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Sample records for diagnosed spinal infection

  1. How Are Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... spinal cord tumors in children staged? How are brain and spinal cord tumors diagnosed in children? Brain ... resonance angiography (MRA) or computerized tomographic angiography (CTA). Brain or spinal cord tumor biopsy Imaging tests such ...

  2. Rehabilitation in spinal infection diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Karakoç, Mehmet; Ayd?n, Abdulkadir; Öne?, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord infections were the diseases defined by Hypocrite yet the absence of modern medicine and there was not a real protocol in rehabilitation although there were many aspects in surgical treatment options. The patients whether surgically or conservatively treated had a lot of neurological, motor, and sensory disturbances. Our clinic has quite experience from our previous researchs. Unfortunately, serious spinal cord infections are still present in our region. In these patients the basic rehabilitation approaches during early, pre-operation, post-operation period and in the home environment will provide significant contributions to improve the patients’ sensory and motor skills, develop the balance and proriocaption, increase the independence of patients in daily living activities and minimize the assistance of other people. There is limited information in the literature related with the nature of the rehabilitation programmes to be applied for patients with spinal infections. The aim of this review is to share our clinic experience and summarise the publications about spinal infection rehabilitation. There are very few studies about the rehabilitation of spinal infections. There are still not enough studies about planning and performing rehabilitation programs in these patients. Therefore, a comprehensive rehabilitation programme during the hospitalisation and home periods is emphasised in order to provide optimal management and prevent further disability. PMID:25621205

  3. How Is Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... should be assessed for possible damage to the spinal cord 1 : Head injuries, particularly those with trauma to ... show if nerve signals can pass through the spinal cord. Spine X-rays. These may show fracture or ...

  4. Clinical Value of Procalcitonin in Patients with Spinal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Deok-Ki; Lee, Hyun-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluation the diagnostic value of procalcitonin (PCT) in patients with spinal infection, compare to the classical biomarkers such as C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), white blood cell (WBC) count. Methods All patients who were diagnosed as a spinal infection between January, 2013 and July, 2014 were included in this study. Serum PCT, CRP, ESR, and WBC count were checked at initial hospital visit and once a week serially until they were discharged. Patient's medical history, causes and pathogens of spinal infection were reviewed. Results Total 34 (16 men, 18 women) patients were included in this study. Mean age of the patients was 65.6 year-old. Causes of spinal infection were pain block procedure (14, 41.2%) and post-operation (5, 14.7%). Out of 25 patients who showed elevated initial serum PCT level, 20 patients (80%) had a combined systemic infection. 14 patients (6.7%) had a sepsis, 3 patients (14.2%) had a urinary tract infection and 2 (9.6%) had a pneumonia. 14 patients (41.2%) showed elevation of serum PCT level during treatment. Among them, 9 patients (64.3%) had a combined infection such as sepsis and urinary tract infection. Conclusion Serum CRP showed more sensitivity compared to serum PCT in patients with spinal infection. Patients with spinal infection who showed elevated serum PCT level should be investigated for combined infection and proper antibiotics should be applied. PMID:26539272

  5. Postoperative Spinal Wound Infections and Postprocedural Diskitis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Saad B; Vives, Michael J; Basra, Sushil K; Reiter, Mitchell F

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Postprocedural infections are a significant cause of morbidity after spinal interventions. Methods: Literature review. An extensive literature review was conducted on postprocedural spinal infections. Relevant articles were reviewed in detail and additional case images were included. Results: Clinical findings, laboratory markers, and imaging modalities play important roles in the detection of postprocedural spinal infections. Treatment may range from biopsy and antibiotics to multiple operations with complex strategies for soft tissue management. Conclusions: Early detection and aggressive treatment are paramount in managing postprocedural spinal infections and limiting their long-term sequelae. PMID:18092559

  6. Management of postoperative spinal infections

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vishal; Meredith, Dennis S; Kepler, Christopher K; Huang, Russel C

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after posterior lumbar spine surgery. This review details an approach to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of SSIs. Factors contributing to the development of a SSI can be split into three categories: (1) microbiological factors; (2) factors related to the patient and their spinal pathology; and (3) factors relating to the surgical procedure. SSI is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The virulence of the organism causing the SSI can affect its presentation. SSI can be prevented by careful adherence to aseptic technique, prophylactic antibiotics, avoiding myonecrosis by frequently releasing retractors and preoperatively optimizing modifiable patient factors. Increasing pain is commonly the only symptom of a SSI and can lead to a delay in diagnosis. C-reactive protein and magnetic resonance imaging can help establish the diagnosis. Treatment requires acquiring intra-operative cultures to guide future antibiotic therapy and surgical debridement of all necrotic tissue. A SSI can usually be adequately treated without removing spinal instrumentation. A multidisciplinary approach to SSIs is important. It is useful to involve an infectious disease specialist and use minimum serial bactericidal titers to enhance the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. A plastic surgeon should also be involved in those cases of severe infection that require repeat debridement and delayed closure. PMID:23330073

  7. Overview and classification of spinal infections.

    PubMed

    Calderone, R R; Larsen, J M

    1996-01-01

    Hematogenous spread is the most common cause for vertebral osteomyelitis. S. aureus is the most common organism in pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis. Hematogenous osteomyelitis is common among diabetics and intravenous drug abusers. Tuberculous spondylitis remains common worldwide. In general, vertebral body infections not responding to antibiotic treatment and those creating unacceptable deformity or neurologic compromise require debridement via an anterior approach with strut grafting. Posterior infections are almost always postsurgical and require posterior irrigation and debridement in addition to antibiotics. Abscesses within the canal require antibiotics and surgical debridement especially when neurologic symptoms are present. Infections within the canal are approached posteriorly unless the pathology involves the anterior spine. Use of metal fixation within the site of an adequately debrided spinal infection is controversial but necessary on rare occasions. Posterior fixation for anterior infections is preferred. Much has been written about spinal infections and their treatment. Landmark articles and additional comprehensive sources on spinal infections have been included in the references. PMID:8539040

  8. Infection with spinal instrumentation: Review of pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and management

    PubMed Central

    Kasliwal, Manish K.; Tan, Lee A.; Traynelis, Vincent C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Instrumentation has become an integral component in the management of various spinal pathologies. The rate of infection varies from 2% to 20% of all instrumented spinal procedures. Every occurrence produces patient morbidity, which may adversely affect long-term outcome and increases health care costs. Methods: A comprehensive review of the literature from 1990 to 2012 was performed utilizing PubMed and several key words: Infection, spine, instrumentation, implant, management, and biofilms. Articles that provided a current review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and management of instrumented spinal infections over the years were reviewed. Results: There are multiple risk factors for postoperative spinal infections. Infections in the setting of instrumentation are more difficult to diagnose and treat due to biofilm. Infections may be early or delayed. C Reactive Protein (CRP) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are important diagnostic tools. Optimal results are obtained with surgical debridement followed by parenteral antibiotics. Removal or replacement of hardware should be considered in delayed infections. Conclusions: An improved understanding of the role of biofilm and the development of newer spinal implants has provided insight in the pathogenesis and management of infected spinal implants. This literature review highlights the mechanism, pathogenesis, prevention, and management of infection after spinal instrumentation. It is important to accurately identify and treat postoperative spinal infections. The treatment is often multimodal and prolonged. PMID:24340238

  9. Surgical Site Infections in Spinal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Boody, Barrett S; Jenkins, Tyler J; Hashmi, Sohaib Z; Hsu, Wellington K; Patel, Alpesh A; Savage, Jason W

    2015-12-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a potentially devastating complication of spine surgery. SSIs are defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as occurring within 30 days of surgery or within 12 months of placement of foreign bodies, such as spinal instrumentation. SSIs are commonly categorized by the depth of surgical tissue involvement (ie, superficial, deep incisional, or organ and surrounding space). Postoperative infections result in increased costs and postoperative morbidity. Because continued research has improved the evaluation and management of spinal infections, spine surgeons must be aware of these modalities. The controversies in evaluation and management of SSIs in spine surgery will be reviewed. PMID:26566255

  10. Orbital aspergillus infection diagnosed by FNAC.

    PubMed

    Kuruba, Sree Lakshmi; Prabhakaran, Venkatesh C; Nagarajappa, A H; Biligi, Dayanand S

    2011-07-01

    Fungal infections of the orbit represent a small minority of orbital infections. However, due to the virulent nature of some of the fungal species, they can have a devastating effect on ocular functions. Most of these fungi are saprophytes, which cause opportunistic infections. Aspergillus is one such fungus that can cause infection at various sites in an immunosuppressed individual. Sinonasal aspergillus infection with orbital extension and orbital aspergillus infection progress relentlessly. They can have a precipitous clinical course resulting in total loss of vision. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is rarely used as a preoperative diagnostic tool in the investigation of orbital mass lesions. Further, fungal infections of orbit are seldom diagnosed on FNAC. Two cases of fungal infection of the orbital and periorbital tissue diagnosed on FNAC are presented. A 50-year-old diabetic male presented with diminishing vision, pain, and forward protrusion of the left eye. On examination, he had upper eye lid fullness. A 55-year-old diabetic male presented with a swelling on the right upper eye lid. The patients were evaluated radiologically and then subjected to FNAC. The smears showed giant cells, histiocytes, epithelioid granulomas, and fungal hyphae. A diagnosis of fungal infection was arrived at which was subsequently confirmed by culture and biopsy. Orbital aspergillus infection can have a precipitous course. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the orbit provide crucial information. However, FNAC can help in making an early definitive diagnosis of fungal infection and thus obviate the need for a biopsy. PMID:21695805

  11. Propionibacterium acnes delayed infection following spinal surgery with instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Mhaidli, Hani H; Der-Boghossian, Asdghig H; Haidar, Rachid K

    2013-04-01

    Propionibacterium acnes detection in culture media was previously considered a contamination but recently its infectious role was discovered in post-spinal surgery infections. P. acnes might be introduced during surgery. Its diagnosis is based on non-specific clinical signs, image indications of infection, and the conclusive microbiological sign. Furthermore, its diagnosis is difficult because of slow growth rate and low virulence, delaying its presentation. Usually, the infection is manifested after a couple of months or years. Here, a 65-year-old man presented with drainage at the site of instrumented spinal surgery performed 13 years ago. P. acnes infection was confirmed by culture with extended incubation. Our review of the literature revealed only two other reported cases of delayed P. acnes infection presenting a decade following a spinal surgery with instrumentation. This article sheds light on such delayed infections and discusses their presentation and management. PMID:22441672

  12. Urinary tract infections in patients with spinal injuries.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection remains an important problem for patients with spinal cord injury. Interventions used to promote bladder emptying and maintain low-pressure voiding have variable risks for urinary tract infection. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common in this population and should not be treated. However, identification of symptomatic infection is compromised by difficulties in ascertainment of symptoms. Use of hydrophilic coated catheters for intermittent catheterization does not influence the frequency of symptomatic urinary tract infection. Botulinum toxin injection in the detrusor muscle or the urethral sphincter improves bladder emptying and does not influence the frequency of urinary infection. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is a common finding in pregnant women with spinal cord injury, but optimal management is not clear. Other research needs include further development and evaluation of interventions to decrease the frequency of infection, improve diagnostic precision, and limit the emergence of resistant organisms. PMID:24445675

  13. Diagnosing and treating asymptomatic tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize relevant parts of the guidelines recommended by the Canadian and American Thoracic Societies for diagnosis and management of asymptomatic tuberculosis (TB) infection. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The latest guidelines published by the Canadian and American Thoracic Societies were reviewed. Unfortunately, neither of these guidelines state explicitly how recommendations were derived. The references accompanying each set of guidelines, however, suggest that they were developed by extensive literature review of the subject and consensus among expert panels. MAIN MESSAGE: Only higher-risk patients should receive a TB screening test (Mantoux test) to minimize the possibility of false-positive test results. The cutoff points for positive tests vary to reflect the pretest likelihood of TB infection. An induration 5 mm or greater is considered positive in patients at highest risk of TB infection, that is, HIV-infected patients, close contacts of active TB cases, and patients with chest x-ray abnormalities suggestive of previous untreated TB. All other patients are considered positive if they have induration greater than 10 mm according to the Canadian guideline. A 15-mm cutoff point, however, is used for patients without risk factors in the American guideline. All patients with positive Mantoux test results should be considered infected with TB. Infected patients should be offered 6 to 12 months of isoniazid prophylaxis if they have HIV infection, if they have medical conditions that increase the risk of TB activation, or if they are younger than 35 years. CONCLUSIONS: Prophylactic treatment of infected individuals effectively prevents the spread of TB infection. Family physicians, who most often see patients in the asymptomatic stage of TB infection, are uniquely situated to prevent secondary cases of TB by offering appropriate patients prophylactic treatment. Patients should be counseled about the risk and benefit of prophylactic treatment so they give informed consent for it. PMID:10540699

  14. Spinal infections with and without hardware: the viewpoint of an infectious disease specialist.

    PubMed

    Miksi?, Nina Gorišek

    2013-07-01

    The incidence rate of spinal infections has been rising in last decades, and despite the advances in medicine, they still represent a therapeutic challenge, especially when related to spinal implants. The majority of spinal infections in developed world are caused by pyogenic bacteria, with Staphylococcus aureus as a leading cause among gram-positive cocci and Escherichia coli among gram-negative bacteria, whereas coagulase-negative staphylococci are frequently involved in implant-associated spinal infections. Implant-associated spinal infections are caused by bacteria capable of biofilm production on the implant surface rendering them resistant to majority of antimicrobial drugs. Spinal infections in patients without implants can be treated conservatively with pathogen-directed antimicrobial therapy, whereas in implant-associated spinal infections combined surgical and antibiotic therapy is necessary. Empiric antimicrobial treatment of spinal infections without microbiological diagnosis should be discouraged in the era of drug resistant pathogens. PMID:23712669

  15. Diagnosing Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Accuracy of CSF 14-3-3 Protein Test of the Spinal Fluid

    MedlinePLUS

    ... JAKOB DISEASE: ACCURACY OF THE 14-3-3 PROTEIN TEST OF THE SPINAL FLUID This information sheet ... help you understand how the 14-3-3 protein test helps in diagnosing sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease ( ...

  16. Risk factors for surgical site infections following spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fei; Cao, Junming; Meng, Xianzhong

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for postoperative infection after spinal surgery, in order to prevent its occurrence. We searched the Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane library databases, and identified 25 case-control studies. The pooled results revealed that the major factors associated with infection were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] 2.04; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.69-2.46), obesity (OR 2.13; 95% CI 1.55-2.93), smoking (OR 1.17; 95% CI 1.03-1.32), urinary tract infection (OR 3.19; 95% CI 1.68-6.06), hypertension (OR 1.67; 95% CI 1.26-2.22), transfusion (OR 3.64; 95% CI 2.60-5.08), and cerebrospinal fluid leak (OR 3.22; 95% CI 1.07-9.67). There was insufficient evidence to suggest that male sex, age, alcohol use, and steroid use increased the incidence of infection after spinal surgery. Our analyses suggest strategies to prevent surgical site infection. However, the results should be interpreted with caution because of heterogeneity amongst the included studies. PMID:26282155

  17. Pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections: emphasis on diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of abscesses and pus collections.

    PubMed

    Moritani, T; Kim, J; Capizzano, A A; Kirby, P; Kademian, J; Sato, Y

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of spinal infections has increased in the past two decades, owing to the increasing number of elderly patients, immunocompromised conditions, spinal surgery and instrumentation, vascular access and intravenous drug use. Conventional MRI is the gold standard for diagnostic imaging; however, there are still a significant number of misdiagnosed cases. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with a b-value of 1000 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps provide early and accurate detection of abscess and pus collection. Pyogenic infections are classified into four types of extension based on MRI and DWI findings: (1) epidural/paraspinal abscess with spondylodiscitis, (2) epidural/paraspinal abscess with facet joint infection, (3) epidural/paraspinal abscess without concomitant spondylodiscitis or facet joint infection and (4) intradural abscess (subdural abscess, purulent meningitis and spinal cord abscess). DWI easily detects abscesses and demonstrates the extension, multiplicity and remote disseminated infection. DWI is often a key image in the differential diagnosis. Important differential diagnoses include epidural, subdural or subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebrospinal fluid leak, disc herniation, synovial cyst, granulation tissue, intra- or extradural tumour and post-surgical fluid collections. DWI and the ADC values are affected by susceptibility artefacts, incomplete fat suppression and volume-averaging artefacts. Recognition of artefacts is essential when interpreting DWI of spinal and paraspinal infections. DWI is not only useful for the diagnosis but also for the treatment planning of pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections. PMID:24999081

  18. Pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections: emphasis on diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of abscesses and pus collections

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Capizzano, A A; Kirby, P; Kademian, J; Sato, Y

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of spinal infections has increased in the past two decades, owing to the increasing number of elderly patients, immunocompromised conditions, spinal surgery and instrumentation, vascular access and intravenous drug use. Conventional MRI is the gold standard for diagnostic imaging; however, there are still a significant number of misdiagnosed cases. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with a b-value of 1000 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps provide early and accurate detection of abscess and pus collection. Pyogenic infections are classified into four types of extension based on MRI and DWI findings: (1) epidural/paraspinal abscess with spondylodiscitis, (2) epidural/paraspinal abscess with facet joint infection, (3) epidural/paraspinal abscess without concomitant spondylodiscitis or facet joint infection and (4) intradural abscess (subdural abscess, purulent meningitis and spinal cord abscess). DWI easily detects abscesses and demonstrates the extension, multiplicity and remote disseminated infection. DWI is often a key image in the differential diagnosis. Important differential diagnoses include epidural, subdural or subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebrospinal fluid leak, disc herniation, synovial cyst, granulation tissue, intra- or extradural tumour and post-surgical fluid collections. DWI and the ADC values are affected by susceptibility artefacts, incomplete fat suppression and volume-averaging artefacts. Recognition of artefacts is essential when interpreting DWI of spinal and paraspinal infections. DWI is not only useful for the diagnosis but also for the treatment planning of pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections. PMID:24999081

  19. Simian Virus 40 Infection in the Spinal Cord of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Immunosuppressed Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Kaliyaperumal, Saravanan; Wüthrich, Christian; Westmoreland, Susan V; Koralnik, Igor J

    2015-11-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is an often-fatal demyelinating disease of the CNS that usually develops in immunocompromised individuals because of reactivation of quiescent JC virus (JCV). There are only a few reports of JCV infection in the human spinal cord. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy-like demyelinating lesions have been documented in the brains of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques. To determine whether simian virus 40 (SV40) can infect and cause PML lesions in spinal cords of immunosuppressed macaques, we examined archival spinal cord samples from 15 simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus monkeys with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and SV40 infection of the brain. Among those, 6 (40%) had SV40-infected cells in the spinal cord, including 1 with PML-like lesions, 1 with PML-like lesions and meningoencephalitis, 2 with meningoencephalitis, 1 with gray matter gliosis, and 1 with no lesions. One animal with a large PML-like lesion had extensive demyelination and SV40 infection of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and meningeal cells. None of the 6 animals had SV40-infected spinal cord neurons. These observations indicate that, like JCV in immunosuppressed humans, SV40 can infect glial cells and cause PML-like lesions in the spinal cord of immunosuppressed rhesus macaques. Rhesus macaques could serve as an animal model to study polyomavirus infection and pathogenesis in the spinal cord. PMID:26469249

  20. Accuracy of Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Diagnosing Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy in Patients Showing Spinal Cord Compression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungbo; Lee, Young Han; Chung, Tae-Sub; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Yoo, Yeon Hwa; Kim, In Seong; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Suh, Jin-Suck; Park, Jung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the performance of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for the diagnosis of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) in patients with deformed spinal cord but otherwise unremarkable conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Materials and Methods A total of 33 patients who underwent MRI of the cervical spine including DTI using two-dimensional single-shot interleaved multi-section inner volume diffusion-weighted echo-planar imaging and whose spinal cords were deformed but showed no signal changes on conventional MRI were the subjects of this study. Mean diffusivity (MD), longitudinal diffusivity (LD), radial diffusivity (RD), and fractional anisotropy (FA) were measured at the most stenotic level. The calculated performance of MD, FA, MD?FA (considered positive when both the MD and FA results were positive), LD?FA (considered positive when both the LD and FA results were positive), and RD?FA (considered positive when both the RD and FA results were positive) in diagnosing CSM were compared with each other based on the estimated cut-off values of MD, LD, RD, and FA from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis with the clinical diagnosis of CSM from medical records as the reference standard. Results The MD, LD, and RD cut-off values were 1.079 × 10-3, 1.719 × 10-3, and 0.749 × 10-3 mm2/sec, respectively, and that of FA was 0.475. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were: 100 (4/4), 44.8 (13/29), 20 (4/20), and 100 (13/13) for MD; 100 (4/4), 27.6 (8/29), 16 (4/25), and 100 (8/8) for FA; 100 (4/4), 58.6 (17/29), 25 (4/16), and 100 (17/17) for MD?FA; 100 (4/4), 68.9 (20/29), 30.8 (4/13), and 100 (20/20) for LD?FA; and 75 (3/4), 68.9 (20/29), 25 (3/12), and 95.2 (20/21) for RD?FA in percentage value. Diagnostic performance comparisons revealed significant differences only in specificity between FA and MD?FA (p = 0.003), FA and LD?FA (p < 0.001), FA and RD?FA (p < 0.001), MD and LD?FA (p = 0.024) and MD and RD?FA (p = 0.024). Conclusion Fractional anisotropy combined with MD, RD, or LD is expected to be more useful than FA and MD for diagnosing CSM in patients who show deformed spinal cords without signal changes on MRI. PMID:26576120

  1. Therapy of acute and delayed spinal infections after spinal surgery treated with negative pressure wound therapy in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, Pawel; König, Matthias Alexander; Osterhoff, Georg; Wilzeck, Verena; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Jukema, Gerrolt Nico

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the treatment of infected primary or delayed spine wounds after spinal surgery using negative pressure wound therapy. In our institution (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland) nine patients (three women and six men; mean age 68.6, range 43-87 years) were treated in the period between January to December 2011 for non-healing spinal wounds. The treatment consisted of repeated debridements, irrigation and temporary closure with negative pressure wound therapy system. Three patients were admitted with a spinal epidural abscess; two with osteoporotic lumbar fracture; two with pathologic vertebra fracture and spinal cord compression, and two with vertebra fracture after trauma. All nine patients have been treated with antibiotic therapy. In one case the hardware has been removed, in three patients laminectomy was performed without instrumentation, in five patients there was no need to remove the hardware. The average hospital stay was 16.6 days (range 11-30). The average follow-up was 3.8, range 0.5-14 months. The average number of negative pressure wound therapy procedures was three, with the range 1-11. Our retrospective study focuses on the clinical problems faced by the spinal surgeon, clinical outcomes after spinal surgery followed by wound infection, and negative pressure wound therapy. Moreover, we would like to emphasize the importance for the patients and their relatives to be fully informed about the increased complications of surgery and about the limitations of treatment of these wounds with negative pressure wound therapy. PMID:24416474

  2. Australian Institute of Sport and the Australian Paralympic Committee position statement: urinary tract infection in spinal cord injured athletes.

    PubMed

    Compton, Stacey; Trease, Larissa; Cunningham, Corey; Hughes, David

    2015-10-01

    Patients with spinal cord injuries are at increased risk of developing symptomatic urinary tract infections. Current evidence-based knowledge regarding prevention and treatment of urinary tract infection in the spinal cord injured population is limited. There are currently no urinary tract infection prevention and management guidelines specifically targeted towards elite spinal cord injured athletes. This position statement represents a set of recommendations intended to provide clinical guidelines for sport and exercise medicine physicians and other healthcare providers for the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infection in spinal cord injured athletes. It has been endorsed by the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and the Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). PMID:25869093

  3. Wound management with vacuum-assisted closure in postoperative infections after surgery for spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Karaaslan, Fatih; Erdem, ?evki; Mermerkaya, Musa U?ur

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the results of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the treatment of surgical spinal site infections. Materials and methods The use of NPWT in postoperative infections after dorsal spinal surgery (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion plus posterior instrumentation) was studied retrospectively. From February 2011 to January 2012, six patients (females) out of 317 (209 females; 108 males) were readmitted to our clinic with surgical site infections on postoperative day 14 (range 9–19) and were treated with debridement, NPWT, and antibiotics. We evaluated the clinical and laboratory data, including the ability to retain the spinal hardware and recurrent infections. Results The incidence of deep postoperative surgical site infection was six (1.89%) patients (females) out of 317 patients (209 females; 108 males) at 1 year. All patients completed their wound NPWT regimen successfully. An average of 5.1 (range 3–8) irrigation and debridement sessions was performed before definitive wound closure. The mean follow-up period was 13 (range 12–16) months. No patient had a persistent infection requiring partial or total hardware removal. The hospital stay infection parameters normalized within an average of 4.6 weeks. Conclusion The study illustrates the usefulness of NPWT as an effective adjuvant treatment option for managing complicated deep spinal surgical wound infections. PMID:25565903

  4. The Prevention and Management of Urinary Tract Infection among People with Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NIDRR Consensus Statement, 1992

    1992-01-01

    A 1992 Urinary Tract Infection Consensus Validation Conference brought together researchers, clinicians, and consumers to arrive at consensus on the best practices for preventing and treating urinary tract infections (UBI) in people with spinal cord injuries; the risk factors and diagnostic studies that should be done; indications for antibiotic…

  5. Urine as a Specimen to Diagnose Infections in Twenty-First Century: Focus on Analytical Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Tuuminen, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Urine as a clinical specimen to diagnose infections has been used since ancient times. Many rapid technologies to assist diagnosis of infections are currently in use. Alongside traditional enzyme immunoassays (EIA), new technologies have emerged. Molecular analysis of transrenal DNA to diagnose infections is also a rapidly growing field. The majority of EIAs utilize the detection of excreted sugar compounds of the outer microbial cell-wall shed into the bloodstream and excreted into the urine. This mini-review focuses on current knowledge on rapid urinary antigen detection tests to diagnose most common infections, and highlights their diagnostic utility. The past and the future of urinalysis are also briefly discussed. The analysis of the literature shows that some methods are not quantitative, and analytical sensitivity may remain suboptimal. In addition, the performance criteria and technical documentation of some commercial tests are insufficient. Clinical microbiologists and physicians should be alert to assay limitations. PMID:22566927

  6. Prevalence of Diagnosed and Undiagnosed HIV Infection--United States, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Hall, H Irene; An, Qian; Tang, Tian; Song, Ruiguang; Chen, Mi; Green, Timothy; Kang, Jian

    2015-06-26

    Persons unaware of their human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection contribute nearly one third of ongoing transmission in the United States. Among the estimated 1.2 million persons living with HIV in the United States in 2011, 14% had undiagnosed infections. To accelerate progress toward reducing undiagnosed HIV infection, CDC and its partners have pursued an approach that includes expanding HIV testing in communities with high HIV infection rates. To measure the prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed HIV infection for the 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC), CDC analyzed data from the National HIV Surveillance System. In 42 jurisdictions with numerically stable estimates, HIV prevalence in 2012 ranged from 110 per 100,000 persons (Iowa) to 3,936 per 100,000 (DC). The percentage of persons living with diagnosed HIV ranged from 77% in Louisiana to ?90% in Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, and New York. In 39 jurisdictions with numerically stable estimates, the percentage of HIV cases with diagnosed infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) ranged from 75% in Louisiana to ?90% in Hawaii and New York. These data demonstrate the need for interventions and public health strategies to reduce the prevalence of undiagnosed HIV infection. Because the percentage of persons with undiagnosed HIV varies by geographic area, efforts tailored to each area's unique circumstances might be needed to increase the percentage of persons aware of their infection. PMID:26110835

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Newly Diagnosed at Autopsy in New York City, 2008–2012

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Chitra; Ellman, Tanya M.; Myers, Julie; Madsen, Ann; Sepkowitz, Kent; Shepard, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Studying the most extreme example of late diagnosis, new HIV diagnoses after death, may be instructive to HIV testing efforts. Using the results of routine HIV testing of autopsies performed by the Office of Chief Medical Examiner (OCME), we identified new HIV diagnoses after death in New York City (NYC) from 2008 to 2012. Methods.?Population-based registries for HIV and deaths were linked to identify decedents not known to be HIV-infected before death. Multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to determine correlates of a new HIV diagnosis after death among all persons newly diagnosed with HIV and among all HIV-infected decedents receiving an OCME autopsy. Results.?Of 264 893 deaths, 24 426 (9.2%) were autopsied by the NYC OCME. Of these, 1623 (6.6%) were infected with HIV, including 142 (8.8%) with a new HIV diagnosis at autopsy. This represents 0.8% (142 of 18 542) of all new HIV diagnoses during the 5-year period. Decedents newly diagnosed with HIV at OCME autopsy were predominantly male (73.9%), aged 13–64 years (85.9%), non-white (85.2%), unmarried (81.7%), less than college educated (83.8%), and residents of an impoverished neighborhood (62.0%). Of all HIV-infected OCME decedents aged ?65 years (n = 71), 22.0% were diagnosed at autopsy. The strongest independent correlate of new HIV diagnosis at autopsy in both multivariable models was age ?65 years. Conclusions.?Human immunodeficiency virus diagnoses first made after death are rare, but, when observed, these diagnoses are more commonly found among persons ?65 years, suggesting that despite highly visible efforts to promote HIV testing community-wide, timely diagnosis among older adults living in impoverished, high-prevalence neighborhoods may require additional strategies. PMID:26566538

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Newly Diagnosed at Autopsy in New York City, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Chitra; Ellman, Tanya M; Myers, Julie; Madsen, Ann; Sepkowitz, Kent; Shepard, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Background. ?Studying the most extreme example of late diagnosis, new HIV diagnoses after death, may be instructive to HIV testing efforts. Using the results of routine HIV testing of autopsies performed by the Office of Chief Medical Examiner (OCME), we identified new HIV diagnoses after death in New York City (NYC) from 2008 to 2012. Methods. ?Population-based registries for HIV and deaths were linked to identify decedents not known to be HIV-infected before death. Multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to determine correlates of a new HIV diagnosis after death among all persons newly diagnosed with HIV and among all HIV-infected decedents receiving an OCME autopsy. Results. ?Of 264 893 deaths, 24 426 (9.2%) were autopsied by the NYC OCME. Of these, 1623 (6.6%) were infected with HIV, including 142 (8.8%) with a new HIV diagnosis at autopsy. This represents 0.8% (142 of 18 542) of all new HIV diagnoses during the 5-year period. Decedents newly diagnosed with HIV at OCME autopsy were predominantly male (73.9%), aged 13-64 years (85.9%), non-white (85.2%), unmarried (81.7%), less than college educated (83.8%), and residents of an impoverished neighborhood (62.0%). Of all HIV-infected OCME decedents aged ?65 years (n = 71), 22.0% were diagnosed at autopsy. The strongest independent correlate of new HIV diagnosis at autopsy in both multivariable models was age ?65 years. Conclusions. ?Human immunodeficiency virus diagnoses first made after death are rare, but, when observed, these diagnoses are more commonly found among persons ?65 years, suggesting that despite highly visible efforts to promote HIV testing community-wide, timely diagnosis among older adults living in impoverished, high-prevalence neighborhoods may require additional strategies. PMID:26566538

  9. Value of CXCL13 in diagnosing asymptomatic neurosyphilis in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Hu, RongXin; Lu, Chun; Lu, Sihan; Hu, Yunxin; Ma, Han; Lai, Wei; Zhu, Guoxing; Feng, Peiying; Lu, Rongbiao; Li, Ying

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosing asymptomatic neurosyphilis (ANS) in HIV-infected patients is difficult. A recent report suggested that CXCL13 is a promising diagnostic marker for neurosyphilis in HIV-positive patients. However, whether CXCL13 can be a diagnostic marker for ANS in HIV-infected patients remains unknown. The purpose of our study was to determine the role of CXCL13 in diagnosing ANS in HIV-infected patients. This study comprised two study and three control groups. Two study groups included 12 HIV-infected patients with ANS and 25 patients with syphilis and HIV co-infection (without ANS). Three control groups included 9 patients with ANS without HIV infection, 25 HIV-infected patients without syphilis and 10 healthy volunteers. Concentrations of CSF CXCL13 were measured before and after neurosyphilis therapy. Our results showed that CSF CXCL13 concentrations were significantly increased in all of the HIV-infected patients with ANS, the 25 HIV patients with syphilis and the 9 ANS patients without HIV, but not in the patients of the other two control groups. CSF CXCL13 concentrations declined in the two study groups of patients following neurosyphilis therapy. Therefore, CSF CXCL13 concentrations could improve the diagnosis of ANS in HIV-infected patients. PMID:25769888

  10. Expanding role of 18F-fluoro-d-deoxyglucose PET and PET/CT in spinal infections

    PubMed Central

    Rijk, Paul C.; Collins, James M. P.; Parlevliet, Thierry; Stumpe, Katrin D.; Palestro, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    18F-fluoro-d-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]-FDG PET) is successfully employed as a molecular imaging technique in oncology, and has become a promising imaging modality in the field of infection. The non-invasive diagnosis of spinal infections (SI) has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Morphological imaging modalities such as conventional radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are techniques frequently used in patients with SI. However, these methods are sometimes non-specific, and difficulties in differentiating infectious from degenerative end-plate abnormalities or postoperative changes can occur. Moreover, in contrast to CT and MRI, FDG uptake in PET is not hampered by metallic implant-associated artifacts. Conventional radionuclide imaging tests, such as bone scintigraphy, labeled leukocyte, and gallium scanning, suffer from relatively poor spatial resolution and lack sensitivity, specificity, or both. Initial data show that [18F]-FDG PET is an emerging imaging technique for diagnosing SI. [18F]-FDG PET appears to be especially helpful in those cases in which MRI cannot be performed or is non-diagnostic, and as an adjunct in patients in whom the diagnosis is inconclusive. The article reviews the currently available literature on [18F]-FDG PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis of SI. PMID:20052505

  11. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  12. Low prevalence of neurocognitive impairment in early diagnosed and managed HIV-infected persons

    PubMed Central

    Moore, David J.; Letendre, Scott; Poehlman Roediger, Mollie; Eberly, Lynn; Weintrob, Amy; Ganesan, Anuradha; Johnson, Erica; Del Rosario, Raechel; Agan, Brian K.; Hale, Braden R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence of neurocognitive impairment (NCI) among early diagnosed and managed HIV-infected persons (HIV+) compared to HIV-negative controls. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study among 200 HIV+ and 50 matched HIV-uninfected (HIV?) military beneficiaries. HIV+ patients were categorized as earlier (<6 years of HIV, no AIDS-defining conditions, and CD4 nadir >200 cells/mm3) or later stage patients (n = 100 in each group); both groups were diagnosed early and had access to care. NCI was diagnosed using a comprehensive battery of standardized neuropsychological tests. Results: HIV+ patients had a median age of 36 years, 91% were seroconverters (median window of 1.2 years), had a median duration of HIV of 5 years, had a CD4 nadir of 319, had current CD4 of 546 cells/mm3, and 64% were on highly active antiretroviral therapy (initiated 1.3 years after diagnosis at a median CD4 of 333 cells/mm3). NCI was diagnosed among 38 (19%, 95% confidence interval 14%–25%) HIV+ patients, with a similar prevalence of NCI among earlier and later stage patients (18% vs 20%, p = 0.72). The prevalence of NCI among HIV+ patients was similar to HIV? patients. Conclusions: HIV+ patients diagnosed and managed early during the course of HIV infection had a low prevalence of NCI, comparable to matched HIV-uninfected persons. Early recognition and management of HIV infection may be important in limiting neurocognitive impairment. PMID:23303852

  13. Acute lower motor neuron syndrome and spinal cord gray matter hyperintensities in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael R.; Chad, David A.; Venna, Nagagopal

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe a novel manifestation of lower motor neuron disease in patients with well-controlled HIV infection. Methods: A retrospective study was performed to identify HIV-positive individuals with acute, painful lower motor neuron diseases. Results: Six patients were identified with HIV and lower motor neuron disease. Two patients met the inclusion criteria of well-controlled, chronic HIV infection and an acute, painful, unilateral lower motor neuron paralytic syndrome affecting the distal portion of the upper limb. These patients had segmental T2-hyperintense lesions in the central gray matter of the cervical spinal cord on MRI. One patient stabilized and the second patient improved with immunomodulatory therapy. Conclusions: This newly described syndrome expands the clinical spectrum of lower motor neuron diseases in HIV. PMID:26015990

  14. Spinal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CRP) and an erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). These values may be slightly elevated after an operation, but usually return to normal values within a few weeks. Abnormal elevation may represent ...

  15. A differentially expressed set of microRNAs in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) can diagnose CNS malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Drusco, Alessandra; Bottoni, Arianna; Laganà, Alessandro; Acunzo, Mario; Fassan, Matteo; Cascione, Luciano; Antenucci, Anna; Kumchala, Prasanthi; Vicentini, Caterina; Gardiman, Marina P.; Alder, Hansjuerg; Carosi, Mariantonia A.; Ammirati, Mario; Gherardi, Stefano; Luscrì, Marilena; Carapella, Carmine; Zanesi, Nicola; Croce, Carlo M.

    2015-01-01

    Central Nervous System malignancies often require stereotactic biopsy or biopsy for differential diagnosis, and for tumor staging and grading. Furthermore, stereotactic biopsy can be non-diagnostic or underestimate grading. Hence, there is a compelling need of new diagnostic biomarkers to avoid such invasive procedures. Several biological markers have been proposed, but they can only identify specific prognostic subtype of Central Nervous System tumors, and none of them has found a standardized clinical application. The aim of the study was to identify a Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature that could differentiate among Central Nervous System malignancies. CSF total RNA of 34 neoplastic and of 14 non-diseased patients was processed by NanoString. Comparison among groups (Normal, Benign, Glioblastoma, Medulloblastoma, Metastasis and Lymphoma) lead to the identification of a microRNA profile that was further confirmed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. Hsa-miR-451, -711, 935, -223 and -125b were significantly differentially expressed among the above mentioned groups, allowing us to draw an hypothetical diagnostic chart for Central Nervous System malignancies. This is the first study to employ the NanoString technique for Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling. In this article, we demonstrated that Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling mirrors Central Nervous System physiologic or pathologic conditions. Although more cases need to be tested, we identified a diagnostic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature with good perspectives for future diagnostic clinical applications. PMID:26246487

  16. Skin and Environmental Contamination in Patients Diagnosed With Clostridium difficile Infection but Not Meeting Clinical Criteria for Testing.

    PubMed

    Kundrapu, Sirisha; Sunkesula, Venkata; Tomas, Myreen; Donskey, Curtis J

    2015-11-01

    Of 134 patients diagnosed with Clostridium difficile infection, 30 (22%) did not meet clinical criteria for testing because they lacked significant diarrhea or had alternative explanations for diarrhea and no recent antibiotic exposure. For these patients, skin and/or environmental contamination was common only in those with prior antibiotic exposure. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;36(11):1348-1350. PMID:26315659

  17. Agreement among Health Care Professionals in Diagnosing Case Vignette-Based Surgical Site Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lepelletier, Didier; Ravaud, Philippe; Baron, Gabriel; Lucet, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess agreement in diagnosing surgical site infection (SSI) among healthcare professionals involved in SSI surveillance. Methods Case-vignette study done in 2009 in 140 healthcare professionals from seven specialties (20 in each specialty, Anesthesiologists, Surgeons, Public health specialists, Infection control physicians, Infection control nurses, Infectious diseases specialists, Microbiologists) in 29 University and 36 non-University hospitals in France. We developed 40 case-vignettes based on cardiac and gastrointestinal surgery patients with suspected SSI. Each participant scored six randomly assigned case-vignettes before and after reading the SSI definition on an online secure relational database. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess agreement regarding SSI diagnosis on a seven-point Likert scale and the kappa coefficient to assess agreement for superficial or deep SSI on a three-point scale. Results Based on a consensus, SSI was present in 21 of 40 vignettes (52.5%). Intraspecialty agreement for SSI diagnosis ranged across specialties from 0.15 (95% confidence interval, 0.00–0.59) (anesthesiologists and infection control nurses) to 0.73 (0.32–0.90) (infectious diseases specialists). Reading the SSI definition improved agreement in the specialties with poor initial agreement. Intraspecialty agreement for superficial or deep SSI ranged from 0.10 (?0.19–0.38) to 0.54 (0.25–0.83) (surgeons) and increased after reading the SSI definition only among the infection control nurses from 0.10 (?0.19–0.38) to 0.41 (?0.09–0.72). Interspecialty agreement for SSI diagnosis was 0.36 (0.22–0.54) and increased to 0.47 (0.31–0.64) after reading the SSI definition. Conclusion Among healthcare professionals evaluating case-vignettes for possible surgical site infection, there was large disagreement in diagnosis that varied both between and within specialties. PMID:22529980

  18. A differentially expressed set of microRNAs in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) can diagnose CNS malignancies.

    PubMed

    Drusco, Alessandra; Bottoni, Arianna; Laganà, Alessandro; Acunzo, Mario; Fassan, Matteo; Cascione, Luciano; Antenucci, Anna; Kumchala, Prasanthi; Vicentini, Caterina; Gardiman, Marina P; Alder, Hansjuerg; Carosi, Mariantonia A; Ammirati, Mario; Gherardi, Stefano; Luscrì, Marilena; Carapella, Carmine; Zanesi, Nicola; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-08-28

    Central Nervous System malignancies often require stereotactic biopsy or biopsy for differential diagnosis, and for tumor staging and grading. Furthermore, stereotactic biopsy can be non-diagnostic or underestimate grading. Hence, there is a compelling need of new diagnostic biomarkers to avoid such invasive procedures. Several biological markers have been proposed, but they can only identify specific prognostic subtype of Central Nervous System tumors, and none of them has found a standardized clinical application.The aim of the study was to identify a Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature that could differentiate among Central Nervous System malignancies.CSF total RNA of 34 neoplastic and of 14 non-diseased patients was processed by NanoString. Comparison among groups (Normal, Benign, Glioblastoma, Medulloblastoma, Metastasis and Lymphoma) lead to the identification of a microRNA profile that was further confirmed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization.Hsa-miR-451, -711, 935, -223 and -125b were significantly differentially expressed among the above mentioned groups, allowing us to draw an hypothetical diagnostic chart for Central Nervous System malignancies.This is the first study to employ the NanoString technique for Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling. In this article, we demonstrated that Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling mirrors Central Nervous System physiologic or pathologic conditions. Although more cases need to be tested, we identified a diagnostic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature with good perspectives for future diagnostic clinical applications. PMID:26246487

  19. Intellectual Impairment in Patients with Newly Diagnosed HIV Infection in Southwestern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Sunmonu, Taofiki A.; Sellner, Johann; Ogunrin, Olubunmi A.; Imarhiagbe, Frank A.; Komolafe, Morenikeji A.; Afolabi, Olusegun T.; Ilesanmi, Olayinka S.; Olanrewaju, Fatai; Oladimeji, Benedicta Y.

    2015-01-01

    Neurocognitive impairment is a detrimental complication of HIV infection. Here, we characterized the intellectual performance of patients with newly diagnosed HIV infection in southwestern Nigeria. We conducted a prospective study at Owo Federal Medical Center by using the adapted Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). The raw scores were converted to standardized scores (z-scores) and correlated with clinical and laboratory findings. Fifty-eight HIV positive patients were recruited; 72% were in WHO stages 3 and 4. We detected a high rate of intellectual impairment in HIV positive patients and controls (63.8% and 10%, resp.; P < 0.001). HIV positive patients performed worse throughout the subtests of both verbal and performance intelligence quotients. Presence of opportunistic infections was associated with worse performance in the similarities and digit symbol tests and performance and full scale scores. Lower body weight correlated with poor performance in different WAIS subtests. The high rate of advanced disease stage warrants measures aimed at earlier diagnosis and treatment. Assessment of neurocognitive performance at diagnosis may offer the opportunity to improve functioning in daily life and counteract disease progression. PMID:26295033

  20. Aetiological diagnosis of brain abscesses and spinal infections: application of broad range bacterial polymerase chain reaction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kupila, L; Rantakokko-Jalava, K; Jalava, J; Nikkari, S; Peltonen, R; Meurman, O; Marttila, R; Kotilainen, E; Kotilainen, P

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of the broad range bacterial rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method combined with DNA sequencing in the aetiological diagnosis of intracranial or spinal infections in neurosurgical patients. Methods: In addition to conventional methods, the broad range bacterial PCR approach was applied to examine pus or tissue specimens from cerebral or spinal lesions in patients treated in a neurosurgical unit for a clinical or neuroradiological suspicion of bacterial brain abscess or spondylitis. Results: Among the 44 patients with intracranial or spinal lesions, the final diagnosis suggested bacterial disease in 25 patients, among whom the aetiological agent was identified in 17. A causative bacterial species was identified only by the rDNA PCR method in six cases, by both the PCR methodology and bacterial culture in six cases, and by bacterial culture alone in five. All samples in which a bacterial aetiology was identified only by the PCR approach were taken during antimicrobial treatment, and in three patients the method yielded the diagnosis even after ? 12 days of parenteral treatment. One case also identified by the PCR approach alone involved a brain abscess caused by Mycoplasma hominis, which is not readily cultured by routine methods. Conclusions: In patients with brain abscesses and spinal infections, the broad range bacterial rDNA PCR approach may be the only method to provide an aetiological diagnosis when the patient is receiving antimicrobial treatment, or when the causative agent is fastidious. PMID:12754340

  1. Difficulties diagnosing spinal subdural hemorrhage in a hypo-coagulated patient due to simultaneous symptomatic subdural cranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Lino

    2009-07-01

    A hypo-coagulated 58-year-old female complained of headaches right after being exposed to the first pressure waves generated during an exhibition of fireworks. The day after she presented with seizures and the CT scan showed subdural hemorrhage over the left frontoparietal sulci. Eight hours after admission she disclosed left lower limb hypo-esthesia, i.e. a finding not attributable to the cranial hemorrhage. Four hours later sphincter dysfunction and paraparesis were also present with a left predominance. This was due to a T12-L1 subdural extramedullary hemorrhage. The patient was operated and showed a favorable outcome. Hypo-coagulated patients with cranial hemorrhage require prolonged surveillance and may harbor spinal hemorrhage as well. This rare combination can be unsuspected in view of the evident cranial event, and may cause severe neurological deficits if not detected. PMID:19082640

  2. Idiopathic spinal cord herniation.

    PubMed

    Miura, Y; Mimatsu, K; Matsuyama, Y; Yoneda, M; Iwata, H

    1996-02-01

    Idiopathic spinal cord herniation is a rare disease, few cases having been reported. We encountered a case of idiopathic spinal cord herniation presenting with severe spasticity in the right leg and urinary dysfunction. The spinal cord was herniated into a cavity created by duplication of the dura mater and resection of the inner layer improved the neurological deficits. MRI, myelography, and CT myelography were useful for diagnosing this disease. Four radiological signs of spinal cord herniation are described. PMID:8692428

  3. Brief Report: Recent Infection, Sexually Transmitted Infections, and Transmission Clusters Frequently Observed Among Persons Newly Diagnosed With HIV in San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Truong, Hong-Ha M; Pipkin, Sharon; O?Keefe, Kara J; Louie, Brian; Liegler, Teri; McFarland, Willi; Grant, Robert M; Bernstein, Kyle; Scheer, Susan

    2015-08-15

    There were 1311 newly diagnosed HIV cases in San Francisco between 2005 and 2011 that were linked to care at publicly funded facilities and had viral sequences available for analysis. Of the 214 cases characterized as recently infected with HIV at the time of diagnosis, 25% had a recent sexually transmitted infection diagnosis (vs. 10% among longer-standing HIV infections, P < 0.001) and 57% were part of a phylogenetic transmission cluster (vs. 42% among longer-standing HIV infection, P < 0.001). The association observed between recent HIV infection and having a sexually transmitted infection diagnosis during the interval overlapping likely HIV acquisition points to potential opportunities to interrupt HIV transmission. PMID:25967271

  4. Those animals that were later diagnosed with BRD were more likely to be infected with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and M. haemolytica paired (p<0.05)

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    RESULTS · Those animals that were later diagnosed with BRD were more likely to be infected animals · 73 of the healthy calves were later diagnosed with BRD · 2 deep pharyngeal and 1 mid-nasal swab in the pathogen(s) an animal became infected with · The pairing of BRSV and M. haemolytica were more prevalent

  5. Spinal blocks.

    PubMed

    Kokki, Hannu

    2012-01-01

    Every anesthetist should have the expertise to perform lumbar puncture that is the prerequisite to induce spinal anesthesia. Spinal anesthesia is easy and effective technique: small amount of local anesthetic injected in the lumbar cerebrospinal fluid provides highly effective anesthesia, analgesia, and sympathetic and motor block in the lower part of the body. The main limitation of spinal anesthesia is a variable and relatively short duration of the block with a single-injection of local anesthetic. With appropriate use of adjuvant or combining spinal anesthesia with epidural anesthesia, the analgesic action can be controlled in case of early recovery of initial block or in patients with prolonged procedures. Contraindications are rare. Bleeding disorders and any major dysfunction in coagulation system are rare in children, but spinal anesthesia should not be used in children with local infection or increased intracranial pressure. Children with spinal anesthesia may develop the same adverse effects as has been reported in adults, but in contrast to adults, cardiovascular deterioration is uncommon in children even with high blocks. Most children having surgery with spinal anesthesia need sedation, and in these cases, close monitoring of sufficient respiratory function and protective airway reflexes is necessary. Postdural puncture headache and transient neurological symptoms have been reported also in pediatric patients, and thus, guardians should be provided instructions for follow-up and contact information if symptoms appear or persist after discharge. Epidural blood patch is effective treatment for prolonged, severe headache, and nonopioid analgesic is often sufficient for transient neurological symptoms. PMID:21899656

  6. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePLUS

    Tumor - spinal cord ... spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Most often these are ependymomas and other ... gene mutations. Spinal tumors can occur: Inside the spinal cord (intramedullary) In the membranes (meninges) covering the spinal ...

