnosis and aggressive management is emphasized. PMID:24909485

  20. [Vascular access in diabetic patients. Are these patients "difficult"?].

    PubMed

    Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Weyde, Wacław; Kusztal, Mariusz; Porażko, Tomasz; Augustyniak-Bartosik, Hanna; Madziarska, Katarzyna; Krajewska, Magdalena; Koniński, Przemysław; Sydor, Antoni; Letachowicz, Krzysztof; Klinger, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetics with stage V chronic kidney disease (CKD) on hemodialysis (HD) are considered as "difficult patients", because of problems with creation of the vascular access. There is controversy regarding the results and recommendations for preparation of the vascular access in these patients. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the results of creating different types of arteriovenous fistula (AVFs) in consecutive series of patients starting dialysis treatment. The analysis was performed in 741 patients (385 females and 356 males), average age 61.4±7 years, who started dialysis treatment in our department between January 2005 and December 2012. Native AVFs were created in all patients. No patients received an AVF requiring synthetic graft material. The number of patients with diabetic nephropathy was 166 (22.4%). Among them, 30 (18%) had type 1 diabetes and 136 (82%) type 2. In this group the occurrence of calcification in the forearm artery was estimated on the basis of physical examination, Allan's test, Doppler ultrasound and forearm X-ray. In a subgroup of patients with atherosclerotic changes in the arterial system the frequency of failed AVFs was analyzed. These results were compared with the group without diabetes. The number of procedures necessary for successfu AVF creation and type of access was counted in both groups. The assessment of the procedure frequency and AVF location in diabetic and in non-diabetic patients was made by χ² test with Yates correction. In the group of 166 patients with diabetes, in 100 cases (60%) atherosclerotic changes in forearm arteries were observed. In a subgroup of 30 patients with type 1 diabetes atherosclerosis was observed in 17 adults (57%). In this subgroup creation of a suitable forearm AVF in the first procedure in 9 patients was possible and in the other 8 cases the atherosclerotic changes necessitated repeated procedures and were an important obstacle to create the AVF. In the subgroup of 136

  1. The Impact of Built Environment on Diabetic Patients: The Case of Eastern Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Sidawi, Bhzad; Al-Hariri, Mohamed Taha Ali

    2012-01-01

    At present, Diabetes mellitus is considered as one of the main threats to the human health in the 21st century. It may lead to severe conditions such as blindness, end-stage of renal disease, limb amputation and a variety of debilitating neuropathies. Previous researches indicated that diabetes is caused by a complex interaction of patient’s genetics, life-style and environmental factors. They also highlighted that providing quality and healthy built environment to citizens including diabetic patients would prevent poor and unhealthy condition. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) is one of top ten countries in the prevalence of diabetes. Little researches though were conducted in KSA in regards to the effect of environmental conditions of the built environment. In 2011, the present researchers have carried out a pilot survey on a number of diabetic patients to find out the possible impact of built environment settings on the patient’s lifestyle. The research explored whether diabetic patients use smart tools in their daily life to overcome the daily life’s difficulties and perform their life as normal as possible. The results showed a close link between a poor home and environmental settings, the patient’s lifestyle, and the patient’s health status. It also highlighted the absence of smart tools and systems use. The paper argues that certain changes to the built environment must be done and to provide a healthy and safe environment for diabetic patients. This would help these patients to abandon their bad habits and adopt healthier lifestyle. PMID:22980349

  2. Managing diabetes in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Sam M; Fan, Stanley L; Yaqoob, M Magdi; Chowdhury, Tahseen A

    2012-03-01

    Burgeoning levels of diabetes are a major concern for dialysis services, as diabetes is now the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in most developed nations. With the rapid rise in diabetes prevalence in developing countries, the burden of end stage renal failure due to diabetes is also expected to rise in such countries. Diabetic patients on dialysis have a high burden of morbidity and mortality, particularly from cardiovascular disease, and a higher societal and economic cost compared to non-diabetic subjects on dialysis. Tight glycaemic and blood pressure control in diabetic patients has an important impact in reducing risk of progression to end stage renal disease. The evidence for improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis having an impact on mortality or morbidity is sparse. Indeed, many factors make improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis very challenging, including therapeutic difficulties with hypoglycaemic agents, monitoring difficulties, dialysis strategies that exacerbate hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia, and possibly a degree of therapeutic nihilism or inertia on the part of clinical diabetologists and nephrologists. Standard drug therapy for hyperglycaemia (eg, metformin) is clearly not possible in patients on dialysis. Thus, sulphonylureas and insulin have been the mainstay of treatment. Newer therapies for hyperglycaemia, such as gliptins and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues have become available, but until recently, renal failure has precluded their use. Newer gliptins, however, are now licensed for use in 'severe renal failure', although they have yet to be trialled in dialysis patients. Diabetic patients on dialysis have special needs, as they have a much greater burden of complications (cardiac, retinal and foot). They may be best managed in a multidisciplinary diabetic-renal clinic setting, using the skills of diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical nurse specialists in nephrology and diabetes, along with

  3. Rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Gen, Ramazan; Horasan, Elif Şahin; Vaysoğlu, Yusuf; Arpaci, Rabia Bozdoğan; Ersöz, Gülden; Özcan, Cengiz

    2013-03-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening fungal infection that occurs in immunocompromised patients. The most common predisposing risk factor for mucormycosis is diabetes mellitus. Rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis is the most common form in diabetic patients and is characterized by paranasal sinusitis, ophthalmoplegia with blindness, and unilateral proptosis with cellulitis, facial pain with swelling, headache, fever, rhinitis, granular or purulent nasal discharge, nasal ulceration, epistaxis, hemiplegia or stroke, and decreased mental function. Diabetic ketoacidosis is the most common and serious acute complication of diabetic patients. We herein report 2 cases of fatal rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:23524816

  4. Medicare Coverage for Patients With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenazy, R; Abrahamson, MJ

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes in the U.S. Medicare population is growing at an alarming rate. From 1980 to 2004, the number of people aged 65 or older with diagnosed diabetes increased from 2.3 million to 5.8 million. According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS), 32% of Medicare spending is attributed to the diabetes population. Since its inception, Medicare has expanded medical coverage of monitoring devices, screening tests and visits, educational efforts, and preventive medical services for its diabetic enrollees. However, oral antidiabetic agents and insulin were excluded from reimbursement. In 2003, Congress passed the Medicare Modernization Act that includes a drug benefit to be administered either through Medicare Advantage drug plans or privately sponsored prescription drug plans for implementation in January 2006. In this article we highlight key patient and drug plan characteristics and resources that providers may focus upon to assist their patients choose a coverage plan. Using a case example, we illustrate the variable financial impact the adoption of Medicare part D may have on beneficiaries with diabetes due to their economic status. We further discuss the potential consequences the legislation will have on diabetic patients enrolled in Medicare, their providers, prescribing strategies, and the diabetes market. PMID:16686819

  5. Corneal Melting after Collagen Cross-Linking for Keratoconus in a Thin Cornea of a Diabetic Patient Treated with Topical Nepafenac: A Case Report with a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed-Noriega, Karim; Butrón-Valdez, Karla; Vazquez-Galvan, Jeronimo; Mohamed-Noriega, Jibran; Cavazos-Adame, Humberto; Mohamed-Hamsho, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the case of a 50-year-old woman with diabetes that presented with corneal melting and perforation 6 weeks after collagen cross-linking (CxL) for keratoconus (KC) and postoperative use of nepafenac eye drops, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Methods This is a case report of a patient with diabetes, KC and a thin cornea that had undergone left eye corneal CxL at a different hospital followed by postoperative use of nepafenac eye drops for 6 weeks. Results The patient presented for the first time to our clinic with left corneal melting, perforation and iris prolapse 6 weeks after corneal CxL and topical nepafenac use. She was treated with a left eye tectonic penetrating keratoplasty, extracapsular cataract extraction, intraocular lens implantation and pupilloplasty. Conclusions The corneal melting and perforation in this patient was associated with multiple risk factors: (1) nepafenac eye drop use, (2) CxL in a cornea thinner than 400 µm and (3) diabetes. The recommended corneal thickness limits should be respected. Topical NSAIDs should be used with caution if used as postoperative treatment after corneal CxL and in patients with diabetes, epithelial defect or delayed healing, because of the possible increased risk for corneal melting when multiple risk factors are observed. PMID:27293413

  6. Impact of Glucose-Lowering Agents on the Risk of Cancer in Type 2 Diabetic Patients. The Barcelona Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Simó, Rafael; Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer; Puente, Diana; Morros, Rosa; Mundet, Xavier; Vilca, Luz M.; Hernández, Cristina; Fuentes, Inmaculada; Procupet, Adriana; Tabernero, Josep M.; Violán, Concepción

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study is to evaluate the impact of glucose-lowering agents in the risk of cancer in a large type 2 diabetic population. Methods A nested case-control study was conducted within a defined cohort (275,164 type 2 diabetic patients attending 16 Primary Health Care Centers of Barcelona). Cases (n = 1,040) comprised those subjects with any cancer diagnosed between 2008 and 2010, registered at the Cancer Registry of Hospital Vall d'Hebron (Barcelona). Three control subjects for each case (n = 3,120) were matched by age, sex, diabetes duration, and geographical area. The treatments analyzed (within 3 years prior to cancer diagnosis) were: insulin glargine, insulin detemir, human insulin, fast-acting insulin and analogues, metformin, sulfonylureas, repaglinide, thiazolidinediones, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and alpha glucosidase inhibitors. Conditional logistic regressions were used to calculate the risk of cancer associated with the use of each drug adjusted by age, BMI, dose and duration of treatment, alcohol use, smoking habit, and diabetes duration. Results No differences were observed between case and control subjects for the proportion, dose or duration of exposure to each treatment. None of the types of insulin and oral agents analyzed showed a significant increase in the risk of cancer. Moreover, no cancer risk was observed when glargine was used alone or in combination with metformin. Conclusions Our results suggest that diabetes treatment does not influence the risk of cancer associated with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, an eventual increase of cancer should not be a reason for biasing the selection of any glucose-lowering treatment in type 2 diabetic population. PMID:24278227

  7. Candida Carriage Rate and Growth Characteristics of Saliva in Diabetes Mellitus Patients: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Balan, Preethi; B Gogineni, Subhas; Kumari N, Sucheta; Shetty, Veena; Lakshman Rangare, Anusha; L Castelino, Renita; Areekat K, Fazil

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to establish a relationship between salivary glucose levels and Candida carriage rate in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and assess the growth characteristics and acid production of Candida in glucose-supplemented saliva. Materials and methods. A total of 90 subjects, 30 with controlled type 2 diabetes, 30 with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes and 30 without diabetes (control subjects), aged 30‒60 years, participated in the study. Unstimulated saliva was collected and investigated for glucose levels (GOD-POD method), colony-forming units (CFU) of Candida and salivary pH, using Indikrom paper strips). Analysis of statistical significance of salivary glucose and PH levels was carried out using post hoc Tukey HSD test. Correlation of Candida carriage rate with salivary glucose and salivary PH in the study groups and control group was made using Pearson’s correlation. Results.Candida CFUs were significantly higher in diabetic subjects, with a significant and positive correlation with salivary glucose levels. There was a negative correlation between salivary PH levels and Candida carriage rate. Conclusion. Increased salivary glucose was associated with increased prevalence of oral Candida in diabetic subjects. The growth of Candida in saliva was accompanied by a rapid decline in PH, which in turn favored their growth. PMID:26889366

  8. Candida Carriage Rate and Growth Characteristics of Saliva in Diabetes Mellitus Patients: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Balan, Preethi; B Gogineni, Subhas; Kumari N, Sucheta; Shetty, Veena; Lakshman Rangare, Anusha; L Castelino, Renita; Areekat K, Fazil

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to establish a relationship between salivary glucose levels and Candida carriage rate in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and assess the growth characteristics and acid production of Candida in glucose-supplemented saliva. Materials and methods . A total of 90 subjects, 30 with controlled type 2 diabetes, 30 with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes and 30 without diabetes (control subjects), aged 30‒60 years, participated in the study. Unstimulated saliva was collected and investigated for glucose levels (GOD-POD method), colony-forming units (CFU) of Candida and salivary pH, using Indikrom paper strips). Analysis of statistical significance of salivary glucose and PH levels was carried out using post hoc Tukey HSD test. Correlation of Candida carriage rate with salivary glucose and salivary PH in the study groups and control group was made using Pearson's correlation. Results. Candida CFUs were significantly higher in diabetic subjects, with a significant and positive correlation with salivary glucose levels. There was a negative correlation between salivary PH levels and Candida carriage rate. Conclusion. Increased salivary glucose was associated with increased prevalence of oral Candida in diabetic subjects. The growth of Candida in saliva was accompanied by a rapid decline in PH, which in turn favored their growth. PMID:26889366

  9. Diabetes Insipidus and Polydipsia in a Patient with Asperger's Disorder and an Empty Sella: A Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raja, Michele; Azzoni, Antonella; Giammarco, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Describes an Italian patient with Asperger disorders, Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus, and Primary Empty Sella. His response to vasopressin treatment suggested a concomitant presence of primary polydipsia. Implications of the observed concurrence of these rare disorders are discussed in relation to diagnosis and pathogenesis. (Author/CR)

  10. Diabetic Neuroarthropathy: Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Robillard, Rosario; Gagnon, Paul-A.; Alarie, Roger

    1964-01-01

    Diabetic neuroarthropathy was observed in four patients; these are the first cases of this nature reported in the Canadian medical literature. The criteria for this diagnosis included: (1) long-standing diabetes; (2) arthropathy, most frequently involving the foot, which shows deformity, shortening and ulceration without evidence of infection or peripheral circulatory failure; (3) abolition or diminution of pain on weight-bearing; (4) diabetic peripheral neuropathy with impaired sense of position or vibration and weak or absent deep tendon reflexes. Radiographic findings were similar to those in patients with Charcot's arthropathy from any cause. Tabes dorsalis, leprosy, syringomyelia, myelodysplasia and the arthropathies of corticosteroid therapy were ruled out in these cases. In addition to conventional medical therapy the patients were treated by means of walking-casts for several months. Diabetic neuroarthropathy is probably more common than the medical literature would indicate. Diminished sensation in the lower limbs in diabetics of long standing appears to be the major factor contributing to this disorder. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:14199108

  11. Charcot spinal arthropathy in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    van Eeckhoudt, S; Minet, M; Lecouvet, F; Galant, C; Banse, X; Lambert, M; Lefèbvre, C

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of Charcot spinal arthropathy in a diabetic patient and emphasize the clinical reasoning leading to the diagnosis, discuss the differential diagnosis, and insist on the crucial role of the radiologist and pathologist which allows the distinction between Charcot spinal arthropathy and infectious or tumoural disorders of the spine. PMID:25012751

  12. Multimodal Surgical and Medical Treatment for Extensive Rhinocerebral Mucormycosis in an Elderly Diabetic Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Pirrello, Roberto; Guadagnino, Giuliana; Richiusa, Pierina; Lo Casto, Antonio; Sarno, Caterina; Moschella, Francesco; Cabibi, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a well-known risk factor for invasive mucormycosis with rhinocerebral involvement. Acute necrosis of the maxilla is seldom seen and extensive facial bone involvement is rare in patients with rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis. An aggressive surgical approach combined with antifungal therapy is usually necessary. In this report, we describe the successful, personalized medical and surgical management of extensive periorbital mucormycosis in an elderly diabetic, HIV-negative woman. Mono- or combination therapy with liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) and posaconazole (PSO) and withheld debridement is discussed. The role of aesthetic plastic surgery to preserve the patient's physical appearance is also reported. Any diabetic patient with sinonasal disease, regardless of their degree of metabolic control, is a candidate for prompt evaluation to rule out mucormycosis. Therapeutic and surgical strategies and adjunctive treatments are essential for successful disease management. These interventions may include combination therapy. Finally, a judicious multimodal treatment approach can improve appearance and optimize outcome in elderly patients. PMID:24982678

  13. Improving the economic and humanistic outcomes for diabetic patients: making a case for employer-sponsored medication therapy management

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Sharrel L; Kumar, Jinender; Partha, Gautam; Bechtol, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the cost savings of a pharmacist-led, employer-sponsored medication therapy management (MTM) program for diabetic patients and to assess for any changes in patient satisfaction and self-reported medication adherence for enrollees. Methods Participants in this study were enrollees of an employer-sponsored MTM program. They were included if their primary medical insurance and prescription coverage was from the City of Toledo, they had a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, and whether or not they had been on medication or had been given a new prescription for diabetes treatment. The data were analyzed on a prospective, pre-post longitudinal basis, and tracked for one year following enrollment. Outcomes included economic costs, patient satisfaction, and self-reported patient adherence. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the population, calculate the number of visits, and determine the mean costs for each visit. Friedman’s test was used to determine changes in outcomes due to the nonparametric nature of the data. Results The mean number of visits to a physician’s office decreased from 10.22 to 7.07. The mean cost of these visits for patients increased from $47.70 to $66.41, but use of the emergency room and inpatient visits decreased by at least 50%. Employer spending on emergency room visits decreased by $24,214.17 and inpatient visit costs decreased by $166,610.84. Office visit spending increased by $11,776.41. A total cost savings of $179,047.80 was realized by the employer at the end of the program. Significant improvements in patient satisfaction and adherence were observed. Conclusion Pharmacist interventions provided through the employer-sponsored MTM program led to substantial cost savings to the employer with improved patient satisfaction and adherence on the part of employees at the conclusion of the program. PMID:23610526

  14. Prevalence of Vitamin B12 deficiency in patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus on metformin: A case control study from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Iftikhar, Raheel; Kamran, Sultan Mehmood; Qadir, Adnan; Iqbal, Zohaib; Usman, Hassan bin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes Mellitus is the most common endocrine disorder and metformin is the most commonly prescribed oral hypoglycemic agent. Metformin is well known to cause viamin B12 deficiency due to effect on calcium-dependent membrane action in the terminal ileum leading to malabsorption of vitamin B12. The purpose of this study is to determine prevalence and associations of Vitamin B12 deficiency in patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with metformin. Methods This case control study was carried out in department of medicine, Combined Military Hospital, Kharian from 1st Jan 2012 to 30 december 2012. We enrolled 114 outdoor patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus currently on metformin for atleast 12 months, by consecutive sampling, and 105 age and sex matched patients taken as control. Patients with vitamin B12 levels of less than 150 pg/ml were said to be B12 deficient. The results were analyzed on SPSS version 16. Results Serum B12 levels were low in 35 patients (31%) on metformin as compared to only 9 patients (8.6%) among controls,(p value 0.002). Mean B12 levels were significantly low in metformin group 311 pg/ml (±194.4), p value 0.03. Dose of metformin had inverse correlation with B12 levels and the difference was statistically significant with p-value < 0.001. Conclusion Our study demonstrated significantly high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in patients treated with metformin with significant effect of dose and duration of metformin use on B12 levels. Physicians must recognize this important fact and screen diabetics on metformin therapy for underlying B12 deficiency. PMID:24711867

  15. Disseminated periportal fatty degeneration after allogeneic intraportal islet transplantation in a patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Eckhard, M; Lommel, D; Hackstein, N; Winter, D; Ziegler, A; Rau, W; Choschzick, M; Bretzel, R G; Brendel, M D

    2004-05-01

    Insulin independence after islet transplantation has been significantly improved by using new steroid-free immunosuppressive protocols and increased islet mass. Only little is known about the influence on the morphology of the liver of intraportally transplanted islets. We describe a case of disseminated periportal fatty degeneration after allogeneic intraportal islet transplantation (ITx). A 35-year-old patient with type-1 diabetes mellitus who was suffering from repeated severe hypoglycemic episodes received two sequential intraportal islet grafts. Liver structure was normal before the first ITx, based upon ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One week after the first ITx, ultrasound demonstrated normal liver morphology. Four months later, at the second ITx, we detected small, disseminated, and hypodense hepatic lesions (1 to 3 mm) by ultrasound, which were confirmed by MRI and interpreted to be fatty degenerations. Histologically we found focal drop-shaped fatty degenerations with signs of mild periportal chronic inflammation. These liver alterations without clinical symptoms or pathological liver function tests matched the predicted distribution of infused islets. Glucose metabolism markedly improved after the first ITx, namely 58.6% reduction of daily insulin requirements, 1.4% decrease in HbA1c, basal C-peptide of 0.8 to 1.3 ng/dl with no severe hypoglycemia. We interpreted these benign changes in liver morphology as reactions to a local hyperinsulinemia in the neighborhood of the transplanted islets. We hypothesized that a steroid-free immunosuppression with rapamycin and tacrolimus may have contributed to changes in the portal microenvironment. PMID:15194387

  16. [Intelligent footwear for diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Pataky, Zoltan; Grivon, Daniel; Civet, Yoan; Perriard, Yves

    2016-01-20

    The incidence of diabetic foot ulcerations and lower extremity amputations remains very high and inacceptable. The high risk of ulceration and consequent amputation is strongly related to difficulties to obtain foot off-loading, particularly on long term. Due to the complexity of their utilization, the available foot off-loading devices are underused both by health care providers and patients with very low therapeutic adherence. This article summarizes the foot off-loading in diabetic patients and describes the concept of intelligent footwear we developed, based on continuous measurements and permanent and automatic adaptations of the shoe insole's rigidity. PMID:26946791

  17. [Central diabetes insipidus in adult patients--the first sign of Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Erdheim-Chester disease. Three case studies and literature review].

    PubMed

    Adam, Z; Balsíková, K; Krejcí, M; Pour, L; Stĕpánková, S; Svacina, P; Hermanová, M; Vanícek, J; Krupa, P; Stanícek, J; Koukalová, R; Neubauer, J; Krivanová, A; Mayer, J; Hájek, R

    2010-02-01

    Central diabetes insipidus with an onset in adulthood is very rare. Unlike in children, central diabetes insipidus in adults is more frequently caused by inflammatory processes and neoplastic infiltrations that do not originate from the neuronal tissue than primary neuronal tissue tumours. Rare histiocytic neoplasias (Langerhans cell histiocytosis, xanthogranulomatosis and Erdheim-Chester disease) have a specific affinity to hypothalamus and the pituitary stalk not only in paediatric patients but also when occurring in adults. We describe 3 cases of central diabetes insipidus with an onset in adulthood. Diabetes insipidus was the first sign of Langerhans cell histiocytosis in 2 patients, and it was the first sign of Erdheim-Chester disease in one patient. MR imaging showed pathological infiltration and dilated pituitary stalks in all 3 patients. PET-CT proved useful in differential diagnosis, showing further extracranial pathological changes either on the basis of significant glucose accumulation or on the basis of CT imaging. The Langerhans cell histiocytosis in the first patient has also manifested itself as an infiltration of the perianal area with intensive accumulation of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) - SUV 8.6 and gingival inflammation indistinguishable from parodontosis. Histology of the perianal infiltrate confirmed Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Infiltration of the pituitary stalk disappeared from the MR image after 4 cycles of 2-chlordeoxyadenosin (5 mg/m2 5 consecutive days). The PET-CT of the 2nd patient showed only borderline accumulation of FDG in the ENT area, while simultaneously performed CT imaging showed cystic restructuring of the pulmonary parenchyma and nodulations consistent with pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Bronchoalveolar lavage identified higher number of CD1 and S100 positive elements, consistent, once again, with pulmonary LCH also affecting pituitary stalk and ear canal. The PET-CT of the third patient showed increased activity

  18. Minimally Invasive Treatment of a Complex Tibial Plateau Fracture with Diaphyseal Extension in a Patient with Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Ashok K; Dhake, Rakesh P; Pawaskar, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the proximal tibia comprise a huge spectrum of injuries with different fracture configurations. The combination of tibia plateau fracture with diaphyseal extension is a rare injury with sparse literature being available on treatment of the same. Various treatment modalities can be adopted with the aim of achieving a well-aligned, congruous, stable joint, which allows early motion and function. We report a case of a 40-year-old male who sustained a Schatzker type VI fracture of left tibial plateau with diaphyseal extension. On further investigations, the patient was diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus with grossly deranged blood sugar levels. The depressed tibial condyle was manipulated to lift its articular surface using K-wire as a joystick and stabilized with an additional K-wire. Distal tibial skeletal traction was maintained for three weeks followed by an above knee cast. At eight months of follow-up, X-rays revealed a well-consolidated fracture site, and the patient had attained a reasonably good range of motion with only terminal restriction of squatting. Tibial plateau fractures with diaphyseal extension in a patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus is certainly a challenging entity. After an extended search of literature, we could not find any reports highlighting a similar method of treatment for complex tibial plateau injuries in a patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. PMID:27335711

  19. Minimally Invasive Treatment of a Complex Tibial Plateau Fracture with Diaphyseal Extension in a Patient with Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Ashok K; Pawaskar, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the proximal tibia comprise a huge spectrum of injuries with different fracture configurations. The combination of tibia plateau fracture with diaphyseal extension is a rare injury with sparse literature being available on treatment of the same. Various treatment modalities can be adopted with the aim of achieving a well-aligned, congruous, stable joint, which allows early motion and function. We report a case of a 40-year-old male who sustained a Schatzker type VI fracture of left tibial plateau with diaphyseal extension. On further investigations, the patient was diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus with grossly deranged blood sugar levels. The depressed tibial condyle was manipulated to lift its articular surface using K-wire as a joystick and stabilized with an additional K-wire. Distal tibial skeletal traction was maintained for three weeks followed by an above knee cast. At eight months of follow-up, X-rays revealed a well-consolidated fracture site, and the patient had attained a reasonably good range of motion with only terminal restriction of squatting. Tibial plateau fractures with diaphyseal extension in a patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus is certainly a challenging entity. After an extended search of literature, we could not find any reports highlighting a similar method of treatment for complex tibial plateau injuries in a patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. PMID:27335711

  20. Risking Life and Limb: A Case of Spontaneous Diabetic Muscle Infarction (Diabetic Myonecrosis).

    PubMed

    Cumberledge, Jeremy; Kumar, Bharat; Rudy, David

    2016-06-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction, also known as diabetic myonecrosis, is a microvascular complication of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus characterized by unilateral limb pain and swelling. Because these symptoms closely mimic cellulitis and thromboembolism, diagnosis is often delayed or missed altogether, leading to increased morbidity and inappropriate treatment. We describe a case of unilateral limb pain and swelling due to diabetic muscle infarction in a 36-year-old patient with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. We also review the literature on the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of this under-recognized condition. PMID:26643376

  1. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes in a young Ugandan patient, a rare form of secondary diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes is an infrequent type of secondary diabetes due to chronic tropical non alcoholic calcific pancreatitis. It has been widely described exclusively in developing tropical countries. A diagnosis is made basing on the presence of abdominal pain, presence of pancreatic calcifications, steatorrhoea, and diabetes mellitus. Case presentation We report a case of a 20 year old Ugandan female patient who presented with features of chronic tropical calcific pancreatitis complicated by diabetes mellitus, oedematous malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. Conclusion This case report demonstrates that fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes still exists in developing countries like Uganda. Clinicians in such settings should possess a high clinical suspicion of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes especially in presence of malnutrition. Challenges of management of such patients in resource limited settings are comprehensively discussed in the review of literature. PMID:23126518

  2. [Treatment of elderly diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Rušavý, Zdeněk; Žourek, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes has become a pandemic disease over the past 50 years. Its incidence increases the most rapidly in the senior population, i.e. among people older than 65. In a number of countries 1/4 of the people with diabetes are now older than 65 years. Geriatrics now examines numerous differences regarding the senior patients, which often lead to somewhat different therapeutic procedures as compared to the treatment of other adult patients. This paper aims to show some different aspects of the treatment of an elderly patient with diabetes. The intensity of diabetes treatment in the elderly is mainly defined by the incidence of symptoms caused by diabetic decompensation which negatively affect quality of life and are likely to increase mortality. The treatment goals expressed by HbA1c, fasting and post-prandial glycemia, should be set individually based on age, initial HbA1c, present comorbidities and the level of frailty of an elderly patient. An effort to reduce weight regarding people at an older age is probably inappropriate and maybe even harmful, while physical activity reduces mortality and slows muscle catabolism at every age. Ideal is normal walking for 20-30 minutes a day. Except for "very fit elders" without renal insufficiency, the sulfonylurea treatment is unsuitable and perhaps even harmful. It significantly increases the incidence of different types of hypoglycemia and very likely overall mortality as well. The basis of diabetes treatment for the elderly is the effort to perform any regular exercise. In regard to medication treatment it is recommended to choose metformin or gliptin following the rule "start low, go slow", i.e. start with low medication doses and increase them at a slow pace. The main goal of the treatment is to maintain the good quality of life as long as possible, without symptoms associated with hyperglycemia with minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia development. PMID:25894262

  3. Salmonella Abscess of the Anterior Chest Wall in a Patient With Type 2 Diabetes and Poor Glycemic Control: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chiao, Hao-Yu; Wang, Chi-Yu; Wang, Chih-Hsin

    2016-03-01

    Salmonella can cause extra-intestinal focal infections as well as gastrointestinal problems. A few cases of Salmonella skin and soft tissue infection have been documented in immunocompromised patients such as persons with type 2 diabetes and poor glycemic control. A case study is presented of a 30-year-old man with a 10-year history of poorly controlled (HbA1C 11.7%) diabetes mellitus who presented with a ruptured nodule resulting in a wound with signs of infection over his anterior chest region of 1-month duration. He had been taking amoxycillin/clavulanate for the week previous to presentation at the authors' facility. Following sharp debridement, the ulcerative wound deteriorated and a chest wall abscess developed. Bacterial culture results were positive for Salmonella group D, resistant to ampicillin and susceptible to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. The patient underwent surgical debridement, resulting in a wound 7 cm x 4 cm, and was provided ceftriaxone 2.0 g intravenously daily along with insulin therapy. After surgical debridement, a local rotational flap was created for wound closure and reconstruction. The patient was discharged 1 week later on oral antibiotic therapy for 1 week. His wound was completely healed without recurrence at his 4-month follow-up. For this patient, addressing glycemic issues, identifying the infectious organism, and providing appropriate therapy, radical debridement, and flap surgery helped heal an advanced soft tissue infection. In immunocompromised patients with skin or soft tissue infections, the presence of Salmonella should be considered. PMID:26978859

  4. Depression in diabetic patients attending University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Birhanu, Anteneh Messele; Alemu, Fekadu Mazengia; Ashenafie, Tesfaye Demeke; Balcha, Shitaye Alemu; Dachew, Berihun Assefa

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus, frequently associated with comorbid depression, contributes to the double burden of individual patients and community. Depression remains undiagnosed in as many as 50%–75% of diabetes cases. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and associated factors of depression among diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to May 2014 among 422 sampled diabetic patients attending the University of Gondar Hospital Diabetic Clinic. The participants were selected using systematic random sampling. Data were collected by face-to-face interview using a standardized and pretested questionnaire linked with patient record review. Depression was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Data were entered to EPI INFO version 7 and analyzed by SPSS version 20 software. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with depression. Results A total of 415 diabetic patients participated in the study with a response rate of 98.3%. The prevalence of depression among diabetic patients was found to be 15.4% (95% confidence interval (CI): 11.7–19.2). Only religion (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =2.65 and 95% CI: 1.1–6.0) and duration of diabetes (AOR =0.27 and 95% CI: 0.07–0.92) were the factors associated with depression among diabetic patients. Conclusion The prevalence of depression was low as compared to other similar studies elsewhere. Disease (diabetes) duration of 10 years and above and being a Muslim religion follower (as compared to Christian) were the factors significantly associated with depression. Early screening of depression and treating depression as a routine component of diabetes care are recommended. Further research with a large sample size, wider geographical coverage, and segregation of type of diabetes mellitus is recommended. PMID:27274296

  5. Primary Infrainguinal Subintimal Angioplasty in Diabetic Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bargellini, Irene Petruzzi, Pasquale; Scatena, Alessia; Cioni, Roberto; Cicorelli, Antonio; Vignali, Claudio; Rizzo, Loredana; Piaggesi, Alberto; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2008-07-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate technical and clinical results of infrainguinal subintimal angioplasty in a series of diabetic patients with limb-threatening ischemia. From July 2003 to December 2007, 60 consecutive diabetic patients (M/F = 41/19; mean age, 69.4 {+-} 9.4 years) with Fontaine stage IV critical limb ischemia, not suitable for surgical recanalization, underwent primary infrainguinal subintimal angioplasty. The technical success, perioperative morbidity and mortality, and clinical success (defined by ulcer healing) were evaluated. Kaplan-Meier life-table analysis was obtained for cumulative clinical success, limb salvage, and survival rates. The procedure was technically successful in 55 of 60 (91.7%) patients; in 5 cases we were not able to achieve a reentry. Periprocedural mortality was 5% (3 patients); three patients (5%) required major amputation periprocedurally. Mean follow-up was 23 months (range, 0-48 months). On an intention-to-treat basis, the limb salvage rate was 93.3% (56/60 patients); ulcer healing was observed in 45 of 60 (75%) patients and it was significantly (p < 0.05) associated with serum creatinine and HbA1c levels, diabetes duration, and infrapopliteal recanalization. One- and three-year cumulative survival rates were 91.5% and 83.1%, respectively; serum creatinine levels, patient age, and clinical success were significant predictors of survival. In conclusion, infrainguinal primary subintimal angioplasty is a safe and effective treatment in diabetic patients with limb-threatening ischemia not suitable for surgical recanalization. This procedure is aimed to create a 'temporary bypass' that facilitates ulcer healing.

  6. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN DIABETIC PATIENTS IN SOHAG UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS, EGYPT.

    PubMed

    Elnadi, Nada A; Hassanien, Hassan A; Ahmad, Amal M; Abd Ellah, Asmaa K

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal parasites usually create benign diseases, though they may induce complications with high morbidity and mortality to the immunocompromised, including diabetic patients. The study detected the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in diabetic patients, comparing to non-diabetic controls and other parameters. A total of 100 fecal samples were collected from diabetic patients at the outpatient clinic of Sohag University Hospitals and another 100 from cross matched controls. The samples were examined macroscopically and microscopically by direct smear and different concentration methods then stained by Modified Ziehl-Neelsen Acid fast stain. Glycated hemoglobin (Hb Alc) was measured to detect DM controlled patients. The data were organized, tabulated, and statistically analyzed. Intestinal parasites were found in 25 (25%) cases out of 100 patients in diabetic group and 7(7%) cases out of 100 controls with high significance (P<0.001)). In the diabetic group, Giardia lamblia was detected in 22 cases (22%) and 5 (5%) among controls, Entamoeba histolytica in 7 cases (7%) and 3 (3%) among controls, Hymenolypis nana in 5 cases (5%) and 3 (3%) among controls, Entamoeba coli in 8 patients (8%), Entamoeba hartmanni in 3 cases (3%), Dientamoeba fragilis in a case (1%), Cryptosporidium parvum in 5 cases (5%) and microsporidia in 3 cases (3%). But, E. coli, E. hartmanni, D. fragilis and C. parvum nor microsporidia were detected in controls. The rate of G. lamblia in DM patients compared to controls was high significant (P<0.001). Hymenolepis nana was 5% (5 cases) in diabetic patients compared to 3% (3 cases) in controls. Residence and sex differences were not significant, while age, >10 years showed the highest prevalence (P< 0.003), type I infection rate was significantly higher than type II (P<0.001). DM control was also significantly affected the infection rates (P<0.007 in type I and P< 0.01 in type II). PMID:26485865

  7. TNF A -308G>A polymorphism in Moroccan patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a case-control study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sefri, Hajar; Benrahma, Houda; Charoute, Hicham; Lakbakbi el Yaagoubi, Fouzia; Rouba, Hassan; Lyoussi, Badiaa; Nourlil, Jalal; Abidi, Omar; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2014-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of causes of mortality and morbidity in Moroccan population. The identification of genes implicated in this disease can help to found a specific treatment and to improve the quality of life for type 2 diabetic patients. In this study we analyze the association between a polymorphism (-308G>A) of TNF A promoter gene and T2DM in Moroccan patients. Five hundred and fifty-one individuals (307 patients with T2DM and 244 controls) were genotyped for this polymorphism by PCR-RFLP. This association was further reconsidered by a meta-analysis on 21 studies including 8,187 cases and 7,811 controls. We found that in Moroccan patients the -308A allele is strongly associated with T2DM (p = 0.000002; odds ratio 1.79, 95 % confidence interval 1.41-2.28). Based on our meta-analysis, there was no significant association detected between the TNF A -308G>A polymorphism and risk for T2DM. Our results suggest that the -308G>A polymorphism is a genetic risk factor for the development of T2DM in Moroccan population. On the other hand the meta analysis results led to controversial conclusions in other ethnicities. PMID:24952604

  8. Handheld fluorescence imaging device detects subclinical wound infection in an asymptomatic patient with chronic diabetic foot ulcer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yichao C; Smith, Marlie; Chu, Ashley; Lindvere-Teene, Liis; Starr, Danielle; Tapang, Kim; Shekhman, Rachel; Wong, Olive; Linden, Ron; DaCosta, Ralph S

    2016-08-01

    Chronic wounds are a significant burden to global patient and health care infrastructures, and there is a need for better methods of early wound diagnosis and treatment. Traditional diagnosis of chronic wound infection by pathogenic bacteria, using clinical signs and symptoms, is based on visual inspection under white light and microbiological sampling (e.g. swabbing and/or biopsy) of the wound, which are subjective and suboptimal. Diagnosing microbial infection based on traditional clinical signs and symptoms in wounds of asymptomatic patients is especially challenging at the bedside. Bacteria are invisible to the unaided eye and wound sampling for diagnostic testing can cause unacceptable delays in diagnosis and treatment. To address this problem, we developed a new prototype handheld, portable fluorescence imaging device that enables non-contact, real-time, high-resolution visualisation of pathogenic bacteria and tissues in wounds. Herein, we report the clinical use of this imaging device in detecting subsurface heavy bacterial load and subclinical local infection in an asymptomatic 50-year-old patient with a non-healing diabetic foot ulcer. PMID:25907362

  9. Cross-sectional assessment reveals high diabetes prevalence among newly-diagnosed tuberculosis cases

    PubMed Central

    Camerlin, Aulasa J; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Wang, Weiwei; Restrepo, Mary A; Zarate, Izelda; Mora-Guzmán, Francisco; Crespo-Solis, Jesus G; Briggs, Jessica; McCormick, Joseph B; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To estimate the contribution of clinically-confirmed diabetes mellitus to tuberculosis (TB) rates in communities where both diseases are prevalent as a way to identify opportunities for TB prevention among diabetic patients. Methods This is a prospective study in which TB patients ≥ 20 years old at TB clinics in the Texas–Mexico border were tested for diabetes. The risk of tuberculosis attributable to diabetes was estimated from statistics for the corresponding adult population. Findings The prevalence of diabetes among TB patients was 39% in Texas and 36% in Mexico. Diabetes contributed 25% of the TB cases studied, whereas human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection contributed 5% or fewer. Among TB patients, fewer Mexicans than Texans were aware that they had diabetes before this study (4% and 19%, respectively). Men were also less frequently aware than women that they had diabetes (P = 0.03). Patients who knew that they had diabetes before the study had an 8-year history of the disease, on average, before being diagnosed with TB. Conclusion Patients with diabetes are at higher risk of contracting TB than non-diabetic patients. Integrating TB and diabetes control programmes worldwide would facilitate TB prevention among diabetes patients and increase the number of diabetics who learn of their condition, particularly among males. Such a strategy would lead to earlier case detection and improve the management of both TB and diabetes. PMID:21556303

  10. Transient Tear Film Dysfunction after Cataract Surgery in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tongsheng; Mashaghi, Alireza; Liu, Qinghuai; Hong, Jiaxu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly common systemic disease. Many diabetic patients seek cataract surgery for a better visual acuity. Unlike in the general population, the influence of cataract surgery on tear film function in diabetic patients remains elusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tear function in diabetic and nondiabetic patients following cataract surgery. Methods In this prospective, interventional case series, 174 diabetic patients without dry eye syndrome (DES) and 474 age-matched nondiabetic patients as control who underwent phacoemulsification were enrolled at two different eye centers between January 2011 and January 2013. Patients were followed up at baseline and at 7 days, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. Ocular symptom scores (Ocular Surface Disease Index, OSDI) and tear film function including tear film stability (tear film break-up time, TBUT), corneal epithelium integrity (corneal fluorescein staining, CFS), and tear secretion (Schirmer’s I test, SIT) were evaluated. Results In total, 83.9% of the diabetic patients (146 cases with 185 eyes) and 89.0% of the nondiabetic patients (422 cases with 463 eyes) completed all check-ups after the interventions (P = 0.095). The incidence of DES was 17.1% in the diabetic patients and 8.1% in the nondiabetic patients at 7 days after cataract surgery. In the diabetic patients, the incidence of DES remained 4.8% at 1 month postoperatively and decreased to zero at 3 months after surgery. No DES was diagnosed in nondiabetic patients at either the 1-month or 3-month follow-up. Compared with the baseline, the diabetic patients had worse symptom scores and lower TBUT values at 7 days and 1 month but not at 3 months postoperatively. In the nondiabetic patients, symptom scores and TBUT values had returned to preoperative levels at 1-month check-up. CFS scores and SIT values did not change significantly postoperatively in either group (P = 0.916 and P = 0.964, respectively

  11. Case of ketoacidosis by a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor in a diabetic patient with a low-carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Hayami, Tomohide; Kato, Yoshiro; Kamiya, Hideki; Kondo, Masaki; Naito, Ena; Sugiura, Yukako; Kojima, Chika; Sato, Sami; Yamada, Yuichiro; Kasagi, Rina; Ando, Toshihito; Noda, Saeko; Nakai, Hiromi; Takada, Eriko; Asano, Emi; Motegi, Mikio; Watarai, Atsuko; Kato, Koichi; Nakamura, Jiro

    2015-09-01

    We present a case of a 32-year-old diabetic woman with Prader-Willi syndrome who developed severe ketoacidosis caused by a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, a novel class of antihyperglycemic agents, during a strict low-carbohydrate diet. At admission, a serum glucose level of 191 mg/dL was relatively low, though laboratory evaluations showed severe ketoacidosis. This is the first report of ketoacidosis caused by a SGLT2 inhibitor. It is necessary to not only pay attention when using a SGLT2 inhibitor in patients following a low-carbohydrate diet, but also to start a low-carbohydrate diet in patients treated with a SGLT2 inhibitor because of a high risk for developing ketoacidosis. PMID:26417418

  12. [Acyclovir-induced neurotoxicity and acute kidney injury in an elderly diabetic patient treated with valacyclovir: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Sagawa, Naoko; Tsurutani, Yuya; Nomura, Kazushi; Okuyama, Tomoko; Kondo, Mai; Sata, Akira; Miyao, Mariko; Mizuno, Yuzo

    2014-01-01

    An 83-year-old Japanese man had a 29-year history of well-controlled diabetes mellitus. His HbA1c level was approximately 6.0%, with no microalbuminuria and a serum creatinine level seven days before admission of 0.8 mg/dl (eGFR: 69.67 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). Five days before admission, he visited an ophthalmologist with inflammation of the right palpebra and conjunctiva and began taking valacyclovir at a dose of 3,000 mg for the treatment of herpes zoster. Two days before admission, he was prescribed loxoprofen at a dose of 180 mg for a headache. One day prior to admission, he developed dysarthria, wandering and loss of appetite. He was subsequently admitted to our hospital with progressive deterioration of consciousness (Japan Coma Scale: II-20). On admission, he exhibited renal dysfunction, with a serum creatinine level of 5.11 mg/dl (eGFR: 9.16 ml/min/1.73 m(2)). Based on his diverse symptoms and current treatment with valacyclovir, the patient was diagnosed with acyclovir-induced neurotoxicity and his symptoms rapidly improved after hemodialysis. The serum acyclovir level on admission was found to be 9.25 μg/ml. Although acyclovir-induced neurotoxicity is commonly seen in elderly patients with renal dysfunction, there are also reports of this condition in patients with a normal renal function. Valacyclovir is frequently prescribed to the elderly to treat diseases such as herpes zoster. As valacyclovir induces renal dysfunction, which raises the serum acyclovir level to the toxic range, special attention must be paid when administering this drug in elderly subjects. PMID:25749332

  13. Economic burden of hepatitis B infection among patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Gaurav; Klink, Andrew J.; Shenolikar, Rahul; Singer, Joseph; Eisenberg Lawrence, Debra F.; Krishnarajah, Girishanthy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite ACIP recommendation and cost-effectiveness established in those 19–59 y old diabetes patients the uptake of Hepatitis B vaccine in diabetes patients is low. There is need to highlight the impact of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in diabetes patients in terms of healthcare utilization and costs to recognize the burden of HBV in this population. This retrospective claims analysis included patients with diabetes and HBV (cases; n=1,236) and those with diabetes without HBV (controls; n=4,944), identified by ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes. Cases were matched with 4 controls using propensity score matching. Healthcare utilization and cost were compared; incremental effect of HBV infection was assessed using multivariate analysis. In the adjusted analyses, the mean number of hospitalizations (0.6 vs 0.4), outpatient service visits (34.2 vs. 20.4), and office visits (10.9 vs. 9.8) were 41%, 68%, and 11% higher, respectively, in cases vs. controls (all p<0.05). Gastroenterologist visits (0.8 vs. 0.2) and infectious disease visits (0.1 vs. 0.0) were 80% and 18% higher in subset of case and controls with these events. Cases ($39,435) incurred $16,397 incremental total costs compared with controls ($23,038). Medical ($30,968 vs. $17,765) and pharmacy costs ($8,029 vs. $5,114) were both significantly higher for cases (p < 0.0001). Healthcare utilization and costs were higher among patients with diabetes and HBV than in those with diabetes alone. These results provide evidence supporting the need for HBV vaccination among unvaccinated diabetes patients. PMID:27050021

  14. An uncommon case of diabetic mastopathy in type II non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sotome, Keiichi; Ohnishi, Tatsuya; Miyoshi, Ryo; Nakamaru, Makoto; Furukawa, Akio; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Morozumi, Kyoei; Tanaka, Yoichi; Iri, Hisami

    2006-01-01

    Diabetic mastopathy is an uncommon tumor-like proliferation of fibrous tissue of the breast that usually occurs in a patient who has suffered from type I diabetes mellitus of long duration. Here we report a rare case of diabetic mastopathy that occurred in type II non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. This patient was a 63-year-old postmenopausal woman. Mammography, ultrasonography and MR imaging could not distinguish it from breast cancer. Although the core needle biopsy specimen showed fibrosis without evidence of malignancy, excisional biopsy was performed. Histological findings demonstrated typical diabetic mastopathy with keloid-like fibrosis, perivascular lymphocytic infiltration, and lymphocytic lobulitis without evidence of malignancy. These lymphocytes were composed predominantly of B-cells. Five months after surgical biopsy, a nodular formation approximately 4 cm in diameter recurred adjacent to the resected end of the biopsy. PMID:16755119

  15. Effects of aspartame on diabetic rats and diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, H; Yoshida, T; Nakai, M; Mori, H; Kano, Y; Nishioka, H; Kajiyama, S; Kitagawa, Y; Kanatsuna, T; Kondo, M

    1985-10-01

    The effects of aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) on plasma glucose and insulin levels were investigated in diabetic rats and patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The oral administration of 0.45 mg aspartame per 100g body weight, which is equivalent to 150 mg of glucose in sweetness, to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats had no effect on the plasma glucose or insulin levels. Also, 225 mg oral aspartame loading, which is equivalent to 75 g of glucose in sweetness, to patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus did not increase plasma glucose or insulin levels, although 75 g of oral glucose loading increased plasma glucose and insulin levels in diabetic patients as expected. Aspartame ingestion for three days at a dose of 24-48 mg per day and the intake of snacks flavored with 240 mg of aspartame also did not increase fasting plasma glucose levels. These results suggest that acute administration of aspartame has no influence on plasma glucose or insulin levels in diabetic rats and patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. PMID:3908628

  16. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Patient with Cocaine Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Abu-Abed Abdin, Asma; Hamza, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad S; Ahmed, Awab

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is characterized by elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, hyperglycemia, and elevated ketones in urine and blood. Hyperglycemia is a key component of DKA; however, a subset of DKA patients can present with near-normal blood glucose, an entity described as "euglycemic DKA." This rare phenomenon is thought to be due to starvation and food restriction in insulin dependent diabetic patients. Cocaine abuse is considered a trigger for development of DKA. Cocaine also has anorexic effects. We describe an interesting case of euglycemic DKA in a middle-aged diabetic female presenting with elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, with near-normal blood glucose, in the settings of noncompliance to insulin and cocaine abuse. We have postulated that cocaine abuse was implicated in the pathophysiology of euglycemic DKA in this case. This case highlights complex physiological interplay between type-1 diabetes, noncompliance to insulin, and cocaine abuse leading to DKA, with starvation physiology causing development of euglycemic DKA. PMID:27579186

  17. Case 22:Type II diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. It is composed of two types depending on the pathogenesis. Type I diabetes is characterized by insulin deficiency and usually has its onset during childhood or teenage years. This is also called ketosis-prone diabetes. Type II diab...

  18. Coronary Artery Revascularization in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Page Coronary Artery Revascularization in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus David H. Fitchett , Milan Gupta , Michael E. ... with exertion), heart attack, and possibly sudden death. Diabetes and Coronary Artery Disease Patients with diabetes mellitus ...

