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Sample records for diagnosed spinal infection

  1. Spinal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgical risk factors include a long surgical time, instrumentation and re-operations. Infections occur in up to 4% of surgical cases despite the numerous preventative measures that are taken. The likelihood of an infection ...

  2. How Are Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord tumors in children staged? How are brain and spinal cord tumors diagnosed in children? Brain ... resonance angiography (MRA) or computerized tomographic angiography (CTA). Brain or spinal cord tumor biopsy Imaging tests such ...

  3. Diagnosing BVDV infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are widespread among the U.S. cattle population and it is generally accepted that these infections result in substantial economic loss for producers. There is a push in the U.S. to design BVDV control programs that will curb these losses. While ...

  4. Parasitic and rare spinal infections.

    PubMed

    do Amaral, Lázaro Luís Faria; Nunes, Renato Hoffmann; da Rocha, Antonio Jose

    2015-05-01

    The imaging features of spinal parasitic diseases and other rare infections are herein discussed. These diseases are distributed worldwide, with increased prevalence in areas with poor sanitary conditions and in developing countries. In nonendemic areas, sporadic cases may occur, consequent to increased international travel and immunocompromising conditions. Infectious diseases are usually treatable, and early detection is often crucial. A thorough comprehension of the imaging patterns associated with the clinical features, epidemiology, and laboratory results allows the radiologist to narrow down the options for differential diagnosis and facilitates the timely implementation of appropriate therapies. PMID:25952177

  5. Spinal infections in children: A review.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Rahul

    2016-12-01

    Spinal infections are uncommon but significant causes of morbidity and hospitalization in the paediatric population. These infections encompass a broad range of conditions, from discitis to osteomyelitis and spinal epidural and intramedullary abscesses. Paediatric spinal infections can be caused by a range of bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic agents. Ultrastructural differences of the vertebrae and associated structures result in distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis of spinal infections in children compared to adults. The non-specific nature of symptoms produced by them can cause considerable diagnostic delays. Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging can facilitate early identification of the disease, and distinguish it from other spinal pathologies. The association of antimicrobial resistant bacterial strains from some of the cases appears worrisome; as is the increasing incidence of Kingella kingae infections causing spinal infections. Rest and immobilization are the general treatment, and prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is warranted to ensure optimal clinical outcome. Most patients generally have a good prognosis; however, early identification and prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy is essential to achieve the best therapeutic response. PMID:27408498

  6. Infection with spinal instrumentation: Review of pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and management

    PubMed Central

    Kasliwal, Manish K.; Tan, Lee A.; Traynelis, Vincent C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Instrumentation has become an integral component in the management of various spinal pathologies. The rate of infection varies from 2% to 20% of all instrumented spinal procedures. Every occurrence produces patient morbidity, which may adversely affect long-term outcome and increases health care costs. Methods: A comprehensive review of the literature from 1990 to 2012 was performed utilizing PubMed and several key words: Infection, spine, instrumentation, implant, management, and biofilms. Articles that provided a current review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and management of instrumented spinal infections over the years were reviewed. Results: There are multiple risk factors for postoperative spinal infections. Infections in the setting of instrumentation are more difficult to diagnose and treat due to biofilm. Infections may be early or delayed. C Reactive Protein (CRP) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are important diagnostic tools. Optimal results are obtained with surgical debridement followed by parenteral antibiotics. Removal or replacement of hardware should be considered in delayed infections. Conclusions: An improved understanding of the role of biofilm and the development of newer spinal implants has provided insight in the pathogenesis and management of infected spinal implants. This literature review highlights the mechanism, pathogenesis, prevention, and management of infection after spinal instrumentation. It is important to accurately identify and treat postoperative spinal infections. The treatment is often multimodal and prolonged. PMID:24340238

  7. Pitfalls in diagnosing diabetic foot infections.

    PubMed

    Peters, Edgar J

    2016-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of a diabetic foot infection is made based on clinical symptoms and signs, we also use blood laboratory, microbiological and radiological studies to make treatment decisions. All of these diagnostic studies have pitfalls that can lead to a delay in diagnosis. Such delays will likely lead to further tissue damage and to a higher chance of amputation. One of these pitfalls is that some clinicians rely on microbiological, rather than clinical data, to diagnose infection. Though subjective by nature, clinical signs predict outcome of foot infections accurately. Another pitfall is that microbiological data can be misleading. All wounds harbour microorganisms; therefore, a positive wound culture does not mean that a wound is infected. Furthermore, the outcome of cultures of wound swabs does not correlate well with culture results of tissue biopsies. Therapy guidance by wound swab will likely lead to overtreatment of non-pathogenic organisms. Genotyping might have a role in identifying previously unrecognized (combinations of) pathogens in diabetic foot infection, bacteria in sessile phenotype and non-culturable pathogens, e.g. in cases where antibiotics have already been administered. One more pitfall is that the diagnosis of osteomyelitis remains difficult. Although the result of percutaneous bone biopsy is the reference standard for osteomyelitis, some other diagnostic modalities can aid in the diagnosis. A combination of several of these diagnostic tests is probably a good strategy to achieve a higher diagnostic accuracy. Relying on a single test will likely lead to misidentification of patients with osteomyelitis with associated overtreatment and undertreatment. PMID:26813617

  8. Orofacial characteristics of adolescents with diagnosed spinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Végh, András; Fábian, Gábor; Jianu, Rodica; Segatto, Emil

    2012-02-01

    The objective of the current epidemiological study is to show the correlation of various postural abnormalities and spinal deformities and the clinically identifiable dentofacial anomalies by orthodontic examination. Twenty-three children with Scheuermann's disease [mean age: 14 years 8 months; standard deviation (SD): 1 year 8 months] and 28 with scoliosis (mean age: 14 years 7 months; SD: 2 years 3 months) participated in the study. Standardized orthodontic screening protocols were used to map the occlusal relations in the sagittal, vertical, and horizontal dimensions; the space relations of the maxillary and mandibular frontal segment; the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) status; and the facial asymmetries. Statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were found between the values of the examined groups of patients for the following measurements: incisal overjet and overbite, upper and lower midline deviation, mandibular frontal spacing, TMJ pathological symptoms and functional characteristics, and frequency of facial asymmetries. A large percentage of patients with pre-pubertal developments of spinal deformities have various dentofacial anomalies. The majority of these anomalies are present in patients with Scheuermann's disease. Early treatment of the malocclusions closely correlated to postural disorders should minimize the progression of the dentofacial anomalies, making necessary performing orthodontic screening of these patients as early as possible. PMID:22718594

  9. An Imaging-Based Approach to Spinal Cord Infection.

    PubMed

    Talbott, Jason F; Narvid, Jared; Chazen, J Levi; Chin, Cynthia T; Shah, Vinil

    2016-10-01

    Infections of the spinal cord, nerve roots, and surrounding meninges are uncommon, but highly significant given their potential for severe morbidity and even mortality. Prompt diagnosis can be lifesaving, as many spinal infections are treatable. Advances in imaging technology have now firmly established magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the gold standard for spinal cord imaging evaluation, enabling the depiction of infectious myelopathies with exquisite detail and contrast. In this article, we aim to provide an overview of MRI findings for spinal cord infections with special focus on imaging patterns of infection that are primarily confined to the spinal cord, spinal meninges, and spinal nerve roots. In this context, we describe and organize this review around 5 distinct patterns of transverse spinal abnormality that may be detected with MRI as follows: (1) extramedullary, (2) centromedullary, (3) eccentric, (4) frontal horn, and (5) irregular. We seek to classify the most common presentations for a wide variety of infectious agents within this image-based framework while realizing that significant overlap and variation exists, including some infections that remain occult with conventional imaging techniques. PMID:27616314

  10. Postoperative Surgical Infection After Spinal Surgery in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kensuke; Ohba, Tetsuro; Ebata, Shigeto; Haro, Hirotaka

    2016-05-01

    Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis are at higher risk for infection than the general population, and surgical site infection after spinal surgery in this population can result in clinically significant complications. The goal of this study was to identify risk factors for acute surgical site infection after spinal surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated with nonbiologic (conventional) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or with biologic DMARDs. All patients treated with biologic agents were treated with nonbiologic agents as well. The authors performed a retrospective, single-center review of 47 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent spinal surgery and had follow-up of 3 months or longer. The incidence of surgical site infection was examined, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to test the association of surgical site infection with putative risk factors, including the use of biologic agents, methotrexate, and prednisolone, as well as the duration of rheumatoid arthritis, the presence of diabetes, patient age, length of surgery, and number of operative levels. After spinal surgery, 14.89% (7 of 47) of patients had surgical site infection. Use of methotrexate and/or prednisolone, patient age, diabetes, duration of rheumatoid arthritis, length of surgery, number of operative levels, and use of biologic DMARDs did not significantly increase the risk of infection associated with spinal surgery. All patients who had surgical site infection had undergone spinal surgery with instrumentation. The findings show that greater attention to preventing surgical site infection may be needed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who undergo spinal surgery with instrumentation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to show that the use of biologic agents did not increase the incidence of surgical site infection after spinal surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

  11. Diagnosing and treating asymptomatic tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize relevant parts of the guidelines recommended by the Canadian and American Thoracic Societies for diagnosis and management of asymptomatic tuberculosis (TB) infection. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The latest guidelines published by the Canadian and American Thoracic Societies were reviewed. Unfortunately, neither of these guidelines state explicitly how recommendations were derived. The references accompanying each set of guidelines, however, suggest that they were developed by extensive literature review of the subject and consensus among expert panels. MAIN MESSAGE: Only higher-risk patients should receive a TB screening test (Mantoux test) to minimize the possibility of false-positive test results. The cutoff points for positive tests vary to reflect the pretest likelihood of TB infection. An induration 5 mm or greater is considered positive in patients at highest risk of TB infection, that is, HIV-infected patients, close contacts of active TB cases, and patients with chest x-ray abnormalities suggestive of previous untreated TB. All other patients are considered positive if they have induration greater than 10 mm according to the Canadian guideline. A 15-mm cutoff point, however, is used for patients without risk factors in the American guideline. All patients with positive Mantoux test results should be considered infected with TB. Infected patients should be offered 6 to 12 months of isoniazid prophylaxis if they have HIV infection, if they have medical conditions that increase the risk of TB activation, or if they are younger than 35 years. CONCLUSIONS: Prophylactic treatment of infected individuals effectively prevents the spread of TB infection. Family physicians, who most often see patients in the asymptomatic stage of TB infection, are uniquely situated to prevent secondary cases of TB by offering appropriate patients prophylactic treatment. Patients should be counseled about the risk and benefit of prophylactic treatment so they give

  12. Diagnosing Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Accuracy of CSF 14-3-3 Protein Test of the Spinal Fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... JAKOB DISEASE: ACCURACY OF THE 14-3-3 PROTEIN TEST OF THE SPINAL FLUID This information sheet ... help you understand how the 14-3-3 protein test helps in diagnosing sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease ( ...

  13. Molecular techniques for diagnosing prosthetic joint infections.

    PubMed

    Hartley, John C; Harris, Kathryn A

    2014-09-01

    Prosthetic joint infections (PJI) can be broadly classed into two groups: those where there is a strong clinical suspicion of infection and those with clinical uncertainty, including 'aseptic loosening'. Confirmation of infection and identification of the causative organism along with provision of antibiotic susceptibility data are important stages in the management of PJI. Conventional microbiological culture and susceptibility testing is usually sufficient to provide this. However, it may fail due to prior antimicrobial treatment or the presence of unusual and fastidious organisms. Molecular techniques, in particular specific real-time and broad-range PCR, are available for diagnostic use in suspected PJI. In this review, we describe the techniques available, their current strengths, limitations and future development. Real-time pathogen-specific and broad-range PCR (with single sequence determination) are suitable for use as part of the routine diagnostic algorithm for clinically suspected PJI. Further development of broad-range PCR with high-throughput (next-generation) sequencing is necessary to understand the microbiome of the prosthetic joint further before this technique can be used for routine diagnostics in clinically unsuspected PJI, including aseptic loosening. PMID:25135084

  14. [Spinal epidural abscess as a complication of a finger infection].

    PubMed

    Ridderikhof, M L; van den Brink, W A; van Dalsen, A D; Kieft, H

    2008-06-21

    An 81-year-old man was treated with intravenous antibiotics for a soft tissue infection in a finger. Despite adequate antibiotic treatment, he developed signs of spinal cord injury caused by a cervical spinal epidural abscess. An emergency laminectomy was performed. The neurological impairment appeared to be irreversible, and the patient died. Spinal epidural abscess is a rare and serious complication ofa bacteraemia. It is often caused by an infection of the skin or soft tissue with Staphylococcus aureus. Given the risk of rapidly progressive and irreversible neurological damage, this complication must be treated as soon as possible. The treatment of choice is surgery. Conservative management with intravenous antibiotics is an option only under strict conditions. PMID:18624007

  15. A systematic review of clinical outcomes for patients diagnosed with skin cancer spinal metastases.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C Rory; Sankey, Eric W; Liu, Ann; Elder, Benjamin D; Kosztowski, Thomas; Lo, Sheng-Fu L; Fisher, Charles G; Clarke, Michelle J; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2016-05-01

    .2%-100.0%), and the rate of known spine metastasis recurrence despite treatment for all skin malignancies was 2.8% (n = 17/608, range 0.0%-33.3%). Age greater than 65 years, sacral spinal involvement, presence of a neurological deficit, and nonambulatory status were associated with decreased survival in patients diagnosed with a primary skin cancer spinal metastasis. All other clinical or prognostic parameters were of low or insufficient strength. CONCLUSIONS Patients diagnosed with a primary skin cancer metastasis to the spine have poor overall survival with the exception of those with BCC. The median duration of survival for patients who received surgical intervention alone, medical management (chemotherapy and/or radiation) alone, or the combination of therapies was similar across interventions. Age, spinal region, and neurological status may be associated with poor survival following surgery. PMID:26544595

  16. Spinal hydatidosis accompanied by a secondary infection. Case report.

    PubMed

    Kotil, Kadir; Tatar, Zeynep; Bilge, Turgay

    2007-06-01

    Spinal hydatid disease is rarely encountered in nonendemic regions. It is a progressive disease that is associated with risks of serious morbidity. The authors report a case of an isolated primary hydatid cyst of the spine in a 34-year-old woman who presented with back pain, which had lasted for 3 months, as well as lower-extremity pain and fatigue, which had persisted for 2 months. A neurological examination yielded findings indicative of upper motor neuron involvement with complete sensory loss below the level of T-11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine showed multiple extradural cystic lesions with an abscess formation at T-11 and involvement of the paraspinal muscles. The patient underwent spinal decompression in which stabilization and total excision of the multiple epidural and psoas abscesses and paraspinal multiloculated cysts were performed. The diagnosis of hydatid disease associated with another infection was confirmed by histopathological evaluation. Albendazole was administered during the postoperative period. Previous reports of secondary infections accompanying this disease in extraspinal locations have been published. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, there have been no publications about a secondary infection associated with hydatidosis in the spinal cord. One should bear in mind that spinal hydatidosis may be accompanied by other infections in endemic regions. Antihelminthic treatment should be administered for a long period following early decompressive surgery and adequate stabilization. PMID:17561751

  17. Challenges in diagnosing infection in the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Glaudemans, A W J M; Uçkay, I; Lipsky, B A

    2015-06-01

    Diagnosing the presence of infection in the foot of a patient with diabetes can sometimes be a difficult task. Because open wounds are always colonized with microorganisms, most agree that infection should be diagnosed by the presence of systemic or local signs of inflammation. Determining whether or not infection is present in bone can be especially difficult. Diagnosis begins with a history and physical examination in which both classic and 'secondary' findings suggesting invasion of microorganisms or a host response are sought. Serological tests may be helpful, especially measurement of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate in osteomyelitis, but all (including bone biomarkers and procalcitonin) are relatively non-specific. Cultures of properly obtained soft tissue and bone specimens can diagnose and define the causative pathogens in diabetic foot infections. Newer molecular microbial techniques, which may not only identify more organisms but also virulence factors and antibiotic resistance, look very promising. Imaging tests generally begin with plain X-rays; when these are inconclusive or when more detail of bone or soft tissue abnormalities is required, more advanced studies are needed. Among these, magnetic resonance imaging is generally superior to standard radionuclide studies, but newer hybrid imaging techniques (single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography, positron emission tomography/computed tomography and positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) look to be useful techniques, and new radiopharmaceuticals are on the horizon. In some cases, ultrasonography, photographic and thermographic methods may also be diagnostically useful. Improved methods developed and tested over the past decade have clearly increased our accuracy in diagnosing diabetic foot infections. PMID:25765225

  18. Psychiatric Diagnoses among an HIV-Infected Outpatient Clinic Population.

    PubMed

    Shacham, Enbal; Önen, Nur F; Donovan, Michael F; Rosenburg, Neal; Overton, E Turner

    2016-01-01

    As individuals with HIV infection are living longer, the management of psychiatric disorders has increasingly been incorporated into comprehensive care. Individuals were recruited from an outpatient HIV clinic to assess the prevalence and related associations of current psychiatric disorders and biomarkers. Of the 201 participants who completed the interviews, the median age was 43.5 years, and the majority was male and African American. Most were receiving HIV therapy and 78% of those had achieved virologic suppression. Prevalent psychiatric diagnoses included major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety, and agoraphobia. Alcohol and cocaine/crack abuse and dependence were common substance use disorders. Current receipt of HIV therapy was less common among those diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder. Agoraphobia was the only disorder associated with unsuppressed viral load. Psychiatric and substance use disorders are highly prevalent among an urban HIV clinic population, although we identified few associations between psychiatric diagnoses and HIV diseases status. PMID:25348798

  19. Diagnosing and treating urinary tract infections in older people.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Kirsty

    2015-05-01

    Even though diagnosing and treating urinary tract infections (UTIs) in older people can be difficult, it is essential to prevent reduction in the patients' wellbeing. Near-patient testing can be useful, but guidelines on this discuss the use of urine dipstick testing and laboratory culture in some detail. In addition, there are significant differences in the management of males and females, those with recurrent infections, and those with catheters. Community nurses are well placed to assess and manage this common condition, implementing correct treatment and resolution, owing to the close relationships they cultivate with service users. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of UTIs in older people, highlighting the differentials and red flags that need to be addressed urgently. PMID:25993370

  20. Spinal infection--an overview and the results of treatment.

    PubMed

    Razak, M; Kamari, Z H; Roohi, S

    2000-09-01

    A retrospective review of thirty-eight patients (16 males and 22 females) with spinal infection between 1993 and 1998 revealed that the mean age was 39.9 years and the peak incidence was in the 5th decade of life. Infections in thirty-two patients (84.2%) were tuberculous in origin, 13.2% were pyogenic and 2.6% were fungal. Back pain was a symptom in 94.7% while 55.8% had neurological deficits, of which two-thirds were tuberculous in origin. Twenty-two patients (57.9%) had an impaired immune status secondary to pulmonary either tuberculosis, diabetes mellitus, intravenous drug abuse, prolonged steroid treatment, malnutrition, or advanced age. History of contact with tuberculous patients was elicited in 31.3%, extraskeletal tuberculosis was found in 28.1%, while Mantoux test was only positive in 53.1% of tuberculous patients. Majority of the cases (57.9%) involved lumbar vertebra. The histopathological examination was only positive in 22.2% from material taken via CT guided biopsy but 93.3% were found to be conclusive from open biopsy. 4 out of 5 patients who had a pyogenic infection were treated conservatively and produced a good result. There was no difference in outcome for tuberculosis patients treated with either the 3 drug or 4 drug regimen. Anterior decompression and bone grafting in tuberculous patients was superior in terms of a faster fusion rate, early pain relief and prevention of kvphotic deformity. The initial neurological deficit did not reflect the future prognosis of patients with spinal infection. PMID:11200039

  1. Pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections: emphasis on diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of abscesses and pus collections.

    PubMed

    Moritani, T; Kim, J; Capizzano, A A; Kirby, P; Kademian, J; Sato, Y

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of spinal infections has increased in the past two decades, owing to the increasing number of elderly patients, immunocompromised conditions, spinal surgery and instrumentation, vascular access and intravenous drug use. Conventional MRI is the gold standard for diagnostic imaging; however, there are still a significant number of misdiagnosed cases. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with a b-value of 1000 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps provide early and accurate detection of abscess and pus collection. Pyogenic infections are classified into four types of extension based on MRI and DWI findings: (1) epidural/paraspinal abscess with spondylodiscitis, (2) epidural/paraspinal abscess with facet joint infection, (3) epidural/paraspinal abscess without concomitant spondylodiscitis or facet joint infection and (4) intradural abscess (subdural abscess, purulent meningitis and spinal cord abscess). DWI easily detects abscesses and demonstrates the extension, multiplicity and remote disseminated infection. DWI is often a key image in the differential diagnosis. Important differential diagnoses include epidural, subdural or subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebrospinal fluid leak, disc herniation, synovial cyst, granulation tissue, intra- or extradural tumour and post-surgical fluid collections. DWI and the ADC values are affected by susceptibility artefacts, incomplete fat suppression and volume-averaging artefacts. Recognition of artefacts is essential when interpreting DWI of spinal and paraspinal infections. DWI is not only useful for the diagnosis but also for the treatment planning of pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections. PMID:24999081

  2. Pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections: emphasis on diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of abscesses and pus collections

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Capizzano, A A; Kirby, P; Kademian, J; Sato, Y

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of spinal infections has increased in the past two decades, owing to the increasing number of elderly patients, immunocompromised conditions, spinal surgery and instrumentation, vascular access and intravenous drug use. Conventional MRI is the gold standard for diagnostic imaging; however, there are still a significant number of misdiagnosed cases. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with a b-value of 1000 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps provide early and accurate detection of abscess and pus collection. Pyogenic infections are classified into four types of extension based on MRI and DWI findings: (1) epidural/paraspinal abscess with spondylodiscitis, (2) epidural/paraspinal abscess with facet joint infection, (3) epidural/paraspinal abscess without concomitant spondylodiscitis or facet joint infection and (4) intradural abscess (subdural abscess, purulent meningitis and spinal cord abscess). DWI easily detects abscesses and demonstrates the extension, multiplicity and remote disseminated infection. DWI is often a key image in the differential diagnosis. Important differential diagnoses include epidural, subdural or subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebrospinal fluid leak, disc herniation, synovial cyst, granulation tissue, intra- or extradural tumour and post-surgical fluid collections. DWI and the ADC values are affected by susceptibility artefacts, incomplete fat suppression and volume-averaging artefacts. Recognition of artefacts is essential when interpreting DWI of spinal and paraspinal infections. DWI is not only useful for the diagnosis but also for the treatment planning of pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections. PMID:24999081

  3. A Case of Subacute Combined Degeneration of the Spinal Cord with Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Jiang; He, Jia; Qu, Wen-sheng; Tian, Dai-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Subacute combined degeneration (SCD) is a rare cause of demyelination of the dorsal and lateral columns of spinal cord and is a neurogenic complication due to cobalamin deficiency. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) occurs in patients with acute or chronic immune activation, including infective endocarditis. It remains to be elucidated whether ACD patients are more sensitive to suffer from SCD. Little cases about SCD patients accompanied with ACD have been reported till now. Here we reported a 36-year-old man with SCD with a medical history of mitral inadequacy over 20 years, who was admitted and transported from another hospital to our hospital due to an 8-month history of gait disturbance, lower limb weakness and paresthesia, and loss of proprioception. Significant laboratory results and echocardiography suggest iron deficiency anemia and infective endocarditis (IE). The SCD diagnosis was confirmed by MRI, which showed selective demyelination in the dorsal and lateral columns of spinal cord. In conclusion, the ACD patients may suffer from SCD, which can be diagnosed by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26435864

  4. Management of Deep Infection after Instrumentation on Lumbar Spinal Surgery in a Single Institution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jung-Tung; Liao, Wen-Jui; Chang, Cheng-Siu; Chen, Yung-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative surgical site infections (SSIs) are more common complications after spinal surgery. SSIs often require extended hospitalisation and may worsen overall clinical outcomes. A retrospective database review of consecutive patients with traditional open lumbar spinal surgery was performed. SSIs patients were identified and reviewed for clinically relevant details, and postoperative SSIs' incidence was calculated for the entire cohort as well as for subgroups with or without spinal implants. In 15 years, 1,176 patients underwent open lumbar spinal surgery with spinal implants and 699 without. Thirty-eight developed postoperative SSIs. Total SSI rate for the entire group was 2.03%. The incidence of postoperative SSIs in the nonimplant group was relatively low. Patients received antibiotics, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and wet dressing. We provided the precise rates of postoperative SSIs in traditional open spinal surgery obtained from a single-centre data. Patients with spinal implants had higher SSIs' incidence than those without. PMID:26273650

  5. Safety of instrumentation and fusion at the time of surgical debridement for spinal infection.

    PubMed

    Talia, Adrian J; Wong, Michael L; Lau, Hui C; Kaye, Andrew H

    2015-07-01

    The present study aims to assess the results of single-stage instrumentation and fusion at the time of surgical debridement of spinal infections; vertebral osteomyelitis or epidural abscess. Nine patients with spinal infection were treated with instrumentation and fusion after radical debridement in a single-stage operation. Predisposing factors and comorbidities, pain, American Spinal Injury Association motor scores, primary pathologies, microbiology and perioperative markers were recorded. Seven patients with pyogenic and two with tuberculous spinal infection were encountered; the most common pathogen was Staphylococcus aureus. Five patients were predisposed to infection because of diabetes mellitus. Duration of antibiotic therapy lasted up to 12 months. Six patients had thoracic infection, two lumbar and one cervical. No post-operative complications were encountered. There was a significant reduction in pain scores compared to pre-operatively. All patients with neurological deficits improved post-operatively. Despite introduction of hardware, no patients had a recurrence of their infection in the 12 month follow up period. Single-stage debridement and instrumentation appeared to be a safe and effective method of managing spinal infections. The combination of debridement and fusion has the dual benefit of removing a focus of infection and stabilising the spine. The current series confirms that placing titanium cages into an infected space is safe in a majority of patients. Stabilisation and correction of spinal deformity reduces pain, aids neurologic recovery and improves quality of life. The small patient population and retrospective nature limit the present study. PMID:25911501

  6. Getting Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... also for those with related disorders. How is Marfan syndrome diagnosed? getting_diagnosed.jpg A Marfan diagnosis ... spinal column). Is there a genetic test for Marfan syndrome? Genetic testing can provide helpful information in ...

  7. Infection after anterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis using the Cotrel-Dubousset-Hopf system: A clinical case series of three patients

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Paul C.; Punt, Ilona M.; van Rhijn, Lodewijk W.; van Ooij, André

    2016-01-01

    Background Three patients with late-onset infection after multilevel instrumented anterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis, using the Cotrel-Dubousset-Hopf (CDH) system, are presented. The CDH-system is an anterior instrumentation with high biomechanical stability and rigidity, ensuring a stable primary fixation. Unlike after posterior spinal fusion, infection after anterior spinal fusion (ASF) for idiopathic scoliosis has rarely been reported. Methods The files of three patients who developed an infection after ASF for scoliosis using the CDH-system, were reviewed. The clinical presentation and diagnostic and therapeutic options are discussed. Results All three patients had a late-onset infection of the CDH-system, which was difficult to diagnose because of nonspecific symptoms. Radiographs and technetium bone scan appeared to be of low value. When an abscess was present, this could accurately be diagnosed with MRI or CT imaging. Operative treatment with implant removal and antibiotic therapy was successful in all cases. Conclusion Late onset infections after ASF using the CDH-system presented with few and nonspecific symptoms. The clinical presentation was mainly characterized by vague abdominal- or back-pain after an interval of normal postoperative recovery, moderately raised infection parameters and inconclusive findings with imaging modalities. As treatment, implant removal, debridement and parenteral antibiotics are recommended. It should be noted though that implant removal poses serious risks for vascular and visceral structures. PMID:26913222

  8. Multiple recurrent postoperative spinal infections due to an unrecognized presacral abscess following placement of bicortical sacral screws: case report.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Laura; Burks, S Shelby; Levi, Allan D

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative wound infections in spinal surgery remain an important complication to diagnose and treat successfully. In most cases of deep infection, even with instrumentation, aggressive soft-tissue debridement followed by intravenous antibiotics is sufficient. This report presents a patient who underwent L3-S1 laminectomy and pedicle screw placement including bicortical sacral screws. This patient went on to develop multiple (7) recurrent infections at the operative site over a 5-year period. Continued investigation eventually revealed a large presacral abscess, which remained the source of recurrent bacterial seeding via the remaining bone tracts of the bicortical sacral screws placed during the original lumbar surgery. Two years after drainage of this presacral collection via a retroperitoneal approach, the patient remains symptom free. PMID:26613281

  9. Difficulty of diagnosing infected hypertrophic pseudarthrosis by radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjipavlou, A.; Lisbona, R.; Rosenthall, L.

    1983-02-01

    Hypertrophic pseudarthrosis was studied with /sup 99m/Tc MDP and /sup 67/Ga citrate in 11 patients. Two of the 11 pseudarthroses were complicated by infection. A high concentration of both radiopharmaceuticals was obtained at all 11 sites and their distribution patterns were identical. It was therefore impossible to distinguish the infected from the noninfected pseudarthroses by using /sup 67/Ga.

  10. Australian Institute of Sport and the Australian Paralympic Committee position statement: urinary tract infection in spinal cord injured athletes.

    PubMed

    Compton, Stacey; Trease, Larissa; Cunningham, Corey; Hughes, David

    2015-10-01

    Patients with spinal cord injuries are at increased risk of developing symptomatic urinary tract infections. Current evidence-based knowledge regarding prevention and treatment of urinary tract infection in the spinal cord injured population is limited. There are currently no urinary tract infection prevention and management guidelines specifically targeted towards elite spinal cord injured athletes. This position statement represents a set of recommendations intended to provide clinical guidelines for sport and exercise medicine physicians and other healthcare providers for the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infection in spinal cord injured athletes. It has been endorsed by the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and the Australian Paralympic Committee (APC). PMID:25869093

  11. The Prevention and Management of Urinary Tract Infection among People with Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NIDRR Consensus Statement, 1992

    1992-01-01

    A 1992 Urinary Tract Infection Consensus Validation Conference brought together researchers, clinicians, and consumers to arrive at consensus on the best practices for preventing and treating urinary tract infections (UBI) in people with spinal cord injuries; the risk factors and diagnostic studies that should be done; indications for antibiotic…

  12. Unyvero i60 implant and tissue infection (ITI) multiplex PCR system in diagnosing periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Hischebeth, Gunnar T R; Randau, Thomas M; Buhr, Johanna K; Wimmer, Matthias D; Hoerauf, Achim; Molitor, Ernst; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Gravius, Sascha

    2016-02-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most challenging complications in orthopedic surgery. In cases of suspected periprosthetic joint infection several diagnostic methods are available. In this study we investigated the performance of the newly available Unyvero i60 implant and tissue infection (ITI) multiplex PCR System. 62 specimens from 31 patients with suspected PJI or aseptic loosening of a painful joint arthoplasty were included in this study. Besides the established diagnostic procedures we included a commercial multiplex PCR detection system for diagnosis of PJI. The PCR results obtained from analysis of sonication and synovial fluids (62 specimens) showed a sensitivity of 66.7%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 100% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 68.4% when compared to cultural methods. Notably, cultures from sonication fluid displayed a sensitivity of 88.9%, a specificity of 61.5%, a PPV of 76.2% and a NPV of 80.0% when compared to tissue cultures. In conclusion, multiplex PCR is an additional - rapid - method for diagnosing PJI. Positive results with the PCR assay used in this study were always confirmed by subsequent matching culture positivity. However, apart from the time saved the nucleic acid amplification technique did not yield additional information than that obtained from microbiological cultures. PMID:26689142

  13. Spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome enhances infection susceptibility dependent on lesion level.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Benedikt; Engel, Odilo; Kopp, Marcel A; Watzlawick, Ralf; Müller, Susanne; Prüss, Harald; Chen, Yuying; DeVivo, Michael J; Finkenstaedt, Felix W; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Liebscher, Thomas; Meisel, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of death after acute spinal cord injury and is associated with poor neurological outcome. In contrast to the current understanding, attributing enhanced infection susceptibility solely to the patient's environment and motor dysfunction, we investigate whether a secondary functional neurogenic immune deficiency (spinal cord injury-induced immune deficiency syndrome, SCI-IDS) may account for the enhanced infection susceptibility. We applied a clinically relevant model of experimental induced pneumonia to investigate whether the systemic SCI-IDS is functional sufficient to cause pneumonia dependent on spinal cord injury lesion level and investigated whether findings are mirrored in a large prospective cohort study after human spinal cord injury. In a mouse model of inducible pneumonia, high thoracic lesions that interrupt sympathetic innervation to major immune organs, but not low thoracic lesions, significantly increased bacterial load in lungs. The ability to clear the bacterial load from the lung remained preserved in sham animals. Propagated immune susceptibility depended on injury of central pre-ganglionic but not peripheral postganglionic sympathetic innervation to the spleen. Thoracic spinal cord injury level was confirmed as an independent increased risk factor of pneumonia in patients after motor complete spinal cord injury (odds ratio = 1.35, P < 0.001) independently from mechanical ventilation and preserved sensory function by multiple regression analysis. We present evidence that spinal cord injury directly causes increased risk for bacterial infection in mice as well as in patients. Besides obvious motor and sensory paralysis, spinal cord injury also induces a functional SCI-IDS ('immune paralysis'), sufficient to propagate clinically relevant infection in an injury level dependent manner. PMID:26754788

  14. Prevalence of and risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis among newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected Nigerian children

    PubMed Central

    Ebonyi, Augustine O.; Oguche, Stephen; Ejeliogu, Emeka U.; Agbaji, Oche O.; Shehu, Nathan Y.; Abah, Isaac O.; Sagay, Atiene S.; Ugoagwu, Placid O.; Okonkwo, Prosper I.; Idoko, John A.; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Studies on the prevalence of and risk factors for tuberculosis (TB) among newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children in sub-Saharan Africa are scarce and in Nigeria there is paucity of reported data. We determined the prevalence of and risk factors for pulmonary TB (PTB) in newly diagnosed (treatment-naïve) HIV-1 infected children at the pediatric HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH) in Nigeria. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 876 children, aged 2 months – 13 years, diagnosed with HIV-1 infection between July 2005 and December 2012, of which 286 were diagnosed with PTB at presentation after TB screening. The study site was the AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN)-supported Pediatric HIV clinic at JUTH, Jos. A multivariate forward logistic regression modelling was used to identify risk factors for PTB-HIV co-infection. Results The prevalence of PTB-HIV co-infection was 32% (286/876). Severe immunosuppression (SI) and World Health Organization (WHO) HIV clinical stage 3/4 were identified as independent risk factors for PTB-HIV co-infection in HIV infected children. The odds of PTB-HIV co-infection was increased two-fold in HIV-infected children with WHO clinical stage 3/4 compared to those with stage 1/2 (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.76 [1.31-2.37], p<0.001) and 1.5-fold in children with SI compared to those without SI (AOR 1.52 [1.12-2.06], p=0.007). Conclusion In our setting, the burden of PTB was high among newly diagnosed HIV-infected children, and late WHO HIV clinical stage and severe immunosuppression were associated with PTB-HIV co-infection. Therefore there is a clear need to improve strategies for early diagnosis of both HIV and PTB to optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:27019829

  15. Recent advances in understanding and diagnosing hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Fourati, Slim; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects approximately 240 million individuals worldwide. Recent advances in the virology, immunopathogenesis, and diagnosis of HBV infection are summarized in this review article. The identification of a hepatocyte-specific cellular receptor for HBV, the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP), made it possible to develop reliable cell culture systems and better understand the early steps of the viral lifecycle. Viral and host factors involved in covalently closed circular DNA synthesis, stability, and transcriptional regulation have also been identified and provide potential targets for new drugs. Based on recent evidence showing trained immunity in immune-tolerant patients, the immune tolerance and immune clearance phases have been renamed the non-inflammatory and inflammatory phases, respectively. New diagnostic and monitoring tools are now available, including rapid diagnostic tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) detection, HBsAg quantification assays, anti-HBc antibody quantification assays, an HBV core-related antigen (HBcrAg) quantification test, new HBV DNA detection and quantification assays, and an HBV RNA quantification test. Their clinical utility is under study. Finally, new antiviral and immune modulation approaches are in the preclinical or early clinical developmental stages, with the goal to achieve functional cure or ideally (if possible) eradication of HBV infection.