  7. Obtaining Self-Samples to Diagnose Curable Sexually Transmitted Infections: A Systematic Review of Patients’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Paudyal, Priyamvada; Llewellyn, Carrie; Lau, Jason; Mahmud, Mohammad; Smith, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Background Routine screening is key to sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention and control. Previous studies suggest that clinic-based screening programmes capture only a small proportion of people with STIs. Self-sampling using non- or minimally invasive techniques may be beneficial for those reluctant to actively engage with conventional sampling methods. We systematically reviewed studies of patients’ experiences of obtaining self-samples to diagnose curable STIs. Methods We conducted an electronic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, BNI, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify relevant articles published in English between January 1980 and March 2014. Studies were included if participants self-sampled for the diagnosis of a curable STI and had specifically sought participants’ opinions of their experience, acceptability, preferences, or willingness to self-sample. Results The initial search yielded 558 references. Of these, 45 studies met the inclusion criteria. Thirty-six studies assessed patients’ acceptability and experiences of self-sampling. Pooled results from these studies shows that self-sampling is a highly acceptable method with 85% of patients reporting the method to be well received and acceptable. Twenty-eight studies reported on ease of self-sampling; the majority of patients (88%) in these studies found self-sampling an “easy” procedure. Self-sampling was favoured compared to clinician sampling, and home sampling was preferred to clinic-based sampling. Females and older participants were more accepting of self-sampling. Only a small minority of participants (13%) reported pain during self-sampling. Participants were willing to undergo self-sampling and recommend others. Privacy and safety were the most common concerns. Conclusion Self-sampling for diagnostic testing is well accepted with the majority having a positive experience and willingness to use again. Standardization of self-sampling procedures and rigorous validation of outcome measurement will lead to better comparability across studies. Future studies need to conduct rigorous economic evaluations of self-sampling to inform policy development for the management of STI. PMID:25909508

  8. Incidence of microbiological contamination of local bone autograft used in posterior lumbar interbody fusion and its association with postoperative spinal infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Kang, Kyung-Chung; Chung, Sung-Soo; Kim, Ki-Tack; Shin, Seong-Kee

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to examine the results of microbiological cultures from local bone autografts used in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and to identify their association with postoperative spinal infection. METHODS The authors retrospectively evaluated cases involving 328 patients who had no previous spinal surgeries and underwent PLIF for degenerative diseases with a minimum 1-year follow-up. Local bone was obtained during laminectomy, and microbiological culture was performed immediately prior to bone grafting. The associations between culture results from local bone autografts and postoperative spinal infections were evaluated. RESULTS The contamination rate of local bone was 4.3% (14 of 328 cases). Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (29%) was the most common contaminant isolated, followed by Streptococcus species and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Of 14 patients with positive culture results, 5 (35.7%) had postoperative spinal infections and were treated with intravenous antibiotics for a minimum of 4 weeks. One of these 5 patients also underwent reoperation for debridement during this 4-week period. Regardless of the microbiological culture results, the infection rate after PLIF with local bone autograft was 2.4% (8 of 328 cases), with 5 (62.5%) of 8 patients showing positive results on autograft culture. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of contamination of local bone autograft during PLIF was considerable, and positive culture results were significantly associated with postoperative spinal infection. Special attention focused on the preparation of local bone for autograft and its microbiological culture will be helpful for the control of postoperative spinal infection. PMID:26360142

  9. The incidence and risk factors for surgical site infection after clean spinal operations: A prospective cohort study and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Saeedinia, Saeed; Nouri, Mohsen; Azarhomayoun, Amir; Hanif, Hamed; Mortazavi, Abolghasem; Bahramian, Parisa; Yarandi, Kourosh Karimi; Amirjamshidi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative infection is one of the most common complications after spine surgeries. In our study, surgical site infection (SSI) is described as; superficial (i.e., skin and subcutaneous tissues) and deep (i.e., fascia and muscles) infections occurring in the short term (i.e., 1-month) after spine surgeries (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition 81.00–81.08). To detect the risk factors for the occurrence of such a complication, studies require a large number of patients, a high quality of data and adequate analysis. In this study, we prospectively enrolled 987 patients undergoing spinal surgery over a 3 years period. Methods: From November 2010 to November 2013, 987 patients had a variety of spinal operations that included; disc herniation, spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, fracture-dislocations, spine and spinal cord tumors, and syringomyelia. Patients under the age of 10, those with a recent history of infection and antibiotherapy, and patients with immunodeficiency disorders were excluded. Results: Of the 987 spine procedures performed, 27 (2.73%) developed postoperative infections. Multi-variant data analysis indicated that multiple factors correlated with an increased risk of SSI in descending order; trauma, a past history of diabetes, smoking, being confined to bed, in the perioperative period, mean blood sugar levels above 120 mg/dl, longer lengths of incisions, and longer hospital stay. Conclusion: Considering the preventable nature of most of the factors contributing to SSI, it should be possible to reduce these complications. PMID:26500800

  10. Enhancing the Fever Workup Utilizing a Multi-Technique Modeling Approach to Diagnose Infections More Accurately

    PubMed Central

    Fadlalla, Adam M.A.; Golob, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Differentiation between infectious and non-infectious etiologies of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in trauma patients remains elusive. We hypothesized that mathematical modeling in combination with computerized clinical decision support would assist with this differentiation. The purpose of this study was to determine the capability of various mathematical modeling techniques to predict infectious complications in critically ill trauma patients and compare the performance of these models with a standard fever workup practice (identifying infections on the basis of fever or leukocytosis). Methods An 18-mo retrospective database was created using information collected daily from critically ill trauma patients admitted to an academic surgical and trauma intensive care unit. Two hundred forty-three non-infected patient-days were chosen randomly to combine with the 243 infected-days, which created a modeling sample of 486 patient-days. Utilizing ten variables known to be associated with infectious complications, decision trees, neural networks, and logistic regression analysis models were created to predict the presence of urinary tract infections (UTIs), bacteremia, and respiratory tract infections (RTIs). The data sample was split into a 70% training set and a 30% testing set. Models were compared by calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, overall accuracy, and discrimination. Results Decision trees had the best modeling performance, with a sensitivity of 83%, an accuracy of 82%, and a discrimination of 0.91 for identifying infections. Both neural networks and decision trees outperformed logistic regression analysis. A second analysis was performed utilizing the same 243 infected days and only those non-infected patient-days associated with negative microbiologic cultures (n?=?236). Decision trees again had the best modeling performance for infection identification, with a sensitivity of 79%, an accuracy of 83%, and a discrimination of 0.87. Conclusion The use of mathematical modeling techniques beyond logistic regression can improve the robustness and accuracy of predicting infections in critically ill trauma patients. Decision tree analysis appears to have the best potential to use in assisting physicians in differentiating infectious from non-infectious SIRS. PMID:20666579

  11. Increase in transmitted resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors among newly diagnosed HIV-1 infections in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One out of ten newly diagnosed patients in Europe was infected with a virus carrying a drug resistant mutation. We analysed the patterns over time for transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM) using data from the European Spread program. Methods Clinical, epidemiological and virological data from 4317 patients newly diagnosed with HIV-1 infection between 2002 and 2007 were analysed. Patients were enrolled using a pre-defined sampling strategy. Results The overall prevalence of TDRM in this period was 8.9% (95% CI: 8.1-9.8). Interestingly, significant changes over time in TDRM caused by the different drug classes were found. Whereas nucleoside resistance mutations remained constant at 5%, a significant decline in protease inhibitors resistance mutations was observed, from 3.9% in 2002 to 1.6% in 2007 (p?=?0.001). In contrast, resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) doubled from 2.0% in 2002 to 4.1% in 2007 (p?=?0.004) with 58% of viral strains carrying a K103N mutation. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these temporal changes could not be explained by large clusters of TDRM. Conclusion During the years 2002 to 2007 transmitted resistance to NNRTI has doubled to 4% in Europe. The frequent use of NNRTI in first-line regimens and the clinical impact of NNRTI mutations warrants continued monitoring. PMID:25047543

  12. Diagnosing of Herpes Simplex Virus Infections in Suspected Patients Using Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Aliabadi, Nasrin; Jamalidoust, Marzieh; Asaei, Sadaf; Namayandeh, Mandana; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Herpes simplex virus infections are very common worldwide. The virus can cause infection in various body parts, especially eyes and the nervous system. Therefore, an early diagnosis and highly sensitive method is very helpful. Objectives: The present study sought to investigate the efficiency of Real-time TaqMan probe PCR in the diagnosis of HSV infection in suspected patients. Patients and Methods: In this study, 1566 patients with suspected HSV infections were enrolled. They aged 17 days to 96 years. The collected specimens were classified into four groups; cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from HSE suspected individuals, samples from eye epithelial scraping, tear fluid or aqueous humor from herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) suspected patients, plasma of immune compromised patients and mucocutaneous collected samples from different body parts. The samples were analyzed by Real-time PCR assays. Results: In total, 44 (5.6%), 118 (26.8%), 23 (11.7%), 13 (44.8%) and 65 (45.5%) of 791 HSE, 407 HSK, 29 skin HSV, 143 oropharyngeal suspected patients and 196 patients with systemic HSV infection HSV had positive results by Real-time PCR assays, respectively. Conclusions: Real-time PCR assay, due to its high sensitivity and specificity, can help in early diagnosis and more effective treatment for patients. Also, it requires shorter hospital stay and promotes patients' survival. PMID:25834711

  13. A Lethal Sequelae of Spinal Infection Complicating Surgery and Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Mak, Kin Cheung; Tsang, Helen Hoi Lun

    2015-01-01

    Patients who have undergone neck dissection and radiotherapy are at risk of cervical spine infections. Furthermore, previous radiotherapy and cervical spine infections can lead to fistula formation to the subarachnoid space and intracranial infection. This report discusses the serious consequences of a missed cervical spine infection including cerebrospinal fluid fistula formation and persistent central nervous system infection, and serves as a reminder to clinicians of the possible association between cervical spine infections and prior head and neck surgery and radiotherapy. In all such cases, the posterior pharyngeal wall should be inspected during follow-up. Despite the appearance of an intracranial infection, the cervical spine should be investigated, especially if the response to appropriate antibiotics is suboptimal. PMID:26240724

  14. A Lethal Sequelae of Spinal Infection Complicating Surgery and Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Mak, Kin Cheung; Tsang, Helen Hoi Lun; Luk, Keith Dip Kei

    2015-08-01

    Patients who have undergone neck dissection and radiotherapy are at risk of cervical spine infections. Furthermore, previous radiotherapy and cervical spine infections can lead to fistula formation to the subarachnoid space and intracranial infection. This report discusses the serious consequences of a missed cervical spine infection including cerebrospinal fluid fistula formation and persistent central nervous system infection, and serves as a reminder to clinicians of the possible association between cervical spine infections and prior head and neck surgery and radiotherapy. In all such cases, the posterior pharyngeal wall should be inspected during follow-up. Despite the appearance of an intracranial infection, the cervical spine should be investigated, especially if the response to appropriate antibiotics is suboptimal. PMID:26240724

  15. Glucocorticoid Therapy and the Risk of Infection in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yasuharu; Ishizuka, Naoki; Arai, Toru; Kiyokawa, Tetsuyuki; Suematsu, Eiichi; Yoshimura, Mitsuhiro; Kawabe, Yojiro; Matsumura, Ryutaro; Akagawa, Shinobu; Mori, Shunsuke; Shirai, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yukio; Minami, Naoya; Soga, Takayoshi; Owan, Isoko; Ohshima, Shiro; Yoshizawa, Shigeru; Matsui, Toshihiro; Tohma, Shigeto; Bito, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is associated with the risk of life-threatening adverse events in patients with autoimmune disease. To determine accurately the incidence and predictors of GC-related adverse events during initial GC treatment, we conducted a cohort study. Patients with autoimmune disease who were initially treated with GCs in Japan National Hospital Organization (NHO) hospitals were enrolled. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to determine the independent risks for GC-related serious adverse events and mortality. Survival was analyzed according to the Kaplan-Meier method and was assessed with the log-rank test. The 604 patients had a total follow-up of 1105.8 person-years (mean, 1.9 year per patient). One hundred thirty-six patients had at least 1 infection with objective confirmation, and 71 patients had serious infections. Twenty-two cardiovascular events, 55 cases of diabetes, 30 fractures, 23 steroid psychosis events, and 4 avascular bone necrosis events occurred during the follow-up period. The incidence of serious infections was 114.8 (95% confidence interval, 95.7–136.6) per 1000 person-years. After adjustment for covariates, the following independent risk factors for serious infection were found: elderly age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.25/10-yr age increment; p = 0.016), presence of interstitial lung disease (HR, 2.01; p = 0.011), high-dose GC use (?29.9 mg/d) (HR, 1.71; p = 0.047), and low performance status (Karnofsky score, HR, 0.98/1-score increment; p = 0.002). During the follow-up period, 73 patients died, 35 of whom died of infection. Similarly, elderly age, the presence of interstitial lung disease, and high-dose GC use were found to be significant independent risk factors for mortality. The incidence of serious and life-threatening infection was higher in patients with autoimmune disease who were initially treated with GCs. Although the primary diseases are important confounding factors, elderly age, male sex, the presence of interstitial lung diseases, high-dose GCs, and low performance status were shown to be risk factors for serious infection and mortality.

  16. Increase in newly diagnosed HIV infections among young black men who have sex with men--Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, 1999-2008.

    PubMed

    2011-02-01

    During 2001-2006, new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnoses among black men aged 13-24 years who have sex with men (MSM) in 33 states increased by 93%. The Wisconsin Division of Public Health (WDPH) recently reported to CDC a 144% increase during 2000-2008 in HIV diagnoses among black MSM aged 15-29 years in Milwaukee County. In October 2009, the City of Milwaukee Health Department (MHD), WDPH, and CDC investigated whether the increase in HIV infections among young black MSM in Milwaukee represented increased HIV transmission or simply better identification of prevalent infections. This report describes the results of that investigation, which indicated that a new "social networks" HIV testing strategy and the recent expansion of better targeted HIV testing efforts accounted for few diagnoses among young black MSM and occurred after HIV diagnoses increased, respectively. Therefore, although some diagnoses were made because of intensified testing, an increase in HIV transmission likely occurred. Moreover, an increase in syphilis diagnoses among young black MSM in Milwaukee preceded the increase in HIV diagnoses, which suggests that changes in risk behavior or sexual networks might explain the increase. These findings highlight the need for new or improved interventions promoting prevention education, early HIV detection, and entry to care for young HIV-infected and at-risk black MSM in Milwaukee. PMID:21293324

  17. Unreported Male Sex Partners Among Men with Newly Diagnosed HIV Infection - North Carolina, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsiu; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Gay, Cynthia L; Zhang, Xinjian; Beagle, Steve; Hall, Laura; Jackson, Tonyka; Marmorino, Jenni; Do, Ann N; Peters, Philip J

    2015-09-25

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention interventions, such as preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), are often targeted to men who have sex with men (MSM) who self-report high-risk behaviors. Data from a prospective study evaluating methods to detect acute HIV infection among a primarily young (aged <25 years) and black or African American (African American) population from North Carolina were analyzed. In the study, participants were asked about risk behaviors during pretest counseling (at the time of testing) and then during a partner services interview (at HIV diagnosis). Participants whose disclosure of sexual risk behaviors during pretest counseling was different from their disclosure of sexual risk behaviors during their partner services interview were identified, and factors associated with these discordant responses were examined. Among 113 HIV-infected men, 26 (23.0%) did not disclose male sex partners at pretest counseling, but subsequently did disclose this information during their partner services interview. When compared with men who disclosed having male partners at pretest counseling, these 26 MSM who did not disclose male partners during pretest counseling were found to have a similar number of male partners during contact tracing, but were more likely to have a female partner (30.8% versus 6.9%). In addition, the proportions of MSM found to have at least one HIV-infected partner were similar for both groups (MSM who disclosed having male partners during pretest counseling and those who did not). To better customize HIV prevention interventions for MSM, HIV prevention programs might consider using novel strategies to accurately assess risk in this population. PMID:26401589

  18. Durations of military service after diagnoses of HIV-1 infections among active component members of the U.S. Armed Forces, 1990-2013.

    PubMed

    Brundage, John F; Hunt, Devin J; Clark, Leslie L

    2015-08-01

    This report describes the trends in length of military service for active component members of the U.S. Armed Forces who were diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections during 1990-2013. Durations of service after service members' initial diagnoses of HIV-1 infection were compared for five different cohorts that corresponded to when diagnoses were made during the 5-year intervals beginning in 1990, 1995, 2000, and 2005, and the 4-year interval of 2010-2013. By several measures, the durations of service after initial diagnoses of HIV-1 infection increased from the earliest to the later cohorts. The findings are discussed in the context of changes in several factors during the surveillance period: the growing availability and effectiveness of treatments for HIV-1 disease; the stigmas associated with the diagnosis of HIV-1 infection and its link to homosexuality; and the changes in U.S. military policy about the inclusion of homosexuals in its ranks. Also discussed are the limitations of the estimates for the most recent cohorts and the future prospects for continued lengthening of service for those infected with HIV-1. PMID:26295975

  19. Atypical spinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pande, Ketan C; Babhulkar, Sudhir S

    2002-05-01

    Typical spinal tuberculosis is readily diagnosed and treated. Certain atypical clinical and radiologic presentations of spinal tuberculosis are described. Failure to recognize these presentations may lead to delay in diagnosis and initiation of treatment. In some atypical forms of the disease, this may have disastrous consequences. The current authors present a new classification for atypical spinal tuberculosis and describe the various presentations. The role of advanced imaging studies such as computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging and imaging-guided aspiration cytology is discussed. PMID:11964633

  20. Acute spinal cord injury and infection with multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex among returning Operation Iraqi Freedom soldiers: Successful innovations in rehabilitation during isolation.

    PubMed

    Recio, Albert C; Bohart, Zachary W; Havens, Spencer R; Stiens, Steven A

    2010-04-01

    Concerns about drug-resistant infectious organisms are increasing in rehabilitation facilities. Resulting isolation protocols can potentially challenge the patients' access to medical care, psychological adaptation, mobility, and environmental interaction and therefore hinder the rehabilitation process. We report a systematic, retrospective case review of an active-duty Army sergeant who sustained a C5 American Spinal Cord Injury Association Impairment Scale A spinal cord injury while serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom. The patient's acute rehabilitation was complicated by an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex infection, in the blood and urine, contracted while in Iraq. Isolation protocols were designed to enable regular hands-on contact for proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, transfers, wheelchair fitting, mobility training, and environmental control. After 1 mo of comprehensive acute interdisciplinary rehabilitation, delivered in a single room on the spinal cord injury unit, the patient acquired functional skills comparable with other complete C5 tetraplegics in our unit. If a patient with spinal cord injury must be placed in isolation, it is still feasible to conduct a comprehensive interdisciplinary rehabilitation program while strictly adhering to contact isolation protocols. PMID:20068440

  1. A meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of real-time PCR for diagnosing novel coronavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Lin, C; Ye, R; Xia, Y L

    2015-01-01

    Novel coronavirus (nCoV) belongs to the Coronaviridae family, which includes the virus that causes SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome. However, infection source, transmission route, and host of nCoV have not yet been thoroughly characterized. In some cases, nCoV presented a limited person-to-person transmission. Therefore, early diagnosis of nCoV may be of importance for reducing the spread of disease in public. Methods for nCoV diagnosis involve smear dyeing inspection, culture identification, and real-time PCR detection, all of which are proved highly effective. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of real-time PCR for diagnosing nCoV infection. Fifteen articles conformed to the inclusion and exclusion criteria for further meta-analysis on the basis of a wide range of publications searched from databases involving PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Medline, ISI. We analyzed the stability and publication bias as well as examined the heterogeneity inspection of real-time PCR detection in contrast to smear staining and culture identification. The fixed-effect model was adopted in our meta-analysis. Our result demonstrated that the combination of real-time PCR and smear diagnostics yielded an odds ratio (OR) = 1.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.51-2.41, Z = 5.43, P < 0.05, while the combination of real-time PCR and culture identification yielded OR = 2.44, 95%CI = 1.77-3.37, Z = 5.41, P < 0.05. Therefore, we propose real-time PCR as an efficient method that offers an auxiliary support for future nCoV diagnosis. PMID:26634531

  2. THE EFFECT OF INTRAWOUND VANCOMYCIN POWDER ON SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS IN POSTERIOR INSTRUMENTED SPINAL ARTHRODESES

    E-print Network

    Heller, Aaron

    2012-08-31

    . Klevens RM, Edwards JR, Richards CL, Jr., et al. Estimating health care-associated infections and deaths in U.S. hospitals, 2002. Public Health Rep. 2007;122(2):160-166. 3. de Lissovoy G, Fraeman K, Hutchins V, Murphy D, Song D, Vaughn BB. Surgical site... procedures specifically. Sampling the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project dataset from 2005, de Lissovoy et al used a conservative approach and targeted a single SSI ICD9-CM code3. They found that compared...

  3. Spinal stenosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... claudication; Central spinal stenosis; Foraminal spinal stenosis; Degenerative spine disease; Back pain - spinal stenosis ... to bulge. The bones and ligaments of the spine thicken or grow larger. This is caused by ...

  4. Spinal infection multidisciplinary management project (SIMP): from diagnosis to treatment guideline.

    PubMed

    Gasbarrini, A; Boriani, L; Nanni, C; Zamparini, E; Rorato, G; Ghermandi, R; Salvadori, C; Allegri, V; Bandiera, S; Barbanti-Brodano, G; Colangeli, S; Corghi, A; Terzi, S; Babbi, L; Amendola, L; Cristini, F; Marinacci, G; Tumietto, F; Ciminari, R; Malaguti, M C; Rimondi, E; Difiore, M; Bacchin, R; Facchini, F; Frugiuele, J; Morigi, A; Albisinni, U; Bonarelli, S; Fanti, S; Viale, P; Boriani, S

    2011-01-01

    Spine infections require a multidisciplinary approach to be treated and solved. A guide line to drive physicians in the deep complexity of such a disease is extremely helpful. SIMP suggests a flow-chart built up on clear concepts such as right and well managed antibiotic therapy, sound stability of the spine, correct and smart use of the standard and functional imaging techniques, such as f18 FDG PET/CT. In 16 months a total of 41 patients have been treated for spondylodiscitis, discitis and vertebral osteomyelitis by our team of physicians and 25 patients have been enrolled in a prospective study whose target is the assessment of the SIMP flow-chart and of every single aspect that characterize it. PMID:21669158

  5. High Percentage of Recent HIV Infection Among HIV-Positive Individuals Newly Diagnosed at Voluntary Counseling and Testing Sites in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Marzec-Bogustawska, Anna; Janiec, Janusz; Smole?-Dzirba, Joanna; W?sik, Tomasz; Gniewosz, Joanna; Zalewska, Ma?gorzata; Murphy, Gary; McKinney, Elaine; Porter, Kholoud

    2013-01-01

    Abstract To gain insight into HIV transmission we estimated the proportion of those recently infected. We examined data from HIV-positive patients and a random 10% sample of HIV-negative patients tested at Voluntary Counseling and Testing sites in Poland in 2006. Archived samples from positive patients were tested by three assays to differentiate recent from long-standing infection. Using logistic regression, we examined the association of recent infection (at least one assay) with age, sex, HIV exposure category, and the interval between self-reported HIV exposure and previous HIV test. Of 13,511 tests, 154 (1.1%) were HIV positive, representing 19.7% (n=783) of new diagnoses in Poland in 2006. Demographic and behavioral data were linked for 95, of whom 45 (47%) were recently infected and 1,001 were HIV negative. New diagnoses were more likely to be injectors (17% vs. 2%), men who have sex with men (MSM) (37% vs. 12%), and less frequent condom users (7.8% vs. 14% always) compared to HIV negatives. The median number of partners during the past 12 months was one and two among positives and negatives, but was higher among MSM—four and three, respectively. Ever injectors were less likely to be recently infected (adjusted OR=0.15, 95%CI=0.03–0.73). Having two or more sexual partners in the past 12 months was an independent predictor of recent infection (4.01, 1.4–11.49). We found no evidence that age or sex predicted recent infection. These data reinforce health education campaigns for safe sex messages, especially among MSM. They also suggest, albeit based on a subset of new diagnoses, that interventions should not be limited to selected age/sex groups. PMID:23343475

  6. Prevention of urinary tract infections in palliative radiation for vertebral metastasis and spinal compression: A pilot study in 71 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Manas, Ana . E-mail: amanas.hdoc@salud.madrid.org; Glaria, Luis; Pena, Carmen; Sotoca, Amalia; Lanzos, Eduardo; Fernandez, Castalia; Riviere, Marc

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of bladder instillations of hyaluronic acid (HA) on the prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients receiving emergency radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression. Methods and Materials: Patients were recruited consecutively at one center and assigned to usual care (UC) (n = 34, mean age 62.2 years) or UC with once-weekly HA instillation (UC + HA) (Cystistat: 40 mg in 50 mL phosphate-buffered saline) (n = 37; mean age, 63.1 years). All patients had an indwelling catheter and received radiotherapy. UTI status was assessed at baseline and during hospitalization. Results: At baseline, patient groups were comparable, except for the prevalence of UTI at baseline, which was 11.8% and 0% in the UC and UC + HA patients, respectively (p = 0.0477). During hospitalization, 76.5% (vs. 11.8% at baseline, p < 0.0001) of the UC patients had a UTI compared with 13.5% (vs. 0% at baseline, p = 0.0541) of the UC + HA patients (p < 0.0001). Both groups were hospitalized for similar periods (19.8 days [UC] vs. 18.5 days, p = 0.4769) and received equivalent radiotherapy sessions (4.6 [UC] vs. 5.8 sessions, p = 0.2368). Conclusions: Patients receiving UC + HA had a 5.7-fold decrease in UTI prevalence over the hospitalization period compared to UC patients, suggesting that bladder instillations of HA effectively prevent UTI in patients with indwelling catheters receiving radiotherapy for nerve compression.

  7. Decreasing Proportion of Recent Infections among Newly Diagnosed HIV-1 Cases in Switzerland, 2008 to 2013 Based on Line-Immunoassay-Based Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Schüpbach, Jörg; Niederhauser, Christoph; Yerly, Sabine; Regenass, Stephan; Gorgievski, Meri; Aubert, Vincent; Ciardo, Diana; Klimkait, Thomas; Dollenmaier, Günter; Andreutti, Corinne; Martinetti, Gladys; Brandenberger, Marcel; Gebhardt, Martin D.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV surveillance requires monitoring of new HIV diagnoses and differentiation of incident and older infections. In 2008, Switzerland implemented a system for monitoring incident HIV infections based on the results of a line immunoassay (Inno-Lia) mandatorily conducted for HIV confirmation and type differentiation (HIV-1, HIV-2) of all newly diagnosed patients. Based on this system, we assessed the proportion of incident HIV infection among newly diagnosed cases in Switzerland during 2008-2013. Methods and Results Inno-Lia antibody reaction patterns recorded in anonymous HIV notifications to the federal health authority were classified by 10 published algorithms into incident (up to 12 months) or older infections. Utilizing these data, annual incident infection estimates were obtained in two ways, (i) based on the diagnostic performance of the algorithms and utilizing the relationship ‘incident = true incident + false incident’, (ii) based on the window-periods of the algorithms and utilizing the relationship ‘Prevalence = Incidence x Duration’. From 2008—2013, 3’851 HIV notifications were received. Adult HIV-1 infections amounted to 3’809 cases, and 3’636 of them (95.5%) contained Inno-Lia data. Incident infection totals calculated were similar for the performance- and window-based methods, amounting on average to 1’755 (95% confidence interval, 1588—1923) and 1’790 cases (95% CI, 1679—1900), respectively. More than half of these were among men who had sex with men. Both methods showed a continuous decline of annual incident infections 2008—2013, totaling -59.5% and -50.2%, respectively. The decline of incident infections continued even in 2012, when a 15% increase in HIV notifications had been observed. This increase was entirely due to older infections. Overall declines 2008—2013 were of similar extent among the major transmission groups. Conclusions Inno-Lia based incident HIV-1 infection surveillance proved useful and reliable. It represents a free, additional public health benefit of the use of this relatively costly test for HIV confirmation and type differentiation. PMID:26230082

  8. Individual-Level and Partner-Level Predictors of Newly Diagnosed HIV Infection Among Black and White Men Who Have Sex with Men in Baltimore, MD.

    PubMed

    Maulsby, Cathy; Jain, Kriti; Sifakis, Frangiscos; German, Danielle; Flynn, Colin P; Holtgrave, David

    2015-05-01

    Black MSM continue to be the group most disproportionately impacted by HIV in the United States. This study assesses the relationship between partner-level and respondent-level characteristics and newly diagnosed HIV infection among a sample of MSM. Ego-centric data were gathered using venue-based time-space sampling on 335 men who reported on a total of 831 male anal sex partners. In multivariate analyses, age of partner, HIV status of partner, and respondent having had an STD in the past twelve months were associated with a newly diagnosed HIV infection among black MSM. Efforts for black MSM are needed that aim to increase HIV and STD testing, foster open communication between partners about HIV status, and address social determinants of health. PMID:25092514

  9. Recent trends in diagnoses of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections in England and Wales among men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, N; Dougan, S; McGarrigle, C; Baster, K; Rice, B; Evans, B; Fenton, K

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To examine trends in rates of diagnoses of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in men who have sex with men (MSM) in England and Wales between 1997 and 2002. Methods: Estimates of the MSM population living in England and Wales, London and the rest of England and Wales were applied to surveillance data, providing rates of diagnoses of HIV and STIs and age group specific rates for HIV and uncomplicated gonorrhoea. Results: Between 1997 and 2002, rates of diagnoses of HIV and acute STIs in MSM increased substantially. Rates in London were higher than elsewhere. Rises in acute STIs were similar throughout England and Wales, except for uncomplicated gonorrhoea and infectious syphilis, with greater increases outside London. Rates of gonorrhoea diagnoses doubled between 1999 and 2001 (661/100 000, 1271/100 000, p<0.001) in England and Wales followed by a slight decline to 1210/100 000 (p = 0.03) in 2002—primarily the result of a decline in diagnoses among men aged 25–34 (1340/100 000, 1128/100 000, p<0.001) and 35–44 (924/100 000, 863/100 000, p = 0.03) in London. HIV was the third most common STI diagnosed in MSM in England and Wales and the second in London, with the highest rate (1286/100 000) found among men aged 35–44 in London in 2002. Conclusions: Rates of diagnosis of HIV and other STIs have increased substantially among MSM in England and Wales. Increases show heterogeneity by infection, geography, and age over time. Rates in London were twice those seen elsewhere, with greatest changes over time. The observed changes reflect concomitant increases in high risk behaviour documented in behavioural surveillance survey programmes. PMID:15572622

  10. Spinal dorsal dermal sinus tract: An experience of 21 cases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ishwar; Rohilla, Seema; Kumar, Prashant; Sharma, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal dorsal dermal sinus is a rare entity, which usually comes to clinical attention by cutaneous abnormalities, neurologic deficit, and/or infection. The present study was undertaken to know the clinical profile of these patients, to study associated anomalies and to assess the results of surgical intervention. Methods: Medical records of 21 patients treated for spinal dorsal dermal sinus from September 2007 to December 2013 were reviewed. Results: We had 21 patients with male: female ratio of 13:8. Only 2 patients were below 1-year of age, and most cases (15) were between 2 and 15 years (mean age = 8.2 years). Lumbar region (11 cases) was most frequently involved, followed by thoracic (4 cases), lumbosacral, and cervical region in 3 patients each. All of our patients presented with neurological deficits. Three patients were admitted with acute meningitis with acute onset paraplegia and had intraspinal abscess. The motor, sensory, and autonomic deficits were seen in 14, 6, and 8 patients, respectively. Scoliosis and congenital talipes equinovarus were the common associated anomalies. All patients underwent surgical exploration and repair of dysraphic state and excision of the sinus. Overall, 20 patients improved or neurological status stabilized and only 1 patient deteriorated. Postoperative wound infection was seen in 2 cases. Conclusions: All patients with spinal dorsal dermal sinuses should be offered aggressive surgical treatment in the form of total excision of sinus tract and correction of spinal malformation, as soon as diagnosed. PMID:26539316

  11. Selective testing strategies for diagnosing group A streptococcal infection in children with pharyngitis: a systematic review and prospective multicentre external validation study

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jérémie F.; Cohen, Robert; Levy, Corinne; Thollot, Franck; Benani, Mohamed; Bidet, Philippe; Chalumeau, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several clinical prediction rules for diagnosing group A streptococcal infection in children with pharyngitis are available. We aimed to compare the diagnostic accuracy of rules-based selective testing strategies in a prospective cohort of children with pharyngitis. Methods: We identified clinical prediction rules through a systematic search of MEDLINE and Embase (1975–2014), which we then validated in a prospective cohort involving French children who presented with pharyngitis during a 1-year period (2010–2011). We diagnosed infection with group A streptococcus using two throat swabs: one obtained for a rapid antigen detection test (StreptAtest, Dectrapharm) and one obtained for culture (reference standard). We validated rules-based selective testing strategies as follows: low risk of group A streptococcal infection, no further testing or antibiotic therapy needed; intermediate risk of infection, rapid antigen detection for all patients and antibiotic therapy for those with a positive test result; and high risk of infection, empiric antibiotic treatment. Results: We identified 8 clinical prediction rules, 6 of which could be prospectively validated. Sensitivity and specificity of rules-based selective testing strategies ranged from 66% (95% confidence interval [CI] 61–72) to 94% (95% CI 92–97) and from 40% (95% CI 35–45) to 88% (95% CI 85–91), respectively. Use of rapid antigen detection testing following the clinical prediction rule ranged from 24% (95% CI 21–27) to 86% (95% CI 84–89). None of the rules-based selective testing strategies achieved our diagnostic accuracy target (sensitivity and specificity > 85%). Interpretation: Rules-based selective testing strategies did not show sufficient diagnostic accuracy in this study population. The relevance of clinical prediction rules for determining which children with pharyngitis should undergo a rapid antigen detection test remains questionable. PMID:25487666

  12. Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Safak; Tatar, Oner; Akpancar, Serkan; Bilgic, Serkan; Ersen, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis (TB) is a significant form of TB, causing spinal deformity and paralysis. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for avoiding multivertebral destruction and are critical for improving outcomes in spinal TB. We believe that appropriate treatment method should be implemented at the early stage of this disease and that the Gulhane Askeri T?p Akademisi classification system can be considered a practical guide for spinal TB treatment planning in all countries. PMID:26609247

  13. Pediatric spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Wagner, Matthias W; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Tekes, Aylin; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric spinal trauma is unique. The developing pediatric spinal column and spinal cord deal with direct impact and indirect acceleration/deceleration or shear forces very different compared to adult patients. In addition children are exposed to different kind of traumas. Moreover, each age group has its unique patterns of injury. Familiarity with the normal developing spinal anatomy and kind of traumas is essential to correctly diagnose injury. Various imaging modalities can be used. Ultrasound is limited to the neonatal time period; plain radiography and computer tomography are typically used in the acute work-up and give highly detailed information about the osseous lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive for disco-ligamentous and spinal cord injuries. Depending on the clinical presentation and timing of trauma the various imaging modalities will be employed. In the current review article, a summary of the epidemiology and distribution of posttraumatic lesions is discussed in the context of the normal anatomical variations due to progressing development of the child. PMID:25512255

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of a point-of-care urine test for tuberculosis screening among newly-diagnosed hiv-infected adults: a prospective, clinic-based study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A rapid diagnostic test for active tuberculosis (TB) at the clinical point-of-care could expedite case detection and accelerate TB treatment initiation. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of a rapid urine lipoarabinomannan (LAM) test for TB screening among HIV-infected adults in a TB-endemic setting. Methods We prospectively enrolled newly-diagnosed HIV-infected adults (?18 years) at 4 outpatient clinics in Durban from Oct 2011-May 2012, excluding those on TB therapy. A physician evaluated all participants and offered CD4 cell count testing. Trained study nurses collected a sputum sample for acid-fast bacilli smear microscopy (AFB) and mycobacterial culture, and performed urine LAM testing using Determine™ TB LAM in the clinic. The presence of a band regardless of intensity on the urine LAM test was considered positive. We defined as the gold standard for active pulmonary TB a positive sputum culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Diagnostic accuracy of urine LAM was assessed, alone and in combination with smear microscopy, and stratified by CD4 cell count. Results Among 342 newly-diagnosed HIV-infected participants, 190 (56%) were male, mean age was 35.6 years, and median CD4 was 182/mm3. Sixty participants had culture-positive pulmonary TB, resulting in an estimated prevalence of 17.5% (95% CI 13.7-22.0%). Forty-five (13.2%) participants were urine LAM positive. Mean time from urine specimen collection to LAM test result was 40 minutes (95% CI 34–46 minutes). Urine LAM test sensitivity was 28.3% (95% CI 17.5-41.4) overall, and 37.5% (95% CI 21.1-56.3) for those with CD4 count <100/mm3, while specificity was 90.1% (95% CI 86.0-93.3) overall, and 86.9% (95% CI 75.8-94.2) for those with CD4?diagnosed HIV-infected adults, but improved sensitivity when combined with sputum smear microscopy. PMID:24571362

  15. Staging Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  16. Spinal hamartoma in an elderly man.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Daisuke; Shimono, Taro; Takami, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Sayaka; Tsukamoto, Taro; Miki, Yukio

    2015-11-01

    Spinal hamartoma is a very rare, benign spinal lesion, usually occurring in children with either spinal dysraphism or neurofibromatosis type 1. We report a case of thoracic spinal hamartoma in a 75-year-old male without associated lesions. This patient represents the oldest of 19 patients whose cases we found reported in detail and one of only nine reported cases without associated lesions. On magnetic resonance imaging, the current patient showed a well-defined exophytic appearance arising from the dorsal midline surface of the spinal cord. We discuss the radiological and pathological features of spinal hamartoma and review the literature, focusing on magnetic resonance imaging features for diagnosing spinal hamartoma. PMID:26316189

  17. Occult Plasmodium vivax infection diagnosed by a polymerase chain reaction-based detection system: a case report.

    PubMed

    Blossom, David B; King, Charles H; Armitage, Keith B

    2005-07-01

    After a trip to Zambia, a previously healthy adult traveler presented with a prolonged illness characterized by low-grade fevers and fatigue. Although malaria smears and antibody tests results for Plasmodium species were negative, a diagnosis of malaria was ultimately determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and species-specific nucleic acid hybridization techniques. The patient was successfully treated and cured. Clinical use of PCR technology may facilitate the identification of cases of smear-negative malaria, which up to the present time, have been difficult to diagnose. PMID:16014856

  18. Comparison of an indirect haemagglutination assay and an ELISA for diagnosing Fasciola hepatica in experimentally and naturally infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, J B; de Leeuw, W A; van der Heijden, P J

    1992-12-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with somatic (S) or excretory-secretory antigens (ES) was compared with an indirect haemagglutination assay (IHA) for ability to detect antibodies against Fasciola hepatica in sheep. The specificity of both assays was determined by testing sera collected from sheep experimentally or naturally mono-infected with Fasciola hepatica, Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia circumcincta, Cooperia curticei, Taenia ovis, Eimeria spp., Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis or Nematodirus battus respectively. With S or ES antigens the specificity of the ELISA was 98% or 95% respectively, whereas the specificity of the IHA was 86%. Antibodies directed against Fasciola hepatica were detected by the ELISA with S or ES antigens from 2 weeks after infection until the end of the experiment, whereas the IHA detected antibodies from week 3. We conclude that the ELISA with S antigens compares favourably with the IHA and can be used for the serodiagnosis of ovine fasciolosis in the Netherlands. PMID:1485406

  19. Retrospective, Demographic, and Clinical Investigation of the Causes of Postoperative Infection in Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Who Underwent Posterior Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Yaldiz, Can; Yaldiz, Mahizer; Ceylan, Nehir; Kacira, Ozlem Kitiki; Ceylan, Davut; Kacira, Tibet; Kizilcay, Gokhan; Tanriverdi, Taner

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Owing to the increasing population of elderly patients, a large number of patients with degenerative spondylosis are currently being surgically treated. Although basic measures for decreasing postoperative surgical infections (PSIs) are considered, it still remains among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this retrospective analysis is to present possible causes leading to PSI in patients who underwent surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylosis and highlight how it can be avoided to decrease morbidity and mortality. The study included 540 patients who underwent posterior stabilization due to degenerative lumbar stenosis between January 2013 and January 2014. The data before and after surgery was retrieved from the hospital charts. Patients with degenerative lumbar stenosis who were operated upon in this study had >2 levels of laminectomy and facetectomy. For this reason, posterior stabilization was performed for all the patients included in this study. Determining the causes of postoperative infection (PI) following spinal surgeries performed with instrumentation is a struggle. Seventeen different parameters that may be related to PI were evaluated in this study. The presence of systemic diseases, unknown glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions were among the parameters that increased the prevalence of PI. Alternatively, prolene sutures, double-layered gloves, and the use of rifampicin Sv (RIS) decreased the incidence of PI. Although the presence of systemic diseases, unnoticed glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions increased PIs, prolene suture material, double-layered gloves, and the use of RIS decreased PIs. PMID:26200620

  20. Epidemiological characteristics of Malassezia folliculitis and use of the May-Grünwald-Giemsa stain to diagnose the infection.

    PubMed

    Durdu, Murat; Güran, Mümtaz; Ilkit, Macit

    2013-08-01

    Various bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral pathogens can cause folliculitis, which is often mistakenly treated with antibiotics for months or even years. A laboratory diagnosis is required before therapy can be planned. Here, we describe the prevalence and risk factors, as well as the clinical, cytological, and mycological characteristics, of patients with Malassezia folliculitis (MF) in Adana, Turkey. We also report the treatment responses of the MF patients and describe the Malassezia spp. using culture-based molecular methods. Cytological examinations were performed in 264 folliculitis patients, 49 of whom (18.5%) were diagnosed with MF. The positivity of the May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG) smear was higher (100%) than that of the potassium hydroxide test (81.6%). Using Wood's light, yellow-green fluorescence was observed in 66.7% of the MF patients. Identification using the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region revealed that Malassezia globosa was the most common species, followed by Malassezia sympodialis, Malassezia restricta, and Malassezia furfur. The MF patients were treated with itraconazole capsules (200 mg/d) for 2 weeks. Complete recovery was observed in 79.6% of the patients. These novel findings help improve our current understanding of the epidemiological characteristics of MF and establish MGG as a practical tool for the diagnosis of MF. PMID:23706503

  1. Sensitivity of perianal tape impressions to diagnose pinworm (Syphacia spp.) infections in rats (Rattus norvegicus) and mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Hill, William Allen; Randolph, Mildred M; Mandrell, Timothy D

    2009-07-01

    We determined the sensitivity of perianal tape impressions to detect Syphacia spp. in rats and mice. We evaluated 300 rat and 200 mouse perianal impressions over 9 wk. Pinworm-positive perianal tape impressions from animals with worm burdens at necropsy were considered as true positives. Conversely, pinworm-negative perianal tape impressions from animals with worm burdens were considered false negatives. The sensitivity of perianal tape impressions for detecting Syphacia muris infections in rats was 100%, and for detecting Syphacia obvelata in mice was 85.5%. Intermittent shedding of Syphacia obvelata ova is the most probable explanation for the decreased sensitivity rate we observed in mice. We urge caution in use of perianal tape impressions alone for Syphacia spp. screening in sentinel mice and rats. PMID:19653945

  2. Genetic Characteristics of CRF01_AE Among Newly Diagnosed HIV-1-Infected 16- to 25-Year Olds in 3 Geographic Regions of Guangxi, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Shen, Zhi-Yong; Li, Zheng; Liang, Shu-Jia; He, Cui; Liang, Fu-Xiong; Feng, Yi; Li, Jian-Jun; Ruan, Yu-Hua; Zhou, Yue-Jiao; Shao, Yi-Ming; Xing, Hui; Liao, Ling-Jie

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of clusters and drug resistance of CRF01_AE among newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve HIV-infected teenagers and young adults in 3 major HIV-affected geographic regions of Guangxi Province, including the cities of Hezhou, Liuzhou, and Nanning. Samples were sequentially collected from newly diagnosed HIV-infected 16- to 25-year olds in these 3 regions from 2009 to 2013. The viral genome was extracted, and the partial pol gene was amplified and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses were used to determine HIV-1 subtypes and CRF01_AE clusters. Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations were identified using the 2009 WHO list of TDR mutations. A total of 216 sequences were obtained from CRF01_AE strains, which accounted for 83.1% of the 260 genotyped samples, of which 36 were from Hezhou, 147 from Liuzhou, and 33 in Nanning. Most (83.3%, 180/216) were from heterosexuals, followed by injection drug users (5.6%), homosexuals (4.2%), and unknown risk group (6.9%). Based on phylogenetic analyses by the maximum likelihood method, 5 distinct clusters (cluster 1-5) were identified with 213 (98.6%) sequences, whereas 3 (1.4%) sequences were ungrouped. In Hezhou, 88.9% (32/36) of CRF01_AE infections were caused by cluster 2, and 11.1% (4/36) were caused by cluster 1. In Liuzhou, 83.0% (122/147) of the CRF01_AE strains were found in cluster 1, 11.6% (17/147) from cluster 2, 1.4% (2/147) from cluster 3, 2.7% (4/147) from cluster 4, and 0.7% (1/147) from cluster 5. The distribution of CRF01_AE clusters was more even in Nanning than it was in the other 2 regions, with 18.2% (6/33) from cluster 1, 36.3% (12/33) from cluster 2, 9.1% (3/33) from cluster 3, 18.2% (6/33) from cluster 4, and 12.1% (4/33) from cluster 5. The most frequent TDR mutations were M46I (2) in the protease region and Y181C (2) from the reverse transcriptase fragment. Clusters 1 and 2 of CRF01_AE strains were prevalent in Liuzhou and Hezhou, respectively. However, multiple CRF01_AE clusters existed in Nanning. This can be partially explained by the high mobility of laborers in Nanning, the capital city of Guangxi. The prevalence of TDR was low. PMID:26020400

  3. Molecular identification of Rickettsia parkeri infecting Amblyomma triste ticks in an area of Argentina where cases of rickettsiosis were diagnosed

    PubMed Central

    Cicuttin, Gabriel; Nava, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Specimens of the hard tick Amblyomma triste were found infected with Rickettsia parkeri in an area of Argentina (General Lavalle, Buenos Aires Province) where cases of human illness attributed to this microorganism have been reported. Molecular detection of R. parkeri was based on polymerase chain reactions that amplify a ca. 400-bp fragment of the 23S-5S intergenic spacer and a ca. 500-bp fragment of the gene encoding a 190-kDa outer membrane protein. Three (6.97%) of 43 A. triste ticks were determined to be positive for R. parkeri. These results provide strong evidence that A. triste is the vector of R. parkeri in the study area. The findings of this work have epidemiological relevance because human parasitism by A. triste ticks has been frequently recorded in some riparian areas of Argentina and Uruguay and new cases of R. parkeri rickettsiosis might arise in the South American localities where humans are exposed to the bites of this tick species. PMID:23440128

  4. Spinal codes

    E-print Network

    Perry, Jonathan

    Spinal codes are a new class of rateless codes that enable wireless networks to cope with time-varying channel conditions in a natural way, without requiring any explicit bit rate selection. The key idea in the code is the ...

  5. Spinal Tap

    MedlinePLUS

    ... test that involves taking a small sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for examination. Cerebrospinal fluid is a clear, colorless liquid that delivers ... medications into a person's spinal fluid. Testing the cerebrospinal fluid can help doctors detect or rule out ...

  6. Spinal injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... messages between your brain and body. The cord passes through your neck and back. A spinal cord ... Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Mosby; 2009:chap 40. Torg JS. Cervical ...

  7. Spinal codes

    E-print Network

    Perry, Jonathan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Spinal codes are a new class of rateless codes that enable wireless networks to cope with time-varying channel conditions in a natural way, without requiring any explicit bit rate selection. The key idea in the code is the ...

  8. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  9. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brain and Spinal Tumors Information Page Synonym(s): Spinal Cord ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Brain and Spinal Tumors? Brain and spinal cord tumors ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Spinal Cord Injury How does the spinal cord work? What is a spinal cord injury? Why is ... stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Spinal Cord Injury Information Page Condensed from Spinal Cord Injury: ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Spinal Cord Injury? A spinal cord injury usually begins with ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePLUS

    Spinal Cord Injury Map Loss of function depends on what part of the spinal cord is damaged, as ... control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the entire family FacingDisability is designed ...