  19. Managing type 2 diabetes in Black patients.

    PubMed

    Akindana, Adeola; Ogunedo, Chioma

    2015-09-13

    Despite many novel treatments available for managing type 2 diabetes mellitus, Black patients continue to disproportionately suffer complications associated with poor glycemic control. This article describes a comprehensive approach to managing diabetes mellitus in these patients while addressing cultural nuances that may be barriers to positive outcomes. PMID:26259037

  20. Galectin-3 in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Giuseppe; Iacobini, Carla; Ricci, Carlo; Blasetti Fantauzzi, Claudia; Menini, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    Galectin-3 is a versatile molecule which exerts several and sometimes opposite functions in various pathophysiological processes. Recently, galectin-3 has gained attention as a powerful predictor of heart failure and mortality, thus becoming a useful prognostic marker in clinical practice. Moreover, though not specifically investigated in diabetic cohorts, plasma levels of galectin-3 correlated with the prevalence of diabetes and related metabolic conditions, thus suggesting that pharmacological blockade of this lectin might be successful for treating heart failure especially in subjects suffering from these disorders. Indeed, galectin-3 is considered not only as a marker of heart failure, but also as a mediator of the disease, due to its pro-fibrotic action, though evidence comes mainly from studies in galectin-3 deficient mice. However, these studies have provided contrasting results, with either attenuation or acceleration of organ fibrosis and inflammation, depending on the experimental setting and particularly on the levels of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs)/advanced lipoxidation endproducts (ALEs), of which galectin-3 is a scavenging receptor. In fact, under conditions of increased AGE/ALE levels, galectin-3 ablation was associated with tissue-specific outcomes, reflecting the AGE/ALE-receptor function of this lectin. Conversely, in experimental models of acute inflammation and fibrosis, galectin-3 deficiency resulted in attenuation of tissue injury. There is a need for prospective studies in diabetic patients specifically investigating the relation of galectin-3 levels with complications and for further animal studies in order to establish the effective role of this lectin in organ damage before considering its pharmacological blockade in the clinical setting. PMID:24940712

  1. Bilateral Ramsay Hunt syndrome in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Syal, Rajan; Tyagi, Isha; Goyal, Amit

    2004-12-01

    BACKGROUND: Herpes zoster oticus accounts for about 10% cases of facial palsy, which is usually unilateral and complete and full recovery occurs in only about 20% of untreated patients. Bilateral herpes zoster oticus can sometime occur in immunocompromised patients, though incidence is very rare. CASE PRESENTATION: Diabetic male, 57 year old presented to us with bilateral facial palsy due to herpes zoster oticus. Patient was having bilateral mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Patient was treated with appropriate metabolic control, anti-inflammatory drugs and intravenous acyclovir. Due to uncontrolled diabetes, glucocorticoids were not used in this patient. Significant improvement in hearing status and facial nerve functions were seen in this patient. CONCLUSIONS: Herpes zoster causes severe infections in diabetic patients and can be a cause of bilateral facial palsy and bilateral Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Herpes zoster in diabetic patients should be treated with appropriate metabolic control, NSAIDS and intravenous acyclovir, which we feel should be started at the earliest. Glucocorticoids should be avoided in diabetic patients. PMID:15575957

  2. Bilateral Ramsay Hunt syndrome in a diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Syal, Rajan; Tyagi, Isha; Goyal, Amit

    2004-01-01

    Background Herpes zoster oticus accounts for about 10% cases of facial palsy, which is usually unilateral and complete and full recovery occurs in only about 20% of untreated patients. Bilateral herpes zoster oticus can sometime occur in immunocompromised patients, though incidence is very rare. Case presentation Diabetic male, 57 year old presented to us with bilateral facial palsy due to herpes zoster oticus. Patient was having bilateral mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Patient was treated with appropriate metabolic control, anti-inflammatory drugs and intravenous acyclovir. Due to uncontrolled diabetes, glucocorticoids were not used in this patient. Significant improvement in hearing status and facial nerve functions were seen in this patient. Conclusions Herpes zoster causes severe infections in diabetic patients and can be a cause of bilateral facial palsy and bilateral Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Herpes zoster in diabetic patients should be treated with appropriate metabolic control, NSAIDS and intravenous acyclovir, which we feel should be started at the earliest. Glucocorticoids should be avoided in diabetic patients. PMID:15575957

  3. Management of diabetic foot ulcers: evaluation of case studies.

    PubMed

    Torkington-Stokes, Rachel; Metcalf, Daniel; Bowler, Philip

    2016-08-11

    This article explores local barriers to diabetic foot ulcer healing, and describes the use of a dressing designed to manage exudate, infection and biofilm (AQUACEL® Ag+ dressing (AQAg+)) on recalcitrant diabetic foot ulcers. The authors consider four case studies that demonstrate how managing local barriers to wound healing with antimicrobial and anti-biofilm dressings in protocols of care can improve outcomes for patients. PMID:27523769

  4. Stroke in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mankovsky, Boris N; Ziegler, Dan

    2004-01-01

    The article's objective is to review the key advances in the scientific literature related to the association of stroke with diabetes mellitus and to summarize the current approaches to stroke prevention in diabetic patients. The key findings from the literature regarding stroke incidence in patients with diabetes, specific and nonspecific risk factors of stroke in the diabetic population, such as arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, diabetes duration, diabetic complications, insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia, course and outcome of stroke in subjects with diabetes and/or hyperglycemia, and the peculiarities of type, site and size of stroke in diabetic patients are discussed. The results of recent clinical trials aimed at correcting hyperglycemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, to prevent stroke in people with diabetes, are reviewed. The medical database Medline along with original articles from peer-reviewed journals were used for analysis. There is convincing evidence suggesting that diabetes mellitus represents a strong independent risk factor of stroke. The contribution of hyperglycemia to increased stroke risk is not proven. Data suggest an association of the full cluster of the insulin resistance syndrome and stroke. Diabetes is a risk factor mainly for ischemic stroke, while its association with hemorrhagic stroke remains controversial. Hyperglycemia is common in stroke patients, but it is not known whether it independently influences the course and outcome of stroke or merely reflects stroke severity and location. Aggressive control of arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia allows to decrease the risk of stroke in diabetic patients substantially, while the importance of glucose control for stroke prevention remains unproven. PMID:15250030

  5. Diabetic Mastopathy: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Neetu, G.; Pathmanathan, R.; Weng, Ngun Kok

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic mastopathy is a rare fibroinflammatory breast disease characterized by lymphocytic lobulitis, ductitis, and perivasculitis with stromal fibrosis. This lesion often presents as a discretely palpable uni- or bilateral mass in long-standing type I diabetes and other autoimmune diseases. We report a case of insulin-dependent diabetic mastopathy, which presented clinically as an indeterminate breast lump suspicious for malignancy. The patient is a 36-year-old woman who had type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Mammography and ultrasonography raised a suspicion of malignancy, and an excisional biopsy was performed. A previous biopsy had shown no evidence of malignancy. Histopathological examination now showed dense keloid-like stromal fibrosis with epithelioid-like and spindly myofibroblasts and a characteristic lymphocytic infiltration around blood vessels in and around lobules and ducts, features consistent with diabetic mastopathy. The literature is briefly reviewed. PMID:20740205

  6. Diabetic Mastopathy: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Neetu, G; Pathmanathan, R; Weng, Ngun Kok

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic mastopathy is a rare fibroinflammatory breast disease characterized by lymphocytic lobulitis, ductitis, and perivasculitis with stromal fibrosis. This lesion often presents as a discretely palpable uni- or bilateral mass in long-standing type I diabetes and other autoimmune diseases. We report a case of insulin-dependent diabetic mastopathy, which presented clinically as an indeterminate breast lump suspicious for malignancy. The patient is a 36-year-old woman who had type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Mammography and ultrasonography raised a suspicion of malignancy, and an excisional biopsy was performed. A previous biopsy had shown no evidence of malignancy. Histopathological examination now showed dense keloid-like stromal fibrosis with epithelioid-like and spindly myofibroblasts and a characteristic lymphocytic infiltration around blood vessels in and around lobules and ducts, features consistent with diabetic mastopathy. The literature is briefly reviewed. PMID:20740205

  7. Corneal hydrops induced by diabetic ketoacidosis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Meiyan; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports of corneal hydrops associated with diabetic ketoacidosis. The present study first reports a case of a 20-year-old male patient with diabetic ketoacidosis-induced corneal hydrops. The patient exhibited mild hydrops in their left eyelid, which was accompanied by mixed hyperemia, and hazy turbid in a white color was observed in the cornea. To alleviate the corneal hydrops, 5% glucose was administered dropwise to the left eye for 2 h to alleviate the inflammation. Finally, the patient was discharged from the hospital with a satisfactory outcome. PMID:27602094

  8. Breaking Therapeutic Inertia in Type 2 Diabetes: Active Detection of In-Patient Cases Allows Improvement of Metabolic Control at Midterm

    PubMed Central

    Lucas Martín, Anna M.; Guanyabens, Elena; Zavala-Arauco, R.; Chamorro, Joaquín; Granada, Maria Luisa; Mauricio, Didac; Puig-Domingo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) exists in 25–40% of hospitalized patients. Therapeutic inertia is the delay in the intensification of a treatment and it is frequent in T2D. The objectives of this study were to detect patients admitted to surgical wards with hyperglycaemia (HH; fasting glycaemia > 140 mg/dL) as well as those with T2D and suboptimal chronic glycaemic control (SCGC) and to assess the midterm impact of treatment modifications indicated at discharge. A total of 412 HH patients were detected in a period of 18 months; 86.6% (357) had a diagnosed T2D. Their preadmittance HbA1c was 7.7 ± 1.5%; 47% (189) had HbA1c ≥ 7.4% (SCGC) and were moved to the upper step in the therapeutic algorithm at discharge. Another 15 subjects (3.6% of the cohort) had T2D according to their current HbA1c. Ninety-four of the 189 SCGC patients were evaluated 3–6 months later. Their HbA1c before in-hospital-intervention was 8.6 ± 1.2% and 7.5 ± 1.2% at follow-up (P < 0.004). Active detection of hyperglycaemia in patients admitted in conventional surgical beds permits the identification of T2D patients with SCGC as well as previously unknown cases. A shift to the upper step in the therapeutic algorithm at discharge improves this control. Hospitalization is an opportunity to break therapeutic inertia. PMID:26089883

  9. Staphylococcus simulans osteitis in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Désidéri-Vaillant, C; Nédelec, Y; Guichon, J-M; Le Louarn, S; Noyer, V; Sapin-Lory, J; Le Guen, P; Nicolas, X

    2011-12-01

    Staphylococcus simulans was identified as the aetiological agent of osteitis in a diabetic woman. Its identifying characteristics and antibiogram were confirmed. Diabetic foot frequently becomes infected and the spread of infection to bone is a major causal factor behind lower-limb amputation. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential in such cases. PMID:22074636

  10. [Diagnosis and assessment of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J

    2014-02-01

    Hypoglycaemic episodes are rather common among diabetic patients, especially those treated with sulfonylureas or insulin (more in type 1 than in type 2 diabetes). The presentation of hypoglycaemia may considerably vary from patient-to-patient and from time-to-time in a given patient. With the illustration of a clinical case, we will describe the characteristics of the three main types of hypoglycaemia: severe hypoglycaemia (with or without coma), symptomatic hypoglycaemia (with or without confirmation) and asymptomatic hypoglycaemia ("hypoglycaemia unawareness") discovered as a low blood glucose measurement. We will also briefly analyse the reasons of such differences and the potential clinical consequences that these three main types of hypoglycaemia may exert in the real life of diabetic patients. PMID:24683833

  11. Serum magnesium levels in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Dipankar; Osta, Manish; Mandal, Tridibeswar; Bandyopadhyay, Ujjwal; Ray, Debes; Gautam, Divyendu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetic retinopathy is one of the leading causes of blindness in the world. Hypomagnesemia has been reported to occur at an increased frequency among patients with type 2 diabetes compared with their counterparts without diabetes. Hypomagnesemia has been linked to poor glycemic control. Many studies have been undergone to find out the precipitated factors of retinopathy such as duration and type of diabetes, hyperglycemia, hypomagnesemia and increased urinary total protein levels. Aim: This study was carried out to study the correlation between serum magnesium levels, glycosylated hemoglobin and urinary total protein levels in diabetic patients with retinopathy. Materials and Methods: The study population comprised of 30 type 2 diabetic patients without retinopathy as Group 2, 30 type 2 diabetic patients with retinopathy as Group 3 in the age group 45-75 years as cases and 60 age and sex matched healthy individuals as controls (Group 1). Determination of Serum Magnesium (photometric xylidyl blue method), glycosylated hemoglobin, Hb1C (IFCC), fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose (glucose oxidase method) and urine total protein (Pyrogallol red method) was carried out. The statistical software SPSS 11.0 and Systat 8.0 were used for the analysis of the data. Results: Hypomagnesemia was observed in cases compared with both Group 2 and Group 3. FBS, PPBS, HbA1c, Urine total protein levels were increased in cases (without retinopathy and with retinopathy) compared with controls. Conclusion: Hypomagnesemia and albuminuria individually or in conjunction serve as indicators for dysglycemia and could be used as marker for the risk of development of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:23633845

  12. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Polymorphism (V16A) is Associated with Diabetic Retinopathy in Slovene (Caucasians) Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Petrovič, Mojca Globočnik; Cilenšek, Ines; Petrovič, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Substantial data indicate that oxidative stress is involved in the development of diabetic retinopathy. Two candidate genes that affect the oxidative stress are manganese mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The aim of the present study was to examine the role of the V16A polymorphism of the Mn-SOD gene and the 4a/b polymorphism of the eNOS gene in the development of diabetic retinopathy in Caucasians with type 2 diabetes. In this cross sectional case-control study 426 unrelated Slovene subjects (Caucasians) with type 2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled: 283 patients with diabetic retinopathy and the control group of 143 subjects with type 2 diabetes of duration of more than 10 years who had no clinical signs of diabetic retinopathy. A significantly higher frequency of the VV genotype of the V16A polymorphism of the Mn-SOD was found in patients with diabetic retinopathy compared to those without diabetic retinopathy (OR=2.1, 95% CI = 1.2–3.4; p = 0.006), whereas the 4a/b polymorphism of the eNOS gene failed to yield an association with diabetic retinopathy. We may conclude that the VV genotype of the V16A polymorphism of the Mn-SOD gene was associated with diabetic retinopathy in Caucasians with type 2 diabetes, therefore it might be used as a genetic marker of diabetic retinopathy in Caucasians. PMID:18057537

  13. Vietnamese diabetic patients and their physicians

    PubMed Central

    Mull, Dorothy S; Nguyen, Nghia; Mull, J Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To describe the cultural context of type 2 diabetes mellitus among Vietnamese immigrants in the United States, including people's ideas about cause and proper treatment; and to suggest ways in which better control of the disease can be achieved in this population. Design The method was ethnographic. A native speaker used a structured interview guide to talk with 38 Vietnamese patients, and family members of 2 other patients, being treated for type 2 diabetes. In addition, 8 Vietnamese health providers—5 physicians, 2 nurses, and an herbalist—were interviewed. Setting A low-income area of southern California populated by a large number of Vietnamese. Participants Forty patients being treated for type 2 diabetes and 8 health practitioners. Results Three quarters of the patients had not achieved good control of their diabetes. Ideas about the cause and proper treatment of the disease were culturally shaped. Many patients used eastern (herbal) medicine and described a strong aversion to insulin injections. Patients stopped taking their oral medications when using eastern medicine, and a quarter lowered their dose whenever they felt “out of balance.” Almost two thirds had used traditional home remedies for diabetes. Two had received nonstandard medical care from neighborhood physicians trained in Viet Nam; 1 of these patients died during the study. Conclusion The Vietnamese community and physicians serving that community need culturally appropriate education about type 2 diabetes and modern therapy for the disease. PMID:11694472

  14. The effects of Low Level LASER Therapy (LLLT) on blood glucose levels in patients with Diabetes Mellitus type I : a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Leonardo; Postiglione, Marco; Buccioni, Tommaso; Longo, Diego

    2009-06-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a widespread disease and a serious public health problem. Low Level LASER Therapy (LLLT) has been found to reduce glycaemia on DM type 1 patients, an observation requiring further research especially as regards characteristics of treatment protocol. The purpose of this work is to continue the line of research and propose a specific protocol for LLLT use. In spring 2008 a 48 year old man, DM type 1 insulin dependent patient has been submitted to 810 nm wavelength LLLT treatment in specific body areas daily for 3 weeks and then once a week for 4 weeks until normalization of glycaemia. Medical supervision was present before, during and after application. Insulin was reduced progressively and then stopped. A gradual reduction of glycaemia was noted during the course of treatment. In successive follow-ups a reduction in HbA1c was noted. Results confirm previous observations and need for further research on large cohorts. The indication that LASER may become a valuable addition to DM type 1 treatment is confirmed and the proposed protocol appears to be effective. The case presented merits review since it reports a therapeutic challenge, contributes to advance in medical science and spawns research.

  15. Chryseobacterium meningosepticum bacteremia in diabetic nephropathy patient on hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Dias, M.; Prashant, K.; Pai, R.; Scaria, B.

    2010-01-01

    The Chryseobacterium species are inhabitants of soil and water. In the hospital environment, they exist in water systems and wet surfaces. We report here a case of Chryseobacterium meningosepticum bacteremia in a diabetic nephropathy patient on hemodialysis. He was successfully treated with Vancomycin and ceftazidime for three weeks with good clinical outcome. This is the first case reported in dialysis patients from India. PMID:21206682

  16. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction Predicts Diabetic Foot Ulcers in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Without Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jae-Seung; Cha, Seon-Ah; Lim, Tae-Seok; Lee, Eun-Young; Song, Ki-Ho; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Yoo, Ki-Dong; Kim, Joon-Sung; Park, Yong-Moon; Ko, Seung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the factors that might influence the development of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) in type 2 diabetes patients without diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). From January 2000 to December 2005, a total of 595 patients who had type 2 diabetes without DPN between the ages of 25 and 75 years, and had no prior history of DFUs were consecutively enrolled in the study. A cardiovascular autonomic function test was performed to diagnose cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) using heart rate variability parameters. The median follow-up time was 13.3 years. Among the 449 (75.4%) patients who completed the follow-up evaluation, 22 (4.9%) patients developed new ulcers, and 6 (1.3%) patients underwent the procedure for lower extremity amputations. The patients in the DFUs group had a longer duration of diabetes, higher baseline HbA1c levels, higher rates of nephropathy, and CAN. A Cox hazard regression analysis results revealed that the development of DFUs was significantly associated with the presence of CAN (normal vs definite CAN; HR, 4.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.29–15.33) after adjusting for possible confounding factors. The development of DFUs was independently associated with CAN in patients with type 2 diabetes without DPN. We suggested the importance of CAN as a predictor of DFUs even in the patients without DPN, and the need to pay attention to patients with definite CAN and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27015188

  17. Imaging presentation of complicated diabetic ketoacidosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Eduardo; Mullenix, Philip S; Sapp, Jason E

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous pneumomediastinum is a fairly uncommon complication of diabetic ketoacidosis. Knowledge of the clinical and radiographic manifestation is important for the proper management of patients since the disease usually follows a benign evolution. We report a case of a 20-year-old soldier who presented with a pneumomediastinum that was initially falsely attributed to a motor vehicular crash. PMID:22684306

  18. Somatotype in elderly type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Buffa, Roberto; Floris, Giovanni; Putzu, Paolo F; Carboni, Luciano; Marini, Elisabetta

    2007-09-01

    Somatotyping is a practical technique for the description of physique. Individuals with Type 2 diabetes are characterized by physical peculiarities, such as overweight, obesity and a central pattern of body fat distribution. Somatotype applications to diabetes are limited. The objective of this study is to describe the somatotype of elderly type 2 diabetes patients. The sample consisted of 110 patients with type 2 diabetes (45 men, mean age 69.4 +/- 7.0 years; 65 women, mean age 72.9 +/- 7.1 years). The pathological subjects were compared with a control group consisting of 280 healthy individuals (134 men, mean age 74.2 +/- 7.3 years; 146 women, mean age 74.9 +/- 7.4 years). The Heath-Carter somatotype was applied. Diabetic men and women (mean somatotype, respectively: 6.8-5.6-0.6 and 8.6-6.4-0.2) presented significantly higher values of endomorphy than the controls (p = 0.043 in men, p = 0.003 in women); men also had a lower mesomorphic component (p = 0.000). The somatotype method revealed physical peculiarities in type 2 diabetes patients. The marked endomorphy in the pathological individuals can be related to general fatness, which is a well known disease risk factor. The somatotype appears to be a suitable technique for the assessment of physique in type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:18041381

  19. Relationship between blood levels of methyl donor and folate and mild cognitive impairment in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Miaoyan; Zhang, Meilin; Yang, Juhong; Zhao, Shijing; Qin, Shanchun; Chen, Hui; Gao, Yuxia; Huang, Guowei

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment. Folate insufficiency fosters a decline in the sole methyl donor, S-adenosylmethionine, and decreases methylation potential, which is associated with Alzheimer’s disease in non-diabetic patients. However, little is known in diabetic patients. We analyzed plasma levels of S-adenosylmethionine, S-adenosylhomocysteine and serum level of folate in 100 elderly type 2 diabetic patients with and without mild cognitive impairment. S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio was used to reflect the methylation potential. Patients with mild cognitive impairment had significantly lower levels of S-adenosylmethionine, folate and S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteineratios. Furthermore, logistic regression analysis indicated the plasma S-adenosylmethionine, S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio and serum folate (OR, 0.96, 0.698, 0.72, respectively; p<0.05) were negatively associated with risk of mild cognitive impairment, even after adjusting for related covariates. In addition, folate level was positively correlated with S-adenosylmethionine and the S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio (r = 0.38, 0.46, respectively; p<0.05) among patients within the middle tertile of folate levels (6.3–9.1 µg/L). These findings indicate mild cognitive impairment is associated with lower levels of S-adenosylmethionine, folate and weakened methylation potential; plasma S-adenosylmethionine and methylation potential may be predicted by serum folate within a suitable range of folate concentrations in diabetic patients. PMID:24688222

  20. Managing coeliac disease in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leonard, M M; Cureton, P A; Fasano, A

    2015-01-01

    The association between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes has long been established. The combination of genetic susceptibility along with a potential role for gluten in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity makes defining gluten's role in type 1 diabetes extremely important. Evidence supporting the role of a gluten-free diet to improve complications associated with type 1 diabetes is not robust. However there is evidence to support improved growth, bone density and potentially the prevention of additional autoimmune diseases in patients with coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes. The gluten free diet is expensive and challenging to adhere to in people already on a modified diet. Early identification of those who have coeliac disease and would benefit from a gluten-free diet is of utmost importance to prevent complications associated with type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease. PMID:24814173

  1. Treating the elderly diabetic patient: special considerations

    PubMed Central

    Kezerle, Louise; Shalev, Leah; Barski, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is rising in the >65 year-old group. The challenge of defining the goals of therapy arises from the heterogeneity of the aging process and the sparse clinical data in this patient population. In light of these challenges, the clinician should be aware of the pitfalls of caring for the older diabetic patient and prioritize an individualized treatment plan to ensure an optimal glycemic control, without placing the patient at unnecessary risk. We present a review of the current guidelines and literature that deal specifically with the treatment of the older diabetic patient in order to establish the principles of treatment in this age group and help the clinician make decisions regarding the care of these patients. PMID:25210468

  2. Data Standards in Diabetes Patient Registries

    PubMed Central

    Richesson, Rachel L

    2011-01-01

    Widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) and expansion of patient registries present opportunities to improve patient care and population health and advance translational research. However, optimal integration of patient registries with EHR functions and aggregation of regional registries to support national or global analyses will require the use of standards. Currently, there are no standards for patient registries and no content standards for health care data collection or clinical research, including diabetes research. Data standards can facilitate new registry development by supporting reuse of well-defined data elements and data collection systems, and they can enable data aggregation for future research and discovery. This article introduces standardization topics relevant to diabetes patient registries, addresses issues related to the quality and use of registries and their integration with primary EHR data collection systems, and proposes strategies for implementation of data standards in diabetes research and management. PMID:21722563

  3. Diabetic fibrous mastopathy. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Foschini, M P; Cavazza, A; Macedo Pinto, I M; Eusebi, V

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of a characteristic form of fibrous mastopathy associated with type I diabetes mellitus are described. Well-circumscribed nests of mature lymphocytes in a hyaline stroma are the hallmark of this condition. In one case mastectomy was performed, as the lesion had been interpreted as malignant on frozen section. It appears that this form of "idiopathic mastopathy" deserves wider recognition. PMID:2125392

  4. Diabetic patients: epidemiology and global impact.

    PubMed

    Setacci, C; de Donato, G; Setacci, F; Chisci, E

    2009-06-01

    Definition of the exact epidemiology and the global impact of diabetes is not easy, being strictly related to the availability of data in developing countries and to the use in the existing population-based investigations of common criteria for the diagnosis and definition of diabetes. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) the total number of people with diabetes was 171 million in 2000, and is projected to rise up to 366 million in 2030. The true prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in people with diabetes has been difficult to determine, as most patients are asymptomatic, many do not report their symptoms, screening modalities have not been uniformly agreed upon, and pain perception may be blunted by the presence of peripheral neuropathy. Population-based studies, using a validated and reproducible test, have revealed a prevalence of PAD in people with diabetes to be up to 30%. Among people with diabetes, the annual incidence of developing a foot ulcer ranges from 1% to 4.1% and the prevalence ranges from 4% to 10%, which suggests that the lifetime incidence may be as high as 25%. Foot ulcer associated to PAD requires revascularization, although it is generally considered that the outcome in those people is inferior to that in non-diabetic patients. In summary, the increasing worldwide diabetes prevalence will inevitably result in increasing proportions of deaths from cardiovascular disease, as well as in increased prevalence and associated consequences of other complications of diabetes. As suggested by WHO, a concerted, global initiative is required to address the diabetes epidemic. PMID:19543188

  5. Euglycaemic diabetic ketoacidosis in a patient with type 2 diabetes started on empagliflozin.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Owais; Farooq, Saad; Kiran, Zareen; Islam, Najmul

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) is largely associated with type 1 diabetes and has hyperglycaemia as a cardinal feature. We discuss the case of a 42-year-old man, a patient with type 2 diabetes, who presented to the emergency room, with nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. He had recently changed his diabetes medications and started on an SGLT2 inhibitor (empagliflozin) along with metformin, pioglitazone, liraglutide and self-adjusted exogenous insulin. DKA was suspected in the wake of clinical examination and lab findings but glucose levels were below the cut-off for DKA; therefore, he was diagnosed with euglycaemic DKA. He was successfully managed with intravenous hydration and insulin infusion. We discuss the link of SGLT2 inhibitors with DKA and the pathophysiology behind euglycaemic DKA. PMID:27177938

  6. Diabetes education improves depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Zhang, Xiyao; Xu, Xiuping; Lv, Xiaofeng; Yao, Lu; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xueying; Liu, Baozhu; Li, Qiang; Cui, Can

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The prevalence of depression is relatively high in individuals with diabetes. However, screening and monitoring of depressive state in patients with diabetes is still neglected in developing countries and the treatment of diabetes-related depression is rarely performed in these countries. In this study, our aim was to study the role of diabetes education in the improvement of depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The Dutch version of the center for epidemiological studies depression scale (CES-D scale) and the problem areas in diabetes (PAID) questionnaire were used to assess depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress in 1200 newly diagnosed male adult patients with type 2 diabetes before and after a two-week diabetes education by professionally trained nurses. Pearson correlation and regression analysis were used to analyze the factors related to depression in patients with type 2 diabetes. Results: The incidence of depression in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes was 28%, and the rate of diabetes-specific emotional distress was 65.5%. High education levels, low income were correlated to depression in individuals with diabetes. After two weeks of diabetes education, the incidence of depression and diabetes-specific emotional distress decreased significantly to 20.5% (P < 0.05) and 11% (P < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: The incidence of depression, especially diabetes-specific emotional distress, was relatively high in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. The depression state could be improved by diabetes education. PMID:24353709

  7. Diabetes mellitus in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Alves, Crésio de Aragão Dantas; Aguiar, Renata Arruti; Alves, Ana Cláudia S; Santana, Maria Angélica

    2007-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the principal extra-pulmonary complication of cystic fibrosis, occurring in 15-30% of adult cystic fibrosis patients. The number of cystic fibrosis patients who develop diabetes is increasing in parallel with increases in life expectancy. The aim of this study was to review the physiopathology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of CFRD. A bibliographic search of the Medline and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature databases was made. Articles were selected from among those published in the last twenty years. Insulin deficiency, caused by reduced beta-cell mass, is the main etiologic mechanism, although insulin resistance also plays a role. Presenting features of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, CFRD typically affects individuals of approximately 20 years of age. It can also be accompanied by fasting, non-fasting or intermittent hyperglycemia. Glucose intolerance is associated with worsening of nutritional status, increased morbidity, decreased survival and reduced pulmonary function. Microvascular complications are always present, although macrovascular complications are rarely seen. An oral glucose tolerance test is recommended annually for patients > or = 10 years of age and for any patients presenting unexplained weight loss or symptoms of diabetes. Patients hospitalized with severe diseases should also be screened. If fasting hyperglycemia persists for more than 48 h, insulin therapy is recommended. Insulin administration remains the treatment of choice for diabetes and fasting hyperglycemia. Calories should not be restricted, and patients with CFRD should be managed by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:17724542

  8. Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy: Development and Progression.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Chi-Juei; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Yang, Chung-May; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Li; Wang, I-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of current study aims to investigate the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a nationwide population-based cohort in Taiwan. Newly diagnosed DN patients and age- and sex-matched controls were identified from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database from 2000 to 2010. We studied the effects of age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN), and medications on the development of nonproliferative DR (NPDR), proliferative DR (PDR), and diabetic macular edema (DME) in patients with DN. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of the development of DR. Our results show that the adjusted HRs of NPDR and PDR were 5.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.68-5.37) and 9.7 (95% CI = 8.15-11.5), respectively, in patients with DN as compared with patients in the non-DN cohort. At 5-year follow-up, patients with DN showed an increased HR of NPDR progression to PDR (HR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.68-3.03), and the major comorbidities were hypertension (HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.10-1.38 with NPDR; HR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.02-1.72 with PDR) and DPN (HR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.72-2.41 in NPDR; HR = 2.95, 95% CI = 2.16-4.03 in PDR). Dyslipidemia increased the HR of developing NPDR but not PDR or DME. Moreover, DN did not significantly affect DME development (HR = 1.47, 95% CI = 0.87-2.48) or progression (HR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.11-1.20). We concluded that DN was an independent risk factor for DR development and progression; however, DN did not markedly affect DME development in this study, and the potential association between these disorders requires further investigation. PMID:27564383

  9. Rapid Normalization of High Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Autoantibody Titers and Preserved Endogenous Insulin Secretion in a Patient with Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Kaneko, Masanori; Furukawa, Tatsuo; Koike, Tadashi; Sone, Hirohito; Tanaka, Shoichiro; Kaneko, Kenzo; Kamoi, Kyuzi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old Japanese woman developed diabetes mellitus without ketoacidosis in the presence of glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody (GADA) (24.7 U/mL). After the amelioration of her hyperglycemia, the patient had a relatively preserved serum C-peptide level. Her endogenous insulin secretion capacity remained almost unchanged during 5 years of insulin therapy. The patient's GADA titers normalized within 15 months. The islet-related autoantibodies, including GADA, are believed to be produced following the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells and are predictive markers of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the transient appearance of GADA in our patient may have reflected pancreatic autoimmune processes that terminated without progression to insulin deficiency. PMID:26935368

  10. Improving Diabetes Care for Hospice Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei J; Jacobson, Margaret A; Johnston, C Bree

    2016-07-01

    Although type 2 diabetes guidelines recommend less aggressive glycemic control for patients with limited life expectancy, many hospice patients continue their glucose-lowering medications, resulting in an increased risk of hypoglycemia. Three common reasons for overly tight glycemic control in hospice patients include (1) discussions about reducing or stopping chronic medications are uncomfortable; (2) many patients and families believe that mild hyperglycemia can cause symptoms; and (3) until 2014, Healthcare Information and Data Information Set (HEDIS) quality indicators for glycemic control included hospice patients. To address these issues, we recommend (1) providers discuss with patients and families upon hospice enrollment that diabetes medications can be reduced or discontinued as their life-limiting disease progresses; (2) keeping blood glucose levels between 200 and 300 mg/dL; and (3) educate providers that HEDIS measures now exclude hospice patients. Implementing these recommendations should decrease the risk of hypoglycemia in hospice patients and improve their quality of life. PMID:25852204

  11. Glycemic control and diabetes management in hospitalized patients in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of tight blood glucose control among outpatients with diabetes mellitus is well established, however, the management of diabetes in the hospital setting is generally considered secondary in importance. This study sought to assess glycemic control and diabetes management in adult patients admitted to hospitals in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional and nationwide survey was conducted from July 2010 to January 2012. Eligible cases were 18 years of age or older, had a diagnosis of diabetes and a hospitalization length of stay ≥72 hours. Socio-demographic information, hospitalization details, and data on diabetes diagnosis, management and treatment were collected for all patients by chart review. Information on all blood glucose (BG) readings for a maximum of 20 consecutive days of hospitalization was recorded for each patient. Results Overall, 2,399 patients were surveyed in 24 hospitals located in 13 cities from all five Brazilian regions. The prevalence of patients presenting hyperglycemic (BG >180 mg/dL) or hypoglycemic (BG <70 mg/dL) events was 89.4% and 30.9% in patients in general wards, and 88.2% and 27.7% in those in Intensive Care Units (ICUs), respectively. In addition, a BG measure >180 mg/dL was recorded in two-thirds of the patient-days. A high proportion of patients were treated with sliding-scale insulin regimen alone in the general wards (52.0%) and in the ICUs (69.2%), and only 35.7% and 3.9% received appropriate insulin therapy in general wards (basal + bolus insulin) and in ICUs (continuous IV insulin), respectively. Conclusions Inpatient glycemic control and diabetes management needs improvement. Opportunities to improve care in Brazilian hospitals include expanded use of intravenous insulin and subcutaneous basal-bolus insulin protocols, avoiding use of sliding-scale insulin alone, increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring, and institution wide quality improvement efforts targeting both physician and nursing

  12. Lymphocytic mastitis and fibrosis of the breast in long-standing insulin-dependent diabetics. A histopathologic study on diabetic mastopathy and report of ten cases.

    PubMed

    Hunfeld, K P; Bässler, R

    1997-07-01

    Diabetic mastopathy represents less than 1% of benign breast diseases, but is more frequent (13%) in insulin-dependent diabetics. We report on 10 cases (eight females and two males) of this rare lesion of the breast in patients with additional diabetes mellitus type I. All cases showed a marked B-lymphocytic mastitis in combination with a homogenous fibrosis of the breast and with presence of epithelioid fibroblasts. In the male patients, diabetic mastopathy simulated gynecomastia. A comparative examination of 12 cases of lymphocytic mastitis without long-standing type-I-diabetes mellitus revealed a more heterogeneous pattern with lower degrees of inflammation and fibrosis. From the pathophysiologic point of view, lymphocytic mastitis in diabetic mastopathy is thought to be a diabetes-induced reaction probably of autoimmune origin. Moreover, lymphocytic mastitis with or without diabetes mellitus may represent a lymphoepithelial lesion of the MALT-type which, under certain circumstances, is considered to bear a prelymphomatous potential. PMID:9269908

  13. Treating Hispanic patients for type 2 diabetes mellitus: special considerations.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jeffrey S

    2008-05-01

    The number of Hispanic people in the United States with diagnosed diabetes mellitus is projected to increase by 107% by 2020. The author presents the case of a 62-year-old obese Hispanic man, with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), diabetic peripheral neuropathy, background retinopathy, and diabetic nephropathy. The patient also had diagnosed hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, and hyperlipidemia. The treatment plan for this patient included the following medications: pioglitazone hydrochloride (a thiazolidinedione, 30 mg/d); irbesartan (an angiotensin receptor blocker, 150 mg/d titrated to 300 mg/d); hydrochlorothiazide (an antikaliuretic agent, 12.5 mg/d); and aspirin (325 mg/d). Sitagliptin phosphate (a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor, 50 mg/d) was added to the treatment regimen to improve glycemic control. Simvastatin (20 mg/d) and niacin (1 g/d) were used for lipid management. Therapy also included a low-protein diet and walking program. At 6-month follow-up, the patient showed substantial improvement in his glycosylated hemoglobin level, lipid profile, blood pressure, creatinine clearance rate, and urine albumin level. There were also improvements in his peripheral vascular disease and diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Furthermore, the patient demonstrated encouraging progress in diet and lifestyle modification and in mental attitude. PMID:18519840

  14. Patient Self-Management of Diabetes Care in the Inpatient Setting: Con.

    PubMed

    Shah, Arti D; Rushakoff, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    Self-management of diabetes by inpatients can be problematic. People with type 1 diabetes often prefer to self-manage their diabetes in the inpatient setting. We report the case of a patient admitted to the surgical service who was self-administering his home insulin, often without telling his nurse or physician. He was aiming for tight glycemic control, which resulted in life-threatening hypoglycemia. While patients can often self-manage their diabetes in the outpatient setting, inpatient management of diabetes is very different. Patients may not be familiar with common scenarios requiring adjustments of insulin therapy. Therefore, we recommend against self-management of diabetes in the hospital. However, the patients should be involved in discussions about management of their diabetes in the hospital to allay their concerns about changes made to their insulin regimens. An example of successful cooperative management is with use of protocols that allow continued use of insulin pumps in the hospital. PMID:25990293

  15. Newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients presenting with proliferative diabetic retinopathy as an initial sign

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hoon; Kim, Young Gyun; Lee, Jong Wook; Park, Jong Seok

    2014-01-01

    AIM To investigate the clinical features of newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus (NDM) patients showing proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) as an initial sign. METHODS As a retrospective case series, the medical records of a total of four hundred and thirty-two patients who underwent a vitrectomy due to PDR were reviewed to find the subjects. Of 432 patients, six cases of NDM patients showing PDR as an initial sign were included and analyzed with their systemic and ocular features. Main outcome measures: the systemic features and ocular features [preoperative and postoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraoperative findings]. RESULTS The mean onset age of visual symptoms was 36.3 years old. The mean serum insulin and C-peptide titer was below the normal range. The mean fasting plasma glucose was 178mg/dL and the mean postprandial 2h plasma glucose was 306mg/dL. The mean HbA1c at diagnosis was 11.02%. In all cases, an acute progressive fibrovascular proliferation was observed. Intraoperative retinal tears were found in three cases of six. The mean preoperative BCVA was +0.67±0.58 logMAR and the mean BCVA at postoperative 6 months was +0.20±0.30 logMAR. CONCLUSION All patients were considered to have latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). A rapid deterioration of kidney function as well as poor diabetic control status at diagnosis was observed in all six cases. The ocular features of the patients showed acute progressive fibrovascular proliferation and relatively favorable postoperative visual acuity. PMID:24634886

  16. Diabetes mellitus and Ramadan in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Azzoug, Said; Mahgoun, Souad; Chentli, Farida

    2015-05-01

    Worldwide, the proportion of people above 60 years old represents 15% of the whole population. Diabetes mellitus is more frequent in this age group, and is associated with increased risk of morbidities and premature mortality. Aged Muslim people with diabetes insist on fasting during Ramadan, for many reasons. Elderly people, especially frail patients, who fast are at increased risk for many complications such as hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia and metabolic decompensation including hyperosmolar coma, diabetic ketoacidosis, dehydration and thrombosis. Therefore it is important to assess functional capacity, cognition, mental health and comorbidities in elderly people with diabetes in order to evaluate the risk of fasting, individualize the therapy, and adapt care to their needs. PMID:26013782

  17. Diabetic patient education: determinants of success.

    PubMed

    Day, J L

    2000-01-01

    Education/empowerment is critical if successful self-management is to be achieved. All professional patient interactions have a learning component. Clinical outcomes in diabetes are as dependent on psycho-social factors or learned behaviour as on metabolic state or therapeutic interventions. These factors include targets set, self-management skills, influence of living with diabetes, emotional factors, role of other people, perceived benefits and barriers, feelings of self-efficacy, weight concern and diet barrier. Training in learning processes and factors governing behaviour are essential for all those involved in delivery of patient care. Educational programmes should recognise the wide range of learning strategies used by different people. PMID:11054893

  18. Navigating care for Bedouin patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dunton, Shauna; Higgins, Alison; Amkraut, Jonathan; Abu-Rabia, Yones

    2016-01-01

    The Bedouin Arab population in the southern Negev region of Israel has faced health problems as a result of transitioning rapidly from a nomadic agricultural lifestyle to a more modern urban lifestyle. Like many populations around the world, the Bedouins have changed their diets and become more sedentary and this has led to a high rate of diabetes. In this case report, we examine how diabetes has affected the life of an influential man in the Bedouin community and the significance this case has in the greater context of a global rise in chronic disease. PMID:26944372

  19. The impact of intra-articular methylprednisolone acetate injection on fructosamine levels in diabetic patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Habib, George; Sakas, Fahed; Artul, Suheil; Khazin, Fadi; Hakim, Geries; Jabbour, Adel; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen

    2016-06-01

    Fructosamine is a glycated protein that reflects blood glucose control over the last 2-3 weeks. There are no studies that address the impact of intra-articular injection (IAI) of methylprednisolone acetate (MPA) on fructosamine levels among patients with type-2 diabetes and osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK). Non-selected patients attending the rheumatology or orthopedic clinic with type-2 diabetes and painful OAK, who failed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) and physical therapy, were asked to participate in our study. After consent blood tests were drown for fructosamine, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level, complete blood count, lipid profile, serum albumin, serum protein, c-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Demographic and different clinical parameters were also documented. Immediately after that, patients had IAI of 80 mg of MPA at the knee joint (group 1). Two to three weeks later, the same blood tests were repeated (except for HbA1c). Age- and sex-matched group of patients with type-2 diabetes and painful OAK attending the same clinics, but who were managed by NSAIDS were asked to participate as a control group (group 2) and had the same evaluation at enrollment and 2-3 weeks later, after consent. Eighteen patients from either group completed the study. Mean fructosamine level in group 1 patients was 263.7 ± 31.8 mg% prior to the IAI vs. 274.6 ± 39.3 mg% (p = 0.035), 2-3 weeks later, while mean fructosamine level in the control group (group 2) at enrollments was 274.2 ± 31.2 mg% vs. 269 ± 30.2 mg%, p = 0.509, 2-3 weeks later. There was no significant change in any other parameter tested at enrollment in either group, compared to those obtained 2-3 weeks afterwards. Body mass index was on the edge of significance as a predictor for a significant change in fructosamine level in group 1 patients. IAI of 80 mg of MPA in patients with type-2 diabetes and OAK had resulted in a significant, though mild

  20. Retrograde pedal access with a 20-gauge intravenous cannula after failed antegrade recanalization of a tibialis anterior artery in a diabetic patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Colkesen, Yucel

    2015-01-01

    Retrograde tibiopedal approach is being used frequently in below-the-knee vascular interventions. In patients with diabetic foot pathology, complex anatomy often requires a retrograde technique when the distal vascular anatomy and puncture site is suitable. The dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial arteries can be punctured because of their relatively superficial position. We report a retrograde puncturing technique in patients with chronic total occlusions. After failed antegrade recanalization, puncturing and cannulation of a tiny dorsalis pedis artery with a narrow bore [20-gauge (0.8 mm)] intravenous cannula is described. PMID:26257023

  1. Acute Multiple Arteriovenous Thromboses in a Patient with Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Sayaka; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Kishimoto, Miyako; Ikeda, Nahoko; Inoue, Kaori; Ihana, Noriko; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Noto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the most serious acute complications of diabetes mellitus. An arterial thrombotic tendency from DKA is relatively common; however, the occurrence of acute multiple arteriovenous thromboses is rare. We herein report the case of a 49-year-old man with DKA complicated by multiple thromboses. After transfer to our emergency room with DKA, the patient developed sudden abdominal pain. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed near-complete occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery, superior mesenteric vein, splenic artery, and right femoral artery. This occurrence highlights the need for considering the risk of thrombosis during the initial treatment for DKA. PMID:26278296

  2. Resource use among patients with diabetes, diabetic neuropathy, or diabetes with depression

    PubMed Central

    Le, Trong K; Able, Stephen L; Lage, Maureen J

    2006-01-01

    Background Diabetes is often associated with complications and comorbidities. The purpose of this research is to compare medical resources used by patients with the following diagnoses: diabetes mellitus (DM), diabetic neuropathy (DN), and diabetes mellitus combined with comorbid depression (DD). Methods Adult patients who were diagnosed with DM, DN, or DD were included in the study. There were 55,972 patients in the DM cohort, 2,146 in the DN, and 2,379 in the DD. P values for comparisons between the three mutually exclusive cohorts were conducted using the Tukey-Kramer method. Cost comparisons among the cohorts were conducted using a stepwise multivariate regression that controlled for patient characteristics and comorbid conditions. Results Individuals in the DM or DN cohorts were generally more likely to use antidiabetic medications than patients in the DD group. Those diagnosed with DN or DD generally used more pain medications than individuals in the DM cohort. The DM cohort had significantly lower diabetes-related total medical costs ($1,297 v $5,125, p < 0.0001) and lower total medical costs ($4,819 v $24,765, p < 0.0001) than the DN cohort. The DM cohort also had significantly lower diabetes-related total medical costs ($1,297 v $3,264, p < 0.0001) as well as significantly lower total medical costs ($4,819 v $19,298, p < 0.0001) than the DD cohort. Conclusion Results from this study indicated significant differences in demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and medication use among individuals diagnosed with DM, DN, or DD. These differences translated into significant cost differences. Patients diagnosed with DN or DD had higher diabetes-related costs than patients diagnosed with DM. PMID:17059602

  3. Decreased gastric secretory functions in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Takebe, K; Imamura, K; Miyazawa, T; Ishii, M; Kudoh, K; Terada, A; Machida, K; Kikuchi, H; Kasai, F

    1994-06-01

    A total of 37 subjects consisted of 10 healthy subjects (Group III), 15 diabetic patients without autonomic neuropathy (Group II), and 12 diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy including gastroparesis in 6 cases (Group I). All three groups were comparable in age. In order to clarify the gastric function in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy, secretion of serum gastrin, gastric secretory function, endoscopic Congo red test of fundic glands, and coefficiency of variance of electrocardiographic beat-to-beat intervals (C.V. R-R) were examined. In Group I, 5 patients had hypergastrinemia, but its elevation was inhibited when an acid solution was injected into the stomach. Gastric secretion and C.V. R-R were markedly lower in Group I, compared with Groups II and III. In Group I, the area of fundic glands (parietal cells) was reduced considerably. The C.V. R-R was significantly correlated with fasting serum gastrin concentration and with maximal acid output. From these results, in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy (vagal neuropathy), gastric acid secretion in response to tetragastrin stimulation was lowered with a reduction in area of fundic gland distribution. Hypergastrinemia may reflect a negative feedback mechanism responding to decreased acidity of gastric content in the antrum. PMID:7817384

  4. Risk factors of diabetic foot Charcot arthropathy: a case-control study at a Malaysian tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Fauzi, Aishah Ahmad; Chung, Tze Yang; Latif, Lydia Abdul

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to determine the risk factors of diabetic Charcot arthropathy of the foot among diabetic patients with and without foot problems. METHODS This was a case-control study involving diabetic patients attending the Diabetic Foot Care and Wound Management Clinic at University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from June 2010 to June 2011. Data on sociodemographic profiles, foot factors and diabetes characteristics was collected and analysed. RESULTS A total of 48 diabetic patients with Charcot arthropathy of the foot were identified. Data from these 48 patients was compared with those of 52 diabetic patients without foot problems. Up to 83.3% of patients with diabetic Charcot arthropathy presented with unilateral Charcot foot, most commonly located at the midfoot (45.8%). Patients with a history of foot problems, including foot ulcer, amputation, surgery or a combination of problems, had the highest (26-time) likelihood of developing Charcot arthropathy (odds ratio 26.4; 95% confidence interval 6.4–109.6). Other significant risk factors included age below 60 years, more than ten years’ duration of diabetes mellitus and the presence of nephropathy. CONCLUSION A history of prior diabetic foot problems is the greatest risk factor for developing diabetic Charcot arthropathy, compared with other risk factors such as diabetes characteristics and sociodemographic profiles. Preventive management of diabetic foot problems in the primary care setting and multidisciplinary care are of paramount importance, especially among chronic diabetic patients. PMID:27075668

  5. Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy: Development and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Chi-Juei; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Yang, Chung-May; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Li

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of current study aims to investigate the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a nationwide population-based cohort in Taiwan. Newly diagnosed DN patients and age- and sex-matched controls were identified from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database from 2000 to 2010. We studied the effects of age, sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN), and medications on the development of nonproliferative DR (NPDR), proliferative DR (PDR), and diabetic macular edema (DME) in patients with DN. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to estimate the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of the development of DR. Our results show that the adjusted HRs of NPDR and PDR were 5.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.68–5.37) and 9.7 (95% CI = 8.15–11.5), respectively, in patients with DN as compared with patients in the non-DN cohort. At 5-year follow-up, patients with DN showed an increased HR of NPDR progression to PDR (HR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.68–3.03), and the major comorbidities were hypertension (HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.10–1.38 with NPDR; HR = 1.33, 95% CI = 1.02–1.72 with PDR) and DPN (HR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.72–2.41 in NPDR; HR = 2.95, 95% CI = 2.16–4.03 in PDR). Dyslipidemia increased the HR of developing NPDR but not PDR or DME. Moreover, DN did not significantly affect DME development (HR = 1.47, 95% CI = 0.87–2.48) or progression (HR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.11–1.20). We concluded that DN was an independent risk factor for DR development and progression; however, DN did not markedly affect DME development in this study, and the potential association between these disorders requires further investigation. PMID:27564383

  6. [A familial case of proliferative diabetic retinopathy associated with a mutation in the mitochondrial gene].

    PubMed

    Kuze, M; Arima, M; Saso, M; Uji, Y

    1998-11-01

    We report a 39-year-old male patient with proliferative diabetic retinopathy associated with a mutation in the mitochondrial DNA and with his family. The patient was referred for fundus examination in 1993. He had been diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus 15 years before but his diabetic control was not good. He was thin and short and presented with bilateral proliferative diabetic retinopathy. When he received pan retinal photocoagulation, an exudative retinal detachment was found in his left eye, but it disappeared spontaneously. The patient's history included sensorineural deafness and autonomic nerve system disorder. Mitochondrial analysis obtained from blood showed mutation of adenine to guanine at mitochondrial DNA 3243. Generally speaking, mitochondrial disorders often include pigmentary degeneration. For this reason diabetic patients with mitochondrial disorders rarely suffer proliferative diabetic retinopathy. In this case, the retinitis pigmentosa was not so severe as to cause the proliferative change, so that it was probably derived from heteroplasmy. PMID:9852718

  7. Hospitalization for Hypoglycemia in Japanese Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Akahito; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Goto, Atsushi; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to elucidate the epidemiology, patient demographics, and clinical outcomes of hospitalization for hypoglycemia in diabetic patients using a Japanese large-scale database. We conducted a retrospective study using a national inpatient database of acute care hospitals in Japan. Diabetic patients ages ≥15 years with hypoglycemia as a main diagnosis for hospitalization were eligible. We estimated the annual number of hospitalizations in Japan and compared the annual admission rate by age and treatment groups. We also analyzed the association between patient characteristics and in-hospital mortality. Among 22.7 million discharge records from July 2008 and March 2013, a total of 25,071 patients were eligible. The mean age was 73.4 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 22.3 kg/m2. The estimated annual hospitalization for hypoglycemia in Japan was ∼20,000. Annual admission rates for hypoglycemia per 1000 diabetic patients and 1000 diabetic patients receiving insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents were 2.1 and 4.1, respectively. Patients <40 years and >70 years old were at a higher risk of hospitalization. In-hospital mortality was 3.8%, and risk factors associated with poor survival were male sex, older age, lower bed capacity, community hospital, low BMI, coma at admission, and higher Charlson Comorbidity Index. To prevent severe hypoglycemia that leads to death and complications, individualized and careful glycemic control are important, especially in very old or young patients and in those with comorbid conditions or low BMI. PMID:26107672

  8. Increased Risk of Diabetes and Likelihood of Receiving Diabetes Treatment in Patients with Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Azfar, Rahat S.; Seminara, Nicole M.; Shin, Daniel B.; Troxel, Andrea B.; Margolis, David J.; Gelfand, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory disorder that has been mechanistically linked to type II diabetes mellitus. We sought to assess the risk of incident diabetes in patients with psoriasis and to evaluate diabetes treatment patterns among patients with psoriasis and incident diabetes. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting UK-based electronic medical records. Patients We matched 108,132 psoriasis patients aged 18–90 years to 430,716 unexposed patients based on practice and time of visit. For our nested study, only patients who developed incident diabetes during our study time were included. Main Outcome Measure(s) Incident diabetes and adjusted risk of pharmacotherapy among those with incident diabetes. Results The fully adjusted HRs (95% CI) for incident diabetes were 1.14 (1.10–1.18), 1.11 (1.07, 1.15), and 1.46 (1.30, 1.65) in the overall, mild and severe psoriasis groups, respectively. Among those with incident diabetes and severe psoriasis, the adjusted risk for receiving diabetes pharmacotherapy was 1.55 (1.15–2.10). Conclusions Our results suggest that psoriasis is an independent risk factor for the development of type II diabetes mellitus in a dose dependent manner, and that patients with severe psoriasis who develop diabetes are more likely to receive systemic diabetic therapies in comparison to diabetics without psoriasis. PMID:22710320

  9. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Patient with Cocaine Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Abed Abdin, Asma; Ahmed, Awab

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is characterized by elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, hyperglycemia, and elevated ketones in urine and blood. Hyperglycemia is a key component of DKA; however, a subset of DKA patients can present with near-normal blood glucose, an entity described as “euglycemic DKA.” This rare phenomenon is thought to be due to starvation and food restriction in insulin dependent diabetic patients. Cocaine abuse is considered a trigger for development of DKA. Cocaine also has anorexic effects. We describe an interesting case of euglycemic DKA in a middle-aged diabetic female presenting with elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis, with near-normal blood glucose, in the settings of noncompliance to insulin and cocaine abuse. We have postulated that cocaine abuse was implicated in the pathophysiology of euglycemic DKA in this case. This case highlights complex physiological interplay between type-1 diabetes, noncompliance to insulin, and cocaine abuse leading to DKA, with starvation physiology causing development of euglycemic DKA. PMID:27579186

  10. A non-healing corneal ulcer as the presenting feature of type 1 diabetes mellitus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic keratopathy is a rare complication of diabetes mellitus. This case illustrates the importance of checking blood sugar levels of patients with non-healing corneal ulcers to rule out the possibility of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Case presentation We report the unusual case of a 24-year-old southeast Asian woman who presented with a sterile corneal ulcer to our hospital and later was found to be diabetic after a prolonged hospital stay. Despite all efforts, the corneal ulcer had failed to heal until treatment for previously undiagnosed diabetes was started. The sterile corneal ulcer began to heal once blood sugar levels began to normalize. Conclusions Diabetic keratopathy is a rare complication of diabetes mellitus and needs to be considered as a diagnosis in younger patients with non-healing sterile corneal ulcers. Blood sugar levels should be checked in these cases for undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. PMID:22051138

  11. Diabetes insipidus in a quadriplegic patient.

    PubMed

    Farrell, C A; Staas, W E

    1986-02-01

    An incomplete quadriplegic patient underwent investigation for production of copious amounts of dilute urine. Serum osmolality, electrolytes, BUN, glucose, and serum antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were recorded, as well as urinary osmolality, electrolytes, glucose, and pH. In response to subcutaneous vasopressin during the dehydration test, the patient's urinary osmolality increased by 12%, from 620 mOsm/l to 695 mOsm/l. A definitive diagnosis of partial central diabetes insipidus was made. Physicians involved in the care of patients with spinal cord injuries should be aware of the method of evaluating polyuric conditions, particularly while the patient is undergoing catheterization. PMID:3954565

  12. Chromoblastomycosis in a Diabetic Patient Without a History of Trauma.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mina; Schneider, Samantha; Villasante, Alexandra; Villada, Gabriel; Patel, Tejas; Hu, Shasa; Romanelli, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Chromoblastomycosis (CBM) is a slowly progressive cutaneous and subcutaneous mycosis mostly seen in tropical and subtropical areas and Fonsecaea pedrosoi is the most common cause. The authors describe the case of a diabetic Haitian woman, presenting with a chronic verrucous plaque without any history of trauma. Her histopathologic results showed epidermal hyperplasia and sclerotic bodies, which are diagnostic for CBM. Her therapy began with itraconazole 200 mg tablets twice a day. The unique feature of this patient is the coincidence of diabetes and CBM. However, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented case of human CBM in Miami, FL, which develops the awareness regarding this diagnosis among doctors in this area. There should be a close communication between dermatologists and pathologists to make an early diagnosis of CBM and also adequate therapy, which both are fundamental to improve patient's quality of life. PMID:25830721

  13. Diabetes mellitus in patients with cirrhosis: clinical implications and management.

    PubMed

    Elkrief, Laure; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Sarin, Shiv; Valla, Dominique; Paradis, Valérie; Moreau, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Disorders of glucose metabolism, namely glucose intolerance and diabetes, are frequent in patients with chronic liver diseases. In patients with cirrhosis, diabetes can be either a classical type 2 diabetes mellitus or the so-called hepatogenous diabetes, i.e. a consequence of liver insufficiency and portal hypertension. This review article provides an overview of the possible pathophysiological mechanisms explaining diabetes in patients with cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is associated with portosystemic shunts as well as reduced hepatic mass, which can both impair insulin clearance by the liver, contributing to peripheral insulin resistance through insulin receptors down-regulation. Moreover, cirrhosis is associated with increased levels of advanced-glycation-end products and hypoxia-inducible-factors, which may play a role in the development of diabetes. This review also focuses on the clinical implications of diabetes in patients with cirrhosis. First, diabetes is an independent factor for poor prognosis in patients with cirrhosis. Specifically, diabetes is associated with the occurrence of major complications of cirrhosis, including ascites and renal dysfunction, hepatic encephalopathy and bacterial infections. Diabetes is also associated with an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic liver diseases. Last, the management of patients with concurrent diabetes and liver disease is also addressed. Recent findings suggest a beneficial impact of metformin in patients with chronic liver diseases. Insulin is often required in patients with advanced cirrhosis. However, the favourable impact of controlling diabetes in patients with cirrhosis has not been demonstrated yet. PMID:26972930

  14. Ascending infection of foot tendons in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Mismar, Ayman; Yousef, Mohammad; Badran, Darwish; Younes, Nidal

    2013-12-01

    Bone and soft tissue infection in the foot of diabetic patients is a well-described issue in the literature. A sound anatomical knowledge of the foot anatomy and compartments is mandatory to understand the mechanisms of infection spread. We describe four cases of diabetic foot infection complicated by long ascending infection. All did not respond initially to antibiotic treatment and the usual surgical debridement and were cured only after excision of the infected tendons. We highlight a rare but serious complication of the diabetic foot disease not commonly seen by the surgical community. We hope that this report raises the awareness of this condition so that a prompt diagnosis is made and appropriate treatment started, thereby reducing the risk of major lower limb amputations. PMID:24043670

  15. Severe chronic sensory-motor polyneuropathy: coexistence of 3 unrelated etiologies in a type 1 diabetic patient. A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Micco, Andrea; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Baron, Pierluigi; Conti, Giancarlo; Napoli, Laura; Serafini, Massimo; Scarlato, Guglielmo; Scarpini, Elio

    2003-03-01

    We present the case of a 58-year-old man, who has suffered from type 1 diabetes mellitus since he was young. He had monoclonal IgM kappa gammopathy of undetermined significance and high anti-MAG antibody titer. He developed a polyneuropathic picture with the clinical and laboratory features of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy within the span of approximately 2 years. He benefited from IV administration of high doses of immunoglobulins. Investigation of all parameters, but particularly of the clinical phenotype, can lead to a better definition of the polyneuropathic picture, especially for therapeutic and prognostic purposes. PMID:12678551

  16. Survival Among Patients With Pancreatic Cancer and Long-Standing or Recent-Onset Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chen; Rubinson, Douglas A.; Qian, Zhi Rong; Wu, Chen; Kraft, Peter; Bao, Ying; Ogino, Shuji; Ng, Kimmie; Clancy, Thomas E.; Swanson, Richard S.; Gorman, Megan J.; Brais, Lauren K.; Li, Tingting; Stampfer, Meir J.; Hu, Frank B.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Kulke, Matthew H.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Wolpin, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Long-standing diabetes is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, and recent-onset diabetes in the several years before diagnosis is a consequence of subclinical pancreatic malignancy. However, the impact of diabetes on survival is largely unknown. Patients and Methods We analyzed survival by diabetes status among 1,006 patients diagnosed from 1986 to 2010 from two prospective cohort studies: the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS). We validated our results among 386 patients diagnosed from 2004 to 2013 from a clinic-based case series at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI). We estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for death using Cox proportional hazards models, with adjustment for age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking, diagnosis year, and cancer stage. Results In NHS and HPFS, HR for death was 1.40 (95% CI, 1.15 to 1.69) for patients with long-term diabetes (> 4 years) compared with those without diabetes (P < .001), with median survival times of 3 months for long-term diabetics and 5 months for nondiabetics. Adjustment for a propensity score to reduce confounding by comorbidities did not change the results. Among DFCI patient cases, HR for death was 1.53 (95% CI, 1.07 to 2.20) for those with long-term diabetes compared with those without diabetes (P = .02), with median survival times of 9 months for long-term diabetics and 13 months for nondiabetics. Compared with nondiabetics, survival times were shorter for long-term diabetics who used oral hypoglycemics or insulin. We observed no statistically significant association of recent-onset diabetes (< 4 years) with survival. Conclusion Long-standing diabetes was associated with statistically significantly decreased survival among patients with pancreatic cancer enrolled onto three longitudinal studies. PMID:25403204

  17. Diabetic dermopathy ("shin spots") and diabetic bullae ("bullosis diabeticorum") at the same patient.

    PubMed

    Brzezinski, Piotr; Chiriac, Anca E; Pinteala, Tudor; Foia, Liliana; Chiriac, Anca

    2015-01-01

    We present a diabetic patient with associated two diabetic dermatoses: diabetic dermopathy ("shin spots") and diabetic bullae. A 34-year-old man, with long history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and moderate obesity presented to Dermatology Unit for diagnosis of his skin lesions. On clinical examination multiple, light brown, irregular patches, with atrophic scars and crusts over large bullae were observed on the anterior aspect of both legs. PMID:26649029

  18. EUGLYCEMIC DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS AND SEVERE ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY SECONDARY TO OFF LABEL USE OF SODIUM GLUCOSE COTRANSPORTER-2 INHIBITOR IN A TYPE-1 DIABETIC PATIENT.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Hassan; Wani, Adil; Daruwalla, Vistasp; Daboul, Nour; Sagi, Jahnavi

    2015-01-01

    Sodium glucose Cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of drug approved for the treatment of type-2 diabetes; however they are also increasingly used off label in type-1 diabetic patients. SGLT2 Inhibitors work by increasing glucose excretion in urine. Euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is potentially life threatening side effect as patients have normal glucose and minimal symptoms thus delaying diagnosis and treatment. Our case report highlights the risk of using SGLT2 inhibitors in type-1 diabetes and also supports the need for long term studies to define clear efficacy and complications of SGLT 2 inhibitors in both type-1 and type 2 diabetes mellitis. PMID:27004352

  19. [Plausible solution to prevent major amputation in diabetic foot patients].

    PubMed

    Laginja, Stanislava; Seremet, Jasmina; Spehar, Branka; Marinović, Marin

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the leading public health problems in the world. Complications of diabetes mellitus include cardiovascular diseases, retinopathy, neuropathy and diabetic foot, which can in turn lead to lower extremity amputations. This is the main cause of mortality and the biggest expenditure for health system. Treatment is long and frustrating for the patient and also for medical staff. Amputations are becoming more frequent, while the quality of life after amputation is greatly reduced. Healing of postoperative infection is long lasting and demands a lot of hard work from the surgeon and the rest of medical staff, while causing severe suffering for the patient. Progression of infection increases mortality. Negative pressure therapy after minor foot amputations greatly reduces healing time. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) was applied after surgical treatment. All necrotic tissue and fibrin deposits were removed. Initial therapy was administered continuously with 125 mm Hg of vacuum. The NPWT was continued intermittently. Additionally, all patients underwent additional hyperbaric treatment and local hemoglobin administration. In conclusion, in all cases presented, combined NPWT, hyperbaric and topical hemoglobin therapy proved to be a highly effective therapeutic option in preventing pending major amputation following minor diabetic foot amputation. PMID:25326996

  20. Diabetic mastopathy of bilateral breasts in an elderly Japanese woman with type 2 diabetes: a case report and a review of the literature in Japan.