  16. Urine as a specimen to diagnose infections in twenty-first century: focus on analytical accuracy.

    PubMed

    Tuuminen, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Urine as a clinical specimen to diagnose infections has been used since ancient times. Many rapid technologies to assist diagnosis of infections are currently in use. Alongside traditional enzyme immunoassays (EIA), new technologies have emerged. Molecular analysis of transrenal DNA to diagnose infections is also a rapidly growing field. The majority of EIAs utilize the detection of excreted sugar compounds of the outer microbial cell-wall shed into the bloodstream and excreted into the urine. This mini-review focuses on current knowledge on rapid urinary antigen detection tests to diagnose most common infections, and highlights their diagnostic utility. The past and the future of urinalysis are also briefly discussed. The analysis of the literature shows that some methods are not quantitative, and analytical sensitivity may remain suboptimal. In addition, the performance criteria and technical documentation of some commercial tests are insufficient. Clinical microbiologists and physicians should be alert to assay limitations. PMID:22566927

  17. Urine as a Specimen to Diagnose Infections in Twenty-First Century: Focus on Analytical Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Tuuminen, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Urine as a clinical specimen to diagnose infections has been used since ancient times. Many rapid technologies to assist diagnosis of infections are currently in use. Alongside traditional enzyme immunoassays (EIA), new technologies have emerged. Molecular analysis of transrenal DNA to diagnose infections is also a rapidly growing field. The majority of EIAs utilize the detection of excreted sugar compounds of the outer microbial cell-wall shed into the bloodstream and excreted into the urine. This mini-review focuses on current knowledge on rapid urinary antigen detection tests to diagnose most common infections, and highlights their diagnostic utility. The past and the future of urinalysis are also briefly discussed. The analysis of the literature shows that some methods are not quantitative, and analytical sensitivity may remain suboptimal. In addition, the performance criteria and technical documentation of some commercial tests are insufficient. Clinical microbiologists and physicians should be alert to assay limitations. PMID:22566927

  18. Diagnosing pelvic osteomyelitis beneath pressure ulcers in spinal cord injured patients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Brunel, A-S; Lamy, B; Cyteval, C; Perrochia, H; Téot, L; Masson, R; Bertet, H; Bourdon, A; Morquin, D; Reynes, J; Le Moing, V

    2016-03-01

    There is no consensus on a diagnostic strategy for osteomyelitis underlying pressure ulcers. We conducted a prospective study to assess the accuracy of multiple bone biopsies and imaging to diagnose pelvic osteomyelitis. Patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis beneath pelvic pressure ulcers were enrolled. Bone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgical bone biopsies (three or more for microbiology and one for histology per ulcer) were performed. Bacterial osteomyelitis diagnosis relied upon the association of positive histology and microbiology (at least one positive culture for non-commensal microorganisms or three or more for commensal microorganisms of the skin). From 2011 to 2014, 34 patients with 44 pressure ulcers were included. Bacterial osteomyelitis was diagnosed for 28 (82.3%) patients and 35 (79.5%) ulcers according to the composite criterion. Discrepancy was observed between histology and microbiology for 5 (11.4%) ulcers. Most common isolates were Staphylococcus aureus (77.1%), Peptostreptococcus (48.6%) and Bacteroides (40%), cultured in three or more samples in 42.9% of ulcers for S. aureus and ≥20% for anaerobes. Only 2.8% of ulcers had three or more positive specimens with coagulase-negative staphylococci, group B Streptococcus, and nil with enterococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus and group milleri Streptococcus were recovered from one sample in 22.8%, 11.4% and 11.4% of ulcers, respectively. Agreement was poor between biopsies and MRI (κ 0.2). Sensitivity of MRI was 94.3% and specificity was 22.2%. The diagnosis of pelvic osteomyelitis relies on multiple surgical bone biopsies with microbiological and histological analyses. At least three bone samples allows the detection of pathogens and exclusion of contaminants. MRI is not routinely useful for diagnosis. PMID:26620686

  19. The Feasibility of an Infection Control "Safe Zone" in a Spinal Cord Injury Unit.

    PubMed

    Lones, Keshonna; Ramanathan, Swetha; Fitzpatrick, Margaret; Hill, Jennifer N; Guihan, Marylou; Richardson, Michael S A; Evans, Charlesnika T

    2016-06-01

    We report on healthcare worker use of a safe zone (outside a 3-foot perimeter around the patient's bed) and personal protective equipment in 2 inpatient spinal cord injury/disorder units. Workers remained within the safe zone during 22% of observations but were less compliant with personal protective equipment inside the zone. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:714-716. PMID:26916410

  20. Value of CXCL13 in diagnosing asymptomatic neurosyphilis in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Hu, RongXin; Lu, Chun; Lu, Sihan; Hu, Yunxin; Ma, Han; Lai, Wei; Zhu, Guoxing; Feng, Peiying; Lu, Rongbiao; Li, Ying

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosing asymptomatic neurosyphilis (ANS) in HIV-infected patients is difficult. A recent report suggested that CXCL13 is a promising diagnostic marker for neurosyphilis in HIV-positive patients. However, whether CXCL13 can be a diagnostic marker for ANS in HIV-infected patients remains unknown. The purpose of our study was to determine the role of CXCL13 in diagnosing ANS in HIV-infected patients. This study comprised two study and three control groups. Two study groups included 12 HIV-infected patients with ANS and 25 patients with syphilis and HIV co-infection (without ANS). Three control groups included 9 patients with ANS without HIV infection, 25 HIV-infected patients without syphilis and 10 healthy volunteers. Concentrations of CSF CXCL13 were measured before and after neurosyphilis therapy. Our results showed that CSF CXCL13 concentrations were significantly increased in all of the HIV-infected patients with ANS, the 25 HIV patients with syphilis and the 9 ANS patients without HIV, but not in the patients of the other two control groups. CSF CXCL13 concentrations declined in the two study groups of patients following neurosyphilis therapy. Therefore, CSF CXCL13 concentrations could improve the diagnosis of ANS in HIV-infected patients. PMID:25769888

  1. The Prevalence, Etiologic Agents and Risk Factors for Urinary Tract Infection Among Spinal Cord Injury Patients

    PubMed Central

    Togan, Turhan; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Durukan, Elif; Arslan, Hande

    2014-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with spinal cord injury and 22% of patients with acute spinal cord injury develop UTI during the first 50 days. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, etiologic agents and risk factors for asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections in patients with spinal cord injury. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective investigation of spinal cord injury patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections in Baskent University Medical Faculty Ayas Rehabilitation Center and Ankara Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Center between January 2008 and December 2010. The demographic status, clinical and laboratory findings of 93 patients with spinal cord injury were analyzed in order to determine the risk factors for asymptomatic or symptomatic bacteriuria Results: Sixty three (67.7%) of 93 patients had asymptomatic bacteriuria and 21 (22.6%) had symptomatic urinary tract infection. Assessment of the frequency of urinary bladder emptying methods revealed that 57 (61.3%) of 93 patients employed permanent catheters and 24 (25.8%) employed clean intermittent catheterization. One hundred and thirty-five (48.0%) of 281 strains isolated form asymptomatic bacteriuria attacks and 16 (66.6%) of 24 strains isolated from symptomatic urinary tract infection attacks, totaling 151 strains, had multidrug resistance (P > 0.05). One hundred (70.4%) of 142 Escherichia coli strains and 19 (34.5%) of 55 Klebsiella spp strains proliferated in patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria; 8 (80%) of 10 E. coli strains and 4 (80%) of 5 Klebsiella spp. strains were multidrug resistant. Conclusions: The most common infectious episode among spinal cord injury patients was found to be urinary tract ınfection. E. coli was the most common microorganism isolated from urine samples. Antibiotic use in the previous 2 weeks or 3 months

  2. Diagnosing diabetic foot infection: the role of imaging and a proposed flow chart for assessment.

    PubMed

    Israel, O; Sconfienza, L M; Lipsky, B A

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a major current epidemic, is frequently complicated by foot infections that are associated with high morbidity. Diagnosing these infections, especially whether or not underlying bone is involved, poses clinical challenges, but is crucial to making proper decisions regarding therapeutic strategies. The most effective means of managing patients with a diabetic foot infection is within the framework of a multidisciplinary team. Present diagnostic efforts are aimed at developing better methods to differentiate uninfected from infected soft tissue wounds, to determine when bone infection is present, and to more clearly define when infection has resolved with treatment. Imaging studies play a major role in diagnosis. This usually begins with plain radiographs, but when advanced imaging is needed, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice. Newer techniques, such as molecular hybrid imaging, positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission (SPECT)/CT using various radiotracers, play an increasing role. These tests may redefine the non-invasive diagnostic work-up of diabetic foot wounds, potentially leading to substantial improvements in patient management. As experts in infectious diseases, radiology and nuclear medicine, we reviewed the available literature on diagnosing diabetic foot infections, especially the currently available imaging techniques, and developed a proposed diagnostic flow chart, for evaluating patients with a diabetic foot wound. PMID:24231797

  3. Intrawound vancomycin powder decreases staphylococcal surgical site infections following posterior instrumented spinal arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Aaron; McIff, Terence E.; Lai, Sue-Min; Burton, Douglas C.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective historical cohort design. Objective To determine what effect the addition of intrawound vancomycin powder to the prophylactic regimen of posterior instrumented spinal arthrodesis procedures has had on acute surgical site infections. Summary of Background Data Surgical site infections (SSI) are known complications in instrumented spinal arthrodesis procedures, and are predominately caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Recent reports have suggested that placing vancomycin powder into the surgical wound prior to closure prevents surgical site infections in spinal surgery. Risk factors for SSIs in the setting of intrawound vancomycin powder use have not been previously reported on. Methods Surgical site infection rates following 342 posterior instrumented spinal arthrodeses (Oct. 2008 to Sept. 2011) in which intrawound vancomycin powder was used in addition to the standard antimicrobial prophylaxis (Vanco cohort) were compared to 341 posterior instrumented spinal arthrodeses (Apr. 2005 to Oct. 2008) in which no vancomyin powder was added (Non-Vanco cohort). Both two sample t-test and Chi-square test (Fisher’s where appropriate) were used for group comparisons. A sub-analysis of the Vanco cohort was undertaken to identify risk factors for SSIs despite intrawound vancomycin use. Results There was a significant reduction in the number of acute staphylococcal SSIs in the Vanco cohort (1.1%) compared to the Non-Vanco cohort (3.8%) (p=0.029). Deep staphylococcal infections decreased to 0 compared to 7 in the Non-Vanco cohort (2.1%) (p=0.008). Deep MRSA infections decreased to 0 compared to 5 in the Non-Vanco cohort (1.5%) (p=0.031). Sub-analysis of the Vanco cohort identified that being discharged to an inpatient rehabilitation or skilled nursing facility was associated with developing a SSI. Conclusions Intrawound vancomycin powder use has decreased the rate of acute staphylococcal SSIs in our posterior instrumented spine arthrodesis surgeries

  4. Gene Expression Signatures Diagnose Influenza and Other Symptomatic Respiratory Viral Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Zaas, Aimee K.; Chen, Minhua; Varkey, Jay; Veldman, Timothy; Hero, Alfred O.; Lucas, Joseph; Huang, Yongsheng; Turner, Ronald; Gilbert, Anthony; Lambkin-Williams, Robert; Øien, N. Christine; Nicholson, Bradly; Kingsmore, Stephen; Carin, Lawrence; Woods, Christopher W.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are a common reason for seeking medical attention and the threat of pandemic influenza will likely add to these numbers. Using human viral challenge studies with live rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza A, we developed peripheral blood gene expression signatures that distinguish individuals with symptomatic ARI from uninfected individuals with > 95% accuracy. We validated this “acute respiratory viral” signature - encompassing genes with a known role in host defense against viral infections - across each viral challenge. We also validated the signature in an independently acquired dataset for influenza A and classified infected individuals from healthy controls with 100% accuracy. In the same dataset, we could also distinguish viral from bacterial ARIs (93% accuracy). These results demonstrate that ARIs induce changes in human peripheral blood gene expression that can be used to diagnose a viral etiology of respiratory infection and triage symptomatic individuals. PMID:19664979

  5. A trend towards increasing viral load in newly diagnosed HIV-infected inpatients in southeast China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Wang, Z; Huang, A; Yuan, J; Wei, D; Ye, H

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral blood viral load is an important indicator of viral production and clearance. Previous studies have suggested that viral load might predict the rate of decrease in CD4+ cell count and progression to AIDS and death. Here, we conducted a retrospective analysis of the trends in HIV-1 viral load in southeast China. Among inpatients newly diagnosed with HIV infection, we found that viral load has increased over the past decade from 4·20 log10 copies/ml in 2002 to 6·61 log10 copies/ml in 2014, with a mean increase of 0·19 log10 copies/ml each year. However, the CD4+ cell count was stable and insensitive to changes in viral load. Thus, increasing viral load appears to be an emerging trend in newly diagnosed HIV-infected inpatients. PMID:26732896

  6. HIV Screening Rates among Medicaid Enrollees Diagnosed with Other Sexually Transmitted Infections

    PubMed Central

    Adekeye, Oluwatoyosi A.; Abara, Winston E.; Xu, Junjun; Lee, Joel M.; Rust, George; Satcher, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 20 million new sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are diagnosed yearly in the United States costing the healthcare system an estimated $16 billion in direct medical expenses. The presence of other STIs increases the risk of HIV transmission. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has long recommended routine HIV screening for individuals with a diagnosed STI. Unfortunately, HIV screening prevalence among STI diagnosed patients are still sub-optimal in many healthcare settings. Objective To determine the proportion of STI-diagnosed persons in the Medicaid population who are screened for HIV, examine correlates of HIV screening, and to suggest critical intervention points to increase HIV screening in this population. Methods A retrospective database analysis was conducted to examine the prevalence and correlates of HIV screening among participants. Participant eligibility was restricted to Medicaid enrollees in 29 states with a primary STI diagnosis (chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis) or pelvic inflammatory disease claim in 2009. HIV-positive persons were excluded from the study. Frequencies and descriptive statistics were conducted to characterize the sample in general and by STI diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed to estimate unadjusted odds ratios and adjusted odds ratio respectively and the 95% confidence intervals. Multivariate logistic regression models that included the independent variables (race, STI diagnosis, and healthcare setting) and covariates (gender, residential status, age, and state) were analyzed to examine independent associations with HIV screening. Results About 43% of all STI-diagnosed study participants were screened for HIV. STI-diagnosed persons that were between 20–24 years, female, residing in a large metropolitan area and with a syphilis diagnosis were more likely to be screened for HIV. Participants who received their STI diagnosis in the emergency

  7. A Diagnostic Algorithm for Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Initially Diagnosed as Lumbar Disc Hernia or Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Personal Experience and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Kosei; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Miyoshi, Kota; Sato, Masaki; Arino, Yusuke; Mikami, Yoji

    2016-08-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, Churg-Strauss syndrome) is a rare systemic vasculitis and is difficult to diagnose. EGPA has a number of symptoms including peripheral dysesthesia caused by mononeuropathy multiplex, which is similar to radiculopathy due to lumbar disc hernia or lumbar spinal stenosis. Therefore, EGPA patients with mononeuropathy multiplex often visit orthopedic clinics, but orthopedic doctors and spine neurosurgeons have limited experience in diagnosing EGPA because of its rarity. We report a consecutive series of patients who were initially diagnosed as having lumbar disc hernia or lumbar spinal stenosis by at least 2 medical institutions from March 2006 to April 2013 but whose final diagnosis was EGPA. All patients had past histories of asthma or eosinophilic pneumonia, and four out of five had peripheral edema. Laboratory data showed abnormally increased eosinophil counts, and nerve conduction studies of all patients revealed axonal damage patterns. All patients recovered from paralysis to a functional level after high-dose steroid treatment. We shortened the duration of diagnosis from 49 days to one day by adopting a diagnostic algorithm after experiencing the first case. PMID:27549670

  8. [A pediatric case of HIV who diagnosed by virtue of disseminated cryptococcus infection].

    PubMed

    Acar, Manolya; Sütçü, Murat; Aktürk, Hacer; Hançerli Törün, Selda; Karagöz, Nurinisa; Beka, Hayati; Yekeler, Ensar; Ağaçfidan, Ali; Salman, Nuran; Somer, Ayper

    2016-07-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an important opportunistic pathogen that causes serious mortality and morbidity in AIDS patients. Although its incidence has decreased with proper antiretroviral treatment (ART), it is still a major concern in areas with low socioeconomic HIV endemic countries with poor sources of therapy. In our country, pediatric HIV infection and so, HIV-related opportunistic infections are very rare. In order to pay attention to this unusual collaboration; herein, we presented a pediatric case who was diagnosed with HIV and disseminated cryptococcus infection concomitantly. A 6.5-year-old previously healthy girl has admitted to our hospital with the complaints of prolonged fever, cough and hemoptysis. On her physical examination she had oral candidiasis, generalized lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. Laboratory findings were as follows; white blood cell count: 3170 µL (neutrophil: 2720 µL, lymphocyte: 366 µL), hemoglobin level: 7.8 gr/dl, hematocrit: 25.5% platelets: 170.000 µL, CRP: 15.2 mg/L and serum IgG level: 1865 mg/dl. Her anti-HIV test yielde,d positive result and confirmed by Western blot assay, together with a high viral load (HIV-RNA: 3.442.000 copies/ml). She was started ART (lamivudine, zidovudine and lopinavir/ritonavir combination) with the diagnosis of stage 3 HIV infection (AIDS). Posteroanterior chest radiograph showed mediastinal extension and nodular parenchyma. Since the patient was suspected to have pulmonary tuberculosis based on the clinical and radiological findings, empirical antituberculosis therapy was started. Because of the insistance of fever, three different blood specimens, bone marrow and gastric aspirates were collected for culture, in which all of them yielded C.neoformans growth. She was then diagnosed as disseminated cryptococcosis and treated with liposomal amphotericin B and fluconazole successfully. Although pediatric HIV infection is usually diagnosed secondary to maternal disease, it can rarely be

  9. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  10. Advanced noninvasive imaging of spinal vascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Eddleman, Christopher S.; Jeong, Hyun; Cashen, Ty A.; Walker, Matthew; Bendok, Bernard R.; Batjer, H. Hunt; Carroll, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal vascular malformations (SVMs) are an uncommon, heterogeneous group of vascular anomalies that can render devastating neurological consequences if they are not diagnosed and treated in a timely fashion. Imaging SVMs has always presented a formidable challenge because their clinical and imaging presentations resemble those of neoplasms, demyelination diseases, and infection. Advancements in noninvasive imaging modalities (MR and CT angiography) have increased during the last decade and have improved the ability to accurately diagnose spinal vascular anomalies. In addition, intraoperative imaging techniques have been developed that aid in the intraoperative assessment before, during, and after resection of these lesions with minimal and/or optimal use of spinal digital subtraction angiography. In this report, the authors review recent advancements in the imaging of SVMs that will likely lead to more timely diagnoses and treatment while reducing procedural risk exposure to the patients who harbor these uncommon spinal lesions. PMID:19119895

  11. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... all. They include Pain in your neck or back Numbness, weakness, cramping, or pain in your arms or legs Pain going down the leg Foot problems Doctors diagnose spinal stenosis with a physical exam and ...

  12. The Frequency of Enterobius Vermicularis Infections in Patients Diagnosed With Acute Appendicitis in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Muhammad Umer; Bilal, Muhammad; Anis, Khurram; Khan, Ali Mahmood; Fatima, Kaneez; Ahmed, Iqbal; Khatri, Ali Mohammad; Shafiq-ur-Rehman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The main aim of this study was to determine the frequency of Enterobius Vermicularis infections and other unique histopathological findings in patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis. Materials: This retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital of Karachi, Pakistan over a time period of 9 years from 2005 to 2013. The recorded demographic and histopathological data for the 2956 appendectomies performed during this time frame were extracted using a structured template form. Negative and incidental appendectomies were excluded from the study. Results: Out of the 2956 patients diagnosed with acute appendicitis, 84 (2.8%) patients had Enterobius Vermicularis infections. Malignancy (n=2, 0.1%) and infection with Ascaris (n=1, 0.1%) was found very rarely among the patients. Eggs in lumen (n=22, 0.7%), mucinous cystadenoma (n=28, 1.0%), mucocele (n=11, 0.4%), lymphoma (n=9, 0.3%), obstruction in lumen (n=17, 0.6%) and purulent exudate (n=37, 1.3%) were also seldom seen in the histopathological reports. Conclusion: Enterobius Vermicularis manifestation is a rare overall but a leading parasitic cause of appendicitis. Steps such as early diagnosis and regular de worming may help eradicate the need for surgeries. PMID:26156929

  13. Spinal Cord Ventral Horns and Lymphoid Organ Involvement in Powassan Virus Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Rodrigo I.; Hermance, Meghan E.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Thangamani, Saravanan

    2016-01-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) belongs to the family Flaviviridae and is a member of the tick-borne encephalitis serogroup. Transmission of POWV from infected ticks to humans has been documented in the USA, Canada, and Russia, causing fatal encephalitis in 10% of human cases and significant neurological sequelae in survivors. We used C57BL/6 mice to investigate POWV infection and pathogenesis. After footpad inoculation, infected animals exhibited rapid disease progression and 100% mortality. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence revealed a very strong neuronal tropism of POWV infection. The central nervous system infection appeared as a meningoencephalitis with perivascular mononuclear infiltration and microglial activation in the brain, and a poliomyelitis-like syndrome with high level of POWV antigen at the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Pathological studies also revealed substantial infection of splenic macrophages by POWV, which suggests that the spleen plays a more important role in pathogenesis than previously realized. This report provides a detailed description of the neuroanatomical distribution of the lesions produced by POWV infection in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:27529273

  14. Spinal Cord Ventral Horns and Lymphoid Organ Involvement in Powassan Virus Infection in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rodrigo I; Hermance, Meghan E; Gelman, Benjamin B; Thangamani, Saravanan

    2016-01-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) belongs to the family Flaviviridae and is a member of the tick-borne encephalitis serogroup. Transmission of POWV from infected ticks to humans has been documented in the USA, Canada, and Russia, causing fatal encephalitis in 10% of human cases and significant neurological sequelae in survivors. We used C57BL/6 mice to investigate POWV infection and pathogenesis. After footpad inoculation, infected animals exhibited rapid disease progression and 100% mortality. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence revealed a very strong neuronal tropism of POWV infection. The central nervous system infection appeared as a meningoencephalitis with perivascular mononuclear infiltration and microglial activation in the brain, and a poliomyelitis-like syndrome with high level of POWV antigen at the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Pathological studies also revealed substantial infection of splenic macrophages by POWV, which suggests that the spleen plays a more important role in pathogenesis than previously realized. This report provides a detailed description of the neuroanatomical distribution of the lesions produced by POWV infection in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:27529273

  15. Rates of Prevalent HIV Infection, Prevalent Diagnoses, and New Diagnoses Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in US States, Metropolitan Statistical Areas, and Counties, 2012-2013

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Travis Howard; Sullivan, Patrick Sean

    2016-01-01

    Background In the United States, men who have sex with men (MSM) increasingly represent the majority of people living with and acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Local and federal surveillance programs estimate the number of persons living with an HIV diagnosis, persons living with HIV infection, and new diagnoses. Given the absence of population-based estimates of the number of MSM for US states, metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), or counties, it is not possible to accurately estimate rates using these indicators at these levels, inhibiting the ability to understand HIV burden and to direct prevention efforts. Objective To synthesize recently published estimates of MSM population size with publicly available HIV surveillance data, in order to estimate the prevalence of HIV diagnosis and infection and the rate of new diagnoses, at the national, state, MSA, and county levels. Methods The number of MSM living with HIV infection in 2012 (prevalence), living with an HIV diagnosis in 2012 (diagnosed prevalence), and newly diagnosed with HIV infection in 2013 (new diagnosis), at state, MSA, and county levels, were obtained from publicly available data from AIDSVu.org and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The estimated number of MSM living in every US county was calculated using recently published methodology that utilized data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and American Community Survey. Estimated county-level MSM counts were aggregated to form MSA- and state-level totals. From this, we estimated HIV prevalence, diagnosed prevalence, and new diagnosis rates. Results The estimated HIV prevalence among MSM in the United States in 2012 was 15.0% (666,900/4,452,772), the diagnosed HIV prevalence in 2012 was 11.1% (493,453/4,452,772), and the new diagnosis rate for 2013 was 0.7 per 100 MSM. For diagnosed prevalence at the state level, 6 states had both <15,000 cases and diagnosed prevalence rates of ≥15

  16. Cutaneous aseptic neutrophilic abscesses and Yersinia enterocolitica infection in a case subsequently diagnosed as Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Safa, G; Loppin, M; Tisseau, L; Lamoril, J

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a man who presented cutaneous aseptic abscesses, a rare form of neutrophilic disease, associated with Yersinia enterocolitica infection and who was later diagnosed as having Crohn's disease (CD). Genetic analysis showed that the patient had a mutation in the caspase activation recruitment domain 15/nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 gene (R702W heterozygote). This case is in keeping with recent evidence in the literature which suggests that CD is a disease linked to abnormal immune responses to enteric bacteria in genetically susceptible individuals. Further understanding of the innate immune system should provide new insights into the pathogenesis of these inflammatory diseases. PMID:18799880

  17. Multiple nocardial abscesses of the brainstem and spinal cord diagnosed after an open biopsy through a cervical partial central corpectomy: case report.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Ian; Casselman, Jan W; Vandecasteele, Stefaan J; Janssen, Alexander; Regaert, Bart; Vantomme, Nikolaas; Vanopdenbosch, Ludo J

    2015-09-01

    Nocardiosis of the central nervous system is a challenging and difficult diagnosis for the clinician. The combination of infections of the brain and spinal cord is even more rare. The authors report on a patient with multiple lesions in the brainstem and cervical spinal cord. This 81-year-old immunocompetent woman presented with symptoms of progressive walking difficulty and ataxia. The results of an extensive workup with laboratory investigation, MRI, lumbar puncture, positron emission tomography (PET), and bone marrow biopsy remained inconclusive. Only after an open biopsy of a cervical lesion by an anterior approach through a partial central corpectomy of the cervical spine, was the diagnosis of nocardiosis made, allowing for specific antibiotic treatment. PMID:26091435

  18. Diagnosing intramammary infections: evaluating expert opinions on the definition of intramammary infection using conjoint analysis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, S; Dohoo, I R; Olde Riekerink, R; Stryhn, H

    2010-07-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to develop a set of criteria to serve as a pseudo-gold standard for what constitutes an intramammary infection using data from 3 consecutive quarter milk samples taken 1 wk apart. Data from lactating cows in 90 dairy herds in 4 Canadian provinces were used to generate the data sets (profiles) used in the conjoint analysis to elicit expert opinions on the topic. The experts were selected from the participants (n=23) in the 2007 Mastitis Research Workers' Conference in Minneapolis and from a series of mastitis laboratory courses for bovine practitioners (n=25) in the Netherlands. Three-week udder quarter profiles with specific combinations of somatic cell count, bacterial species isolated, and plate colony count were selected and included in the conjoint analysis based on the desire to achieve even distributions in the categories of 6 constructed variables. The participants were presented with 3 sets of cards with 20 cards in each set. On each card, they were asked to assign a probability of infection on the middle day (test day) in the 3-wk profile. Depending on the set of cards, they were asked only to be concerned with the probability of infection with coagulase-negative staphylococci, Escherichia coli, or Staphylococcus aureus. These 3 organisms were chosen to represent a minor pathogen, a major environmental pathogen, and a major contagious pathogen, respectively. The assigned probabilities for each organism were cross-tabulated according to the number of times the organism of interest was isolated in the 3-wk period, how many colonies of the organism of interest were isolated on the test day, and the somatic cell count (200,000 cells/mL). There was considerable variation in the assigned probabilities within each of the combinations of factors. The median, minimum, and maximum values of the assigned probabilities for each combination were computed. The combinations with a median probability >50% were considered

  19. Limited cross-border infections in patients newly diagnosed with HIV in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background International travel plays a role in the spread of HIV-1 across Europe. It is, however, not known whether international travel is more important for spread of the epidemic as compared to endogenous infections within single countries. In this study, phylogenetic associations among HIV of newly diagnosed patients were determined across Europe. Results Data came from the SPREAD programme which collects samples of newly diagnosed patients that are representative for national HIV epidemics. 4260 pol sequences from 25 European countries and Israel collected in 2002–2007 were included. We identified 457 clusters including 1330 persons (31.2% of all patients). The cluster size ranged between 2 and 28. A number of 987 patients (74.2%) were part of a cluster that consisted only of patients originating from the same country. In addition, 135 patients (10.2%) were in a cluster including only individuals from neighboring countries. Finally, 208 patients (15.6%) clustered with individuals from countries without a common border. Clustering with patients from the same country was less prevalent in patients being infected with B subtype (P-value <0.0001), in men who have sex with men (P-value <0.0001), and in recently infected patients (P-value =0.045). Conclusions Our findings indicate that the transmission of HIV-1 in Europe is predominantly occurring between patients from the same country. This could have implications for HIV-1 transmission prevention programmes. Because infections through travelling between countries is not frequently observed it is important to have good surveillance of the national HIV-1 epidemics. PMID:23551870

  20. Development of culture-based serological assays to diagnose Babesia divergens infections.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Simona; Galuppi, Roberta; Marcer, Federica; Marini, Carla; Tampieri, Maria Paola; Moretti, Annabella; Pietrobelli, Mario; Cancrini, Gabriella

    2012-02-01

    Babesioses are hematic tick-borne diseases that induce malaria-like disorders in domestic, wild animals, and humans. Although indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) commercial kits are available to test the presence of antibodies against most Babesia species, no kit exists to serologically diagnose the infections due to Babesia divergens, one of the most important zoonotic species. To fill this gap and to develop assays to detect animal and human infections, in vitro cultures (microaerophilous stationary phase system) of B. divergens were organized. Infected erythrocytes were adsorbed as corpuscular antigen (CA) on IFAT slides and ELISA microwells. The supernatant medium of the cultures (metabolic antigen, MA) was collected and employed in ELISA and western blot (WB) assays. B. divergens was also used to produce positive sera in Meriones unguiculatus and to infect a calf. Serological tests were set up with sera from experimentally/naturally infected animals, and possible cross-reactions were evaluated using heterologous sera from cattle positive to other piroplasms. Sera from clinically healthy people at risk of infection were also tested. As expected, assays based on the purified MAs from in vitro cultures proved more sensitive and specific than CA-IFAT and CA-ELISA. In fact, MA-ELISA provided satisfactory performances (even if 8.4%-15.7% cross-reactions were evidenced), and the WB developed proved totally sensitive and specific. WB indicated as immunodominant antigens two major protein bands at 33 and 37 kDa, which were also evidenced in 2.2% of the human sera tested, proving the parasite transmission to humans also in Italy. PMID:21995263

  1. Acute lower motor neuron syndrome and spinal cord gray matter hyperintensities in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael R.; Chad, David A.; Venna, Nagagopal

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe a novel manifestation of lower motor neuron disease in patients with well-controlled HIV infection. Methods: A retrospective study was performed to identify HIV-positive individuals with acute, painful lower motor neuron diseases. Results: Six patients were identified with HIV and lower motor neuron disease. Two patients met the inclusion criteria of well-controlled, chronic HIV infection and an acute, painful, unilateral lower motor neuron paralytic syndrome affecting the distal portion of the upper limb. These patients had segmental T2-hyperintense lesions in the central gray matter of the cervical spinal cord on MRI. One patient stabilized and the second patient improved with immunomodulatory therapy. Conclusions: This newly described syndrome expands the clinical spectrum of lower motor neuron diseases in HIV. PMID:26015990

  2. Pathology of the spinal cord of C57BL/6J mice infected with rabies virus (CVS-11 strain).

    PubMed

    Kojima, Daisuke; Park, Chun-Ho; Satoh, Yusuke; Inoue, Satoshi; Noguchi, Akira; Oyamada, Toshifumi

    2009-03-01

    Fixed rabies viruses (CVS-11 strain) were inoculated intramuscularly to C57BL/6J mice, and the pathomorphological changes of the spinal cord including dorsal root spinal ganglion cells were investigated. At 4 days postinoculation (PI), viral antigens were first detected in the spinal neurons and dorsal root spinal ganglion cells without producing morphological changes. At 5 days PI, mild infiltration of lymphocytes was observed around the central canal, small blood vessels and leptomeninges. Cells positive to anti-Iba1 and anti-GFAP antibodies increased significantly from 3 to 5 days PI, respectively. Microglia changed their morphological forms to be ramified or amoeboid, and astroglia extended their cytoplasm from the leptomeninges to the parenchyma. At 7 days PI, apoptotic cells were found in the spinal cord and dorsal root spinal ganglion using TUNEL. We confirmed that most of T lymphocytes and a minority of microglial cells underwent apoptosis, using a combination of TUNEL and immunostaining with antibodies to viral phosphoprotein, CD3, Iba1 and GFAP. On the other hand, astroglial cells and virus-infected nerve cells were negative against TUNEL and cleaved caspase-3 antibody. These findings indicate that T lymphocytes and microglial cells died by apoptosis, whereas virus-infected nerve cells died by necrosis. This was accompanied by increased numbers and morphological changes of glial cells associated with the pathogenesis of CVS-11 in the C57BL/6J mouse. PMID:19346700

  3. Analysis of the host transcriptome from demyelinating spinal cord of murine coronavirus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Ruth; Li, Fan; Dragomir, Isabelle; Chua, Ming Ming W; Gregory, Brian D; Weiss, Susan R

    2013-01-01

    Persistent infection of the mouse central nervous system (CNS) with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) induces a demyelinating disease pathologically similar to multiple sclerosis and is therefore used as a model system. There is little information regarding the host factors that correlate with and contribute to MHV-induced demyelination. Here, we detail the genes and pathways associated with MHV-induced demyelinating disease in the spinal cord. High-throughput sequencing of the host transcriptome revealed that demyelination is accompanied by numerous transcriptional changes indicative of immune infiltration as well as changes in the cytokine milieu and lipid metabolism. We found evidence that a Th1-biased cytokine/chemokine response and eicosanoid-derived inflammation accompany persistent MHV infection and that antigen presentation is ongoing. Interestingly, increased expression of genes involved in lipid transport, processing, and catabolism, including some with known roles in neurodegenerative diseases, coincided with demyelination. Lastly, expression of several genes involved in osteoclast or bone-resident macrophage function, most notably TREM2 and DAP12, was upregulated in persistently infected mouse spinal cord. This study highlights the complexity of the host antiviral response, which accompany MHV-induced demyelination, and further supports previous findings that MHV-induced demyelination is immune-mediated. Interestingly, these data suggest a parallel between bone reabsorption by osteoclasts and myelin debris clearance by microglia in the bone and the CNS, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of using an RNA-seq approach to study the host CNS response to persistent viral infection. PMID:24058676

  4. Intellectual Impairment in Patients with Newly Diagnosed HIV Infection in Southwestern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Sunmonu, Taofiki A.; Sellner, Johann; Ogunrin, Olubunmi A.; Imarhiagbe, Frank A.; Komolafe, Morenikeji A.; Afolabi, Olusegun T.; Ilesanmi, Olayinka S.; Olanrewaju, Fatai; Oladimeji, Benedicta Y.