  13. Newly Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ... start this journey: Get a copy of your pathology report. We can help you understand the report ...

  14. Treatment of Newly Diagnosed and Recurrent Childhood Brain Tumors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  15. Diagnosing Flu

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your symptoms and their clinical judgment. Will my health care provider test me for flu if I have flu-like ... flu symptoms do not require testing because the test results usually do not change how you are treated. Your health care provider may diagnose you with flu based on ...

  16. The changing pattern of spinal arachnoiditis.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, M D; Russell, J A; Grossart, K W

    1978-01-01

    Spinal arachnoiditis is a rare condition. Eighty cases, diagnosed during a period when 7600 spinal contrast investigations were undertaken, have been reviewed. The majority had suffered a previous spinal condition, the most common being lumbar disc disease. There has been a change in the distribution of arahnoiditis with the lumbar region now most frequently involved. This accounts for the persistence of radicular symptoms and the relatively low incidence of paraplegia when compared with earlier series. Surgery does not appear to have any role in the treatment. Images PMID:632824

  17. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... column provides the main support for the upper body, allowing humans to stand upright or bend and twist, and ... of nerve roots that continues from the lumbar region, where the spinal cord ends, ... part of the body. It resembles a “horse’s tail” ( cauda equina in ...

  18. Treatment-associated polymorphisms in protease are significantly associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 count in newly diagnosed drug-naive HIV-1 infected patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effect of drug resistance transmission on disease progression in the newly infected patient is not well understood. Major drug resistance mutations severely impair viral fitness in a drug free environment, and therefore are expected to revert quickly. Compensatory mutations, often already polymorphic in wild-type viruses, do not tend to revert after transmission. While compensatory mutations increase fitness during treatment, their presence may also modulate viral fitness and virulence in absence of therapy and major resistance mutations. We previously designed a modeling technique that quantifies genotypic footprints of in vivo treatment selective pressure, including both drug resistance mutations and polymorphic compensatory mutations, through the quantitative description of a fitness landscape from virus genetic sequences. Results Genotypic correlates of viral load and CD4 cell count were evaluated in subtype B sequences from recently diagnosed treatment-naive patients enrolled in the SPREAD programme. The association of surveillance drug resistance mutations, reported compensatory mutations and fitness estimated from drug selective pressure fitness landscapes with baseline viral load and CD4 cell count was evaluated using regression techniques. Protease genotypic variability estimated to increase fitness during treatment was associated with higher viral load and lower CD4 cell counts also in treatment-naive patients, which could primarily be attributed to well-known compensatory mutations at highly polymorphic positions. By contrast, treatment-related mutations in reverse transcriptase could not explain viral load or CD4 cell count variability. Conclusions These results suggest that polymorphic compensatory mutations in protease, reported to be selected during treatment, may improve the replicative capacity of HIV-1 even in absence of drug selective pressure or major resistance mutations. The presence of this polymorphic variation may either reflect a history of drug selective pressure, i.e. transmission from a treated patient, or merely be a result of diversity in wild-type virus. Our findings suggest that transmitted drug resistance has the potential to contribute to faster disease progression in the newly infected host and to shape the HIV-1 epidemic at a population level. PMID:23031662

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  20. General Information about Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  1. Long-Term Outcomes of Spinal Cord Stimulation With Percutaneously Introduced Paddle Leads in

    E-print Network

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    Long-Term Outcomes of Spinal Cord Stimulation With Percutaneously Introduced Paddle Leads for spinal cord stimulation. Methods: Twenty-one patients diagnosed with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS of interest. OBJECTIVE Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is an implantable, safe, reversible, and efficacious pain

  2. Spinal Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Katonis, P.; Datsis, G.; Karantanas, A.; Kampouroglou, A.; Lianoudakis, S.; Licoudis, S.; Papoutsopoulou, E.; Alpantaki, K.

    2013-01-01

    Although osteosarcoma represents the second most common primary bone tumor, spinal involvement is rare, accounting for 3%–5% of all osteosarcomas. The most frequent symptom of osteosarcoma is pain, which appears in almost all patients, whereas more than 70% exhibit neurologic deficit. At a molecular level, it is a tumor of great genetic complexity and several genetic disorders have been associated with its appearance. Early diagnosis and careful surgical staging are the most important factors in accomplishing sufficient management. Even though overall prognosis remains poor, en-block tumor removal combined with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy is currently the treatment of choice. This paper outlines histopathological classification, epidemiology, diagnostic procedures, and current concepts of management of spinal osteosarcoma. PMID:24179411

  3. Spinal Bracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Dr. Arthur Copes of the Copes Foundation, Baton Rouge, LA, says that 35 percent of the 50 technical reports he received from the NASA/Southern University Industrial Applications Center in Baton Rouge and the Central Industrial Applications Center, Durant, OK, were vital to the development of his Copes Scoliosis Braces, which are custom designed and feature a novel pneumatic bladder that exerts constant corrective pressure to the torso to slowly reduce or eliminate the spinal curve.

  4. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke - www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  5. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Types of illnesses and disabilities Spinal cord injury Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a ... your health on a daily basis. Living with spinal cord injury — your questions answered top What are pediatric ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePLUS

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually ...

  8. Spinal Cord Infarction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Spinal Cord Infarction Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Organizations Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Spinal Cord Infarction? Spinal cord infarction is a stroke either ...

  9. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The cervical spinal column is made up of vertebral bodies which protect the spinal cord. ... spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine ...

  10. TUBERCULOSIS INFECTION MIGHT INCREASE THE RISK OF INVASIVE CANDIDIASIS IN AN IMMUNOCOMPETENT PATIENT

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Xiao-Hua; GAO, Yun-Chao; ZHANG, Yi; TANG, Zheng-Hao; YU, Yong-Sheng; ZANG, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Deep Candida infections commonly occur in immunosuppressed patients. A rare case of a multiple deep organ infection with Candida albicansand spinal tuberculosis was reported in a healthy young man. The 19-year-old man complained of month-long fever and lower back pain. He also had a history of scalded mouth syndrome. Coinfection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Candida albicans was diagnosed using the culture of aspirates from different regions. Symptoms improved considerably after antifungal and antituberculous therapy. This case illustrates that infection with tuberculosis might impair the host's immune system and increase the risk of invasive candidiasis in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:26200971

  11. Findings from frozen sections of spinal subependymomas: Is it possible to differentiate this diagnosis from other common spinal tumors?

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Kyu; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Byeongwoo; Minn, Yang Ki; Kim, Keung-Nyun; Kim, Se Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Subependymomas are slow-growing, benign neoplasms that are rarely found in the spinal cord. Because of the differences in the treatment plans, it might be very helpful for neurosurgeons to intraoperatively establish a diagnosis of spinal subependymoma, differentiated from other spinal intramedullary tumors. In this study, we analyzed frozen sections of spinal subependymomas to identify potential histological clues of spinal subependymomas to differentiate them from tumors that mimic spinal subependymoma. We reviewed the frozen sections and the corresponding permanent slides for 7 cases of spinal subependymoma. The spinal subependymomas showed several characteristic patterns, including, most importantly, an eccentric or both central and eccentric location in the axial plane. Histologically, they showed a (1) well-demarcated and multinodular mass with (2) low or moderate cellularity, (3) a microlobular pattern, and (4) small clusters of neoplastic cells. These features appear to be very specific to spinal subependymomas and could help differentiate them from ependymomas or astrocytomas. Although we might not be able to provide an exact diagnosis of all spinal subependymomas using these histological features, we hope that they help neuropathologists and neurosurgeons to adequately diagnose and treat spinal subependymomas. PMID:26515302

  12. Diagnosing hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gelfer, Mark; Dawes, Martin; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Padwal, Raj; Cloutier, Lyne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To highlight the 2015 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of hypertension. Quality of evidence A systematic search was performed current to August 2014 by a Cochrane Collaboration librarian using the MEDLINE and PubMed databases. The search results were critically appraised by the CHEP subcommittee on blood pressure (BP) measurement and diagnosis, and evidence-based recommendations were presented to the CHEP Central Review Committee for independent review and grading. Finally, the findings and recommendations were presented to the Recommendations Task Force for discussion, debate, approval, and voting. The main recommendations are based on level II evidence. Main message Based on the most recent evidence, CHEP has made 4 recommendations in 2 broad categories for 2015 to improve BP measurement and the way hypertension is diagnosed. A strong recommendation is made to use electronic BP measurement in the office setting to replace auscultatory BP measurement. For patients with elevated office readings, CHEP is recommending early use of out-of-office BP measurement, preferably ambulatory BP measurement, in order to identify early in the process those patients with white-coat hypertension. Conclusion Improvements in diagnostic accuracy are critical to optimizing hypertension management in Canada. The annual updates provided by CHEP ensure that practitioners have up-to-date evidence-based information to inform practice. PMID:26564654

  13. Characteristics of Patients Recently Infected with HIV-1 Non-B Subtypes in France: a Nested Study within the Mandatory Notification System for New HIV Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Denys; Moreau, Alain; Cazein, Françoise; Lot, Florence; Pillonel, Josiane; Brunet, Sylvie; Thierry, Damien; Le Vu, Stéphane; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Semaille, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The presence of HIV-1 non-B subtypes in Western Europe is commonly attributed to migration of individuals from non-European countries, but the possible role of domestic infections with non-B subtypes is not well investigated. The French mandatory anonymous reporting system for HIV is linked to a virological surveillance using assays for recent infection (<6 months) and serotyping. During the first semester of years 2007 to 2010, any sample corresponding to a non-B recent infection was analyzed by sequencing a 415-bp env region, followed by phylogenetic analysis and search for transmission clusters. Two hundred thirty-three recent HIV-1 infections with non-B variants were identified. They involved 5 subtypes and 7 circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). Ninety-two cases (39.5%) were due to heterosexual transmissions, of which 39 occurred in patients born in France. Eighty-five cases (36.5%) were identified in men having sex with men (MSM). Forty-three recent non-B infections (18.5%) segregated into 14 clusters, MSM being involved in 11 of them. Clustered transmission events included 2 to 7 cases per cluster. The largest cluster involved MSM infected by a CRF02_AG variant. In conclusion, we found that the spread of non-B subtypes in France occurs in individuals of French origin and that MSM are particularly involved in this dynamic. PMID:25232163

  14. Symptomatic spinal cord metastasis from cerebral oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Elefante, A; Peca, C; Del Basso De Caro, M L; Russo, C; Formicola, F; Mariniello, G; Brunetti, A; Maiuri, F

    2012-06-01

    Spinal subarachnoid spread is not uncommon in brain oligodendrogliomas; on the other hand, symptomatic involvement of the spinal cord and cauda is very rare, with only 16 reported cases. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who underwent resection of a low-grade frontal oligodendroglioma 4 years previously. He was again observed because of bilateral sciatic pain followed by left leg paresis. A spine MRI showed an intramedullary T12-L1 tumor with root enhancement. At operation, an intramedullary anaplastic oligodendroglioma with left exophytic component was found and partially resected. Two weeks later, a large left frontoparietal anaplastic oligodendroglioma was diagnosed and completely resected. The patient was neurologically stable for 8 months and died 1 year after the spinal surgery because of diffuse brain and spinal leptomeningeal spread. The review of the reported cases shows that spinal symptomatic metastases can occur in both low-grade and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, even many years after surgery of the primary tumor; however, they exceptionally occur as first clinical manifestation or as anaplastic progression. The spinal seeding represents a negative event leading to a short survival. PMID:21927882

  15. A hardware spinal decoder

    E-print Network

    Iannucci, Peter A.

    Spinal codes are a recently proposed capacity-achieving rateless code. While hardware encoding of spinal codes is straightforward, the design of an efficient, high-speed hardware decoder poses significant challenges. We ...

  16. Spinal cord stimulation

    MedlinePLUS

    Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses a mild electric current to block nerve impulses ... stretched into the space on top of your spinal cord. These wires will be connected to a small ...

  17. The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance in newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals in Croatia: the role of transmission clusters of men who have sex with men carrying the T215S surveillance drug resistance mutation.

    PubMed

    Grgic, Ivana; Lepej, Snjezana Zidovec; Lunar, Maja M; Poljak, Mario; Vince, Adriana; Vrakela, Ivana Baca; Planinic, Ana; Seme, Katja; Begovac, Josip

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in newly diagnosed and treatment-naive HIV-infected patients from Croatia and evaluate a possible contribution of transmission clusters to the spread of resistant virus. The study enrolled treatment-naive HIV-infected patients that entered clinical care at the Croatian Reference Center for HIV/AIDS between 2006 and 2008. The protease gene and a part of the reverse transcriptase gene of the HIV-1 genome were sequenced by using the Trugene HIV-1 Genotyping System. The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance was analyzed by using the surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRM) list recommended by the WHO in 2009. We report findings for 118 of 180 eligible patients (65.6% coverage). SDRM were detected in 26 of 118 patients (22.0%) who were infected with subtype B and belonged mostly to the men having sex with men (MSM). The majority of patients with primary resistance carried SDRM associated with resistance to nucleoside analogues reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, 23 of 118 patients, 19.5%). The most frequently found NRTI SDRM was T215S (17 of 118 patients, 14.4%). SDRM associated with resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were detected in three (2.5%) patients and primary resistance to protease inhibitors was not detected. Non-B subtypes were detected in 13/118 patients (11%). A total of 12 transmission pairs and eight distinct transmission clusters were identified with the largest cluster harboring sequences from 19 patients; among them all but two were carrying the T215S mutation. This study showed a high prevalence of TDR in newly diagnosed MSM from Croatia and is an important contribution concerning the relationship between local transmission clusters and the spread of resistant virus. PMID:22906365

  18. Surveillance of Physician-Diagnosed Skin and Soft Tissue Infections Consistent With Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) among Nebraska High School Athletes, 2008-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buss, Bryan F.; Connolly, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Though historically confined to hospital settings, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has received increasing attention in the wider community, particularly among athletes. A 2007-2008 investigation in Nebraska concluded that MRSA skin infections were an emerging problem among the state's student athletes. Statewide…

  19. Epidemiological and clinical features, response to HAART, and survival in HIV-infected patients diagnosed at the age of 50 or more

    PubMed Central

    Nogueras, MaMercedes; Navarro, Gemma; Antón, Esperança; Sala, Montserrat; Cervantes, Manel; Amengual, MaJosé; Segura, Ferran

    2006-01-01

    Background Over the last years, the mean age of subjects with HIV infection and AIDS is increasing. Moreover, some epidemiological and clinical differences between younger and older HIV-infected individuals have been observed. However, since introduction of HAART therapy, there are controversial results regarding their response to HAART. The aim of the present study is to evaluate epidemiological and clinical features, response to HAART, and survival in elderly HIV-infected patients with regard to younger HIV-infected patients. Methods A prospective cohort study (1998–2003) was performed on patients from Sabadell Hospital, in Northeast of Spain. The cohort includes newly attended HIV-infected patients since January 1, 1998. For the purpose of this analysis, data was censured at December 31, 2003. Taking into account age at time of diagnosis, it was considered 36 HIV-positive people aged 50 years or more (Group 1, G1) and 419 HIV-positive people aged 13–40 years (Group 2, G2). Epidemiological, clinical, biological and therapy data are recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-squared test and Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney U test, Kaplan-Meier, Log Rank test, and Two-Way ANOVA from random factors. Results G1 showed higher proportion of men than G2. The most common risk factors in G1 were heterosexual transmission (P = 0.01) and having sex with men or women (P < 0.001). G1 and G2 show parallel profiles through the time regarding immunological response (P = 0.989) and virological response (P = 0.074). However, older people showed lower CD4 cell counts at first clinic visit (P < 0.001) and, eventually, they did not achieve the same counts as G2. G1 presented faster progression to AIDS (P < 0.001) and shorter survival (P < 0.001). Conclusion Older patients have different epidemiological features. Their immunological and virological responses are good. However, older patients do not achieve the same CD4 cell counts likely due to they have lower counts at first clinic visit. Thus, it is essential physicians know older HIV-infected patients features to consider the possibility of HIV infection in these patients with the aim of treatment would not be delayed. PMID:17087819

  20. Severe Strep Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... severe group A strep infections may lead to shock, organ failure, and death. Therefore, healthcare providers must diagnose and treat such infections quickly. Treatment Antibiotics used to treat these severe infections include ...

  1. Microbiology and Epidemiology of Infectious Spinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Se-Jin; Youm, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Ha, Ho-Gyun; Yi, Jin-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Objective Infectious spinal disease is regarded as an infection by a specific organism that affects the vertebral body, intervertebral disc and adjacent perivertebral soft tissue. Its incidence seems to be increasing as a result of larger proportion of the older patients with chronic debilitating disease, the rise of intravenous drug abuser, and the increase in spinal procedure and surgery. In Korea, studies assessing infectious spinal disease are rare and have not been addressed in recent times. The objectives of this study are to describe the epidemiology of all kind of spinal infectious disease and their clinical and microbiological characteristics as well as to assess the diagnostic methodology and the parameters related to the outcomes. Methods A retrospective study was performed in all infectious spinal disease cases presenting from January 2005 to April 2010 to three tertiary teaching hospitals within a city of 1.5 million in Korea. Patient demographics, risk factors, clinical features, and outcomes were assessed. Risk factors entailed the presence of diabetes, chronic renal failure, liver cirrhosis, immunosuppressants, remote infection, underlying malignancy and previous spinal surgery or procedure. We comparatively analyzed the results between the groups of pyogenic and tuberculous spinal infection. SPSS version 14 statistical software was used to perform the analyses of the data. The threshold for statistical significance was established at p<0.05. Results Ninety-two cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Overall, patients of tuberculous spinal infection (TSI) and pyogenic spinal infection (PSI) entailed 20 (21.7%) and 72 (78.3%) cases, respectively. A previous spinal surgery or procedure was the most commonly noted risk factor (39.1%), followed by diabetes (15.2%). The occurrence of both pyogenic and tuberculous spondylitis was predominant in the lumbar spine. Discs are more easily invaded in PSI. At initial presentation, white cell blood count and C-reactive protein levels were higher in PSI compared to TSI (p<0.05). Etiological agents were identified in 53.3%, and the most effective method for identification of etiological agents was tissue culture (50.0%). Staphyococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated infective agent associated with pyogenic spondylitis, followed by E. coli. Surgical treatment was performed in 31.5% of pyogenic spondylitis and in 35.0% of tuberculous spondylitis cases. Conclusion Many previous studies in Korea usually reported that tuberculous spondylitis is the predominant infection. However, in our study, the number of pyogenic infection was 3 times greater than that of tuberculous spinal disease. Etiological agents were identified in a half of all infectious spinal disease. For better outcomes, we should try to identify the causative microorganism before antibiotic therapy and make every effort to improve the result of culture and biopsy. PMID:25289121

  2. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed? Pneumonia can be hard to diagnose because it may ... than these other conditions. Your doctor will diagnose pneumonia based on your medical history, a physical exam, ...

  3. How Are Arrhythmias Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Are Arrhythmias Diagnosed? Arrhythmias can be hard to diagnose, especially the types ... symptoms every once in a while. Doctors diagnose arrhythmias based on medical and family histories, a physical ...

  4. Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Swimmer's Ear (Otitis Externa) Syphilis Tetanus Tonsillitis Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxic Synovitis Tuberculosis Urinary Tract Infections Vaginal ... Roseola Rubella (German Measles) Scabies Scarlet Fever Toxic Shock Syndrome Vitiligo Warts Sign up for our free ...

  5. Spinal Tuberculosis Resembling Neoplastic Lesions on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculous spondylitis is one of the commonest forms of skeletal tuberculosis in developing countries like India causing significant morbidity due to compression of spinal cord and adjacent nerve roots. Diagnosis and intervention at early stage can prevent permanent damage such as spinal deformity and neurological deficits. Aim The purpose of this study was to demonstrate atypical MRI features in cases of tubercular spondylitis resembling neoplastic lesions and to stress that tuberculous spondylitis should be one of the differential diagnoses in any spinal pathology especially in developing countries. Materials and Methods This was a prospective study done in the patients diagnosed as tuberculous spondylitis on 0.2 T Siemens MRI between June 2011 and December 2014 in a tertiary care hospital in India. Total 529 cases of tubercular spinal lesions were diagnosed. Out of which only 59 patients showed atypical features on MR imaging which resembled neoplastic lesions were included in the study. The diagnosis was confirmed by cytology, histopathology, serology and corroborative findings. Results Lumbo-sacral region involvement (30.5%) is the commonest in our study followed by dorsal and cervical region. Multiple level lesions are seen in 14 cases (23.7%). All the 59 (100%) cases show no involvement of intervetebral disc. Posterior appendage involvement seen in 32 cases (54.2%). Soft tissue component seen in Intraspinal (37.2%) and paraspinal (45.7%) compartments. Cord compression seen in 19 cases (32.2%), out which only 7 cases (11.8%) shows cord oedema. Conclusion On MRI, tubercular spondylitis may have variable pictures on imaging. For any spinal and paraspinal lesions, we should also consider the possibility of tubercular aetiology along with other. Since early diagnosis avoids unnecessary delay in the treatment thereby reducing morbidity and possible complications. PMID:26675162

  6. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Genevay, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is most commonly due to degenerative changes in older individuals. LSS is being more commonly diagnosed and may relate to better access to advanced imaging and to an aging population. This review focuses on radicular symptoms related to degenerative central and lateral stenosis and updates knowledge of LSS pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. Since patients with anatomic LSS can range from asymptomatic to severely disabled, the clinical diagnosis focuses on symptoms and examination findings associated with LSS. Imaging findings are helpful for patients with persistent, bothersome symptoms in whom invasive treatments are being considered. There is limited information from high quality studies about the relative benefits and harms of commonly used treatments. Interpreting and comparing results of available research is limited by a lack of consensus about the definition of LSS. Nevertheless, evidence supports decompressive laminectomy for patients with persistent and bothersome symptoms. Recommendations favor a shared decision making approach due to important trade-offs between alternative therapies and differences among patients in their preferences and values. PMID:20227646

  7. Primary spinal oligoastrocytoma mimicking longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis.

    PubMed

    Yeo, T R; Wong, C F; Lee, J J X; Ng, V Z Y; Tan, K

    2015-11-01

    Longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) is most commonly associated with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD). However, a wide range of etiologies may produce longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (LESCLs) on imaging. We highlight the case of a patient with a spinal cord tumor whose imaging showed LESCL and was diagnosed with LETM. He did not respond to immunosuppression and subsequently developed a progressive and protracted clinical course. Thoracic cord biopsy performed 6 years after symptom onset showed primary spinal oligoastrocytoma. We discuss the features that should raise suspicion of a neoplasm in the context of LESCL and serve a reminder that not all LESCLs are inflammatory. PMID:26590667

  8. Simplified Antibiotic Regimens for the Management of Clinically Diagnosed Severe Infections in Newborns and Young Infants in First-level Facilities in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Infection in young infants is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in low-middle income countries, with high neonatal mortality rates. Timely case management is lifesaving, but the current standard of hospitalization for parenteral antibiotic therapy is not always feasible. Alternative, simpler antibiotic regimens that could be used in outpatient settings have the potential to save thousands of lives. Methods: This trial aims to determine whether 2 simplified antibiotic regimens are equivalent to the reference therapy with 7 days of once-daily (OD) intramuscular (IM) procaine penicillin and gentamicin for outpatient management of young infants with clinically presumed systemic bacterial infection treated in primary health-care clinics in 5 communities in Karachi, Pakistan. The reference regimen is close to the current recommendation of the hospital-based intravenous ampicillin and gentamicin therapy for neonatal sepsis. The 2 comparison arms are (1) IM gentamicin OD and oral amoxicillin twice daily for 7 days; and (2) IM penicillin and gentamicin OD for 2 days, followed by oral amoxicillin twice daily for 5 days; 2250 “evaluable” infants will be enrolled. The primary outcome of this trial is treatment failure (death, deterioration or lack of improvement) within 7 days of enrollment. Results are expected by early 2014. Discussion: This trial will determine whether simplified antibiotic regimens with fewer injections in combination with high-dose amoxicillin are equivalent to 7 days of IM procaine penicillin and gentamicin in young infants with clinical severe infection. Results will have program and policy implications in countries with limited access to hospital care and high burden of neonatal deaths. PMID:23945571

  9. Surveillance of physician-diagnosed skin and soft tissue infections consistent with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among Nebraska high school athletes, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Buss, Bryan F; Connolly, Susan

    2014-02-01

    Though historically confined to hospital settings, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has received increasing attention in the wider community, particularly among athletes. A 2007-2008 investigation in Nebraska concluded that MRSA skin infections were an emerging problem among the state's student athletes. Statewide surveillance was subsequently conducted during 4 school years (2008-2012) to estimate incidence of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) consistent with MRSA among student athletes. High school athletic officials completed Internet-based surveys following winter and fall sport seasons. Over 3 school years, incidence estimates per 10,000 athletes decreased substantially from 20.9 (2008-2009) to 11.3 (2010-2011) among football players and from 60.8 (2008-2009) to 28.1 (2010-2011) among wrestlers. Following the 2011-2012 sport seasons, however, incidence estimates increased to 16.6 per 10,000 football players and 43.3 per 10,000 wrestlers. School nurses should support school officials to prioritize prevention and control efforts for SSTI, including MRSA. PMID:23727844

  10. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Gisberto; Andreani, Lorenzo; Girardi, Federico; Darren, Lebl; Sama, Andrew; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication. PMID:26605028

  11. Sarcoidosis of the spinal cord: literature review and report of eight cases.

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Samer; Saw, Chandan; Marzouk, Kamel; Sharma, Om

    2006-01-01

    Sarcoidosis, which affects African Americans more than it does other racial/ethnic groups, only rarely manifests initially as spinal cord dysfunction. This paper presents the findings of eight patients with spinal cord dysfunction as part of a presentation of sarcoidosis. After reviewing these cases, we devised an algorithm to diagnose and manage spinal cord sarcoidosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:16775923

  12. Focal thoracolumbar spinal cord lymphosarcoma in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo)

    PubMed Central

    Ingrao, Joelle C.; Eshar, David; Vince, Andrew; Lee-Chow, Bridget; Nykamp, Stephanie; DeLay, Josepha; Smith, Dale

    2014-01-01

    A 6-year-old, castrated male domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was euthanized following progressive hind limb paresis and atonia of the bladder of 1-year duration. Neurological evaluation localized the lesion to the thoracolumbar spinal region, and magnetic resonance imaging showed a focal intramedullary spinal cord lesion. Histopathology revealed an extensive, unencapsulated, poorly demarcated mass within the thoracolumbar spinal cord, diagnosed as lymphosarcoma. PMID:24982519

  13. West Nile Virus Infection in Horses: Detection by Immunohistochemistry, In Situ Hybridization, and ELISA.

    PubMed

    Toplu, N; O?uzo?lu, T Ç; Ural, K; Albayrak, H; Ozan, E; Ertürk, A; Epikmen, E T

    2015-11-01

    This study describes the clinicopathologic findings in naturally occurring West Nile virus (WNV) infection in horses. WNV was diagnosed in a foal by immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization methods, and the presence of WNV antibodies was detected in 5 other horses with clinical signs suggestive of WNV infection. At necropsy of the foal, lymph nodes were edematous and enlarged, and the intestines showed diffuse congestion and focal hemorrhages. The most significant histologic lesions in this case were nonsuppurative meningoencephalomyelitis, particularly in the brainstem and spinal cord. Identification of viral RNA by in situ hybridization and viral antigen by immunohistochemistry was concentrated primarily in nerve fibers, glial cells, and their processes in brainstem and spinal cord and, to a lesser extent, within the cerebral hemispheres and cerebellum. PMID:25677341

  14. Accuracy of Lipoarabinomannan and Xpert MTB/RIF Testing in Cerebrospinal Fluid To Diagnose Tuberculous Meningitis in an Autopsy Cohort of HIV-Infected Adults.

    PubMed

    Cox, Janneke A; Lukande, Robert L; Kalungi, Sam; Van Marck, Eric; Lammens, Martin; Van de Vijver, Koen; Kambugu, Andrew; Nelson, Ann M; Colebunders, Robert; Manabe, Yukari C

    2015-08-01

    Point-of-care tests for tuberculous meningitis (TBM) are needed. We studied the diagnostic accuracy of the lipoarabinomannan (LAM) lateral flow assay (LFA), LAM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and Xpert MTB/RIF in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in an autopsy cohort of Ugandan HIV-infected adults. We obtained written informed consent postmortem from the next of kin. A complete autopsy was done and CSF obtained. We performed LAM LFA (on unprepared and supernatant CSF after heating and spinning), LAM ELISA, and Xpert MTB/RIF on the CSF samples. Accuracy parameters were calculated for histopathological TBM and also for the composite standard, including Xpert MTB/RIF-positive cases. We tested CSF of 91 patients. LAM LFA had a sensitivity of 75% for definite histopathological TBM, ELISA a sensitivity of 43%, and Xpert MTB/RIF a sensitivity of 100% and specificities of 87%, 91%, and 87%, respectively. LAM LFA had a sensitivity of 50% for definite and probable histopathological TBM, ELISA a sensitivity of 38%, and Xpert MTB/RIF a sensitivity of 86% and specificities of 70%, 91%, and 87%, respectively. LAM LFA had a sensitivity of 68% for the composite standard and ELISA a sensitivity of 48% and specificities of 78% and 98%, respectively. The rapid diagnostic tests detected TBM in 22% to 78% of patients not on anti-TB treatment. Point-of-care tests have high accuracy in diagnosis of TBM in deceased HIV-infected adults. LAM LFA in CSF is a useful additional diagnostic tool. PMID:26063865

  15. Spinal Cord and Spinal Nerve Root Involvement (Myeloradiculopathy) in Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rahul; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Verma, Rajesh; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Most of the information about spinal cord and nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis is available in the form of isolated case reports or case series. In this article, we evaluated the incidence, predictors, and prognostic impact of spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis. In this prospective study, 71 consecutive patients of newly diagnosed tuberculous meningitis were enrolled. In addition to clinical evaluation, patients were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain and spine. Patients were followed up for at least 6 months. Out of 71 patients, 33 (46.4%) had symptoms/signs of spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement, 22 (30.9%) of whom had symptoms/signs at enrolment. Eleven (15.4%) patients had paradoxical involvement. Paraparesis was present in 22 (31%) patients, which was of upper motor neuron type in 6 (8.4%) patients, lower motor neuron type in 10 (14%) patients, and mixed type in 6 (8.4%) patients. Quadriparesis was present in 3 (4.2%) patients. The most common finding on spinal MRI was meningeal enhancement, seen in 40 (56.3%) patients; in 22 (30.9%), enhancement was present in the lumbosacral region. Other MRI abnormalities included myelitis in 16 (22.5%), tuberculoma in 4 (5.6%), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) loculations in 4 (5.6%), cord atrophy in 3 (4.2%), and syrinx in 2 (2.8%) patients. The significant predictor associated with myeloradiculopathy was raised CSF protein (>250?mg/dL). Myeloradiculopathy was significantly associated with poor outcome. In conclusion, spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis is common. Markedly raised CSF protein is an important predictor. Patients with myeloradiculopathy have poor outcome. PMID:25621686

  16. How Is COPD Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is COPD Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose COPD based on ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is COPD? 05/22/2014 Describes how COPD, or chronic ...

  17. How Is Infertility Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How is infertility diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links Share ... providers evaluate men and women differently to diagnose infertility. Evaluating Female Fertility In evaluating a woman's fertility, ...

  18. How Is Atherosclerosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atherosclerosis Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose atherosclerosis based on ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  19. Spinal tuberculosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Somvanshi, Dilip Singh

    2011-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis is a destructive form of tuberculosis. It accounts for approximately half of all cases of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis is more common in children and young adults. The incidence of spinal tuberculosis is increasing in developed nations. Genetic susceptibility to spinal tuberculosis has recently been demonstrated. Characteristically, there is destruction of the intervertebral disk space and the adjacent vertebral bodies, collapse of the spinal elements, and anterior wedging leading to kyphosis and gibbus formation. The thoracic region of vertebral column is most frequently affected. Formation of a 'cold' abscess around the lesion is another characteristic feature. The incidence of multi-level noncontiguous vertebral tuberculosis occurs more frequently than previously recognized. Common clinical manifestations include constitutional symptoms, back pain, spinal tenderness, paraplegia, and spinal deformities. For the diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive imaging technique than x-ray and more specific than computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging frequently demonstrates involvement of the vertebral bodies on either side of the disk, disk destruction, cold abscess, vertebral collapse, and presence of vertebral column deformities. Neuroimaging-guided needle biopsy from the affected site in the center of the vertebral body is the gold standard technique for early histopathological diagnosis. Antituberculous treatment remains the cornerstone of treatment. Surgery may be required in selected cases, e.g. large abscess formation, severe kyphosis, an evolving neurological deficit, or lack of response to medical treatment. With early diagnosis and early treatment, prognosis is generally good. PMID:22118251

  20. Spinal Crawlers: Deformable Organisms for Spinal Cord Segmentation and Analysis

    E-print Network

    Hamarneh, Ghassan

    Spinal Crawlers: Deformable Organisms for Spinal Cord Segmentation and Analysis Chris Mc, Canada {cmcintos, hamarneh}@cs.sfu.ca Abstract. Spinal cord analysis is an important problem relating to the study of various neurological diseases. We present a novel approach to spinal cord segmentation

  1. Faun tail: a rare cutaneous sign of spinal dysraphism.

    PubMed

    Kurtipek, Gülcan Saylam; Cihan, Fatma Göksin; Öner, Vefa; Ataseven, Arzu; Özer, ?lkay; Akman, Zahide

    2015-01-01

    Faun tail is a triangle-shaped hypertrichosis of the lumbosacral region. It is a rare condition and it can be a cutaneous marker of underlying spinal cord anomaly. We report on a 17-year-old female patient with hypertrichosis on the lumbosacral area since birth that was later diagnosed with tethered cord in magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25770308

  2. Eikenella corrodens discitis after spinal surgery: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ang, B S P; Ngan, C C L

    2002-11-01

    Eikenella corrodens is part of the normal flora of the mouth and upper respiratory tract and is usually associated with dental and head and neck infections. We report a case of Eikenella discitis occurring soon after spinal surgery in an otherwise healthy patient, review the literature on bone and joint infections unrelated to human bites and fist-fight injuries, and stress the importance of definitive diagnosis in post-operative spinal infections. PMID:12423617

  3. Spinal injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Boden, Barry P; Jarvis, Christopher G

    2008-02-01

    Athletic competition has long been a known source of spinal injuries. Approximately 8.7% of all new cases of spinal cord injuries in the United States are related to sports activities. The sports activities that have the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, and cheerleading. Axial compression forces to the top of the head can lead to cervical fracture and quadriplegia in any sport. It is critical for any medical personnel responsible for athletes in team sports to have a plan for stabilization and transfer of an athlete who sustains a cervical spine injury. PMID:18295084

  4. Spinal injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Boden, Barry P; Jarvis, Christopher G

    2009-02-01

    Athletic competition has long been a known source of spinal injuries. Approximately 8.7% of all new cases of spinal cord injuries in the United States are related to sports activities. The sports activities that have the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, and cheerleading. Axial compression forces to the top of the head can lead to cervical fracture and quadriplegia in any sport. It is critical for any medical personnel responsible for athletes in team sports to have a plan for stabilization and transfer of an athlete who sustains a cervical spine injury. PMID:19084763

  5. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; ?ah, Volkan; Ayd?n, Abdulkadir; Öne?, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients’ family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary. PMID:25621206

  6. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; ?ah, Volkan; Ayd?n, Abdulkadir; Öne?, Kadriye

    2015-01-18

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients' family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary. PMID:25621206

  7. Bridging spinal cord injuries

    E-print Network

    2008-10-15

    Abstract One strategy for spinal cord injury repair is to make cellular bridges that support axon regeneration. However, the bridging cells often fail to integrate with host tissue and may lead to increased pain sensitivity. Recent work has tested...

  8. What Is Spinal Stenosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... To order the Sports Injuries Handout on Health full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ... publication. To order the Spinal Stenosis Q&A full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ...

  9. Update on treatment options for spinal brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Ulu-Kilic, A; Karakas, A; Erdem, H; Turker, T; Inal, A S; Ak, O; Turan, H; Kazak, E; Inan, A; Duygu, F; Demiraslan, H; Kader, C; Sener, A; Dayan, S; Deveci, O; Tekin, R; Saltoglu, N; Ayd?n, M; Horasan, E S; Gul, H C; Ceylan, B; Kadanal?, A; Karabay, O; Karagoz, G; Kayabas, U; Turhan, V; Engin, D; Gulsun, S; Elald?, N; Alabay, S

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of antibiotic regimens and optimal duration of therapy in complicated and uncomplicated forms of spinal brucellosis. This is a multicentre, retrospective and comparative study involving a total of 293 patients with spinal brucellosis from 19 health institutions. Comparison of complicated and uncomplicated spinal brucellosis was statistically analysed. Complicated spinal brucellosis was diagnosed in 78 (26.6%) of our patients. Clinical presentation was found to be significantly more acute, with fever and weight loss, in patients in the complicated group. They had significantly higher leukocyte and platelet counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and C-reactive protein levels, and lower haemoglobulin levels. The involvement of the thoracic spine was significantly more frequent in complicated cases. Spondylodiscitis was complicated, with paravertebral abscess in 38 (13.0%), prevertebral abscess in 13 (4.4%), epidural abscess in 30 (10.2%), psoas abscess in 10 (3.4%) and radiculitis in 8 (2.7%) patients. The five major combination regimens were: doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and streptomycin 1 g/day; doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and gentamicin 5 mg/kg; doxycycline 200 mg/day and rifampicin 600 mg/day; doxycycline 200 mg/day and streptomycin 1 g/day; and doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and ciprofloxacin 1 g/day. There were no significant therapeutic differences between these antibiotic groups; the results were similar regarding the complicated and uncomplicated groups. Patients were mostly treated with doxycycline and rifampicin with or without an aminoglycoside. In the former subgroup, complicated cases received antibiotics for a longer duration than uncomplicated cases. Early recognition of complicated cases is critical in preventing devastating complications. Antimicrobial treatment should be prolonged in complicated spinal brucellosis in particular. PMID:24118178

  10. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in newly diagnosed HIV

    PubMed Central

    Soza, Gabriela M.; Patel, Mahir; Readinger, Allison

    2016-01-01

    We present a woman with a widespread severe papulopustular eruption, fever, and fatigue of 5 weeks' duration. HIV infection was diagnosed, with an absolute CD4+ count of 3 cells/µL. The eruption was consistent with disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis. The clinical manifestations and management of cutaneous histoplasmosis are reviewed. PMID:26722169

  11. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  12. Spinal cord injury rehabilitation. 2. Medical complications.

    PubMed

    Bergman, S B; Yarkony, G M; Stiens, S A

    1997-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights new advances in understanding medical complications of spinal cord injury through the lifespan. It is part of the chapter on spinal cord injury rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article covers reasons for transferring patients to specialized spinal cord injury centers once they have been stabilized, and the management of common medical problems, including fever, autonomic dysreflexia, urinary tract infection, acute and chronic abdominal complications, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary complications, and heterotopic ossification. Formulation of an educational program for prevention of late complications is also discussed, including late renal complications, syringomyelia, myelomalacia, burns, pathologic fractures, pressure ulcers, and cardiovascular disease. New advances covered in this section include new information on old problems, and a discussion of exercise tolerance in persons with tetraplegia, the pathophysiology of late neurologic deterioration after spinal cord injury, and a view of the care of these patients across the lifespan. PMID:9084368

  13. Spinal Subdural Abscess: A Rare Complication of Decubitus Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Usoltseva, Natalia; Medina-Flores, Rafael; Rehman, Ateeq; Samji, Swetha; D’Costa, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Spinal subdural abscess (SSA) is an uncommon entity. The exact incidence is unknown, with very few cases reported in the literature. This condition may result in spinal cord compression, thus constituting a medical and neurosurgical emergency. The pathogenesis of SSA is not well-described, and the available knowledge is based on case observations only. There is only one case report that describes direct seeding from decubitus ulcers as a possible mechanism for development of SSA. We report a case of subacute onset of quadriplegia in a male patient, age 55 years, due to spinal cord compression from SSA and superimposed spinal subdural hematoma. The direct seeding from decubitus ulcers is thought to be the cause of infection in our patient. We present this case of SSA to elucidate and review the predisposing factors, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic modalities, and treatment regarding management of this rare disorder. PMID:24667217

  14. Optimizing the management of patients with spinal myeloma disease.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Sean; Lai, Maggie; Pratt, Guy; Ramasamy, Karthik; Wilson, David; Quraishi, Nasir; Auger, Martin; Cumming, David; Punekar, Maqsood; Quinn, Michael; Ademonkun, Debo; Willis, Fenella; Tighe, Jane; Cook, Gordon; Stirling, Alistair; Bishop, Timothy; Williams, Cathy; Boszczyk, Bronek; Reynolds, Jeremy; Grainger, Mel; Craig, Niall; Hamilton, Alastair; Chalmers, Isobel; Ahmedzai, Sam; Selvadurai, Susanne; Low, Eric; Kyriakou, Charalampia

    2015-11-01

    Myeloma is one of the most common malignancies that results in osteolytic lesions of the spine. Complications, including pathological fractures of the vertebrae and spinal cord compression, may cause severe pain, deformity and neurological sequelae. They may also have significant consequences for quality of life and prognosis for patients. For patients with known or newly diagnosed myeloma presenting with persistent back or radicular pain/weakness, early diagnosis of spinal myeloma disease is therefore essential to treat and prevent further deterioration. Magnetic resonance imaging is the initial imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of spinal disease. Treatment of the underlying malignancy with systemic chemotherapy together with supportive bisphosphonate treatment reduces further vertebral damage. Additional interventions such as cement augmentation, radiotherapy, or surgery are often necessary to prevent, treat and control spinal complications. However, optimal management is dependent on the individual nature of the spinal involvement and requires careful assessment and appropriate intervention throughout. This article reviews the treatment and management options for spinal myeloma disease and highlights the value of defined pathways to enable the proper management of patients affected by it. PMID:26184699

  15. Intramedullary Spinal Cord Metastasis From Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kyung Ho; Yi, Seong Yoon; Jung, Joo Hyuk; Kang, Seung Hee; Choi, Pyong Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis (ISCM) is an uncommon condition of the central nervous system (CNS) cause by systemic malignant tumors. Most ISCM cases are known to occur in patients with lung cancer and breast cancer; however, ISCM also very rarely occurs in patients with colorectal cancer. For the first time in Korea, we experienced a case of ISCM arising from rectal cancer, where a 75-year-old man presented with an abruptly-developed left-foot drop and numbness in both legs. The patient had lung metastases from rectal cancer that had been treated with chemotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intramedullary nodular lesion at the T12 level. ISCM was diagnosed and treated with steroids and radiotherapy. The patient's neurological symptoms were relieved for a while after treatment, but his condition deteriorated progressively. He died 4 months after ISCM had been diagnosed. PMID:25360432

  16. Living with Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... techniques that may prevent injury and disease. A spinal cord injury (SCI) can result from trauma, such as ... with daily living skills. What can persons with spinal cord injuries and their friends and families do? ? Get ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury Prevention Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    Spinal Cord Injury Prevention Tips American Association of Neurological Surgeons 5550 Meadowbrook Drive, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008-3852 ... NeurosurgeryToday.org Every year, an estimated 11,000 spinal cord injury (SCI) accidents occur in the United States. ...

  18. What Is Spinal Cord Injury?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Spinal Cord Injury (SCI): Condition Information Skip sharing on social ... with SCI is the lowest point on the spinal cord below which sensory feeling and motor movement diminish ...

  19. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Are you newly diagnosed? Have questions? Connect with ...

  20. How Is Lymphocytopenia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of lymphocytes—T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells. The test can help diagnose the underlying ... cause low levels of B cells or natural killer cells. Tests for Underlying Conditions Many diseases and ...

  1. Diagnosing Tic Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... condition (for example, seizures, Huntington disease, or postviral encephalitis). Persistent (Chronic) Motor or Vocal Tic Disorder For ... tics (for example, seizures, Huntington disease, or postviral encephalitis). not have been diagnosed with TS. Provisional Tic ...

  2. How Is Hemochromatosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tests to check for damage to your liver. Liver damage may be a sign of hemochromatosis. If you ... This procedure also can help your doctor diagnose liver damage (for example, scarring and cancer). Liver biopsies are ...

  3. Diagnosing Abiotic Degradation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The abiotic degradation of chlorinated solvents in ground water can be difficult to diagnose. Under current practice, most of the “evidence” is negative; specifically the apparent disappearance of chlorinated solvents with an accumulation of vinyl chloride, ethane, ethylene, or ...

  4. A retrospective study of spinal cord lesions in goats submitted to 3 veterinary diagnostic laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew L.; Goupil, Brad A.; Valentine, Beth A.

    2012-01-01

    A retrospective study of spinal cord lesions in goats was conducted to identify the range of lesions and diseases recognized and to make recommendations regarding the best tissues to examine and tests to conduct in order to maximize the likelihood of arriving at a definitive etiologic diagnosis in goats with clinical signs referable to the spinal cord. Twenty-seven goats with a spinal cord lesion were identified. The most common lesion recognized, in 13 of 27 goats, was degenerative myelopathy. Eight goats with degenerative myelopathy were diagnosed with copper deficiency. Non-suppurative inflammation due to caprine arthritis encephalitis virus, necrosis due to parasite larvae migration, and neoplasia were each diagnosed 3 times. Based on these findings, it is recommended that, in addition to careful handling and histologic examination of the spinal cord, samples of other tissues, including the brain, liver, and serum, be collected for ancillary testing if warranted. PMID:23204583

  5. 17-Year-Delayed Fistula Formation After Elective Spinal Instrumentation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Etemadrezaei, Hamid; Zabihyan, Samira; Shakeri, Aidin; Ganjeifar, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A late-developing infection after an uneventful initial spinal instrumentation procedure is rare. Delayed infection and new fistula formation have been reported from a few months to 13 years. Here we report an unusual 17-year-delayed fistula formation after primary spinal instrumentation. The patient underwent hardware removal surgery with antibiotic therapy as a definitive treatment. Case Presentation Here we report an unusual 17-year delayed fistula formation after primary spinal instrumentation due to spinal trauma. He was admitted to Ghaem General Hospital, a chief referral center, Mashhad, North-East of Iran in August 2014. The patient underwent hardware removal surgery with antibiotic therapy as a definitive treatment. Conclusions Late inflammation may occur around spinal instruments and results in cutaneous fistula formation. After oral or intravenous antibiotic treatment, total device extraction is the cornerstone of treatment. PMID:26082855

  6. Spinal cord monitoring.

    PubMed

    Nuwer, M R

    1999-12-01

    Over the past two decades, intraoperative spinal cord monitoring has matured into a widely used clinical tool. It is used when the spinal cord is at risk for damage during a surgical procedure. This includes orthopedic, neurosurgical, and certain cardiothoracic procedures. Both somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) and direct motor pathway stimulation techniques are available. The SEP techniques are used most widely, are generally accepted, and have been shown to reduce surgical morbidity. A large multicenter study has shown that SEP monitoring reduces postoperative paraplegia by more than 50-60%. Techniques and literature on clinical applications are reviewed in this report. PMID:10567073

  7. Incidence of Secondary Complications in Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, C. A.; Shepherd, C.

    1996-01-01

    Data from 348 patients (mean age 37) with postacute spinal cord injury revealed that 95% reported at least 1 secondary problem, and 58% reported 3 or more. The number and severity of complications varied with time since the injury. Obesity, pain, spasticity, urinary tract infections, pressure sores, and lack of social integration were common…

  8. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Diagnosed? The first step in diagnosing cardiogenic shock ... is cardiogenic shock. Tests and Procedures To Diagnose Shock and Its Underlying Causes Blood Pressure Test Medical ...

  9. Understanding Prostate Cancer: Newly Diagnosed

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Wellness PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Understanding Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Newly Diagnosed Staging the Disease Issues ... you care about has recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer, this section will help guide you through the ...

  10. How a Stroke Is Diagnosed

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Patients & Families About Stroke Stroke Diagnosis Stroke ... Diagnosis » How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed How a Stroke is Diagnosed Lab ...

  11. E-Coli Infection: Not Just from Food

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and spinal cord (meningitis) in newborn children, and urinary tract infections in children and adults of all ages. In ... head is the fontanelle), and seizures. Signs of urinary tract infection (UTI) include pain when urinating, increased frequency of ...