    PubMed

    Honda, Munehiro; Mori, Yasumichi; Nishi, Tsunehiro; Mizuguchi, Kunio; Ishibashi, Miyuki

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of diabetic mastopathy in an elderly woman with type 2 diabetes. The patient was a 69-year-old woman diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at the age of 33 years. She had been treated with insulin for 25 years, however, her blood glucose had been poorly controlled. She noticed bilateral breast lumps in September 2002. Mammography of the breast showed increased density in the glandular pattern and architectural distortion without focal mass and microcalcification. Ultrasonography of the breast showed an irregular-shaped hypoechoic mass with an acoustic shadow. As malignancy needed to be excluded, core needle biopsy was performed in the left breast and diabetic mastopathy was confirmed pathologically. Diabetic mastopathy is usually a complication of pre-menopausal type 1 diabetes and develops in a unilateral breast. This case developed in bilateral breasts in an elderly type 2 diabetic patient. PMID:17878645

  1. Aquaporin 11 variant associates with kidney disease in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Choma, David P; Vanacore, Roberto; Naylor, Helen; Zimmerman, Ian A; Pavlichenko, Andrei; Pavlichenko, Artyom; Foye, Liberty; Carbone, David P; Harris, Raymond C; Dikov, Mikhail M; Tchekneva, Elena E

    2016-03-01

    Kidney disease, a common complication of diabetes, associates with poor prognosis. Our previous animal model studies linked aquaporin (AQP)11 to acute kidney injury, hyperglycemia-induced renal impairment, and kidney disease in diabetes. Here, we report the AQP11 rs2276415 variant as a genetic factor placing type 2 diabetic patients at greater risk for the development of kidney disease. We performed two independent retrospective case-control studies in 1,075 diabetic and 1,619 nondiabetic individuals who were identified in the Synthetic Derivative Database with DNA samples in the BioVU DNA repository at Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN). A χ(2)-test and multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustments for age, sex, baseline serum creatinine, and underlying comorbid disease covariates showed a significant association between rs2276415 and the prevalence of any event of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in diabetic patients but not in patients without diabetes. This result was replicated in the second independent study. Diabetic CKD patients over 55 yrs old with the minor AQP11 allele had a significantly faster progression of estimated glomerular filtration rate decline than patients with the wild-type genotype. Three-dimensional structural analysis suggested a functional impairment of AQP11 with rs2276415, which could place diabetic patients at a higher risk for kidney disease. These studies identified rs2276415 as a candidate genetic factor predisposing patients with type 2 diabetes to CKD. PMID:26719361

  2. Combined treatment with sitagliptin and vitamin D in a patient with latent autoimmune diabetes in adults

    PubMed Central

    Rapti, E; Karras, S; Grammatiki, M; Mousiolis, A; Tsekmekidou, X; Potolidis, E; Zebekakis, P; Daniilidis, M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a relatively new type of diabetes with a clinical phenotype of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and an immunological milieu characterized by high titers of islet autoantibodies, resembling the immunological profile of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Herein, we report a case of a young male, diagnosed with LADA based on both clinical presentation and positive anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-abs), which were normalized after combined treatment with a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (DPP-4) (sitagliptin) and cholecalciferol. Learning points Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-abs) titers in young patients being previously diagnosed as type 2 diabetes (T2D) may help establish the diagnosis of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). Sitagliptin administration in patients with LADA might prolong the insulin-free period. Vitamin D administration in patients with LADA might have a protective effect on the progression of the disease. PMID:27252860

  3. Obesity, Diabetes and Survival in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Deger, Serpil M.; Ellis, Charles D.; Bian, Ahuia; Shintani, Ayumi; Ikizler, T. Alp; Hung, Adriana M.

    2016-01-01

    Increased body mass index (BMI) confers a survival advantage in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients. Diabetic (DM) patients undergoing MHD have worse survival. There are limited studies examining the effect of obesity on the risk of death among MHD patients with diabetes. Ninety-eight MHD patients were studied for median follow-up time of 78 months. Patients were classified according to the presence of obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) or DM. Primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Cox regression was used to evaluate the effect of obesity on time to death. Effect modification and mediation analysis were also performed. Mean age was 49 ± 13 years, 66% were male, 48% were obese and 34% were diabetic. Mortality rates (per 100 person years) were: 3.4 for non-diabetic obese, 8.6 for non-diabetic non-obese, 14.3 for diabetic non-obese and 18.1 for diabetic obese patients. Log-rank comparing diabetic obese versus non diabetic obese was significant (p=0.007). Diabetes was associated with an increased risk of mortality after adjustment for potential mediators. Effect modification of obesity in the mortality risk was different between patients with and without diabetes. With adjustment for adipokines, a greater effect modification by diabetes was observed whereas adjustment for inflammatory marker did not influence the effect modification. Diabetic obese MHD patients have increased mortality risk compared to non-diabetic obese. Obesity does not offer survival benefits in Diabetic obese MHD patients and potentially may have detrimental effects. Larger studies evaluating the effect of adipokines and obesity in outcomes in the diabetic MHD population need to be undertaken. PMID:24467439

  4. Psychosocial interventions for the diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, John N

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes usually requires substantial life-long self-management by the patient. Psychological factors and the patient’s health beliefs are important determinants of self-care behavior. Education has a modest influence on generating better self-care, but psychologically based interventions are clearly more effective. This review gives an overview of these interventions with some discussion of their basis in psychological theory. Some labels such as cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy include a wide range of approaches. Randomized trials have generally produced improvement in measures of psychological well-being, but improved glycemic control has been more elusive. The influence on behavior can be very dependent on the individual therapist. Only a few trials have managed to sustain improvement in glycosylated hemoglobin beyond a year. Not all patients are prepared to engage and accept these forms of therapeutic intervention. We are still some way from moving psychological management from the trial situation into the diabetic clinic. PMID:25657590

  5. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  6. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S; Abdulhadi, Nadia N; Coppell, Kirsten J

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002-2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  7. Diabetic mastopathy, a clinicopathological correlation of 34 cases.

    PubMed

    Dorokhova, Olena; Fineberg, Susan; Koenigsberg, Tova; Wang, Yihong

    2012-10-01

    Diabetic mastopathy (DM) is an unusual fibrous disease of the breast. We report 34 cases with clinicopathological correlation and follow-ups. Patients mean age was 57 years and 24 had histories of diabetes mellitus. The DM presented as a palpable breast mass in 85.3% of the cases clinically. Image findings were often as an irregular hypoechoic mass (44.4%) on ultrasound and negative or non-specific density (67.6%) on mammogram. Histologically, we found that the majority of DM occurred in the upper outer/central part of the breast (76%) and the size ranged from 0.5 to 3.7 cm. All cases showed lymphocytic lobulitis and vasculitis, keloidal fibrosis, lobular atrophy and varying degree of epithelioid fibroblasts. Examining the surrounding normal tissue of the excision specimens revealed that the margins of DM were often poorly circumscribed and irregularly demarcated from the sounding breast tissue. Vascular calcifications were identified in 10 of 24 excisional specimens, suggesting a hypothesis that vascular damage and scar/wounding healing process could contribute to the pathogenesis of DM. Twenty-one cases had repeated procedures for uncertain descriptive diagnosis. This is the largest study of diabetic mastopathy to date with clinical and imagining correlation. Recognition of this benign entity is important to better understanding the pathogenesis and to avoid unnecessary procedures. PMID:23005592

  8. Diabetes Stories: Use of Patient Narratives of Diabetes to Teach Patient-Centered Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumagai, Arno K.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Paula T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical component to instituting compassionate, patient-centered diabetes care is the training of health care providers. Our institution developed the Family Centered Experience (FCE), a comprehensive 2-year preclinical program based on longitudinal conversations with patients about living with chronic illness. The goal of the FCE is to explore…

  9. Intraocular surgery in a large diabetes patient population: risk factors and surgical results.

    PubMed

    Ostri, Christoffer

    2014-05-01

    surgery, regardless of the degree of diabetic retinopathy. Poor preoperative visual acuity, a high degree of diabetic retinopathy and advanced age are predictors of a poor visual acuity after surgery. The risk of diabetic macular oedema after surgery is 4%. Finally, Study IV (case-control study, 2066 type 1 diabetes patients) demonstrates that diabetic papillopathy shares characteristics with diabetic retinopathy. The risk of experiencing diabetic papillopathy increases markedly with a drastic, recent reduction in glycosylated haemoglobin A1c and a small optic disc. This lends support to the theory that diabetic eye complications may occur in anatomically predisposed patients in response to metabolic control variability. Overall, results after intraocular surgery in diabetes patients are favourable. Surgery, however, is associated with costs to society, patient discomfort and risk of complications. This thesis provides an analysis of risk factors for intraocular surgery and identifies prognostic factors for visual acuity after surgery, which can be used for preventive purposes, surgical decision-making and patient counselling. PMID:24809766

  10. Association between serum visfatin and carotid atherosclerosis in diabetic and non-diabetic patients on maintenance hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    El-Shishtawy, Samia Hassan; Mosbah, Osama; Sherif, Nevine; Metwaly, Amna; Hanafy, Amr; Kamel, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adipose tissue releases bioactive factors termed adipokines. Visfatin is an adipokine that plays an active role promoting vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between serum visfatin levels and carotid atherosclerosis in diabetic and non-diabetic patients on maintenance hemodialysis (HD) in order to clarify the role of serum visfatinas, a risk factor for cardiovascular complications in HD patients. Methods Forty patients on maintenance hemodialysis were enrolled in this case-control study in 2015. They were subdivided into two groups, i.e., a diabetic group (n = 20) and a non-diabetic group (n = 20). Twenty healthy subjects who were age and gender matched were included as a control group. Carotid Duplex studies were performed on all patients, and serum visfatin was determined by a competitive enzyme immunoassay. Results HD patients showed a highly significant increase in serum visfatin, urea, creatinine, Ca×Ph, K, fasting glucose, triglycerides, LDL levels, and a significant decrease in eGFR, Na, HDL, and Hb compared to the control group. Also, serum visfatin levels showed a highly significant increase in the diabetic HD group compared to both the non-diabetic HD and control groups. Serum visfatin showed a highly significant increase in non-diabetic HD patients compared to the control group. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) showed a highly significant increase in HD group compared to the control group. Serum visfatin correlated positively with serum urea, creatinine, glucose, and IMT, but it was negatively correlated with eGFR, Na, and HDL Conclusion We concluded that serum visfatin is increased in HD patients with and without diabetes. Moreover, its association with IMT may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in CRF patients. PMID:27054006

  11. Diabetic ketoacidosis complicated by the use of ecstasy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamin), a hallucinogenic amphetamine, is often used by young people, especially at 'raves'. This illicit drug can cause many metabolic changes and its use, when associated with prolonged exercise, may exacerbate ketoacidosis in type 1 diabetic patients. Case presentation This is a case of ketoacidosis complicated by the use of ecstasy in a 19-year-old insulin-dependent diabetic Caucasian woman. Conclusion The use of ecstasy may trigger diabetic ketoacidosis in patients with a preexisting metabolic disorder PMID:20682062

  12. The Influence of Smoking on Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Kuan-Jen; Lee, Jen-Jyh; Chien, Shun-Tien; Suk, Chi-Won; Chiang, Chen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Both smoking and diabetes can increase the risk and influence the manifestations and outcomes of tuberculosis (TB). It is not clear whether the influence of smoking on pulmonary TB differs between non-diabetic and diabetic patients. Herein, we assessed the manifestations and outcomes of TB in relation to smoking in both diabetic and non-diabetic TB patients. Methodology/Principal Findings All diabetic culture-positive pulmonary TB patients notified from 2005–2010 at three teaching hospitals in Taiwan were enrolled. A culture-positive pulmonary TB patient without DM who was notified to the health authority immediately prior to each diabetic TB patient was selected for comparison. The 972 patients in this study cohort included 365 (37.6%) non-diabetic non-smokers, 149 (15.3%) non-diabetic smokers, 284 (29.2%) diabetic non-smokers, and 174 (17.9%) diabetic smokers. The adjusted relative risk of a pretreatment positive smear for a smoker compared with a non-smoker was 2.19 (95% CI 1.38–3.47) in non-diabetic patients and 2.23 (95% CI 1.29–3.87) in diabetic culture-positive pulmonary TB patients. The adjusted relative risk for a positive smear among diabetic smokers was 5.61 (95% CI 3.35–9.41) compared with non-diabetic non-smokers. Smoking was significantly associated with an increased frequency of bilateral lung parenchyma involvement (AdjOR 1.84, 95% CI 1.16–2.93), far-advanced pulmonary TB (AdjOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.04–3.50), cavitary lesions (AdjOR 2.03, 95% CI 1.29–3.20), and unfavorable outcomes of TB (AdjOR 2.35, 95% CI 1.02–5.41) in non-diabetic patients. However, smoking was not associated with cavitary lung parenchyma lesions regarding the location, number or size of the cavity in diabetic TB patients. Conclusions/Significance Smoking and diabetes have joint effects on a pretreatment positive smear. Diabetic smokers had more than a 5-fold increased risk of a pretreatment positive smear than did non-diabetic non-smokers, indicating

  13. Dipstick urinalysis for diabetes screening in TB patients

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Blanca I.; Pino, Paula A.; Zarate, Izelda; Mora-Guzman, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes knowledge among TB patients can contribute to improved TB treatment outcomes, but lack of diabetes diagnosis awareness is a limitation in developing countries. Given its low cost, the sensitivity of urine glucose dipsticks for diabetes screening in TB patients was assessed. Methods Glycosuria was assessed in 90 newly diagnosed TB patients (38 with diabetes) in south Texas, USA (n = 20) and northeast Mexico (n = 70) during January 2009–December 2010. Results Glycosuria was detected in 65% of the diabetic patients with chronic hyperglycemia (positive predictive value 91%, negative predictive value 84%). Conclusion We propose that TB clinics with limited budgets where portable glucometers may not be available conduct universal screening for diabetes with urine dipsticks. This could be followed by blood glucose or HbA1c testing in the subset of patients requiring confirmation or higher sensitivity assessment, to improve the comanagement of TB and diabetes. PMID:24030116

  14. Use of collagenase ointment in conjunction with negative pressure wound therapy in the care of diabetic wounds: a case series of six patients

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John D.; Carter, Elizabeth; Hatch, David C.; Zhubrak, Michelle; Giovinco, Nicholas A.; Armstrong, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic wounds with additional comorbidities are costly, time intensive, and difficult to heal. Often, multiple modalities may be necessary to achieve wound resolution, relying on the synergistic advantage of each therapy to affect wound healing. The selectivity of Clostridium collagenase is physiologically effective at degrading non-viable collagen fibers while preserving living collagen tissue. Additionally, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has long been used to aid wound healing while concurrently depreciating biological wound burden time. Methods Six patients were selected from those appearing to our university based limb salvage service. Inclusion criteria included patients with a recurrent mixed fibrotic and granular wound base, in which NPWT was indicated, without exclusion criteria. Patients enrolled were administered clostridial collagenase ointment at each regularly scheduled NPWT dressing change. Patients were followed until healing, with visual representations of wound progression and time to full healing recorded. Results Tandem application of these therapies appeared to expedite wound healing by clearing degenerative fibrous tissue and expediting wound granulation without additional complication. Unfortunately, not all patients were able to reach full healing; with two patients experiencing ulcer recurrence, likely a result of their significant comorbid nature. Conclusion In our experience, we have noticed a specific subgroup of patients who benefit greatly when collagenase enzymatic debridement therapy is combined with NPWT. It is our belief that this combination therapy combines the molecular clearing of non-viable collagen with the wound granulation necessary to advance complex wounds to the next step in healing despite the current paucity in literature discussing this specific pairing. PMID:25630362

  15. Oxidative stress: the special case of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wiernsperger, N F

    2003-01-01

    The implication of oxidative stress (OS) in diabetes is a major concern for the development of therapeutics aimed at improving the metabolic and/or vascular dysfunctions of this burdening disease. Ample evidence is available suggesting that OS is present in essentially all tissues and can even be observed in prediabetic states. This raises the question of the origin of OS and suggests that, although hyperglycemia is largely linked with free radical production, its role may mainly be the aggravation of a preexisting state. Indeed other factors are also causally linked to OS, such as hormones and lipids. The main debate is about the pertinence of antioxidant therapy since the large scale clinical trials performed recently have essentially failed to show any significant improvement in metabolic or vascular disturbances of diabetic patients. However this conclusion must be tempered by the fact that they have mainly been using vitamin E +/-C; indeed many arguments suggest that either the choice or the application modalities of these substances may have been inadequate. Potential reasons for the actual failure of antioxidant therapy in diabetes are discussed; the indisputable involvement of OS in this disease still leaves hope for alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:14757973

  16. Pancreatitis with pancreatic tail swelling associated with incretin-based therapies detected radiologically in two cases of diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hirosuke; Sugitani, Seita; Yamaji, Shuhei; Otsu, Satoko; Higashi, Yoshihito; Ohtomo, Yumiko; Inoue, Gen

    2012-01-01

    We herein report two cases of pancreatitis associated with incretin-based therapies in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing dialysis. A 75-year-old woman with a history of liraglutide use and a 68-year-old man with a history of vildagliptin use both presented with nausea. They showed elevated levels of pancreatic enzymes and pancreatic tail swelling on CT. Their symptoms improved after discontinuing the drugs. In the absence of any obvious secondary causes of pancreatitis, we believe that the pancreatitis observed in these cases was associated with the incretin-based therapies. Few reports have been published on the safety and efficacy of incretin-based therapies in ESRD patients, and it remains uncertain whether the changes in the pancreas observed in the present cases are characteristic of ESRD patients. PMID:23124148

  17. Diabetes Case Management in Primary Care: The New Brunswick Experience and Expanding the Practice of the Certified Diabetes Educator Nurse into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shelley L

    2015-08-01

    The role of the outreach diabetes case manager in New Brunswick, Canada, was first developed in the Moncton Area of Horizon Health Network in response to a physician-identified gap between patients' diagnoses of diabetes and their attendance at the local diabetes education centre. This model of collaborative interprofessional practice increases support for primary care providers and people living with diabetes in that they are being provided the services of certified diabetes educators who can address knowledge gaps with respect to evidence-based guidelines and best practice, promote advancement of diabetes and chronic-disease management therapies and support adherence to treatment plans and self-management practices. This report chronicles a review of the implementation, expansion and evaluation of the outreach diabetes case manager model in the province of New Brunswick, Canada, along with the rationale for development of the role for registered nurses in other jurisdictions. PMID:25797113

  18. Pancreatic carcinoma: differences between patients with or without diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Girelli, C M; Reguzzoni, G; Limido, E; Savastano, A; Rocca, F

    1995-04-01

    In order to assess the prevalence and type of diabetes mellitus in patients with pancreatic carcinoma and if the risk factors for the cancer have a different distribution among diabetics and non-diabetics, we reviewed the charts of 127 histologically and/or cytologically proven pancreatic carcinomas consecutively diagnosed from 1977 to 1989 and referred to our Primary Care Hospital from the attending physician. 48 out of 127 (37.7%) subjects were found to be diabetic; 3 had long standing insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, 10 long standing non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and 35 (73% of all diabetics) new onset diabetes mellitus. 5 out of 10 long standing non insulin dependent diabetics showed secondary failure to oral antidiabetic agents and weight loss in the last six months before the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. When compared to non-diabetics, all diabetics were older (p = 0.05), drank less alcohol (p = 0.047) and had a higher rate of previous neoplasms (p = 0.005). New onset diabetics had a less advanced cancer than those of long standing (p = 0.009). Our study calls for a careful search for pancreatic carcinoma in new onset diabetes of elderly and in long standing, weight losing, non insulin dependent diabetics on secondary failure to oral antidiabetic agents and support the hypothesis that diabetes associated pancreatic carcinoma may bear an its own etiopathogenesis. PMID:7617956

  19. Clinical Characteristics of Young Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjia; Cai, Xiaoling; Han, Xueyao; Ji, Linong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly in the young population. The clinical characteristics and risk factors for young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis are not fully explicated. The aim of the present study was to investigate various clinical and biochemical characteristics of young type 2 diabetic patients with atherosclerosis. Design and Methods This was a cross-sectional study. The study involved 2199 hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes. The young patients were classified into the atherosclerotic group or the non-atherosclerotic group, and we also enrolled an older group with peripheral atherosclerosis disease and an age of at least 45 years. Comparisons were made between the different groups to investigate the cardiovascular and metabolic risk profiles of young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis. We also used logistic regression models to assess the atherosclerosis risk factors for young patients. Results Compared to older type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis, young patients with atherosclerosis had more deleterious profiles of weight and hyperlipidemia. Only age and diabetes duration were found to be significant independent risk factors for atherosclerosis in young patients. The ratio of the presence of atherosclerosis in the lower extremity arteries alone was significantly higher in young patients than older patients (26.4% vs. 14.0%, P = 0.000). Conclusion Young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis have more adverse cardiovascular risk profiles and inadequate control of these risk factors. Lower extremity examination is of high importance in young patients. PMID:27391819

  20. Psychological Adjustment and Neuropsychological Performance in Diabetic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skenazy, Judy A.; Bigler, Erin D.

    1985-01-01

    Compared diabetic (N=39) with nondiabetic chronic illness patients (N=20) and healthy controls (N=24). The chronic illness and the diabetic groups had significant elevations on the Hypochondriasis, Depression, and Hysteria scales of the Feschingbauer Abbreviated MMPI. For diabetics, results demonstrated a negligible effect of poor adjustment on…

  1. PREVALENCE OF HEPATITIS C IN DIABETIC PATIENTS: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Nosheen; Nasir, Bushra; Abrar, Muhammad Asad; Kaukab, Iram; Nawaz, Ahmad; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2016-01-01

    There is a strong evidence of the relationship between diabetes and hepatitis C however, there are certain gaps in the literature. Therefore, this study was carried out to determine the prevalence of hepatitis C in diabetic patients and risk factors associated with it, to evaluate the presence of possible relationship between hepatitis C and diabetes. Serological testing for anti HCV antibody was carried out on a sample of 100 diabetic patients visiting the diabetic clinic Nishtar Medical College and Hospital Multan. An anti HCV antibody test was carried out on HCV ELISA 3.0 (third generation) kit, locally purchased. Data about demographic information and history of risk factors for HCV was collected from diabetic patients using a structured questionnaire as an experimental tool, after taking informed consent. Data of about 100 non diabetic subjects (volunteer blood donors) was taken from the blood bank of that hospital. Prevalence rate of HCV infection among diabetic patients was recorded 19% and in the control group (non-diabetics) was 3%. Prevalence of HCV infection is higher in type 2 diabetic patients as compared to type 1 diabetic patients (84% vs. 16%). Diabetic patients between age group 46-55 years of age has high prevalence rates (47%) as compared to healthy individuals. Female diabetic patients have higher seropositivity (74%) as compared to male diabetic patients (26%). High prevalence of HCV infection has been reported among diabetic patients with duration of disease = 11 years (47%). Most of the patients were married (95%) and from urban locality (89%) and almost all were poor (99%). HCV positive diabetic patients have also history of blood transfusion (16%), hospital admissions (84%), major surgical procedure (63%), family history of hepatitis C (16%), razor sharing among males (16%) and comb sharing (79%). There was not any I/V drug addict (or history of I/V drug addiction), and tattooing, nose/ear piercing from contaminated needle and toothbrush

  2. A qualitative study of primary care professionals’ views of case finding for depression in patients with diabetes or coronary heart disease in the UK

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Routinely conducting case finding (also commonly referred to as screening) in patients with chronic illness for depression in primary care appears to have little impact. We explored the views and experiences of primary care nurses, doctors and managers to understand how the implementation of case finding/screening might impact on its effectiveness. Methods Two complementary qualitative focus group studies of primary care professionals including nurses, doctors and managers, in five primary care practices and five Community Health Partnerships, were conducted in Scotland. Results We identified several features of the way case finding/screening was implemented that may lead to systematic under-detection of depression. These included obstacles to incorporating case finding/screening into a clinical review consultation; a perception of replacing individualised care with mechanistic assessment, and a disconnection for nurses between management of physical and mental health. Far from being a standardised process that encouraged detection of depression, participants described case finding/screening as being conducted in a way which biased it towards negative responses, and for nurses, it was an uncomfortable task for which they lacked the necessary skills to provide immediate support to patients at the time of diagnosis. Conclusion The introduction of case finding/screening for depression into routine chronic illness management is not straightforward. Routinized case finding/screening for depression can be implemented in ways that may be counterproductive to engagement (particularly by nurses), with the mental health needs of patients living with long term conditions. If case finding/screening or engagement with mental health problems is to be promoted, primary care nurses require more training to increase their confidence in raising and dealing with mental health issues and GPs and nurses need to work collectively to develop the relational work required to

  3. Intentional hypoglycemia to control bingeing in a patient with type 1 diabetes and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Mandana; Kreisman, Stuart; Hall, Lacresha

    2015-02-01

    Most cases of eating disorders associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus are categorized as diabulimia, a disorder of withholding insulin treatment to lose weight through sustained hyperglycemia. In this paper, we report a unique case of a patient with both type 1 diabetes and bulimia nervosa who has an atypical way of controlling her bingeing by keeping her blood sugars low. This pattern of intentionally sustained hypoglycemia has not been previously described in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Knowing various presentations of eating disorders in patients with type 1 diabetes can provide healthcare workers with enhanced ability in recognizing and educating at-risk patients, in the hope of preventing serious hypoglycemia or complications. Furthermore, a patient's awareness of complications associated with suboptimal control of diabetes, whether by overdosing or underdosing their insulin regimen, might lead to avoidance of disordered eating behaviours. PMID:25282003

  4. Learning Difficulties of Diabetic Patients: A Survey of Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Caroline; Gagnayre, Remi; d'Ivernois, Jean-Francois

    1998-01-01

    Surveys 85 health care professionals on the learning difficulties of diabetic patients. Results show that educators find it easy to teach techniques: patients master procedures well and make few mistakes. In contrast, diabetic patients seem to have problems learning skills, such as insulin dose adjustment, that require complex problem-solving.…

  5. Traumatic injuries in patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Mekkodathil, Ahammed; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with increased in-hospital morbidity and mortality in patients sustained traumatic injuries. Identification of risk factors of traumatic injuries that lead to hospital admissions and death in DM patients is crucial to set effective preventive strategies. We aimed to conduct a traditional narrative literature review to describe the role of hypoglycemia as a risk factor of driving and fall-related traumatic injuries. DM poses significant burden as a risk factor and predictor of worse outcomes in traumatic injuries. Although there is no consensus on the impact and clear hazards of hyperglycemia in comparison to the hypoglycemia, both extremes of DM need to be carefully addressed and taken into consideration for proper management. Moreover, physicians, patients, and concerned authorities should be aware of all these potential hazards to share and establish the right management plans. PMID:27162438

  6. [Diabetes among new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in Hanoï, Vietnam].

    PubMed

    Thanh, Nguyen Phuong; Khue, Pham Minh; Sy, Dinh Ngoc; Strobel, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze all new pulmonary tuberculosis cases and to assess the frequency and consequences of associated diabetes mellitus. Although apparently distinct, these two diseases could be linked, as suspected since decades. The context is the persistent endemicity of tuberculosis and the recent emergence of diabetes, two major health events for developing countries. The study was conducted at National TB hospital in Hanoï, Vietnam, and retrospectively included tuberculosis patients, cases with diabetes and controls without diabetes, collected during a three-year period 2006-2008. Cases associated with HIV infection or other comorbidities potentially affecting mortality were excluded. Among 2867 new pulmonary TB cases, 254 (8.8%) had associated diabetes. Eighty-six cases and 86 matched controls were included. Among cases mean blood glucose at admission was 14.4 mmol/dl, and patients were mostly urban (50% cases vs 32.5% controls, p=0.03). Clinical symptoms were similar in both groups. However, chest X-Ray cavitary images were significantly more frequent among cases (38.3% vs 16.3%, p=0.002, OR=4.1), as did infiltrative images (78% vs 62%, p=0.017, OR=2.55) and positive sputum smears (67.4% vs 47.8%, p=0.014, OR=2.21). In Vietnam, DM is found in quasi 9% of patients with a new diagnosis of primary pulmonary TB. The diabetes-TB patients may have more severe radiologic findings and a higher smear positivity rate. We suggest that in addition to the systematic HIV screening, all new TB patients should also be screened for diabetes. PMID:26490764

  7. Prognostic Value of Admission Blood Glucose in Diabetic and Non-diabetic Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shichao; Pan, Yuesong; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Li, Hao; He, Yan; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun; Guo, Li

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to validate prognostic value of elevated admission blood glucose (ABG) for clinical outcomes in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a representative large cohort. Data of ICH patients with onset time ≤24 h were derived from the China National Stroke Registry. Clinical outcomes included 3-month poor outcome (death or dependency) and death. Logistic regression was performed for the association between ABG and clinical outcomes, both in the entire cohort and in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. 2951 ICH patients were enrolled, including 267 (9.0%) diabetics. In the entire cohort, there was a trend to increased risk of poor outcome with increasing ABG levels (adjusted OR 1.09; 95% CI, 1.04-1.15; P < 0.001). The risk of poor outcome was significantly greatest for the highest quartile (≥7.53 mmol/L) of ABG (adjusted OR 1.54; 95% CI, 1.17-2.03; p = 0.002, P for trend 0.004). We got similar association in non-diabetics but not in diabetics. Elevated ABG confers a higher risk of poor outcome in non-diabetics than diabetics with similar glucose level. Elevated ABG is an independent predictor of 3-month poor outcome in ICH patients, the prognostic value of which is greater in non-diabetics than diabetics with similar glucose level. PMID:27562114

  8. Prognostic Value of Admission Blood Glucose in Diabetic and Non-diabetic Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shichao; Pan, Yuesong; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Li, Hao; He, Yan; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun; Guo, Li

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to validate prognostic value of elevated admission blood glucose (ABG) for clinical outcomes in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a representative large cohort. Data of ICH patients with onset time ≤24 h were derived from the China National Stroke Registry. Clinical outcomes included 3-month poor outcome (death or dependency) and death. Logistic regression was performed for the association between ABG and clinical outcomes, both in the entire cohort and in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. 2951 ICH patients were enrolled, including 267 (9.0%) diabetics. In the entire cohort, there was a trend to increased risk of poor outcome with increasing ABG levels (adjusted OR 1.09; 95% CI, 1.04–1.15; P < 0.001). The risk of poor outcome was significantly greatest for the highest quartile (≥7.53 mmol/L) of ABG (adjusted OR 1.54; 95% CI, 1.17–2.03; p = 0.002, P for trend 0.004). We got similar association in non-diabetics but not in diabetics. Elevated ABG confers a higher risk of poor outcome in non-diabetics than diabetics with similar glucose level. Elevated ABG is an independent predictor of 3-month poor outcome in ICH patients, the prognostic value of which is greater in non-diabetics than diabetics with similar glucose level. PMID:27562114

  9. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult Male Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeun Seoung; Lim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Woocheol; Jung, Soon-Hee; Park, Il Hwan; Lee, Myoung Kyu; Lee, Won Yeon; Yong, Suk Joong; Lee, Seok Jeong; Jung, Ye-Ryung; Choi, Jiwon; Choi, Ji Sun; Jeong, Joon Taek; Yoo, Jin Sae

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is an uncommon diffuse cystic lung disease in adults. In rare cases, it can involve extrapulmonary organs and lead to endocrine abnormalities such as central diabetes insipidus. A 42-year-old man presented with polyphagia and polydipsia, as well as a dry cough and dyspnea on exertion. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hypothalamic-pituitary system failed to show the posterior pituitary, which is a typical finding in patients with central diabetes insipidus. This condition was confirmed by a water deprivation test, and the patient was also found to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Computed tomographic scanning of the lungs revealed multiple, irregularly shaped cystic lesions and small nodules bilaterally, with sparing of the costophrenic angles. Lung biopsy through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery revealed pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. On a follow-up visit, only 1 year after the patient had quit smoking, clinical and radiological improvement was significant. Here, we report an uncommon case of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis that simultaneously presented with diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26508947

  10. Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis in an Adult Male Presenting with Central Diabetes Insipidus and Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeun Seoung; Lim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Woocheol; Jung, Soon-Hee; Park, Il Hwan; Lee, Myoung Kyu; Lee, Won Yeon; Yong, Suk Joong; Lee, Seok Jeong; Jung, Ye-Ryung; Choi, Jiwon; Choi, Ji Sun; Jeong, Joon Taek; Yoo, Jin Sae; Kim, Sang-Ha

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis is an uncommon diffuse cystic lung disease in adults. In rare cases, it can involve extrapulmonary organs and lead to endocrine abnormalities such as central diabetes insipidus. A 42-year-old man presented with polyphagia and polydipsia, as well as a dry cough and dyspnea on exertion. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hypothalamic-pituitary system failed to show the posterior pituitary, which is a typical finding in patients with central diabetes insipidus. This condition was confirmed by a water deprivation test, and the patient was also found to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Computed tomographic scanning of the lungs revealed multiple, irregularly shaped cystic lesions and small nodules bilaterally, with sparing of the costophrenic angles. Lung biopsy through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery revealed pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. On a follow-up visit, only 1 year after the patient had quit smoking, clinical and radiological improvement was significant. Here, we report an uncommon case of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis that simultaneously presented with diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26508947

  11. Depression and Quality of Life in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Derakhshanpour, Firooze; Vakili, Mohammad Ali; Farsinia, Maryam; Mirkarimi, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Frequency of mood disorders in patients with chronic diseases, especially diabetes and its effects on life quality are dramatically increasing. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the relation between depression and quality of life in patients with diabetes. Patients and Methods: This is a cross sectional survey. Subjects were selected from 330 eligible people referred to the only diabetes clinic in Gorgan City during 6 months, using systematic random sampling. Beak Depression questionnaire and the brief questioner with 26 questions recommended by the World Health Organization (WHOQOL-BREF) were used to measure depression and quality of life, respectively. Data were analyzed through descriptive methods, Chi-square, Independent t test and linear regression model using SPSS16; moreover, P value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: In total, 330 patients with diabetes (35.5 % male and 64.5% women) were studied. The mean and standard deviation of their age and years involved with diabetes were 50.6 ± 9.0 and 5.4 ± 4.5 years, respectively. Range of age was 25 - 75 years, as well. The prevalence of depression in all patients with diabetes was 58.2% (124 mild, 56 medium, and 12 with severe depression). Hypertension was 13.9% more in diabetic patients with depression (P value < 0.001) and physical activity in 24.7% of the cases was less with a meaningful difference (P value = 0.01). The mean and standard deviation of quality of life in diabetic patients with and without depression was 50.7 ± 14 and 60.5 ± 13.3, respectively that was significant in two groups (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The prevalence of depression is high in patients with diabetes and has a considerable impact on the consequences of diabetes and quality of life too. PMID:26082854

  12. Diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy: The diagnosis must be considered in all diabetic neuropathic patients presenting with a hot, swollen foot.

    PubMed

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S; Mason, Rhett; Lunt, Helen

    2015-10-16

    The diagnosis of diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) is challenging. This is especially true early in the disease process, when its classical presentation of an acutely inflamed foot may masquerade as other more common lower limb conditions. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment reduces the risk of CN causing permanent incapacitating foot deformity or amputation. We report two cases in which the diagnosis was delayed, resulting in long-term sequelae. These cases highlight the importance of considering CN in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, who present with a red, hot, and swollen foot. PMID:26645758

  13. Risk factors for occurrence and recurrence of diabetic foot ulcers among Iraqi diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Samer I.; Mikhael, Ehab M.; Ahmed, Fadia T.; Al-Tukmagi, Haydar F.; Jasim, Ali L.

    2016-01-01

    There are a few studies that discuss the medical causes for diabetic foot (DF) ulcerations in Iraq, one of them in Wasit province. The aim of our study was to analyze the medical, therapeutic, and patient risk factors for developing DF ulcerations among diabetic patients in Baghdad, Iraq. PMID:26983600

  14. Depression influences the quality of diabetes-related self-management activities in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mut-Vitcu, Gabriela; Timar, Bogdan; Timar, Romulus; Oancea, Cristian; Citu, Ioan Cosmin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prevalence of depression and its impact on the quality of diabetes-related self-care activities in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients and methods In this cross-sectional study, 184 patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled. Depression was evaluated using Patient Health Questionnaire-9 while the quality of diabetes-related self-care activities was assessed using the Summary of Diabetes-Related Self Care Activities Questionnaire. Results In our study group, 53.3% of the patients had moderate depression, 17.9% had severe depression, and 28.8% had no depression symptoms. Patient’s age (P=0.024), presence of diabetic neuropathy (P<0.001), and body mass index (P=0.037) proved to be independent and significant predictors for developing depression in patients with type 2 diabetes. The severity of depression was reverse correlated with the quality of self-care activities for all the studied components: global score (r=−0.305), diet intervention score (r=−0.297), exercise score (r=−0.388), glycemic monitoring score (r=−0.055), and feet care score (r=−0.180). The presence of severe depression was associated with an increased prevalence of diabetes complications such as diabetic neuropathy and chronic kidney disease. Conclusion The prevalence of depression is higher in patients with type 2 diabetes compared to general population. Depression has a major negative impact on the quality of diabetes-related self-care activities and, being a treatable condition, proactive screening followed in case of a positive diagnosis by adequate treatment should be performed in all patients with diabetes. PMID:27217731

  15. A cohort study of diabetic patients and diabetic foot ulceration patients in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yufeng; Wang, Xuemei; Xia, Lei; Fu, Xiaobing; Xu, Zhangrong; Ran, Xingwu; Yan, Li; Li, Qiu; Mo, Zhaohui; Yan, Zhaoli; Ji, Qiuhe; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    To determine the annual incidence and clinically relevant risk factors for foot ulceration in a large cohort study of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients and diabetes mellitus (DM) patients in China. To investigate a cohort of 1,333 patients comprising 452 DFU patients and 881 DM patients, who underwent foot screening, physical examination, and laboratory tests in eight hospitals. The patients were assessed at baseline in terms of their demographic information, medical and social history, peripheral neuropathy disease (PND) screening, periphery artery disease (PAD) screening, assessment of nutritional status, and diabetic control. One year later, the patients were followed up to determine the incidence of new foot ulcers, amputation, and mortality. By univariate analysis, statistically significant differences were found in age, location, gender, living alone (yes/no), occupation, smoking, hypertension, PND, PAD, nephropathy, retinopathy, cataracts, duration of diabetes, Glycosylated hemoglobin A (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose level, postprandial blood glucose level, insulin level, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, cholesterol, triglyeride, high density lipoprotein (HDL), serum albumin, white blood cell, and body mass index. A binary logistic regression model was used to examine which of these risk factors were independent risk factors for foot ulceration. A total of 687 (51.5%) of the 1,333 patients were followed up for an average of 12 months; there were 458 DM patients and 229 DFU patients. A total of 46 patients died during the follow-up period; 13 were DM patients, and 33 were DFU patients. Of the 641 patients, 445 (69.4%) patients were DM patients, and 196 (30.6%) were DFU patients. At follow-up, 36/445 DM patients (8.1%), and 62/196 DFU patients (31.6%), developed new ulcers; 10/196 DFU patients underwent an amputation. The annual incidence of ulceration for DM patients and amputation for DFU patients were 8.1 and 5.1%, respectively. The annual mortality of

  16. Subclinical hyperthyroidism in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Iglesias, Pedro

    2012-08-01

    Both subclinical hyperthyroidism and type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been associated with an increase in cardiovascular disease risk and mortality. We aimed to assess the prevalence of newly diagnosed subclinical hyperthyroidism in a cohort of patients with T2D, and also to analyse the relationships between diabetes-related characteristics and the presence of subclinical hyperthyroidism. 933 diabetic patients without previous history of thyroid disease (45.4% females, mean age 66.3 years, median duration of diabetes 10 years) were evaluated. A sample of 911 non-diabetic subjects without known thyroid dysfunction was studied as control group. Serum concentrations of thyrotropin were measured in all subjects. Subclinical hyperthyroidism was present in 4.3% of female and 3.5% of male diabetic patients. Relative risk was significant only for the female gender (OR 3.69, 95% CI 1.56-8.71). In comparison with diabetic patients without thyroid hyperfunction, patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism were older, had longer duration of diabetes, showed lower fasting glucose levels, had greater proportion of goitre and diet therapy, and had lower proportion of treatment with oral agents. Logistic regression analysis showed that age and the presence of goitre were significantly related to subclinical hyperthyroidism in patients with T2D. The risk for subclinical hyperthyroidism is increased in women with T2D. Advanced age and the presence of goitre are significantly and independently related with the presence of subclinical hyperthyroidism in diabetic population. PMID:22327927

  17. Difficulties of Diabetic Patients in Learning about Their Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Caroline; Gagnayre, Remi; d'Ivernois, Jean Francois

    2001-01-01

    Examines the difficulties experienced by diabetic patients in learning about their illness. Diabetic people (N=138) were questioned by means of a closed answer questionnaire. Results reveal that patients easily acquired manual skills, yet numerous learning difficulties were associated with the skills required to solve problems and make decisions,…

  18. Characterization of lipid parameters in diabetic and non-diabetic atherosclerotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Fatima; Jamil, Hassan; Anwar, Sanam Saiqa; Wajid, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Background & Objective The relationship between lipid profile perturbation and diabetes associated complications has long been an area of interest. Dyslipidemia is a potent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. The aim of present study was to investigate relationship between aging and lipid profiles in diabetic and non-diabetic atherosclerotic patients. Methods Five hundred and seventy six individuals (45–75 year age) participated in this study. Among these, 192 were having history of diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Individuals are categorized on the base of health (normal, non-diabetic atherosclerosis, diabetic atherosclerosis) and age (45–55 years, 56–65 years, and 66–75 years). All the participants were subjected to the procedures like a detailed history, biochemical analysis for fasting blood sugar, hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein-(LDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). All these parameters were compared between diabetic and non-diabetic atherosclerotic patients of all three age groups. TC/HDL and LDL/HDL were also calculated. Results Diabetic atherosclerotic individuals (both males and females) had high level of TC, TG, LDL, VLDL and low level of HDL in comparison to non-diabetic atherosclerotic and normal control individuals. Among all three age groups, lipoprotein abnormality was observed to be more frequent in females than males. There was a significant increase in TC/HDL and LDL/HDL ratio in diabetic atherosclerotic subjects compared to age and sex matched non-diabetic atherosclerotic and normal control. Conclusions Degree of dyslipidemia increases with increase in age in both genders. Female are more prone to diabetic dyslipidemia and hence have more risk of developing atherosclerosis with increasing age. PMID:25678903

  19. [Correction of dyslipidemia in patients with chronic hepatitis C, combined with diabetes type 2].

    PubMed

    Derbak, M; Boldizhar, P

    2014-01-01

    The article shows the results of treatment of 118 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) which is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). When planning therapeutic interventions in chronic hepatitis C in patients with diabetes, it is considered the presence of visceral obesit , dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis. The efficacy of different treatment regimens was studied. Found that the usage of ursodeoxycholic acid and ademetionin in HCV patients with diabetes type 2 receiving standard antiviral therapy (SAVT), significantly make a positive effect on the level of dyslipidemia. The normalization of lipid profile allows for a full course of SAVT, which reduces the frequency of relapse. It is also noted that the simultaneous use of ademetionin and ursodeoxycholic acid in treatment of chronic hepatitis C leads to a reduction of side effects of SAVT. Metabolic therapy may be recommended for patients with chronic hepatitis C in combination with type 2 diabetes in case of SAVT, and at its contraindications or intolerance. PMID:24523328

  20. Hyperglycaemia and ketosis in a non-diabetic patient--an unusual cause of delayed recovery.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Sundeep T; Nath, Soumya S; Ansari, Farrukh

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of hyperglycaemia and ketosis developing in a non-diabetic patient who underwent a neurosurgical procedure under general anaesthesia. A 52-year-old non-diabetic female patient underwent excision of acoustic neuroma under general anaesthesia. Pancreatic function was not disturbed and she received a single dose of dexamethasone (8 mg) and paracetamol (1 g). Delayed recovery from anaesthesia occurred. On investigation, she was found to have hyperglycaemia and ketosis. She was further managed on the line of diabetic ketoacidosis. After 24 hours, when blood glucose had normalised and ketosis abated, she could be weaned from mechanical ventilation and extubated. The patient did not receive any drugs known to cause such a condition. To the best of our knowledge, hyperglycaemia and ketosis developing in a non-diabetic patient causing delayed recovery and extubation is here reported for the first time. PMID:25078770

  1. Effectiveness of Diabetes Interventions in the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Ackroyd, Sarah A.; Wexler, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care model for the provision of primary care that is being rapidly adopted in the U.S. with the support of federal agencies and professional organizations. Its goal is to provide comprehensive, patient-centered care with increased access, quality, and efficiency. Diabetes, as a common, costly, chronic disease that requires ongoing management by patients and providers, is a condition that is frequently monitored as a test case in PCMH implementations. While in theory a PCMH care model that supports patient engagement and between-visit care may help improve diabetes care delivery and outcomes, the success of this approach may depend largely upon the specific strategies used and implementation approach. The cost-effectiveness of diabetes care in the PCMH model is not yet clear. Interventions have been most effective and most cost-effective for those with the poorest diabetes management at baseline. PMID:24477830

  2. E-prescribing: clinical implications for patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marie; Dang, Devra; Lee, Jennifer

    2009-09-01

    With the recent Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services and stimulus package incentives for health information technology, many clinicians are expected to adopt or enhance their use of e-prescribing systems. E-prescribing has nearly eradicated medication errors resulting from prescriber handwriting interpretations, yet several other patient-care and workflow benefits still remain a promise. As prescribers select or update their e-prescribing systems (whether stand-alone or integrated with electronic health records), close attention is needed to the e-prescribing application features and level of clinical decision support to avoid clinical blind spots, including incomplete or inaccurate patient medication lists, poor drop-down menu or screen design, and lack of clinically relevant and actionable drug interaction and drug allergy alerts. This article presents three case studies that highlight common e-prescribing problems involving diabetes patients. PMID:20144439

  3. Diabetes Causation Beliefs Among Spanish-Speaking Patients

    PubMed Central

    Concha, Jeannie Belinda; Mayer, Sallie D.; Mezuk, Briana R.; Avula, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore how the inquiry of cultural diabetes causation beliefs can improve Hispanic/Latino patient self-management. Methods Two semistructured focus groups were conducted with 13 Hispanic/Latinos adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Prior to taking part in the group discussion, participants completed a demographic survey and the Illness Perception Questionnaire–Revised. Results The top 5 diabetes causation items endorsed by participants per the questionnaire included stress or worry, behavior, hereditary, diet/eating habits, and family problems/worries. The qualitative analysis revealed stress as a recurring theme for a cause of diabetes. Work stress was specifically identified as a contributor to unhealthy eating and diabetes. Most participants were aware of and believed in susto and referred to it as coraje (anger). Participants believed that asking patients about their diabetes causation beliefs and emotional status can help health professionals (1) better understand the patient and (2) identify and prioritize diabetes treatments. Participants also indicated that the role of doctors is important and the encouragement that they give to patients is clinically and spiritually valued. Conclusions Stress was identified as a cause of diabetes in addition to unhealthy diets and heredity. Asking patients about diabetes causation beliefs and emotional status may help prioritize treatment and management goals. PMID:26568376

  4. Changes in retinal microvascular diameter in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Andréa Vasconcellos Batista; Gouvea, Sonia Alves; da Silva, Aurélio Paulo Batista; Bortolon, Saulo; Rodrigues, Anabel Nunes; Abreu, Glaucia Rodrigues; Herkenhoff, Fernando Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Diabetic retinopathy is the main microvascular complication in diabetes mellitus and needs to be diagnosed early to prevent severe sight-threatening retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to quantify the retinal microvasculature pattern and analyze the influence of blood glucose level and the duration of diabetes mellitus on the retinal microvasculature. Methods Two groups were analyzed: patients with diabetes (N=26) and patients without diabetes, ie, controls (N=26). A quantitative semiautomated method analyzed retinal microvasculature. The diameters of arterioles and venules were measured. The total numbers of arterioles and venules were counted. The ratio of arteriole diameter to venule diameter was calculated. The retinal microvasculature pattern was related to clinical and biochemical parameters. Results Patients with diabetes exhibited larger venule diameters in the upper temporal quadrant of the retina compared to the lower temporal quadrant (124.85±38.03 µm vs 102.92±15.69 µm; P<0.01). Patients with diabetes for 5 or more years had larger venule diameters in the upper temporal quadrant than patients without diabetes (141.62±44.44 vs 112.58±32.11 µm; P<0.05). The degree of venodilation in the upper temporal quadrant was positively correlated with blood glucose level and the estimated duration of diabetes mellitus. Interpretation and conclusion The employed quantitative method demonstrated that patients with diabetes exhibited venule dilation in the upper temporal quadrant, and the duration of diabetes mellitus was positively correlated with blood glucose level. Therefore, the early assessment of retinal microvascular changes is possible prior to the onset of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26345217

  5. Diabetic retinopathy and the associated risk factors in diabetes type 2 patients in Abha, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Razia A.; Khalil, Shamsun N.; Al-Qahtani, Mohammad A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the proportion and grades of retinopathy and its risk factors in diabetes type 2 patients. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 401 type 2 diabetic patients. A questionnaire and checklist were used to collect the data. Retinopathy was diagnosed and graded by fundus photographs and slit lamp examination. The duration of diabetes, age of patients, age at onset of diabetes, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c level, blood pressure, and complications were noted. Results: The mean age of male and female patients was 54.93 and 54.25 years; 57.6% were males. The mean age of onset and mean duration of diabetes were 43.91 and 13.4 years, respectively. The proportion of retinopathy was 36.4%. Grades of retinopathy were: Mild 57.5%, moderate 19.9%, severe nonproliferative 11%, and proliferative retinopathy 11.6%; 7.2% of patients had maculopathy. Retinopathy was significantly associated with older age, younger age at onset, longer duration of disease, poorly controlled blood sugar, hypertension, insulin use; the presence of neuropathy and nephropathy appeared as a significant risk. Younger age at onset, longer duration, and insulin use appeared as the strongest predictors for diabetic retinopathy. Conclusions: More than a third (36.4%) of the diabetic patients attending a diabetic center had retinopathy. The control of the risk factors may reduce both prevalence and consequences of retinopathy. PMID:26929725

  6. Disordered eating behaviors in type 1 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Larrañaga, Alejandra; Docet, María F; García-Mayor, Ricardo V

    2011-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus are at high risk for disordered eating behaviors (DEB). Due to the fact that type 1 diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic illnesses of childhood and adolescence, the coexistence of eating disorders (ED) and diabetes often affects adolescents and young adults. Since weight management during this state of development can be especially difficult for those with type 1 diabetes, some diabetics may restrict or omit insulin, a condition known as diabulimia, as a form of weight control. It has been clearly shown that ED in type 1 diabetics are associated with impaired metabolic control, more frequent episodes of ketoacidosis and an earlier than expected onset of diabetes-related microvascular complications, particularly retinopathy. The management of these conditions requires a multidisciplinary team formed by an endocrinologist/diabetologist, a nurse educator, a nutritionist, a psychologist and, frequently, a psychiatrist. The treatment of type 1 diabetes patients with DEB and ED should have the following components: diabetes treatment, nutritional management and psychological therapy. A high index of suspicion of the presence of an eating disturbance, particularly among those patients with persistent poor metabolic control, repeated episodes of ketoacidosis and/or weight and shape concerns are recommended in the initial stage of diabetes treatment, especially in young women. Given the extent of the problem and the severe medical risk associated with it, more clinical and technological research aimed to improve its treatment is critical to the future health of this at-risk population. PMID:22087355

  7. Effect of hope therapy on the hope of diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ghazavi, Zahra; Khaledi-Sardashti, Firouz; Kajbaf, Mohamad Bagher; Esmaielzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hope is the most important factor in diabetic patients’ life. The level of hope may be changing among these individuals as a result of chronic nature of diabetes and its complications. When the level of hope increases among these patients, they can resist against physical and psychological complications of diabetes more, accept the treatment better, enjoy life more, and adapt with their situations more efficiently. This study aimed to define the efficacy of hope therapy on hope among diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study conducted on 38 diabetic patients referring to Sedigheh Tahereh Research and Treatment Center affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in Iran in 2012. The subjects were selected based on the goals and inclusion criteria of the study and then were randomly assigned to study and control groups. Herth Hope Index (HHI) was completed by both groups before, after, and 1 month after intervention. In the study group, 120-min sessions of hope therapy were held twice a week for 4 weeks. Descriptive and inferential statistical tests were adopted to analyze the data through SPSS version 12. Results: Comparison of the results showed that hope therapy significantly increased hope in diabetic patients after intervention in the study group compared to control (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results showed that hope therapy increased hope among diabetic patients. This method is suggested to be conducted for diabetic patients. PMID:25709694

  8. Is there a role for screening asymptomatic patients with diabetes?

    PubMed

    Veillet-Chowdhury, Mahdi; Blankstein, Ron

    2015-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) remains a leading cause of death among patients with diabetes mellitus. However, many patients with diabetes and CAD are asymptomatic and may sustain a myocardial infarction as their presenting symptom of CAD. Non-invasive cardiovascular imaging offers an opportunity to detect the presence and severity of CAD, or its hemodynamic consequences. The Detection of Ischemia in Asymptomatic Diabetics study and the FACTOR-64 study examined the utility of non-invasive imaging tests to evaluate asymptomatic individuals with diabetes mellitus. The results of these trials may have been negative with regard to promoting CAD screening of asymptomatic diabetic patients, but they do strengthen the position of optimal medical management in reducing cardiovascular events. However, performing a trial to include true high-risk patients who have CAD and are more likely to have silent ischemia could lead to prognostically beneficial coronary revascularizations. PMID:25979367

  9. Subclinical Onychomycosis in Patients With Type II Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    El Tawdy, Amira; Zaki, Naglaa; Alfishawy, Mostafa; Rateb, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Fungal organisms could be present in the nail without any clinical manifestations. As onychomycosis in diabetics has more serious complications, early detection of such infection could be helpful to prevent them. We aim in this study to assess the possibility of detecting subclinical onychomycosis in type II diabetic patients and addressing possible associated neuropathy. A cross sectional, observational study included patients with type II diabetes with normal big toe nail. All were subjected to nail clipping of the big toe nail, followed by staining with Hematoxylin and Eosin and Periodic-Acid-Schiff (PAS) stains and examined microscopically. A total of 106 patients were included, fungal infection was identified in eight specimens, all were uncontrolled diabetes, and six had neuropathy. Using the nail clipping and microscopic examination with PAS stain to detect such subclinical infection could be an applicable screening test for diabetic patients, for early detection and management of onychomycosis. PMID:26734120

  10. [The ruptured, infected femoral artery aneurysm in the patient with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Niedziela, P; Michalak, J; Kobusiewicz, W

    1998-01-01

    The performance of vascular operations in the patients with co-existing diabetes poses a very difficult therapeutic problem. In our thesis we present the cases in which only after multiple reconstruction operations the limb could be saved. In the case of infection of the vascular prosthesis an extra-anatomic transplant (graft) is the only solution. PMID:10222848

  11. Management of type 2 diabetes: evolving strategies for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nyenwe, Ebenezer A.; Jerkins, Terri W.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.; Kitabchi, Abbas E.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to increase at an alarming rate around the world, with even more people being affected by prediabetes. Although the pathogenesis and long-term complications of type 2 diabetes are fairly well known, its treatment has remained challenging, with only half of the patients achieving the recommended hemoglobin A1c target. This narrative review explores the pathogenetic rationale for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, with the view of fostering better understanding of the evolving treatment modalities. The diagnostic criteria including the role of hemoglobin A1c in the diagnosis of diabetes are discussed. Due attention is given to the different therapeutic maneuvers and their utility in the management of the diabetic patient. The evidence supporting the role of exercise, medical nutrition therapy, glucose monitoring, and antiobesity measures including pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery is discussed. The controversial subject of optimum glycemic control in hospitalized and ambulatory patients is discussed in detail. An update of the available pharmacologic options for the management of type 2 diabetes is provided with particular emphasis on newer and emerging modalities. Special attention has been given to the initiation of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, with explanation of the pathophysiologic basis for insulin therapy in the ambulatory diabetic patient. A review of the evidence supporting the efficacy of the different preventive measures is also provided. PMID:21134520

  12. Kidney transplant in diabetic patients: modalities, indications and results

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Érika B; de Sá, João R; Melaragno, Cláudio S; Gonzalez, Adriano M; Linhares, Marcelo M; Salzedas, Alcides; Medina-Pestana, José O

    2009-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a disease of increasing worldwide prevalence and is the main cause of chronic renal failure. Type 1 diabetic patients with chronic renal failure have the following therapy options: kidney transplant from a living donor, pancreas after kidney transplant, simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant, or awaiting a deceased donor kidney transplant. For type 2 diabetic patients, only kidney transplant from deceased or living donors are recommended. Patient survival after kidney transplant has been improving for all age ranges in comparison to the dialysis therapy. The main causes of mortality after transplant are cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, infections and neoplasias. Five-year patient survival for type 2 diabetic patients is lower than the non-diabetics' because they are older and have higher body mass index on the occasion of the transplant and both pre- and posttransplant cardiovascular diseases prevalences. The increased postransplant cardiovascular mortality in these patients is attributed to the presence of well-known risk factors, such as insulin resistance, higher triglycerides values, lower HDL-cholesterol values, abnormalities in fibrinolysis and coagulation and endothelial dysfunction. In type 1 diabetic patients, simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant is associated with lower prevalence of vascular diseases, including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and amputation in comparison to isolated kidney transplant and dialysis therapy. Conclusion Type 1 and 2 diabetic patients present higher survival rates after transplant in comparison to the dialysis therapy, although the prevalence of cardiovascular events and infectious complications remain higher than in the general population. PMID:19825194

  13. Associations with fracture in patients with diabetes: a nested case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Starup-Linde, Jakob; Gregersen, Søren; Vestergaard, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of fractures, which is not fully explained by bone mineral density and common risk factors. The aim of this study is to investigate the association of medication and biochemical markers on the risk of fracture in a diabetes population. Design and setting A nested case–control study was conducted based on Danish diabetes patients from The Danish National Hospital Discharge Registry. Participants The cases of the study were diabetes patients with a fracture (n=24 349), and controls were diabetes patients with no fracture (n=132 349). A total of 2627 diabetes patients were available for an analysis of patient characteristics, comorbidities, biochemical parameters and drug usage. Results Age (OR=1.02, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.04), diabetes duration (OR=1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.09), a diagnosis of previous fracture (OR=2.20, 95% CI 1.55 to 3.11), an alcohol-related diagnosis (OR=2.94, 95% CI 1.76 to 4.91), total cholesterol level (OR=2.50, 95% CI 1.20 to 5.21) and the usage of antiepileptics (OR=2.12, 95% CI 1.39 to 3.59) all increased the odds of fracture. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels decreased the odds of fracture (OR =0.34, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.74), where the level of 3.04–5.96 mmol/L was optimal with regard to fracture risk. Conclusions Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol may improve our understanding of fractures in diabetes patients, and it may be added to current fracture risk models in diabetes patients. PMID:26873048

  14. Nrf2 and Redox Status in Prediabetic and Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Osorio, Angélica S.; Picazo, Alejandra; González-Reyes, Susana; Barrera-Oviedo, Diana; Rodríguez-Arellano, Martha E.; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2014-01-01

    The redox status associated with nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) was evaluated in prediabetic and diabetic subjects. Total antioxidant status (TAS) in plasma and erythrocytes, glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured as redox status markers in 259 controls, 111 prediabetics and 186 diabetic type 2 subjects. Nrf2 was measured in nuclear extract fractions from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Nrf2 levels were lower in prediabetic and diabetic patients. TAS, GSH and activity of glutamate cysteine ligase were lower in diabetic subjects. An increase of MDA and superoxide dismutase activity was found in diabetic subjects. These results suggest that low levels of Nrf2 are involved in the development of oxidative stress and redox status disbalance in diabetic patients. PMID:25383674

  15. [Myocardial involvement in diabetic patients evaluated by exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and cardiac catheterization].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, S; Genda, A; Nakayama, A; Igarashi, Y; Takeda, R

    1985-06-01

    To evaluate myocardial involvement in diabetes mellitus, we studied 39 patients with negative double-Master's test and without hypertension by exercise thallium-201 (T1-201) myocardial scintigraphy using a bicycle ergometer. Among the 39 patients, 12 (30.8%) showed filling defects in the scintigrams (positive cases), including eight with stress-induced defects and four with fixed defects. The positive cases had higher scores of diabetic complications (3.6 +/- 2.4 vs 2.1 +/- 1.8; p less than 0.05) and longer durations of diabetes as compared with those of the negative cases. The frequency of insulin therapy was also greater in the positive cases. Eleven patients (5 positive and 6 negative cases) who underwent cardiac catheterization had no significant stenotic lesions of their coronary arteries. However, all of the positive cases showed abnormal wall motion, mainly hypokinesis, by left ventriculography (LVG). The abnormalities of the LVG corresponded to the findings of the scintigrams (i.e. filling defects and decrease in washout ratios by circumferential profile analysis). These results suggest that in some diabetics myocardial involvement exists in the early stage without overt cardiac disease and exercise T1-201 scintigraphy is useful in detecting pre-clinical cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathy in diabetics seems to be due to disturbances of the myocardial microcirculation. PMID:4093624

  16. Diabetic retinopathy: variations in patient therapeutic outcomes and pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Aniruddha; Soliman, Mohamed K; Sepah, Yasir J; Do, Diana V; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes and its microvascular complications in patients poses a significant challenge and constitutes a major health problem. When it comes to manifestations in the eye, each case of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is unique, in terms of the phenotype, genotype, and, more importantly, the therapeutic response. It is therefore important to identify factors that distinguish one patient from another. Personalized therapy in DR is a new trend aimed at achieving maximum therapeutic response in patients by identifying genotypic and phenotypic factors that may result in less than optimal response to conventional therapy, and consequently, lead to poorer outcome. With advances in the identification of these genetic markers, such as gene polymorphisms and human leucocyte antigen associations, as well as development of drugs that can target their effects, the future of personalized medicine in DR is promising. In this comprehensive review, data from various studies have been analyzed to present what has been achieved in the field of pharmacogenomics thus far. An insight into future research is also provided. PMID:25548526

  17. Atherosclerotic lesions of supra-aortic arteries in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Vidjak, Vinko; Hebrang, Andrija; Brkljacić, Boris; Brajsa, Mladen; Novacić, Karlo; Barada, Ante; Skopljanac, Andrija; Erdelez, Lidija; Crncević, Maja; Kucan, Damir; Flegar-Mestrić, Zlata; Vrhovski-Hebrang, Danijela; Roić, Goran

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine the prevalence and localization of stenotic atherosclerotic lesions of supra-aortic arteries in diabetic patients according to age and sex. Angiograms obtained by digital subtraction angiography were analyzed in 150 diabetic patients (study group) and 150 non-diabetic patients (control group) with symptoms of cerebral ischemia. Diabetic patients were found to have a significantly higher prevalence of stenotic atherosclerotic lesions of the internal carotid artery. Lesions of the large supra-aortic arteries were significantly more common in the left than in the right side of the neck (p < 0.001), but the difference between the diabetic and the non-diabetic group did not reach statistical significance. Hemodynamic conditions were found to be more important than diabetes for the occurrence of atherosclerotic lesions in these arteries. Changes in the proximal segment of the left common carotid artery were the most common finding in diabetic patients, hence attention should be paid to this localization on control examinations. PMID:18041380

  18. Infratemporal Space Infection Following Maxillary Third Molar Extraction in an Uncontrolled Diabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Mesgarzadeh, Ali Hossein; Ghavimi, Mohammad Ali; Gok, Gulşen; Zarghami, Afsaneh

    2012-01-01

    Infratemporal space infection is a rare but serious sequel of odontogenic infection. The diagnosis is difficult due to non spe-cific signs and symptoms. Diabetes mellitus as a definitive risk factor for odontogenic infections needs more consideration during clinical procedures. We report a case of an undiagnosed diabetic patient with isolated infratemporal space infection after tooth extraction with presentation of similar signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint and muscle problem. PMID:22991649

  19. Normoglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Pregnant Patient with Type II Diabetes Mellitus Presenting for Emergent Cesarean Delivery.