    2015-01-01

    Neurocognitive impairment is a detrimental complication of HIV infection. Here, we characterized the intellectual performance of patients with newly diagnosed HIV infection in southwestern Nigeria. We conducted a prospective study at Owo Federal Medical Center by using the adapted Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). The raw scores were converted to standardized scores (z-scores) and correlated with clinical and laboratory findings. Fifty-eight HIV positive patients were recruited; 72% were in WHO stages 3 and 4. We detected a high rate of intellectual impairment in HIV positive patients and controls (63.8% and 10%, resp.; P < 0.001). HIV positive patients performed worse throughout the subtests of both verbal and performance intelligence quotients. Presence of opportunistic infections was associated with worse performance in the similarities and digit symbol tests and performance and full scale scores. Lower body weight correlated with poor performance in different WAIS subtests. The high rate of advanced disease stage warrants measures aimed at earlier diagnosis and treatment. Assessment of neurocognitive performance at diagnosis may offer the opportunity to improve functioning in daily life and counteract disease progression. PMID:26295033

  5. Intellectual Impairment in Patients with Newly Diagnosed HIV Infection in Southwestern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Sunmonu, Taofiki A; Sellner, Johann; Ogunrin, Olubunmi A; Imarhiagbe, Frank A; Komolafe, Morenikeji A; Afolabi, Olusegun T; Ilesanmi, Olayinka S; Olanrewaju, Fatai; Oladimeji, Benedicta Y

    2015-01-01

    Neurocognitive impairment is a detrimental complication of HIV infection. Here, we characterized the intellectual performance of patients with newly diagnosed HIV infection in southwestern Nigeria. We conducted a prospective study at Owo Federal Medical Center by using the adapted Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). The raw scores were converted to standardized scores (z-scores) and correlated with clinical and laboratory findings. Fifty-eight HIV positive patients were recruited; 72% were in WHO stages 3 and 4. We detected a high rate of intellectual impairment in HIV positive patients and controls (63.8% and 10%, resp.; P < 0.001). HIV positive patients performed worse throughout the subtests of both verbal and performance intelligence quotients. Presence of opportunistic infections was associated with worse performance in the similarities and digit symbol tests and performance and full scale scores. Lower body weight correlated with poor performance in different WAIS subtests. The high rate of advanced disease stage warrants measures aimed at earlier diagnosis and treatment. Assessment of neurocognitive performance at diagnosis may offer the opportunity to improve functioning in daily life and counteract disease progression. PMID:26295033

  6. Stent-graft implantation for clinically diagnosed syphilitic aortic aneurysm in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Shota; Imoto, Kiyotaka; Uchida, Keiji; Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Yokoi, Yoshihiko; Shigematsu, Hiroshi; Masuda, Munetaka

    2014-01-01

    We describe our experience with stent-graft placement in a patient with a clinically diagnosed syphilitic aortic aneurysm.The patient was a 43-year-old man with syphilitic and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an aortic aneurysm with 89 mm in maximum size which was located at distal aortic arch and was considered syphilis derived saccular aneurysm. The aneurysm was judged at high risk of rupture from its shape. We decided to perform stent-graft implantation. Before surgery, the patient was given antibacterial and anti-HIV agents. Hand-made fenestrated stent graft by Tokyo Medical University was implanted. The graft was placed from the ascending aorta to Th 9 level in the descending aorta. The aneurysm completely disappeared during follow-up, with no flare-up of syphilitic infection up to 2 years after surgery.The number of patients with syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus co-infection is now increasing. Stent-graft implantation may be an effective treatment in such immunocompromised patients. PMID:23774613

  7. Diagnosing intramammary infections: evaluation of composite milk samples to detect intramammary infections.

    PubMed

    Reyher, K K; Dohoo, I R

    2011-07-01

    Composite milk samples, in which milk from all 4 bovine quarters is collected in a single vial, are widely used in many developed dairy industries for detection of intramammary infections (IMI). These samples are more economical for use in culturing protocols than individual quarter samples, and may be useful when considering management options at the cow and herd level. The dilution effect may be problematic, however, resulting in lower sensitivity (Se) in IMI detection on composite samples. Relative Se and specificity (Sp) in composite samples have previously been described for some major pathogens, but because the causative organism for IMI is initially unknown, it is beneficial to investigate the reliability of composite samples for detection of all types of mastitis-causing bacteria. The Canadian Bovine Mastitis Research Network has a large data collection platform-the National Cohort of Dairy Farms-containing a vast amount of data on mastitis in Canada. These data have been used to further investigate the Se and Sp of composite samples in detecting IMI caused by specific mastitis pathogens. Milk samplings of selected cows before dry-off, after calving, and during lactation (n=48,835 samples) were employed to this end. Composite samples showed moderately high Se for Staphylococcus aureus (77.1%, 95% CI=73.3-80.5) and Streptococcus dysgalactiae (73.4%, 95% CI=60.9-83.7), with moderate Se for Streptococcus uberis (62.1%, 95% CI=49.3-73.8) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (59.8%, 95% CI=58.4-61.2). Sensitivities always increased as the number of affected quarters increased. Composite samples also showed high Sp (>97%) for most organisms. Factors such as lactation number and stage of lactation were evaluated for their influence on the Se and Sp of composite sampling, but were only found to be significant for coagulase-negative staphylococci. Predictive values using the herd prevalences found across Canada were calculated and can be useful in field scenarios

  8. A Novel Prevention Bundle to Reduce Surgical Site Infections in Pediatric Spinal Fusion Patients.

    PubMed

    Gould, Jane M; Hennessey, Patricia; Kiernan, Andrea; Safier, Shannon; Herman, Martin

    2016-05-01

    BACKGROUND The Surgical Care Improvement Project bundle emphasizes operative infection prevention practices. Despite implementing the Surgical Care Improvement Project bundle in 2008, spinal fusion surgical site infections (SF-SSI) continued to be prevalent for this low-volume, high-risk surgery. OBJECTIVE To design a combined pre-, peri-, and postoperative bundle (PPPB) that would lead to sustained reductions in SF-SSI rates. DESIGN Quality improvement project, before-after trial with cost-effectiveness analysis. SETTING Children's hospital. PATIENTS All spinal fusion patients, 2008-2015. INTERVENTION A multidisciplinary team developed the PPPB composed of Surgical Care Improvement Project elements plus improved wound care practices, nursing standard of care, dedicated nursing unit, dermatology assessment tool and consultation, nursing education tool using "teach back" technique, and a "Back Home" kit. SF-SSI rates were compared before (2008-2010) and after (2011-February 2015) implementation of PPPB. PPPB compliance was monitored. RESULTS A total of 224 SF surgeries were performed from 2008 to February 2015. Pre-PPPB analysis revealed median time to SF-SSI of 28 days, secondary to skin and bowel flora. Mean 3-year pre-PPPB SF-SSI rate per 100 SF surgeries was 8.2 (8/98) (2008: 13.3 [4/30], 2009: 2.7 [1/37], 2010: 9.7 [3/31]). Mean SF-SSI rate after PPPB was 2.4 (3/126) (January 2011-February 2015); there was a 71% reduction in mean SSI rate (P=.0695). No SF-SSI occurred in neuromuscular patients (P=.008) after PPPB. Compliance with PPPB elements has been 100%. CONCLUSIONS PPPB led to sustained improvement in SF-SSI rates over 50 months. The PPPB could be reproduced for other surgeries. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:527-534. PMID:26818613

  9. Agreement among Health Care Professionals in Diagnosing Case Vignette-Based Surgical Site Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lepelletier, Didier; Ravaud, Philippe; Baron, Gabriel; Lucet, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess agreement in diagnosing surgical site infection (SSI) among healthcare professionals involved in SSI surveillance. Methods Case-vignette study done in 2009 in 140 healthcare professionals from seven specialties (20 in each specialty, Anesthesiologists, Surgeons, Public health specialists, Infection control physicians, Infection control nurses, Infectious diseases specialists, Microbiologists) in 29 University and 36 non-University hospitals in France. We developed 40 case-vignettes based on cardiac and gastrointestinal surgery patients with suspected SSI. Each participant scored six randomly assigned case-vignettes before and after reading the SSI definition on an online secure relational database. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess agreement regarding SSI diagnosis on a seven-point Likert scale and the kappa coefficient to assess agreement for superficial or deep SSI on a three-point scale. Results Based on a consensus, SSI was present in 21 of 40 vignettes (52.5%). Intraspecialty agreement for SSI diagnosis ranged across specialties from 0.15 (95% confidence interval, 0.00–0.59) (anesthesiologists and infection control nurses) to 0.73 (0.32–0.90) (infectious diseases specialists). Reading the SSI definition improved agreement in the specialties with poor initial agreement. Intraspecialty agreement for superficial or deep SSI ranged from 0.10 (−0.19–0.38) to 0.54 (0.25–0.83) (surgeons) and increased after reading the SSI definition only among the infection control nurses from 0.10 (−0.19–0.38) to 0.41 (−0.09–0.72). Interspecialty agreement for SSI diagnosis was 0.36 (0.22–0.54) and increased to 0.47 (0.31–0.64) after reading the SSI definition. Conclusion Among healthcare professionals evaluating case-vignettes for possible surgical site infection, there was large disagreement in diagnosis that varied both between and within specialties. PMID:22529980

  10. Identification of the spinal cord as a major site of persistence during chronic infection with a murine coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Perlman, S; Jacobsen, G; Olson, A L; Afifi, A

    1990-04-01

    After intranasal inoculation, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) gains entry into the central nervous system (CNS) via the olfactory and trigeminal nerves. Under the appropriate conditions, some mice develop clinically apparent demyelinating encephalomyelitis several weeks later, with virus always present in the spinal cord. To determine the pathway by which virus reaches the cord, brains and spinal cords of infected, asymptomatic mice were analyzed by in situ hybridization. Viral RNA was always detected in the anterior part of the upper spinal cord. A similar analysis of mice with the recent onset of hindlimb weakness showed that viral RNA was detected in the same location. The results suggest that MHV is transported to the spinal cord via well-defined neuroanatomic pathways and that viral amplification with resultant clinical disease occurs from this site of persistence in the anterior spinal cord. This process of viral amplification may involve the generation of viral variants as has been described for MHV-infected rats. No major changes in viral RNA or protein could be detected when MHV isolated from mice with hindlimb paralysis was analyzed. The data suggest that the generation of viral variants is not important in the pathogenesis of the late onset of neurological disease induced by MHV in mice. PMID:2158180

  11. Difficult Cases of Pain and Nonpain Symptoms in Intractable Spinal Infections: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Molly L.; Havyer, Rachel D. A.; Smith, Thomas J.; Swetz, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    In the modern age of advanced surgical techniques and pharmacologic management, bacterial spinal infections (SIs) can be managed (either eradicated or suppressed) in many hosts. However, the optimal management of SIs may be limited by patient comorbidities, which do not allow for surgical management, or limited by antimicrobial options due to side effects, toxicities, or emerging drug resistance. In these settings, frank and honest discussion regarding risks and benefits of treatment should be pursued, including that the SI may be a terminal illness. In this case series, we present 3 patients who had bacterial SIs whose treatments were limited by the above-mentioned factors. Furthermore, each case presented challenges regarding optimal medical management of somatic and neuropathic pain associated with the SI. PMID:22144661

  12. Catheter-related urinary tract infection in patients suffering from spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Dedeić-Ljubović, Amela; Hukić, Mirsada

    2009-02-01

    Urinary tract infection is commoner in patients with spinal cord injuries because of incomplete bladder emptying and the use of catheters that can result in the introduction of bacteria into the bladder. 145 patients suffering from spinal cord injuries, admitted to the Institute for physical medicine and rehabilitation, Centre for paraplegia of the Clinical Centre of the University of Sarajevo, were included. The patients were divided in three groups according to the method of bladder drainage: Group A (n=61) consisted of patients on clean intermittent catheterization; Group B (n=54) consisted of patients with indwelling catheters; Group C (n=30) consisted of patients who had performed self-catheterization. From a total of 4539 urine samples, 3963 (87,3%) were positive and 576 (12,7%) were sterile. More than 90% of the infected patients were asymptomatic. The overall rate of urinary infection amounted to about 2,1 episodes, and bacteriuria to 8,1 episodes per patient. 77% of infections (113/145) were acquired within seven days from catheterization. Infection was usually polymicrobial; the greatest number of urine samples 1770/3943 (44,9%) included more than one bacterium. The vast majority of cases of urinary tract infection and bacteriuria are caused by Gram-negative bacilli and enterococci, commensal organisms of the bowel and perineum, representative of those from the hospital environment. Providencia stuarti (18,9%) being the most common, followed by Proteus mirabilis (16,3%), Escherichia coli (11,8%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10,2%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (8,1%), Morganella morgani (5,4%), Acinetobacter baumannii (4,6%), Providencia rettgeri (3,5%). 15,7% of isolates were Gram-positive with Enterococcus faecalis (8,6%) as the most common. 55,3% of isolates were multidrug-resistant, and the highest rates of resistance were found among Acinetobacter baumannii (87,8%), Providencia rettgeri (86,7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85,4%), Providencia stuarti (84,3%) and

  13. Comparison of real-time PCR techniques to cytotoxigenic culture methods for diagnosing Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Knetsch, C W; Bakker, D; de Boer, R F; Sanders, I; Hofs, S; Kooistra-Smid, A M D; Corver, J; Eastwood, K; Wilcox, M H; Kuijper, E J

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, the incidence of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) with a more severe course has increased in Europe and North America. Assays that are capable of rapidly diagnosing CDI are essential. Two real-time PCRs (LUMC and LvI) targeting C. difficile toxin genes (tcdB, and tcdA and tcdB, respectively) were compared with the BD GeneOhm PCR (targeting the tcdB gene), using cytotoxigenic culture as a gold standard. In addition, a real-time PCR targeting the tcdC frameshift mutation at position 117 (Δ117 PCR) was evaluated for detecting toxigenic C. difficile and the presence of PCR ribotype 027 in stool samples. In total, 526 diarrheal samples were prospectively collected and included in the study. Compared with those for cytotoxigenic culture, sensitivity, specificity, positive predicted value (PPV), and negative predicted value (NPV) were for PCR LUMC 96.0%, 88.0%, 66.0%, and 98.9%, for PCR LvI 100.0%, 89.4%, 69.7%, and 100.0%, for PCR Δ117 98.0%, 90.7%, 71.9%, and 99.5%, and for PCR BD GeneOhm 88.3%, 96.9%, 86.5%, and 97.4%. Compared to those with feces samples cultured positive for C. difficile type 027, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the Δ117 PCR were 95.2%, 96.2%, 87.0%, and 98.7%. We conclude that all real-time PCRs can be applied as a first screening test in an algorithm for diagnosing CDI. However, the low PPVs hinder the use of the assays as stand-alone tests. Furthermore, the Δ117 PCR may provide valuable information for minimizing the spread of the epidemic C. difficile PCR ribotype 027. PMID:20980562

  14. [A case diagnosed with chronic granulomatous disease after disseminated infection following BCG vaccination].

    PubMed

    Delibalta, Güler; Seringeç, Murat; Öncül, Oral

    2015-07-01

    BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) vaccine is a widely used vaccine with the recommendation of World Health Organization to protect children against miliary tuberculosis (TB) and TB meningitis. Severe side effects related to this vaccine mostly manifest in the presence of underlying immunosuppressive disease. In this report, an infant case with unknown chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) who developed disseminated BCG infection after administration of BCG vaccine, was presented. High fever, left axillary lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly have developed in a 3-month 28-day female infant, without a known health problem, following BCG vaccination. The acid-fast bacilli (ARB) was isolated from the material of excised lymph node cultivated in Löwenstein-Jensen medium, and the isolate was identified as Mycobacterium bovis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex DNA was detected in the axillary lymph node sample by polymerase chain reaction. Anti-tuberculous treatment included 20 mg/kg of rifampicin+10 mg/kg of isoniazid+15 mg/kg of ethambutol+30 mg/kg of streptomycin was started. The patient was then further evaluated for immunodeficiency and on the basis of the results of dihydroamine and LAD (lymphocyte adhesion defect) tests, diagnosed as autosomal recessive CGD. Based on the anamnesis, there was no known immunodeficiency history both in the case during neonatal period and her family members. Interferon-gamma therapy, which is recommended for the patients with CGD living in endemic areas, was initiated. Our patient's fever dropped at the 15th day of anti-tuberculosis treatment, and she was discharged on the 35th day and continued to receive treatment at home. The patient was followed up at outpatient clinic and had no additional complaints; her hepatosplenomegaly was back to normal at the third month. As a result, since BCG vaccine is contraindicated in CGD carriers, newborns with a family history of CGD should be immunologically examined and BCG vaccine should be

  15. Development and validation of an algorithm to identify patients newly diagnosed with HIV infection from electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Hoang, Tuyen; Kan, Virginia L; Rimland, David; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria

    2014-07-01

    An algorithm was developed that identifies patients with new diagnoses of HIV infection by the use of electronic health records. It was based on the sequence of HIV diagnostic tests, entry of ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes, and measurement of HIV-1 plasma RNA levels in persons undergoing HIV testing from 2006 to 2012 at four large urban Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities. Source data were obtained from the VHA National Corporate Data Warehouse. Chart review was done by a single trained abstractor to validate site-level data regarding new diagnoses. We identified 1,153 patients as having a positive HIV diagnostic test within the VHA. Of these, 57% were determined to have prior knowledge of their HIV status from testing at non-VHA facilities. An algorithm based on the sequence and results of available laboratory tests and ICD-9-CM entries identified new HIV diagnoses with a sensitivity of 83%, specificity of 86%, positive predictive value of 85%, and negative predictive value of 90%. There were no meaningful demographic or clinical differences between newly diagnosed patients who were correctly or incorrectly classified by the algorithm. We have validated a method to identify cases of new diagnosis of HIV infection in large administrative datasets. This method, which has a sensitivity of 83%, specificity of 86%, positive predictive value of 85%, and negative predictive value of 90% can be used in analyses of the epidemiology of newly diagnosed HIV infection. PMID:24564256

  16. Design, Construction, and Evaluation of a Specific Chimeric Antigen To Diagnose Chagasic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Sebastián; Silber, Ariel M.; Brito, Maria Edileuza F.; Ribone, María E.; Lagier, Claudia M.; Marcipar, Iván S.

    2006-01-01

    Chagas' disease is routinely diagnosed by detecting specific antibodies (Abs) using serological methods. The methodology has the drawback of potential cross-reactions with Abs raised during other infectious and autoimmune diseases (AID). Fusion of DNA sequences encoding antigenic proteins is a versatile tool to engineer proteins to be used as sensitizing elements in serological tests. A synthetic gene encoding a chimeric protein containing the C-terminal region of C29 and the N-terminal region of TcP2β was constructed. A 236-serum panel, composed of 104 reactive and 132 nonreactive sera to Chagas' disease, was used to evaluate the performance of the chimera. Among the nonreactive sera, 65 were from patients with AID (systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis) or patients infected with Leishmania brasiliensis, Brucella abortus, Streptococcus pyogenes, or Toxoplasma gondii. The diagnostic performances of the complete TcP2β (TcP2βFL) and its N-terminal region (TcP2βN) were evaluated. TcP2βFL showed unspecific recognition toward leishmaniasis (40%) and AID Abs (58%), while TcP2βN showed no unspecific recognition. The diagnostic utility of the chimera was evaluated by analyzing reactivity and comparing the results with those obtained with TcP2βN. The chimera reactivity was higher than that of the peptide fractions (0.874 versus 0.564 optical density, P = 0.0017). The detectability and specificity were both 100% for the whole serum panel tested. We conclude that the obtained chimera shows an improved selectivity and sensitivity compared with other ones previously reported, therefore displaying an optimized performance for Trypanosoma cruzi infection diagnosis. PMID:17021107

  17. Expansion of the E138A mutation in newly diagnosed HIV-infected patients in Gran Canaria.

    PubMed

    Chamizo, Francisco; Gilarranz, Raúl; Tosco, Tomás; Carrillo, Deyanira; Holguín, África; Santana, Évora; Pérez-Arellano, Jose Luís; Hernández, Michele; Francés, Adela; Cárdenes, Miguel Ángel; Zarzalejos, Jose María; Pena-López, María José

    2016-09-01

    Molecular epidemiology allows us to know local HIV transmission and to design strategies of prevention. We studied 25 HIV newly diagnosed patients with the E138A mutation since the year 2010. Most transmission networks involved young and promiscuous men who have sex with men. Recent infection was only documented in patients grouped into the smaller clusters. PMID:27352730

  18. Treatment of Thoracolumbar Spinal Infections through Anterolateral Approaches Using Expandable Titanium Mesh Cage for Spine Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Tarantino; Daniele, Marruzzo; Martina, Cappelletti; Tiziano, De Giacomo; Roberto, Delfini

    2012-01-01

    Pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis (PVO) is still a rare pathology. However, its incidence is on the rise. This is due to an increasing population with predisposing factors. Also, the availability of more effective diagnostic tools has brought it increasingly to the surgeon's attention. In this study the patients were treated in the Neurosurgery Division of the Department of Neurological Sciences and Psychiatry of the Sapienza University of Rome, between 2001 and 2009. They had thoracolumbar pyogenic spondylitis. This study was undertaken in order to identify the correct diagnostic and therapeutic treatment needed in such cases. From the cases studied here, it is evident that spinal infections can be extremely insidious and that diagnosis tends to be reached late. Surgery, along with the antibiotic treatment, allows for eradication of the causes of the pathology by the reclamation of the affected region. Surgery is also fundamental in helping to recover vital functions and in restoring as much as possible the correct curvature of the rachises. The use of an anterolateral approach is dictated by the necessity of obtaining 360° stability as well as by the need to clear away extensive infections, which are not always reachable using a posterior approach. PMID:23193382

  19. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such as meningitis and polio Inflammatory diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral ...

  20. Mycobacterium chelonae infection presenting as recurrent cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules--a presentation previously diagnosed as Weber Christian disease.

    PubMed

    Maverakis, Emanual; He, Yong; Patel, Forum B; Fitzmaurice, Sarah; Fung, Maxwell A

    2014-06-01

    Although the dermatologic community rarely uses "Weber-Christian Disease" as a diagnosis, it still appears in the internal medicine literature. Herein we present a patient with recurrent cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules who was initially treated with aggressive immunosupression for a presumptive diagnosis of Weber-Christian Disease. After more than a decade the patient was diagnosed with cutaneous Mycobacterium chelonea. This case is an excellent example of the difficulty in diagnosing mycobacterial infections and underscores the importance of having a high suspicion for infectious etiologies for unresponsive cutaneous eruptions in patients on immunosuppressive medications. PMID:24945648

  1. Burkholderia pseudomallei Rapidly Infects the Brain Stem and Spinal Cord via the Trigeminal Nerve after Intranasal Inoculation.

    PubMed

    St John, James A; Walkden, Heidi; Nazareth, Lynn; Beagley, Kenneth W; Ulett, Glen C; Batzloff, Michael R; Beacham, Ifor R; Ekberg, Jenny A K

    2016-09-01

    Infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a disease with a high mortality rate (20% in Australia and 40% in Southeast Asia). Neurological melioidosis is particularly prevalent in northern Australian patients and involves brain stem infection, which can progress to the spinal cord; however, the route by which the bacteria invade the central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. We have previously demonstrated that B. pseudomallei can infect the olfactory and trigeminal nerves within the nasal cavity following intranasal inoculation. As the trigeminal nerve projects into the brain stem, we investigated whether the bacteria could continue along this nerve to penetrate the CNS. After intranasal inoculation of mice, B. pseudomallei caused low-level localized infection within the nasal cavity epithelium, prior to invasion of the trigeminal nerve in small numbers. B. pseudomallei rapidly invaded the trigeminal nerve and crossed the astrocytic barrier to enter the brain stem within 24 h and then rapidly progressed over 2,000 μm into the spinal cord. To rule out that the bacteria used a hematogenous route, we used a capsule-deficient mutant of B. pseudomallei that does not survive in the blood and found that it also entered the CNS via the trigeminal nerve. This suggests that the primary route of entry is via the nerves that innervate the nasal cavity. We found that actin-mediated motility could facilitate initial infection of the olfactory epithelium. Thus, we have demonstrated that B. pseudomallei can rapidly infect the brain and spinal cord via the trigeminal nerve branches that innervate the nasal cavity. PMID:27382023

  2. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection

    MedlinePlus

    ... neurologic disorders. These may include infections (such as meningitis) and brain or spinal cord damage. A spinal ... blood sugar), bacterial or fungal infection (such as meningitis ), tuberculosis, or certain other types of meningitis. BLOOD ...

  3. Obtaining Self-Samples to Diagnose Curable Sexually Transmitted Infections: A Systematic Review of Patients’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Paudyal, Priyamvada; Llewellyn, Carrie; Lau, Jason; Mahmud, Mohammad; Smith, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Background Routine screening is key to sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention and control. Previous studies suggest that clinic-based screening programmes capture only a small proportion of people with STIs. Self-sampling using non- or minimally invasive techniques may be beneficial for those reluctant to actively engage with conventional sampling methods. We systematically reviewed studies of patients’ experiences of obtaining self-samples to diagnose curable STIs. Methods We conducted an electronic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, BNI, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify relevant articles published in English between January 1980 and March 2014. Studies were included if participants self-sampled for the diagnosis of a curable STI and had specifically sought participants’ opinions of their experience, acceptability, preferences, or willingness to self-sample. Results The initial search yielded 558 references. Of these, 45 studies met the inclusion criteria. Thirty-six studies assessed patients’ acceptability and experiences of self-sampling. Pooled results from these studies shows that self-sampling is a highly acceptable method with 85% of patients reporting the method to be well received and acceptable. Twenty-eight studies reported on ease of self-sampling; the majority of patients (88%) in these studies found self-sampling an “easy” procedure. Self-sampling was favoured compared to clinician sampling, and home sampling was preferred to clinic-based sampling. Females and older participants were more accepting of self-sampling. Only a small minority of participants (13%) reported pain during self-sampling. Participants were willing to undergo self-sampling and recommend others. Privacy and safety were the most common concerns. Conclusion Self-sampling for diagnostic testing is well accepted with the majority having a positive experience and willingness to use again. Standardization of self-sampling procedures

  4. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - spinal cord ... spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Most often these are ependymomas and other ... gene mutations. Spinal tumors can occur: Inside the spinal cord (intramedullary) In the membranes (meninges) covering the spinal ...

  5. Role of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgG Avidity Testing in Diagnosing Primary CMV Infection during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lapé-Nixon, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The risk of intrauterine transmission of cytomegalovirus (CMV) during pregnancy is much greater for women who contract primary CMV infection after conception than for women with evidence of infection (circulating CMV antibodies) before conception. Thus, laboratory tests that aid in the identification of recent primary CMV infection are important tools for managing the care of pregnant women suspected of having been exposed to CMV. CMV IgM detection is a sensitive marker of primary CMV infection, but its specificity is poor because CMV IgM is also produced during viral reactivation and persists following primary infection in some individuals. Studies conducted over the last 20 years convincingly demonstrate that measurement of CMV IgG avidity is both a sensitive and a specific method for identifying pregnant women with recent primary CMV infection and thus at increased risk for vertical CMV transmission. IgG avidity is defined as the strength with which IgG binds to antigenic epitopes expressed by a given protein; it matures gradually during the 6 months following primary infection. Low CMV IgG avidity is an accurate indicator of primary infection within the preceding 3 to 4 months, whereas high avidity excludes primary infection within the preceding 3 months. In this minireview, we summarize published data demonstrating the clinical utility of CMV IgG avidity results for estimating time since primary infection in pregnant women, describe commercially available CMV IgG avidity assays, and discuss some of the issues and controversies surrounding CMV IgG avidity testing during pregnancy. PMID:25165026

  6. Screening for asymptomatic lymphogranuloma venereum co-infection in men who have sex with men newly diagnosed with HIV, hepatitis C or syphilis.