  12. Spinal Cord Stereotaxy: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Nadvornik, Pavel

    2015-07-01

    The origin of spinal cord stereotaxy can be traced back to the 19th-century work of Woroshiloff, the pioneer of brain stereotaxy. The development of clinical brain stereotaxy began in the mid-20th century, but spinal cord stereotaxy lagged behind. The first stereotactic spinal cord surgery was successfully performed by Hitchcock for pain treatment in the 1960s, and surgery for urinary bladder hyperspasticity performed by Nádvorník followed several years later. Other stereotactic surgeries of the spinal cord movement system could not be considered until Slovak anatomist ?ierny used animal experiments (with cats) to discover the exact location of motoneurons for the individual muscles in the anterior horns of the spinal cord. Having compared the data with the pattern of Riley's atlas based on microscopic investigation of the human spinal cord (only motoneuron groups without functional properties), the first stereotactic spinal cord atlas was transferred to human structures. With the construction of a universal spinal cord stereotactic device began a new era in spinal cord stereotaxy. The investigation of spinal cord movement functions will probably become the main focus of this discipline that aims to restore physiologic movement after spinal cord injury associated with paraplegia. PMID:25798803

  13. Acute neurological signs as the predominant clinical manifestation in four dogs with Angiostrongylus vasorum infections in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Four dogs with acute neurological signs caused by haemorrhages in the central nervous system were diagnosed with Angiostrongylus vasorum infection as the underlying aetiology. Two dogs presented with brain lesions, one dog with spinal cord lesions and one with lesions in both the brain and spinal cord. Only one dog presented with concurrent signs of classical pulmonary angiostrongylosis (respiratory distress, cough), and only two dogs displayed overt clinical signs of haemorrhages. Results of coagulation assays were inconsistent. Neurological signs reflected the site of pathology and included seizures, various cranial nerve deficits, vestibular signs, proprioceptive deficits, ataxia and paraplegia. One dog died and three were euthanised due to lack of improvement despite medical treatment. This emphasises canine angiostrongylosis as a potential cause of fatal lesions of the central nervous system and the importance of including A. vasorum as a differential diagnosis in young dogs with acute neurological signs in Denmark. PMID:21711538

  14. Spinal Hydatid as a Rare Cause of Posterior Mediastinal Lesion: Understanding Cervicothoracic Sign on Chest Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Aswani, Yashant; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Location of an intrathoracic lesion on chest radiograph is facilitated by application of ‘silhouette sign’. This helps narrow down the differential diagnoses. The list of probable diagnoses reduces further on determination of the density of the lesion. A spinal hydatid presents as a fluid-density posterior mediastinal lesion on chest radiograph with destruction of the vertebral body and preservation of the disc space. Spinal hydatid is, however, rare. Case Report We describe a case of a 30-year-old female with gradual-onset paraperesis since six months. Chest radiograph was suggestive of a posterior mediastinal lesion with fluid density and destruction of D4 vertebra. MRI findings were consistent with spinal hydatid. The patient was started on perioperative benzimidazole therapy with resection of the hydatid cyst. The drug therapy was continued for six months post-operatively. Conclusions A chest radiograph helps localise the site and possible contents of the lesion. It also guides further investigations. MRI is the imaging modality of choice for spinal pathologies causing cord compression including spinal hydatid. Echinococcal involvement of the spine is a rarity but needs to be considered in the differential diagnoses for spinal causes of gradual-onset paraperesis. PMID:26692911

  15. Idiopathic Spinal Cord Herniation Presented as Brown-Sequard Syndrome : A Case Report and Surgical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Min-Wook; Youm, Jin-Young; Kwon, Hyon-Jo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord herniation is a rare condition that has become increasingly recognised in the last few years. The authors report a case of idiopathic spinal cord herniation in a 33 year old woman performed with progressive Brown-Sequard syndrome. The diagnosis was made on MR imaging. After repairing the herniation, the patient made a gradual improvement. Potential causes are discussed, including a possible role of dural defect. In conclusion, idiopathic spinal cord herniation is a potentially treatable condition that should be more readily diagnosed that increasing awareness and improved imaging techniques. PMID:26539277

  16. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID:23087647

  17. Multifocal spinal and extra-spinal Mycobacterium chelonae osteomyelitis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Korres, D S; Papagelopoulos, P J; Zahos, K A; Kolia, M D; Poulakou, G G; Falagas, M E

    2007-03-01

    Only localized cases of Mycobacterium chelonae osteomyelitis have been reported. In this article, a 55-year-old immunosuppressed man with M. chelonae osteomyelitis and multiple spinal and extra-spinal involvement is presented. The patient had nodule-pustular skin lesions, spondylodiscitis at multiple levels, and osteolytic lesions at extra-spinal locations. Biopsy and cultures of the osseous lesions showed M. chelonae osteomyelitis. The patient started antimycobacterial chemotherapy with ciprofloxacin and clarithromycin. Progressive cervical kyphosis associated with anterior wedged deformity of the C5 vertebra and posterior C5-C6 spondylolisthesis resulted in compression of the spinal cord and neurological impairment. The patient underwent anterior decompression and C4-C6 arthrodesis using a titanium mesh cage and cervical plate. About 15 months after the initiation of chemotherapy and 5 months after surgery, the patient was pain free, with significant improvement of his neurological function. In the presence of immunosuppression, the physician should be alert for unusual or opportunistic pathogens of osteomyelitis. Long-term antimicrobial chemotherapy and surgical intervention is the cornerstone of successful treatment of multifocal bone M. chelonae infection. PMID:17313477

  18. Spinal cord involvement in a child with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Muge; Balta, Gunay; Unal, Sule; Oguz, Kader; Cetin, Mualla; Gumruk, Fatma

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) in familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) has known to be limited to the brain, brain stem, and cerebellum. Herein, we report an 11-year-old boy who presented with neurological symptoms and was diagnosed as FHL by molecular diagnosis. The hemophagocytic lesions in the CNS were shown to extend to the thoracal level of spinal cord which completely disappeared after the completion of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis-2004 protocol. PMID:23560006

  19. Neurologic recovery and neurologic decline after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Little, J W; Burns, S P; James, J J; Stiens, S A

    2000-02-01

    Physicians caring for patients with spinal cord injury facilitate neurologic recovery by optimizing nutrition and general health, by coordinating active exercise and functional training to enhance the underlying synapse growth, reversal of muscle atrophy, and motor learning, and by controlling interfering spasticity. SCI physicians also must monitor for neurologic decline during initial rehabilitation and later in life, diagnose promptly and accurately such decline, and orchestrate the appropriate intervention. PMID:10680159

  20. Cerebral subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mehrdad; Shami, Shoaleh; Farhadifar, Fariba; Nesseri, Karim

    2012-01-01

    Postdural puncture headache and cerebral subdural hematoma are among complications of spinal anesthesia with some common characteristics; however misdiagnosis of these two could result in a catastrophic outcome or prevent unwanted results by urgent interventions. With the purpose of increasing awareness of such complications and a speedy diagnosis, we report two cases of postspinal anesthesia headache that was timely diagnosed as cerebral subdural hematoma and prevented the likelihood of a disastrous outcome. PMID:22536262

  1. Automated identification of spinal cord and vertebras on sagittal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Dong, Qian; He, Bo; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Couriel, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We are developing an automated method for the identification of the spinal cord and the vertebras on spinal MR images, which is an essential step for computerized analysis of bone marrow diseases. The spinal cord segment was first enhanced by a newly developed hierarchical multiscale tubular (HMT) filter that utilizes the complementary hyper- and hypo- intensities in the T1-weighted (T1W) and STIR MRI sequences. An Expectation-Maximization (EM) analysis method was then applied to the enhanced tubular structures to extract candidates of the spinal cord. The spinal cord was finally identified by a maximum-likelihood registration method by analysis of the features extracted from the candidate objects in the two MRI sequences. Using the identified spinal cord as a reference, the vertebras were localized based on the intervertebral disc locations extracted by another HMT filter applied to the T1W images. In this study, 5 and 30 MRI scans from 35 patients who were diagnosed with multiple myeloma disease were collected retrospectively with IRB approval as training and test set, respectively. The vertebras manually outlined by a radiologist were used as reference standard. A total of 422 vertebras were marked in the 30 test cases. For the 30 test cases, 100% (30/30) of the spinal cords were correctly segmented with 4 false positives (FPs) mistakenly identified on the back muscles in 4 scans. A sensitivity of 95.0% (401/422) was achieved for the identification of vertebras, and 5 FPs were marked in 4 scans with an average FP rate of 0.17 FPs/scan.

  2. Surgical Outcomes of High-Grade Spinal Cord Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Syunsuke; Aoyama, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Izumi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to obtain useful information for establishing the guidelines for treating high-grade spinal cord gliomas. Overview of Literature The optimal management of high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains controversial. We report the outcomes of the surgical management of 14 high-grade spinal glioma. Methods We analyzed the outcomes of 14 patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas who were surgically treated between 1989 and 2012. Survival was charted with the Kaplan-Meier plots and comparisons were made with the log-rank test. Results None of the patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas underwent total resection. Subtotal resection was performed in two patients, partial resection was performed in nine patients, and open biopsy was performed in three patients. All patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy and six patients further underwent radiation cordotomy. The median survival time for patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas was 15 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 22.2%. The median survival time for patients with World Health Organization grade III tumors was 25.5 months, whereas the median survival time for patients with glioblastoma multiforme was 12.5 months. Both univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models demonstrated a significant effect only in the group that did not include cervical cord lesion as a factor associated with survival (p=0.04 and 0.03). Conclusions The surgical outcome of patients diagnosed with high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains poor. Notably, only the model which excluded cervical cord lesions as a factor significantly predicted survival. PMID:26713128

  3. Diagnosing ADHD in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Margaret H.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Garefino, Allison C.; Kuriyan, Aparajita B.; Babinski, Dara E.; Karch, Kathryn M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examines adolescent-specific practical problems associated with current practice parameters for diagnosing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to inform recommendations for the diagnosis of ADHD in adolescents. Specifically, issues surrounding the use of self- versus informant ratings, diagnostic threshold, and…

  4. Rapidly Progressive Gas-containing Lumbar Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jin Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Gas-containing (emphysematous) infections of the abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are well-known disease entities, which can potentially be life-threatening. They require aggressive medical and often surgical treatment. In the neurosurgical field, some cases of gas-containing brain abscess and subdural empyema have been reported. Sometimes they progress rapidly and even can cause fatal outcome. However, gas-containing spinal epidural abscess has been rarely reported and clinical course is unknown. We report on a case of rapidly progressive gas-containing lumbar spinal epidural abscess due to Enterococcus faecalis in a 72-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26512268

  5. A paradigm for the evaluation and management of spinal coccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Skoch, Jesse M.; Zaninovich, Orel; Zoccali, Carmine; Galgiani, John N.; Baaj, Ali A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal infection that is endemic to parts of the Southwestern United States. When infection involves the spine, the treatment strategies can be challenging. We have devised a management protocol for spinal coccidioidomycosis based on a review of the literature and our experience. Methods: The electronic literature search of National Library of Medicine for publications from 1964 to 2014 was performed using the following keywords: Coccidioidomycosis and spine. The search yielded 24 papers. Treatment strategies were summarized into a treatment protocol. Results: A total of 164 cases of spinal coccidioidomycosis were identified, ranging in age from <10 to >80 years. Males (n = 131) and African-Americans (n = 79) were strikingly over-represented. Medical therapy: Once a diagnosis of spinal coccidioidomycosis is established, antifungal therapy should always be started. Antifungal therapy with amphotericin B or azoles like fluconazole. Medical therapy needs to be continued for many years and sometimes indefinitely to reduce disease recurrence or progression. Surgical management is indicated in cases with mechanical instability, neurologic deficit, medically intractable pain, or progression of infection despite antifungal therapy. Conclusions: This work provides a working protocol involving assessment and reassessment for the management of spinal coccidioidomycosis. Medical management with antifungal agents in some cases can provide satisfactory disease control. However, in patients with mechanical instability, neurologic deficit, medically intractable pain or disease progression disease control may only be achieved with surgical debridement and stabilization. PMID:26167359

  6. Migration of the Anterior Spinal Rod to the Right Thigh, a Rare Complication of Anterior Spinal Instrumentations: A Case Report and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Camino Willhuber; Danilo, Taype Zamboni; Guido, Carabelli; Jorge, Barla; Carlos, Sancineto

    2015-01-01

    Posterior and anterior fusion procedures with instrumentation are well-known surgical treatments for scoliosis. Rod migration has been described as unusual complication in anterior spinal instrumentations; migration beyond pelvis is a rare complication. A 32-year-old female presented to the consultant with right thigh pain, rod migration was diagnosed, rod extraction by minimal approach was performed, and spinal instrumentation after nonunion diagnosis was underwent. A rod migration case to the right thigh is presented; this uncommon complication of spinal instrumentation should be ruled out as unusual cause of sudden pain without any other suspicions, and long-term follow-up is important to prevent and diagnose this problem. PMID:26613058

  7. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III; Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  8. Lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chad, David A

    2007-05-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis may be congenital or acquired. A classic clinical presentation is described as neurogenic claudication. Physical signs of sensory loss, weakness, and attenuation of reflexes often are mild and limited in distribution. Neuroimaging of the lumbosacral spine with MRI and electrodiagnostic (electromyographic [EMG]) tests are the most informative diagnostic modalities. Conservative management often is successful, but surgical decompression may be indicated in refractory cases. PMID:17445736

  9. [Information analysis of spinal ganglia].

    PubMed

    Lobko, P I; Kovaleva, D V; Kovalchuk, I E; Pivchenko, P G; Rudenok, V V; Davydova, L A

    2000-01-01

    Information parameters (entropia and redundancy) of cervical and thoracic spinal ganglia of albino rat foetuses, mature animals (cat and dog) and human subjects were analysed. Information characteristics of spinal ganglia were shown to be level-specified and to depend on their functional peculiarities. Information parameters of thoracic spinal ganglia of man and different animals are specie specified and may be used in assessment of morphological structures as information systems. PMID:12629803

  10. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ventricular puncture; Lumbar puncture; Cisternal puncture; Cerebrospinal fluid culture ... pressure may be due to spinal cord tumor, shock, fainting, or diabetic coma . CSF PROTEIN Increased CSF ...

  11. Urinary considerations for adult patients with spinal dysraphism.

    PubMed

    Veenboer, Paul W; de Kort, Laetitia M O; Chrzan, Rafal J; de Jong, Tom P V M

    2015-06-01

    The incidence of newborns with spinal dysraphism is diminishing worldwide, although survival of individuals with this condition into adulthood continues to improve. The number of adults with spinal dysraphism will, therefore, increase in the coming years, which will pose new challenges in patient management. Urological manifestations of spinal dysraphism can include increased risks of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infection, urinary calculi, sexual dysfunction, end-stage renal disease and iatrogenic metabolic disturbances; however, the severity and incidence of these symptoms varies substantially between patients. Owing to the presence of multiple comorbidities, treatment and follow-up protocols often have to be adapted to best suit the needs of specific patients. Authors describe bladder and kidney function and long-term complications of treatments initiated in childhood, as well as the potential for improvements in quality of life through better follow-up schedules and future developments. PMID:25963964

  12. West Nile virus infection in free-ranging squirrels in Illinois.

    PubMed

    Heinz-Taheny, Kathleen M; Andrews, John J; Kinsel, Michael J; Pessier, Allan P; Pinkerton, Marie E; Lemberger, Karin Y; Novak, Robert J; Dizikes, George J; Edwards, Eric; Komar, Nicholas

    2004-05-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection was diagnosed in 13 gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) and 3 fox squirrels (Sciurus niger) that were observed with neurologic signs before death or found dead. All 16 had gliosis throughout all sections of the brain. Most had lymphoplasmacytic encephalitis or meningoencephalitis, many with admixed neutrophils. Neuronal necrosis and neuronophagia were also prominent features. West Nile virus antigen was demonstrated in the brain, spleen, heart or kidney in 10 of 13 gray squirrels and 3 of 3 fox squirrels by immunohistochemistry. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) confirmed the presence of WNV in the brain or spinal cord of 10/10 gray squirrels and 1/3 fox squirrels tested. Viral levels were quantified in various tissues of selected gray squirrels, and titers were highest in spleen and brain, with no virus detected in serum. This is the first description of lesions associated with WNV infection in gray and fox squirrels. PMID:15152831

  13. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of spinal osteoid osteoma under CT guidance

    PubMed Central

    Morassi, L G; Kokkinis, K; Karargyris, O; Vlachou, I; Kalokairinou, K; Pneumaticos, S G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Osteoid osteoma (OO) accounts for approximately 10–12% of all benign bone tumours and 3% of all bone tumours. Spinal involvement appears in 10–25% of all cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation in the treatment of spinal OOs and report our experience. Methods: 13 patients suffering from spinal OO and treated at the authors' institution using CT-guided RF ablation were retrospectively evaluated. The RF probe was introduced through a 11-G Jamshidi® needle, and the lesion was heated at 90?°C for 6?min. Results: All procedures were considered technically successful as the correct positioning of the probe was proven by CT. 11 of the 13 patients reported pain relief after RF ablation. In two cases, RF ablation was repeated 1 month after the first procedure. Pain relief was achieved in both cases after the second procedure. No recurrence was reported throughout the follow-up. No complications like skin burn, soft-tissue haematoma, infection, vessel damage or neurological deficit were reported. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that CT-guided percutaneous RF ablation is a safe and effective method for the treatment of spinal OOs. Advances in knowledge: The data of this study support the efficacy and safety of the recently applied CT-guided percutaneous RF ablation technique for the treatment of spinal OOs. PMID:24712322

  14. Bacterial Spine Infections in Adults: Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Cornett, Chris A; Vincent, Scott A; Crow, Jordan; Hewlett, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial spinal infections in adults can have notable adverse consequences, including pain, neurologic deficit, spinal instability and/or deformity, or death. Numerous factors can predispose a person to spinal infection, many of which affect the immune status of the patient. These infections are typically caused by direct seeding of the spine, contiguous spread, or hematogenous spread. Infections are generally grouped based on anatomic location; they are broadly categorized as vertebral osteomyelitis, discitis, and epidural abscess. In some cases, the diagnosis may not be elucidated early without a reasonable index of suspicion. Diagnosis is based on history and physical examination, laboratory data, proper imaging, and culture. Most infections can be treated with an appropriate course of antibiotics and bracing if needed. Surgical intervention is usually reserved for infections resistant to medical management, the need for open biopsy/culture, evolving spinal instability or deformity, and neurologic deficit or deterioration. PMID:26700630

  15. Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of ... easy, affordable blood test that could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD)—even before symptoms began to show? Researchers ...

  16. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed? Doctors diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) based on ... to see whether the baby has CF. Cystic Fibrosis Carrier Testing People who have one normal CFTR ...

  17. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) based on your medical and family histories, a ... exam, and the results from tests and procedures. PH can develop slowly. In fact, you may have ...

  18. Imaging modalities in spinal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kricun, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an approach to the various imaging modalities used to view the spine. It discusses the indications, limitations and practical use of each in the diagnosis, work-up and staging of various spinal disorders, and compares each of them in various clinical settings. Topics covered include low back pain syndrome, disk disease, spinal cord lesions, congenital abnormalities, and trauma.

  19. Spinal Injury Rehabilitation in Singapore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, H. L.; Chua, K.; Chan, W.

    1998-01-01

    This study reviewed 231 cases of spinal cord injury treated in Singapore. Data on demographic characteristics, common causes (mostly falls and traffic accidents), types of spinal damage, and outcomes are reported. Following rehabilitation, 68 patients were able to ambulate independently and 45 patients achieved independence in activities of daily…

  20. Infection in Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Cook, Gillian E; Markel, David C; Ren, Weiping; Webb, Lawrence X; McKee, Michael D; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2015-12-01

    Infection in orthopaedic trauma patients is a common problem associated with significant financial and psychosocial costs, and increased morbidity. This review outlines technologies to diagnose and prevent orthopaedic infection, examines implant-related infection and its management, and discusses the treatment of post-traumatic osteomyelitis. The gold standard for diagnosing infection has a number of disadvantages, and thus new technologies to diagnose infection are being explored, including multilocus polymerase chain reaction with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and optical imaging. Numerous strategies have been employed to prevent orthopaedic infection, including use of antibiotic-impregnated implant coatings and cement; however, further research is required to optimize these technologies. Biofilm formation on orthopaedic implants is attributed to the glycocalyx-mediated surface mode of bacterial growth and is usually treated through a secondary surgery involving irrigation, debridement and the appropriate use of antibiotics, or complete removal of the infected implant. Research into the treatment of post-traumatic osteomyelitis has focused on developing an optimal local antibiotic delivery vehicle, such as antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement beads or bioabsorbable bone substitute (BBS) delivery systems. As these new technologies to diagnose, prevent and treat orthopaedic infection advance, the incidence of infection will decrease and patient care will be optimized. PMID:26584261

  1. Full Endoscopic Spinal Surgery Techniques: Advancements, Indications, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yue, James J; Long, William

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in both surgical instrumentation and full endoscopic spine techniques have resulted in positive clinical outcomes in the treatment of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pathologies. Endoscopic techniques impart minimal approach related disruption of non-pathologic spinal anatomy and function while concurrently maximizing functional visualization and correction of pathological tissues. An advanced understanding of the applicable functional neuroanatomy, in particular the neuroforamen, is essential for successful outcomes. Additionally, an understanding of the varying types of disc prolapse pathology in relation to the neuroforamen will result in more optimal surgical outcomes. Indications for lumbar endoscopic spine surgery include disc herniations, spinal stenosis, infections, medial branch rhizotomy, and interbody fusion. Limitations are based on both non spine and spine related findings. A high riding iliac wing, a more posteriorly located retroperitoneal cavity, an overly distal or proximally migrated herniated disc are all relative contra-indications to lumbar endoscopic spinal surgery techniques. Modifications in scope size and visual field of view angulation have enabled both anterior and posterior cervical decompression. Endoscopic burrs, electrocautery, and focused laser technology allow for the least invasive spinal surgical techniques in all age groups and across varying body habitus. Complications include among others, dural tears, dysesthsia, nerve injury, and infection. PMID:26114086

  2. Association of autosomal dominant familial exudative vitreoretinopathy and spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Mammo, Danny; Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Thomas, Benjamin J; Shah, Ankoor R; Abbey, Ashkan M; Trese, Michael T; Drenser, Kimberly A; Capone, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We present an 8-month-old boy with severe retinal detachment from familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FZD4 exon 1 deletion). He was subsequently diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy with SMN1 deletion. ?-catenin signaling is dysregulated in both disorders, so we hypothesize that the co-occurrence may have exacerbated the vitreoretinal phenotype. PMID:26109022

  3. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  4. Attitudes Towards Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Cassandra Sligh D.; Gooden, Randy; Nowell, Jennifer; Wilson, Navodda

    2010-01-01

    This paper will shed light on the lives of persons with spinal cord injuries by revealing the literature on spinal cord injuries that focuses on research that can shed light on attitudes towards persons with spinal cord injuries. The background literature related to incidences, the definition of spinal cord injury, and vocational opportunities are…

  5. Diagnosable structured logic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling (Inventor); Miles, Lowell (Inventor); Gambles, Jody (Inventor); Maki, Gary K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A diagnosable structured logic array and associated process is provided. A base cell structure is provided comprising a logic unit comprising a plurality of input nodes, a plurality of selection nodes, and an output node, a plurality of switches coupled to the selection nodes, where the switches comprises a plurality of input lines, a selection line and an output line, a memory cell coupled to the output node, and a test address bus and a program control bus coupled to the plurality of input lines and the selection line of the plurality of switches. A state on each of the plurality of input nodes is verifiably loaded and read from the memory cell. A trusted memory block is provided. The associated process is provided for testing and verifying a plurality of truth table inputs of the logic unit.

  6. Nonmissile penetrating spinal injury with an impaled knife: case report.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bodapati Chandramowliswara; Vemula, Ramesh Chandra; Varaprasad, Gangumolu

    2013-06-01

    We report a case of non missile penetrating spinal injury (NMPSI) caused due to an impaled knife in the lumbar region. The patient was neurologically preserved and presented with the knife blade retained in his back. The wound with the knife in situ was explored, the knife removed and a dural laceration was repaired. The wound healed without evidence for cerebrospinal fluid leakage or infection. PMID:24426437

  7. Outcomes in Treatment for Intradural Spinal Cord Ependymomas

    SciTech Connect

    Volpp, P. Brian Han, Khanh; Kagan, A. Robert; Tome, Michael

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Spinal cord ependymomas are rare tumors, accounting for <2% of all primary central nervous system tumors. This study assessed the treatment outcomes for patients diagnosed with spinal cord ependymomas within the Southern California Kaiser Permanente system. Methods and Materials: We studied 23 patients treated with surgery with or without external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The local and distant control rates and overall survival rates were determined. Results: The overall local control, overall recurrence, and 9-year overall survival rate was 96%, 17.4%, and 63.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The results of our study indicate that en bloc gross total resection should be the initial treatment, with radiotherapy reserved primarily for postoperative cases with unfavorable characteristics such as residual tumor, anaplastic histologic features, or piecemeal resection. Excellent local control and overall survival rates can be achieved using modern microsurgical techniques, with or without local radiotherapy.

  8. 21 CFR 888.3050 - Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3050 Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis. (a) Identification. A spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis...spondylolisthesis (a dislocation of the spinal column), and lower back syndrome....

  9. 21 CFR 888.3050 - Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3050 Spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis. (a) Identification. A spinal interlaminal fixation orthosis...spondylolisthesis (a dislocation of the spinal column), and lower back syndrome....

  10. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ta-Wei; Chou, Tzu-Yi; Jou, Herng-Jeng; Yang, Pei-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Li; Sung, Fung-Chang; Hsu, Chung-Y.; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to elucidate the relationship between spinal cord injury (SCI) and the risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in a cohort study with a large representative sample. The National Health Insurance Database was used to select patients who were diagnosed from 2000 to 2010. Patients with a history of PAD were excluded. The SCI group comprised 42,673 patients diagnosed with SCI, and we enrolled 170,389 matched controls (non-SCI group). We used a Cox proportional hazards regression model to analyze the adjusted risk of PAD between the case and control patients. Patients with SCI exhibited a significantly higher risk (hazard ratio [HR]?=?1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI]?=?1.22–1.53) of PAD than patients without SCI. Patients with diabetes were at the highest risk of developing PAD (adjusted HR?=?3.11, 95% CI?=?2.80–3.44). Among patients without comorbidity, SCI patients exhibited a significantly higher risk of PAD than non-SCI patients. Furthermore, lumbar, sacral, or coccygeal spine, and multiple spine SCI were significantly associated with an increased risk of PAD (HR?=?1.56, 95% CI?=?1.33–1.84, HR?=?2.11, 95% CI?=?1.59–2.79, respectively). SCI is associated with an increased risk of PAD. Future studies should focus on modifying risk factors to reduce PAD risk among patients with SCI. PMID:26469900

  11. Spinal muscular atrophies.

    PubMed

    Darras, Basil T

    2015-06-01

    Spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are hereditary degenerative disorders of lower motor neurons associated with progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Proximal 5q SMA is caused by decreased levels of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein and is the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. Its inheritance pattern is autosomal recessive, resulting from mutations involving the SMN1 gene on chromosome 5q13. Unlike other autosomal recessive diseases, the SMN gene has a unique structure (an inverted duplication) that presents potential therapeutic targets. Although there is currently no effective treatment of SMA, the field of translational research in this disorder is active and clinical trials are ongoing. Advances in the multidisciplinary supportive care of children with SMA also offer hope for improved life expectancy and quality of life. PMID:26022173

  12. Spinal cord abscess

    MedlinePLUS

    ... through the spine. It may be caused by tuberculosis in some areas of the world, but this ... Thorough treatment of boils, tuberculosis, and other infections decreases the risk. Early diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent complications.

  13. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  14. [Not diagnosable malignant melanomas].

    PubMed

    Neuber, H; Lippold, A; Hundeiker, M

    1991-04-01

    Of the 3574 malignant melanomas treated in Hornheide between December 1981 and August 1990 (not including preinvasive cases) 97 were not immediately recognized. These tumours did not look like melanomas. In 72% they were smaller than 10 mm in diameter, and in 20%, smaller than 5 mm. Clark's so often quoted "pencil rule" should no longer be used as an aid to exclusion of invasive melanoma. Localization of the unrecognized melanomas was on the head and neck in 22% of cases. In 37%, the patients were under the age of 40 years. No less than 25% of the patients had multiple melanomas. Many of these melanomas. Many of these melanomas were thin tumours (less than 0.75 mm in 55% and less than 1.5 mm in 77%). This explains why more than 50% of the lesions are described as "macules". The most common incorrect diagnoses were dysplastic naevi (44%) and common (23%) naevi. The most important anamnestic criteria are the patients' own statements about changes in size, colour and shape. These "dynamic" elements must be more carefully observed and documented during process of the clinical diagnosis. PMID:1860796

  15. Novel approaches in diagnosing tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, Arend H. J.; Dang, Ngoc A.; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Gibson, Tim; Anthony, Richard; Claassens, Mareli M.; Kaal, Erwin; Janssen, Hans-Gerd

    2011-06-01

    The WHO declared tuberculosis (TB) a global emergency. An estimated 8-9 million new cases occur each year with 2-3 million deaths. Currently, TB is diagnosed mostly by chest-X ray and staining of the mycobacteria in sputum with a detection limit of 1x104 bacteria /ml. There is an urgent need for better diagnostic tools for TB especially for developing countries. We have validated the electronic nose from TD Technology for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by headspace analysis of 284 sputum samples from TB patients. We used linear discriminant function analysis resulting in a sensitivity of 75% a specificity of 67% and an accuracy of 69%. Further research is still required to improve the results by choosing more selective sensors and sampling techniques. We used a fast gas chromatography- mass spectrometry method (GC-MS). The automated procedure is based on the injection of sputum samples which are methylated inside the GC injector using thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation (THM-GC-MS). Hexacosanoic acid in combination with tuberculostearic acid was found to be specific for the presence of M. tuberculosis. The detection limit was similar to microscopy. We found no false positives, all microscopy and culture positive samples were also found positive with the THM-GC-MS method. The detection of ribosomal RNA from the infecting organism offers great potential since rRNA molecules outnumber chromosomal DNA by a factor 1000. It thus may possible to detect the organism without amplification of the nucleic acids (NA). We used a capture and a tagged detector probe for the direct detection of M. tuberculosis in sputum. So far the detection limit is 1x106 bacteria / ml. Currently we are testing a Lab-On-A-Chip Interferometer detection system.

  16. Relationship between Spinal Cord Volume and Spinal Cord Injury due to Spinal Shortening

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Feng; Yang, Jin-Cheng; Ma, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Jun-Jie; Yang, Qing-Lei; Zhou, Xin; Xiao, Yao-Sheng; Hu, Hai-Sheng; Xia, Li-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral column resection is associated with a risk of spinal cord injury. In the present study, using a goat model, we aimed to investigate the relationship between changes in spinal cord volume and spinal cord injury due to spinal shortening, and to quantify the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height in order to clarify a safe limit for shortening. Vertebral column resection was performed at T10 in 10 goats. The spinal cord was shortened until the somatosensory-evoked potential was decreased by 50% from the baseline amplitude or delayed by 10% relative to the baseline peak latency. A wake-up test was performed, and the goats were observed for two days postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the spinal cord volume, T10 height, disc height, osteotomy segment height, and spinal segment height pre- and postoperatively. Two of the 10 goats were excluded, and hence, only data from eight goats were analyzed. The somatosensory-evoked potential of these eight goats demonstrated meaningful changes. With regard to neurologic function, five and three goats were classified as Tarlov grades 5 and 4 at two days postoperatively. The mean shortening distance was 23.6 ± 1.51 mm, which correlated with the d-value (post-pre) of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment (r = 0.95, p < 0.001) and with the height of the T10 body (r = 0.79, p = 0.02). The mean d-value (post-pre) of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment was 142.87 ± 0.59 mm3 (range, 142.19–143.67 mm3). The limit for shortening was approximately 106% of the vertebral height. The mean volumes of the osteotomy and spinal segments did not significantly change after surgery (t = 0.310, p = 0.765 and t = 1.241, p = 0.255, respectively). Thus, our results indicate that the safe limit for shortening can be calculated using the change in spinal cord volume per 1-mm height. PMID:26001196

  17. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... temperature from the body to the spinal cord. Did You Know... Doctors can often tell where the ... on symptoms and results of a physical examination. Did You Know... Nerves from the lowest parts of ...

  18. Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to adjusting to spinal cord injury is personal motivation . Individuals who are newly injured are often motivated ... to find purpose in your life and the motivation to achieve your goals. It may help to ...

  19. Depression and Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... colleagues, with an educational grant from Pfizer Inc. University of Washington-operated SCI Clinics: Harborview Medical Center ... Spinal Cord Injury Clinic nurses: 206-744-5862 University of Washington Medical Center Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic 1959 ...

  20. Complications related to the use of spinal cord stimulation for managing persistent postoperative neuropathic pain after lumbar spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Westwick, Harrison J; Heary, Robert F

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Structural spinal surgery yields improvement in pain and disability for selected patients with spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, or a herniated intervertebral disc. A significant fraction of patients exhibit persistent postoperative neuropathic pain (PPNP) despite technically appropriate intervention, and such patients can benefit from spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to alleviate suffering. The complication profile of this therapy has not been systematically assessed and, thus, was the goal of this review. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify prospective cohorts of patients who had PPNP following structurally corrective lumbar spinal surgery and who underwent SCS device implantation. Data about study design, technique of SCS lead introduction, and complications encountered were collected and analyzed. Comparisons of complication incidence were performed between percutaneously and surgically implanted systems, with the level of significance set at 0.05. RESULTS Review of 11 studies involving 542 patients formed the basis of this work: 2 randomized controlled trials and 9 prospective cohorts. Percutaneous implants were used in 4 studies and surgical implants were used in 4 studies; in the remainder, the types were undefined. Lead migration occurred in 12% of cases, pain at the site of the implantable pulse generator occurred in 9% of cases, and wound-related complications occurred in 5% of cases; the latter 2 occurred more frequently among surgically implanted devices. CONCLUSIONS Spinal cord stimulation can provide for improved pain and suffering and for decreased narcotic medication use among patients with PPNP after lumbar spinal surgery. This study reviewed the prospective studies forming the evidence base for this therapy, to summarize the complications encountered and, thus, best inform patients and clinicians considering its use. There is a significant rate of minor complications, many of which require further surgical intervention to manage, including lead migration or implant infection, although such complications do not directly threaten patient life or function. PMID:26424339

  1. How Is Stomach Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... then removed and looked at under a microscope. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan MRI scans use radio waves and strong magnets instead of ... to look at the brain and spinal cord. MRI scans take longer than CT scans, often up to ...

  2. Unilateral posterior cervical spinal cord infarction due to spontaneous vertebral artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Sébastien; Abdallah, Chifaou; Chanson, Anne; Foscolo, Sylvain; Baillot, Pierre-Alexandre; Ducrocq, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Context Ischemia of the cervical spinal cord is a rare complication of spontaneous vertebral artery dissection (VAD) and usually involves the ventral portion. We describe a less evocative clinical presentation and images of unilateral posterior spinal cord infarction due to spontaneous VAD in order to facilitate early diagnosis. Findings A previously fit 30-year-old man presented with persistent headaches and proximal motor deficit of the right arm. He was diagnosed with spontaneous dissection of both vertebral arteries, with occlusion of the right one, and the right carotid artery. Neurological examination also revealed a right C2–C3 tactile sensory loss, with unilateral proprioceptive deficit below. Brain images revealed small bilateral cerebellar infarcts which could not be responsible for the clinical symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal cord showed a right posterior cervical spinal cord infarction. The patient achieved nearly complete recovery after several weeks of anticoagulation and rehabilitation. Conclusion and clinical relevance Infarction of the caudal portion of the cervical spinal cord, especially unilateral, caused by spontaneous VAD, has rarely been described and is certainly under-diagnosed due to less suggestive symptoms, like unilateral and mainly sensory deficit. Nevertheless, early diagnosis of this condition is important to guide patient management and rehabilitation. PMID:24090478

  3. Primary lumbar epidural abscess without spondylodiscitis caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum diagnosed by 16S rRNA PCR.

    PubMed

    Sanmillán, Jose Luis; Pelegrín, Iván; Rodríguez, David; Ardanuy, Carmen; Cabellos, Carmen

    2013-10-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old woman who presented a primary spinal epidural abscess caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. This is the second report in the medical literature to associate this organism with a primary spinal epidural abscess without spondylodiscitis. After treatment with emergency laminectomy followed by 8 weeks of antibiotic treatment the patient was cured. Oral metronidazole (500 mg every 8 h) was the definitive choice of treatment. F. necrophorum spinal epidural abscess is rare, although samples for anaerobic culture should be collected in order to improve detection of anaerobic spinal infections. PCR amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA permits early diagnosis in anaerobic infections. PMID:23845584

  4. Neuroblastoma in Children: Just Diagnosed Information

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Meet the Supporters Blog Donate Now Select Page Neuroblastoma in Children – Just Diagnosed Home > Understanding Children’s Cancer > ... Diagnosed Just Diagnosed In Treatment After Treatment Diagnosing Neuroblastoma Depending on the location of the tumor and ...

  5. Pathophysiology of primary spinal syringomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, John D.; Snyder, Kendall; Peterson, Matthew M.; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Butman, John A.; Smith, René K.; DeVroom, Hetty L.; Sansur, Charles A.; Eskioglu, Eric; Kammerer, William A.; Oldfield, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    Object The pathogenesis of syringomyelia in patients with an associated spinal lesion is incompletely understood. The authors hypothesized that in primary spinal syringomyelia, a subarachnoid block effectively shortens the length of the spinal subarachnoid space (SAS), reducing compliance and the ability of the spinal theca to dampen the subarachnoid CSF pressure waves produced by brain expansion during cardiac systole. This creates exaggerated spinal subarachnoid pressure waves during every heartbeat that act on the spinal cord above the block to drive CSF into the spinal cord and create a syrinx. After a syrinx is formed, enlarged subarachnoid pressure waves compress the external surface of the spinal cord, propel the syrinx fluid, and promote syrinx progression. Methods To elucidate the pathophysiology, the authors prospectively studied 36 adult patients with spinal lesions obstructing the spinal SAS. Testing before surgery included clinical examination; evaluation of anatomy on T1-weighted MRI; measurement of lumbar and cervical subarachnoid mean and pulse pressures at rest, during Valsalva maneuver, during jugular compression, and after removal of CSF (CSF compliance measurement); and evaluation with CT myelography. During surgery, pressure measurements from the SAS above the level of the lesion and the lumbar intrathecal space below the lesion were obtained, and cardiac-gated ultrasonography was performed. One week after surgery, CT myelography was repeated. Three months after surgery, clinical examination, T1-weighted MRI, and CSF pressure recordings (cervical and lumbar) were repeated. Clinical examination and MRI studies were repeated annually thereafter. Findings in patients were compared with those obtained in a group of 18 healthy individuals who had already undergone T1-weighted MRI, cine MRI, and cervical and lumbar subarachnoid pressure testing. Results In syringomyelia patients compared with healthy volunteers, cervical subarachnoid pulse pressure was increased (2.7 ± 1.2 vs 1.6 ± 0.6 mm Hg, respectively; p = 0.004), pressure transmission to the thecal sac below the block was reduced, and spinal CSF compliance was decreased. Intraoperative ultrasonography confirmed that pulse pressure waves compressed the outer surface of the spinal cord superior to regions of obstruction of the subarachnoid space. Conclusions These findings are consistent with the theory that a spinal subarachnoid block increases spinal subarachnoid pulse pressure above the block, producing a pressure differential across the obstructed segment of the SAS, which results in syrinx formation and progression. These findings are similar to the results of the authors' previous studies that examined the pathophysiology of syringomyelia associated with obstruction of the SAS at the foramen magnum in the Chiari Type I malformation and indicate that a common mechanism, rather than different, separate mechanisms, underlies syrinx formation in these two entities. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00011245. (http://thejns.org/doi/abs/10.3171/2012.8.SPINE111059) PMID:22958075

  6. Isolated thoracic (D5) intramedullary epidermoid cyst without spinal dysraphism: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Satapathy, Mani Charan; Deo, Rama Chandra; Tripathy, Soubhagya Ranjan; Senapati, Satya Bhusan

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidermoid cyst, congenital or acquired, is mainly congenital associated with spinal dysraphism, rarely in isolation. Intramedullary epidermoid cysts (IECs) are rare with less than 60 cases reported so far; isolated variety (i.e., without spinal dysraphism) is still rarer. Complete microsurgical excision is the dictum of surgical treatment. A 14-year-old boy presented with 4-month history of upper backache accompanied with progressive descending paresthesia with paraparesis with early bladder and bowel involvement. His condition deteriorated rapidly making him bedridden. Neurological examination revealed upper thoracic myeloradiculopathy probably of neoplastic origin with sensory localization to D5 spinal level. Digital X-ray revealed no feature suggestive of spinal dysraphism. Contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics clinched the presumptive diagnosis. Near-total microsurgical excision was done leaving behind a small part of the calcified capsule densely adhered to cord. Histopathological features were confirmative of an epidermoid cyst. Postoperatively, he improved significantly with a gain of motor power sufficient to walk without support within a span of 6 months. Spinal IECs, without any specific clinical presentation, are often diagnosed based upon intraoperative and histopathological findings, however early diagnosis is possible on complete MRI valuation. Complete microsurgical excision, resulting in cessation of clinical progression and remission of symptoms, has to be limited to sub-total or near-total excision if cyst is adherent to cord or its confines. PMID:26167216

  7. Isolated thoracic (D5) intramedullary epidermoid cyst without spinal dysraphism: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Satapathy, Mani Charan; Deo, Rama Chandra; Tripathy, Soubhagya Ranjan; Senapati, Satya Bhusan

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidermoid cyst, congenital or acquired, is mainly congenital associated with spinal dysraphism, rarely in isolation. Intramedullary epidermoid cysts (IECs) are rare with less than 60 cases reported so far; isolated variety (i.e., without spinal dysraphism) is still rarer. Complete microsurgical excision is the dictum of surgical treatment. A 14-year-old boy presented with 4-month history of upper backache accompanied with progressive descending paresthesia with paraparesis with early bladder and bowel involvement. His condition deteriorated rapidly making him bedridden. Neurological examination revealed upper thoracic myeloradiculopathy probably of neoplastic origin with sensory localization to D5 spinal level. Digital X-ray revealed no feature suggestive of spinal dysraphism. Contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics clinched the presumptive diagnosis. Near-total microsurgical excision was done leaving behind a small part of the calcified capsule densely adhered to cord. Histopathological features were confirmative of an epidermoid cyst. Postoperatively, he improved significantly with a gain of motor power sufficient to walk without support within a span of 6 months. Spinal IECs, without any specific clinical presentation, are often diagnosed based upon intraoperative and histopathological findings, however early diagnosis is possible on complete MRI valuation. Complete microsurgical excision, resulting in cessation of clinical progression and remission of symptoms, has to be limited to sub-total or near-total excision if cyst is adherent to cord or its confines. PMID:26167216

  8. A Syrian patient diagnosed with meningococcal meningitis serogroup B.

    PubMed

    Tezer, Hasan; Ozkaya-Parlakay, Aslinur; Kanik-Yuksek, Saliha; Gülhan, Belgin; Güldemir, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal infection is an important health problem in children, with significant mortality and morbidity. In this infection, early recognition and aggressive treatment can reduce mortality. Herein we report an 11-year-old-Syrian refugee girl living in Turkey for 3 months admitting with fever, headache, and vomiting diagnosed as meningococcal meningitis type B who was cured with intravenous ceftriaxone therapy. Infections in refugee populations constitute major importance for highlighting importance of investigation of endemic diseases in their own country and contagious diseases in their present place. PMID:25424959

  9. Complication with Removal of a Lumbar Spinal Locking Plate

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Brooke; Lenarz, Christopher; Watson, J. Tracy; Alander, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The use of locking plate technology for anterior lumbar spinal fusion has increased stability of the vertebral fusion mass over traditional nonconstrained screw and plate systems. This case report outlines a complication due to the use of this construct. Case. A patient with a history of L2 corpectomy and anterior spinal fusion presented with discitis at the L4/5 level and underwent an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) supplemented with a locking plate placed anterolaterally for stability. Fifteen months after the ALIF procedure, he returned with a hardware infection. He underwent debridement of the infection site and removal of hardware. Results. Once hardware was exposed, removal of the locking plate screws was only successful in one out of four screws using a reverse thread screw removal device. Three of the reverse thread screw removal devices broke in attempt to remove the subsequent screws. A metal cutting drill was then used to break hoop stresses associated with the locking device and the plate was removed. Conclusion. Anterior locking plates add significant stability to an anterior spinal fusion mass. However, removal of this hardware can be complicated by the inherent properties of the design with significant risk of major vascular injury. PMID:25838956

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Spinal muscular atrophy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a loss of specialized nerve cells, called motor neurons, in the spinal cord and the part of ... spinal cord (the brainstem). The loss of motor neurons leads to weakness and wasting (atrophy) of muscles ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the UAB-SCIMS Contact the UAB-SCIMS UAB Spinal Cord Injury Model System Newly Injured Health Daily Living ... Information Network The University of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) maintains this Information ...

  12. The role of BDNF in spinal learning 

    E-print Network

    Huie, John Russell

    2009-05-15

    Previous research in our laboratory has shown that the spinal cord is capable of a simple form of instrumental learning. Spinally transected rats that receive controllable shock to an extended hindlimb exhibit a progressive increase in flexion...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury—Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, William H

    2007-01-01

    Summary: This special report traces the path of spinal cord injury (SCI) from ancient times through the present and provides an optimistic overview of promising clinical trials and avenues of basic research. The spinal cord injuries of Lord Admiral Sir Horatio Nelson, President James A. Garfield, and General George Patton provide an interesting perspective on the evolution of the standard of care for SCI. The author details the contributions of a wide spectrum of professionals in the United States, Europe, and Australia, as well as the roles of various government and professional organizations, legislation, and overall advances in surgery, anesthesia, trauma care, imaging, pharmacology, and infection control, in the advancement of care for the individual with SCI. PMID:17591221

  14. FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Care? Emergency Medical Services Hospital (Acute) Care Rehabilitation More FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) If you or a loved one ... spinal cord injury? What recovery is expected following spinal cord injury? Where is ... on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number H133N110008). NIDILRR is a ...

  15. Intramedullary spinal metastasis of a carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jay I; Yanamadala, Vijay; Shin, John H

    2015-12-01

    We report an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from a bronchial carcinoid, and discuss its mechanisms and management. Intramedullary spinal cord metastases from any cancer are rare, and bronchial carcinoids account for only a small fraction of lung cancers. To our knowledge, an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis from a bronchial carcinoid has been described only once previously. PMID:26260116

  16. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Fang, Marong; Chen, Haohao; Gou, Fangming; Ding, Mingxing

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies. PMID:25598784

  17. RESEARCH ARTICLE Spinal Cord Segmentation by One

    E-print Network

    Fleet, David J.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Spinal Cord Segmentation by One Dimensional Normalized Template Matching: A Novel, Ontario, Canada * michael.fehlings@uhn.ca Abstract Spinal cord segmentation is a developing area cord atrophy. Spinal cord segmentation is difficult due to the variety of MRI contrasts

  18. Spinal reflexes in brain death.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Yesim; Çiftçi, Yeliz; Incesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Akhan, Galip

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous and reflex movements have been described in brain death and these unusual movements might cause uncertainties in diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the presence of spinal reflexes in patients who fulfilled the criteria for brain death. Thirty-two (22 %) of 144 patients presented unexpected motor movements spontaneously or during examinations. These patients exhibited the following signs: undulating toe, increased deep tendon reflexes, plantar responses, Lazarus sign, flexion-withdrawal reflex, facial myokymia, neck-arm flexion, finger jerks and fasciculations. In comparison, there were no significant differences in age, sex, etiology of brain death and hemodynamic laboratory findings in patients with and without reflex motor movement. Spinal reflexes should be well recognized by physicians and it should be born in mind that brain death can be determined in the presence of spinal reflexes. PMID:24604683

  19. Bacterial Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadi; Khan, Tariq; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections account for 0.5% of outpatient visits to primary care. Skin and soft tissue infections can usually be managed in an outpatient setting. However, there are certain circumstances as discussed in this article that require more urgent care or inpatient management. Primary care providers should be able to diagnose, manage, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these frequently seen skin infections. This article provides family physicians with a comprehensive review of the assessment and management of common bacterial skin infections. PMID:26612370

  20. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News, Videos & Podcasts » Articles » Text Size Print Bookmark Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed Long-term Complications Result from Poor Recovery Mistaking an ankle fracture for an ankle sprain has serious consequences ...

  1. How Is an Aneurysm Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Is an Aneurysm Diagnosed? If you have an aortic aneurysm but no symptoms, your doctor may find it ... or abdominal pain. If you have an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), your doctor may feel a throbbing mass ...

  2. How Is Lactose Intolerance Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... following tests also can help diagnose lactose intolerance: Hydrogen breath test. For this test, a person drinks ... beverage that has lactose in it. Then, the hydrogen level in the breath is measured at set ...

  3. How Are Learning Disabilities Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with plans that improve learning. 5 Role of SLPs All SLPs are trained in diagnosing and treating speech- and language-related disorders. A SLP can provide a complete language evaluation as well ...