    PubMed

    Cardonell, Bradford L; Marks, Barry A; Entrup, Michael H

    2016-04-15

    The development of acute abdominal pain in a laboring parturient after a previous cesarean delivery is of concern and may be the result of a potentially life-threatening condition such as uterine rupture. We present a case of a parturient with type II diabetes mellitus, who had undergone 2 previous cesarean deliveries and now presented in labor with increasing abdominal pain. An emergency cesarean delivery was performed for probable uterine rupture. Intraoperatively, the patient was noted to be severely hypocarbic with significant metabolic acidosis, and the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis was established. PMID:26825994

  20. Correlation between Microalbuminuria and Hypertension in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Alia; Taj, Azeem; Amin, Muhammad Joher; Iqbal, Farrukh; Iqbal, Zafar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is commonly found in patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD). Microalbuminuria is the first clinical sign of involvement of kidneys in patients with type 2 diabetes. Uncontrolled hypertension induces a higher risk of cardiovascular events, including death, increasing proteinuria and progression to kidney disease. Objectives: To determine the correlation between microalbuminuria and hypertension and their association with other risk factors in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: One hundred and thirteen type 2 diabetic patients attending the diabetic clinic of Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lahore, Pakistan were screened for microalbuminuria and raised blood pressure. The study was conducted from November 2012 to June 2013. Results: Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1, those with normoalbuminuria (n=63) and Group 2, those having microalbuminuria (n=50). Group 2 patients showed higher blood pressure values as compared to Group 1. The results were statistically significant and showed poor glycemic control as a contributing risk factor. Conclusion: The study concluded that there is high frequency of hypertension among type 2 diabetics but still much higher among those having microalbuminuria. So, early recognition of renal dysfunction through detection of microalbuminuria and to start treatment without any delay will confer future protection from end stage renal disease as well as hypertension and its complications in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:24948969

  1. High Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy in Diabetic Patients Concomitant with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lu; Xin, Zhong; Yuan, Ming-Xia; Cao, Xi; Feng, Jian-Ping; Shi, Jing; Zhu, Xiao-Rong; Yang, Jin-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Research Design and Methods We conducted a case-controlled study, with data obtained from 2,551 Chinese participants between 18–79 years of age (representing a population of 1,660,500 in a district of Beijing). 74 cases of DR were found following data assessment by two 45° digital retinal images. Subjects without DR (NDR group) selected from the remaining 2,477 subjects were matched 1:1 to the DR group by HbA1c. MetS was defined by incorporating diagnostic criteria of the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Results There were no statistical differences between the DR group and NDR group in a number of biological or laboratory tests. However, the percentage of patients with DR increased vs. patients without DR with the number of MetS components from 1 to 5 (14.3% vs. 85.7%, 38.9% vs. 61.1%, 49.1% vs. 50.9%, 61.4% vs. 38.6% and 83.3% vs. 16.7%, respectively) (Pearson χ2 = 9.938, P = 0.037). The trend to develop DR with MetS was significantly higher than that without MetS (NMetS) (χ2 = 5.540, P = 0.019). MetS was an independent statistical indicator of the presence of DR after adjusting for age and sex [odds ratio (95% CI): 2.701(1.248–5.849), P = 0.012], which is still the case with an additional adjustment for WC, SBP, TC, HbA1c and duration of diabetes [odds ratio (95% CI): 2.948(1.134–7.664), P = 0.027]. Conclusion DR is one of the diabetic microvascular complications. Apart from poor glycemic control, the concomitance of other metabolic factors can also influence DR. MetS, defined as a cluster of metabolic risk factors, is a strong and independent indicator of DR, even to the same extent as glycemic control. PMID:26745177

  2. Successful Hepatitis C Antiviral Therapy Induces Remission of Type 2 Diabetes: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Mary-Anne; Cooper, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 49 Final Diagnosis: Type 2 diabetes Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Endocrinology and Metabolic Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Type 2 diabetes is a well described extra-hepatic manifestation of hepatitis C infection (HCV). Eradication of HCV has led to improvements in insulin resistance but to date has not been shown to induce remission of diabetes. Case Report: We report a case of a 49-year-old man with HCV and a 2-year history of T2DM on oral agents. He was initially treated with peg-interferon/ribavirin (peg-IFN/rib) but did not achieve a HCV treatment response. Four years later he was retreated with peg-IFN/rib plus an HCV protease inhibitor (boceprevir). His HbA1c at the start of treatment was 7.9%. Antiviral response to HCV-therapy correlated with a significant improvement in glucose control without a change in diabetes therapy or improvement in adherence. He achieved a sustained virological response and within a year of completing antiviral therapy he no longer required medical therapy for diabetes. Two years after the completion of HCV treatment, the patient has maintained an HbA1c of 5.8% without any diabetes medications. Conclusions: This case provides evidence of the important relationship between HCV and diabetes and highlights the potential reversibility of glucose abnormalities with successful eradication of HCV. Increased awareness of this association may improve detection of undiagnosed HCV infection, identify patients with reversible causes of diabetes, guide therapeutic decisions for HCV treatment, and improve outcomes in patients with both diseases. PMID:26482468

  3. What the radiologist needs to know about the diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Raptis, Athanasios E; Markakis, Konstantinos P; Mazioti, Maria C; Raptis, Sotirios A; Dimitriadis, George D

    2011-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is recognised as a major health problem. Ninety-nine percent of diabetics suffer from type 2 DM and 10% from type 1 and other types of DM. The number of diabetic patients worldwide is expected to reach 380 millions over the next 15 years. The duration of diabetes is an important factor in the pathogenesis of complications, but other factors frequently coexisting with type 2 DM, such as hypertension, obesity and dyslipidaemia, also contribute to the development of diabetic angiopathy. Microvascular complications include retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. Macroangiopathy mainly affects coronary arteries, carotid arteries and arteries of the lower extremities. Eighty percent of deaths in the diabetic population result from cardiovascular incidents. DM is considered an equivalent of coronary heart disease (CHD). Stroke and peripheral artery disease (PAD) are other main manifestations of diabetic macroangiopathy. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DC) represents another chronic complication that occurs independently of CHD and hypertension. The greater susceptibility of diabetic patients to infections completes the spectrum of the main consequences of DM. The serious complications of DM make it essential for physicians to be aware of the screening guidelines, allowing for earlier patient diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22347947

  4. Predictors of direct cost of diabetes care in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examines factors that predict elevated direct costs of pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods: A cohort of 784 children with type 1 diabetes at least 6 months postdiagnosis and managed by pediatric endocrinologists at Texas Children's Hospital were included in this study. Actual...

  5. Diabetes screening, diagnosis, and therapy in pediatric patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rodbard, Helena W

    2008-01-01

    The dramatic rise in the incidence and prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the pediatric and adolescent populations has been associated with the ongoing epidemic of overweight, obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome seen in these age groups. Although the majority of pediatric patients diagnosed with diabetes are still classified as having type 1 diabetes, almost 50% of patients with diabetes in the pediatric age range (under 18 years) may have type 2 diabetes. Screening of high-risk patients for diabetes and prediabetes is important. Prompt diagnosis and accurate diabetes classification facilitate appropriate and timely treatment and may reduce the risk for complications. This is especially important in children because lifestyle interventions may be successful and the lifelong risk for complications is greatest. Treatment usually begins with dietary modification, weight loss, and a structured program of physical exercise. Oral antidiabetic agents are added when lifestyle intervention alone fails to maintain glycemic control. Given the natural history of type 2 diabetes, most if not all patients will eventually require insulin therapy. In those requiring insulin, improved glycemic control and reduced frequency of hypoglycemia can be achieved with insulin analogs. It is common to add insulin therapy to existing oral therapy only when oral agents no longer provide adequate glycemic control. PMID:18924636

  6. Prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers in newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Sinharay, Keshab; Paul, Uttam Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Anup Kumar; Pal, Salil Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Foot ulcer is one of the most common and dreadest complication of diabetes mellitus.This is also a frequent cause of hospitalisation and disability. Most of the patients with diabetic foot ulcers living in developing countries present to healthcare facilities fairly late with advanced foot ulcers because of poor economic status, inadequate knowledge of self-care, sociocultural reasons and poor and inadequate diabetes healthcare. To determine the prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers amongst the newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients (n = 1674) a cross-sectional study was carried out during the period January 2010 to January 2011 in the department of medicine, NRS Medical College, Kolkata. Diabetic foot ulcers were found in 4.54% newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus patients. Neuropathic type of foot ulcer was present in 46.06% of patients (52.5% in male and 38.88% in female). Ischaemic type of foot ulcer was present in 19.74% of patients (22.5% in male and in 16.66% females). Neuroischaemic type of foot ulcer was present in 34.2% of patients (25% in males and 44.44% in females). Neuropathy occurred most frequently either singly or with peripheral vascular disease. General awareness about the disease, early diagnosis and proper management will prevent this dreaded complication. PMID:23741832

  7. Type 2 Diabetes Treatment in the Patient with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Malin, Steven K; Kashyap, Sangeeta R

    2016-09-01

    Lifestyle modification is the cornerstone treatment of type 2 diabetes in the obese patient, and is highly effective at promoting glucose regulation. However, many individuals struggle over time to maintain optimal glycemic control and/or body weight with lifestyle modification. Therefore, additional therapeutic approaches are needed. Pharmacologic interventions have shown promising results for obesity-related diabetes complications. Not surprisingly though lifestyle modification and pharmacology may become ineffective for treating diabetes over time. Bariatric surgery is considered by some, but not all, to be the most effective and durable treatment for combating obesity. In fact many patients with type 2 diabetes have normalized glucose concentrations within days postoperation. Taken together, treatment of obesity in the patient with type 2 diabetes requires a multi-faceted approach. PMID:27519130

  8. 3D DCE-MRA of pedal arteries in patients with diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamyshevskaya, M.; Zavadovskaya, V.; Zorkaltsev, M.; Udodov, V.; Grigorev, E.

    2016-02-01

    Purpose was identification and evaluation of pedal vascularization in diabetic patients of using contrast MR-angiography (3D DCE-MRA). 23 diabetic feet of 23 patients (15 male, 8 female; mean age 56 ± 14.6) underwent 3D DCE-MRA (Gadobutrol 15ml) at 1.5 T. Imaging analysis included blood-flow's speed, vascular architectonic's condition and character of contrast's accumulation. Osteomyelitis was verified by surgery in 15 cases. All patients were divided in 3 groups: neuropathic, neuroischemic, ischemic forms of diabetic foot. First- pass MRA detected significant delay of contrast's arrival in ischemic group. There were no significant differences between the values of neuropathic and neuroischemic forms of diabetic foot. Pedal vessels in patients were absent. Contrast MRA revealed three types of contrast distribution in soft tissues: uniform, local increase and local absence. Osteomyelitis was associated with diffuse enhanced contrast accumulation in all cases. In summary, MRI blood vessel imaging is a promising and valuable method for examining peripheral arterial changes in diabetic foot and might be useful for treatment planning in different forms of diabetic foot.

  9. Lisfranc fracture-dislocation precipitating acute Charcot arthopathy in a neuropathic diabetic foot: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Joey; Muir, Kenneth Ross; Dissanayake, Ajith Munasinghe; Tzu-Chieh, Wendy Yu

    2008-01-01

    The Lisfranc injury is relatively uncommon yet remains popular in the literature due to its variable causative mechanisms and subtleties in radiographic features despite its potential for disabling long term outcomes if treatment is inadequate, inappropriate or delayed. These injuries are especially pertinent in diabetic patients, especially those with neuropathy, since they are more common, can lead to Charcot neuropathic joint, ulcers and have different causative mechanisms compared to the general population. We describe the case of a neuropathic diabetic patient who presented with a Lisfranc injury which precipitated the development of acute Charcot arthropathy in the right foot. The case serves to illustrate several salient points about the Lisfranc joint and related injuries in diabetic patients. PMID:18973700

  10. Oral health related quality of life in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Rokhsareh; Taleghani, Ferial; Farhadi, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Diabetic patients display an increased risk of oral disorders, and oral health related quality of life (OHRQL) might affect their management and treatment modalities. The aim of the present study was to determine OHRQL and associated parameters in patients with diabetes. Materials and methods. In this study two hundred patients were recruited from the diabetes clinic in Mustafa Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran. OHRQL was assessed using Oral Health Impact Profile Questionnaire (OHIP-20). Also, another questionnaire was designed which contained questions regarding participants' knowledge about oral complications of diabetes and oral health behavior. OHRQL was categorized as low and good. Data were analyzed using logistic regression at P = 0.05. Results. Of the diabetic patients assessed, 77.5% were in good and 22.5% were in low categories of OHRQL. This quality was significantly associated with age (OR = 4.03, 95% CI = 1.63-11.29), knowledge about diabetes oral complications (OR = 18.17 95% CI = 4.42-158.6), educational level (OR = 26.31 95% CI = 4.2-1080.3), referred for dental visit by physician (OR = 3.16 95% CI = 1.48-6.69), frequency of brushing (OR = 10.29 95% CI = 3.96-31.2) and length of time diagnosed with diabetes (OR = 6.21 95% CI = 2.86-13.63). Conclusion. Oral health related quality of life was not negatively affected by diabetes mellitus in the assessed sample. PMID:25587385

  11. Height at diagnosis of insulin dependent diabetes in patients and their non-diabetic family members.

    PubMed Central

    Songer, T J; LaPorte, R E; Tajima, N; Orchard, T J; Rabin, B S; Eberhardt, M S; Dorman, J S; Cruickshanks, K J; Cavender, D E; Becker, D J

    1986-01-01

    Height at the onset of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was evaluated in 200 newly diagnosed children, 187 non-diabetic siblings, and 169 parents. Diabetic children 5-9 years of age at diagnosis were consistently taller than the national average. Non-diabetic siblings of the same age were also tall. Diabetic children aged 14 or over at diagnosis were short, while their siblings and parents were of normal height. Diabetic children positive for islet cell antibodies were taller than those without islet cell antibodies. No association between height and HLA antigens was found. Non-diabetic siblings at high risk for the disease were closer in height to the diabetic children than were the lower risk, non-diabetic siblings. Siblings, particularly those under 10, were also significantly more obese than the general population. Deviations in growth in patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus appear to be related to age at diagnosis and a factor(s) not related to parental height. PMID:3087454

  12. Association Between Diabetic Macular Edema and Cardiovascular Events in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Leveziel, Nicolas; Ragot, Stéphanie; Gand, Elise; Lichtwitz, Olivier; Halimi, Jean Michel; Gozlan, Julien; Gourdy, Pierre; Robert, Marie-Françoise; Dardari, Dured; Boissonnot, Michèle; Roussel, Ronan; Piguel, Xavier; Dupuy, Olivier; Torremocha, Florence; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Maréchaud, Richard; Hadjadj, Samy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the main cause of visual loss associated with diabetes but any association between DME and cardiovascular events is unclear. This study aims to describe the possible association between DME and cardiovascular events in a multicenter cross-sectional study of patients with type 2 diabetes. Two thousand eight hundred seven patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from diabetes and nephrology clinical institutional centers participating in the DIAB 2 NEPHROGENE study focusing on diabetic complications. DME (presence/absence) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) classification were based on ophthalmological report and/or on 30° color retinal photographs. DR was defined as absent, nonproliferative (background, moderate, or severe) or proliferative. Cardiovascular events were stroke, myocardial infarction, and lower limb amputation. Details regarding associations between DME and cardiovascular events were evaluated. The study included 2807 patients with type 2 diabetes, of whom 355 (12.6%) had DME. DME was significantly and independently associated with patient age, known duration of diabetes, HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, and DR stage. Only the prior history of lower limb amputation was strongly associated with DME in univariate and multivariate analyses, whereas no association was found with regard to myocardial infarction or stroke. Moreover, both major (n = 32) and minor lower limb (n = 96) amputations were similarly associated with DME, with respective odds ratio of 3.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77–7.74; P = 0.0012) and of 4.29 (95% CI, 2.79–6.61; P < 0.001). DME is strongly and independently associated with lower limb amputation in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:26287408

  13. Evidence for a Specific Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: An Observational Retrospective Echocardiographic Study in 656 Asymptomatic Type 2 Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Pham, Isabelle; Cosson, Emmanuel; Nguyen, Minh Tuan; Banu, Isabela; Genevois, Isabelle; Poignard, Patricia; Valensi, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Our aim was to assess the prevalence of subclinical diabetic cardiomyopathy, occurring among diabetic patients without hypertension or coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods. 656 asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes for 14 ± 8 years (359 men, 59.7 ± 8.7 years old, HbA1c 8.7 ± 2.1%) and at least one cardiovascular risk factor had a cardiac echography at rest, a stress cardiac scintigraphy to screen for silent myocardial ischemia (SMI), and, in case of SMI, a coronary angiography to screen for silent CAD. Results. SMI was diagnosed in 206 patients, and 71 of them had CAD. In the 157 patients without hypertension or CAD, left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH: 24.1%) was the most frequent abnormality, followed by left ventricular dilation (8.6%), hypokinesia (5.3%), and systolic dysfunction (3.8%). SMI was independently associated with hypokinesia (odds ratio 14.7 [2.7-81.7], p < 0.01) and systolic dysfunction (OR 114.6 [1.7-7907], p < 0.01), while HbA1c (OR 1.9 [1.1-3.2], p < 0.05) and body mass index (OR 1.6 [1.1-2.4], p < 0.05) were associated with systolic dysfunction. LVH was more prevalent among hypertensive patients and hypokinesia in the patients with CAD. Conclusion. In asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients, diabetic cardiomyopathy is highly prevalent and is predominantly characterized by LVH. SMI, obesity, and poor glycemic control contribute to structural and functional LV abnormalities. PMID:26074964

  14. Evidence for a Specific Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: An Observational Retrospective Echocardiographic Study in 656 Asymptomatic Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Isabelle; Cosson, Emmanuel; Nguyen, Minh Tuan; Banu, Isabela; Genevois, Isabelle; Poignard, Patricia; Valensi, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Our aim was to assess the prevalence of subclinical diabetic cardiomyopathy, occurring among diabetic patients without hypertension or coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods. 656 asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes for 14 ± 8 years (359 men, 59.7 ± 8.7 years old, HbA1c 8.7 ± 2.1%) and at least one cardiovascular risk factor had a cardiac echography at rest, a stress cardiac scintigraphy to screen for silent myocardial ischemia (SMI), and, in case of SMI, a coronary angiography to screen for silent CAD. Results. SMI was diagnosed in 206 patients, and 71 of them had CAD. In the 157 patients without hypertension or CAD, left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH: 24.1%) was the most frequent abnormality, followed by left ventricular dilation (8.6%), hypokinesia (5.3%), and systolic dysfunction (3.8%). SMI was independently associated with hypokinesia (odds ratio 14.7 [2.7–81.7], p < 0.01) and systolic dysfunction (OR 114.6 [1.7–7907], p < 0.01), while HbA1c (OR 1.9 [1.1–3.2], p < 0.05) and body mass index (OR 1.6 [1.1–2.4], p < 0.05) were associated with systolic dysfunction. LVH was more prevalent among hypertensive patients and hypokinesia in the patients with CAD. Conclusion. In asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients, diabetic cardiomyopathy is highly prevalent and is predominantly characterized by LVH. SMI, obesity, and poor glycemic control contribute to structural and functional LV abnormalities. PMID:26074964

  15. The DKA that wasn't: a case of euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis due to empagliflozin.

    PubMed

    Candelario, Nellowe; Wykretowicz, Jedrzej

    2016-07-01

    Sodium glucose co-transporter (SGLT-2) inhibitor is a relatively new medication used to treat diabetes. At present, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has only approved three medications (canagliflozin, dapagliflozin and empagliflozin) in this drug class for the management of Type 2 diabetes. In May 2015, the FDA issued a warning of ketoacidosis with use of this drug class. Risk factors for the development of ketoacidosis among patients who take SGLT-2 inhibitors include decrease carbohydrate intake/starvation, acute illness and decrease in insulin dose. When identified, immediate cessation of the medication and administration of glucose must be done, and in some instances, starting an insulin drip might be necessary. We present a case of a patient with diabetes mellitus being on empagliflozin (SGLT-2 antagonist) who was admitted for acute cholecystitis. The hospital course was complicated by euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis after being kept nothing per orem before a contemplated cholecystectomy. PMID:27471597

  16. The DKA that wasn't: a case of euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis due to empagliflozin

    PubMed Central

    Candelario, Nellowe; Wykretowicz, Jedrzej

    2016-01-01

    Sodium glucose co-transporter (SGLT-2) inhibitor is a relatively new medication used to treat diabetes. At present, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has only approved three medications (canagliflozin, dapagliflozin and empagliflozin) in this drug class for the management of Type 2 diabetes. In May 2015, the FDA issued a warning of ketoacidosis with use of this drug class. Risk factors for the development of ketoacidosis among patients who take SGLT-2 inhibitors include decrease carbohydrate intake/starvation, acute illness and decrease in insulin dose. When identified, immediate cessation of the medication and administration of glucose must be done, and in some instances, starting an insulin drip might be necessary. We present a case of a patient with diabetes mellitus being on empagliflozin (SGLT-2 antagonist) who was admitted for acute cholecystitis. The hospital course was complicated by euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis after being kept nothing per orem before a contemplated cholecystectomy. PMID:27471597

  17. Lymphocytic mastitis and diabetic mastopathy: a molecular, immunophenotypic, and clinicopathologic evaluation of 11 cases.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Riccardo; Thorson, John; Finn, William G; Schnitzer, Bertram; Kleer, Celina G

    2003-03-01

    Lymphocytic mastitis and diabetic mastopathy are uncommon fibroinflammatory breast diseases. The lesions seen in these entities are unique in that the associated lymphoid infiltrates are composed of predominantly B cells. In addition, B-cell lymphoepithelial lesions, a finding commonly associated with extranodal marginal zone B-cell/mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas, are also often present in lymphocytic mastitis and diabetic mastopathy. Although the clinical and immunomorphologic features are well characterized, the clonality of the B-cell infiltrate and the lymphomatous potential of lymphocytic mastitis and diabetic mastopathy have not been emphasized in the literature. We evaluated 11 cases of lymphocytic mastitis/diabetic mastopathy for immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement and correlated the findings with all available clinical data. A longstanding history of Type I diabetes mellitus was present in seven patients. One nondiabetic patient had Sjogren's syndrome, and two patients had no history of diabetes mellitus or other autoimmune disease. Clinical data were unavailable for one patient. B-cell-predominant lymphoid infiltrates were seen in all cases, and B-cell lymphoepithelial lesions were found in five. No evidence of a B-cell clone was found in any of the 11 cases by appropriately controlled immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement studies, and none of the patients developed lymphoma during follow-up intervals ranging from 2-126 months. These findings suggest that despite the presence of B-cell-predominant lymphoid infiltrates and lymphoepithelial lesions, lymphocytic mastitis and diabetic mastopathy do not appear to be associated with an increased risk for lymphoma. PMID:12640102

  18. Are antiresorptive drugs effective against fractures in patients with diabetes?

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Peter; Rejnmark, Lars; Mosekilde, Leif

    2011-03-01

    We studied whether the reduction in bone turnover by use of antiresorptive drugs is detrimental in patients with diabetes who already have low bone turnover due to hyperglycemia in a nationwide cohort study from Denmark. All users of antiresorptive drugs against osteoporosis between 1996 and 2006 (n = 103,562) were the exposed group, with three age- and gender-matched controls from the general population (n = 310,683). Patients on bisphosphonates and raloxifene had a higher risk of hip, spine, and forearm fractures. However, no difference was observed in the antifracture efficacy between patients with diabetes and nondiabetic controls or between patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Too few were users of strontium to allow analysis for this compound. The excess risk of fractures among patients treated with bisphosphonates or raloxifene compared to nonexposed controls was due to the higher a priori risk of fractures among patients treated for osteoporosis. Diabetes does not seem to affect the fracture-preventive potential of bisphosphonates or raloxifene. The low-turnover state of diabetes thus does not seem to be a hindrance to the effect of these drugs against osteoporosis. Therefore, patients with diabetes should receive treatment for osteoporosis in the same way as nondiabetic patients. PMID:21161194

  19. Type 2 diabetes mellitus: A risk factor for Helicobacter pylori infection: A hospital based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Devrajani, Bikha Ram; Shah, Syed Zulfiquar Ali; Soomro, Aftab Ahmed; Devrajani, Tarachand

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in diabetic and non-diabetic patients and to compare the frequency of H. pylori infection in both groups. Study Design: Case control. Place and Duration: Department of Medicine, Liaquat University Hospital from October 2007 to March 2008. Materials and Methods: This hospital-based case-control study was conducted on 148 subjects and divided into two groups i.e. type 2 diabetics and non-diabetics; each group consisting of 74 patients. All diabetic patients of ≥ 35 years of age, both gender and the known cases with history of dyspepsia, epigastric pain or bloating for more than a month were screened for Helicobacter pylori infection. The collected data of both groups was evaluated and separated for analysis. Results: Majority of the patients were male with mean age ± SD, 52.86 ± 8.51. Among the diabetic group, HpSA was positive in 54/74 (73%), whereas in the non-diabetic group HpSA was positive in 38/74 (51.4%) cases. Fasting blood glucose was identified as low in 04 (5.40%) H. pylori infected - diabetic patients where as the blood glucose level of 07 (9.45%) known diabetic patients was raised despite the ongoing medication. Conclusion: Diabetic patients are more prone and at risk to acquire H. Pylori infection. Therefore proper monitoring of blood glucose level and screening for H. pylori infection are effective preventive measures for this life threatening infection. PMID:20431802

  20. A novel intravitreal fluocinolone acetonide implant (Iluvien®) in the treatment of patients with chronic diabetic macular edema that is insufficiently responsive to other medical treatment options: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Schmit-Eilenberger, Vera K

    2015-01-01

    Background Iluvien® is a novel, nonbiodegradable, sustained-release drug delivery system (0.2 μg/d fluocinolone acetonide [FAc]) indicated in Europe for the treatment of vision impairment associated with chronic diabetic macular edema (DME), considered insufficiently responsive to available therapies. Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of 190-μg FAc implant in patients with chronic DME refractory to other medical treatment options in a clinical setting. Methods Retrospective registry data were collected by using standard case report forms (CRFs). Prior to intravitreal injection of the FAc implant, all patients were treated either with a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antagonist and/or a steroid (triamcinolone, dexamethasone implant). Patients were excluded from receiving FAc if they had a known history of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) following corticosteroid therapy, glaucoma, ocular hypertension, or any contraindications cited in the summary of product characteristics. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was the main study parameter. Central fovea thickness (CFT) and IOP were measured concurrently. These parameters were recorded prior to and after the injection of the 190-μg FAc implant (between 1 week and 9 months). Injections were performed between May 2013 and March 2014. Results Fifteen eyes from ten patients were treated. Thirteen eyes (nine patients) were pseudophakic, and seven eyes (five patients) were vitrectomized prior to receiving therapy. BCVA improved in eleven eyes (73.3%), remained unchanged in two eyes (13.3%), and decreased slightly in two eyes (13.3%) at the last follow-up visit versus baseline levels. IOP increased in two patients and was controlled using fixed-combination of IOP-lowering eyedrops or sectorial cyclocryotherapy (n=1). Conclusion The 190-μg FAc implant was efficacious and showed a favorable benefit-to-risk profile in the patient population with chronic DME of this case series that were refractory

  1. Successful Management of Tardive Dyskinesia with Quetiapine and Clonazepam in a Patient of Schizophrenia with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Satyakam

    2016-01-01

    Tardive dyskinesia is one of the most significant side effects of antipsychotic medications. Antipsychotic treated schizophrenia patients with diabetes mellitus are more likely to develop tardive dyskinesia than those without diabetes. Clozapine is probably best supported for management of tardive dyskinesia. But clozapine has been strongly linked to hyperglycaemia and impaired glucose tolerance, so it is not preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus. We present a case of 35-year-old male with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and type 2 diabetes mellitus with tardive dyskinesia, who was successfully treated with quetiapine and clonazepam. PMID:27121435

  2. Successful Management of Tardive Dyskinesia with Quetiapine and Clonazepam in a Patient of Schizophrenia with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Satyakam

    2016-05-31

    Tardive dyskinesia is one of the most significant side effects of antipsychotic medications. Antipsychotic treated schizophrenia patients with diabetes mellitus are more likely to develop tardive dyskinesia than those without diabetes. Clozapine is probably best supported for management of tardive dyskinesia. But clozapine has been strongly linked to hyperglycaemia and impaired glucose tolerance, so it is not preferred in patients with diabetes mellitus. We present a case of 35-year-old male with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and type 2 diabetes mellitus with tardive dyskinesia, who was successfully treated with quetiapine and clonazepam. PMID:27121435

  3. Dyslipidemia, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-chi; Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the relationship between dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascular diseases in patients with diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is associated with complications in the cardiovascular and renal system, and is increasing in prevalence worldwide. Modification of the multifactorial risk factors, in particular dyslipidemia, has been suggested to reduce the rates of diabetes-related complications. Dyslipidemia in diabetes is a condition that includes hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein levels, and increased small and dense low-density lipoprotein particles. This condition is associated with higher cardiovascular risk and mortality in diabetic patients. Current treatment guidelines focus on lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level; multiple trials have confirmed the cardiovascular benefits of treatment with statins. Chronic kidney disease also contributes to dyslipidemia, and dyslipidemia in turn is related to the occurrence and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Different patterns of dyslipidemia are associated with different stages of diabetic nephropathy. Some trials have shown that treatment with statins not only decreased the risk of cardiovascular events, but also delayed the progression of diabetic nephropathy. However, studies using statins as the sole treatment of hyperlipidemia in patients on dialysis have not shown benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk. Diabetic patients with nephropathy have a higher risk of cardiovascular events than those without nephropathy. The degree of albuminuria and the reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate are also correlated with the risk of cardiovascular events. Treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers to reduce albuminuria in diabetic patients has been shown to decrease the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:24380085

  4. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  5. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  6. Ocular surface changes in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Ru, Yu-Sha; Wang, Xiao-Wu; Yang, Ji-Zhong; Li, Chun-Hui; Wang, Hong-Xing; Li, Xiao-Rong; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    AIM To detect and analyze the changes on ocular surface and tear function in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), an advanced stage of diabetic retinopathy (DR), using conventional ophthalmic tests and the high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy. METHODS Fifty-eight patients with type II diabetes were selected. Based on the diagnostic criteria and stage classification of DR, the patients were divided into the non-DR (NDR) group and the PDR group. Thirty-six patients with cataract but no other ocular and systemic disease were included as non-diabetic controls. All the patients were subjected to the conventional clinical tests of corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I Test, and corneal fluorescein staining. The non-invasive tear film break-up time (NIBUT) and tear interferometry were conducted by a Tearscope Plus. The morphology of corneal epithelia and nerve fibers was examined using the high-resolution confocal microscopy. RESULTS The NDR group exhibited significantly declined corneal sensitivity and Schirmer I test value, as compared to the non-diabetic controls (P< 0.001). The PDR group showed significantly reduced corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I test value, and NIBUT in comparison to the non-diabetic controls (P < 0.001). Corneal fluorescein staining revealed the progressively injured corneal epithelia in the PDR patients. Moreover, significant decrease in the corneal epithelial density and morphological abnormalities in the corneal epithelia and nerve fibers were also observed in the PDR patients. CONCLUSION Ocular surface changes, including blunted corneal sensitivity, reduced tear secretion, tear film dysfunction, progressive loss of corneal epithelia and degeneration of nerve fibers, are common in type II diabetic patients, particularly in the diabetic patients with PDR. The corneal sensitivity, fluorescein staining scores, and the density of corneal epithelial cells and nerve fibers in the diabetic patients correlate

  7. Analysis of epistasis for diabetic nephropathy among type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Liang, Kung-Hao; Hung, Yi-Jen; Huang, Li-Chin; Pei, Dee; Liao, Ya-Tang; Kuo, Shi-Wen; Bey, Monica Shian-Jy; Chen, Jui-Lin; Chen, Ellson Y

    2006-09-15

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the most serious complications of diabetes, accounting for the majority of patients with end-stage renal disease. The molecular pathogenesis of DN involves multiple pathways in a complex, partially resolved manner. The paper presents an exploratory epistatic study for DN. Association analysis were performed on 231 SNP loci in a cohort of 264 type 2 diabetes patients, followed by the epistasis analysis using the multifactor dimensionality reduction and the genetic algorithm with Boolean algebra. A two-locus epistatic effect of EGFR and RXRG was identified, with a cross-validation consistency of 91.7%. PMID:16893912

  8. Health literacy and its influencing factors in Iranian diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Zahra; Tehrani Banihashemi, Arash; Asgharifard, Homa; Bahramian, Mehran; Baradaran, Hamid Reza; Khamseh, Mohammad E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health literacy is the ability to obtain, read, understand and use healthcare information to make appropriate health decisions and follow instructions for treatment. The aim of this study was to identify the effect of various factors on health literacy in patients with diabetes. Methods: 407 patients with diabetes older than 15 years of age were identified from the Diabetes Clinic affiliated to the Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism (IEM) of Iran University of Medical Sciences. We assessed patients' health literacy using the Persian version of Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (TOFHLA) questionnaire. Results: Mean age of the patients was 55.8 ± 11.3 years, and 61.7% the participants were female.. Overall, 18.2% of the patients had adequate health literacy skills, 11.8% had marginal and 70.0% inadequate health literacy skills. Male participants performed better than females (p< 0.01) and older patients had lower health literacy score than younger patients (p< 0.001). Furthermore, patients with higher educational and occupational levels had higher functional health literacy score than those with lower levels (p< 0.001). Conclusion: Health literacy score in Iranian patients with diabetes seems inadequate. Therefrom effective interventions should be designed and implemented for this group of patients to improve diabetes outcomes. PMID:26478888

  9. Managing the asymptomatic diabetic patient with silent myocardial ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Doubell, A F

    2002-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is common in diabetic patients and remains the major cause of death in these patients. However myocardial ischaemia resulting from coronary lesions does not always give rise to symptoms. The managing physician must therefore consider the benefit of screening for silent myocardial ischaemia in diabetic patients. Screening all diabetic patients is not recommended. The challenge to the physician is to select the patient subgroups likely to benefit from screening. Patients with more than one cardiac risk factor (dyslipidaemia, hypertension, smoking, family history, micro-albuminuria) in addition to diabetes, as well as patients with established macrovascular disease, e.g. peripheral vascular disease, will benefit most from screening. A standard treadmill stress ECG is the recommended screening test. A number of additional tests have been proposed to select high-risk patients for screening. Of these, testing for microalbuminuria and elevated CRP levels are most likely to influence decision-making. Once silent ischaemia has been detected in a diabetic patient, the mainstay of treatment remains the aggressive control of risk factors, improvement of glycaemic control and aspirin therapy. The use of beta-blockers and ACE-inhibitors often need consideration. The attending physician must then consider referring the patient to a cardiologist for angiography and possible intervention. This decision is based on the presence of poor prognostic signs during the stress ECG and the number of risk factors present. Microalbuminuria and elevated CRP levels are helpful in assisting with the risk stratification process. PMID:12389062

  10. Hypoglycemia in Patients with Diabetes and Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E.

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic limitations in this situation. PMID:26239457

  11. Diabetes Cases Quadruple Worldwide Since 1980: Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... editorial accompanying the study, Etienne Krug, from the World Health Organization, wrote that the findings "sound the alarm for large-scale, effective action to reduce the health and economic impact of diabetes. Improvements in prevention and management, ...

  12. Diabetes self-care behaviours and clinical outcomes among Taiwanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Chung-Mei; Dwyer, Johanna T; Jacques, Paul F; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Haas, Catherine F; Weinger, Katie

    2015-01-01

    We examined the influences of patients' background characteristics on the frequency of performing five diabetes self-care behaviours that 185 Taiwanese outpatients reported. All patients had type 2 diabetes diagnosed for more than a year and attended an outpatient clinic at a large university hospital where they had received at least one dietitian-led individual nutrition education session and one nurse-led diabetes education session during the course of their care. Seventy nine percent of the patients regularly (defined as responses often or always on the questionnaire) took their medications and over half followed recommended meal plans and exercised, but fewer performed foot care (38%) or checked their blood glucose levels (20%) regularly. The associations between patients' demographics and disease-related characteristics and their performance of self-care behaviours were assessed with logistic regression. Although checking blood glucose levels and performing diabetes foot care were unrelated to any clinical outcome examined, patients who took their diabetes medications had lower hemoglobin A1c levels and fewer chronic complications than those who did not. Furthermore, patients who followed a diabetes meal plan also had lower hemoglobin A1c levels, and those who exercised regularly had healthier body mass indices (BMI) than those who did not. PMID:26420184

  13. Urinary biomarkers for early diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Fiseha, Temesgen

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a serious complication of diabetes associated with increased risk of mortality, and cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Diagnostic markers to detect DN at early stage are important as early intervention can slow loss of kidney function and improve patient outcomes. Urinary biomarkers may be elevated in diabetic patients even before the appearance of microalbuminuria, and can be used as useful marker for detecting nephropathy in patients with normoalbuminuria (early DN). We reviewed some new and important urinary biomarkers, such as: Neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG), Cystatin C, alpha 1-microglobulin, immunoglobulin G or M, type IV collagen, nephrin, angiotensinogen and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) associated with early DN in type 2 diabetic patients. Our search identified a total of 42 studies that have been published to date. Urinary levels of these biomarkers were elevated in type 2 diabetic patients compared with non-diabetic controls, including in patients who had no signs indicating nephropathy (without microalbuminuria), and showed positive correlation with albuminuria. Despite the promise of these new urinary biomarkers, further large, multicenter prospective studies are still needed to confirm their clinical utility as a screening tool for early type 2 DN in every day practice. PMID:26146561

  14. Diabetic Ketoacidosis—A Review of Cases at a University Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Kiraly, John F.; Becker, Charles E.; Williams, Hibbard E.

    1970-01-01

    Twenty-five cases of diabetic ketoacidosis were studied retrospectively with respect to clinical characteristics and results of therapy. In this series (as with all 88 patients admitted in the last five years with a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis) there were no deaths. Infection was found to be the most common precipitating event, documented by physical findings and cultures in one-third of these cases. In about two-thirds of the cases, electrocardiograms which were read as abnormal on admission reverted to normal after therapy. In all patients serum potassium levels decreased from admission values; one patient became symptomatically hypokalemic. Low serum potassium levels on admission and early vigorous bicarbonate therapy are emphasized as major predisposing factors of symptomatic hypokalemia. None of the patients had overt hyperosmolar coma, lactic acidosis or cerebral edema during therapy. PMID:4985288

  15. [Surgical service for patients with purulonecrotic complications of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Malakhov, Iu S; Aver'ianov, D A; Ivanov, A V; Stepaniuk, A V; Kozovoĭ, I Ia

    2013-04-01

    The article deals with staging surgical service for patients with ulceronecrotic damages of the distal parts of lower extremities associated with diabetic foot. The authors grounded the deadlines of sanitive operations, performing after reconstructive vascular operations, on the basis of assessment of outflow tract according to Rutherford and index of TcPO2 increase. High efficiency of revascularization in order to maintenance of lower-extremity function in patients with complicated forms of diabetic foot is proved. PMID:24000608

  16. Imaging Features of Pulmonary CT in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongbo; Ren, Yanwei; Lu, Xiwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Until now, radiographic manifestations of multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (MDR- TB) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have not been reported. We conducted a study to investigate the imaging features of pulmonary computed tomography (CT) for type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients with MDR-TB. Methods The clinical data and pulmonary CT findings of 39 type 2 diabetic patients with MDR-TB, 46 type 2 diabetic patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis (DS-TB), and 72 pure drug-susceptible TB cases (without T2DM and MDR) treated at Dalian Tuberculosis Hospital from 2012 to 2015 were collected, and the clinical features and imaging differences of the three groups were compared. Results The clinical characteristics of the three groups of patients were not significantly different except with respect to age and previous treatment history. However, on imaging, the patients with MDR-TB showed consolidation in and above the pulmonary segments was significantly more extensive than that seen in the DS-TB group with or without T2DM. Conclusion Consolidation in or above multiple pulmonary segments with multiple mouth-eaten cavities and bronchial damage on pulmonary CT images in type 2 diabetic patients with tuberculosis suggests the possibility of multi-drug resistance. PMID:27022735

  17. Glycated hemoglobin screening identifies patients admitted for retreatment of tuberculosis at risk for diabetes in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Sariko, Margaretha L; Mpagama, Stellah G; Gratz, Jean; Kisonga, Riziki; Saidi, Queen; Kibiki, Gibson S; Heysell, Scott K

    2016-01-01

    Introduction World Health Organization recommendations of bidirectional screening for tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes have been met with varying levels of uptake by national TB programs in resource-limited settings. Methodology Kibong’oto Infectious Diseases Hospital (KIDH) is a referral hospital for TB from northern Tanzania, and the national referral hospital for multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB. Glycated hemoglobin (HgbA1c) testing was done on patients admitted to KIDH for newly diagnosed TB, retreatment TB, and MDR-TB, to determine the point prevalence of diabetes (HgbA1c ≥ 6.5%) and prediabetes (HgbA1c 5.7%– 6.4%). Results Of 148 patients hospitalized at KIDH over a single week, 59 (38%) had no prior TB treatment, 22 (15%) were retreatment cases, and 69 (47%) had MDR-TB. Only 3 (2%) had a known history of diabetes. A total of 144 (97%) had successful screening, of which 110 (77%) had an HgbA1c ≤ 5.6%, 28 (19%) had ≥ 5.7 < 6.5, and 6 (4%) had ≥ 6.5. Comparing subjects with prediabetes or diabetes to those with normal A1c levels, retreatment patients were significantly more likely to have a A1c ≥ 5.7% (odds ratio: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.2–9.0; p = 0.02) compared to those without prior TB treatment. No retreatment case was a known diabetic, thus the number needed to screen to diagnose one new case of diabetes among retreatment cases was 11. Conclusions Diabetes prevalence by HgbA1c was less common than expected, but higher HgA1c values were significantly more frequent among retreatment cases, allowing for a rational, resource-conscious screening approach. PMID:27131008

  18. [A case of pulmonary eosinophilic granuloma and diabetes insipidus].

    PubMed

    Ochi, H; Aizawa, H; Matsumoto, K; Hashimoto, S; Hara, N

    1995-05-01

    A 31-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of a sudden onset of thirst, polyposia, and polyuria. Five years previously he had been admitted to our hospital because of a dry cough. On the first admission, the chest X-ray film had shown reticular shadows and bullous changes in both upper lung fields. Histological examination of a transbronchial lung biopsy specimen had revealed that the nodular lesion in the interstitium of the alveolar lesion consisted of an aggregate of many Langerhans cells with pale cytoplasm and partly convoluted nuclei. In addition, immunoperoxidase stain for S-100 protein had been strongly positive in numerous Langerhans cells in a bone biopsy specimen from a left mandibullar lesion, which is the same histological appearance as the lung lesion. A diagnosis of pulmonary eosinophilic granuloma had been made. The course after discharge was not progressive without treatment for 5 years, but the patient suddenly began to have thirst, polyposia, and polyuria. Dehydration, vasopressin tests, and the findings of MRI indicated diabetes insipidus due to a pathological change in the pituitary gland. Although diabetes insipidus is known to be a common complication of pulmonary eosinophilic granuloma, only 9 cases have been reported in Japan. PMID:7609347

  19. An Analysis, Using Concept Mapping, of Diabetic Patients' Knowledge, before and after Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand, C.; d'Ivernois, J. F.; Assal, J. P.; Slama, G.; Hivon, R.

    2002-01-01

    Assesses whether concept maps used with diabetic patients could describe their cognitive structure, before and after having followed an educational program. Involves 10 diabetic patients and shows that concept maps can be a suitable technique to explore the type and organization of the patients' prior knowledge and to visualize what they have…

  20. Updates on the management of diabetes in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Connie M; Leung, Angela M; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Lynch, Katherine E; Brent, Gregory A; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the U.S. and many countries globally. The role of improved glycemic control in ameliorating the exceedingly high mortality risk of diabetic dialysis patients is unclear. The treatment of diabetes in ESRD patients is challenging, given changes in glucose homeostasis, the unclear accuracy of glycemic control metrics, and the altered pharmacokinetics of glucose-lowering drugs by kidney dysfunction, the uremic milieu, and dialysis therapy. Up to one-third of diabetic dialysis patients may experience spontaneous resolution of hyperglycemia with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels <6%, a phenomenon known as "Burnt-Out Diabetes," which remains with unclear biologic plausibility and undetermined clinical implications. Conventional methods of glycemic control assessment are confounded by the laboratory abnormalities and comorbidities associated with ESRD. Similar to more recent approaches in the general population, there is concern that glucose normalization may be harmful in ESRD patients. There is uncertainty surrounding the optimal glycemic target in this population, although recent epidemiologic data suggest that HbA1c ranges of 6% to 8%, as well as 7% to 9%, are associated with increased survival rates among diabetic dialysis patients. Lastly, many glucose-lowering drugs and their active metabolites are renally metabolized and excreted, and hence, require dose adjustment or avoidance in dialysis patients. PMID:24588802

  1. Updates on the Management of Diabetes in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Connie M.; Leung, Angela M.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Lynch, Katherine E.; Brent, Gregory A.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the U.S. and many countries globally. The role of improved glycemic control in ameliorating the exceedingly high mortality risk of diabetic dialysis patients is unclear. The treatment of diabetes in ESRD patients is challenging, given changes in glucose homeostasis, the unclear accuracy of glycemic control metrics, and the altered pharmacokinetics of glucose-lowering drugs by kidney dysfunction, the uremic milieu, and dialysis therapy. Up to one-third of diabetic dialysis patients may experience spontaneous resolution of hyperglycemia with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels <6%, a phenomenon known as “Burnt-Out Diabetes,” which remains with unclear biologic plausibility and undetermined clinical implications. Conventional methods of glycemic control assessment are confounded by the laboratory abnormalities and comorbidities associated with ESRD. Similar to more recent approaches in the general population, there is concern that glucose normalization may be harmful in ESRD patients. There is uncertainty surrounding the optimal glycemic target in this population, although recent epidemiologic data suggest that HbA1c ranges of 6% to 8%, as well as 7 to 9%, are associated with increased survival rates among diabetic dialysis patients. Lastly, many glucose-lowering drugs and their active metabolites are renally metabolized and excreted, and hence, require dose adjustment or avoidance in dialysis patients. PMID:24588802

  2. Lipoprotein(a) Serum Levels in Diabetic Patients with Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Gagliano, Caterina; Vacante, Marco; Malaguarnera, Michele; Leonardi, Daniela Giovanna; Motta, Massimo; Drago, Filippo; Avitabile, Teresio

    2013-01-01

    Background. Atherogenic lipoproteins, such as total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, oxidized low density lipoprotein, and triglycerides, are associated with progression of retinopathy. Aim. To evaluate the relationship between lipoprotein(a) and retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 145 diabetic consecutive patients (82 females, 63 males; mean age 66.8 ± 12 years, mean duration of diabetes 9.4 ± 6.8 years). Presence and severity of retinopathy were evaluated. Serum lipid profile, including Lp(a) level, was assessed. Results. High Lp(a) levels have been observed in 54 (78.3%) subjects and normal levels in 13 (18.85%) subjects as regards diabetic patients with retinopathy. Lp(a) levels were high in 15 subjects (21.75%) and normal in 63 subjects (91.35%) as regards patients without retinopathy. Conclusions. Lp(a) levels are increased in a significant percentage of patients with retinopathy compared to diabetic patients without retinopathy. The impact of Lp(a) levels on diabetic retinopathy needs to be further investigated. PMID:23862162

  3. Abdominal pain in an adult with Type 2 diabetes: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Panagoulias, George; Tentolouris, Nicholas; Ladas, Spiros S

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Chronic abdominal pain (CAP) may be a manifestation of diseases involving many intra-abdominal organs. Beside diseases affecting subjects without diabetes mellitus, diabetic patients may have CAP due to diabetes-related complications like neuritis, motor diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and autonomic dysfunction. Atherosclerosis is 2–4 times more common in patients with diabetes and affects mainly carotid, coronary, iliac and lower limb arteries as well as aorta. Another less common complication is chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI, intestinal angina), caused by atherosclerotic obstruction of the celiac artery and its branches and results in episodic or constant intestinal hypoperfusion. Case presentation We present a case of a diabetic patient with CMI in whom the diagnosis was delayed by almost 5 years. The dominant symptoms were crampy abdominal postprandial pain, anorexia, changes in bowel habits and cachexia. Conventional angiography revealed significant stenosis of the celiac artery and complete obstruction of the inferior mesenteric artery. Noteworthy, no significant stenoses in carotids or limbs' arteries were found. Revascularization resulted in clinical improvement 1 week post-intervention. Conclusion CAP in patients with diabetes may be due to CMI. The typical presentation is crampy postprandial abdominal pain in a heavy smoker male patient with long-standing diabetes, accompanied by anorexia, changes in bowel habits and mild to moderate weight loss. At least two of the three main splanchnic arteries must be significantly occluded in order CMI to be symptomatic. The diagnostic procedure of choice is conventional angiography and revascularization of the occluded arteries is the radical treatment. PMID:18798976

  4. Teriparatide in patients with osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann V; Pavo, Imre; Alam, Jahangir; Disch, Damon P; Schuster, Dara; Harris, Jennifer M; Krege, John H

    2016-10-01

    Despite evidence for higher fracture risk, clinical effects of osteoporosis treatments in type 2 diabetes (T2D) are largely unknown. Post hoc analyses of the DANCE observational study compared T2D patients and patients without diabetes to assess the effect of teriparatide, an osteoanabolic therapy on skeletal outcomes and safety. Patients included ambulatory men and women with osteoporosis receiving teriparatide 20μg/day SQ up to 24months followed by observation up to 24months. Main outcome measures included nonvertebral fracture incidence comparing 0-6months with 6+ months of teriparatide, change from baseline in BMD and back pain severity, and serious adverse events. Analyses included 4042 patients; 291 with T2D, 3751 without diabetes. Treatment exposure did not differ by group. For T2D patients, fracture incidence was 3.5 per 100 patient-years during 0-6months treatment, and 1.6 during 6months to treatment end (47% of baseline, 95% CI 12-187%); during similar periods, for patients without diabetes, fracture incidence was 3.2 and 1.8 (57% of baseline, 95% CI 39-83%). As determinants of fracture outcome during teriparatide treatment, diabetes was not a significant factor (P=0.858), treatment duration was significant (P=0.003), and the effect of duration was not significantly different between the groups (interaction P=0.792). Increases in spine and total hip BMD did not differ between groups; increase in femoral neck BMD was greater in T2D patients than in patients without diabetes (+0.34 and +0.004g/cm(2), respectively; P=0.014). Back pain severity decreased in both groups. Teriparatide was well tolerated without new safety findings. In conclusion, during teriparatide treatment, reduction in nonvertebral fracture incidence, increase in BMD, and decrease in back pain were similar in T2D and non-diabetic patients. PMID:27374026

  5. [Monogenic form of diabetes mellitus due to HNF4α mutation (MODY-1) - the first case in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Jermendy, György; Balogh, István; Gaál, Zsolt

    2016-03-20

    The classification of diabetes mellitus in adolescents and young adults is often difficult. The diagnosis of the monogenic form of diabetes may have substantial influence on quality of life, prognosis and the choice of the appropriate treatment of affected patients. Among MODY (maturity-onset of diabetes in the young) MODY-1 is rarely detected, only 13 families were described in 2000, and 103 different mutations in 173 families were known in 2013 worldwide. The authors present the first Hungarian case of a monogenic form of diabetes due to HNF4α mutation (MODY-1). The diabetes of the index patient No. 1 (42-year-old woman with insulin treated diabetes) was diagnosed as gestational diabetes at age of 20 when she was treated with diet only. Later, insulin treatment has been initiated when marked hyperglycaemia was detected during an episode of acute pneumonia at age of 26. The diabetes of the index patient No. 2 (20-year-old daughter of the index patient No. 1, treated also with insulin) was diagnosed as type 2 diabetes at age of 13 and the patient was treated with diet only. Later the classification was modified to type 1 and insulin therapy was initiated at age of 14. The manifestation of diabetes, the familial occurrence and the low dose insulin requirement were suggestive for monogenic diabetes. Using molecular genetic method a mutation (c.869G>A, p.R290H) of HNF4α gene was found and MODY-1 was diagnosed in both cases. Insulin therapy was switched to treatment with low dose sulfanylurea and an excellent glycaemic control was achieved and sustained at follow-up of 1-year. No further positive cases were found during screening of other family members. PMID:26971647

  6. Comparison of Salivary and Serum Glucose Levels in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Simarpreet Virk; Bansal, Himanta; Sharma, Deepti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is a noncommunicable disease with a rising prevalence worldwide and in developing countries. The most commonly used diagnostic biofluid for detection of glucose levels is blood, but sample collection is an invasive and painful procedure. Thus, there arises a need for a noninvasive and painless technique to detect glucose levels. Aims and Objectives: The objectives of the present study were to estimate the glucose levels of saliva, to assess if any significant correlation existed between the serum and salivary glucose levels, and to correlate salivary glucose levels with regard to duration of diabetes, age, and gender. In the present study, serum and salivary glucose levels of 200 subjects (100 diabetic subjects and 100 nondiabetic subjects) were estimated by glucose oxidase method. Glycosylated hemoglobin levels were also measured in randomly selected 40 diabetic subjects. Results: The findings of present study revealed a significant correlation between salivary and serum glucose levels in both diabetic and nondiabetic subjects. No significant relationship was observed between salivary glucose levels and gender or age in both diabetics and nondiabetics and between salivary glucose levels and duration of diabetes in diabetics. Conclusion: On the basis of the findings, it was concluded that salivary glucose levels could serve as a potentially noninvasive adjunct to monitor glycemic control in diabetic patients. PMID:25294888

  7. [Intracranial hypertension in severe diabetic ketoacidosis with coma. Two cases].