    PubMed

    Pallawela, Sns; Bradshaw, D; Hodson, L; Rehill, K; Wong, F; Rockwood, N; Gedela, K; Hardie, J; Price, H; Alexander, S; McLean, K; Dean, G; Smith, A; Sullivan, A K

    2016-07-01

    Patients diagnosed with lymphogranuloma venereum have high rates of co-infection with HIV, syphilis and hepatitis C. The aim of this enhanced surveillance was to screen all men who have sex with men (MSM) newly diagnosed with HIV, syphilis or hepatitis C for co-infection with asymptomatic lymphogranuloma venereum as part of the recommended sexual health screen. Of the 145 patients screened, 21 patients were diagnosed with rectal Chlamydia trachomatis, one with both rectal and urethral chlamydia and six with urethral chlamydia. One rectal chlamydia-positive sample, when tested, was equivocal for lymphogranuloma venereum. Our data suggested that there was not a pool of asymptomatic lymphogranuloma venereum infection in MSM recently diagnosed with HIV, hepatitis C and syphilis. However, there have been recent reports of an increased incidence of asymptomatic lymphogranuloma venereum, raising the question whether lymphogranuloma venereum should be screened for in high risk asymptomatic MSM. The prevalence of asymptomatic rectal chlamydia infections was 19%. PMID:26158451

  7. (1, 3)-β-D-glucan assay for diagnosing invasive fungal infections in critically ill patients with hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Azoulay, Elie; Guigue, Nicolas; Darmon, Michael; Mokart, Djamel; Lemiale, Virginie; Kouatchet, Achille; Mayaux, Julien; Vincent, François; Nyunga, Martine; Bruneel, Fabrice; Rabbat, Antoine; Bretagne, Stéphane; Lebert, Christine; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Benoit, Dominique; Pene, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are life-threatening complications of hematological malignancies that must be diagnosed early to allow effective treatment. Few data are available on the performance of serum (1–3)-β-D-glucan (BG) assays for diagnosing IFI in patients with hematological malignancies admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In this study, 737 consecutive patients with hematological malignancies admitted to 17 ICUs routinely underwent a BG assay at ICU admission. IFIs were diagnosed using standard criteria applied by three independent specialists. Among the 737 patients, 439 (60%) required mechanical ventilation and 273 (37%) died before hospital discharge. Factors known to alter BG concentrations were identified in most patients. IFIs were documented in 78 (10.6%) patients (invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, n = 54; Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, n = 13; candidemia, n = 13; and fusarium infections, n = 3). BG concentrations (pg/mL) were higher in patients with than without IFI (144 (77–510) vs. 50 (30–125), < 0.0001). With 80 pg/mL as the cutoff, sensitivity was 72%, specificity 65%, and area-under-the-curve 0.74 (0.68–0.79). Assuming a prevalence of 10%, the negative and positive predictive values were 94% and 21%. By multivariable analysis, factors independently associated with BG > 80 pg/mL were IFI, admission SOFA score, autologous bone-marrow or hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, and microbiologically documented bacterial infection. In conclusion, in unselected critically ill hematology patients with factors known to affect serum BG, this biomarker showed only moderate diagnostic performance and rarely detected IFI. However, the negative predictive value was high. Studies are needed to assess whether a negative BG test indicates that antifungal de-escalation is safe. PMID:26910891

  8. HPV infection and intraepithelial lesions from the anal region: how to diagnose?

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Newton Sérgio de; Ferreira, Aliana Meneses; Bueno, Camila Caroline Tremel

    2011-01-01

    In the last years, the prevalence of HPV infection in the anal region has increased, especially in some groups like homosexual and HIV-positive people. Since this infection can be associated with the development of squamous anal cancer due to its progression from HPV infection to anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and finally to cancer, the screening and evaluation of these conditions are important. Anal cytology and high resolution anoscopy are good methods that are available and can be used. Although useful, these methods should be performed correctly and not indiscriminately in all patients. Patients for whom anal cytology screening is recommended are: HIV-infected patients, homosexuals, women who present with high-grade vulvar squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, vulvar cancer or cervical cancer. An abnormal anal cytology should be further evaluated with high resolution anoscopy. PMID:22230855

  9. Concomitant Aspergillus Species Infection and Squamous Cell Carcinoma Diagnosed on Pap Smear.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prajwala; Goyal, Snigdha; Kaushal, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant infection with Aspergillus species and cervical squamous cell carcinoma in the female genital tract is a rare occurrence and attributed to the opportunistic nature of infection in the immunocompromised state due to the underlying malignancy. The contamination of smears with Aspergillus species should be excluded. The diagnosis of Aspergillus species infection along with squamous cell carcinoma was established on cervicovaginal pap smears in a 62-year-old female presented to gynecological clinic with complaints of stress urinary incontinence. Speculum examination revealed first-degree cervical descent. Smears showed features of squamous cell carcinoma along with fungal spores and fruiting body with hyphae of Aspergillus species. The presence of fruiting bodies and hyphae of Aspergillus species with coexisting squamous cell carcinoma is rare in routine pap smears. True infection needs to be distinguished from contamination by Aspergillus species. Early diagnosis can be established on routine cervicovaginal Pap smear examination. PMID:24272933

  10. Genetic diversity of HIV-1 and transmitted drug resistance among newly diagnosed individuals with HIV infection in Hangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiafeng; Guo, Zhihong; Yang, Jiezhe; Pan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Jun; Ding, Xiaobei; Zhang, Wenjun; Xia, Yan; Xu, Yun; Huang, Jingjing

    2015-10-01

    HIV transmitted drug resistance (TDR) can compromise antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited countries like China where ART has been scaled up and thus leads to an important public health concern. The aim of the study was to elucidate the HIV-1 genetic characteristics and TDR in Hangzhou, China. Two-hundred eleven ART-naive, newly diagnosed individuals were enrolled during January and August 2013. Specimens were classified as recent or chronic infections using the BED capture enzyme immunoassay (BED-CEIA). The pol fragment covering the entire protease and the first 300 codons of the reverse transcriptase gene was amplified by RT-PCR and nested PCR. Genotypic drug resistance (DR) and phylogenetic analysis were performed on the 200 obtained sequences. Multiple genotypes were identified, including CRF01_AE (62.0%), CRF07_BC (31.0%), subtype B (2.0%), CRF08_BC (1.5%), CRF55_01B (1.0%), CRF18_cpx (0.5%), and unique recombinant forms (URFs, 2.0%). All the four URFs were found in men who have sex with men, consisting of a recombination of CRF01_AE with subtype B or CRF07_BC. The prevalence of primary DR in newly diagnosed individuals in Hangzhou was low (4.0%). The proportion of DR mutation to protease inhibitors (PIs), nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) was 1.5%, 1.5%, and 1.0%, respectively. BED-CEIA revealed that 21.8% (45/211) of the specimens were associated with recent infections. The prevalence of TDR in recent infections was moderate (6.5%). High HIV diversity and relatively high prevalence of TDR in new infections has been found in Hangzhou, indicating an increasing challenge for future HIV prevention and treatment. PMID:25899877

  11. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/CT Scanning in Diagnosing Vascular Prosthetic Graft Infection

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Ben R.; Pol, Robert A.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular prosthetic graft infection (VPGI) is a severe complication after vascular surgery. CT-scan is considered the diagnostic tool of choice in advanced VPGI. The incidence of a false-negative result using CT is relatively high, especially in the presence of low-grade infections. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) scanning has been suggested as an alternative for the diagnosis and assessment of infectious processes. Hybrid 18F-FDG PET/CT has established the role of 18F-FDG PET for the assessment of suspected VPGI, providing accurate anatomic localization of the site of infection. However, there are no clear guidelines for the interpretation of the uptake patterns of 18F-FDG as clinical tool for VPGI. Based on the available literature it is suggested that a linear, diffuse, and homogeneous uptake should not be regarded as an infection whereas focal or heterogeneous uptake with a projection over the vessel on CT is highly suggestive of infection. Nevertheless, 18F-FDG PET and 18F-FDG PET/CT can play an important role in the detection of VPGI and monitoring response to treatment. However an accurate uptake and pattern recognition is warranted and cut-off uptake values and patterns need to be standardized before considering the technique to be the new standard. PMID:25210712

  12. Spinal cord abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscess is caused by an infection inside the spine. An abscess of the spinal cord itself is ... by a staphylococcus infection that spreads through the spine. It may be caused by tuberculosis in some ...

  13. Schistosomiasis japonicum diagnosed on liver biopsy in a patient with hepatitis B co-infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic hepatitis B virus and schistosomiasis are independently associated with significant mortality and morbidity worldwide. Despite much geographic overlap between these conditions and no reason why co-infection should not exist, we present what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first published report of a proven histological diagnosis of hepatic Schistosomiasis japonicum and chronic hepatitis B co-infection. A single case of hepatitis B and hepatic Schistosomiasis mansoni diagnosed by liver biopsy has previously been reported in the literature. Case presentation A 38-year-old Chinese man with known chronic hepatitis B virus infection presented with malaise, nausea and headache. Blood tests revealed increased transaminases and serology in keeping with hepatitis B virus e-antigen seroconversion. A liver biopsy was performed because some investigations, particularly transient elastography, suggested cirrhosis. Two schistosome ova were seen on liver histology, identified as S. japonicum, probably acquired in China as a youth. His peripheral eosinophil count was normal, schistosomal serology and stool microscopy for ova, cysts and parasites were negative. Conclusion Hepatic schistosomiasis co-infection should be considered in patients with hepatitis B virus infection who are from countries endemic for schistosomiasis. Screening for schistosomiasis using a peripheral eosinophil count, schistosomal serology and stool microscopy may be negative despite infection, therefore presumptive treatment could be considered. Transient elastography should not be used to assess liver fibrosis during acute flares of viral hepatitis because readings are falsely elevated. The impact of hepatic schistosomiasis on the sensitivity and specificity of transient elastography measurement for the assessment of hepatitis B is as yet unknown. PMID:24521427

  14. [Pediatric Patient with anaerobic Bacterial Meningitis Who was Infected through a Spinal Congenital Dermal Sinus Route].

    PubMed

    Okui, Hideyuki; Fukasawa, Chie; Tokutake, Shoko; Takei, Haruka; Sato, Junichi; Hoshino, Tadashi

    2016-05-01

    We report the case of a pediatric patient in whom a spinal congenital dermal sinus was detected after the onset of anaerobic bacterial meningitis. The patient was a 4-month-old boy. He had a recurrent fever for 2 weeks before admission. On admission, he presented with a convulsive status and a bulging anterior fontanel. The previously consulted physician had made a diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Spinal fluid cultures tested positive for Peptoniphilus asaccharolyticus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a spinal subdural abscess and cranial subdural hydrops; therefore, the patient was transported to our hospital for surgical treatment. A sacral dimple was noted on his lower back, and an MRI showed a spinal congenital dermal sinus. Antimicrobial therapy, cranial subdural aspiration, dermal sinus excision, and drainage were performed. He was discharged on the 60th hospital day. When pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli, Proteus sp. or anaerobic bacteria invade through a dermal sinus, it can result in meningitis. Involvement of a dermal sinus should be suspected when meningitis is caused by these pathogens or when recurrent meningitis occurs. PMID:27529968

  15. Diagnosing feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in FIV-vaccinated and FIV-unvaccinated cats using saliva.

    PubMed

    Westman, Mark E; Malik, Richard; Hall, Evelyn; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2016-06-01

    We recently showed that two immunochromatography point-of-care FIV antibody test kits (Witness FeLV/FIV and Anigen Rapid FIV/FeLV) were able to correctly assign FIV infection status, irrespective of FIV vaccination history, using whole blood as the diagnostic specimen. A third FIV antibody test kit, SNAP FIV/FeLV Combo (an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]), was unable to differentiate antibodies produced in response to FIV vaccination from those incited by FIV infection. The aim of this study was to determine if saliva is a suitable diagnostic specimen using the same well characterized feline cohort. FIV infection status of these cats had been determined previously using a combination of serology, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing and virus isolation. This final assignment was then compared to results obtained using saliva as the diagnostic specimen utilizing the same three point-of-care FIV antibody test kits and commercially available PCR assay (FIV RealPCR). In a population of cats where one third (117/356; 33%) were FIV-vaccinated, both immunochromatography test kits accurately diagnosed FIV infection using saliva via a centrifugation method, irrespective of FIV vaccination history. For FIV diagnosis using saliva, the specificity of Anigen Rapid FIV/FeLV and Witness FeLV/FIV was 100%, while the sensitivity of these kits was 96% and 92% respectively. SNAP FIV/FeLV Combo respectively. SNAP FIV/FeLV Combo had a specificity of 98% and sensitivity of 44%, while FIV RealPCR testing had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 72% using saliva. A revised direct method of saliva testing was trialed on a subset of FIV-infected cats (n=14), resulting in 14, 7 and 0 FIV positive results using Anigen Rapid FIV/FeLV, Witness FeLV/FIV and SNAP FIV/FeLV Combo, respectively. These results demonstrate that saliva can be used to diagnose FIV infection, irrespective of FIV vaccination history, using either a centrifugation method (Anigen Rapid FIV/FeLV and Witness

  16. The Evolution of the Polymerase Chain Reaction to Diagnose Childhood Infections.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Beverly Barton

    2015-01-01

    Children's healthcare has evolved over the years, and the pediatric laboratory has contributed to the clinical understanding of childhood disease through the application of new technology and knowledge. This article highlights the evolution of PCR technology to aid in the diagnosis of pediatric infections, from the discovery of the PCR, through the subsequent years when the clinical need exceeded the capability of the technology, until the current day, when application of the PCR is becoming commonplace. PMID:26701384

  17. Urinary and genital infections in patients with diabetes: How to diagnose and how to treat.

    PubMed

    Njomnang Soh, P; Vidal, F; Huyghe, E; Gourdy, P; Halimi, J M; Bouhanick, B

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes is a predisposing factor for urinary tract and genital infections in both women and men. Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors constitute a novel therapeutic class indicated for type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients, and are already on the market in a few countries in Europe. They decrease glycaemia mainly by enhancing glucose excretion in urine by reducing renal glucose reabsorption via the action of SGLT2 in the kidneys. In general, they are well tolerated, but their mode of action results in specific side effects as well as an increased risk of genital (vulvovaginitis and balanitis) and urinary tract infections, for which T2D patients are already at high risk, reported within the first 6 months of treatment. Usually these infectious events are successfully treated with standard therapies, but diabetologists are not accustomed to dealing with them. The aim of this review is to describe the different types of lower urinary tract and genital infections, and the treatment strategies currently available for patients with diabetes. PMID:26323665

  18. Factors Related to the Occurrence of Urinary Tract Infection Following a Urodynamic Study in Patients With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the factors related to urinary tract infection (UTI) occurrence after an urodynamic study (UDS) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods We retrospectively investigated the medical records of 387 patients with SCI who underwent UDS with prophylactic antibiotic therapy between January 2012 and December 2012. Among them, 140 patients met the inclusion criteria and were divided into two groups, UTI and non-UTI. We statistically analyzed the following factors between the two groups: age, sex, level of injury, SCI duration, spinal cord independence measure, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, diabetes mellitus, the American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale (AIS), lower extremity spasticity, a history of UTI within the past 4 weeks prior to the UDS, symptoms and signs of neurogenic bladder, urination methods, symptoms during the UDS and UDS results. Results Among the 140 study participants, the UTI group comprised 12 patients and the non-UTI group comprised 128 patients. On univariate analysis, a history of UTI within the past 4 weeks prior to the UDS was significant and previous autonomic dysreflexia before the UDS showed a greater tendency to influence the UTI group. Multivariable logistic regression analysis using these two variables showed that the former variable was significantly associated with UTI and the latter variable was not significantly associated with UTI. Conclusion In patients with SCI, a history of UTI within the past 4 weeks prior to the UDS was a risk factor for UTI after the UDS accompanied by prophylactic antibiotic therapy. Therefore, more careful pre-treatment should be considered when these patients undergo a UDS. PMID:27606279

  19. Unreported Male Sex Partners Among Men with Newly Diagnosed HIV Infection - North Carolina, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsiu; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Gay, Cynthia L; Zhang, Xinjian; Beagle, Steve; Hall, Laura; Jackson, Tonyka; Marmorino, Jenni; Do, Ann N; Peters, Philip J

    2015-09-25

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention interventions, such as preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), are often targeted to men who have sex with men (MSM) who self-report high-risk behaviors. Data from a prospective study evaluating methods to detect acute HIV infection among a primarily young (aged <25 years) and black or African American (African American) population from North Carolina were analyzed. In the study, participants were asked about risk behaviors during pretest counseling (at the time of testing) and then during a partner services interview (at HIV diagnosis). Participants whose disclosure of sexual risk behaviors during pretest counseling was different from their disclosure of sexual risk behaviors during their partner services interview were identified, and factors associated with these discordant responses were examined. Among 113 HIV-infected men, 26 (23.0%) did not disclose male sex partners at pretest counseling, but subsequently did disclose this information during their partner services interview. When compared with men who disclosed having male partners at pretest counseling, these 26 MSM who did not disclose male partners during pretest counseling were found to have a similar number of male partners during contact tracing, but were more likely to have a female partner (30.8% versus 6.9%). In addition, the proportions of MSM found to have at least one HIV-infected partner were similar for both groups (MSM who disclosed having male partners during pretest counseling and those who did not). To better customize HIV prevention interventions for MSM, HIV prevention programs might consider using novel strategies to accurately assess risk in this population. PMID:26401589

  20. Self-Reported Reproductive Tract Infections and Ultrasound Diagnosed Uterine Fibroids in African-American Women

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kristen R.; Cole, Stephen R.; Dittmer, Dirk P.; Schoenbach, Victor J.; Smith, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: For decades, it has been hypothesized that reproductive tract infections (RTIs) are risk factors for uterine fibroids. However, only two recent studies have been conducted. We aimed to investigate the relationship between RTIs and fibroids in a large study using ultrasound screening for fibroids. Methods: We used cross-sectional enrollment data from African American women ages 23–34 years with no previous fibroid diagnosis. RTI history was measured by self-report and fibroid status by standardized ultrasound. Secondary fibroid outcomes were size, number, and total volume. Age- and multivariable-adjusted logistic regression were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs). Results: In total, 1,656 women were included; 22% had fibroids. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) was associated with a 21% increased odds of fibroids [aOR 1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93–1.58]. Chlamydia infection and pelvic inflammatory disease were associated with a 38% (aOR 0.62, 95% CI 0.40–0.97) and a 46% (aOR 0.54, 95% CI 0.25–1.17) reduced odds of having two or more fibroids, respectively. Those with a previous BV diagnosis had a 47% increased odds of having 2 or more fibroids (aOR 1.47, 95% CI 0.98–2.21) and a 41% increased odds of having a larger total fibroid volume (aOR 1.41, 95% CI 0.98–2.04). Conclusions: Our study was the first to explore the relationship between RTIs and fibroid size, number, and total volume. There appeared to be no strong associations between self-reported RTIs and fibroids. Studies using serology, a biochemical measure of past infection, are needed to better investigate associations between RTIs and fibroids. PMID:25901468

  1. Hemorrhage in the central canal of the cervical spinal cord in a coonhound diagnosed with canine juvenile polyarteritis (steroid responsive meningitis-arteritis)

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Kelly L.; Stieger-Vanegas, Susanne M.; Valentine, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Patchy meningeal and parenchymal contrast enhancement of the spinal cord with multifocal central canal dilations was noted in a computed tomography myelogram of the cervical spine of a 6-month-old intact female coonhound with a confirmed diagnosis of canine juvenile polyarteritis and associated hemorrhage within the central canal. PMID:26028675

  2. How To Diagnose and Manage Infected Endografts after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Setacci, Carlo; Chisci, Emiliano; Setacci, Francesco; Ercolini, Leonardo; de Donato, Gianmarco; Troisi, Nicola; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Michelagnoli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of endograft infections (EI) after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is below 1%. With the growing number of patients with aortic endografts and the aging population, the number of patients with EI might also increase. The diagnosis is based on an association of clinical symptoms, imaging, and microbial cultures. Angio-computed tomography is currently the gold-standard technique for diagnosis. Low-grade infection sometimes requires nuclear medicine imaging to make a correct diagnosis. There is no good evidence to guide management so far. In the case of active gastrointestinal bleeding, pseudoaneurysm, or extensive perigraft purulence involving adjacent organs, an invasive treatment should always be attempted. In the other cases (the majority), when there is not an immediate danger to the patient's life, a conservative management is started with a proper antimicrobial therapy. Any infectious cavity can be percutaneously drained. Management depends on the patient's condition and a tailored approach should always be offered. In the case of a patient who is young, has a good life expectancy, or in whom there is absence of significant comorbidities, a surgical attempt can be proposed. Surgical techniques favor, in terms of mortality, patency, and reinfection rate, the in situ reconstruction. Choice of technique relies on the center and the operator's experience. Long-term antibiotic therapy is always required in all cases, with close monitoring of the C-reactive protein. PMID:26798744

  3. How To Diagnose and Manage Infected Endografts after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Setacci, Carlo; Chisci, Emiliano; Setacci, Francesco; Ercolini, Leonardo; de Donato, Gianmarco; Troisi, Nicola; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Michelagnoli, Stefano

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of endograft infections (EI) after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is below 1%. With the growing number of patients with aortic endografts and the aging population, the number of patients with EI might also increase. The diagnosis is based on an association of clinical symptoms, imaging, and microbial cultures. Angio-computed tomography is currently the gold-standard technique for diagnosis. Low-grade infection sometimes requires nuclear medicine imaging to make a correct diagnosis. There is no good evidence to guide management so far. In the case of active gastrointestinal bleeding, pseudoaneurysm, or extensive perigraft purulence involving adjacent organs, an invasive treatment should always be attempted. In the other cases (the majority), when there is not an immediate danger to the patient's life, a conservative management is started with a proper antimicrobial therapy. Any infectious cavity can be percutaneously drained. Management depends on the patient's condition and a tailored approach should always be offered. In the case of a patient who is young, has a good life expectancy, or in whom there is absence of significant comorbidities, a surgical attempt can be proposed. Surgical techniques favor, in terms of mortality, patency, and reinfection rate, the in situ reconstruction. Choice of technique relies on the center and the operator's experience. Long-term antibiotic therapy is always required in all cases, with close monitoring of the C-reactive protein. PMID:26798744

  4. Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Better Method for Diagnosing Chronic Schistosoma mansoni Infections

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas Hamed; Mohamed, Rabie M.; Belal, Usama S.; Abdel-Raheem, Ehab M.; Naoi, Koji; Norose, Kazumi

    2015-01-01

    For more effective diagnosis of the acute and chronic stages of Schistosoma mansoni infection in humans, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was compared with the Kato-Katz method. A total of 150 stool samples were collected from inpatient and outpatient clinics at the Department of Tropical Medicine, Minia University Hospital, Egypt. Three groups of patients, 50 with acute intestinal schistosomiasis, 70 with chronic intestinal schistosomiasis and 30 normal healthy controls were studied. Stool samples were analyzed by PCR and the Kato-Katz method. The mean number of eggs per gram of feces was 4.6 when estimated by the Kato-Katz method in positive stool samples from acute schistosomiasis cases but only 1.7 in chronic cases. In acute intestinal schistosomiasis, 15 and 45 out of 50 cases were positive by Kato-Katz and PCR, respectively. In the chronic intestinal schistosomiasis cases, 6 and 68 out of 70 cases were positive by the Kato-Katz and PCR methods, respectively. We conclude that PCR appears to be an effective diagnostic technique for S. mansoni infection, especially where a low worm burden exists, such as in chronic cases. PMID:26865821

  5. Accuracy of Rapid Urease Test in Diagnosing Helicobacter pylori Infection in Patients using NSAIDs

    PubMed Central

    Foroutan, Mojgan; Loloei, Behnam; Irvani, Shahrokh; Azargashb, Ezanollah

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim: This study aimed to determine the effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the results of rapid urease test (RUT). Patients and Methods: The study evaluated 210 consecutive patients for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. They were divided into case and control groups based on history of NSAID use (n=70 each). Two biopsy specimens were collected from antrum and corpus of stomach during endoscopy and sent for rapid urease testing and histopathology. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy rate of RUT test were compared against histology. Results: The average age was 55.2±12.9 and 43.3±12.1 years in the case and control groups, respectively. Among NSAID users, RUT sensitivity, specificity and accuracy rate were all 100%. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy rate of RUT in patients without history of NSAID use were 97.37, 98.57 and 98.14%, respectively. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy rate of RUT were 98.57, 99.29, and 99.04%, respectively. Conclusion: Our study shows that sensitivity, specificity and accuracy rate of RUT are not affected by NSAID use. Rapid urease test remains a reliable test for diagnosis of H. pylori in patients on NSAIDs. PMID:20339181

  6. (1-3)-β-D-Glucan vs Galactomannan Antigen in Diagnosing Invasive Fungal Infections (IFIs)

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, C; Gaziano, R; Favaro, M; Casalinuovo, IA; Pistoia, ES; Di Francesco, P

    2012-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are serious and often life-threatening complications in patients with haematological malignancies. Early diagnosis and the initiation of efficacious antifungal treatments could affect the prognosis of these patients. The detection of (1-3)-β-D-Glucan (BDG) could be a promising non-culture-based, noninvasive tool for IFI analyses in haemato-oncological patients, allowing the diagnosis of the two major IFIs, invasive aspergillosis (IA) and invasive candidiasis (IC), with a single test. The aim of this work was to evaluate and compare the use of the BDG in combination with the galactomannan antigen (GAL) assay in order to exclude or confirm suspected IFIs. Sera from 46 haemato-oncological patients (24 with proven/probable IFI and 22 without IFI symptoms) were evaluated retrospectively for the detection of GAL and BDG. In 24 patients, the serum BDG levels facilitated IFI diagnosis: 18 probable IA, 3 proven IA and 3 IC. In the remaining 22 patients, the BDG level helped exclude IFIs. The BDG was positive earlier than GAL in 5/24 cases [three of probable invasive aspergillosis (IA), one of proven IA and one case of proven invasive candidiasis (IC)] and was positive at the same time as GAL in 19/24 cases; in no case was GAL positive before BDG was. The BDG detection is useful, however, the test has a great limitation because it is a completely manual procedure. PMID:22942923

  7. An Innovative Field-Applicable Molecular Test to Diagnose Cutaneous Leishmania Viannia spp. Infections

    PubMed Central

    Saldarriaga, Omar A.; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Porrozzi, Renato; Baldeviano, Gerald C.; Lescano, Andrés G.; de Los Santos, Maxy B.; Fernandez, Olga L.; Saravia, Nancy G.; Costa, Erika; Melby, Peter C.; Travi, Bruno L.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis is widely distributed in Central and South America. Leishmania of the Viannia subgenus are the most frequent species infecting humans. L. (V.) braziliensis, L. (V.) panamensis are also responsible for metastatic mucosal leishmaniasis. Conventional or real time PCR is a more sensitive diagnostic test than microscopy, but the cost and requirement for infrastructure and trained personnel makes it impractical in most endemic regions. Primary health systems need a sensitive and specific point of care (POC) diagnostic tool. We developed a novel POC molecular diagnostic test for cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) spp. Parasite DNA was amplified using isothermal Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) with primers and probes that targeted the kinetoplast DNA. The amplification product was detected by naked eye with a lateral flow (LF) immunochromatographic strip. The RPA-LF had an analytical sensitivity equivalent to 0.1 parasites per reaction. The test amplified the principal L. Viannia species from multiple countries: L. (V.) braziliensis (n = 33), L. (V.) guyanensis (n = 17), L. (V.) panamensis (n = 9). The less common L. (V.) lainsoni, L. (V.) shawi, and L. (V.) naiffi were also amplified. No amplification was observed in parasites of the L. (Leishmania) subgenus. In a small number of clinical samples (n = 13) we found 100% agreement between PCR and RPA-LF. The high analytical sensitivity and clinical validation indicate the test could improve the efficiency of diagnosis, especially in chronic lesions with submicroscopic parasite burdens. Field implementation of the RPA-LF test could contribute to management and control of cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis. PMID:27115155

  8. An Innovative Field-Applicable Molecular Test to Diagnose Cutaneous Leishmania Viannia spp. Infections.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga, Omar A; Castellanos-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Porrozzi, Renato; Baldeviano, Gerald C; Lescano, Andrés G; de Los Santos, Maxy B; Fernandez, Olga L; Saravia, Nancy G; Costa, Erika; Melby, Peter C; Travi, Bruno L

    2016-04-01

    Cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis is widely distributed in Central and South America. Leishmania of the Viannia subgenus are the most frequent species infecting humans. L. (V.) braziliensis, L. (V.) panamensis are also responsible for metastatic mucosal leishmaniasis. Conventional or real time PCR is a more sensitive diagnostic test than microscopy, but the cost and requirement for infrastructure and trained personnel makes it impractical in most endemic regions. Primary health systems need a sensitive and specific point of care (POC) diagnostic tool. We developed a novel POC molecular diagnostic test for cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) spp. Parasite DNA was amplified using isothermal Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) with primers and probes that targeted the kinetoplast DNA. The amplification product was detected by naked eye with a lateral flow (LF) immunochromatographic strip. The RPA-LF had an analytical sensitivity equivalent to 0.1 parasites per reaction. The test amplified the principal L. Viannia species from multiple countries: L. (V.) braziliensis (n = 33), L. (V.) guyanensis (n = 17), L. (V.) panamensis (n = 9). The less common L. (V.) lainsoni, L. (V.) shawi, and L. (V.) naiffi were also amplified. No amplification was observed in parasites of the L. (Leishmania) subgenus. In a small number of clinical samples (n = 13) we found 100% agreement between PCR and RPA-LF. The high analytical sensitivity and clinical validation indicate the test could improve the efficiency of diagnosis, especially in chronic lesions with submicroscopic parasite burdens. Field implementation of the RPA-LF test could contribute to management and control of cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis. PMID:27115155

  9. Associations between availability and coverage of HIV-prevention measures and subsequent incidence of diagnosed HIV infection among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Wiessing, Lucas; Likatavicius, Giedrius; Klempová, Danica; Hedrich, Dagmar; Nardone, Anthony; Griffiths, Paul

    2009-06-01

    HIV-prevention measures specific to injection drug users (IDUs), such as opioid substitution treatment and needle-and-syringe programs, are not provided in many countries where injection drug use is endemic. We describe the incidence of diagnosed HIV infection in IDUs and the availability and coverage of opioid substitution and needle-and-syringe programs in the European Union and 5 middle- and high-income countries. Countries with greater provision of both prevention measures in 2000 to 2004 had lower incidence of diagnosed HIV infection in 2005 and 2006. PMID:19372511

  10. Spinal stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal stenosis; Foraminal spinal stenosis; Degenerative spine disease; Back pain - spinal stenosis ... help your pain during flare-ups. Treatments for back pain caused by spinal stenosis include: Medicines that may ...

  11. Comparison of Real-Time PCR Techniques to Cytotoxigenic Culture Methods for Diagnosing Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Knetsch, C. W.; Bakker, D.; de Boer, R. F.; Sanders, I.; Hofs, S.; Kooistra-Smid, A. M. D.; Corver, J.; Eastwood, K.; Wilcox, M. H.; Kuijper, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, the incidence of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) with a more severe course has increased in Europe and North America. Assays that are capable of rapidly diagnosing CDI are essential. Two real-time PCRs (LUMC and LvI) targeting C. difficile toxin genes (tcdB, and tcdA and tcdB, respectively) were compared with the BD GeneOhm PCR (targeting the tcdB gene), using cytotoxigenic culture as a gold standard. In addition, a real-time PCR targeting the tcdC frameshift mutation at position 117 (Δ117 PCR) was evaluated for detecting toxigenic C. difficile and the presence of PCR ribotype 027 in stool samples. In total, 526 diarrheal samples were prospectively collected and included in the study. Compared with those for cytotoxigenic culture, sensitivity, specificity, positive predicted value (PPV), and negative predicted value (NPV) were for PCR LUMC 96.0%, 88.0%, 66.0%, and 98.9%, for PCR LvI 100.0%, 89.4%, 69.7%, and 100.0%, for PCR Δ117 98.0%, 90.7%, 71.9%, and 99.5%, and for PCR BD GeneOhm 88.3%, 96.9%, 86.5%, and 97.4%. Compared to those with feces samples cultured positive for C. difficile type 027, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the Δ117 PCR were 95.2%, 96.2%, 87.0%, and 98.7%. We conclude that all real-time PCRs can be applied as a first screening test in an algorithm for diagnosing CDI. However, the low PPVs hinder the use of the assays as stand-alone tests. Furthermore, the Δ117 PCR may provide valuable information for minimizing the spread of the epidemic C. difficile PCR ribotype 027. PMID:20980562

  12. A meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of real-time PCR for diagnosing novel coronavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Lin, C; Ye, R; Xia, Y L

    2015-01-01

    Novel coronavirus (nCoV) belongs to the Coronaviridae family, which includes the virus that causes SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome. However, infection source, transmission route, and host of nCoV have not yet been thoroughly characterized. In some cases, nCoV presented a limited person-to-person transmission. Therefore, early diagnosis of nCoV may be of importance for reducing the spread of disease in public. Methods for nCoV diagnosis involve smear dyeing inspection, culture identification, and real-time PCR detection, all of which are proved highly effective. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of real-time PCR for diagnosing nCoV infection. Fifteen articles conformed to the inclusion and exclusion criteria for further meta-analysis on the basis of a wide range of publications searched from databases involving PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Medline, ISI. We analyzed the stability and publication bias as well as examined the heterogeneity inspection of real-time PCR detection in contrast to smear staining and culture identification. The fixed-effect model was adopted in our meta-analysis. Our result demonstrated that the combination of real-time PCR and smear diagnostics yielded an odds ratio (OR) = 1.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.51-2.41, Z = 5.43, P < 0.05, while the combination of real-time PCR and culture identification yielded OR = 2.44, 95%CI = 1.77-3.37, Z = 5.41, P < 0.05. Therefore, we propose real-time PCR as an efficient method that offers an auxiliary support for future nCoV diagnosis. PMID:26634531

  13. [Chronological analyses of neuropathological and molecular biological changes in affected spinal cord of HTLV-I-infected rat (HAM rat disease)].