  4. 3D visualization of Thoraco-Lumbar Spinal Lesions in German Shepherd Dog

    SciTech Connect

    Azpiroz, J.; Krafft, J.; Cadena, M.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2006-09-08

    Computed tomography (CT) has been found to be an excellent imaging modality due to its sensitivity to characterize the morphology of the spine in dogs. This technique is considered to be particularly helpful for diagnosing spinal cord atrophy and spinal stenosis. The three-dimensional visualization of organs and bones can significantly improve the diagnosis of certain diseases in dogs. CT images were acquired of a German shepherd's dog spinal cord to generate stacks and digitally process them to arrange them in a volume image. All imaging experiments were acquired using standard clinical protocols on a clinical CT scanner. The three-dimensional visualization allowed us to observe anatomical structures that otherwise are not possible to observe with two-dimensional images. The combination of an imaging modality like CT together with imaging processing techniques can be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of a number of animal diseases.

  5. Acute cervical cord infarction in anterior spinal artery territory with acute swelling mimicking myelitis.

    PubMed

    Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; AbouAl-Shaar, Iyad; Al-Kawi, Mohammed Z

    2015-10-01

    Acute infarction of the cervical segment of the spinal cord is extremely uncommon. Patients may present with signs and symptoms mimicking that of acute myelitis. On imaging, both conditions may present as a hyperintense area on T-2 weighted MRI. History of sudden onset is essential in establishing the diagnosis. We report a case of cervical spinal cord infarction in a 40-year-old man who was diagnosed with acute transverse myelitis, and was treated with high dose intravenous corticosteroids followed by 5 sessions of plasma exchange. An MRI of the spine revealed abnormal high T2 signal intensity extending from the C2 to C7 level involving the anterior two-thirds of the cord with more central involvement. The findings were consistent with anterior spinal artery territory cervical cord infarction. PMID:26492118

  6. Melatonin lowers edema after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Chen, Xiao; Qiao, Suchi; Liu, Xinwei; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Degang; Su, Jiacan; Wang, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin has been shown to diminish edema in rats. Melatonin can be used to treat spinal cord injury. This study presumed that melatonin could relieve spinal cord edema and examined how it might act. Our experiments found that melatonin (100 mg/kg, i.p.) could reduce the water content of the spinal cord, and suppress the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein after spinal cord injury. This suggests that the mechanism by which melatonin alleviates the damage to the spinal cord by edema might be related to the expression of aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. PMID:25657743

  7. Lumbar spinal atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Aditi; Tekautz, Tanya; Recinos, Violette; Murphy, Erin; Prayson, Richard A; Ruggieri, Paul; Wolff, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    We describe a pediatric patient with an atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) exclusively of the lumbar spine, with a different presentation from the two previously reported pediatric lumbar AT/RT. AT/RT are rare pediatric tumors of the central nervous system, with a dismal prognosis. Although there is sufficient literature on brain AT/RT, spinal AT/RT continues to be a rare entity, with a lumbar location even less frequently reported. A 30-month-old African American boy with multiple comorbidities presented with the inability to ambulate, encopresis and urinary dribbling. The MRI showed an intradural extramedullary mass extending downwards from the L3-4 level. He underwent an L3-S2 laminoplasty. The surgically resected mass was marked by sheets of cells with large nuclei and prominent nucleoli. The tumor cells stained with antibodies to synaptophysin and CAM5.2, and showed no immunoreactivity to INI-1 antibody. He was diagnosed with a World Health Organization Grade IV AT/RT. There was no mutation detected in the SMARCB1 gene on a comprehensive analysis of his blood. The boy is currently being treated according to the Medical University of Vienna AT/RT protocol, with no evidence of tumor recurrence 8months after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the only report of a lumbar AT/RT in an African American child. PMID:26234633

  8. Vestibulo-spinal reflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The specific objectives of experiments designed to investigate postural reflex behavior during sustained weightlessness are discussed. The first is to investigate, during prolonged weightlessness with Hoffmann response (H-reflex) measurement procedures, vestibulo-spinal reflexes associated with vestibular (otolith) responses evoked during an applied linear acceleration. This objective includes not only an evaluation of otolith-induced changes in a major postural muscle but also an investigation with this technique of the adaptive process of the vestibular system and spinal reflex mechanisms to this unique environment. The second objective is to relate space motion sickness to the results of this investigation. Finally, a return to the vestibulo-spinal and postural reflexes to normal values following the flight will be examined. The flight experiment involves activation of nerve tissue (tibial N) with electrical shock and the recording of resulting muscle activity (soleus) with surface electrodes. Soleus/spinal H-reflex testing procedures will be used in conjuction with linear acceleration through the subject's X-axis.

  9. SPINAL CORD INJURY (SCI) DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Spinal Cord Injury Database has been in existence since 1973 and captures data from SCI cases in the United States. Since its inception, 24 federally funded Model SCI Care Systems have contributed data to the National SCI Database. Statistics are derived from this da...

  10. Management of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Jon; Tomkins-Lane, Christy

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200?000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality. PMID:26727925

  11. Congenital spinal dermal tract: how accurate is clinical and radiological evaluation?

    PubMed

    Tisdall, Martin M; Hayward, Richard D; Thompson, Dominic N P

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT A dermal sinus tract is a common form of occult spinal dysraphism. The presumed etiology relates to a focal failure of disjunction resulting in a persistent adhesion between the neural and cutaneous ectoderm. Clinical and radiological features can appear innocuous, leading to delayed diagnosis and failure to appreciate the implications or extent of the abnormality. If it is left untreated, complications can include meningitis, spinal abscess, and inclusion cyst formation. The authors present their experience in 74 pediatric cases of spinal dermal tract in an attempt to identify which clinical and radiological factors are associated with an infective presentation and to assess the reliability of MRI in evaluating this entity. METHODS Consecutive cases of spinal dermal tract treated with resection between 1998 and 2010 were identified from the departmental surgical database. Demographics, clinical history, and radiological and operative findings were collected from the patient records. The presence or absence of active infection (abscess, meningitis) at the time of neurosurgical presentation and any history of local sinus discharge or infection was assessed. Magnetic resonance images were reviewed to evaluate the extent of the sinus tract and determine the presence of an inclusion cyst. Radiological and operative findings were compared. RESULTS The surgical course was uncomplicated in 90% of 74 cases eligible for analysis. Magnetic resonance imaging underreported the presence of both an intradural tract (MRI 46%, operative finding 86%) and an intraspinal inclusion cyst (MRI 15%, operative finding 24%). A history of sinus discharge (OR 12.8, p = 0.0003) and the intraoperative identification of intraspinal inclusion cysts (OR 5.6, p = 0.023) were associated with an infective presentation. There was no significant association between the presence of an intradural tract discovered at surgery and an infective presentation. CONCLUSIONS Surgery for the treatment of spinal dermal tract carries a low morbidity. While it seems intuitive that tracts without intradural extension carry a low risk of spinal cord tethering, it is not possible to reliably detect these cases using MRI. Similarly, intraspinal dermoid cannot be reliably excluded using MRI and carries an increased risk of infection. These points justify excision together with intradural exploration of all spinal dermal sinus tracts. PMID:26030333

  12. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  13. Fungal infections in children.

    PubMed

    Caputo, R V

    1986-01-01

    Fungal infections of the skin represent a relatively common problem in pediatric dermatology. Although fungal infections of the feet, nails, and groin are uncommon in the pediatric age group, fungal infections of the scalp are very common and must be diagnosed early because they may lead to permanent hair loss if left untreated. Perhaps the most significant change in fungal infections in children has occurred in tinea capitis, including the causative agent and the type of infection this organism may produce; these factors are focused upon in this article. Also discussed are infections caused by the yeast organisms Candida albicans and Pityrosporum orbiculare, as well as the deep mycoses, specifically chromoblastomycosis and cutaneous aspergillosis. PMID:2941199

  14. Infective endocarditis due to brucella.

    PubMed

    Purwar, S; Metgud, S C; Darshan, A; Mutnal, M B; Nagmoti, M B

    2006-10-01

    One of the complications of brucellosis is infective endocarditis, which carries a high mortality rate if undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. We report a case of Brucella infective endocarditis, which was diagnosed serologically and by polymerase chain reaction. After Brucella specific treatment, patient showed dramatic improvement clinically, as evident by echocardiogram findings and other investigations. PMID:17185849

  15. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma on the Ventral Portion of Whole Spinal Canal: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Young; Ha, Young-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is an uncommon but disabling disease. This paper reports a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma and treatment by surgical management. A 32-year-old male presented with a 30-minute history of sudden headache, back pain, chest pain, and progressive quadriplegia. Whole-spinal sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed spinal epidural hematoma on the ventral portion of the spinal canal. Total laminectomy from T5 to T7 was performed, and hematoma located at the ventral portion of the spinal cord was evacuated. Epidural drainages were inserted in the upper and lower epidural spaces. The patient improved sufficiently to ambulate, and paresthesia was fully recovered. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma should be considered when patients present symptoms of spinal cord compression after sudden back pain or chest pain. To prevent permanent neurologic deficits, early and correct diagnosis with timely surgical management is necessary. PMID:26512277

  16. Superficial Fungal Infections.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Neha; Pujalte, George G A; Reese, Stephanie T

    2015-12-01

    Superficial fungal infections grow in dark and moist areas and invade various parts of the body. These infections are easily treatable in immunocompetent individuals. In immunosuppressed individuals, the presentation can be quite severe, requiring use of more potent antifungal agents. The treatment for these conditions consists of topical antifungal agents, creams, and oral systemic medications. The use of prednisone can alter the appearance of superficial fungal infections, making them difficult to diagnose. It is important for primary care providers to become adept at understanding the epidemiology, transmission, clinical presentation, diagnosis techniques, and treatment options available. PMID:26612371

  17. Ganglioglioma of the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Daniel C; Johnson, Mahlon D; Judkins, Alexander R

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioglioma is a rare tumor consisting of neoplastic glial and neuronal elements. It accounts for only 0.5% of all primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms. We report an unusual case of extensive intramedullary thoracic spinal cord ganglioglioma in a 14-month-old girl who underwent subtotal resection followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. The epidemiology, histopathologic features, imaging findings, treatment, and prognosis are subsequently reviewed. PMID:26605127

  18. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-25

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  19. Instrumental Learning Within the Spinal Cord: Underlying Mechanisms

    E-print Network

    Grau, James

    191 Instrumental Learning Within the Spinal Cord: Underlying Mechanisms and Implications. Alternative Views Presumptions regarding spinal cord plasticity vary considerably. Some view plasticity, including inverte- brates and the vertebrate spinal cord. The alternative view assumes a form

  20. What Are Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cord tumors in children What are brain and spinal cord tumors in children? Brain and spinal cord tumors ... filled with CSF. Parts of the brain and spinal cord The main areas of the brain include the ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Switches How GABA Affects Nociceptive Plasticity 

    E-print Network

    Huang, Yung-Jen

    2015-05-11

    Research has shown that spinal cord injury (SCI) can induce neural hyperexcitability within the spinal cord that facilitates nociceptive reflexes. Nociceptive inputs have been shown to sensitize spinal nociceptive systems, inducing a learning...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... catalog Conditions > Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... What is spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy? Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA- ...

  3. Surgical Management of Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess Caused by Brucella Melitensis : Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Özbek, Zühtü; Göko?lu, Abdülkerim; Menkü, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess, if especially caused by Brucellosis is a very rare disease which is usually a consequence of spondylodiscitis. The spinal column can be affected at any joint; however, the lumbar spine is the most common region, especially at the level of the L4-5 and L5-S1. The frequency of spinal involvement usually seen at the lumbar, thoracic and cervical spine respectively. As an occupational disease in farmers, veterinaries, butchers, laboratory staff and shepherds, brucellosis can also occur by direct contact to animals and infected materials or ingestion of raw cheese, milk or unpasteurized milk products. In this study, we presented two cases with cervical spinal epidural abscess caused by brucella melitensis, which was successfully treated by surgical approach. Initial treatment was combined with antibiotic therapy after the surgery for 3 months. PMID:22949972

  4. Strategies for prevention of urinary tract infections in neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Lance L; Klausner, Adam P

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the problem of urinary tract infections (UTIs) after spinal cord injury and disorders is defined, the relationship of bladder management to UTIs is discussed, and mechanical and medical strategies for UTI prevention in spinal cord injury and disorders are described. PMID:25064790

  5. Artificial nose can diagnose bacterial infections Thursday, April 28, 2011

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    by smell using a low-cost array of printed pigments as a chemical sensor. Led by Univ. of Illinois there has been some interest in using sophisticated spectroscopy or genetic methods for clinical diagnosis of a stretch." The artificial nose is an array of 36 cross-reactive pigment dots that change color when

  6. Genome Wide Search for Biomarkers to Diagnose Yersinia Infections.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vipin Chandra; Kumar, Prasun

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial identification on the basis of the highly conserved 16S rRNA (rrs) gene is limited by its presence in multiple copies and a very high level of similarity among them. The need is to look for other genes with unique characteristics to be used as biomarkers. Fifty-one sequenced genomes belonging to 10 different Yersinia species were used for searching genes common to all the genomes. Out of 304 common genes, 34 genes of sizes varying from 0.11 to 4.42 kb, were selected and subjected to in silico digestion with 10 different Restriction endonucleases (RE) (4-6 base cutters). Yersinia species have 6-7 copies of rrs per genome, which are difficult to distinguish by multiple sequence alignments or their RE digestion patterns. However, certain unique combinations of other common gene sequences-carB, fadJ, gluM, gltX, ileS, malE, nusA, ribD, and rlmL and their RE digestion patterns can be used as markers for identifying 21 strains belonging to 10 Yersinia species: Y. aldovae, Y. enterocolitica, Y. frederiksenii, Y. intermedia, Y. kristensenii, Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. rohdei, Y. ruckeri, and Y. similis. This approach can be applied for rapid diagnostic applications. PMID:26543261

  7. History of the spinal cord localization.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Sait; Türe, U?ur; Pait, T Glenn

    2004-01-15

    The first reference to spinal cord injury is recorded in the Edwin Smith papyrus. Little was known of the function of the cord before Galen's experiments conducted in the second century AD. Galen described the protective coverings of the spinal cord: the bone, posterior longitudinal ligament, dura mater, and pia mater. He gave a detailed account of the gross anatomy of the spinal cord. During the medieval period (AD 700-1500) almost nothing of note was added to Galen's account of spinal cord structure. The first significant work on the spinal cord was that of Blasius in 1666. He was the first to differentiate the gray and white matter of the cord and demonstrated for the first time the origin of the anterior and posterior spinal nerve roots. The elucidation of the various tracts in the spinal cord actually began with demonstrations of pyramidal decussation by Mistichelli (1709) and Pourfoir du Petit (1710). Huber (1739) recorded the first detailed account of spinal roots and the denticulate ligaments. In 1809, Rolando described the substantia gelatinosa. The microtome, invented in 1824 by Stilling, proved to be one of the fundamental tools for the study of spinal cord anatomy. Stilling's technique involved slicing frozen or alcohol-hardened spinal cord into very thin sections and examining them unstained by using the naked eye or a microscope. With improvements in histological and experimental techniques, modern studies of spinal cord anatomy and function were initiated by Brown-Sequard. In 1846, he gave the first demonstration of the decussation of the sensory tracts. The location and direction of fiber tracts were uncovered by the experimental studies of Burdach (1826), Turck (1849), Clarke (1851), Lissauer (1855), Goll (1860), Flechsig (1876), and Gowers (1880). Bastian (1890) demonstrated that in complete transverse lesions of the spinal cord, reflexes below the level of the lesion are lost and muscle tone is abolished. Flatau (1894) observed the laminar nature of spinal pathways. The 20th century ushered in a new era in the evaluation of spinal cord function and localization; however, the total understanding of this remarkable organ remains elusive. Perhaps the next century will provide the answers to today's questions about spinal cord localization. PMID:15264793

  8. Fibrin glue to treat spinal fluid leaks associated with intrathecal drug systems.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Eric D; Hoelzer, Bryan C; Eldrige, Jason S; Moeschler, Susan M

    2014-07-01

    Intrathecal drug delivery systems (IDDSs) are used to treat resistant pain states as well as intractable spasticity via medication delivery into the spinal fluid. Risks associated with implantation of these devices include infection, bleeding, intrathecal granuloma formation, and neurologic sequelae similar to other neuraxial procedures. Intrathecal catheter placement creates the additional risk of persistent spinal fluid leak, which can lead to postdural puncture headaches as well as seroma formation and may require subsequent surgical exploration or explantation. This retrospective case series examines 3 patients at a single institution with persistent spinal fluid leak after IDDS placement (and explantation in one case) resulting in headache and/or seroma formation that were treated with epidural fibrin glue. Three patients underwent IDDS implantation with baclofen for spasticity. In 1 patient, a cerebral spinal fluid leak developed at 1-week postoperatively. After several unsuccessful epidural blood patches and surgical exploration with a catheter revision, she was ultimately treated successfully with a fibrin glue patch. The second patient received an IDDS and did well until a seroma developed 1 year later. He was likewise treated with an epidural fibrin glue patch after 2 failed blood patches. In a third patient, a spinal fluid leak developed after explantation of an IDDS and was treated with an epidural fibrin glue patch as initial therapy. PMID:24256213

  9. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a highly genetic condition partly mediated by disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Battié, Michele C.; Ortega-Alonso, Alfredo; Niemelainen, Riikka; Gill, Kevin; Levalahti, Esko; Videman, Tapio; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most commonly diagnosed spinal disorders in older adults. Although the pathophysiology of the clinical syndrome is not well understood, a narrow central canal or intervertebral foramen is an essential or defining feature. The aim of the present study was to estimate the magnitude of genetic versus environmental influences on central lumbar spinal stenosis, and investigate disc degeneration and stature or bone development as possible genetic pathways. Methods A classic twin study with multivariate analyses considering lumbar level and other covariates was conducted. The study sample comprised 598 male twins (147 monozygotic and 152 dizygotic pairs), 35-70 years of age, from the population-based Finnish Twin Cohort. Primary phenotypes were central lumbar stenosis assessed qualitatively on MRI and quantitatively measured dural sac cross-sectional area. Additional phenotypes to examine possible genetic pathways included disc bulging and standing height, as an indicator of overall skeletal size or development. Results The heritability estimate (h2) for qualitatively assessed central lumbar spinal stenosis on MRI was 67% (95%CI: 56.8-74.5). The broad sense heritability estimate for dural sac cross-sectional area was 81.2% (95%CI: 74.5 – 86.1%), with a similar magnitude of genetic influences across lumbar levels (h2=72.4-75.6). The additive genetic correlation of quantitatively assessed stenosis and disc bulging was extremely high. There was no indication of shared genetic influences between stenosis and stature. Conclusion Central lumbar spinal stenosis and associated dural sac dimensions are highly genetic, and disc degeneration (bulging) appears to be one pathway through which genes influence spinal stenosis. PMID:25155712

  10. Helicobacter pylori associated vitamin B12 deficiency, pernicious anaemia and subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Gowdappa, H Basavana; Mahesh, M; Murthy, K V K S N; Narahari, M G

    2013-01-01

    A 23-year-old man presented with weakness in the lower limbs, numbness in hands and feet over past 6 months. Examination revealed a combination of absent ankle jerk, extensor plantar response and reduced sensations in a glove and stocking distribution. MRI of the spinal cord was distinctive of subacute combined degeneration (SACD) of the spinal cord. Serum vitamin B12 was low and anti-intrinsic factor antibodies were positive. A biopsy of the stomach revealed intense inflammatory infiltrates in lamina propria with grade III Helicobacter pylori infection. Other work-up for the cause of vitamin B12 deficiency was unremarkable. H pylori infection triggers autoantibodies by a mechanism of molecular mimicry. This case report highlights H pylori as a causative agent in vitamin B12 deficiency and culminating in SACD of the spinal cord. H pylori treatment reverses the underlying pathogenesis and corrects vitamin B12 deficient state in selected individuals. PMID:24081591

  11. Spinal Manipulation for Low-Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NCCIH fact sheet Chiropractic: An Introduction . What the Science Says About Spinal Manipulation for Low-Back Pain Overall, studies have shown that spinal manipulation is one of several options—including exercise, massage, and physical therapy—that can provide mild- ...

  12. Nutrition of People with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This conference proceeding summarizes current knowledge about the nutritional status and needs of the spinal cord injured patient. Topics covered include the aspects of spinal cord injury that influence nutrient intakes and status, and the nutrients most likely to be problematic in this diverse gro...

  13. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae

    2015-09-16

    Recently, many surgeons have been using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) in spinal surgery to reduce the incidence of postoperative neurological complications, including level of the spinal cord, cauda equina and nerve root. Several established technologies are available and combined motor and somatosensory evoked potentials are considered mandatory for practical and successful IOM. Spinal cord evoked potentials are elicited compound potentials recorded over the spinal cord. Electrical stimulation is provoked on the dorsal spinal cord from an epidural electrode. Somatosensory evoked potentials assess the functional integrity of sensory pathways from the peripheral nerve through the dorsal column and to the sensory cortex. For identification of the physiological midline, the dorsal column mapping technique can be used. It is helpful for reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with dorsal column dysfunction when distortion of the normal spinal cord anatomy caused by an intramedullary cord lesion results in confusion in localizing the midline for the myelotomy. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) consist of spinal, neurogenic and muscle MEPs. MEPs allow selective and specific assessment of the functional integrity of descending motor pathways, from the motor cortex to peripheral muscles. Spinal surgeons should understand the concept of the monitoring techniques and interpret monitoring records adequately to use IOM for the decision making during the surgery for safe surgery and a favorable surgical outcome. PMID:26380823

  14. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring in spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Recently, many surgeons have been using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) in spinal surgery to reduce the incidence of postoperative neurological complications, including level of the spinal cord, cauda equina and nerve root. Several established technologies are available and combined motor and somatosensory evoked potentials are considered mandatory for practical and successful IOM. Spinal cord evoked potentials are elicited compound potentials recorded over the spinal cord. Electrical stimulation is provoked on the dorsal spinal cord from an epidural electrode. Somatosensory evoked potentials assess the functional integrity of sensory pathways from the peripheral nerve through the dorsal column and to the sensory cortex. For identification of the physiological midline, the dorsal column mapping technique can be used. It is helpful for reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with dorsal column dysfunction when distortion of the normal spinal cord anatomy caused by an intramedullary cord lesion results in confusion in localizing the midline for the myelotomy. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) consist of spinal, neurogenic and muscle MEPs. MEPs allow selective and specific assessment of the functional integrity of descending motor pathways, from the motor cortex to peripheral muscles. Spinal surgeons should understand the concept of the monitoring techniques and interpret monitoring records adequately to use IOM for the decision making during the surgery for safe surgery and a favorable surgical outcome. PMID:26380823

  15. Psychological Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewing literature on the psychological impact of spinal cord injury suggests: (a) depression may not be a precondition for injury adjustment; (b) many persons sustaining cord injury may have experienced psychological disruption prior to injury; and (c) indexes of rehabilitation success need to be developed for the spinal cord injured. (Author)

  16. Feasibility of 3.0 T diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of functional recovery of rats with complete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Duo; Li, Xiao-hui; Zhai, Xu; He, Xi-jing

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is a sensitive way to reflect axonal necrosis and degeneration, glial cell regeneration and demyelination following spinal cord injury, and to display microstructure changes in the spinal cord in vivo. Diffusion tensor imaging technology is a sensitive method to diagnose spinal cord injury; fiber tractography visualizes the white matter fibers, and directly displays the structural integrity and resultant damage of the fiber bundle. At present, diffusion tensor imaging is restricted to brain examinations, and is rarely applied in the evaluation of spinal cord injury. This study aimed to explore the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and the feasibility of diffusion tensor tractography in the evaluation of complete spinal cord injury in rats. The results showed that the average combined scores were obviously decreased after spinal cord transection in rats, and then began to increase over time. The fractional anisotropy scores after spinal cord transection in rats were significantly lower than those in normal rats (P < 0.05); the apparent diffusion coefficient was significantly increased compared with the normal group (P < 0.05). Following spinal cord transection, fractional anisotropy scores were negatively correlated with apparent diffusion coefficient values (r = –0.856, P < 0.01), and positively correlated with the average combined scores (r = 0.943, P < 0.01), while apparent diffusion coefficient values had a negative correlation with the average combined scores (r = –0.949, P < 0.01). Experimental findings suggest that, as a non-invasive examination, diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging can provide qualitative and quantitative information about spinal cord injury. The fractional anisotropy score and apparent diffusion coefficient have a good correlation with the average combined scores, which reflect functional recovery after spinal cord injury. PMID:25878589

  17. Use of autologous growth factors in lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Lowery, G L; Kulkarni, S; Pennisi, A E

    1999-08-01

    The results of spinal fusion, especially posteriorly above the lumbosacral junction, have been mixed. Autologous growth factor concentrate (AGF) prepared by ultraconcentration of platelets contains multiple growth factors having a chemotactic and mitogenic effect on mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts and may play a role in initiating bone healing. The purpose of this retrospective study is to review our results with AGF in lumbar spinal fusions. To date, AGF has been used in 39 patients having lumbar spinal fusion. The study group consisted of the first 19 consecutive cases to allow at least 6 months follow-up. The average follow-up was 13 months (range 6 to 18 months). Follow-up compliance was 91%. There were 7 men and 12 women. Average age was 52 years (range 30-72 years). Nine patients had prior back surgery. There were 8 smokers. AGF was used in posterior (n = 15) or anterior intradiscal (n = 4) fusions. AGF was used with autograft and coraline hydroxyapatite in all posterior fusions, and autograft, coral, and intradiscal spacer (carbon fiber spinal fusion cages or Synthes femoral ring) in intradiscal fusions. Posterior stabilization was used in all cases. Eight cases were single-level fusions, 6 were two-level, and 1 was a three-level fusion. Autologous iliac crest bone graft was taken in 14 cases and local autograft used in 5 cases. Posteriorly, a total of 23 levels were fused; of these, nine were at L5-S1, eight at L4-L5, five at L3-L4, and one at L2-L3. No impending pseudoarthroses were noted on plain radiographic examination at last follow-up visit. Solid fusion was confirmed in 3 patients having routine hardware removal, and in 2 patients who had surgery at an adjacent level. There was one posterior wound infection, which was managed without sequelae. When used as an adjunct to autograft, AGF offers theoretical advantages that need to be examined in controlled studies. Further study is necessary to determine whether coralline hydroxyapatite used as a bone graft extender in lumbar spinal fusion may help to obviate the need for secondary site graft harvesting. PMID:10458274

  18. Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Grunseich, Christopher; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2015-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, or Kennedy disease, is a slowly progressive X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by a trinucleotide (CAG) repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene. Affected males typically develop weakness in their mid-40s as well as evidence of androgen insensitivity with reduced fertility and gynecomastia. Diagnosis is often delayed because of decreased awareness of the disease, although genetic testing allows for direct diagnosis. Therapeutic strategies to block the toxicity of the mutant androgen receptor have been unsuccessful thus far, and evaluation of additional candidate therapies is underway. PMID:26515625

  19. Diagnosing and managing peripartum headache

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Gelpi, Brian; Wortman, Alison; Tao, Weike

    2015-01-01

    A 38-year-old gravida 7 para 5 Hispanic woman at 36 weeks and 4 days gestation presented with a postpartum headache following vaginal delivery complicated by an unintentional dural puncture for epidural analgesia. Due to the positional nature of the headache and its frontal and occipital origin, a postdural puncture headache was diagnosed. After failure of conservative treatment, an epidural blood patch was used, which offered immediate relief. However, shortly following the procedure, the parturient's neurological condition deteriorated due to an unrecognized intraparenchymal and subarachnoid hemorrhage requiring an emergent craniectomy. This case highlights the importance of diligence when evaluating and treating postpartum headache despite a classic presentation. PMID:26424942

  20. Diagnosing and managing peripartum headache.

    PubMed

    Grant, Erica N; Wang, Jia; Gelpi, Brian; Wortman, Alison; Tao, Weike

    2015-10-01

    A 38-year-old gravida 7 para 5 Hispanic woman at 36 weeks and 4 days gestation presented with a postpartum headache following vaginal delivery complicated by an unintentional dural puncture for epidural analgesia. Due to the positional nature of the headache and its frontal and occipital origin, a postdural puncture headache was diagnosed. After failure of conservative treatment, an epidural blood patch was used, which offered immediate relief. However, shortly following the procedure, the parturient's neurological condition deteriorated due to an unrecognized intraparenchymal and subarachnoid hemorrhage requiring an emergent craniectomy. This case highlights the importance of diligence when evaluating and treating postpartum headache despite a classic presentation. PMID:26424942

  1. How Is a Heart Attack Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is a Heart Attack Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose a heart attack ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is a heart attack? 05/22/2014 Describes how a heart attack ...

  2. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Vulvodynia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose vulvodynia? Skip sharing on social media ... been ruled out. To diagnose vulvodynia, 1 a health care provider may recommend that a woman have blood ...

  3. Pulmonary symptoms and diagnoses are associated with HIV in the MACS and WIHS cohorts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several lung diseases are increasingly recognized as comorbidities with HIV; however, few data exist related to the spectrum of respiratory symptoms, diagnostic testing, and diagnoses in the current HIV era. The objective of the study is to determine the impact of HIV on prevalence and incidence of respiratory disease in the current era of effective antiretroviral treatment. Methods A pulmonary-specific questionnaire was administered yearly for three years to participants in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) and Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). Adjusted prevalence ratios for respiratory symptoms, testing, or diagnoses and adjusted incidence rate ratios for diagnoses in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected participants were determined. Risk factors for outcomes in HIV-infected individuals were modeled. Results Baseline pulmonary questionnaires were completed by 907 HIV-infected and 989 HIV-uninfected participants in the MACS cohort and by 1405 HIV-infected and 571 HIV-uninfected participants in the WIHS cohort. In MACS, dyspnea, cough, wheezing, sleep apnea, and incident chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were more common in HIV-infected participants. In WIHS, wheezing and sleep apnea were more common in HIV-infected participants. Smoking (MACS and WIHS) and greater body mass index (WIHS) were associated with more respiratory symptoms and diagnoses. While sputum studies, bronchoscopies, and chest computed tomography scans were more likely to be performed in HIV-infected participants, pulmonary function tests were no more common in HIV-infected individuals. Respiratory symptoms in HIV-infected individuals were associated with history of pneumonia, cardiovascular disease, or use of HAART. A diagnosis of asthma or COPD was associated with previous pneumonia. Conclusions In these two cohorts, HIV is an independent risk factor for several respiratory symptoms and pulmonary diseases including COPD and sleep apnea. Despite a higher prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms, testing for non-infectious respiratory diseases may be underutilized in the HIV-infected population. PMID:24884738

  4. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome: Temporary Visual Loss After Spinal Deformity Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kueper, Janina; Loftus, Michael L; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba; Lebl, Darren

    2015-11-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a rare cause of temporary postoperative visual loss (POVL) after spinal deformity surgery. We report on 2 patients diagnosed with PRES after spinal deformity surgery, who were closely examined postoperatively. A 78-year-old woman with severe disability due to degenerative lumbar spondylosis after laminectomy was treated with transpsoas lumbar interbody fusion from L1 to L4 and posterior spinal fusion from T10 to pelvis. She developed confusion and bilateral visual loss on postoperative day 7. A second patient, a 51-year-old woman with progressive pain and decompensation caused by adult scoliosis, was treated with posterior spinal fusion from T3 to pelvis and interbody fusion from L4 to S1 via a presacral interbody fusion approach. She developed bilateral visual loss on postoperative day 15. Both patients achieved a complete recovery of their vision after medical management of PRES. Timely diagnosis of PRES and prompt intervention allow for a good patient prognosis and complete recovery of eyesight. PMID:26566564

  5. 21 CFR 880.2500 - Spinal fluid manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Spinal fluid manometer. 880.2500 Section 880.2500... Devices § 880.2500 Spinal fluid manometer. (a) Identification. A spinal fluid manometer is a device used to measure spinal fluid pressure. The device uses a hollow needle, which is inserted into the...

  6. 21 CFR 880.2500 - Spinal fluid manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spinal fluid manometer. 880.2500 Section 880.2500... Devices § 880.2500 Spinal fluid manometer. (a) Identification. A spinal fluid manometer is a device used to measure spinal fluid pressure. The device uses a hollow needle, which is inserted into the...

  7. 21 CFR 880.2500 - Spinal fluid manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... column fluid space, to connect the spinal fluid to a graduated column so that the pressure can be... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Spinal fluid manometer. 880.2500 Section 880.2500... Devices § 880.2500 Spinal fluid manometer. (a) Identification. A spinal fluid manometer is a device...

  8. 21 CFR 880.2500 - Spinal fluid manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... column fluid space, to connect the spinal fluid to a graduated column so that the pressure can be... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Spinal fluid manometer. 880.2500 Section 880.2500... Devices § 880.2500 Spinal fluid manometer. (a) Identification. A spinal fluid manometer is a device...

  9. Clinical radiology of the spine and spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Banna, M.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a source of information about aspects of radiology of the spine and spinal column. It presents coverage of both normal and abnormal conditions. Contents: Spinal fractures and dislocations. Degenerative diseases of the spine. Gross anatomy of the spinal cord and meninges. Intraspinal mass lesions. Spinal dysraphism. Congenital anomalies. Tumors of the vertebral column, and more.

  10. 21 CFR 880.2500 - Spinal fluid manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... column fluid space, to connect the spinal fluid to a graduated column so that the pressure can be... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Spinal fluid manometer. 880.2500 Section 880.2500... Devices § 880.2500 Spinal fluid manometer. (a) Identification. A spinal fluid manometer is a device...

  11. CyberKnife radiosurgery for spinal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gerszten, Peter C; Burton, Steven A; Ozhasoglu, Cihat

    2007-01-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial lesions is well established. Its use for the treatment of spinal lesions has been limited by the availability of effective target immobilization and localization technologies. Conventional external beam radiotherapy lacks the precision to allow delivery of large doses of radiation near radiosensitive structures such as the spinal cord. The CyberKnife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, Calif., USA) is an imageguided frameless stereotactic radiosurgery system that allows for the radiosurgical treatment of spinal lesions. The system utilizes the coupling of an orthogonal pair of X-ray cameras to a dynamically manipulated robot-mounted lightweight linear accelerator which has 6 d.f. that guides the therapy beam to the intended target without the use of frame-based fixation. Realtime imaging tracking allows for patient movement tracking with 1mm spatial accuracy. Cervical spine lesions are located and tracked relative to skull bony landmarks; lower spinal lesions are tracked relative to percutaneously placed gold fiducial bone markers. Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery using a frameless image-guided system is now both feasible and safe. The major potential benefits of radiosurgical ablation of spinal lesions are short treatment time in an outpatient setting with rapid recovery and good symptomatic response. This technique offers a successful therapeutic modality for the treatment of a variety of spinal lesions as a primary treatment or for lesions not amenable to open surgical techniques, in medically inoperable patients, lesions located in previously irradiated sites, or as an adjunct to surgery. PMID:17318002

  12. Learning from the spinal cord: How the study of spinal cord plasticity informs our view of learning

    E-print Network

    Grau, James

    Review Learning from the spinal cord: How the study of spinal cord plasticity informs our view o Article history: Available online xxxx Keywords: Spinal cord Instrumental conditioning Pavlovian training can induce a lasting change in spinal cord function. A framework for the study of learning

  13. Spinal cord evolution in early Homo.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marc R; Haeusler, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery at Nariokotome of the Homo erectus skeleton KNM-WT 15000, with a narrow spinal canal, seemed to show that this relatively large-brained hominin retained the primitive spinal cord size of African apes and that brain size expansion preceded postcranial neurological evolution. Here we compare the size and shape of the KNM-WT 15000 spinal canal with modern and fossil taxa including H. erectus from Dmanisi, Homo antecessor, the European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, and Pan troglodytes. In terms of shape and absolute and relative size of the spinal canal, we find all of the Dmanisi and most of the vertebrae of KNM-WT 15000 are within the human range of variation except for the C7, T2, and T3 of KNM-WT 15000, which are constricted, suggesting spinal stenosis. While additional fossils might definitively indicate whether H. erectus had evolved a human-like enlarged spinal canal, the evidence from the Dmanisi spinal canal and the unaffected levels of KNM-WT 15000 show that unlike Australopithecus, H. erectus had a spinal canal size and shape equivalent to that of modern humans. Subadult status is unlikely to affect our results, as spinal canal growth is complete in both individuals. We contest the notion that vertebrae yield information about respiratory control or language evolution, but suggest that, like H. antecessor and European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, early Homo possessed a postcranial neurological endowment roughly commensurate to modern humans, with implications for neurological, structural, and vascular improvements over Pan and Australopithecus. PMID:26553817

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Y; Badriul, H

    1999-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomach of man, especially during childhood. However, H. pylori strains are not created equal, with major differences in virulence factors such as the vacuolating cytotoxin A and the cytotoxic-associated gene A, probably accounting for different clinical symptoms. The majority of infected subjects remain asymptomatic. Symptoms are aspecific. Helicobacter pylori infection is correlated with socioeconomic conditions and hygienic circumstances, resulting in an extremely high prevalence in children in developing countries. The golden standard technique to diagnose Helicobacter infection is culture of gastric biopsies; specificity and sensitivity of serology are low during childhood. Carbon-13 urea breath tests are a useful in the diagnosis but especially during follow-up. Recommended treatment consists of proton pump inhibitors in combination with two antibiotics out of amoxycillin, clarithromycin and metronidazole. The importance or clinical relevance of Helicobacter infection in asymptomatic individuals remains to be determined. PMID:10910617

  15. Comparison of the effects on spinal reflexes of acetylsalicylate and metamizol in spinalized and normal rats.

    PubMed

    Gen?, Osman; Turgut, Sebahat; Turgut, Günfer; Kortunay, Selim

    2005-01-01

    The effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, acetylsalicylate and metamizol, on spinal monosynaptic reflexes were investigated in spinalized and normal rats. Adult rats (n=36) weighing 150-200 g were anesthetized with ketamine and artificially ventilated. Half of rats were spinalized at C1 level. A laminectomy was performed in the lumbosacral region. Following electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve by single pulses, reflex potentials were recorded from the ipsilateral L5 ventral root. Acetylsalicylate was administered orally (100 mg/kg for both spinalized and normal rats). Metamizol was administered intramuscularly (15 mg/kg for both spinalized and normal rats). These drug administrations significantly decreased the amplitude of reflex response in all groups (p < 0.05). These data verify that observed inhibition by acetylsalicylicate and metamizol may be at the level of spinal cord. Also we suggested that the cyclooxygenase products of arachidonic acid may play an important role in regulating the reflex potential. PMID:16640028

  16. Methods of diagnosing alagille syndrome

    DOEpatents

    Li, Linheng; Hood, Leroy; Krantz, Ian D.; Spinner, Nancy B.

    2004-03-09

    The present invention provides an isolated polypeptide exhibiting substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the polypeptide does not have the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. The invention further provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule containing a nucleotide sequence encoding substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the nucleotide sequence does not encode the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. Also provided herein is a method of inhibiting differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells by contacting the progenitor cells with an isolated JAGGED polypeptide, or active fragment thereof. The invention additionally provides a method of diagnosing Alagille Syndrome in an individual. The method consists of detecting an Alagille Syndrome disease-associated mutation linked to a JAGGED locus.

  17. Disseminated fungal infection in two species of captive sharks.

    PubMed

    Marancik, David P; Berliner, Aimee L; Cavin, Julie M; Clauss, Tonya M; Dove, Alistair D M; Sutton, Deanna A; Wickes, Brian L; Camus, Alvin C

    2011-12-01

    In this report, two cases of systemic mycosis in captive sharks are characterized. These cases were progressive and ultimately culminated in terminal disease. Paecilomyces lilacinus, an uncommon pathogen in human and veterinary medicine, was associated with areas of necrosis in the liver, heart, and gill in a great hammerhead shark (Sphyrna mokarran). Fungal growth was observed from samples of kidney, spleen, spinal fluid, and coelomic cavity swabs. Dual fungal infection by Exophiala pisciphila and Mucor circinelloides was diagnosed in a juvenile zebra shark (Stegostoma fasciatum). Both fungi were present in the liver, with more severe tissue destruction associated with E. pisciphila. E. pisciphila also produced significant necrosis in the spleen and gill, while M. circinelloides was associated with only minimal tissue changes in the heart. Fungal cultures from liver, kidney, and spleen were positive for both E. pisciphila and M. circinelloides. Identification of P. lilacinus and M. circinelloides was based on colonial and hyphal morphology. E. pisciphila was identified by sequence analysis of the 28S rRNA D1/D2 region and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region between the 18S and 28S rRNA subunit. These cases, and a lack of information in the literature, highlight the need for further research and diagnostic sampling to further characterize the host-pathogen interaction between elasmobranchs and fungi. PMID:22204064

  18. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. 882.5850 Section 882...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. ...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation is an electrical...

  19. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. 882.5850 Section 882...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. ...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation is an electrical...

  20. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. 882.5850 Section 882...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. ...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation is an electrical...

  1. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. 882.5850 Section 882...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. ...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation is an electrical...

  2. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. 882.5850 Section 882...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. ...spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation is an electrical...

  3. Spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis in ?-thalassaemia intermedia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin Hoi; Li, Allen; Lui, Tun Hing; Sit, Yan Kit

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old man known to have ?-thalassaemia intermedia since childhood presented with bilateral lower limb weakness after spinal anaesthesia for an elective minor operation of his left leg. MRI and CT scans were performed to rule out acute epidural haematoma; coincidental imaging features of marrow hyperplasia and spinal epidural extramedullary haematopoiesis were found. This article will present and discuss the imaging features, differential diagnosis, management and literature review of the rare occurrence of extramedullary haematopoiesis in the spinal epidural space. PMID:24390965

  4. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  5. Effects of Radiation on Spinal Dura Mater and Surrounding Tissue in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokogawa, Noriaki; Murakami, Hideki; Demura, Satoru; Kato, Satoshi; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Iseki, Shoichi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Spinal surgery in a previously irradiated field carries increased risk of perioperative complications, such as delayed wound healing or wound infection. In addition, adhesion around the dura mater is often observed clinically. Therefore, similar to radiation-induced fibrosis—a major late-stage radiation injury in other tissue—epidural fibrosis is anticipated to occur after spinal radiation. In this study, we performed histopathologic assessment of postirradiation changes in the spinal dura mater and peridural tissue in mice. Materials and Methods The thoracolumbar transition of ddY mice was irradiated with a single dose of 10 or 20 Gy. After resection of the irradiated spine, occurrence of epidural fibrosis and expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 in the spinal dura mater were evaluated. In addition, microstructures in the spinal dura mater and peridural tissue were assessed using an electron microscope. Results In the 20-Gy irradiated mice, epidural fibrosis first occurred around 12 weeks postirradiation, and was observed in all cases from 16 weeks postirradiation. In contrast, epidural fibrosis was not observed in the nonirradiated mice. Compared with the nonirradiated mice, the 10- and 20-Gy irradiated mice had significantly more overexpression of transforming growth factor beta 1 at 1 week postirradiation and in the late stages after irradiation. In microstructural assessment, the arachnoid barrier cell layer was thinned at 12 and 24 weeks postirradiation compared with that in the nonirradiated mice. Conclusion In mice, spinal epidural fibrosis develops in the late stages after high-dose irradiation, and overexpression of transforming growth factor beta 1 occurs in a manner similar to that seen in radiation-induced fibrosis in other tissue. Additionally, thinning of the arachnoid barrier cell layer was observed in the late stages after irradiation. Thus, consideration should be given to the possibility that these phenomena can occur as radiation-induced injuries of the spine. PMID:26214850

  6. Malignancies of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Waters, J Dawn; Peran, Encarnacion Maria Navarro; Ciacci, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The management of intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCT) is primarily concerned with the preservation of existing neurologic function. To this end, clinical scientists are continually seeking tools and techniques to improve the safety and efficacy of tumor resection and control. Further advances in safety and efficacy can be proposed at each phase of management, from pre-operative screening to post-treatment monitoring. Innovations within the areas of molecular biology and genetics, intraoperative imaging and stereotactic radiosurgery offer exciting new options to explore in the management of IMSCT. This section will review the pathophysiology and epidemiology of IMSCT and the state-of-the-art management before delving into the promising new tools and techniques for each phase of management. PMID:23281516

  7. Spinal epidural abscess in brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Boyaci, Ahmet; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Sen Dokumac?, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    Involvement of the skeletal system is a common complication of brucellosis. However, muscle involvement or paraspinal abscess formation are rare complications. Paraspinal abscess usually develops secondary to spondylitis. A case is reported here of a 33-year-old woman with symptoms of night sweats, fever and low back pain. Rose-Bengal test for brucellosis was positive and Brucella standard tube agglutination test was positive at a titre of 1/160. The diagnosis was made on MRI. The patient was treated with doxycycline and rifampin daily for 16?weeks. On day 14 of treatment, decline was observed in the patient’s symptoms. In the presence of inflammatory lower back pain and fever, brucellosis should be considered particularly in the endemic areas. Furthermore, tuberculosis should be remembered in the differential diagnosis when a spinal epidural abscess is determined. PMID:24072838

  8. Spinal and Paraspinal Ewing Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R.; Shahlaee, Amir H.; Morris, Christopher G.; Gibbs, C. Parker; Scarborough, Mark T.; Pincus, David W.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To perform a review of the 40-year University of Florida experience treating spinal and paraspinal Ewing tumors. Patients and Methods: A total of 27 patients were treated between 1965 and 2007. For local management, 21 patients were treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone and 6 with surgery plus RT. All patients with metastatic disease were treated with RT alone. The risk profiles of each group were otherwise similar. The median age was 17 years, and the most frequent subsite was the sacral spine (n = 9). The median potential follow-up was 16 years. Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rate was 62%, 62%, and 90%, respectively. For the nonmetastatic subset (n = 22), the 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rate was 71%, 71%, and 89%, respectively. The local control rate was 84% for patients treated with RT alone vs. 100% for those treated with surgery plus RT. Patients who were >14 years old and those who were treated with intensive therapy demonstrated superior local control. Of 9 patients in our series with Frankel C or greater neurologic deficits at presentation, 7 experienced a full recovery with treatment. Of the 27 patients, 37% experienced Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 3 or greater toxicity, including 2 deaths from sepsis. Conclusion: Aggressive management of spinal and paraspinal Ewing tumors with RT with or without surgery results in high toxicity but excellent local control and neurologic outcomes. Efforts should be focused on identifying disease amenable to combined modality local therapy and improving RT techniques.

  9. Chlamydia Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... chlamydia can infect the urinary tract. In women, infection of the reproductive system can lead to pelvic ... Babies born to infected mothers can get eye infections and pneumonia from chlamydia. In men, chlamydia can ...

  10. Meningococcal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are a type of bacteria that cause serious infections. The most common infection is meningitis, which is an inflammation of the ... also cause other problems, including a serious bloodstream infection called sepsis. Meningococcal infections can spread from person ...

  11. Improving spinal trauma management in non-specialist centres

    PubMed Central

    Magnussen, Alex; Galloway, Kate; Dinneen, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Fractures of the vertebral column are increasing in incidence. Even though spinal trauma is increasingly being managed in specialist units, these patients often still initially present to district general hospitals. Due to lack of exposure to these patients, the attending Orthopaedic Senior House Officer may not always be aware of current best practice in the acute management of these patients beyond immediate Advance Trauma Life Support measures. There is concern that initiation of management may be delayed as a result of lack of a concise documented plan. The physiotherapy team requires specific instructions from the orthopaedic team before they can attempt to mobilise these patients. Lack thereof may lead to inappropriate prolonged immoblisation, prolonged hospital admission and, as a result, medical complications such as aspiration pneumonia, other nosocomial infections or pressure sores. An audit of departmental practice in two district general hospitals in the London and KSS deaneries demonstrated that a lack of easily accessible guidelines led to delays in definitive management of these patients with several episodes of medical concern. A proforma was devised in conjunction with the physiotherapy department and the regional spinal orthopaedic service in order to aid doctors in formulation of these management plans. These were rolled out effectively in both centres and re-audit in the first centre demonstrated marked improvement in patient care. Re-audit in the second hospital is ongoing.

  12. Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults Download Printable ... the topics below to get started. What Is Brain/CNS Tumors In Adults? What is cancer? What ...

  13. Simulation and resident education in spinal neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Parker E.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A host of factors have contributed to the increasing use of simulation in neurosurgical resident education. Although the number of simulation-related publications has increased exponentially over the past two decades, no studies have specifically examined the role of simulation in resident education in spinal neurosurgery. Methods: We performed a structured search of several databases to identify articles detailing the use of simulation in spinal neurosurgery education in an attempt to catalogue potential applications for its use. Results: A brief history of simulation in medicine is given, followed by current trends of spinal simulation utilization in residency programs. General themes from the literature are identified that are integral for implementing simulation into neurosurgical residency curriculum. Finally, various applications are reported. Conclusion: The use of simulation in spinal neurosurgery education is not as ubiquitous in comparison to other neurosurgical subspecialties, but many promising methods of simulation are available for augmenting resident education. PMID:25745588

  14. Spinal Gap Junction Channels in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves or the spinal cord is often accompanied by neuropathic pain, which is a complex, chronic pain state. Increasing evidence indicates that alterations in the expression and activity of gap junction channels in the spinal cord are involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Thus, this review briefly summarizes evidence that regulation of the expression, coupling, and activity of spinal gap junction channels modulates pain signals in neuropathic pain states induced by peripheral nerve or spinal cord injury. We particularly focus on connexin 43 and pannexin 1 because their regulation vastly attenuates symptoms of neuropathic pain. We hope that the study of gap junction channels eventually leads to the development of a suitable treatment tool for patients with neuropathic pain. PMID:26495077

  15. Spinal cord implants for nerve regeneration

    E-print Network

    Abbaschian, Lara Suzanne, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    It has only been in the last couple decades that the potential for regeneration in the spinal cord became accepted. However, there is still no proven method for enabling this regeneration. An implant model was developed ...