    PubMed

    Blanc, P L; Bedock, B; Jay, S; Martin, A; Marc, J M

    1994-11-19

    We observed two cases of severe diabetic ketoacidosis with coma and shock. In one case, coma was present at admission and in the second occurred within 15 hours. In both cases, intracranial hypertension was confirmed with an extradural captor. These findings are in agreement with observations of brain oedema in diabetic ketoacidosis with coma. Clinical data suggest that brain oedema may occur after a latency period but that clinical expression is much more rare, perhaps favoured by treatment (excessive rehydratation, alkalinization, too sharp drop in blood glucose level). In our cases, despite major fluid infusion, shock persisted requiring norepinephrine. This shock could have been the expression of the severe ketoacidosis or have resulted from an underlying infection. In case of sudden onset coma, a regularly encountered manifestation of brain oedema, respiratory assistance and mannitol infusion must be instituted rapidly. With this type of management, it should be possible to improve the severe prognosis of brain oedema in diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:7899292

  8. Disseminated Cutaneous Herpes Zoster in a Patient with Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Malkud, Shashikant; Patil, Santosh M

    2015-07-01

    Herpes zoster is a clinical manifestation which results from reactivation of latent VZV (Varicella zoster virus) present in the sensory root ganglia. Disseminated herpes zoster has been reported in immune-compromised patients such as patient on cancer chemotherapy, HIV (Human immune deficiency virus) infection, systemic corticosteroid therapy. However, we report a case of disseminated herpes zoster infection in an uncontrolled diabetic patient. A brief review of literature on this topic has been bestowed. PMID:26393187

  9. Disseminated Cutaneous Herpes Zoster in a Patient with Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh M

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a clinical manifestation which results from reactivation of latent VZV (Varicella zoster virus) present in the sensory root ganglia. Disseminated herpes zoster has been reported in immune-compromised patients such as patient on cancer chemotherapy, HIV (Human immune deficiency virus) infection, systemic corticosteroid therapy. However, we report a case of disseminated herpes zoster infection in an uncontrolled diabetic patient. A brief review of literature on this topic has been bestowed. PMID:26393187

  10. Disorders of colonic motility in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Battle, W. M.; Cohen, J. D.; Snape, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Motility disturbances of the colon can give significant symptoms in patients with diabetes mellitus. Constipation is a common complaint in these patients. Diarrhea associated with a generalized autonomic neuropathy can be very troublesome. There is a disturbance in the gastrocolonic response to eating in patients with diabetes mellitus who have constipation. These patients have no postprandial increase in colonic motility. However, their colonic smooth muscle contracts normally to the exogenous administration of neostigmine or metoclopramide. Stool softeners used in combination with the smooth muscle stimulants (neostigmine or metoclopramide) are helpful in treating constipation in patients with diabetes mellitus. Diarrhea can be treated with loperamide or diphenoxylate. Biofeedback may be useful in treating incontinence associated with diarrhea in these patients. PMID:6670291

  11. Chronic maxillary sinusitis and diabetes related maxillary osteonecrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dental infections and maxillary sinusitis are the main causes of osteomyelitis. Osteomyelitis can occur in all age groups, and is more frequently found in the lower jaw than in the upper jaw. Systemic conditions that can alter the patient's resistance to infection including diabetes mellitus, anemia, and autoimmune disorders are predisposing factors for osteomyelitis. We report a case of uncommon broad maxillary osteonecrosis precipitated by uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic maxillary sinusitis in a female patient in her seventies with no history of bisphosphonate or radiation treatment. PMID:26734561

  12. Chronic maxillary sinusitis and diabetes related maxillary osteonecrosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Huh, Suk; Lee, Chae-Yoon; Ohe, Joo-Young; Lee, Jung-Woo; Choi, Byung-Jun; Lee, Baek-Soo; Kwon, Yong-Dae

    2015-12-01

    Dental infections and maxillary sinusitis are the main causes of osteomyelitis. Osteomyelitis can occur in all age groups, and is more frequently found in the lower jaw than in the upper jaw. Systemic conditions that can alter the patient's resistance to infection including diabetes mellitus, anemia, and autoimmune disorders are predisposing factors for osteomyelitis. We report a case of uncommon broad maxillary osteonecrosis precipitated by uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic maxillary sinusitis in a female patient in her seventies with no history of bisphosphonate or radiation treatment. PMID:26734561

  13. Diabetic dermopathy (“shin spots”) and diabetic bullae (“bullosis diabeticorum”) at the same patient

    PubMed Central

    Brzezinski, Piotr; Chiriac, Anca E; Pinteala, Tudor; Foia, Liliana; Chiriac, Anca

    2015-01-01

    We present a diabetic patient with associated two diabetic dermatoses: diabetic dermopathy (“shin spots”) and diabetic bullae. A 34-year-old man, with long history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and moderate obesity presented to Dermatology Unit for diagnosis of his skin lesions. On clinical examination multiple, light brown, irregular patches, with atrophic scars and crusts over large bullae were observed on the anterior aspect of both legs. PMID:26649029

  14. Diabetes therapies in hemodialysis patients: Dipeptidase-4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuya; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Tsuji, Mayumi; Udaka, Yuko; Mihara, Masatomo; Shimizu, Tatsuo; Inoue, Michiyasu; Goto, Yoshikazu; Gotoh, Hiromichi; Inagaki, Masahiro; Oguchi, Katsuji

    2015-06-25

    Although several previous studies have been published on the effects of dipeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors in diabetic hemodialysis (HD) patients, the findings have yet to be reviewed comprehensively. Eyesight failure caused by diabetic retinopathy and aging-related dementia make multiple daily insulin injections difficult for HD patients. Therefore, we reviewed the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors with a focus on oral antidiabetic drugs as a new treatment strategy in HD patients with diabetes. The following 7 DPP-4 inhibitors are available worldwide: sitagliptin, vildagliptin, alogliptin, linagliptin, teneligliptin, anagliptin, and saxagliptin. All of these are administered once daily with dose adjustments in HD patients. Four types of oral antidiabetic drugs can be administered for combination oral therapy with DPP-4 inhibitors, including sulfonylureas, meglitinide, thiazolidinediones, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitor. Nine studies examined the antidiabetic effects in HD patients. Treatments decreased hemoglobin A1c and glycated albumin levels by 0.3% to 1.3% and 1.7% to 4.9%, respectively. The efficacy of DPP-4 inhibitor treatment is high among HD patients, and no patients exhibited significant severe adverse effects such as hypoglycemia and liver dysfunction. DPP-4 inhibitors are key drugs in new treatment strategies for HD patients with diabetes and with limited choices for diabetes treatment. PMID:26131325

  15. Bone and wound healing in the diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Siddhant K; Breitbart, Eric A; Berberian, Wayne S; Liporace, Frank A; Lin, Sheldon S

    2010-09-01

    Impaired soft tissue regeneration and delayed osseous healing are known complications associated with diabetes mellitus with regard to orthopedic surgery, making the management and treatment of diabetic patients undergoing foot and ankle surgery more complex and difficult. At the moment several options are available to address the known issues that complicate the clinical outcomes in these high-risk patients. Using a multifaceted approach, with close attention to intraoperative and perioperative considerations including modification of surgical technique to supplement fixation, local application of orthobiologics, tight glycemic control, administration of supplementary oxygen, and biophysical stimulation via low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and electrical bone stimulation, the impediments associated with diabetic healing can potentially be overcome, to yield improved clinical results for diabetic patients after acute or elective foot and ankle surgery. PMID:20682414

  16. Co-Managing Patients with Type 1 Diabetes and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Best, Conor J; Thosani, Sonali; Ortiz, Marjorie; Levesque, Celia; Varghese, Sigi S; Lavis, Victor R

    2016-08-01

    The life expectancy of people with type 1 diabetes is improving and now approaches that of those without diabetes. As this population ages, a growing number will be diagnosed with and treated for cancer. Cancer treatments can drastically affect insulin requirement and glycemic control through multiple mechanisms including high doses of glucocorticoids and targeted therapies that directly interfere with cellular pathways involved in the action of insulin. Patients with cancer frequently also have alterations in gastrointestinal motility or appetite and require supplemental enteral or parenteral nutrition. Few studies have evaluated these patients directly, but data on patients with and without diabetes suggest that glycemic control may play a larger role in cancer outcomes than is often recognized. Collaboration between the treating oncologist and diabetologist allows people with diabetes to receive the most effective therapies for their cancers without undue risk of hypoglycemia or adverse outcomes due to hyperglycemia. PMID:27319323

  17. Male gonadal axis function in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Pablo R; Knoblovits, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes have lower serum testosterone levels and a higher prevalence of hypogonadism than non-diabetic patients, independently of the metabolic control of disease. The mechanisms underlying a decrease in testosterone might be related to age, obesity and insulin resistance, often present in patients with type 2 diabetes. The increase in estrogens due to higher aromatase enzyme activity in increased adipose tissue might exert negative-feedback inhibition centrally. Insulin stimulates gonadal axis activity at all three levels and therefore insulin resistance might account for the lower testosterone production. Leptin exerts a central stimulatory effect but inhibits testicular testosterone secretion. Thus, resistance to leptin in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes determines lower central effects of leptin with lower gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and, on the other hand, hyperleptinemia secondary to leptin resistance inhibits testosterone secretion at the testicular level. However, lower testosterone levels in patients with diabetes are observed independently of age, weight and body mass index, which leads to the assumption that hyperglycemia per se might play a role in the decrease in testosterone. Several studies have shown that an overload of glucose results in decreased serum testosterone levels. The aim of this review is to assess changes in the male gonadal axis that occur in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27071157

  18. Supporting patients with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anne

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that is mediated by genetic, immunologic and environmental factors. Its prevalence is further complicated by increasing obesity levels, and this can make diagnosis complicated. Health professionals play a key role in enablement and optimising person-centred care approaches to educate and augment the essential skills required for successful self-management of this lifelong condition. This article reflects on the physiology and aetiology of type 1 diabetes and prevalence and considers recent guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for adults with type 1 diabetes (NG17) and for children and young people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes (NG18). PMID:27019172

  19. Corneal oedema after phacoemulsification in the early postoperative period: A qualitative comparative case-control study between diabetics and non-diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Tsaousis, Konstantinos T.; Panagiotou, Dimitrios Z.; Kostopoulou, Eirini; Vlatsios, Vasileios; Stampouli, Despoina

    2015-01-01

    Background The occurrence and severity of corneal oedema after phacoemulsification is dependent on the integrity of corneal endothelial cells. The function of these cells is affected by diabetes mellitus and consequently the behaviour of the cornea in diabetic patients is of special interest. Aim To compare the frequency of corneal oedema in two age-matched groups of diabetics and non diabetic patients that underwent cataract surgery in the Ophthalmology Department of Xanthi General Hospital in Greece. Methods A retrospective case control study was conducted in a retrospective fashion. Patients in the control and study groups were assessed regarding the severity of corneal oedema at three postoperative visits: days 1, 3–7, 10–14 after the operation. Ultrasound energy consumed during phacoemulsification was also a parameter of interest and possible correlations with the pre-existent cataract severity and the subsequent incidence of corneal oedema were investigated. Results The difference in the incidence of severe corneal oedema between the study and control group was statistically significant: (4.5% non diabetics vs 14.3% diabetics). The consumed ultrasound energy did not define final clinical outcome. Conclusions The existence of diabetes mellitus type 2 appears to be a significant risk factor for the development of persistent corneal oedema. The results of our study led to the modification of the algorithm for postoperative follow-up of patients of this remote area of Greece. PMID:26865977

  20. [Patient education for diabetic patients in precarious conditions: fostering and promoting relationships].

    PubMed

    Corbeau, Catherine; Boegner, Catherine; Fassier, Michelle; Bonte, Fabienne Parada; Mohammed, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Meetings between patients and professionals were held with a view to developing guidelines for patient education. The participants included ten patients with a low socioeconomic status and struggling to control their diabetes, ten health professionals dealing with issues in diabetes education and a member of an association of diabetic patients. The participants highlighted the importance of fostering links between patients, between professionals, and between patients and professionals in order to promote involvement and mobilization and to encourage the development of a viable long-term education program. PMID:24313083

  1. The use of propeller perforator flaps for diabetic limb salvage: a retrospective review of 25 cases

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Alexandru V.; Matei, Ileana R.; Capota, Irina M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Peripheral vascular disease and/or diabetic neuropathy represent one of the main etiologies for the development of lower leg and/or diabetic foot ulcerations, and especially after acute trauma or chronic mechanical stress. The reconstruction of such wounds is challenging due to the paucity of soft tissue resources in this region. Various procedures including orthobiologics, skin grafting (SG) with or without negative pressure wound therapy and local random flaps have been used with varying degrees of success to cover diabetic lower leg or foot ulcerations. Other methods include: local or regional muscle and fasciocutaneous flaps, free muscle and fasciocutaneous, or perforator flaps, which also have varying degrees of success. Patients and methods This article reviews 25 propeller perforator flaps (PPF) which were performed in 24 diabetic patients with acute and chronic wounds involving the foot and/or lower leg. These patients were admitted beween 2008 and 2011. Fifteen PPF were based on perforators from the peroneal artery, nine from the posterior tibial artery, and one from the anterior tibial artery. Results A primary healing rate (96%) was obtained in 18 (72%) cases. Revisional surgery and SG for skin necrosis was performed in six (24%) cases with one complete loss of the flap (4%) which led to a lower extremity amputation. Conclusions The purpose of this article is to review the use of PPF as an effective method for soft tissue coverage of the diabetic lower extremity and/or foot. In well-controlled diabetic patients that present with at least one permeable artery in the affected lower leg, the use of PPF may provide an alternative option for soft tissue reconstruction of acute and chronic diabetic wounds. PMID:23050066

  2. Risk factors for major amputation in hospitalised diabetic foot patients.

    PubMed

    Namgoong, Sik; Jung, Suyoung; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the main cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients. Eight hundred and sixty diabetic patients were admitted to the diabetic wound centre of the Korea University Guro Hospital for foot ulcers between January 2010 and December 2013. Among them, 837 patients were successfully monitored until complete healing. Ulcers in 809 patients (96·7%) healed without major amputation and those in 28 patients (3·3%) healed with major amputation. Data of 88 potential risk factors including demographics, ulcer condition, vascularity, bioburden, neurology and serology were collected from patients in the two groups and compared. Among the 88 potential risk factors, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed in 26 risk factors. In the univariate analysis, which was carried out for these 26 risk factors, statistically significant differences were observed in 22 risk factors. In a stepwise multiple logistic analysis, six of the 22 risk factors remained statistically significant. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios were 11·673 for ulcers penetrating into the bone, 8·683 for dialysis, 6·740 for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, 6·158 for hind foot ulcers, 0·641 for haemoglobin levels and 1·007 for fasting blood sugar levels. The risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients were bony invasions, dialysis, GI disorders, hind foot locations, low levels of haemoglobin and elevated fasting blood sugar levels. PMID:26478562

  3. Two cases of diabetic mastopathy: MR imaging and pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Hatsuko; Ikeda, Akiko; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Teruya, Chikako; Koizumi, Kei; Kinoshita, Mana; Tsuchida, Takashi; Baba, Satoshi; Miura, Katsutoshi; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi

    2015-09-01

    Diabetic mastopathy is a rare benign condition associated with long-standing diabetes mellitus and presents with breast lumps. This report describes two cases in which diffusion-weighted images (DWI) on magnetic resonance imaging were quite different from each other. In case 1, there were hyperintense lesions on DWI, and surgically removed specimens revealed ductitis with marked lymphocytic infiltration. In case 2, no abnormal intensity was depicted on DWI, and biopsy specimens showed dense stromal fibrosis with mild perivascular lymphocytic infiltration that corresponded to previous reports. Although it is reported that diabetic mastopathy is composed of dense fibrous tissue with low cellularity that results in no hyperintense lesion on DWI, in cases with marked lymphocytic infiltration, strong hyperintensity can be seen on DWI mimicking malignant breast tumors. PMID:22976289

  4. New-onset diabetic ketoacidosis in a 13-months old african toddler: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Katte, Jean-Claude; Djoumessi, Romance; Njindam, Gisele; Fetse, Gerard Tama; Dehayem, Mesmin; Kengne, Andre-Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is very rare in infants and toddlers and is usually associated with high mortality when complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Toddlers in DKA are often missed in our typical African setting where there is low index of suspicion. Usually, the classical symptoms are not usually at the forefront and many infants and toddlers who develop DKA are mistreated for infections. The case of a 13-months old toddler with new-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus, complicated with DKA at diagnosis is reported in view of its rarity and elevated mortality even when diagnosed in our African setting. She was subsequently treated with intravenous insulin and was passed over to subcutaneous insulin after the eradication of ketones in urine. She continues follow-up at the out-patient children diabetes clinic at the Bafoussam Regional Hospital. PMID:26966489

  5. [Pantethine, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Clinical study of 1045 patients].

    PubMed

    Donati, C; Bertieri, R S; Barbi, G

    1989-03-31

    After a review of the clinical studies on the treatment of diabetic patients with pantethine, the authors discuss the results obtained in a postmarketing surveillance (PMS) study on 1045 hyperlipidemic patients receiving pantethine (900 mg/day on average). Of these patients, 57 were insulin-dependent (Type I) and 241 were non insulin-dependent (Type II) diabetics. Beyond the epidemiological considerations made possible by a PMS study, the authors show that pantethine brought about a statistically significant and comparable improvement of lipid metabolism in the three groups of patients, with very good tolerability. Pantethine should therefore be considered for the treatment of lipid abnormalities also in patients at risk such as those with diabetes mellitus. PMID:2524328

  6. Novel and emerging diabetes mellitus drug therapies for the type 2 diabetes patient

    PubMed Central

    Rochester, Charmaine D; Akiyode, Oluwaranti

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder of deranged fat, protein and carbohydrate metabolism resulting in hyperglycemia as a result of insulin resistance and inadequate insulin secretion. Although a wide variety of diabetes therapies is available, yet limited efficacy, adverse effects, cost, contraindications, renal dosage adjustments, inflexible dosing schedules and weight gain significantly limit their use. In addition, many patients in the United States fail to meet the therapeutic HbA1c goal of < 7% set by the American Diabetes Association. As such new and emerging diabetes therapies with different mechanisms of action hope to address some of these drawbacks to improve the patient with type 2 diabetes. This article reviews new and emerging classes, including the sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors, 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibitors, glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors, G Protein-Coupled receptor agonists and glucokinase activators. These emerging diabetes agents hold the promise of providing benefit of glucose lowering, weight reduction, low hypoglycemia risk, improve insulin sensitivity, pancreatic β cell preservation, and oral formulation availability. However, further studies are needed to evaluate their safety profile, cardiovascular effects, and efficacy durability in order to determine their role in type 2 diabetes management. PMID:24936252

  7. Reversible Acute Parkinsonism and Bilateral Basal Ganglia Lesions in a Diabetic Uremic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Sá, Francisca; Capela, Carlos; Ferreira, Fátima; Basílio, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The syndrome of bilateral basal ganglia lesions in diabetic uremic patients is a rare disorder mostly reported in Asians. There are few reports of the syndrome in Caucasians. It manifests as an acute hyperkinetic or hypokinetic extrapyramidal disorder in association with uniform neuroimaging findings of bilateral symmetrical basal ganglia changes in diabetics undergoing hemodialysis. Its pathophysiology remains largely unknown. Thus, we report a typical case of the syndrome in a Caucasian patient who developed an acute and reversible akinetic rigid parkinsonism secondary to bilateral basal ganglia lesions. PMID:23185167

  8. Patient Characteristics Associated with Measurement of Routine Diabetes Care: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Van Doorn-Klomberg, Arna L.; Braspenning, Jozé C. C.; Atsma, Femke; Jansen, Birgit; Bouma, Margriet; Wolters, René J.; Wensing, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-modifiable patient characteristics, including age, gender, ethnicity as well as the occurrence of multi-morbidities, are associated with processes and outcomes of diabetes care. Information on these factors can be used in case mix adjustment of performance measures. However, the practical relevance of such adjustment is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the strength of associations between patient factors and diabetes care processes and outcomes. Methods We performed an observational study based on routinely collected data of 12,498 diabetes patients in 59 Dutch primary care practices. Data were collected on patient age, gender, whether the patient lived in a deprived area, body mass index and the co-occurrence of cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, depression or anxiety. Outcomes included 6 dichotomous measures (3 process and 3 outcome related) regarding glycosylated hemoglobin, systolic blood pressure and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol. We performed separate hierarchical logistic mixed model regression models for each of the outcome measures. Results Each of the process measure models showed moderate effect sizes, with pooled areas under the curve that varied between 0.66 and 0.76. The frequency of diabetes related consultations as a measure of patient compliance to treatment showed the strongest association with all process measures (odds ratios between 5.6 and 14.5). The effect sizes of the outcome measure models were considerably smaller than the process measure models, with pooled areas under the curve varying from 0.57 to 0.61. Conclusions Several non-modifiable patient factors could be associated with processes and outcomes of diabetes care. However, associations were small. These results suggest that case-mix correction or stratification in assessing diabetes care has limited practical relevance. PMID:25822978

  9. Towards Automatic Diabetes Case Detection and ABCS Protocol Compliance Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ninad K.; Son, Roderick Y.; Arnzen, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective According to the American Diabetes Association, the implementation of the standards of care for diabetes has been suboptimal in most clinical settings. Diabetes is a disease that had a total estimated cost of $174 billion in 2007 for an estimated diabetes-affected population of 17.5 million in the United States. With the advent of electronic medical records (EMR), tools to analyze data residing in the EMR for healthcare surveillance can help reduce the burdens experienced today. This study was primarily designed to evaluate the efficacy of employing clinical natural language processing to analyze discharge summaries for evidence indicating a presence of diabetes, as well as to assess diabetes protocol compliance and high risk factors. Methods Three sets of algorithms were developed to analyze discharge summaries for: (1) identification of diabetes, (2) protocol compliance, and (3) identification of high risk factors. The algorithms utilize a common natural language processing framework that extracts relevant discourse evidence from the medical text. Evidence utilized in one or more of the algorithms include assertion of the disease and associated findings in medical text, as well as numerical clinical measurements and prescribed medications. Results The diabetes classifier was successful at classifying reports for the presence and absence of diabetes. Evaluated against 444 discharge summaries, the classifier’s performance included macro and micro F-scores of 0.9698 and 0.9865, respectively. Furthermore, the protocol compliance and high risk factor classifiers showed promising results, with most F-measures exceeding 0.9. Conclusions The presented approach accurately identified diabetes in medical discharge summaries and showed promise with regards to assessment of protocol compliance and high risk factors. Utilizing free-text analytic techniques on medical text can complement clinical-public health decision support by identifying cases and high risk

  10. Brain changes in diabetes mellitus patients with gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Drewes, Anne M; Søfteland, Eirik; Dimcevski, Georg; Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjær, Jens B; Krogh, Klaus; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-25

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In various studies up to 30%-70% of patients present dysfunction and complications related to the gut. To date several clinical studies have demonstrated that autonomic nervous system neuropathy and generalized neuropathy of the central nervous system (CNS) may play a major role. This systematic review provides an overview of the neurodegenerative changes that occur as a consequence of diabetes with a focus on the CNS changes and gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction. Animal models where diabetes was induced experimentally support that the disease induces changes in CNS. Recent investigations with electroencephalography and functional brain imaging in patients with diabetes confirm these structural and functional brain changes. Encephalographic studies demonstrated that altered insular processing of sensory stimuli seems to be a key player in symptom generation. In fact one study indicated that the more GI symptoms the patients experienced, the deeper the insular electrical source was located. The electroencephalography was often used in combination with quantitative sensory testing mainly showing hyposensitivity to stimulation of GI organs. Imaging studies on patients with diabetes and GI symptoms mainly showed microstructural changes, especially in brain areas involved in visceral sensory processing. As the electrophysiological and imaging changes were associated with GI and autonomic symptoms they may represent a future therapeutic target for treating diabetics either pharmacologically or with neuromodulation. PMID:26839652

  11. Brain changes in diabetes mellitus patients with gastrointestinal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Anne M; Søfteland, Eirik; Dimcevski, Georg; Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjær, Jens B; Krogh, Klaus; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In various studies up to 30%-70% of patients present dysfunction and complications related to the gut. To date several clinical studies have demonstrated that autonomic nervous system neuropathy and generalized neuropathy of the central nervous system (CNS) may play a major role. This systematic review provides an overview of the neurodegenerative changes that occur as a consequence of diabetes with a focus on the CNS changes and gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction. Animal models where diabetes was induced experimentally support that the disease induces changes in CNS. Recent investigations with electroencephalography and functional brain imaging in patients with diabetes confirm these structural and functional brain changes. Encephalographic studies demonstrated that altered insular processing of sensory stimuli seems to be a key player in symptom generation. In fact one study indicated that the more GI symptoms the patients experienced, the deeper the insular electrical source was located. The electroencephalography was often used in combination with quantitative sensory testing mainly showing hyposensitivity to stimulation of GI organs. Imaging studies on patients with diabetes and GI symptoms mainly showed microstructural changes, especially in brain areas involved in visceral sensory processing. As the electrophysiological and imaging changes were associated with GI and autonomic symptoms they may represent a future therapeutic target for treating diabetics either pharmacologically or with neuromodulation. PMID:26839652

  12. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  13. Quantitative estimation of antioxidant therapy efficiency in diabetes mellitus patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurfinkel, Youri I.; Ishunina, Angela M.; Ovsyannickov, Konstantin V.; Strokov, Igor A.

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this work was to find out to which degree Tanakan affects the microcirculation parameters and the malonic dialdehyde level as a parameter of intense lipid peroxidation in insulin-independent diabetes patients with different disease durations. We used computerized capillaroscope GY-0.04 designed by the Centre for Analysis of Substances, Russia for the non-invasive measurement of capillary blood velocity as well as the size of the perivascular zone and density of blood aggregates and lipid inclusions. The microcirculation parameters were studied in two groups of insulin-independent diabetes patients. The basic group included 58 patients (61+/-9,0 years, disease duration 14,7+/-7,8 years). The patients had late diabetic complications as retinopathy and nephrophathy, neuropathy, confirmed by clinical and tool investigation. In this group we also studied the level of serum malonic dialdehyde, as a parameter of intense lipid peroxidation. The reference group included 31 patients (57+/-1,3 years, disease duration 3,6+/-0,6 years) with minimum diabetic complication. We show that Tanakan in daily dosage 120 mg for 2 months reduces the malonic dialdehyde level in the blood serum and the erythrocyte membranes of type II diabetes patients and improves the microcirculation parameters. There are correspondences between the density of lipid inclusions as determined with computerized capillaroscopy and the lipid exchange parameters as determined using a routing blood test. Thus, noninvasive blood lipid quantification is feasible and reliable.

  14. Optimizing antidiabetic treatment options for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Malesker, Mark A

    2008-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with diabetes mellitus and represents a persistent risk that is inextricably linked to the diabetic disease state. The growing number of United States Food and Drug Administration-approved antidiabetic agents provides a wide range of therapeutic options, both as monotherapy and combination therapy, for treating hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Long-term clinical experience with many of these agents has revealed nonglycemic effects on lipid levels, inflammation, and cardiovascular function. Although some of these agents can improve cardiovascular disease risk in patients with diabetes, others may increase the risk and may be prohibited from use in certain populations. Thus, the effect of antidiabetic agents on cardiovascular health and safety must be considered when selecting the most appropriate therapy. A review of the current literature was undertaken to examine the effects of antidiabetic agents on cardiovascular disease, and with the help of illustrative patient case examples, useful information is provided for clinicians to individualize therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:18225965

  15. Comparing the Levels of Trace Elements in Patients With Diabetic Nephropathy and Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Makhlough, Atieh; Makhlough, Marjan; Shokrzadeh, Mohammad; Mohammadian, Mozhdeh; Sedighi, Omid; Faghihan, Mansooreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in developed countries. Several trace elements were reported to be changed in diabetic nephropathy. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate changes in serum levels of zinc, copper and chromium and their association with the incidence of ESRD in patients with diabetes. Patients and Methods: This study was performed on 70 patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy (macro and micro-albuminuria) and 70 healthy individuals. Samples were collected to survey metals by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Data was analyzed by SPSS18 using descriptive and inferential analysis methods. Results: Mean ± SD levels of Zn, Cu and Cr were significantly decreased in blood samples of patients compared to healthy subjects (P < 0.01). Also the mean concentrations of Cu, Zn and Cr in drinking water of Sari were lower than the accepted limit. Only in one case, Cu was higher than the accepted limit, which was the possibility of contamination by water supply pipes. Conclusions: Cu, Zn and Cr play a specific role in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. Meanwhile in these patients, low serum levels of Cu, Zn and Cr were not associated with factors such as drinking water. Possible causes should be sought in other factors like urine, intervention factors in absorption and utilization and individual conditions. PMID:26539418

  16. Relationship between Depression and Treatment Satisfaction among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Jon; Adelman, Alan; Gabbay, Robert; Aňel-Tiangco, Raquel M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression has been shown to adversely affect glycemic control. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between depression and treatment satisfaction in patients with diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Baseline data was collected on 545 patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes enrolled in a study that examined the effectiveness of diabetes nurse case managers. Depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) questionnaire, and treatment satisfaction, using the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ). RESULTS: The majority of participants (59%) were female, with a high percentage (41%) of Hispanic/Latino participants with a mean HbA1C of 8.4%. The prevalence of depression in this population was 35.6%. High CES-D scores were associated with elevated levels of HbA1C and LDL cholesterol (p<0.001). The relationship between depression and treatment satisfaction was significant (p<0.001), indicating that as depression increases, treatment satisfaction decreases. DISCUSSION: We identified a significant relationship between depression and treatment satisfaction in this group of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes patients. Although causation cannot be determined, it is possible that patients who are depressed are less likely to be satisfied with their treatment. This could lead to decreased patient adherence, ultimately resulting in poor glycemic control. PMID:23243556

  17. Relationship between Depression and Treatment Satisfaction among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Jon; Adelman, Alan; Gabbay, Robert; Aňel-Tiangco, Raquel M

    2012-01-01

    Background Depression has been shown to adversely affect glycemic control. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between depression and treatment satisfaction in patients with diabetes. Materials and methods Baseline data was collected on 545 patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes enrolled in a study that examined the effectiveness of diabetes nurse case managers. Depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) questionnaire, and treatment satisfaction, using the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ). Results The majority of participants (59%) were female, with a high percentage (41%) of Hispanic/Latino participants with a mean HbA1C of 8.4%. The prevalence of depression in this population was 35.6%. High CES-D scores were associated with elevated levels of HbA1C and LDL cholesterol (p<0.001). The relationship between depression and treatment satisfaction was significant (p<0.001), indicating that as depression increases, treatment satisfaction decreases. Discussion We identified a significant relationship between depression and treatment satisfaction in this group of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes patients. Although causation cannot be determined, it is possible that patients who are depressed are less likely to be satisfied with their treatment. This could lead to decreased patient adherence, ultimately resulting in poor glycemic control. PMID:23243556

  18. Improvements in Care and Reduced Self-Management Barriers Among Rural Patients With Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dettori, Nancy; Flook, Benjamin N.; Pessl, Erich; Quesenberry, Kim; Loh, Johnson; Harris, Colleen; McDowall, Janet M.; Butcher, Marcene K.; Helgerson, Steven D.; Gohdes, Dorothy; Harwell, Todd S.

    2005-01-01

    Improved preventive care and clinical outcomes among patients with diabetes can reduce complications and costs; however, diabetes care continues to be suboptimal. Few studies have described effective strategies for improving care among rural populations with diabetes. In 2000, the Park County Diabetes Project and the Montana Diabetes Control…

  19. Educating Resident Physicians Using Virtual Case-Based Simulation Improves Diabetes Management: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sperl-Hillen, JoAnn; O’Connor, Patrick J.; Ekstrom, Heidi L.; Rush, William A.; Asche, Stephen E.; Fernandes, Omar D.; Apana, Deepika; Amundson, Gerald H.; Johnson, Paul E.; Curran, Debra M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test a virtual case-based Simulated Diabetes Education (SimDE) intervention developed to teach primary care residents how to manage diabetes. Method Nineteen primary care residency programs, with 341 volunteer residents in all post-graduate years (PGY), were randomly assigned to a SimDE intervention group or control group (CG). The web-based interactive educational intervention used computerized virtual patients who responded to provider actions through programmed simulation models. Eighteen distinct learning cases (L-cases) were assigned to SimDE residents over 6 months from 2010–2011. Impact was assessed using performance on 4 virtual assessment cases (A-cases), an objective knowledge test, and pre-post changes in self-assessed diabetes knowledge and confidence. Group comparisons were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models, controlling for clustering of residents within residency programs and differences in baseline knowledge. Results The percentage of residents appropriately achieving A-case composite clinical goals for glucose, blood pressure, and lipids was: A-Case 1, SimDE = 21.2%, CG = 1.8%, P = .002; A-Case 2, SimDE = 15.7%, CG = 4.7%, P = .02; A-Case 3, SimDE = 48.0%, CG = 10.4%, P < .001; A-Case 4, SimDE = 42.1%, CG = 18.7%, P = .004. The mean knowledge score and pre-post changes in self-assessed knowledge and confidence were significantly better for SimDE group than CG participants. Conclusions A virtual case-based simulated diabetes education intervention improved diabetes management skills, knowledge, and confidence for primary care residents. PMID:25006707

  20. Diabetes and glucose disturbances in patients with psychosis in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Eric; Westman, Jeanette; Sudic Hukic, Dzana; Eriksson, Sven V; Edman, Gunnar; Bodén, Robert; Jedenius, Erik; Reutfors, Johan; Berntsson, Anders; Hilding, Agneta; Schalling, Martin; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Ösby, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to (1) analyze the prevalence of diabetes, prediabetes, and antidiabetic medication in patients with psychosis compared with control subjects and (2) determine what factors in patients with psychosis were associated with antidiabetic medication. Method We studied 977 patients with psychosis recruited from outpatient clinics in Stockholm County, Sweden, and they were compared with 3908 non-psychotic control subjects for fasting plasma glucose levels; prevalence of diabetes, prediabetes, antidiabetic treatment, and tobacco use; and blood pressure, weight, height, and waist circumference. Group differences were evaluated with analysis of variance and χ2 test, and factors associated with antidiabetic treatment were evaluated with logistic regression. Results Diabetes was observed in 94 (10%) patients with psychosis, 2.7 times the prevalence observed in control subjects. Among patients with psychosis, 87 (10%) had prediabetes (fasting glucose, 6.1–6.9 mmol/L) compared with 149 (3.8%) control subjects. Most patients with psychosis (77%) who had prediabetes fulfilled criteria for metabolic syndrome. In patients with psychosis, both lipid-lowering medication and fasting glucose were significantly associated with antidiabetic treatment. There was no significant relation between antidiabetic treatment and lifestyle factors such as smoking or degree of psychiatric illness. Conclusions The high prevalence of impaired fasting glucose and metabolic syndrome in patients with psychosis warrants further clinical research in preventing or delaying the onset of diabetes in these patients by pharmacotherapy and/or lifestyle intervention. PMID:26468398

  1. The relationship between diabetes attitudes and treatment among free clinic patients and volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Akiko; Christensen, Nancy; Nourian, Maziar M; Myers, Kyl; Saunders, AnnMarie; Solis, Silvia P; Ashby, Jeanie; Greenwood, Jessica L J; Reel, Justine J

    2014-12-01

    Free clinics provide free primary care to the under or uninsured and have been playing an important role in serving the socio-economically disadvantaged. Free clinic patients represent a group of people who experience significant barriers to receiving diabetes prevention and intervention. This study examined diabetes attitudes among free clinic patients and volunteers. English or Spanish speaking patients and volunteers (N = 384), aged 18 years or older completed a self-administered survey. Diabetic patients and volunteers shared similar levels of diabetes attitudes compared to non-diabetic patients. Among patients, ethnicity, education level, diabetes education, and family history affected diabetes attitudes. Among volunteers, diabetes education was an important factor associated with positive diabetes attitudes. Whether the volunteer is a healthcare professional or student was related only to one aspect of diabetes attitudes, seriousness of type 2 diabetes. The results, indicating free clinic diabetic patients and volunteers shared similar levels of diabetes attitudes, were positive for maintaining and developing diabetes education programs at a free clinic. Unfortunately, the average length of volunteering at this free clinic was short and student volunteers likely leave the clinic upon graduation. Future research should examine issues of volunteer retention in free clinics. Diabetes education for patients may need to be diversified according to ethnicity, family history of diabetes, and educational level. Finally, non-healthcare professional volunteers could potentially be involved in diabetes education at a free clinic. PMID:24756836

  2. [Ketosis-prone atypical diabetes mellitus: report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Belhadi, L; Chadli, A; Bennis, L; Ghomari, H; Farouqi, A

    2007-12-01

    An atypical presentation of diabetes mellitus was described in black subjects, initially in adolescents by Winter et al. then, in adult populations. The principal characteristics of "African" diabetes are an acute onset with severe hyperglycemia and ketosis, and a clinical course of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In the subsequent clinical course after initiation of insulin therapy, prolonged remission is often possible with cessation of insulin therapy and maintenance of appropriate metabolic control. In the subsequent clinical course after initiation of insulin therapy, prolonged remission is often possible with cessation of insulin therapy and maintenance of appropriate metabolic control. The molecular mechanisms underlining the insulin secretory dysfunction are still to be understood and may involve glucolipotoxicity processes. The HLA alleles associated with susceptibility to type 1 diabetes were reported of high frequency in some populations with this form of diabetes, in the absence of makers of pancreatic beta cell autoimmunity. The aim of the present review is to discuss two cases of African diabetes and review the specific diagnostic, metabolic, pathogenic and management features of this atypical diabetes. PMID:17692810

  3. Patient involvement in diabetes care: experiences in nine diabetes care groups

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Simone R.; Struijs, Jeroen N.; Rijken, Mieke; Nijpels, Giel; Baan, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite the expected beneficial effects on quality of care, patient involvement in diabetes care groups, which deliver a bundled paid integrated care programme for diabetes type 2, seems to be limited. The aim of this study was to gain insight into levels and methods of patient involvement, into facilitators and barriers, and into the future preferences of care groups and patient representatives. Theory and methods Semi-structured interviews were held with 10 representatives of care groups and 11 representatives of patient advocacy groups. An adapted version of Arnstein's ladder of citizen participation was used to define five levels of patient involvement. Results Patient involvement in care groups was mostly limited to informing and consulting patients. Higher levels, i.e., advising, co-producing and decision-making, were less frequently observed. Care groups and patient representatives perceived largely the same barriers and facilitators and had similar preferences regarding future themes and design of patient involvement. Conclusion Constructive collaboration between diabetes care groups and patient representatives to enhance patient involvement in the future seems viable. Several issues such as the lack of evidence for effectiveness of patient involvement, differences in viewpoints on the role and responsibilities of care groups and perceived barriers need to be addressed. PMID:27118961

  4. Illness Beliefs Predict Mortality in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Vedhara, Kavita; Dawe, Karen; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Wetherell, Mark A.; Cullum, Nicky; Dayan, Colin; Drake, Nicola; Price, Patricia; Tarlton, John; Weinman, John; Day, Andrew; Campbell, Rona; Reps, Jenna; Soria, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients’ illness beliefs have been associated with glycaemic control in diabetes and survival in other conditions. Objective We examined whether illness beliefs independently predicted survival in patients with diabetes and foot ulceration. Methods Patients (n = 169) were recruited between 2002 and 2007. Data on illness beliefs were collected at baseline. Data on survival were extracted on 1st November 2011. Number of days survived reflected the number of days from date of recruitment to 1st November 2011. Results Cox regressions examined the predictors of time to death and identified ischemia and identity beliefs (beliefs regarding symptoms associated with foot ulceration) as significant predictors of time to death. Conclusions Our data indicate that illness beliefs have a significant independent effect on survival in patients with diabetes and foot ulceration. These findings suggest that illness beliefs could improve our understanding of mortality risk in this patient group and could also be the basis for future therapeutic interventions to improve survival. PMID:27096609

  5. Blood glucose levels in diabetic patients following corticosteroid injections into the hand and wrist

    PubMed Central

    Stepan, Jeffrey G.; London, Daniel A.; Boyer, Martin I.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To quantify diabetic patients’ change in blood glucose levels after corticosteroid injection for common hand diseases and to assess which patient-level risk factors may predict an increase in blood glucose levels. Methods Patients were recruited for this case-crossover study in the clinic of fellowship-trained hand surgeons at a tertiary care center. Patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2 receiving a corticosteroid injection recorded their morning fasting blood glucose levels for 14 days after their injection. Fasting glucose levels on days 1–7 after injection qualified as “case” data with levels on days 10–14 providing control data. A mixed model with a priori contrasts were used to compare post-injection blood glucose levels to baseline levels. A linear regression model was used to determine patient predictors of a post-injection rise in blood glucose levels. Results Forty of 67 patients (60%) recruited for the study returned completed blood glucose logs. There was a significant increase in fasting blood glucose levels following injection limited to post-injection days 1 and 2. Among patient risk factors in our linear regression model, type 1 diabetes and use of insulin each predicted a post-injection increase in blood glucose levels from baseline while higher HbA1c levels did not predict increases. Discussion Corticosteroid injections in the hand transiently increase blood glucose levels in diabetic patients. Patients with type 1 diabetes and insulin-dependent diabetics are more likely to experience this transient rise in blood glucose levels. Level of Evidence Therapeutic Level III PMID:24679910

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of ozone in patients with diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sánchez, Gregorio; Al-Dalain, Saied M; Menéndez, Silvia; Re, Lamberto; Giuliani, Attilia; Candelario-Jalil, Eduardo; Alvarez, Hector; Fernández-Montequín, José Ignacio; León, Olga Sonia

    2005-10-31

    Oxidative stress is suggested to have an important role in the development of complications in diabetes. Because ozone therapy can activate the antioxidant system, influencing the level of glycemia and some markers of endothelial cell damage, the aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of ozone in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes and diabetic feet and to compare ozone with antibiotic therapy. A randomized controlled clinical trial was performed with 101 patients divided into two groups: one (n = 52) treated with ozone (local and rectal insufflation of the gas) and the other (n = 49) treated with topical and systemic antibiotics. The efficacy of the treatments was evaluated by comparing the glycemic index, the area and perimeter of the lesions and biochemical markers of oxidative stress and endothelial damage in both groups after 20 days of treatment. Ozone treatment improved glycemic control, prevented oxidative stress, normalized levels of organic peroxides, and activated superoxide dismutase. The pharmacodynamic effect of ozone in the treatment of patients with neuroinfectious diabetic foot can be ascribed to the possibility of it being a superoxide scavenger. Superoxide is considered a link between the four metabolic routes associated with diabetes pathology and its complications. Furthermore, the healing of the lesions improved, resulting in fewer amputations than in control group. There were no side effects. These results show that medical ozone treatment could be an alternative therapy in the treatment of diabetes and its complications. PMID:16198334

  7. Managing diabetes in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shridhar N; Tanenberg, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Because few randomized trials have been done, little is known about appropriate glycemic control in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. These patients are at high risk of hypoglycemia. It is prudent to monitor glucose closely, set less-stringent blood sugar goals, avoid oral antidiabetic agents, and possibly reduce insulin dosage. PMID:27055204

  8. Understanding diabetes in patients with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the incidence, pathogenetic mechanisms and management strategies of diabetes mellitus in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It classifies patients based on the aetiopathogenetic mechanisms, and proposes rational methods of management of the condition, based on aetiopathogenesis and concomitant pharmacotherapy. PMID:21232158

  9. [Neuroprotector therapy of patients with decompensated diabetes mellitus type 1].

    PubMed

    Kligunenko, E N; Sedinkin, V A

    2011-01-01

    The influence of actovegin and reamberin on diabetic ketoacidotic crises has been studied on a group of 128 patients with severe diabetic ketoacidosis on the background of diabetes mellitus type 1 with disorders ranging from consciousness to coma or precoma states. Patients of group 1 received standard intensive therapy of diabetic ketoacidosis. In group 2, an intensive therapy for neuroprotection by actovegin was added. In group 3, patients received reamberin on the background of standard therapy. In group 4, the neuroprotective therapy using actovegin and reamberin was combined. The mental status was estimated upon recovery from coma, on 5th and 28th days from the beginning of treatment, by taking into consideration cognitive functions such as attention, memory, mentality. The results showed that the use of neuroprotective drugs, including the combination of actovegin and reamberin, allowed to the restore the compensatory-adaptive reaction of patients to ketoacidotic crisis, accelerate the restoration of consciousness within 19.2 +/- 3.8 h, restore the cognitive functions with exceeding norm for patients with diabetes mellitus in compensation stage and maintain their high level on 28th day after crisis. PMID:22379876

  10. Identifying patients at risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Savill, Peter

    2012-01-01

    At present there are nearly 3 million people with diabetes in the UK. It is predicted that this number will almost double by 2025. Nine out of ten of these individuals will have type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that one in seven adults have impaired glucose regulation and up to 12% of these will develop type 2 diabetes each year. The impact of obesity on the development of type 2 diabetes cannot be overemphasised, with a 1 kg/m2 increase in BMI raising the risk of impaired fasting glycaemia by 9.5% and of developing new-onset type 2 diabetes by 8.4%. A 1 cm increase in waist circumference increases the risks by 3.2% and 3.5% respectively. NICE advises using a validated risk assessment tool to identify patients at risk of diabetes. Risk factors used by such tools include: age; ethnicity; weight; first-degree relative with type 2 diabetes; low birthweight and sedentary lifestyle. Certain comorbidities increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, these include: cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease; polycystic ovary syndrome; a history of gestational diabetes; and mental health problems. The initial screening blood test could be a fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, or an oral glucose tolerance test, according to WHO criteria. NICE recommends that high-risk patients should be offered a programme encouraging them to undertake a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity a week, gradually lose weight to reach and maintain a BMI within the healthy range, increase consumption of whole grains, vegetables, and other foods that are high in dietary fibre, reduce the total amount of fat in their diet and eat less saturated fat. PMID:22988703

  11. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy in type 2 diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Dietrich; Deutsch, Lydia; Klemm, Matthias; Jentsch, Susanne; Hammer, Martin; Peters, Sven; Haueisen, Jens; Müller, Ulrich A.; Dawczynski, Jens

    2015-06-01

    The time-resolved autofluorescence of the eye is used for the detection of metabolic alteration in diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy. One eye from 37 phakic and 11 pseudophakic patients with type 2 diabetes, and one eye from 25 phakic and 23 pseudophakic healthy subjects were included in the study. After a three-exponential fit of the decay of autofluorescence, histograms of lifetimes τi, amplitudes αi, and relative contributions Qi were statistically compared between corresponding groups in two spectral channels (490diabetic patients and age-matched controls (p<0.000004). The lack of pixels with a τ2 of ˜360 ps, the increased number of pixels with τ2>450 ps, and the shift of τ3 from ˜3000 to 3700 ps in ch1 of diabetic patients when compared with healthy subjects indicate an increased production of free flavin adenine dinucleotide, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGE), and, probably, a change from free to protein-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide at the fundus. AGE also accumulated in the crystalline lens.

  12. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy in type 2 diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Dietrich; Deutsch, Lydia; Klemm, Matthias; Jentsch, Susanne; Hammer, Martin; Peters, Sven; Haueisen, Jens; Müller, Ulrich A; Dawczynski, Jens

    2015-06-01

    The time-resolved autofluorescence of the eye is used for the detection of metabolic alteration in diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy. One eye from 37 phakic and 11 pseudophakic patients with type 2 diabetes, and one eye from 25 phakic and 23 pseudophakic healthy subjects were included n the study. After a three-exponential fit of the decay of autofluorescence, histograms of lifetimes τ(i), amplitudes α(i), and relative contributions Q(i) were statistically compared between corresponding groups in two spectral channels (490 < ch1 < 560 nm, 560 < ch2 < 700 nm). The change in single fluorophores was estimated by applying the Holm–Bonferroni method and by calculating differences in the sum histograms of lifetimes. Median and mean of the histograms of τ(2), τ(3), and α(3) in ch1 show the greatest differences between phakic diabetic patients and age-matched controls (p < 0.000004). The lack of pixels with a τ(2) of ∼360 ps, the increased number of pixels with τ(2) > 450 ps, and the shift of τ(3) from ∼3000 to 3700 ps in ch1 of diabetic patients when compared with healthy subjects indicate an increased production of free flavin adenine dinucleotide, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGE), and, probably, a change from free to protein-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine inucleotide at the fundus. AGE also accumulated in the crystalline lens. PMID:25769278

  13. A Patient-Held Medical Record Integrating Depression Care into Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Ito, Hiroto; Akashi, Tomoyuki; Yamakage, Hajime; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Daisuke; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Depression is frequently observed in people with diabetes. The purpose of this study is to develop a tool for individuals with diabetes and depression to communicate their comorbid conditions to health-care providers. METHOD We searched the Internet to review patient-held medical records (PHRs) of patients with diabetes and examine current levels of integration of diabetes and depression care in Japan. RESULTS Eight sets of PHRs were found for people with diabetes. All PHRs included clinical follow-up of diabetes and multidisciplinary clinical pathways for diabetes care. No PHRs included depression monitoring and/or treatment. In terms of an integrated PHR for a patient comorbid with diabetes and depression, necessary components include hopes/preferences, educational information on diabetes complications and treatment, medical history, stress and coping, resources, and monitoring diabetes and depression. CONCLUSION A new PHR may be suitable for comorbid patients with diabetes and depression. PMID:27478395

  14. [Diabetics in population of patients treated by pars plana vitrectomy].

    PubMed

    Bezdésová-Bohunická, N; Skorkovská, S; Synek, S; Kanovský, R; Masková, Z; Synková, M

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate visual and anatomic outcomes following pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for complications of diabetic retinopathy (DR), and to assess risk factors that might influence the visual outcome after successful PPV. The medical records of 35 diabetic patients of both types 1 and 2 of diabetes, who underwent vitrectomy for complications of proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) between 2004 and 2005, were analyzed retrospectively. Certain preoperative systemic and ophthalmic variables, intraoperative variables and postoperative complications with negative influence on visual outcome after PPV were recorded. The postoperative follow-up time was 6 months. The collected data as well as visual outcomes after PPV were statistically analyzed. Statistically significant visual improvement was achieved in 51.4 % of the patients; visual acuity (VA) deteriorated in 25.7% of the patients and remained unchanged in 22.9 % of the patients. Preoperative median of VA was 0.0167, changed to 0.1 postoperatively and remained stable on 0.1 level during the 6 months follow-up. VA > or = 0.1 was achieved in 60 % of the patients 6 months after PPV. Some of the followed variables associated with deteriorated or unchanged postoperative VA can be considered as risk factors of an unfavorable prognosis. Evaluated risk factors include preoperative VA worse than 0.1, presence of systemic complications of DM accompanying ocular complications, postoperative occurrence of iris neovascularization and neovascular glaucoma. In conclusion, anatomically successful PPV in diabetic patients is not always followed by an improvement of VA. The optimal timing of vitrectomy is very important not only in order to obtain good visual acuity but also to maintain good visual function for long time. We suppose that an adequate control of DM, sufficient screening for DR and timely laser intervention of DR might decrease the progression of DR and onset of sight threatening complications

  15. Rates of Complications and Mortality in Older Diabetes Patients: The Diabetes and Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Elbert S.; Laiteerapong, Neda; Liu, Jennifer Y.; John, Priya M.; Moffet, Howard H.; Karter, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Importance In the coming decades, the population of older adults with diabetes is expected to grow substantially. Understanding the clinical course of diabetes in this population is critical for establishing evidence-based clinical practice recommendations, research priorities, allocating resources, and setting health policies. Objective Contrast rates of diabetes complications and mortality across age and diabetes duration categories. Design, Setting, Participants This cohort study (2004–2010) included 72,310 older (≥60 years of age) patients with type 2 diabetes enrolled in a large, integrated healthcare delivery system. Incidence densities (events per 1000 person-years (pys)) were calculated for each age category (60s, 70s, 80+ years) and duration of diabetes (shorter: 0–9 years vs. longer: 10+ years). Main Outcome Measures Incident acute hyperglycemic events, acute hypoglycemic events (hypoglycemia), microvascular complications [end-stage renal disease (ESRD), peripheral vascular disease, lower extremity amputation, advanced eye disease], cardiovascular complications [coronary artery disease (CAD), cerebrovascular disease (CVD), congestive heart failure (CHF)], and all-cause mortality. Results Among older adults with diabetes of short duration, cardiovascular complications followed by hypoglycemia were the most common non-fatal complications. For example, among 70–79 year olds with short duration of diabetes, CAD and hypoglycemia rates were higher (11.5 and 5.0/1000 pys respectively), compared to ESRD (2.6/1000), amputation (1.3/1000), and acute hyperglycemic events (0.8/1000). We observed a similar pattern among subjects in the same age group with long diabetes duration where CAD and hypoglycemia had some of the highest incidence rates (19.0 and 15.9 /1000 pys respectively), compared to ESRD (7.6/1000), amputation (4.3/1000), and acute hyperglycemic events (1.8/1000). For a given age group, rates of each outcome, particularly hypoglycemia and

  16. Homocysteine Serum Levels in Diabetic Patients with Non Proliferative, Proliferative and without Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gagliano, Caterina; Giordano, Maria; Vacante, Marco; Caraci, Filippo; Drago, Filippo; Avitabile, Teresio; Motta, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine has been associated with extracellular matrix changes. The diabetic retinopathy is a neurovascular complication of diabetes mellitus and it is the leading cause of vision loss among working adults worldwide. In this study, we evaluate the role of homocysteine in diabetic retinopathy analyzing the plasma levels of homocysteine in 63 diabetic type 2 patients with nonproliferative retinopathy (NPDR), 62 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), 50 healthy subjects used as control group, and 75 randomly selected patients. PMID:24877066

  17. Angina and exertional myocardial ischemia in diabetic and nondiabetic patients: assessment by exercise thallium scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Nesto, R.W.; Phillips, R.T.; Kett, K.G.; Hill, T.; Perper, E.; Young, E.; Leland, O.S. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease are thought to have painless myocardial ischemia more often than patients without diabetes. We studied 50 consecutive patients with diabetes and 50 consecutive patients without diabetes, all with ischemia, on exercise thallium scintigraphy to show the reliability of angina as a marker for exertional ischemia. The two groups had similar clinical characteristics, treadmill test results, and extent of infarction and ischemia, but only 7 patients with diabetes compared with 17 patients without diabetes had angina during exertional ischemia. In diabetic patients the extent of retinopathy, nephropathy, or peripheral neuropathy was similar in patients with and without angina. Angina is an unreliable index of myocardial ischemia in diabetic patients with coronary artery disease. Given the increased cardiac morbidity and mortality in such patients, periodic objective assessments of the extent of ischemia are warranted.

  18. Mobile application to induce lifestyle modifications in type 2 diabetic patients: prototype based on international guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Jaramillo, M.; Delgado, J. S.; León-Vargas, F.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a prototype app to induce lifestyle modifications in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients. The app design is based on International Diabetes Federation guidelines and recommendations from clinical studies related to diabetes health-care. Two main approaches, lifestyle modification and self-management education are used owing to significant benefits reported. The method used is based on setting goals under medical support related to physical activity, nutritional habits and weight loss, in addition to educational messages. This is specially implemented to address the main challenges that have limited the success of similar mobile applications already validated on diabetic patients. A traffic light is used to show the overall state of the goals compliance. This state could be understood as excellent (green), there are aspects to improve (yellow), or some individual goals are not carrying out (red). An example of how works this method is presented in results. Furthermore, the app provides recommendations to the user in case the overall state was in yellow or red. The recommendations pretend to induce the user to make changes in their eating habits and physical activity. According to international guidelines and clinical studies, a prototype of mobile application to induce a lifestyle modification in order to prevent adverse risk factors related to diabetes was presented. The resulting application is apparently consistent with clinical judgments, but a formal clinical validation is required. The effectiveness of this app is currently under consideration for the Colombian population with type 2 diabetes.