    PubMed

    Ohya, O

    2000-03-01

    The author chronologically analyzed neuropathological aspects of the demyelination process in spinal cords of a rat model of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) from early asymptomatic to late disease stage for clarifying the pathogenetic roles of HTLV-I in central nervous system. There was no significant difference in histopathological and immunohistochemical findings between the rats within 7 months after the HTLV-I infection and age-matched controls. The first sign of demyelination was the appearance of apoptotic cell death beginning at 7 months after the infection and the apoptotic cell number gradually increased to 12 cells per a whole horizontal section of the spinal cord, in contrast to 5 cells in the control rats. The majority of the apoptotic cells were shown to be oligodendrocytes by immunohistochemical stain with an anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody. Increment of activated microglia/macrophages started at 9 months after the infection and they rapidly increased from 15 months to reach 600 cells per a whole horizontal section, in contrast to 300 cells in the control rats. Rapid increase of gemistocytic astrocytes was found from 20 months after the infection (the late disease stage). Molecular analysis of the spinal cords revealed that HTLV-I provirus DNA was evident as early as 4 months after the infection, and massages of HTLV-I pX and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha began to be expressed at 7 months, just before or at the same time as the appearance of the apoptotic cells. The collective evidence suggests that the apoptotic death of oligodendrocytes, which may be induced either directly by the local expression of HTLV-I or indirectly by upregulated cytotoxic humoral mediators, such as TNF-alpha, through the transactive function of p40 Tax, is the major cause of chronic progressive myelopathy in WKAH rats with HTLV-I infection. PMID:10791252

  14. Emerging trends in Lassa fever: redefining the role of immunoglobulin M and inflammation in diagnosing acute infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lassa fever (LF) is a devastating hemorrhagic viral disease that is endemic to West Africa and responsible for thousands of human deaths each year. Analysis of humoral immune responses (IgM and IgG) by antibody-capture ELISA (Ab-capture ELISA) and Lassa virus (LASV) viremia by antigen-capture ELISA (Ag-capture ELISA) in suspected patients admitted to the Kenema Government Hospital (KGH) Lassa Fever Ward (LFW) in Sierra Leone over the past five years is reshaping our understanding of acute LF. Results Analyses in LF survivors indicated that LASV-specific IgM persists for months to years after initial infection. Furthermore, exposure to LASV appeared to be more prevalent in historically non-endemic areas of West Africa with significant percentages of reportedly healthy donors IgM and IgG positive in LASV-specific Ab-capture ELISA. We found that LF patients who were Ag positive were more likely to die than suspected cases who were only IgM positive. Analysis of metabolic and immunological parameters in Ag positive LF patients revealed a strong correlation between survival and low levels of IL-6, -8, -10, CD40L, BUN, ALP, ALT, and AST. Despite presenting to the hospital with fever and in some instances other symptoms consistent with LF, the profiles of Ag negative IgM positive individuals were similar to those of normal donors and nonfatal (NF) LF cases, suggesting that IgM status cannot necessarily be considered a diagnostic marker of acute LF in suspected cases living in endemic areas of West Africa. Conclusion Only LASV viremia assessed by Ag-capture immunoassay, nucleic acid detection or virus isolation should be used to diagnose acute LASV infection in West Africans. LASV-specific IgM serostatus cannot be considered a diagnostic marker of acute LF in suspected cases living in endemic areas of West Africa. By applying these criteria, we identified a dysregulated metabolic and pro-inflammatory response profile conferring a poor prognosis in acute LF. In

  15. Decreasing Proportion of Recent Infections among Newly Diagnosed HIV-1 Cases in Switzerland, 2008 to 2013 Based on Line-Immunoassay-Based Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Schüpbach, Jörg; Niederhauser, Christoph; Yerly, Sabine; Regenass, Stephan; Gorgievski, Meri; Aubert, Vincent; Ciardo, Diana; Klimkait, Thomas; Dollenmaier, Günter; Andreutti, Corinne; Martinetti, Gladys; Brandenberger, Marcel; Gebhardt, Martin D.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV surveillance requires monitoring of new HIV diagnoses and differentiation of incident and older infections. In 2008, Switzerland implemented a system for monitoring incident HIV infections based on the results of a line immunoassay (Inno-Lia) mandatorily conducted for HIV confirmation and type differentiation (HIV-1, HIV-2) of all newly diagnosed patients. Based on this system, we assessed the proportion of incident HIV infection among newly diagnosed cases in Switzerland during 2008-2013. Methods and Results Inno-Lia antibody reaction patterns recorded in anonymous HIV notifications to the federal health authority were classified by 10 published algorithms into incident (up to 12 months) or older infections. Utilizing these data, annual incident infection estimates were obtained in two ways, (i) based on the diagnostic performance of the algorithms and utilizing the relationship ‘incident = true incident + false incident’, (ii) based on the window-periods of the algorithms and utilizing the relationship ‘Prevalence = Incidence x Duration’. From 2008—2013, 3’851 HIV notifications were received. Adult HIV-1 infections amounted to 3’809 cases, and 3’636 of them (95.5%) contained Inno-Lia data. Incident infection totals calculated were similar for the performance- and window-based methods, amounting on average to 1’755 (95% confidence interval, 1588—1923) and 1’790 cases (95% CI, 1679—1900), respectively. More than half of these were among men who had sex with men. Both methods showed a continuous decline of annual incident infections 2008—2013, totaling -59.5% and -50.2%, respectively. The decline of incident infections continued even in 2012, when a 15% increase in HIV notifications had been observed. This increase was entirely due to older infections. Overall declines 2008—2013 were of similar extent among the major transmission groups. Conclusions Inno-Lia based incident HIV-1 infection surveillance proved useful and

  16. Complications in the management of metastatic spinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, Eilis Catherine; Butler, Joseph Simon; Morris, Seamus

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic spine disease accounts for 10% to 30% of new cancer diagnoses annually. The most frequent presentation is axial spinal pain. No treatment has been proven to increase the life expectancy of patients with spinal metastasis. The goals of therapy are pain control and functional preservation. The most important prognostic indicator for spinal metastases is the initial functional score. Treatment is multidisciplinary, and virtually all treatment is palliative. Management is guided by three key issues; neurologic compromise, spinal instability, and individual patient factors. Site-directed radiation, with or without chemotherapy is the most commonly used treatment modality for those patients presenting with spinal pain, causative by tumours which are not impinging on neural elements. Operative intervention has, until recently been advocated for establishing a tissue diagnosis, mechanical stabilization and for reduction of tumor burden but not for a curative approach. It is treatment of choice patients with diseaseadvancement despite radiotherapy and in those with known radiotherapy-resistant tumors. Vertebral resection and anterior stabilization with methacrylate or hardware (e.g., cages) has been advocated.Surgical decompression and stabilization, however, along with radiotherapy, may provide the most promising treatment. It stabilizes the metastatic deposited areaand allows ambulation with pain relief. In general, patients who are nonambulatory at diagnosis do poorly, as do patients in whom more than one vertebra is involved. Surgical intervention is indicated in patients with radiation-resistant tumors, spinal instability, spinal compression with bone or disk fragments, progressive neurologic deterioration, previous radiation exposure, and uncertain diagnosis that requires tissue diagnosis. The main goal in the management of spinal metastatic deposits is always palliative rather than curative, with the primary aim being pain relief and improved mobility

  17. Spinal stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection (ESI) involves injecting medicine directly into the space around your spinal nerves or spinal cord. Spinal stenosis symptoms often become worse over time, but this may happen slowly. If the pain ...

  18. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... head. Alternative Names Spinal cord injury; SCI Images Skeletal spine Vertebra, cervical (neck) Vertebra, lumbar (low back) Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Vertebral column Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  19. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anterior spinal fusion; Spine surgery - spinal fusion; Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion ... If you had chronic back pain before surgery, you will likely still have some pain afterward. Spinal fusion is unlikely to take away all your pain ...

  20. Individual-Level and Partner-Level Predictors of Newly Diagnosed HIV Infection Among Black and White Men Who Have Sex with Men in Baltimore, MD.

    PubMed

    Maulsby, Cathy; Jain, Kriti; Sifakis, Frangiscos; German, Danielle; Flynn, Colin P; Holtgrave, David

    2015-05-01

    Black MSM continue to be the group most disproportionately impacted by HIV in the United States. This study assesses the relationship between partner-level and respondent-level characteristics and newly diagnosed HIV infection among a sample of MSM. Ego-centric data were gathered using venue-based time-space sampling on 335 men who reported on a total of 831 male anal sex partners. In multivariate analyses, age of partner, HIV status of partner, and respondent having had an STD in the past twelve months were associated with a newly diagnosed HIV infection among black MSM. Efforts for black MSM are needed that aim to increase HIV and STD testing, foster open communication between partners about HIV status, and address social determinants of health. PMID:25092514

  1. Prevention of urinary tract infections in palliative radiation for vertebral metastasis and spinal compression: A pilot study in 71 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Manas, Ana . E-mail: amanas.hdoc@salud.madrid.org; Glaria, Luis; Pena, Carmen; Sotoca, Amalia; Lanzos, Eduardo; Fernandez, Castalia; Riviere, Marc

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of bladder instillations of hyaluronic acid (HA) on the prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients receiving emergency radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression. Methods and Materials: Patients were recruited consecutively at one center and assigned to usual care (UC) (n = 34, mean age 62.2 years) or UC with once-weekly HA instillation (UC + HA) (Cystistat: 40 mg in 50 mL phosphate-buffered saline) (n = 37; mean age, 63.1 years). All patients had an indwelling catheter and received radiotherapy. UTI status was assessed at baseline and during hospitalization. Results: At baseline, patient groups were comparable, except for the prevalence of UTI at baseline, which was 11.8% and 0% in the UC and UC + HA patients, respectively (p = 0.0477). During hospitalization, 76.5% (vs. 11.8% at baseline, p < 0.0001) of the UC patients had a UTI compared with 13.5% (vs. 0% at baseline, p = 0.0541) of the UC + HA patients (p < 0.0001). Both groups were hospitalized for similar periods (19.8 days [UC] vs. 18.5 days, p = 0.4769) and received equivalent radiotherapy sessions (4.6 [UC] vs. 5.8 sessions, p = 0.2368). Conclusions: Patients receiving UC + HA had a 5.7-fold decrease in UTI prevalence over the hospitalization period compared to UC patients, suggesting that bladder instillations of HA effectively prevent UTI in patients with indwelling catheters receiving radiotherapy for nerve compression.

  2. Activation of Intrinsic Immune Responses and Microglial Phagocytosis in an Ex Vivo Spinal Cord Slice Culture Model of West Nile Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Quick, Eamon D.; Leser, J. Smith; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic flavivirus that causes significant neuroinvasive disease involving the brain and/or spinal cord. Experimental mouse models of WNV infection have established the importance of innate and adaptive immune responses in controlling the extent and severity of central nervous system (CNS) disease. However, differentiating between immune responses that are intrinsic to the CNS and those that are dependent on infiltrating inflammatory cells has proven difficult. We used a murine ex vivo spinal cord slice culture (SCSC) model to determine the innate immune processes specific to the CNS during WNV infections. By 7 days after ex vivo infection of SCSCs, the majority of neurons and a substantial percentage of astrocytes were infected with WNV, resulting in apoptotic cell death and astrogliosis. Microglia, the resident immune cells of the CNS, were activated by WNV infection, as exemplified by their amoeboid morphology, the development of filopodia and lamellipodia, and phagocytosis of WNV-infected cells and debris. Microglial cell activation was concomitant with increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including CXCL10, CXCL1, CCL5, CCL3, CCL2, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The application of minocycline, an inhibitor of neuroinflammation, altered the WNV-induced proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression profile, with inhibited production of CCL5, CCL2, and IL-6. Our findings establish that CNS-resident cells have the capacity to initiate a robust innate immune response against WNV infection in the absence of infiltrating inflammatory cells and systemic immune responses. IMPORTANCE There are no specific treatments of proven efficacy available for WNV neuroinvasive disease. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of WNV CNS infection is crucial for the rational development of novel therapies. Development of a spinal cord

  3. Spinal cord schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Adeel, Ahmed Awad

    2015-01-01

    Acute myelopathy is increasingly being recognized as a common neurological complication of schistosomiasis. Schistosome eggs reach the spinal cord either as egg emboli or as eggs produced by ectopic worms. This leads to inflammatory reaction and granuloma formation around the eggs. Patients with spinal schistosomiasis may not have clinical evidence of schistosomiasis. The typical clinical picture is that of lumbar pain preceded by other symptoms by hours or up to 3 weeks. Patients may present with paraparesis, urinary retention or paraplegia. Definitive diagnosis of spinal cord schistosomiasis is by detection of the eggs in a spinal cord biopsy or at autopsy. However, most cases are diagnosed based on a presumptive diagnosis that depends on a suggestive clinical picture, history or evidence of active schistosomiasis and exclusion of other conditions. Investigations include stools and urine examination for schistosome eggs, blood tests, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and examination of the cerebrospinal fluid. Treatment of cases is mainly by praziquantel, corticosteroids, surgical intervention and rehabilitation.

  4. Comparison of bacterial growth in sonication fluid cultures with periprosthetic membranes and with cultures of biopsies for diagnosing periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Hischebeth, Gunnar T R; Randau, Thomas M; Molitor, Ernst; Wimmer, Matthias D; Hoerauf, Achim; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Gravius, Sascha

    2016-02-01

    Total joint arthroplasty is a common operation worldwide with infection rates between 1% and 3%. In cases of suspected periprosthetic joint infection, it is very challenging to rule out the causative microorganisms. In this study, we compared the appearance of periprosthetic membranes with the microbiological results obtained from cultures of sonication fluid and the correlation between classical microbiological cultures and cultures of sonication fluid. The results confirmed a strong correlation of bacterial growth in sonication fluid cultures with bacterial growth in classical microbiological cultures. Most importantly, however, our study documented a highly significant correlation of periprosthetic membranes typical for periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) with bacterial growth in sonication fluid. Sonication fluid cultures yielded a better sensitivity than tissue cultures (72.34-60.87%). These 3 methods are useful tools in diagnosing PJIs, and even more, sonication fluid cultures should be included in the diagnostic path of PJI. PMID:26584961

  5. Imaging studies in patients with spinal pain

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate an a priori threshold for advanced imaging in patients with spinal pain. Design Patients with spinal pain in any region for 6 to 52 weeks were assessed to determine if radiologic studies beyond x-ray scans were indicated, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and radionuclide bone scans. An a priori threshold was set before MRI, CT, or bone scans would be considered. Those who did not have MRI, CT, or bone scans ordered were followed for at least 1 year to determine if any of them went on to be diagnosed with a more serious spinal disorder (eg, infection, fracture, spondylitis, tumour, neurologic compression). Setting Four large primary care clinics in Edmonton, Alta. Participants A total of 1003 consecutively presenting patients with symptoms suspected to be related to the spine (for a duration of generally 6 to 52 weeks) who had not already undergone advanced imaging and did not have a diagnosis of nonbenign back pain. Main outcome measures Number of cases of nonbenign spinal disorder in participants who underwent advanced imaging and participants who did not undergo advanced imaging (ie, did not have any red flags). Results There were 399 women (39.8%) and 604 men (60.2%). The mean (SD) age of the group was 47.2 (14.6) years. The mean (SD) duration of symptoms was 15.1 (8.6) weeks. Of the 1003 participants, 110 met an a priori threshold for undergoing at least 1 of MRI, CT, or bone scan. In these 110 participants, there were newly diagnosed cases of radiculopathy (n = 12), including a case of cauda equina syndrome; spondyloarthropathy (n = 6); occult fracture (n = 2); solitary metastasis (n = 1); epidural lipomatosis (n = 1); osteomyelitis (n = 1), and retroperitoneal hematoma (n = 1), each of which was considered likely to be the cause of the patient’s spinal symptoms. The remaining 893 participants were followed for at least 1 year and none showed evidence of a nonbenign cause of his or her

  6. Diagnosing viral and bacterial respiratory infections in acute COPD exacerbations by an electronic nose: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    van Geffen, Wouter H; Bruins, Marcel; Kerstjens, Huib A M

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory infections, viral or bacterial, are a common cause of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). A rapid, point-of-care, and easy-to-use tool distinguishing viral and bacterial from other causes would be valuable in routine clinical care. An electronic nose (e-nose) could fit this profile but has never been tested in this setting before. In a single-center registered trial (NTR 4601) patients admitted with AECOPD were tested with the Aeonose(®) electronic nose, and a diagnosis of viral or bacterial infection was obtained by bacterial culture on sputa and viral PCR on nose swabs. A neural network with leave-10%-out cross-validation was used to assess the e-nose data. Forty three patients were included. In the bacterial infection model, 22 positive cases were tested versus the negatives; and similarly 18 positive cases were tested in the viral infection model. The Aeonose was able to distinguish between COPD-subjects suffering from a viral infection and COPD patients without infection, showing an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.74. Similarly, for bacterial infections, an AUC of 0.72 was obtained. The Aeonose e-nose yields promising results in 'smelling' the presence or absence of a viral or bacterial respiratory infection during an acute exacerbation of COPD. Validation of these results using a new and large cohort is required before introduction into clinical practice. PMID:27310311

  7. Gonococcal tenosynovitis in two HIV-infected heterosexual men: delayed diagnoses following negative urine nucleic acid amplification testing.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jonathan W; Flegg, Peter; Sweeney, John

    2016-05-01

    With recent increases in annual gonorrhoea incidence and disproportionately high infection rates amongst men who have sex with men, the clinical picture of disseminated gonococcal infection is changing. We present two cases where consideration of, and investigation for, disseminatedNeisseria gonorrhoeaeinfection provided the answer when routine inpatient diagnostics had been unsuccessful. PMID:25953962

  8. Arachnoiditis ossificans after spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Di; Zhao, Song; Liu, Wan-Guo; Zhang, Shao-Kun

    2015-05-01

    This article presents an unusual case of arachnoiditis ossificans after spinal surgery. A case of arachnoiditis ossificans secondary to lumbar fixation and decompression surgery for the treatment of multilevel lumbar fractures is reported and the relevant literature is reviewed. A 29-year-old man who previously underwent posterior pedicle screw fixation and fusion for multiple lumbar spine fractures reported lower back stiffness and discomfort 23 months postoperatively. A laminectomy was performed at L2 and at L3-L4. At L2, bone fragments from the burst fracture had injured the dural sac and some nerve roots. A posterolateral fusion was performed using allogeneic bone. Postoperatively, there were no signs of fever, infection, or systemic inflammatory responses. Arachnoiditis ossificans of the thecal sac from L1-L5 was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography at the 2-year follow-up. His postoperative neurological status progressively improved and he regained motor and sensory functions. Because of neurological improvements, fixation hardware was removed without further decompression. The authors report a case of arachnoiditis ossificans secondary to lumbar fixation and decompression surgery, which involved a large region. Arachnoiditis ossificans is a relatively rare disorder with unclear etiologies and limited treatment options. Spinal surgical intervention of arachnoiditis ossificans should be carefully considered because it may lead to poor outcomes and multiple revision surgeries. PMID:25970374

  9. The Impact of Asymptomatic Helminth Co-Infection in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Tuberculosis in North-West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Ebba; Belayneh, Meseret; Gelaw, Aschalew; Idh, Jonna; Getachew, Assefa; Alemu, Shitaye; Diro, Ermias; Fikre, Nigussu; Britton, Sven; Elias, Daniel; Aseffa, Abraham; Stendahl, Olle; Schön, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background Areas endemic of helminth infection, tuberculosis (TB) and HIV are to a large extent overlapping. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of asymptomatic helminth infection on the immunological response among TB patients with and without HIV, their house hold contacts and community controls. Methodology Consecutive smear positive TB patients (n = 112), their household contacts (n = 71) and community controls (n = 112) were recruited in Gondar town, Ethiopia. Stool microscopy, HIV serology, serum IgE level, eosinophil and CD4 counts were performed and tuberculosis patients were followed up for 3 months after initiation of anti-TB treatment. Results Helminth co-infection rate was 29% in TB patients and 21% in both community control and household contacts (p = 0.3) where Ascaris lumbricoides was the most prevalent parasite. In TB patients the seroprevalence of HIV was 47% (53/112). Eosinophilia and elevated IgE level were significantly associated with asymptomatic helminth infection. During TB treatment, the worm infection rate of HIV+/TB patients declined from 31% (10/32) at week 0 to 9% (3/32) at week 2 of TB treatment, whereas HIV−/TB patients showed no change from baseline to week 2, 29% (13/45) vs. 22.2% (10/45). This trend was stable at week 8 and 12 as well. Conclusion One third of smear positive TB patients were infected with helminths. Eosinophilia and elevated IgE level correlated with asymptomatic worm infection, indicating an effect on host immunity. The rate of worm infection declined during TB treatment in HIV+/TB co-infected patients whereas no decline was seen in HIV−/TB group. PMID:22952620

  10. Diagnosing and Treating Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Diagnosing and Treating Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Diagnosing HPS Diagnosing HPS in ... of patients that develop HPS from New World Hantaviruses recover completely. No chronic infection has been detected ...

  11. Imaging in spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Johan W M; Maes, Menno; Ozsarlak, Ozkan; van den Hauwe, Luc; Parizel, Paul M

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  12. Alcohol-Related Diagnoses and All-Cause Hospitalization Among HIV-Infected and Uninfected Patients: A Longitudinal Analysis of United States Veterans from 1997 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Rentsch, Christopher; Tate, Janet P; Akgün, Kathleen M; Crystal, Stephen; Wang, Karen H; Ryan Greysen, S; Wang, Emily A; Bryant, Kendall J; Fiellin, David A; Justice, Amy C; Rimland, David

    2016-03-01

    Individuals with HIV infection are living substantially longer on antiretroviral therapy, but hospitalization rates continue to be relatively high. We do not know how overall or diagnosis-specific hospitalization rates compare between HIV-infected and uninfected individuals or what conditions may drive hospitalization trends. Hospitalization rates among United States Veterans were calculated and stratified by HIV serostatus and principal diagnosis disease category. Because alcohol-related diagnoses (ARD) appeared to have a disproportional effect, we further stratified our calculations by ARD history. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was fitted to assess the relative risk of hospitalization controlling for demographic and other comorbidity variables. From 1997 to 2011, 46,428 HIV-infected and 93,997 uninfected patients were followed for 1,497,536 person-years. Overall hospitalization rates decreased among HIV-infected and uninfected patients. However, cardiovascular and renal insufficiency admissions increased for all groups while gastrointestinal and liver, endocrine, neurologic, and non-AIDS cancer admissions increased among those with an alcohol-related diagnosis. After multivariable adjustment, HIV-infected individuals with an ARD had the highest risk of hospitalization (hazard ratio 3.24, 95 % CI 3.00, 3.49) compared to those free of HIV infection and without an ARD. Still, HIV alone also conferred increased risk (HR 2.08, 95 % CI 2.04, 2.13). While decreasing overall, risk of all-cause hospitalization remains higher among HIV-infected than uninfected individuals and is strongly influenced by the presence of an ARD. PMID:25711299

  13. Spatial pattern in prevalence of paratuberculosis infection diagnosed with misclassification in Danish dairy herds in 2009 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Bihrmann, Kristine; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2016-02-01

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic infection of economic importance to the dairy industry. The infection may be latent for years, which makes diagnostic misclassification a general challenge. The objective of this study was to identify the spatial pattern in infection prevalence, when results were adjusted for covariate information and diagnostic misclassification. Furthermore, we compared the estimated spatial pattern with the spatial pattern obtained without adjustment for misclassification. The study included 1242 herds in 2009 and 979 herds in 2013. The within-herd prevalence was modelled using a hierarchical logistic regression model and included a spatial component modelled by a continuous Gaussian field. The Stochastic Partial Differential Equation (SPDE) approach and Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation (INLA) were used for Bayesian inference. We found a significant spatial component, and our results suggested that the estimated range of influence and the overall location of areas with increased prevalence are not very sensitive to diagnostic misclassification. PMID:26919750

  14. Matched population-based study examining the risk of type 2 diabetes in people with and without diagnosed hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Schnier, C; Wild, S; Kurdi, Z; Povey, C; Goldberg, D J; Hutchinson, S J

    2016-08-01

    Meta-analyses have found hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection to be associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Here, we examine this association within a large population-based study, according to HCV RNA status. A data-linkage approach was used to examine the excess risk of diagnosed T2DM in people diagnosed with antibodies to HCV (anti-HCV) in Scotland (21 929 anti-HCV(+ves) ; involving 15 827 HCV RNA(+ves) , 3927 HCV RNA(-ves) and 2175 with unknown RNA-status) compared to that of a threefold larger general population sample matched for gender, age and postcode (65 074 anti-HCV(-ves) ). To investigate effects of ascertainment bias the following periods were studied: up to 1 year before (pre-HCV)/within 1 year of (peri-HCV)/more than 1 year post (post-HCV) the date of HCV-diagnosis. T2DM had been diagnosed in 2.9% of anti-HCV(+ves) (including 3.2% of HCV RNA(+ves) and 2.3% of HCV RNA(-ves) ) and 2.7% of anti-HCV(-ves) . A higher proportion of T2DM was diagnosed in the peri-HCV period (i.e. around the time of HCV-diagnosis) for the anti-HCV(+ves) (22%) compared to anti-HCV(-ves) (10%). In both the pre-HCV and post-HCV periods, only those anti-HCV(+ves) living in less deprived areas (13% of the cohort) were found to have a significant excess risk of T2DM compared to anti-HCV(-ves) (adjusted odds ratio in the pre-HCV period: 4.0 for females and 2.3 for males; adjusted hazard ratio in the post-HCV period: 1.5). These findings were similarly observed for both HCV RNA(+ves) (chronic) and HCV RNA(-ves) (resolved). In the largest study of T2DM among chronic HCV-infected individuals to date, there was no evidence to indicate that infection conveyed an appreciable excess risk of T2DM at the population level. PMID:26910297

  15. Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Safak; Tatar, Oner; Akpancar, Serkan; Bilgic, Serkan; Ersen, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis (TB) is a significant form of TB, causing spinal deformity and paralysis. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for avoiding multivertebral destruction and are critical for improving outcomes in spinal TB. We believe that appropriate treatment method should be implemented at the early stage of this disease and that the Gulhane Askeri Tıp Akademisi classification system can be considered a practical guide for spinal TB treatment planning in all countries. PMID:26609247

  16. Spinal dorsal dermal sinus tract: An experience of 21 cases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ishwar; Rohilla, Seema; Kumar, Prashant; Sharma, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal dorsal dermal sinus is a rare entity, which usually comes to clinical attention by cutaneous abnormalities, neurologic deficit, and/or infection. The present study was undertaken to know the clinical profile of these patients, to study associated anomalies and to assess the results of surgical intervention. Methods: Medical records of 21 patients treated for spinal dorsal dermal sinus from September 2007 to December 2013 were reviewed. Results: We had 21 patients with male: female ratio of 13:8. Only 2 patients were below 1-year of age, and most cases (15) were between 2 and 15 years (mean age = 8.2 years). Lumbar region (11 cases) was most frequently involved, followed by thoracic (4 cases), lumbosacral, and cervical region in 3 patients each. All of our patients presented with neurological deficits. Three patients were admitted with acute meningitis with acute onset paraplegia and had intraspinal abscess. The motor, sensory, and autonomic deficits were seen in 14, 6, and 8 patients, respectively. Scoliosis and congenital talipes equinovarus were the common associated anomalies. All patients underwent surgical exploration and repair of dysraphic state and excision of the sinus. Overall, 20 patients improved or neurological status stabilized and only 1 patient deteriorated. Postoperative wound infection was seen in 2 cases. Conclusions: All patients with spinal dorsal dermal sinuses should be offered aggressive surgical treatment in the form of total excision of sinus tract and correction of spinal malformation, as soon as diagnosed. PMID:26539316

  17. A comparison of psychiatric diagnoses among HIV-infected prisoners receiving combination antiretroviral therapy and transitioning to the community

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, Angela; Altice, Frederick L; Powell, Mary Lindsay; Trestman, Robert L; Springer, Sandra A

    2014-01-01

    Background The criminal justice system (CJS), specifically prisons and jails, is ideally suited for uniform screening of psychiatric (PD) and substance use disorders (SUDs) among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), who are concentrated in these settings. By accurately diagnosing PDs and SUDs in these controlled settings, treatment can be initiated and contribute to improved continuity of care upon release. In the context of PLWHA, it may also improve combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) adherence, and reduce HIV transmission risk behaviors. Methods A retrospective data analysis was conducted by creating a cohort of PLWHA transitioning to the community from prison or jail enrolled who were enrolled in a controlled trial of directly administered antiretroviral (DAART). Participants were systematically assessed for PDs and SUDs using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), a standardized psychiatric assessment tool, and compared to diagnoses documented within the correctional medical record. Results Findings confirm a high prevalence of Axis I PDs (47.4%) and SUDs (67.1%) in PLWHA even after prolonged abstinence from alcohol and drugs. Although prevalence of PDs and SUDs were high in the medical record, there was fair to poor agreement among PDs using the MINI, making evident the potential benefit of more objective and concurrent PD assessments to guide treatment. Conclusions Additional PD diagnoses may be detected in PLWHA in CJS using supplementary and objective screening tools. By identifying and treating PDs and SUDs in the CJS, care may be improved and may ultimately contribute to healthier outcomes after community release if patients are effectively transitioned. PMID:25606368

  18. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Chikungunya Virus Strain Isolated from a Patient Diagnosed with Dengue Virus Infection in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Han Ming; Rohani, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a chikungunya virus coinfection strain isolated from a dengue virus serotype 2-infected patient in Malaysia. This coinfection strain was determined to be of the Asian genotype and contains a novel insertion in the nsP3 gene. PMID:27563048

  19. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Chikungunya Virus Strain Isolated from a Patient Diagnosed with Dengue Virus Infection in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Man Kwan; Gan, Han Ming; Rohani, Ahmad; Syed Hassan, Sharifah

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a chikungunya virus coinfection strain isolated from a dengue virus serotype 2-infected patient in Malaysia. This coinfection strain was determined to be of the Asian genotype and contains a novel insertion in the nsP3 gene. PMID:27563048

  20. Distribution and Molecular Characterization of Human Adenovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus Infections in Tonsillar Lymphocytes Isolated from Patients Diagnosed with Tonsillar Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Assadian, Farzaneh; Sandström, Karl; Bondeson, Kåre; Laurell, Göran; Lidian, Adnan; Svensson, Catharina; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Surgically removed palatine tonsils provide a conveniently accessible source of T and B lymphocytes to study the interplay between foreign pathogens and the host immune system. In this study we have characterised the distribution of human adenovirus (HAdV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in purified tonsillar T and B cell-enriched fractions isolated from three patient age groups diagnosed with tonsillar hypertrophy and chronic/recurrent tonsillitis. HAdV DNA was detected in 93 out of 111 patients (84%), while EBV DNA was detected in 58 patients (52%). The most abundant adenovirus type was HAdV-5 (68%). None of the patients were positive for HCMV. Furthermore, 43 patients (39%) showed a co-infection of HAdV and EBV. The majority of young patients diagnosed with tonsillar hypertrophy were positive for HAdV, whereas all adult patients diagnosed with chronic/recurrent tonsillitis were positive for either HAdV or EBV. Most of the tonsils from patients diagnosed with either tonsillar hypertrophy or chronic/recurrent tonsillitis showed a higher HAdV DNA copy number in T compared to B cell-enriched fraction. Interestingly, in the majority of the tonsils from patients with chronic/recurrent tonsillitis HAdV DNA was detected in T cells only, whereas hypertrophic tonsils demonstrated HAdV DNA in both T and B cell-enriched fractions. In contrast, the majority of EBV positive tonsils revealed a preference for EBV DNA accumulation in the B cell-enriched fraction compared to T cell fraction irrespective of the patients' age. PMID:27136093

  1. Prevalent and Incident HIV Diagnoses among Entamoeba histolytica-Infected Adult Males: A Changing Epidemiology Associated with Sexual Transmission — Taiwan, 2006–2013

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yi-Chun; Ji, Dar-Der; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Background Sexually transmitted Entamoeba histolytica infection (EHI) has been increasingly recognized among men who have sex with men (MSM). We used the National Disease Surveillance Systems (NDSS) to identify prevalent and incident HIV diagnoses among adults with EHI and to determine the associated factors. Methodology The NDSS collect demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of case patients through physician reports and public health interviews. EHI was confirmed by polymerase-chain-reaction assays, histopathology, or serology with documented liver abscess. We linked NDSS databases to identify prevalent and incident HIV diagnoses among noninstitutionalized Taiwanese adults with confirmed EHI during 2006–2013. Cox proportional-hazards analysis was used to determine associated factors. Principal findings Of noninstitutionalized adults with EHI, we identified prevalent HIV diagnosis in 210 (40%) of 524 males and one (1.7%) of 59 females, and incident HIV diagnosis in 71 (23%) of 314 males. MSM accounted for 183 (87%) and 64 (90%) of prevalent and incident HIV diagnoses in males, respectively. From 2006–2009 to 2010–2013, the prevalence of HIV diagnosis increased from 32% to 45% (P = 0.001) while the incidence of HIV diagnosis increased from 5.4 to 11.3 per 100 person-years (P = 0.001) among males with EHI. Incident HIV diagnosis was independently associated with a younger age, residing in metropolitan areas, hospitalization, previous syphilis, and engagement in oral, anal, or oral–anal sex before illness onset. Conclusions/significance Prevalent and incident HIV diagnoses were increasingly identified among adult males in Taiwan, preferentially affecting younger urban MSM. Surveillance and risk-reduction interventions are recommended against the interplay of HIV epidemic and sexually transmitted EHI. PMID:25299178

  2. How Is Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... five classification levels, ranging from complete loss of neural function in the affected area to completely normal ... Reviewed: 05/28/2013 Related A-Z Topics Neural Tube Defects (NTDs) Rehabilitation Medicine NICHD News and ...