  16. The Mystery and History of Spinal Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Michael C. P.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of spinal manipulation and shows its origin in an obscure past among many cultures. The author suggests reasons for the medical profession's relative disinterest in manipulation, but questions this attitude. PMID:20469344

  17. Integrating spinal codes into wireless systems

    E-print Network

    Iannucci, Peter Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Rateless spinal codes [47] promise performance gains for future wireless systems. These gains can be realized in the form of higher data rates, longer operational ranges, reduced power consumption, and greater reliability. ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Spinal muscular atrophy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... children. Spinal muscular atrophy, lower extremity, dominant (SMA-LED) is characterized by leg muscle weakness that is ... to another. DYNC1H1 gene mutations that cause SMA-LED disrupt the function of the dynein complex. As ...

  19. VOLUNTARY EXERCISE INCREASES OLIGODENDROGENESIS IN SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    Krityakiarana, W.; Espinosa-Jeffrey, A.; Ghiani, C.A.; Zhao, P. M.; Gomez-Pinilla, F.; Yamaguchi, M.; Kotchabhakdi, N.; de Vellis, J.

    2009-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase hippocampal neurogenesis, but the effects of exercise on oligodendrocyte generation have not yet been reported. In this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that voluntary exercise may affect neurogenesis, and more in particular, oligodendrogenesis, in the thoracic segment of the intact spinal cord of adult nestin-GFP transgenic mice. Voluntary exercise for 7 and 14 days increased nestin-GFP expression around the ependymal area. In addition, voluntary exercise for 7 days significantly increased nestin-GFP expression in both the white and gray matter of the thoracic segment of the intact spinal cord, whereas, 14 days-exercise decreased nestin-GFP expression. Markers for immature oligodendrocytes (Transferrin and CNPase) were significantly increased after 7 days of voluntary exercise. These results suggest that voluntary exercise positively influences oligodendrogenesis in the intact spinal cord, emphasizing the beneficial effect of voluntary exercise as a possible co-treatment for spinal cord injury. PMID:20374076

  20. Spinal Cord Injury: Hope through Research

    MedlinePLUS

    ... chronic pain in people with spinal cord injury. Robotic-assisted therapy Most recovery following SCI takes place ... the safety and efficacy of a type of robotic therapy device known as the AMES device. The ...

  1. Doxycycline plus streptomycin versus ciprofloxacin plus rifampicin in spinal brucellosis [ISRCTN31053647

    PubMed Central

    Alp, Emine; Koc, Rahmi Kemal; Durak, Ahmet Candan; Yildiz, Orhan; Aygen, Bilgehan; Sumerkan, Bulent; Doganay, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Background The optimal treatment regimen and duration of the therapy is still controversial in spinal brucellosis. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy, adverse drug reactions, complications and cost of ciprofloxacin plus rifampicin versus doxycycline plus streptomycin in the treatment of spinal brucellosis. Methods The patients diagnosed as spinal brucellosis between January 2002 to December 2004 were enrolled into the study. Patients were enrolled into the two antimicrobial therapy groups (doxycycline plus streptomycin vs. ciprofloxacin plus rifampicin) consecutively. For the cost analysis of the two regimens, only the cost of antibiotic therapy was analysed for each patient. Results During the study period, 31 patients with spinal brucellosis were enrolled into the two antimicrobial therapy groups. Fifteen patients were included in doxycycline plus streptomycin group and 16 patients were included in ciprofloxacin plus rifampicin group. Forty-two levels of spinal column were involved in 31 patients. The most common affected site was lumbar spine (n = 32, 76%) and involvement level was not different in two groups. Despite the disadvantages (older age, more prevalent operation and abscess formation before the therapy) of the patients in the ciprofloxacin plus rifampicin group, the duration of the therapy (median 12 weeks in both groups) and clinical response were not different from the doxycycline plus streptomycin. The cost of ciprofloxacin plus rifampicin therapy was 1.2 fold higher than the cost of doxycycline plus streptomycin therapy. Conclusion Classical regimen (doxycycline plus streptomycin), with the appropriate duration (at least 12 weeks), is still the first line antibiotics and alternative therapies should be considered when adverse drug reactions were observed. PMID:16606473

  2. Metachronous spinal metastases from supratentorial anaplastic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Raheja, Amol; Borkar, Sachin Anil; Kumar, Rajinder; Suri, Vaishali; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Leptomeningeal spinal metastases from supratentorial high-grade glioma are relatively rare. Authors report an unusual case of metachronous, symptomatic, dual spinal drop metastases in a 20-year-old male patient who was operated for right insular anaplastic astrocytoma 20 months earlier. Surgical decompression of the symptomatic D11-L2 drop metastasis was carried out. Histo-pathological examination revealed features suggestive of glioblastoma multiforme. Patient was advised postoperative radiotherapy. The pertinent literature is reviewed regarding this uncommon entity. PMID:25767596

  3. Metachronous spinal metastases from supratentorial anaplastic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Raheja, Amol; Borkar, Sachin Anil; Kumar, Rajinder; Suri, Vaishali; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Leptomeningeal spinal metastases from supratentorial high-grade glioma are relatively rare. Authors report an unusual case of metachronous, symptomatic, dual spinal drop metastases in a 20-year-old male patient who was operated for right insular anaplastic astrocytoma 20 months earlier. Surgical decompression of the symptomatic D11-L2 drop metastasis was carried out. Histo-pathological examination revealed features suggestive of glioblastoma multiforme. Patient was advised postoperative radiotherapy. The pertinent literature is reviewed regarding this uncommon entity. PMID:25767596

  4. Spinal cord ischemia after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, H; Ujike, Y; Asai, Y; Kaneko, M; Chiba, S

    1994-01-01

    Subsequent to cardiac arrest, a 58-year-old man with intractable dysrhythmia and severe arteriosclerosis developed flaccid paraplegia, depressed deep tendon reflexes, and showed no pain or temperature sensation caudal to Th-7 in spite of completely intact proprioception and vibration sensation. An echocardiogram showed no clots or vegetation on the prosthetic valve and no thrombus in the left atrium or left ventricle. The patient's paraplegia was permanent, at least through a follow-up period of 2 years. These findings suggest that the etiology was spinal cord ischemia due to blood supply in the area of the anterior spinal artery (ASA); however, magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging demonstrated signal abnormalities throughout the gray matter and in the adjacent center white matter. Somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEP) measure neural transmission in the afferent spinal cord pathway, which is located in the lateral and posterior columns of the white matter; these showed a delay in latency between Th-6 and Th-7. The spinal cord is as vulnerable to transient ischemia as the brain. Spinal cord ischemia after cardiac arrest results from principal damage in the anterior horn of the gray matter, the so-called ASA syndrome; however, the pathways of SEP and pathogenesis of the spinal cord ischemia need further investigation. PMID:7884198

  5. Diagnosing Common Benign Skin Tumors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, James C; Maher, Michael H; Douglas, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Patients will experience a wide range of skin growths and changes over their lifetime. Family physicians should be able to distinguish potentially malignant from benign skin tumors. Most lesions can be diagnosed on the basis of history and clinical examination. Lesions that are suspicious for malignancy, those with changing characteristics, symptomatic lesions, and those that cause cosmetic problems may warrant medical therapy, a simple office procedure (e.g., excision, cryosurgery, laser ablation), or referral. Acrochordons are extremely common, small, and typically pedunculated benign neoplasms. Simple scissor or shave excision, electrodesiccation, or cryosurgery can be used for treatment. Sebaceous hyperplasia presents as asymptomatic, discrete, soft, pale yellow, shiny bumps on the forehead or cheeks, or near hair follicles. Except for cosmesis, they have no clinical significance. Lipomas are soft, flesh-colored nodules that are easily moveable under the overlying skin. Keratoacanthomas are rapidly growing, squamoproliferative benign tumors that resemble squamous cell carcinomas. Early simple excision is recommended. Pyogenic granuloma is a rapidly growing nodule that bleeds easily. Treatment includes laser ablation or shave excision with electrodesiccation of the base. Dermatofibromas are an idiopathic benign proliferation of fibroblasts. No treatment is required unless there is a change in size or color, bleeding, or irritation from trauma. Epidermal inclusion cysts can be treated by simple excision with removal of the cyst and cyst wall. Seborrheic keratoses and cherry angiomas generally do not require treatment. PMID:26447443

  6. [Diagnosing and therapy of gout].

    PubMed

    Pavelka, Karel

    2015-06-01

    Gout is an inflammatory, metabolically conditioned crystal-induced disease. Prevalence of gout is on the increase. In clinical practice it is frequently wrongly diagnosed and the therapy of acute attacks in particular is not adequate. The first part of the publication discusses diagnostic possibilities of gouty arthritis. First of all the advantage of the analysis of synovial exudate and of direct evidence of crystals in the polarization microscope is emphasized. If the material for crystallographic analysis is not available, it is necessary to use a combination of clinical criteria as specified e.g. in the recommendations of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). The second part focuses on the therapy of gout which is divided into the periods of asymptomatic hyperuricemia, acute gouty attack, intercritical and chronic tophaceous gout. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia is only treated when uricemia greater than 540 µmol/l occur repeatedly, or when other risk factors and comorbidities are present. In the treatment of acute gouty attack its early start is more important than the choice of a preparation. Alternatives are NSA, colchicine or glucocorticoids. A newly regist-ered medicine for the treatment of refractory acute inflammation is the IL-1 inhibitor canakinumab. The treatment of hyperuricemia involves regimen and diet measures, abstinence and hypouricemic therapy. Available are the xanthine oxidase inhibitors, allopurinol and febuxostat; the latter is better suited for patients with moderate renal insufficiency. A new medicine for the treatment of severe refractory tophaceous gout is pegloticase.Key words: gouty arthritis - colchicine - nonsteroidal antirheumatic drugs. PMID:26258966

  7. Urinary tract infection in children - aftercare

    MedlinePLUS

    Symptoms of urinary tract infection should begin to improve within 1 to 2 days. ... If diagnosed with a urinary tract infection (UTI), your child will take antibiotic medicines by mouth at home. These may come as pills, capsules, or a liquid. ...

  8. Clinical Assessment Of Stereotactic IGRT: Spinal Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Gerszten, Peter C. Burton, Steven A.

    2008-07-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of intracranial lesions is well established. Its use for the treatment of spinal lesions has been limited because of the availability of effective target immobilization devices. Recent advances in stereotactic IGRT have allowed for spinal applications. Large clinical experience with spinal radiosurgery to properly assess clinical outcomes has previously been limited. At our institution, we have developed a successful multidisciplinary spinal radiosurgery program in which 542 spinal lesions (486 malignant and 56 benign lesions) were treated with a single-fraction radiosurgery technique. Patient ages ranged from 18 to 85 years (mean 56 years). Lesion location included 92 cervical, 234 thoracic, 130 lumbar, and 86 sacral. The most common metastatic tumors were renal cell (89 cases), breast (74 cases), and lung (71 cases). The most common benign tumors were neurofibroma (24 cases), schwannoma (13 cases), and meningioma (7 cases). Eighty-nine cervical lesions were treated using skull tracking. Thoracic, lumbar, and sacral tumors were tracked relative to either gold or stainless steel fiducial markers. The maximum intratumoral dose ranged from 12.5 to 30 Gy (mean 20 Gy). Tumor volume ranged from 0.16 to 298 mL (mean 47 mL). Three hundred thirty-seven lesions had received prior external beam irradiation with spinal cord doses precluding further conventional irradiation. The primary indication for radiosurgery was pain in 326 cases, as a primary treatment modality in 70 cases, for tumor radiographic tumor progression in 65 cases, for post-surgical treatment in 38 cases, for progressive neurological deficit in 35 cases, and as a radiation boost in 8 cases. Follow-up period was at least 3 to 49 months. Axial and/or radicular pain improved in 300 of 326 cases (92%). Long-term tumor control was demonstrated in 90% of lesions treated with radiosurgery as a primary treatment modality and in 88% of lesions treated for radiographic tumor progression. Thirty of 35 patients (85%) with progressive neurological deficits experienced at least some improvement after treatment. Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery is now a feasible, safe, and clinically effective technique for the treatment of a variety of spinal lesions. The potential benefits of radiosurgical ablation of spinal lesions are short treatment time in an outpatient setting with essentially no recovery time and excellent symptomatic response. This technique offers a new therapeutic modality for the primary treatment of a variety of spinal lesions, including the treatment of neoplasms in medically inoperable patients, previously irradiated sites, for lesions not amenable to open surgical techniques, and as an adjunct to surgery.

  9. Newly Diagnosed Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Avvisati, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) represents a medical emergency with a high rate of early mortality. As a consequence, as soon as the diagnosis is suspected based upon cytologic criteria, it is necessary to start all- trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment without delay. For patients with newly diagnosed APL, induction therapy with ATRA plus anthracycline based chemotherapy is recommended. At present the combination of arsenic trioxide plus ATRA should be considered for patients who are not candidates for anthracycline-based therapy. For pediatric and adult patients with APL aged < 60 years who achieve a CR with induction, I recommend 3 intensive courses of consolidation chemotherapy associated to ATRA, targeted on the basis of the risk group at diagnosis. In patients treated with a very intensive consolidation chemotherapy maintenance treatment can be omitted. However If a maintenance treatment has to be adopted I suggest the use of intermittent ATRA for 15 days every 3 months for a period of 2 years, rather than ATRA associated to chemotherapy. Moreover, taking into account the medical literature, a reduced dosage of ATRA ( 25 mg/m2) in pediatric patients and a consolidation chemotherapy of reduced intensity in elderly patients is recommended. Furthermore, in order to maximize survival, careful attention should be reserved to the coagulopathy and to the appearance of the differentiation syndrome. Finally, PCR for the PML/RARA fusion gene on a bone marrow specimen every three months for two years, and then every six months for additional three years are needed during the follow-up. PMID:22220261

  10. DARPA challenge: developing new technologies for brain and spinal injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonia, Christian; Zamisch, Monica; Judy, Jack; Ling, Geoffrey

    2012-06-01

    The repair of traumatic injuries to the central nervous system remains among the most challenging and exciting frontiers in medicine. In both traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injuries, the ultimate goals are to minimize damage and foster recovery. Numerous DARPA initiatives are in progress to meet these goals. The PREventing Violent Explosive Neurologic Trauma program focuses on the characterization of non-penetrating brain injuries resulting from explosive blast, devising predictive models and test platforms, and creating strategies for mitigation and treatment. To this end, animal models of blast induced brain injury are being established, including swine and non-human primates. Assessment of brain injury in blast injured humans will provide invaluable information on brain injury associated motor and cognitive dysfunctions. The Blast Gauge effort provided a device to measure warfighter's blast exposures which will contribute to diagnosing the level of brain injury. The program Cavitation as a Damage Mechanism for Traumatic Brain Injury from Explosive Blast developed mathematical models that predict stresses, strains, and cavitation induced from blast exposures, and is devising mitigation technologies to eliminate injuries resulting from cavitation. The Revolutionizing Prosthetics program is developing an avant-garde prosthetic arm that responds to direct neural control and provides sensory feedback through electrical stimulation. The Reliable Neural-Interface Technology effort will devise technologies to optimally extract information from the nervous system to control next generation prosthetic devices with high fidelity. The emerging knowledge and technologies arising from these DARPA programs will significantly improve the treatment of brain and spinal cord injured patients.

  11. Plasticity of the Injured Human Spinal Cord: Insights Revealed by Spinal Cord Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Cadotte, David W.; Bosma, Rachael; Mikulis, David; Nugaeva, Natalia; Smith, Karen; Pokrupa, Ronald; Islam, Omar; Stroman, Patrick W.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction While numerous studies have documented evidence for plasticity of the human brain there is little evidence that the human spinal cord can change after injury. Here, we employ a novel spinal fMRI design where we stimulate normal and abnormal sensory dermatomes in persons with traumatic spinal cord injury and perform a connectivity analysis to understand how spinal networks process information. Methods Spinal fMRI data was collected at 3 Tesla at two institutions from 38 individuals using the standard SEEP functional MR imaging techniques. Thermal stimulation was applied to four dermatomes in an interleaved timing pattern during each fMRI acquisition. SCI patients were stimulated in dermatomes both above (normal sensation) and below the level of their injury. Sub-group analysis was performed on healthy controls (n?=?20), complete SCI (n?=?3), incomplete SCI (n?=?9) and SCI patients who recovered full function (n?=?6). Results Patients with chronic incomplete SCI, when stimulated in a dermatome of normal sensation, showed an increased number of active voxels relative to controls (p?=?0.025). There was an inverse relationship between the degree of sensory impairment and the number of active voxels in the region of the spinal cord corresponding to that dermatome of abnormal sensation (R2?=?0.93, p<0.001). Lastly, a connectivity analysis demonstrated a significantly increased number of intraspinal connections in incomplete SCI patients relative to controls suggesting altered processing of afferent sensory signals. Conclusions In this work we demonstrate the use of spinal fMRI to investigate changes in spinal processing of somatosensory information in the human spinal cord. We provide evidence for plasticity of the human spinal cord after traumatic injury based on an increase in the average number of active voxels in dermatomes of normal sensation in chronic SCI patients and an increased number of intraspinal connections in incomplete SCI patients relative to healthy controls. PMID:23029097

  12. Cardiac dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Iacobini, MA; Stoian, R; Neascu, C; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze cardiac dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Cardiac dysfunctions are common complications following SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. We reviewed epidemiology of cardiac disturbances after SCI, and neuroanatomy and pathophysiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic. SCI causes disruption of descendent pathways from central control centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating into intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 spinal cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant cardiac dysfunction. Impairment of autonomic nervous control system, mostly in patients with cervical or high thoracic SCI, causes cardiac dysrrhythmias, especially bradycardia and, rarely, cardiac arrest, or tachyarrhytmias and hypotension. Specific complication dependent on the period of time after trauma like spinal shock and autonomic dysreflexia are also reviewed. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe bradycardia and hypotension. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Besides all this, additional cardiac complications, such as cardiac deconditioning and coronary heart disease may also occur. Proper prophylaxis, including nonpharmacologic and pharmacological strategies and cardiac rehabilitation diminish occurrence of the cardiac dysfunction following SCI. Each type of cardiac disturbance requires specific treatment. PMID:20108532

  13. Diagnosing and managing postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Nalamachu, Srinivas; Morley-Forster, Patricia

    2012-11-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) represents a potentially debilitating and often undertreated form of neuropathic pain that disproportionately affects vulnerable populations, including the elderly and the immunocompromised. Varicella zoster infection is almost universally prevalent, making prevention of acute herpes zoster (AHZ) infection and prompt diagnosis and aggressive management of PHN of critical importance. Despite the recent development of a herpes zoster vaccine, prevention of AHZ is not yet widespread or discussed in PHN treatment guidelines. Diagnosis of PHN requires consideration of recognized PHN signs and known risk factors, including advanced age, severe prodromal pain, severe rash, and AHZ location on the trigeminal dermatomes or brachial plexus. PHN pain is typically localized, unilateral and chronic, but may be constant, intermittent, spontaneous and/or evoked. PHN is likely to interfere with sleep and daily activities. First-line therapies for PHN include tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentin and pregabalin, and the lidocaine 5 % patch. Second-line therapies include strong and weak opioids and topical capsaicin cream or 8 % patch. Tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentinoids and strong opioids are effective but are also associated with systemic adverse events that may limit their use in many patients, most notably those with significant medical comorbidities or advanced age. Of the topical therapies, the topical lidocaine 5 % patch has proven more effective than capsaicin cream or 8 % patch and has a more rapid onset of action than the other first-line therapies or capsaicin. Given the low systemic drug exposure, adverse events with topical therapies are generally limited to application-site reactions, which are typically mild and transient with lidocaine 5 % patch, but may involve treatment-limiting discomfort with capsaicin cream or 8 % patch. Based on available clinical data, clinicians should consider administering the herpes zoster vaccine to all patients aged 60 years and older. Clinicians treating patients with PHN may consider a trial of lidocaine 5 % patch monotherapy before resorting to a systemic therapy, or alternatively, may consider administering the lidocaine 5 % patch in combination with a tricyclic antidepressant or a gabapentinoid to provide more rapid analgesic response and lower the dose requirement of systemic therapies. PMID:23038608

  14. Swallowable Camera To Help Diagnose Esophagus Disorders

    E-print Network

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    knbc.com Swallowable Camera To Help Diagnose Esophagus Disorders POSTED: 10:57 am PST December 21 to diagnose esophagus disorders like acid reflux. A patient swallows the disposable miniature camera Esophagus Disorders - Print This Story News Story - KNBC ... URL: http://www.knbc.com/print/14907252/detail

  15. How Is von Willebrand Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is von Willebrand Disease Diagnosed? Early diagnosis of von Willebrand disease (VWD) is important to make sure that ... diagnose the disorder. These tests may include: Von Willebrand factor antigen. This test measures the amount of ...

  16. Adiposity and spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Wells, Kathryn M; Austin, Timothy L

    2015-01-01

    The drastic changes in body composition following spinal cord injury (SCI) have been shown to play a significant role in cardiovascular and metabolic health. The pattern of storage and distribution of different types of adipose tissue may impact metabolic health variables similar to carbohydrate, lipid and bone metabolism. The use of magnetic resonance imaging provides insights on the interplay among different regional adipose tissue compartments and their role in developing chronic diseases. Regional adipose tissue can be either distributed centrally or peripherally into subcutaneous and ectopic sites. The primary ectopic adipose tissue sites are visceral, intramuscular and bone marrow. Dysfunction in the central nervous system following SCI impacts the pattern of distribution of adiposity especially between tetraplegia and paraplegia. The current editorial is focused primarily on introducing different types of adipose tissue and establishing scientific basis to develop appropriate dietary, rehabilitation or pharmaceutical interventions to manage the negative consequences of increasing adiposity after SCI. We have also summarized the clinical implications and future recommendations relevant to study adiposity after SCI. PMID:26396933

  17. Persistent paralysis after spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Zaphiratos, Valerie; McKeen, Dolores M; Macaulay, Bruce; George, Ronald B

    2015-02-01

    Anterior spinal artery syndrome has rarely been reported as a cause of permanent neurologic complications after neuraxial anesthesia in obstetric patients. A parturient developed anterior spinal artery syndrome after spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery. A healthy 32-year-old parturient presented at 41(2/7) weeks for primary elective caesarean delivery for breech presentation. Spinal anesthesia was easily performed with clear cerebrospinal fluid, and block height was T4 at 5 minutes. Intraoperative course was uneventful except for symptomatic bradycardia (37-40 beats per minute) and hypotension (88/44 mm Hg) 4 minutes postspinal anesthesia, treated with ephedrine and atropine. Dense motor block persisted 9 hours after spinal anesthesia, and magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral region was normal, finding no spinal cord compression or lesion. Physical examination revealed deficits consistent with a spinal cord lesion at T6, impacting the anterior spinal cord while sparing the posterior tracts. PMID:25433726

  18. Vocational Rehabilitation of Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poor, Charles R.

    1975-01-01

    Reviews historical development of organized vocational rehabilitation programming for the spinal cord injured in the United States. Significant factors that affect vocational rehabilitation outcomes with spinal cord injured persons are listed and discussed. (Author)

  19. What Are the Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI)? Skip sharing on social media links ... no known ways to reverse damage to the spinal cord. However, researchers are continually working on new treatments, ...

  20. Paralyzed Man Walks Using Technology That Bypasses Spinal Cord

    MedlinePLUS

    ... html Paralyzed Man Walks Using Technology That Bypasses Spinal Cord Brain signals travel through a computer that sends ... system like this might help people with a spinal cord injury regain some ability to walk, the researchers ...

  1. The localization of instrumental learning within the spinal cord 

    E-print Network

    Liu, Grace Alexandra Tsu-Chi

    2013-02-22

    Spinal neurons of surgically transected rats can support a simple form of instrumental learning. Rats learn to maintain leg flexion as a response to shock. The present experiments localized the region of the spinal cord that mediates this learning...

  2. Diagnoses and visit length in complementary and mainstream medicine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The demand for complementary medicine (CM) is growing worldwide and so is the supply. So far, there is not much insight in the activities in Dutch CM practices nor in how these activities differ from mainstream general practice. Comparisons on diagnoses and visit length can offer an impression of how Dutch CM practices operate. Methods Three groups of regularly trained physicians specialized in CM participated in this study: 16 homeopathic physicians, 13 physician acupuncturists and 11 naturopathy physicians. Every CM physician was asked to include a maximum of 75 new patients within a period of six months. For each patient an inclusion registration form had to be completed and the activities during a maximum of five repeat visits were subsequently registered. Registrations included patient characteristics, diagnoses and visit length. These data could be compared with similar data from general practitioners (GPs) participating in the second Dutch national study in general practice (DNSGP-2). Differences between CM practices and between CM and mainstream GP data were tested using multilevel regression analysis. Results The CM physicians registered activities in a total of 5919 visits in 1839 patients. In all types of CM practices general problems (as coded in the ICPC) were diagnosed more often than in mainstream general practice, especially fatigue, allergic reactions and infections. Psychological problems and problems with the nervous system were also diagnosed more frequently. In addition, each type of CM physician encountered specific health problems: in acupuncture problems with the musculoskeletal system prevailed, in homeopathy skin problems and in naturopathy gastrointestinal problems. Comparisons in visit length revealed that CM physicians spent at least twice as much time with patients compared to mainstream GPs. Conclusions CM physicians differed from mainstream GPs in diagnoses, partly related to general and partly to specific diagnoses. Between CM practices differences were found on specific domains of complaints. Visit length was much longer in CM practices compared to mainstream GP visits, and such ample time may be one of the attractive features of CM for patients. PMID:20100343

  3. Endoscopic approaches to the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Lopez, William Omar Contreras; de Oliveira, Ywzhe Sifuentes Almeida; Lara, Nilton Alves; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive procedures have been used to treat various diseases in medicine. Great improvements in these techniques have provided intraventricular, transnasal and more recently cisternal intracranial accesses used to treat different conditions. Endoscopic approaches have been proposed for the treatment of disk herniation or degenerative disease of the spine with great progress in the recent years. However the spinal cord has not yet been reached by video-assisted procedures. This article describes our recent experience in procedures to approach the spinal cord itself in order to provide either diagnosis by tissue biopsies or inducing radiofrequency spinal ablation to treat chronic pain syndromes. We describe three different approaches proposed to provide access to the entire length of the spinal canal from the cranium-cervical transition, cervico-thoracic canal (spinal cord and radiculi) to the lumbar-sacral intraraquidian structures (conus medularis and sacral roots). We idealized the use of endoscopy to assist cervical anterolateral cordotomies and trigeminal nucleotractotomies, avoiding the use of contrast medium as well as vascular injuries and consequent unpredictable neurological deficits. This technique can also provide minimally invasive procedures to possibly treat spasticity through selective rhizotomies, assist catheter placements in the lumbar canal or debridation of adherences in cystic syringomyelia and arachnoid cysts, providing normalization of CSF flow. PMID:21107941

  4. Chronic fatigue syndrome 5 years after giardiasis: differential diagnoses, characteristics and natural course

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A high prevalence of chronic fatigue has previously been reported following giardiasis after a large waterborne outbreak in Bergen, Norway in 2004. The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate differential diagnoses and natural course of fatigue five years after giardiasis among patients who reported chronic fatigue three years after the infection. Methods Patients who three years after Giardia infection met Chalder’s criteria for chronic fatigue (n=347) in a questionnaire study among all patients who had laboratory confirmed giardiasis during the Bergen outbreak (n=1252) were invited to participate in this study five years after the infection (n=253). Structured interviews and clinical examination were performed by specialists in psychiatry, neurology and internal medicine/infectious diseases. Fukuda et al’s 1994 criteria were used to diagnose chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and idiopathic chronic fatigue (ICF). Self-reported fatigue recorded with Chalder Fatigue Questionnaire three and five years after infection were compared. Results 53 patients were included. CFS was diagnosed in 41.5% (22/53) and ICF in 13.2% (7/53). Chronic fatigue caused by other aetiology was diagnosed in 24.5% (13/53); five of these patients had sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome, six had depression and five anxiety disorder, and among these two had more than one diagnosis. Fatigue had resolved in 20.8% (11/53). Self-reported fatigue score in the cohort was significantly reduced at five years compared to three years (p<0.001). Conclusion The study shows that Giardia duodenalis may induce CFS persisting as long as five years after the infection. Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome, depression and anxiety were important differential diagnoses, or possibly comorbidities, to post-infectious fatigue in this study. Improvement of chronic fatigue in the period from three to five years after giardiasis was found. PMID:23399438

  5. Primary Dural Spinal Lymphoma Presentation of a Rare Spinal Tumor Case

    PubMed Central

    Çeçen, Dilber Ayçiçek; Tatarl?, Necati; Turan Süslü, Hikmet; Özdo?an, Selçuk; Bar???k, Nagehan Özdemir

    2015-01-01

    Background. Primary spinal dural lymphomas (PSDL) are tumors with characteristic histopathology of a lymphoma, which are completely in the spinal epidural space without any other systemic involvement. Extranodal primary lymphoma involving nervous system prefers thalamus/basal ganglia, periventricular region, cerebellum, eyes, meninges/dura, and cranial nerves or spinal cord. Rare spinal localization with acute spinal cord compression is worth attention. Case Presentation. A 48-year-old male presented with a several-month-long history of upper back pain. Lately, he had numbness and weakness at both lower extremities and was unable to walk for one week. A spinal MRI showed a thoracic lesion with cord compression at T2–T4 levels. The patient underwent surgical decompression, with his final histopathology showing diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Systemic work-up was negative for nodal disease. Following surgery, he received radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy. He experienced a good outcome after four years. Conclusion. The upper thoracic cord is a rare location for primary spinal lesions/metastases, both of which prefer the lower thoracic and upper lumbar regions. In cases of progressive paraparesis, there should be immediate surgical intervention in the case of denovo disease, followed by combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy procedures. PMID:26199784

  6. MRI Evaluation of Spinal Length and Vertebral Body Angle During Loading with a Spinal Compression Harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James A.; Hargens, Alan R.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan, R.; Sanchez, E.; Yang, C.; Mitsui, I.; Schwandt, D.; Fechner, K. P.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Weight bearing by the spinal column during upright posture often plays a role in the common problem of low back pain. Therefore, we developed a non-ferromagnetic spinal compression harness to enable MRI investigations of the spinal column during axial loading. Human subjects were fitted with a Nest and a footplate which were connected by adjustable straps to an analog load cell. MRI scans of human subjects (5 males and 1 female with age range of 27-53 yrs) during loaded and unloaded conditions were accomplished with a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa scanner. Studies of two subjects undergoing sequentially increasing spinal loads revealed significant decreases (r(sup 2) = 0.852) in spinal length between T4 and L5 culminating in a 1.5 to 2% length decrease during loading with 75% body weight. Sagittal vertebral body angles of four subjects placed under a constant 50% body weight load for one hour demonstrated increased lordotic and kyphotic curvatures. In the lumbar spine, the L2 vertebral body experienced the greatest angular change (-3 deg. to -5 deg.) in most subjects while in the thoracic spine, T4 angles increased from the unloaded state by +2 deg. to +9 deg. Overall, our studies demonstrate: 1) a progressive, although surprisingly small, decrease in spinal length with increasing load and 2) relatively large changes in spinal column angulation with 50% body weight.

  7. Spinal Cord Tolerance in the Age of Spinal Radiosurgery: Lessons From Preclinical Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Paul M.; Boike, Thomas P.

    2011-04-01

    Clinical implementation of spinal radiosurgery has increased rapidly in recent years, but little is known regarding human spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction irradiation. In contrast, preclinical studies in single-fraction spinal cord tolerance have been ongoing since the 1970s. The influences of field length, dose rate, inhomogeneous dose distributions, and reirradiation have all been investigated. This review summarizes literature regarding single-fraction spinal cord tolerance in preclinical models with an emphasis on practical clinical significance. The outcomes of studies that incorporate uniform irradiation are surprisingly consistent among multiple small- and large-animal models. Extensive investigation of inhomogeneous dose distributions in the rat has demonstrated a significant dose-volume effect while preliminary results from one pig study are contradictory. Preclinical spinal cord dose-volume studies indicate that dose distribution is more critical than the volume irradiated suggesting that neither dose-volume histogram analysis nor absolute volume constraints are effective in predicting complications. Reirradiation data are sparse, but results from guinea pig, rat, and pig studies are consistent with the hypothesis that the spinal cord possesses a large capacity for repair. The mechanisms behind the phenomena observed in spinal cord studies are not readily explained and the ability of dose response models to predict outcomes is variable underscoring the need for further investigation. Animal studies provide insight into the phenomena and mechanisms of radiosensitivity but the true significance of animal studies can only be discovered through clinical trials.

  8. [Perioperative anticoagulant therapy in a patient with congenital antithrombin III deficiency undergoing posterior spinal fusion].

    PubMed

    Kubo, Kota; Hatori, Eiki; Suhara, Tomohiro; Yamada, Takashige; Katori, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Tatsuya; Morisaki, Hiroshi; Takeda, Junzo

    2013-06-01

    A 22-year-old female was scheduled to undergo posterior thoracolumbar spinal fusion. She had been diagnosed with congenital antithrombin III (AT-III) deficiency by the onset of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis after the first operation at the age of 18. Thereafter she had taken warfarin, 5 mg daily, until 4 days before the surgery. Preoperatively, we administered AT-III products to regulate AT-III activity. The posterior spinal fusion was performed successfully without surgical complications. Postoperatively, we continued administration of AT-III products to maintain AT-III activity above 75%. We also used low dose unfractionated heparin with AT-III by continuous intravenous infusion. Heparin was administered with dose adjustment to achieve a target activated partial thromboplastin time of 45 to 60 seconds. After the activated partial thromboplastin time was stabilized in the target range, we started warfarin therapy (target international normalized ratio, 1.5 to 2.5) on postoperative day 16 and stopped administration of heparin on postoperative day 19. There was no thrombosis complications during the perioperative period. Good anticoagulant management was achieved in a patient with congenital AT-III deficiency undergoing posterior spinal fusion. PMID:23815000

  9. Bone Cement Dislodgement: One of Complications Following Bone Cement Augmentation Procedures for Osteoporotic Spinal Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kee-Yong; Yoo, Sung-Rim; Molon, Jan Noel

    2015-01-01

    Bone cement augmentation procedures have been getting more position as a minimally invasive surgical option for osteoporotic spinal fractures. However, complications related to these procedures have been increasingly reported. We describe a case of bone cement dislodgement following cement augmentation procedure for osteoporotic spinal fracture by reviewing the patient's medical records, imaging results and related literatures. A 73-year-old woman suffering back and buttock pain following a fall from level ground was diagnosed as an osteoporotic fracture of the 11th thoracic spine. Percutaneous kyphoplasty was performed for this lesion. Six weeks later, the patient complained of a recurrence of back and buttock pain. Radiologic images revealed superior dislodgement of bone cement through the 11th thoracic superior endplate with destruction of the lower part of the 10th thoracic spine. Staged anterior and posterior fusion was performed. Two years postoperatively, the patient carries on with her daily living without any significant disability. Delayed bone cement dislodgement can occur as one of complications following bone cement augmentation procedure for osteoporotic spinal fracture. It might be related to the presence of intravertebral cleft, lack of interdigitation of bone cement with the surrounding trabeculae, and possible damage of endplate during ballooning procedure. PMID:26113965

  10. Systematic Review of Urologic Outcomes from Tethered Cord Release in Occult Spinal Dysraphism in Children.

    PubMed

    White, Jeffrey T; Samples, Derek C; Prieto, Juan C; Tarasiewicz, Izabela

    2015-11-01

    Tethered cord syndrome describes a condition of multisystem end organ dysfunction due to fixation of the spinal cord. This systematic review focuses on the closed skin variant of this condition, occult spinal dysraphism. The embryology, pathophysiology, presentation, and classification of occult spinal dysraphism are explained to develop a simple framework for discussions regarding this often confusing condition. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we synthesized urologic outcome data after tethered cord release in children from 17 studies performed over the past 25 years. These results prompted several conclusions. First, the different subgroups and different nomenclature of tethered cord syndrome are often confused, making interpretation of results difficult. Second, untethering has a positive effect on urologic symptoms and urodynamics parameters. Third, timing of untethering is important: early intervention prevents significant long-term traction aiming to avoid irreversible neurologic damage. Fourth, pediatric urologists and neurosurgeons have an important role in diagnosing and treating this condition and should work closely as part of a multidisciplinary team. PMID:26396132

  11. Intramedullary Sarcoidosis Presenting with Delayed Spinal Cord Swelling after Cervical Laminoplasty for Compressive Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Du Ho; Kim, Eun-Sang; Eoh, Whan

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease of unknown etiology that may affect any organ in the body. The nervous system is involved in 5-16% of cases of sarcoidosis. Here, we report a case of intramedullary sarcoidosis presenting with delayed spinal cord swelling after laminoplasty for the treatment of compressive cervical myelopathy. A 56-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of upper extremity pain and gait disturbance. The patient had undergone laminoplasty for compressive cervical myelopathy 3 months previously. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large solitary intramedullary lesion with associated extensive cord swelling, signal changes, and heterogeneous enhancement of spinal cord from C2 to C7. Spinal cord biopsy revealed non-necrotizing granulomas with signs of chronic inflammation. The final diagnosis of sarcoidosis was based upon laboratory data, imaging findings, histological findings, and the exclusion of other diagnoses. Awareness of such presentations and a high degree of suspicion of sarcoidosis may help arrive at the correct diagnosis. PMID:25535524

  12. Diagnosis and Treatment of Bone Disease in Multiple Myeloma: Spotlight on Spinal Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Bone disease is observed in almost 80% of newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma patients, and spine is the bone site that is more frequently affected by myeloma-induced osteoporosis, osteolyses, or compression fractures. In almost 20% of the cases, spinal cord compression may occur; diagnosis and treatment must be carried out rapidly in order to avoid a permanent sensitive or motor defect. Although whole body skeletal X-ray is considered mandatory for multiple myeloma staging, magnetic resonance imaging is presently considered the most appropriate diagnostic technique for the evaluation of vertebral alterations, as it allows to detect not only the exact morphology of the lesions, but also the pattern of bone marrow infiltration by the disease. Multiple treatment modalities can be used to manage multiple myeloma-related vertebral lesions. Surgery or radiotherapy is mainly employed in case of spinal cord compression, impending fractures, or intractable pain. Percutaneous vertebroplasty or balloon kyphoplasty can reduce local pain in a significant fraction of treated patients, without interfering with subsequent therapeutic programs. Systemic antimyeloma therapy with conventional chemotherapy or, more appropriately, with combinations of conventional chemotherapy and compounds acting on both neoplastic plasma cells and bone marrow microenvironment must be soon initiated in order to reduce bone resorption and, possibly, promote bone formation. Bisphosphonates should also be used in combination with antimyeloma therapy as they reduce bone resorption and prolong patients survival. A multidisciplinary approach is thus needed in order to properly manage spinal involvement in multiple myeloma. PMID:24381787

  13. Eye Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is ...

  14. Bone Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the body, bones can get infected. The infections are usually bacterial, but can also be fungal. ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent ...

  15. Staphylococcal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of bacteria. There are over 30 types, but Staphylococcus aureus causes most staph infections (pronounced "staff infections"), including ... Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are resistant to certain antibiotics, making infections harder ...

  16. Staph Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Staph Infection? Staph is the shortened name for Staphylococcus (pronounced: staf-uh-low-KAH-kus), a type ... most staph infections are caused by the species Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) . Which of these infections do you ...

  17. Vaginal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Two common vaginal infections are bacterial vaginosis and yeast infections . Bacterial vaginosis (BV) happens when a certain ... increases the chances that you’ll get BV. Yeast infections happen when a fungus (a type of ...

  18. Managing pressure ulcers in patients with a spinal cord injury: a case study.

    PubMed

    Warren, Diana V

    Grade 4 pressure ulceration is a common and often unavoidable secondary complication for patients who have sustained a traumatic spinal cord injury. Pressure ulcer management involves treating infection, providing a moist wound-healing environment and choosing the appropriate dressing. However, the case of Mr M highlights other issues such as pain, a poor appetite and sleep disturbance, which all delay wound healing. This article discusses ulcer prevention, from the initial assessment of the spinal injury to patient repositioning using the 'log-rolling' technique. Although this technique is not effective in providing prolonged pressure relief, it did reduce Mr M's pain. This article also suggests recommendations for future practice, including the need to relate to patients on a personal level, which should reduce mental health deterioration and increase the patient's quality of life, and to take a multidisciplinary approach to managing and treating pressure ulceration. PMID:20335929

  19. The use of dual growing rods to correct spinal deformity secondary to a low-grade spinal cord astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Elizabeth N.; Muthigi, Akhil; Frino, John; Powers, Alexander K.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric intramedullary spinal cord astrocytomas are rare, and the majority are low grade, typically carrying a low risk of mortality, but a high risk of morbidity. Quality of life is, therefore, an important consideration in treating concomitant progressive kyphoscoliosis. Compared with fusion-based spinal stabilization, fusionless techniques may limit some complications related to early instrumentation of the developing spine. Another consideration is the timing of radiation therapy relative to both spinal maturity and spinal instrumentation. To date, there have been no reports of the use of a fusionless technique to treat spinal deformity secondary to an intramedullary spinal cord tumor. Herein, we report the use of fusionless spinal stabilization with dual growing rods in a boy with low-grade spinal cord astrocytoma after radiation therapy. PMID:26468485

  20. Causes of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the causes of spinal cord injury (SCI) and associated factors is critical in the development of successful prevention programs. Objective: This study analyzed data from the National SCI Database (NSCID) and National Shriners SCI Database (NSSCID) in the United States to examine specific etiologies of SCI by age, sex, race, ethnicity, day and month of injury, and neurologic outcomes. Methods: NSCID and NSSCID participants who had a traumatic SCI from 2005 to 2011 with known etiology were included in the analyses (N=7,834). Thirty-seven causes of injury documented in the databases were stratified by personal characteristics using descriptive analysis. Results: The most common causes of SCI were automobile crashes (31.5%) and falls (25.3%), followed by gunshot wounds (10.4%), motorcycle crashes (6.8%), diving incidents (4.7%), and medical/surgical complications (4.3%), which collectively accounted for 83.1% of total SCIs since 2005. Automobile crashes were the leading cause of SCI until age 45 years, whereas falls were the leading cause after age 45 years. Gunshot wounds, motorcycle crashes, and diving caused more SCIs in males than females. The major difference among race/ethnicity was in the proportion of gunshot wounds. More SCIs occurred during the weekends and warmer months, which seemed to parallel the increase of motorcycle- and diving-related SCIs. Level and completeness of injury are also associated with etiology of injury. Conclusions: The present findings suggest that prevention strategies should be tailored to the targeted population and major causes to have a meaningful impact on reducing the incidence of SCI. PMID:23678280

  1. Neurotrophin gradients and axon growth after spinal cord injury

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Laura Anne

    2007-01-01

    stem cells constitutively secrete neurotrophic factors and promote extensive host axonal growth after spinal cord injury.stem cells constitutively secrete neurotrophic factors and promote extensive host axonal growth after spinal cord injury.stem cells constitutively secrete neurotrophic factors and promote extensive host axonal growth after spinal cord injury.

  2. 21 CFR 880.2500 - Spinal fluid manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...spinal fluid pressure. The device uses a hollow needle, which is inserted into the spinal column fluid space, to connect the spinal fluid to a graduated column so that the pressure can be measured by reading the height of the fluid. (b)...

  3. 21 CFR 880.2500 - Spinal fluid manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...spinal fluid pressure. The device uses a hollow needle, which is inserted into the spinal column fluid space, to connect the spinal fluid to a graduated column so that the pressure can be measured by reading the height of the fluid. (b)...

  4. 21 CFR 880.2500 - Spinal fluid manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...spinal fluid pressure. The device uses a hollow needle, which is inserted into the spinal column fluid space, to connect the spinal fluid to a graduated column so that the pressure can be measured by reading the height of the fluid. (b)...

  5. 21 CFR 880.2500 - Spinal fluid manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...spinal fluid pressure. The device uses a hollow needle, which is inserted into the spinal column fluid space, to connect the spinal fluid to a graduated column so that the pressure can be measured by reading the height of the fluid. (b)...

  6. 21 CFR 880.2500 - Spinal fluid manometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...spinal fluid pressure. The device uses a hollow needle, which is inserted into the spinal column fluid space, to connect the spinal fluid to a graduated column so that the pressure can be measured by reading the height of the fluid. (b)...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the...; spinal tumor; and failed previous fusion (pseudarthrosis). These pedicle screw spinal systems must comply... with significant mechanical instability or deformity requiring fusion with instrumentation....

  8. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the...; spinal tumor; and failed previous fusion (pseudarthrosis). These pedicle screw spinal systems must comply... with significant mechanical instability or deformity requiring fusion with instrumentation....

  9. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the...; spinal tumor; and failed previous fusion (pseudarthrosis). These pedicle screw spinal systems must comply... with significant mechanical instability or deformity requiring fusion with instrumentation....

  10. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the...; spinal tumor; and failed previous fusion (pseudarthrosis). These pedicle screw spinal systems must comply... with significant mechanical instability or deformity requiring fusion with instrumentation....

  11. 21 CFR 888.3070 - Pedicle screw spinal system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immobilization and stabilization of spinal segments in skeletally mature patients as an adjunct to fusion in the...; spinal tumor; and failed previous fusion (pseudarthrosis). These pedicle screw spinal systems must comply... with significant mechanical instability or deformity requiring fusion with instrumentation....

  12. Technical Note Functional MRI of the Thoracic Spinal Cord During

    E-print Network

    Smith, Stephen D.

    Technical Note Functional MRI of the Thoracic Spinal Cord During Vibration Sensation Jennifer functional magnetic resonance images from thoracic spinal cord neurons. Materials and Methods: The lower spinal cord using a HASTE sequence on a 3 Tesla MRI system. Results: Signal increases were observed

  13. Control of Membrane Sealing in Injured Mammalian Spinal Cord Axons

    E-print Network

    Shi, Riyi

    Control of Membrane Sealing in Injured Mammalian Spinal Cord Axons RIYI SHI, TOMOKO ASANO, NEIL C spinal cord axons. J Neurophysiol 84: 1763­1769, 2000. The process of sealing of damaged axons was examined in isolated strips of white matter from guinea pig spinal cord by recording the "compound membrane

  14. Peripheral Inflammation Undermines the Plasticity of the Isolated Spinal Cord

    E-print Network

    Grau, James

    Peripheral Inflammation Undermines the Plasticity of the Isolated Spinal Cord Michelle A. Hook demonstrate that capsaicin also undermines the adaptive plasticity of the spinal cord, rendering the system the spinal cord against the maladaptive effects. Rats pretrained with controllable stimulation do not display

  15. Limb-specific emotional modulation of cervical spinal cord neurons

    E-print Network

    Smith, Stephen D.