  19. [Evidence based therapy with insulin in diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Jermendy, György

    2005-02-20

    A fast development in therapy with insulin was observed after its discovery. Besides the widely used human regular insulin preparations, nowadays ultrashort and long-acting insulin analogues are also available for the patients. At present, the results of large clinical trials enable an evidence based diabetes care. It is well documented, that near-normoglycemia should be achieved by intensive conservative insulin treatment or pump therapy in type 1 diabetic patients. The beneficial effects of the good metabolic control could also be observed years later concerning late specific complications of diabetes. Similarly, as good as possible metabolic control should be aimed with antidiabetic treatment including insulin, if necessary, in type 2 diabetic patients. It is documented that the risk of cardiovascular complications is not increased in type 2 diabetic patients treated with insulin. Hypoglycemia and weight gain are the most important side effects of the insulin treatment. Recently, evidence based recommendations for treatment with ultrashort (insulin lispro, insulin aspart) and long-acting insulin analogues (glargine) can also be determined. PMID:15803885

  20. Guidelines for Perioperative Management of the Diabetic Patient.

    PubMed

    Sudhakaran, Sivakumar; Surani, Salim R

    2015-01-01

    Management of glycemic levels in the perioperative setting is critical, especially in diabetic patients. The effects of surgical stress and anesthesia have unique effects on blood glucose levels, which should be taken into consideration to maintain optimum glycemic control. Each stage of surgery presents unique challenges in keeping glucose levels within target range. Additionally, there are special operative conditions that require distinctive glucose management protocols. Interestingly, the literature still does not report a consensus perioperative glucose management strategy for diabetic patients. We hope to outline the most important factors required in formulating a perioperative diabetic regimen, while still allowing for specific adjustments using prudent clinical judgment. Overall, through careful glycemic management in perioperative patients, we may reduce morbidity and mortality and improve surgical outcomes. PMID:26078998

  1. Guidelines for Perioperative Management of the Diabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Salim R.

    2015-01-01

    Management of glycemic levels in the perioperative setting is critical, especially in diabetic patients. The effects of surgical stress and anesthesia have unique effects on blood glucose levels, which should be taken into consideration to maintain optimum glycemic control. Each stage of surgery presents unique challenges in keeping glucose levels within target range. Additionally, there are special operative conditions that require distinctive glucose management protocols. Interestingly, the literature still does not report a consensus perioperative glucose management strategy for diabetic patients. We hope to outline the most important factors required in formulating a perioperative diabetic regimen, while still allowing for specific adjustments using prudent clinical judgment. Overall, through careful glycemic management in perioperative patients, we may reduce morbidity and mortality and improve surgical outcomes. PMID:26078998

  2. Mechanisms of hypoglycemia unawareness and implications in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Timón, Iciar; del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia unawareness (HU) is defined at the onset of neuroglycopenia before the appearance of autonomic warning symptoms. It is a major limitation to achieving tight diabetes and reduced quality of life. HU occurs in approximately 40% of people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and with less frequency in T2DM. Though the aetiology of HU is multifactorial, possible mechanisms include chronic exposure to low blood glucose, antecedent hypoglycaemia, recurrent severe hypoglycaemia and the failure of counter-regulatory hormones. Clinically it manifests as the inability to recognise impeding hypoglycaemia by symptoms, but the mechanisms and mediators remain largely unknown. Prevention and management of HU is complex, and can only be achieved by a multifactorial intervention of clinical care and structured patient education by the diabetes team. Less know regarding the impact of medications on the development or recognition of this condition in patients with diabetes. Several medications are thought to worsen or promote HU, whereas others may have an attenuating effect on the problem. This article reviews recent advances in how the brain senses and responds to hypoglycaemia, novel mechanisms by which people with insulin-treated diabetes develop HU and impaired counter-regulatory responses. The consequences that HU has on the person with diabetes and their family are also described. Finally, it examines the evidence for prevention and treatment of HU, and summarizes the effects of medications that may influence it. PMID:26185599

  3. Study of type 2 diabetes mellitus cases at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Sanjib; Devkota, Krishna Chandra; Chhetri, Pramod; Bhattarai, Praveen; Shrestha, Ananta

    2004-12-01

    A total of 110 cases attending diabetic clinic at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital were studied. Associated risk factors and co-morbid conditions were analyzed. Among them 63.6% have systolic BP more than 130 mm of Hg and 24.5% have diastolic BP more than 85 mm of Hg reflecting hypertension as most common co-morbid condition. Various complications of diabetes in studied subjects are highlighted. Eighty percent of patients have fasting blood sugar more than 110 mg% and 93.0% have post-prandial blood sugar more than 140 mg% reflecting poor overall glycemic control despite the use of medication. PMID:16295737

  4. Prevalence of Urinary Tract Infection and Antimicrobial Susceptibility among Diabetic Patients with Controlled and Uncontrolled Glycemia in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Sewify, May; Nair, Shinu; Warsame, Samia; Murad, Mohamed; Alhubail, Asma; Behbehani, Kazem; Al-Refaei, Faisal; Tiss, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients have higher risk of urinary tract infection (UTI). In the present study, we investigated the impact of glycemic control in diabetic patients on UTI prevalence, type of strains, and their antimicrobial drugs susceptibility. This study was conducted on urine samples from 722 adult diabetic patients from which 252 (35%) samples were positive for uropathogens. Most UTI cases occurred in the uncontrolled glycemic group (197 patients) versus 55 patients with controlled glycemia. Higher glycemic levels were measured in uncontrolled glycemia group (HbA1c = 8.3 ± 1.5 and 5.4 ± 0.4, resp., P < 0.0001). Females showed much higher prevalence of UTI than males in both glycemic groups (88.5% and 11.5%, resp., P < 0.0001). In the uncontrolled glycemia group 90.9% of the UTI cases happened at ages above 40 years and a clear correlation was obtained between patient age ranges and number of UTI cases (r = 0.94; P = 0.017), whereas in the group with controlled glycemia no trend was observed. Escherichia coli was the predominant uropathogen followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae and they were together involved in 76.2% of UTI cases. Those species were similarly present in both diabetic groups and displayed comparable antibiotic resistance pattern. These results highlight the importance of controlling glycemia in diabetic patients to reduce the UTI regardless of age and gender. PMID:26844231

  5. Prevalence of Urinary Tract Infection and Antimicrobial Susceptibility among Diabetic Patients with Controlled and Uncontrolled Glycemia in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Sewify, May; Nair, Shinu; Warsame, Samia; Murad, Mohamed; Alhubail, Asma; Behbehani, Kazem; Al-Refaei, Faisal; Tiss, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients have higher risk of urinary tract infection (UTI). In the present study, we investigated the impact of glycemic control in diabetic patients on UTI prevalence, type of strains, and their antimicrobial drugs susceptibility. This study was conducted on urine samples from 722 adult diabetic patients from which 252 (35%) samples were positive for uropathogens. Most UTI cases occurred in the uncontrolled glycemic group (197 patients) versus 55 patients with controlled glycemia. Higher glycemic levels were measured in uncontrolled glycemia group (HbA1c = 8.3 ± 1.5 and 5.4 ± 0.4, resp., P < 0.0001). Females showed much higher prevalence of UTI than males in both glycemic groups (88.5% and 11.5%, resp., P < 0.0001). In the uncontrolled glycemia group 90.9% of the UTI cases happened at ages above 40 years and a clear correlation was obtained between patient age ranges and number of UTI cases (r = 0.94; P = 0.017), whereas in the group with controlled glycemia no trend was observed. Escherichia coli was the predominant uropathogen followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae and they were together involved in 76.2% of UTI cases. Those species were similarly present in both diabetic groups and displayed comparable antibiotic resistance pattern. These results highlight the importance of controlling glycemia in diabetic patients to reduce the UTI regardless of age and gender. PMID:26844231

  6. Bacteriological and Resistance Profile in Isolates from Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Vinita; Singhai, Monil; Kumar, Ashok; Jha, Pawan Kumar; Goyal, Rajeev

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus has become a global epidemic illness and poses a threat for development of resistant bacterial infections. Aim: This study was aimed to know the bacteriological and resistance profile of isolates obtained from diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: The bacterial isolates obtained from various samples of diabetic patients admitted in medicine department in 6-month period were identified and tested for antibiotic susceptibility. The extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESβL), AmpC, and metallo-beta-lactamases (MβL) enzymes were detected in gram-negative bacilli. Methicillin, macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS), and linezolid resistance in Staphylococcus spp. were detected. High-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) in Enterococcus spp. was also tested. Results: In all, 38 of 125 diabetic patients (30.4%) had bacterial infection, 18 patients had wound infections, 18 had urinary tract infections (UTIs), and 2 had respiratory tract infections. Escherichia coli among gram-negative bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus among gram-positive bacteria were the predominant pathogens. 32.5% gram-negative bacilli were AmpC producers, 37.5% were MβL producers, and 40% were ESβL producers. Methicillin and MLS resistance was found in 50% and 33.3% isolates of Staphylococcus spp., respectively. HLAR resistance was alarming in Enterococcus spp. Polymyxin among gram-negative bacteria and vancomycin for gram-positive bacteria were the last resort with highest susceptibility rates to treat infections among diabetic patients. Conclusion: Resistant bacterial infections in diabetic patients are common. The presence of various resistance mechanisms in isolates of our study shows that therapeutic failure can occur if empirical prescription is unsubstantiated. PMID:23181227

  7. Dysregulation and containment in the psychoanalytic psychotherapy of a poorly controlled diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Ginieri-Coccossis, Maria; Vaslamatzis, Grigoris

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulation, as a phenomenon of disruption in the psychotherapeutic setting, may be evidenced in the psychoanalytic psychotherapy of diabetic patients presenting poor metabolic and treatment control. In the case of a female patient, violations of the setting via acting out behaviors provided an opportunity for working through and understanding in depth the patient's unconscious attempts to activate traumatic childhood experiences and introduce loss and confusion into the relationship with the psychotherapist. Dysregulation was considered in connection with the patient's pathological containment function, in conflicting part self and object representations, and in relation to traumatic experiences of maternal desertion. Improvement of the patient was identified in her relationships with the psychotherapist, significant others, and the medical health providers, as well as in the overall management of her diabetic treatment. PMID:18399745

  8. Predictors of major lower limb amputation among type II diabetic patients admitted for diabetic foot problems

    PubMed Central

    Yusof, Nazri Mohd; Rahman, Jamalludin Ab; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Che-Ahmad, Aminudin; Khalid, Kamarul Ariffin; Sulong, Ahmad Fadzli; Vijayasingham, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of amputations in Malaysia. This study aimed to identify the predictive factors for major lower limb amputation among patients with type 2 DM (T2DM) who were admitted to a hospital, in order to reduce its likelihood. METHODS This cross-sectional study involved 218 patients with T2DM who were admitted to Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan, Kuantan, Malaysia, for diabetic foot problems from June 2011 to July 2012. A form was developed to document the patients’ profiles, comorbidities, complications, investigations, treatment and clinical outcomes. The predictors for major lower limb amputations were determined using univariate and stepwise logistic regression analysis. RESULTS A total of 31 patients underwent major lower limb amputations (25 transtibial, 6 transfemoral). The following factors were found to be associated with the incidence of major lower limb amputations: T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, presentation with gangrene, diabetic foot conditions of Wagner grade 4 or 5, and necrotising fasciitis. Patients who underwent major amputations had significantly lower haemoglobin and albumin levels, and higher total white blood cell counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and C-reactive protein, urea and creatinine levels. However, only T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, positive bacterial culture and albumin levels were significant on stepwise logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSION T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, positive bacterial culture and low albumin levels were found to be significant predictive factors for major lower limb amputation among patients with T2DM admitted for diabetic foot problems. PMID:26668408

  9. Neuroretinal alterations in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Carpineto, P; Toto, L; Aloia, R; Ciciarelli, V; Borrelli, E; Vitacolonna, E; Di Nicola, M; Di Antonio, L; Mastropasqua, R

    2016-05-01

    PurposeTo study neuroretinal alterations in patients affected by type 2 diabetes with no diabetic retinopathy (DR) or mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) and without any sign of diabetic macular edema.Patients and methodsIn total, 150 type 2 diabetic patients with no (131 eyes) or mild NPDR (19 eyes) and 50 healthy controls were enrolled in our study. All underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination, including Spectral-Domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness values were calculated after automated segmentation of SD-OCT scans.ResultsMean best-corrected visual acuity was 0.0±0.0 LogMAR in all the groups. Mean GC-IPL thickness was 80.6±8.1 μm in diabetic patients and 85.3±9.9 μm in healthy controls, respectively (P=0.001). Moreover, evaluating the two different diabetic groups, GC-IPL thickness was 80.7±8.1 μm and 79.7±8.8 μm in no-DR and mild-NPDR group (P=0.001 and P=0.022 compared with healthy controls, respectively). Average RNFL thickness was 86.1±10.1 μm in diabetes patients and 91.2±7.3 μm in controls, respectively (P=0.003). RNFL thickness was 86.4±10.2 μm in no-DR group and 84.1±9.4 μm in mild-NPDR group (P=0.007 and P=0.017 compared with healthy controls, respectively).ConclusionWe demonstrated a significantly reduced GC-IPL and RNFL thickness values in both no-DR and mild-NPDR groups compared with healthy controls. These data confirmed neuroretinal alterations are early in diabetes, preceding microvascular damages. PMID:26869156

  10. Foot ulcers in the diabetic patient, prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Stephanie C; Driver, Vickie R; Wrobel, James S; Armstrong, David G

    2007-01-01

    Lower extremity complications in persons with diabetes have become an increasingly significant public health concern in both the developed and developing world. These complications, beginning with neuropathy and subsequent diabetic foot wounds frequently lead to infection and lower extremity amputation even in the absence of critical limb ischemia. In order to diminish the detrimental consequences associated with diabetic foot ulcers, a com-mon-sense-based treatment approach must be implemented. Many of the etiological factors contributing to the formation of diabetic foot ulceration may be identified using simple, inexpensive equipment in a clinical setting. Prevention of diabetic foot ulcers can be accomplished in a primary care setting with a brief history and screening for loss of protective sensation via the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. Specialist clinics may quantify neuropathy, plantar foot pressure, and assess vascular status with Doppler ultrasound and ankle-brachial blood pressure indices. These measurements, in conjunction with other findings from the history and physical examination, may enable clinicians to stratify patients based on risk and help determine the type of intervention. Other effective clinical interventions may include patient education, optimizing glycemic control, smoking cessation, and diligent foot care. Recent technological advanced combined with better understanding of the wound healing process have resulted in a myriad of advanced wound healing modalities in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. However, it is imperative to remember the fundamental basics in the healing of diabetic foot ulcers: adequate perfusion, debridement, infection control, and pressure mitigation. Early recognition of the etiological factors along with prompt management of diabetic foot ulcers is essential for successful outcome. PMID:17583176

  11. Tedium among patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lundman, B; Asplund, K; Norberg, A

    1988-01-01

    Tedium assessment and factor analysis of psychosocial variables were performed in 158 insulin-dependent diabetic patients. High tedium scores correlated significantly (P less than 0.05) with high education, lack of self-monitoring, many reported problems concerning insulin injections, diet, strict planning of the activities of everyday life and anxiety concerning complications. There was also a significant relationship between low tedium scores and reported positive effects of the diabetes. There was a higher proportion (ns) of high tedium scores among patients in poor or good metabolic control than in those with intermediate metabolic control. PMID:3372882

  12. Conservative Surgery of Diabetic Forefoot Osteomyelitis: How Can I Operate on This Patient Without Amputation?

    PubMed

    Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Lázaro-Martínez, Jose L; Alvaro-Afonso, Francisco Javier; Molinés-Barroso, Raúl

    2015-06-01

    Surgery is necessary in many cases of diabetic foot osteomyelitis. The decision to undertake surgery should be based on the clinical presentation of diabetic foot osteomyelitis. Surgery is required when the bone is protruding through the ulcer, there is extensive bone destruction seen on x-ray or progressive bone damage on sequential x-ray while undergoing antibiotic treatment, the soft tissue envelope is destroyed, and there is gangrene or spreading soft tissue infection. Several issues should be taken into account when considering surgery for treating diabetic foot osteomyelitis. It is necessary to have a surgeon available with diabetic foot expertise. Regarding location of diabetic foot osteomyelitis, it is important to consider whether isolated bone or a joint is involved. In cases in which osteomyelitis is associated with a bone deformity, surgery should be able to correct this. The surgeon should always reflect about whether extensive/radical surgery could destabilize the foot. The forefoot is the most frequent location of diabetic foot osteomyelitis and is associated with better prognosis than midfoot and hindfoot osteomyelitis. Many surgical procedures can be performed in patients with diabetes and forefoot ulcers complicated by osteomyelitis while avoiding amputations. Performing conservative surgeries without amputations of any part of the foot is not always feasible in cases in which the infection has destroyed the soft tissue envelope. Attempting conservative surgery in such cases risks infected tissues remaining in the wound bed leading to failure. The election of different surgical options depends on the expertise of the surgeons selected for the multidisciplinary teams. It is the aim of this article to provide a sample of surgical techniques in order to remove the bone infection from the forefoot while avoiding amputations. PMID:25256285

  13. Possible genetic defects in regulation of glycosaminoglycans in patients with diabetic nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Deckert, T.; Horowitz, I.M.; Kofoed-Enevoldsen, A.; Kjellen, L.; Deckert, M.; Lykkelund, C.; Burcharth, F. )

    1991-06-01

    The hypothesis of genetic defects in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) regulation among patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and nephropathy was assessed by studies in tissue cultures of fibroblasts obtained from 7 patients with normal urinary albumin excretion, 11 patients with diabetic nephropathy, and 6 nondiabetic control subjects. The incorporation of (2H) glucosamine and (35S) sulfate into hyaluronic acid (HA), chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate (CS + DS), and heparan sulfate (HS) was measured in cells, matrix, and medium and related to micrograms of tissue protein. Large interindividual variations were seen in all three groups, and the incorporation of (3H) glucosamine into HA, CS + DS, and HS and (35S) sulfate into CS + DS and HS were not significantly different between the three groups. However, the fractional incorporation of (3H)glucosamine into HS was significantly reduced in diabetic patients with nephropathy compared with control subjects. This was the case not only when related to the total amount of GAGs (P = 0.014) but also when related to HA (P = 0.014). No significant difference was seen between control subjects and normoalbuminuric diabetic patients. The degree of N-sulfation of HS was not significantly different between the experimental groups. The results suggest that patients with diabetic nephropathy may suffer from deficiencies of coordinate regulation in the biosynthesis of GAG in fibroblasts, which may lead to a reduced density of HS in the extracellular matrix. If these changes reflect alterations in the biosynthesis of GAG from endothelial, myomedial, and mesangial cells, this observation may be relevant for the pathogenesis of severe diabetic complications.

  14. Case 6: amputation site on an ulcerated diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Antunes, José Neves Paulos

    2016-03-01

    A patient presented with diabetic gangrene on four toes and a moderately infected ulcer on the dorsum of the foot. Following amputation of the gangrenous toes, it was possible to salvage the remaining foot using a combination of antibiotics, octenilin Wound Irrigation Solution and Octiset. PMID:26949850

  15. Risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in northern Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhi-Peng; Ma, Jing-Xue

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in northern Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). METHODS This retrospective cross-sectional study was performed between May 2011 and April 2012. A total of 1100 patients (male/female, 483/617) were included in this study. DR was defined following the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) severity scale. All included patients accepted a comprehensive ophthalmic examination including retinal photographs. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) after adjusting for age and gender. RESULTS Retinopathy was present in 307 patients with a prevalence of 27.9%. In univariate logistic analysis, presence of DR was associated with longer duration of diabetes (OR, 5.70; 95%CI, 2.91-12.56), higher concentration of fasting blood glucose (OR, 12.94; 95%CI, 2.40-67.71), higher level of glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c (OR, 5.50; 95%CI, 3.78-11.97) and insulin treatment (OR, 6.99; 95%CI, 1.39-35.12). The lifestyle of patients with T2DM including smoking, alcohol consumption and regular exercise seemed not associated with the development of DR. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that fasting serum glucose concentration, HbA1c level, duration of diabetes and insulin treatment are potential risk factors for DR in northern Chinese patients with T2DM, while the lifestyle of included patients seems not associated with DR. PMID:27588275

  16. Patient selection and vitamin E treatment in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Goldenstein, Hagit; Levy, Nina S; Lipener, Yisrael T; Levy, Andrew P

    2013-03-01

    In diabetes, there is an increase in oxidative stress due to elevated glucose levels in the plasma. High glucose promotes glycosylation, of both plasma and cellular proteins, which particularly affects the endothelial-cell lining of the blood vessel wall and interferes with its normal function. Thus, diabetes mellitus patients suffer from a higher incidence of cardiovascular complications such as atherosclerosis as compared with the nondiabetic population. Haptoglobin (Hp) is a plasma protein that binds free hemoglobin and prevents heme-iron mediated oxidation. There are three different types of Hp, which differ in their antioxidant ability. Several clinical studies have shown that the Hp 2-2 genotype is associated with higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases among diabetics. Vitamin E, a low-cost, easy-to-use antioxidant, was found to decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases in Hp 2-2 diabetic patients. This review summarizes several studies that show the importance of vitamin E supplementation in a specific subgroup of patients, diabetic individuals carrying the Hp 2-2 genotype. PMID:23469912

  17. Oral magnesium supplementation in type II diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Solati, Mehrdad; Ouspid, Elham; Hosseini, Saeedeh; Soltani, Nepton; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Dehghani, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Magnesium is the second most abundant intracellular cation. It plays an important role in insulin homeostasis and glucose metabolism through multiple enzymatic reactions. With increasing data on magnesium deficiency in diabetic patients and epidemiological studies demonstrating magnesium deficiency as a risk factor for diabetes, it is logical to search for its possible beneficial effects on diabetes control and prevention. We aimed to determine whether oral magnesium supplementation improves metabolic control, lipid profile and blood pressure in patients with type II diabetes. Methods: Fifty four patients with type II diabetes were included in a randomized double blind placebocontrolled clinical trial.Patients received either placebo or 300 mg elemental magnesium (as magnesium sulfate -MgSo4-) daily, for 3 months. Metabolic control, lipid profile, blood pressure, magnesium status, hepatic enzymes, hemoglobin concentration, and anthropometric indices were determined in the beginning and at the end of the study. Results: Daily administration of 300 mg elemental magnesium for 3 months, significantly improved fasting blood glucose (183.9±15.43 to 125.8±6.52 vs. 196.5±28.12 to 136.5±7.94, p< 0.0001), 2-hour post prandial glucose (239.1±74.75 to 189.1±60mg/dl vs. 246.4±97.37 to 247.8±86.74mg/dl, p< 0.01), lipid profile, blood pressure and hepatic enzymes. Conclusion: Oral magnesium supplementation with proper dosage has beneficial effects on blood glucose, lipid profile, and blood pressure in patients with type II diabetes. PMID:25405132

  18. A comprehensive review of urologic complications in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Arrellano-Valdez, Fernando; Urrutia-Osorio, Marta; Arroyo, Carlos; Soto-Vega, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, as a result of abnormal insulin production, insulin function, or both. DM is associated with systemic complications, such as infections, neuropathy and angiopathy, which involve the genitourinary tract. The three most significant urologic complications include: bladder cystopathy, sexual dysfunction and urinary tract infections. Almost half of the patients with DM have bladder dysfunction or cystopathy, which can be manifested in women as hypersensitivity (in 39-61% of the diabetic women) or neurogenic bladder. In males it can be experienced as lower urinary tract symptoms (in 25% of diabetic males with a nearly twofold increased risk when seen by age groups). Additionally, an increased prostate volume affects their micturition as well as their urinary tract. Involving sexual dysfunction in women, it includes reduced libido, decreased arousal, clitoral erectile dysfunction and painful or non-sensitive intercourse; and in diabetic males it varies from low libido, ejaculatory abnormalities and erectile dysfunction. Globally, sexual disorders have a prevalence of 18-42%. Erectile dysfunction is ranked as the third most important complication of DM. Urinary tract infections are observed frequently in diabetic patients, and vary from emphysematous infections, Fournier gangrene, staghorn infected lithiasis to repetitive bacterial cystitis. The most frequent finding in diabetic women has been lower urinary tract infections. Because of the high incidence of obesity worldwide and its association with diabetes, it is very important to keep in mind the urologic complication associated with DM in patients, in order to better diagnose and treat this population. PMID:25332855

  19. Hypodermic needles in the neuropathic foot of a patient with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Woolfrey, P G; Kirby, R L

    1998-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, diabetic neuropathy, neuropathic arthropathy of the feet and a plantar ulcer underwent plain radiography, which showed 2 clipped-off hypodermic needles, of which she had been unaware, in the soft tissue of one foot. This previously unreported complication is clinically instructive in that it demonstrates the importance of counselling patients about the protection of insensitive extremities. This case also has public health implications, suggesting as it does that the still-common practice of breaking hypodermic needles before disposal should be strongly discouraged. PMID:9538856

  20. Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stojceva-Taneva, Olivera; Otovic, Natasa Eftimovska; Taneva, Borjanka

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) became a new epidemic of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Diabetic nephropathy is one of the leading causes of end-stage renal failure as a result of the diabetes epidemic worldwide. AIM: The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of CKD in the Republic of Macedonia and its association with diabetes mellitus. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was a part of a study conducted in 2006 in terms of screening for early detection of kidney disease. It was a cross-sectional study based on a random sample of patients aged > 20, consecutively consulting their primary physician for any cause. Fifty physicians throughout the country were included in the study. A total of 2637 patients have been analyzed based on integrity data. GFR was estimated using corrected values of serum creatinine and calculating kidney function by the Cockroft & Gault formula, adjusted for body surface using the Gehan & George formula. Patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than 60 ml/min were considered as having CKD. Blood pressure, body weight, height, serum creatinine, glucose, hemoglobin, hematocrit, urinalysis and medical history for presence of cardiovascular diseases or diabetes were also assessed. RESULTS: The mean age of the subjects was 45.97 ± 16.55 SD and 17.97% were older than 60. Regarding gender, 44.14% were males. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 13.9%. Subjects with CKD (eGFR less than 60 ml/min) were 7.53% of the total. Subjects aged 60 or above, had 20 times higher risk of having CKD (eGFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2). Out of the total group of subjects, 13.9% had diabetes mellitus and they had 3.13 times higher risk of having CKD stage 3-5 (eGFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2) when compared to non-diabetics. The results showed that diabetes was significantly more associated with lower eGFR (less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2) in younger subjects (age less than 60) compared to older ones (odds ratio 3

  1. Lower limb nerve impairment in diabetic patients: multiperspective assessment.

    PubMed

    Padua, L; Saponara, C; Ghirlanda, G; Padua, R; Aprile, I; Caliandro, P; Tonali, P

    2002-01-01

    To assess the relationship between patient's perception of his own inferior limbs symptom and function and the clinical-neurophysiological assessment in patients affected by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). We studied 50 consecutive outpatients affected by IDDM (23 men, 27 women). We used validated measurements clinical [Semmes-Weinstein (SW), vibration perception threshold (VPT), muscle strength, osteotendineous reflexes, etc.], neurophysiological (sural, peroneal nerves), metabolic and patient-oriented [North American Spine Society (NASS) questionnaire]. Patient-oriented scores were significantly related with neurophysiological findings of the inferior limbs. Our data suggest that electrodiagnostic tests are useful to assess the severity of the diabetic polyneuropathy not only because they provide a biological measurement of the nerve function but also because they appeared related to the patient's quality of life related to the peripheral nerve involvement. PMID:11784379

  2. The use of an extract of Hypericum perforatum and Azadirachta indica in a neuropathic patient with advanced diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Iabichella, Maria Letizia; Caruso, Claudio; Lugli, Marzia

    2014-01-01

    The successful use of an extract of Hypericum flowers (Hypericum perforatum) and nimh oil (Azadirachta indica; Hyperoil) in foot wounds with exposed bone in a patient with bilateral advanced diabetic ulcers, has been reported previously. It was hypothesised that this amelioration was linked with the improved glycaemic control and peripheral microvascular circulation. In this case report, the surprisingly successful outcome of another patient using Hyperoil for infection damaged diabetic foot, without prior use of surgical procedure, is described. The patient had no macrovascular pattern impairment. Diabetic foot healing paralleled with controlled local infection and enhanced glycaemic control. The outcome of this patient suggests that the effectiveness of this inexpensive therapy using Hyperoil for diabetic foot is not only linked with the presence of severe microvascular disorder, but also with the appropriate local treatment for ulcer being a must for its recovery. PMID:25378221

  3. Case Study: Hidden Complexity of Medicines Use: Information Provided by a Person with Intellectual Disability and Diabetes to a Pharmacist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flood, Bernadette; Henman, Martin C.

    2015-01-01

    People with intellectual disabilities may be "invisible" to pharmacists. They are a complex group of patients many of whom have diabetes. Pharmacists may have little experience of the challenges faced by this high risk group of patients who may be prescribed high risk medications. This case report details information supplied by Pat, a…

  4. Balneotherapy and platelet glutathione metabolism in type II diabetic patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Agishi, Yuko

    1996-09-01

    Effects of balneotherapy on platelet glutathione metabolism were investigated in 12 type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) on admission were well correlated with those of fasting plasma glucose (FPG; r=0.692, P<0.02). After 4 weeks of balneotherapy, the mean level of GSH showed no changes; however, in well-controlled patients (FPG <150 mg/dl), the level increased ( P<0.01) and in poorly controlled patients (FPG >150 mg/dl), the value decreased ( P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities and the levels of FPG ( r=-0.430, P<0.05). After balneotherapy, the activity increased in 5 patients, decreased in 3 patients and showed no changes (alteration within ±3%) in all the other patients. From these findings in diabetic patients we concluded: (1) platelet GSH synthesis appeared to be induced in response to oxidative stress; (2) lowered GPX activities indicated that the antioxidative defense system was impaired; and (3) platelet glutathione metabolism was partially improved by 4 weeks balneotherapy, an effect thought to be dependent on the control status of plasma glucose levels. It is suggested that balneotherapy is beneficial for patients whose platelet antioxidative defense system is damaged, such as those with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease.

  5. Recurrence of diabetic kidney disease in a type 1 diabetic patient after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nyumura, Izumi; Honda, Kazuho; Babazono, Tetsuya; Horita, Shigeru; Murakami, Toru; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Uchigata, Yasuko

    2015-07-01

    Post-transplant hyperglycaemia of diabetic patients may cause recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts. We report a patient with slowly progressive DKD with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) toxicity after the kidney transplantation. A 28-year-old female with type 1 diabetes mellitus underwent successful kidney transplantation from her mother in April 2003, and the kidney graft survived for more than 10 years. She was treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy consisting of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. After transplantation, she continued to take insulin injection four times per day, but her glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was above 10%. Protocol allograft kidney biopsies performed 5 and 10 years after transplantation revealed the recurrence of slowly progressive diabetic kidney disease. In addition, arteriolar hyalinosis partly associated with calcineurin inhibitor toxicity (CNI) was detected with progression. Post-transplant hyperglycaemia causes recurrent diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in kidney allografts, but its progression is usually slow. For long-term management, it is important to prevent the progression of the calcineurin inhibitor arteriolopathy, as well as maintain favourable glycaemic control. PMID:26031596

  6. Predictors of Diabetes Self-Management among Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health concern in Malaysia. Treatment of diabetes is costly and can lead to complications if disease is poorly controlled. Diabetes self-management (DSM) is found to be essential for optimal glycemic control. This cross-sectional study was conducted among samples from four randomly selected diabetes clinics in Sarawak, Malaysia. The aim was to determine the predictors for DSM. Face-to-face interview using questionnaire was used to collect data. Four hundred respondents with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were recruited. Majority of the respondents were Sarawak Bumiputra (Iban and Bidayuh, 48.6%) and female (68.6%). The mean age was 58.77 years (SD = 11.46) and approximately half of the respondents (50.6%) had T2DM for six years (SD = 4.46). The mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) was 8.06 mmol/L (SD = 2.94), with majority (76.1%) having the level higher than 6.1 mmol/L. Multiple logistic regression tests showed significant linear relationship between DSM and belief in treatment effectiveness (p = 0.001), family support (p = 0.007), and self-efficacy (p = 0.027). Health care personnel must convince patients with T2DM of the effectiveness of the treatment, empower and enhance their self-efficacy, and enlist the family support so as to ensure patients sustain their DSM efforts. PMID:27563681

  7. Predictors of Diabetes Self-Management among Type 2 Diabetes Patients.

    PubMed

    Gunggu, Azylina; Thon, Chang Ching; Whye Lian, Cheah

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health concern in Malaysia. Treatment of diabetes is costly and can lead to complications if disease is poorly controlled. Diabetes self-management (DSM) is found to be essential for optimal glycemic control. This cross-sectional study was conducted among samples from four randomly selected diabetes clinics in Sarawak, Malaysia. The aim was to determine the predictors for DSM. Face-to-face interview using questionnaire was used to collect data. Four hundred respondents with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were recruited. Majority of the respondents were Sarawak Bumiputra (Iban and Bidayuh, 48.6%) and female (68.6%). The mean age was 58.77 years (SD = 11.46) and approximately half of the respondents (50.6%) had T2DM for six years (SD = 4.46). The mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) was 8.06 mmol/L (SD = 2.94), with majority (76.1%) having the level higher than 6.1 mmol/L. Multiple logistic regression tests showed significant linear relationship between DSM and belief in treatment effectiveness (p = 0.001), family support (p = 0.007), and self-efficacy (p = 0.027). Health care personnel must convince patients with T2DM of the effectiveness of the treatment, empower and enhance their self-efficacy, and enlist the family support so as to ensure patients sustain their DSM efforts. PMID:27563681

  8. Gluteal Necrosis and Lumbosacral Plexopathy in a Diabetic Patient after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, M. A.; Masoumi, N.; Argani, H.

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old diabetic patient underwent a renal transplant which was complicated by right side lower extremity paresis and numbness with gluteal necrosis. The main reason was ligation of internal iliac artery of the same side as a result of extensive microvascular obstruction due to severe atheromatous plaque. This is a rare complication which is mostly reported in aneurysmal patients after bypass surgery. The gluteal necrosis is a serious complication which, as in our patient, resulted in patient's death in most of the reported cases. Because of catastrophic nature of this condition, identifying preventive measures is extremely important. PMID:26793402

  9. [Obstetric consequences of uncontrolled gestational diabetes--a case study].

    PubMed

    Murlewska, Julia; Pietryga, Marek; Bagnosz-Magnuszewska, Alina; Zawiejska, Agnieszka; Brazert, Jacek; Gadzinowski, Janusz; Wender-Ozegowska, Ewa

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a case of a pregnant woman who was admitted to the obstetrics and gynecology department because of a new onset of uncontrolled diabetes in 27 weeks gestation. The maternal and fetal diabetic complications suggested a chronic character of the disease which must have been undiagnosed before pregnancy. Many of the co-existing infections caused a life-threatening ketoacidosis. Fortunately with the adequate treatment it was possible to ensure appropriate birth weight of the newborn baby despite the ultrasound markers for LGA (Large For Gestational Age) observed during pregnancy. Intensive insulin therapy was obligatorily continued by the mother after the delivery. PMID:21957610

  10. Biomarkers of Renal Disease and Progression in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hojs, Radovan; Ekart, Robert; Bevc, Sebastjan; Hojs, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes prevalence is increasing worldwide, mainly due to the increase in type 2 diabetes. Diabetic nephropathy occurs in up to 40% of people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It is important to identify patients at risk of diabetic nephropathy and those who will progress to end stage renal disease. In clinical practice, most commonly used markers of renal disease and progression are serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria or albuminuria. Unfortunately, they are all insensitive. This review summarizes the evidence regarding the prognostic value and benefits of targeting some novel risk markers for development of diabetic nephropathy and its progression. It is focused mainly on tubular biomarkers (neutrophil-gelatinase associated lipocalin, kidney injury molecule 1, liver-fatty acid-binding protein, N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase), markers of inflammation (pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-α and tumour necrosis factor-α receptors, adhesion molecules, chemokines) and markers of oxidative stress. Despite the promise of some of these new biomarkers, further large, multicenter prospective studies are still needed before they can be used in everyday clinical practice. PMID:26239462

  11. Atypical onset of diabetes in a teenage girl: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mihai, Cristina Maria; Catrinoiu, Doina; Stoicescu, Ramona Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    Background Chorea, hemichorea-hemiballismus and severe partial seizures may be the presenting feature of nonketotic hyperglycemia in older adults with type 2 diabetes, but cases in children with type 1 diabetes are rare, since the most easily recognized symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children are secondary to hyperglycemia, glycosuria, and ketoacidosis. Case presentation A previously healthy 15-year-old girl presents with sudden onset of right-sided chorea. Brain CT did not detect any abnormal density areas. A T1-weighted image of brain MRI was normal. Investigations revealed hyperglycemia with absent ketones and normal serum osmolality. Achievement of normoglycemia with insulin therapy determined the involuntary movements to regress completely within a day. The direct effect of hyperglycemia could be the pathogenesis of the chorea in our patient. Severe hyperglycemia without ketosis at the clinical onset of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 1) has been reported in children and adolescents, but nonketotic hyperglycemia is an unusual cause of chorea-ballismus in children, and chorea-ballismus is also a rare manifestation of primary diabetes mellitus. Conclusion The importance of clinical evaluation, laboratory testing and neuroimaging for the differential diagnostics of chorea is emphasized. PMID:19116001

  12. Guidelines for treatment of patients with diabetes and infected ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mansilha, A; Brandão, D

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers and their consequences do not only represent a major tragedy for the patient and his/her family, but also place a significant burden on the healthcare systems and society in general. Diabetic patients may develop foot ulcers due to neuropathy (autonomic, sensory, and motor deficits), angiopathy or both. As a result of the additional immunopathy associated with diabetes, the probability of these wounds to become infected is extremely high. Diabetic foot infections can be classified in mild, moderate and severe according to local and systemic signs. Their identification should lead to a prompt and systematic evaluation and treatment, ideally performed by a multidisciplinary team. Decisions concerning empirical initial antibiotic agent(s), desirable route of administration, duration and need of hospitalization should be based on the more likely involved pathogen(s), the severity of the infection, the ulcer chronicity and the presence of significant ischemia. Wound cultures, ideally from ulcer tissue, are strongly advisable and can help guiding and narrowing the antibiotic spectrum. Appropriate wound care and off-loading should not be neglected. When revascularization is required, the correct timing can be crucial for limb salvage. Since the recurrence of ulcer and infection is high, the implementation of appropriate preventive measures can be critical. Ultimately, the definitive goal in the treatment of diabetic foot infections is to prevent the amputation catastrophe. PMID:23443604

  13. Diabetes mellitus patients' family caregivers' subjective quality of life.

    PubMed Central

    Awadalla, Abdel W.; Ohaeri, Jude U.; Al-Awadi, Shafika A.; Tawfiq, Adel M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the subjective quality of life (QOL) of family caregivers of Sudanese type-1 and type-2 diabetic outpatients, using the WHO 26-item QOL instrument, compared with a general population sample; and to examine the factors associated with caregiver QOL. METHOD: Responses of caregivers of 105 outpatients with type-1 diabetes and 135 with type-2 diabetes were compared with 139 general population subjects. RESULTS: Caregivers were satisfied with the content of items related to general social supports. Type-1 caregivers had significantly lower QOL scores than type-2 caregivers and the general population. Parents and siblings had lowest scores compared with other family groups. Caregivers scored higher than patients. Patients' age and duration of illness, and caregivers' education, marital status and state of health were positively associated with caregiver QOL. Caregivers' QOL was predicted by their appraisal of patients' QOL. CONCLUSIONS: Caregivers who were sick, younger, single, less educated and caring for patients with more recent illness appeared relatively vulnerable. Clinicians should be interested in the dynamics of the family caregiving situation--as it impacts QOL--and in promoting caregiver awareness of diabetes in order to enhance the caregiving role, quality of care and QOL. PMID:16749648

  14. Supporting shared care for diabetes patients. The synapses solution.

    PubMed Central

    Toussaint, P. J.; Kalshoven, M.; Ros, M.; van der Kolk, H.; Weier, O.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the construction of a Federated Health Care Record server within the context of the European R&D project Synapses. We describe the system using the five ODP viewpoints. From an analysis of the business process to be supported by the distributed system (the shared care for diabetes patients) requirements for the server are derived. PMID:9357655

  15. Miniopen Repair of Ruptured Achilles Tendon in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acute degenerative Achilles tendons ruptures may be managed either operatively or nonoperatively with the superiority of the operative treatment in reducing the risk of rerupture. Acute rupture of Achilles tendon is commonly seen in diabetic patients. Open techniques for Achilles tendon repair have been associated with significant complications as deep infection and wound-related problems. Patients and Methods. Thirteen type II diabetic patients with acute degenerative rupture of the Achilles tendon were managed by miniopen repair augmented by peroneus brevis tendon. Results. All repairs healed successfully. The patients were able to return to preinjury level of activity after a mean of 5 months. The mean ATRS score improved from 15.1 preoperatively to 74.8 postoperatively. The mean Leppilahti ankle score was 59.6. Three patients suffered from superficial wound infection which was successfully managed. However, no patients suffered any major complications such as DVT, deep infection, or reruptures during the period of the study. Conclusion. Repair of acute degenerative tear of the Achilles tendon with peroneus brevis tendon augmentation could be successfully performed through a miniopen technique with minimization of wound complications in diabetic patients. PMID:27437478

  16. Biophoton emission from blood serum of diabetic patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Wijk, R.; Wiegant, F. A. C.; Popp, Fritz A.; Storms, G. E. M. G.

    1994-12-01

    The concept that free radicals mediate vascular abnormalities in diabetes has been debated. This study examines the relationship between serum free radical activity and glycaemic regulation. A cross-sectional assessment is presented of the chemiluminescence of blood serum, long term glycaemic control (HbAlc, fructosamine) and blood glucose concentrations in patients with type-1 (n equals 114) and patients with type-2 (n equals 112) diabetes. The average value of serum chemiluminescence of type-1 patients is higher than that of type-2 patients (p equals 0.014). Spectral analysis suggests that different sources of free radical activity are responsible in different ratios for chemiluminescence in type-1 and type-2 sera. Serum chemiluminescence values of type-1 patients strongly correspond with blood glucose levels (p < 0.001). Chemiluminescence values were higher, although not significant (p equals 0.082) in the 'poorly' controlled group characterized by high values of HbAlc and/or fructosamine in comparision with the group of 'good' glycaemic control with lower values of HbAlc and/or fructosamine. Serum chemeluminescence values of type-2 patients neither correspond to their long tern glycaemic status nor to their blood glucose levels. It is concluded that changes in glucose metabolism and changes in chemiluminescence are coordinated for type-1 but not for type-2 patients. This strongly indicates the relevance of ther free radical connection to diabetes type-1 complications.

  17. Diabetic patients have abnormal cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Croughwell, N.; Lyth, M.; Quill, T.J.; Newman, M.; Greeley, W.J.; Smith, L.R.; Reves, J.G. )

    1990-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that insulin-dependent diabetic patients with coronary artery bypass graft surgery experience altered coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption. In a study of 23 patients (11 diabetics and 12 age-matched controls), cerebral blood flow was measured using 133Xe clearance during nonpulsatile, alpha-stat blood gas managed cardiopulmonary bypass at the conditions of hypothermia and normothermia. In diabetic patients, the cerebral blood flow at 26.6 +/- 2.42 degrees C was 25.3 +/- 14.34 ml/100 g/min and at 36.9 +/- 0.58 degrees C it was 27.3 +/- 7.40 ml/100 g/min (p = NS). The control patients increased cerebral blood flow from 20.7 +/- 6.78 ml/100 g/min at 28.4 +/- 2.81 degrees C to 37.6 +/- 8.81 ml/100 g/min at 36.5 +/- 0.45 degrees C (p less than or equal to 0.005). The oxygen consumption was calculated from jugular bulb effluent and increased from hypothermic values of 0.52 +/- 0.20 ml/100 g/min in diabetics to 1.26 +/- 0.28 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.001) at normothermia and rose from 0.60 +/- 0.27 to 1.49 +/- 0.35 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.0005) in the controls. Thus, despite temperature-mediated changes in oxygen consumption, diabetic patients did not increase cerebral blood flow as metabolism increased. Arteriovenous oxygen saturation gradients and oxygen extraction across the brain were calculated from arterial and jugular bulb blood samples. The increase in arteriovenous oxygen difference between temperature conditions in diabetic patients and controls was significantly different (p = 0.01). These data reveal that diabetic patients lose cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass and compensate for an imbalance in adequate oxygen delivery by increasing oxygen extraction.

  18. Study on Glycaemic Status and Lipid Profile in Type 2 Diabetic Patients Attending Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh.

    PubMed

    Tabazzum, R; Mia, A R; Haq, R U; Epsi, E Z

    2016-07-01

    Recent increases in the incidence of diabetes in developing countries have been associated with complications resulting in mortality and morbidity. A case control study of 120 subjects attending out patient department of Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh was done with an aim to evaluate alteration of serum lipid profile and HbA1c in type 2 diabetic patients and compare with age matched healthy control. Of the total cases, 60 were Type 2 diabetic patients and 60 were apparently healthy persons recruited for the study. These patients and control subjects were classified as male (50%) and female (50%). Fasting lipid profile and HbA1c% were measured by following the standard laboratory methods. The study subjects had relatively poor glycemic control. The mean HbA1c was 9.21±1.19% in diabetes patient and 4.71±0.60% was in control. The mean fasting blood glucose level was 10.18±1.56mmol/L in diabetes patient and 4.51±0.48mmol/L in control. The mean total cholesterol, triacylglycerols, HDL-C & LDL-C were 211.93±11.83mg/dl, 156.90±7.96mg/dl, 35.20±3.17mg/dl & 133.20±3.99mg/dl in diabetes patient accordingly and the mean total cholesterol, triacylglycerols, HDL-C & LDL-C were 159.72±4.89mg/dl, 117.45±12.97mg/dl, 44.23±2.75mg/dl & 92.15±5.67mg/dl in control group accordingly. The study revealed that the most common abnormality seen was decreased serum HDL-Cholesterol levels (91.67%). Hypertriglyceridaemia present in 81.67% patients, 78.34% had high LDL-Cholesterol and 73.34% had hypercholesteromia. Diabetic males had significantly higher levels of total cholesterol and LDL-Cholesterol compared to diabetic females and diabetic females had significantly lower levels of HDL-Cholesterol compared to diabetic males. It was concluded from the results of this study that, diabetic patients are more prone to develop dyslipidaemia. Thus early diagnosis of dyslipidemia and good glycaemic control can be used as a preventive measure for the development of cardiovascular

  19. Free Triiodothyronine Levels Are Associated with Diabetic Nephropathy in Euthyroid Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingcheng; Li, Xiaohua; Tao, Yang; Wang, Yufei; Peng, Yongde

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the association of thyroid function and diabetic nephropathy (DN) in euthyroid patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. A total of 421 patients were included in this cross-sectional study. The following parameters were assessed: anthropometric measurements, fast plasma glucose, serum creatinine, lipid profile, HbA1c, free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone levels, and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR). Patients with UACR of ≥30 mg/g were defined as those suffering from DN. Results. Of the 421 patients, 203 (48.2%) suffered from DN, and no difference was found between males and females. The patients with DN yielded significantly lower FT3 levels than those without DN (P < 0.01). The prevalence of DN showed a significantly decreasing trend across the three tertiles based on FT3 levels (59.6%, 46.4%, and 38.6%, P < 0.01). After adjustment for gender and age, FT3 levels were found to correlate positively with estimated glomerular filtration rate (P = 0.03) and negatively with UACR (P < 0.01). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that FT3 level was independently associated with UACR (β = -0.18, t = -3.70, and P < 0.01). Conclusion. Serum FT3 levels are inversely associated with DN in euthyroid patients with type 2 diabetes, independent of traditional risk factors. PMID:26697065

  20. Free Triiodothyronine Levels Are Associated with Diabetic Nephropathy in Euthyroid Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingcheng; Li, Xiaohua; Tao, Yang; Wang, Yufei; Peng, Yongde

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the association of thyroid function and diabetic nephropathy (DN) in euthyroid patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods. A total of 421 patients were included in this cross-sectional study. The following parameters were assessed: anthropometric measurements, fast plasma glucose, serum creatinine, lipid profile, HbA1c, free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone levels, and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR). Patients with UACR of ≥30 mg/g were defined as those suffering from DN. Results. Of the 421 patients, 203 (48.2%) suffered from DN, and no difference was found between males and females. The patients with DN yielded significantly lower FT3 levels than those without DN (P < 0.01). The prevalence of DN showed a significantly decreasing trend across the three tertiles based on FT3 levels (59.6%, 46.4%, and 38.6%, P < 0.01). After adjustment for gender and age, FT3 levels were found to correlate positively with estimated glomerular filtration rate (P = 0.03) and negatively with UACR (P < 0.01). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that FT3 level was independently associated with UACR (β = −0.18, t = −3.70, and P < 0.01). Conclusion. Serum FT3 levels are inversely associated with DN in euthyroid patients with type 2 diabetes, independent of traditional risk factors. PMID:26697065

  1. Correlation between diabetic lower-extremity arterial disease and diabetic neuropathy in patients with type II diabetes: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Guo, Jianchao; Xu, Na

    2015-01-01

    The lower-extremity vascular injuries and neuropathy are the most salient complications of diabetes which could lead to the poor prognosis, especially for the type II diabetes. The lower extremity vascular injuries and neuropathy usually coexist, yet their correlation in the pathogenesis of lower extremity lesions has received little attention in previous studies. To investigate the correlation between the degree of lower-extremity arterial injuries and lower-extremity neurological functional status in patients with type II diabetes, 32 patients with type II diabetes were examined for the mean flow velocity of the femoral artery and popliteal artery of lower extremeties, while the motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV) of the bilateral common peroneal nerve, sural nerve and posterior tibial nerve were simultaneously examined. Results showed that there was moderate correlation between the mean flow velocity of lower-extremity arteries and MCV/SCV. In particular, the MCV of the right tibial nerve was strongly correlated with the average velocity of the right popliteal artery (P < 0.05). PMID:25785144

  2. Fasting Ramadan in diabetic patients: When is fasting not advisable in a person with diabetes?

    PubMed

    Aziz El-Sayed, Adel Abdel; Sabet, Eman Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    Ramadan Fasting is one of the five pillars of Islam, but there is a clear exemption in holy Qur'an for those who are temporarily or permanently ill. Diabetes Mellitus is one of the most prevalent chronic illnesses globally; it is associated with metabolic risks that might be augmented with fasting. In spite of this risk many Muslims prefer to fast considering not fasting is a great sin and shameful. Defining the situations when fasting is not advisable in a diabetic patient is an important issue which has to be clearly determined on bases of solid evidence whenever possible. The recommendations have to be agreed between experts of physicians and Islamic Religion scientists. The advances in diabetes management necessitate continuous updating of the recommendations to match with Islamic legitimacy. The role of healthcare providers is neither recommending nor preventing a patient from fasting, their role is just to explore risks and provide medical advice for safe fasting. This review summarizes previous trials for risk stratifications and recommendations for fasting in diabetic patients. PMID:26013778

  3. Indicators of glycemic control in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kunihiko; Koga, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has become clear that mild abnormal glucose tolerance increases the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications, and so the definition and diagnostic criteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have been changed. Therefore, in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus, even stricter glycemic control than before is required to reduce the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications. Strict glycemic control cannot be attained without an indicator of glycemic control; this review proposes a reliable indicator. The gold standard indicator of glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus is hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c); however, we have demonstrated that HbA1c does not reflect glycemic control accurately during pregnancy because of iron deficiency. It has also become clear that glycated albumin, another indicator of glycemic control, is not influenced by iron deficiency and therefore might be a better indicator of glycemic control in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus. However, large-population epidemiological studies are necessary in order to confirm our proposal. Here, we outline the most recent findings about the indicators of glycemic control during pregnancy including fructosamine and 1,5-anhydroglucitol. PMID:26240701

  4. A Rare Case of Tolosa-Hunt-Like Syndrome in a Poorly Controlled Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lasam, Glenmore; Kapur, Sakshi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 50-year-old female with diabetes mellitus who presented with progressive second, third, fifth, sixth, and eighth cranial nerve palsy. Diagnostic investigation revealed hyperglycemic state, and brain imaging showed a right cavernous sinus enhancement suggestive of and consistent with Tolosa-Hunt syndrome. The patient was started on steroids with tight glycemic control for eight weeks; subsequently, the cranial nerve palsies resolved as well as documented resolution of the right cavernous sinus enhancement. PMID:27087813

  5. Timing of access to secondary healthcare services and lower extremity amputations in patients with diabetes: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Claire M; Ali, Fauzi; Roberts, Graham A; Kearney, Patricia M; Perry, Ivan J; Bradley, Colin P

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between timing of patient access to secondary healthcare services for diabetes management and lower extremity amputation (LEA) among patients with diabetes. Research design and methods A case–control study was conducted in the secondary healthcare system in Ireland. Cases were 116 patients with diabetes who underwent a first major non-traumatic LEA between 2006 and 2012. Controls were 348 patients with diabetes, over 45 years, admitted to the same hospital as an emergency or electively, frequency-matched for gender, type of diabetes, and year. Data were collected for 7 years prior to the event year. ORs for LEA in patients with diabetes comparing early versus late referral from primary to secondary healthcare were calculated. Results Statistically significant risk factors associated with LEA in patients with diabetes included being single, chronic kidney disease, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. Documented retinopathy was a significant protective factor. In unconditional logistic regression analysis adjusted for potential confounders, there was no evidence of a reduced risk of LEA among patients referred earlier to secondary healthcare for diabetes management. Conclusions Specialist referral may need to occur earlier than the 7-year cut-off used to demonstrate an effect on reducing LEA risk. Documented retinopathy was associated with reduced risk of LEA, most likely as a proxy for better self-care. Variation in the management of diabetes in primary care may also be impacting on outcomes. Efforts to develop more integrated care between primary and secondary services may be beneficial, rather than focusing on timing of referral to secondary healthcare. PMID:26336607

  6. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a 27 year-old female patient with type-1-Diabetes treated with sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor Canagliflozin.

    PubMed

    Bader, Nimrah; Mirza, Lubna

    2016-01-01

    We are reporting a timely case of atypical euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis in a type 1 diabetic patient treated with sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor canagliflozin. The clinical history, physical examination findings and laboratory values are described. Other causes of acidosis such as salicylate toxicity or alcohol intoxication were excluded. Ketoacidosis resolved after increasing dextrose and insulin doses supporting the hypothesis that SGLT-2 inhibitors may lead to hypoinsulinemia. Euglycemic ketoacidosis did not recur in our patient after discontinuing canagliflozin. We recommend reserving SGLT2 inhibitor therapy to type 2 diabetics, discontinuing medication and treating patients presenting with ketoacidosis due to SGLT-2 inhibitors with higher concentrations of dextrose with appropriate doses of insulin to help resolve acidosis. PMID:27375734

  7. Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a 27 year-old female patient with type-1-Diabetes treated with sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor Canagliflozin

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Nimrah; Mirza, Lubna

    2016-01-01

    We are reporting a timely case of atypical euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis in a type 1 diabetic patient treated with sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor canagliflozin. The clinical history, physical examination findings and laboratory values are described. Other causes of acidosis such as salicylate toxicity or alcohol intoxication were excluded. Ketoacidosis resolved after increasing dextrose and insulin doses supporting the hypothesis that SGLT-2 inhibitors may lead to hypoinsulinemia. Euglycemic ketoacidosis did not recur in our patient after discontinuing canagliflozin. We recommend reserving SGLT2 inhibitor therapy to type 2 diabetics, discontinuing medication and treating patients presenting with ketoacidosis due to SGLT-2 inhibitors with higher concentrations of dextrose with appropriate doses of insulin to help resolve acidosis. PMID:27375734

  8. [The cure of type 2 diabetes and patient education].