  3. Diagnosing Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis in Patients Without Signs of Soft Tissue Infection by Coupling Hybrid 67Ga SPECT/CT With Bedside Percutaneous Bone Puncture

    PubMed Central

    Aslangul, Elisabeth; M’Bemba, Jocelyne; Caillat-Vigneron, Nadine; Coignard, Sophie; Larger, Etienne; Boitard, Christian; Lipsky, Benjamin A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Successful treatment of osteomyelitis is more likely with accurate diagnosis and identification of the causative pathogens. This typically requires obtaining a specimen of bone, usually by image-guided biopsy. We sought to develop a simpler bedside method for definitively diagnosing osteomyelitis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Over 2 years, we enrolled consecutive patients presenting to our diabetic foot clinic with a foot ulcer and clinically suspected osteomyelitis but without soft tissue infection. Each underwent hybrid 67Ga single-photon emission computed tomography and X-ray computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging; those with a positive scan underwent bedside percutaneous bone puncture. Patients with a positive bone culture received culture-guided antibiotic therapy. Patients with negative 67Ga SPECT/CT imaging or with positive imaging but negative bone culture were not treated with antibiotics. All patients were followed up for ≥1 year. RESULTS Among 55 patients who underwent 67Ga SPECT/CT imaging, 13 had negative results and all of their foot ulcers resolved without antibiotic therapy. Among 42 with positive imaging, 2 were excluded (for recent antibiotic therapy) and 40 had bone punctures (3 punctured twice): 19 had negative results, 3 of which were likely false negatives, and 24 had positive results (all gram-positive cocci). At follow-up, 3 patients had died, 3 had undergone amputation, and 47 had no evidence of foot infection. The sensitivity and specificity of this combined method were 88.0 and 93.6%, respectively, and the positive and negative predictive values were 91.7 and 90.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Coupling of 67Ga SPECT/CT imaging and bedside percutaneous bone puncture appears to be accurate and safe for diagnosing diabetic foot osteomyelitis in patients without signs of soft tissue infection, obviating the need for antibiotic treatment in 55% of suspected cases. PMID:23514729

  4. Production, Characterization, and Use of Monoclonal Antibodies Against gp51 Protein to Diagnose Bovine Leukemia Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Troiano, Ludmilla D.C.; Agottani, Jorge V.B.; Brodzinski, Josiane; Penha, Tania R.; Ozaki, Silvia C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) is a retroviral infection that causes persistent lymphocytosis and lymphosarcoma in cattle. The economic importance of infection by bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is due to several factors, including losses in exportation, treatment of secondary infection, and reduction in dairy production. To facilitate the development of a national test that is sensitive, simple, and applicable on a large scale, this work aimed to produce and characterize monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against gp51 protein from BLV for use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test. Two hundred seventy-four hybridomas were generated, from which 37 were mAbs secretory clones screened by indirect ELISA. The specificity of the mAbs generated against gp51 was verified by Western blot analysis, and the isotypes were characterized for isotyping in IgG1 and IgM. To evaluate the test, 250 sera were tested by agar gel immunodiffusion and mAb-ELISA. The values obtained for the mAb-ELISA test were 95% sensitivity and 90% specificity. PMID:23515423

  5. Production, Characterization, and Use of Monoclonal Antibodies Against gp51 Protein to Diagnose Bovine Leukemia Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Troiano, Ludmilla D C; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Agottani, Jorge V B; Brodzinski, Josiane; Penha, Tania R; Ozaki, Silvia C

    2013-02-01

    Enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL) is a retroviral infection that causes persistent lymphocytosis and lymphosarcoma in cattle. The economic importance of infection by bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is due to several factors, including losses in exportation, treatment of secondary infection, and reduction in dairy production. To facilitate the development of a national test that is sensitive, simple, and applicable on a large scale, this work aimed to produce and characterize monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against gp51 protein from BLV for use in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test. Two hundred seventy-four hybridomas were generated, from which 37 were mAbs secretory clones screened by indirect ELISA. The specificity of the mAbs generated against gp51 was verified by Western blot analysis, and the isotypes were characterized for isotyping in IgG1 and IgM. To evaluate the test, 250 sera were tested by agar gel immunodiffusion and mAb-ELISA. The values obtained for the mAb-ELISA test were 95% sensitivity and 90% specificity. PMID:23515423

  6. Epidemiological characteristics of Malassezia folliculitis and use of the May-Grünwald-Giemsa stain to diagnose the infection.

    PubMed

    Durdu, Murat; Güran, Mümtaz; Ilkit, Macit

    2013-08-01

    Various bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral pathogens can cause folliculitis, which is often mistakenly treated with antibiotics for months or even years. A laboratory diagnosis is required before therapy can be planned. Here, we describe the prevalence and risk factors, as well as the clinical, cytological, and mycological characteristics, of patients with Malassezia folliculitis (MF) in Adana, Turkey. We also report the treatment responses of the MF patients and describe the Malassezia spp. using culture-based molecular methods. Cytological examinations were performed in 264 folliculitis patients, 49 of whom (18.5%) were diagnosed with MF. The positivity of the May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG) smear was higher (100%) than that of the potassium hydroxide test (81.6%). Using Wood's light, yellow-green fluorescence was observed in 66.7% of the MF patients. Identification using the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region revealed that Malassezia globosa was the most common species, followed by Malassezia sympodialis, Malassezia restricta, and Malassezia furfur. The MF patients were treated with itraconazole capsules (200 mg/d) for 2 weeks. Complete recovery was observed in 79.6% of the patients. These novel findings help improve our current understanding of the epidemiological characteristics of MF and establish MGG as a practical tool for the diagnosis of MF. PMID:23706503

  7. Staging Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  8. How Many Samples and How Many Culture Media To Diagnose a Prosthetic Joint Infection: a Clinical and Microbiological Prospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Julie; Tandé, Didier; Plouzeau, Chloé; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Lemarié, Carole; Kempf, Marie; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Bret, Laurent; Juvin, Marie Emmanuelle; Giraudeau, Bruno; Burucoa, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous perioperative samples and culture media are required to diagnose prosthetic joint infection (PJI), their exact number and types have not yet been definitely determined with a high level of proof. We conducted a prospective multicenter study to determine the minimal number of samples and culture media required for accurate diagnosis of PJI. Over a 2-year period, consecutive patients with clinical signs suggesting PJI were included, with five perioperative samples per patient. The bacteriological and PJI diagnosis criteria were assessed using a random selection of two, three, or four samples and compared with those obtained using the recommended five samples (references guidelines). The results obtained with two or three culture media were then compared with those obtained with five culture media for both criteria. The times-to-positivity of the different culture media were calculated. PJI was confirmed in 215/264 suspected cases, with a bacteriological criterion in 192 (89%). The PJI was monomicrobial (85%) or polymicrobial (15%). Percentages of agreement of 98.1% and 99.7%, respectively, for the bacteriological criterion and confirmed PJI diagnosis were obtained when four perioperative samples were considered. The highest percentages of agreement were obtained with the association of three culture media, a blood culture bottle, a chocolate agar plate, and Schaedler broth, incubated for 5, 7, and 14 days, respectively. This new procedure leads to significant cost saving. Our prospective multicenter study showed that four samples seeded on three culture media are sufficient for diagnosing PJI. PMID:26637380

  9. How Many Samples and How Many Culture Media To Diagnose a Prosthetic Joint Infection: a Clinical and Microbiological Prospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Bémer, Pascale; Léger, Julie; Tandé, Didier; Plouzeau, Chloé; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Lemarié, Carole; Kempf, Marie; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Bret, Laurent; Juvin, Marie Emmanuelle; Giraudeau, Bruno; Corvec, Stéphane; Burucoa, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Although numerous perioperative samples and culture media are required to diagnose prosthetic joint infection (PJI), their exact number and types have not yet been definitely determined with a high level of proof. We conducted a prospective multicenter study to determine the minimal number of samples and culture media required for accurate diagnosis of PJI. Over a 2-year period, consecutive patients with clinical signs suggesting PJI were included, with five perioperative samples per patient. The bacteriological and PJI diagnosis criteria were assessed using a random selection of two, three, or four samples and compared with those obtained using the recommended five samples (references guidelines). The results obtained with two or three culture media were then compared with those obtained with five culture media for both criteria. The times-to-positivity of the different culture media were calculated. PJI was confirmed in 215/264 suspected cases, with a bacteriological criterion in 192 (89%). The PJI was monomicrobial (85%) or polymicrobial (15%). Percentages of agreement of 98.1% and 99.7%, respectively, for the bacteriological criterion and confirmed PJI diagnosis were obtained when four perioperative samples were considered. The highest percentages of agreement were obtained with the association of three culture media, a blood culture bottle, a chocolate agar plate, and Schaedler broth, incubated for 5, 7, and 14 days, respectively. This new procedure leads to significant cost saving. Our prospective multicenter study showed that four samples seeded on three culture media are sufficient for diagnosing PJI. PMID:26637380

  10. Infection.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Gaurav; Nagornaya, Natalya; Post, M Judith D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is useful in the diagnosis and management of infections of the central nervous system. Typically, imaging findings at the outset of the disease are subtle and nonspecific, but they often evolve to more definite imaging patterns in a few days, with less rapidity than for stroke but faster than for neoplastic lesions. This timing is similar to that of noninfectious inflammatory brain disease, such as multiple sclerosis. Fortunately, imaging patterns help to distinguish the two kinds of processes. Other than for sarcoidosis, the meninges are seldom involved in noninfectious inflammation; in contrast, many infectious processes involve the meninges, which then enhance with contrast on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, brain infection causes a vast array of imaging patterns. Although CT is useful when hemorrhage or calcification is suspected or bony detail needs to be determined, MRI is the imaging modality of choice in the investigation of intracranial infections. Imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging help in accurately depicting the location and characterizing pyogenic infections and are particularly useful in differentiating bacterial infections from other etiologies. Susceptibility-weighted imaging is extremely useful for the detection of hemorrhage. Although MR spectroscopy findings can frequently be nonspecific, certain conditions such as bacterial abscesses show a relatively specific spectral pattern and are useful in diagnosing and constituting immediate therapy. In this chapter we review first the imaging patterns associated with involvement of various brain structures, such as the epidural and subdural spaces, the meninges, the brain parenchyma, and the ventricles. Involvement of these regions is illustrated with bacterial infections. Next we illustrate the patterns associated with viral and prion diseases, followed by mycobacterial and fungal infections, to conclude with a review of imaging findings

  11. Newly Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ... start this journey: Get a copy of your pathology report. We can help you understand the report ...

  12. Genetic Characteristics of CRF01_AE Among Newly Diagnosed HIV-1-Infected 16- to 25-Year Olds in 3 Geographic Regions of Guangxi, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Shen, Zhi-Yong; Li, Zheng; Liang, Shu-Jia; He, Cui; Liang, Fu-Xiong; Feng, Yi; Li, Jian-Jun; Ruan, Yu-Hua; Zhou, Yue-Jiao; Shao, Yi-Ming; Xing, Hui; Liao, Ling-Jie

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of clusters and drug resistance of CRF01_AE among newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve HIV-infected teenagers and young adults in 3 major HIV-affected geographic regions of Guangxi Province, including the cities of Hezhou, Liuzhou, and Nanning. Samples were sequentially collected from newly diagnosed HIV-infected 16- to 25-year olds in these 3 regions from 2009 to 2013. The viral genome was extracted, and the partial pol gene was amplified and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses were used to determine HIV-1 subtypes and CRF01_AE clusters. Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations were identified using the 2009 WHO list of TDR mutations. A total of 216 sequences were obtained from CRF01_AE strains, which accounted for 83.1% of the 260 genotyped samples, of which 36 were from Hezhou, 147 from Liuzhou, and 33 in Nanning. Most (83.3%, 180/216) were from heterosexuals, followed by injection drug users (5.6%), homosexuals (4.2%), and unknown risk group (6.9%). Based on phylogenetic analyses by the maximum likelihood method, 5 distinct clusters (cluster 1-5) were identified with 213 (98.6%) sequences, whereas 3 (1.4%) sequences were ungrouped. In Hezhou, 88.9% (32/36) of CRF01_AE infections were caused by cluster 2, and 11.1% (4/36) were caused by cluster 1. In Liuzhou, 83.0% (122/147) of the CRF01_AE strains were found in cluster 1, 11.6% (17/147) from cluster 2, 1.4% (2/147) from cluster 3, 2.7% (4/147) from cluster 4, and 0.7% (1/147) from cluster 5. The distribution of CRF01_AE clusters was more even in Nanning than it was in the other 2 regions, with 18.2% (6/33) from cluster 1, 36.3% (12/33) from cluster 2, 9.1% (3/33) from cluster 3, 18.2% (6/33) from cluster 4, and 12.1% (4/33) from cluster 5. The most frequent TDR mutations were M46I (2) in the protease region and Y181C (2) from the reverse transcriptase fragment. Clusters 1 and 2 of CRF01_AE strains were prevalent in Liuzhou and Hezhou, respectively. However

  13. Development and validation of a prediction model for diagnosing blood stream infections in febrile, non-neutropenic children with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esbenshade, Adam J.; Di Pentima, M. Cecilia; Zhao, Zhiguo; Shintani, Ayumi; Esbenshade, Jennifer C.; Simpson, Monique E.; Montgomery, Kathleen C.; Lindell, Robert B.; Lee, Haerin; Wallace, Ato; Garcia, Kelly L.; Moons, Karel G.M.; Debra L., Friedman

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric oncology patients are at increased risk for blood stream infections (BSI). Risk in the absence of severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count (ANC) ≥500/µl) is not well defined. Procedure In a retrospective cohort of febrile (temperature ≥38.0° for > 1 hour or ≥38.3°) pediatric oncology patients with ANC≥500/µl , a diagnostic prediction model for BSI was constructed using logistic regression modeling and the following candidate predictors: age, ANC, absolute monocyte count, body temperature, inpatient/outpatient presentation, sex, central venous catheter type, hypotension, chills, cancer diagnosis, stem cell transplant, upper respiratory symptoms, and exposure to cytarabine, anti-thymocyte globulin, or anti-GD2 antibody. The model was internally validated with bootstrapping methods. Results Among 932 febrile episodes in 463 patients, we identified 91 cases of BSI. Independently significant predictors for BSI were higher body temperature (Odds ratio (OR) 2.36 p<0.001), tunneled external catheter (OR 13.79 p<0.001), peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) (OR 3.95 p=0.005), elevated ANC (OR 1.19 p=0.024), chills (OR 2.09 p=0.031) and hypotension (OR 3.08 p=0.004). Acute lymphoblastic leukemia diagnosis (OR 0.34 p=0.026), increased age (OR 0.70 p=0.049) and drug exposure (OR 0.08 p<0.001) were associated with decreased risk for BSI. The risk prediction model had a C-index of 0.898; after bootstrapping adjustment for optimism, corrected C-index 0.885. Conclusions We developed a diagnostic prediction model for BSI in febrile pediatric oncology patients without severe neutropenia. External validation is warranted before use in clinical practice. PMID:25327666

  14. Spinal osteosarcoma in a hedgehog with pedal self-mutilation.

    PubMed

    Rhody, Jeffrey L; Schiller, Chris A

    2006-09-01

    An African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was diagnosed with osteosarcoma of vertebral origin with compression of the spinal cord and spinal nerves. The only presenting sign was a self-mutilation of rear feet. Additional diagnoses included a well-differentiated splenic hemangiosarcoma, an undifferentiated sarcoma of the ascending colon, and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. PMID:16931383

  15. Retrospective, Demographic, and Clinical Investigation of the Causes of Postoperative Infection in Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Who Underwent Posterior Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Yaldiz, Can; Yaldiz, Mahizer; Ceylan, Nehir; Kacira, Ozlem Kitiki; Ceylan, Davut; Kacira, Tibet; Kizilcay, Gokhan; Tanriverdi, Taner

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Owing to the increasing population of elderly patients, a large number of patients with degenerative spondylosis are currently being surgically treated. Although basic measures for decreasing postoperative surgical infections (PSIs) are considered, it still remains among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this retrospective analysis is to present possible causes leading to PSI in patients who underwent surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylosis and highlight how it can be avoided to decrease morbidity and mortality. The study included 540 patients who underwent posterior stabilization due to degenerative lumbar stenosis between January 2013 and January 2014. The data before and after surgery was retrieved from the hospital charts. Patients with degenerative lumbar stenosis who were operated upon in this study had >2 levels of laminectomy and facetectomy. For this reason, posterior stabilization was performed for all the patients included in this study. Determining the causes of postoperative infection (PI) following spinal surgeries performed with instrumentation is a struggle. Seventeen different parameters that may be related to PI were evaluated in this study. The presence of systemic diseases, unknown glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions were among the parameters that increased the prevalence of PI. Alternatively, prolene sutures, double-layered gloves, and the use of rifampicin Sv (RIS) decreased the incidence of PI. Although the presence of systemic diseases, unnoticed glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions increased PIs, prolene suture material, double-layered gloves, and the use of RIS decreased PIs. PMID:26200620

  16. Spinal anaesthesia for spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Jellish, W Scott; Shea, John F

    2003-09-01

    Spinal anaesthesia for spinal surgery is becoming increasingly more popular because this anaesthetic technique allows the patient to self-position and avoid neurological injury that may occur with prone positioning under general anaesthesia. Spinal anaesthesia reduces intraoperative surgical blood loss, improves perioperative haemodynamic stability and reduces pain in the immediate postoperative period. This leads to a reduced need for analgesics and a reduction in the incidence of nausea and vomiting in the postoperative setting. Spinal anaesthesia for lumbar spine surgery also decreases the incidence of lower extremity thrombo-embolic complications and does not increase the occurrence of problems with micturition. These benefits increase the patient's satisfaction, and they expedite discharge of the patient from the hospital. Combination anaesthetic techniques, using both subarachnoid and epidural dosing schemes, may be beneficial for improving postoperative pain control and add further to the benefit of spinal anaesthesia for lumbar spine surgical procedures. PMID:14529005

  17. Diagnosing Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... your symptoms and their clinical judgment. Will my health care provider test me for flu if I have flu-like ... flu symptoms do not require testing because the test results usually do not change how you are treated. Your health care provider may diagnose you with flu based on ...

  18. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose. PMID:27448107

  19. Variations in the Role of Social Support on Disclosure Among Newly Diagnosed HIV-Infected People Who Inject Drugs in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Go, Vivian F; Latkin, Carl; Le Minh, Nguyen; Frangakis, Constantine; Ha, Tran Viet; Sripaipan, Teerada; Mo, Tran Thi; Davis, Wendy W; Vu, Pham The; Quan, Vu Minh

    2016-01-01

    Stigma and perceived social support can influence the decision to disclose HIV positive status, especially for people who inject drugs (PWID). In this analysis, the association between social support and HIV disclosure among 336 newly diagnosed HIV-infected PWID in Northern Vietnam was assessed. One month after diagnosis, 34.8 % of participants had not disclosed to anyone. Disclosure to anyone and to a family member specifically, was associated with baseline social support in the form of positive interactions and a history of incarceration. Disclosing to a family member was less likely among those who had unprotected sex in the previous 3 months. Disclosure to an injecting partner was more likely among those with a history of being in a drug treatment program, knowing someone on ART and believing that ART is safe. These data suggest that social support may facilitate disclosure among family members, including spouses, while disclosure to injecting partners is greater when PWID know that ART is a safe and viable option. PMID:25972071

  20. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis. PMID:3786010

  1. Treatment of Newly Diagnosed and Recurrent Childhood Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  2. Spinal cord trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal cord injury; Compression of spinal cord; SCI; Cord compression ... them more likely to fall may also have spinal cord injury. ... vary depending on the location of the injury. Spinal cord injury causes weakness and loss of feeling at, and ...

  3. Spinal tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Binning, Mandy; Klimo, Paul; Gluf, Wayne; Goumnerova, Liliana

    2007-10-01

    Pediatric spine tumors encompass a diverse group of pathologic diagnoses that differ markedly based on the location and age of the child. Children can be affected by primary and metastatic tumors, making the differential diagnosis and treatment options extensive. This article discusses the features of spinal tumors in children based primarily on location: extradural, intradural-extramedullary, and intramedullary tumors. Because this article deals with such a broad topic, detailed descriptions and outcomes of surgical and nonsurgical treatments for each particular tumor are limited. Rather, the key clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic features of each tumor are discussed. PMID:17991588

  4. Patterns of drug resistance among newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected patients in Greece during the last decade: the crucial role of transmission networks

    PubMed Central

    Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Zavitsanou, Assimina; Magiorkinis, Emmanouil; Gargalianos, Panagiotis; Xylomenos, Georgios; Lazanas, Marios; Chini, Maria; Skoutelis, Athanasios; Papastamopoulos, Vasileios; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Psichogiou, Mina; Daikos, Georgios; Vassilakis, Alexis; Chrysos, Georgios; Paparizos, Vasilis; Kourkounti, Sofia; Sambatakou, Helen; Kordossis, Theodoros; Koratzanis, Georgios; Panagopoulos, Periklis; Maltezos, Evangelos; Drimis, Stylianos; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of drug resistance is approximately 10% in Europe and North America among newly infected patients. We aim to investigate the temporal patterns of resistance among drug naive HIV-infected individuals in Greece and also to determine transmission networking among those with resistant strains. Materials and Methods Protease (PR) and partial reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences were determined from 2499 newly diagnosed HIV-1 patients, in Greece, during 2003–2013. Genotypic drug resistance was estimated using the HIVdb: Genotypic Resistance Interpretation Algorithm. We identified transmission clusters of resistant strains on the basis of a large collection of HIV-1 sequences from 4024 seropositives in Greece. Phylodynamic analysis was performed using a Bayesian method. Results We estimated drug resistance levels among naïve patients on the basis of all resistance mutations in PR and partial RT. The overall prevalence of resistance was 19.6% (490/2499). Resistance to NNRTIs was the most common (397/2499, 15.9%) followed by PIs (116/2499, 4.6%) and NRTIs (79/2499, 3.2%). We found a significant trend for decreasing resistance to NRTIs over time (6.7%–1.6%). There was no time trend for the overall PI and NNRTI resistance. The most frequently observed major resistant sites in PR were V82 (2.0%) and L90 (1.8%). In RT, we found E138 (58.6%), K103 (13.1%), V179 (8.4%) and T215 (7.1%), M41 (4.7%) associated with resistance to NNRTIs and NRTIs, respectively. The prevalence of K103N and E138Q were significantly increased during 2003–2013. Crucially, we found that both K103N, E138Q are associated with transmission networking within men having sex with men (MSM) and intravenous drug user (IDU) local networks. The K103N network included seropositives across Greece, while the latter only from the recent IDU outbreak in Athens metropolitan area (1). Phylodynamic analyses revealed that the exponential growth for K103N network started in 2009 (Figure 1

  5. A Census Tract–Level Examination of Social Determinants of Health among Black/African American Men with Diagnosed HIV Infection, 2005–2009—17 US Areas

    PubMed Central

    Gant, Zanetta; Gant, Larry; Song, Ruiguang; Willis, Leigh; Johnson, Anna Satcher

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV disproportionately affects black men in the United States: most diagnoses are for black gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (collectively referred to as MSM). A better understanding of the social conditions in which black men live and work may better explain why HIV incidence and diagnosis rates are higher than expected in this population. Methods Using data from the National HIV Surveillance System and the US Census Bureau's American Community Survey, we examined the relationships of HIV diagnosis rates and 5 census tract–level social determinants of health variables for 21,948 black MSM and non-MSM aged ≥15 years residing in 17 areas in the United States. We examined federal poverty status, marital status, education level, employment status, and vacancy status and computed rate ratios (RRs) and prevalence odds ratios (PORs), using logistic regression with zero-inflated negative binomial modeling. Results Among black MSM, HIV diagnosis rates decreased as poverty increased (RR: 0.54). At the time of HIV diagnosis, black MSM were less likely than black non-MSM to live in census tracts with a higher proportion below the poverty level (POR: 0.81) and with a higher proportion of vacant houses (POR: 0.86). In comparison, housing vacancy was positively associated with HIV diagnosis rates among black non-MSM (RR: 1.65). HIV diagnosis rates were higher for black MSM (RR: 2.75) and non-MSM (RR: 4.90) whose educational level was low. Rates were significantly lower for black MSM (RR: 0.06) and non-MSM (RR: 0.26) as the proportion unemployed and the proportion married increased. Conclusions This exploratory study found differences in the patterns of HIV diagnosis rates for black MSM and non-MSM and provides insight into the transmission of HIV infection in areas that reflect substantial disadvantage in education, housing, employment, and income. PMID:25268831

  6. Postpartum Loss to HIV Care and HIV Viral Suppression among Previously Diagnosed HIV-Infected Women with a Live Birth in New York State

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mother-to-child-transmission of HIV in the United States has been greatly reduced, with clear benefits for the child. However, little is known about factors that predict maternal loss to HIV care in the postpartum year. This retrospective cohort study included 980 HIV-positive women, diagnosed with HIV at least one year before pregnancy, who had a live birth during 2008–2010 in New York State. Women who did not meet the following criterion in the 12 months after the delivery-related hospital discharge were considered to be lost to HIV care: two or more laboratory tests (CD4 or HIV viral load), separated by at least 90 days. Adjusted relative risks (aRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for predictors of postpartum loss to HIV care were identified with Poisson regression, solved using generalized estimating equations. Having an unsuppressed (>200 copies/mL) HIV viral load in the postpartum year was also evaluated. Overall, 24% of women were loss to HIV care during the postpartum year. Women with low participation in HIV care during preconception were more likely to be lost to HIV care during the postpartum year (aRR: 2.70; 95% CI: 2.09–3.49). In contrast, having a low birth weight infant was significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of loss to HIV care (aRR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.53–0.98). While 75% of women were virally suppressed at the last viral load before delivery only 44% were continuously suppressed in the postpartum year; 12% had no viral load test reported in the postpartum year and 44% had at least one unsuppressed viral load test. Lack of engagement in preconception HIV-related health care predicts postpartum loss to HIV care for HIV-positive parturient women. Many women had poor viral control during the postpartum period, increasing the risk of disease progression and infectivity. PMID:27513953

  7. Types of Haemophilus influenzae Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... many different kinds of infections. These infections can range from mild ear infections to severe diseases, like bloodstream infections. When the bacteria invade parts of the body that are normally free from germs, like spinal fluid or blood, this ...

  8. Low back pain at presentation in a newly diagnosed diabetic.

    PubMed

    Ladhani, S; Phillips, S D; Allgrove, J

    2002-12-01

    Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus predisposes to a range of different and unusual infections, including epidural and psoas abscesses. However, they occur mainly in adults with longstanding diabetes. We report the case of a 12 year old boy who presented with diabetic ketoacidosis and low back pain, and was subsequently diagnosed with both a left psoas abscess and an extensive thoracolumbar spinal epidural abscess measuring 20 cm in length. This case report highlights the need to maintain a high index of suspicion for epidural abscesses in children presenting with fever and localised back pain. Early diagnosis with appropriate imaging and aggressive management can prevent development of permanent neurological damage as was the case in our patient. PMID:12456563

  9. Spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Melancia, João Levy; Francisco, António Fernandes; Antunes, João Lobo

    2014-01-01

    Narrowing of the spinal canal or foramina is a common finding in spine imaging of the elderly. Only when symptoms of neurogenic claudication and/or cervical myelopathy are present is a spinal stenosis diagnosis made, either of the lumbar spine, cervical spine or both (only very rarely is the thoracic spine involved). Epidemiological data suggest an incidence of 1 case per 100 000 for cervical spine stenosis and 5 cases per 100 000 for lumbar spine stenosis. Cervical myelopathy in patients over 50 years of age is most commonly due to cervical spine stenosis. Symptomatic spinal narrowing can be congenital, or, more frequently, acquired. The latter may be the result of systemic illneses, namely endocrinopathies (such as Cushing disease or acromegaly), calcium metabolism disorders (including hyporarthyroidism and Paget disease), inflammatory diseases (such as rheumathoid arthritis) and infectious diseases. Physical examination is more often abnormal in cervical spondylotic myeloptahy whereas in lumbar spinal stenosis it is typically normal. Therefore spinal stenosis diagnosis relies on the clinical picture corresponding to conspicuous causative changes identified by imaging techniques, most importantly CT and MRI. Other ancillary diagnostic tests are more likely to be yielding for establishing a differential diagnosis, namely vascular claudication. Most patients have a progressive presentation and are offered non operative management as first treatment strategy. Surgery is indicated for progressive intolerable symptoms or, more rarely, for the neurologically catastrophic initial presentations. Surgical strategy consists mainly of decompression (depending on the anatomical level and type of narrowing: laminectomy, foraminotomy, discectomy, corporectomy) with additional instrumentation should spinal stability and sagittal balance be at risk. For cervical spine stenosis the main objective of surgery is to halt disease progression. There is class 1b evidence that surgery

  10. Extradural spinal synovial cysts in nine dogs.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, P J; Sturges, B K; Berry, W L; Vernau, K M; Koblik, P D; Lecouteur, R A

    2001-10-01

    Nine dogs presenting for investigation of cervical or thoracolumbar myelopathies were diagnosed with extradural spinal synovial cysts. Degenerative disease affecting the articular facets or intervertebral discs was present on plain spinal radiographs in all cases. Myelography was consistent with dorsolateral, extradural spinal cord compression. Two groups of dogs were identified: (1) young, giant breed dogs with multiple cysts involving one or more levels of the cervical spinal cord; and (2) older, large breed dogs with solitary cysts involving the thoracolumbar spinal cord. The synovial cysts constituted the major compressive lesions in four of the dogs. Analysis of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid demonstrated albuminocytological dissociation, consistent with chronic compressive myelopathy, in six dogs. All dogs underwent decompressive surgery and the diagnosis of synovial cysts was confirmed histologically. The mean follow-up period was 17 months (range four to 36 months). At the time of follow-up, all dogs were fully ambulatory with improved neurological function compared with that at initial presentation. PMID:11688527

  11. Genetic diversity and drug resistance among newly diagnosed and antiretroviral treatment-naive HIV-infected individuals in western Yunnan: a hot area of viral recombination in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The emergence of an HIV-1 epidemic in China was first recognized in Dehong, western Yunnan. Due to its geographic location, Dehong contributed greatly in bridging HIV-1 epidemics in Southeast Asia and China through drug trafficking and injection drug use; and also extensively to the HIV genetic diversity in Yunnan and China. We attempt to monitor HIV-1 in this area by studying the HIV-1 genetic distribution and transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in various at-risk populations. Methods Blood samples from a total of 320 newly HIV-1 diagnosed individuals, who were antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive, were collected from January 2009 to December 2010 in 2 counties in Dehong. HIV-1 subtypes and pol gene drug resistance (DR) mutations were genotyped. Results Among 299 pol sequences successfully genotyped (93.4%), subtype C accounted for 43.1% (n=129), unique recombinant forms (URFs) for 18.4% (n=55), CRF01_AE for 17.7% (n=54), B for 10.7% (n=32), CRF08_BC for 8.4% (n=25) and CRF07_BC for 1.7% (n=5). Subtype distribution in patients infected by different transmission routes varied. In contract to the previous finding of CRF01_AE predominance in 2002-2006, subtype C predominated in both injecting drug users (IDUs) and heterosexually transmitted populations in this study. Furthermore, we found a high level of BC, CRF01_AE/C and CRF01_AE/B/C recombinants suggesting the presence of active viral recombination in the area. TDR associated mutations were identified in 4.3% (n=13) individuals. A total of 1.3% of DR were related to protease inhibitors (PIs), including I85IV, M46I and L90M; 0.3% to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), including M184I; and 2.7% to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), including K103N/S, Y181C, K101E and G190A. Conclusion Our work revealed diverse HIV-1 subtype distributions and intersubtype recombinations. We also identified a low but significant TDR mutation rate among ART-naive patients. These findings

  12. Diagnosing hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gelfer, Mark; Dawes, Martin; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Padwal, Raj; Cloutier, Lyne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To highlight the 2015 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of hypertension. Quality of evidence A systematic search was performed current to August 2014 by a Cochrane Collaboration librarian using the MEDLINE and PubMed databases. The search results were critically appraised by the CHEP subcommittee on blood pressure (BP) measurement and diagnosis, and evidence-based recommendations were presented to the CHEP Central Review Committee for independent review and grading. Finally, the findings and recommendations were presented to the Recommendations Task Force for discussion, debate, approval, and voting. The main recommendations are based on level II evidence. Main message Based on the most recent evidence, CHEP has made 4 recommendations in 2 broad categories for 2015 to improve BP measurement and the way hypertension is diagnosed. A strong recommendation is made to use electronic BP measurement in the office setting to replace auscultatory BP measurement. For patients with elevated office readings, CHEP is recommending early use of out-of-office BP measurement, preferably ambulatory BP measurement, in order to identify early in the process those patients with white-coat hypertension. Conclusion Improvements in diagnostic accuracy are critical to optimizing hypertension management in Canada. The annual updates provided by CHEP ensure that practitioners have up-to-date evidence-based information to inform practice. PMID:26564654

  13. Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors Treatment Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  14. Spinal Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Katonis, P.; Datsis, G.; Karantanas, A.; Kampouroglou, A.; Lianoudakis, S.; Licoudis, S.; Papoutsopoulou, E.; Alpantaki, K.