    Limb-specific emotional modulation of cervical spinal cord neurons Theresa A. McIver & Jennifer activity in the cervical spinal cord as well. In the present study, we used fMRI to investigate the specificity of this emotion-dependent spinal cord activity. We examined whether the limb depicted

  16. Original Article Electrophysiological changes in isolated spinal cord white matter

    E-print Network

    Shi, Riyi

    Original Article Electrophysiological changes in isolated spinal cord white matter in response pig spinal cord white matter. Objectives: To determine whether lack of oxygen can cause irreversible of reoxygenation, mammalian spinal cord white matter can partially recover electrical impulse conduction. However

  17. BRAINA JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY Altering spinal cord excitability enables

    E-print Network

    Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

    BRAINA JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY Altering spinal cord excitability enables voluntary movements after of Neurological Surgery, Kentucky Spinal Cord Research Centre, University of Louisville, KY, USA 3 Department individual who had a motor complete, but sensory incomplete spinal cord injury regained voluntary movement

  18. Towards Optimal Pain Relief: Acupuncture and Spinal Cord Stimulation

    E-print Network

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Towards Optimal Pain Relief: Acupuncture and Spinal Cord Stimulation Richard Al'o 1 , Kenneth Al is a discrete optimization problem, e.g., for pain relief methodologies such as acupuncture and spinal cord problems related to pain relief: ffl problems of acupuncture, and ffl problems related to spinal cord

  19. Turkish Adaptation of Spinal Cord Independence Measure--Version III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesiktas, Nur; Paker, Nurdan; Bugdayci, Derya; Sencan, Sureyya; Karan, Ayse; Muslumanoglu, Lutfiye

    2012-01-01

    Various rating scales have been used to assess ability in individuals with spinal cord injury. There is no specific functional assessment scale for Turkish patients with spinal cord injury. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) is a specific test, which has become popular in the last decade. A study was conducted to validate and evaluate the…

  20. Automated Analysis of Remyelination Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury

    E-print Network

    Meenakshisundaram, Gopi

    Automated Analysis of Remyelination Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury Paper ID: 25 ABSTRACT disorders resulting in spinal cord injury (SCI). The lost myelin sheath can be replaced by remyelination ­ is a prominent fea- ture in many neurological disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury

  1. Sexuality Counseling with Clients Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Examines effects of spinal cord injury on sexuality. Discusses areas of sexual concern. Provides suggestions for treating clients with spinal cord injuries experiencing sexual difficulties. Concludes that major goal in working with clients with spinal cord injuries who have sexual difficulties should be the facilitation of a creative and…

  2. Modular organization of motor behavior in the frog's spinal cord

    E-print Network

    Bizzi, Emilio

    REVIEW Modular organization of motor behavior in the frog's spinal cord Emilio Bizzi, Simon F in the spinal cord. These structures contain circuitry that, when activated, produce precisely balanced an equilibrium point in space. Remarkably, the force outputs, produced by activating different spinal-cord

  3. NOCICEPTIVE PLASTICITY INHIBITS ADAPTIVE LEARNING IN THE SPINAL CORD

    E-print Network

    Grau, James

    NOCICEPTIVE PLASTICITY INHIBITS ADAPTIVE LEARNING IN THE SPINAL CORD A. R. FERGUSON,a * E. D in central neurogenic pain. Over the last 100 years researchers have found that the spinal cord is also (response­outcome) learning in the spi- nal cord, we use a preparation in which spinally transected rats

  4. Surgical Strategies for Cervical Spinal Neurinomas

    PubMed Central

    ITO, Kiyoshi; AOYAMA, Tatsuro; MIYAOKA, Yoshinari; HORIUCHI, Tetsuyoshi; HONGO, Kazuhiro

    Cervical spinal neurinomas are benign tumors that arise from nerve roots. Based on their location, these tumors can also take the form of a dumbbell-shaped mass. Treatment strategies for these tumors have raised several controversial issues such as appropriate surgical indications and selection of surgical approaches for cervical dumbbell-shaped spinal neurinomas. In this report, we review previous literature and retrospectively analyze cervical spinal neurinoma cases that have been treated at our hospital. Surgical indications and approaches based on tumor location and severity are discussed in detail. Thus, with advances in neuroimaging and neurophysiological monitoring, we conclude that appropriate surgical approaches and intraoperative surgical manipulations should be chosen on a case-by-case basis. PMID:26119900

  5. Cannabinoids to treat spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition for which there is no standard treatment beyond rehabilitation strategies. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the use of cannabinoids to treat this condition. The endocannabinoid system is expressed in the intact spinal cord, and it is dramatically upregulated after lesion. Endogenous activation of this system counteracts secondary damage following SCI, and treatments with endocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists promote a better functional outcome in experimental models. The use of cannabinoids in SCI is a new research field and many questions remain open. Here, we discuss caveats and suggest some future directions that may help to understand the role of cannabinoids in SCI and how to take advantage of this system to regain functions after spinal cord damage. PMID:25805333

  6. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage following thoracic spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Morofuji, Yoichi; Tsunoda, Keishi; Takeshita, Tomonori; Hayashi, Kentaro; Kitagawa, Naoki; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Izumi

    2009-03-01

    A 51-year-old man underwent surgery for ossification of the ligamentum flavum at the T9-T10 levels. Intraoperatively, the dura was opened unintentionally and a subcutaneous suction drain was placed. The patient complained of severe headache and nausea postoperatively. Brain computed tomography obtained 3 days after the surgery demonstrated remote cerebellar hemorrhage and hydrocephalus. Suboccipital decompression, C1 laminectomy, and ventriculostomy were performed and his symptoms subsided 2 months later. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage following spinal surgery is extremely rare, but may occur after any type of spinal surgery resulting in dural tear or intradural manipulation. Early diagnosis is particularly important for the treatment of remote cerebellar hemorrhage following spinal surgery. PMID:19318737

  7. Vascular dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popa, F; Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Burnei, G; Strambu, V; Sinescu, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the vascular dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Vascular dysfunctions are common complications of SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. Neuroanatomy and physiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, is reviewed. SCI implies disruption of descendent pathways from central centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating in intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant vascular dysfunction. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and it is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Arterial hypotension with orthostatic hypotension occurs in both acute and chronic phases. The etiology is multifactorial. We described a few factors influencing the orthostatic hypotension occurrence in SCI: sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, low plasma catecholamine levels, rennin–angiotensin–aldosterone activity, peripheral alpha–adrenoceptor hyperresponsiveness, impaired function of baroreceptors, hyponatremia and low plasmatic volume, cardiovascular deconditioning, morphologic changes in sympathetic neurons, plasticity within spinal circuits, and motor deficit leading to loss of skeletal muscle pumping activity. Additional associated cardiovascular concerns in SCI, such as deep vein thrombosis and long–term risk for coronary heart disease and systemic atherosclerosis are also described. Proper prophylaxis, including non–pharmacologic and pharmacological strategies, diminishes the occurrence of the vascular dysfunction following SCI. Each vascular disturbance requires a specific treatment. PMID:20945818

  8. The Effects of Behavioral Training on Spinal Plasticity and ERK1/2 Phosphorylation, Within the Injured Spinal Cord 

    E-print Network

    Hughes, Abbey

    2009-06-09

    -1 THE EFFECTS OF BEHAVIORAL TRAINING ON SPINAL PLASTICITY AND ERK1/2 PHOSPHORYLATION, WITHIN THE INJURED SPINAL CORD Major: Psychology April 2009 Submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Research Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by ABBEY JEAN HUGHES THE EFFECTS OF BEHAVIORAL TRAINING ON SPINAL PLASTICITY AND ERK1/2 PHOSPHORYLATION, WITHIN THE INJURED SPINAL CORD Approved by...

  9. Biofilms in periprosthetic orthopedic infections

    PubMed Central

    McConoughey, Stephen J; Howlin, Rob; Granger, Jeff F; Manring, Maurice M; Calhoun, Jason H; Shirtlif, Mark; Kathju, Sandeep; Stoodley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As the number of total joint arthroplasty and internal fixation procedures continues to rise, the threat of infection following surgery has significant clinical implications. These infections may have highly morbid consequences to patients, who often endure additional surgeries and lengthy exposures to systemic antibiotics, neither of which are guaranteed to resolve the infection. Of particular concern is the threat of bacterial biofilm development, since biofilm-mediated infections are difficult to diagnose and effective treatments are lacking. Developing therapeutic strategies have targeted mechanisms of biofilm formation and the means by which these bacteria communicate with each other to take on specialized roles such as persister cells within the biofilm. In addition, prevention of infection through novel coatings for prostheses and the local delivery of high concentrations of antibiotics by absorbable carriers has shown promise in laboratory and animal studies. Biofilm development, especially in an arthoplasty environment, and future diagnostic and treatment options are discussed. PMID:25302955

  10. The Postnatal Development of Spinal Sensory Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Maria; Jennings, Ernest

    1999-07-01

    The mechanisms by which infants and children process pain should be viewed within the context of a developing sensory nervous system. The study of the neurophysiological properties and connectivity of sensory neurons in the developing spinal cord dorsal horn of the intact postnatal rat has shed light on the way in which the newborn central nervous system analyzes cutaneous innocuous and noxious stimuli. The receptive field properties and evoked activity of newborn dorsal horn cells to single repetitive and persistent innocuous and noxious inputs are developmentally regulated and reflect the maturation of excitatory transmission within the spinal cord. These changes will have an important influence on pain processing in the postnatal period.

  11. An Ecological Community-Based Participatory Research Study of Late Diagnosed HIV/AIDS in Oakland, California: Investigating influential factors in racial/ ethnic health inequities

    E-print Network

    Chopel, Alison Marie

    2014-01-01

    regard to immigration policies around HIV status. 19 Taylorrace US immigra- tion policies re: HIV infection Females andand policy developments must be designed in order to halt the increasing inequities in late diagnosed HIV and

  12. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Painful Spinal Tumors Adjacent to the Spinal Cord with Real-Time Monitoring of Spinal Canal Temperature: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Uraki, Junji; Makita, Masashi; Oshima, Fumiyoshi; Takeda, Kan

    2009-01-15

    PurposeTo prospectively evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical utility of bone radiofrequency (RF) ablation with real-time monitoring of the spinal canal temperature for the treatment of spinal tumors adjacent to the spinal cord.Materials and MethodsOur Institutional Review Board approved this study. Patients gave informed consent. The inclusion criteria were (a) a painful spinal metastasis and (b) a distance of 1 cm or less between the metastasis and the spinal cord. The thermocouple was placed in the spinal canal under CT fluoroscopic guidance. When the spinal canal temperature reached 45{sup o}C, RF application was immediately stopped. RF ablation was considered technically successful when the procedure was performed without major complications. Clinical success was defined as a fall in the visual analogue scale score of at least 2 points.ResultsTen patients with spinal tumors measuring 3-8 cm (mean, 4.9 {+-} 1.5 cm) were enrolled. The distance between the tumor and the spinal cord was 1-6 mm (mean, 2.4 {+-} 1.6 mm). All procedures were judged technically successful (100%). The spinal canal temperature did not exceed 45{sup o}C in 9 of the 10 patients (90%). In the remaining patient, the temperature rose to 48{sup o}C, resulting in transient neural damage, although RF application was immediately stopped when the temperature reached 45{sup o}C. Clinical success was achieved within 1 week in all patients (100%).ConclusionBone RF ablation with real-time monitoring of the spinal canal temperature is feasible, safe, and clinically useful for the treatment of painful spinal metastases adjacent to the spinal cord.

  13. Pathology of fatal lineage 1 and 2 West Nile virus infections in horses in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Williams, June H; van Niekerk, Stephanie; Human, Stacey; van Wilpe, Erna; Venter, Marietjie

    2014-01-01

    Since 2007, West Nile virus (WNV) has been reported in South African horses, causing severe neurological signs. All cases were of lineage 2, except for one case that clustered with lineage 1 viruses. In the present study, gross and microscopic lesions of six South African lineage 2-infected horses and the one lineage 1 case are described. Diagnoses were confirmed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of central nervous system (CNS) tissue and one by RT-PCR of a brain virus isolate. The CNS of all cases was negative by RT-PCR or immunohistochemistry (IHC) for African horse sickness (AHS), equine encephalosis virus, equine herpes viruses 1 and 4, other zoonotic flaviviruses, alphaviruses, and shunivirus, and either by immunofluorescence or IHC for rabies. Gross visceral lesions were nonspecific but often mimicked those of AHS. The CNS histopathology of WNV lineage 2 cases resembled the nonsuppurative polioencephalomyelitis reported in the Northern Hemisphere lineage 1 and recent Hungarian lineage 2 cases. Occasional meningitis, focal spinal ventral horn poliomalacia, dorsal and lateral horn poliomyelitis, leucomyelitis, asymmetrical ventral motor spinal neuritis and frequent olfactory region involvement were also seen. Lineage 2 cases displayed marked variations in CNS lesion severity, type and distribution, and suggested various viral entry routes into the CNS, based on findings in experimental mice and hamsters. Lineage 1 lesions were comparable to the milder lineage 2 cases. West Nile virus IHC on CNS sections with marked lesions from all cases elicited only two antigen-positive cells in the olfactory cortex of one case. The presence in the CNS of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, plasma cells and macrophage-monocytes was confirmed by cluster of differentiation (CD) 3, CD20, multiple myeloma oncogene 1 (MUM1) and macrophage (MAC) 387 IHC. PMID:25686260

  14. In-111-leukocyte scintigraphy for detection of infection associated with peritoneal dialysis catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Kipper, S.L.; Steiner, R.W.; Witztum, K.F.; Basarab, R.M.; Kipper, M.S.; Halpern, S.E.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1984-05-01

    In-111-labeled leukocytes were administered to 13 patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in order to locate catheter-associated infections. Using a marker to indicate the catheter exit site, infections of the catheter tunnel were correctly identified prior to surgery in 4 patients with relapsing peritonitis and infections of the exit site were diagnosed in 5 out of 7 patients. The authors conclude that In-111-leukocyte scintigraphy appears to be accurate in diagnosing peritoneal infections of the dialysis catheter tunnel.

  15. K.R.Subramanian et al., "Visualizing the Spinal Neuronal Dynamics of Locomotion" Visualizing the Spinal Neuronal Dynamics of Locomotion

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Kalpathi R.

    dynamics causing locomo- tion of a single hip joint, based on pattern generator output of the spinal cord approaches to overcome this: (1) building a 3D anatomical model of the spinal cord with neurons distributed spinal cord model from published drawings,15 and locating populations of neurons within the cord

  16. Strategies to avoid a missed diagnosis of co-occurring concussion in post-acute patients having a spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kushner, David S

    2015-06-01

    Research scientists and clinicians should be aware that missed diagnoses of mild-moderate traumatic brain injuries in post-acute patients having spinal cord injuries may approach 60-74% with certain risk factors, potentially causing clinical consequences for patients, and confounding the results of clinical research studies. Factors leading to a missed diagnosis may include acute trauma-related life-threatening issues, sedation/intubation, subtle neuropathology on neuroimaging, failure to collect Glasgow Coma Scale scores or duration of posttraumatic amnesia, or lack of validity of this information, and overlap in neuro-cognitive symptoms with emotional responses to spinal cord injuries. Strategies for avoiding a missed diagnosis of mild-moderate traumatic brain injuries in patients having a spinal cord injuries are highlighted in this perspective. PMID:26199589

  17. Strategies to avoid a missed diagnosis of co-occurring concussion in post-acute patients having a spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Research scientists and clinicians should be aware that missed diagnoses of mild-moderate traumatic brain injuries in post-acute patients having spinal cord injuries may approach 60–74% with certain risk factors, potentially causing clinical consequences for patients, and confounding the results of clinical research studies. Factors leading to a missed diagnosis may include acute trauma-related life-threatening issues, sedation/intubation, subtle neuropathology on neuroimaging, failure to collect Glasgow Coma Scale scores or duration of posttraumatic amnesia, or lack of validity of this information, and overlap in neuro-cognitive symptoms with emotional responses to spinal cord injuries. Strategies for avoiding a missed diagnosis of mild-moderate traumatic brain injuries in patients having a spinal cord injuries are highlighted in this perspective. PMID:26199589

  18. Integrated Source Case Investigation for Tuberculosis (TB) and HIV in the Caregivers and Household Contacts of Hospitalised Young Children Diagnosed with TB in South Africa: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lala, Sanjay G.; Little, Kristen M.; Tshabangu, Nkeko; Moore, David P.; Msandiwa, Reginah; van der Watt, Martin; Chaisson, Richard E.; Martinson, Neil A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Contact tracing, to identify source cases with untreated tuberculosis (TB), is rarely performed in high disease burden settings when the index case is a young child with TB. As TB is strongly associated with HIV infection in these settings, we used source case investigation to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed TB and HIV in the caregivers and household contacts of hospitalised young children diagnosed with TB in South Africa. Methods Caregivers and household contacts of 576 young children (age ?7 years) with TB diagnosed between May 2010 and August 2012 were screened for TB and HIV. The primary outcome was the detection of laboratory-confirmed, newly-diagnosed TB disease and/or HIV-infection in close contacts. Results Of 576 caregivers, 301 (52·3%) self-reported HIV-positivity. Newly-diagnosed HIV infection was detected in 63 (22·9%) of the remaining 275 caregivers who self-reported an unknown or negative HIV status. Screening identified 133 (23·1%) caregivers eligible for immediate anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Newly-diagnosed TB disease was detected in 23 (4·0%) caregivers. In non-caregiver household contacts (n = 1341), the prevalence of newly-diagnosed HIV infection and TB disease was 10·0% and 3·2% respectively. On average, screening contacts of every nine children with TB resulted in the identification of one case of newly-diagnosed TB disease, three cases of newly diagnosed HIV-infection, and three HIV-infected persons eligible for ART. Conclusion In high burden countries, source case investigation yields high rates of previously undiagnosed HIV and TB infection in the close contacts of hospitalised young children diagnosed with TB. Furthermore, integrated screening identifies many individuals who are eligible for immediate ART. Similar studies, with costing analyses, should be undertaken in other high burden settings–integrated source case investigation for TB and HIV should be routinely undertaken if our findings are confirmed. PMID:26378909

  19. How Is Heart Valve Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Congenital Heart Defects Endocarditis Heart Murmur How the Heart Works Mitral Valve Prolapse Send ... Diagnosed? Your primary care doctor may detect a heart murmur or other signs of heart valve disease. However, ...

  20. How Is a Heart Murmur Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is a Heart Murmur Diagnosed? Doctors use a stethoscope to listen to ... especially with physical exertion), dizziness, or fainting. Evaluating Heart Murmurs When evaluating a heart murmur, your doctor will ...

  1. Diagnosing Asthma in Very Young Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Diagnosing Asthma in Babies & Toddlers Article Body One of the ... family with recurrent bronchitis or sinus problems. When Asthma is Not the Cause Your pediatrician will listen ...

  2. How Are Pelvic Floor Disorders Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How are pelvic floor disorders diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links ... fee ). This test is used to evaluate the pelvic floor and rectum while the patient is having a ...

  3. Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning about Prediabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes There are several ways ... mg/dl – 199 mg/dl Preventing Type 2 Diabetes You will not develop type 2 diabetes automatically ...

  4. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Endometriosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose endometriosis? Skip sharing on social media ... under a microscope, to confirm the diagnosis. 1 Health care providers may also use imaging methods to produce ...

  5. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pheochromocytoma?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pheochromocytoma? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider uses blood and urine tests that measure ...

  6. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Hypoparathyroidism?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose hypoparathyroidism? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider will order a blood test to determine ...

  7. Coping When You're Newly Diagnosed

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and ultimately surviving when you’re first diagnosed. Shock and Denial The shock of learning you have PH can be overwhelming. ... the grieving process, the apathy associated with prolonged shock and denial can sometimes prevent patients from seeking ...

  8. Opportunistic Infections in Patients with HTLV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshiki; Sekioka, Toshio; Usui, Masakatsu

    2015-01-01

    As an acquired immunodeficiency, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is primarily responsible for opportunistic infections in infected patients. However, opportunistic infections also occur in individuals with human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. Here, we report opportunistic infections in two Japanese HTLV-1-seropositive patients. The first patient was a 67-year-old male, who had cytomegalovirus infection associated with esophagogastritis and terminal ileitis. The patient was HTLV-1-positive and was diagnosed with smoldering adult T cell leukemia (ATL). High levels of serum soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R; 4,304?U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (75.5%) in peripheral blood were also detected. The second patient was a 78-year-old female, a known asymptomatic HTLV-1 carrier, who presented with persistent herpes zoster, followed by Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Disease progression of smoldering ATL along opportunistic infections was observed with very high levels of serum sIL-2R (14,058?U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (87.2%) in peripheral blood. In patients with suspected opportunistic infections, both HTLV-1 and HIV should be considered. In HTLV-1-positive patients, an increase in the CD4+CD25+ T cell subset may have its value as a prognostic marker. PMID:26693362

  9. Opportunistic Infections in Patients with HTLV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiki; Sekioka, Toshio; Usui, Masakatsu; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2015-01-01

    As an acquired immunodeficiency, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is primarily responsible for opportunistic infections in infected patients. However, opportunistic infections also occur in individuals with human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. Here, we report opportunistic infections in two Japanese HTLV-1-seropositive patients. The first patient was a 67-year-old male, who had cytomegalovirus infection associated with esophagogastritis and terminal ileitis. The patient was HTLV-1-positive and was diagnosed with smoldering adult T cell leukemia (ATL). High levels of serum soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R; 4,304?U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (75.5%) in peripheral blood were also detected. The second patient was a 78-year-old female, a known asymptomatic HTLV-1 carrier, who presented with persistent herpes zoster, followed by Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Disease progression of smoldering ATL along opportunistic infections was observed with very high levels of serum sIL-2R (14,058?U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (87.2%) in peripheral blood. In patients with suspected opportunistic infections, both HTLV-1 and HIV should be considered. In HTLV-1-positive patients, an increase in the CD4+CD25+ T cell subset may have its value as a prognostic marker. PMID:26693362

  10. Gastrointestinal involvement in spinal cord injury: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Ellen

    2012-03-01

    Bowel problems occur in 27% to 62% of patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI), most commonly constipation, distention, abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, hemorrhoids, bowel accidents, and autonomic hyperreflexia. The acute abdomen, with a mortality of 9.5%, does not present with rigidity or absent bowel sounds but rather with dull/poorly-localized pain, vomiting, or restlessness, with tenderness, fever, and leukocytosis in up to 50% of patients. Fecal impaction may present with anorexia and nausea. Methods used for bowel care include laxatives, anal massage, manual evacuation, and enemas. Randomized, double-blind studies demonstrated the effectiveness of neostigmine, which increases cholinergic tone, combined with glycopyrrolate, an anticholinergic agent with minimal activity in the colon that reduces extracolonic side-effects. Improved bowel function occurs with anterior sacral root stimulators which may be combined with an S2 to S4 posterior sacral rhizotomy which interrupts the reflex arc by cutting the posterior roots carrying the spasticity-causing sensory nerves. For severe constipation, a colostomy reduces time for bowel care, providing a clean environment so decubitus ulcers may heal. Gallstones occur in 17% to 31% of patients, and acalculous cholecystitis in 3.7% of patients with acute SCI. A high index of suspicion is needed to properly diagnose bowel problems in SCI. PMID:22457863

  11. [Diagnosis of maternofetal infections].

    PubMed

    Vauloup-Fellous, Christelle; Bouthry, Elise

    2015-06-01

    Prevention is an essential aspect of management of infections that can be transmitted from mother to fetus during pregnancy: The prescription and interpretation of serologic markers differ according to clinical context: screening, counts, clinical signs, or ultrasound signs. Testing for rubella IgG antibodies is recommended at the beginning of pregnancy, in the absence of written results proving either immunity or previous vaccination with two doses. Monthly serologic monitoring (IgG and IgM) is recommended for woman lacking immunity to toxoplasmosis. Diagnosis of a primary infection requires the concomitant detection of IgG and IgM. Nonetheless, the presence of specific IgM is not necessarily a marker of recent infection. IgG avidity must be measured to confirm or rule out a recent primary infection when IgM is positive. The observation of stable antibody titers is often inaccurately considered to be reassuring. In fact, depending on the individuals tested and especially the technique used, antibodies may reach a plateau several days or several weeks after the onset of the infection. Clinical diagnosis of rubella is not reliable, and its rarity today means that physicians are unlikely to recognize it or consider it as a possible differential diagnosis. Nonetheless, residual circulation of the rubella virus continues in France. A chickenpox rash is diagnosed clinically. For atypical eruptions, the virus can be sought directly in the vesicular fluid. Serology is not helpful in this case. PMID:26033555

  12. Necrotizing Skin Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Version Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ... students Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ...

  13. Bacterial Nasal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Version Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ... students Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ...

  14. Genetically identified spinal interneurons integrating tactile afferents for motor control.

    PubMed

    Bui, Tuan V; Stifani, Nicolas; Panek, Izabela; Farah, Carl

    2015-12-01

    Our movements are shaped by our perception of the world as communicated by our senses. Perception of sensory information has been largely attributed to cortical activity. However, a prior level of sensory processing occurs in the spinal cord. Indeed, sensory inputs directly project to many spinal circuits, some of which communicate with motor circuits within the spinal cord. Therefore, the processing of sensory information for the purpose of ensuring proper movements is distributed between spinal and supraspinal circuits. The mechanisms underlying the integration of sensory information for motor control at the level of the spinal cord have yet to be fully described. Recent research has led to the characterization of spinal neuron populations that share common molecular identities. Identification of molecular markers that define specific populations of spinal neurons is a prerequisite to the application of genetic techniques devised to both delineate the function of these spinal neurons and their connectivity. This strategy has been used in the study of spinal neurons that receive tactile inputs from sensory neurons innervating the skin. As a result, the circuits that include these spinal neurons have been revealed to play important roles in specific aspects of motor function. We describe these genetically identified spinal neurons that integrate tactile information and the contribution of these studies to our understanding of how tactile information shapes motor output. Furthermore, we describe future opportunities that these circuits present for shedding light on the neural mechanisms of tactile processing. PMID:26445867

  15. Simplified spinal cord phantom for evaluation of SQUID magnetospinography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Y.; Oyama, D.; Somchai, N.; Kawabata, S.; Uehara, G.

    2014-05-01

    Spinal cord functional imaging by magnetospinography (MSG) is a noninvasive diagnostic method for spinal cord diseases. However, the accuracy and spatial resolution of lesion localization by MSG have barely been evaluated in detail so far. We developed a simplified spinal cord phantom for MSG evaluation. The spinal cord phantom is composed of a cylindrical vessel filled with saline water, which acts as a model of a neck. A set of modeled vertebrae is arranged in the cylindrical vessel, which has a neural current model made from catheter electrodes. The neural current model emulates the current distribution around the activated site along the axon of the spinal cord nerve. Our MSG system was used to observe the magnetic field from the phantom; a quadrupole-like pattern of the magnetic field distribution, which is a typical distribution pattern for spinal cord magnetic fields, was successfully reproduced by the phantom. Hence, the developed spinal cord phantom can be used to evaluate MSG source analysis methods.

  16. Spinal Pathways Mediating Phrenic Activation during High Frequency Spinal Cord Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    DiMarco, Anthony F.; Kowalski, Krzysztof E.

    2012-01-01

    High frequency spinal cord stimulation (HF-SCS) is a method of inspiratory muscle activation resulting in phrenic motoneuron activation via stimulation of spinal cord pathways. The specific pathways mediating this response, however, are unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of upper cervical (C1–C4) pre-phrenic interneurons (UCI) and localize the pathways in the thoracic spinal cord mediating activation of phrenic motoneurons during HF-SCS. In 7 anesthetized, spinalized (C1 level) dogs, HF-SCS was applied at the T2 level. Diaphragm EMG, inspired volume and airway pressure generation were monitored before and following sequential spinal cord sections at the C4 and C8 levels. Section at the C4 level and dorsal columns at C8 resulted in no significant changes. However, lateral funiculi section (C8 level) resulted in significant reductions in each parameter. We conclude that during upper thoracic HF-SCS, the phrenic motoneuron pools are activated via spinal pathways located in the lateral funiculus but UCI are not involved. PMID:23261850

  17. Endovascular treatment in spinal perimedullary arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Phadke, Rajendra V; Bhattacharyya, Avik; Handique, Akash; Jain, Krishan; Kumar, Alok; Singh, Vivek; Baruah, Deb; Kumar, Tushant; Patwari, Sriram; Mohan, B Madan

    2014-01-01

    This study includes 20 patients with 21 spinal perimedullary fistulae. There were nine Type IVa (42.8%) lesions, ten Type IVb (47.6%) and two Type IVc (9.5%) lesions. The dominant arterial supply was from the anterior spinal artery (47.6%), posterior spinal artery (19%) and directly from the radiculomedullary artery (28.5%). Sixteen lesions in 15 patients were treated by endovascular route using n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. Endovascular treatment was not feasible in five patients. Of the ten patients with microfistulae, catheterization failed/was not attempted in 40%, complete obliteration of the lesion was seen in 60% but clinical improvement was seen in 40% of patients. Catheterization was feasible in all ten patients with macrofistulae (nine type IVb and two type IVc lesions). Complete obliteration of the lesions was seen in 60% and residue in 30%. Clinical improvement was seen in 80% and clinical deterioration in 10%. In conclusion, endovascular glue embolization is safe and efficacious in type IVb and IVc spinal perimedullary fistulae and should be considered the first option of treatment. It is also feasible in many of the type IVa lesions. PMID:24976100

  18. Ependymal cyst of the thoracic spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Gainer, J. V.; Chou, S. M.; Nugent, G. R.; Weiss, V.

    1974-01-01

    A unique case of an ependymal cyst on the anterior aspect of the thoracic spinal cord in a woman aged 68 years is described. Clinical signs were precipitated by trauma. Recovery of function, while incomplete, was remarkably good after extirpation of the cyst. Images PMID:4419009

  19. Employment Outcomes Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, S.; Murphy, G. S.; Athanasou, J. A.; Hickey, L.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 83 Australian adults with spinal cord injuries found that at least 56% had worked at some time post-injury and those who were working when surveyed had done so for an average of close to 10 years. Clerical, office, and administrative occupations proved to be the most suitable. (Author/CR)

  20. Accommodating Workers with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowler, Denetta; Batiste, Linda; Whidden, Eddie

    1998-01-01

    Examination of over 1,000 calls to the Job Accommodation Network involving workers with spinal cord injury identified the nature of the industry, job, career progression, and accessibility solutions. The number of calls increased dramatically after passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. (SK)

  1. Rehabilitation of Disabled Children Following Spinal Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, Kenneth M.; Hays, Ross M.

    1986-01-01

    Records of 16 patients (ages 6-19) who had undergone surgery for severe spinal deformity were retrospectively analyzed to document ten aspects of rehabilitation intervention, including mobility skills, patient and family training and education, daily living activities, ongoing medical problems, planning for school reentry, and management of…

  2. Suction Drain Tip Culture after Spine Surgery: Can It Predict a Surgical Site Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jae-Sung; Park, Eugene; Park, Il-Young; Lee, Jae Won

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective clinical study. Purpose To assess the diagnostic value of suction drain tip culture in patients undergoing primary posterior spine surgery. Overview of Literature To date, the diagnostic value of suction drain tip culture for predicting surgical site infection (SSI) has not been firmly established in orthopedic or spinal surgery. Methods In total, 133 patients who underwent primary posterior spine surgery from January 2013 to April 2015 were included in this retrospective study. Patients diagnosed with infective disease or condition was excluded. The suction drain tip was cut off approximately 5 cm from its far end. The sample was sent to the microbiological laboratory of the hospital for culture analysis. Any signs of infection, such as wound discharge or dehiscence, fever, chills, or chronic pain, were recorded. The culture outcome, identification of bacteria, and postoperative transition of the serum C-reactive protein level were also recorded in all patients. The wounds were followed up for a minimum of 3 months. Results A positive drain tip culture was found in 48 patients (36.1%), of whom, 6 developed SSI. The sensitivity of drain tip culture for SSI after primary posterior spine surgery was 60.0%, and the specificity was 65.9%. The association between the incidence of positive suction tip culture and SSI was not statistically significant. Among the 48 positive drain tip cultures, there was no significant association between the occurrence of SSI and virulence of isolated bacteria. There was no significant association between drain tip culture positivity and the duration of drainage, or between the rate of SSI and duration of drainage. Conclusions Suction drain tip culture analysis is a poor predictor of SSI after primary posterior spine surgery. Routine use of a drain tip culture is not supported by the results of this study. PMID:26713117

  3. Immunodiffusion test for diagnosing and monitoring pythiosis in horses.

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, L; Kaufman, L; Standard, P G

    1986-01-01

    A practical, sensitive, and specific immunodiffusion test was developed for diagnosing and monitoring pythiosis in horses. Culture filtrates, a soluble cell mass, and trypsinized Pythium sp. antigens were evaluated against prepared rabbit anti-Pythium sp. serum and pythiosis horse case sera. The culture filtrate antigens demonstrated the greatest capacity for detecting precipitins and the greatest stability during storage. In contrast, the trypsinized antigens had the weakest capability for detecting multiple precipitins and the poorest stability. The 13 sera from horses with proven active pythiosis were positive in immunodiffusion tests with the culture filtrate antigens. Each serum contained from three to six precipitins. Treated horses lost precipitins, and some became antibody negative. No false-positive reactions were noted in tests with sera from normal horses and humans or with sera from a variety of heterologous horse and human infections. Images PMID:3086368

  4. Gene Delivery to the Spinal Cord: Comparison Between Lentiviral, Adenoviral, and Retroviral Vector Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Abdellatif, Ahmed A.; Pelt, Jennifer L.; Benton, Richard L.; Howard, Russell M.; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Ping, Peipei; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Whittemore, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    Viral gene delivery for spinal cord injury (SCI) is a promising approach for enhancing axonal regeneration and neuroprotection. An understanding of spatio-temporal transgene expression in the spinal cord is essential for future studies of SCI therapies. Commonly, intracellular marker proteins (e.g., EGFP) were used as indicators of transgene levels after viral delivery, which may not accurately reflect levels of secreted transgene. This study examined transgene expression using ELISA after viral delivery of D15A, a neurotrophin with BDNF and NT-3 activities, at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after in vivo and ex vivo delivery using lentiviral, adenoviral, and retroviral vectors. Further, the inflammatory responses and viral infection patterns after in vivo delivery were examined. Lentiviral vectors had the most stable pattern of gene expression, with D15A levels of 536 ± 38 and 363 ± 47 pg/mg protein seen at 4 weeks after the in vivo and ex vivo delivery, respectively. Our results show that protein levels downregulate disproportionately to levels of EGFP after adenoviral vectors both in vivo and ex vivo. D15A dropped from initial levels of 422 ± 87 to 153 ± 18 pg/mg protein at 4 weeks after in vivo administration. Similarly, ex vivo retrovirus-mediated transgene expression exhibited rapid downregulation by 2 weeks post-grafting. Compared to adenoviral infection, macrophage activation was attenuated after lentiviral infection. These results suggest that lentiviral vectors are most suitable in situations where stable long-term transgene expression is needed. Retroviral ex vivo delivery is optional when transient expression within targeted spinal tissue is desired, with adenoviral vectors in between. PMID:16786574

  5. Epidemiology of Otologic Diagnoses in United States Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Kozin, Elliott D.; Sethi, Rosh K.V.; Remenschneider, Aaron K.; Kaplan, Alyson; del Portal, Daniel A.; Gray, Stacey T.; Shrime, Mark G.; Lee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Otologic complaints may place a significant burden on emergency departments (EDs) in the United States; however, few studies have comprehensively examined this discrete patient population. We aim to identify utilization of EDs by patients with primary otologic complaints. Study Design Retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) from 2009 through 2011. Methods The NEDS database was queried for patient encounters with a primary otologic diagnosis based on ICD9 codes (380–389). Weighted estimates for demographic, diagnostic characteristics, SES, and trends over time were extracted. Predictors of mortality and admission were determined by multivariable logistic regression. Results A weighted total of 8,611,282 visits between 2009 and 2011 were attributed to otologic diagnoses, representing 2.21% of all ED visits. Stratified by patient age, otologic diagnoses encompassed 1.01% and 6.79% of all adult and pediatric ED visits, respectively. The majority of patients were treated and released (98.17%). The average age of patients presenting with an otologic complaint was 17.9 years (Standard Error [SE] = 0.23). Overall, 62.7% of patients that presented with an otologic complaint were 0–17 years old. The most common diagnoses among all age groups included otitis media NOS (60.6%), infected otitis externa NOS (11.8%), and otalgia NOS (6.8%). Conclusions We provide a comprehensive overview of otologic complaints that are an overlooked diagnostic category in public health research. NEDS data demonstrates significant number of visits related to otologic complaints, especially in the pediatric population, that are non-emergent. PMID:25702897

  6. A Rare Case of Brucella canis in an HIV-Infected Patient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Presentation: A 46-year-old HIV-infected woman was admitted with a three-day history of high fever, diffuse arthralgias, malaise, and loose stools. History: The patient had been diagnosed with HIV infection for 16 years with no previous AIDS-defining diagnoses or other complications. A self-impos...

  7. Cutoff Values of Plasma D-Dimer Level in Patients with Diagnosis of the Venous Thromboembolism after Elective Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Riazi, Mahdieh

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A prospective clinical study. Purpose Our objective in the present study was twofold. First, we sought to evaluate the relationship between postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) development and concentration of D-dimer to determine the cutoff value in patients who underwent elective spinal surgery. Second, we identified the predictive risk factors for postoperative VTE. Overview of Literature VTE affects the general health of patients and may even cause death. Since the complications of VTE are difficult to predict, the safest and most cost effective diagnostic method should be used in order to confirm a suspected VTE event after spinal surgery. Methods This study was performed on 97 patients who underwent elective spinal surgery. The D-dimer assay was carried out on the day before surgery, and on days 1, 3, and 10 following surgery. VTE occurrence and D-dimer levels were compared between the VTE and the control groups. Results Four patients (4.1%) were diagnosed with deep vein thrombosis and one patient (1%) was diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism. The optimum D-dimer cutoff value on day 3 following surgery in the VTE group was determined to be more than 2.1 µg/mL with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 80.7%. Moreover, the duration of postoperative recumbency was a significant risk factor for the development of VTE in this study. Conclusions We have demonstrated that postoperative D-dimer measurements in patients who underwent elective spinal surgery can provide a complementary diagnostic screening for VTE during the first week after surgery. PMID:25901235

  8. A case of intravascular lymphoma presenting as myelopathy diagnosed with a skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Yunoki, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Kenta; Uneda, Atsuhito; Yoshino, Kimihiro

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intravascular lymphoma (IVL) is a rare subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with exclusively or predominantly intravascular proliferation. Without therapeutic intervention, the neurologic involvement is rapidly progressive and inevitably fatal. Most of the IVL patients have prominent or exclusive manifestations in the nervous system and there are several reports of patients presenting with spinal symptoms. Case Description: A 68-year-old male patient admitted with the complaints of progressive paraparesis. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spinal cord showed hyperintense lesions in the thoracic cord. A diagnosis of myelitis of unknown etiology was assumed, and steroid pulse therapy was administered, which temporarily improved the patient's symptoms. However, the paraparesis recurred, and other symptoms, such as vertigo, psychosis, and seizures, developed 1-month after the initial treatment. Multiple high-intensity lesions were detected in the bilateral subcortical white matter on DW MRI. Based on the patient's clinical course, IVL was suspected; however, obtaining histological confirmation was not possible, as no Gd-enhanced brain or spinal lesions were identified and repeated cerebrospinal fluid examinations were negative for tumor cells. Therefore, a random skin biopsy was performed, and IVL was diagnosed. Obtaining a comparatively favorable outcome was possible owing to the subsequent administration of R-CHOP chemotherapy. Conclusion: IVL should be included in the differential diagnosis of atypical case of presumed myelitis. An early diagnosis and chemotherapy is crucial for improving the patient's outcome. When obtaining a diagnosis based on tissues other than skin is difficult, a random skin biopsy should be considered in patients with suspected IVL. PMID:26421216

  9. Instrumental Learning Within the Rat Spinal Cord: Localization of the Essential Neural Circuit

    E-print Network

    Grau, James

    Instrumental Learning Within the Rat Spinal Cord: Localization of the Essential Neural Circuit A&M University Following spinal transection of the upper thoracic spinal cord, male Sprague and S3. Keywords: spinal cord, instrumental, learning, lumbar, sacral Spinal cord neurons can adapt

  10. Diagnosis and management of urinary tract infection in older adults.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Theresa Anne; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2014-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a commonly diagnosed infection in older adults. Despite consensus guidelines developed to assist providers in diagnosing UTI, distinguishing symptomatic UTI from asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in older adults is problematic, as many older adults do not present with localized genitourinary symptoms. This article summarizes the recent literature and guidelines on the diagnosis and management of UTI and ASB in older adults. PMID:24484576

  11. Brain gliomas presenting with symptoms of spinal cord metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mariniello, Giuseppe; Peca, Carmela; Del Basso De Caro, Marialaura; Carotenuto, Biagio; Formicola, Fabiana; Elefante, Andrea; Maiuri, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Three patients with brain gliomas (aged 41, 37, and 43 years) presented spinal cord symptoms as first neurological presentation (two cases) or at anaplastic progression (one case).Histologically, two cases were anaplastic (WHO III) astrocytomas and one anaplastic (WHO III) oligodendroglioma. The spinal surgery consisted of partial tumor resection in two cases with localized spinal cord metastasis, and tumor biopsy in another with diffuse spreading to the conus and cauda. Spinal irradiation was performed in one case. The time interval between the spinal surgery and the appearance of brain symptoms was very short (1 month or less). Two patients underwent brain surgery (tumor resection in one and stereotactic biopsy in another). The survival time was very short (2 and 3 months) in the two patients with anaplastic astrocytoma, whereas the patient with anaplastic oligodendroglioma survived 1 year after the spinal surgery.Brain gliomas may exceptionally present with symptoms of a spinal cord metastasis. The magnetic resonance imaging finding of a spinal cord enhancing lesion, particularly if associated with root enhancement, should suggest the presence of a brain glioma. In cases with a localized spinal lesion, an early spinal surgery is advised for both diagnosis and decompression of the nervous structures. However, the clinical outcome is poor and the survival time is short. PMID:26216664

  12. An Up-regulation of IRF-1 After a Spinal Cord Injury: Implications for Neuronal Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Chen, Chen; Xiao, Jian-Ru; Wei, Hai-Feng; Zhou, Xu-Hui; Mao, Xing-Xing; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Qian, Rong; Chen, Xin-Lei; He, Ming-Qing; Yu, Xiao-Wei; Zhao, Jian

    2015-12-01

    IRF-1, a kind of transcription factor, is expressed in many cell types, except in early embryonal cells. IRF-1 has played an essential role in various physiological and pathological processes, including tumor immune surveillance, viral infection, development of immunity system and pro-inflammatory injury. However, the expression and function of IRF-1 in spinal cord injury (SCI) are still unknown. In this study, we have performed an acute SCI model in adult rats and investigated the dynamic changes of IRF-1 expression in the spinal cord. Western blot have shown that IRF-1 protein levels gradually increased, reaching a peak at day 3 and then gradually declined to a normal level at day 14 after SCI. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that IRF-1 immunoreactivity was found in neurons, but not in astrocytes and microglia. Additionally, colocalization of IRF-1/active caspase-3 was detected in neurons. In vitro, IRF-1 depletion, by short interfering RNA, obviously decreases neuronal apoptosis. In conclusion, this is the first description of IRF-1 expression in spinal cord injury. Our results suggested that IRF-1 might play crucial roles in CNS pathophysiology after SCI. PMID:26342280

  13. Challenges in early operative approaches to intramedullary spinal cord tumors: Harvey Cushing's perspective.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Courtney; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Jallo, George I; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2015-10-01

    Although Harvey Cushing was mostly known for his contributions to brain tumor surgery, he was also a pioneer in the development of spinal cord surgery. This lesser known facet of Cushing's career can provide a fresh and unique perspective into how the founders of neurosurgery surmounted early challenges in the field. The authors bring to light and examine for the first time Cushing's unpublished writing "Technique of Laminectomy" along with his first 3 documented intramedullary spinal cord tumor (IMSCT) cases at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. The authors draw lessons from the challenges in pathological classification, preoperative diagnosis, tumor localization, and surgical technique of that time. Although Cushing's attempts at exploration and resection of IMSCT as described here were of limited success, his ability to adapt his clinical and surgical technique to the challenges of the time, as well as develop skills to successfully manipulate the spinal cord during these exploratory procedures without the patients incurring neurological damage, postoperative infection, or complications, is a testament to his determination to advance the field and his meticulous operative technique. In spite of the limitations imposed on the pioneer neurosurgeons, Harvey Cushing and his contemporaries persevered through many of the challenges and built an essential part of neurosurgery's common story. PMID:26115026

  14. Multiple sclerosis of the spinal cord: Magnetic resonance appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Thielen, K.R.; Miller, G.M.

    1996-05-01

    To determine the MR appearance of spinal cord multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques in patients presenting with myclopathy by using a high-field (1.5 T) imager. We studied 119 patients who underwent high-field (1.5 T) MR studies of the spinal cord for evaluation of myelopathy. All 119 patients were thought to have possible findings of spinal cord MS at the time of the MRI interpretation. Sixty-four plaques were studied in 47 patients with clinically definite MS and adequate quality MRI. Of these patients 68% had a single spinal cord plaque, 19% had two plaques, and 13% had three or more plaques. Sixty-two percent of the plaques occurred in the cervical spinal cord and most frequently involved the posterior (41%) and lateral (25%) aspects of the spinal cord. None of the 64 lesions involved the entire thickness of the spinal cord. The lesion length varied from 2 to 60 mm, with 84% of the lesions <15 mm in length. The spinal cord diameter was unchanged in 84% of plaques, enlarged at the level of the lesion in 14%, and atrophic in 2%. Just over half (55%) of the plaques enhanced with intravenously administered gadolinium. Of the patients who received synchronous head and spinal cord examinations on the same day, 24% had normal findings on the MR study of the head. Follow-up spinal cord studies were available in nine patients. New lesions developed in two patients, while previously described lesions resolved. In three patients only new lesions developed. In four patients no change occurred in the existing number of cord plaques. Spinal cord demyelinating plaques present as well-circumscribed foci of increased T2 signal that asymmetrically involve the spinal cord parenchyma. Knowledge of their usual appearance may prevent unnecessary biopsy. An MR examination of the head may confirm the imaging suggestion of spinal cord demyelinating disease, because up to 76% of patients have abnormal intracranial findings. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Improving Multiple Fault Diagnosability using Possible Conflicts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Bregon, Anibal; Biswas, Gautam; Koutsoukos, Xenofon; Pulido, Belarmino

    2012-01-01

    Multiple fault diagnosis is a difficult problem for dynamic systems. Due to fault masking, compensation, and relative time of fault occurrence, multiple faults can manifest in many different ways as observable fault signature sequences. This decreases diagnosability of multiple faults, and therefore leads to a loss in effectiveness of the fault isolation step. We develop a qualitative, event-based, multiple fault isolation framework, and derive several notions of multiple fault diagnosability. We show that using Possible Conflicts, a model decomposition technique that decouples faults from residuals, we can significantly improve the diagnosability of multiple faults compared to an approach using a single global model. We demonstrate these concepts and provide results using a multi-tank system as a case study.

  16. [Nursing diagnoses of the elderly at home].

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Maria do Livramento Fortes; Luz, Maria Helena Barros Araújo; de Brito, Cleidiane Maria Sales; Sousa, Suéli Nolêto Silva; da Silva, Dâmaris Rebeca Soares

    2008-01-01

    The descriptive study, with quantitative approach, that has had as objective to do the characterization of ill elderly at home attended by the ESF teams of the Satellite's District in Teresina - PI and to collect Nursing Diagnoses and it respective interventions. This descriptive study was constituted by 50 seniors interviewed at home, the results showed that most of the women in age between of 60 and 79 years were ill at home for one or five years at least. There were eight Nursing Diagnoses (ND) prevalent, in which 98% of the seniors were identified with the ND - Inadequate Control of Therapeutic Regime, and in 72% the deambulation was prejudiced with mobility's limitation and, for all diagnoses were proposed nursing interventions objectifying the conquest of autonomy and independence of these seniors. PMID:18797782

  17. Pulmonary embolus diagnosed by endobronchial ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Segraves, Justin M.; Daniels, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) imaging is commonly used to evaluate and aid in biopsy of mediastinal lymph nodes. Pulmonary arteries are readily viewable with this type of imaging modality. We present a case report of a pulmonary embolism (PE) diagnosed by EBUS. Our patient had no smoking history and presented with respiratory and constitutional symptoms, urinary retention, and leg weakness suspicious for malignancy with metastasis to spine. Chest computed tomography (CT) was suggestive of lung carcinoma and specifically showed no PE. EBUS with TBNA was requested for tissue diagnosis. A mobile filling defect consistent with a PE was observed and reported to primary team. Follow-up chest CT showed an acute PE which confirmed the diagnosis originally made by EBUS. Bronchoscopists should be aware of potential to diagnose a PE while performing EBUS. Additionally, there may be a role in using EBUS specifically to diagnose a PE in the right patient population.

  18. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide were incorporated in the PEG-PCL-PEG gel and injected into a lesion transecting the main dorsomedial and minor ventral medial corticospinal tract (CST). The degree of collateralization of the transected CST was quantified as an indicator of the regenerative potential of these treatments. At one month post-injury, we observed the robust rostral collateralization of the CST tract in response to the bFGF plasmid-loaded gel. In conclusion, we hope that this platform technology can be applied to the sustained local delivery of other proteins for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  19. Malignant Mesothelioma Diagnosed by Bronchoscopic Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeon-Hee; Choi, Jae-Woo; Jung, Sang-Ok; Cho, Min-Ji; Kang, Da-Hyun; Chung, Chae-Uk; Park, Dong-Il; Moon, Jae-Young; Park, Hee-Sun; Jung, Sung-Soo; Kim, Ju-Ock; Kim, Sun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a rare malignant neoplasm that arises from mesothelial surfaces of the pleural cavity, peritoneal cavity, tunica vaginalis, or pericardium. Typically, pleural fluid cytology or closed pleural biopsy, surgical intervention (video thoracoscopic biopsy or open thoracotomy) is conducted to obtain pleural tissue specimens. However, endobronchial lesions are rarely seen and cases diagnosed from bronchoscopic biopsy are also rarely reported. We reported the case of a 77-year-old male who was diagnosed as malignant mesothelioma on bronchoscopic biopsy from obstructing masses of the endobronchial lesion. PMID:26175790

  20. Giardia Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... water. Diarrhea is the main symptom of giardia infection. Others include Passing gas Greasy stools Stomach cramps ... people have no symptoms at all. Symptoms of infection often last two to six weeks. Stool sample ...

  1. Opportunistic Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Infections Opportunistic Infections and Their Relationship to HIV/AIDS People with healthy immune systems can be exposed ... Disease Dementia Hospitalization & Palliative Care Related Topics on AIDS.gov Signs and Symptoms Immune System 101 Stages ...

  2. Infection Control

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lost because of the spread of infections in hospitals. Health care workers can take steps to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. These steps are part of infection control. Proper hand washing is the most effective way ...

  3. Anaerobic Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... been associated with conditions like chronic ear infections, deep skin infections, and lung abscesses. Cultures can be ... Academy of Pediatrics) The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute ...

  4. Rotavirus Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all ... the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before their 5th birthday. Infections happen most often ...

  5. FGF-2-Responsive and Spinal Cord-Resident Cells Improve Locomotor Function after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Masaki; Jikoh, Takahiro; Fukumitsu, Hidefumi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The adult central nervous system has only a limited capacity for axonal regeneration. In this study, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) was injected once into the spinal cord tissue around the injury site immediately after complete spinal cord transection in rats. This treatment markedly improved the locomotor function of the animals. Histological analysis demonstrated that tissue composed of FGF-2-induced fibronectin-positive cells (FIFs) had infiltrated the injury site and filled large cystic cavities, into which numerous axons with growth-associated protein-43 immunoreactivity penetrated. The FIFs could also be cultured from the intact spinal cord tissue, demonstrating that they were resident in the non-injured spinal cord. They had a spindle-shaped morphology and enhanced expression of mRNAs of N-cadherin and neurotrophic factors, suggesting the beneficial properties of the FIFs for axonal regeneration. Thus, these results argue for the continual use of autologous transplantation as a novel and promising cell therapy for the treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:20199141

  6. The course of spinal tuberculosis (Pott disease): results of the multinational, multicentre Backbone-2 study.

    PubMed

    Batirel, A; Erdem, H; Sengoz, G; Pehlivanoglu, F; Ramosaco, E; Gülsün, S; Tekin, R; Mete, B; Balkan, I I; Sevgi, D Y; Giannitsioti, E; Fragou, A; Kaya, S; Cetin, B; Oktenoglu, T; Celik, A D; Karaca, B; Horasan, E S; Ulug, M; Senbayrak, S; Kaya, S; Arslanalp, E; Hasbun, R; Ates-Guler, S; Willke, A; Senol, S; Inan, D; Güclü, E; Ertem, G T; Koc, M M; Tasbakan, M; Ocal, G; Kocagoz, S; Kusoglu, H; Güven, T; Baran, A I; Dede, B; Karadag, F Y; Yilmaz, H; Aslan, G; Al-Gallad, D A; Cesur, S; El-Sokkary, R; Sirmatel, F; Savasci, U; Karaahmetoglu, G; Vahaboglu, H

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to describe clinical, laboratory, diagnostic and therapeutic features of spinal tuberculosis (ST), also known as Pott disease. A total of 314 patients with ST from 35 centres in Turkey, Egypt, Albania and Greece were included. Median duration from initial symptoms to the time of diagnosis was 78 days. The most common complications presented before diagnosis were abscesses (69%), neurologic deficits (40%), spinal instability (21%) and spinal deformity (16%). Lumbar (56%), thoracic (49%) and thoracolumbar (13%) vertebrae were the most commonly involved sites of infection. Although 51% of the patients had multiple levels of vertebral involvement, 8% had noncontiguous involvement of multiple vertebral bodies. The causative agent was identified in 41% of cases. Histopathologic examination was performed in 200 patients (64%), and 74% were consistent with tuberculosis. Medical treatment alone was implemented in 103 patients (33%), while 211 patients (67%) underwent diagnostic and/or therapeutic surgical intervention. Ten percent of the patients required more than one surgical intervention. Mortality occurred in 7 patients (2%), and 77 (25%) developed sequelae. The distribution of the posttreatment sequelae were as follows: 11% kyphosis, 6% Gibbus deformity, 5% scoliosis, 5% paraparesis, 5% paraplegia and 4% loss of sensation. Older age, presence of neurologic deficit and spinal deformity were predictors of unfavourable outcome. ST results in significant morbidity as a result of its insidious course and delayed diagnosis because of diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. ST should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with vertebral osteomyelitis, especially in tuberculosis-endemic regions. Early establishment of definitive aetiologic diagnosis and appropriate treatment are of paramount importance to prevent development of sequelae. PMID:26232534

  7. Outcome in patients undergoing surgery for spinal injury in an Ethiopian hospital.

    PubMed

    Lehre, Martin Andreas; Eriksen, Lars Magnus; Tirsit, Abenezer; Bekele, Segni; Petros, Saba; Park, Kee B; Bøthun, Marianne Lundervik; Wester, Knut

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to investigate epidemiology and outcome after surgical treatment for spinal injuries in Ethiopia. METHODS Medical records of patients who underwent surgery for spine injuries at Myungsung Christian Medical Center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, between January 2008 and September 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Assessment of outcome and complications was determined from patient consultations and phone interviews. RESULTS A total of 146 patients were included (129 males, 17 females). Their mean age was 31.7 years (range 15-81 years). The leading cause of injury was motor vehicle accidents (54.1%), and this was followed by falls (26.7%). The most common injury sites were lumbar (41.1%) and cervical (34.2%) regions of the spine. In 21.2% of patients, no neurological deficit was present before surgery, 46.6% had incomplete spinal cord injury (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale [AIS] Grade B-D), and 32.2% had complete spinal cord injury (AIS Grade A). Follow-up was hampered by suboptimal infrastructure, but information regarding outcome was successfully obtained for 110 patients (75.3%). At follow-up (mean 22.9 months; range 2-57 months), 25 patients (17.1%) were confirmed dead and 85 patients (58.2%) were alive; 49 patients (33.6%) underwent physical examination. At least 8 of the 47 patients (17.0%) with a complete injury and 29 of the 68 patients (42.6%) with an incomplete injury showed neurological improvement. The reported incidences of pressure wounds, recurrent urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and thromboembolic events were 22.5%, 13.5%, 5.6%, and 1.1%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Patients showed surprisingly good recovery considering the limited resources. Surgical treatment for spine injuries in Ethiopia is considered beneficial. PMID:26340379

  8. Current trends in spinal cord injury repair.

    PubMed

    Yu, W-Y; He, D-W

    2015-09-01

    One of the rapidly prevailing neurological disorders affecting thousands of people per year is spinal cord injury (SCI). Though, great research has been made in recent past to understand thoroughly the molecular bases of the diseases, no fully restorative treatments for SCI are available. However, various rehabilitative, cellular and molecular therapies are being tested in animal models. Some of them have shown promising results. So, the present review shall enlighten all these latest developments in the field of spinal cord injury repair. The review shall discuss latest upcoming areas being focused for the management of SCI patients like stem cell therapy approach, cell-based approaches, combination therapeutic approaches, neuronal plasticity and possible use of omega-3 fatty acids in SCI repair. PMID:26439026

  9. Permanent sensorineural hearing loss following spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kiliçkan, L; Gürkan, Y; Ozkarakas, H

    2002-10-01

    A 25-year-old female developed permanent, fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), disabling vertigo, and tinnitus following an uneventful spinal anesthesia for cesarean section. At her first visit to the ear-nose-throat (ENT) department approximately 2 months postoperatively, pure-tone thresholds revealed profound SNHL on the right side whereas thresholds were within normal limits on the left side. The recruitment score (SISI) was 95% at 2000 Hz on the right side. Directional preponderance towards the right and the right canal paresis were evidenced by bithermal caloric testing. At follow ups the pure tone thresholds have shown some improvement, but fluctuating SNHL, disabling vertigo attacks, and tinnitus have remained. These findings imply a cochlear pathology causing endolymphatic hydrops possibly induced by lumbar puncture for spinal anesthesia. PMID:12366513

  10. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Spinal Cord Compression.

    PubMed

    O'Phalen, Kristine H; Bunney, E Bradshaw; Kuluz, John W

    2015-12-01

    There are many causes of acute myelopathy including multiple sclerosis, systemic disease (SD), and acute spinal cord compression (SCC). SCC should be among the first potential causes considered given the significant permanent loss of neurologic function commonly associated with SCC. This impairment can occur over a short period of time, and may be avoided through rapid and acute surgical intervention. Patients with SCC typically present with a combination of motor and sensory dysfunction that has a distribution referable to a spinal level. Bowel and bladder dysfunction and neck or back pain may also be part of the clinical presentation, but are not uniformly present. Because interventions are critically time-sensitive, the recognition and treatment of SCC was chosen as an ENLS protocol. PMID:26438458

  11. Dynamic CT scanning of spinal column trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.M.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Cann, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Dynamic sequential computed tomographic scanning with automatic table incrementation uses low milliampere-second technique to eliminate tube cooling delays between scanning slices and, thus, markedly shortens examination times. A total of 25 patients with spinal column trauma involving 28 levels were studied with dynamic scans and retrospectively reviewed. Dynamic studies were considerably faster than conventional spine examinations and yielded reliable diagnosis. Bone disruption and subluxation was accurately evaluated, and the use of intrathecal metrizamide in low doses allowed direct visualization of spinal cord or radicular compromise. Multiplanar image reformation was aided by the dynamic incrementation technique, since motion between slices (and the resulting misregistration artifact on image reformation) was minimized. A phantom was devised to test spatial resolution of computed tomography for objects 1-3 mm in size and disclosed minimal differences for dynamic and conventional computed tomographic techniques in resolving medium-to-high-contrast objects.

  12. Coexistence of type 1 diabetes mellitus and spinal muscular atrophy in an 8-year-old girl: a case report.

    PubMed

    Borkowska, Anna; Jankowska, Agnieszka; Szlagatys-Sidorkiewicz, Agnieszka; Sztangierska, Beata; Liberek, Anna; Plata-Nazar, Katarzyna; Kami?ska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The spinal muscular atrophy is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by the progressive loss of muscular strength. In its natural course the disease leads to death. Diabetes mellitus type 1 is an autoimmune metabolic disorder characterized by the disturbed insulin synthesis. This is a case report of an 8-year-old girl suffering from Werdnig Hoffman disease in whom DM1 was diagnosed. The unspecific clinical manifestation and diagnostic difficulties are presented in this paper. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first publication concerning the co-existence of these two medical conditions. PMID:25669159

  13. Cochlear Function Monitoring After Spinal Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Janecka-Placek, Agata; Lisowska, Gra?yna; Paradysz, Andrzej; Misio?ek, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to examine the effect of spinal anesthesia on the function of cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), determined by means of objective distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) testing. To the best of our knowledge, our study was the second OAE-based analysis of cochlear function during spinal anesthesia, and the only experiment including such a large group of patients. Material/Methods The study included 20 patients (18 men and 2 women) subjected to a scheduled uretherorenoscopic lithotripsy with routine spinal anesthesia with 10 mg (2 ml) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine and 50 ?g (1 ml) of fentanyl. The levels of DPOAEs and background noise at 1000–6000 Hz were recorded prior to and immediately after the anesthesia, and on the postoperative day 2. Results We did not find significant differences between DPOAEs values recorded prior to and immediately after the anesthesia. The only exception pertained to 5652 Hz, at which a significantly higher level of DPOAEs was observed immediately after the anesthesia. The levels of DPOAEs at 2002 Hz and 2380 Hz collected on the postoperative day 2 were significantly higher than the respective baseline values. Irrespective of the frequency and time of testing, we did not find any significant differences between the recorded levels of background noise. Conclusions Our findings point to the lack of a detrimental effect of spinal anesthesia on objectively evaluated cochlear function, and thus suggest that this method is safe, even for OHCs, which are extremely susceptible to exogenous and endogenous injuries. PMID:26377393

  14. Spinal cord injury rehabilitation. 3. Functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Formal, C S; Cawley, M F; Stiens, S A

    1997-03-01

    This self-directed learning module highlights new advances in this topic area. It is part of the chapter on spinal cord injury rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article contains information about mobility, ambulation, upper extremity function, bowel management, and technology to enhance function in the community. New advances covered in this section include functional electrical stimulation for enhancing mobility and upper extremity function. PMID:9084369

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Stauder, Michael C.; Miller, Robert C.; Bauer, Heather J.; Rose, Peter S.; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Brown, Paul D.; Brinkmann, Debra H.; Laack, Nadia N.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Based on reports of safety and efficacy, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of malignant spinal tumors was initiated at our institution. We report prospective results of this population at Mayo Clinic. Materials and Methods: Between April 2008 and December 2010, 85 lesions in 66 patients were treated with SBRT for spinal metastases. Twenty-two lesions (25.8%) were treated for recurrence after prior radiotherapy (RT). The mean age of patients was 56.8 {+-} 13.4 years. Patients were treated to a median dose of 24 Gy (range, 10-40 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). Radiation was delivered with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and prescribed to cover 80% of the planning target volume (PTV) with organs at risk such as the spinal cord taking priority over PTV coverage. Results: Tumor sites included 48, 22, 12, and 3 in the thoracic, lumbar, cervical, and sacral spine, respectively. The mean actuarial survival at 12 months was 52.2%. A total of 7 patients had both local and marginal failure, 1 patient experienced marginal but not local failure, and 1 patient had local failure only. Actuarial local control at 1 year was 83.3% and 91.2% in patients with and without prior RT. The median dose delivered to patients who experienced local/marginal failure was 24 Gy (range, 18-30 Gy) in a median of three fractions (range, 1-5). No cases of Grade 4 toxicity were reported. In 1 of 2 patients experiencing Grade 3 toxicity, SBRT was given after previous radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate SBRT to be an effective measure to achieve local control in spinal metastases. Toxicity of treatment was rare, including those previously irradiated. Our results appear comparable to previous reports analyzing spine SBRT. Further research is needed to determine optimum dose and fractionation to further improve local control and prevent toxicity.

  16. Highly accurate volumetry of the spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Florian; Daams, Marita; Lukas, Carsten; Barkhof, Frederik; Hahn, Horst K.

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of the spinal cord from MR images is of significant clinical interest when studying certain neurologic diseases. Especially for multiple sclerosis, a number of studies have analyzed the relation between spinal cord atrophy and clinically monitored progression of the disease. A commonly analyzed parameter in this field is the mean cross-sectional area of the cord, which can also be expressed as the average volume per cm. In this paper, we present a novel approach for precise measurement of the volume, length, and cross-sectional area of the spinal cord from T1-weighted MR images. It is computationally fast, with a low effort of required user interaction. It is based on a semi-automated pre-segmentation of a sub-section of the spinal cord, followed by an automated Gaussian mixture-model fit for volume calculation. Additionally, the centerline of the cord is extracted, which allows for calculation of the mean cross-sectional area of the measured section. We evaluate the accuracy of our method with respect to scan/re-scan reproducibility as well as intra- and inter-rater agreement. We achieved a mean coefficient of variation of 0.62% over repeated MR acquisitions, mean CoV of 0.39% for intra-rater comparison, and a mean CoV of 0.28% for inter-rater comparison by five different observers. These results prove a high sensitivity to detect even small changes in atrophy, as it could typically be observed over the temporal progression of MS

  17. DIAGNOSING CAUSES OF IMPAIRMENT IN COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engle, Virginia D. and Stephen J. Jordan. In press. Diagnosing Causes of Impairment in Coastal Ecosystems (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November 2004, Portland, OR. 1 p. (ERL,GB R1008).

    Estuarine and coastal ecosystems are challenge...

  18. General Cancer Support Group Newly diagnosed?

    E-print Network

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    General Cancer Support Group Newly diagnosed? Involved with treatment for some time? Either way types and stages of cancer who come together to share their journey, ask questions, or simply listen to others' stories in a supportive environment. Each week is focused on a different care topic

  19. Eating Disorder Diagnoses: Empirical Approaches to Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.; Keel, Pamela K.; Williamson, Donald A.; Crosby, Ross D.

    2007-01-01

    Decisions about the classification of eating disorders have significant scientific and clinical implications. The eating disorder diagnoses in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) reflect the collective wisdom of experts in the field but are frequently not supported in…

  20. [Mechanical principle and clinical application of the combined spinal rod-plate and transpedicular screws fixation system].

    PubMed

    Zhang, G H

    1989-12-01

    Twenty-one patients with unstable burst fractures of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine were treated with a combined spinal rod-plate and transpedicular screws (CSRP-TPS) fixation system. This system is a new device for disorders of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine. In treatment of spinal fractures, it provided three-column axial distraction and stabilized the injured vertebra in a lordotic position-this maximized the reduction and indirectly achieved a neurologic decompression by ligamentotaxis. This "indirect" neurologic decompression was more successful in cases treated early after injury as the spinal canal area (measured by pre- and postoperative CT) increased 35% in cases treated within one week after injury; 25% in cases treated 7-14 days after injury; and there was little improvement in cases treated more than two weeks following injury. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 12 months. There were no infections, iatrogenic neurologic deficits or instrumentation failures. The CSRP-TPS system gave more improved results over conventional Harrington and segmental spinal instrumentation systems and only required fixation and fusion of three vertebral levels. PMID:2636110

  1. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. 882.5880 Section 882...Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to...

  2. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. 882.5880 Section 882...Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to...

  3. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. 882.5880 Section 882...Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to...

  4. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. 882.5880 Section 882...Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to...

  5. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. 882.5880 Section 882...Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to...

  6. Histological and Functional Benefit Following Transplantation of Motor Neuron Progenitors to the Injured Rat Spinal Cord

    E-print Network

    2010-01-01

    stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors into rat spinal cord injuriesafter Cervical Spinal Cord Injury. Stem Cells 28: 152– PLoSstem/progenitor cells promote early functional recovery after rat spinal cord injury.

  7. 76 FR 71623 - Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ...Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey, VA...10-0515 will be used to determine spinal cord patients' satisfaction with...

  8. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Imaging of Axonal Myelin in Live Spinal Tissues

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Ji-Xin

    (CARS) microscopy. We use spinal cord white matter strips that are isolated from guinea pigs and kept spinal cord white matter isolated from guinea pigs. Presently, the major tools used for spinal tissue

  9. Running Title: Intraspinal stimulation caudal to spinal cord transections in rats.

    E-print Network

    Prochazka, Arthur

    Running Title: Intraspinal stimulation caudal to spinal cord transections in rats. Testing: spinal cord injury, microstimulation, regeneration, ISMS, recovery, movement, BBB. Page 1 of 22 Articles across damaged portions of the spinal cord. Associated improvements in hindlimb locomotor movements have

  10. Cellular and axonal plasticity in the lesioned spinal cord of adult zebrafish 

    E-print Network

    Kuscha, Veronika

    2011-11-25

    Zebrafish, in contrast to mammals, are capable of functional regeneration after complete transection of the spinal cord. In this system I asked: (1) Which spinal cell types regenerate in the lesioned spinal cord? (2) To ...

  11. SPINAL CORD STIMULATION FOR CHRONIC PAIN MANAGEMENT: TOWARDS AN EXPERT SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    SPINAL CORD STIMULATION FOR CHRONIC PAIN MANAGEMENT: TOWARDS AN EXPERT SYSTEM Kenneth M. Al.uh.edu ABSTRACT Chronic pain is a serious health problem affect­ ing millions of people worldwide. Spinal cord; Spinal Cord Stimulation for

  12. Spinal cord ischemia: practical imaging tips, pearls, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Vargas, M I; Gariani, J; Sztajzel, R; Barnaure-Nachbar, I; Delattre, B M; Lovblad, K O; Dietemann, J-L

    2015-05-01

    Ischemia of the spinal cord is a rare entity with a poor prognosis. Brain ischemia is no longer a diagnostic challenge; on the contrary, ischemia of the spinal cord remains difficult, particularly in children. In this article, we illustrate the principal causes in children and adults, clinical presentation, different techniques for the diagnosis by MR imaging (diffusion, spinal MR angiography, and 1.5 versus 3T), pathophysiology, and differential diagnosis. We will discuss current knowledge, perspectives, and pitfalls. PMID:25324492

  13. Molecular basis of vascular events following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popa, F; Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Sandu, A; Popescu, M; Burnei, G; Strambu, V; Popa, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the effects of the molecular basis of vascular events following spinal cord injury and their contribution in pathogenesis. First of all, we reviewed the anatomy of spinal cord vessels. The pathophysiology of spinal cord injuries revealed two types of pathogenic mechanisms. The primary event, the mechanic trauma, results in a disruption of neural and vascular structures into the spinal cord. It is followed by secondary pathogenesis that leads to the progression of the initial lesion. We reviewed vascular responses following spinal cord injury, focusing on both primary and secondary events. The intraparenchymal hemorrhage is a direct consequence of trauma; it has a typical pattern of distribution into the contused spinal cord, inside the gray matter and, it is radially extended into the white matter. The intraparenchymal hemorrhage is restricted to the dorsal columns, into adjacent rostral and caudal spinal segments. Distribution of chronic lesions overlaps the pattern of the early intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We described the mechanisms of action, role, induction and distribution of the heme oxygenase isoenzymes 1 and 2. Posttraumatic inflammatory response contributes to secondary pathogenesis. We analyzed the types of cells participating in the inflammatory response, the moment of appearance after the injury, the decrease in number, and the nature of their actions. The disruption of the blood–spinal cord barrier is biphasic. It exposes the spinal cord to inflammatory cells and to toxic effects of other molecules. Endothelin 1 mediates oxidative stress into the spinal cord through the modulation of spinal cord blood flow. The role of matrix metalloproteinases in blood–spinal cord barrier disruption, inflammation, and angiogenesis are reviewed. PMID:20945816

  14. Cellular therapies for treating pain associated with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury leads to immense disability and loss of quality of life in human with no satisfactory clinical cure. Cell-based or cell-related therapies have emerged as promising therapeutic potentials both in regeneration of spinal cord and mitigation of neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury. This article reviews the various options and their latest developments with an update on their therapeutic potentials and clinical trialing. PMID:22394650

  15. Subdural hematoma following spinal cord stimulator implant.

    PubMed

    Chiravuri, Srinivas; Wasserman, Ronald; Chawla, Amit; Haider, Naeem

    2008-01-01

    Headache following interventional procedures is a diagnostic challenge due to the multitude of possible etiologies involved. Presentation can be simple (PDPH alone) or complex (exacerbation of pre-existing chronic headache along with PDPH) or headache associated with a new onset intracranial process. Subdural hematoma is a rare complication of cranio-spinal trauma. Cranial subdural hematoma may present in an acute, sub-acute, or chronic fashion. Diagnosis of a subdural hematoma in the wake of a PDPH is difficult, requiring a high level of suspicion. Delayed diagnosis of subdural hematoma is usually related to failure to consider it in the differential diagnosis. Thorough history, assessment of the evolution of symptoms, and imaging studies may identify the possible cause and help direct treatment. Change in the character of initial presenting symptoms may be a sign of resolution of the headache or the onset of a secondary process. We report a case of acute intracranial subdural hematoma secondary to unintentional dural puncture during placement of a permanent spinal cord stimulator lead for refractory angina. There is need for careful follow-up of patients with a known post-dural tear. Failure to identify uncommon adverse events in patients with complicated spinal cord stimulator implantation may lead to permanent injury. PMID:18196176

  16. Progressive Spinal Kyphosis in the Aging Population.

    PubMed

    Ailon, Tamir; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Lenke, Lawrence G; Harrop, James S; Smith, Justin S

    2015-10-01

    Thoracic kyphosis tends to increase with age. Hyperkyphosis is defined as excessive curvature of the thoracic spine and may be associated with adverse health effects. Hyperkyphosis in isolation or as a component of degenerative kyphoscoliosis has important implications for the surgical management of adult spinal deformity. Our objective was to review the literature on the epidemiology, etiology, natural history, management, and outcomes of thoracic hyperkyphosis. We performed a narrative review of literature on thoracic hyperkyphosis and its implications for adult spinal deformity surgery. Hyperkyphosis has a prevalence of 20% to 40% and is more common in the geriatric population. The cause is multifactorial and involves an interaction between degenerative changes, vertebral compression fractures, muscular weakness, and altered biomechanics. It may be associated with adverse health consequences including impaired physical function, pain and disability, impaired pulmonary function, and increased mortality. Nonoperative management may slow the progression of kyphosis and improve function. Surgery is rarely performed for isolated hyperkyphosis in the elderly due to the associated risk, but is an option when kyphosis occurs in the context of significant deformity. In this scenario, increased thoracic kyphosis influences selection of fusion levels and overall surgical planning. Kyphosis is common in older individuals and is associated with adverse health effects and increased mortality. Current evidence suggests a role for nonoperative therapies in reducing kyphosis and delaying its progression. Isolated hyperkyphosis in the elderly is rarely treated surgically; however, increased thoracic kyphosis as a component of global spinal deformity has important implications for patient selection and operative planning. PMID:26378354

  17. Nanofibrous Patches for Spinal Cord Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yiqian; Wang, Aijun; Shen, Wenqian; Patel, Shyam; Zhang, Rong; Young, William; Li, Song

    2010-05-10

    The difficulty in spinal cord regeneration is related to the inhibitory factors for axon growth and the lack of appropriate axon guidance in the lesion region. Here we developed scaffolds with aligned nanofibers for nerve guidance and drug delivery in spinal cord. Blended polymers including Poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA) and Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) were used to electrospin nanofibrous scaffolds with two-layer structure: aligned nanofibers in the inner layer and random nanofibers in the outer layer. Rolipram, a small molecule that can enhance cAMP activity in neurons and suppress inflammatory responses, was immobilized onto nanofibers. To test the therapeutic effects of nanofibrous scaffolds, the nanofibrous scaffolds loaded with rolipram were used to bridge the hemisection lesion in 8-week old athymic rats. The scaffolds with rolipram increased axon growth through the scaffolds and in the lesion, promoted angiogenesis through the scaffold, and decreased the population of astrocytes and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in the lesion. Locomotor scale rating analysis showed that the scaffolds with rolipram significantly improved hindlimb function after 3 weeks. This study demonstrated that nanofibrous scaffolds offered a valuable platform for drug delivery for spinal cord regeneration. PMID:23378825

  18. [Neurological complications of surgery for spinal deformities].

    PubMed

    Michel, F; Rubini, J; Grand, C; Bérard, J; Kohler, R; Michel, C R

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to precisely analyse the physio-pathogenic mechanisms, bring to light the risk factors, and find a more practical way of proceeding in spinal surgery. Out of 667 spinal instrumentation surgical operations carried out between 1980-1989, we found 33 (4.8 per cent) neurological complications and have divided them into 2 groups: 7 peripheral complications, 26 cord and central complications. After further analysis, especially of the cord complications (2.5 per cent), we were able to pick out the factors which influence the rate of neurological complications and their evolution: secondary aetiology and the kyphotic composition of spinal deformation, and above all the notion of cord at risk. The delay of cord complications and especially the relation between the severity of the neurological syndrome and its evolution is extremely important. Somesthesic evoked potential monitoring confirmed that per operative diagnosis of a cord injury is possible. The steps to take when confronted with neurological complications, depend on the results of many examinations: pre and post-operative neurological evaluations electrophysiological exploration of the cord and neuro radiological explorations (myelography, scanner and IRM). This helps to complete aetiology and eliminate mechanical causes, which are the only positive indications of iterative surgery. The problems of instrumentation removal in emergency and the legal-medical aspect brought on by this type of complication are discussed. PMID:1410727

  19. Influence of blood coagulability after spinal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Marcelo Hide; Rodrigues, Luiz Claudio Lacerda; Batalini, Luiz Gustavo da silva; Fonteles, Thales Arcanjo; Bortoletto, Adalberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To verify whether spinal surgery causes relevant changes in the blood clotting process and define which factors have the greatest influence on changes found. Method: This is a not randomized, cross-sectional study, Forty seven patients were evaluated between August 2011 and February 2013, whose clinical, surgical, laboratory and image daata were collected. The data obtained were crossed with the epidemiological data of each patient in a moment prior to and another after surgery searching which variables have been directly influenced. Result: Our analysis showed that the most important changes occurred in patients with BMI classified, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as out of healthy range. Other smaller correlations were also found. Another important consideration was the tendency to observe hypercoagulability in smoker patients, a fact that is not influenced by spinal procedures. Conclusion: We concluded that spinal surgeries cause few relevant changes in the blood clotting process and that among the factors studied, BMI (when out of the healthy range, according to the WHO classification) showed closer relationship with changes in laboratory coagulation tests. Level of Evidence III, Cross-Sectional Study. PMID:25328429

  20. Spinal cord herniation with characteristic bone change: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Tasuku; Nakane, Yukimi; Tachibana, Eiji; Ogura, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spinal cord herniation (SCH) is a rare disease characterized by herniation of the thoracic spinal cord through an anterior dural defect, presenting with progressive myelopathy. A case of a 69-year-old woman who presented with Brown-Sequard syndrome and a bone defect, in which an osteophyte created a hemisphere-like cavity with spinal cord herniation, is presented. The strangled spinal cord was released, and the defect was closed microsurgically using an artificial dural patch to prevent re-herniation. Postoperatively, the patient experienced gradual improvement in neurologic function. The SCH mechanism and surgical strategy are discussed. PMID:26412899

  1. Management of spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    El Tecle, Najib E; Abode-Iyamah, Kingsley O; Hitchon, Patrick W; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2015-12-01

    Ankylosing spondlylitis is a seronegative spondyloarthropathy that primarily affects the spinal column and sacroiliac joints. With disease progression autofusion of the spinal column takes place. This combined with the brittle bone quality make patients prone to fractures and spinal cord injury. The typical fracture pattern is extension type and involves all three columns. These fractures and injuries may involve the craniovertebral junction, the subaxial cervical spine, and the thoracolumbar spine. While at times these fractures are challenging to manage especially when they affect the elderly, there is evidence that supports long segment fixation and fusion. This article presents a narrative review on managing spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:26513429

  2. Upper cervical spinal cord gunshot injury without bone destruction???

    PubMed Central

    Seçer, Mehmet; Uluta?, Murat; Yayla, Erdal; Ç?nar, Kadir

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This report describes a rare case of the gunshot injury of the spine and spinal cord. PRESENTATION OF CASE A rare case of the bullet lodged intra-durally in the upper cervical region without damaging the vertebrae or the spinal cord. The bullet was removed as microneurosurgical and duraplasty was performed. DISCUSSION Surgical management of the gunshot wounds of the spine and spinal cord is not widely advocated and controversial. CONCLUSION Advances in microneurosurgical instrumentation and microscopic techniques may open up a new era of surgical treatment of spinal cord gunshot wounds. PMID:24566426

  3. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Treatment of Spinal Metastases Recurring in Close Proximity to Previously Irradiated Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steven D.; Jackson, Paul S.; Minn, A. Yuriko; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: As the spinal cord tolerance often precludes reirradiation with conventional techniques, local recurrence within a previously irradiated field presents a treatment challenge. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 51 lesions in 42 patients treated from 2002 to 2008 whose spinal metastases recurred in a previous radiation field (median previous spinal cord dose of 40 Gy) and were subsequently treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Results: SRS was delivered to a median marginal dose of 20 Gy (range, 10-30 Gy) in 1-5 fractions (median, 2), targeting a median tumor volume of 10.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.2-128.6 cm{sup 3}). Converting the SRS regimens with the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 3), the median spinal cord maximum single-session equivalent dose (SSED) was 12.1 Gy{sub 3} (range, 4.7-19.3 Gy{sub 3}). With a median follow-up of 7 months (range, 2-47 months), the Kaplan-Meier local control and overall survival rates at 6/12 months were 87%/73% and 81%/68%, respectively. A time to retreatment of {<=}12 months and the combination of time to retreatment of {<=}12 months with an SSED of <15 Gy{sub 10} were significant predictors of local failure on univariate and multivariate analyses. In patients with a retreatment interval of <12 months, 6/12 month local control rates were 88%/58%, with a SSED of >15 Gy{sub 10}, compared to 45%/0% with <15 Gy{sub 10}, respectively. One patient (2%) experienced Grade 4 neurotoxicity. Conclusion: SRS is safe and effective in the treatment of spinal metastases recurring in previously irradiated fields. Tumor recurrence within 12 months may correlate with biologic aggressiveness and require higher SRS doses (SSED >15 Gy{sub 10}). Further research is needed to define the partial volume retreatment tolerance of the spinal cord and the optimal target dose.

  4. Sexual dysfunction in patients with spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Courtois, Frédérique; Charvier, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of sexuality can be disrupted following a spinal cord lesion (SCL). It can alter an individual's self-esteem and body image, interfere with positioning and mobility, introduce unexpected problems with incontinence and spasticity, decrease pleasure, and delay orgasm. Sexual concerns in men can involve erectile function, essential for intercourse, ejaculation function, necessary for fertility, and the ability to reach orgasm. In women they can involve concerns with vaginal lubrication, genital congestion, and vaginal infections, which can all go unnoticed, and orgasm, which may be lost. All of these concerns must be addressed during rehabilitation as individuals with SCL continue to live an active sexual life, and consider sexuality among their top priority for quality of life. This chapter describes the impact of SCL on various phases of men's and women's sexual responses and on various aspects of sexuality. Treatments are described in terms of what is currently available and what is specific to the SCL population. New approaches in particular for women are described, along with tips from sexual counseling which consider an overall approach, taking into account the primary, secondary, and tertiary consequences of the SCL on the individual's sexuality. Throughout the chapter, attempts are made to integrate neurophysiologic knowledge, findings from the literature on SCL, and clinical experience in sexual rehabilitation. PMID:26003247

  5. [Morphofunctional changes in the spinal cord and spinal ganglion tissues following epidural injection of clopheline].

    PubMed

    Volchkov, V A

    2002-01-01

    Epidural injection of clophelin extends the possibilities and increases of the effectiveness of regional anesthesia in clinical treatment of pain syndromes. Morphological and histoenzymological changes in spinal cord and spinal ganglion neurons were analyzed in dogs after epidural injection of clophelin. The results indicate the absence of pathological structural and metabolic changes in nervous tissue following clophelin administration. Increase in neuronal RNA content and microvascular alkaline phosphatase activity in experimental group as compared to the control one indicates the activation of protein synthesis and the augmentation of active transport processes in the nervous tissue capillary endothelium, both of which may be interpreted as the favorable phenomena. PMID:12108102

  6. How Is Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... infection is causing your symptoms. Skin Test for Tuberculosis For this test, your doctor injects a substance ... one of your arms. This substance reacts to tuberculosis (TB). If you have a positive reaction, a ...

  7. How Are Thrombocythemia and Thrombocytosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Clotting Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Stroke Von Willebrand Disease Send a link to NHLBI to someone ... recent infections or vaccines you've had The medicines you take, including over-the-counter medicines Your ...

  8. Cardiac Involvement with Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hidron, Alicia; Vogenthaler, Nicholas; Santos-Preciado, José I.; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J.; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Rassi, Anis

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Parasitic infections previously seen only in developing tropical settings can be currently diagnosed worldwide due to travel and population migration. Some parasites may directly or indirectly affect various anatomical structures of the heart, with infections manifested as myocarditis, pericarditis, pancarditis, or pulmonary hypertension. Thus, it has become quite relevant for clinicians in developed settings to consider parasitic infections in the differential diagnosis of myocardial and pericardial disease anywhere around the globe. Chagas' disease is by far the most important parasitic infection of the heart and one that it is currently considered a global parasitic infection due to the growing migration of populations from areas where these infections are highly endemic to settings where they are not endemic. Current advances in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis offer hope to prevent not only the neurological complications but also the frequently identified cardiac manifestations of this life-threatening parasitic infection. The lack of effective vaccines, optimal chemoprophylaxis, or evidence-based pharmacological therapies to control many of the parasitic diseases of the heart, in particular Chagas' disease, makes this disease one of the most important public health challenges of our time. PMID:20375355

  9. Effect of epidural injection of prosidol with clonidine on the state of spinal cord and spinal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Volchkov, V A; Strashnov, V I; Tomson, V V; Boikova, N V; Zaitsev, A A

    2001-09-01

    Morphological and histoenzymatic changes in cells of the spinal cord and spinal ganglia after epidural injection of a combination of prosidol with clonidine were studied on dogs. No pathological structural and metabolic changes in the nervous tissue were found after combined treatment with the test drugs. Higher activity of nucleic acids and alkaline phosphatase in spinal neurons and spinal ganglion in experimental animals in comparison with those in controls indicates intensification of protein synthesis and active transport in the endothelium of nerve tissue capillaries, which is a favorable factor. PMID:11740590

  10. Epidural infection: Is it really an abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Avilucea, Frank R.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We reviewed the literature regarding the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of spinal epidural abscess (SEA). Methods: Utilizing PubMed, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature on SEAs. Results: SEA remains a difficult infectious process to diagnose. This is particularly true in the early stages, when patients remain neurologically intact, and before the classic triad of fever, back pain, and neurologic deficit develop. However, knowledge of risk factors, obtaining serologic markers, and employing magnetic resonance scans facilitate obtaining a prompt and accurate diagnosis. In patients without neurologic deficits, lone medical therapy may prove effective. Conclusions: More prevalent over the previous three decades, SEA remains a rare but deleterious infectious process requiring prompt identification and treatment. Historically, identification of SEA is often elusive, diagnosis is delayed, and clinicians contend that surgical debridement is the cornerstone of treatment. Early surgery leads to more favorable outcomes and preserves neurologic function, particularly in the early stages of disease when minimal or no neurologic deficits are present. The advent of improved imaging modalities, diagnostic techniques, and multidrug antimicrobial agents has enabled medical/spinal surgical consultants to more rapidly diagnose SEA and institute more effective early medical treatment (e.g., data suggest that lone medical therapy may prove effective in the early management of SEA). PMID:23248757

  11. Incidence and risk of delayed surgical site infection following instrumented lumbar spine fusion.

    PubMed

    Lewkonia, Peter; DiPaola, Christian; Street, John

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed a retrospective case series of patients with delayed infections after spinal fusion, and surveyed medical experts in Canada and the USA regarding their use of prophylactic antibiotics for patients undergoing invasive procedures following spine surgery. Infections after spinal fusion are a relatively common complication, which typically occur early in the postoperative period. Infections which occur more than 3months from the index procedure are rare and are often caused by atypical pathogens. The proportion of infections that required debridement and occurred 6 months after the index procedure was 4.3% (7/162). Over 85% of these infections were polymicrobial, with one third of those containing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The most common operative indications were either trauma or tumour, and most patients with a delayed infection had a distant chronic infection. The majority of spine experts do not routinely recommend prophylactic antibiotics for invasive procedures after spine fusion. In the multivariate analysis, experts were more likely to recommend antibiotics for patients undergoing a non-dental procedure, those who were diabetic, and those who were greater than 1year out from their procedure. In summary, the delayed presentation of infection after instrumented spinal fusion is a rare but serious complication. However, due to its infrequency, routine prophylaxis to prevent haematogenous seeding is likely unnecessary. PMID:26358200

  12. Tuberculous meningitis with dementia as the presenting symptom after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Yagi, Hideki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Early-stage TB meningitis has no specific symptoms in patients, potentially leading to delayed diagnosis and consequently worsening prognosis. The authors present the fatal case with a delayed diagnosis of tuberculous (TB) meningitis with dementia as the presenting symptom after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection. The medical records, operative reports, and radiographical imaging studies of a single patient were retrospectively reviewed. A 77-year-old man who underwent thoracic intramedullary hemangioblastoma resection for 2 times. The postoperative course was uneventful, but 1.5 months after surgery, the patient suffered from dementia with memory loss and diminished motivation and speech in the absence of a fever. No abnormalities were detected on blood test, brain computed tomography and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. A sputum sample was negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT-G) In-Tube Test and the tuberculin skin test was also negative. The patient was diagnosed with senile dementia by a psychiatrist. However, the patient’s symptoms progressively worsened. Despite the absence of TB meningitis findings, we suspected TB meningitis from the patient’s history, and administered a four-drug regimen. However the patient died 29 days after admission, subsequently M. tuberculosis was detected in the CSF sample. This case is a rare case of TB meningitis initially mistaken for dementia after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection. Symptoms of dementia after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection should first be suspected as one of TB meningitis, even if the tests for meningitis are negative. We propose that anti-tuberculosis therapy should be immediately initiated in cases of suspected TB meningitis prior to positive identification on culture.

  13. Gait Analysis Using a Support Vector Machine for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Toribatake, Yasumitsu; Murakami, Hideki; Yoneyama, Takeshi; Watanabe, Tetsuyou; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS) is diagnosed based on physical examination and radiological documentation of lumbar spinal canal narrowing. Differential diagnosis of the level of lumbar radiculopathy is difficult in multilevel spinal stenosis. Therefore, the authors focused on gait analysis as a classification method to improve diagnostic accuracy. The goal of this study was to identify gait characteristics of L4 and L5 radiculopathy in patients with LSS and to classify L4 and L5 radiculopathy using a support vector machine (SVM). The study group comprised 13 healthy volunteers (control group), 11 patients with L4 radiculopathy (L4 group), and 22 patients with L5 radiculopathy (L5 group). Light-emitting diode markers were attached at 5 sites on the affected side, and walking motion was analyzed using video recordings and the authors' development program. Potential gait characteristics of each group were identified to use as SVM parameters. In the knee joint of the L4 group, the waveform was similar to that of normal gait, but knee extension at initial contact was slightly greater than that of the other groups. In the ankle joint of the L5 group, the one-peak waveform pattern with disappearance of the second peak was present in 10 (45.5%) of 22 cases. The total classification accuracy was 80.4% using the SVM. The highest and lowest classification accuracies were obtained in the control group (84.6%) and the L4 group (72.7%), respectively. The authors' walking motion analysis system identified several useful factors for differentiating between healthy individuals and patients with L4 and L5 radiculopathy, with a high accuracy rate. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(11):e959-e964.]. PMID:26558674

  14. Maternal Infection Requiring Hospitalization during Pregnancy and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atladottir, Hjordis O.; Thorsen, Poul; Ostergaard, Lars; Schendel, Diana E.; Lemcke, Sanne; Abdallah, Morsi; Parner, Erik T.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to prenatal infection has been suggested to cause deficiencies in fetal neurodevelopment. In this study we included all children born in Denmark from 1980, through 2005. Diagnoses of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and maternal infection were obtained through nationwide registers. Data was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards…

  15. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis diagnosed by brain biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hee Young; Hong, Che Ry; Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Hyery; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Park, Kyung Duk; Chae, Jong-Hee; Phi, Ji Hoon; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Park, Sung-Hye; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is characterized by fever, splenomegaly, jaundice, and pathologic findings of hemophagocytosis in bone marrow or other tissues such as the lymph nodes and liver. Pleocytosis, or the presence of elevated protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid, could be helpful in diagnosing HLH. However, the pathologic diagnosis of the brain is not included in the diagnostic criteria for this condition. In the present report, we describe the case of a patient diagnosed with HLH, in whom the brain pathology, but not the bone marrow pathology, showed hemophagocytosis. As the diagnosis of HLH is difficult in many cases, a high level of suspicion is required. Moreover, the pathologic diagnosis of organs other than the bone marrow, liver, and lymph nodes may be a useful alternative. PMID:26512263

  16. Prenatally diagnosed monochorionic diamniotic triplet pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yonetani, Naoto; Ishii, Keisuke; Mabuchi, Aki; Sasahara, Jun; Hayashi, Shusaku; Mitsuda, Nobuaki

    2015-08-01

    We present an extremely rare case of monochorionic diamniotic (MD) triplet pregnancy diagnosed via ultrasonography at the end of the first trimester that resulted in delivery of three healthy newborns. Ultrasonography for a 34-year-old woman at 12 weeks of gestation showed three fetuses and one placenta with a T-sign at the initial segment of the dividing membrane. Color Doppler examination revealed umbilical cord entanglement between two fetuses in one sac in addition to another sac containing one fetus. Therefore, this was diagnosed as MD triplet pregnancy. The triplets were delivered by cesarean section at 35 weeks of gestation and were healthy without neurological morbidities at the age of 28 days. Histopathological examination also revealed an MD triplet placenta. The possibility of MD triplet pregnancy should be recognized, although it is rare. PMID:25832331

  17. Diagnosing dying: an integrative literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Catriona; Brooks-Young, Patricia; Brunton Gray, Carol; Larkin, Phil; Connolly, Michael; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Larsson, Maria; Smith, Tracy; Chater, Susie

    2014-01-01

    Background To ensure patients and families receive appropriate end-of-life care pathways and guidelines aim to inform clinical decision making. Ensuring appropriate outcomes through the use of these decision aids is dependent on timely use. Diagnosing dying is a complex clinical decision, and most of the available practice checklists relate to cancer. There is a need to review evidence to establish diagnostic indicators that death is imminent on the basis of need rather than a cancer diagnosis. Aim To examine the evidence as to how patients are judged by clinicians as being in the final hours or days of life. Design Integrative literature review. Data sources Five electronic databases (2001–2011): Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) on The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL. The search yielded a total of 576 hits, 331 titles and abstracts were screened, 42 papers were retrieved and reviewed and 23 articles were included. Results Analysis reveals an overarching theme of uncertainty in diagnosing dying and two subthemes: (1) ‘characteristics of dying’ involve dying trajectories that incorporate physical, social, spiritual and psychological decline towards death; (2) ‘treatment orientation’ where decision making related to diagnosing dying may remain focused towards biomedical interventions rather than systematic planning for end-of-life care. Conclusions The findings of this review support the explicit recognition of ‘uncertainty in diagnosing dying’ and the need to work with and within this concept. Clinical decision making needs to allow for recovery where that potential exists, but equally there is the need to avoid futile interventions. PMID:24780536

  18. Neurocutaneous Melanosis in Association with Dandy-Walker Complex with Extensive Intracerebral and Spinal Cord Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyoung-Su

    2014-01-01

    Neurocutaneous melanosis (NCM) is a rare congenital syndrome consisting of benign or malignant melanotic tumors of the central nervous system with large or numerous cutaneous melanocytic nevi. The Dandy-Walker complex (DWC) is characterized by an enlarged posterior fossa with high insertion of the tentorium, hypoplasia or aplasia of the cerebellar vermis, and cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle. These each two conditions are rare, but NCM associated with DWC is even more rare. Most patients of NCM with DWC present neurological symptoms early in life such as intracranial hemorrhage, hydrocephalus, and malignant transformation of the melanocytes. We report a 14-year-old male patient who was finally diagnosed as NCM in association with DWC with extensive intracerebral and spinal cord involvement. PMID:25289129

  19. Myotonia-like symptoms in a patient with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kunihiko; Nakanishi, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Atsuta, Naoki; Yamada, Shinichiro; Hijikata, Yasuhiro; Hashizume, Atsushi; Suzuki, Keisuke; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen

    2015-11-01

    We describe the case of a 33-year-old man with a 4-year history of worsening muscle stiffness and weakness in his right hand. He showed elevated serum creatine kinase levels at the onset of muscle stiffness that was characterized by delayed muscle relaxation after voluntary contraction. This symptom often occurred during cold exposure, and was partially attenuated by sodium channel blockade. Electrodiagnostic findings in repetitive nerve stimulation, short-exercise, and cooling tests were normal. Electromyography showed chronic denervation potentials in his cranial, cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral myotomes without myotonic discharge. He exhibited facial and tongue fasciculations, hypernasality, gynecomastia, neurogenic changes in muscle biopsy, and increased serum testosterone levels. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) was diagnosed on the basis of the CAG trinucleotide expansion in the gene coding androgen receptor. A myotonia-like symptom without myotonic discharge may present as an early neurological sign of SBMA, which possibly reflects a sodium channel dysfunction in skeletal muscles. PMID:26363965

  20. Respiratory Dysfunction and Management in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert; DiMarco, Anthony F; Hoit, Jeannette D; Garshick, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory dysfunction is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in spinal cord injury (SCI), which causes impairment of respiratory muscles, reduced vital capacity, ineffective cough, reduction in lung and chest wall compliance, and excess oxygen cost of breathing due to distortion of the respiratory system. Severely affected individuals may require assisted ventilation, which can cause problems with speech production. Appropriate candidates can sometimes be liberated from mechanical ventilation by phrenic-nerve pacing and pacing of the external intercostal muscles. Partial recovery of respiratory-muscle performance occurs spontaneously. The eventual vital capacity depends on the extent of spontaneous recovery, years since injury, smoking, a history of chest injury or surgery, and maximum inspiratory pressure. Also, respiratory-muscle training and abdominal binders improve performance of the respiratory muscles. For patients on long-term ventilation, speech production is difficult. Often, practitioners are reluctant to deflate the tracheostomy tube cuff to allow speech production. Yet cuff-deflation can be done safely. Standard ventilator settings produce poor speech quality. Recent studies demonstrated vast improvement with long inspiratory time and positive end-expiratory pressure. Abdominal binders improve speech quality in patients with phrenic-nerve pacers. Recent data show that the level and completeness of injury and older age at the time of injury may not be related directly to mortality in SCI, which suggests that the care of SCI has improved. The data indicate that independent predictors of all-cause mortality include diabetes mellitus, heart disease, cigarette smoking, and percent-of-predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second. An important clinical problem in SCI is weak cough, which causes retention of secretions during infections. Methods for secretion clearance include chest physical therapy, spontaneous cough, suctioning, cough assistance by forced compression of the abdomen (“quad cough”), and mechanical insufflation-exsufflation. Recently described but not yet available for general use is activation of the abdominal muscles via an epidural electrode placed at spinal cord level T9-L1. PMID:16867197