    PubMed

    Lagger, G; Chambouleyron, M; Correia, J C; Sittarame, F; Miganne, G; Lasserre Moutet, A; Golay, A

    2015-03-25

    Type 2 diabetes is a potentially reversible disease. Patient education encompasses a deep investment of the health care providers, who with the aid of pedagogic tools, help the pa tient commit to this path. This facilitates the learning of uncommon knowledge and skills required. Whether or not it leads to a complete remission of the disease may not be the main purpose. The main goal lies in the patient's motivation to learn and change on a long term basis. PMID:26027202

  9. Gender Differences in Periodontal Status and Oral Hygiene of Non-Diabetic and Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Antina; Busse, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study investigated gender dependent differences by the comparison of periodontal status and oral hygiene between diabetic patients and non-diabetic subjects. Methods: 517 mostly obese subjects (171 non-diabetic, 205 type 2 diabetic with oral and 141 with insulin therapy; mean: 59 years) completed an oral hygiene questionnaire and had a clinical examination, including periodontal screening and recording (PSR), percentage of bleeding teeth (PBT), probing pocket depth (PD), gingivitis index (GI), and number of teeth (Tn). Main parameters were “periodontitis” and “oral hygiene behaviour”, each defined by 5 sub-parameters. For a comparison of all results, each sub-parameter was set 0.2. The “low performance index“ (LoP) was the sum of significantly worse sub-parameters in the compared groups (maximum of low performing = 1.0). Results: Gender comparison: In non-diabetic and diabetic patients with oral medication, males performed worse (LoP: periodontitis 0.6 - 0.8; oral hygiene 0.4 - 0.6). The male insulin group performed worse oral hygiene (LoP: 0.4) than females with insulin therapy, whereas the periodontal status showed no difference. Diabetic and non-diabetic groups: Females: Diabetic groups performed worse than non-diabetics (LoP: periodontitis 0.2 - 1.0; oral hygiene 0.4). Insulin patients had worse periodontal status and showed no difference in oral hygiene when compared to diabetic patients with oral medication (LoP: 0.2). Males: Diabetic group with oral medication had worse periodontal status than non-diabetics (LoP: 0.6). Conclusions: The periodontal status was mainly due to oral hygiene behaviour, which was worse in men. Apparently behaviour and not diabetes is the major determinant of periodontitis. Men apparently need much more advise than women. PMID:27347232

  10. DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    Limited options for clinical management of patients with juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus call for a novel therapeutic paradigm. Two innovative studies support endoplasmic reticulum as an emerging target for combating both autoimmune and heritable forms of this disease. PMID:24393784

  11. Restless Legs Syndrome in Patients with Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sabic, Adela; Sinanovic, Osman; Sabic, Dzevad; Galic, Gordan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze frequency of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Patients and Methods: It was analyzed 120 subjects (from Health Center Živinice/Family Medicine Department) through a survey conducted in the period from March to June 2015, of which 30 (8 men/22 women). Subjects were 30 patients with longtime hypertension (HT)(18 men/12 women), 30 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) type I or II (9 men/21 women), 30 patients with long standing DM type I or II and HT (12 men /18 women), and 30 control subjects (12 men/18 women). RLS were evaluated by questionnaire - International RLS Study Group Criteria. The average age of patients in the group with HT was 58.70 ± 9.07, in the group with DM 48.43 ± 15.37, and in the group of patients with HT and DM 63.90 ± 7.49 years. In the control group mean age was 52.76 ± 14.83 years. Statistical data were analyzed in Excel and SSPS statistical program. Results: RLS was identified in 10 (30%) of those with HT; 7 (21%) in patients with DM, and 10 (30%) in patients with HT+DM. In the control group RLS was verified in 4 (12%) patients. Comparing the results, it was observed significant difference between the HT and the control group (p=0.0012) and HT+ DM and control group (p=0.0012). The frequency of RLS between DM and the control group was not significantly significant (p=0.107). Conclusion: RLS is frequent in patients with hypertension (30%), hypertension+ diabetes mellitus (30%), and patients with DM (21%). PMID:27147785

  12. Social Orientation and Diabetes-Related Distress in Japanese and American Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Kaori; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Morling, Beth; Ayano-Takahara, Shiho; Carroll, Andrew E.; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Uchida, Yukiko; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2014-01-01

    Objective Recent evidence in cultural and social psychology suggests Eastern cultures' emphasis on harmony and connection with others and Western cultures' emphasis on self-direction and autonomy. In Eastern society, relational harmony is closely linked to people's well-being. The impact of this cultural and social orientation on diabetes-related distress was investigated. Research Design and Methods Japanese and American patients with type 2 diabetes were surveyed by well-established questionnaire in Japan and in the United States, respectively. The association of personal values for interdependence, perceived emotional support, and the Problem Areas in Diabetes scale (PAID) were analyzed. Results A positive correlation between interdependence and PAID (r = 0.18; P = 0.025) and a negative correlation between perceived emotional support and PAID (r = − 0.24; P = 0.004) were observed after adjustments for other factors in Japanese data (n = 149), but not in American data (r = 0.00; P = 0.990, r = 0.02; P = 0.917, respectively, n = 50). In Japanese data, the three-factor structure of PAID (negative feelings about total life with diabetes, about living conditions with diabetes, and about treatment of diabetes) was identified, and interdependence showed significant positive correlations with the first and second factors and perceived emotional support showed significant negative correlations with all three factors of PAID. Conclusions These results suggest that personal values for interdependence may be linked to the level of diabetes-related distress and that the distress may be relieved by perception of emotional support, especially in an interdependent cultural context. PMID:25333692

  13. A Clinical Study of Meibomian Gland Dysfunction in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shamsheer, R. P.; Arunachalam, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Aims of the Study: To study the frequency of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) in patients of diabetes mellitus with dry eye. Materials and Methods: A case-control cross sectional study. Sampling: Purposive random sampling. Totally, 200 eyes of 100 patients of diabetes mellitus and an equal number of eyes of normal subjects as control, who were gender and age matched and all of whom were symptomatic for dry eye were assessed for MGD by noting the symptoms and determining the meibomian gland expression scale for volume and viscosity, and ocular surface staining with Lissamine green, and Fluorescein sodium. All the subjects were graded for the severity of MGD. The results were compared in both the groups to ascertain whether the frequency of MGD in diabetics is significantly more as compared to nondiabetics. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed by Chi-square test for significance. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: There was a significant increase in the frequency of MGD in diabetics as compared to the nondiabetics. Conclusion: Diabetes mellitus is associated with MGD. PMID:26692718

  14. Panel: Big Data & Social Media for Empowering Patients with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Luque, Luis; Mejova, Yelena; Mayer, Miguel-Angel; Hasvold, Per Erlend; Joshi, Surabhi

    2016-01-01

    Millions of people living with diabetes are using mobile phones, Internet and social media to socialize with other patients, share experience or search information relevant for their self-management. This phenomena is leading towards a new paradigm of hyper-connected diabetes digital self-management. This is also leading towards an explosion on data, a large amount of data is collected on populations around the world. This panel will address the opportunities this data presents, discuss the latest research that uses it, and the limitations and other concerns. PMID:27332274

  15. Specific Blood Pressure Targets for Patients With Diabetic Nephropathy?

    PubMed

    Grassi, Guido; Mancia, Giuseppe; Nilsson, Peter M

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy represents a condition frequently detected in current clinical practice characterized by a very high cardiovascular risk profile. Blood pressure reduction via antihypertension drug treatment represents a therapeutic approach capable of exerting favorable effects on renal and cardiovascular outcomes. The purpose of this article is to review the current literature and results of key clinical trials pertaining to blood pressure goals of antihypertension treatment in these patients. The pros and cons of a less or a more intensive blood pressure goal in diabetic nephropathy will be discussed, with particular emphasis on the cardiovascular and renal effects of each therapeutic strategy. PMID:27440837

  16. Health locus of control and self-care behaviors in diabetic foot patients

    PubMed Central

    Abredari, Hamid; Bolourchifard, Fariba; Rassouli, Maryam; Nasiri, Navideh; Taher, Mohammad; Abedi, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetic foot affects more than 25% of diabetic patients and finally up to 20% of cases result in amputation. The most important factor resulting in severe complications or even death is lack of self-care. Health locus of control has been introduced as one of health factors and predicting factors of self-care. This research was performed for analyzing the correlation between self-care behaviors and health locus of control in diabetic foot patients. Methods: In this descriptive study, 120 patients with diabetic foot were chosen using convenience sampling from endocrine clinic and wards of endocrine and vascular surgery of Teleqani Hospital of Shahid Beheshti Medical University. The data were gathered by demographic, self-care behavior, and health locus of control questionnaires. The t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and spearman coefficient were used to analyze the data. Results: Results of this research showed that there is a direct and significant relation between selfcare behaviors and internal health locus of control (p<0.001), and also in contrast with chance health locus of control (p<0.001). Conclusion: We have to consider these factors’ role in nursing interventions and patient-care education programs and plans. Probably, interventions and programs that will lead to the strengthening of internal health locus of control improve and strengthen patients’ self-care behaviors and their involvement in treatment. PMID:26913246

  17. Primary Paranasal Tuberculosis in a Diabetic Mimicking Odontogenic Infection: A Rare Case; A Unique Presentation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit; Mehendirratta, Monica; Sareen, Chanchal; Aggarwal, Anju

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of Tuberculosis (TB) is high especially in developing countries but primary para-nasal TB is still a rarity. The latter often remains quiescent until it reaches an advanced stage and offers a diagnostic challenge. In the present case report maxillary sinus TB mimicked a destructive periodontitis induced space infection, thus causing a delay in treatment. The present case report describes clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and outcome of a 50-year-old diabetic/HIV seronegative patient with histopathologically confirmed case of maxillary sinus TB. PMID:27135017

  18. Primary Paranasal Tuberculosis in a Diabetic Mimicking Odontogenic Infection: A Rare Case; A Unique Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mehendirratta, Monica; Sareen, Chanchal; Aggarwal, Anju

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of Tuberculosis (TB) is high especially in developing countries but primary para-nasal TB is still a rarity. The latter often remains quiescent until it reaches an advanced stage and offers a diagnostic challenge. In the present case report maxillary sinus TB mimicked a destructive periodontitis induced space infection, thus causing a delay in treatment. The present case report describes clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and outcome of a 50-year-old diabetic/HIV seronegative patient with histopathologically confirmed case of maxillary sinus TB. PMID:27135017

  19. Presumed paradoxical embolus in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Catherine; Lamarche, Caroline; Bell, Robert Z; Vallée, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic complications figure among the most frequent causes of mortality in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar state. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman presenting with DKA whereby a newly discovered patent foramen ovale was found due in part to the observation of bilateral deep vein thrombosis in legs, bilateral multiple pulmonary embolisms, and left subclavian acute artery thrombosis. Diabetes is known as a hypercoagulability state, and DKA is rising as a risk factor for vascular events. The importance of prophylactic anticoagulation should be emphasized in this setting. PMID:26445558

  20. Presumed paradoxical embolus in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Catherine; Lamarche, Caroline; Bell, Robert Z; Vallée, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic complications figure among the most frequent causes of mortality in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar state. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman presenting with DKA whereby a newly discovered patent foramen ovale was found due in part to the observation of bilateral deep vein thrombosis in legs, bilateral multiple pulmonary embolisms, and left subclavian acute artery thrombosis. Diabetes is known as a hypercoagulability state, and DKA is rising as a risk factor for vascular events. The importance of prophylactic anticoagulation should be emphasized in this setting. PMID:26445558

  1. Comparison of the nerve fiber layer of type 2 diabetic patients without glaucoma with normal subjects of the same age and sex

    PubMed Central

    Takis, Alexandros; Alonistiotis, Dimitrios; Panagiotidis, Dimitrios; Ioannou, Nikolaos; Papaconstantinou, Dimitris; Theodossiadis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    Background The retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 was compared to normal subjects of similar age and sex, having first excluded any risk factors for glaucoma. The correlation between the RNFL thickness and the severity of diabetic retinopathy was investigated at its primary stages and with other ocular and diabetic parameters. Methods A prospective, case series study was carried out. Twenty-seven diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy, 24 diabetic patients with mild retinopathy, and 25 normal, age-matched subjects underwent a complete ophthalmological examination and imaging with scanning laser polarimetry for the evaluation of the RNFL. Multivariate analysis was applied in order to investigate the correlation between RNFL and diabetic parameters, such as age, duration of diabetes, insulin therapy, levels of glycosylated hemoglobin; and ocular parameters, such as cup to disc ratio, levels of normal intraocular pressure, and central corneal thickness. Results The mean inferior average of RNFL and the temporal-superior-nasal-inferior-temporal standard deviation were statistically significantly lower in both diabetic groups, and the nerve fiber index was higher (P=0.04) compared to the normal group. There was no statistically significant difference between the diabetic groups. The factor analysis showed no significant correlation between the RNFL and the previously mentioned diabetic and ocular parameters. Conclusion The existence of diabetes should be seriously considered in evaluating the results of scanning laser polarimetry. Multivariate analysis for RNFL was used for the first time. PMID:24596452

  2. The 5-Year Onset and Regression of Diabetic Retinopathy in Chinese Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Peiyao; Peng, Jinjuan; Zou, Haidong; Wang, Weiwei; Fu, Jiong; Shen, Binjie; Bai, Xuelin; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the rate and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) onset and regression in Chinese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Methods This is a 5-year community-based prospective study. The demographic information, systemic examination results and ophthalmological test results of each participant were collected. The study outcomes were DR incidence, defined as the onset of DR in at least one eye, and DR regression, defined as full regression from existing DR to no retinopathy without invasive treatments. The associations between each potential risk factor and the outcomes were studied. Results In total, 778 participants were enrolled. There were 322 patients without DR at baseline, of which 151 participants developed DR during follow-up (DR incidence rate = 46.89%). Baseline hyperglycemia and high blood pressure were two independent risk factors associated with DR incidence. Among the 456 participants with existing DR at entry, 110 fully recovered after 5 years (DR regression rate = 24.12%). Low baseline glucose and low serum triglyceride were two independent factors associated with DR regression. Conclusions DR incidence occurred more frequently in patients with hyperglycemia and high blood pressure. DR regression occurred mostly in patients with lower glucose and lower serum triglyceride levels among Chinese type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:25402474

  3. Comparison and Correlation of Glucose Levels in Serum and Saliva of Both Diabetic and Non-diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bhumika J; Dave, Bela; Dave, Dilip; Karmakar, Payel; Shah, Mona; Sarvaiya, Bhumi

    2015-01-01

    Background: To detect and compare salivary glucose with plasma glucose level and postprandial blood sugar (PPBS) and fasting blood sugar (FBS) in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients were participated in this study. They were divided into two groups, each group consist of 50 patients. Un-stimulated saliva and blood were collected and investigated for glucose levels. Results: FBS, PPBS, plasma glucose levels and salivary glucose levels were higher in diabetic patients than healthy controls. FBS, PPBS, plasma glucose level and salivary glucose levels were significantly correlated with each other in diabetic patients Conclusion: Salivary glucose level can be used for monitoring tool to assess the glycemic status of diabetes mellitus patients as it is noninvasive and diagnostic method. PMID:26464543

  4. How health information is received by diabetic patients?

    PubMed Central

    Zare-Farashbandi, Firoozeh; Lalazaryan, Anasik; Rahimi, Alireza; Zadeh, Akbar Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of correct information-seeking behavior by the patients can provide health specialists and health information specialists with valuable information in improving health care. This study aimed to investigate the passive receipt and active seeking of health information by diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: A survey method was used in this research on 6426 diabetic patients of whom 362 patients were selected by a no percentage stratified random sampling. The Longo information-seeking behavior questionnaire was used to collect data and they were analyzed by SPSS 20 software. Results: The most common information source by diabetic patients was practitioners (3.12). The minimum usage among the information sources were from charity organizations and emergency phone lines with a usage of close to zero. The amount of health information gained passively from each source has the lowest average of 4.18 and usage of this information in making health decision has the highest average score of 5.83. Analysis of the data related to active seeking of information showed that knowledge of available medical information from each source has the lowest average score of 3.95 and ability in using the acquired information for making medical decisions has the highest average score of 5.28. The paired t-test showed that differences between passive information receipt (41.68) and active information seeking (39.20) considered as statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Because diabetic patients are more passive information receivers than active information seekers, the health information must be distributed by passive means to these patients. In addition, information-seeking behavior during different time periods should be investigated; to identify more effective distribution of health information. PMID:26261828

  5. Diabetes Nurse Case Management and Motivational Interviewing for Change (DYNAMIC): Study Design and Baseline Characteristics in the Chronic Care Model for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Stuckey, Heather L.; Dellasega, Cheryl; Graber, Nora J.; Mauger, David T.; Lendel, Irina; Gabbay, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite evidence that diabetes is costly and devastating, the health care system is poorly equipped to meet the challenges of chronic disease care. The Penn State Institute of Diabetes & Obesity is evaluating a model of managing Type 2 DM which includes nurse case management (NCM) and motivational interviewing (MI) to foster behavior change. The primary care intervention is designed to improve patients' self care and to reduce clinical inertia through provider use of standardized clinical guidelines to achieve better diabetes outcomes. Methods This RCT tests the efficacy of an enhanced NCM intervention on Type 2 DM (n=549) patient outcomes mediated by changes in self-care behavior and diabetes management. Outcome measures include: (a) effect on clinical parameters such as HbA1c (<7), BP (<130/80), and LDL (<100), depression scores and weight; (b) process measures such as complication screening; (c) patient psychological and behavioral outcomes as measured by emotional distress (PAID), diabetes-specific quality of life (ADDQoL), patient satisfaction (DTSQ), self-care activities (SDSCA); and (d) physician satisfaction and cost-effectiveness of the intervention. Conclusions Baseline includes (mean) age = 58; BMI = 34.4; 57% females; 47% Caucasian, and 39% Hispanic. Patients had elevated HbA1c (8.4), BP (137/77) and LDL (114). Overall, patients were depressed (CES-D = 21.6) and had an extremely negative quality of life (ADDQoL = -1.58). We believe that enhanced NCM will both improve self-care and reduce emotional distress for patients with diabetes. If proven effective, enhanced NCM may be translated to other chronic illnesses. PMID:19328244

  6. Secretion of salivary statherin is compromised in uncontrolled diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Masahiro; Zhang, Bin-Xian; Dean, David D.; Lin, Alan L.; Saunders, Michèle J.; Hazuda, Helen P.; Yeh, Chih-Ko

    2015-01-01

    Background Statherin is an important salivary protein for maintaining oral health. The purpose of the current study was to determine if differences in statherin levels exist between diabetic and healthy subjects. Methods A total of 48 diabetic and healthy controls were randomly selected from a community-based database. Diabetic subjects (n = 24) had fasting glucose levels > 180 mg/dL, while controls (n = 24) had levels < 110 mg/dL. Parotid saliva (PS) and sublingual/submandibular saliva (SS) were collected and salivary flow rates determined. Salivary statherin levels were determined by densitometry of Western blots. Blood hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and total protein in saliva were also obtained. Results SS, but not PS, salivary flow rate and total protein in diabetics were significantly less than those in healthy controls (p = 0.021 & p < 0.001 respectively). Correlation analysis revealed the existence of a negative correlation between PS statherin levels and HbA1c (p = 0.012) and fasting glucose (p = 0.021) levels, while no such correlation was found for SS statherin levels. When statherin levels were normalized to total salivary protein, the proportion of PS statherin, but not SS statherin, in diabetics was significantly less than that in controls (p = 0.032). In contrast, the amount of statherin secretion in SS, but not PS, was significantly decreased in diabetics compared to controls (p = 0.016). Conclusions and general significance The results show that synthesis and secretion of statherin is reduced in diabetics and this reduction is salivary gland specific. As compromised salivary statherin secretion leads to increased oral health risk, this study indicates that routine oral health assessment of these patients is warranted. PMID:25793156

  7. Diabetic kidney disease and vascular comorbidities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Bentata, Yassamine; Chemlal, A; Karimi, I; El Alaoui, F; Haddiya, I; Abouqal, Redouane

    2015-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with an increased risk of progression toward end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular (CV) risk mortality. To investigate this association, we studied 637 patients with T2DM in the Eastern area of Morocco. The mean follow-up period was 42 ± 11 months. At the baseline visit, 22.8%, 59.1% and 18.1% of the patients had normo-albuminuria, micro-albuminuria and macro-albuminuria, respectively. Of all patients, 51.6% had a history of hypertension and 37.4% had hypertension on admission. At the end of follow-up, rapid progression (estimated glomerular filtration rate >5 mL/min/1.73 m² /year) was observed in 24.1% of the cases and the frequency of occurrence of CV events was 5%, 18.5% and 32.5% in the normo-, micro- and macro-albuminuria groups, respectively (P <0.001). In multivariate analysis, arterial hypertension was identified as an independent risk factor related to diabetic kidney disease (DKD, P = 0.04) and occurrence of CV events (P = 0.02), while albuminuria was not identified as an independent risk factor, either for DKD or for the occurrence of CV events. Our study found that hypertension was an independent risk factor for the DKD and the occurrence of the CV events in T2DM patients. PMID:26354588

  8. Shear wave elastography of the placenta in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Mehmet Aytac; Kilic, Fahrettin; Kayadibi, Yasemin; Alici Davutoglu, Ebru; Imamoglu, Metehan; Bakan, Selim; Mihmanli, Ismail; Kantarci, Fatih; Madazli, Riza

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate placental elasticty in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and non-diabetic controls. Thirty-three pregnant women with GDM according to the current criteria of the American Diabetes Association and 43 healthy pregnant women who were admitted to the antenatal clinic were recruited for this case-control study. Elasticity values of both the peripheral and the central parts of the placentas of the patients in both groups were determined by shear wave elastography (SWE) imaging. Mean elasticity values of both the central and the peripheral part of the placentas were significantly higher in GDM pregnancies (p < 0.001). No difference was observed in the mean elasticity values of the central and the peripheral part of the placentas in two groups (p > 0.05). SWE imaging technology might provide a quantitative assessment of the morphological pathologies of placentas in pregnant women with GDM. PMID:27012734

  9. Prevalence of Diabetic Foot Disease in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus under Renal Replacement Therapy in Lleida, Spain.

    PubMed

    Dòria, Montserrat; Rosado, Verónica; Pacheco, Linda Roxana; Hernández, Marta; Betriu, Àngels; Valls, Joan; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Fernández, Elvira; Mauricio, Dídac

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the prevalence of diabetic foot and other associated conditions in patients with diabetes mellitus under renal replacement in the region of Lleida, Spain. Methods. This was an observational, cross-sectional study of 92 dialysis-treated diabetic patients. Besides a podiatric examination, we explored the presence of cardiovascular risk factors, late diabetes complications, including peripheral neuropathy, atherosclerotic disease, and peripheral artery disease. We assessed risk factors for foot ulceration and amputation by logistic regression. Results. Prevalent diabetic foot was found in 17.4% of patients, foot deformities were found in 54.3%, previous ulcer was found in 19.6%, and amputations were found in 16.3%; and 87% of them had some risk of suffering diabetic foot in the future. We observed a high prevalence of patients with peripheral neuropathy and peripheral artery disease (89.1% and 64.2%, resp.). Multivariable analysis identified diabetic retinopathy and advanced atherosclerotic disease (stenosing carotid plaques) as independent risk factors for foot ulceration (p = 0.004 and p = 0.023, resp.) and diabetic retinopathy also as an independent risk factor for lower-limb amputations (p = 0.013). Moreover, there was a temporal association between the initiation of dialysis and the incidence of amputations. Conclusion. Diabetic patients receiving dialysis therapy are at high risk of foot complications and should receive appropriate and intensive foot care. PMID:27190996

  10. Prevalence of Diabetic Foot Disease in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus under Renal Replacement Therapy in Lleida, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Dòria, Montserrat; Rosado, Verónica; Pacheco, Linda Roxana; Betriu, Àngels; Valls, Joan; Mauricio, Dídac

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the prevalence of diabetic foot and other associated conditions in patients with diabetes mellitus under renal replacement in the region of Lleida, Spain. Methods. This was an observational, cross-sectional study of 92 dialysis-treated diabetic patients. Besides a podiatric examination, we explored the presence of cardiovascular risk factors, late diabetes complications, including peripheral neuropathy, atherosclerotic disease, and peripheral artery disease. We assessed risk factors for foot ulceration and amputation by logistic regression. Results. Prevalent diabetic foot was found in 17.4% of patients, foot deformities were found in 54.3%, previous ulcer was found in 19.6%, and amputations were found in 16.3%; and 87% of them had some risk of suffering diabetic foot in the future. We observed a high prevalence of patients with peripheral neuropathy and peripheral artery disease (89.1% and 64.2%, resp.). Multivariable analysis identified diabetic retinopathy and advanced atherosclerotic disease (stenosing carotid plaques) as independent risk factors for foot ulceration (p = 0.004 and p = 0.023, resp.) and diabetic retinopathy also as an independent risk factor for lower-limb amputations (p = 0.013). Moreover, there was a temporal association between the initiation of dialysis and the incidence of amputations. Conclusion. Diabetic patients receiving dialysis therapy are at high risk of foot complications and should receive appropriate and intensive foot care. PMID:27190996

  11. Improvement of Diabetic Patients Nursing Care by the Development of Educational Programs

    PubMed Central

    Vissarion, Bakalis; Malliarou, Maria; Theofilou, Paraskevi; Zyga, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a major health problem with many social and economic consequences in general population. The importance of education in the diabetic patient and his family, led to the development of diabetes clinical nurse specialist. The role of diabetes clinical nurse specialist is essential and crucial to the hospitals and the community, in order to form a relationship with the diabetic patient and his/her family. In this way health is promoted to the maximum extent possible. In conclusion educational programs help patients with diabetes to obtain information about their condition and improve their self-care skills. PMID:26973922

  12. Correlation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Polymorphism (GG, TT and GT Genotype) with Proteinuria and Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Ali; Saadatmand, Saeed; Kheiri, Soleiman

    2016-01-01

    Background Nephropathy is the most important leading cause of end stage renal failure in type 2 diabetic patients, so numerous studies were done to diagnose and evaluate risk factors of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Some gene polymorphisms may be associated with progression or regression of DN, so the aim of this study was to compare prevalence of eNOS gene polymorphism in diabetic patients with controls and its association with diabetic nephropathy. Materials and Methods In a cross-sectional study, 94 type 2 diabetic patients and 94 normal participants were enrolled. Patients without retinopathy were excluded from this study. For all of the patients, fasting blood sugar (FBS), 2 hours post-prandial (BS), Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN), Creatinine (Cr), 24 hours urine protein were measured in the case group. Endothelial nitric oxide synthetase gene polymorphism was evaluated in the case and control groups. Results There was no significant difference based on age and sex between patients in case and control groups. GG genotype of eNOS was less common in the patient group compared to control group. There was no difference between prevalence of TT, GT or GG genotype based on age and sex. There was no correlation between diabetic retinopathy or proteinuria and genotypes of eNOs. Conclusion The study showed that in type 2 diabetic patients, NOS gene polymorphism was more common compared to normal population; however, there is no correlation between this gene polymorphism and proteinuria or retinopathy in these patients. PMID:27042499

  13. Clinical course and visual outcome in patients with diabetes mellitus and uveitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We report the clinical course and visual outcome of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) who subsequently developed uveitis from any cause. Methods Longitudinal, retrospective case note review. Results A total of 36 patients (M/F: 18/18, 58 eyes) were included, Of the 36 patients, 35 had Type 2 DM and one had Type 1 DM. Mean age of onset of DM was 49 years and uveitis 55 years. The uveitis was bilateral in 22 (61%) patients. There were 19 patients with anterior uveitis, 12 with panuveitis and 5 with intermediate uveitis. Mean follow up was 4.4 years (range 1-18). Mean number of uveitis recurrences was 3 (range 1-7). Causes of vision of 6/18 or worse appeared related to the uveitis in 9 eyes and diabetes in 4 eyes. Cataract occurred in 22 eyes, glaucoma in 17 eyes, and cystoid macular oedema in 10 eyes. Diabetic retinopathy was detected in 38 (65.5%) eyes (29 non-proliferative including 6 with clinically significant macular oedema, and 9 proliferative). Progression of diabetic retinopathy to proliferative stage occurred in 7 eyes of 4 patients over a mean duration of 4.4 years. In 10 patients with active uveitis the mean HbA1c was 80 mmol/mol [9.5%], (range 49-137 [6.6-14.7]), and 67 mmol/mol [8.3%] (range 46-105 [6.4-11.8]) when the uveitis was quiescent, p = 0.01. Better glycaemic control was required in 10 patients during episodes of uveitis. Conclusions Patients with DM who develop uveitis may have a high complication rate, reduced vision and poor glycaemic control. Checking blood glucose during episodes of uveitis is important. PMID:23628425

  14. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Nsiah, Kwabena; Shang, V Owusua; Boateng, K Agyenim; Mensah, FO

    2015-01-01

    Background: The diabetic condition is influenced by several factors, some of which can accelerate the disease's progression to various complications that aggravate the morbidity. Aims: This study aimed at determining the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components and the most critical predictive risk factors of MetS in type 2 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 150 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and was conducted at the Diabetes Centre of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, the Ashanti Region of Ghana, from February, 2013 to April, 2013. The study involved the use of a questionnaire to obtain some information on the diabetics, undertaking anthropometric measurements, as well as collecting blood samples for the measurement of some biochemical parameters; fasting blood glucose and lipid profile. MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results: The prevalence of MetS was 58% in the studied Ghanaian population. Hypertension was the commonest risk factor (60%), followed by central obesity (48.67%) and dyslipidemia (37%). Female type 2 diabetics had a higher prevalence of MetS, and carried more components than their male counterparts. Regression analysis showed three factors; femininity, high body mass index and low educational status were the most critical predictive risk factors of MetS, according to this study. Conclusion: With hypertension being the commonest component, future cardiovascular disease prevention strategies should focus attention on its management and prevention, through education. PMID:26097823

  15. Total Antioxidant Status in Type 2 Diabetic Patients in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, Akram T; Darwish, Hisham M; Akkawi, Mutaz A; Ashareef, Abdelkareem A; Almasri, Zaher A; Bader, Khaldoun A; Khammash, Umaiyeh M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the level of total antioxidant status (TAS) in type 2 diabetic and normal Palestinian subjects as well as the major factors influencing TAS levels. A sample of convenience composed of 212 type 2 diabetic and 208 normal subjects above the age of 40 were recruited. Only 9.8% of the subjects had normal body mass index (BMI) levels (<25), 29% were overweight (≥25 to <30), and 61.2% were obese (≥30). The mean levels of TAS were significantly higher in diabetic compared to control subjects (2.18 versus 1.84 mM Trolox, P = 0.001) and in hypertensive subjects compared to subjects with normal blood pressure (BP). Mean TAS levels were higher in obese compared to nonobese subjects (2.12 versus 1.85 mM Trolox, P = 0.001). Mean TAS levels were similarly higher in subjects with high fasting plasma glucose (FPG) compared to normal FPG (2.19 versus 1.90 mM Trolox) and high HbA1c (≥6.5%) compared to HbA1c < 6.5% (2.14 versus 1.91 mM Trolox). Multivariate analysis revealed that only diabetic status (P = 0.032) and the level of education (P = 0.036) were significantly associated with TAS. In conclusion diabetic patients had 18.5% increase in TAS levels compared to control subjects. PMID:26090472

  16. Canagliflozin Treatment in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Triplitt, Curtis; Cornell, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) indicate a patient-centered approach that should go beyond glycemic control. Of the many antihyperglycemic agents available for treatment of T2DM, sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors offer the advantages of reduced glycated hemoglobin (A1C), body weight (BW), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and are associated with a low risk of hypoglycemia when used either as monotherapy or with other agents not typically associated with increased risk of hypoglycemia. Collaborative, multidisciplinary teams are best suited to provide care to patients with diabetes, and clinical pharmacists can enhance the care provided by these teams. This review aims to provide insight into the mode of action, pharmacology, potential drug–drug interactions, clinical benefits, and safety considerations associated with use of the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin in patients with T2DM and to provide information to enhance clinical pharmacists’ understanding of canagliflozin. PMID:26523120

  17. Myocardial Revascularization for Patients With Diabetes: Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting or Percutaneous Coronary Intervention?

    PubMed

    Castelvecchio, Serenella; Menicanti, Lorenzo; Garatti, Andrea; Tramarin, Roberto; Volpe, Marianna; Parolari, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    Patients affected by diabetes usually have extensive coronary artery disease. Coronary revascularization has a prominent role in the treatment of coronary artery disease in the expanding diabetic population. However, diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting or percutaneous coronary intervention experience worse outcomes than nondiabetic patients. Several studies comparing coronary artery bypass grafting vs percutaneous coronary intervention in subgroups of diabetic patients demonstrated a survival advantage and fewer repeat revascularization procedures with an initial surgical strategy. This review summarizes the current state of evidence comparing the effectiveness and safety of coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous coronary intervention in diabetic patients. PMID:27217297

  18. The role of the nurse specialist in the care of patients with diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Susie

    2005-01-01

    Successful management of patients with diabetic foot ulcers requires a multidisciplinary approach in which team members use their unique skills to achieve wound healing and prevent wound recurrence. This article describes the role of the nurse specialist and defines the roles of the baccalaureate-prepared wound care nurse specialist and the master's-prepared wound care nurse specialist. A case presentation highlights the role of the nurse practitioner in the outpatient wound clinic setting. PMID:15680114

  19. Six-month Outcomes of Mobile Phone Application-based Self-management in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mi Kyeong; Cho, Young Yun; Rha, Mi Yong; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2015-07-01

    We report the case in order to examine the effect of a mobile application program ("Diabetes & Nutrition") developed in 2011-2012 for self-management in patients with type 2 diabetes and to recommend important considerations when the mobile application program is developed. A 46-year-old man was newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2013 and had no complications. The height of the patient was 168 cm and the body weight was 75.6 kg. Nutrition education was conducted according to a medical prescription, and follow-up nutrition education was conducted after 3 and 6 months. After nutrition education, the patient was engaged in self-management using "Diabetes & Nutrition" program during 3 months. At 3 months, the body weight had decreased by 4.4 kg (from 75.6 to 71.2 kg), waist circumference by 5 cm (from 88 to 83 cm) and HbA1c level from 7.9% to 6.1%. Also at 3 months, the medication was reduced from from the dose of 850 mg to the dose of 500 mg metformin per twice a day. Since then, the patient did not continue to use the "Diabetes & Nutrition" because the level of blood glucose had stabilized, and the patient felt inconvenient and annoying to use the program. At 6 months, no significant change in the body weight and body composition was observed in comparison with those at 3 months. The present case demonstrates that the early use of "Diabetes & Nutrition" could be helpful for self-management of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Developing self-management mobile application programs in the future will require strategies of how to promote continuous use of application program and self-management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26251839

  20. Exercise thallium imaging in patients with diabetes mellitus. Prognostic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Felsher, J.; Meissner, M.D.; Hakki, A.H.; Heo, J.; Kane-Marsch, S.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1987-02-01

    We used exercise thallium 201 imaging in 123 patients with diabetes mellitus (77 men and 46 women, aged 56 +/- 8 years), 75% of whom had angina pectoris (typical or atypical). During exercise testing, 18 patients (15%) had angina pectoris, 28 (23%) had ischemic ST changes, and 69 (56%) had abnormal thallium images. During follow-up (up to 36 months), there were 12 cardiac events; four patients died of cardiac causes and eight had nonfatal acute myocardial infarction. Univariate and multivariate survival analysis identified two independent predictors of cardiac events: the event rate was significantly less in patients with normal images and exercise heart rate over 120 beats per minute than in patients with abnormal images and exercise heart rate of 120 beats per minute or less (0% vs 22%). The patients with abnormal images or exercise heart rate of 120 beats per minute or less had an intermediate event rate (11.5%). Furthermore, two of the 54 patients with normal images and ten of 69 patients with abnormal images had subsequent cardiac events. Thus, exercise thallium imaging is useful in risk stratification in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  1. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Diabetic Retinopathy amongst the Diabetic Patients of AlJouf and Hail Province of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder which is characterized by elevated blood sugar levels. It is a non-communicable disease and currently, a major disease of concern in terms of public health. Aim To assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of diabetic retinopathy amongst the diabetic patients of Saudi Arabia. Material and Methods Patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus visiting to Ministry of Health hospitals were incorporated in this study. Self administered questionnaires were used to assess knowledge, attitude and practice of diabetic retinopathy amongst the diabetic patients. The data collected was entered in a pre-designed proforma and analysed using SPSS version 20.0 Results This study incorporated 439 diabetic individuals out of which 251 (57.17%) were male patients and 188 (42.82%) were females. Majority of the diabetic patients (75.62%) were aware that diabetes can cause eye disorders, 73.80% of patients replied that diabetic individuals should go for regular eye check-ups and 65.10% of patients were aware that they should visit an ophthalmologist in the event of eye problem. Out of 439 diabetic 302 patients (68.79%) were aware that timely treatment can prevent or delay damage of eyes in diabetic patients and about 95% of all the participants went for regular ocular examinations. Conclusion Majority of the diabetes patients were aware that diabetes can cause eye disease and it is necessary for the diabetic individuals to consult the ophthalmologist for the prevention of the same. PMID:27437254

  2. Microangiopathy is Common in Submucosal Vessels of the Colon in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sasor, Agata; Ohlsson, Bodil

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The pathophysiology behind gastrointestinal dysmotility in diabetes mellitus is unknown. Both esophageal dysmotility and gastroparesis have been shown to be associated with retinopathy, suggesting that microangiopathy is important in the common etiology. The aim of the present study was to examine whether patients with diabetes exhibit microangiopathy in the colon, and if present, to correlate microangiopathy with the clinical picture. METHODS: Consecutive patients subjected to colon surgery were identified in the southernmost districts of Skåne between January 2011 and May 2013. Medical records were scrutinized, and patients with a history of diabetes were noted. Gender, age, type of diabetes, treatment, complications, and other concomitant diseases were registered. Histopathologic re-evaluation of surgical biopsies with morphometric analyses of submucosal vessels in the colon was performed. Morphometric examination and clinical data were compared with non-diabetic patients. RESULTS: Of 1135 identified patients during the time period studied, 95 patients with diabetes were recognized and included. Fifty-three non-diabetic, randomly chosen patients served as controls. The mean age was 71.8 ± 10.2 and 71.4 ± 9.5 years in diabetic and non-diabetic patients, respectively. Microangiopathy was found in 68.4% of diabetic patients and in 7.5% of non-diabetic patients (p < 0.001). The wall-to-lumen ratio was 0.31 (0.23-0.46) in patients with diabetes compared with 0.16 (0.12-0.21) in non-diabetic patients (p < 0.001). No clinical association with microangiopathy could be verified. CONCLUSION: Microangiopathy in the colon is more common in diabetic than in non-diabetic patients. The clinical significance of microangopathy has yet to be clarified. PMID:25396405

  3. Barriers and Potential Solutions to Providing Optimal Guideline-Driven Care to Patients With Diabetes in the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Vigersky, Robert A.; Fitzner, Karen; Levinson, Jenifer

    2013-01-01

    The cost of diabetes, driven primarily by the cost of preventable diabetes complications, will continue to increase with the epidemic rise in its prevalence in the U.S. The Diabetes Working Group (DWG), a consortium of professional organizations and individuals, was created to examine the barriers to better diabetes care and to recommend mitigating solutions. We consolidated three sets of guidelines promulgated by national professional organizations into 29 standards of optimal care and empanelled independent groups of diabetes care professionals to estimate the minimum and maximum time needed to achieve those standards of care for each of six clinical vignettes representing typical patients seen by diabetes care providers. We used a standards-of-care economic model to compare provider costs with reimbursement and calculated “reimbursement gaps.” The reimbursement gap was calculated using the maximum and minimum provider cost estimate (reflecting the baseline- and best-case provider time estimates from the panels). The cost of guideline-driven care greatly exceeded reimbursement in almost all vignettes, resulting in estimated provider “losses” of 470,000–750,000 USD/year depending on the case mix. Such “losses” dissuade providers of diabetes care from using best practices as recommended by national diabetes organizations. The DWG recommendations include enhancements in care management, workforce supply, and payment reform. PMID:24159181

  4. High levels of lipid peroxidation in semen of diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    La Vignera, S; Condorelli, R A; Vicari, E; D'Agata, R; Salemi, M; Calogero, A E

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) (one of the final products of lipid peroxidation and well-known marker of oxidative stress) in semen of infertile men with type 2 diabetes and to investigate its relationship with their glycaemic control. Forty infertile men with type 2 diabetes were evaluated. The mean ages were 36.5 ± 8.0. Men with diabetes were divided into two groups. Group A (n = 20) with glycated haemoglobin >10% and group B (n = 20) with glycated haemoglobin <7%. A single sample was examined according to the criteria of the World Health Organization (WHO Laboratory Manual for the Examination of Human Semen and Sperm-Cervical Mucus Interaction, 1999, Cambridge University Press). MDA was assessed using the thiobarbituric acid method. MDA concentration in semen of group A patients (0.95 ± 0.35 nmol ml(-1)) was significantly higher than in group B patients (0.43 ± 0.13 nmol ml(-1)) (P value < 0.05) and had negative relationship with sperm density (r = -.717; P value < 0.05), total sperm count (r = -.625; P value < 0.05), progressive motility (r = -.489; P value < 0.05) and normal forms (r = -.545; P value < 0.05). Based on these results, it could be concluded that increase in lipid peroxidation in men with diabetes with poor metabolic control was associated with low sperm quality. PMID:21919944

  5. Hyperglycemic crisis precipitated by Lassa fever in a patient with previously undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Edo, A E; Okaka, E; Ezeani, I U

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemic crisis (HC) is an acute complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) that is commonly precipitated by infections and non-compliance with therapy. Viral precipitant of HC is uncommon. To report a rare case of HC unmasked by Lassa fever in a patient previously not known to have diabetes mellitus. A 54 year old lady presented with complaints of generalized body weakness, inability to pass stool, and fever. There was no abdominal pain, vomiting and nausea. There were no features of DM. She is not a known case of diabetes mellitus or hypertension. Patient does not drink alcoholic beverages. There was no history of bleeding from any orifices. She was acutely ill-looking, afebrile, not pale, anicteric, nil pedal oedema. Pulse rate was 110 beats per minute, regular, normal volume. Blood pressure was 110/80 mmHg. Respiratory rate was 26 cycles/minute, breath sound was vesicular. Abdomen was full and moved with respiration. There were no areas of tenderness, no organomegaly, no ascites, and bowel sounds were normoactive. Neurologic examination revealed a conscious patient who was restless. Casual blood glucose was 600mg/dl. Urinalysis: Glycosuria (+++), HbA1c was 12.4%. Lassa PCR done was positive. Patient was managed for hyperglycemic crisis with intravenous normal saline and soluble insulin. She was also commenced on Ribavirin but died of complications of lassa fever. Lassa fever should be included as a precipitant of hyperglycemic crisis in endemic countries. PMID:25244282

  6. Oral Candida spp carriers: its prevalence in patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus*

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ramon Felipe Fernandez; Jaimes-Aveldañez, Alejandra; Hernández-Pérez, Francisco; Arenas, Roberto; Miguel, Guadalupe Fabián-San

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prevalence of oral candidiasis in diabetic patients is 13.7-64%. Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species (75-86.5%). OBJECTIVE: To obtain the prevalence of Candida carriers among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to identify the species of the yeast. Study design: It is an open, observational, descriptive, cross-sectional, and prospective study. METHODS: We included voluntary patients from the National Diabetes Marathon and performed a blood glucose measurement, sialometry test, Gram-stained exfoliative cytology, and culture on Sabouraud dextrose agar and CHROMagar Candida TM. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: We examined 141 patients (mean age 57 years): 103 women (73%) and 38 men (26.9%). Exfoliative cytology was positive in 32 cases (23 with oral lesions); 78 had oral lesions but no Candida (93.9%). Candida was isolated in 58 patients (41.1%), 21 (45.6 %) had blood glucose greater than 126 mg/dl, and 37 (38.9%) had less than 126 mg/dl. The most frequent species was C. albicans (82.7%). Forty-two Candida carriers had salivary flow greater than 20 mm (72.4%), and 16 (27.5%) had hyposalivation. Candida was isolated in 25 of 79 patients with dental prosthesis (31.6%), 9 of 15 were smokers (60%), and 22 of 71 had symptoms (30.9%). CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of oral Candida carriers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexico was similar to that found in other countries; exfoliative cytology was effective in finding Candida; salivary flow rate, use of prosthesis, and presence of oral lesions and symptoms were similar in oral Candida carriers and negative patients. Most smokers were Candida carriers. PMID:23739717

  7. Infrared dermal thermography on diabetic feet soles to predict ulcerations: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Klein, Marvin E.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Bus, Sicco A.; van Netten, Jaap J.

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication for patients with diabetes mellitus. If not adequately treated, these ulcers may lead to foot infection, and ultimately to lower extremity amputation, which imposes a major burden to society and great loss in health-related quality of life for patients. Early identification and subsequent preventive treatment have proven useful to limit the incidence of foot ulcers and lower extremity amputation. Thus, the development of new diagnosis tools has become an attractive option. The ultimate objective of our project is to develop an intelligent telemedicine monitoring system for frequent examination on patients' feet, to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration. Inflammation in diabetic feet can be an early and predictive warning sign for ulceration, and temperature has been proven to be a vicarious marker for inflammation. Studies have indicated that infrared dermal thermography of foot soles can be one of the important parameters for assessing the risk of diabetic foot ulceration. This paper covers the feasibility study of using an infrared camera, FLIR SC305, in our setup, to acquire the spatial thermal distribution on the feet soles. With the obtained thermal images, automated detection through image analysis was performed to identify the abnormal increased/decreased temperature and assess the risk for ulceration. The thermography for feet soles of patients with diagnosed diabetic foot complications were acquired before the ordinary foot examinations. Assessment from clinicians and thermography were compared and follow-up measurements were performed to investigate the prediction. A preliminary case study will be presented, indicating that dermal thermography in our proposed setup can be a screening modality to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration.

  8. Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes After Initiation of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitor Treatment.

    PubMed

    Storgaard, Heidi; Bagger, Jonatan I; Knop, Filip K; Vilsbøll, Tina; Rungby, Jørgen

    2016-02-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) were recently introduced for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). SGLT2i lower plasma glucose by inhibiting the renal reuptake of glucose leading to glucosuria. Generally, these drugs are considered safe to use. However, recently, SGLT2i have been suggested to predispose to ketoacidosis. Here, we present a case of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) developed in an obese, poorly controlled male patient with T2D treated with the SGLT2i dapagliflozin. He was admitted with DKA 5 days after the initiation of treatment with the SGLT2i dapagliflozin. On admission, the primary symptoms were nausea and dizziness, and he was hypertensive (170/103) and tachycardic (119 bpm) and had mild hyperglycaemia (15.3 mmol/l), severe ketonuria and severe metabolic acidosis (pH 7.08). He responded well to infusions of insulin, glucose and saline and was discharged after 72 hr with insulin as the only glucose-lowering therapy. After 1 month, dapagliflozin was reintroduced as add-on to insulin with no recurrent signs of ketoacidosis. During acute illness or other conditions with increased insulin demands in diabetes, SGLT2i may predispose to the formation of ketone bodies and ensuing acidosis. PMID:26291182

  9. Diabetic foot wounds in haemodialysis patients: 2-year outcome after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and minor amputation.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kyoichi; Miyamoto, Akira; Hakamata, Naohiro; Fukuda, Masahiro; Yamauchi, Yasutaka; Akita, Takako; Kuhara, Ryoji; Tezuka, Shingo

    2012-12-01

    Critical limb ischaemia (CLI) is known to be associated with high mortality. In some patients, surgery cannot be performed due to high risk of perioperative death and complications. In other cases, there is only pain at rest but no wound. Therefore, it is difficult to accurately predict the prognosis of individual patients. We examined the prognosis of CLI cases in which therapeutic footwear was made for ambulation after wounds healed. The subjects were 31 haemodialysis patients with diabetic foot wounds, which were treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and minor amputation. The subjects were 22 men and 9 women. Female patients were significantly older than male patients (P = 0.046). Two-year postoperative outcomes were survival in 19 patients and death in 12 patients. Eight of twelve deceased patients had a history of coronary intervention. There were 8 deaths among 13 patients with such history, indicating a marginally significant increase in the mortality rate (P = 0.060). Re-amputation was performed in 6 of 19 patients who survived. Two years postoperatively, 41.9% of patients overall survived without re-amputation. It is important to increase the number of cases for further study to improve the well-being of CLI patients and to examine medical economics. PMID:23095148

  10. Infectious Spondylodiscitis, Epidural Phlegmon, and Psoas Abscess Complicating Diabetic Foot Infection: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nicolosi, Nicole; Pratt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Few published case reports have cited vertebral osteomyelitis as a sequela of a diabetic foot infection. The purpose of the present report is to increase awareness of a potentially severe complication of diabetic foot ulceration: vertebral osteomyelitis and associated pathologic features. We present the case of a 63-year-old male with right calcaneal osteomyelitis who developed acute onset lower back pain with concomitant fever and chills. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed L4-L5 vertebral osteomyelitis, a T9-L1 epidural abscess, and a right psoas muscle abscess secondary to hematogenous seeding from the calcaneus. The patient underwent right partial calcanectomy, spinal and right psoas abscess incision and drainage, and direct lumbar interbody fusion of L4-L5 with a right iliac crest allograft. All bone, blood, and abscess cultures were positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. After the surgery, the patient's pain resolved in his back and hip and he regained full right lower extremity function. The 1-year follow-up examination revealed that the patient had vertebral arthritis but was able to perform his activities of daily living with a walker and cane. It is important to recognize the potential complications of diabetic foot ulcerations and be aware of the identifying symptoms and treatment options for this condition to prevent significant morbidity and mortality. PMID:25128309

  11. A case of hypothyroidism and type 2 diabetes associated with type V hyperlipoproteinemia and eruptive xanthomas.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Rang; Jung, Tae Sik; Jung, Jung Hwa; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Kim, Me Ae; Park, Ki-Jong; Kim, Deok Ryong; Chang, Se-Ho; Chung, Soon Il; Hahm, Jong Ryeal

    2005-06-01

    Primary hypothyroidism and type 2 diabetes are both typically associated with the increased level of triglycerides. To date, there have been only a few case reports of type 2 diabetes patients with both type V hyperlipoproteinemia and eruptive xanthomas, but there have been no reports of hypothyroidism patients associated with eruptive xanthomas. We report here on a case of a 48-yr old female patient who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and primary hypothyroidism associated with both type V hyperlipoproteinemia and eruptive xanthomas. We found rouleaux formation of RBCs in peripheral blood smear, elevated TSH, and low free T4 level, and dyslipidemia (total cholesterol 18.1 mM/L, triglyceride 61.64 mM/L, HDL 3.0 mM/L, and LDL 2.54 mM/L). She has taken fenofibrate, levothyroxine, and oral hypoglycemic agent for 4 months. After treatment, both TSH level and lipid concentration returned to normal range, and her yellowish skin nodules have also disappeared. PMID:15953878

  12. Persistent corneal epithelial defect responding to rebamipide ophthalmic solution in a patient with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yusuke; Toshida, Hiroshi; Matsuzaki, Yusuke; Matsui, Asaki; Ohta, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rebamipide ophthalmic suspension was developed for the treatment of dry eyes and for other corneal diseases, promoting the secretion of both mucin in tear fluid and membrane-associated mucin, increasing the number of goblet cells, and restoring the barrier function of the corneal epithelium. We report a case of a persistent corneal epithelial defect in a patient with diabetes treated with topical application of rebamipide ophthalmic suspension. Case presentation A 73-year-old woman had a history of type 2 diabetes for 35 years and nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy for 23 years. She presented to our department with discharge and ophthalmalgia in the left eye. A corneal ulcer was detected, and culture of corneal scrapings was performed, with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus canis being isolated. The infection was treated with levofloxacin eye drops and ofloxacin ophthalmic ointment based on the sensitivity profile of the isolate. However, a corneal epithelial defect persisted for approximately 2 months despite continuing treatment with 0.1% hyaluronic acid ophthalmic suspension and 0.3% ofloxacin eye ointment. Her hemoglobin A1c was 7.3%. The persistent corneal epithelial defect showed improvement at 2 weeks after treatment with rebamipide unit dose 2% ophthalmic suspension, and it did not recur even when vitrectomy was subsequently performed for vitreous hemorrhage due to progression of diabetic retinopathy. Conclusion This is the first report about efficacy of rebamipide unit dose 2% ophthalmic suspension for presenting persistent corneal epithelial defect in a patient with diabetes. In the present case, the suggested mechanisms are the following: improving the corneal barrier function, stabilization of mucin on the keratoconjunctival epithelium, and improving the wettability and stability of the tear film, which resulted in the promotion of healing of the corneal epithelial defect in a short time period. PMID:27257394

  13. Use of wireless microcurrent stimulation for the treatment of diabetes-related wounds: 2 case reports.

    PubMed

    Ramadhinara, Adisaputra; Poulas, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Wireless microcurrent stimulation (WMCS) is a new method in wound healing that may have advantages compared with conventional electrical stimulation (ES) devices. Although ES has been widely known as an effective method to promote the wound-healing process in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, to the authors' knowledge, there are still no data about the ability of WMCS to match the desired effect. In this article, the authors report the results of 2 cases of diabetes-related wounds (1 acute and 1 chronic) that have been treated successfully using WMCS. Neither patient reported discomfort during treatment, and the risk of infection was minimized because there was no direct contact from the device during the treatment course. PMID:23263389

  14. Case-control study on risk factors associated with fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vannasaeng, S; Nitiyanant, W; Vichayanrat, A

    1988-12-01

    We investigated the relation between fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes and cassava consumption in a case-control study, in which 31 cases of pancreatic diabetes were compared with 45 non-diabetic control subjects who had no pancreatic calcification. Risk of diabetes was not related to cassava consumption. We also observed no increased risk of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes associated with alcohol consumption, history of gallbladder and biliary tract diseases, ascariasis, and family history of diabetes. Lower monthly income, farmer occupation, rural residence, and low BMI were significantly (p less than 0.05) related to pancreatic diabetes. Our data suggest that consumption of cassava may not be an important risk factor for pancreatic diabetes. With limited sample size, however, cassava consumption could not be excluded as one possible cause of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes. PMID:2976643

  15. Anakinra treatment in patients with gout and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Antonio; Cantarini, Luca; Rigante, Donato; Bardelli, Marco; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    We report three Caucasian patients affected by gout and type 2 diabetes, who were treated with the recombinant nonglycosylated human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra (100 mg/day subcutaneously) after an unsatisfactory or incomplete response to urate-lowering therapy, colchicine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and prednisone. The remarkable clinical improvement in joint symptoms within 24 h and in glycemic control during a 6-month period gives anakinra a potential therapeutic role in the management of gout and type 2 diabetes. When anakinra was discontinued, a gout attack occurred within 3-25 days in all three patients. The contribution of anakinra in the treatment of such syndromes is encouraging, but requires further studies to establish its long-term efficacy. PMID:24733251

  16. A Case of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Following Chikungunya Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Tolokh, Illya; Laux, Timothy; Kim, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Chikungunya is a mosquito-borne viral disease that has recently become endemic in the Caribbean, including the island of Puerto Rico. We present the case of a 50-year-old Puerto Rican man who traveled to St. Louis for business and was diagnosed with acute chikungunya virus infection with atypical features causing diabetic ketoacidosis. This case highlights the need to keep tropical infectious diseases on the differential diagnosis in appropriate individuals and the ways in which tropical infectious diseases can masquerade as part of common presentations. PMID:26033023

  17. The importance of serum lipids in exudative diabetic macular edema in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Uçgun, Nil Irem; Yildirim, Zuhal; Kiliç, Nedret; Gürsel, Emin

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate the relationship between serum lipid levels and exudative diabetic maculopathy in patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, 27 patients with exudative diabetic macular edema were included in group A and 27 patients without exudative diabetic macular edema were included in group B. All 54 patients have nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Blood cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and hemoglobin levels were measured in patients in group A and group B. The mean concentration of cholesterol in group A (224.30 +/- 49.49 mg/dL), in group B (197.78 +/- 41.49 mg/dL); triglyceride in group A (199.11 +/- 90.51 mg/dL), in group B (160.78 +/- 65.30 mg/dL); HDL in group A (43.48 +/- 10.62 mmol/L), in group B (42.37 +/- 10.92 mmol/L); LDL in group A (150.59 +/- 43.96 mg/dL), in group B (124.37 +/- 40.28 mg/dL); VLDL in group A (40.52 +/- 16.54 mg/dL), in group B (37.89 +/- 23.70 mg/dL); HbA1c in group A (9.62 +/- 2.50), in group B (7.36 +/- 1.62 g/dL); and hemoglobin in group A (13.46 +/- 1.6 g/dL), in group B (13.90 +/- 1.77 g/dL). Serum cholesterol (P = 0.38), LDL (P = 0.026), and HbA1c (P = 0.000) levels were different between the two groups. Triglyceride, HDL, VLDL, and hemoglobin levels were not different between the two groups. We must consider regulation of high blood sugar and elevated total serum cholesterol or LDL levels in patients with macular edema and high hard exudates. PMID:17460181

  18. Peripheral artery disease in patients with diabetes: Epidemiology, mechanisms, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Thiruvoipati, Thejasvi; Kielhorn, Caitlin E; Armstrong, Ehrin J

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is the atherosclerosis of lower extremity arteries and is also associated with atherothrombosis of other vascular beds, including the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems. The presence of diabetes mellitus greatly increases the risk of PAD, as well as accelerates its course, making these patients more susceptible to ischemic events and impaired functional status compared to patients without diabetes. To minimize these cardiovascular risks it is critical to understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis in diabetic patients. This, in turn, can offer insights into the therapeutic avenues available for these patients. This article provides an overview of the epidemiology of PAD in diabetic patients, followed by an analysis of the mechanisms by which altered metabolism in diabetes promotes atherosclerosis and plaque instability. Outcomes of PAD in diabetic patients are also discussed, with a focus on diabetic ulcers and critical limb ischemia. PMID:26185603

  19. Diabetic Retinopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cases of Diabetic Retinopathy (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Diabetic retinopathy affects men and ... Cases of Diabetic Retinopathy (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Projections for Diabetic Retinopathy (2010- ...

  20. Treatment of a High-Risk Diabetic Patient with Peripheral Vascular Disease and Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Allen, Latricia L; Kalmar, Garrett; Driver, Vickie R

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of calcaneal osteomyelitis that was surgically resected from a patient with diabetes and peripheral vascular disease. A 91-year-old male with history of type 2 diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, balloon angioplasty, and recent (2 months ago) stent of the superficial femoral artery presented to the emergency department with a left heel wound infection probed to bone. The patient reported having been on intravenous Zosyn for several months via an outside infectious disease provider for clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis, but noted no improvement. This report includes information regarding the clinical examination and imaging findings, which were used to assess this high-risk patient. Our patient underwent a partial calcanectomy and completed a 6-week course of intravenous antibiotics. The purpose of this case report is to illustrate limb preservation in a high-risk patient with compromised vascular supply who underwent a partial calcanectomy for treatment of calcaneal osteomyelitis. The patient underwent surgical resection of the calcaneus without complications and healed unremarkably with the ability to ambulate while wearing an ankle foot orthosis with a custom shoe. This report was authorized for publication as an educational report to contribute to generalizable knowledge and does not include any patient health information. PMID:27423990

  1. Effectiveness of a Nurse-Managed Protocol to Prevent Hypoglycemia in Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Giuseppe; Avanzini, Fausto; Iacuitti, Giuseppe; Planca, Enrico; Frigerio, Ilaria; Busi, Giovanna; Carlino, Liliana; Cortesi, Laura; Roncaglioni, Maria Carla; Riva, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hypoglycemia due to inadequate carbohydrate intake is a frequent complication of insulin treatment of diabetic in-patients. Objective. To assess the effectiveness of a nurse-managed protocol to prevent hypoglycemia during subcutaneous insulin treatment. Design. Prospective pre-post-intervention study. Methods. In 350 consecutive diabetic in-patients the incidence of hypoglycemia (blood glucose < 70 mg/dL) during subcutaneous insulin treatment was assessed before (phase A) and after (phase B) the protocol was adopted to permit (1) the patient to opt for substitutive food to integrate incomplete carbohydrate intake in the meal; (2) in case of lack of appetite or repeatedly partial intake of the planned food, prandial insulin administered at the end of the meal to be related to the actual amount of carbohydrates eaten; (3) intravenous infusion of glucose during prolonged fasting. Results. Eighty-four patients in phase A and 266 in phase B received subcutaneous insulin for median periods of, respectively, 7 (Q1–Q3 6–12) and 6 days (Q1–Q3 4–9). Hypoglycemic events declined significantly from 0.34 ± 0.33 per day in phase A to 0.19 ± 0.30 in phase B (P > 0.001). Conclusions. A nurse-managed protocol focusing on carbohydrate intake reduced the incidence of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes receiving subcutaneous insulin in hospital. PMID:25961051

  2. Rosiglitazone Use and the Risk of Bladder Cancer in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eugene; Jang, Suk-Yong; Kim, Gyuri; Lee, Yong-ho; Choe, Eun Yeong; Nam, Chung Mo; Kang, Eun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with diabetes have a higher incidence of bladder cancer; however, the association between thiazolidinedione use and bladder cancer risk has been controversial. We aimed to investigate whether pioglitazone or rosiglitazone use is associated with bladder cancer risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This nationwide nested case-control study used data set obtained from the Korean National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort 2002 to 2013. Among the 47,738 patients with incident diabetes, 85 cases of newly diagnosed bladder cancer and 850 controls (1:10 matched by age, sex, index year, and diabetes diagnosis year) were recruited. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and bladder cancer were diagnosed using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision code. More cases of bladder cancer were diagnosed in men (81.2%), and the stratified age peaked at 70 to 79 years old. Exclusive rosiglitazone use raised the incidence of bladder cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 3.07, 95% confidence interval [CI ] = 1.48–6.37). The risk of bladder cancer started to increase after less than 3 months use (OR = 3.30, 95% CI = 1.02–10.70) and peaked at 3 to 12 months of rosiglitazone use (OR = 4.48, 95% CI = 1.51–13.31). Patients were first exposed to exclusive rosiglitazone within 1 year (OR = 11.74, 95% CI = 2.46–56.12) and those who had consistently used it for 1 year (OR = 4.48 95% CI = 1.51–13.31), had higher risks of bladder cancer compared with nonthiazolidinedione users. Neither pioglitazone use nor exclusive pioglitazone use were associated with an increased incidence of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone use is associated with an increased risk of incident bladder cancer independent of age and sex in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The highest odds of bladder cancer in rosiglitazone users was seen in those with <1 year of exposure. PMID:26871835

  3. Rosiglitazone Use and the Risk of Bladder Cancer in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Jang, Suk-Yong; Kim, Gyuri; Lee, Yong-Ho; Choe, Eun Yeong; Nam, Chung Mo; Kang, Eun Seok

    2016-02-01

    Patients with diabetes have a higher incidence of bladder cancer; however, the association between thiazolidinedione use and bladder cancer risk has been controversial. We aimed to investigate whether pioglitazone or rosiglitazone use is associated with bladder cancer risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.This nationwide nested case-control study used data set obtained from the Korean National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort 2002 to 2013. Among the 47,738 patients with incident diabetes, 85 cases of newly diagnosed bladder cancer and 850 controls (1:10 matched by age, sex, index year, and diabetes diagnosis year) were recruited. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and bladder cancer were diagnosed using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision code.More cases of bladder cancer were diagnosed in men (81.2%), and the stratified age peaked at 70 to 79 years old. Exclusive rosiglitazone use raised the incidence of bladder cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 3.07, 95% confidence interval [CI ] = 1.48-6.37). The risk of bladder cancer started to increase after less than 3 months use (OR = 3.30, 95% CI = 1.02-10.70) and peaked at 3 to 12 months of rosiglitazone use (OR = 4.48, 95% CI = 1.51-13.31). Patients were first exposed to exclusive rosiglitazone within 1 year (OR = 11.74, 95% CI = 2.46-56.12) and those who had consistently used it for 1 year (OR = 4.48 95% CI = 1.51-13.31), had higher risks of bladder cancer compared with nonthiazolidinedione users. Neither pioglitazone use nor exclusive pioglitazone use were associated with an increased incidence of bladder cancer.Rosiglitazone use is associated with an increased risk of incident bladder cancer independent of age and sex in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The highest odds of bladder cancer in rosiglitazone users was seen in those with <1 year of exposure. PMID:26871835

  4. Seasonal Variations of Severe Hypoglycemia in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, and Non-diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Miyako; Noto, Hiroshi; Hachiya, Remi; Kimura, Akio; Kakei, Masafumi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Blood glucose control in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is reportedly influenced by the seasons, with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels decreasing in the summer or warm season and increasing in the winter or cold season. In addition, several studies have shown that sepsis is also associated with the seasons. Although both blood glucose control and sepsis can strongly affect the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia, few studies have examined the seasonal variation of severe hypoglycemia. The aim of the present study is to examine the association between severe hypoglycemia and the seasons in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and non-diabetes mellitus (non-DM). We retrospectively reviewed all the patients with severe hypoglycemia at a national center in Japan between April 1, 2006 and March 31, 2012. A total of 57,132 consecutive cases that had visited the emergency room by ambulance were screened, and 578 eligible cases of severe hypoglycemia were enrolled in this study. The primary outcome was to assess the seasonality of severe hypoglycemia. In the T1DM group (n = 88), severe hypoglycemia occurred significantly more often in the summer than in the winter (35.2% in summer vs 18.2% in winter, P = 0.01), and the HbA1c levels were highest in the winter and lowest in the summer (9.1% [7.6%–10.1%] in winter vs 7.7% [7.1%–8.3%] in summer, P = 0.13). In the non-DM group (n = 173), severe hypoglycemia occurred significantly more often in the winter than in the summer (30.6% in winter vs 19.6% in summer, P = 0.01), and sepsis as a complication occurred significantly more often in winter than in summer (24.5% in winter vs 5.9% in summer, P = 0.02). In the T2DM group (n = 317), the occurrence of severe hypoglycemia and the HbA1c levels did not differ significantly among the seasons. The occurrence of severe hypoglycemia might be seasonal and might fluctuate with temperature changes. Patients

  5. Obesity and type 2 diabetes: which patients are at risk?

    PubMed

    Garber, A J

    2012-05-01

    An estimated 72.5 million American adults are obese, and the growing US obesity epidemic is responsible for substantial increase in morbidity and mortality, as well as increased health care costs. Obesity results from a combination of personal and societal factors, but is often viewed as a character flaw rather than a medical condition. This leads to stigma and discrimination towards obese individuals and decreases the likelihood of effective intervention. Conditions related to obesity are increasingly common, such as metabolic syndrome, impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), all of which indicate high risk for type 2 diabetes (T2DM). This paper reviews the progression from obesity to diabetes, identifying physiological changes that occur along this path as well as opportunities for patient identification and disease prevention. Patients with prediabetes (defined as having IFG, IGT or both) and/or metabolic syndrome require interventions designed to preserve insulin sensitivity and β-cell function, both of which start to deteriorate prior to T2DM diagnosis. Lifestyle modification, including both healthy eating choices and increased physical activity, is essential for weight management and diabetes prevention. Although sustained weight loss is often considered by patients and physicians as being impossible to achieve, effective interventions do exist. Specifically, the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and programs modelled along its parameters have shown repeated successes, even with long-term maintenance. Recent setbacks in the development of medications for weight loss further stress the importance of lifestyle management. By viewing obesity as a metabolic disorder rather than a personal weakness, we can work with patients to address this increasingly prevalent condition and improve long-term health outcomes. PMID:22074144

  6. Elderly Diabetic Patient with Surgical Site Mucormycosis Extending to Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Atul K; Vora, Himanshu J; Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Bhavin

    2010-01-01

    Mucormycosis is rare in clinical practice. Most infections are acquired by inhalation; other portals of entry are traumatic implantation and ingestion in immunocompromised host. Mucormycosis is life threatening infection in immunocompromised host with variable moratlity ranging from 15-81% depending upon site of infection. General treatment principles include early diagnosis, correction of underlying immunosuppression and metabolic disturbances, adequate surgical debridement along with amphotericin therapy. We describe surgical site mucormycosis extended to involve large bowel in elderly diabetic patient. PMID:20606975

  7. Elderly diabetic patient with surgical site mucormycosis extending to bowel.

    PubMed

    Patel, Atul K; Vora, Himanshu J; Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Bhavin

    2010-05-01

    Mucormycosis is rare in clinical practice. Most infections are acquired by inhalation; other portals of entry are traumatic implantation and ingestion in immunocompromised host. Mucormycosis is life threatening infection in immunocompromised host with variable moratlity ranging from 15-81% depending upon site of infection. General treatment principles include early diagnosis, correction of underlying immunosuppression and metabolic disturbances, adequate surgical debridement along with amphotericin therapy. We describe surgical site mucormycosis extended to involve large bowel in elderly diabetic patient. PMID:20606975

  8. Effect of polymorphisms of the MTHFR and APOE genes on susceptibility to diabetes and severity of diabetic retinopathy in Brazilian patients.

    PubMed

    Errera, F I V; Silva, M E R; Yeh, E; Maranduba, C M C; Folco, B; Takahashi, W; Pereira, A C; Krieger, J E; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2006-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a highly prevalent complex genetic disorder. There has been a worldwide effort in the identification of susceptibility genes for DM and its complications, and the 5-10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and apolipoprotein-E (APOE) genes have been considered good candidate susceptibility genes to this condition. The objectives of the present study were to determine if the 677T MTHFR and epsilon2/epsilon3/epsilon4 APOE alleles are risk factors for DM and for severity of diabetic retinopathy (DR). A total of 248 individuals were studied: 107 healthy individuals and 141 diabetic patients (46 with type 1 diabetes and 95 with type 2 diabetes), who also had DR (81 with non-proliferative DR and 60 with proliferative DR). The polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR followed by digestion with restriction enzyme or the single-nucleotide primer extension method. No evidence of association between the 677TT genotype of MTHFR gene and DM [cases: TT = 10/95 (10.6%); controls: TT = 14/107 (13%)] or with severity of DR was observed [cases: TT = 5/60 (8.5%); controls: TT = 9/81 (11.1%); P > 0.05]. We also did not find evidence of an association between APOE alleles and proliferative DR (epsilon2, epsilon3 and epsilon4 in cases: 9, 76, and 15%, and in controls: 5, 88, and 12%, respectively) but the carriers of epsilon2 allele were more frequent among patients with type 2 DM and DR than in controls [cases: 15/95 (15.8%); controls: 7/107 (6.5%); P < 0.05]. Therefore, our results suggest that the epsilon2 allele/APOE might be a risk factor for diabetes in the Brazilian population. PMID:16862278

  9. MicroRNA Dysregulation in Diabetic Ischemic Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Simona; Fasanaro, Pasquale; Castelvecchio, Serenella; D’Alessandra, Yuri; Arcelli, Diego; Di Donato, Marisa; Malavazos, Alexis; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Menicanti, Lorenzo; Martelli, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Increased morbidity and mortality associated with ischemic heart failure (HF) in type 2 diabetic patients requires a deeper understanding of the underpinning pathogenetic mechanisms. Given the implication of microRNAs (miRNAs) in HF, we investigated their regulation and potential role. miRNA expression profiles were measured in left ventricle biopsies from 10 diabetic HF (D-HF) and 19 nondiabetic HF (ND-HF) patients affected by non–end stage dilated ischemic cardiomyopathy. The HF groups were compared with each other and with 16 matched nondiabetic, non-HF control subjects. A total of 17 miRNAs were modulated in D-HF and/or ND-HF patients when compared with control subjects. miR-216a, strongly increased in both D-HF and ND-HF patients, negatively correlated with left ventricular ejection fraction. Six miRNAs were differently expressed when comparing D-HF and ND-HF patients: miR-34b, miR-34c, miR-199b, miR-210, miR-650, and miR-223. Bioinformatic analysis of their modulated targets showed the enrichment of cardiac dysfunctions and HF categories. Moreover, the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway was activated in the noninfarcted, vital myocardium of D-HF compared with ND-HF patients, indicating a dysregulation of the hypoxia response mechanisms. Accordingly, miR-199a, miR-199b, and miR-210 were modulated by hypoxia and high glucose in cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells cultured in vitro. In conclusion, these findings show a dysregulation of miRNAs in HF, shedding light on the specific disease mechanisms differentiating diabetic patients. PMID:22427379

  10. The case for low carbohydrate diets in diabetes management

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Surender K; McFarlane, Samy I

    2005-01-01

    A low fat, high carbohydrate diet in combination with regular exercise is the traditional recommendation for treating diabetes. Compliance with these lifestyle modifications is less than satisfactory, however, and a high carbohydrate diet raises postprandial plasma glucose and insulin secretion, thereby increasing risk of CVD, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and diabetes. Moreover, the current epidemic of diabetes and obesity has been, over the past three decades, accompanied by a significant decrease in fat consumption and an increase in carbohydrate consumption. This apparent failure of the traditional diet, from a public health point of view, indicates that alternative dietary approaches are needed. Because carbohydrate is the major secretagogue of insulin, some form of carbohydrate restriction is a prima facie candidate for dietary control of diabetes. Evidence from various randomized controlled trials in recent years has convinced us that such diets are safe and effective, at least in short-term. These data show low carbohydrate diets to be comparable or better than traditional low fat high carbohydrate diets for weight reduction, improvement in the dyslipidemia of diabetes and metabolic syndrome as well as control of blood pressure, postprandial glycemia and insulin secretion. Furthermore, the ability of low carbohydrate diets to reduce triglycerides and to increase HDL is of particular importance. Resistance to such strategies has been due, in part, to equating it with the popular Atkins diet. However, there are many variations and room for individual physician planning. Some form of low carbohydrate diet, in combination with exercise, is a viable option for patients with diabetes. However, the extreme reduction of carbohydrate of popular diets (<30 g/day) cannot be recommended for a diabetic population at this time without further study. On the other hand, the dire objections continually raised in the literature appear to have very little scientific

  11. Two Cases of Allergy to Insulin in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gi Jun; Kim, Shin Bum; Jo, Seong Il; Shin, Jin Kyeong; Kwon, Hee Sun; Jeong, Heekyung; Son, Jang Won; Lee, Seong Su; Kim, Sung Rae; Kim, Byung Kee

    2015-01-01

    Allergic reaction to insulin is uncommon since the introduction of human recombinant insulin preparations and is more rare in pregnant than non-pregnant females due to altered immune reaction during pregnancy. Herein, we report two cases of allergic reaction to insulin in gestational diabetes that were successfully managed. One case was a 33-year-old female using isophane-neutral protamine Hagedorn human insulin and insulin lispro. She experienced dyspnea, cough, urticaria and itching sensation at the sites of insulin injection immediately after insulin administration. We discontinued insulin therapy and started oral hypoglycemic agents with metformin and glibenclamide. The other case was a 32-year-old female using insulin lispro and insulin detemer. She experienced pruritus and burning sensation and multiple nodules at the sites of insulin injection. We changed the insulin from insulin lispro to insulin aspart. Assessments including immunoglobulin E (IgE), IgG, eosinophil, insulin antibody level and skin biopsy were performed. In the two cases, the symptoms were resolved after changing the insulin to oral agents or other insulin preparations. We report two cases of allergic reaction to human insulin in gestational diabetes due to its rarity. PMID:26435137

  12. Two Cases of Allergy to Insulin in Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gi Jun; Kim, Shin Bum; Jo, Seong Il; Shin, Jin Kyeong; Kwon, Hee Sun; Jeong, Heekyung; Son, Jang Won; Lee, Seong Su; Kim, Sung Rae; Kim, Byung Kee; Yoo, Soon Jib

    2015-09-01

    Allergic reaction to insulin is uncommon since the introduction of human recombinant insulin preparations and is more rare in pregnant than non-pregnant females due to altered immune reaction during pregnancy. Herein, we report two cases of allergic reaction to insulin in gestational diabetes that were successfully managed. One case was a 33-year-old female using isophane-neutral protamine Hagedorn human insulin and insulin lispro. She experienced dyspnea, cough, urticaria and itching sensation at the sites of insulin injection immediately after insulin administration. We discontinued insulin therapy and started oral hypoglycemic agents with metformin and glibenclamide. The other case was a 32-year-old female using insulin lispro and insulin detemer. She experienced pruritus and burning sensation and multiple nodules at the sites of insulin injection. We changed the insulin from insulin lispro to insulin aspart. Assessments including immunoglobulin E (IgE), IgG, eosinophil, insulin antibody level and skin biopsy were performed. In the two cases, the symptoms were resolved after changing the insulin to oral agents or other insulin preparations. We report two cases of allergic reaction to human insulin in gestational diabetes due to its rarity. PMID:26435137

  13. Salivary gland dysfunction markers in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Aitken-Saavedra, Juan; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Maturana-Ramírez, Andrea; Escobar-Álvarez, Alejandro; Cortes-Coloma, Andrea; Reyes-Rojas, Montserrat; Viera -Sapiain, Valentina; Villablanca-Martínez, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease of the carbohydrate metabolism that, when not rigorously controlled, compromises systemic and organ integrity, thereby causing renal diseases, blindness, neuropathy, arteriosclerosis, infections, and glandular dysfunction, including the salivary glands. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the qualitative and quantitative parameters of salivary alteration, which are indicators of salivary gland dysfunction, and the level of metabolic control of type 2 diabetes patients. Material and Methods A convenience sample of 74 voluntary patients with type 2 DM was selected, each of whom donated a sample of unstimulated saliva. Salivary parameters such as salivary flow rate, protein concentration, pH, and xerostomia were studied. Results There is a positive relationship between the level of metabolic control measured with HbA1 and the protein concentration in saliva (Spearman rho = 0.329 and p = 0.004). The same assay showed an inverse correlation between HbA1 and pH (Spearman rho = -0.225 and p = 0.05). Conclusions The protein concentration in saliva and, to a lesser extent, the pH may be useful as glandular dysfunction indicators in DM2 patients. Key words:Saliva, type 2 diabetes mellitus, pH, protein concentration, xerostomia. PMID:26535097

  14. Pilot study using mobile health to coordinate the diabetic patient, diabetologist, and ophthalmologist.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Irena; Drexler, Andrew; Stanton, Annette L; Kageyama, Jennie; Ngo, Elaine; Straatsma, Bradley R

    2014-07-01

    In the United States, more than 25 million adults have diabetes, 40% of diabetics have diabetic retinopathy, and diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people 20 to 74 years of age. Clinical trials have shown that strict control of blood glucose level and other risk factors delays diabetic retinopathy onset, progression, and vision loss. Patients with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus, access to an Apple iPhone or iPad, and no psychological or medical condition that would interfere with the study participated in a nonrandomized clinical trial using SightBook™, a free mobile app that enables self-measurement of visual function and creates a password-protected web account for each patient. Sixty patients enrolled in the clinical trial over a 6 month period. Twenty-six participants were men and 34 were women, with ages from 23 to 72 years (mean 45 ± 15) and diabetes duration of 1.5 to 50 years (mean 15.5 ± 11.5). Thirty-nine (65%) patients reported Type 1 diabetes and 21 (35%) patients reported Type 2 diabetes. Every patient established a personal web account on SightBook and invited participation of treating physicians; 51 (85%) patients completed the validated self-reported outcome assessments. Diabetologist examinations of 49 (82%) patients demonstrated systolic hypertension (≥140 mgHg) in 20% and hemoglobin A1c ≥ 7.0% in 56%. Ophthalmology examinations of 45 patients showed visual acuity in the worse-seeing eye of < 20/40 in 18% and diabetic retinopathy in 42% of patients. This clinical trial used a mobile health app to incorporate diabetic patient self-measurement of vision and coordinate the diabetic patient, diabetologist, and ophthalmologist for control of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy risk factors. PMID:24876413

  15. Target Blood Pressure in Patients with Diabetes: Asian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Park, Sungha; Kario, Kazuomi; Park, Chang Gyu; Huang, Qi Fang; Cheng, Hao Min; Hoshide, Satoshi; Wang, Ji Guang; Chen, Chen Huan

    2016-11-01

    Recently, the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) blood pressure (BP) trial enrolled 4733 participants with type 2 diabetes and randomized them to a target systolic blood pressure (SBP) of less than 120 mm Hg or 140 mm Hg. Despite the significant difference in the achieved SBP, there was no significant difference in the incidence of primary outcomes. Based on this evidence, the target SBP for diabetics has been revised in the majority of major guidelines. However, there is a steeper association between SBP and stroke in Asians than other ethnicities, with stroke being the leading cause of cardiovascular mortality. This suggests that target BP in the Asian region should be tailored towards prevention of stroke. In the ACCORD study, the intensive BP treatment was associated with significant reductions in both total stroke and non-fatal stroke. The results from the ACCORD study are supported by a subgroup analysis from the ONgoing Telmisartan Alone and in combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) study, which showed that, in diabetic patients, the risk of stroke continues to decrease to a SBP value of 115 mm Hg with no evidence of J curve. As diabetes is highly associated with underlying coronary artery disease, there is a justified concern for adverse effects resulting from too much lowering of BP. In a post hoc analysis of 6400 diabetic subjects enrolled in the International Verapamil SR-Trandolapril (INVEST) study, subjects with SBP of less than 110 mm Hg were associated with a significant increase in all-cause mortality. In the ONTARGET study, at any levels of achieved SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) below 67 mm Hg was associated with increased risk for cardiovascular outcomes. As such, a prudent approach would be to target a SBP of 130-140 mm Hg and DBP of above 60 mm Hg in diabetics with coronary artery disease. In conclusion, hypertension, in association with diabetes, has been found to be significantly correlated

  16. Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Poncelas, Antonio; Mundet-Tudurí, Xavier; Miravet-Jiménez, Sonia; Casellas, Aina; Barrot-De la Puente, Joan F.; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Coll-de Tuero, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore the relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in a representative population of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients in Catalonia (Spain). Methods This was a population-based, cross-sectional study. A total of 28,344 patients diagnosed with DM2 who had recorded ophthalmologic and renal functional examinations were evaluated. Data were obtained from a primary healthcare electronic database of medical records. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration ratio (eGFR) of <60 ml/min/1.73m2 and/or urine albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) ≥30 mg/g. DR was categorized as non-vision threatening diabetic retinopathy and vision threatening diabetic retinopathy. Results CKD was associated with a higher rate of DR [OR], 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5 (1.4–1.7). When we analyzed the association between different levels of UACR and DR prevalence observed that DR prevalence rose with the increase of UACR levels, and this association was significant from UACR values ≥10 mg/g, and increased considerably with UACR values ≥300mg/g (Odds ratio [OR], 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0 (1.6–2.5). This association was lower in patients with eGFR levels 44 to 30 mL/min/1.73m2 [OR], 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 (1.1–1.6). Conclusions These results show that CKD, high UACR and/or low eGFR, appear to be associated with DR in this DM2 population. PMID:26886129

  17. Intralesional epidermal growth factor for diabetic foot wounds: the first cases in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ertugrul, Bulent M.; Buke, Cagri; Ersoy, Ozlem Saylak; Ay, Bengisu; Demirez, Dilek Senen; Savk, Oner

    2015-01-01

    Background Intralesional recombinant epidermal growth factor (EGF) was produced in the Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB), Cuba, in 1988 and licensed in 2006. Because it may accelerate wound healing, it is a potential new treatment option in patients with a diabetic foot wound (whether infected or not) as an adjunct to standard treatment (i.e. debridement, antibiotics). We conducted the initial evaluation of EGF for diabetic foot wounds in Turkey. Methods We enrolled 17 patients who were hospitalized in various medical centers for a foot ulcer and/or infection and for whom below the knee amputation was suggested to all except one. All patients received 75 μg intralesional EGF three times per week on alternate days. Results The appearance of new granulation tissue on the wound site (≥75%) was observed in 13 patients (76%), and complete wound closure was observed in 3 patients (18%), yielding a ‘complete recovery’ rate of 94%. The most common side effects were tremor (n=10, 59%) and nausea (n=6, 35%). In only one case,a serious side effect requiring cessation of EGF treatment was noted. That patient experienced severe hypotension at the 16th application session, and treatment was discontinued. At baseline, a total of 21 causative bacteria were isolated from 15 patients, whereascultures were sterile in two patients. The most frequently isolated species was Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusion Thus, this preliminary study suggests that EGF seems to be a potential adjunctive treatment option in patients with limb-threatening diabetic foot wounds. PMID:26268583

  18. Attainment of Canadian Diabetes Association recommended targets in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    McCrate, Farah; Godwin, Marshall; Murphy, Laura

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the degree to which targets for diabetes (blood pressure [BP], glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c], and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C]) are achieved in family practices and how these results compare with family physicians’ perceptions of how well targets are being achieved. DESIGN Chart audit and physician survey. SETTING Newfoundland and Labrador. PARTICIPANTS Patients with type 2 diabetes and their family physicians. INTERVENTIONS The charts of 20 patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly chosen from each of 8 family physician practices in St John’s, Nfld, and data were abstracted. All family physicians in the province were surveyed using a modified Dillman method. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The most recent HbA1c, LDL-C, and BP measurements listed in each audited chart; surveyed family physicians’ knowledge of the recommended targets for HbA1c, LDL-C, and BP and their estimates of what percentage of their patients were at those recommended targets. RESULTS The chart audit revealed that 20.6% of patients were at the recommended target for BP, 48.1% were at the recommended target for HbA1c, and 17.5% were at the recommended target for LDL-C. When targets were examined collectively, only 2.5% of patients were achieving targets in all 3 areas. The survey found that most family physicians were aware of the recommended targets for BP, LDL-C, and HbA1c. However, their estimates of the percentages of patients in their practices achieving these targets appeared high (59.3% for BP, 58.2% for HbA1c, and 48.4% for LDL-C) compared with the results of the chart audit. CONCLUSION The findings of the chart audit are consistent with other published reports, which have illustrated that a large majority of patients with diabetes fall short of reaching recommended targets for BP, blood glucose, and lipid levels. Although family physicians are knowledgeable about recommended targets, there is a gap between knowledge and clinical outcomes. The reasons for

  19. Diabetes screening: a pending issue in hypertense/obese patients.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Armina; Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco; Ramírez-Prado, Dolores; Navarro-Cremades, Felipe; Cortés, Ernesto; Rizo-Baeza, María Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The literature about possible cardiovascular consequences of diagnostic inertia in diabetes is scarce. We examined the influence of undetected high fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels on the cardiovascular risk and poor control of cardiovascular risk factors in hypertensive or obese patients, with no previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (i.e., diagnostic inertia). A cross-sectional study during a preventive program in a Spanish region was performed in 2003-2004. The participants were aged ≥40 years and did not have diabetes but were hypertensive (n = 5, 347) or obese (n = 7, 833). The outcomes were high cardiovascular risk (SCORE ≥5%), poor control of the blood pressure (≥140/90 mmHg) and class II obesity. The relationship was examined between FBG and the main parameters, calculating the adjusted odd ratios with multivariate models. Higher values of FBG were associated with all the outcomes. A more proactive attitude towards the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in the hypertensive and obese population should be adopted. PMID:25922799

  20. Diabetes screening: a pending issue in hypertense/obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Sepehri, Armina; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco; Ramírez-Prado, Dolores; Navarro-Cremades, Felipe; Cortés, Ernesto; Rizo-Baeza, María Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The literature about possible cardiovascular consequences of diagnostic inertia in diabetes is scarce. We examined the influence of undetected high fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels on the cardiovascular risk and poor control of cardiovascular risk factors in hypertensive or obese patients, with no previous diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (i.e., diagnostic inertia). A cross-sectional study during a preventive program in a Spanish region was performed in 2003–2004. The participants were aged ≥40 years and did not have diabetes but were hypertensive (n = 5, 347) or obese (n = 7, 833). The outcomes were high cardiovascular risk (SCORE ≥5%), poor control of the blood pressure (≥140/90 mmHg) and class II obesity. The relationship was examined between FBG and the main parameters, calculating the adjusted odd ratios with multivariate models. Higher values of FBG were associated with all the outcomes. A more proactive attitude towards the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in the hypertensive and obese population should be adopted. PMID:25922799

  1. Patient Cases 2. A Patient with Apparent Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    True treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH) is defined by specific criteria and a failure to response to initial therapy options does not necessarily mean that a patient has TRH. In this case, a 44-year-old male was discharged on a fixed combination of valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) 160/125 mg/day after presenting to the emergency room with paraesthesia of the upper left limb and recording a blood pressure (BP) of 190/110 mmHg. The patient had a number of other cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, and was determined to be at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and of CV death. Carvedilol and atorvastatin were added, but 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) showed persistent hypertension. After specialist assessment, the patient's antihypertensive regimen was switched to a fixed-dose combination of olmesartan/HCTZ in the morning and a fixed-dose combination of olmesartan/amlodipine in the evening. Repeat ABPM 6 weeks later showed better BP control then previous ABPM. PMID:26072255

  2. Predictors of cardiac morbidity in diabetic, new-onset diabetic and non-diabetic high-risk hypertensive patients: The Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-term Use Evaluation (VALUE) trial.

    PubMed

    Aksnes, Tonje A; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Rostrup, Morten; Holzhauer, Björn; Hua, Tsushung A; Julius, Stevo

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic and new-onset diabetic patients with hypertension have higher cardiac morbidity than patients without diabetes. We aimed to investigate whether baseline predictors of cardiac morbidity, the major constituent of the primary endpoint in the Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-term Use Evaluation (VALUE) trial, were different in patients with diabetes and new-onset diabetes compared to patients without diabetes. In total, 15,245 high-risk hypertensive patients in the VALUE trial were followed for an average of 4.2 years. At baseline, 5250 patients were diabetic by the 1999 World Health Organization criteria, 1298 patients developed new-onset diabetes and 8697 patients stayed non-diabetic during follow-up. Cardiac morbidity was defined as a composite of myocardial infarction and heart failure requiring hospitalization, and baseline predictors were identified by univariate and multivariate stepwise Cox regression analyses. History of coronary heart disease (CHD) and age were the most important predictors of cardiac morbidity in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients. History of CHD, history of stroke and age were the only significant predictors of cardiac morbidity in patients with new-onset diabetes. Predictors of cardiac morbidity, in particular history of CHD and age, were essentially the same in high-risk hypertensive patients with diabetes, new-onset diabetes and without diabetes who participated in the VALUE trial. PMID:26808585

  3. Prevention of macrovascular disease in patients with diabetes mellitus: opportunities for intervention.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Theodore

    2007-09-01

    Individuals with diabetes mellitus are at considerably higher risk for coronary artery disease compared with individuals without diabetes. In the United States, diabetes is the most prevalent factor putting patients at risk for coronary events. Intensive control of blood glucose has been demonstrated to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 1 diabetes, but this has yet to be proved in patients with type 2 diabetes. Aggressive management of established cardiovascular risk factors using blood pressure-lowering and lipid-lowering therapies (particularly the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, or statins) has been conclusively shown to reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients with type 2 diabetes remain at residual excess risk compared with individuals without diabetes, such that there is still a need for novel therapeutic approaches. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) may have beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease in diabetes beyond improving blood glucose control. Although the evidence regarding rosiglitazone is yet to mature, completed and ongoing clinical trials with pioglitazone suggest that this TZD may be a novel treatment for managing cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetes. Addition of pioglitazone to existing therapy in high-risk patients with diabetes and atherosclerotic disease improves cardiovascular outcomes, and may be particularly beneficial for patients with previous myocardial infarction or stroke. PMID:17826043

  4. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jun Ouk; Lee, Tae Hee; Park, Ja Young; Choi, Seong Ho; Park, Hee Seung; Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Seung Heon; Seo, Eun Hee; Kim, Young Hwan; Kang, Young Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal symptoms are common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Korea appears to be increasing. Some studies have shown that T2DM is a risk factor for symptomatic GERD. However, this possibility is still debated, and the pathogenesis of GERD in T2DM is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and risk factors (including autonomic neuropathy) of GERD in patients with T2DM. Methods This cross-sectional case-control study enrolled T2DM patients (n=258) and healthy controls (n=184). All participants underwent physical examinations and laboratory tests. We evaluated medical records and long-term diabetes complications, including peripheral and autonomic neuropathy in patients with T2DM. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in all patients. The Los Angeles (LA) classification was used to grade GERD. GERD was defined as LA grade A (or higher) or minimal change with GERD symptoms. GERD symptoms were examined using a frequency scale. Data were expressed as mean±standard error. Independent t-tests or chi-square tests were used to make comparisons between groups. Results The prevalence of GERD (32.6% vs. 35.9%, P=0.266) and GERD symptoms (58.8% vs. 59.2%, P=0.503) was not significantly different between T2DM patients and controls. We found no significant differences between T2DM patients with GERD and T2DM patients without GERD with respect to diabetic complications, including autonomic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, duration of DM, and glucose control. Conclusion The prevalence of GERD in patients with T2DM showed no difference from that of controls. GERD was also not associated with peripheral and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy, age, or duration of DM in patients with T2DM. PMID:27352149

  5. Hemichorea with unilateral MRI striatal hyperintensity in a Saudi patient with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Al-Quliti, Khalid W; Assaedi, Ekhlas S

    2016-01-01

    Hemichorea is a disorder characterized by abnormal, continuous, nonrhythmic, jerky, and distal movement involving one side of the body. It may result from cerebrovascular insult to basal ganglia, or from other causes including neoplasm, infection, and non-ketotic hyperglycemia. We report the clinical, laboratory, and neuroimaging data with treatment response of a Saudi woman who has diabetes with left side hemichorea, involving the face, and upper and lower extremities, with unilateral right striatal hyperintense signal changes in T1 weighted MRI, and a hyperglycemic state of longstanding uncontrolled diabetes. Literature review suggested a syndrome with a triad of symptoms: non-ketotic hyperglycemia, hemichorea, and T1 MRI striatal hyperintensities. As the number of internationally reported cases is still modest, reporting more patients will highlight aspects pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. We present a patient who had a sustained therapeutic result from haloperidol and clonazepam. PMID:26818169

  6. Association Between Specific Depression Symptoms and Glycemic Control Among Patients With Comorbid Type 2 Diabetes and Provisional Depression

    PubMed Central

    Czech, Stephanie J.; Orsillo, Susan M.; Pirraglia, Paul A.; English, Thomas M.; Connell, Alexa J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether specific depression symptoms are associated with glycemic control independent of potential demographic and clinical covariates among primary care patients with comorbid type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression. Method: We examined a convenience sample of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression (N = 82) at 2 family health centers. Cases were identified using a population-based registry of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (ICD-9 codes 250.00 for controlled type 2 diabetes and 250.02 for uncontrolled type 2 diabetes). Data from patients with a primary care provider appointment from the beginning of April 2011 through the end of June 2012 and with at least one 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) depression screener and a glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) laboratory test between 2 weeks before and 10 weeks after PHQ-9 screening were eligible for inclusion. We defined provisional threshold or subthreshold depression using PHQ-9 scoring criteria, which were designed to yield provisional diagnostic information about major depressive disorder based on DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. Results: Patients reporting higher severity of sleep problems on the PHQ-9 had significantly higher HbA1c levels (mean = 8.48, SD = 2.17) compared to patients reporting lower severity or absence of this symptom (mean = 7.19, SD = 1.34, t48.88 = −3.13, P = .003). Problems with sleep contributed unique variance on glycemic control (β = 0.27, P = .02) when controlling for potential clinical and demographic covariates, with those reporting more sleep difficulties having higher HbA1c levels. Conclusions: For patients with type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression, it may be prudent to aggressively address sleep problems as a potential mechanism toward improving diabetes control. PMID:26835160

  7. Cental Macular Thickness in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus without Clinical Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Demir, Mehmet; Dirim, Burcu; Acar, Zeynep; Yılmaz, Murat; Sendul, Yekta

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare central macular thickness (CMT) of diabetic patients with type 2 diabetes without clinical retinopathy and healthy subjects. Materials and Methods. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements were performed in 124 eyes of 62 subjects with diabetes mellitus without clinical retinopathy (study group: 39 females, 23 males; mean age: 55.06 ± 9.77 years) and in 120 eyes of 60 healthy subjects (control group: 35 females, 25 males; mean age: 55.78 ± 10.34 years). Blood biochemistry parameters were analyzed in all cases. The data for central macular thickness (at 1 mm), the levels of fasting plasma glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were compared in both groups. Results. The mean central macular thickness was 232.12 ± 24.41 µm in the study group and 227.19 ± 29.94 µm in the control group. The mean HbA1c level was 8.92 ± 2.58% in the study group and 5.07 ± 0.70% in the control group (P = 0.001). No statistically significant relationship was found between CMT, HbA1c, and fasting plasma glucose level in either group (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Central macular thickness was not significantly thicker in patients with type 2 diabetes without clinical retinopathy than in healthy subjects. PMID:23691279

  8. Improper sharp disposal practices among diabetes patients in home care settings: Need for concern?

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Anindo; Sahoo, Jayaprakash; Roy, Gautam; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, outbreaks of blood-borne infections have been reported from assisted living facilities, which were traced back to improper blood glucose monitoring practices. Needle-stick injuries have been implicated in many such cases. This directly raises concerns over sharp disposal practices of diabetic patients self-managing their condition in home care settings. With India being home to a huge diabetic population, this issue, if neglected, can cause substantial damage to the health of the population and a marked economic loss. This article discusses the sharp disposal practices prevalent among diabetes patients, the importance of proper sharp disposal, barriers to safe disposal of sharps, and the options available for doing the same. For adopting an environmentally safe wholesome approach, disposal of plastics generated as a result of diabetes self-care at home is important as well. The article also looks at the possible long-term solutions to these issues that are sustainable in an Indian context. PMID:25932402

  9. Comparison of Methods for Renal Risk Prediction in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes (ZODIAC-36)

    PubMed Central

    Riphagen, Ineke J.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Drion, Iefke; Alkhalaf, Alaa; van Diepen, Merel; Cao, Qi; Groenier, Klaas H.; Landman, Gijs W. D.; Navis, Gerjan; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetes are at high risk of death prior to reaching end-stage renal disease, but most models predicting the risk of kidney disease do not take this competing risk into account. We aimed to compare the performance of Cox regression and competing risk models for prediction of early- and late-stage renal complications in type 2 diabetes. Methods Patients with type 2 diabetes participating in the observational ZODIAC study were included. Prediction models for (micro)albuminuria and 50% increase in serum creatinine (SCr) were developed using Cox regression and competing risk analyses. Model performance was assessed by discrimination and calibration. Results During a total follow-up period of 10 years, 183 out of 640 patients (28.6%) with normoalbuminuria developed (micro)albuminuria, and 22 patients (3.4%) died without developing (micro)albuminuria (i.e. experienced the competing event). Seventy-nine out of 1,143 patients (6.9%) reached the renal end point of 50% increase in SCr, while 219 (19.2%) died without developing the renal end point. Performance of the Cox and competing risk models predicting (micro)albuminuria was similar and differences in predicted risks were small. However, the Cox model increasingly overestimated the risk of increase in SCr in presence of a substantial number of competing events, while the performance of the competing risk model was quite good. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that, in case of substantial numbers of competing events, it is important to account for the competing risk of death in renal risk prediction in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25775414

  10. [Effectiveness of physical exercise programs in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Cano-De La Cuerda, Roberto; Aguila-Maturana, Ana María; Miangolarra-Page, Juan Carlos

    2009-02-14

    Clinical studies with methodological rigor have shown that the strategies for lifestyle modification and drug therapies can prevent or at least delay the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in individuals at high risk. Combination of regular physical exercise and diet is more effective than each one separately to achieve modest weight loss and improve metabolic control in patients with DM. Our objective is to describe the role of exercise in patients with DM and the exercise programs in relation to the previous considerations, taking into account the intensity of the exercise, components of the program, duration, frequency and precautions. PMID:19211086

  11. Adjuvant treatment modalities to control macular edema in diabetic patients undergoing cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Ebru Nevin; Yıldırım, Cem

    2013-10-01

    Cataract surgical outcomes in diabetic patients has been subject to changes with the advances in the surgical techniques. Recent studies suggest that cataract surgery does not cause the progression of diabetic retinopathy and intravitreal bevacizumab and/or triamcinolone injections combined with cataract surgery may contribute in short term improvement of macular edema in diabetic patients. This article reviews the progression of diabetic retinopathy after cataract surgery with phacoemulsification and the use of adjuvant intravitreal treatments combined with phacoemusification in diabetic patients undergoing cataract surgery. PMID:23248073

  12. Relationship between Helicobacter pylori Infections in Diabetic Patients and Inflammations, Metabolic Syndrome, and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kayar, Yusuf; Pamukçu, Özgül; Eroğlu, Hatice; Kalkan Erol, Kübra; Ilhan, Aysegul; Kocaman, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection and diabetes mellitus are two independent common diseases. It is showed that the worsening glycemic and metabolic control increases the rates of Helicobacter pylori infections and Helicobacter pylori is shown as one of the common problems in diabetic patients with complaints of gastrointestinal diseases. In this study, we aimed to investigate the prevalence and eradication rates of Helicobacter pylori in diabetic patients and the relationship of Helicobacter pylori with the risk factors and diabetic complications. In our study, in which we have included 133 patients, we have shown a significant relationship between Helicobacter pylori infections and metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, inflammations, and diabetic complications. PMID:26464868

  13. Glucometric assessment of gingival crevicular blood in diabetic and non-diabetic patients: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Puja; Govila, Vivek; Sharma, Mona; Saini, Ashish; Pandey, Suraj

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is one of the most incessant metabolic afflictions with high prevalence rate in Indians. Diagnosis of diabetics in the initial stage helps to prevent its long term complications that are responsible for high morbidity and mortality. The aim of the present study was to assess whether glucometric analysis using Gingival Crevicular Blood (GCB) can be used for screening of diabetic patients in dental chair. Materials and methods Present study was a double blinded randomized controlled trial. A total of 50 patients, 25 diabetic and 25 non-diabetic with chronic periodontitis were enrolled in the study. Blood oozing from the gingival crevices after periodontal pocket probing of anterior teeth and Finger Prick Blood (FPB) was taken and analysed by glucometer. Result Mean ± S.D was 195.84 ± 27.19 and 138.78 ± 29.95 for GCB and FPB respectively in diabetic group. For non-diabetic group Mean ± S.D was 103.84 ± 12.56 and 84.36 ± 10.36 respectively for GCB and FPB. A Karl Pearson correlation coefficient value of r = +0.735 for diabetic and r = +0.802 for non-diabetic group comparing GCB and FPB. Conclusion GCB cannot be used for screening blood glucose during periodontal examination. PMID:25853040

  14. Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Kelly E.; Tang, Tania; Golub, Jonathan E.; Dorman, Susan E.; Cronin, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an emerging chronic health condition of developed and developing countries. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients with active, culture-confirmed tuberculosis (TB) in Maryland to determine the impact of DM on TB treatment outcomes. Of 297 TB patients, 42 (14%) had DM. Patients with diabetes had 2.0 times higher odds of death than patients without diabetes (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74–5.2, P = 0.18). Adjusting for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), age, weight, and foreign birth, the odds of death were 6.5 times higher in patients with diabetes than patients without diabetes (95% CI 1.1–38.0, P = 0.039). In pulmonary TB patients, time to sputum culture conversion was longer in patients with diabetes than patients without diabetes (median 49 versus 39 days, P = 0.09). Two-month culture conversion proportions were similar (70% and 69%). Treatment failure occurred in 4.1% of patients without diabetes and 6.7% of patients with diabetes (P = 0.51). In conclusion, DM was a risk factor for death in Maryland TB patients. There was a trend toward increased time to culture conversion; two-month culture conversion proportions, however, were similar. PMID:19346391

  15. A study on the hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of an ayurvedic drug Rajanyamalakadi in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Faizal, P; Suresh, S; Satheesh Kumar, R; Augusti, K T

    2009-01-01

    A study was undertaken for evaluating the hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of an ayurvedic medicine "Rajanyamalakadi" containing Curcuma longa, Emblica officinalis and Salacia oblonga in type II diabetic patients over a period of 3 months. Ethical committee consent for the study was given by the Director, Indian Systems of Medicine, Kerala. A total of 43 patients with established diabetes mellitus as adjudged from clinical features and FBS values, appeared for the camp (Age group 35-75 yrs). An informed consent for the study was obtained from each patient. The clinical proforma was given to each patient to collect data such as height, weight, diet pattern, previous history of illness etc. The ongoing antidiabetic medications were stopped under medical supervision and the patients were provided with 'Rajanyamalakadi' tablets (dose 1-2 tablets each weighing 500mg). The dosage of the drug was decided by the supervising medical officer on a case to case basis, taking note of the clinical conditions and responsiveness of the patients. The patients were monitored for three months, who were divided into 6 groups based on their age and again into two groups, 5 & 6, based on their mean FBS values. ie; Normal Persons, Diabetics of age groups 35-45yrs, 46-55yrs, >55yrs and those with FBS < 145.9 mg% and > 145.9 mg%. The Ayurvedic medicine "Rajanyamalakadi" has showed significant antidiabetic, hypolipidemic and antioxidant effects. In addition to that significant ameliorating effects on the elevated serum AST and ALT activities were also demonstrated by the treatment. The nutraceuticals present in the drug like Terpenoids, Polyphenols, Curcumin etc are responsible for the medicinal effects. PMID:23105812

  16. CHOROIDAL THICKNESS IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETIC RETINOPATHY ANALYZED BY SPECTRAL-DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    REGATIERI, CAIO V.; BRANCHINI, LAUREN; CARMODY, JILL; FUJIMOTO, JAMES G.; DUKER, JAY S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to examine choroidal thickness in patients with diabetes using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Methods Forty-nine patients (49 eyes) with diabetes and 24 age-matched normal subjects underwent high-definition raster scanning using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with frame enhancement software. Patients with diabetes were classified into 3 groups: 11 patients with mild or moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and no macular edema, 18 patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema, and 20 patients with treated proliferative diabetic retinopathy and no diabetic macular edema (treated proliferative diabetic retinopathy). Choroidal thickness was measured from the posterior edge of the retinal pigment epithelium to the choroid/sclera junction at 500-μm intervals up to 2,500 μm temporal and nasal to the fovea. Results Reliable measurements of choroidal thickness were obtainable in 75.3% of eyes examined. Mean choroidal thickness showed a pattern of thinnest choroid nasally, thickening in the subfoveal region, and thinning again temporally in normal subjects and patients with diabetes. Mean subfoveal choroidal thickness was thinner in patients with diabetic macular edema (63.3 μm, 27.2%, P < 0.05) or treated proliferative diabetic retinopathy (69.6 μm, 30.0%, P < 0.01), compared with normal subjects. There was no difference between nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and normal subjects. Conclusion Choroidal thickness is altered in diabetes and may be related to the severity of retinopathy. Presence of diabetic macular edema is associated with a significant decrease in the choroidal thickness. PMID:22374157

  17. Comparison of maternal morbidity and medical costs during pregnancy and delivery between patients with gestational diabetes and patients with pre-existing diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Son, K H; Lim, N-K; Lee, J-W; Cho, M-C; Park, H-Y

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effects of gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes on maternal morbidity and medical costs, using data from the Korea National Health Insurance Claims Database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. Methods Delivery cases in 2010, 2011 and 2012 (459 842, 442 225 and 380 431 deliveries) were extracted from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. The complications and medical costs were compared among the following three pregnancy groups: normal, gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes. Results Although, the rates of pre-existing diabetes did not fluctuate (2.5, 2.4 and 2.7%) throughout the study, the rate of gestational diabetes steadily increased (4.6, 6.2 and 8.0%). Furthermore, the rates of pre-existing diabetes and gestational diabetes increased in conjunction with maternal age, pre-existing hypertension and cases of multiple pregnancy. The risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension, urinary tract infections, premature delivery, liver disease and chronic renal disease were greater in the gestational diabetes and pre-existing diabetes groups than in the normal group. The risk of venous thromboembolism, antepartum haemorrhage, shoulder dystocia and placenta disorder were greater in the pre-existing diabetes group, but not the gestational diabetes group, compared with the normal group. The medical costs associated with delivery, the costs during pregnancy and the number of in-hospital days for the subjects in the pre-existing diabetes group were the highest among the three groups. Conclusions The study showed that the rates of pre-existing diabetes and gestational diabetes increased with maternal age at pregnancy and were associated with increases in medical costs and pregnancy-related complications. PMID:25472691

  18. Psychological aspects of diabetes care: Effecting behavioral change in patients

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Boon-How; Shariff-Ghazali, Sazlina; Fernandez, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) need psychological support throughout their life span from the time of diagnosis. The psychological make-up of the patients with DM play a central role in self-management behaviors. Without patient’s adherence to the effective therapies, there would be persistent sub-optimal control of diseases, increase diabetes-related complications, causing deterioration in quality of life, resulting in increased healthcare utilization and burden on healthcare systems. However, provision of psychosocial support is generally inadequate due to its challenging nature of needs and demands on the healthcare systems. This review article examines patient’s psychological aspects in general, elaborates in particular about emotion effects on health, and emotion in relation to other psychological domains such as cognition, self-regulation, self-efficacy and behavior. Some descriptions are also provided on willpower, resilience, illness perception and proactive coping in relating execution of new behaviors, coping with future-oriented thinking and influences of illness perception on health-related behaviors. These psychological aspects are further discussed in relation to DM and interventions for patients with DM. Equipped with the understanding of the pertinent nature of psychology in patients with DM; and knowing the links between the psychological disorders, inflammation and cardiovascular outcomes would hopefully encourages healthcare professionals in giving due attention to the psychological needs of patients with DM. PMID:25512782

  19. Regular Chinese Green Tea Consumption Is Protective for Diabetic Retinopathy: A Clinic-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qinghua; Chen, Dandan; Sun, Hong-Peng; Yan, Ning; Xu, Yong; Pan, Chen-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the association between regular Chinese green tea consumption and the risk of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in diabetic patients in China. Methods. 100 DR patients and 100 age-sex-matched diabetic controls without retinopathy were recruited in a clinic-based, case-control study. DR was defined from retinal photographs and detailed information on Chinese green tea consumption of the participants was collected through a face-to-face interview. Results. The crude odds ratio [OR] of Chinese green tea consumption for DR was 0.49 (95% confidence interval: 0.26–0.90). When stratified by sex, the protective effect of Chinese green tea consumption on DR was statistically significant in women (P = 0.01) but not in men (P = 0.63). After adjusting for age, sex, and other confounders, DR was significantly associated with Chinese green tea consumption (OR = 0.48; P = 0.04), higher systolic blood pressure (OR = 1.02; P = 0.05), longer duration of diabetes (OR = 1.07; P = 0.02), and the presence of family history of diabetes (OR = 2.35; P = 0.04). Conclusions. Diabetic patients who had regularly drunk Chinese green tea every week for at least one year in their lives had a DR risk reduction of about 50% compared with those who had not. Regular Chinese green tea consumption may be a novel approach for the prevention of DR. PMID:26539551

  20. Lactic Acidosis in Diabetic Population: Is Metformin Implicated? Results of a Matched Case-Control Study Performed on the Type 2 Diabetes Population of Grenoble Hospital University

    PubMed Central

    Lepelley, Marion; Giai, Joris; Yahiaoui, Nassima; Chanoine, Sébastien; Villier, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To evaluate the strength of association between lactic acidosis (LA) and well-recognized risk factors for LA, particularly the weight of metformin. Methods. This study is a matched case-control analysis concerning the type 2 diabetes population from Grenoble Hospital University. Cases of LA were defined biologically with pH < 7.35 and lactates > 5 mmol/L. They were matched to 2 controls defined as type 2 diabetic inpatients who did not present a LA during the study period. We performed a conditional logistic regression. Results. We included 302 cases and 604 controls; mean age was 69.5 years (SD 11.93). Intercurrent diseases were significantly associated with LA. Chronic medical conditions had a minor impact on LA incidence, except hepatocellular dysfunction. Metformin was significantly associated with a higher LA probability in case of acute kidney injury (AKI) (OR = 1.79; p value = 0.020) but not in patients without AKI. Discussion and Conclusions. According to this study, metformin, compared to acute medical conditions, seemed not to be associated with LA in patients with type 2 diabetes; however in case of AKI, metformin may be associated with LA. PMID:27034959

  1. AT1R A1166C variants in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Mahmoudreza; Rahimi, Zohreh; Amiri, Sonia; Rahimi, Ziba; Vessal, Mahmood; Nasri, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are inconsistent reports related to the role of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) on the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its renal complications. Objectives: To identify the association between AT1R A1166C variants with the risk of T2DM and also with diabetic nephropathy (DN). Patients and Methods: In a case-control study, the AT1R A1166C polymorphism was detected in 135 T2DM patients with and without DN and in 98 healthy subjects from Western Iran. The genotypes of AT1R A1166C polymorphism were detected using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Results: The frequencies of AT1R A1166C genotypes and alleles were not significantly difference between patients with and without DN and controls. The frequencies of rare allele of 1166 C were 10%, 16.5%, 15.9% and 15.3% in micro-, macro- and normo-albuminuric patients and in healthy individuals, respectively ( P > 0.05). The systolic blood pressure and serum creatinine level in DN patients were significantly higher in carriers of AT1R CC compared to carriers of AT1R AA genotype. In the presence of uncontrolled hyperglycemia (HbA1c > 7.5%), there was a trend toward increased risk of macro-albuminuria in carriers of AC+CC genotype (OR=3.66, [95% CI: 0.81-16.58], P = 0.092). Conclusions: Our study indicated the absence of an association between AT1R A1166C polymorphism with the risk of T2DM and DN. It seems in carriers of AT1R C allele systolic blood pressure and serum creatinine level to be higher compared to the A allele carriers. PMID:26310144

  2. Retinopathy among type 2 diabetic patients seen at a tertiary hospital in Nigeria: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Ashaye, Adeyinka; Arije, Ayodeji; Kuti, Modupe; Olusanya, Bolutife; Ayeni, Ezekiel; Fasanmade, Adesoji; Akinlade, Kehinde; Obajimi, Millicent; Adeleye, Jokotade

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy among patients attending the diabetic clinics of a tertiary hospital in Nigeria. Methodology We examined the eyes of 76 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus between July 2003 and January 2004 using dilated fundoscopy at the eye clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan. The results were compared with published figures. Results Mean age of patients was 57.5 ± 10.4 years. Thirty–two patients (42.1%) had diabetic retinopathy. Of these, one patient had features of proliferative diabetic retinopathy while the other patients had non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Majority (53.1%) of those who had retinopathy had diabetes for more than 10 years, while 21.4% of patients without retinopathy had diabetes for more than 10 years (p = 0.005). The mean serial post-prandial plasma glucose of those who had retinopathy was higher when compared with the mean for those who did not have retinopathy (248.7 mg/dl vs 178.3 mg/dl; p = 0.003). Conclusion The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in our patients is higher than was previously reported in earlier studies. Patients with diabetes ought to be referred for ophthalmological evaluation and follow-up which they should be actively encouraged to attend. PMID:19668393

  3. Assessment of plantar pressure and balance in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Anjos, Daniela M.C.; Gomes, Luciana P.O.; Sampaio, Luciana M.M.; Correa, João C.F.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Patients with diabetes for more than 10 years may have an increase in peak plantar pressure, considerable postural oscillation, balance deficit, alterations in gait pattern and an increased risk of falls. The aim of the present study was to assess the correlation between plantar pressure distribution and balance in patients with diabetes using a pressure platform (Footwork). Material and methods The study was carried out at the Human Movement Clinic of the Centro Universitário de Belo Horizonte (Brazil). The sample was made up of 18 right-handed individuals with type 2 diabetes – 14 females and 4 males – with an average age of 58.72 ±9.54 and an average of 18.56 ±6.61 years since diagnosis. Result Data analysis revealed that greater peak plantar pressure on the right hindfoot led to greater radial displacement (Rd) (r = 0.2022) and greater displacement velocity (r = 0.2240). Greater peak plantar pressure on the left hindfoot also led to greater displacement velocity (P) (r = 0.5728) and radial displacement (RD) (r = 0.1972). A positive correlation was found between time elapsed since diagnosis and peak midfoot pressure (r = 0.3752) on the right and left side as well as between BMI and plantar pressure on all regions of the foot. Conclusions The data reveal a correlation between postural oscillation and peak plantar