    2013-01-01

    Although osteosarcoma represents the second most common primary bone tumor, spinal involvement is rare, accounting for 3%–5% of all osteosarcomas. The most frequent symptom of osteosarcoma is pain, which appears in almost all patients, whereas more than 70% exhibit neurologic deficit. At a molecular level, it is a tumor of great genetic complexity and several genetic disorders have been associated with its appearance. Early diagnosis and careful surgical staging are the most important factors in accomplishing sufficient management. Even though overall prognosis remains poor, en-block tumor removal combined with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy is currently the treatment of choice. This paper outlines histopathological classification, epidemiology, diagnostic procedures, and current concepts of management of spinal osteosarcoma. PMID:24179411

  15. Spinal Bracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Dr. Arthur Copes of the Copes Foundation, Baton Rouge, LA, says that 35 percent of the 50 technical reports he received from the NASA/Southern University Industrial Applications Center in Baton Rouge and the Central Industrial Applications Center, Durant, OK, were vital to the development of his Copes Scoliosis Braces, which are custom designed and feature a novel pneumatic bladder that exerts constant corrective pressure to the torso to slowly reduce or eliminate the spinal curve.

  16. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  17. Spinal Cord Infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Spinal Cord Infarction Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... Organizations Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Spinal Cord Infarction? Spinal cord infarction is a stroke either ...

  18. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov The National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the severity of the injury. Tap this spinal column to see how the level of injury affects loss of function and control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the ...

  1. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The cervical spinal column is made up of vertebral bodies which protect the spinal cord. ... spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine ...

  2. Postoperative Spine Infections.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit Yuvaraj; Biswas, Samar Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection increases the morbidity of the patient and the cost of healthcare. Despite the development of prophylactic antibiotics and advances in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patient outcome after spinal surgery. Spinal instrumentation also has an important role in the development of postoperative infections. This review analyses the risk factors that influence the development of postoperative infection. Classification and diagnosis of postoperative spinal infection is also discussed to facilitate the choice of treatment on the basis of infection severity. Preventive measures to avoid surgical site (SS) infection in spine surgery and methods for reduction of all the changeable risk factors are discussed in brief. Management protocols to manage SS infections in spine surgery are also reviewed. PMID:26949475

  3. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Samar Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection increases the morbidity of the patient and the cost of healthcare. Despite the development of prophylactic antibiotics and advances in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patient outcome after spinal surgery. Spinal instrumentation also has an important role in the development of postoperative infections. This review analyses the risk factors that influence the development of postoperative infection. Classification and diagnosis of postoperative spinal infection is also discussed to facilitate the choice of treatment on the basis of infection severity. Preventive measures to avoid surgical site (SS) infection in spine surgery and methods for reduction of all the changeable risk factors are discussed in brief. Management protocols to manage SS infections in spine surgery are also reviewed. PMID:26949475

  4. Postpartum Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Interactions Pill Identifier Commonly searched drugs Aspirin Metformin Warfarin Tramadol Lactulose Ranitidine News & Commentary Recent News ... Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's Health Issues ... Bladder and Kidney Infections Breast Infection Postpartum Blood Clots Postpartum Thyroid Disorders Postpartum ...

  5. Characteristics of Patients Recently Infected with HIV-1 Non-B Subtypes in France: a Nested Study within the Mandatory Notification System for New HIV Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Denys; Moreau, Alain; Cazein, Françoise; Lot, Florence; Pillonel, Josiane; Brunet, Sylvie; Thierry, Damien; Le Vu, Stéphane; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Semaille, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The presence of HIV-1 non-B subtypes in Western Europe is commonly attributed to migration of individuals from non-European countries, but the possible role of domestic infections with non-B subtypes is not well investigated. The French mandatory anonymous reporting system for HIV is linked to a virological surveillance using assays for recent infection (<6 months) and serotyping. During the first semester of years 2007 to 2010, any sample corresponding to a non-B recent infection was analyzed by sequencing a 415-bp env region, followed by phylogenetic analysis and search for transmission clusters. Two hundred thirty-three recent HIV-1 infections with non-B variants were identified. They involved 5 subtypes and 7 circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). Ninety-two cases (39.5%) were due to heterosexual transmissions, of which 39 occurred in patients born in France. Eighty-five cases (36.5%) were identified in men having sex with men (MSM). Forty-three recent non-B infections (18.5%) segregated into 14 clusters, MSM being involved in 11 of them. Clustered transmission events included 2 to 7 cases per cluster. The largest cluster involved MSM infected by a CRF02_AG variant. In conclusion, we found that the spread of non-B subtypes in France occurs in individuals of French origin and that MSM are particularly involved in this dynamic. PMID:25232163

  6. Performance of Interferon-Gamma and IP-10 Release Assays for Diagnosing Latent Tuberculosis Infections in Patients with Concurrent Malaria in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Drabe, Camilla H; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Helleberg, Marie; Nyagonde, Nyagonde; Rose, Michala V; Francis, Filbert; Theilgaard, Ola P; Asbjørn, Jens; Amos, Ben; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Ruhwald, Morten; Ravn, Pernille

    2016-04-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used to detect cellular immune recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis The chemokine IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) is an alternative diagnostic biomarker to IFN-γ. Several conditions interfere with IGRA test performance. We aimed to assess the possible influence of Plasmodium falciparum infection on the IGRA test QuantiFERON-TB GOLD® In-Tube (QFT) test and an in-house IP-10 release assay. In total, 241 Tanzanian adults were included; 184 patients with uncomplicated malaria (88 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] coinfected) and 57 HIV-infected patients without malaria infection. Malaria was treated with artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem®). QFT testing was performed before initiation of malaria treatment and at days 7 and 42. In total, 172 patients completed follow-up. IFN-γ and IP-10 was measured in QFT supernatants. We found that during malaria infection IFN-γ and IP-10 levels in the unstimulated samples were elevated, mitogen responsiveness was impaired, and CD4 cell counts were decreased. These alterations reverted after malaria treatment. Concurrent malaria infection did not affect QFT test results, whereas there were more indeterminate IP-10 results during acute malaria infection. We suggest that IGRA and IP-10 release assay results of malaria patients should be interpreted with caution and that testing preferably should be postponed until after malaria treatment. PMID:26834199

  7. Pneumocephalus and Pneumorrhachis After Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Akyüz, Orhan; Gökpınar, Deniz; Aydın, Emsal; Aydın, Sergülen; Duymuş, Mahmut; Çığşar, Gülşen; Özdemir, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Pneumocephalus and pneumorrhachis are rare complications of neurosurgery. When a closed system such as the head and spinal area get injuried, it becomes open and the air can come in through that opening. In this case, we present a case of pneumocephalus and pneumorrhachis after spinal fusion surgery. Case Report Herein we present a case of diagnosis and treatment of pneumocephalus and pneumorrhachis after spinal fusion surgery. Conclusions Our patient developed postoperative pneumocephalus and pneumorrhachis as a late complication secondary to an infection. We wanted it to be considered as an important problem. PMID:26893792

  8. Nuclear medicine imaging of bone infections.

    PubMed

    Love, C; Palestro, C J

    2016-07-01

    Osteomyelitis is a broad group of infectious diseases that involve the bone and/or bone marrow. It can arise haematogenously, via extension from a contiguous infection, or by direct inoculation during surgery or trauma. The diagnosis is not always obvious and imaging tests are frequently performed as part of the diagnostic work-up. Commonly performed radionuclide tests include technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-diphosphonate bone scintigraphy (bone), and gallium-67 ((67)Ga) and in vitro labelled leukocyte (white blood cell; WBC) imaging. Although they are useful, each of these tests has limitations. Bone scintigraphy is sensitive but not specific, especially when underlying osseous abnormalities are present. (67)Ga accumulates in tumour, trauma, and in aseptic inflammation; furthermore, there is typically an interval of 1-3 days between radiopharmaceutical injection of and imaging. Currently, this agent is used primarily for spinal infections. Except for the spine, WBC imaging is the nuclear medicine test of choice for diagnosing complicating osteomyelitis. The in vitro leukocyte labelling process requires skilled personnel, is laborious, and is not always available. Complementary marrow imaging is usually required to maximise accuracy. Not surprisingly, alternative radiopharmaceuticals are continuously being investigated. Radiolabelled anti-granulocyte antibodies and antibody fragments, investigated as in vivo leukocyte labelling agents, have their own limitations and are not widely available. (111)In-biotin is useful for diagnosing spinal infections. Radiolabelled synthetic fragments of ubiquicidin, a naturally occurring human antimicrobial peptide that targets bacteria, have shown promise as infection specific radiopharmaceuticals. 2-[(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) with or without computed tomography (CT) is very useful in musculoskeletal infection. Sensitivities of more than 95% and specificities ranging from 75-99% have been

  9. Primary extramedullary spinal melanoma mimicking spinal meningioma: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    LI, YU-PING; ZHANG, HENG-ZHU; SHE, LEI; WANG, XIAO-DONG; DONG, LUN; XU, ENXI; WANG, XING-DONG

    2014-01-01

    Primary spinal melanoma is a rare lesion, which occurs throughout the cranial and spinal regions, however, is primarily observed in the middle or lower thoracic spine. The clinical features of primary spinal melanoma are complex and unspecific, resulting in a high misdiagnosis rate. In the present case report, a rare case of spinal melanoma exhibiting the dural tail sign and mimicking spinal meningioma is reported. The initial diagnosis, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was unclear. Thus, melanin-containing tumors and spinal meningioma should have been considered in the differential diagnosis. The tumor was completely resected using a standard posterior midline approach, which was followed by chemotherapy. Subsequent to the surgery, the patient was discharged with improved motor capacity and a follow-up MRI scan showed no recurrence after six months. The present study demonstrates that it is critical for neurosurgeons to focus on increasing the accuracy of initial diagnoses in order to make informed decisions regarding the requirement for surgical resection. The present case report presents the clinical, radiological and pathological features of primary extramedullary spinal melanoma mimicking spinal meningioma to emphasize the importance of early identification and diagnosis. PMID:24959273

  10. Spinal interventions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Santiago, F; Filippiadis, D K; Guzmán Álvarez, L; Martínez Martínez, A; Castellano, M M

    2016-04-01

    We review the state of the art in imaging-guided percutaneous interventional procedures used to diagnose and/or treat the diverse causes of back pain. These procedures can be used for diagnosis, treatment, or both. They are focused on the vertebral bodies, the facet joints, the intervertebral discs, and the nerve structures. PMID:26778583

  11. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed? Pneumonia can be hard to diagnose because it may ... than these other conditions. Your doctor will diagnose pneumonia based on your medical history, a physical exam, ...

  12. Recurrent surgical site infection of the spine diagnosed by dual (18)F-NaF-bone PET/CT with early-phase scan.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Jeong Won; Jeon, Min Hyok; Lee, Sang Mi

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of a 31-year-old man who showed recurrently elevated level of the serum inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) after spinal operation. He underwent (18)F-flurodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and dual (18)F-sodium-fluoride ((18)F-NaF) PET/CT with an additional early-phase scan to find a hidden inflammation focus. Only mildly increased (18)F-FDG was found at the surgical site of T11 spine on (18)F-FDG PET/CT. In contrast, dual (18)F-NaF bone PET/CT with early-phase scan demonstrated focal active inflammation at the surgical site of T11 spine. After a revision operation of the T11 spine, serum CRP level decreased to the normal range without any symptom or sign of inflammation. Inflammatory focus in the surgical site of the spine can be detected with using dual (18)F-NaF bone PET/CT scan with early-phase scan. PMID:27388912

  13. Surveillance of Physician-Diagnosed Skin and Soft Tissue Infections Consistent With Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) among Nebraska High School Athletes, 2008-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buss, Bryan F.; Connolly, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Though historically confined to hospital settings, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has received increasing attention in the wider community, particularly among athletes. A 2007-2008 investigation in Nebraska concluded that MRSA skin infections were an emerging problem among the state's student athletes. Statewide…

  14. Expression and purification of Suid Herpesvirus-1 glycoprotein E in the baculovirus system and its use to diagnose Aujeszky's disease in infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Serena, María Soledad; Geisler, Christoph; Metz, Germán Ernesto; Corva, Santiago Gerardo; Mórtola, Eduardo Carlos; Larsen, Alejandra; Jarvis, Donald L; Echeverría, María Gabriela

    2013-07-01

    Suid Herpesvirus 1 (SHV-1) is the etiological agent of Aujeszky's disease (AD), which affects swine herds worldwide and causes substantial economic losses due to animal mortality and lost productivity. In order to eradicate SHV-1, vaccination programs using viruses lacking the gene encoding glycoprotein E (gE) are ongoing in several countries. These eradication programs have generated a currently unmet demand for affordable and sensitive tests that can detect SHV-1 infection, yet distinguish between infected and vaccinated pigs. To meet this demand, we used the baculovirus-insect cell system to produce immunologically authentic full-length recombinant gE protein for use in a serum ELISA assay. As previous efforts to clone the gE gene had failed due to its extremely high GC-content (75% average), we used betaine as a PCR enhancer to facilitate amplification of the entire gE gene from the Argentinian CL15 strain of SHV-1. The cloned gE gene was expressed at high levels in recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells and reacted strongly with sera from SHV-1 infected pigs. We used the recombinant gE protein to develop a local indirect ELISA test with sensitivity and specificity comparable to currently available commercial tests. Thus, recombinant gE produced in baculovirus-infected insect cells is a viable source of antigen for the detection of SHV-1 in ELISA tests. We also provide evidence supporting a potential application of this recombinant form of gE as a SHV-1 subunit vaccine. PMID:23631926

  15. The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance in newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals in Croatia: the role of transmission clusters of men who have sex with men carrying the T215S surveillance drug resistance mutation.

    PubMed

    Grgic, Ivana; Lepej, Snjezana Zidovec; Lunar, Maja M; Poljak, Mario; Vince, Adriana; Vrakela, Ivana Baca; Planinic, Ana; Seme, Katja; Begovac, Josip

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in newly diagnosed and treatment-naive HIV-infected patients from Croatia and evaluate a possible contribution of transmission clusters to the spread of resistant virus. The study enrolled treatment-naive HIV-infected patients that entered clinical care at the Croatian Reference Center for HIV/AIDS between 2006 and 2008. The protease gene and a part of the reverse transcriptase gene of the HIV-1 genome were sequenced by using the Trugene HIV-1 Genotyping System. The prevalence of transmitted drug resistance was analyzed by using the surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRM) list recommended by the WHO in 2009. We report findings for 118 of 180 eligible patients (65.6% coverage). SDRM were detected in 26 of 118 patients (22.0%) who were infected with subtype B and belonged mostly to the men having sex with men (MSM). The majority of patients with primary resistance carried SDRM associated with resistance to nucleoside analogues reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs, 23 of 118 patients, 19.5%). The most frequently found NRTI SDRM was T215S (17 of 118 patients, 14.4%). SDRM associated with resistance to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were detected in three (2.5%) patients and primary resistance to protease inhibitors was not detected. Non-B subtypes were detected in 13/118 patients (11%). A total of 12 transmission pairs and eight distinct transmission clusters were identified with the largest cluster harboring sequences from 19 patients; among them all but two were carrying the T215S mutation. This study showed a high prevalence of TDR in newly diagnosed MSM from Croatia and is an important contribution concerning the relationship between local transmission clusters and the spread of resistant virus. PMID:22906365

  16. Non-hepatocellular carcinoma spinal metastases.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C Rory; Abu-Bonsrah, Nancy; Boone, Christine; Ruiz-Valls, Alejandro; Sankey, Eric W; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Elder, Benjamin D; Kosztowski, Thomas; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2016-05-01

    Metastases to the spine from non-hepatocellular carcinomas, such as cholangiocarcinoma and angiosarcoma, occur rarely. With improvements in oncologic care, the number of patients diagnosed with metastatic cancer is expected to increase. We performed a systematic review of the literature to assess the clinical presentation, treatment, outcome and survival of patients diagnosed with non-hepatocellular carcinoma spinal metastasis using PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and Web of Science. We identified 19 cases of spinal metastases from non-hepatocellular carcinomas that fit our pre-specified criteria. The mean age at presentation was 62.3years and cholangiocarcinoma was the most common subtype. Patients frequently presented with pain, weakness or paraparesis and at the time of diagnosis, most of them had multi-level involvement of the spine. A majority of patients with spinal metastasis were treated either with radiation or chemotherapy or received no treatment. A minority of the reports included information on survival, which revealed a median survival of 1.5months following diagnosis of the spinal metastasis. Although there is a paucity of published literature on non-hepatocellular carcinoma spinal metastasis, this systematic review provides descriptive clinical characteristics of these patients. PMID:26778049

  17. Additional diagnostic yield of adding serology to PCR in diagnosing viral acute respiratory infections in Kenyan patients 5 years of age and older.

    PubMed

    Feikin, Daniel R; Njenga, M Kariuki; Bigogo, Godfrey; Aura, Barrack; Gikunju, Stella; Balish, Amanda; Katz, Mark A; Erdman, Dean; Breiman, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    The role of serology in the setting of PCR-based diagnosis of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) is unclear. We found that acute- and convalescent-phase paired-sample serologic testing increased the diagnostic yield of naso/oropharyngeal swabs for influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus, adenovirus, and parainfluenza viruses beyond PCR by 0.4% to 10.7%. Although still limited for clinical use, serology, along with PCR, can maximize etiologic diagnosis in epidemiologic studies. PMID:23114699

  18. Scientific Rationale for Study Design of Community-based Simplified Antibiotic Therapy Trials in Newborns and Young Infants With Clinically Diagnosed Severe Infections or Fast Breathing in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Newborns and young infants suffer high rates of infections in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Timely access to appropriate antibiotic therapy is essential for reducing mortality. In an effort to develop community case management guidelines for young infants, 0–59 days old, with clinically diagnosed severe infections, or with fast breathing, 4 trials of simplified antibiotic therapy delivered in primary care clinics (Pakistan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya and Nigeria) or at home (Bangladesh and Nigeria) are being conducted. Methods: This article describes the scientific rationale for these trials, which share major elements of trial design. All the trials are in settings of high neonatal mortality, where hospitalization is not feasible or frequently refused. All use procaine penicillin and gentamicin intramuscular injections for 7 days as reference therapy and compare this to various experimental arms utilizing comparatively simpler combination regimens with fewer injections and oral amoxicillin. Conclusion: The results of these trials will inform World Health Organization policy regarding community case management of young infants with clinical severe infections or with fast breathing. PMID:23945577

  19. Use of intraoperative ultrasonography in canine spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Nanai, Beatrix; Lyman, Ronald; Bichsel, Pierre S

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the intraoperative appearance of various spinal cord conditions, and to investigate how intraoperative ultrasonography assisted in modification of surgical and postoperative treatment plans. Intraoperative ultrasonography (B-mode, and power Doppler mode) was used in 25 dogs undergoing spinal surgery. The neurologic conditions included cervical spondylomyelopathy, intervertebral disc (IVD) protrusion, IVD extrusion, spinal tumors, nerve sheath mass, granulomatous myelitis, and discospondylitis. All of these diagnoses were supported by histopathologic and/or cytologic evaluation. It was possible to visualize the spinal cord and the abnormal spinal tissue in all of the patients. Power Doppler imaging allowed assessment of the spinal cord microcirculation, and assisted in judgment of the degree of decompression. Ultrasound imaging directly impacted the surgical and the medical treatment plans in four patients. Owing to the intraoperative imaging, two hemilaminectomies were extended cranially and caudally, and additional disc spaces were fenestrated, one hemilaminectomy site was extended dorsally to retrieve the disc material from the opposite side, and one intramedullary cervical spinal cord lesion was discovered, aspirated, and consequently diagnosed as granulomatous inflammation, which altered the long-term medication protocol in that dog. This study suggests that intraoperative sonographic spinal cord imaging is a useful and viable technique. PMID:17508514

  20. Symptomatic spinal cord metastasis from cerebral oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Elefante, A; Peca, C; Del Basso De Caro, M L; Russo, C; Formicola, F; Mariniello, G; Brunetti, A; Maiuri, F

    2012-06-01

    Spinal subarachnoid spread is not uncommon in brain oligodendrogliomas; on the other hand, symptomatic involvement of the spinal cord and cauda is very rare, with only 16 reported cases. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who underwent resection of a low-grade frontal oligodendroglioma 4 years previously. He was again observed because of bilateral sciatic pain followed by left leg paresis. A spine MRI showed an intramedullary T12-L1 tumor with root enhancement. At operation, an intramedullary anaplastic oligodendroglioma with left exophytic component was found and partially resected. Two weeks later, a large left frontoparietal anaplastic oligodendroglioma was diagnosed and completely resected. The patient was neurologically stable for 8 months and died 1 year after the spinal surgery because of diffuse brain and spinal leptomeningeal spread. The review of the reported cases shows that spinal symptomatic metastases can occur in both low-grade and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, even many years after surgery of the primary tumor; however, they exceptionally occur as first clinical manifestation or as anaplastic progression. The spinal seeding represents a negative event leading to a short survival. PMID:21927882

  1. Dermatological problems following spinal cord injury in Korean patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zee-A; Choi, Ja Young; Ko, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify dermatological conditions following spinal cord injury (SCI) and analyze these conditions in relation to various characteristics of SCI. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital of Korea, Rehabilitation Center, Spinal Cord Unit. Participants Patients treated for SCI who were referred to dermatology for dermatological problems, 2000–2012. Results Of the 1408 SCI patients treated at the spinal cord unit, 253 patients with SCI were identified to have been referred to dermatology for skin problems and a total of 335 dermatological conditions were diagnosed. The most common dermatological finding was infectious (n = 123, 36.7%) followed by eczematous lesions (n = 109, 32.5%). Among the infectious lesions, fungal infection (n = 76, 61.8%) was the most common, followed by bacterial (n = 27, 21.9%) lesions. Seborrheic dermatitis (n = 59, 64.1%) was the most frequent eczematous lesion. Ingrown toenail occurred more frequently in tetraplegics whereas vascular skin lesions occurred more commonly in patients with paraplegia (P < 0.05). Xerotic dermatitis showed a higher occurrence within 12 months of injury rather than thereafter (P < 0.05). Of these, 72.4% of the infectious and 94.7% of the fungal skin lesions manifested below the neurological level of injury (NLI; P < 0.001) and 61.5% of the eczematous lesions and 94.9% of seborrheic dermatitis cases occurred above the NLI (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in dermatological diagnoses between patients with neurologically complete and incomplete SCI. Conclusion The most common dermatological condition in patients with SCI among those referred to dermatology was fungal infection, followed by seborrheic dermatitis. Although dermatological problems after SCI are not critical in SCI outcome, they negatively affect the quality of life. Patients and caregivers should be educated about appropriate skin care and routine

  2. Neurologic Complication Following Spinal Epidural Anesthesia in a Patient with Spinal Intradural Extramedullary Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Won

    2010-01-01

    Paraplegia following spinal epidural anesthesia is extremely rare. Various lesions for neurologic complications have been documented in the literature. We report a 66-year-old female who developed paraplegia after left knee surgery for osteoarthritis under spinal epidural anesthesia. In the recovery room, paraplegia and numbness below T4 vertebra was checked. A magnetic resonance image (MRI) scan showed a spinal thoracic intradural extramedullary (IDEM) tumor. After extirpation of the tumor, the motor weakness improved to the grade of 3/5. If a neurologic deficit following spinal epidural anesthesia does not resolve, a MRI should be performed without delay to accurately diagnose the cause of the deficit and optimal treatment should be rendered for the causative lesion. PMID:21430985

  3. Simplified Antibiotic Regimens for the Management of Clinically Diagnosed Severe Infections in Newborns and Young Infants in First-level Facilities in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Infection in young infants is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in low-middle income countries, with high neonatal mortality rates. Timely case management is lifesaving, but the current standard of hospitalization for parenteral antibiotic therapy is not always feasible. Alternative, simpler antibiotic regimens that could be used in outpatient settings have the potential to save thousands of lives. Methods: This trial aims to determine whether 2 simplified antibiotic regimens are equivalent to the reference therapy with 7 days of once-daily (OD) intramuscular (IM) procaine penicillin and gentamicin for outpatient management of young infants with clinically presumed systemic bacterial infection treated in primary health-care clinics in 5 communities in Karachi, Pakistan. The reference regimen is close to the current recommendation of the hospital-based intravenous ampicillin and gentamicin therapy for neonatal sepsis. The 2 comparison arms are (1) IM gentamicin OD and oral amoxicillin twice daily for 7 days; and (2) IM penicillin and gentamicin OD for 2 days, followed by oral amoxicillin twice daily for 5 days; 2250 “evaluable” infants will be enrolled. The primary outcome of this trial is treatment failure (death, deterioration or lack of improvement) within 7 days of enrollment. Results are expected by early 2014. Discussion: This trial will determine whether simplified antibiotic regimens with fewer injections in combination with high-dose amoxicillin are equivalent to 7 days of IM procaine penicillin and gentamicin in young infants with clinical severe infection. Results will have program and policy implications in countries with limited access to hospital care and high burden of neonatal deaths. PMID:23945571

  4. Delayed Onset Intracranial Subdural Hematoma Following Spinal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Işik, Semra; Yilmaz, Baran; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Özcan-Ekşi, Emel Ece; Akakin, Akin; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Konya, Deniz

    2016-06-01

    In this case-based review, the authors analyzed relevant literature with an illustrative patient of theirs about subdural hematoma secondary to dural tear at spinal surgery. Intracranial hypotension is a condition of decreased cerebrospinal fluid volume and pressure. Even though intracranial hypotension is temporary and can be managed conservatively, it may progress and result in subdural fluid collections, hematoma formations, "brain sagging or slumping" states, syringohydromyelia, encephalopathy, coma, and even death. The authors present an 81-year-old man admitted with subdural hematoma 50 days following previous spinal surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis. In his previous spinal surgery he had had dural tear, which had been closed primarily. To the literature, only 21 patients have been reported to develop subdural hematoma following spinal surgery. In patients with subdural hematoma following spinal surgery, the female:male ratio was 3:4 and the median age was 55 years. Surgical diagnoses for previous spinal surgeries were intervertebral disc herniation (5), spinal canal stenosis and spondylolisthesis (6), failed back syndrome (2), tethered cord syndrome and myelodysplastic spine (2), spinal cord tumor, spinal epidural hematoma, vertebral dislocation, vertebral fracture, vertebral tumor, and inflammatory spine. Patients presented with signs and symptoms of subdural hematoma within 6 hours to 50 days following the spinal surgery. Source of cerebrospinal fluid leak was most commonly from lumbar region (13 patients, 62%). Ten of 21 (48%) patients were treated conservatively. Late-onset neurological findings should not prevent the evaluation of cranial vault with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Spinal dural tear should be more aggressively treated instead of suture alone approach, when recognized in older patients during the spinal surgery. PMID:27192649

  5. Spinal cord stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses a mild electric current to block nerve impulses ... stretched into the space on top of your spinal cord. These wires will be connected to a small ...

  6. Spinal cord trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can be removed or reduced before the spinal nerves are completely destroyed, paralysis may improve. Surgery may be needed to: Realign the spinal bones (vertebrae) Remove fluid or tissue that presses ...

  7. Spinal fusion - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The vertebrae are the bones that make up the spinal column, which surrounds and protects the spinal cord. The ... disks are soft tissues that sit between each vertebrae and act as cushions between vertebrae, and absorb ...

  8. Diagnosing and treating respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Napierkowski, Daria B

    2016-09-22

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the major causes of respiratory tract illness in children and can lead to significant infection and death. This article discusses the incidence, clinical presentation, diagnosis, current treatment, and prevention options to successfully diagnose and treat infections caused by RSV. PMID:27552683

  9. Surgical Treatment of Spinal Tuberculosis Complicated with Extensive ABSCESS

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Joaquim Soares Do; Tirado, António; Fernandes, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tuberculosis can be responsible for extensive spinal lesions. Despite the efficacy of medical treatment, surgery is indicated to avoid or correct significant deformity, treat spinal instability, prevent neurological compromise, and to eradicate an extensive tuberculous abscess. In this paper we present our experience in the surgical management of spinal tuberculosis complicated with large abscess. Patients and Methods Fifteen patients with spinal tuberculosis complicated with extensive abscess were identified; and nine of those patients had extension of the infection into the epidural space. The average age at treatment was 34 years old. Seven patients had thoracic infection, seven patients had lumbar infection and one had thoracolumbar infection. Six patients had neurological deficit at presentation. All patients were surgically treated with abscess debridement, spinal stabilization and concurrent antituberculous chemotherapy. A single anterior surgical approach was used in three cases, a posterior approach was used in four others and a combined approach was performed in eight patients. Results Surgical management allowed for effective abscess debridement and sspinal stabilization in this cohort. In combination with antituberculous drugs, surgical treatment resulted in infection eradication and bone fusion in all patients at 24 month average follow-up. Satisfactory neurological outcomes with improved American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scores were observed in 100% of patients. Conclusion Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis abscess can lead to satisfactory clinical outcomes. PMID:25328472

  10. Frequency, risk factors, and outcomes of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus colonization and infection in patients with newly diagnosed acute leukemia: different patterns in patients with acute myelogenous and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ford, Clyde D; Lopansri, Bert K; Haydoura, Souha; Snow, Greg; Dascomb, Kristin K; Asch, Julie; Bo Petersen, Finn; Burke, John P

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency, risk factors, and outcomes for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) colonization and infection in patients with newly diagnosed acute leukemia. DESIGN Retrospective clinical study with VRE molecular strain typing. SETTING A regional referral center for acute leukemia. PATIENTS Two hundred fourteen consecutive patients with newly diagnosed acute leukemia between 2006 and 2012. METHODS All patients had a culture of first stool and weekly surveillance for VRE. Clinical data were abstracted from the Intermountain Healthcare electronic data warehouse. VRE molecular typing was performed utilizing the semi-automated DiversiLab System. RESULTS The rate of VRE colonization was directly proportional to length of stay and was higher in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Risk factors associated with colonization include administration of corticosteroids (P=0.004) and carbapenems (P=0.009). Neither a colonized prior room occupant nor an increased unit colonization pressure affected colonization risk. Colonized patients with acute myelogenous leukemia had an increased risk of VRE bloodstream infection (BSI, P=0.002). Other risk factors for VRE BSI include severe neutropenia (P=0.04) and diarrhea (P=0.008). Fifty-eight percent of BSI isolates were identical or related by molecular typing. Eighty-nine percent of bloodstream isolates were identical or related to stool isolates identified by surveillance cultures. VRE BSI was associated with increased costs (P=0.0003) and possibly mortality. CONCLUSIONS VRE colonization has important consequences for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia undergoing induction therapy. For febrile neutropenic patients with acute myelogenous leukemia, use of empirical antibiotic regimens that avoid carbapenems and include VRE coverage may be helpful in decreasing the risks associated with VRE BSI. PMID:25627761

  11. Comparable performance of conventional and liquid-based cytology in diagnosing anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-infected and -uninfected Thai men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Phanuphak, Nittaya; Teeratakulpisarn, Nipat; Lim, Cherry; Changnam, Taweesak; Kerr, Stephen J.; Deesua, Amornrat; Hongchookiat, Piranun; Rodbamrung, Piyanee; Numto, Saranya; Barisri, Jiranuwat; Phanuphak, Praphan; Keelawat, Somboon; Sohn, Annette H.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Triratanachat, Surang

    2013-01-01

    Background Anal cytology has increasingly been used to screen for anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) among men who have sex with men (MSM) at increased risk for anal cancer. Use of liquid-based cytology has been reported to reduce fecal and bacterial contamination and air-drying artifact compared to conventional cytology. Costs associated with liquid-based cytology, however, may limit its use in resource-limited settings. Methods Anal swab samples were collected from MSM participants and used to prepare conventional and liquid-based cytology slides. Abnormal conventional cytology results triggered referral for high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) and biopsy. Agreement between the two cytology techniques and the positive predictive value (PPV) ratios of histology confirmed AIN were calculated. Results Among 173 MSM, abnormal anal cytology was identified in 46.2% of conventional and 32.4% of liquid-based slides. The results agreed in 62.4% of cases with a kappa (κ) value of 0.49 (P <0.001). HIV-infected MSM had a 3.6-fold increased odds of having discordant anal cytology results (95% CI 1.6–7.8, p=0.001) compared with HIV-uninfected MSM. Histological AIN 2 and 3 were identified in 20 MSM. The PPV ratios and 95% CI indicated no difference between the two techniques. Conclusions Conventional anal cytology may be a preferred option for resource-limited settings given comparable performances to liquid-based cytology for the detection of AIN, although the agreement between the two techniques was lower among HIV-infected MSM. Due to high prevalence of abnormal anal cytology and AIN, health systems should prepare adequate infrastructure for HRA services and AIN treatment. PMID:23535296

  12. Accuracy of Lipoarabinomannan and Xpert MTB/RIF Testing in Cerebrospinal Fluid To Diagnose Tuberculous Meningitis in an Autopsy Cohort of HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lukande, Robert L.; Kalungi, Sam; Van Marck, Eric; Lammens, Martin; Van de Vijver, Koen; Kambugu, Andrew; Nelson, Ann M.; Colebunders, Robert; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2015-01-01

    Point-of-care tests for tuberculous meningitis (TBM) are needed. We studied the diagnostic accuracy of the lipoarabinomannan (LAM) lateral flow assay (LFA), LAM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and Xpert MTB/RIF in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in an autopsy cohort of Ugandan HIV-infected adults. We obtained written informed consent postmortem from the next of kin. A complete autopsy was done and CSF obtained. We performed LAM LFA (on unprepared and supernatant CSF after heating and spinning), LAM ELISA, and Xpert MTB/RIF on the CSF samples. Accuracy parameters were calculated for histopathological TBM and also for the composite standard, including Xpert MTB/RIF-positive cases. We tested CSF of 91 patients. LAM LFA had a sensitivity of 75% for definite histopathological TBM, ELISA a sensitivity of 43%, and Xpert MTB/RIF a sensitivity of 100% and specificities of 87%, 91%, and 87%, respectively. LAM LFA had a sensitivity of 50% for definite and probable histopathological TBM, ELISA a sensitivity of 38%, and Xpert MTB/RIF a sensitivity of 86% and specificities of 70%, 91%, and 87%, respectively. LAM LFA had a sensitivity of 68% for the composite standard and ELISA a sensitivity of 48% and specificities of 78% and 98%, respectively. The rapid diagnostic tests detected TBM in 22% to 78% of patients not on anti-TB treatment. Point-of-care tests have high accuracy in diagnosis of TBM in deceased HIV-infected adults. LAM LFA in CSF is a useful additional diagnostic tool. PMID:26063865

  13. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brain and Spinal Tumors Information Page Synonym(s): Spinal Cord ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Brain and Spinal Tumors? Tumors of the brain and ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  15. How Is Sarcoidosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Sarcoidosis Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose sarcoidosis based on ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  16. Diagnosing Tic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Websites Information For... Media Policy Makers Diagnosing Tic Disorders Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... or postviral encephalitis). Persistent (Chronic) Motor or Vocal Tic Disorder For a person to be diagnosed with ...

  17. Cystic Abnormalities of the Spinal Cord and Vertebral Column.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Ronaldo C; Cook, Laurie B

    2016-03-01

    Cystic lesions of the vertebral column and spinal cord are important differential diagnoses in dogs with signs of spinal cord disease. Synovial cysts are commonly associated with degenerative joint disease and usually affect the cervical and lumbosacral regions. Arachnoid diverticulum (previously known as cyst) is seen in the cervical region of large breed dogs and thoracolumbar region of small breed dogs. This article reviews the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of these and other, less common, cystic lesions. PMID:26706913

  18. Cervical spinal intradural arachnoid cysts in related, young pugs.

    PubMed

    Rohdin, C; Nyman, H T; Wohlsein, P; Hultin Jäderlund, K

    2014-04-01

    Seven related young pugs were diagnosed with cervical spinal intradural arachnoid cysts by magnetic resonance imaging (n = 6) and myelography (n = 1). All dogs were presented with skin abrasions on their thoracic limbs and non-painful neurological deficits, indicating a C1-T2 myelopathy. In all six dogs examined by magnetic resonance imaging not only the spinal arachnoid cyst but also a concomitant, most likely secondary, syringohydromyelia was confirmed. Pedigree analysis suggested a genetic predisposition for spinal arachnoid cysts in this family of pugs. Generalised proprioceptive deficits more pronounced in the thoracic limbs suggesting a focal cervical spinal cord lesion, with concomitant skin abrasions on the dorsal aspect of the thoracic limbs in a young pug, should alert veterinarians to the possibility of cervical spinal arachnoid cysts. PMID:24372140

  19. Comparison study of QuantiFERON test with tuberculin skin testing to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection among nurses working in teaching hospitals of Ahvaz, Iran.

    PubMed Central

    Salmanzadeh, Shokrollah; Abbasissifar, Hajar; Alavi, Seyed Mohmmad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prompt diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) are needed to control TB. The aim of the study was to compare the performance of Quanti FERON-TB test (QFT) with conventional TST for the diagnosis of LTBI. Methods: In this analytical - comparison study, we enrolled 87 nurses working in teaching hospitals in Ahvaz. All study subjects were tested by TST. TST results were interpreted as positive if induration was more than 10 mm. If the level of QFT after stimulation was equal or greater than 0.35 IU/ml, test was considered as positive. Data were analyzed with SPSS program. QFT results compared with induration in TST and its relation to all variables were investigated. Results: The rate of LTB diagnosis by TST and QFT was 31% and 35.6%, respectively. There was no significant difference between TST and QFT in LTB diagnosis (P=0.62). Among the 56 subjects who were TST- negative, 14 cases (approximately 25%) were QFT- positive and 42 (75%) were QFT- negative. Among the 31 cases (35.6%) that had TST- positive, 13 (42%) were QFT-positive and 18 (58%) were QFT- negative. The overall percent agreement was 63.2% (k=0.139, P=0.69), discordance %=15.9-20.7, sensitivity= 41.5% and specificity=75.5%. Conclusion: Diagnostic value of QFT is similar to TST, when there is strong clinical and epidemiological evidence of LTB in a nurse with negative TST, adding QFT to diagnostic evaluation is associated with increased rate of LTB diagnosis.

  20. Spinal cord metastasis in small cell carcinoma of the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Holoye, P.; Libnoch, J.; Cox, J.; Kun, L.; Byhardt, R.; Almagro, U.; McCelland, S.; Chintapali, K.

    1984-03-01

    Among 50 patients with small cell bronchogenic carcinoma who were placed on a protocol of combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy, seven patients developed recurrence in the spinal cord. Five cases terminated in paraplegia and death. One patient with pontine recurrence recovered with local radiation therapy. One patient, diagnosed early, responded to local radiation therapy and is ambulatory. Methods of diagnosis were myelogram, computerized axial tomography, cerebro spinal fluid, chemistry and cytologies. The poor prognosis and the difficulty of diagnosis suggest that prophylactic therapy of the entire cranio-spinal axis should be evaluated.

  1. Incidence Density of Invasive Fungal Infections during Primary Antifungal Prophylaxis in Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients in a Tertiary Cancer Center, 2009 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Mulanovich, Victor E.; Jiang, Y.; Lewis, Russell E.

    2014-01-01

    Although primary antifungal prophylaxis (PAP) is routinely administered in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) during remission-induction and consolidation chemotherapy, the impact of PAP on the incidence of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) is not well described. We retrospectively analyzed the incidence of IFIs in 152 patients with AML who had been admitted to a tertiary cancer center between August 2009 and March 2011 and received PAP within 120 days after first remission-induction chemotherapy. We excluded patients who had undergone stem cell transplantation. Patients received a PAP drug with anti-Aspergillus activity during 72% (7,660/10,572) of prophylaxis-days. The incidence of documented IFIs (definite or probable according to revised European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] criteria) was 2.0/1,000 prophylaxis-days (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 3.04). IFIs due to molds were more common than IFIs due to yeasts (1.5/1,000 prophylaxis-days versus 0.4/1,000 prophylaxis-days; P = 0.01). Echinocandin-based PAP (8.6 and 7.1/1,000 prophylaxis-days, respectively) was associated with higher rates of documented IFIs than anti-Aspergillus azoles (voriconazole or posaconazole) (2.4 and 1.1/1,000 prophylaxis-days, respectively) at both 42 days (P = 0.03) and 120 days (P < 0.0001) after first remission-induction chemotherapy. The incidence of overall (documented and presumed) IFIs (P < 0.001), documented IFIs (P < 0.01), and empirical antifungal therapies (P < 0.0001) was higher during the first 42 days than after day 42. Despite the broad use of PAP with anti-Aspergillus activity, IFIs, especially molds, remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in AML patients, predominantly during the remission-induction phase. Patients receiving echinocandin-based PAP experienced higher rates of IFIs than did those receiving anti-Aspergillus azoles. PMID:24277033

  2. Spatial distribution, risk factors and haemato-biochemical alterations associated with Theileria equi infected equids of Punjab (India) diagnosed by indirect ELISA and nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Sumbria, Deepak; Singla, L D; Kumar, Sanjay; Sharma, Amrita; Dahiya, Rajesh K; Setia, Raj

    2016-03-01

    Equine piroplasmosis is a febrile, tick-borne disease of equids predominately caused by obligatory intra-erythrocytic protozoa Theileria equi in the Indian sub-continent. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 464 equids (426 horses and 38 donkeys/mules) in Punjab, India to assess the level of exposure to equine piroplasmosis by 18S rRNA gene nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) and equine merozoite antigen-2 (EMA2) indirect-ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay), to investigate risk factors and haemato-biochemical alterations associated with the infection. The endemicity of the disease was confirmed by positive PCR amplification in 21.77% and positive antibody titers in 49.78% equid samples. There was a fair agreement between these two diagnostic techniques (Kappa coefficient=0.326). The spatial distribution analysis revealed an increasing trend of T. equi prevalence from north-eastern to south-western region of Punjab by both the techniques correspondingly, which proffered a direct relation with temperature and inverse with humidity variables. The relatively prominent risk factor associated with sero-positivity was the presence of other domestic animals in the herd, while the propensity of finding a positive PCR amplification was higher in donkeys/mules, animal kept at unorganised farm or those used for commercial purposes as compared to their counterparts. There was a significant increase in globulins, gamma glutamyl-transferase, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, indirect bilirubin, glucose levels and decrease in total erythrocyte count, haemoglobin, packed cell volume by animals, which were revealed positive by nPCR (may or may not positive by indirect-ELISA) and increase in creatinine, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, glucose and decrease in total erythrocytes count by animals, which were revealed positive by indirect-ELISA (alone). To our knowledge, this study, for the first time, brings out a comprehensive report on the status on spatial

  3. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and acute encephalitis and poliomyelitis-like flaccid paralysis.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kanae; Kano, Gen; Shibata, Mayumi; Sakamoto, Izumi; Matsui, Hirofumi; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2011-05-01

    A 3-year-old male presented with Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The patient developed an episode of HLH with severe skin eruption following C. pneumoniae pneumonia. Symptoms responded to steroid/cyclosporine A therapy, but the patient slowly lost consciousness and developed systemic flaccid paralysis. He was diagnosed with encephalitis/myelitis by brain and spinal MRI. Neurological symptoms and signs gradually resolved. We thought that the immune response to C. pneumoniae infection triggered the development of HLH, associated with unusual neurological complications. This report describes a novel case of C. pneumoniae-associated HLH and with poliomyelitis like flaccid paralysis. PMID:21370423

  4. Stereotactic radiosurgery for intramedullary spinal arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Kalani, Maziyar A; Choudhri, Omar; Gibbs, Iris C; Soltys, Scott G; Adler, John R; Thompson, Patricia A; Tayag, Armine T; Samos, Cindy H; Chang, Steven D

    2016-07-01

    Spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are rare lesions associated with recurrent hemorrhage and progressive ischemia. Occasionally a favorable location, size or vascular anatomy may allow management with endovascular embolization and/or microsurgical resection. For most, however, there is no good treatment option. Between 1997 and 2014, we treated 37 patients (19 females, 18 males, median age 30years) at our institution diagnosed with intramedullary spinal cord AVM (19 cervical, 12 thoracic, and six conus medullaris) with CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) stereotactic radiosurgery. A history of hemorrhage was present in 50% of patients. The mean AVM volume of 2.3cc was treated with a mean marginal dose of 20.5Gy in a median of two sessions. Clinical and MRI follow-up were carried out annually, and spinal angiography was repeated at 3years. We report an overall obliteration rate of 19% without any post-treatment hemorrhagic events. In those AVM that did not undergo obliteration, significant volume reduction was noted at 3years. Although the treatment paradigm for spinal cord AVM continues to evolve, radiosurgical treatment is capable of safely obliterating or significantly shrinking most intramedullary spinal cord AVM. PMID:26869363

  5. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Gisberto; Andreani, Lorenzo; Girardi, Federico; Darren, Lebl; Sama, Andrew; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication. PMID:26605028

  6. Surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by cervical spine fracture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are few reports regarding surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis with spinal cord injury. Our purpose is to evaluate the safety and feasibility of open-door expansive laminoplasty in combination with transpedicular screw fixation for the treatment of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury in the trauma population. Methods This was a retrospective study of 21 patients who had multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury with unstable fracture. An open-door expansive posterior laminoplasty combined with transpedicular screw fixation was performed under persistent intraoperative skull traction. Outcome measures included postoperative improvement in Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and incidence of complications. Results The average operation time was 190 min, with an average blood loss of 437 ml. A total of 120 transpedicular screws were implanted into the cervical vertebrae between vertebral C3 and C7, including 20 into C3, 34 into C4, 36 into C5, 20 into C6, and 10 into C7. The mean preoperative JOA score was 3.67 ± 0.53. The patients were followed for an average of 17.5 months, and the average JOA score improved to 8.17 ± 1.59, significantly higher than the preoperative score (t = 1.798, P < 0.05), with an average improvement of 44.7 ± 11.7%. Postoperative complications in four patients included cerebrospinal fluid leakage, delayed wound healing, pulmonary infection, and urinary system infection. All four patients were responsive to antibiotic treatment; one died from respiratory failure 3 months postoperatively. Conclusions The open-door expansive laminoplasty combined with posterior transpedicular screw fixation is feasible for treating multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by unstable fracture. Its advantages include minimum surgical trauma, less intraoperative blood loss, and satisfactory stable supportive effect for

  7. Spinal Cord and Spinal Nerve Root Involvement (Myeloradiculopathy) in Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rahul; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Verma, Rajesh; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Most of the information about spinal cord and nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis is available in the form of isolated case reports or case series. In this article, we evaluated the incidence, predictors, and prognostic impact of spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis. In this prospective study, 71 consecutive patients of newly diagnosed tuberculous meningitis were enrolled. In addition to clinical evaluation, patients were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain and spine. Patients were followed up for at least 6 months. Out of 71 patients, 33 (46.4%) had symptoms/signs of spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement, 22 (30.9%) of whom had symptoms/signs at enrolment. Eleven (15.4%) patients had paradoxical involvement. Paraparesis was present in 22 (31%) patients, which was of upper motor neuron type in 6 (8.4%) patients, lower motor neuron type in 10 (14%) patients, and mixed type in 6 (8.4%) patients. Quadriparesis was present in 3 (4.2%) patients. The most common finding on spinal MRI was meningeal enhancement, seen in 40 (56.3%) patients; in 22 (30.9%), enhancement was present in the lumbosacral region. Other MRI abnormalities included myelitis in 16 (22.5%), tuberculoma in 4 (5.6%), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) loculations in 4 (5.6%), cord atrophy in 3 (4.2%), and syrinx in 2 (2.8%) patients. The significant predictor associated with myeloradiculopathy was raised CSF protein (>250 mg/dL). Myeloradiculopathy was significantly associated with poor outcome. In conclusion, spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis is common. Markedly raised CSF protein is an important predictor. Patients with myeloradiculopathy have poor outcome. PMID:25621686

  8. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the vertebral bodies (osteophytes), which compress spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine problems include: pain that interferes with daily ...

  9. Vaginal Yeast Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... t diagnose this condition by a person’s medical history and physical examination. They usually diagnose yeast infection by examining vaginal secretions under a microscope for evidence of yeast. Treatment Various antifungal vaginal ...

  10. Human Spinal Motor Control.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-07-01

    Human studies in the past three decades have provided us with an emerging understanding of how cortical and spinal networks collaborate to ensure the vast repertoire of human behaviors. Humans have direct cortical connections to spinal motoneurons, which bypass spinal interneurons and exert a direct (willful) muscle control with the aid of a context-dependent integration of somatosensory and visual information at cortical level. However, spinal networks also play an important role. Sensory feedback through spinal circuitries is integrated with central motor commands and contributes importantly to the muscle activity underlying voluntary movements. Regulation of spinal interneurons is used to switch between motor states such as locomotion (reciprocal innervation) and stance (coactivation pattern). Cortical regulation of presynaptic inhibition of sensory afferents may focus the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. PMID:27023730

  11. Spinal subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia: case report.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Marion; Strzelecki, Antoine; Houadec, Mireille; Krikken, Isabelle Ranz; Danielli, Antoine; Souza Neto, Edmundo Pereira de

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia is known to be very rare. In the majority of these cases, spinal anaesthesia was difficult to perform and/or unsuccessful; other risk factors included antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, and direct spinal cord trauma. We report a case of subarachnoid haematoma after spinal anaesthesia in a young patient without risk factors. PMID:27591468

  12. Incidence of Primary Spinal Cord, Spinal Meninges, and Cauda Equina Tumors in Korea, 2006-2010

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyu-Won; Park, Kwang Hyon; Ha, Johyun; Lee, Seung Hoon; Won, Young-Joo; Yoo, Heon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Primary spinal cord and appendage tumors (PSCAT) originating from the spinal cord, spinal meninges, and cauda equina are uncommon. Worldwide, population-based cancer registry data are mostly based on malignant tumors only, which means few data are available on PSCATs, including non-malignant tumors. Therefore, the objective of this study was to provide information regarding the incidence of both non-malignant and malignant PSCATs in Korea on a national level. Materials and Methods Incidence of PSCATs was estimated from cases diagnosed between 2006 and 2010 using the National Cancer Incidence Database in Korea. Age-adjusted rates were calculated using the world standard population, and male-to-female rate ratios were calculated by histology type. Results Of all PSCATs registered (n=3,312), 86.6% were non-malignant. The overall age-adjusted incidence of PSCATs was 1.08 per 100,000 person-years, with an incidence of 0.99 per 100,000 in females and 1.15 in males. The most common site of PSCATs was the spinal cord (83.4%), followed by spinal meninges (16.1%) and cauda equina (0.5%). The most common histological type was neurilemmoma (41.3%), followed by meningiomas (20.1%) and ependymomas (7.6%). Men had significantly higher rates than women for ependymomas and lymphomas but had lower rates for meningiomas. Conclusion This study provides the first population-based analysis of PSCATs in Korea. PMID:25544579

  13. [Spinal multiple sclerosis mimicking a spinal cord tumor: a case report].

    PubMed

    Maezawa, H; Takano, M; Nagai, S; Iida, H; Tachibana, S

    1995-11-01

    Since the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to visualize lesions of multiple sclerosis has become easy to do. However, in some cases with primary spinal cord multiple sclerosis, it is not always easy to obtain a diagnosis in the first instance. We reported a case of primary spinal multiple sclerosis diagnosed through histological examination of a surgical specimen taken by an open biopsy. A 35-year-old woman was admitted with complaints of two-months duration of progressive weakness and sensory disturbance in the legs and buttocks. On radiological examinations including metrizamide CT myelography and MRI, enlargement of the conus medullaris was the only positive finding. Respective to her clinical course, intramedullary spinal cord tumor could not be ruled out, so an open biopsy was performed. Histological examination revealed that the cord lesion was acute demyelination with perivascular inflammation. Her neurological signs were almost completely cured with administration of corticosteroid, though new brainstem signs took place two months later and then a concrete diagnosis of her having multiple sclerosis was finally achieved. Since preoperative examinations can not differentiate spinal cord tumor from any other intramedullary cord lesions such as demyelinating foci of multiple sclerosis, surgical intervention would be approved in such atypical primary spinal cord multiple sclerosis. PMID:7477708

  14. Thoracic epidural spinal angiolipoma with coexisting lumbar spinal stenosis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Benvenutti-Regato, Mario; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background Spinal angiolipomas (SALs) are uncommon benign lesions that may present insidiously with back pain or acutely with weakness due to tumor bleeding/thrombosis. Given their rarity, these lesions are often overlooked in the differential diagnosis of epidural masses. The purpose of this article is to report the case of an epidural SAL and to conduct a literature review on the topic. Methods A case report and review of the literature using the PubMed/Medline databases. All case reports and case series were reviewed up to June 2015. Results A 65-year old female presented with neurogenic claudication and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed lumbar spinal stenosis. Following decompressive surgery, she experienced symptom resolution, but three months postoperatively she presented to the emergency department with acute paraparesis. A thoracic MRI revealed a lesion located between T8 and T10 causing severe spinal cord compression. Following emergent laminectomy and en bloc resection, the patient regained function and the lesion was diagnosed as SAL. Our literature review revealed 178 reported cases, with a female and thoracic predominance. The majority of patients underwent surgical treatment, achieving a gross total resection in most cases. Similarly, complete symptom resolution was the most common outcome. Conclusion Spinal angiolipomas are uncommon spinal tumors. However, they may be treated as any other space-occupying lesion, and surgical resection allows for complete symptom recovery in most patients. PMID:26767159

  15. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in newly diagnosed HIV.

    PubMed

    Soza, Gabriela M; Patel, Mahir; Readinger, Allison; Ryan, Caitriona

    2016-01-01

    We present a woman with a widespread severe papulopustular eruption, fever, and fatigue of 5 weeks' duration. HIV infection was diagnosed, with an absolute CD4(+) count of 3 cells/µL. The eruption was consistent with disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis. The clinical manifestations and management of cutaneous histoplasmosis are reviewed. PMID:26722169

  16. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in newly diagnosed HIV

    PubMed Central

    Soza, Gabriela M.; Patel, Mahir; Readinger, Allison

    2016-01-01

    We present a woman with a widespread severe papulopustular eruption, fever, and fatigue of 5 weeks' duration. HIV infection was diagnosed, with an absolute CD4+ count of 3 cells/µL. The eruption was consistent with disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis. The clinical manifestations and management of cutaneous histoplasmosis are reviewed. PMID:26722169

  17. En Bloc Resection of Solitary Functional Secreting Spinal Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C Rory; Clarke, Michelle J; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Fisher, Charles; Laufer, Ilya; Weber, Michael H; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective Functional secretory tumors metastatic to the spine can secrete hormones, growth factors, peptides, and/or molecules into the systemic circulation that cause distinct syndromes, clinically symptomatic effects, and/or additional morbidity and mortality. En bloc resection has a limited role in metastatic spine disease due to the current paradigm that systemic burden usually determines morbidity and mortality. Our objective is to review the literature for studies focused on en bloc resection of functionally active spinal metastasis as the primary indication. Methods A review of the PubMed literature was performed to identify studies focused on functional secreting metastatic tumors to the spinal column. We identified five cases of patients undergoing en bloc resection of spinal metastases from functional secreting tumors. Results The primary histologies of these spinal metastases were pheochromocytoma, carcinoid tumor, choriocarcinoma, and a fibroblast growth factor 23-secreting phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor. Although studies of en bloc resection for these rare tumor subtypes are confined to case reports, this surgical treatment option resulted in metabolic cures and decreased clinical symptoms postoperatively for patients diagnosed with solitary functional secretory spinal metastasis. Conclusion Although the ability to formulate comprehensive conclusions is limited, case reports demonstrate that en bloc resection may be considered as a potential surgical option for the treatment of patients diagnosed with solitary functional secretory spinal metastatic tumors. Future prospective investigations into clinical outcomes should be conducted comparing intralesional resection and en bloc resection for patients diagnosed with solitary functional secretory spinal metastasis. PMID:27099819

  18. En Bloc Resection of Solitary Functional Secreting Spinal Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, C. Rory; Clarke, Michelle J.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Fisher, Charles; Laufer, Ilya; Weber, Michael H.; Sciubba, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective Functional secretory tumors metastatic to the spine can secrete hormones, growth factors, peptides, and/or molecules into the systemic circulation that cause distinct syndromes, clinically symptomatic effects, and/or additional morbidity and mortality. En bloc resection has a limited role in metastatic spine disease due to the current paradigm that systemic burden usually determines morbidity and mortality. Our objective is to review the literature for studies focused on en bloc resection of functionally active spinal metastasis as the primary indication. Methods A review of the PubMed literature was performed to identify studies focused on functional secreting metastatic tumors to the spinal column. We identified five cases of patients undergoing en bloc resection of spinal metastases from functional secreting tumors. Results The primary histologies of these spinal metastases were pheochromocytoma, carcinoid tumor, choriocarcinoma, and a fibroblast growth factor 23–secreting phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor. Although studies of en bloc resection for these rare tumor subtypes are confined to case reports, this surgical treatment option resulted in metabolic cures and decreased clinical symptoms postoperatively for patients diagnosed with solitary functional secretory spinal metastasis. Conclusion Although the ability to formulate comprehensive conclusions is limited, case reports demonstrate that en bloc resection may be considered as a potential surgical option for the treatment of patients diagnosed with solitary functional secretory spinal metastatic tumors. Future prospective investigations into clinical outcomes should be conducted comparing intralesional resection and en bloc resection for patients diagnosed with solitary functional secretory spinal metastasis. PMID:27099819

  19. Long segment spinal epidural extramedullary hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Kanwaljeet; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Manmohan; Chandra, P. Sarat; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Extramedullary hematopoiesis is defined as the formation of blood cells outside the bone marrow. It is a common manifestation of many chronic hemolytic anemias, and typically involves the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Only rarely is the spinal epidural space involved. Methods: We describe a 25-year-old male, known to have thalassemia intermedia, who presented with a 1-month history of stiffness and weakness in both lower extremities. On physical examination, he had palpable splenomegaly accompanied by spinal tenderness at the D5 level, weakness in both lower extremities, hyperactive bilateral Patellar and Achilles reflexes with bilateral Babinski responses, and a graded sensory loss to pin appreciation below D5. Results: The magnetic resonance (MR) study revealed a posterior, isointense and soft tissue epidural mass extending from D2 to D12 on both the T1- and T2-weighted images. These findings were consistent with the diagnosis of “red marrow,” and long-segment spinal epidural extramedullary hematopoiesis. Conclusions: Although extramedullary hematopoiesis is rarely encountered within the spinal canal, it should be considered among the differential diagnoses when a posterior compressive thoracic lesion contributes to myelopathy in a patient with a history of thalassemia intermedia and the accompanying chronic hemolytic anemia. PMID:24404404

  20. How Is Lymphocytopenia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of lymphocytes—T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells. The test can help diagnose the underlying ... cause low levels of B cells or natural killer cells. Tests for Underlying Conditions Many diseases and ...

  1. How Is Endocarditis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can get detailed pictures of the heart's structures. EKG An EKG is a simple, painless test that detects your ... signals as they pass through your heart. An EKG typically isn't used to diagnose IE. However, ...

  2. How Is Hemophilia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Hemophilia Diagnosed? If you or your child appears to ... have bleeding problems. However, some people who have hemophilia have no recent family history of the disease. ...

  3. Can Internet-Based Sexual Health Services Increase Diagnoses of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI)? Protocol for a Randomized Evaluation of an Internet-Based STI Testing and Results Service

    PubMed Central

    Free, Caroline; Morris, Tim P; Kenward, Michael G; Syred, Jonathan; Baraitser, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Ensuring rapid access to high quality sexual health services is a key public health objective, both in the United Kingdom and internationally. Internet-based testing services for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are considered to be a promising way to achieve this goal. This study will evaluate a nascent online STI testing and results service in South East London, delivered alongside standard face-to-face STI testing services. Objective The aim of this study is to establish whether an online testing and results services can (1) increase diagnoses of STIs and (2) increase uptake of STI testing, when delivered alongside standard face-to-face STI testing services. Methods This is a single-blind randomized controlled trial. We will recruit 3000 participants who meet the following eligibility criteria: 16-30 years of age, resident in the London boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark, having at least one sexual partner in the last 12 months, having access to the Internet and willing to take an STI test. People unable to provide informed consent and unable to read and understand English (the websites will be in English) will be excluded. Baseline data will be collected at enrolment. This includes participant contact details, demographic data (date of birth, gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation), and sexual health behaviors (last STI test, service used at last STI test and number of sexual partners in the last 12 months). Once enrolled, participants will be randomly allocated either (1) to an online STI testing and results service (Sexual Health 24) offering postal self-administered STI kits for chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis, and HIV; results via text message (short message service, SMS), except positive results for HIV, which will be delivered by phone; and direct referrals to local clinics for treatment or (2) to a conventional sexual health information website with signposting to local clinic-based sexual health services. Participants will be free to

  4. Spinal epidural abscess with a rapid course in young healthy infantry recruits with multiple skin lacerations.

    PubMed

    Honig, Asaf; Or, Omer; Barzilay, Yair; Fraifeld, Shifra; Pikkel, Yoav Y; Eliahou, Ruth; Cohen, José E; Itshayek, Eyal

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, there has been high prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infection among soldiers in the Israeli military, with devastating sequelae in several cases. Emergency department physicians have developed a high level of suspicion for spinal epidural abscess (SEA) in patients presenting known risk factors; however, SEA is a particularly elusive diagnosis in young healthy adults with no history of drug abuse. We review three cases of SEA secondary to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) infection in young healthy soldiers without known risk factors. We retrospectively reviewed clinical files of soldiers treated at our Medical Center from 2004-2015 to identify patients diagnosed with SEA. Those aged less than 30years with no history of intravenous drug use, spine surgery or spine trauma were included in the study. Three young army recruits met the inclusion criteria. These young men developed SEA through extension of MSSA infection to proximal skin and soft tissue from impetigo secondary to skin scratches sustained during "basic" training. All presented with mild nuchal rigidity and severe persistent unremitting lancinating radicular pain. Although healthy at baseline, they had a severe, rapidly progressive course. Following urgent surgery, two patients recovered after rehabilitation; one remained with paraparesis at late follow-up. Neurological deficits and systemic evidence of S. aureus infection progressed rapidly in these young healthy SEA patients with no history of drug abuse, emphasizing the critical role of timely MRI, diagnosis, and surgery. PMID:27364320

  5. Spinal cord cysticercosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bouree, Patrice; Dumazedier, Deborah; Bisaro, Francine; Resende, Paula; Comoy, Jean; Aghakhani, Nozar

    2006-12-01

    Cysticercosis caused by the infection with the larva of Taenia solium, common through out the world, is located in the muscles, the eyes and the central nervous system, but mostly in the brain. Spinal cord infection is rare. The authors report a case of a young girl, living in Paris who had traveled in Latin America, and complained of back pains and troublesome walking. MRI showed a cyst in spinal cord, but other examinations were normal. Diagnosis was confirmed by a pathologist. It was a pure intramedullary cysticercosis, the check-up to find other locations was negative. Only approximately 130 cases are reported in the literature, with motor and sensory disorders. The diagnosis was based on MRI and pathological examination. Antiparasitic medical treatment was useful when combined with surgery. PMID:17153691

  6. Spontaneous Regression of an Incidental Spinal Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ali; Kizilay, Zahir; Sair, Ahmet; Avcil, Mucahit; Ozkul, Ayca

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The regression of meningioma has been reported in literature before. In spite of the fact that the regression may be involved by hemorrhage, calcification or some drugs withdrawal, it is rarely observed spontaneously. CASE REPORT: We report a 17 year old man with a cervical meningioma which was incidentally detected. In his cervical MRI an extradural, cranio-caudal contrast enchanced lesion at C2-C3 levels of the cervical spinal cord was detected. Despite the slight compression towards the spinal cord, he had no symptoms and refused any kind of surgical approach. The meningioma was followed by control MRI and it spontaneously regressed within six months. There were no signs of hemorrhage or calcification. CONCLUSION: Although it is a rare condition, the clinicians should consider that meningiomas especially incidentally diagnosed may be regressed spontaneously. PMID:27275345

  7. Spinal Cord Lesions in Congenital Toxoplasmosis Demonstrated with Neuroimaging, Including Their Successful Treatment in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Burrowes, Delilah; Boyer, Kenneth; Swisher, Charles N.; Noble, A. Gwendolyn; Sautter, Mari; Heydemann, Peter; Rabiah, Peter; Lee, Daniel; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies for persons in the National Collaborative Chicago-Based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study (NCCCTS) with symptoms and signs referable to the spinal cord were reviewed. Three infants had symptomatic spinal cord lesions, another infant a Chiari malformation, and another infant a symptomatic peri-spinal cord lipoma. One patient had an unusual history of prolonged spinal cord symptoms presenting in middle age. Neuroimaging was used to establish her diagnosis and response to treatment. This 43 year-old woman with congenital toxoplasmosis developed progressive leg spasticity, weakness, numbness, difficulty walking, and decreased visual acuity and color vision without documented re-activation of her chorioretinal disease. At 52 years of age, spinal cord lesions in locations correlating with her symptoms and optic atrophy were diagnosed with 3 Tesla MRI scan. Treatment with pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine decreased her neurologic symptoms, improved her neurologic examination, and resolved her enhancing spinal cord lesions seen on MRI. PMID:23487348

  8. Metal levels in corrosion of spinal implants

    PubMed Central

    Beguiristain, Jose; Duart, Julio

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion affects spinal instrumentations and may cause local and systemic complications. Diagnosis of corrosion is difficult, and nowadays it is performed almost exclusively by the examination of retrieved instrumentations. We conducted this study to determine whether it is possible to detect corrosion by measuring metal levels on patients with posterior instrumented spinal fusion. Eleven asymptomatic patients, with radiological signs of corrosion of their stainless steel spinal instrumentations, were studied by performing determinations of nickel and chromium in serum and urine. Those levels were compared with the levels of 22 patients with the same kind of instrumentation but without evidence of corrosion and to a control group of 22 volunteers without any metallic implants. Statistical analysis of our results revealed that the patients with spinal implants without radiological signs of corrosion have increased levels of chromium in serum and urine (P < 0.001) compared to volunteers without implants. Corrosion significantly raised metal levels, including nickel and chromium in serum and urine when compared to patients with no radiological signs of corrosion and to volunteers without metallic implants (P < 0.001). Metal levels measured in serum have high sensibility and specificity (area under the ROC curve of 0.981). By combining the levels of nickel and chromium in serum we were able to identify all the cases of corrosion in our series of patients. The results of our study confirm that metal levels in serum and urine are useful in the diagnosis of corrosion of spinal implants and may be helpful in defining the role of corrosion in recently described clinical entities such as late operative site pain or late infection of spinal implants. PMID:17256156

  9. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dramatically Improves Function After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats May 2004 press release on an experimental treatment ... NINDS). Signaling Molecule Improves Nerve Cell Regeneration in Rats August 2002 news summary on a signaling molecule ...

  10. What Is Spinal Stenosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... To order the Sports Injuries Handout on Health full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ... publication. To order the Spinal Stenosis Q&A full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ...